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Sample records for percutaneous carpal tunnel

  1. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm. Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and ... difficult. Often, the cause is having a smaller carpal tunnel than other people do. Other causes include ...

  2. The carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-12-01

    The carpal bones are deeply convex anteriorly. This bony gutter is converted by the flexor retinaculum into a tube - the carpal tunnel, which conveys the median nerve, together with the long flexor tendons of the fingers and thumb, into the hand. It is of special interest to the surgeon because it is the site of a common nerve entrapment, the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  3. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, James Leo; Dagum, Alexander B.

    1992-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a very common hand problem usually presenting with nighttime pain, numbness, and loss of dexterity. Controversy arises over the diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of results. Nighttime splinting will improve the symptoms in some patients. If this fails, excellent results can be achieved with surgical decompression of the median nerve in the carpal canal. PMID:21221355

  4. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... through NIH's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine are investigating the effects of acupuncture on pain, loss of median nerve function, and changes in the brain associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. In addition, a ...

  5. Ultrasound-Assisted Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Hiroshi; Hattori, Soichi; Shinga, Kotaro; Ichikawa, Ken; Yamada, Shin

    2016-06-01

    Various surgical procedures for carpal tunnel syndrome exist, such as open release, ultrasound-guided percutaneous release, and endoscopic release. Postoperative pain, scarring, and slow recovery to normal function are reported complications of open release. Damage to vessels and the median nerve and its branches underlying the transverse carpal ligament is a reported complication of ultrasound-guided percutaneous release. Damage to the superficial palmar arch and incomplete release are reported complications of endoscopic release. By performing endoscopic carpal tunnel release with ultrasound assistance, we could visualize neurovascular structures directly with the endoscope and also indirectly with ultrasound to minimize complications. We could also evaluate the morphologic changes of the median nerve dynamically before and after the release. We discuss the technique for this procedure and outline pearls and pitfalls for success. PMID:27656366

  6. Carpal tunnel syndrome and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Baum, H; Lüdecke, D K; Herrmann, H D

    1986-01-01

    50 patients with acromegaly and carpal tunnel syndrome have been examined electrophysiologically before and after transnasal operation of the pituitary adenoma. 32 of the 50 patients (64%) had symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. 13 of them had neurological deficits. 28 of the examined patients had pathological neurographical findings only. About 1 week post-operatively DL was decreased in 43%; in 10 out of 13 patients with neurological deficits DL decreased. GH was normalized in 80% and reduced to 5-10 micrograms/l in a further 10%. The investigation did not show whether the carpal tunnel syndrome only depended on a GH increase or on other factors also such as e.g., on the duration of symptoms or tissue changes. None of the patients had the transversal carpal ligament operated on. The coincidence between acromegaly and carpal tunnel syndrome was 64%. In 3 cases the carpal tunnel syndrome was the leading sign to the diagnosis of acromegaly.

  7. Carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chammas, M

    2014-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the commonest entrapment neuropathy and is due to combined compression and traction on the median nerve at the wrist. It is often idiopathic. Although spontaneous resolution is possible, the usual natural evolution is slow progression. Diagnosis is mainly clinical depending on symptoms and provocative tests. An electromyogram is recommended preoperatively and in cases of work-related disease. Medical treatment is indicated early on or in cases with no deficit and consists of steroid injection in the canal or a night splint in neutral wrist position. Surgical treatment is by section of the flexor retinaculum and is indicated in resistance to medical treatment, in deficit or acute cases. Mini-invasive techniques such as endoscopic and mini-open approaches to carpal tunnel release with higher learning curves are justified by the shorter functional recovery time compared to classical surgery, but with identical long-term results. The choice depends on the surgeon's preference, patient information, stage of severity, etiology and availability of material. Results are satisfactory in 90% of cases. Nerve recovery depends on the stage of severity as well as general patient factors. Recovery of force takes about 2-3 months after the disappearance of 'pillar pain'. This operation has a benign reputation with a 0.2-0.5% reported neurovascular complication rate.

  8. CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME AND WORK

    PubMed Central

    Newington, Lisa; Harris, E Clare; Walker-Bone, Karen

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome and frequently presents in working-aged adults. Its mild form causes ‘nuisance’ symptoms including dysaesthesia and nocturnal waking. At its most severe however it can significantly impair motor function and weaken pinch grip. This review will discuss the anatomy of the carpal tunnel and the clinical presentation of the syndrome as well as the classification and diagnosis of the condition. Carpal tunnel syndrome has a profile of well-established risk factors including individual factors and predisposing co-morbidities, which will be briefly discussed. However, there is a growing body of evidence for an association between carpal tunnel syndrome and various occupational factors, which will also be discussed. Management of carpal tunnel syndrome, conservative and surgical will be described. Finally, we will discuss the issue of safe return to work post carpal tunnel release surgery and the lack of evidence-based guidelines. PMID:26612240

  9. Effects of static fingertip loading on carpal tunnel pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rempel, D.; Keir, P. J.; Smutz, W. P.; Hargens, A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure and fingertip force during a simple pressing task. Carpal tunnel pressure was measured in 15 healthy volunteers by means of a saline-filled catheter inserted percutaneously into the carpal tunnel of the nondominant hand. The subjects pressed on a load cell with the tip of the index finger and with 0, 6, 9, and 12 N of force. The task was repeated in 10 wrist postures: neutral; 10 and 20 degrees of ulnar deviation; 10 degrees of radial deviation; and 15, 30, and 45 degrees of both flexion and extension. Fingertip loading significantly increased carpal tunnel pressure for all wrist angles (p = 0.0001). Post hoc analyses identified significant increase (p < 0.05) in carpal tunnel pressure between unloaded (0 N) and all loaded conditions, as well as between the 6 and 12 N load conditions. This study demonstrates that the process whereby fingertip loading elevates carpal tunnel pressure is independent of wrist posture and that relatively small fingertip loads have a large effect on carpal tunnel pressure. It also reveals the response characteristics of carpal tunnel pressure to fingertip loading, which is one step in understanding the relationship between sustained grip and pinch activities and the aggravation or development of median neuropathy at the wrist.

  10. Carpal tunnel syndrome and work.

    PubMed

    Newington, Lisa; Harris, E Clare; Walker-Bone, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome, and it frequently presents in working-aged adults. Its mild form causes 'nuisance' symptoms including dysaesthesia and nocturnal waking. At its most severe, CTS can significantly impair motor function and weaken pinch grip. This review discusses the anatomy of the carpal tunnel and the clinical presentation of the syndrome as well as the classification and diagnosis of the condition. CTS has a profile of well-established risk factors including individual factors and predisposing co-morbidities, which are briefly discussed. There is a growing body of evidence for an association between CTS and various occupational factors, which is also explored. Management of CTS, conservative and surgical, is described. Finally, the issue of safe return to work post carpal tunnel release surgery and the lack of evidence-based guidelines are discussed.

  11. The recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kern, B C; Brock, M; Rudolph, K H; Logemann, H

    1993-01-01

    Sixteen out of 720 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who had undergone surgery since 1979 were reoperated for a "recurrence" (2.2%). Twelve of these patients had been originally operated on in our department. Thus, our own recurrence rate is 1.7%. Three patients deteriorated following surgery, 6 had an unsatisfactory improvement, and in 7 the symptoms recurred after initial improvement. Eight of the reoperated patients had a predisposing disease (terminal renal insufficiency, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, acromegaly). In 10 of the 16 cases the initial operation had been carried out by surgeons in the first three years of training. Reoperation revealed incomplete splitting of the transverse carpal ligament in 10 cases, compression of the median nerve by the scar in 4, injury of the muscular branch in 1, and an anatomical variant as cause of incomplete decompression in 1 patient. "Recurrences" after carpal tunnel surgery are predominantly due to inadequacies of the first procedure. A remarkable number of patients (50%) has predisposing diseases. Interfascicular or epineural neurolysis and complete exposure and neurolysis of the median nerve and its branches is necessary only in cases of recurrence. Their omission at the first surgery does not result in an increased recurrence rate. Our observations indicate that the number of operations for recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome can probably be reduced when the first operation is performed with care and experience. Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to a systemic disease are particularly at risk.

  12. Carpal tunnel release

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuts through the carpal ligament to make more space for the nerve and tendons. The surgery is done in the following way: First, you receive numbing medicine so that you do not feel pain during ...

  13. An ultrasonographic and anatomical study of carpal tunnel, with special emphasis on the safe zones in percutaneous release.

    PubMed

    Chern, T-C; Jou, I-M; Chen, W-C; Wu, K-C; Shao, C-J; Shen, P-C

    2009-02-01

    We examined 40 wrists of 12 embalmed and eight fresh cadavers and defined the relative position of the flexor retinaculum to the neurovascular structure, ultrasonographic markers and safe zones by ultrasonography and anatomical dissection. Both longitudinal and transverse ultrasonographic sections clearly depicted the flexor retinaculum, neurovascular bundles, median nerve, flexor tendons and bony boundaries of the underlying joints. Topographic measurement showed [i] good correlation between the actual extent of the flexor retinaculum and the ultrasonographically determined distance between bony landmarks in all hands, and [ii] the widths and lengths of well-defined safe zones. A comparison study confirmed the accuracy of ultrasonography. We conclude that these ultrasonographic landmarks can locate the flexor retinaculum and facilitate safe and complete carpal tunnel release with open or minimally invasive techniques.

  14. Pressure-morphology relationship of a released carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hee; Marquardt, Tamara L; Gabra, Joseph N; Shen, Zhilei Liu; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-04-01

    We investigated morphological changes of a released carpal tunnel in response to variations of carpal tunnel pressure. Pressure within the carpal tunnel is known to be elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and dependent on wrist posture. Previously, increased carpal tunnel pressure was shown to affect the morphology of the carpal tunnel with an intact transverse carpal ligament (TCL). However, the pressure-morphology relationship of the carpal tunnel after release of the TCL has not been investigated. Carpal tunnel release (CTR) was performed endoscopically on cadaveric hands and the carpal tunnel pressure was dynamically increased from 10 to 120 mmHg. Simultaneously, carpal tunnel cross-sectional images were captured by an ultrasound system, and pressure measurements were recorded by a pressure transducer. Carpal tunnel pressure significantly affected carpal arch area (p < 0.001), with an increase of >62 mm(2) at 120 mmHg. Carpal arch height, length, and width also significantly changed with carpal tunnel pressure (p < 0.05). As carpal tunnel pressure increased, carpal arch height and length increased, but the carpal arch width decreased. Analyses of the pressure-morphology relationship for a released carpal tunnel revealed a nine times greater compliance than that previously reported for a carpal tunnel with an intact TCL. This change of structural properties as a result of transecting the TCL helps explain the reduction of carpal tunnel pressure and relief of symptoms for patients after CTR surgery.

  15. Referral guidelines: carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Laws, E R

    1997-07-15

    The contribution on the postoperative management and rehabilitation of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome should be carefully considered by every surgeon. The operation is simply not over when the last stitch goes in; careful postoperative management is quite important if one is to obtain optimal surgical results. The principles outlined here are valuable and help to explain the occasional poor outcome. We have become convinced that the use of a dorsal splint in the 1st week to 10 days following surgery is a helpful measure. It is designed to prevent the median nerve from prolapsing forward and becoming adherent to or trapped by the edges of the severed transverse carpal ligament. With regard to surgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome. It is exceedingly important to continue producing outcome studies showing that our interventions really do eliminate the problem and allow people to return to productive work. Templates for outcome assessment are under development by the Outcomes Committee of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and also by the American College of surgeons. Hopefully, they can be applied to the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. The following segment represents some suggested referral guidelines for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The present differential diagnosis, methods of confirming the diagnosis, and appropriate indications for considering surgery. These guidelines have been reviewed by the various authors who have contributed to this issue of Neurosurgical Focus and other colleagues in neurosurgery, orthopedics, plastic surgery, neurology, and occupational therapy. It is hoped that they will be a reasonable start in our efforts to inform referring physicians as to the nature of median thenar neuropathy and its overall management.

  16. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome as a result of spontaneous bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Chenicheri; Jarrahnejad, Payam; Balakrishnan, Anila; Huettner, William C

    2008-01-01

    Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compression neuropathy of the upper extremity following trauma. A rare occurence of spontaneous bleeding into the carpal tunnel, presenting as acute carpal tunnel syndrome, is presented. PMID:19721797

  17. Surgical efficacy of carpal tunnel release for carpal tunnel syndrome in acromegaly: report of four patients.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, N; Masuko, T; Ishikawa, J; Minami, A

    2005-12-01

    Although carpal tunnel syndrome is frequent in acromegaly, few acromegalics will be encountered by most hand surgeons. This paper considers the treatment of four cases of acromegaly in whom carpal tunnel syndrome arose, to discuss aspects of management of carpal tunnel syndrome in this patient group.

  18. Electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leilei

    2013-02-01

    This article discusses the historical aspects related to the understanding of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and its diagnosis, highlighting observations about this disease that have yet to be challenged. This is followed by a discussion regarding the use of electrodiagnostic testing as a diagnostic tool for CTS, as well as the author's approach to making the diagnosis of CTS. Finally, conclusions about future directions in the diagnosis and treatment of this disorder are presented.

  19. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Tolis, Konstantinos E.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, Georgios N.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  20. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic.

  1. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  2. Carpal tunnel syndrome among ski manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, S; Demers, P A; Miller, M; Longstreth, W T; Rosenstock, L

    1991-02-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common disorder marked by pain and dysesthesias of the upper extremities. As a test of the hypothesis that carpal tunnel syndrome is associated with occupational risk factors, jobs at a ski assembly plant were classified as repetitive and nonrepetitive. The prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome among 106 employees with repetitive jobs was compared with that among 67 employees with nonrepetitive jobs. The data collection included a questionnaire, a physical examination, and the measurement of distal sensory latencies of the median and ulnar nerves. Carpal tunnel syndrome was present in either or both hands in 15.4% of those workers with repetitive jobs, but only in 3.1% of those workers with nonrepetitive jobs (crude prevalence ratio 4.92, 95% confidence interval 1.17-20.7). The conclusion was drawn that carpal tunnel syndrome is associated with jobs requiring frequent and sustained hand work.

  3. Carpal tunnel syndrome - anatomical and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Iskra, Tomasz; Mizia, Ewa; Musial, Agata; Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common and widely known of the entrapment neuropathies in which the body's peripheral nerves are compressed. Common symptoms of CTS involve the hand and result from compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. In general, CTS develops when the tissues around the median nerve irritate or compress on the nerve along its course through the carpal tunnel, however often it is very difficult to determine cause of CTS. Proper treatment (conservative or surgical) usually can relieve the symptoms and restore normal use of the wrist and hand.

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Van Meir, Nathalie; De Smet, Luc

    2003-10-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is rarely seen in children. A literature search in 1989 revealed 52 published cases. The authors review 163 additional cases that were published since that date. The majority of these cases were related with a genetic condition. The most common aetiology was lysosomal storage disease: mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) in 95 and mucolipidoses (ML) in 22. In CTS secondary to MPS, clinical signs typical of adult CTS are rarely seen, and difficulty with fine motor tasks is the most frequent finding. CTS in MPS does not seem to be prevented by bone marrow transplantation, the usual treatment for the condition. CTS is probably due to a combination of excessive lysosomal storage in the connective tissue of the flexor retinaculum and a distorted anatomy because of underlying bone dysplasia. Mucolipidoses come next in the aetiology, with essentially similar symptoms. The authors found in the literature 11 cases of primary familial CTS, a condition which presents as an inheritable disorder of connective tissue mediated by an autosomal dominant gene; the symptoms may be more typical in some cases, but are more similar to MPS in others. A case with self-mutilation has been reported. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterised by episodes of decreased sensation or palsies after slight traction or pressure on peripheral nerves; it may also give symptoms of CTS. Schwartz-Jampel syndrome (SJS), another genetic disorder with autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia, is characterised by varying degrees of myotonia and chondrodysplasia; it has also been noted associated with CTS in a child. Melorrheostosis and Leri's syndrome have also been noted in children with CTS, as well as Déjerine-Sottas syndrome and Weill-Marchesani syndrome. Among non-genetic causes of CTS in children, idiopathic cases with children onset have been reported, usually but not always related with thickening of the

  5. Carpal tunnel release complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Greco, R J; Curtsinger, L J

    1993-06-01

    We report a 31-year-old diabetic woman who underwent carpal tunnel release for median nerve compression followed by a laparoscopic tubal ligation. The procedure was complicated by a severe postoperative necrotizing fasciitis infection of the carpal tunnel release incision. This has not been previously reported. The wound was poorly responsive to antibiotic therapy and serial wound debridements. Control of the woman's infection required total excision of the palmar skin and fascia. Complicating factors in this case included the woman's long history of insulin-dependent diabetes and a concomitant clean-contaminated procedure.

  6. Treatment of repetitive use carpal tunnel syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Chadwick F.; Vangsness, C. Thomas; Anderson, Thomas; Good, Wayne

    1995-05-01

    In 1990, a randomized, double-blind study was initiated to evaluate the use of an eight-point conservative treatment program in carpal tunnel syndrome. A total of 160 patients were delineated with symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. These patients were then divided into two groups. Both groups were subjected to an ergonomically correct eight-point work modification program. A counterfeit low level laser therapy unit was utilized in Group A, while an actual low level laser therapy unit was utilized in Group B. The difference between Groups A and B was statistically significant in terms of return to work, conduction study improvement, and certain range of motion and strength studies.

  7. Prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome in motorcyclists.

    PubMed

    Manes, Harvey R

    2012-05-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is prevalent in patients who have a repetitive motion, vibration, or pressure exerted on the wrist joint for an extended period of time. The prevalence of this condition in the general population is approximately 5%. Motorcyclists subject themselves to high levels of vibration from the road and use their wrists to control the motorcycle's brakes, gas intake, and gears via the handlebars. Under these conditions, the author hypothesized that an increased prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome would be observed in this population.

  8. Bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Manganelli, P; Pavesi, G; Salaffi, F

    1987-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may be associated with endocrinopathies, such as hypothyroidism and acromegaly. A direct relationship between CTS and hyperthyroidism has recently been suggested. We now report a case in which bilateral CTS developed after treatment of Graves' disease, thus, questioning the possibility of a relationship between these two disease processes.

  9. Employees' Knowledge of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandy-Goldston, Terrie M.

    A study examined employees' knowledge of the causes of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), its prevention, and their legal rights after being diagnosed with CTS. A 24-item questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 30 Chicago-area employees who had been afflicted with CTS. Of those surveyed, 99% considered their CTS injury related to their…

  10. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in ARL Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Joyce K.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 72 member libraries in the Association of Research Libraries revealed the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and the measures taken to cope with it. Recommends implementing proactive ergonomics programs; soliciting staff input for solutions; providing report guidelines; using external help; stressing preventive measures and…

  11. Myofascial release of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sucher, B M

    1993-01-01

    Current treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome may be ineffective or associated with complications or recurrence. In the case reported here, a myofascial release by the physician combined with the patient's self-stretch reduced pain and numbness and improved electromyographic results. The manipulative approach releases the transverse carpal ligament,-and "opens" or dilates the canal. The patient stretches the wrist, digits, and thumb, including myofascial components. An aggressive, conservative approach lessens the need for surgery in mild to moderate cases. Studies with magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful to document canal size before and after treatment.

  12. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Tamara L; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 min of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p < 0.001) and resulted in increased carpal arch height (p < 0.01), increased carpal arch curvature (p < 0.001), and increased radial distribution of the carpal arch area (p < 0.05). It was also shown that wrist compression reduced the flattening of the median nerve, as indicated by changes in the nerve's circularity and flattening ratio (p < 0.001). This study demonstrated that the carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1234-1240, 2016.

  13. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Tamara L.; Evans, Peter J.; Seitz, William H.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 minutes of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p < 0.001) and resulted in increased carpal arch height (p < 0.01), increased carpal arch curvature (p < 0.001), and increased radial distribution of the carpal arch area (p < 0.05). It was also shown that wrist compression reduced the flattening of the median nerve, as indicated by changes in the nerve’s circularity and flattening ratio (p < 0.001). Statement of clinical significance This study demonstrated that the carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26662276

  14. Extended open-carpal tunnel release in renal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Benna, Sammy; Nano, P G C; El-Enin, Haussam

    2012-11-01

    Chronic hemodialysis patients are susceptible to median nerve compression. The clinical symptoms, surgical results and prognosis of chronic hemodialysis-related carpal tunnel syndrome have different results from those of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results of extended open carpal tunnel release in chronic hemodialysis-related carpal tunnel syndrome. A review of 31 open-extended carpal tunnel decompressions in 27 chronic dialysis patients was performed. The surgical technique is detailed and the clinical results analyzed. There was an improvement in symptoms and strength in all patients. There were no instances of recurrence of nerve compression during the one year follow-up period. Extended open carpal tunnel decompression improves symptoms and enhances hand function in patients receiving chronic hemodialysis.

  15. Carpal Tunnel Cross-Sectional Area Affected by Soft Tissues Abutting the Carpal Bones.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-02-01

    The carpal tunnel accommodates free movement of its contents, and the tunnel's cross-sectional area is a useful morphological parameter for the evaluation of the space available for the carpal tunnel contents and of potential nerve compression in the tunnel. The osseous boundary of the carpal bones as the dorsal border of the carpal tunnel is commonly used to determine the tunnel area, but this boundary contains soft tissues such as numerous intercarpal ligaments and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. The aims of this study were to quantify the thickness of the soft tissues abutting the carpal bones and to investigate how this soft tissue influences the calculation of the carpal tunnel area. Magnetic resonance images were analyzed for eight cadaveric specimens. A medical balloon with a physiological pressure was inserted into an evacuated tunnel to identify the carpal tunnel boundary. The balloon-based (i.e. true carpal tunnel) and osseous-based carpal tunnel boundaries were extracted and divided into regions corresponding to the hamate, capitate, trapezoid, trapezium, and transverse carpal ligament (TCL). From the two boundaries, the overall and regional soft tissue thicknesses and areas were calculated. The soft tissue thickness was significantly greater for the trapezoid (3.1±1.2mm) and trapezium (3.4±1.0mm) regions than for the hamate (0.7±0.3mm) and capitate (1.2±0.5mm) regions. The carpal tunnel area using the osseous boundary (243.0±40.4mm(2)) was significantly larger than the balloon-based area (183.9±29.7mm(2)) with a ratio of 1.32. In other words, the carpal tunnel area can be estimated as 76% (= 1/1.32) of the osseous-based area. The abundance of soft tissue in the trapezoid and trapezium regions can be attributed mainly to the capitate-trapezium ligament and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. Inclusion of such soft tissue leads to overestimations of the carpal tunnel area. Correct quantification of the carpal tunnel area aids in examining carpal

  16. Subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, S; Tanaka, R; Hasegawa, A; Tamura, T; Kuroki, M

    1993-08-01

    Median nerve conduction was studied in 16 acromegalic patients with asymptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) to examine the incidence of subclinical CTS. Thirteen patients (81%) and 23 hands (72%) demonstrated subclinical CTS, 10 bilaterally and three unilaterally in the dominant hand. The incidence reflects the greater sensitivity of the inching method for detecting focal conduction abnormalities. Two of three patients without subclinical CTS showed normal plasma somatomedin-C concentration despite growth hormone hypersecretion. Following adenomectomy, nerve conduction normalized in only six hands (26%). The postoperative persistence of the conduction delay implies that irreversible narrowing of the carpal tunnel rather than reversible soft tissue edema is the principal cause of CTS associated with acromegaly.

  17. Effect of wrist posture on carpal tunnel pressure while typing.

    PubMed

    Rempel, David M; Keir, Peter J; Bach, Joel M

    2008-09-01

    Long weekly hours of keyboard use may lead to or aggravate carpal tunnel syndrome. The effects of typing on fluid pressure in the carpal tunnel, a possible mediator of carpal tunnel syndrome, are unknown. Twenty healthy subjects participated in a laboratory study to investigate the effects of typing at different wrist postures on carpal tunnel pressure of the right hand. Changes in wrist flexion/extension angle (p = 0.01) and radial/ulnar deviation angle (p = 0.03) independently altered carpal tunnel pressure; wrist deviations in extension or radial deviation were associated with an increase in pressure. The activity of typing independently elevated carpal tunnel pressure (p = 0.001) relative to the static hand held in the same posture. This information can guide the design and use of keyboards and workstations in order to minimize carpal tunnel pressure while typing. The findings may also be useful to clinicians and ergonomists in the management of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who use a keyboard.

  18. Structural changes of the carpal tunnel, median nerve and flexor tendons in MRI before and after endoscopic carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Momose, Toshimitsu; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kobayashi, Seneki; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural changes of the carpal tunnel, median nerve, and flexor tendons in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR). We studied 36 hands undergoing ECTR. In MRI, the cross-sectional area of the carpal tunnel and the median nerve at the hamate and the pisiform levels were measured. The distance from the volar side of carpal bone to the median nerve or tendons and the volar displacement were measured. In post-operative MRI, the transverse carpal ligament could not be well delineated and the carpal tunnel was significantly enlarged both at the hamate and pisiform levels. The median nerve was enlarged at the hamate level. The median nerve and flexor tendons significantly moved to the volar side. The volar displacement of the median nerve and flexor digitorum superficialis in the long and ring fingers was greater than the other tendons.

  19. Idiopathic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Evaluation of the Depth of the Carpal Tunnel by Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Elsaman, Ahmed Mohammed Mahrous Yousif; Thabit, Mohamed Nasreldin; Radwan, Ahmed Roshdy Al-Agamy; Ohrndorf, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the work described here was to evaluate the depth of the carpal tunnel (DCT) in patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and healthy volunteers by ultrasonography (US), through measurement of the distance from the flexor retinaculum to the surface of the capitate bone at the carpal tunnel outlet, and compare it with other ultrasonographic and electrophysiologic parameters in CTS. The study was conducted in 60 non-diabetic patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (unilateral n = 37, bilateral n = 23) evidenced by electrophysiologic diagnosis according to the criteria of the American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AAEM). Furthermore, 40 hands from 20 healthy volunteers were examined. Median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA); flattening ratio (FR), the ratio of the length to the width of the median nerve; and DCT at the canal outlet were measured for all participants. The mean age was 35.6 ± 9.48 y. The female-to-male ratio was 47:13 in the CTS patients. The sensitivity and specificity were 82% and 95% for CSA, 75% and 60% for FR and 75% and 87.5% for DCT, respectively. Differences between patients and healthy controls were significant for all three parameters, greatest for DCT, followed by CSA and then FR. We conclude that DCT increased in CTS and this new parameter is comparable in sensitivity and specificity to CSA and FR. DCT increased independently of the cause of the CTS (decrease in size of canal or increase in contents).

  20. Risk and complications in endoscopic carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Shinya, K; Lanzetta, M; Conolly, W B

    1995-04-01

    Single portal endoscopic carpal tunnel release was carried out in 107 hands of 88 patients. There were 11 complications. These included incomplete release (2), post operative scarring around the median and ulnar nerves (2), laceration of the superficial palmar arterial arch (1), reflex sympathetic dystrophy (2), palmar fasciitis (1), and wound inflammation (3). In two cases there was no relief of symptoms. In one there was incorrect diagnosis and in another, incorrect indication for endoscopic carpal tunnel release. The follow-up was from 3 to 18 months with an average of 6.8 months. The overall results of the patients in this series are being presented in another paper. Of the 107 procedures, 73 were rated as having an excellent, 25 good, three fair, and six poor results. The case of laceration of the superficial palmar arterial arch is discussed in detail in the paper. The two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy and the one case of palmar fasciitis had mild clinical features and resolved within 3 months. The inflammation in three of the wounds at the wrist resolved within 2 days of removal of the percutaneous sutures. These three patients had returned to heavy hand activities within a few days of surgery.

  1. Osteopathic manipulative medicine for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siu, Gilbert; Jaffe, J Douglas; Rafique, Maryum; Weinik, Michael M

    2012-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is 1 of the most common peripheral nerve entrapment disorders. Osteopathic manipulative medicine can be invaluable in diagnosing and managing CTS. Combined with a patient's history and a standard physical examination, an osteopathic structural examination can facilitate localizing the nerve entrapment, diagnosing CTS, and monitoring the disease process. Osteopathic manipulative treatment is noninvasive and can be used to supplement traditional CTS treatment methods. The authors also review the relevant anatomy involving CTS and the clinical efficacy of osteopathic manipulative medicine in the management of this disorder.

  2. Carpal tunnel: Normal anatomy, anatomical variants and ultrasound technique.

    PubMed

    Presazzi, A; Bortolotto, C; Zacchino, M; Madonia, L; Draghi, F

    2011-03-01

    The carpal tunnel is an osteofibrous canal situated in the volar wrist. The boundaries are the carpal bones and the flexor retinaculum. In addition to the medial nerve, the carpal tunnel contains nine tendons: the flexor pollicis longus, the four flexor digitorum superficialis and the four flexor digitorum profundus. Ultrasound (US) study of the carpal tunnel generally involves short-axis imaging of the tendons, and in the presence of disease, long-axis imaging and dynamic maneuvers are added. There are numerous reports of anatomical variants of the wrist involving vessels, nerves, tendons and muscles, and they can all be studied by US. Some are particularly relevant from a clinical point of view and will therefore be accurately described. The anatomy is complex, and the US operator should therefore be thoroughly familiar with the normal anatomy as well as the anatomical variants that may have a role in the pathogenesis of carpal tunnel syndrome or influence treatment.

  3. [Carpal tunnel syndrome. The contribution of ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Pardal-Fernandez, J M

    2014-11-16

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent mononeuropathy. Its incidence is huge and the ensuing community health problems are therefore the cause of much concern. Such a situation has made it necessary to develop a key point in the management of the illness, that is, to find flexible, sensitive, specific and cost-effective diagnostic procedures. Today tools of proven worth are now available, especially electrophysiology, and quite recently we also have ultrasonography. Both of these techniques allow us to confirm and characterise neuropathies due to entrapment and indeed a large number of papers dealing with ultrasound imaging have been published in the literature over the last few years. It therefore comes as no surprise that many renowned authors have acknowledged the usefulness of this technique. Here, we review the pathophysiological and diagnostic aspects of carpal tunnel syndrome, with greater emphasis on how ultrasonography has contributed to the morphological evaluation of the entrapped nerve. This method has proved itself to have significant advantages not only due to its being readily available, inexpensive, fast and painless, but also, and above all, because of its high capacity to detect neural and perineural alterations. A critical review of the literature supports this thesis and shows its incorporation into routine daily evaluation to be highly recommendable.

  4. Medical history of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, Heidi; Posner, Martin A

    2002-05-01

    The anatomical configuration of the carpal tunnel is that of an inelastic channel. Consequently, any increase in its volume or alteration in shape will usually result in a significant increase in interstitial pressure. At a pressure threshold of 20 mm Hg to 30 mm Hg, epineurial blood flow is compromised. When that pressure is sustained, the symptoms and physical findings associated with CTS appear. Typically, patients present with intermittent pain and paresthesias in all or part of the median nerve distribution of their hand(s). As weeks and months pass, symptoms progressively increase in frequency and severity. Eventually, thenar muscle weakness develops that initially manifests itself as "fatigue," or "tiredness." The progressive increase in symptoms and physical findings, usually accompanied by a progressive deterioration in electrodiagnostic studies, facilitates the classification of the condition into early, intermediate, and advanced stages. The increase in interstitial pressure in the carpal tunnel is in the vast majority of cases idiopathic (spontaneous). It can also be caused by a myriad of other conditions that can be classified into three other categories: intrinsic factors that increase the volume of the tunnel (outside and inside the nerve), extrinsic factors that alter the contour of the tunnel, and repetitive/overuse conditions. In addition, there is another category of neuropathic factors that affect the nerve without increasing interstitial pressure. In rare situations CTS can present as an acute problem. Far less common than the chronic form of the condition, it can follow acute wrist trauma, rheumatologic disorders, hemorrhagic problems, vascular disorders affecting a patent median artery, and high pressure injection injuries. Prompt recognition is important, followed in most cases by urgent surgical decompression of the median nerve.

  5. Treatment considerations in carpal tunnel syndrome with coexistent Dupuytren's disease.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, M; Kleinert, H E

    1980-11-01

    Twenty-nine patients with involvement of 31 hands presented with coexisting carpal tunnel syndrome and ipsilateral Dupuytren's disease. Analysis of the patient population showed a high proportion of women, dominant hand involvement, and repetitive manual trauma. Various treatment combinations were used and the results evaluated. Simultaneous surgical excision of Dupuytren's contracture and carpal tunnel release gave compromised long-term results, particularly among the women. To minimize complications, it is advised that carpal tunnel release not be performed at the same time as excision of Dupuytren's contracture.

  6. Description, reliability and validity of a novel method to measure carpal tunnel pressure in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coppieters, Michel W; Schmid, Annina B; Kubler, Paul A; Hodges, Paul W

    2012-12-01

    Elevated carpal tunnel pressure is an important pathomechanism in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Several invasive methods have been described for direct measurement of carpal tunnel pressure, but all have two important limitations. The pressure gauge requires sterilisation between uses, which makes time-efficient data collection logistically cumbersome, and more importantly, the reliability of carpal tunnel pressure measurements has not been evaluated for any of the methods in use. This technical note describes a new method to measure carpal tunnel pressure using inexpensive, disposable pressure sensors and reports the within and between session reliability of the pressure recordings in five different wrist positions and during typing and computer mouse operation. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC[3,1]) were calculated for recordings within one session for healthy participants (n = 7) and patients with CTS (n = 5), and for recordings between two sessions for patients with CTS (n = 5). Overall, the reliability was high. With the exception of two coefficients, the reliability of the recordings at different wrist angles varied from 0.63 to 0.99. Reliability for typing and mouse operation ranged from 0.86 to 0.99. The new method described in this report is inexpensive and reliable, and data collection can be applied more efficiently as off-site sterilisation of equipment is not required. These advances are likely to promote future research into carpal tunnel pressure, such as investigation of the therapeutic mechanisms of various conservative treatment modalities that are believed to reduce elevated carpal tunnel pressure.

  7. Treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome by low-level laser versus open carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Elwakil, Tarek F; Elazzazi, Alaa; Shokeir, Hisham

    2007-11-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is an entrapment neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist. It is one of the most common peripheral nerve disorders. The cause of idiopathic CTS remains unclear. The diagnosis of CTS is still mainly clinical. Open carpal tunnel release is the standard treatment. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of low level laser treatment (LLLT) for CTS in comparison to the standard open carpal tunnel release surgery. Out of 54 patients, 60 symptomatic hands complaining of CTS were divided into two equal groups. Group A, was subjected to LLLT by Helium Neon (He-Ne) laser (632.8 nm), whereas group B was treated by the open approach for carpal tunnel release. The patients were evaluated clinically and by nerve conduction studies (NCSs) about 6 months after the treatment. LLLT showed overall significant results but at a lower level in relation to surgery. LLLT showed significant outcomes in all parameters of subjective complaints (p < or = 0.01) except for muscle weakness. Moreover, LLLT showed significant results in all parameters of objective findings (p < or = 0.01) except for thenar atrophy. However, NCSs expressed the same statistical significance (p < or = 0.01) after the treatment by both modalities. LLLT has proven to be an effective and noninvasive treatment modality for CTS especially for early and mild-to-moderate cases when pain is the main presenting symptom. However, surgery could be preserved for advanced and chronic cases. Refinement of laser tools and introduction of other wavelengths could make LLLT for CTS treatment a field for further investigations. PMID:17334675

  8. Area and shape changes of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure.

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Ming; Masters, Tamara L; Mondello, Tracy A

    2011-12-01

    Carpal tunnel mechanics is relevant to our understanding of median nerve compression in the tunnel. The compliant characteristics of the tunnel strongly influence its mechanical environment. We investigated the distensibility of the carpal tunnel in response to tunnel pressure. A custom balloon device was designed to apply controlled pressure. Tunnel cross sections were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging to derive the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure and morphological parameters at the hook of hamate. The results showed that the cross-sectional area (CSA) at the level of the hook of hamate increased, on average, by 9.2% and 14.8% at 100 and 200 mmHg, respectively. The increased CSA was attained by a shape change of the cross section, displaying increased circularity. The increase in CSA was mainly attributable to the increase of area in the carpal arch region formed by the transverse carpal ligament. The narrowing of the carpal arch width was associated with an increase in the carpal arch. We concluded that the carpal tunnel is compliant to accommodate physiological variations of the carpal tunnel pressure, and that the increase in tunnel CSA is achieved by increasing the circularity of the cross section.

  9. Carpal tunnel syndrome associated with Kienböck disease.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Takaaki; Nakamura, Ryogo; Nakao, Etsuhiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-08-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 12 patients (3 men and 9 women, with a mean age of 72 years) who were surgically treated for carpal tunnel syndrome associated with Kienböck disease. All patients except 1 were incidentally diagnosed with Kienböck disease and had little or no wrist pain. Radiographic tests revealed advanced Kienböck disease in all patients. Intraoperative findings indicated that the site of maximum compression on the median nerve was located at the level of the carpal tunnel inlet in 11 patients, and the volar dislocated fragment of the lunate was located proximally adjacent to the floor of the carpal tunnel inlet. This disorder is most prevalent in elderly women, and even advanced Kienböck disease can present without wrist pain. Our findings suggest that palmar protrusion of the lunate may be the primary cause of carpal tunnel syndrome associated with Kienböck disease.

  10. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: The Risk to Educational Interpreters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedt, Joe D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and its ramifications for sign language users, in particular, educational interpreters. Discussed are the syndrome's incidence, causes, diagnostic procedures, medical and surgical interventions, and prevention guidelines. (JDD)

  11. Carpal tunnel syndrome associated with Kienböck disease

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Takaaki; Nakamura, Ryogo; Nakao, Etsuhiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We retrospectively reviewed 12 patients (3 men and 9 women, with a mean age of 72 years) who were surgically treated for carpal tunnel syndrome associated with Kienböck disease. All patients except 1 were incidentally diagnosed with Kienböck disease and had little or no wrist pain. Radiographic tests revealed advanced Kienböck disease in all patients. Intraoperative findings indicated that the site of maximum compression on the median nerve was located at the level of the carpal tunnel inlet in 11 patients, and the volar dislocated fragment of the lunate was located proximally adjacent to the floor of the carpal tunnel inlet. This disorder is most prevalent in elderly women, and even advanced Kienböck disease can present without wrist pain. Our findings suggest that palmar protrusion of the lunate may be the primary cause of carpal tunnel syndrome associated with Kienböck disease. PMID:27578910

  12. [Principal causes for recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Alonso, M F; Abdala-Dergal, C

    2016-01-01

    The frequent causes of relapsing carpal tunnel syndrome were analyzed. Nine patients were followed-up from January 1st to December 31st, 2011. They underwent a physical exam and imaging tests. Pain was measured in all of them with the VAS, and the Brigham and Womens Hospital questionnaire was used to assess disability. Patients included seven females and two males; mean age was 52 years. Major causes for relapse included postoperative fibrosis with incomplete release in seven patients and incomplete release in two patients in whom minimally invasive approaches were used. Three of the nine patients had retractile scars. The main cause of relapse was postoperative fibrosis associated with the minima-lly invasive approach. PMID:27627773

  13. Intrasynovial lipoma causing trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shinji; Kodama, Narihito; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2008-01-01

    Triggering of the flexor tendon at the wrist is rare. We report a case of intrasynovial lipoma that caused a trigger wrist. As far as we know it is unique in that the intrasynovial lipoma simultaneously caused carpal tunnel syndrome. The massive tenosynovitis and adhesion of flexors tendons after the locking of the intrasynovial lipoma may have resulted from inflammation caused by attrition within the carpal tunnel.

  14. The effect of transverse carpal ligament lengthening on carpal tunnel volumetry: a comparison between four techniques.

    PubMed

    Pavlidis, Leonidas; Chalidis, Byron E; Demiri, Efterpi; Dimitriou, Christos G

    2010-11-01

    Transverse carpal ligament (TCL) reconstruction after open carpal tunnel release has been advocated to restore wrist kinematics and grip strength. This study investigates the effect of TCL reconstruction in carpal tunnel volume (CTV). Thirty-eight cadaveric wrists were volarly approached and TCL was exposed to its proximal and distal edges. Carpal tunnel contents were removed and the CTV was measured considering that carpal tunnel resembled the shape of a truncated cone. TCL was then dissected and subsequently reconstructed by using 4 different surgical lengthening techniques. Three of these techniques were retrieved from the literature. The fourth was proposed and performed by the authors. Postreconstruction calculation of CTV was done with the same method. In 6 cadavers, a magnetic resonance imaging-based measurement of CTV was performed to assess the validity and reliability of simulation method. The average increase of CTV ranged from 31% to 44% (P < 0.001 for all techniques). However, no statistical significant difference was found between the 4 techniques (P = 0.097). Magnetic resonance imaging volumetric values were equal to simulation measured values before and after reconstruction of TCL (P = 0.224 and P = 0.674, respectively). Lengthening of TCL substantially increases the carpal tunnel capacity regardless the applied surgical technique. The simulation model method seems to be an accurate, precise, and cost-effective approach for the evaluation of CTV. PMID:20661126

  15. Carpal tunnel release with subneural reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament compared with isolated open and endoscopic release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Li, Y; Wen, S; Zhu, H; Shao, X; Yu, Y

    2015-02-01

    We report a new surgical technique of open carpal tunnel release with subneural reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament and compare this with isolated open and endoscopic carpal tunnel release. Between December 2007 and October 2011, 213 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (70 male, 143 female; mean age 45.6 years; 29 to 67) were recruited from three different centres and were randomly allocated to three groups: group A, open carpal tunnel release with subneural reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament (n = 68); group B, isolated open carpal tunnel release (n = 92); and group C, endoscopic carpal tunnel release (n = 53). At a mean final follow-up of 24 months (22 to 26), we found no significant difference between the groups in terms of severity of symptoms or lateral grip strength. Compared with groups B and C, group A had significantly better functional status, cylindrical grip strength and pinch grip strength. There were significant differences in Michigan Hand Outcome scores between groups A and B, A and C, and B and C. Group A had the best functional status, cylindrical grip strength, pinch grip strength and Michigan Hand Outcome score. Subneural reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament during carpal tunnel decompression maximises hand strength by stabilising the transverse carpal arch. PMID:25628286

  16. Anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel: a brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Civelek, Erdinc; Cansever, Tufan; Kabatas, Serdar; Yilmaz, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common focal peripheral neuropathy. Increased pressure in the carpal tunnel results in median nerve compression and impaired nerve perfusion, leading to discomfort and paresthesia in the affected hand. Surgical division of the transverse carpal ligament is preferred in severe cases of CTS and should be considered when conservative measures fail. A through knowledge of the normal and variant anatomy of the median nerve in the wrist is fundamental in avoiding complications during carpal tunnel release. This paper aims to briefly review the anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel and its implications in carpal tunnel surgery.

  17. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Caused by Space Occupying Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho Jung; Yoon, Hong Ki; Hahn, Soo Bong; Kim, Sung Jae

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnosis and treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to space occupying lesions (SOL). Materials and Methods Eleven patients and 12 cases that underwent surgery for CTS due to SOL were studied retrospectively. We excluded SOL caused by bony lesions, such as malunion of distal radius fracture, volar lunate dislocation, etc. The average age was 51 years. There were 3 men and 8 women. Follow-up period was 12 to 40 months with an average of 18 months. The diagnosis of CTS was made clinically and electrophysiologically. In patients with swelling or tenderness on the area of wrist flexion creases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomogram (CT) were additionally taken as well as the carpal tunnel view. We performed conventional open transverse carpal ligament release and removal of SOL. Results The types of lesion confirmed by pathologic examination were; tuberculosis tenosynovitis in 3 cases, nonspecific tenosynovitis in 2 cases, and gout in one case. Other SOLs were tumorous condition in five cases, and abnormal palmaris longus hypertrophy in 1 case. Tumorous conditions were due to calcifying mass in 4 cases and ganglion in 1 case. Following surgery, all cases showed alleviation of symptom without recurrence or complications. Conclusion In cases with swelling or tenderness on the area of wrist flexion creases, it is important to obtain a carpal tunnel view, and MRI and/or CT should be supplemented in order to rule out SOLs around the carpal tunnel, if necessary. PMID:19430560

  18. Risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome in a general population.

    PubMed Central

    Nordstrom, D L; Vierkant, R A; DeStefano, F; Layde, P M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the individual, physical, and psychosocial risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome in a general population. METHODS: Population based case-control study in Marshfield epidemiological study area in Wisconsin, USA. Cases were men and women aged 18-69 with newly diagnosed carpal tunnel syndrome (n = 206 (83.1%) of 248 eligible). Controls were a random sample of residents of the study area who had no history of diagnosed carpal tunnel syndrome (n = 211 (81.5%) of 259 eligible). Cases and controls were matched by age. Telephone interviews and reviews of medical records obtained height and weight, medical history, average daily hours of exposure to selected physical and organisational work factors, and self ratings on psychosocial work scales. RESULTS: In the final logistic regression model, five work and three non-work variables were associated with risk of carpal tunnel syndrome, after adjusting for age. For each one unit of increase in body mass index (kg/m2), risk increased 8% (odds ratio (OR) 1.08; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.03 to 1.14). Having a previous musculoskeletal condition was positively associated with carpal tunnel syndrome (OR 2.54; 95% CI 1.03 to 6.23). People reporting the least influence at work had 2.86 times the risk (95% CI, 1.10 to 7.14) than those with the most influence at work. CONCLUSIONS: Carpal tunnel syndrome is a work related disease, although some important measures of occupational exposure, including keyboard use, were not risk factors in this general population study. The mechanism whereby a weight gain of about six pounds increases the risk of disease 8% requires explanation. PMID:9404321

  19. A vertical mouse and ergonomic mouse pads alter wrist position but do not reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Kubler, Paul A; Johnston, Venerina; Coppieters, Michel W

    2015-03-01

    Non-neutral wrist positions and external pressure leading to increased carpal tunnel pressure during computer use have been associated with a heightened risk of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This study investigated whether commonly used ergonomic devices reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with CTS. Carpal tunnel pressure was measured in twenty-one patients with CTS before, during and after a computer mouse task using a standard mouse, a vertical mouse, a gel mouse pad and a gliding palm support. Carpal tunnel pressure increased while operating a computer mouse. Although the vertical mouse significantly reduced ulnar deviation and the gel mouse pad and gliding palm support decreased wrist extension, none of the ergonomic devices reduced carpal tunnel pressure. The findings of this study do therefore not endorse a strong recommendation for or against any of the ergonomic devices commonly recommended for patients with CTS. Selection of ergonomic devices remains dependent on personal preference. PMID:25479984

  20. A vertical mouse and ergonomic mouse pads alter wrist position but do not reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Kubler, Paul A; Johnston, Venerina; Coppieters, Michel W

    2015-03-01

    Non-neutral wrist positions and external pressure leading to increased carpal tunnel pressure during computer use have been associated with a heightened risk of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This study investigated whether commonly used ergonomic devices reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with CTS. Carpal tunnel pressure was measured in twenty-one patients with CTS before, during and after a computer mouse task using a standard mouse, a vertical mouse, a gel mouse pad and a gliding palm support. Carpal tunnel pressure increased while operating a computer mouse. Although the vertical mouse significantly reduced ulnar deviation and the gel mouse pad and gliding palm support decreased wrist extension, none of the ergonomic devices reduced carpal tunnel pressure. The findings of this study do therefore not endorse a strong recommendation for or against any of the ergonomic devices commonly recommended for patients with CTS. Selection of ergonomic devices remains dependent on personal preference.

  1. [Acute carpal tunnel syndrome in a patient with Marfan syndrome].

    PubMed

    Franke, J; Wenzel, W; Rehfuss, D; Keiner, H P; Manncke, K

    2008-05-01

    Acute carpal tunnel syndrome (ACTS) is rare and is mostly the result of fractures of the distal radius or the carpal bones. This paper gives the first report of an ACTS following contusion of the wrist as the result of an extensive haematoma of the flexor tendon sheath, which did not appear until 50 hours after the injury was sustained but then developed rapidly. The patient suffers from Marfan syndrome. This disease is associated with pathologic changes to the major vessels, and especially the aorta, and of the smaller peripheral vessels. It is assumed that the haematoma arose from an aneurysm of such a small vessel. The treatment of choice in ACTS is emergency incision of the carpal tunnel.

  2. Changes in electrophysiological parameters after open carpal tunnel release

    PubMed Central

    Tahririan, Mohammad A.; Moghtaderi, Alireza; Aran, Farzaneh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most frequent compressive mononeuropathy, affecting mostly females. Few studies have been performed to assess the electrophysiological parameters before and after carpal tunnel release. The purpose of our study was to evaluate these changes postoperatively and in the course of a 9-month period after operation in comparison with the preoperative values. Materials and Methods: A case-series study was carried out and included 17 cases of moderate or severe electrophysiologically confirmed CTS, who underwent open carpal tunnel release (CTR) from December 2010 to May 2011. Severity grade was assigned following American Association of the Electrodiagnostic Medicine criteria of CTS. Distal motor and sensory latencies and sensory nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve across the carpal tunnel were evaluated and compared before, at 6, and 9 months after surgery. Results: From the 17 evaluated hand with moderate, moderate to severe and severe CTS, severity improvement was reported in 82.3% 6 months and in 88.2% 9 months after surgery, but only 47% had satisfied or completely satisfied opinion about the results. Others, though still complaining of serious symptoms, had improved or normal NCS. Discussion: Electrophysiological investigations outlined severity improvement after CTR. In the current study, the electrophysiological studies were not meaningful in determining outcome. PMID:23326777

  3. Prevalence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome among Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Jens Erik Just; Peter, Peter Johannsen; Nielsen, Viggo Kamp; Mai, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    Forty-eight patients with Down syndrome were examined clinically and electrophysiologically for occurrence of carpal tunnel syndrome. Twenty-seven patients had normal findings, 13 had prolonged distal motor latency and reduced distal nerve conduction velocity, and 8 patients had one of these signs. Results show that prevalence of…

  4. Carpal tunnel and transverse carpal ligament stiffness with changes in wrist posture and indenter size.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Michael W R; Howarth, Samuel J; Callaghan, Jack P; Keir, Peter J

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of loading and posture on mechanical properties of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL). Ten fresh-frozen cadaver arms were dissected to expose the TCL and positioned in the load frame of a servo-hydraulic testing machine, equipped with a load cell and custom made indenters. Four cylindrical indenters (5, 10, 20, and 35 mm) loaded the TCL in three wrist postures (30° extension, neutral and 30° flexion). Three loading cycles with a peak force of 50 N were applied at 5 N/s for each condition. The flexed wrist posture had significantly greater TCL stiffness (40.0 ± 3.3 N/mm) than the neutral (35.9 ± 3.5 N/mm, p = 0.045) and extended postures (34.9 ± 2.8 N/mm, p = 0.025). TCL stiffness using the 10 and 20 mm indenters was larger than the 5 mm indenter. Stiffness was greatest with the 20 mm indenter, which had the greatest indenter contact area on the TCL. The 35 mm indenter covered the carpal bones, compressed the carpal tunnel and produced the lowest stiffness. The complexity of the TCL makes it an important part of the carpal tunnel and the mechanical properties found are essential to understanding mechanisms of carpal tunnel syndrome.  PMID:21520261

  5. Carpal tunnel and transverse carpal ligament stiffness with changes in wrist posture and indenter size.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Michael W R; Howarth, Samuel J; Callaghan, Jack P; Keir, Peter J

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of loading and posture on mechanical properties of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL). Ten fresh-frozen cadaver arms were dissected to expose the TCL and positioned in the load frame of a servo-hydraulic testing machine, equipped with a load cell and custom made indenters. Four cylindrical indenters (5, 10, 20, and 35 mm) loaded the TCL in three wrist postures (30° extension, neutral and 30° flexion). Three loading cycles with a peak force of 50 N were applied at 5 N/s for each condition. The flexed wrist posture had significantly greater TCL stiffness (40.0 ± 3.3 N/mm) than the neutral (35.9 ± 3.5 N/mm, p = 0.045) and extended postures (34.9 ± 2.8 N/mm, p = 0.025). TCL stiffness using the 10 and 20 mm indenters was larger than the 5 mm indenter. Stiffness was greatest with the 20 mm indenter, which had the greatest indenter contact area on the TCL. The 35 mm indenter covered the carpal bones, compressed the carpal tunnel and produced the lowest stiffness. The complexity of the TCL makes it an important part of the carpal tunnel and the mechanical properties found are essential to understanding mechanisms of carpal tunnel syndrome. 

  6. Value of anatomic landmarks in carpal tunnel surgery.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, O Y; Uras, I; Tasbas, B; Kaya, M; Ozay, R; Komurcu, M

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated which anatomic landmarks were most useful for correct and safe incision placement in carpal tunnel surgery. Kirschner wires were attached to the hands to mark previously defined landmarks. The bony attachments of the transverse carpal ligament, which were identified previously, were drawn on an anteroposterior digital x-ray of the hand, with the thumb in full abduction. The relationship between anatomic landmarks and these bony attachments were examined. In all hands, either the line along the third web space or the crease between the thenar and the hypothenar regions, or both, were on the ulnar half of the transverse carpal ligament. During incision placement, we recommend selecting the most ulnar choice between the line drawn along the third web space and the crease between the thenar and hypothenar regions in order to be at safe distance from the recurrent motor branch of the median nerve.

  7. Does the ratio of the carpal tunnel inlet and outlet cross-sectional areas in the median nerve reflect carpal tunnel syndrome severity?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Rehemutula, Aierken; Peng, Feng; Yu, Cong; Wang, Tian-Bin; Chen, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Although ultrasound measurements have been used in previous studies on carpal tunnel syndrome to visualize injury to the median nerve, whether such ultrasound data can indicate the severity of carpal tunnel syndrome remains controversial. The cross-sectional areas of the median nerve at the tunnel inlet and outlet can show swelling and compression of the nerve at the carpal. We hypothesized that the ratio of the cross-sectional areas of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel inlet to outlet accurately reflects the severity of carpal tunnel syndrome. To test this, high-resolution ultrasound with a linear array transducer at 5-17 MHz was used to assess 77 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The results showed that the cut-off point for the inlet-to-outlet ratio was 1.14. Significant differences in the inlet-to-outlet ratio were found among patients with mild, moderate, and severe carpal tunnel syndrome. The cut-off point in the ratio of cross-sectional areas of the median nerve was 1.29 between mild and more severe (moderate and severe) carpal tunnel syndrome patients with 64.7% sensitivity and 72.7% specificity. The cut-off point in the ratio of cross-sectional areas of the median nerve was 1.52 between the moderate and severe carpal tunnel syndrome patients with 80.0% sensitivity and 64.7% specificity. These results suggest that the inlet-to-outlet ratio reflected the severity of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  8. Concurrent Minimally Invasive Carpal Tunnel Release Techniques in Distal Radius Open Reduction Internal Fixation.

    PubMed

    Low, O-Wern; Cheah, Andre E J

    2016-02-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common complication associated with distal radius fractures. Open carpal tunnel release in the same setting as open reduction and internal fixation of distal radius fractures is widely accepted. In this paper, we describe the technical details of a minimally invasive carpal tunnel release in the same setting as the fixation of a distal radius fracture via the same incision. Two options of minimally invasive techniques are described: The Knifelight® (Stryker, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA) instrument and the single portal carpal tunnel release system (Agee, 3M Healthcare, St Paul, Minnesota, USA). Being well known and accepted techniques of carpal tunnel release, we believe that the techniques described in this paper provide a viable alternative for carpal tunnel release in the setting of distal radius fracture fixation; with the added advantages of the original minimally invasive techniques. PMID:27454517

  9. [Carpal tunnel syndrome revealed by digital ulcerations caused by arterial vasospasm].

    PubMed

    Léger, O; Lavallé, F

    2005-02-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome presenting as a trophic disorder in the hand is unusual. We report the case of a 66 year old man in whom nerve conduction tests confirmed compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and vasospasm in the corresponding area was demonstrated by arteriography for, we believe, the first time. Simple decompression of the carpal tunnel brought about total recovery. The mechanism of the autonomic disorders found in carpal tunnel syndrome remains controversial. The clinical case that we report objectively demonstrates the vasospasm caused by the compression of the autonomic fibres of the median nerve.

  10. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  11. Pre- and postoperative electromyographic evaluations in the carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schlagenhauff, R E; Glasauer, F E

    1971-09-01

    Twenty-five cases of carpal tunnel syndrome in 20 patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively by electromyography. Clinical improvement resulted in all cases following decompression of the median nerve, and only in a few instances did mild symptoms persist. Distal motor conduction time im proved postoperatively in 24 cases studied, 19 of which returned to normal range. Most of the obvious improvement occurred within the first 3 months and further improvement could be observed as late as 36 months. Although no definite correlation could be established between the preoperative severity of the carpal tunnel syndrome and the postoperative clinical and electrical im provement, there was a definite evidence of better recovery in the younger age group. There was a greater range of improvement and a return closer to normal postoperatively in cases with severe preoperative distal latency. All cases ex amined after 24 months had reached normal values.

  12. Work-Related Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Gary M; Friedman, Andrew S

    2015-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy, and its risk of occurrence in the presence of repetitive, forceful angular hand movements, or vibration, is common. It is critical to make the diagnosis based on appropriate clinical history and findings and with corroborating electrodiagnostic studies. Conservative management should be undertaken with the goal of maintaining employment; surgical decompression can be highly effective, particularly if undertaken early on. PMID:26231963

  13. Does aging matter? The efficacy of carpal tunnel release in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Fung, Bettina Wai Yan; Tang, Chris Yuk Kwan; Fung, Boris Kwok Keung

    2015-05-01

    Open release remains the gold standard in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome in cases where conservative treatment fails. However, the efficacy of carpal tunnel release in the elderly has been debated in the literature throughout the years. This review aims to review the current evidence pertaining to the efficacy of carpal tunnel release in the elderly. Based on the current evidence, the outcome of carpal tunnel release is unpredictable in the elderly. Elderly patients are also less satisfied with the operation compared to younger patients. The authors recommend that these messages be conveyed to elderly patients before surgery. Moreover, open carpal tunnel release should be offered in the early stages of treatment whenever operative management is indicated. PMID:26015881

  14. The effect of wearing a flexible wrist splint on carpal tunnel pressure during repetitive hand activity.

    PubMed

    Rempel, D; Manojlovic, R; Levinsohn, D G; Bloom, T; Gordon, L

    1994-01-01

    We investigated how repetitive hand activity normally affects carpal tunnel pressure and whether a flexible wrist splint can influence this effect. Nineteen healthy subjects were evaluated under four test conditions: at rest with and without a wrist splint (baseline) and while performing a repetitive task with and without a wrist splint. The task involved loading and unloading 1 lb. cans from a box at a rate of 20 cans per minute for period of 5 minutes. Carpal tunnel pressure and wrist angles were continuously monitored by means of a fluid-filled catheter inserted into the carpal canal and a two-channel electrogoniometer mounted on the dorsum of the hand and forearm. Without the splint, carpal tunnel pressure rose from a median baseline level of 8 +/- 6 mmHg to 18 +/- 13 mmHg during activity. With the splint, carpal tunnel pressure rose from a baseline of 13 +/- 5 mmHg to 21 +/- 12 mmHg during activity. Median carpal tunnel pressure during activity with the splint was no different from that without the splint. Our data indicate that the median nerve is subjected to increased pressure within the carpal tunnel during repetitive hand activity. Wearing a flexible wrist splint during activity limits the range of wrist motion but has no significant effect on carpal tunnel pressure.

  15. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Review of the Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, I; Khan, W.S; Goddard, N; Smitham, P

    2012-01-01

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) remains a puzzling and disabling condition present in 3.8% of the general population. CTS is the most well-known and frequent form of median nerve entrapment, and accounts for 90% of all entrapment neuropathies. This review aims to provide an overview of this common condition, with an emphasis on the pathophysiology involved in CTS. The clinical presentation and risk factors associated with CTS are discussed in this paper. Also, the various methods of diagnosis are explored; including nerve conduction studies, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:22470412

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome: The role of occupational factors

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T

    2011-01-01

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a fairly common condition in working-aged people, sometimes caused by physical occupational activities, such as repeated and forceful movements of the hand and wrist or use of hand-held powered vibratory tools. Symptoms may be prevented or alleviated by primary control measures at work and some cases of disease are compensable. Following a general description of the disorder, its epidemiology, and some of the difficulties surrounding diagnosis, this review focuses on the role of occupational factors in causation of CTS and factors that can mitigate risk. Areas of uncertainty, debate and research interest are emphasised where relevant. PMID:21663847

  17. Changes in Clinical Symptoms, Functions, and the Median Nerve Cross-Sectional Area at the Carpal Tunnel Inlet after Open Carpal Tunnel Release

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Young-Do; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Shin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between clinical symptoms and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel inlet before and after open carpal tunnel release (CTR). Methods Thirty-two patients (53 hands) that underwent open CTR for idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were prospectively enrolled. Median nerve CSA at the carpal tunnel inlet was measured preoperatively and at 2 and 12 weeks after CTR by high resolution ultrasonography. The Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ) was also completed at these times. Results BCTQ symptom (BCTQ-S) score was significantly improved at 2 weeks postoperatively, but BCTQ function (BCTQ-F) score and CSA were significantly improved at 12 weeks postoperatively. Preoperative CSA was significantly correlated with preoperative BCTQ-S and BCTQ-F scores but was not significantly correlated with postoperative BCTQ scores or postoperative changes in BCTQ scores. Postoperative median nerve CSA was not significantly correlated with postoperative BCTQ-S or BCTQ-F scores, and postoperative changes in median nerve CSA were not significantly correlated with postoperative changes in BCTQ-S or BCTQ-F scores. Conclusions The study shows clinical symptoms resolve rapidly after open CTR, but median nerve swelling and clinical function take several months to recover. In addition, preoperative median nerve swelling might predict preoperative severities of clinical symptoms and functional disabilities. However, postoperative reductions in median nerve swelling were not found to reflect postoperative reductions in clinical symptoms or functional disabilities. PMID:27583113

  18. Carpal tunnel syndrome in childhood: study of 6 cases.

    PubMed

    Cruz Martínez, A; Arpa, J

    1998-08-01

    Six children, 4 girls and two boys, aged 5-14 years, with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are reported. Median nerve entrapment had different aetiologies in each case. One patient developed unilateral CTS symptoms after intensive basketball training. He improved upon terminating this sporting activity. In 3 patients bilateral CTS was associated with Schwartz-Jampel syndrome, trigger finger and mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS IS = Scheie syndrome), respectively. The latter subject, a boy aged 11 years who had severe bilateral muscle thenar weakness and atrophy, made a good recovery after surgery. Two cases with bilateral CTS had autosomal dominant disease. One of them showed familial CTS with thickening of the transverse carpal ligament. The other child (5 years old) presented early bilateral CTS as first manifestation of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). His relatives were asymptomatic, but they showed electrophysiological and nerve biopsy changes consistent with HNPP. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) are diagnostic in paediatric CTS. Moreover, NCS is an objective method to evaluate the evolution of the nerve lesions after surgery. NCS must be performed in nerves of the propositus other than the median, as well as in first degree symptomatic and asymptomatic relatives in order to identify possible familial neuropathies.

  19. The US prevalence of self-reported carpal tunnel syndrome: 1988 National Health Interview Survey data.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, S; Wild, D K; Seligman, P J; Behrens, V; Cameron, L; Putz-Anderson, V

    1994-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome among US adults, data from the Occupational Health Supplement of the 1988 National Health Interview Survey were analyzed. Based on a sample of 44,233 households (response rate, 91.5%), an estimated 1.55% (2.65 million) of 170 million adults self-reported carpal tunnel syndrome in 1988. Females and Whites had a higher prevalence of self-reporting carpal tunnel syndrome than males and non-Whites, respectively. Among 127 million adults who worked during the 12 months before the survey, 0.53% (0.68 million) reported that their "prolonged" hand discomfort was called carpal tunnel syndrome by a health care provider. PMID:7977933

  20. A persisting median artery in a patient with symbrachydactyly and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tollan, C J; Sivarajan, V

    2008-07-01

    A persisting median artery associated with carpal tunnel syndrome in a patient with symbrachydactyly has not been previously described in the literature. It is unclear whether there may be a developmental association between persistence of a median artery and Symbrachydactyly.

  1. Assessing the variability of injectate distribution following carpal tunnel injection--a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Jariwala, A; Zaliunaite, R; Soames, R; Wigderowitz, C A

    2013-01-01

    This anatomical study was designed to assess the distribution of a solution (injectate) made up using local anesthetic, steroid and dye into the carpal tunnel using a commonly used injection technique. Dissections were undertaken in 29 embalmed cadaveric wrists. The cadaveric specimens were dissected 24 hours after injection to observe the effect of time on diffusion patterns in both superficial and deep planes. Eighteen of the 29 specimens showed the presence of the injectate in the superficial plane and three preferential patterns of distribution were noted in the deep plane: free in the carpal tunnel, exclusively in the tendon sheath and mixed. This is the first study investigating the delayed diffusion pattern of injectate in the carpal tunnel and illustrates its variability. The findings of variable degree of superficial diffusion and different patterns of intracarpal spread help to offer some explanation regarding the variability of the response following carpal tunnel injection.

  2. PROFILE OF PATIENTS ON SICK LEAVE WITH CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Judson Welber Veríssimo; de Oliveira, Alexandre Barbosa; Nascimento, Valdênia das Graças; de Paiva, Henver Ribeiro; Viecili, Leandro; Rocha, Murilo Antonio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To report clinical and epidemiological characteristics and risk factors of patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) on sick leave admitted in a University Hospital. Methods: This is a transversal study conducted with patients admitted sequentially over 18 years of age, without distinction of gender and race in the period between September and November 2014. Patients answered a questionnaire and underwent physical examination carried out by the authors. Results: Twenty-five patients were admitted within three months, all females, the mean age was 50.24 years old (standard deviation 10,39) . Among the professions they performed, general and cleaning services were the most prevalent. Most patients featured obesity, followed by depression and systemic arterial hypertension. Approximately half of them were on sick leave. Sleep disorders were also a frequent complaint. Conclusion: CTS is a frequent cause of sick leave and it is related to obesity, dyslipidemia and depression. Level of Evidence IV, Series of Cases. PMID:26981030

  3. Job performance failure and occupational carpal tunnel claims.

    PubMed

    Butler, Richard J; Liao, Hui

    2002-03-01

    Using a sample of one job type from one firm (to hold job tasks and sick leave/disability policy constant), we estimate the effect of demographic variables, job performance warnings, and workers' compensation benefits on the propensity to file a carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) loss work-time claim. We find that disciplinary notices increase the employees' propensity to file a CTS claim. State maximum workers' compensation benefits are also positively related to CTS claim frequency, however, the relationship is not statistically significant. CTS claimants respond differently than other sprain/strain claimants to benefits and to gender. In particularly, women have relatively more CTS claims, while men have relatively more other sprain/strain claims in our sample. The estimates here underscore the importance of psychosocial factors in the filing of occupational CTS and sprain injuries claims. PMID:11837054

  4. Practical approach to electrodiagnosis of the carpal tunnel syndrome: A review.

    PubMed

    Basiri, Keivan; Katirji, Bashar

    2015-01-01

    Despite being the most common entrapment neuropathy and the most common reason for referral to the electromyography (EMG) laboratory, the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) continues to be challenging due to a large number of electrodiagnostic (EDX) tests available. We present a flowchart and propose a practical approach to the diagnosis of CTS using the available literature and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) guidelines and the Practice Parameter for Electrodiagnostic Studies in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

  5. Impact of carpal tunnel syndrome surgery on women with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Gunnoo, Neetish; Ebelin, Michel; Arrault, Maria; Vignes, Stéphane

    2015-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome may occur in women with ipsilateral lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. Surgery on the lymphedematous arm is classically feared. Thirty-two consecutive women (mean age at cancer treatment 49 years, interquartile range (Q1;Q3) 43;56) with upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer treatment, followed in a single lymphology unit, and symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome (electromyographically confirmed) requiring surgery were included. Lymphedema volume was calculated using the truncated cone formula, recorded before and after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery, and at each follow-up visit. Median time to lymphedema onset after cancer treatment was 19 (interquartile range (Q1;Q3) 5;73) months. Median lymphedema volume was 497 (Q1;Q3 355;793) mL before (median 4 months) and 582 (Q1;Q3 388;930) mL after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery (median 5 months) (P = 0.004). At the last follow-up post-carpal tunnel syndrome surgery (median 33 months), lymphedema volume was 447 (Q1;Q3 260;733) mL (non-significant, compared to pre-surgery volume). Regular lymphedema treatment included elastic sleeve (n = 31), low-stretch bandage (n = 20), and/or manual lymph drainage (n = 20), with no change before and after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery. All carpal tunnel syndrome clinical manifestations disappeared after surgery and none of the patients experienced local complications. Carpal tunnel syndrome may be treated surgically in women with ipsilateral upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer treatment. Although lymphedema volume increased transiently, it remained stable over long-term follow-up, with no local complications.

  6. Practical approach to electrodiagnosis of the carpal tunnel syndrome: A review

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Keivan; Katirji, Bashar

    2015-01-01

    Despite being the most common entrapment neuropathy and the most common reason for referral to the electromyography (EMG) laboratory, the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) continues to be challenging due to a large number of electrodiagnostic (EDX) tests available. We present a flowchart and propose a practical approach to the diagnosis of CTS using the available literature and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) guidelines and the Practice Parameter for Electrodiagnostic Studies in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. PMID:25802819

  7. Single injection of platelet-rich plasma as a novel treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Malahias, Michael Alexander; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Babis, George C; Nikolaou, Vasileios S

    2015-11-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo experiments have confirmed that platelet-rich plasma has therapeutic effects on many neuropathies, but its effects on carpal tunnel syndrome remain poorly understood. We aimed to investigate whether single injection of platelet-rich plasma can improve the clinical symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Fourteen patients presenting with median nerve injury who had suffered from mild carpal tunnel syndrome for over 3 months were included in this study. Under ultrasound guidance, 1-2 mL of platelet-rich plasma was injected into the region around the median nerve at the proximal edge of the carpal tunnel. At 1 month after single injection of platelet-rich plasma, Visual Analogue Scale results showed that pain almost disappeared in eight patients and it was obviously alleviated in three patients. Simultaneously, the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire showed that upper limb function was obviously improved. In addition, no ultrasonographic manifestation of the carpal tunnel syndrome was found in five patients during ultrasonographic measurement of the width of the median nerve. During 3-month follow-up, the pain was not greatly alleviated in three patients. These findings show very encouraging mid-term outcomes regarding use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  8. Gliding resistance of flexor tendon associated with carpal tunnel pressure: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon was measured with the following six conditions: (1) as a baseline, before balloon insertion; (2) balloon with 0 mmHg pressure; (3) 30 mmHg; (4) 60 mmHg; (5) 90 mmHg; (6) 120 mmHg. The gliding resistance of flexor tendon gradually increased as the carpal tunnel pressure was elevated. At pressures above 60 mmHg, the increase in gliding resistance became significant compared to the baseline condition. This study helps us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure, which is elevated in the patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and tendon gliding resistance, which is a component of the work of flexion. These findings suggest that patients with CTS may have to expend more energy to accomplish specific motions, which may in turn affect symptoms of hand pain, weakness and fatigue, seen commonly in such patients.

  9. Single injection of platelet-rich plasma as a novel treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Malahias, Michael Alexander; Johnson, Elizabeth O.; Babis, George C.; Nikolaou, Vasileios S.

    2015-01-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo experiments have confirmed that platelet-rich plasma has therapeutic effects on many neuropathies, but its effects on carpal tunnel syndrome remain poorly understood. We aimed to investigate whether single injection of platelet-rich plasma can improve the clinical symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Fourteen patients presenting with median nerve injury who had suffered from mild carpal tunnel syndrome for over 3 months were included in this study. Under ultrasound guidance, 1–2 mL of platelet-rich plasma was injected into the region around the median nerve at the proximal edge of the carpal tunnel. At 1 month after single injection of platelet-rich plasma, Visual Analogue Scale results showed that pain almost disappeared in eight patients and it was obviously alleviated in three patients. Simultaneously, the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire showed that upper limb function was obviously improved. In addition, no ultrasonographic manifestation of the carpal tunnel syndrome was found in five patients during ultrasonographic measurement of the width of the median nerve. During 3-month follow-up, the pain was not greatly alleviated in three patients. These findings show very encouraging mid-term outcomes regarding use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26807124

  10. Reliability Assessment of Various Sonographic Techniques for Evaluating Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Junck, Anthony D; Escobedo, Eva M; Lipa, Bethany M; Cronan, Michael; Anthonisen, Colleen; Poltavskiy, Eduard; Bang, Heejung; Han, Jay J

    2015-11-01

    Objectives-The aim of this study was to determine the intra- and inter-rater reliability of sonographic measurements of the median nerve cross-sectional area in individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome and healthy control participants.Methods-The median nerve cross-sectional area was evaluated by sonography in 18 participants with carpal tunnel syndrome (18 upper extremities) and 9 control participants (18 upper extremities) at 2 visits 1 week apart. Two examiners, both blinded to the presence or absence of carpal tunnel syndrome, captured independent sonograms of the median nerve at the levels of the carpal tunnel inlet, pronator quadratus, and mid-forearm. The cross-sectional area was later measured by each examiner independently. Each also traced images that were captured by the other examiner.Results-Both the intra- and inter-rater reliability rates were highest for images taken at the carpal tunnel inlet (radiologist, r = 0.86; sonographer, r = 0.87; inter-rater, r = 0.95; all P < .0001), whereas they was lowest for the pronator quadratus (r = 0.49, 0.29, and 0.72, respectively; all P < .0001). At the mid-forearm, the intra-rater reliability was lower for both the radiologist and sonographer, whereas the inter-rater reliability was relatively high (r = 0.54, 0.55, and 0.81; all P < .0001). Tracing of captured images by different examiners showed high concordance for the median cross-sectional area at the carpal tunnel inlet (r = 0.96-0.98; P < .0001).Conclusions-The highest intra- and inter-rater reliability was found at the carpal tunnel inlet. The results also demonstrate that tracing of the median nerve cross-sectional area from captured images by different examiners does not contribute significantly to measurement variability.

  11. Reliability Assessment of Various Sonographic Techniques for Evaluating Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Junck, Anthony D; Escobedo, Eva M; Lipa, Bethany M; Cronan, Michael; Anthonisen, Colleen; Poltavskiy, Eduard; Bang, Heejung; Han, Jay J

    2015-11-01

    Objectives-The aim of this study was to determine the intra- and inter-rater reliability of sonographic measurements of the median nerve cross-sectional area in individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome and healthy control participants.Methods-The median nerve cross-sectional area was evaluated by sonography in 18 participants with carpal tunnel syndrome (18 upper extremities) and 9 control participants (18 upper extremities) at 2 visits 1 week apart. Two examiners, both blinded to the presence or absence of carpal tunnel syndrome, captured independent sonograms of the median nerve at the levels of the carpal tunnel inlet, pronator quadratus, and mid-forearm. The cross-sectional area was later measured by each examiner independently. Each also traced images that were captured by the other examiner.Results-Both the intra- and inter-rater reliability rates were highest for images taken at the carpal tunnel inlet (radiologist, r = 0.86; sonographer, r = 0.87; inter-rater, r = 0.95; all P < .0001), whereas they was lowest for the pronator quadratus (r = 0.49, 0.29, and 0.72, respectively; all P < .0001). At the mid-forearm, the intra-rater reliability was lower for both the radiologist and sonographer, whereas the inter-rater reliability was relatively high (r = 0.54, 0.55, and 0.81; all P < .0001). Tracing of captured images by different examiners showed high concordance for the median cross-sectional area at the carpal tunnel inlet (r = 0.96-0.98; P < .0001).Conclusions-The highest intra- and inter-rater reliability was found at the carpal tunnel inlet. The results also demonstrate that tracing of the median nerve cross-sectional area from captured images by different examiners does not contribute significantly to measurement variability. PMID:26453123

  12. Severity of Carpal tunnel syndrome assessed with high frequency ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Karadağ, Yeşim Sücüllü; Karadağ, Omer; Ciçekli, Esen; Oztürk, Serefnur; Kiraz, Sedat; Ozbakir, Senay; Filippucci, Emilio; Grassi, Walter

    2010-04-01

    Although nerve conduction study (NCS) is the method most frequently used in daily clinical practice to confirm clinical diagnosis of Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), ultrasonographic (US) measurement of the median nerve cross-sectional area is both sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of CTS. Moreover, an algorithm evaluating CTS severity based on CSA of median nerve was suggested. This study is aimed to investigate the clinical usefulness of this algorithm in assessing CTS severity. The patients underwent a full clinical examination, including Tinel and Phalen test, and questioned about symptoms and the secondary causes of CTS. All of the patients refilled a Turkish version Levine Boston Carpal tunnel syndrome questionnaire (BQ) and the visual analog scale for pain (VAS 0-100 mm) A MyLab 70 US system (Esaote Biomedica, Genoa, Italy) equipped with a broadband 6-18 MHz linear transducer was used for US examination. The cross-sectional area of the median nerve was measured at the proximal inlet of the carpal tunnel (US cut-off points that discriminate between different grades of CTS severity as 10.0-13.0 mm(2) for mild symptoms, 13.0-15.0 mm(2) moderate symptoms and >15.0 mm(2) for severe patients). Nerve conduction studies were carried out, and severity of electrophysiological CTS impairment was reported as normal, mild, moderate, severe and extreme. The agreement between NCS and US in showing CTS severity (normal, mild, moderate and severe) was calculated with Cohen's kappa coefficient. Ninety-nine wrists of 54 patients (male/female: 4/50) were included in the study. Mean ages of patients were (+/-SD) 43.3 +/- 11 years. Forty-nine patients had idiopathic CTS, whereas five had secondary CTS (4 had diabetes mellitus and 1 had hypothyroidism). Symptoms were bilateral in 45 patients (83.3%). There were statistical differences between the groups according to electrophysiologic severity scale in terms of age (P < 0.001), body-mass index (P = 0.034), VAS (P = 0

  13. Correlation of segmental carpal tunnel pressures with changes in hand and wrist positions in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and controls.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, R; Schoenhuber, R; Nathan, P

    1998-10-01

    We investigated pressures at 1 cm intervals along the carpal tunnel in 39 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and 12 controls. Pressures were measured for relaxed and gripping hand positions in combination with neutral, extended, and flexed wrist positions. Patient pressures exceeded control pressures, were below the previously reported 30 mmHg threshold for four of five locations in the relaxed neutral position and were typically greater in extension than in flexion. In the neutral position, both patient and control pressures were slightly above threshold levels just distal to the tunnel. Maximum intratunnel pressures were generally found in the central part of the tunnel and minimum pressures in the distal tunnel. Gripping hand pressures in the tunnel were lowest with the wrist flexed. In both controls and CTS patients, only in the neutral wrist and relaxed hand positions were pressures highest at the point where nerve conduction studies have indicated the nerve is most likely to be compromised (in the midpalm just distal to the distal margin of the carpal tunnel).

  14. Effectiveness of low-level laser on carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Hua-Feng; Ma, Xin-Long; Tian, Peng; Huang, Yuting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been applied in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) for an extended period of time without definitive consensus on its effectiveness. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser in the treatment of mild to moderate CTS using a Cochrane systematic review. Methods: We conducted electronic searches of PubMed (1966–2015.10), Medline (1966–2015.10), Embase (1980–2015.10), and ScienceDirect (1985–2015.10), using the terms “carpal tunnel syndrome” and “laser” according to the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Relevant journals or conference proceedings were searched manually to identify studies that might have been missed in the database search. Only randomized clinical trials were included, and the quality assessments were performed according to the Cochrane systematic review method. The data extraction and analyses from the included studies were conducted independently by 2 reviewers. The results were expressed as the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the continuous outcomes. Results: Seven randomized clinical trials met the inclusion criteria; there were 270 wrists in the laser group and 261 wrists in the control group. High heterogeneity existed when the analysis was conducted. Hand grip (at 12 weeks) was stronger in the LLLT group than in the control group (MD = 2.04; 95% CI: 0.08–3.99; P = 0.04; I2 = 62%), and there was better improvement in the visual analog scale (VAS) (at 12 weeks) in the LLLT group (MD = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.84–1.11; P < 0.01; I2 = 0%). The sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) (at 12 weeks) was better in the LLLT group (MD = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.44–1.73; P = 0.001; I2 = 0%). However, 1 included study was weighted at >95% in the calculation of these 3 parameters. There were no statistically significant differences in the other parameters between the 2 groups. Conclusion

  15. Characteristics of the electrophysiological activity of muscles attached to the transverse carpal ligament in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Gen; Aoki, Takafumi; Ito, Hiromoto

    2011-01-01

    The main cause of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) remains unknown. Stiffness of the subcutaneous area of the volar aspect of the carpal tunnel is present in many patients and suggests that the stiffness of muscles attached to the transverse carpal ligament is increased. We performed an electrophysiological study to investigate muscle activities and to clarify whether the stiffness of muscles attached to the transverse carpal ligament is involved in the pathogenesis of CTS. The subjects of this study included 16 patients with early CTS showing no motor dysfunction. Both thenar muscles (opponens pollicis, abductor pollicis brevis, and flexor pollicis brevis) and hypothenar muscles (opponens digiti minimi, abductor digiti minimi, flexor digiti minimi brevis) were investigated. Surface electrodes were placed on each muscle, and maximum voluntary contractions with the thumb and little finger in opposition were maintained for 3 seconds in all patients and in 7 control subjects. Electromyographs were subjected to fast Fourier transform analysis, and the root mean square (RMS) and the mean power frequency (MPF) were determined for each muscle. The RMS of the opponens pollicis was significantly less in hands affected by CTS (292.8 µV) than in healthy hands (405.9 µV). The RMS did not differ between affected hands and healthy hands for the other 2 thenar muscles but did differ significantly for the hypothenar muscles. The MPF did not differ between affected hands and healthy hands for any muscle. The results show that electrophysiological differences are present among muscles innervated by the median nerve and that hypothenar muscles originally unrelated to median nerve dysfunction are also affected in early CTS. These results suggest that modulation of muscles attached to the transverse carpal ligament is involved in the pathogenesis of CTS.

  16. Outcome of carpal tunnel decompression: the influence of age, gender, and occupation

    PubMed Central

    Majid, I.; Clarke, M.; Kershaw, C. J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of age, gender, and occupation on the outcome of carpal tunnel decompression. A total of 479 patients (342 females, 137 males) with a mean age of 56 years undergoing 608 carpal tunnel decompressions were prospectively studied. Outcome was assessed using the Brigham Hospital carpal tunnel questionnaire at two weeks pre-operatively and six months post-operatively. Cases were divided into four age categories (less than 40 years of age, 40–59, 60–79, and over 80 years of age) and two occupation (repetitive and non-repetitive) groups. The mean differences for both the symptom-severity and functional-status scores amongst the four age categories were similar and no significant difference was found. The mean differences for both the symptom-severity and functional-status scores between females and males and the two occupation groups were similar and no significant differences were found. The majority of the patient’s symptoms improved following carpal tunnel decompression. However, we found no influence of age, gender, or occupation on the outcome of carpal tunnel decompression in our series of patients. PMID:18923831

  17. Finite element simulation of the mechanical impact of computer work on the carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mouzakis, Dionysios E; Rachiotis, George; Zaoutsos, Stefanos; Eleftheriou, Andreas; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2014-09-22

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a clinical disorder resulting from the compression of the median nerve. The available evidence regarding the association between computer use and CTS is controversial. There is some evidence that computer mouse or keyboard work, or both are associated with the development of CTS. Despite the availability of pressure measurements in the carpal tunnel during computer work (exposure to keyboard or mouse) there are no available data to support a direct effect of the increased intracarpal canal pressure on the median nerve. This study presents an attempt to simulate the direct effects of computer work on the whole carpal area section using finite element analysis. A finite element mesh was produced from computerized tomography scans of the carpal area, involving all tissues present in the carpal tunnel. Two loading scenarios were applied on these models based on biomechanical data measured during computer work. It was found that mouse work can produce large deformation fields on the median nerve region. Also, the high stressing effect of the carpal ligament was verified. Keyboard work produced considerable and heterogeneous elongations along the longitudinal axis of the median nerve. Our study provides evidence that increased intracarpal canal pressures caused by awkward wrist postures imposed during computer work were associated directly with deformation of the median nerve. Despite the limitations of the present study the findings could be considered as a contribution to the understanding of the development of CTS due to exposure to computer work.

  18. What is the role of Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing in the diagnosis of electrophysiologically graded carpal tunnel syndrome?

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Pelin; Gunduz, Osman Hakan

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of Semmes-Weinstein Monofilament testing to detect carpal tunnel syndrome, as well as moderate-to-severe carpal tunnel syndrome using varying thresholds and methods. [Subjects] Clinical and electrophysiological data of 62 patients (124 hands) with a mean age of 49.09±10.5 years were evaluated in this study. [Methods] Sensitivity and specificity were calculated according to two threshold values (2.83 and 3.22) and two methods, a conventional method and an internal comparison method. A threshold value of 3.22 was also used to determine sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of electrophysiologically moderate-to-severe carpal tunnel syndrome. Data of the first three digits were averaged to reveal the mean strength value of the monofilaments for each hand. [Results] The criteria of 2.83-conventional method yielded a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 17% in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. The threshold value of 3.22 using a conventional method was found to detect moderate-to-severe carpal tunnel syndrome with high sensitivity (80%) and excellent specificity (93%). A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean strength values of the monofilaments in moderate-to-severe carpal tunnel syndrome hands and hands without carpal tunnel syndrome. [Conclusion] The current study demonstrated that Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing might be a valuable quantitative method for detecting moderate-to-severe carpal tunnel syndrome.

  19. Improved inching method for the diagnosis and prognosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, H; Yorifuji, S; Takahashi, M; Nakamura, Y; Kitaguchi, M; Tarui, S

    1992-03-01

    A modified sensory "inching" method for the electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is described. The median nerve as stimulated at the cubital portion, with 8 channel recording electrodes placed along the nerve across the carpal tunnel. In most of the CTS cases, there was a conductive abnormality from 3 to 4.5 cm distal to the proximal ending of the flexor retinaculum. Subjects' values, obtained by subtracting the theoretical latency from the measured latency, which were more than 0.6 ms, could not be improved by conservative therapy. As we could determine from subtle change at the short span of nerve conduction, below the electrodes from the proximal to the affected site of the carpal tunnel, this method provides high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of CTS.

  20. [Carpal tunnel syndrome in acromegaly--4-case report and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Imamura, H; Isu, T; Iwasaki, Y; Sugimoto, S; Abe, H; Tashiro, K

    1989-09-01

    Four cases of carpal tunnel syndrome in acromegaly were reported. These 4 cases were found in 21 acromegalies (19%). Besides change of features, they complained bilateral sensory disturbances of their hands. After transsphenoidal removal of pituitary adenoma, GH levels returned to the normal range and sensory disturbances were improved in all cases. Mechanism of carpal tunnel syndrome in acromegaly is that edematous synovial tissues compress the median nerve because oversecretion of growth hormone causes increase of sodium and water retention in the extracellular fluid. The patient who showes high basal level of growth hormone and/or acromegalic pattern by various tolerance tests does not always have the carpal tunnel syndrome. But this syndrome is apt to be found in active acromegaly. So the detection of the symptom showed by this activity such as hypersudation in our cases leads to the early diagnosis of acromegaly.

  1. Similar effectiveness of the open versus endoscopic technique for carpal tunnel syndrome: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Gümüştaş, Seyit Ali; Ekmekçi, Burcu; Tosun, Haci Bayram; Orak, Mehmet Müfit; Bekler, Halil İbrahim

    2015-12-01

    This prospective randomized study aims at evaluating the electrophysiological results of endoscopic and open carpal ligament release in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Included in the study were 41 patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome (21 hands in the endoscopic group and 20 hands in the open group). The Boston questionnaire was administered preoperatively and postoperatively to the patients, and their functional capacities and symptom severities were recorded. Physical examination was carried out preoperatively and in the postoperative sixth month. Demographic data and preoperative Boston symptomatic and functional scores were similar between both groups. A significant improvement was obtained in the Boston symptomatic and functional scores of both groups, but no significant difference was found between the groups in terms of improvement in the symptomatic and the functional scores. A significant shortening in median nerve motor distal latency and an increase in the velocity of sensory conductions were determined in both groups in the postoperative electromyography, but no difference was found between them in terms of improvement in the electromyography values. It was shown both clinically and electrophysiologically that endoscopic carpal tunnel surgery was as effective as open surgery as a treatment method for carpal tunnel syndrome.

  2. [Carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger wrist" revealing a tendinous sheath fibroma].

    PubMed

    Benhima, M A; Ait Essi, F; Abkari, I; Najeb, Y; Fikry, T

    2014-02-01

    The tendinous sheath fibroma (TSF) is a rare benign tumor, exceptionally responsible for carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger" wrist: we found this association less than ten times in the English and French literature. We report the case of a 63-year-old right-handed carpenter who featured a triggering phenomenon of the right wrist during the flexion-extension movements and compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel, secondary to a TSF of the flexor digitorum superficialis. The diagnosis was suspected at the sonography and MRI, the tumor was excised and proven histologically to be a TSF. One year later, the patient remained free of symptoms.

  3. Increased Prevalence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Andrew W.; Shoemaker, Ashley H.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by phenotypic abnormalities including brachydactyly/brachymetacarpia, short stature, and sc ossifications. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a chief complaint in many patients with AHO. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the prevalence of CTS in patients with AHO. Design: This was a cross-sectional study. Setting: The study was conducted at the Clinical Research Center (Institute of Clinical and Translational Medicine), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Albright Clinic, Kennedy Krieger Institute. Participants: Thirty-three subjects with a diagnosis of AHO participated in the study. Main Outcome Measures: We assessed for the presence and location of hand tingling, numbness, pain, weakness, flick sign, difficulty with fine motor skills, severe hand or nail biting, and nocturnal symptoms in the setting of normocalcemia and a euthyroid state. Patients were considered to have CTS if they were positive for three of these symptoms. All subjects were analyzed for mutations in the GNAS gene. Results: Twenty-two subjects (67%) had a clinical diagnosis of CTS (95% confidence interval 0.48, 0.82). Twenty-eight of 33 subjects were confirmed to have mutations in GNAS, of whom 68% had CTS (95% confidence interval 0.48, 0.84). There were 14 children in this study; 36% had a clinical diagnosis of CTS. Body mass index, brachydactyly/brachymetacarpia, prior GH treatment, and specific GNAS mutations were not associated with CTS. Conclusions: We report a high prevalence of CTS in both adults and children with AHO. The diagnosis of CTS should be considered when evaluating a patient with AHO because the intervention for CTS could improve overall function and quality of life in these patients. PMID:21525160

  4. Transverse Carpal Ligament and Forearm Fascia Release for the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Change the Entrance Angle of Flexor Tendons to the A1 Pulley: The Relationship between Carpal Tunnel Surgery and Trigger Finger Occurence

    PubMed Central

    Karalezli, Nazım; Kütahya, Harun; Güleç, Ali; Toker, Serdar; Karabörk, Hakan; Ogun, Tunc C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The appearance of trigger finger after decompression of the carpal tunnel without a preexisting symptom has been reported in a few articles. Although, the cause is not clear yet, the loss of pulley action of the transverse carpal ligament has been accused mostly. In this study, we planned a biomechanical approach to fresh cadavers. Methods. The study was performed on 10 fresh amputees of the arm. The angles were measured with (1) the transverse carpal ligament and the distal forearm fascia intact, (2) only the transverse carpal ligament incised, (3) the distal forearm fascia incised to the point 3 cm proximal from the most proximal part of the transverse carpal ligament in addition to the transverse carpal ligament. The changes between the angles produced at all three conditions were compared to each other. Results. We saw that the entrance angle increased in all of five fingers in an increasing manner from procedure 1 to 3, and it was seen that the maximal increase is detected in the middle finger from procedure 1 to procedure 2 and the minimal increase is detected in little finger. Discussion. Our results support that transverse carpal ligament and forearm fascia release may be a predisposing factor for the development of trigger finger by the effect of changing the enterance angle to the A1 pulley and consequently increase the friction in this anatomic area. Clinical Relevance. This study is a cadaveric study which is directly investigating the effect of a transverse carpal ligament release on the enterance angle of flexor tendons to A1 pulleys in the hand. PMID:23878529

  5. Persistent median artery in the carpal tunnel and anastomosis with superficial palmar arch.

    PubMed

    Bijannejad, Dariush; Azandeh, Saeed; Javadnia, Fatemeh; Gholami, Mohammad Reza; Gharravi, Anneh Mohammad; Zhaleh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Persistent median artery (PMA) in present cadaver originated from the brachial artery and anastomosed with the superficial palmar arch (SPA). As the PMA may be the cause of carpal tunnel syndrome and SPA is the main source of arterial supply, knowledge of which are important for the hand surgical interventions. PMID:27583265

  6. Grey-scale sonography and sonoelastography for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Morizaki, Yutaka; Kashiyama, Takahiro; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common peripheral entrapment neuropathy of the median nerve at wrist level, and is thought to be caused by compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. There is no standard quantitative reference for the diagnosis of CTS. Grey-scale sonography and sonoelastography (SEL) have been used as diagnostic tools. The most commonly agreed findings in grey-scale sonography for the diagnosis of CTS is enlargement of the median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA). Several authors have assessed additional parameters. “Delta CSA” is the difference between the proximal median nerve CSA at the pronator quadratus and the maximal CSA within the carpal tunnel. The “CSA ratio” is the ratio of CSA in the carpal tunnel to the CSA at the mid forearm. These additional parameters showed better diagnostic accuracy than CSA measurement alone. Recently, a number of studies have investigated the elasticity of the median nerve using SEL, and have shown that this also has diagnostic value, as it was significantly stiffer in CTS patients compared to healthy volunteers. In this review, we summarize the usefulness of grey-scale sonography and SEL in diagnosing CTS. PMID:27027498

  7. Yoga Asanas for the Relief and Prevention of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beleu, Steve

    This collection of yoga asanas (exercises) can help relieve the pain of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and help prevent CTS among people who work on computer terminals. For maximum benefit, the exercises should be practiced daily or on as regular a schedule as possible. They are not intended to replace surgery or a physician's prescribed care. They…

  8. Interpreter's Wrist: Repetitive Stress Injury and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Sign Language Interpreters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedt, Joe D.

    1992-01-01

    In a survey concerning repetitive stress injury (RSI) and carpal tunnel syndrome, 87 percent of the 40 sign language interpreters reported that they had at some time experienced at least 2 symptoms associated with RSI, and most interpreters knew others with RSI problems. Data indicate that RSI is a severe problem among sign language interpreters.…

  9. Functional deficits in carpal tunnel syndrome reflect reorganization of primary somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Norman; Holden, Jameson; Lee, Jeungchan; Kim, Jieun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Im, Jaehyun; Libby, Alexandra; Mezzacappa, Pia; Morse, Leslie R.; Park, Kyungmo; Audette, Joseph; Tommerdahl, Mark; Napadow, Vitaly

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome, a median nerve entrapment neuropathy, is characterized by sensorimotor deficits. Recent reports have shown that this syndrome is also characterized by functional and structural neuroplasticity in the primary somatosensory cortex of the brain. However, the linkage between this neuroplasticity and the functional deficits in carpal tunnel syndrome is unknown. Sixty-three subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome aged 20–60 years and 28 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were evaluated with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T while vibrotactile stimulation was delivered to median nerve innervated (second and third) and ulnar nerve innervated (fifth) digits. For each subject, the interdigit cortical separation distance for each digit’s contralateral primary somatosensory cortex representation was assessed. We also evaluated fine motor skill performance using a previously validated psychomotor performance test (maximum voluntary contraction and visuomotor pinch/release testing) and tactile discrimination capacity using a four-finger forced choice response test. These biobehavioural and clinical metrics were evaluated and correlated with the second/third interdigit cortical separation distance. Compared with healthy control subjects, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated reduced second/third interdigit cortical separation distance (P < 0.05) in contralateral primary somatosensory cortex, corroborating our previous preliminary multi-modal neuroimaging findings. For psychomotor performance testing, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated reduced maximum voluntary contraction pinch strength (P < 0.01) and a reduced number of pinch/release cycles per second (P < 0.05). Additionally, for four-finger forced-choice testing, subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome demonstrated greater response time (P < 0.05), and reduced sensory discrimination accuracy (P < 0.001) for median nerve, but not ulnar nerve

  10. In-continuity neuroma of the median nerve after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Depaoli, R; Coscia, D R; Alessandrino, F

    2015-03-01

    Iatrogenic injuries of the median nerve after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome resulting in the formation of a neuroma are rare. We present here the case of two patients, one with a bifid median nerve, showing in-continuity neuroma after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome. The patients reported persistent post-operative pain and showing symptoms. In both cases, ultrasound showed an in-continuity neuroma with a hypoechoic and enlarged median nerve at the carpal tunnel. The case report shows that ultrasound may be helpful in confirming the clinical diagnosis of neuroma and it is useful for evaluation of the percentage of the area affected by the tear.

  11. PROSPECTIVE COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN PROXIMAL TRANSVERSE INCISION AND THE CONVENTIONAL LONGITUDINAL INCISIONS FOR CARPAL TUNNEL RELEASE

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira Alves, Marcelo de Pinho

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a pathological condition frequently seen in orthopedic consultation offices. It is most common compressive neuropathy and also the one most often treated surgically. CTS is usually diagnosed clinically, through the clinical history, physical examination (Tinel, Phalen and Durkan tests) and complementary examinations, and more specifically, nerve conduction studies. Ultrasound scans and magnetic resonance imaging may also be used. Conservative treatment is reserved for patients presenting with mild symptoms, with little incapacitation, who show good response to non-steroidal or steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy and lifestyle changes. Surgical treatment is more frequent, and a variety of techniques are used. The goal of the surgery is to decompress the carpal tunnel and, by sectioning the transverse carpal ligament, release the median nerve. The aim of this paper was to compare surgical treatment of CTS by means of a transverse mini-incision made proximally to the carpal canal, with the classic longitudinal incision over the carpal canal. The mini-incision technique was shown to be less invasive and equally effective for treating CTS, with less morbidity than with the classic longitudinal incision. PMID:27022592

  12. Transverse Movement of the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel during Wrist and Finger Motion in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanno, Mitsuhiko; Sawaizumi, Takuya; Kodera, Norie; Tomori, Yuji; Takai, Shinro

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy of the upper extremity. Repetitive wrist and finger motion has been suggested as a major factor of pathogenesis of CTS. However, little is known about the pathomechanics of CTS. We aimed to evaluate the movement of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel during wrist and finger motions using transverse ultrasound in 21 patients with CTS (5 men and 16 women with mean age 69.0 years). We examined quantitatively the median nerve location as a coordinate within the carpal tunnel at varied wrist positions with all fingers full extension and flexion respectively in the affected and unaffected sides. We thus found that at all wrist positions during finger motion, the median nerve moved significantly more ulnopalmarly in the affected side compared to the unaffected side (p < 0.05). Especially, at the wrist palmar-flexion position as a provocative test, the nerve moved significantly (p < 0.05) the most ulnopalmarly among all wrist positions in the affected side. The nerve was the most strongly compressed against the transverse carpal ligament by the flexor tendons. Additionally, the displacement amount of the nerve in the dorsal-palmar direction was significantly smaller in the affected side than in the unaffected side. These findings indicate that such a pattern of nerve movement has the potential to distinguish affected from unaffected individuals. This ultrasound information could be useful in better understanding of the pathomechanics of CTS, and in further improvement of diagnosis and treatment for CTS. PMID:26133190

  13. Quality of information on the Internet about carpal tunnel syndrome: an update.

    PubMed

    Lutsky, Kevin; Bernstein, Joseph; Beredjiklian, Pedro

    2013-08-01

    The use of the Internet for health-related information has increased significantly. In 2000, the current authors examined the source and content of orthopedic information on the Internet. At that time, Internet information regarding carpal tunnel syndrome was found to be of limited quality and poor informational value. The purposes of the current study were to reevaluate the type and quality of information on the Internet regarding carpal tunnel syndrome and to determine whether the quality of information available has improved compared with 1 decade ago. The phrase carpal tunnel syndrome was entered into the 5 most commonly used Internet search engines. The top 50 nonsponsored and the top 5 sponsored universal resource locators identified by each search engine were collected. Each unique Web site was evaluated for authorship and content, and an informational score ranging from 0 to 100 points was assigned. Approximately one-third of nonsponsored Web sites were commercial sites or selling commercial products. Seventy-six percent of sponsored sites were selling a product for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Thirty-eight percent of nonsponsored sites provided unconventional information, and 48% of sponsored sites provided misleading information. Just more than half of nonsponsored sites were authored by a physician or academic institution. The informational mean score was 53.8 points for nonsponsored sites and 14.5 points for sponsored sites. The informational quality on the Internet on carpal tunnel syndrome has improved over the past decade. Despite this progress, significant room exists for improvement in the quality and completeness of the information available.

  14. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Associated with Oral Bisphosphonates. A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Martín Arias, Luis H.; Sáinz, María; Escudero, Antonio; Fierro, Inmaculada; Sauzet, Odile; Cornelius, Victoria R.; Molokhia, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates are widely used to prevent osteoporotic fractures. Some severe musculoskeletal reactions have been described with this medication; among them, some cases of carpal tunnel syndrome. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore whether bisphosphonates may be associated with this syndrome. Methods A cohort study was conducted to compare exposed to unexposed women; the exposed group was that composed of women having received at least one prescription of an oral bisphosphonate. For the purpose, we used information from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database. The outcome of interest was defined as those women diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. A survival analysis was performed; the Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals, and to adjust for identified confounding variables. Results Out of a sample of 59,475 women older than 51 years, 19,825 were treated with bisphosphonates during the period studied. No differences in age distribution or mean follow-up time were observed between the two groups in comparison. Overall, there were 572 women diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome, 242 (1.2%) in the group exposed to bisphosphonates, and 330 (0.8%) in the unexposed. An adjusted hazard ratio of developing carpal tunnel syndrome of 1.38 (95%CI, 1.15–1.64) was found for women exposed to bisphosphonates; no significant changes in the hazard ratios were found when considering different levels of bisphosphonate exposure. Conclusions An increased risk of carpal tunnel syndrome is associated with the use of bisphosphonates in postmenopausal women. PMID:26765346

  15. Comparative responsiveness of the Hand 20 and the DASH-JSSH questionnaires to clinical changes after carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, K; Nishikawa, K; Chaki, M; Sato, A; Morita, A; Hirata, H

    2014-02-01

    This study compared the responsiveness of the Hand 20 and the Japanese version of the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH-JSSH) questionnaires in carpal tunnel syndrome. The scores before and 3 months after surgery were used to calculate the standardized response mean and effect size. Of 57 patients enrolled in the study, 13 underwent open carpal tunnel release and 44 had endoscopic carpal tunnel release. The standardized response mean and the effect size of the Hand 20 scale were 0.60 and 0.54, respectively, and those of the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand scale were 0.39 and 0.36, respectively. Compared with the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, the Hand 20 questionnaire appears to have better responsiveness for assessing the effect of treatment by carpal tunnel release.

  16. Attritional Rupture of the Little Finger Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon in the Carpal Tunnel in a Patient with Acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Munn Yi Tina; Jin, Yeo Chong

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous rupture of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel is rare in the absence of rheumatoid arthritis. Other predisposing conditions such as gout, infection, pisotriquetrial osteoarthritis, as well as hook of hamate fracture non-union, have previously been reported. However, tendon ruptures of the hand in the presence of acromegaly, as well as spontaneous ruptures within the carpal tunnel, have not been described in the literature. PMID:27454510

  17. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome of the hand following a cat bite

    PubMed Central

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Dabloun, Slim; Benzarti, Sofien; Khechimi, Myriam; Jenzeri, Abdesselem; Maalla, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Cat bites at the hand are common situation in emergency departments. Neglected or poorly supported, these lesions sometimes lead to serious injuries that may compromise the function of the hand. Pasteurellamultocida is the most offending germ in these lesions, despite their sensitivity to antibiotics; it can sometimes lead to deep infections involving the skin, bones and joints. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is exceptional after cat bite. We report a case of a 56 Year old female presenting with an acute carpal tunnel syndrome associated with compartment syndrome of the right hand 6 days after a cat bite of her right thumb. The patient was treated by surgery to relieve the median nerve. Microbiology identified PasteurellaMultocida. PMID:26421101

  18. The Endoscopic Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome as an Outpatient Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, E. A.; Klausmann, H. G.; Erggelet, C.; Krämer, J.

    1998-01-01

    From September 1995 to July 1996 50 patients were treated for carpal tunnel syndrome as outpatients by endoscopic release in the rooms of an orthopaedic surgeon (two-portal-technique). The average age was 51.3 years (27–61 years). The average length of symptoms was 43 months, the postoperative time off work averaged 27 days. Six months postoperatively wasting of the thenar persisted in 2 out of 16 patients, a positive Tinel's sign in 1 out of 46 patients and delayed median nerve conduction in 2 out of 48 presenting these symptoms preoperatively. At 6 months the average handgrip strength had recovered to 109% of the preoperative value. One out of 49 patients still presented paresthesia and 1 out of 50 nocturnal dysesthesia. There were minor complications in 7 patients (14%), only one patient requires further treatment. We conclude that endoscopic carpal tunnel release done on outpatients in a private surgery can be reliable, safe and cost efficient. PMID:18493471

  19. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome of the hand following a cat bite.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Dabloun, Slim; Benzarti, Sofien; Khechimi, Myriam; Jenzeri, Abdesselem; Maalla, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Cat bites at the hand are common situation in emergency departments. Neglected or poorly supported, these lesions sometimes lead to serious injuries that may compromise the function of the hand. Pasteurellamultocida is the most offending germ in these lesions, despite their sensitivity to antibiotics; it can sometimes lead to deep infections involving the skin, bones and joints. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is exceptional after cat bite. We report a case of a 56 Year old female presenting with an acute carpal tunnel syndrome associated with compartment syndrome of the right hand 6 days after a cat bite of her right thumb. The patient was treated by surgery to relieve the median nerve. Microbiology identified PasteurellaMultocida. PMID:26421101

  20. Bromocriptine for an acromegalic patient. Improvement in cardiac function and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Luboshitzky, R; Barzilai, D

    1980-10-17

    A 64-year-old woman with active acromegaly of 33 years' duration, severe carpal tunnel syndrome, and subclinical heart disease was treated with bromocriptine mesylate. Within eight months of therapy, basal growth hormone (GH) levels decreased from 90.0 to 7.0 ng/mL, and hand volume was reduced from 375 to 295 mL. Concomitantly, echocardiographic studies showed normal left ventricular size and function. Electromyographic studies demonstrated normal function in both median nerves. Bromocriptine may correct cardiac dysfunction and carpal tunnel syndrome in acromegaly either by reduction of GH oversecretion or by a direct effect of bromocriptine on dopamine receptors in the heart and peripheral nerve endings.

  1. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome of the hand following a cat bite.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Dabloun, Slim; Benzarti, Sofien; Khechimi, Myriam; Jenzeri, Abdesselem; Maalla, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Cat bites at the hand are common situation in emergency departments. Neglected or poorly supported, these lesions sometimes lead to serious injuries that may compromise the function of the hand. Pasteurellamultocida is the most offending germ in these lesions, despite their sensitivity to antibiotics; it can sometimes lead to deep infections involving the skin, bones and joints. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is exceptional after cat bite. We report a case of a 56 Year old female presenting with an acute carpal tunnel syndrome associated with compartment syndrome of the right hand 6 days after a cat bite of her right thumb. The patient was treated by surgery to relieve the median nerve. Microbiology identified PasteurellaMultocida.

  2. A handy review of carpal tunnel syndrome: From anatomy to diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi-rad, Mohammad; Nosair, Emad; Vegh, Andrea; Mohammadi, Afshin; Akkad, Adam; Lesha, Emal; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Sayed, Doaa; Davarian, Ali; Maleki-Miyandoab, Tooraj; Hasan, Anwarul

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most commonly diagnosed disabling condition of the upper extremities. It is the most commonly known and prevalent type of peripheral entrapment neuropathy that accounts for about 90% of all entrapment neuropathies. This review aims to provide an outline of CTS by considering anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, diagnostic modalities and management of this common condition, with an emphasis on the diagnostic imaging evaluation. PMID:24976931

  3. Carpal tunnel syndrome – Part I (anatomy, physiology, etiology and diagnosis)☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Chammas, Michel; Boretto, Jorge; Burmann, Lauren Marquardt; Ramos, Renato Matta; dos Santos Neto, Francisco Carlos; Silva, Jefferson Braga

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is defined by compression of the median nerve in the wrist. It is the commonest of the compressive syndromes and its most frequent cause is idiopathic. Even though spontaneous regression is possible, the general rule is that the symptoms will worsen. The diagnosis is primarily clinical, from the symptoms and provocative tests. Electroneuromyographic examination may be recommended before the operation or in cases of occupational illnesses. PMID:26229841

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome: A rare manifestation of distal radius osteoid osteoma.

    PubMed

    Basran, Sukhvinder Singh; Kumar, Sandeep; Jameel, Javed; Sajid, Imran

    2015-09-01

    Osteoid Osteoma is a benign bone tumor that normally affects long bones and rarely affects distal radius. Because of its nonspecific presentation in the wrist, it remains a diagnostic challenge. We report an unusual case of Osteoid Osteoma at distal radius having symptoms resembling that of carpal tunnel syndrome. The diagnosis was confirmed preoperatively with X-rays; bone scintigraphy, CT, and MRI, later histological examination confirmed the diagnoses. Surgical excision lead to a dramatic improvement in the condition of the patient.

  5. Gouty wrist arthritis causing carpal tunnel syndrome--a case report.

    PubMed

    Sikkandar, M F; Sapuan, J; Singh, R; Abdullah, S

    2012-06-01

    A 63 year old male with a history of gout and hypertension presented with carpal tunnel syndrome. He gave history of bilateral wrist pain associated with numbness over the median nerve distribution of the hand. Tinels sign and Phalens test were positive with no obvious thenar muscle wasting on examination. Tophaceous deposits in the flexor tendons and within the synovium of the wrist joint was seen during surgery and this established gout as the cause of median nerve entrapment in this patient.

  6. Low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: effective optical power.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Cheng-Qiang; Ye, Gang; Liu, Can-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Low-power laser therapy has been used for the non-surgical treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome, although its efficacy has been a long-standing controversy. The laser parameters in low-power laser therapy are closely related to the laser effect on human tissue. To evaluate the efficacy of low-power laser therapy, laser parameters should be accurately measured and controlled, which has been ignored in previous clinical trials. Here, we report the measurement of the effective optical power of low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome. By monitoring the backside reflection and scattering laser power from human skin at the wrist, the effective laser power can be inferred. Using clinical measurements from 30 cases, we found that the effective laser power differed significantly among cases, with the measured laser reflection coefficient ranging from 1.8% to 54%. The reflection coefficient for 36.7% of these 30 cases was in the range of 10-20%, but for 16.7% of cases, it was higher than 40%. Consequently, monitoring the effective optical power during laser irradiation is necessary for the laser therapy of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:27630706

  7. Diagnosis of Severe Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Using Nerve Conduction Study and Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Kido, Kenji; Imajo, Yasuaki; Funaba, Masahiro; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the correlation between nerve conduction study and ultrasonographic findings for assessment of the usefulness of ultrasonography in determining carpal tunnel syndrome severity. Hands of adults with carpal tunnel syndrome were assessed using ultrasound and nerve conduction studies and grouped according to median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA). There were significant differences (p < 0.01) in mean median nerve CSA between controls, patients with median sensory nerve conduction velocity ≤40 m/s and patients with absent sensory nerve action potential and between controls, patients with median nerve distal motor latency ≥4.5 ms and patients with absent compound muscle action potentials of the abductor pollicis brevis. This is the first report to define median nerve CSA cutoff values (18 mm(2)) for determining carpal tunnel syndrome severity in patients with absent compound muscle action potentials of the abductor pollicis brevis. Median nerve CSA values below the cutoff values should prompt clinicians to consider other disorders, such as cervical compressive myelopathy.

  8. Low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: effective optical power

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Cheng-qiang; Ye, Gang; Liu, Can-dong; Xu, Wen-dong

    2016-01-01

    Low-power laser therapy has been used for the non-surgical treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome, although its efficacy has been a long-standing controversy. The laser parameters in low-power laser therapy are closely related to the laser effect on human tissue. To evaluate the efficacy of low-power laser therapy, laser parameters should be accurately measured and controlled, which has been ignored in previous clinical trials. Here, we report the measurement of the effective optical power of low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome. By monitoring the backside reflection and scattering laser power from human skin at the wrist, the effective laser power can be inferred. Using clinical measurements from 30 cases, we found that the effective laser power differed significantly among cases, with the measured laser reflection coefficient ranging from 1.8% to 54%. The reflection coefficient for 36.7% of these 30 cases was in the range of 10–20%, but for 16.7% of cases, it was higher than 40%. Consequently, monitoring the effective optical power during laser irradiation is necessary for the laser therapy of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:27630706

  9. Evaluation of surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome using local anesthesia☆

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marco Felipe Francisco Honorato; da Rocha Luz Júnior, Aurimar; Roncaglio, Bruno; Queiróz Júnior, Célio Pinheiro; Tribst, Marcelo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the results and complications from surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome by means of an open route, using a local anesthesia technique comprising use of a solution of lidocaine, epinephrine and sodium bicarbonate. Material and methods This was a cohort study conducted through evaluating the medical files of 16 patients who underwent open surgery to treat carpal tunnel syndrome, with use of local anesthesia consisting of 20 mL of 1% lidocaine, adrenaline at 1:100,000 and 2 mL of sodium bicarbonate. The DASH scores before the operation and six months after the operation were evaluated. Comparisons were made regarding the intensity of pain at the time of applying the anesthetic and during the surgical procedure, and in relation to other types of procedure. Results The DASH score improved from 65.17 to 16.53 six months after the operation (p < 0.01). In relation to the anesthesia, 75% of the patients reported that this technique was better than or the same as venous puncture and 81% reported that it was better than a dental procedure. Intraoperative pain occurred in two cases. There were no occurrences of ischemia. Conclusion Use of local anesthesia for surgically treating carpal tunnel syndrome is effective for performing the procedure and for the final result. PMID:26962490

  10. Low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: effective optical power

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Cheng-qiang; Ye, Gang; Liu, Can-dong; Xu, Wen-dong

    2016-01-01

    Low-power laser therapy has been used for the non-surgical treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome, although its efficacy has been a long-standing controversy. The laser parameters in low-power laser therapy are closely related to the laser effect on human tissue. To evaluate the efficacy of low-power laser therapy, laser parameters should be accurately measured and controlled, which has been ignored in previous clinical trials. Here, we report the measurement of the effective optical power of low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome. By monitoring the backside reflection and scattering laser power from human skin at the wrist, the effective laser power can be inferred. Using clinical measurements from 30 cases, we found that the effective laser power differed significantly among cases, with the measured laser reflection coefficient ranging from 1.8% to 54%. The reflection coefficient for 36.7% of these 30 cases was in the range of 10–20%, but for 16.7% of cases, it was higher than 40%. Consequently, monitoring the effective optical power during laser irradiation is necessary for the laser therapy of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  11. Gliding characteristics between flexor tendons and surrounding tissues in the carpal tunnel: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Osamura, Naoki; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel with varied wrist positions and tendon motion styles, which may help us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and repetitive hand motion. Eight fresh human cadaveric wrists and hands were used. The peak (PGR) and mean (MGR) gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon were measured with the wrist in 0, 30, and 60 degrees of flexion and extension. While moving all three fingers together, the PGR at 60 degrees flexion was significantly higher than that at 0, 30, or 60 degrees extension. While moving the middle finger alone, the PGR at 60 and 30 degrees flexion was significantly higher than the PGR at 60 degrees extension. The PGR moving the middle finger FDS alone was significantly greater than that for all three digits moving together in 0, 30, and 60 degrees flexion. Differential finger motion with wrist flexion elevated the tendon gliding resistance in the carpal tunnel, which may be relevant in considering the possible role of wrist position and activity in the etiology of CTS.

  12. Risk factors for operated carpal tunnel syndrome: a multicenter population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Stefano; Baldasseroni, Alberto; Bovenzi, Massimo; Curti, Stefania; Cooke, Robin MT; Campo, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Pietro G; Ghersi, Rinaldo; Broccoli, Marco; Cancellieri, Maria Pia; Colao, Anna Maria; dell'Omo, Marco; Fateh-Moghadam, Pirous; Franceschini, Flavia; Fucksia, Serenella; Galli, Paolo; Gobba, Fabriziomaria; Lucchini, Roberto; Mandes, Anna; Marras, Teresa; Sgarrella, Carla; Borghesi, Stefano; Fierro, Mauro; Zanardi, Francesca; Mancini, Gianpiero; Violante, Francesco S

    2009-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a socially and economically relevant disease caused by compression or entrapment of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. This population-based case-control study aims to investigate occupational/non-occupational risk factors for surgically treated CTS. Methods Cases (n = 220) aged 18-65 years were randomly drawn from 13 administrative databases of citizens who were surgically treated with carpal tunnel release during 2001. Controls (n = 356) were randomly sampled from National Health Service registry records and were frequency matched by age-gender-specific CTS hospitalization rates. Results At multivariate analysis, risk factors were blue-collar/housewife status, BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, sibling history of CTS and coexistence of trigger finger. Being relatively tall (cut-offs based on tertiles: women ≥165 cm; men ≥175 cm) was associated with lower risk. Blue-collar work was a moderate/strong risk factor in both sexes. Raised risks were apparent for combinations of biomechanical risk factors that included frequent repetitivity and sustained force. Conclusion This study strongly underlines the relevance of biomechanical exposures in both non-industrial and industrial work as risk factors for surgically treated CTS. PMID:19758429

  13. Medical diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome ameliorated with thrust manipulation of the elbow and carpals

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Gary; Wang, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes the effectiveness of thrust manipulation to the elbow and carpals in the management of a patient referred with a medical diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome (CuTS). The patient was a 45-year-old woman with a 6-week history of right medial elbow pain, ulnar wrist pain, and intermittent paresthesia in the ulnar nerve distribution. Upon initial assessment, she presented with a positive elbow flexion test and upper limb neurodynamic test with ulnar nerve bias. A biomechanical assessment of the elbow and carpals revealed a loss of lateral glide of the humerus on the ulna and a loss of palmar glide of the triquetral on the hamate. After the patient received two thrust manipulations of the elbow and one thrust manipulation of the carpals over the course of four sessions, her pain and paresthesia were resolved. This case demonstrates that the use of thrust manipulation to the elbow and carpals may be an effective approach in the management of insidious onset CuTS. This patient was successfully treated with thrust manipulation when joint dysfunction of the elbow and wrist were appropriately identified. This case report may shed light on the examination and management of insidious onset CuTS. PMID:23633888

  14. Medical diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome ameliorated with thrust manipulation of the elbow and carpals.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Gary; Wang, Sharon

    2012-05-01

    This case report describes the effectiveness of thrust manipulation to the elbow and carpals in the management of a patient referred with a medical diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome (CuTS). The patient was a 45-year-old woman with a 6-week history of right medial elbow pain, ulnar wrist pain, and intermittent paresthesia in the ulnar nerve distribution. Upon initial assessment, she presented with a positive elbow flexion test and upper limb neurodynamic test with ulnar nerve bias. A biomechanical assessment of the elbow and carpals revealed a loss of lateral glide of the humerus on the ulna and a loss of palmar glide of the triquetral on the hamate. After the patient received two thrust manipulations of the elbow and one thrust manipulation of the carpals over the course of four sessions, her pain and paresthesia were resolved. This case demonstrates that the use of thrust manipulation to the elbow and carpals may be an effective approach in the management of insidious onset CuTS. This patient was successfully treated with thrust manipulation when joint dysfunction of the elbow and wrist were appropriately identified. This case report may shed light on the examination and management of insidious onset CuTS.

  15. No correlation between sonographic and electrophysiological parameters in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, A; Walaszek, I; Szlosser, Z

    2014-02-01

    A prospective study was carried out to investigate any correlation between electrophysiological and sonographic findings in patients with a clinical diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. A total of 113 patients (113 wrists) in 90 women and 23 men, with a mean age of 60 years, underwent sonographic and electrophysiological examination. Fifty-five patients (48%) had mild, 43 (38%) moderate and 12 (11%) had severe conduction disturbances and three patients had normal conduction. Sonographic measurements showed a cross-sectional area of the median nerve of 9.9 mm(2) at the forearm and 17.8 mm(2) at the tunnel inlet. The mean anteroposterior diameter (height) of the nerve at the tunnel inlet was 2.7 mm, and the lowest height inside the tunnel was 1.8 mm. No correlation was found between sonographic and electrophysiological parameters.

  16. Open carpal tunnel release with use of a nasal turbinate speculum.

    PubMed

    Muppavarapu, Raghuveer C; Rajaee, Sean S; Ruchelsman, David E; Belsky, Mark R

    2015-11-01

    Incomplete release of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and median nerve injury are complications of carpal tunnel release (CTR). In this article, we describe a modified mini-open release using a fine nasal turbinate speculum to aid in the proximal release with direct visualization of the proximal limb of the TCL and the distal volar forearm fascia (DVFF). The technique begins with a 2.5-cm palmar longitudinal incision, and standard distal release of the TCL is completed. A fine nasal turbinate speculum is inserted into the plane above the proximal limb of the TCL and the DVFF. A long-handle scalpel is used to incise the TCL and the DVFF under direct visualization. We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of 101 consecutive CTR cases (63 right, 38 left). Carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms were relieved in all patients with a high degree of satisfaction. This modified mini-open technique provides surgeons with a reproducible and inexpensive method to ensure a safe proximal release of the TCL.

  17. Single versus repetitive injection of lignocaine in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Akarsu, S; Karadaş, Ö; Tok, F; Levent Gül, H; Eroğlu, E

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of single versus repetitive injection of lignocaine into the carpal tunnel for the management of carpal tunnel syndrome. The 42 patients included were randomly assigned to two Groups: group 1 was injected with 4 mL of 1% lignocaine once and Group 2 was injected with 4 mL of 1% lignocaine twice a week for 2 weeks. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluations were performed at the study onset, and at 6 and 12 weeks following the final injection. Initially, the groups were similar with respect to clinical and electrophysiological findings. All parameters in Group 2 improved 6 weeks post treatment (p < 0.05), and these improvements persisted at 12 weeks post treatment (p < 0.05). Repetitive local lignocaine injection was effective in reducing the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome and improving electrophysiological findings.

  18. [Diffuse tenosenovial giant cell tumor of the wrist revealed by carpal tunnel syndrome: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ait Essi, F; Younsi, A; Abkari, I; Benhima, M A; Najeb, Y; Latifi, M; Fakhri, A; Belaabidia, B

    2012-10-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign proliferative lesion of synovial origin that may affect the joints, bursae and tendon sheaths. It is the second most common soft tissue tumor of the hand after ganglion cyst. The localised (nodular) form is the most common. However, the less-common diffuse-type giant cell tumour is usually located in the peri-articular soft tissue. The authors report the case of a giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath arising from the carpal tunnel of the wrist in a 42-year-old woman. The patient presented a mild carpal tunnel syndrome and a mid-palmar swelling. We present an unusual localization of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath, causing carpal tunnel syndrome.

  19. Single versus repetitive injection of lignocaine in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Akarsu, S; Karadaş, Ö; Tok, F; Levent Gül, H; Eroğlu, E

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of single versus repetitive injection of lignocaine into the carpal tunnel for the management of carpal tunnel syndrome. The 42 patients included were randomly assigned to two Groups: group 1 was injected with 4 mL of 1% lignocaine once and Group 2 was injected with 4 mL of 1% lignocaine twice a week for 2 weeks. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluations were performed at the study onset, and at 6 and 12 weeks following the final injection. Initially, the groups were similar with respect to clinical and electrophysiological findings. All parameters in Group 2 improved 6 weeks post treatment (p < 0.05), and these improvements persisted at 12 weeks post treatment (p < 0.05). Repetitive local lignocaine injection was effective in reducing the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome and improving electrophysiological findings. PMID:25061062

  20. Speckle-Tracking Sonographic Assessment of Longitudinal Motion of the Flexor Tendon and Subsynovial Tissue in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van Doesburg, Margriet H. M.; Yoshii, Yuichi; Henderson, Jacqueline; Villarraga, Hector R.; Moran, Steven L.; Amadio, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to image both tendon and subsynovial connective tissue movement in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and healthy control volunteers, using sonography with speckle tracking. To estimate accuracy of this tracking method, we used in vivo measurements during surgery to validate the motion estimated with sonography. Methods We recruited 22 healthy volunteers and 18 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Longitudinal sonograms of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon and subsynovial connective tissue were obtained during finger flexion and extension. The images were analyzed with a speckle-tracking algorithm. The ratio of the sub-synovial connective tissue velocity to tendon velocity was calculated as the maximum velocity ratio, and the shear index, the ratio of tendon to subsynovial connective tissue motion, was calculated. For validation, we recorded flexor digitorum superficialis tendon motion during open carpal tunnel release. Results The shear index was higher in patients than controls (P < .05), whereas the maximum velocity ratio in extension was lower in patients than controls (P < .05). We found good intraclass correlation coefficients (>0.08) for shear index and maximum velocity ratio measurements between speckle-tracking and in vivo measurements. Bland-Altman analyses showed that all measurements remained within the limits of agreement. Conclusions Speckle tracking is a potentially useful method to assess the biomechanics within the carpal tunnel and to distinguish between healthy individuals and patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. This method, however, needs to be further developed for clinical use, with the shear index and maximum velocity ratio as possible differentiating parameters between patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and healthy individuals. PMID:22733858

  1. Biomechanical risk factors and flexor tendon frictional work in the cadaveric carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Tat, Jimmy; Keir, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Pathological changes in carpal tunnel syndrome patients include fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) adjacent to the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. These clinical findings suggest an etiology of excessive shear-strain force between the tendon and SSCT, underscoring the need to assess tendon gliding characteristics representative of repetitive and forceful work. A mechanical actuator moved the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon proximally and distally in eight fresh frozen cadaver arms. Eighteen experimental conditions tested the effects of three well-established biomechanical predictors of injury, including a combination of two wrist postures (0° and 30° flexion), three tendon velocities (50, 100, 150mm/sec), and three forces (10, 20, 40N). Tendon gliding resistance was determined with two light-weight load cells, and integrated over tendon displacement to represent tendon frictional work. During proximal tendon displacement, frictional work increased with tendon velocity (58.0% from 50-150mm/sec). There was a significant interaction between wrist posture and tendon force. In wrist flexion, frictional work increased 93.0% between tendon forces of 10 and 40N. In the neutral wrist posture, frictional work only increased 33.5% (from 10-40N). During distal tendon displacement, there was a similar multiplicative interaction on tendon frictional work. Concurrent exposure to multiple biomechanical work factors markedly increased tendon frictional work, thus providing a plausible link to the pathogenesis of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. Additionally, our study provides the conceptual basis to evaluate injury risk, including the multiplicative repercussions of combined physical exposures. PMID:25553671

  2. Assessment of the Presence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus, Hypothyroidism and Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Kilinç, Faruk; Tasdemir, Nebahat; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Yildiz, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of the most common entrapment neuropathies of the upper limbs. It results from compromised median nerve function of the wrist that is caused by increased pressure in the carpal tunnel. Repetitive use of the hand and wrist, obesity, pregnancy, rheumatoid diseases, trauma and endocrinopathies are some of the risk factors for CTS. Aim The purpose of this study was to find out whether patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), hypothyroidism and acromegaly have an increased incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome compared to each other and normal population. Materials and Methods Patients were assigned into three groups as follows: patients with type II DM n: 100, patients with hypothyroidism n:48 and patients with acromegaly n:36. In addition, 50 healthy individuals were included in the study as control subjects. Patients were asked if they had any pain, symptoms of paraesthesia and numbness. Patients with peripheral neuropathy were excluded from the study. Boston Symptom Severity Scale and Functional Capacity Scale were used to assess symptom severity and functional capacity. CTS was investigated by performing electrophysiological study for both hands. Results The incidence of CTS was significantly higher in all three groups compared to the control group (p>0.05). In addition, the incidence of CTS was significantly higher in the DM group compared to the hypothyroid and acromegaly groups (p<0.001). The incidence of bilateral CTS in the DM group was significantly higher compared to both hypothyroid and acromegaly groups and the control group (p<0.001). Conclusion CTS has a higher incidence in DM, hypothyroid and acromegaly patients compared to healthy individuals. Clinicians should be careful about development of CTS in DM, hypothyroidism and acromegaly. They should adopt a multidisciplinary approach and co-operate with the psychiatrist. PMID:26266148

  3. Clinical Findings of Asymptomatic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical differences between patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) who have asymptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and those who have symptomatic CTS. Methods Sixty-three patients with DM were assessed using the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ), nerve conduction studies (NCS), and ultrasonographic evaluation of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve. According to the BCTQ responses and NCS results, the patients were divided into the following three groups: group 1 (n=16), in which NCS results did not reveal CTS; group 2 (n=19), in which NCS results revealed CTS but the group scored 0 points on the BCTQ (asymptomatic); and group 3 (n=28), in which NCS results revealed CTS and the group scored >1 point on the BCTQ (symptomatic). The clinical findings, NCS results, and CSA of the median nerve were compared among the three groups. Results There were no significant differences in age, DM duration, glycated hemoglobin levels, and presence of diabetic polyneuropathy among the three groups. The peak latency of the median sensory nerve action potential was significantly shorter in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3 (p<0.001); however, no difference was observed between groups 2 and 3. CSA of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel in group 2 was significantly larger than that in group 1 and smaller than that in group 3 (p<0.05). Conclusion The results of our study suggest that the symptoms of CTS in patients with diabetes are related to CSA of the median nerve, which is consistent with swelling of the nerve. PMID:27446786

  4. Biomechanical risk factors and flexor tendon frictional work in the cadaveric carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Tat, Jimmy; Keir, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Pathological changes in carpal tunnel syndrome patients include fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) adjacent to the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. These clinical findings suggest an etiology of excessive shear-strain force between the tendon and SSCT, underscoring the need to assess tendon gliding characteristics representative of repetitive and forceful work. A mechanical actuator moved the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon proximally and distally in eight fresh frozen cadaver arms. Eighteen experimental conditions tested the effects of three well-established biomechanical predictors of injury, including a combination of two wrist postures (0° and 30° flexion), three tendon velocities (50, 100, 150mm/sec), and three forces (10, 20, 40N). Tendon gliding resistance was determined with two light-weight load cells, and integrated over tendon displacement to represent tendon frictional work. During proximal tendon displacement, frictional work increased with tendon velocity (58.0% from 50-150mm/sec). There was a significant interaction between wrist posture and tendon force. In wrist flexion, frictional work increased 93.0% between tendon forces of 10 and 40N. In the neutral wrist posture, frictional work only increased 33.5% (from 10-40N). During distal tendon displacement, there was a similar multiplicative interaction on tendon frictional work. Concurrent exposure to multiple biomechanical work factors markedly increased tendon frictional work, thus providing a plausible link to the pathogenesis of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. Additionally, our study provides the conceptual basis to evaluate injury risk, including the multiplicative repercussions of combined physical exposures.

  5. Does Hypothyroidism Affect Post-Operative Outcome of Patients Undergoing Carpal Tunnel Release?

    PubMed Central

    Roshanzamir, Sharareh; Mortazavi, Sahameddin; Dabbaghmanesh, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Risk factors associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome include repetitive use of hand and wrist, advanced age, obesity, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Decompression of the median nerve is the last treatment of choice usually indicated when negative results to conservative treatments remain for three months. In this study, we aimed to find out whether hypothyroid patients would respond to CTS surgical decompression differently in comparison to healthy individuals. Methods This case control study was conducted on patients with CTS in need of surgical release who were refered to Shahid Faghihi hospital, International Branch of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran from January 2013 to January 2015. Twenty-five hypothyroid and 22 euthyroid patients were recruited. Hypothyroidism was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and serum TSH level. All patients were followed for three weeks after surgery and a Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) was completed for them pre and post operation. An electrophysiological study was performed during the same follow up period. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16. Results The CTS grade reported by electrophysiological study, decreased significantly 3 weeks after operation in comparison with preoperative grades (p<0.001). A significant decrease was observed in the immediate postoperative BCTQ scores compared to preoperative (p<0.001). Also a decrease was detected in the three weeks of postoperative follow up compared to immediate postoperative BCTQ scores (p<0.001) and preoperative BCTQ scores (p<0.001). Postoperative BCTQ scores of euthyroid patients decreased more in comparison to hypothyroid patients (p<0.001). Conclusion It seems that, hypothyroidism has an effect on postoperative outcome of carpal tunnel release. PMID:27790353

  6. Effectiveness of Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Injection Using In-Plane Ulnar Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Park, Yongbum; Park, Ki Deok; Lee, Ju Kang; Lim, Oh Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to evaluate the degree of symptom improvement and the change of electrophysiological and ultrasonographic findings after sonographically guided local steroid injection using an in-plane ulnar approach in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Seventy-five cases of 44 patients diagnosed with CTS were included and evaluated at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks after injection. All patients received injection with 40 mg of triamcinolone mixed with 1 mL of 1% lidocaine into the carpal tunnel using an in-plane Ultrasound (US)-guided ulnar approach, out-plane US-guided approach, and blind injection. For clinical evaluation, we used the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) and electrophysiological tests. The ultrasonographic findings were also evaluated with regard to cross-sectional area and the flattening ratio of the median nerve. Subjective symptoms measured by BCTQ and median nerve conduction parameters showed significant improvement at 4 weeks in the in-plane ulnar approach group compared with the out-plane ulnar approach and blind injection. This improvement was still observed at 12 weeks. The flattening ratio and cross-sectional area of the median nerve showed a more significant decrease with the in-plane ulnar approach than with the out-plane ulnar approach and blind injection (P < 0.05). US-guided local steroid injection using an in-plane ulnar approach in the CTS may be more effective than out-plane or blind injection. PMID:25546691

  7. Prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome and wrist osteoarthritis in long-term paraplegic patients compared with controls.

    PubMed

    Akbar, M; Penzkofer, S; Weber, M A; Bruckner, T; Winterstein, M; Jung, M

    2014-02-01

    We compared functional and structural changes in the hands, in particular the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome, in 56 paraplegic patients who had been wheelchair dependent for over 25 years with a group of able-bodied volunteers (with matching criteria for gender and age). The hands were assessed by clinical examination, electrophysiology, disabilities of the arm shoulder and hand score and magnetic resonance imaging. Hand function was worse and wrist pain was experienced more often in the paraplegic patients, and they also had a significantly higher prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome both clinically and electrophysiologically. The prevalence of wrist and trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis was significantly higher in the right hand.

  8. Bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and ulnar neuropathy at the elbow in a pizza chef.

    PubMed

    Vimercati, Luigi; Lorusso, Antonio; L'abbate, Nicola; Assennato, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    A case of bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and ulnar neuropathy at the elbow in a 22-year-old pizza chef is described. An on-site analysis revealed that job tasks performed by the worker exposed him to a combination of biomechanical risk factors. Patient history and workplace observations suggest that occupational physical exposure may have caused the bilateral entrapment neuropathies. The present report underlines the advisability of a detailed occupational history in the case of entrapment neuropathies of the upper limbs commonly regarded as being related to biomechanical occupational exposure.

  9. Static Magnetic Field Therapy for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Colbert, Agatha P.; Markov, Marko S.; Carlson, Nels; Gregory, William L.; Carlson, Hans; Elmer, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of conducting trials of static magnetic field (SMF) therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), to collect preliminary data on the effectiveness of two SMF dosages and to explore the influence of a SMF on median nerve conduction. Design Randomized, double blind, sham controlled trial with 6-week intervention and 12-week follow-up. Setting University hospital outpatient clinics Participants Women and men (N=60), ages 21–65, with electrophysiologically-confirmed CTS diagnosis, recruited from the general population. Interventions Participants wore nightly either neodymium magnets that delivered either 15 or 45mTesla (mT) to the contents of the carpal canal, or a non-magnetic disk. Main Outcome Measures Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Function Severity Scale (FSS) of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) and 4 median nerve parameters: sensory distal latency, sensory nerve action potential amplitude, motor distal latency and compound motor action potential amplitude). Results 58 of 60 randomized participants completed the study. There were no significant between-group differences for change in the primary endpoint SSS or for FSS or median nerve conduction parameters. For the SSS and the FSS each group showed a reduction at 6-weeks indicating improvement in symptoms. Conclusions This study demonstrated the feasibility and safety of testing SMF therapy for CTS. There were no between-group differences observed for the BCTQ or median nerve parameters following 6 weeks of SMF therapy. Significant within-group, symptomatic improvements of the same magnitude were experienced by participants in both active and sham magnet groups. Future studies are needed to optimize SMF dosimetry and resolve issues related to the use of sham controls in SMF trials. PMID:20599049

  10. A manual therapy intervention improves symptoms in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Maddali Bongi, Susanna; Signorini, Massimo; Bassetti, Massimo; Del Rosso, Angela; Orlandi, Martina; De Scisciolo, Giuseppe

    2013-05-01

    In carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), manual therapy interventions (MTI) reduce tissue adhesion and increase wrist mobility. We evaluated the efficacy of a MTI in relieving CTS signs and symptoms. Twenty-two CTS patients (pts) (41 hands) were treated with a MTI, consisting in 6 treatments (2/week for 3 weeks) of soft tissues of wrist and hands and of carpal bones. Pts were assessed for hand sensitivity, paresthesia, hand strength, hand and forearm pain, night awakening; Phalen test, thenar eminence hypotrophy and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS). Median nerve was studied by sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) and distal motor latency (DML). CTS was scored as minimal, mild, medium, severe and extreme. We considered as control group the same pts assessed before treatment: at baseline (T0a) and after 12 weeks (T0b). Pts were evaluated at the end of treatment (T1) and after 24-week (T2) follow-up. At T0b, versus T0a, forearm pain and Phalen test positivity were increased and hand strength reduced (p < 0.05). BCTQ-SSS and BCTQ-FSS scores improved at T1 versus T0b (p < 0.05) with the amelioration maintained at T2. At T1, the number of pts with paresthesia, night awakening, hypoesthesia, Phalen test, hand strength reduction and hand sensitivity was reduced with the lacking of symptoms maintained at T2 (p < 0.05). No changes in SNCV, DML and CTS scoring were shown. MTI improved CTS signs and symptoms, with benefits maintained at follow-up. Thus, it may be valid as a conservative therapy.

  11. Clinical Outcome and Wound Healing following Carpal Tunnel Decompression: A Comparison of Two Common Suture Materials

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, Robert J.; Donnelly, Thomas D.; Morapudi, Syam; Waseem, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Debate exists amongst surgeons regarding the ideal suture material for skin closure in carpal tunnel decompression (CTD). This study compares wound related complications, patient satisfaction, and functional outcome following open carpal tunnel decompression in patients undergoing wound closure with either of two common absorbable and nonabsorbable suture types. Materials and Methods. 53 patients underwent CTD with either 4/0 polypropylene (ProleneTM, n = 28) or 4/0 polyglactin (Vicryl RapideTM, n = 25) for skin closure. QuickDASH, VAS satisfaction scores, and Southampton wound scores were assessed preoperatively and at 2 and 6 weeks postoperatively. Results. At 6 weeks the mean QuickDASH scores postoperatively were 18.54 and 17.70 for absorbable and nonabsorbable sutures, respectively, (P = 0.86). The mean VAS scores were 0.61 and 0.42 (P = 0.91), respectively. All patients achieved a Southampton wound score of 0 by 6 weeks except one, who achieved 1C in the nonabsorbable group, equivalent to mild erythema. There were no complications in either group. Conclusion. Both suture types are safe and effective materials for CTD, and we recommend surgeons to choose according to personal preference, handling properties, and resources available for suture removal. PMID:25165693

  12. The Effect of Polarized Polychromatic Noncoherent Light (Bioptron) Therapy on Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Rezaei, Sajad; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Eliaspour, Dariush; Karimzadeh, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To study the effects of Polarized Polychromatic Noncoherent Light (Bioptron) therapy on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods: This study was designed as a randomized clinical trial. Forty four patients with mild or moderate CTS (confirmed by clinical and electrodiagnostic studies) were assigned randomly into two groups (intervention and control goups). At the beginning of the study, both groups received wrist splinting for 8 weeks. Bioptron light was applied for the intervention group (eight sessions, for 3/weeks). Bioptron was applied perpendicularly to the wrist from a 10 centimeter sdistance. Pain severity and electrodiagnostic measurements were compared from before to 8 weeks after initiating each treatment. Results: Eight weeks after starting the treatments, the mean of pain severity based on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores decreased significantly in both groups. Median Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) latency decreased significantly in both groups. However, other electrophysiological findings (median Compound Motor Action Potential (CMAP) latency and amplitude, also SNAP amplitude) did not change after the therapy in both groups. There was no meaningful difference between two groups regarding the changes in the pain severity. Conclusion: Bioptron with the above mentioned parameters led to therapeutic effects equal to splinting alone in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. However, applying Bioptron with different therapeutic protocols and light parameters other than used in this study, perhaps longer duration of therapy and long term assessment may reveal different results favoring Bioptron therapy. PMID:25606338

  13. Sensory axons excitability changes in carpal tunnel syndrome after neural mobilization.

    PubMed

    Ginanneschi, Federica; Cioncoloni, David; Bigliazzi, Jacopo; Bonifazi, Marco; Lorè, Cosimo; Rossi, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Increased mechanosensitivity of the median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has been demonstrated during upper limb tension test 1 (ULTT1) when the nerve is passively elongated. However, the neurophysiological changes of the sensory axons during stressing activities are unknown. The aim of present study was to verify possible changes in the excitability of median nerve afferent axons following nerve stress in elongation, in subjects with and without CTS. Eight CTS hands and eight controls were selected. Recruitment properties of the median nerve were studied by analyzing the relationship between the intensity of electrical stimulation and the size of motor response, before and after intermittent-repetitive neural mobilization. Only in CTS hands, after the intervention, the stimulus-response curve was strikingly abnormal: both plateau and slope values were significantly lower. During anatomical stress across the median nerve in elongation, compressive forces may exert mechanical traction on the median nerve, since it is 'tethered' at the carpal tunnel, resulting inactivation of Na(+) channels at the wrist, or impairment of energy-dependent processes which affect axonal conduction block. We conclude that in entrapment neuropathies, neural mobilization during nerve elongation may generate conduction failure in peripheral nerve. Our study supports specific considerations for patient education and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25896622

  14. [Assessment of quality of pre- and postoperative information documents about carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Facca, S; Sauleau, E; Robert, E; Gouzou, S; Clavert, P; Liverneaux, P

    2014-02-01

    Before surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome, oral patient information is partially understood and accepted. The objective of this study was to perform a documentation for patients, as recommended by the High Authority in Healthcare (HAS), then to compare the effectiveness of oral information. Our series included 37 patients who received the same information: preoperative shower, pathophysiology, and postoperative instructions. The first 18 (group 1) received only oral information. The following 19 (group 2) received oral, written and visual information. The information in Group 2 followed the methodology of McClune: promoter (Department of Hand Surgery), organizing committee (two teachers from the School of Decorative Arts, two teachers of the School of Medicine), group work (five art students, five medical students), panel of experts (three surgeons, two occupational therapists, one physiotherapist). Four documents were developed: a booklet, a diagram, an animation, a poster. Satisfaction was higher in group 2. Understanding and memorization were better in group 2. Fifty-six percent of patients in group 1 would have liked a paper, 12.5% videos, none went on the Internet. Twelve and a half percent of the patients in group 2 went on the Internet, 18.8% would have liked videos. Our results show that in terms of carpal tunnel syndrome, the written and visual information materials for patients significantly improve the efficacy of oral information. These documents may be extended to other pathologies in Hand Surgery. PMID:24485219

  15. An epidemiological profile of cashiers holders carpal tunnel syndrome in a grocery store chain.

    PubMed

    Costa, R; Barros, R; Campos, D; Lima, D; Barbosa, Geórgia

    2012-01-01

    Occupational diseases are those acquired in the work. Statistics show an increase number of cases, victims like typists, telephone's operators, cashiers and many others with varied levels of involvement. It is composed of disorders affecting the upper limbs being recognized by the Ministry of Social Welfare. Among these diseases stands out for its high occurrence Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). It has been considered a disease of the century, because its incidence has increased in 40.8% of repetitive stress disorders, with prevalence in females, and predominant age ranging from 25 to 40 years. It is characterized by pain and paresthesia in the first four fingers and wrists, and arm pain, weakness, numbness in the territory of the median nerve, preserving or not the palmar sensation and numbness in the median sensory distribution. This study aims to assess functional capacity and severity of symptoms presented by cashiers diagnosed with CTS. It is a descriptive and quantitative in nature. The population consists of 13 grocery store cashiers of both sexes, with a workload of 42 hours. We will be used as an instrument called the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. That purports to be an effective means of measuring the numbness and pain in hands and wrists. Exclusion criteria we consider the subjects who have other diseases associated with CTS. The collection is with the possibility of partial results to be entered in a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel for data analysis and subsequent discussion and correlation with the current literature.

  16. Assessment of Decisional Conflict about the Treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome, Comparing Patients and Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, Michiel GJS.; Bossen, Jeroen K.; Neuhaus, Valentin; Mudgal, Chaitanya S.; Ring, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: As part of the process of developing a decision aid for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) according to the Ottawa Decision Support Framework, we were interested in the level of ‘decisional conflict’ of hand surgeons and patients with CTS. This study addresses the null hypothesis that there is no difference between surgeon and patient decisional conflict with respect to test and treatment options for CTS. Secondary analyses assess the impact of patient and physician demographics and the strength of the patient-physician relationship on decisional conflict. Methods: One-hundred-twenty-three observers of the Science of Variation Group (SOVG) and 84 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome completed a survey regarding the Decisional Conflict Scale. Patients also filled out the Pain Self-efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) and the Patient Doctor Relationship Questionnaire (PDRQ-9). Results: On average, patients had significantly greater decision conflict and scored higher on most subscales of the decisional conflict scale than hand surgeons. Factors associated with greater decision conflict were specific hand surgeon, less self-efficacy (confidence that one can achieve one’s goals in spite of pain), and higher PDRQ (relationship between patient and doctor). Surgeons from Europe have--on average--significantly more decision conflict than surgeons in the United States of America. Conclusions: Patients with CTS have more decision conflict than hand surgeons. Decision aids might help narrow this gap in decisional conflict. PMID:27200394

  17. Corticosteroid iontophoresis to treat carpal tunnel syndrome: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Amirjani, Nasim; Ashworth, Nigel L; Watt, M Joe; Gordon, Tessa; Chan, K Ming

    2009-05-01

    Even though injection of corticosteroids into the carpal tunnel alleviates the symptoms of mild to moderately severe carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), it has not gained universal popularity due to its invasiveness. This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of dexamethasone iontophoresis as a noninvasive method of treating CTS. We carried out a double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing six sessions of iontophoresis with 0.4% dexamethasone sodium phosphate with distilled water in 17 patients. Outcome measures including nerve conduction studies, the Levine Self-Assessment Questionnaire, and the Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments were done monthly for 6 months after intervention. Most of the outcome measures did not show any significant change following treatment. Although there was subjective improvement of symptom severity scores in the treatment group as quantified by the Levine Self-Assessment Questionnaire, similar improvement was also observed in the control group (P < 0.05). Although corticosteroid iontophoresis is feasible in clinical settings and is well-tolerated by patients, iontophoresis of 0.4% dexamethasone was not effective in the treatment of mild to moderate CTS. Muscle Nerve 39: 627-633, 2009.

  18. Efficacy of high frequency ultrasound in postoperative evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome treatment

    PubMed Central

    Urbanik, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy and a frequent cause of sick leave because of work-related hand overload. The main treatment is operation. Aim The aim of the study is to assess the usefulness of high frequency ultrasound in the postoperative evaluation of CTS treatment efficacy. Material and methods Sixty-two patients (50 women and 12 men aged 28–70, mean age 55.2) underwent surgical treatment of CTS. Ultrasound examinations of the wrist in all carpal tunnel sufferers were performed 3 months after the procedure with the use of a high frequency broadband linear array transducer (6–18 MHz, using 18 MHz band) of MyLab 70/Esaote. On the basis of the collected data, the author has performed multiple analyses to confirm the usefulness of ultrasound imaging for postoperative evaluation of CTS treatment efficacy. Results Among all 62 patients, 3 months after surgical median nerve decompression: in 40 patients, CTS symptoms subsided completely, and sonographic evaluation did not show median nerve entrapment signs; in 9 patients, CTS symptoms persisted or exacerbated, and ultrasound proved nerve compression revealing preserved flexor retinaculum fibers; in 13 patients, scar tissue symptoms occurred, and in 5 of them CTS did not subside completely (although ultrasound showed no signs of compression). Conclusions Ultrasound imaging with the use of a high frequency transducer is a valuable diagnostic tool for postoperative assessment of CTS treatment efficacy. PMID:27103999

  19. [Assessment of quality of pre- and postoperative information documents about carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Facca, S; Sauleau, E; Robert, E; Gouzou, S; Clavert, P; Liverneaux, P

    2014-02-01

    Before surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome, oral patient information is partially understood and accepted. The objective of this study was to perform a documentation for patients, as recommended by the High Authority in Healthcare (HAS), then to compare the effectiveness of oral information. Our series included 37 patients who received the same information: preoperative shower, pathophysiology, and postoperative instructions. The first 18 (group 1) received only oral information. The following 19 (group 2) received oral, written and visual information. The information in Group 2 followed the methodology of McClune: promoter (Department of Hand Surgery), organizing committee (two teachers from the School of Decorative Arts, two teachers of the School of Medicine), group work (five art students, five medical students), panel of experts (three surgeons, two occupational therapists, one physiotherapist). Four documents were developed: a booklet, a diagram, an animation, a poster. Satisfaction was higher in group 2. Understanding and memorization were better in group 2. Fifty-six percent of patients in group 1 would have liked a paper, 12.5% videos, none went on the Internet. Twelve and a half percent of the patients in group 2 went on the Internet, 18.8% would have liked videos. Our results show that in terms of carpal tunnel syndrome, the written and visual information materials for patients significantly improve the efficacy of oral information. These documents may be extended to other pathologies in Hand Surgery.

  20. Digital flexion contracture and severe carpal tunnel syndrome due to tophaceus infiltration of wrist flexor tendon: first manifestation of gout.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Cortés, P; Caba, M; Gómez-Sánchez, R; Gómez-Morales, M

    2011-11-09

    The authors report an unusual case of flexor tenosynovitis, severe carpal tunnel syndrome, and triggering at the carpal tunnel as the first manifestation of gout. A 69-year-old man presented with digital flexion contracture and severe carpal tunnel syndrome of his right hand and was treated surgically. A flexor tenosynovectomy and a median nerve neurolysis were performed through an extended carpal tunnel approach. The sublimis and the profundus tendons were involved. Partial ruptures and multiple whitish lesions suggestive of tophacceous infiltration of the flexor tendons were seen. Macroscopically, the removed synovial tissue was involved by multiple whitish nodules that were milimetric in size and was suggestive of monosodium urate crystals deposits. By light microscopy examination, numerous nonnecrotizing granulomas of different sizes were observed that were compounded by large aggregations of acellular nonpolarized material, surrounded by epithelioid histiocytes, mononuclear cells, and foreign body multinucleated giant cells. Postoperatively, the patient recovered with resolution of the median nerve symptoms and a near-to-full range of motion of the affected digits.To the authors' knowledge, this patient is the first case report with flexor tendons tophacceous infiltration as the first clinical sign of gout. Gouty flexor tenosynovitis can occur in the absence of a long history of gout. A high index of suspicion is paramount to the initiation of proper management. Operative treatment of gouty flexor tenosynovitis is mandatory to debulk tophaceous deposits, improve tendon gliding, and decompress nerves. Routine uric acid determination could be helpful in the preoperative evaluation of patients with flexor tenosynovitis.

  1. Battling Carpal Tunnel Syndrome through Ergonomics: A Case Study of Texas A&M's Library Provides Insights and Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Joyce K.

    1995-01-01

    Current library automation practices and new technologies have forced library managers to seek some means of reducing carpal tunnel syndrome, and a case study of Texas A&M's library provides insights. Highlights include identifying and assessing the injuries, adjusting work surfaces, testing and selecting new keyboards, and developing adjustable…

  2. The Prevalence of Anatomical Variations of the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Joyeeta; Vikse, Jens; Ramakrishnan, Piravin Kumar; Walocha, Jerzy A.; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective The course and branches of the median nerve (MN) in the wrist vary widely among the population. Due to significant differences in the reported prevalence of such variations, extensive knowledge on the anatomy of the MN is essential to avoid iatrogenic nerve injury. Our aim was to determine the prevalence rates of anatomical variations of the MN in the carpal tunnel and the most common course patterns and variations in its thenar motor branch (TMB). Study Design A systematic search of all major databases was performed to identify articles that studied the prevalence of MN variations in the carpal tunnel and the TMB. No date or language restrictions were set. Extracted data was classified according to Lanz's classification system: variations in the course of the single TMB—extraligamentous, subligamentous, and transligamentous (type 1); accessory branches of the MN at the distal carpal tunnel (type 2); high division of the MN (type 3); and the MN and its accessory branches proximal to the carpal tunnel (type 4). Pooled prevalence rates were calculated using MetaXL 2.0. Results Thirty-one studies (n = 3918 hands) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence rates of the extraligamentous, subligamentous, and transligamentous courses were 75.2% (95%CI:55.4%-84.7%), 13.5% (95%CI:3.6%-25.7%), and 11.3% (95%CI:2.4%-23.0%), respectively. The prevalence of Lanz group 2, 3, and 4 were 4.6% (95%CI:1.6%-9.1%), 2.6% (95%CI:0.1%-2.8%), and 2.3% (95%CI:0.3%-5.6%), respectively. Ulnar side of branching of the TMB was found in 2.1% (95%CI:0.9%-3.6%) of hands. The prevalence of hypertrophic thenar muscles over the transverse carpal ligament was 18.2% (95%CI:6.8%-33.0%). A transligamentous course of the TMB was more commonly found in hands with hypertrophic thenar muscles (23.4%, 95%CI:5.0%-43.4%) compared to those without hypertrophic musculature (1.7%, 95%CI:0%-100%). In four studies (n = 423 hands), identical bilateral course of the TMB was

  3. Electroacupuncture and splinting versus splinting alone to treat carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Vincent C.H.; Ho, Robin S.T.; Liu, Siya; Chong, Marc K.C.; Leung, Albert W.N.; Yip, Benjamin H.K.; Griffiths, Sian M.; Zee, Benny C.Y.; Wu, Justin C.Y.; Sit, Regina W.S.; Lau, Alexander Y.L.; Wong, Samuel Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effectiveness of acupuncture for managing carpal tunnel syndrome is uncertain, particularly in patients already receiving conventional treatments (e.g., splinting). We aimed to assess the effects of electroacupuncture combined with splinting. Methods: We conducted a randomized parallel-group assessor-blinded 2-arm trial on patients with clinically diagnosed primary carpal tunnel syndrome. The treatment group was offered 13 sessions of electroacupuncture over 17 weeks. The treatment and control groups both received continuous nocturnal wrist splinting. Results: Of 181 participants randomly assigned to electroacupuncture combined with splinting (n = 90) or splinting alone (n = 91), 174 (96.1%) completed all follow-up. The electroacupuncture group showed greater improvements at 17 weeks in symptoms (primary outcome of Symptom Severity Scale score mean difference [MD] −0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.36 to −0.03), disability (Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire score MD −6.72, 95% CI −10.9 to −2.57), function (Functional Status Scale score MD −0.22, 95% CI −0.38 to −0.05), dexterity (time to complete blinded pick-up test MD −6.13 seconds, 95% CI −10.6 to −1.63) and maximal tip pinch strength (MD 1.17 lb, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.86). Differences between groups were small and clinically unimportant for reduction in pain (numerical rating scale −0.70, 95% CI −1.34 to −0.06), and not significant for sensation (first finger monofilament test −0.08 mm, 95% CI −0.22 to 0.06). Interpretation: For patients with primary carpal tunnel syndrome, chronic mild to moderate symptoms and no indication for surgery, electroacupuncture produces small changes in symptoms, disability, function, dexterity and pinch strength when added to nocturnal splinting. Trial registration: Chinese Clinical Trial Register no. ChiCTR-TRC-11001655 (www.chictr.org.cn/showprojen.aspx?proj=7890); subsequently deposited in the World Health

  4. Pre- and post-operative comorbidities in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis of the thumb, and trigger digit.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Gong, H S; Lee, H J; Lee, Y H; Rhee, S H; Baek, G H

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 633 hands in 362 patients who had idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome and underwent carpal tunnel release between 1999 and 2009. Electrophysiological studies and simple radiographs of the wrist, cervical spine, and basal joint of the thumb were routinely checked, and patients were also assessed for the presence of trigger digit or de Quervain's disease before and after surgery. Among 362 patients, cervical arthritis was found in 253 patients (70%), and C5-C6 arthritis was the most common site. Basal joint arthritis of the thumb was observed in 216 (34%) of the 633 hands. Trigger digit or de Quervain's disease was observed in 85 of the 633 hands (13%) before surgery, and developed in 67 hands (11%) after surgery. Cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis, and trigger digit commonly coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Patient education about these disorders is very important when they coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

  5. Melorheostosis of the hand affecting the c6 sclerotome and presenting with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Shalimar; Mat Nor, Noreen Fazlina; Mohamed Haflah, Nor Hazla

    2014-04-01

    Melorheostosis is a rare, progressive bone disease accompanied by hyperostosis and soft tissue fibrosis. While affected adults present with contracture and pain, children present with limb length discrepancy and deformity. We report the case of a 20-year-old woman with melorheostosis since childhood who presented with right hand deformity and numbness. Radiographs showed not only a combination of dense sclerosis and opacities, but also the classic 'flowing candle wax' appearance. Radiography can be used to identify melorheostosis, thus preventing unnecessary bone biopsies. Carpal tunnel release revealed the presence of a thickened flexor retinaculum and a degenerated median nerve distal to the retinaculum, but did not show hyperostosis. This case highlights the role of nerve decompression in melorheostosis and the importance of early identification of the disease to prevent unnecessary bone biopsies. PMID:24763843

  6. Patients' point of view on informed consent: a prospective study in carpal tunnel surgery.

    PubMed

    Fusetti, Cesare; Lazzaro, Mario; Trobia, Massimo; Lucchina, Stefano; Petri, John; Garavaglia, Guido

    2013-12-01

    Patients' perception of consent form (CF) is not well known and many patients tend to view the CF as an administrative act. As part of a prospective study, a questionnaire was sent to 188 consecutive patients within 1 month after carpal tunnel release. Questions focused on patients' recall about risks, benefits, alternative options, preferences about decisions process and global satisfaction with CF. Patient's understanding of the legal consequences of the CF was analysed. Risk's recall rate was 59%. CF reduced preoperative anxiety in 65% and the influence in patients' decision was relevant in 55% of cases. Patients have limited understanding of the legal consequences of the consensus and 29% of patients believed that primary function was to protect hospital. Ten percent believed that CF expunges patients' right to compensation in case of claims. Patient involvement in medical decision-making is a key aspect of patient centred care. A substantial uncertainty exists about legal implication of CF, leading to potential discord.

  7. Spatial-temporal features of thermal images for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estupinan Roldan, Kevin; Ortega Piedrahita, Marco A.; Benitez, Hernan D.

    2014-02-01

    Disorders associated with repeated trauma account for about 60% of all occupational illnesses, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) being the most consulted today. Infrared Thermography (IT) has come to play an important role in the field of medicine. IT is non-invasive and detects diseases based on measuring temperature variations. IT represents a possible alternative to prevalent methods for diagnosis of CTS (i.e. nerve conduction studies and electromiography). This work presents a set of spatial-temporal features extracted from thermal images taken in healthy and ill patients. Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers test this feature space with Leave One Out (LOO) validation error. The results of the proposed approach show linear separability and lower validation errors when compared to features used in previous works that do not account for temperature spatial variability.

  8. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zukowski, Lisa A; Roper, Jaimie A; Shechtman, Orit; Otzel, Dana M; Hovis, Patty W; Tillman, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury participated. Motion data were captured as participants propelled across a flat surface, completing five trials in a CMW and five trials in the same CMW fitted with the EHDM. Average angular wrist orientations were compared between the two propulsion styles. Use of the EHDM resulted in reduced wrist extension and ulnar deviation. The shift to more neutral wrist orientations observed with EHDM use may reduce median nerve compression.

  9. Intermittent axial wrist traction as a conservative treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome: a case series.

    PubMed

    Brunarski, David J; Kleinberg, Brian A; Wilkins, Kathryn R

    2004-09-01

    Four patients with clinical and electrodiagnostic evidence of carpal tunnel syndrome underwent intermittent axial wrist traction with a pneumatic device which applied a controlled traction force of forty to sixty pounds per square inch along the axis of the forearm. Traction cycled intermittently five seconds on and five seconds off. Treatment duration was five minutes. Patients in this study received between five and twelve treatment sessions over a three month period. All neurophysiological tests were performed at an independent site without knowledge of treatment plan before treatment commenced and then repeated after the last treatment three months later. Clinical tests were performed initially, after three months and after one year. Significant subjective improvement in all cases were accompanied by objective improvement and normalization of the nerve conduction studies.

  10. The Efficacy of 100 and 300 mg Gabapentin in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eftekharsadat, Bina; Babaei-Ghazani, Arash; Habibzadeh, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a neuropathy due to the compression of the median nerve. It is shown that gabapentin in high doses is effective in treatment of CTS patients. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of low doses of gabapentin in treatment of CTS patients. Ninety patients with CTS were randomly assigned to groups A, B and C. Gabapentin was administered to group A with dose of 100 mg/day and to group B with dose of 300 mg/day for 2 months. Group C received no treatment. Before and after treatment, patients were evaluated using Visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and parasthesia, Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ) including Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS) to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment. The pinch and grip strength was also measured. There was significant improvement in VAS, grip strength, pinch strength, SSS, FSS and BCTQ score in all three groups (p < 0.05), but the changes in CMAP and SNAP was not significant. Groups A and B in comparison to group C had significantly better improvement in VAS, pinch strength, SSS, FSS and BCTQ total score (p < 0.05). There was significantly more improvement in pinch strength and SSS score in group B compared to group A (p < 0.05). Gabapentin in low doses is a useful drug in treatment of CTS symptoms with no side effects and intolerance. Gabapentin with dose of 300 mg/day is more effective than the dose of 100 mg/day. PMID:26664397

  11. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion-extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  12. Enhanced expression of Wnt9a in the flexor tenosynovium in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Menuki, Kunitaka; Zenke, Yukichi; Hirasawa, Hideyuki; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to clarify the association between abnormal Wnt signaling and the cause of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (ICTS) and whether an association exists between Wnt signaling and cell proliferation in the flexor tenosynovium. The subjects included nine patients with ICTS; the controls were nine patients with distal radius fractures without any symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. We extracted mRNA from the flexor tenosynovium and compared the expression levels of genes encoding 17 types of Wnt in both subjects and controls via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Expression levels of factors involved in cell proliferation, such as estrogen-responsive finger protein, epidermal growth factor receptor, heparin binding-epidermal growth factor-like growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also measured using quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, we compared the Wnt and MIB-1 protein expression levels to clarify the effect of Wnt on cell proliferation. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed significantly greater expression of the gene encoding Wnt9a in subjects with ICTS than in controls and also revealed a positive correlation between the expression of genes encoding Wnt9a and VEGF in subjects with ICTS. Quantitative evaluation using immunohistochemical staining also indicated more marked Wnt9a expression in subjects than in controls. However, there was no relationship between the expression of Wnt9a and the cell proliferation index MIB-1. These results indicate that Wnt9a expression is enhanced in ICTS and that Wnt9a may be involved in VEGF expression in ICTS.

  13. Meta-Analysis: Association Between Wrist Posture and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Among Workers

    PubMed Central

    You, Doohee; Smith, Allan H.; Rempel, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common work-related peripheral neuropathy. In addition to grip force and repetitive hand exertions, wrist posture (hyperextension and hyperflexion) may be a risk factor for CTS among workers. However, findings of studies evaluating the relationship between wrist posture and CTS are inconsistent. The purpose of this paper was to conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies to evaluate the evidence of the relationship between wrist posture at work and risk of CTS. Methods PubMed and Google Scholar were searched to identify relevant studies published between 1980 and 2012. The following search terms were used: “work related”, “carpal tunnel syndrome”, “wrist posture”, and “epidemiology”. The studies defined wrist posture as the deviation of the wrist in extension or flexion from a neutral wrist posture. Relative risk (RR) of individual studies for postural risk was pooled to evaluate the overall risk of wrist posture on CTS. Results Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. All were cross-sectional or case–control designs and relied on self-report or observer's estimates for wrist posture assessment. The pooled RR of work-related CTS increased with increasing hours of exposure to wrist deviation or extension/flexion [RR = 2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.646–2.43; p < 0.01: Shore-adjusted 95% CI: 1.32–2.97]. Conclusion We found evidence that prolonged exposure to non-neutral wrist postures is associated with a twofold increased risk for CTS compared with low hours of exposure to non-neutral wrist postures. Workplace interventions to prevent CTS should incorporate training and engineering interventions that reduce sustained non-neutral wrist postures. PMID:24932417

  14. Carpal tunnel syndrome and occupation in U.S. Navy enlisted personnel.

    PubMed

    Garland, F C; Garland, C F; Doyle, E J; Balazs, L L; Levine, R; Pugh, W M; Gorham, E D

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (a) describe demographic factors associated with high rates of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), cubital tunnel syndrome, and other neuritis of the arm and hand, and (2) identify the high-risk occupations associated with these disorders in the Navy. Computerized records of first hospitalizations of all active-duty Navy-enlisted personnel were searched for all cases of CTS, cubital tunnel syndrome, and other neuritis of the arm and hand (ICD-9 CM codes 354.0-354.9) during 1980-1988. There were 1039 first hospitalizations (including 493 cases of CTS) for all neuritis of the arm and hand in 4095708 person-years in men and 186 first hospitalizations (including 90 cases of CTS) in 365668 person-years in women. Incidence rates of hospitalized cases with CTS rose with age for both sexes. Rates in white women were approximately three times those in white men (p < .0001), but rates in black women were not significantly different from those in black men. Rates of cubital tunnel syndrome also increased with age in both sexes and were higher in white women than white men (p < .05). Occupations with significantly high standardized incidence ratios (p < .05) for CTS in men included aviation-support equipment technician, engineman, hull-maintenance technician, boatswain's mate, and machinist's mate. In women, occupations with significantly high standardized incidence ratios included boatswain's mate, engineman, hospital corpsman, ocean-systems technician, and personnelman. Several occupations for each sex had significantly high standardized incidence ratios for cubital tunnel syndrome, with high rates in hospital corpsmen of both sexes (p < .05). Gender and race differences according to occupation did not account for the occupations at highest risk. Further research is needed to determine the extent to which CTS and related disorders could be prevented by modifying the motions currently performed in occupations with the highest standardized

  15. Reporting of allocation method and statistical analyses that deal with bilaterally affected wrists in clinical trials for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Page, Matthew J; O'Connor, Denise A; Pitt, Veronica; Massy-Westropp, Nicola

    2013-11-01

    The authors aimed to describe how often the allocation method and the statistical analyses that deal with bilateral involvement are reported in clinical trials for carpal tunnel syndrome and to determine whether reporting has improved over time. Forty-two trials identified from recently published systematic reviews were assessed. Information about allocation method and statistical analyses was obtained from published reports and trialists. Only 15 trialists (36%) reported the method of random sequence generation used, and 6 trialists (14%) reported the method of allocation concealment used. Of 25 trials including participants with bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, 17 (68%) reported the method used to allocate the wrists, whereas only 1 (4%) reported using a statistical analysis that appropriately dealt with bilateral involvement. There was no clear trend of improved reporting over time. Interventions are needed to improve reporting quality and statistical analyses of these trials so that these can provide more reliable evidence to inform clinical practice.

  16. Effect of grip type, wrist motion, and resistance level on pressures within the carpal tunnel of normal wrists.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Raymond W; Fallentin, Nils; Andersen, Johan H; Keir, Peter J; Hansen, Torben B; Pransky, Glenn; Lin, Jia-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Elevated carpal tunnel pressure (CTP) has been associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. This study systematically evaluated the effect of wrist motion resistance and grip type on CTP during wrist motion typical of occupational tasks. CTP during four wrist motion patterns, with and without resistance, and with and without gripping, was measured in vivo in 14 healthy individuals. CTP measured during compound motions fell between that measured in the cardinal planes of wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation. Generally, with no active gripping there was little pressure change due to wrist angular displacement or resistance level. However, concurrent active pinch or power grip increased CTP particularly in motions including extension. CTP typically did not increase during wrist flexion, and in fact often decreased. Extension motions against resistance when employing a pinch or power grip increase CTP more than motions with flexion. Results could help inform design or modification of wrist motion intensive occupational tasks. © 2014 The Authors.

  17. Combined Cubital and Carpal Tunnel Release Results in Symptom Resolution Outside of the Median or Ulnar Nerve Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Chimenti, Peter C.; McIntyre, Allison W.; Childs, Sean M.; Hammert, Warren C.; Elfar, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resolution of symptoms including pain, numbness, and tingling outside of the median nerve distribution has been shown to occur following carpal tunnel release. We hypothesized that a similar effect would be found after combined release of the ulnar nerve at the elbow with simultaneous release of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel. Methods: 20 patients with combined cubital and carpal tunnel syndrome were prospectively enrolled. The upper extremity was divided into six zones and the location of pain, numbness, tingling, or strange sensations was recorded pre-operatively. Two-point discrimination, Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing, and validated questionnaires were collected pre-operatively and at six-week follow-up. Results: Probability of resolution was greater in the median nerve distribution than the ulnar nerve for numbness (71% vs. 43%), tingling (86% vs. 75%). Seventy percent of the cohort reported at least one extra-anatomic symptom pre-operatively, and greater than 80% of these resolved at early follow-up. There was a decrease in pain as measured by validated questionnaires. Conclusion: This study documents resolution of symptoms in both extra-ulnar and extra-median distributions after combined cubital and carpal tunnel release. Pre-operative patient counseling may therefore include the likelihood of symptomatic improvement in a non-expected nerve distribution after this procedure, assuming no other concomitant pathology which may cause persistent symptoms. Future studies could be directed at correlating pre-operative disease severity with probability of symptom resolution using a larger population. PMID:27347239

  18. Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome: interobserver reliability of the blinded scratch-collapse test.

    PubMed

    Blok, Robin D; Becker, Stéphanie J E; Ring, David C

    2014-06-01

    The reliability of the scratch-collapse test for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has not been tested by independent investigators. This study measured the reliability of the scratch-collapse test comparing the treating hand surgeon and blinded evaluators. We performed a prospective observational study of 41 patients with a provisional diagnosis of CTS or a combination of CTS and cubital tunnel syndrome and prescribed electrodiagnostic testing. The treating hand surgeon performed the scratch-collapse test. Next, the test was administered by one of the six observers, unaware of the patient's symptoms and the diagnosis made by treating hand surgeon. The kappa statistic (κ) was used to calculate the interrater reliability between the treating hand surgeons and blinded scratchers. The agreement between the blinded observers and the hand surgeons on the scratch-collapse test was substantial 0.63 (95 % CI, 0.34-0.87; p < 0.001). The sensitivity of the blinded scratch test in our sample was 32 %. In a small study with a spectrum bias favoring electrophysiologically confirmed CTS the reliability was lower than that reported by the inventors of the test, but was still substantial. We propose a larger study of patients with a greater variety of electrodiagnostic test results using fewer observers with more experience.

  19. [Carpal tunnel syndrome in workers engaged in the assembly of manufactured products in various industries in the province of Brescia].

    PubMed

    Barbieri, P G

    1996-01-01

    Tests were carried out on five manual assembly departments in a variety of different factories, in order to assess the risks associated with the onset of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and to describe the prevalence of this disorder among exposed workers. The application of the risk analysis method proposed by the EPM Research Unit in Milan (Italy) demonstrated the presence of numerous jobs featuring both a high frequency of actions per minute and a total lack of recovery times, in addition to a variety of incongrous upper limb postures. The clinical and instrumental investigation diagnosed 76 cases of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome among the 170 exposed workers. 62% of the cases was bilateral and 24% was associated with Guyon Channel Syndrome. In two of the five departments reviewed, the carpal tunnel disorders detected were endemic, and featured unusually high prevalence. The situation had been seriously underestimated by the company technical and medical staff, resulting in a failure to call for the urgent adoption of individual protection and collective prevention measures. The authors recommend that an extensive and adequate occupational risk assessment analysis be performed: the local occupational health services could play a critical role in identifying the highest risk industries and the diseases diagnosed in a hospital environment.

  20. Prevalence and associated factors of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) among medical laboratory staff at King Saud University Hospitals, KSA

    PubMed Central

    Ahamed S, Shaffi; Anas M, Bardeesi; Aref A, Altwair; Abdulrahman A, AlMubarak

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a group of symptoms resulting from local compression of the median nerve at the wrist leading to its subsequent functional impairment and local ischemia of the nerve. Our objective was to determine the prevalence and commonly reported symptoms of CTS in the laboratory workers of King Saud University (KSU) hospitals and to identify the associated variables with CTS. Methods: This was a quantitative observational cross-sectional study which was conducted in KSU hospitals’ laboratories with a total of 225 participants by using a standardized questionnaire known as “ Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Data Analysis was carried out by IBM SPSS Statistics software version 21.0. Results: Out of the 225 participants, 57 were found to be severely symptomatic with a prevalence of 25.3%. Among the severely affected participants, females were more than males (58% > 42%) and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.045). Technicians affected (91.2%) were more than attendants (8.8%) and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.042). Conclusion: The prevalence of Carpal tunnel syndrome in KSU hospitals’ medical laboratory staff (25.3%) was close to what was found in literature (21.5%). So laboratory workers are at risk of developing CTS, especially females and technicians with the dominant hand most likely to be affected. PMID:26101485

  1. The Relationship between Nerve Conduction Study and Clinical Grading of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cheluvaiah, Janardhan D.; Agadi, Jagadish B.; Nagaraj, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment. Subjective sensory symptoms are common place in patients with CTS, but sometimes they are not supported by objective findings in the neurological examination. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. The amplitudes along with the conduction velocities of the sensory nerve action potential and motor nerve action potential reflect the functional state of axons, and are useful parameters and complement the clinical grading in the assessment of severity of CTS. Aim To conduct median nerve sensory and motor conduction studies on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and correlate the relationship between nerve conduction study parameters and the clinical severity grading. Materials and Methods Based on clinical assessment, the study patients were divided into 03 groups with mild CTS, moderate CTS and severe CTS respectively as per Mackinnson’s classification. Median and ulnar nerve conduction studies were performed on bilateral upper limbs of 50 patients with symptoms of CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The relationship between the clinical severity grade and various nerve conduction study parameters were correlated. Results In this prospective case control study, 50 patients with symptoms consistent with CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects were examined over a 10 month period. A total of 30 patients had unilateral CTS (right upper limb in 19 and left upper limb in 11) and 20 patients had bilateral CTS. Female to male ratio was 3.54 to 1. Age ranged from 25 to 81 years. The mean age at presentation was 49.68±11.7 years. Tingling paresthesias of hand and first three fingers were the most frequent symptoms 48 (98%). Tinel’s and Phalen’s sign were positive in 36 (72%) and 44 (88%) patients respectively. The mean duration of symptoms at presentation was 52.68±99.81 weeks. 16 patients (32%) had

  2. The Relationship between Nerve Conduction Study and Clinical Grading of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cheluvaiah, Janardhan D.; Agadi, Jagadish B.; Nagaraj, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment. Subjective sensory symptoms are common place in patients with CTS, but sometimes they are not supported by objective findings in the neurological examination. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. The amplitudes along with the conduction velocities of the sensory nerve action potential and motor nerve action potential reflect the functional state of axons, and are useful parameters and complement the clinical grading in the assessment of severity of CTS. Aim To conduct median nerve sensory and motor conduction studies on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and correlate the relationship between nerve conduction study parameters and the clinical severity grading. Materials and Methods Based on clinical assessment, the study patients were divided into 03 groups with mild CTS, moderate CTS and severe CTS respectively as per Mackinnson’s classification. Median and ulnar nerve conduction studies were performed on bilateral upper limbs of 50 patients with symptoms of CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The relationship between the clinical severity grade and various nerve conduction study parameters were correlated. Results In this prospective case control study, 50 patients with symptoms consistent with CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects were examined over a 10 month period. A total of 30 patients had unilateral CTS (right upper limb in 19 and left upper limb in 11) and 20 patients had bilateral CTS. Female to male ratio was 3.54 to 1. Age ranged from 25 to 81 years. The mean age at presentation was 49.68±11.7 years. Tingling paresthesias of hand and first three fingers were the most frequent symptoms 48 (98%). Tinel’s and Phalen’s sign were positive in 36 (72%) and 44 (88%) patients respectively. The mean duration of symptoms at presentation was 52.68±99.81 weeks. 16 patients (32%) had

  3. Er:YAG laser for the surgical treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Detlef; Ebinger, Thomas; Illich, Wolfgang; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    2003-10-01

    We developed a new surgical procedure to improve the recurrence rate using an Er:YAG laser as dissection tool for the carpal ligament with the objective to ablate a small amount of the carpal ligament and to denaturate its ends. The Er:YAG Laser was transmitted to the applicator via a GeO fiber. With this system we proceeded 10 carpal ligament dissections without any complications in the follow-up period. All patients were free of pain and recurrence.

  4. Anatomic observations of the carpal tunnel in cadavers with a report of unusual thickening of the perineurium of the median nerve.

    PubMed

    Karev, A

    1985-01-01

    The carpal tunnel of 50 cadavers (100 hands) was dissected. Macroscopic finding included 14 median nerves with pressure signs (in 4 cadavers, unilaterally and 5 bilaterally). In three cadavers, marked synovitis was seen around the tendons and the nerve; in one, lipoma was evident; and in the rest, thickening of the volar carpal ligament was seen. Microscopic examination of the compressed nerves showed concentric thickening of the perineurium, thrombosis of veins, and intrafascicular fibrosis. In one nerve, the thickening of the perineurium was not concentric, but only at that part of the fascicle adjacent to the volar carpal ligament in an "onion peel" form. PMID:3966111

  5. What does the transverse carpal ligament contribute to carpal stability?

    PubMed

    Vanhees, Matthias; Verstreken, Frederik; van Riet, Roger

    2015-02-01

    Background The transverse carpal ligament is well known for its involvement in carpal tunnel syndrome, and sectioning of this ligament remains the definite treatment for this pathology. Some authors believe that the transverse carpal ligament is an important stabilizer of the carpal arch, whereas others do not consider it to be significant. Several studies have been performed, both in vivo and in in vitro. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament does not seem to have any effect on the width of the carpal arch in the unloaded condition. However, patients will load the arch during their activities of daily living. Materials and Methods A cadaveric study was done with distraction of the carpal bones before and after sectioning the transverse carpal ligament. Results With the transverse carpal ligament intact, the carpal arch is mobile, with distraction leading up to 50% widening of the arch. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament resulted in a significant widening of the carpal arch by a further 30%. Conclusions Loading of the carpal arch after sectioning of the transeverse carapal ligament leads to a significant increase in intracarpal mobility. This will inevitably influence carpal kinematics in the patient and might be responsible for some complications after simple carpal tunnel releases, such as pillar pain, palmar tenderness, and loss of grip strength.

  6. Multidimensional ultrasound imaging of the wrist: Changes of shape and displacement of the median nerve and tendons in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Filius, Anika; Scheltens, Marjan; Bosch, Hans G; van Doorn, Pieter A; Stam, Henk J; Hovius, Steven E R; Amadio, Peter C; Selles, Ruud W

    2015-09-01

    Dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel may alter in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to fibrotic changes and increased carpal tunnel pressure. Ultrasound can visualize these potential changes, making ultrasound potentially an accurate diagnostic tool. To study this, we imaged the carpal tunnel of 113 patients and 42 controls. CTS severity was classified according to validated clinical and nerve conduction study (NCS) classifications. Transversal and longitudinal displacement and shape (changes) were calculated for the median nerve, tendons and surrounding tissue. To predict diagnostic value binary logistic regression modeling was applied. Reduced longitudinal nerve displacement (p≤ 0.019), increased nerve cross-sectional area (p≤ 0.006) and perimeter (p≤ 0.007), and a trend of relatively changed tendon displacements were seen in patients. Changes were more convincing when CTS was classified as more severe. Binary logistic modeling to diagnose CTS using ultrasound showed a sensitivity of 70-71% and specificity of 80-84%. In conclusion, CTS patients have altered dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel.

  7. Incidence of trapezius myofascial trigger points in patients with the possible carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Azadeh, Hamid; Dehghani, Mohammad; Zarezadeh, Abolghasem

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) often complain of prominent pain in shoulder and arm, also there are patients that have pain in their shoulder and arm which is due to myofascial trigger point (MTP) located in their upper trapezius muscle. Despite the frequency of this observation, few studies have previously sought to establish possible relationship between the CTS and MTP in shoulder area. METHODS: Samples were 160 patients (221 hands) consist of 130 females and 30 males, with suspected diagnosis of CTS, from March 2008 to October 2008. In this study after performing electrodiagnosis searches, another evaluation was performed to find out if there was any sign of myofascial trigger point. The correlation between these two was sought. RESULTS: It was found that all of 36 hands with normal electrodiagnostic findings had myofascial trigger points in their upper trapezius muscle. Out of 185 hands, 130 hands (70%) with electrophysiological evidences of CTS showed myofascial trigger points in their trapezius muscles. Statistical analysis revealed significant (p < 0.001) reverse correlation between the severity of CTS and the presence of MTP. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study imply the significant correlation between occurrence of CTS and MTP. It is suggested that clinicians consider the probability of existence of MTP in patients referred for diagnosis of CTS. PMID:21526092

  8. General population job exposure matrix applied to a pooled study of prevalent carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dale, Ann Marie; Zeringue, Angelique; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Rempel, David; Bao, Stephen; Thiese, Matthew S; Merlino, Linda; Burt, Susan; Kapellusch, Jay; Garg, Arun; Gerr, Fred; Hegmann, Kurt T; Eisen, Ellen A; Evanoff, Bradley

    2015-03-15

    A job exposure matrix may be useful for the study of biomechanical workplace risk factors when individual-level exposure data are unavailable. We used job title-based exposure data from a public data source to construct a job exposure matrix and test exposure-response relationships with prevalent carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Exposures of repetitive motion and force from the Occupational Information Network were assigned to 3,452 active workers from several industries, enrolled between 2001 and 2008 from 6 studies. Repetitive motion and force exposures were combined into high/high, high/low, and low/low exposure groupings in each of 4 multivariable logistic regression models, adjusted for personal factors. Although force measures alone were not independent predictors of CTS in these data, strong associations between combined physical exposures of force and repetition and CTS were observed in all models. Consistent with previous literature, this report shows that workers with high force/high repetition jobs had the highest prevalence of CTS (odds ratio = 2.14-2.95) followed by intermediate values (odds ratio = 1.09-2.27) in mixed exposed jobs relative to the lowest exposed workers. This study supports the use of a general population job exposure matrix to estimate workplace physical exposures in epidemiologic studies of musculoskeletal disorders when measures of individual exposures are unavailable. PMID:25700886

  9. Can widespread hypersensitivity in carpal tunnel syndrome be substantiated if neck and arm pain are absent?

    PubMed

    Schmid, A B; Soon, B T C; Wasner, G; Coppieters, M W

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) have signs of thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in extra-median territories suggesting an involvement of central pain mechanisms. As previous studies included patients with shoulder/arm symptoms or neck pain, a potential influence of these coexisting disorders cannot be excluded. This study therefore evaluated whether widespread sensory changes (hypoesthesia or hyperalgesia) are present in patients with unilateral CTS in the absence of coexisting disorders. Twenty-six patients with unilateral CTS with symptoms localised to their hand and 26 healthy controls participated in the study. A comprehensive quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol including thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds was performed over the hands (median, ulnar and radial innervation area), lateral elbows, neck and tibialis anterior muscle. Patients with CTS demonstrated thermal and mechanical hypoesthesia in the hand but not at distant sites. Thermal or mechanical hyperalgesia was not identified at any location with traditional QST threshold testing. However, patients with CTS rated the pain during thermal pain testing significantly higher than healthy participants. This was especially apparent for heat pain ratings which were elevated not only in the affected hand but also in the neck and tibialis anterior muscle. In conclusion, CTS alone in the absence of coexisting neck and arm pain does not account for sensory changes outside the affected hand as determined by traditional QST threshold testing. Elevated pain ratings may however be an early indication of central pain mechanisms.

  10. Occupational Overuse Syndrome (Technological Diseases): Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, a Mouse Shoulder, Cervical Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tiric-Campara, Merita; Krupic, Ferid; Biscevic, Mirza; Spahic, Emina; Maglajlija, Kerima; Masic, Zlatan; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Izet

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Technological diseases are diseases of the modern era. Some are caused by occupational exposures, and are marked with direct professional relation, or the action of harmful effects in the workplace. Due to the increasing incidence of these diseases on specific workplaces which may be caused by one or more causal factors present in the workplace today, these diseases are considered as professional diseases. Severity of technological disease usually responds to the level and duration of exposure, and usually occurs after many years of exposure to harmful factor. Technological diseases occur due to excessive work at the computer, or excessive use of keyboards and computer mice, especially the non-ergonomic ones. This paper deals with the diseases of the neck, shoulder, elbow and wrist (cervical radiculopathy, mouse shoulder and carpal tunnel syndrome), as is currently the most common diseases of technology in our country and abroad. These three diseases can be caused by long-term load and physical effort, and are tied to specific occupations, such as occupations associated with prolonged sitting, working at the computer and work related to the fixed telephone communication, as well as certain types of sports (tennis, golf and others). PMID:25568584

  11. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluation of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chao; Dong, Hongjuan; Chu, Hong; Lu, Zuneng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To prospectively assess the effectiveness of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) by using clinical scores and nerve conduction studies (NCS). [Subjects and Methods] Forty-one patients enrolled in the study were clinically evaluated by a symptom severity scale (SSS) and functional status scale (FSS), and were electrophysiologically evaluated by conventional NCS; distal motor latency (DML), sensory conduction velocity (SCV), and difference in sensory latency between the median and ulnar nerves (ΔDSL) were measured. Subjects were treated with wrist splinting. Patients who showed no improvement in symptoms were treated with other conservative treatments, the remaining patients continued to wear splints. SSS, FSS, and NCS were evaluated after splinting as well. [Results] The follow-up was completed in 20 patients (31 wrists) with splinting. SSS and FSS decreased, the DML shortened and ΔDSL decreased significantly after splinting for 3.03 ± 1.16 months. There were significant correlations between SSS and DML, SCV of wrist digit 2, and SCV of wrist digit 4. No correlations were found between SSS and ΔDSL, and FSS and the parameters of NCS. [Conclusion] Neutral wrist nocturnal splinting is effective in at least short term for CTS patients. There is a weak correlation between clinical scores and NCS, which suggests that both approaches should be used to effectively assess the therapeutic effect of CTS treatment. PMID:27630413

  12. Cooling modifies mixed median and ulnar palmar studies in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Rogério Gayer Machado de; Kouyoumdjian, João Aris

    2007-09-01

    Temperature is an important and common variable that modifies nerve conduction study parameters in practice. Here we compare the effect of cooling on the mixed palmar median to ulnar negative peak-latency difference (PMU) in electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Controls were 22 subjects (19 women, mean age 42.1 years, 44 hands). Patients were diagnosed with mild symptomatic CTS (25 women, mean age 46.6 years, 34 hands). PMU was obtained at the usual temperature, >32 degrees C, and after wrist/hand cooling to <27 degrees C in ice water. After cooling, there was a significantly greater increase in PMU and mixed ulnar palmar latency in patients versus controls. We concluded that cooling significantly modifies the PMU. We propose that the latencies of compressed nerve overreact to cooling and that this response could be a useful tool for incipient CTS electrodiagnosis. There was a significant latency overreaction of the ulnar nerve to cooling in CTS patients. We hypothesize that subclinical ulnar nerve compression is associated with CTS.

  13. Evaluation of the scratch collapse test for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makanji, H S; Becker, S J E; Mudgal, C S; Jupiter, J B; Ring, D

    2014-02-01

    This prospective study measured and compared the diagnostic performance characteristics of various clinical signs and physical examination manoeuvres for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), including the scratch collapse test. Eighty-eight adult patients that were prescribed electrophysiological testing to diagnose CTS were enrolled in the study. Attending surgeons documented symptoms and results of standard clinical manoeuvres. The scratch collapse test had a sensitivity of 31%, which was significantly lower than the sensitivity of Phalen's test (67%), Durkan's test (77%), Tinel's test (43%), CTS-6 lax (88%), and CTS-6 stringent (54%). The scratch test had a specificity of 61%, which was significantly lower than the specificity of thenar atrophy (96%) and significantly higher than the specificity of Durkan's test (18%) and CTS-6 lax (13%). The sensitivity of the scratch collapse test was not superior to other clinical signs and physical examination manoeuvers for CTS, and the specificity of the scratch collapse test was superior to that of Durkan's test and CTS-6 lax. Further studies should seek to limit the influence of a patient's clinical presentation on scratch test performance and assess the scratch test's inter-rater reliability.

  14. Often atypical? The distribution of sensory disturbance in carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D; Amirfeyz, R; Leslie, I; Bannister, G

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the disturbance of hand sensation in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and assess the usefulness of objective and subjective measures. The study included 64 patients with CTS confirmed by electrophysiological testing. Sensory assessment was made by objective (pressure aesthesiometry) and subjective (hand symptom diagram) measures in different anatomical areas. The results of the subjective and objective testing were correlated with nerve conduction studies by a kappa analysis. Sensory disturbance occurred more frequently in areas innervated by the median nerve (index finger, 94%) but also with great frequency in other areas (little finger, 39%). Pain occurred frequently in anticipated areas (wrist crease, 33%) but also in other areas (little finger, 11%). There was very poor correlation between objective measures and electrophysiological testing or subjective measures. This study does therefore not support the use of objective sensory assessment for the initial diagnosis of CTS. An atypical distribution of symptoms is a common occurrence and should not discourage diagnosis of CTS. The patient's description of symptoms remains the most important tool in diagnosis. PMID:21929918

  15. Carpal tunnel syndrome and HIV infection. A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Corcho, Andrés; Barrueta-Reyes, Dagnis; Bouza-Jiménez, Yadira; Jam-Morales, Blas C.; Bouza-Jiménez, Yanelka; Lopez-Puig, Yarima

    2009-01-01

    The first clinical case of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in Cuban HIV-infected patient was described, and the scientific literature indexed in: PUBMED/MEDLINE, LILACS and BIREME were revised. The case presented was a male with HIV infection without preceding opportunistic illnesses, CD4+ T cell count over 200 cells/mm3 and clinical symptoms of pain, tingling and numbness in the right hand and wrist for three months. The electrophysiological study was compatible with CTS. The pharmacological treatment did not modify the symptoms and the patient received specific surgical treatment with absolute resolution of symptoms. CTS is a compressive neuropathy that can occur in HIV-positive individuals with as similar frequency as in the general population. The association between HIV infection and CTS is scarcely described in the medical scientific literature and probably does not represent a different phenomenon from what happens in the HIV-negative population. Nevertheless, its clinical recognition among other neurological and muscle-skeletal manifestations in HIV-infected patients is important. PMID:24470880

  16. Histopathological, clinical, and electrophysiological features influencing postoperative outcomes in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galasso, Olimpio; Mariconda, Massimo; Donato, Giuseppe; Di Mizio, Giulio; Padua, Luca; Brando, Antonio; Conforti, Francesco; Valentino, Paola; Gasparini, Giorgio

    2011-08-01

    Data on the outcome predictors of surgical result of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is sparse and often conflicting. The purpose of this prospective comparative study was to evaluate the neurophysiologic findings and histological characteristics of the flexor tenosynovium in patients with CTS, assessing possible associations between these findings and preoperative patient status or surgical outcome. We evaluated 30 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic CTS who were referred for surgery. Demographic data, subjective and objective data, and responses on an expanded assessment set, were collected before and 6 months after surgery. All patients underwent diagnostic neurophysiological testing prior to surgery, and histological analysis of tenosynovium specimens that were removed during surgery. Ten fresh-frozen cadavers served as controls. There was significant improvement in most of the disease specific (Boston questionnaire and Hi-Ob scale) and health generic (SF-36 questionnaire) evaluation tools used in the study at the 6-month follow-up. Vascular changes were noted in the tenosynovium of the flexor tendon of patients with CTS when compared with controls. Greater synovial vascularization was negative predictor of the SF-36's physical summary score before surgery. Bilateral presentation of symptoms and low nerve conduction velocity were negative predictors of the quality of life of patients after surgery for CTS. These findings have to be considered when discussing with patients as for the expected and desired outcomes of CTS surgery. The increased vascularization of flexor tenosynovium is associated with patients' functional status.

  17. Hypothalamus and Amygdala Response to Acupuncture Stimuli in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Napadow, V; Kettner, N; Liu, J; Li, M; Kwong, KK; Vangel, M; Makris, N; Audette, J; Hui, KKS

    2007-01-01

    Brain processing of acupuncture stimuli in chronic neuropathic pain patients may underlie its beneficial effects. We used fMRI to evaluate verum and sham acupuncture stimulation at acupoint LI-4 in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) patients and healthy controls (HC). CTS patients were retested after 5 weeks of acupuncture therapy. Thus, we investigated both the short-term brain response to acupuncture stimulation, as well as the influence of longer-term acupuncture therapy effects on this short-term response. CTS patients responded to verum acupuncture with greater activation in the hypothalamus and deactivation in the amygdala as compared to HC, controlling for the non-specific effects of sham acupuncture. A similar difference was found between CTS patients at baseline and after acupuncture therapy. For baseline CTS patients responding to verum acupuncture, functional connectivity was found between the hypothalamus and amygdala – the less deactivation in the amygdala, the greater the activation in the hypothalamus, and vice versa. Furthermore, hypothalamic response correlated positively with the degree of maladaptive cortical plasticity in CTS patients (inter-digit separation distance). This is the first evidence suggesting that chronic pain patients respond to acupuncture differently than HC, through a coordinated limbic network including the hypothalamus and amygdala. PMID:17240066

  18. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluation of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chao; Dong, Hongjuan; Chu, Hong; Lu, Zuneng

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] To prospectively assess the effectiveness of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) by using clinical scores and nerve conduction studies (NCS). [Subjects and Methods] Forty-one patients enrolled in the study were clinically evaluated by a symptom severity scale (SSS) and functional status scale (FSS), and were electrophysiologically evaluated by conventional NCS; distal motor latency (DML), sensory conduction velocity (SCV), and difference in sensory latency between the median and ulnar nerves (ΔDSL) were measured. Subjects were treated with wrist splinting. Patients who showed no improvement in symptoms were treated with other conservative treatments, the remaining patients continued to wear splints. SSS, FSS, and NCS were evaluated after splinting as well. [Results] The follow-up was completed in 20 patients (31 wrists) with splinting. SSS and FSS decreased, the DML shortened and ΔDSL decreased significantly after splinting for 3.03 ± 1.16 months. There were significant correlations between SSS and DML, SCV of wrist digit 2, and SCV of wrist digit 4. No correlations were found between SSS and ΔDSL, and FSS and the parameters of NCS. [Conclusion] Neutral wrist nocturnal splinting is effective in at least short term for CTS patients. There is a weak correlation between clinical scores and NCS, which suggests that both approaches should be used to effectively assess the therapeutic effect of CTS treatment. PMID:27630413

  19. Effect of Wrist Angle on Median Nerve Appearance at the Proximal Carpal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of wrist angle, sex, and handedness on the changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameters, namely longitudinal diameter (D1) and vertical diameter (D2). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel in both dominant and nondominant hands of men (n = 27) and women (n = 26). A total of seven wrist angles were examined: neutral; 15°, 30°, and 45° extension; and 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Our results indicated sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry of MNCSA, D1 and D2 measurements. MNCSA was significantly reduced when the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions. At flexion positions, D1 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In contrast, at extension positions, D2 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In conclusion, this study showed that MNCSA decreased as the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions in both dominant and nondominant hands of both sexes, whereas deformation of the median nerve differed between wrist flexion and extension. PMID:25658422

  20. Utility of MRI Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Ma, Jingxu; Zhao, Liping; Wang, Yunling; Jia, Xiaowen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND After successful utilization of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in detecting brain pathologies, it is now being examined for use in the detection of peripheral neuropathies. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnostic potentials of DTI in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). MATERIAL AND METHODS The literature search was performed in multiple electronic databases using a keyword search and final selection of the studies was based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. We performed a meta-analyses of mean differences in fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) between CTS patient and healthy subjects. Publication bias detection was done with Begg's test and sensitivity analyses were performed to explore the source/s of higher heterogeneity and the authenticity of results. RESULTS FA was significantly lower in CTS patients in comparison with healthy subjects (mean and the difference [95% confidence interval] was -0.06 [-0.10, -0.02] (p=0.003). The ADC was significantly higher in CTS patients (mean difference [95% CI] was 0.10 [0.02, 0.18], p=0.02). Overall sensitivity of FA-based diagnosis was 82.82%, with 77.83% specificity. CONCLUSIONS DTI can be a valuable tool in diagnosing CTS. PMID:26942911

  1. Diagnostic value of quantitative sensory testing (QST) in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Borg, K; Lindblom, U

    1988-12-01

    The initial sensory symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are usually intermittent and the clinical neurological examination is often normal. The aim of the present study was to determine the rate of impairment of different somatosensory modalities in CTS by means of the following tests: vibrametry, tactile pulses, von Frey hairs, two-point discrimination (2-PD), graphesthesia and warm and cold perception thresholds. The material consisted of 33 hands with CTS from 22 patients. Each of the first 3 tests was abnormal with elevated thresholds in 17 CTS hands (52%), 2-PD was abnormal in 10 hands (30%), graphesthesia in 8 hands (24%), and warm and cold thresholds in only 5 hands (15%). There was an overlap so that at least one test was abnormal in 27 of the 33 CTS hands (82%). Thus, impairment of sensibility can be demonstrated in a majority of patients with CTS if more than one test is applied. Vibrametry and von Frey hairs are recommended instead of the commonly used 2-PD, since abnormality was more often revealed and since they are equally easy to apply. No individual test was sensitive enough to qualify as a diagnostic criterion when it was applied with the hand in resting position. A significant increase in both sensitivity and specificity can be expected for any test if it is combined with provocation, such as wrist flexion, as has been demonstrated for vibrametry.

  2. Median and anterior interosseous nerve entrapment syndromes versus carpal tunnel syndrome: a study of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Tchoryk, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    Two patients presented with forearm and hand pain, and were initially examined by their medical doctors. The first case was diagnosed as a possible neuralgia due to congenital cervical spinal fusion. The second case had a radiographic study taken of the elbow and hand, which was negative and therefore no conclusive diagnosis or treatment was given. This article will discuss the anatomical path of the median and anterior interosseous nerves in the forearm, the possible areas of neural entrapment or irritation and the resulting symptoms and signs as compared to carpal tunnel syndrome. The patient’s presenting symptoms were found to be the most significant detail when differentiating the type of neurological entrapment. In both cases, the patients presented with a gradual progression of anterior forearm pain, numbness or discomfort that radiated to the hand and fingers. To find the cause of this repetitive type of irritation, the functional movement patterns of the upper extremity kinetic chain was assessed including the cervicothoracic and scapulothoracic regions. Provocative tests were used to confirm the site of irritation. The first case showed pronator quadratus weakness. The second patient’s symptoms were reproduced with resisted elbow flexion and pronation while digital pressure was applied to the median nerve. Acute care was directed at the specific area of irritation/inflammation with electrotherapeusis. The treatment also consisted of spinal and joint manipulation, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques, strengthening and endurance rehabilitation exercises aimed at restoring the proper kinematics of the upper extremity

  3. Effect of wrist angle on median nerve appearance at the proximal carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of wrist angle, sex, and handedness on the changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameters, namely longitudinal diameter (D1) and vertical diameter (D2). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel in both dominant and nondominant hands of men (n = 27) and women (n = 26). A total of seven wrist angles were examined: neutral; 15°, 30°, and 45° extension; and 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Our results indicated sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry of MNCSA, D1 and D2 measurements. MNCSA was significantly reduced when the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions. At flexion positions, D1 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In contrast, at extension positions, D2 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In conclusion, this study showed that MNCSA decreased as the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions in both dominant and nondominant hands of both sexes, whereas deformation of the median nerve differed between wrist flexion and extension.

  4. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluation of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chao; Dong, Hongjuan; Chu, Hong; Lu, Zuneng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To prospectively assess the effectiveness of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) by using clinical scores and nerve conduction studies (NCS). [Subjects and Methods] Forty-one patients enrolled in the study were clinically evaluated by a symptom severity scale (SSS) and functional status scale (FSS), and were electrophysiologically evaluated by conventional NCS; distal motor latency (DML), sensory conduction velocity (SCV), and difference in sensory latency between the median and ulnar nerves (ΔDSL) were measured. Subjects were treated with wrist splinting. Patients who showed no improvement in symptoms were treated with other conservative treatments, the remaining patients continued to wear splints. SSS, FSS, and NCS were evaluated after splinting as well. [Results] The follow-up was completed in 20 patients (31 wrists) with splinting. SSS and FSS decreased, the DML shortened and ΔDSL decreased significantly after splinting for 3.03 ± 1.16 months. There were significant correlations between SSS and DML, SCV of wrist digit 2, and SCV of wrist digit 4. No correlations were found between SSS and ΔDSL, and FSS and the parameters of NCS. [Conclusion] Neutral wrist nocturnal splinting is effective in at least short term for CTS patients. There is a weak correlation between clinical scores and NCS, which suggests that both approaches should be used to effectively assess the therapeutic effect of CTS treatment.

  5. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the median nerve: A cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a three-year-old child: A case report and comprehensive literature review

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Jenna-Lynn; Classen, Dale; Bruce, Garth; Kanthan, Rani

    2014-01-01

    A three-year-old boy was investigated for inexplicable incessant crying. On examination, his left wrist was mildly swollen (three to four months) and sensitive. Exploration and carpal tunnel decompression of the left wrist with incisional biopsy was performed for the presence of a fusiform swelling intimately associated with the median nerve. Histopathology revealed the presence of enlarged nerve bundles admixed with mature fat cells and diffuse fibroblastic proliferation. Three months later, he underwent urgent contralateral carpal tunnel decompression for a similar presentation. The final diagnosis was bilateral fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) of the median nerves causing acute bilateral compression neuropathy. FLH of the median nerve is an extremely unusual cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a young child presenting with ‘incessant crying’. A comprehensive review of FLH including epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, imaging, pathology, treatment and prognosis is discussed. PMID:25332651

  6. Changes in the Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon Geometry in the Carpal Tunnel Due to Force Production and Posture of Metacarpophalangeal Joint of the Index Finger: an MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joel R.; Paclet, Florent; Latash, Mark. L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is a disorder caused by increased pressure in the carpal tunnel associated with repetitive, stereotypical finger actions. Little is known about in vivo geometrical changes in the carpal tunnel caused by motion at the finger joints and exerting a fingertip force. Methods The hands and forearms of five subjects were scanned using a 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. The metacarpophalangeal joint of the index finger was placed in: flexion, neutral and extension. For each joint posture subjects either produced no active force (passive condition) or exerted a flexion force to resist a load (~4.0 N) at the fingertip (active condition). Changes in the radii of curvature, position and transverse plane area of the flexor digitorum profundus tendons at the carpal tunnel level were measured. Results The radius of curvature of the flexor digitorum profundus tendons, at the carpal tunnel level, was significantly affected by posture of the index finger metacarpophalangeal joint (p<0.05) and the radii was significantly different between fingers (p<0.05). Actively producing force caused a significant shift (p<0.05) in the flexor digitorum profundus tendons in the ventral (palmar) direction. No significant change in the area of an ellipse containing the flexor digitorum profundus tendons was observed between conditions. Interpretation The results show that relatively small changes in the posture and force production of a single finger can lead to significant changes in the geometry of all the flexor digitorum profundus tendons in the carpal tunnel. Additionally, voluntary force production at the fingertip increases the moment arm of the FDP tendons about the wrist joint. PMID:23219762

  7. Apparent Transverse Compressive Material Properties of the Digital Flexor Tendons and the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Main, Erin K; Goetz, Jessica E; Rudert, M James; Goreham-Voss, Curtis M; Brown, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a frequently encountered peripheral nerve disorder caused by mechanical insult to the median nerve, which may in part be a result of impingement by the adjacent digital flexor tendons. Realistic finite element (FE) analysis to determine contact stresses between the flexor tendons and median nerve depends upon the use of physiologically accurate material properties. To assess the transverse compressive properties of the digital flexor tendons and median nerve, these tissues from ten cadaveric forearm specimens were compressed transversely while under axial load. The experimental compression data were used in conjunction with an FE-based optimization routine to determine apparent hyperelastic coefficients (μ and α) for a first-order Ogden material property definition. The mean coefficient pairs were μ=35.3kPa, α =8.5 for the superficial tendons, μ=39.4kPa, α=9.2 for the deep tendons, μ=24.9kPa, α=10.9 for the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon, and μ=12.9kPa, α=6.5 for the median nerve. These mean Ogden coefficients indicate that the FPL tendon was more compliant at low strains than either the deep or superficial flexor tendons, and that there was no significant difference between superficial and deep flexor tendon compressive behavior. The median nerve was significantly more compliant than any of the flexor tendons. The material properties determined in this study can be used to better understand the functional mechanics of the carpal tunnel soft tissues and possible mechanisms of median nerve compressive insult, which may lead to the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:21194695

  8. The effect of excess body mass on the risk of carpal tunnel syndrome: a meta-analysis of 58 studies.

    PubMed

    Shiri, R; Pourmemari, M H; Falah-Hassani, K; Viikari-Juntura, E

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to estimate the effects of overweight and obesity on carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and to assess whether sex modifies the associations. Literature searches were conducted in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar and ResearchGate databases from 1953 to February 2015. Fifty-eight studies consisting of 1,379,372 individuals qualified for a meta-analysis. We used a random-effects meta-analysis, assessed heterogeneity and publication bias, and performed sensitivity analyses. Overweight increased the risk of CTS or carpal tunnel release 1.5-fold (pooled confounder-adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.47, 95% CI 1.37-1.57, N = 1,279,546) and obesity twofold (adjusted OR = 2.02, 95% CI 1.92-2.13, N = 1,362,207). Each one-unit increase in body mass index increased the risk of CTS by 7.4% (adjusted OR = 1.074, 95% CI 1.071-1.077, N = 1,258,578). Overweight and obesity had stronger effects on carpal tunnel release than CTS. The associations did not differ between men and women, and they were independent of study design. Moreover, the associations were not due to bias or confounding. Excess body mass markedly increases the risk of CTS. As the prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing globally, overweight-related CTS is expected to increase. Future studies should investigate whether a square-shaped wrist and exposure to physical workload factors potentiate the adverse effect of obesity on the median nerve.

  9. Sonographic assessment of carpal tunnel syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis: prevalence and correlation with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Omer; Kalyoncu, Umut; Akdogan, Ali; Karadag, Yesim Sucullu; Bilgen, Sule Apras; Ozbakır, Senay; Filippucci, Emilio; Kiraz, Sedat; Ertenli, Ihsan; Grassi, Walter; Calgüneri, Meral

    2012-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of the most frequent extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). High frequency ultrasonography (US) is a sensitive and specific method in diagnosis of CTS. This study is aimed to: firstly assess diameter frequency of CTS in RA with US and compare with a control group; secondly, investigate relationship of CTS with disease activity. One hundred consecutive RA patients (women/men: 78/22) fulfilling ACR 1987 RA criteria and 45 healthy controls (women/control: 34/11) were enrolled into study. Disease activity parameters, RA and CTS patient global assessment and health assessment questionnaire (HAQ-DI) were recorded. Both patient and control group were questioned about secondary causes of CTS, and Katz hand diagram, Boston CTS questionnaire and Phalen ve Tinel tests were applied once for each hand. Wrist joint and carpal tunnel were assessed with US grey scale and power Doppler US, then cross-sectional area of median nerve (CSA) was calculated. Patients with median nerve CSA between 10.0 and 13.0 mm(2) were evaluated with electromyography (EMG). CTS was diagnosed if CSA of median nerve >13.0 mm(2) or CTS was shown with NCS. Although there was no difference between RA patients and controls in age, sex, history of DM (+) and goitre, CTS was more frequent in RA group (respectively, 17.0% vs. 4.4%, P = 0.038). In RA group with CTS, age, history of DM, disease duration, HAQ-DI score, CTS patient global score, Boston symptom severity and functional status scores were elevated compared to without CTS [respectively, 57 (36-73) vs. 50 (24-76), P = 0.041; 35.3% vs. 6.0%, P < 0.001; 108 (12-396) months vs. 72 (6-360) months, P = 0.036; 1.93 (0.75-2.87) vs. 1.125 (0-2.75), P = 0.013; 52 (1-97) vs. 25 (0-91), P = 0.001; 2.81 (1.18-4.17) vs. 2.0 (1.0-4.01), P = 0.01; 3.37 (1.37-5.0) vs. 2.25 (1.0-5.0), P = 0.008]. No difference was found between CTS (+) and (-) RA patients in acute phase reactants, disease activity and US findings

  10. Comparison of Risk of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Patients with Distal Radius Fractures After 7 Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huan-Li; Wang, Gui-Bin; Jia, Yue-Qing; Zhu, Shi-Cai; Zhang, Feng-Fang; Liu, Hong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare risk of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in distal radius fracture (DRF) patients after 7 treatments using bridging external fixation (BrEF), non-bridging external fixation (non-BrEF), plaster fixation, K-wire fixation, dorsal plating fixation, volar plating fixation, and dorsal and volar plating by performing a network meta-analysis. Material/Methods An exhaustive search of electronic databases identified randomized controlled trails (RCTs) closely related to our study topic. The published articles were screened, based on predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria, to select high-quality studies for the present network meta-analysis. Data extracted from the selected studies were analyzed using STATA version 12.0 software. Results The literature search and selection process identified 12 eligible RCTs that contained a total of 1370 DRF patients (394 patients with BrEF, 377 patients with non-BrEF, 89 patients with K-wire fixation, 192 patients with plaster fixation, 42 patients with dorsal plating fixation, 152 patients with volar plating fixation, and 124 patients with dorsal and volar plating fixation). Our network meta-analysis results demonstrated no significant differences in CTS risk among the 7 treatments (P>0.05). The value of surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA), however, suggested that dorsal plating fixation is the optimal treatment, with the lowest risk of CTS in DRF patients (dorsal plating fixation: 89.2%; dorsal and volar plating: 57.8%; plaster fixation: 50.9%; non-BrEF: 50.6%; volar plating fixation: 39.6%; BrEF: 38.4%; K-wire fixation: 23.6%). Conclusions Our network meta-analysis provides evidence that dorsal plating fixation significantly decreases the risk of CTS and could be the method of choice in DRF patients. PMID:26391617

  11. Prevalence and incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome in a meat packing plant

    PubMed Central

    Gorsche, R. G.; Wiley, J. P.; Renger, R. F.; Brant, R. F.; Gemer, T. Y.; Sasyniuk, T. M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine prevalence and incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a modern meat packing plant. The secondary objective was to explore the relation between ethnicity and CTS. METHODS: Six hundred and sixty five workers were interviewed and examined to find the prevalence of CTS. Subsequently, 421 workers without CTS were followed up and examined at a median interval of 253 days; of those, 333 remained without CTS and were again examined at a median interval of 148 days. RESULTS: The prevalence and incidence of CTS was 21% and 11/100 person-years, respectively. The incidence for Asian mixed, white, and other ethnicities was 12.0, 12.2, and 7.2 cases/100 person- years, respectively. The observed incidence for men and women was 9.7 and 18.4 cases/100 person-years, respectively. This difference was not quite significant (p = 0.068) with an estimated relative risk (women v men) of 1.9 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.9 to 3.8). The interaction between sex and use of tools was significant (p = 0.04), however, although the relative risk for CTS in women who used tools was 4.2 the numbers were small and not significant. The relative risk for men who used tools was 0.64 and not significant. The percentage of incident cases with comorbid disease was only 6.3% (3/47). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence and incidence of CTS in this workforce were higher than in the general population. However, the prevalence of CTS in this modern, mechanised plant was not significantly different from that reported in older plants. No relation was found between ethnicity, age, body mass index, and CTS for either prevalence or incidence. Comorbid disease among the cases of CTS is significantly less than that found in other industry.   PMID:10474539

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome and computer exposure at work in two large complementary cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Mediouni, Z; Bodin, J; Dale, A M; Herquelot, E; Carton, M; Leclerc, A; Fouquet, N; Dumontier, C; Roquelaure, Y; Evanoff, B A; Descatha, A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The boom in computer use and concurrent high rates in musculoskeletal complaints and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among users have led to a controversy about a possible link. Most studies have used cross-sectional designs and shown no association. The present study used longitudinal data from two large complementary cohorts to evaluate a possible relationship between CTS and the performance of computer work. Settings and participants The Cosali cohort is a representative sample of a French working population that evaluated CTS using standardised clinical examinations and assessed self-reported computer use. The PrediCTS cohort study enrolled newly hired clerical, service and construction workers in several industries in the USA, evaluated CTS using symptoms and nerve conduction studies (NCS), and estimated exposures to computer work using a job exposure matrix. Primary and secondary outcome measures During a follow-up of 3–5 years, the association between new cases of CTS and computer work was calculated using logistic regression models adjusting for sex, age, obesity and relevant associated disorders. Results In the Cosali study, 1551 workers (41.8%) completed follow-up physical examinations; 36 (2.3%) participants were diagnosed with CTS. In the PrediCTS study, 711 workers (64.2%) completed follow-up evaluations, whereas 31 (4.3%) had new cases of CTS. The adjusted OR for the group with the highest exposure to computer use was 0.39 (0.17; 0.89) in the Cosali cohort and 0.16 (0.05; 0.59) in the PrediCTS cohort. Conclusions Data from two large cohorts in two different countries showed no association between computer work and new cases of CTS among workers in diverse jobs with varying job exposures. CTS is far more common among workers in non-computer related jobs; prevention efforts and work-related compensation programmes should focus on workers performing forceful hand exertion. PMID:26353869

  13. Relationship of Age, Body Mass Index, Wrist and Waist Circumferences to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Severity

    PubMed Central

    KOMURCU, Hatice Ferhan; KILIC, Selim; ANLAR, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has a multifactorial etiology involving systemic, anatomical, idiopathic, and ergonomic characteristics. In this study, an investigation of the relationship between the CTS degree established by electrophysiological measurements in patients with clinical CTS prediagnosis, and age, gender, body mass index (BMI), hand wrist circumference, and waist circumference measurements has been done. On 547 patients included in the study, motor and sensory conduction examinations of the median and ulnar nerve were done on one or two upper extremities thought to have CTS. In terms of CTS severity, the patients were divided into four groups (normal, mild, medium, and severe CTS). A total of 843 electrophysiological examinations were done consisting of 424 on the right hand wrist and 419 on the left hand wrist. When the age group of 18–35 years is taken as the reference group, the CTS development risk independent of BMI has been found to have increased by a factor of 1.86 for ages 36–64 years, and by 4.17 for ages 65 years and higher after adjustment for BMI. With respect to normal degree CTS group, the BMI were significantly different in groups with mild, medium, and severe CTS. The waist circumferences of groups with mild, medium, and severe CTS severity were found to be significantly higher in comparison to the normal reference group. When this value was corrected with BMI and re-examined the statistically significant differences persisted. The study identified a significant relationship between the CTS severity and age, BMI, waist circumference. PMID:24257492

  14. Personal and workplace psychosocial risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome: a pooled study cohort

    PubMed Central

    Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Eisen, Ellen A; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley; Hegmann, Kurt T; Thiese, Matthew S; Kapellusch, Jay M; Garg, Arun; Burt, Susan; Bao, Stephen; Silverstein, Barbara; Gerr, Fred; Merlino, Linda; Rempel, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Between 2001 and 2010, six research groups conducted coordinated multiyear, prospective studies of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) incidence in US workers from various industries and collected detailed subject-level exposure information with follow-up symptom, physical examination, electrophysiological measures and job changes. Objective This analysis of the pooled cohort examined the incidence of dominant-hand CTS in relation to demographic characteristics and estimated associations with occupational psychosocial factors and years worked, adjusting for confounding by personal risk factors. Methods 3515 participants, without baseline CTS, were followed-up to 7 years. Case criteria included symptoms and an electrodiagnostic study consistent with CTS. Adjusted HRs were estimated in Cox proportional hazard models. Workplace biomechanical factors were collected but not evaluated in this analysis. Results Women were at elevated risk for CTS (HR=1.30; 95% CI 0.98 to 1.72), and the incidence of CTS increased linearly with both age and body mass index (BMI) over most of the observed range. High job strain increased risk (HR=1.86; 95% CI 1.11 to 3.14), and social support was protective (HR=0.54; 95% CI 0.31 to 0.95). There was an inverse relationship with years worked among recent hires with the highest incidence in the first 3.5 years of work (HR=3.08; 95% CI 1.55 to 6.12). Conclusions Personal factors associated with an increased risk of developing CTS were BMI, age and being a woman. Workplace risk factors were high job strain, while social support was protective. The inverse relationship between CTS incidence and years worked among recent hires suggests the presence of a healthy worker survivor effect in the cohort. PMID:23645610

  15. Severity of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Diagnostic Accuracy of Hand and Body Anthropometric Measures

    PubMed Central

    Mondelli, Mauro; Farioli, Andrea; Mattioli, Stefano; Aretini, Alessandro; Ginanneschi, Federica; Greco, Giuseppe; Curti, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the diagnostic properties of hand/wrist and body measures according to validated clinical and electrophysiological carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) severity scales. Methods We performed a prospective case-control study. For each case, two controls were enrolled. Two five-stage clinical and electrophysiological scales were used to evaluate CTS severity. Anthropometric measurements were collected and obesity indicators and hand/wrist ratios were calculated. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were calculated separately by gender. Results We consecutively enrolled 370 cases and 747 controls. The wrist-palm ratio, waist-hip-height ratio and waist-stature ratio showed the highest proportion of cases with abnormal values in the severe stages of CTS for clinical and electrophysiological severity scales in both genders. Accuracy tended to increase with CTS severity for females and males. In severe stage, most of the indexes presented moderate accuracy in both genders. Among subjects with severe CTS, the wrist-palm ratio presented the highest AUC for hand measures in the clinical and electrophysiological severity scales both in females (AUC 0.83 and 0.76, respectively) and males (AUC 0.91 and 0.82, respectively). Among subjects with severe CTS, the waist-stature ratio showed the highest AUC for body measures in the clinical and electrophysiological severity scales both in females (AUC 0.78 and 0.77, respectively) and males (AUC 0.84 and 0.76, respectively). The results of waist-hip-height ratio AUC were similar. Conclusions Wrist-palm ratio, waist-hip-height ratio and waist-stature ratio could contribute to support the diagnostic hypothesis of severe CTS that however has to be confirmed by nerve conduction study. PMID:27768728

  16. Effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the treatment of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Kiyani, Abolghasem; Dehghan, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new and noninvasive treatment including extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of CTS. Materials and Methods: This study is a clinical trial conducted on 60 patients with moderate CTS in selected health centers of Isfahan Medical University from November 2014 to April 2015. Patients with CTS were randomly divided into two groups. Conservative treatment including wrist splint at night for 3 months, consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for 2 weeks, and oral consumption of Vitamin B1 for a month was recommended for both groups. The first group was treated with ESWT, one session per week for 4 weeks. Focus probe with 0.05, 0.07, 0.1, and 0.15 energy and shock numbers 800, 900, 1000, and 1100 were used from the first session to the fourth, respectively. The evaluated parameters were assessed before treatment and after 3 and 6 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 19, Student’s t-test, and Chi-square test. Results: All parameters were significantly decreased in the ESWT group after 3 months. These results remained almost constant after 6 months compared with 3 months after treatment. However, only two parameters considerably improved after 3 months of treatment in the control group. The entire indexes in the control group implicated the regression of results in long-term period. Conclusion: It is recommended to use ESWT as a conservative treatment in patients with CTS. PMID:27563630

  17. The relationship of trigger finger and flexor tendon volar migration after carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Bae, K W; Choy, W S

    2014-09-01

    It has been suggested that the increased frequency of trigger finger (TF) after carpal tunnel release (CTR) may be caused by the volar migration of the flexor tendons at the wrist altering the tendon biomechanics at the A1 pulley. This hypothesis has not been validated. We performed pre- and post-operative ultrasonography (USG) on the affected wrists of 92 patients who underwent CTR. Pre-operative USG was performed in neutral with no tendon loading; post-operative USG was performed in neutral unloaded and in various positions of wrist flexion whilst loading the flexor tendons with gripping. The mean volar migration of the flexor tendons after CTR was 2.2 (SD 0.4) mm in the unloaded neutral position. It was 1.8 (SD 0.4) mm in patients who did not develop TF and 2.5 (SD 0.5) mm in those who did (p = 0.0067). In loaded wrist flexion, the mean volar migration of flexor tendons after CTR in patients who did not develop TF and those who did was 2.1 and 3.0 mm in 0° flexion; 3.2 and 3.9 mm in 15° flexion; 4.3 and 5.1 mm in 30° flexion; and 4.9 and 5.8 mm in 45° flexion, respectively. There were significant differences between patients with and without TF at each flexion angle. Our data indicate that patients with greater volar migration of the flexor tendons after CTR are more likely to develop TF. This conclusion supports the hypothesis that the occurrence of TF after CTR may be caused by the bowstringing effects of the flexor tendons.

  18. Screening for Acromegaly in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Study (ACROCARP).

    PubMed

    Zoicas, F; Kleindienst, A; Mayr, B; Buchfelder, M; Megele, R; Schöfl, C

    2016-07-01

    Early diagnosis of acromegaly prevents irreversible comorbidities and facilitates surgical cure. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is common in acromegaly and patients have often undergone surgery for CTS prior to the diagnosis of acromegaly. We hypothesized that screening CTS-patients for acromegaly could facilitate active case-finding. We prospectively enrolled 196 patients [135 women, 56.9 (range 23-103) years] who presented with CTS for surgery. Patients were asked about 6 symptoms suggestive of acromegaly using a questionnaire calculating a symptom score (0-6 points), and insulin-like-growth factor 1 (IGF-1) was measured. If IGF-1 was increased, IGF-1 measurement was repeated, and random growth hormone (GH) and/or an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with assessment of GH-suppression were performed. The mean symptom score was 1.7±1.3 points. Three patients reported the maximal symptom score of 6 points, but none of them had an increased IGF-1. There was no correlation between the symptom score and IGF-1-SDS (standard deviation score) (r=0.026; p=0.71). Four patients had an IGF-1>2 SDS. In 2 patients acromegaly was ruled out using random GH and OGTT. One patient had normal IGF-1 and random GH at follow-up. One patient refused further diagnostics. In this prospective cohort of patients with CTS, the observed frequency of acromegaly was at most 0.51% (95% CI 0.03 to 2.83%). In this prospective study, none of the 196 patients with CTS had proven acromegaly. Thus, we see no evidence to justify general screening of patients with CTS for acromegaly.

  19. Screening for Acromegaly in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Study (ACROCARP).

    PubMed

    Zoicas, F; Kleindienst, A; Mayr, B; Buchfelder, M; Megele, R; Schöfl, C

    2016-07-01

    Early diagnosis of acromegaly prevents irreversible comorbidities and facilitates surgical cure. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is common in acromegaly and patients have often undergone surgery for CTS prior to the diagnosis of acromegaly. We hypothesized that screening CTS-patients for acromegaly could facilitate active case-finding. We prospectively enrolled 196 patients [135 women, 56.9 (range 23-103) years] who presented with CTS for surgery. Patients were asked about 6 symptoms suggestive of acromegaly using a questionnaire calculating a symptom score (0-6 points), and insulin-like-growth factor 1 (IGF-1) was measured. If IGF-1 was increased, IGF-1 measurement was repeated, and random growth hormone (GH) and/or an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with assessment of GH-suppression were performed. The mean symptom score was 1.7±1.3 points. Three patients reported the maximal symptom score of 6 points, but none of them had an increased IGF-1. There was no correlation between the symptom score and IGF-1-SDS (standard deviation score) (r=0.026; p=0.71). Four patients had an IGF-1>2 SDS. In 2 patients acromegaly was ruled out using random GH and OGTT. One patient had normal IGF-1 and random GH at follow-up. One patient refused further diagnostics. In this prospective cohort of patients with CTS, the observed frequency of acromegaly was at most 0.51% (95% CI 0.03 to 2.83%). In this prospective study, none of the 196 patients with CTS had proven acromegaly. Thus, we see no evidence to justify general screening of patients with CTS for acromegaly. PMID:26849823

  20. Relationship of age, body mass index, wrist and waist circumferences to carpal tunnel syndrome severity.

    PubMed

    Komurcu, Hatice Ferhan; Kilic, Selim; Anlar, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has a multifactorial etiology involving systemic, anatomical, idiopathic, and ergonomic characteristics. In this study, an investigation of the relationship between the CTS degree established by electrophysiological measurements in patients with clinical CTS prediagnosis, and age, gender, body mass index (BMI), hand wrist circumference, and waist circumference measurements has been done. On 547 patients included in the study, motor and sensory conduction examinations of the median and ulnar nerve were done on one or two upper extremities thought to have CTS. In terms of CTS severity, the patients were divided into four groups (normal, mild, medium, and severe CTS). A total of 843 electrophysiological examinations were done consisting of 424 on the right hand wrist and 419 on the left hand wrist. When the age group of 18-35 years is taken as the reference group, the CTS development risk independent of BMI has been found to have increased by a factor of 1.86 for ages 36-64 years, and by 4.17 for ages 65 years and higher after adjustment for BMI. With respect to normal degree CTS group, the BMI were significantly different in groups with mild, medium, and severe CTS. The waist circumferences of groups with mild, medium, and severe CTS severity were found to be significantly higher in comparison to the normal reference group. When this value was corrected with BMI and re-examined the statistically significant differences persisted. The study identified a significant relationship between the CTS severity and age, BMI, waist circumference. PMID:24257492

  1. Does sensory relearning improve tactile function after carpal tunnel decompression? A pragmatic, assessor-blinded, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Jerosch-Herold, C.; Houghton, J.; Miller, L.; Shepstone, L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome being effective in 80%–90% of cases, chronic numbness and hand disability can occur. The aim of this study was to investigate whether sensory relearning improves tactile discrimination and hand function after decompression. In a multi-centre, pragmatic, randomized, controlled trial, 104 patients were randomized to a sensory relearning (n = 52) or control (n = 52) group. A total of 93 patients completed a 12-week follow-up. Primary outcome was the shape-texture identification test at 6 weeks. Secondary outcomes were touch threshold, touch localization, dexterity and self-reported hand function. No significant group differences were seen for the primary outcome (Shape-Texture Identification) at 6 weeks or 12 weeks. Similarly, no significant group differences were observed on secondary outcomes, with the exception of self-reported hand function. A secondary complier-averaged-causal-effects analysis showed no statistically significant treatment effect on the primary outcome. Sensory relearning for tactile sensory and functional deficits after carpal tunnel decompression is not effective. Level of Evidence: II PMID:27402282

  2. [Outbreak of carpal tunnel syndrome of the upper limbs in automobile seat assemblers: results of exposure evaluation and clinical investigation].

    PubMed

    Barbieri, P G; Colombini, D; Rocco, A; Custureri, F; Paderno, G

    1996-01-01

    A group of 59 female workers in the sewing and upholstery departments of a factory manufacturing automobile seats underwent clinical and instrumental tests following reports of several cases of suspected carpal tunnel syndrome. A risk evaluation analysis for disorders attributable to repeated trauma of the upper limbs (WMSDs) was simultaneously carried out using the protocol recommended by the EPM Research Unit in Milan. Evidence was found of a high frequency of elementary actions associated with considerable muscular involvement along with inadequate recovery periods. The clinical investigation revealed an unusually high percentage of carpal tunnel syndromes, often associated with Guyon channel syndrome. This disorder affects males and females equally, is often bilateral, and is not associated with known non-occupational factors. The widespread outbreak of work-related musculo-skeletal disorders reported in the departments in question may have arisen from a combination of significant risk factors relating to the types of activities performed, and the long service of the workers. It is reasonable to assume that failure to adopt technical preventive and organisational measures may have stemmed primarily from a poor evaluation of the relevant occupational risks, and from many years of substandard health surveillance practices.

  3. Efficacy, safety, and cost of surgical versus nonsurgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yi-Ming; Wang, Xi-Shan; Wei, Zhi-Jian; Fan, Bao-You; Lin, Wei; Zhou, Xian-Hu; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common peripheral nerve entrapment disease. Either surgical or conservative intervention for CTS patients is needed to choose. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the clinical efficacy, safety, and cost of surgical versus nonsurgical intervention. Methods: The eligible studies were acquired from PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, Google, and Cochrane Library. The data were extracted by 2 of the coauthors independently and were analyzed by RevMan5.3. Standardized mean differences (SMDs), odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool and Newcastle–Ottawa Scale were used to assess risk of bias. Results: Thirteen studies including 9 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 4 observational studies were assessed. The methodological quality of the trials ranged from moderate to high. The difference of clinical efficacy was statistically significant between surgical and nonsurgical intervention, and nonsurgical treatment was more effective (OR = 2.35, 95%CI = 1.18–4.67, P = 0.01). Meanwhile, different results were discovered by subgroup analysis. The pooled results of function improvement, symptom improvement, neurophysiological parameters improvement, and cost of care at different follow-up times showed that the differences were not statistically significant between the 2 interventions. The difference of complications and side-effects was statistically significant and conservative treatment achieved better result than surgery (OR = 2.03, 95%CI = 1.28–3.22, P = 0.003). Sensitivity analysis proved the stability of the pooled results. Conclusion: Both surgical and conservative interventions had benefits in CTS. Nonsurgical treatment was more effective and safety than surgical treatment, but there were no significant differences in function improvement, symptom improvement, neurophysiological

  4. How to make electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome with normal distal conductions?

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Ju; Liao, Yi-Chu; Wei, Shiew-Jue; Tsai, Chi-Wei; Chang, Ming-Hong

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate which electrodiagnostic techniques are better in clinically diagnosed patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and patients with CTS with normal distal conduction study. A total of 230 clinically diagnosed patients with CTS and 100 normal control subjects were enrolled. All subjects were evaluated by eight electrodiagnostic techniques, including conventional conduction studies: median distal sensory latency and distal motor latency; short distance conduction studies across wrist, including wrist-palm sensory conduction time and wrist-palm motor conduction velocity; comparison of median sensory conduction across the wrist with radial or ulnar nerves in the same limb (median-radial sensory latency difference [M-R] or median-ulnar sensory latency difference [M-U]); and comparison of median wrist-palm and palm-index conduction, including distoproximal conduction time difference and distoproximal conduction time ratio. Normal limits were derived by calculating the mean ± 2 standard deviations from the data of the controls. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve with 95% confidence interval of each test were calculated. In clinically diagnosed patients with CTS, M-R is the best diagnostic technique with significant difference in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.912) compared with other tests except that of M-U. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of M-R were 84.3%, 98%, 99%, and 73.1%, respectively. Further evaluation of patients with CTS with normal distal latencies also revealed the best diagnostic value of M-R and M-U with significance to other tests in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. In clinical practice, after conventional median distal sensory latency and distal motor latency studies, the authors suggest performing

  5. Electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome: which transcarpal conduction technique is best?

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Hong; Liao, Yi-Chu; Lee, Yi-Chung; Hsieh, Peiyuan F; Liu, Lu-Han

    2009-10-01

    Transcarpal conduction techniques are commonly used to be supplementary techniques to distal sensory and motor latencies (DSL and DML) in the electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, which transcarpal conduction techniques, or combination of techniques, are the most sensitive for the electrodiagnosis of CTS is unknown. To determine which transcarpal conduction technique is the most sensitive for the electrodiagnosis of CTS, we prospectively conduct this study. Study subjects were 100 patients with CTS and 50 controls. In addition to DSL and DML determinations, all subjects were evaluated using four transcarpal conduction techniques. These were (1) median wrist-palm sensory conduction time (W-Psen CT); (2) median wrist-palm mixed nerve conduction time (W-Pmix CT); (3) the difference of conduction time across wrist between median and ulnar nerves (W-Pmix M-U CT); and (4) median wrist-palm motor conduction velocity (W-Pmot CV). The sensitivities and specificities of these tests were compared. Ninety patients had one or more electrophysiologic abnormalities. The DSL and DML diagnostic sensitivities were 74% and 72%, respectively. Better sensitivities were obtained with W-Psen CT (82%), W-Pmot CV (81%), W-Pmix CT (78%), and W-Pmix M-U CT (79%). Compared between four transcarpal conduction techniques, there was no significant difference in sensitivity. Of 26 patients with CTS with normal DSL, additional electrophysiologic abnormalities were revealed with W-Psen CT (30.7%), W-Pmot CV (53.8%), W-Pmix CT (30.7%), or W-Pmix M-U CT (38.5%). When W-Pmot CV was compared with W-Psen CT and W-Pmot CV versus W-Pmix CT, calculated probabilities (P = 0.07) showed a clear trend toward statistical significance. Furthermore, of 20 patients with normal DSL and DML, five patients had abnormality for W-Psen CT, eight for W-Pmot CV, four for W-Pmix CT, and six for W-Pmix M-U CT. On the basis of the results, we concluded that the most simple and reliable transcarpal

  6. Transverse ultrasound assessment of median nerve deformation and displacement in the human carpal tunnel during wrist movements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexiang; Zhao, Chunfeng; Passe, Sandra M; Filius, Anika; Thoreson, Andrew R; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, a compression neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist, are aggravated by wrist motion, but the effect of these motions on median nerve motion are unknown. To better understand the biomechanics of the abnormal nerve, it is first necessary to understand normal nerve movement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the deformation and displacement of the normal median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel level on transverse ultrasound images during different wrist movements, to have a baseline for comparison with abnormal movements. Dynamic ultrasound images of both wrists of 10 asymptomatic volunteers were obtained during wrist maximal flexion, extension and ulnar deviation. To simplify the analysis, the initial and final shape and position of the median nerve were measured and analyzed. The circularity of the median nerve was significantly increased and the aspect ratio and perimeter were significantly decreased in the final image compared with the first image during wrist flexion with finger extension, wrist flexion with finger flexion and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (p < 0.01). There were significant differences in median nerve displacement vector between finger flexion, wrist flexion with finger extension and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (all p's < 0.001). The mean amplitudes of median nerve motion in wrist flexion with finger extension (2.36 ± 0.79 normalized units [NU]), wrist flexion with finger flexion (2.46 ± 0.84 NU) and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (2.86 ± 0.51 NU) were higher than those in finger flexion (0.82 ± 0.33 NU), wrist extension with finger extension (0.77 ± 0.46 NU) and wrist extension with finger flexion (0.81 ± 0.58 NU) (p < 0.0001). In the normal carpal tunnel, wrist flexion and ulnar deviation could induce significant transverse displacement and deformation of the median nerve.

  7. Carpal tunnel syndrome due to an atypical deep soft tissue leiomyoma: The risk of misdiagnosis and mismanagement

    PubMed Central

    Chalidis, Byron E; Dimitriou, Christos G

    2007-01-01

    Background Leiomyomas of the deep soft tissue are quite uncommon and occur even more rarely in upper extremity. Case presentation A 32-year old manual laborer man presented with a two-year history of numbness, tingling and burning pain in the palmar surface of the left hand and fingers. His medical history was unremarkable and no trauma episode was reported. According to the clinical examination and the result of median nerve conduction study (NCS) the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome was established. Operative release of the transverse carpal ligament was subsequently performed but the patient experienced only temporary relief of his symptoms. MRI examination revealed a deep palmary located mass with well-defined margins and ovoid shape. Intraoperatively, the tumor was in continuity with the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon of the middle finger causing substantial compression to median nerve. Histopathological findings of the resected mass were consistent with leiomyoma. After two years the patient was pain-free without signs of tumor recurrence. Conclusion Despite the fact that reports on deep soft tissue leiomyoma are exceptional, this tumor had to be considered as differential diagnosis in painful non-traumatic hand syndromes especially in young patients. PMID:17686170

  8. Clinical course, costs and predictive factors for response to treatment in carpal tunnel syndrome: the PALMS study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common neuropathy of the upper limb and a significant contributor to hand functional impairment and disability. Effective treatment options include conservative and surgical interventions, however it is not possible at present to predict the outcome of treatment. The primary aim of this study is to identify which baseline clinical factors predict a good outcome from conservative treatment (by injection) or surgery in patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Secondary aims are to describe the clinical course and progression of CTS, and to describe and predict the UK cost of CTS to the individual, National Health Service (NHS) and society over a two year period. Methods/Design In this prospective observational cohort study patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms typical of CTS and in whom the diagnosis is confirmed by nerve conduction studies are invited to participate. Data on putative predictive factors are collected at baseline and follow-up through patient questionnaires and include standardised measures of symptom severity, hand function, psychological and physical health, comorbidity and quality of life. Resource use and cost over the 2 year period such as prescribed medications, NHS and private healthcare contacts are also collected through patient self-report at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. The primary outcome used to classify treatment success or failures will be a 5-point global assessment of change. Secondary outcomes include changes in clinical symptoms, functioning, psychological health, quality of life and resource use. A multivariable model of factors which predict outcome and cost will be developed. Discussion This prospective cohort study will provide important data on the clinical course and UK costs of CTS over a two-year period and begin to identify predictive factors for treatment success from conservative and surgical interventions. PMID:24507749

  9. Effect of Vitamin B6 on Clinical Symptoms and Electrodiagnostic Results of Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Mahnaz; Andalib, Sasan; Bakhti, Shohreh; Ayromlou, Hormoz; Aghili, Alireza; Talebi, Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) refers to a cluster of signs and symptoms that stems from compression of the median nerve traveling through carpal tunnel. Surgery is a definite treatment for CTS; however, many conservative therapies have been proposed. The present study set out to assess the effect of vitamin B6 in patients with CTS. Methods: Forty patients (67 hands) with mild-moderate CTS were initially selected and randomly assigned into two groups as follows: 1) Case group with 20 subjects (32 affected hands) receiving vitamin B6 (120 mg/day for 3 months) and splinting. 2) Control group with 19 subjects (35 affected hands) only received splinting. One subject from the control group dispensed with continuing participation in the research. Daily symptoms and electrodiagnostic (NCV-EMG) results were assessed at baseline and after 3 months. Results: Nocturnal awakening frequency due to pain, daily pain, daily pain frequency, daily pain persistence, hand numbness, hand weakness, hand tingling, severity of nocturnal numbness and tingling, nocturnal awakening frequency owing to hand numbness and tingling, and clumsiness in handling objects improved significantly in the vitamin B6-treated patients; even so, only problem with opening a jam bottle and handling phone significantly reduced in the control group. The median nerve sensory latency mean decreased following the treatment; and the median nerve sensory amplitude mean and sensory conduction velocity mean increased. Conclusion: The present study suggests that vitamin B6 treatment improves clinical symptoms and sensory electrodiagnostic results in CTS patients, and thus is recommended for CTS treatment. PMID:24312849

  10. The effect of local corticosteroid injection on F-wave conduction velocity and sympathetic skin response in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Orhan; Aygül, Recep; Kotan, Dilcan; Ozdemir, Gökhan; Odabaş, Faruk Omer; Kaya, M Dursun; Ulvi, Hızır

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of steroid injection for the treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), with F-wave parameters and sympathetic skin response (SSR). Seventeen hands of 10 women patients were treated with local steroid injection with 2-month follow-up. All patients underwent single injection into the carpal tunnel. Response to injection was measured nerve conduction studies (NCSs), median nerve F waves, and SSR before and after treatment. To determine the normal values, 42 hands of 21 healthy women were also studied. There was a significant improvement of sensory and motor nerve conduction values when compared to baseline values (P < 0.01). At the end of follow-up period, the median sensory distal latency and the sensory latency differences between the median and the ulnar nerve were improved 35 and 65%, respectively. The maximum, mean F-wave amplitudes and chronodispersion showed a slight improvement with respect to baseline values and controls, but statistical significance was not achieved after treatment. Although no statistically significant improvements were observed in SSR parameters, slightly decreased amplitudes and increased habituation of SSR were noted at the end of the treatment. The present study shows that the local steroid injection results in improvement in NCSs values, but the F-wave parameters were not effectual in short-term outcome of CTS treatment. These findings suggest that the sensory latency differences between the median and the ulnar wrist-to-digit 4 are better parameters in the median nerve recovery after treatment than the median sensory distal latency. Furthermore, the SSR does not seem to be a sensitive method in follow-up of CTS treatment.

  11. Effect of Linum usitatissimum L. (linseed) oil on mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is known as the most common entrapment neuropathy. Conservative treatments cannot reduce the symptomatic severity satisfactorily; therefore, effectiveness of Linum usitatissimum L. (linseed) oil on carpal tunnel syndrome, as a complementary treatment, was evaluated in the current study. Linseed oil is a well-known preparation in Iranian traditional medicine and its analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects have been shown in previous studies. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted. One hundred patients (155 hands) with idiopathic mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome aged between 18 and 65 years old were randomized in two parallel groups. These two groups were treated during 4 weeks with topical placebo and linseed oil. In addition, a night wrist splint was prescribed for both groups. Symptomatic severity and functional status were measured using Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. In addition, median sensory nerve conduction velocity, motor distal latency, sensory distal latency and compound latency as electrodiagnostic parameters were measured at baseline and after the intervention period. Results After the intervention, significant improvement was observed regarding Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire symptomatic severity and functional status mean differences (p <0.001) in the linseed oil group compared with those in the placebo group. Also, regarding the mean differences of both groups, significant improvement of nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve was seen in the linseed oil group by a value of 2.38 m/sec (p < 0.05). However, motor distal latency and sensory distal latency of the median nerve showed no between-group significant changes (p = 0.14 for both items). Finally, compound latency was improved slightly in the case group, comparing mean differences between the groups (p <0.05). No significant adverse events were reported from using linseed

  12. Mild leptospirosis with three-year persistence of IgG- and IgM-antibodies, initially manifesting as carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Sehnal, Ernst; Stanek, Gerold

    2005-08-01

    Long-term persistence of IgG- and IgM-antibodies against leptospira after mild leptospirosis has not been reported. In a 45-year-old female pet-shop worker with carpal tunnel syndrome, accompanied by arthralgias, coughing, repeatedly elevated temperature, followed by easy fatigability, personality change, memory and speech disturbance, blurred vision, myalgia and swollen lymph nodes, leptospirosis was diagnosed, based upon history, clinical findings, and serological investigations. After the described symptoms had disappeared following doxycyclin for 2 weeks, IgG- and IgM-antibodies against leptospira remained positive during the next three years. This case illustrates that leptospirosis may start as carpal tunnel syndrome and that the severity of leptospirosis does not seem to be related to the intensity of the humoral immune response against the causative agent. PMID:16038755

  13. Association between the catechol-o-methyltransferase val158met polymorphism with susceptibility and severity of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eroğlu, P; Görükmez, O; Özemri Sağ, Ş; Yakut, T

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy of the upper extremity. In this study, we aimed to clarify the relationships between the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene Val158Met (rs4680) polymorphism and development, functional and clinical status of CTS. Ninety-five women with electro diagnostically confirmed CTS and 95 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The functional and clinical status of the patients was measured by the Turkish version of the Boston Questionnaire and intensity of pain related to the past 2 weeks was evaluated on a visual analog scale (VAS). The Val158Met polymorphism was determined using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), method. We divided patients according to the genotypes of the Val158Met polymorphism as Val/Val, Val/Met and Met/Met. There were not any significant differences in terms of Val158Met polymorphisms between patients and healthy controls (p >0.05). We also did not find any relationships between the Val158Met polymorphism and CTS (p >0.05). In conclusion, although we did not find any relationships between CTS and the Val158Met polymorphism, we could not generalize this result to the general population. Future studies are warranted to conclude precise associations.

  14. One-year Incidence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Latino Poultry Processing Workers and Other Latino Manual Workers

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Michael S.; Walker, Francis O.; Newman, Jill C.; Schulz, Mark R.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Mora, Dana; Chen, Haiying; Eaton, Bethany; Quandt, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) over one year in Latino poultry processing workers. Methods Symptoms and nerve conduction studies were used to identify Latino poultry processing workers (106 wrists) and Latinos in other manual labor occupations (257 wrists) that did not have CTS at baseline, and these individuals were then evaluated in the same manner one year later. Results Based on wrists, the one-year incidence of CTS was higher in poultry processing workers than non-poultry manual workers (19.8% vs. 11.7%, p = 0.022). Poultry workers had a higher odds (1.89; p = 0.089) of developing CTS over one year compared to non-poultry manual workers. Discussion Latino poultry processing workers have an incidence of CTS that is possibly higher than Latinos in other manual labor positions. Latino poultry workers’ high absolute and relative risk of CTS likely results from the repetitive and strenuous nature of poultry processing work. PMID:23996875

  15. Diagnostic Significance of Ultrasonographic Measurements and Median-Ulnar Ratio in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Correlation with Nerve Conduction Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mesci, Nilgün; Çetinkaya, Yilmaz; Geler Külcü, Duygu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We determined the reliability of ultrasonography (US) measurements for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and their correlation with symptom duration and electrophysiology findings. We determined whether the ratio of the median-to-ulnar cross-sectional areas (CSAs) can support CTS diagnoses. Methods The pisiform CSA (CSApisiform), swelling ratio (SR), palmar bowing, and CSApisiform/ulnar CSA (CSAulnar) measurements made in two subgroups of CTS patients (having sensory affection alone or having both sensory and motor affection) were compared with controls. CSAulnar was measured in Guyon's canal at the level of most-protuberant portion of the pisiform bone. Results The values of all of the measured US parameters were higher in patients with CTS (n=50) than in controls (n=62). CSApisiform could be used to diagnose CTS of mild severity. All of the parameters were positively correlated with the distal latency of the compound muscle action potential, and all of them except for SR were negatively correlated with the sensory nerve conduction velocity. A CSApisiform/CSAulnar ratio of ≥1.79 had a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 76% for diagnosing CTS. Conclusions Only CSApisiform measurements were reliable for diagnosing early stages of CTS, and CSApisiform/CSAulnar had a lower diagnostic value for diagnosing CTS. PMID:27095524

  16. Pooling job physical exposure data from multiple independent studies in a consortium study of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kapellusch, Jay M.; Garg, Arun; Bao, Stephen S.; Silverstein, Barbara A.; Burt, Susan E.; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley A.; Gerr, Frederic E.; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Hegmann, Kurt T.; Merlino, Linda A.; Rempel, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Pooling data from different epidemiological studies of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) is necessary to improve statistical power and to more precisely quantify exposure–response relationships for MSDs. The pooling process is difficult and time-consuming, and small methodological differences could lead to different exposure–response relationships. A subcommittee of a six-study research consortium studying carpal tunnel syndrome: (i) visited each study site, (ii) documented methods used to collect physical exposure data and (iii) determined compatibility of exposure variables across studies. Certain measures of force, frequency of exertion and duty cycle were collected by all studies and were largely compatible. A portion of studies had detailed data to investigate simultaneous combinations of force, frequency and duration of exertions. Limited compatibility was found for hand/wrist posture. Only two studies could calculate compatible Strain Index scores, but Threshold Limit Value for Hand Activity Level could be determined for all studies. Challenges of pooling data, resources required and recommendations for future researchers are discussed. PMID:23697792

  17. Carpal tunnel syndrome and work organisation in repetitive work: a cross sectional study in France. Study Group on Repetitive Work

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, A.; Franchi, P.; Cristofari, M. F.; Delemotte, B.; Mereau, P.; Teyssier-Cotte, C.; Touranchet, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the determinants of signs of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in repetitive industrial work, with special attention to occupational constraints at group level and management practices of the companies. METHOD: A cross sectional study was conducted in three sectors: assembly line; clothing and shoe industry; food industry. A total of 1210 workers in repetitive work, from 53 different companies, was compared with a control group of 337 workers. Constraints at the workplace were partly self declared, and partly assessed by the occupational physicians in charge of the employees of the company. The definition of CTS was based on a standardised clinical examination. RESULTS: CTS was associated with repetitive work, especially packaging. It was more frequent among subjects who declared psychological and psychosomatic problems and those with a body mass index > or = 27. Dissatisfaction with work, lack of job control, short cycle time, and having to press repeatedly with the hand were associated with the syndrome. An odds ratio (OR) of 2.24 was found for "just in time" production. CONCLUSION: The results emphasise the complexity of the determinants of CTS, the role of psychosocial factors at work and the potentially negative effects of some practices of the companies aimed at enhancing their competitiveness.   PMID:9624269

  18. A longitudinal study of industrial and clerical workers: incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome and assessment of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gell, Nancy; Werner, Robert A; Franzblau, Alfred; Ulin, Sheryl S; Armstrong, Thomas J

    2005-03-01

    This study followed workers over an extended period of time to identify factors which may influence the onset of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). The purpose was to evaluate incidence of CTS and to create a predictive model of factors that play a role in the development of CTS. This prospective study followed 432 industrial and clerical workers over 5.4 years. Incident cases were defined as workers who had no prior history of CTS at baseline testing and were diagnosed with CTS during the follow-up period or at the follow-up screening. On the basis of logistic regression, significant predictors for CTS include baseline median-ulnar peak latency difference, a history of wrist/hand/finger tendonitis, a history of numbness, tingling, burning, and/or pain in the hand, and work above the action level of the peak force and hand activity level threshold limit value. This longitudinal study supports findings from previous cross-sectional studies identifying both work related ergonomic stressors and physical factors as independent risk factors for CTS.

  19. Carpal tunnel syndrome: a case-control study evaluating its relationship with body mass index and hand and wrist measurements.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J E; Davis, T R C

    2008-08-01

    This case-control study investigated the associations between the body mass index (BMI), hand and wrist measurements and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The hands and wrists of 50 patients with CTS and 50 age- and sex-matched controls were measured. The right and left wrist indices (wrist depth/wrist width) were significantly greater in CTS patients (mean = 0.71. SD = 0.04) than in the controls (mean = 0.69 SD = 0.04). The hand index (hand length/palm width) and BMI were not significantly different in the two groups. The hand, but not the wrist, index was found to correlate with the BMI. These results provide some support for a causative association between wrist morphometry, as measured by the wrist index, and CTS, but this difference is too small to be of diagnostic value in clinical or epidemiological practice. The results could also suggest that the previously reported association between CTS and the hand index may be secondary to differences in the BMI.

  20. An ergonomics study on the evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome among Chikan embroidery workers of West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Somnath; Chakrabarty, Sabarni; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Dev, Samrat; Das, Tamal; Banerjee, Sunetra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chikan embroidery is a popular handicraft in India that involves hand-intensive stitching while seated in a static posture with the upper back curved and the head bent over the fabric. Women perform most Chikan embroidery. Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the repetitive nature of this work among female Chikan embroiderers by measuring the prevalence of upper extremity discomfort and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods: The Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire was used to analyze the extent of upper extremity pain symptomology. The repetitive nature of Chikan embroidery work was evaluated using the Assessment of Repetitive Tasks of the upper limbs tool (ART). Motor nerve conduction studies of median and ulnar nerves were performed with embroidery workers and a control group to determine the risk of CTS. Results: Among embroidery workers, the prevalence of wrist pain was 68% and forearm pain was 60%. The embroiderers also commonly reported Tingling and numbness in the hands and fingertips. The ART analysis found that Chikan embroidery is a highly repetitive task and nerve conduction studies showed that the embroidery workers were more likely to experience CTS than women in the control group. Conclusions: Chikan embroidery is a hand-intensive occupation involving repetitive use of hands and wrists and this study population is at risk of experiencing CTS. Future research should explore the potential benefits of ergonomics measures including incorporating breaks, stretching exercises, and the use of wrist splints to reduce repetitive strain and the probability of developing CTS. PMID:25658674

  1. Diagnostic value of median nerve ultrasonography for screening of carpal tunnel syndrome in hypothyroid patients: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Mirzaasgari, Zahra; Rohani, Mohammad; Safdarian, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common peripheral entrapment neuropathy in patients with hypothyroid. The diagnosis of CTS is usually clinical and confirmed by electrodiagnostic (EDX) procedures. This study aimed to describe the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography (US) as an alternative method to nerve conduction study (NCS) for the diagnosis of subclinical CTS in patients with hypothyroidism. Methods: Between April 2013 and November 2014, from the patients with the diagnosis of hypothyroidism referring to the institute of endocrinology and metabolism of Firoozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran, those who met our inclusion criteria entered this cross-sectional study. The patients divided into two groups of subclinical CTS with the age- and gender-matched control group. US measurements of the median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA) in the CT inlet were compared with the NCS results as the gold standard diagnostic test. Results: A total number of 152 wrists of 76 hypothyroid patients were examined in this study. The mean of median nerve CSA at the tunnel inlet was 9.96 ± 2.20 mm2 for the CTS group and 7.08 ± 1.38 mm2 for the control group (P < 0.05). 31 wrists (20.4%) were diagnosed as CTS using NCS while US diagnosed 19 wrists (12.5%) as CTS. Using receiver-operating-characteristics analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of US at the diagnosis of CTS were 45.0 and 95.8%, respectively, with a median nerve CSA cutoff point of 9.8 mm2. Positive and negative predictive values of US were 87.2 and 85.5%, respectively, with a test accuracy of 85.5%. Conclusion: According to our findings, US has an acceptable diagnostic value to confirm CTS in hypothyroid patients. However, it may not replace NCS due to low sensitivity. PMID:27326360

  2. Carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, glucosamine and chondroitin, hypnosis in pain management, marijuana for pain.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Scott M

    2007-01-01

    This feature presents information for patients in a question and answer format. It is written to simulate actual questions that many pain patients ask and to provide answers in a context and language that most pain patients will comprehend. Issues addressed in this issue are carpel tunnel syndrome, fibromyalgia, glucosamine and chondroitin, hypnosis, marijuana. PMID:17844729

  3. Percutaneous Creation of Bare Intervascular Tunnels for Salvage of Thrombosed Hemodialysis Fistulas Without Recanalizable Outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu; Wang, Yen-Chi; Weng, Mei-Jui

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThis study aimed to retrospectively assess the efficacy of a bare intervascular tunnel for salvage of a thrombosed hemodialysis fistula. We examined the clinical outcomes and provided follow-up images of the bare intervascular tunnel.Materials and MethodsEight thrombosed fistulas lacked available recanalizable outflow veins were included in this study. These fistulas were salvaged by re-directing access site flow to a new outflow vein through a percutaneously created intervascular tunnel without stent graft placement. The post-intervention primary and secondary access patency rates were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method.ResultsThe procedural and clinical success rates were 100 %. Post-intervention primary and secondary access patency at 300 days were 18.7 ± 15.8 and 87.5 ± 11.7 %, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 218.7 days (range 10–368 days). One patient died of acute myocardial infarction 10 days after the procedure. No other major complications were observed. Minor complications, such as swelling, ecchymosis, and pain around the tunnel, occurred in all of the patients.ConclusionsPercutaneous creation of a bare intervascular tunnel is a treatment option for thrombosed hemodialysis fistulas without recanalizable outflow in selected patients.

  4. Escharotomies, fasciotomies and carpal tunnel release in burn patients--review of the literature and presentation of an algorithm for surgical decision making.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, N S; Piccolo, M S; Piccolo, P D P; Piccolo-Daher, R; Piccolo, N D P; Piccolo, M T S

    2007-06-01

    Escharotomies are usually performed in patients with circumferential third degree burns of the extremities or anterior trunk. Fasciotomies are recommended for patients who sustained high voltage (or associated crush) injuries, with entrance or exit wounds in one or more extremities. Carpal tunnel release is practiced routinely in some services for cases of electrical injury. We have reviewed the literature which provides relatively little information as to when should these procedures actually be performed and what would happen if they were not done. We present a series of patients treated at our institution when an algorithm was used for surgical decision making as to when (or not) to operate (perform an escharotomy, a fasciotomy or a carpal tunnel release), based on clinical signs and monitoring alternatives, using the oximeter and the Doppler flowmeter. 13 938 burn patients were treated at our institution during the year of 2005. Of these, 571, with an average of 22.3 % TBSA, were treated as inpatients. Of these, 58 (10.3 %) had circumferential or electrical burns of one or more extremities. Patients were monitored hourly from admission and decision to operate was based on clinical signs and in absent or below 90 % oximetry, regardless of Doppler flow signs. 68 % were males, 6 (11.3 %) patients had immediate escharotomies, while 4 (7.5 %) had immediate fasciotomies. 2 of these patients were operated regardless of positive Doppler sign but no oximetry. All patients recovered oximetry over 90 % immediately after the operations. 3 patients had negative Doppler sign but oximetry > 90 % and were not operated. 3 patients had carpal tunnel releases based on oximetry < 90 % and symptoms of compression of the median nerve. Patients who were not operated fared well with no signs or symptoms of impairment of circulation or nerve damage up to their 3 and 6 months reevaluations. PMID:17602377

  5. Complex regional pain syndrome and acute carpal tunnel syndrome following radial artery cannulation: a neurological perspective and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, Reynaldo P

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) associated with acute carpal tunnel syndrome (aCTS) developed in a 38-year-old right-handed man following radial artery cannulation (RAC) during the course of lumbar spine surgery. Inciting events and risk factors that might have led to these complications included: multiple arterial punctures and subsequent hematoma formation, radial artery spasm compounded by aggressive hemostasis, anatomical changes in the wrists related to repetitive manual activities in the workplace, and possible protracted hyperextension of the wrists during perioperative and operative procedure. Although CRPS is considered a rare complication of RAC, the condition is disabling and debilitating, especially when associated with aCTS. PMID:25621693

  6. Central sensitization does not identify patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who are likely to achieve short-term success with physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; de-la-Llave-Rincon, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Pareja, Juan A

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to identify whether hyperexcitability of the central nervous system is a prognostic factor for individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) likely to experience rapid and clinical self-reported improvement following a physical therapy program including soft tissue mobilization and nerve slider neurodynamic interventions. Women presenting with clinical and electrophysiological findings of CTS were involved in a prospective single-arm trial. Participants underwent a standardized examination and then a physical therapy session. The physical therapy sessions included both soft tissue mobilization directed at the anatomical sites of potential median nerve entrapment and a passive nerve slider neurodynamic technique targeted to the median nerve. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the median, radial and ulnar nerves, C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, carpal tunnel and tibialis anterior muscle were assessed bilaterally. Additionally, thermal detection and pain thresholds were measured over the carpal tunnel and thenar eminence bilaterally to evaluate central nervous system excitability. Subjects were classified as responders (having achieved a successful outcome) or non-responders based on self-perceived recovery. Variables were entered into a stepwise logistic regression model to determine the most accurate variables for determining prognosis. Data from 72 women were included in the analysis, of which 35 experienced a successful outcome (48.6%). Three variables including PPT over the C5-C6 joint affected side <137 kPa, HPT carpal tunnel affected side <39.6º and general health >66 points were identified. If 2 out of 3 variables were present (LR + 14.8), the likelihood of success increased from 48.6 to 93.3%. We identified 3 factors that may be associated with a rapid clinical response to both soft tissue mobilization and nerve slider neurodynamic techniques targeted to the median nerve in women presenting with CTS. Our results support that

  7. Palmitoylethanolamide, a neutraceutical, in nerve compression syndromes: efficacy and safety in sciatic pain and carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keppel Hesselink, Jan M; Kopsky, David J

    2015-01-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous lipid modulator in animals and humans, and has been evaluated since the 1970s as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug in more than 30 clinical trials, in a total of ~6,000 patients. PEA is currently available worldwide as a nutraceutical in different formulations, with and without excipients. Here we describe the results of all clinical trials evaluating PEA’s efficacy and safety in nerve compression syndromes: sciatic pain and pain due to carpal tunnel syndrome, and review preclinical evidence in nerve impingement models. Both the pharmacological studies as well as the clinical trials supported PEA’s action as an analgesic compound. In total, eight clinical trials have been published in such entrapment syndromes, and 1,366 patients have been included in these trials. PEA proved to be effective and safe in nerve compression syndromes. In one pivotal, double blind, placebo controlled trial in 636 sciatic pain patients, the number needed to treat to reach 50% pain reduction compared to baseline was 1.5 after 3 weeks of treatment. Furthermore, no drug interactions or troublesome side effects have been described so far. Physicians are not always aware of PEA as a relevant and safe alternative to opioids and co-analgesics in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Especially since the often prescribed co-analgesic pregabaline has been proven to be ineffective in sciatic pain in a double blind enrichment trial, PEA should be considered as a new and safe treatment option for nerve compression syndromes. PMID:26604814

  8. Ultrasound assessment on selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part I: Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb - excluding carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the methods for imaging entrapment neuropathies, post-traumatic changes to nerves, nerve tumors and postoperative complications to nerves. This type of examination is becoming more and more popular, not only for economic reasons, but also due to its value in making accurate diagnosis. It provides a very precise assessment of peripheral nerve trunk pathology - both in terms of morphology and localization. During examination there are several options available to the specialist: the making of a dynamic assessment, observation of pain radiation through the application of precise palpation and the comparison of resultant images with the contra lateral limb. Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb are discussed in this study, with the omission of median nerve neuropathy at the level of the carpal canal, as extensive literature on this subject exists. The following pathologies are presented: pronator teres muscle syndrome, anterior interosseus nerve neuropathy, ulnar nerve groove syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome, Guyon's canal syndrome, radial nerve neuropathy, posterior interosseous nerve neuropathy, Wartenberg's disease, suprascapular nerve neuropathy and thoracic outlet syndrome. Peripheral nerve examination technique has been presented in previous articles presenting information about peripheral nerve anatomy [Journal of Ultrasonography 2012; 12 (49): 120-163 - Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the example of the median nerve; Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb; Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb]. In this article potential compression sites of particular nerves are discussed, taking into account pathomechanisms of damage, including predisposing anatomical variants (accessory muscles). The parameters of ultrasound assessment have been established - echogenicity and echostructure, thickness (edema and related increase

  9. Associations of cardiovascular risk factors, carotid intima-media thickness and manifest atherosclerotic vascular disease with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The role of atherosclerosis in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has not previously been addressed in population studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of cardiovascular risk factors, carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), and clinical atherosclerotic diseases with CTS. Methods In this cross sectional study, the target population consisted of subjects aged 30 or over who had participated in the national Finnish Health Survey in 2000-2001. Of the 7977 eligible subjects, 6254 (78.4%) were included in our study. Carotid IMT was measured in a sub-sample of subjects aged 45 to 74 (N = 1353). Results Obesity (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-5.4), high LDL cholesterol (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.6-9.1 for >190 vs. <129 mg/dL), high triglycerides (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2-6.1 for >200 vs. <150 mg/dL), hypertension (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.6-7.4) and cardiac arrhythmia (OR 10.2, 95% CI 2.7-38.4) were associated with CTS in subjects aged 30-44. In the age group of 60 years or over, coronary artery disease (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.5), valvular heart disease (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.0) and carotid IMT (1.4, 95% CI 0.9-2.1 for each 0.23 mm increase) were associated with CTS. Carotid IMT was associated with CTS only in subjects with hypertension or clinical atherosclerotic vascular disease, or in those who were exposed to physical workload factors. Conclusions Our findings suggest an association between CTS and cardiovascular risk factors in young people, and carotid IMT and clinical atherosclerotic vascular disease in older people. CTS may either be a manifestation of atherosclerosis, or both conditions may share similar risk factors. PMID:21521493

  10. Incidence rates of in-hospital carpal tunnel syndrome in the general population and possible associations with marital status

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Stefano; Baldasseroni, Alberto; Curti, Stefania; Cooke, Robin MT; Bena, Antonella; de Giacomi, Giovanna; dell'Omo, Marco; Fateh-Moghadam, Pirous; Melani, Carla; Biocca, Marco; Buiatti, Eva; Campo, Giuseppe; Zanardi, Francesca; Violante, Francesco S

    2008-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a socially relevant condition associated with biomechanical risk factors. We evaluated age-sex-specific incidence rates of in-hospital cases of CTS in central/northern Italy and explored relations with marital status. Methods Seven regions were considered (overall population, 14.9 million) over 3–6-year periods between 1997 and 2002 (when out-of-hospital CTS surgery was extremely rare). Incidence rates of in-hospital cases of CTS were estimated based on 1) codified demographic, diagnostic and intervention data in obligatory discharge records from all Italian public/private hospitals, archived (according to residence) on regional databases; 2) demographic general population data for each region. We compared (using the χscore test) age-sex-specific rates between married, unmarried, divorced and widowed subsets of the general population. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for married/unmarried men and women. Results Age-standardized incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years) of in-hospital cases of CTS were 166 in women and 44 in men (106 overall). Married subjects of both sexes showed higher age-specific rates with respect to unmarried men/women. SIRs were calculated comparing married vs unmarried rates of both sexes: 1.59 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.57–1.60) in women, and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.40–1.45) in men. As compared with married women/men, widows/widowers both showed 2–3-fold higher incidence peaks during the fourth decade of life (beyond 50 years of age, widowed subjects showed similar trends to unmarried counterparts). Conclusion This large population-based study illustrates distinct age-related trends in men and women, and also raises the question whether marital status could be associated with CTS in the general population. PMID:18957090

  11. A Randomized Sham-Controlled Trial of a Neurodynamic Technique in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bialosky, Joel E.; Bishop, Mark D.; Price, Don D.; Robinson, Michael E.; Vincent, Kevin R.; George, Steven Z.

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Randomized, controlled trial. Objectives To assess the believability of a novel sham intervention for a neurodynamic technique (NDT) in participants with signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Additionally, we wished to assess a potential mechanism of NDT (hypoalgesia) and to compare outcomes related to clinical pain and upper extremity disability between NDT and a sham intervention. Background Preliminary evidence suggests that NDT is effective in the treatment of CTS. A sham-controlled study is lacking from the literature and could provide insight to the efficacy of NDT, as well as the corresponding mechanisms. Methods Participants with signs and symptoms consistent with CTS provided baseline measures of expectation, clinical pain intensity, upper extremity disability, and experimental pain sensitivity. Participants were then randomly assigned to receive either a NDT known to anatomically stress the median nerve or a sham technique intended to minimize stress to the median nerve. Following brief exposure to the assigned technique, expectation was reassessed to observe for group-dependent changes. Participants received the assigned intervention over 3 weeks. Additionally, all participants received a prefabricated wrist splint for their involved hands, with instructions to sleep in the splint and to wear it during painful activities when awake. Following 3 weeks of the assigned intervention and splint wear, baseline measures were reassessed and participants were asked which intervention they believed they had received. Results Forty females agreed to participate. Expectations for pain relief and perceived group assignment were similar between the groups. Within-session decreases in clinical pain intensity and pressure pain sensitivity were observed independent of group assignment. Reduction of temporal summation was observed only in participants receiving NDT. Significant improvements in clinical pain intensity and upper extremity

  12. Association of a high normalized protein catabolic rate and low serum albumin level with carpal tunnel syndrome in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Lee, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common mononeuropathy in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The association between chronic inflammation and CTS in hemodialysis (HD) patients has rarely been investigated. HD patients with a high normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) and low serum albumin level likely have adequate nutrition and inflammation. In this study, we assume that a low serum albumin level and high nPCR is associated with CTS in HD patients. We recruited 866 maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients and divided them into 4 groups according to their nPCR and serum albumin levels: (1) nPCR <1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL; (2) nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL; (3) nPCR <1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level ≥4 g/dL; and (4) nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level ≥4 g/dL. After adjustment for related variables, HD duration and nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL were positively correlated with CTS. By calculating the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, we calculated that the nPCR and HD duration cut-off points for obtaining the most favorable Youden index were 1.29 g/kg/d and 7.5 years, respectively. Advance multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that in MHD patients, nPCR ≥1.29 g/kg/d and serum albumin <4 g/dL, and also HD duration >7.5 years were associated with CTS. A high nPCR and low serum albumin level, which likely reflect adequate nutrition and inflammation, were associated with CTS in MHD patients. PMID:27368039

  13. The Value of Median Nerve Sonography as a Predictor for Short- and Long-Term Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Long-Term Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Alexander; Ficjian, Anja; Husic, Rusmir; Zauner, Dorothea; Seel, Werner; Simmet, Nicole E.; Klammer, Alexander; Heizer, Petra; Brickmann, Kerstin; Gretler, Judith; Fürst-Moazedi, Florentine C.; Thonhofer, Rene; Hermann, Josef; Graninger, Winfried B.; Quasthoff, Stefan; Dejaco, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the prognostic value of B-mode and Power Doppler (PD) ultrasound of the median nerve for the short- and long-term clinical outcomes of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods Prospective study of 135 patients with suspected CTS seen 3 times: at baseline, then at short-term (3 months) and long-term (15–36 months) follow-up. At baseline, the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve was measured with ultrasound at 4 levels on the forearm and wrist. PD signals were graded semi-quantitatively (0–3). Clinical outcomes were evaluated at each visit with the Boston Questionnaire (BQ) and the DASH Questionnaire, as well as visual analogue scales for the patient’s assessment of pain (painVAS) and physician’s global assessment (physVAS). The predictive values of baseline CSA and PD for clinical outcomes were determined with multivariate logistic regression models. Results Short-term and long-term follow-up data were available for 111 (82.2%) and 105 (77.8%) patients, respectively. There was a final diagnosis of CTS in 84 patients (125 wrists). Regression analysis revealed that the CSA, measured at the carpal tunnel inlet, predicted short-term clinical improvement according to BQ in CTS patients undergoing carpal tunnel surgery (OR 1.8, p = 0.05), but not in patients treated conservatively. Neither CSA nor PD assessments predicted short-term improvement of painVAS, physVAS or DASH, nor was any of the ultrasound parameters useful for the prediction of long-term clinical outcomes. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel inlet may predict short-term clinical improvement in CTS patients undergoing carpal tunnel release, but long-term outcomes are unrelated to ultrasound findings. PMID:27662617

  14. Correlation between Female Sex Hormones and Electrodiagnostic Parameters and Clinical Function in Post-menopausal Women with Idiopathic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Azam; Naseri, Mahshid; Namazi, Hamid; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the role of sex-hormonal changes in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among post-menopausal women through measuring estrogen receptor (ER) expression in their transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and serum estrogen level, as well as determine the correlation between these factors and electrodiagnostic parameters and Boston score. Methods Biopsy samples of TCL were collected from 12 postmenopausal women who had undergone surgery for severe idiopathic CTS; control specimens were collected from 10 postmenopausal women without CTS who had undergone surgery for the other hand pathologies. To determine the distributions of ER in TCL, histological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed. Serum estrogen level was also measured. Electrodiagnosis and Boston questionnaire were used for CTS severity and determination of the patients' function. Results ER expression in TCL and serum estrogen level were not significantly different in the case group compared to the control group (P = 0.79 and P = 0.88, respectively). Also, there was no correlation between ER expression or serum estrogen level and electrodiagnostic parameters or Boston score. Conclusions Sex hormones cannot still be considered as the etiology of idiopathic CTS in postmenopausal women. The role of other factors such as wrist ratio and narrower outlet in females compared to the males should be considered along with hormonal changes.

  15. Effect of splinting and exercise on intraneural edema of the median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome--an MRI study to reveal therapeutic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Elliott, James M; Strudwick, Mark W; Little, Mary; Coppieters, Michel W

    2012-08-01

    Splinting and nerve and tendon gliding exercises are commonly used to treat carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). It has been postulated that both modalities reduce intraneural edema. To test this hypothesis, 20 patients with mild to moderate CTS were randomly allocated to either night splinting or a home program of nerve and tendon gliding exercises. Magnetic resonance images of the wrist were taken at baseline, immediately after 10 min of splinting or exercise, and following 1 week of intervention. Primary outcome measures were signal intensity of the median nerve at the wrist as a measure of intraneural edema and palmar bowing of the carpal ligament. Secondary outcome measures were changes in symptom severity and function. Following 1 week of intervention, but not immediately after 10 min, signal intensity of the median nerve was reduced by ≈ 11% at the radioulnar level for both interventions (p = 0.03). This was accompanied by a mild improvement in symptoms and function (p < 0.004). A similar reduction in signal intensity is not observed in patients who only receive advice to remain active. No changes in signal intensity were identified further distally (p > 0.28). Ligament bowing remained unchanged (p > 0.08). Intraneural edema reduction is a likely therapeutic mechanism of splinting and exercise.

  16. Correlation between Female Sex Hormones and Electrodiagnostic Parameters and Clinical Function in Post-menopausal Women with Idiopathic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Azam; Naseri, Mahshid; Namazi, Hamid; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the role of sex-hormonal changes in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among post-menopausal women through measuring estrogen receptor (ER) expression in their transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and serum estrogen level, as well as determine the correlation between these factors and electrodiagnostic parameters and Boston score. Methods Biopsy samples of TCL were collected from 12 postmenopausal women who had undergone surgery for severe idiopathic CTS; control specimens were collected from 10 postmenopausal women without CTS who had undergone surgery for the other hand pathologies. To determine the distributions of ER in TCL, histological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed. Serum estrogen level was also measured. Electrodiagnosis and Boston questionnaire were used for CTS severity and determination of the patients' function. Results ER expression in TCL and serum estrogen level were not significantly different in the case group compared to the control group (P = 0.79 and P = 0.88, respectively). Also, there was no correlation between ER expression or serum estrogen level and electrodiagnostic parameters or Boston score. Conclusions Sex hormones cannot still be considered as the etiology of idiopathic CTS in postmenopausal women. The role of other factors such as wrist ratio and narrower outlet in females compared to the males should be considered along with hormonal changes. PMID:27617242

  17. Difficulty of pinching behind the back: an atypical symptom of carpal tunnel syndrome related to a specific wrist position. Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Satoru; Tachibana, Shigekuni; Fujii, Kiyotaka

    2012-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may be overlooked in the absence of typical sensory symptoms. Two patients with CTS lacked the attendant sensory symptoms but experienced difficulties performing a pinching action behind the back (manipulation of the buckle of a baby sling or the hook of a brassiere), a mode of pinching that required wrist flexion. The causative mechanism was probably exacerbation of a latent weakness of the intrinsic muscles of the thumb by wrist flexion, in which the strength of the extrinsic flexors of the thumb and index finger were decreased due to loosening of the tendons. Such symptoms, induced by a specific wrist position, may be help to diagnose a latent weakness in the intrinsic muscles of the thumb, present in patients with CTS.

  18. Repeater F waves: a comparison of sensitivity with sensory antidromic wrist-to-palm latency and distal motor latency in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macleod, W N

    1987-05-01

    Thirty-five thousand six hundred supramaximal shocks were applied to 209 healthy and 147 entrapped median nerves (carpal tunnel syndrome--CTS) to characterize the backfiring behavior of the alpha motor neuron pool of abductor pollicis brevis in health and the modifying effect of a compressive neuropathy. A contraction of the normal subpopulation of active F-wave generators was found in CTS, while active neurons backfired at higher than normal frequencies (p less than 0.001). These modifications in spinal behavior are reflected in the % Repeater F-wave value, whose sensitivity in the detection of CTS approaches that of sensory wrist-to-palm latency estimation. This technique offers an alternative to latency measurement in the diagnosis of CTS. An economical strategy for the electrodiagnosis of CTS is proposed.

  19. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Assessment with Ultrasonography: Value of Inlet-to-Outlet Median Nerve Area Ratio in Patients versus Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Zhu, Jiaan; Ye, Dongmei; Feng, Xianxuan; Xu, Yiming; Wang, Gang; Bai, Yuehong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic value of the Inlet-to-outlet median nerve area ratio (IOR) in patients with clinically and electrophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods Forty-six wrists in 46 consecutive patients with clinical and electrodiagnostic evidence of CTS and forty-four wrists in 44 healthy volunteers were examined with ultrasonography. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve was measured at the carpal tunnel inlet (the level of scaphoid-pisiform) and outlet (the level of the hook of the hamate), and the IOR was calculated for each wrist. Ultrasonography and electrodiagnostic tests were performed under blinded conditions. Electrodiagnostic testing combined with clinical symptoms were considered to be the gold standard test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the diagnostic value between the inlet CSA and IOR. Results The study population included 16 men and 30 women (mean age, 45.3 years; range, 18–83 years). The control population included 18 men and 26 women (mean age, 50.4 years; range, 18–79 years). The mean inlet CSA was 8.7 mm2 in healthy controls and 14.6mm2 in CTS group (P<0.001). The mean IOR in healthy volunteers (1.0) was smaller than that in patients (1.6, P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed a diagnostic advantage to using the IOR rather than the inlet CSA (P<0.01). An IOR cutoff value of ≥ 1.3 would yield 93% specificity and 91% sensitivity in the diagnosis of CTS. Conclusion The IOR of median nerve area promises to be an effective means in the diagnosis of CTS. A large-scale, randomized controlled trial is required to determine how and when this parameter will be used. PMID:25617835

  20. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety & Health Administration U.S. Department of Labor 200 Constitution Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20210 http://www.osha. ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency. Advice on the treatment or care of ...

  1. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by typing on a computer, using a mouse, or repeating movements while working, playing a musical ... devices, such as keyboards, different types of computer mouse, cushioned mouse pads, and keyboard drawers Having someone ...

  2. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 226-4267 Toll-Free; (301) 565-2966 TTY Internet Address: http://www.niams.nih.gov/ National Institute ... 352-9424 Toll-Free; (301) 468-5981 TTY Internet Address: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/ National Institute ...

  3. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ... Lists Supporters About Us Leadership Careers at ACR Social Media Newsroom Annual Reports & Financial Statements Policies & Guidelines ...

  4. Education, night splinting and exercise versus usual care on recovery and conversion to surgery for people awaiting carpal tunnel surgery: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Karina J; Ross, Leo; Coppieters, Michel W; Vicenzino, Bill; Schmid, Annina B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a prevalent upper limb condition that results in significant individual and socioeconomic costs. Large patient numbers, long outpatient waiting times and traditional referral pathways in public health systems create delays in accessing treatment for this condition. Alternative care pathways aimed at streamlining access to treatment and reducing the need for surgical intervention warrant further investigation. Methods A randomised, single-blind controlled clinical trial will be conducted. 128 participants aged 18–75 years with CTS will be recruited from the carpal tunnel surgery waitlists of participating public hospitals. Suitable participants will be stratified for severity and randomly allocated to either receive therapy (education, provision of splints and a home exercise programme) or standard care (continuing on the waitlist without hand therapy intervention for the duration of the study). Outcomes will be measured at baseline and after 6 weeks and 6 months. Primary outcomes are conversion to surgery ratio and perceived effect via the Global Rating of Change Scale. Secondary measures include patient satisfaction, and monitoring of symptoms and function using outcome measures including the Boston CTS Questionnaire, Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire, Patient-Specific Functional Scale, patient completed diagram of symptoms and Self-reported Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale. Discussion This paper outlines the design and rationale for a randomised controlled trial that aims to assess the efficacy of an alternative care pathway for the management of patients with CTS while on the surgery waitlist. It is anticipated that the outcomes of this study will contribute to improved and expedited management of this common condition in a public hospital setting. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was granted by the Princess Alexandra Hospital Centres for Health Research

  5. Successful management of female office workers with "repetitive stress injury" or "carpal tunnel syndrome" by a new treatment modality--application of low level laser.

    PubMed

    Wong, E; Lee, G; Zucherman, J; Mason, D T

    1995-04-01

    Female office workers with desk jobs who are incapacitated by pain and tingling in the hands and fingers are often diagnosed by physicians as "repetitive stress injury" (RSI) or "carpal tunnel syndrome" (CTS). These patients usually have poor posture with their head and neck stooped forward and shoulders rounded; upon palpation, they have pain and tenderness at the spinous processes C5-T1 and the medial angle of the scapula. In 35 such patients we focused the treatment primarily at the posterior neck area and not the wrists and hands. A low level laser (100 mW) was used and directed at the tips of the spinous processes C5-T1. The laser rapidly alleviated the pain and tingling in the arms, hands and fingers, and diminished tenderness at the involved spinous processes. Thereby, it has become apparent that many patients labelled as having RSI or CTS have predominantly cervical radicular dysfunction resulting in pain to the upper extremities which can be managed by low level laser. Successful long-term management involves treating the soft tissue lesions in the neck combined with correcting the abnormal head, neck and shoulder posture by taping, cervical collars, and clavicle harnesses as well as improved work ergonomics.

  6. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) expression is increased in the subsynovial connective tissues of patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chikenji, Takako; Gingery, Anne; Zhao, Chunfeng; Passe, Sandra M; Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Larson, Dirk; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Non-inflammatory fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) is a hallmark of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The etiology of this finding and its relationship to the development of CTS remain poorly understood. Recent studies have found that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays a central role in fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of TGF-β and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a downstream mediator of TGF-β, in the pathogenesis of CTS. We compared SSCT specimens from 26 idiopathic CTS patients with specimens from 10 human cadaver controls with no previous diagnosis of CTS. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine levels TGF-β1, CTGF, collagen 1(Col1) and collagen 3 (Col3) expression. TGF-β1 (p < 0.01), CTGF (p < 0.01), and Col3 (p < 0.01) were increased in SSCT of CTS patients compared with control tissue. In addition, a strong positive correlation was found between TGF-β1 and CTGF, (R(2) = 0.80, p < 0.01) and a moderate positive correlation between Col3 and TGF-β1 (R(2) = 0.49, p < 0.01). These finding suggest that there is an increased expression of TGF-β and CTGF, a TGF-β regulated protein, and that this TGF-β activation may be responsible for SSCT fibrosis in CTS patients.

  7. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) expression is increased in the subsynovial connective tissue in a rabbit model of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chikenji, Takako; Gingery, Anne; Zhao, Chunfeng; Vanhees, Matthias; Moriya, Tamami; Reisdorf, Ramona; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is an idiopathic disease that results from increased fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT). A recent study found overexpression of both transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in the SSCT of CTS patients. This study investigated TGF-β and CTGF expression in a rabbit model of CTS, in which SSCT fibrosis is induced by a surgical injury. Levels of TGF-β1 and CTGF at 6, 12, 24 weeks after injury were determined by immunohistochemistry A significant increase in TGF-β1 and a concomitant significant increase in CTGF were found at 6 weeks, in addition to higher cell density compared to normal (all p<0.05), Interestingly, CTGF expression was reduced at 12 and 24 weeks, suggesting that an initial insult results in a time limited response. We conclude that this rabbit model mimics the fibrosis found in human CTS, and may be useful to study pathogenetic mechanisms of CTS in vivo.

  8. Surveillance and prevention of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome: an application of the Sentinel Events Notification System for Occupational Risks.

    PubMed

    Maizlish, N; Rudolph, L; Dervin, K; Sankaranarayan, M

    1995-05-01

    In response to limitations in state-based, occupational disease surveillance, the California Department of Health Services developed a model for provider- and case-based surveillance of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. The objectives were to enhance case reporting, identify risk factors and high-risk work sites, and link preventive interventions to work sites and the broader community. Using elements from surveillance of communicable diseases and sentinel health events, a model was integrated into the pre-existing reporting system in one California county. Between 1989 and 1991, 54 Santa Clara County health care providers reported 382 suspected cases, of which 365 from 195 work sites met reporting guidelines. Risk factors were profiled from interviews of 135 prioritized cases and 38 employers. Of 24 work sites prioritized for a free, voluntary, nonenforcement inspection, 18 refused and 6 completed an on-site visit. Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR) captured many cases not reported to the pre-existing reporting system. Case interviews indicated a profile of symptoms and signs, treatment, and exposure to uncontrolled occupational risk factors, including a lack of training on ergonomics hazards. Employer health insurance, rather than workers' compensation, was the apparent source of payment for most medical bills. Employers lacked knowledge and motivation to reduce ergonomic risks. Governmentally mandated occupational ergonomics standards are urgently needed.

  9. Acute Effect of Topical Menthol on Chronic Pain in Slaughterhouse Workers with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Triple-Blind, Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Markus D.; Jay, Kenneth; Colado, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Topical menthol gels are classified “topical analgesics” and are claimed to relieve minor aches and pains of the musculoskeletal system. In this study we investigate the acute effect of topical menthol on carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). We screened 645 slaughterhouse workers and recruited 10 participants with CTS and chronic pain of the arm/hand who were randomly distributed into two groups to receive topical menthol (Biofreeze) or placebo (gel with a menthol scent) during the working day and 48 hours later the other treatment (crossover design). Participants rated arm/hand pain intensity during the last hour of work (scale 0–10) immediately before 1, 2, and 3 hours after application. Furthermore, global rating of change (GROC) in arm/hand pain was assessed 3 hours after application. Compared with placebo, pain intensity and GROC improved more following application of topical menthol (P = 0.026 and P = 0.044, resp.). Pain intensity of the arm/hand decreased by −1.2 (CI 95%: −1.7 to −0.6) following topical menthol compared with placebo, corresponding to a moderate effect size of 0.63. In conclusion, topical menthol acutely reduces pain intensity during the working day in slaughterhouse workers with CTS and should be considered as an effective nonsystemic alternative to regular analgesics in the workplace management of chronic and neuropathic pain. PMID:25298894

  10. Clinical Usefulness of Oral Supplementation with Alpha-Lipoic Acid, Curcumin Phytosome, and B-Group Vitamins in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Undergoing Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pajardi, Giorgio; Bortot, Paola; Ponti, Veronica; Novelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with a combination product containing alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in 180 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. Patients in Group A (n = 60) served as controls and did not receive any treatment either before or after surgery. Patients in Group B (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months both before and after surgery (totaling 6 months of supplementation). Patients in Group C (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months before surgery only. Patients in Group B showed significantly lower nocturnal symptoms scores compared with Group A subjects at both 40 days and 3 months after surgery (both P values <0.05). Moreover, patients in Group B had a significantly lower number of positive Phalen's tests at 3 months compared with the other study groups (P < 0.05). We conclude that oral supplementation with alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins twice a day both before and after surgery is safe and effective in CTS patients scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. PMID:24563654

  11. [Carpal instability].

    PubMed

    Redeker, J; Vogt, P M

    2011-01-01

    Carpal instability can be understood as a disturbed anatomical alignment between bones articulating in the carpus. This disturbed balance occurs either only dynamically (with movement) under the effect of physiological force or even statically at rest. The most common cause of carpal instability is wrist trauma with rupture of the stabilizing ligaments and adaptive misalignment following fractures of the radius or carpus. Carpal collapse plays a special role in this mechanism due to non-healed fracture of the scaphoid bone. In addition degenerative inflammatory alterations, such as chondrocalcinosis or gout, more rarely aseptic bone necrosis of the lunate or scaphoid bones or misalignment due to deposition (Madelung deformity) can lead to wrist instability. Under increased pressure the misaligned joint surfaces lead to bone arrosion with secondary arthritis of the wrist. In order to arrest or slow down this irreversible process, diagnosis must occur as early as possible. Many surgical methods have been thought out to regain stability ranging from direct reconstruction of the damaged ligaments, through ligament replacement to partial stiffening of the wrist joint.

  12. Assessment of the effectiveness of interferential current therapy and TENS in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Koca, Irfan; Boyaci, Ahmet; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Ucar, Mehmet; Kocaturk, Ozcan

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of interferential current (IFC) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapies in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) compared with splint therapy, a standard treatment modality for CTS. This was a prospective, single-blinded, single-center, randomized, three-group parallel intervention study of 3 weeks duration. Efficacy was examined in the third week after the end of treatments. Subjects were assigned randomly to one of three groups: group I patients received splint therapy, group II patients received TENS applied on the palmar surface of the hand and the carpal tunnel, and group III patients underwent IFC therapy applied on the palmar surface of the hand and the volar surface of the forearm. TENS and ICF treatments were applied five times weekly for a total of 15 sessions. Group 1 patients were stabilized with volar wrist splints for 3 weeks. The efficacy of the therapies was assessed before initiation of therapy and at 3 weeks after completion of therapy using a visual analog scale (VAS), a symptom severity scale, the functional capacity scale of the BCTQ, and measurement of median nerve motor distal latency (mMDL) and median sensory nerve conduction velocity (mSNCV). Groups were compared pairwise using the Mann-Whitney U test to identify the source of differences between groups. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze changes in variables over time within a group. In the VAS, BCTQ, MDL, and mSNCV, no significant difference was observed between the groups (p > 0.05). In the VAS, BCTQ, and mSNCV, statistically significant improvements were detected in all groups (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between TENS and splint therapy with respect to improvement in clinical scores, whereas IFC therapy provided a significantly greater improvement in VAS, mMDL, and mSNCV values than splint therapy (VAS: 4.80 ± 1.18 and 6.37 ± 1.18; p = 0.001, mMDL: 3.89 ± 0.88 and 4.06 ± 0.61; p = 0

  13. Adaptation of Turkish version of the questionnaire Quick Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (Quick DASH) in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koldas Dogan, Sebnem; Ay, Saime; Evcik, Deniz; Baser, Ozgun

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Quick Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (Quick DASH) scale in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Sixty nine patients with idiopathic CTS were included. The Quick DASH questionnaire consists of three subscales including disability/symptom, and work and sports/performing arts. Quick DASH was administered after translation process to subjects twice a week for testing reliability. The validity was based on correlating Quick DASH with the Boston Questionnaire, visual analogue scale-pain (VAS-pain), and pinch and grip strength tests. Reliability of the Turkish version of the Quick DASH scale was very good with high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.84 for disability/symptom subscale, 0.937 for work subscale, and 0.926 for sports/performing arts subscale) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.931 for disability/symptom subscale, 0.925 for work subscale, and 0.779 for sports/performing arts subscale). The disability/symptom subscale had moderate correlations with the VAS-pain and grip strength test and good correlation with the pinch strength test. The work subscales had moderate correlations with VAS-pain, and pinch and pinch grip strength tests. A high correlation was found between the disability/symptom and work subscales with Boston symptom severity and Boston functional status subscores. The Turkish version of Quick DASH was reliable and valid for evaluating symptoms and functional disability in patients with CTS. Our results suggest that Quick DASH could be preferred as it is a simple and easy scale to use.

  14. The role of median nerve terminal latency index in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome in comparison with other electrodiagnostic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Khosrawi, Saeid; Chatraei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) considers the most common compression neuropathy, which nerve conduction studies (NCSs) used for its detection routinely and universally. This study was performed to determine the value of the median TLI and other NCS variables and to investigate their sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CTS. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out among 100 hands of healthy volunteers and 50 hands of patients who had a positive history of paresthesia and numbness in upper extremities. Information including age, gender, and result of sensory and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), peak latency difference of median and ulnar nerves of fourth digit (M4-U4 peak latency difference), and TLI were recorded for analysis. Sensitivity and specificity of electro diagnostic parameters in the diagnosis of CTS was investigated. Results: Normal range of the median nerve TLI was 0.43 ± 0.077. There was no significant difference between two groups for MNCV means (P = 0. 45). Distal sensory latency and distal motor latency (DML) of median nerve and fourth digit median-ulnar peak latency differences (PM4-PU4) for CTS group was significantly higher (P < 0.001) and mean for sensory nerve conduction velocity was significantly higher in control group (P < 0.001). The most sensitive electrophysiological finding in CTS patients was median TLI (82%), but the most specific one was DML (98%). Conclusion: Although in early stages of CTS, we usually expect only abnormalities in the sensory studies, but TLI may better demonstrate the effect on median nerve motor fiber even in mild cases of CTS. PMID:27376049

  15. Assessment from Functional Perspectives: Using Sensorimotor Control in the Hand as an Outcome Indicator in the Surgical Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Su, Fong-Chin; Kuo, Yao-Lung; Jou, I-Ming; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Kuo, Li-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether sensorimotor control of the hand could be an outcome indicator after carpal tunnel release (CTR), this work examined changes in the results of patients’ manual tactile test (MTT), pinch-holding-up activity (PHUA), two-point discrimination (2PD) and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWM) tests. Participants included 30 predominantly sensory neuropathy CTS patients, as confirmed by a nerve conduction study. The MTT, precision pinch performance in PHUA and traditional sensibility (2PD and SWM) tests were used to examine different aspects of sensory status at the time-points of two weeks before operation and one month post-operation, with a single-blind design. The results showed significant improvements in the sensory function as detected by the 2PD and SWM tests (p<0.001) and sensorimotor function as detected by the MTT (p<0.001) and PHUA test (p<0.05) for patients receiving CTR. The responsiveness of the SWM, MTT and PHUA tests (effect size>0.5, p<0.01) are better than that of two-point discrimination test (effect size<0.5, p<0.001). However, pinch strength saw a decline compared to baseline with a moderate effect sizes (effect size = 0.7, p<0.001). This cohort study found that the MTT and PHUA test can both meet all the statistical criteria with regard to assessing treatment outcomes for patients with CTS. In addition, the results of this work provide clinicians with the information that the sensorimotor functions of the hands, as assessed by MTT and PHUA, are responsive to clinical changes due to CTR. PMID:26053242

  16. Median nerve (anatomical variations) and carpal tunel syndrome - revisited.

    PubMed

    Mizia, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Depukat, Pawel; Klimek-Piotrowska, Wieslawa; Pasternak, Artur; Mroz, Izabela; Bonczar, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome belongs to the most common causative factors of surgical interventions in the wrist region. Anatomy of carpal tunnel and median nerve is a subject of current revision. Authors paid attention to etiology of the syndrome based on review of literature and their own anatomical studies. They remind basic knowledge on the median nerve and indicate that only based on number of dissections a good orthopedic surgeon may acquire experience necessary to perform procedures in a most appropriate way.

  17. Effects of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome on adaptation of multi-digit forces to object mass distribution for whole-hand manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a compression neuropathy of the median nerve that results in sensorimotor deficits in the hand. Until recently, the effects of CTS on hand function have been studied using mostly two-digit grip tasks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the coordination of multi-digit forces as a function of object center of mass (CM) during whole-hand grasping. Methods Fourteen CTS patients and age- and gender-matched controls were instructed to grasp, lift, hold, and release a grip device with five digits for seven consecutive lifts while maintaining its vertical orientation. The object CM was changed by adding a mass at different locations at the base of the object. We measured forces and torques exerted by each digit and object kinematics and analyzed modulation of these variables to object CM at object lift onset and during object hold. Our task requires a modulation of digit forces at and after object lift onset to generate a compensatory moment to counteract the external moment caused by the added mass and to minimize object tilt. Results We found that CTS patients learned to generate a compensatory moment and minimized object roll to the same extent as controls. However, controls fully exploited the available degrees of freedom (DoF) in coordinating their multi-digit forces to generate a compensatory moment, i.e., digit normal forces, tangential forces, and the net center of pressure on the finger side of the device at object lift onset and during object hold. In contrast, patients modulated only one of these DoFs (the net center of pressure) to object CM by modulating individual normal forces at object lift onset. During object hold, however, CTS patients were able to modulate digit tangential force distribution to object CM. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, although CTS did not affect patients’ ability to perform our manipulation task, it interfered with the modulation of specific grasp control variables. This

  18. Differences in risk factors for neurophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome and illness with similar symptoms but normal median nerve function: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To explore whether risk factors for neurophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) differ from those for sensory symptoms with normal median nerve conduction, and to test the validity and practical utility of a proposed definition for impaired median nerve conduction, we carried out a case–control study of patients referred for investigation of suspected CTS. Methods We compared 475 patients with neurophysiological abnormality (NP+ve) according to the definition, 409 patients investigated for CTS but classed as negative on neurophysiological testing (NP-ve), and 799 controls. Exposures to risk factors were ascertained by self-administered questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated by logistic regression. Results NP+ve disease was associated with obesity, use of vibratory tools, repetitive movement of the wrist or fingers, poor mental health and workplace psychosocial stressors. NP-ve illness was also related to poor mental health and occupational psychosocial stressors, but differed from NP+ve disease in showing associations also with prolonged use of computer keyboards and tendency to somatise, and no relation to obesity. In direct comparison of NP+ve and NP-ve patients (the latter being taken as the reference category), the most notable differences were for obesity (OR 2.7, 95 % CI 1.9-3.9), somatising tendency (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9), diabetes (OR 1.6, 95% CI 0.9-3.1) and work with vibratory tools (OR 1.4, 95% CI 0.9-2.2). Conclusions When viewed in the context of earlier research, our findings suggest that obesity, diabetes, use of hand-held vibratory tools, and repeated forceful movements of the wrist and hand are causes of impaired median nerve function. In addition, sensory symptoms in the hand, whether from identifiable pathology or non-specific in origin, may be rendered more prominent and distressing by hand activity, low mood, tendency to somatise, and psychosocial stressors at work

  19. Movement of the distal carpal row during narrowing and widening of the carpal arch width.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Domalain, Mathieu; Li, Zong-Ming

    2012-10-01

    Change in carpal arch width (CAW) is associated with wrist movement, carpal tunnel release, or therapeutic tunnel manipulation. This study investigated the angular rotations of the distal carpal joints as the CAW was adjusted. The CAW was narrowed and widened by 2 and 4 mm in seven cadaveric specimens while the bone positions were tracked by a marker-based motion capture system. The joints mainly pronated during CAW narrowing and supinated during widening. Ranges of motion about the pronation axis for the hamate-capitate (H-C), capitate-trapezoid (C-Td), and trapezoid-trapezium (Td-Tm) joints were 8.1 ± 2.3 deg, 5.3 ± 1.3 deg, and 5.5 ± 3.5 deg, respectively. Differences between the angular rotations of the joints were found at ΔCAW = -4 mm about the pronation and ulnar-deviation axes. For the pronation axis, angular rotations of the H-C joint were larger than that of the C-Td and Td-Tm joints. Statistical interactions among the factors of joint, rotation axis, and ΔCAW indicated complex joint motion patterns. The complex three-dimensional motion of the bones can be attributed to several anatomical constraints such as bone arrangement, ligament attachments, and articular congruence. The results of this study provide insight into the mechanisms of carpal tunnel adaptations in response to biomechanical alterations of the structural components.

  20. Carpal instability nondissociative.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Scott W; Garcia-Elias, Marc; Kitay, Alison

    2012-09-01

    Carpal instability nondissociative (CIND) represents a spectrum of conditions characterized by kinematic dysfunction of the proximal carpal row, often associated with a clinical "clunk." CIND is manifested at the midcarpal and/or radiocarpal joints, and it is distinguished from carpal instability dissociative (CID) by the lack of disruption between bones within the same carpal row. There are four major subcategories of CIND: palmar, dorsal, combined, and adaptive. In palmar CIND, instability occurs across the entire proximal carpal row. When nonsurgical management fails, surgical options include arthroscopic thermal capsulorrhaphy, soft-tissue reconstruction, or limited radiocarpal or intercarpal fusions. In dorsal CIND, the capitate subluxates dorsally from its reduced resting position. Dorsal CIND usually responds to nonsurgical management; refractory cases respond to palmar ligament reefing and/or dorsal intercarpal capsulodesis. Combined CIND demonstrates signs of both palmar and dorsal CIND and can be treated with soft-tissue or bony procedures. In adaptive CIND, the volar carpal ligaments are slackened and are less capable of inducing the physiologic shift of the proximal carpal row from flexion into extension as the wrist ulnarly deviates. Treatment of choice is a corrective osteotomy to restore the normal volar tilt of the distal radius.

  1. Effects of dividing the transverse carpal ligament on the mechanical behavior of the carpal bones under axial compressive load: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zong-Ming

    2009-03-01

    Transecting the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) is a routine procedure to surgically treat carpal tunnel syndrome; yet, its mechanical consequences on carpal bones are unclear. In this study, our intent was to perform a computational analysis of carpal biomechanics resulting from TCL release. A three-dimensional finite element model of the wrist was constructed, which included all the carpal bones, the distal ulna and radius, the proximal metacarpals and the interosseous ligaments. Cartilage layers of each bone were modeled manually according to anatomic visualization software. The TCL was also modeled in three dimensions and added to the bone model. A 100-Newton axial load was applied to the upper section of the second and third metacarpals. The effects of dividing the TCL on the displacements of the carpal bones and the contact stress distribution in the midcarpal joints were studied using a finite element analysis method. When the TCL was divided, the axial compressive load resulted in the carpal bones deviating more radially. More specifically, the carpal bones on the radial side of the capitate and lunate (i.e. the trapezium, trapezoid, and scaphoid) moved further toward the radius, and the carpal bones on the ulnar side of the capitate and lunate (i.e. hamate, triquetrum, and pisiform) moved further toward the metacarpals. The contact stresses and contact locations in the midcarpal joints changed as a result of dividing the TCL. The changes in displacements of carpal bones and the contact stress distributions in the midcarpal joints due to TCL release may be implicated for some of the postoperative complications associated with carpal tunnel release.

  2. Imaging in carpal instability.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, N K; Chojnowski, A J; Toms, A P

    2016-01-01

    Carpal instability is a complex and heterogeneous clinical condition. Management requires accurate identification of structural injury with an understanding of the resultant movement (kinematic) and load transfer (kinetic) failure. Static imaging techniques, such as plain film radiography, stress views, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, MR arthrography and computerized tomography arthrography, may accurately depict major wrist ligamentous injury. Dynamic ultrasound and videofluoroscopy may demonstrate dynamic instability and kinematic dysfunction. There is a growing evidence base for the diagnostic accuracy of these techniques in detecting intrinsic ligament tears, but there are limitations. Evidence of their efficacy and relevance in detection of non-dissociative carpal instability and extrinsic ligament tears is weak. Further research into the accuracy of existing imaging modalities is still required. Novel techniques, including four-dimensional computerized tomography and magnetic resonance, can evaluate both cross-sectional and functional carpal anatomy. This is a narrative review of level-III studies evaluating the role of imaging in carpal instability. PMID:26586689

  3. [Fractures of carpal bones].

    PubMed

    Lögters, T; Windolf, J

    2016-10-01

    Fractures of the carpal bones are uncommon. On standard radiographs fractures are often not recognized and a computed tomography (CT) scan is the diagnostic method of choice. The aim of treatment is to restore pain-free and full functioning of the hand. A distinction is made between stable and unstable carpal fractures. Stable non-displaced fractures can be treated conservatively. Unstable and displaced fractures have an increased risk of arthritis and non-union and should be stabilized by screws or k‑wires. If treated adequately, fractures of the carpal bones have a good prognosis. Unstable and dislocated fractures have an increased risk for non-union. The subsequent development of carpal collapse with arthrosis is a severe consequence of non-union, which has a heterogeneous prognosis.

  4. Utility of Percutaneous Intervention in the Management of Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, John F.; Shilling, Alfred T.; Schenk, Worthington G.; Bissonette, Eric A.; Stadtlander, Kevin S.; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Spinosa, David J.; Leung, Daniel A.; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2003-02-15

    A variety of interventional techniques have been developed to restore function to dysfunctional tunneled hemodialysis catheters (THC). The relative efficacies of these techniques were evaluated retrospectively to determine which therapy might be most beneficial. The records of malfunctioning THCs referred to interventional radiology between November 1995 and December 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Dysfunctional THCs were studied using DSA images obtained while injecting contrast through the lumens of the THCs. The interventions performed were categorized into 1 of 5 groups:no treatment or conservative measures such as vigorous flushing;advancing a guidewire through the THC to reposition the catheter tip or to dislodge a small thrombus; catheter exchange over a guidewire; fibrin stripping of the THC using a loop snare; or prolonged (4 or more hr) direct thrombolytic infusion. A Cox Proportional Hazards model was developed to compare the rate of failure among the procedures. There were 340 THC studies. The catheters were managed as follows: 93 patients received conservative management only, 15 had a guidewire advanced through the catheter, 147 underwent catheter exchange, 62 were treated with a fibrin stripping procedure, and 23 received athrombolytic infusion. Estimated 30-day patency rates for THCs were 38.2% for conservative management, 30.9% for guidewire manipulation of catheter tip, 53.6% for catheter exchange, 76.1% for fibrin stripping, and 69.8% for thrombolytic infusion. Differences among the treatments were observed (p < 0.01) and pairwise comparisons were made among the treatment groups. Failure rates were significantly higher in the catheter exchange(p <0.01) and guidewire manipulation at catheter tip (p <0.01) groups when compared with the fibrin stripping group. The catheter exchange and guidewire manipulation groups also experienced higher rates of failure when compared with the thrombolytic infusion group, although the differences were not

  5. Symptomatic carpal coalition: scaphotrapezial joint.

    PubMed

    Campaigniac, Erin; Eskander, Mark; Jones, Marci

    2013-12-01

    Carpal coalition is an uncommon congenital abnormality that arises from incomplete cavitation of the common cartilaginous precursor that forms the carpal bones. When carpal coalition is discovered, it is typically an asymptomatic incidental radiographic finding, and is often bilateral. We present a case of symptomatic unilateral carpal coalition of the scaphotrapezial joint, which was treated by excising the fibrous coalition and placing an interposition fat graft. This treatment was effective in alleviating the patient's symptoms.

  6. Three-dimensional stiffness of the carpal arch.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The carpal arch of the wrist is formed by irregularly shaped carpal bones interconnected by numerous ligaments, resulting in complex structural mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the three-dimensional stiffness characteristics of the carpal arch using displacement perturbations. It was hypothesized that the carpal arch would exhibit an anisotropic stiffness behavior with principal directions that are oblique to the conventional anatomical axes. Eight (n=8) cadavers were used in this study. For each specimen, the hamate was fixed to a custom stationary apparatus. An instrumented robot arm applied three-dimensional displacement perturbations to the ridge of trapezium and corresponding reaction forces were collected. The displacement-force data were used to determine a three-dimensional stiffness matrix using least squares fitting. Eigendecomposition of the stiffness matrix was used to identify the magnitudes and directions of the principal stiffness components. The carpal arch structure exhibited anisotropic stiffness behaviors with a maximum principal stiffness of 16.4±4.6N/mm that was significantly larger than the other principal components of 3.1±0.9 and 2.6±0.5N/mm (p<0.001). The principal direction of the maximum stiffness was pronated within the cross section of the carpal tunnel which is accounted for by the stiff transverse ligaments that tightly bind distal carpal arch. The minimal principal stiffness is attributed to the less constraining articulation between the trapezium and scaphoid. This study provides advanced characterization of the wrist׳s three-dimensional structural stiffness for improved insight into wrist biomechanics, stability, and function.

  7. [Tenotomy of carpal and digital flexor tendons for correction of congenital neuromyodysplasia in a calf].

    PubMed

    Sohrt, J T; Heppelmann, M; Rehage, J; Staszyk, C

    2013-01-01

    In a 7-day-old heifer calf, a bilateral flexural deformity of the forelimbs involving the digital flexor tendons, the suspensory ligament and the ulnar and radial carpal flexor tendons was diagnosed. After 2 weeks of conservative treatment consisting of manual stretching of the legs and the application of splints and wooden blocks, which were glued to the soles and extended beyond the tip of the claws, the right forelimb could be extended sufficiently to allow weight bearing, whereas the left forelimb could be passively extended to only approximately 120°. Therefore, tenotomy of the ulnar carpal flexor tendon, the digital flexor tendons and the suspensory ligament was carried out in the left leg. A support bandage was then applied to the leg for 8 weeks, after which the carpus and fetlock could be completely extended passively. Flexural deformity of the carpus caused by contracture of the carpal flexor tendons was treated by means of a tenotomy of the ulnar carpal flexor tendon proximal to the accessory carpal bone, which allowed preservation of the carpal tunnel and avoided the risk of iatrogenic damage to nerves and the carpal joint capsule. PMID:23608892

  8. Closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, H; Kato, H; Hata, Y; Nakatsuchi, Y; Tsuchikane, A

    2007-12-01

    We analysed 21 patients with closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders. The tendon that ruptured depended on the location of the bone perforation into the carpal tunnel. Radiocarpal arthrography was performed in 13 patients and capsular perforation was demonstrated by contrast medium leakage into the carpal canal in 11 patients. This proved a useful diagnostic test. The flexor tendon(s) were reconstructed with free tendon graft in 17 patients, cross-over transfer of flexor tendons from adjacent digits in two and buddying to an adjacent flexor tendon in one patient. Postoperative total active range of motion in the fingers after 13 free tendon graft reconstructions averaged 213 degrees (range 170-265 degrees ). The active range of motion of the thumb-interphalangeal joint after free tendon graft reconstruction in three cases improved from 0 degrees to 33 degrees on average (range 10 degrees -40 degrees ).

  9. Adaptation of the Transverse Carpal Ligament Associated with Repetitive Hand Use in Pianists.

    PubMed

    Mhanna, Christiane; Marquardt, Tamara L; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) plays a critical role in carpal tunnel biomechanics through interactions with its surrounding tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo adaptations of the TCL's mechanical properties in response to repetitive hand use in pianists using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. It was hypothesized that pianists, in comparison to non-pianists, would have a stiffer TCL as indicated by an increased acoustic shear wave velocity (SWV). ARFI imagining was performed for 10 female pianists and 10 female non-pianists. The median SWV values of the TCL were determined for the entire TCL, as well as for its radial and ulnar portions, rTCL and uTCL, respectively. The TCL SWV was significantly increased in pianists relative to non-pianists (p < 0.05). Additionally, the increased SWV was location dependent for both pianist and non-pianist groups (p < 0.05), with the rTCL having a significantly greater SWV than the uTCL. Between groups, the rTCL SWV of pianists was 22.2% greater than that of the non-pianists (p < 0.001). This localized increase of TCL SWV, i.e. stiffening, may be primarily attributable to focal biomechanical interactions that occur at the radial TCL aspect where the thenar muscles are anchored. Progressive stiffening of the TCL may become constraining to the carpal tunnel, leading to median nerve compression in the tunnel. TCL maladaptation helps explain why populations who repeatedly use their hands are at an increased risk of developing musculoskeletal pathologies, e.g. carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26953892

  10. Carpal bone analysis in bone age assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aifeng; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Kurkowska-Pospiech, Sylwia; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2006-03-01

    A computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) method has been previously developed in our Laboratory based on features extracted from regions of interest (ROI) in phalanges in a digital hand atlas. Due to various factors, including, the diversity of size, shape and orientation of carpal bones, non-uniformity of soft tissue, low contrast between the bony structure and soft tissue, the automatic identification and segmentation of bone boundaries is an extremely challenging task. Past research work on carpal bone segmentation has been done utilizing dynamic thresholding. However, due to the discrepancy of carpal bones developments and the limitations of segmentation algorithms, carpal bone ROI has not been taken into consideration in the bone age assessment procedure. In this paper, we present a method for fully automatic carpal bone segmentation and feature analysis in hand X-ray radiograph. The purpose of this paper is to automatically segment the carpal bones by anisotropic diffusion and Canny edge detection techniques. By adding their respective features extracted from carpal bones ROI to the phalangeal ROI feature space, the accuracy of bone age assessment can be improved especially when the image processing in the phalangeal ROI fails in younger children.

  11. Complex carpal malformation without a cause.

    PubMed

    Swanger, Ronald; Faulkner, Christyna; Maldjian, Catherine; Schlesinger, Iris; Magill, Richard; Weinberg, Brighita

    2009-11-01

    Carpal dislocation is an uncommon event. We present a 4-year-old male child who had the clinical appearance of a Madelung's deformity; however, he failed to fulfill the radiological criteria for a Madelung's deformity. The carpal bones had not yet ossified making it difficult to arrive at a diagnosis using radiograph alone. Magnetic resonance imaging was diagnostic because of the ability to delineate the carpal cartilaginous ossification centers. Chronic wrist dislocation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a long-standing wrist deformity that clinically resembles a Madelung's deformity in a young child. PMID:19701104

  12. Carpal Ligament Injuries, Pathomechanics, and Classification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel J; Elfar, John C

    2015-08-01

    Carpal instability is a complex array of maladaptive and posttraumatic conditions that lead to the inability of the wrist to maintain anatomic relationships under normal loads. Many different classification schemes have evolved to explain the mechanistic evolution and pathophysiology of carpal instability, including 2 of the most common malalignment patterns: volar intercalated segment instability and the more common dorsal intercalated segment instability. Recent classifications emphasize the relationships within and between the rows of carpal bones. Future research is likely to unify the disparate paradigms used to describe wrist instability.

  13. Complex carpal malformation without a cause.

    PubMed

    Swanger, Ronald; Faulkner, Christyna; Maldjian, Catherine; Schlesinger, Iris; Magill, Richard; Weinberg, Brighita

    2009-11-01

    Carpal dislocation is an uncommon event. We present a 4-year-old male child who had the clinical appearance of a Madelung's deformity; however, he failed to fulfill the radiological criteria for a Madelung's deformity. The carpal bones had not yet ossified making it difficult to arrive at a diagnosis using radiograph alone. Magnetic resonance imaging was diagnostic because of the ability to delineate the carpal cartilaginous ossification centers. Chronic wrist dislocation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a long-standing wrist deformity that clinically resembles a Madelung's deformity in a young child.

  14. Perilunar carpal dislocations treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Gagała, Jacek; Tarczyńska, Marta; Kosior, Piotr

    2006-06-30

    Background. The aim of the study was to analyze late outcomes of perilunar carpal dislocations, depending on the type of the injury, time of the diagnosis and the treatment methods. Material and methods. The material is constituted by 37 patients treated in our department between 1981-2004 because of perilunar dislocation. In group were 2 women and 35 men, aged 19-56 (mean 31 years). All patients were asked for control visit. DASH and Mayo score were used to evaluate the outcome. Range of wrist motion, its stability, grip strength and X-ray pictures were analyzed. Results. Better follow-up results were observed in persons with early diagnosed dislocations of the wrist. The best outcomes were observed in group with perilunar early diagnosed dislocations, which were treated by open reduction. Posttraumatic wrist instability often was diagnosed in patients with dislocation of lunar bone and late-diagnosed transscaphoid perilunar carpal dislocations. Conclusions. The data we obtained show, that the consequences of late-diagnosed and late-treated injuries of the wrist are instability, pain, decrease in range of motion and hand skills. PMID:17592406

  15. Percutaneous cholecystolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Kellett, M J; Wickham, J E; Russell, R C

    1988-02-13

    A percutaneous method was used to remove stones from otherwise normal gall bladders, as assessed by cholecystography and ultrasonography. The procedure was performed in a single stage under general anaesthesia, adopting the method and instruments used for one stage percutaneous nephrolithotomy. A Foley catheter was left in the gall bladder and the system checked with contrast at 10 days to ensure free drainage and exclude residual calculi. Seven out of eight patients had a successful percutaneous cholecystolithotomy. An adequate track could not be secured in one man; he had an uneventful cholecystectomy under the same anaesthetic. Follow up at three months of the seven patients showed no calculi and no complications. Percutaneous cholecystolithotomy may prove complementary to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in patients in whom there is difficulty focusing the shock waves on the gall bladder or who have had incomplete disintegration of stones.

  16. Ultrasound assessment of transverse carpal ligament thickness: a validity and reliability study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Li, Zong-Ming

    2012-06-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) forms the palmar boundary of the carpal tunnel and plays an important role in carpal tunnel mechanics. TCL hypertrophy has been observed for individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and postulated as a potential etiologic factor. Ultrasound is particularly advantageous for TCL imaging because of its capability of detecting the interfaces between the TCL and other tissues. The purposes of this study were to develop an ultrasound based method to measure the TCL thickness and to test the validity and reliability of this method. Three operators conducted two sessions of ultrasound examination on eight cadaveric specimens and eight healthy volunteers. A custom script was used to calculate TCL thickness along the TCL length from the ultrasound images. The ultrasound based TCL thickness of the cadaveric specimens was compared with the dissection based TCL thickness for validation. The results showed Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.867-0.928, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values of 0.726-0.865, a standard error of measurement of 0.02-0.07 mm and a minimal detectable difference of 0.05-0.15 mm. The high correlation coefficients and small errors indicate that the ultrasound based method is valid for measuring TCL thickness. Furthermore, ultrasound measurements showed excellent intraoperator and interoperator reliability with ICC values as 0.826-0.933 and 0.840-0.882, respectively. The ultrasound based TCL thickness was in the range of 0.93-2.34 (1.54 ± 0.33) mm and agreed well with previous studies. The ultrasound method developed in this study is a valuable tool to examine morphologic properties of healthy and pathologic TCLs.

  17. Post-traumatic carpal instability.

    PubMed

    Chantelot, C

    2014-02-01

    The complexity of the carpus explains the difficulty treating carpal injuries. Lesions are dominated by perilunate dislocation, scapholunate dislocation, and scaphoid fractures. The other injuries are trivial. Symptoms include pain and loss of wrist strength, reversible for an acute and well-treated lesion. Too often, these ligament injuries are diagnosed late. For delays longer than 6 weeks, ligament repair is ineffective. These old, complex lesions are potentially highly arthritic in the radiocarpal and mediocarpal joints. Improvements in wrist surgery have mitigated these chronic lesions. Various surgical techniques can preserve a functional wrist; wrist arthrodesis is no longer the only solution for these arthritic wrists. Over the past decade, arthroscopy has contributed to better understanding the injuries of the carpus as well as to better healing them. For acute or chronic ligament injuries without degenerative osteoarthritis, arthroscopy is the treatment of the future. This technique involves a long learning curve and the various arthroscopic techniques must be validated.

  18. Arthroscopy of the wrist: anatomy and classification of carpal instability.

    PubMed

    Cooney, W P; Dobyns, J H; Linscheid, R L

    1990-01-01

    Carpal instability can be defined as the lack of ligamentous and skeletal support adequate to maintain a wrist stable to external forces of pinch and grasp. This instability may be static or dynamic. It has been classified as (a) carpal instability, dissociated (CID), a situation in which one or more of the ligaments are torn, and (b) carpal instability, nondissociative (CIND), a situation in which the ligaments are intact but stretched. Carpal instability can also be the result of carpal bone malalignment from various causes. Arthroscopy can be particularly useful in assessing carpal instability, however arthrography with contrast medium, fluoroscopy, and stress loading should precede this arthroscopic assessment. Arthroscopy allows visualization of the volar radiocarpal and ulnocarpal ligaments of the wrist, and the arthroscopic examination can be combined with manual manipulation of the carpal bones to detect laxity of those ligaments, to examine stability of the scapholunate and lunotriquetral interosseous ligaments, and to show instability of the distal radioulnar joint.

  19. Carpal kinematics of lunotriquetral dissociations.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Rowen, B; Tokunaga, D; Ryu, J; Kato, H; Kihira, M

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the carpal kinematics after serial arthroscopic sectioning of the ligaments at the lunotriquetral joint, without damaging the capsule and other soft tissues of the wrist. Six cadaver wrists were studied and a custom designed three-dimensional mechanical digitizer was utilized. Three sets of digitization were performed for a normal state, after arthroscopic sectioning of lunotriquetral interosseous ligament (stage A), and after further sectioning of volar radiolunotriquetral ligament (stage B). Motion of the scaphoid, lunate, triquetrum, capitate and hamate was studied. The results indicated that the motion of the triquetrum was significantly increased at stage A, particularly after 15 degrees of ulnar deviation. An increased motion at the lunotriquetral joint was observed at stage B, which was mainly due to the significantly decreased lunate extension motion and the increased triquetrum extension motion during wrist extension. This study suggested that the lunotriquetral interosseous ligament plays the most important role for the stabilization of the lunotriquetral joint during wrist ulnar deviation, while the volar radiolunotriquetral ligament may function as a stabilizer for the lunotriquetral joint during wrist extension. PMID:2065165

  20. Percutaneous connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picha, G. J.; Taylor, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A surface possessing a regular array of micro-pillars was evaluated with regard to its ability to control epithelial downgrowth at the percutaneous interface. A range of pillar sizes were applied to the vertical segment of T shaped Biomer (R) implants. These percutaneous tabs were implanted into the dorsum of cats for a period of 6 weeks using a standardized surgical technique. Comments were made post-operatively and at the time of retrieval. A quantitative scoring system was applied to these observations as well as histological results. As observed, the pillar morphology used displayed the ability to control epithelial downgrowth. Collagen ingrowth into the interpillar spaces and possibly direct interactions of the epithelial cells with the morphology may account for the inhibition. The reproducibility of epithelial inhibition is, however, limited by other factors which are currently not well understood. These factors and potential methods of assessment are discussed.

  1. LOW-LEVEL LASER THERAPY AFTER CARPAL TUNNEL RELEASE

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Marcelo de Pinho Teixeira; de Araújo, Gabriel Costa Serrão

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the post-operative treatment of CTS, using the LLLT. Method: We prospectively evaluated 58 patients with CTS, randomly divided into two groups: treatment with LLLT (Group 1) and placebo (Group 2). A 830 nm gallium-aluminum-arsenic laser was used, with a power of 30 mW. Results: There was female predominance in both groups. The mean age of the patients in Group 1 was 44.3 years and in Group 2, 51.9 years. The average duration of disease progression was around two years in both groups. The average time elapsed since discharge from treatment was 3.6 months in both groups, and fewer patients had postoperative complaints in Group 1 than in Group 2. At the end of the treatment, in Group 1, 29.41% of the patients presented electromyographic abnormalities, while in Group 2, 63.64% of the patients had abnormalities, after six months. Conclusion: This was an initial study on adjuvant therapy using postoperative LLLT on CTS. The method presented was sufficient for postoperative evaluation of the patients in this study. Patients undergoing LLLT after surgery for CTS were benefited and had better functional outcomes than shown by the control group. The technique was effective and did not have any adverse effects on the patients studied. PMID:27027075

  2. Factors Affecting the Outcomes of Carpal Tunnel Surgery: A Review.

    PubMed

    Zyluk-Gadowska, P; Zyluk, A

    2016-08-01

    Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit war es, unter Berücksichtigung der in Pubmed und Medline veröffentlichten Ergebnisse nach Eingriffen am Karpalkanal zu ermitteln, inwieweit ausgewählte Faktoren wie das Patientenalter, die Dauer der Symptome, die Ausprägung der klinischen und elektrophysiologischen Befunde, das Vorliegen von Begleiterkrankungen und medikolegale Momente die Ergebnisse beeinflussen. Letztlich konnte für keinen der zahlreichen untersuchten Faktoren ein signifikanter Einfluss auf das Langzeitergebnis nachgewiesen werden. Bestehen die Beschwerden länger, sind die klinischen und elektrophysiologischen Befunde ausgeprägter und liegen Begleiterkrankungen vor, so fallen die Ergebnisse weniger gut aus, was darauf hindeutet, dass die betroffenen Patienten etwas weniger von der Operation profitieren. Nur bei Vorliegen von medikolegalen Faktoren wie Rechtsstreit oder Schadenersatzansprüchen lässt sich definitiv ein schlechtes Ergebnis voraussagen. PMID:27580438

  3. [Diagnostic validity of ultrasonography in carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bueno-Gracia, Elena; Haddad-Garay, María; Tricas-Moreno, José M; Fanlo-Mazas, Pablo; Malo-Urries, Miguel; Estebanez-de-Miguel, Elena; Hidalgo-Garcia, César; Ruiz de Escudero-Zapico, Alazne

    2015-07-01

    Introduccion. La ecografia ha emergido como una herramienta diagnostica alternativa de las neuropatias perifericas, como el sindrome del tunel carpiano (STC). Sin embargo, faltan datos sobre la validez diagnostica de las diferentes mediciones ecograficas para la deteccion del STC en entornos clinicos. Objetivo. Hallar la validez diagnostica de las mediciones ecograficas del area de seccion transversal del nervio mediano en la muñeca (AST-M) y de la ratio del area del nervio mediano entre la muñeca y el antebrazo (R-MA) en el diagnostico del STC, utilizando como tecnica de referencia el electroneurograma (ENG). Pacientes y metodos. Se realizaron mediciones ecograficas en 59 sujetos (97 muñecas) referidos para someterse a un ENG por sospecha de STC. Los examinadores que realizaron la ecografia desconocian los resultados del ENG. Posteriormente, se calcularon los puntos de corte mediante curvas ROC para cada una de las mediciones (AST-M y R-MA) y se analizo su validez diagnostica. Resultados. Con un punto de corte de 9,15 mm2, la medicion AST-M obtuvo una sensibilidad del 75,81%, una especificidad del 74,29%, una ratio de probabilidad positiva de 2,95 y una ratio de probabilidad negativa de 0,33. Para la medicion R-MA y un punto de corte de 1,56, los valores de sensibilidad, especificidad y ratios de probabilidad positiva y negativa fueron 70,97%, 71,43%, 2,48 y 0,4, respectivamente. Conclusion. Tanto el AST-M como la R-MA parecen ser medidas utiles en el diagnostico del STC tomando como prueba de referencia el ENG.

  4. The Light at the End of the Carpal Tunnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusack, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of large public libraries on incidents of muscular-skeletal injuries associated with use of computer keyboards in libraries. Personnel policies and practices that can minimize injuries are outlined. Sidebars describe the importance of adjustable workstations, steps that employees can take to minimize injuries, and…

  5. Carpal arthrodesis in cats. Long-term functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Calvo, I; Farrell, M; Chase, D; Aisa, J; Rayward, R; Carmichael, S

    2009-01-01

    Pancarpal and partial carpal arthrodesis were performed in 22 carpi (20 cats) using various surgical methods. Short and long-term outcomes were assessed using a retrospective review of the case notes and via owner questionnaires. Carpal arthrodesis was associated with complications that did not affect the functional outcome, and in most cases, did not necessitate major revision surgery. Following arthrodesis, the cats did not jump as high, and showed a reduction in their willingness to jump and climb. Based on our results, carpal arthrodesis is a suitable salvage surgery to treat severe carpal injuries in the cat. PMID:19876518

  6. Morphometrical variations of the carpal bones in thoroughbreds and ponies.

    PubMed

    Abdunnabi, A H; Ahmed, Y A; Philip, C J; Davies, H M S

    2012-04-01

    There is scant morphological data for equine carpal bones despite the frequent pathology in Thoroughbreds (TB). This study aimed to identify morphological and morphometrical variations and similarities in carpal bones between and within TB and Ponies (Po). Carpal bones from nine TB and 13 Po were prepared by boiling and drying. Lateromedial width, dorsopalmar depth, proximodistal height, relative density and volume of each bone were measured. Normalized measurements of the radial (Cr) and third (C3) carpal bones were significantly different in all dimensions, and there were significant variations in relative sizes of articular facets of the ulnar (Cu), C3 and fourth (C4) carpal bones between the groups. Bilaterally, the proportionate volume of the intermediate carpal bone (Ci) was significantly greater in Po while that of Cu and C4 were significantly greater in TB. Relative density of most bones was greater in Po. The palmar tuberosity of the proximal surface of Ci and palmar tubercle on the palmar surface of Cu were more prominent and relatively larger in TB. In the second carpal bone (C2), the distal extent of the proximal articular surface on the palmar surface was greater in Po. The inconsistent first carpal bone (C1) was relatively larger in Po. Morphometrical similarities and differences in carpal bones between TB and Po indicate potential effects of selection for body size or fast exercise.

  7. Coordinate systems for the carpal bones of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Coburn, James C; Upal, Mohammad A; Crisco, Joseph J

    2007-01-01

    The eight small and complexly shaped carpal bones of the wrist articulate in six degrees of freedom with each other and to some extent with the radius and the metacarpals. With the increasing number and sophistication of studies of the carpus, a standardized definition for a coordinate system for each the carpal bones would aid in the reporting and comparison of findings. This paper presents a method for defining and constructing a coordinate system specific to each of the eight carpal bones based upon the inertial properties of the bone, derived from surface models constructed from three-dimensional (3-D) medical image volumes. Surface models from both wrists of 5 male and 5 female subjects were generated from CT image volumes in two neutral wrist positions (functional and clinical). An automated algorithm found the principal inertial axes and oriented them according to preset conditions in 85% of the bones, the remaining bones were corrected manually. Six of the eight carpal bones were significantly more extended in the functional neutral position than in the clinical neutral position. Gender had no significant effect on carpal bone posture in either wrist position. Correlations between the 3-D carpal posture and the commonly used 2-D clinical radiographic carpal angles are established. 3-D coordinate systems defined by the anatomy of the carpal bone, such as the ones presented here, are necessary to completely describe 3-D changes in the posture of the carpal bones.

  8. [About the problem of radial tunnel syndrome or "where does the tennis elbow end and where does the radial tunnel syndrome begin?"].

    PubMed

    Smola, C

    2004-08-01

    Tennis elbow or epicondylitis lateralis humeri is a commonly seen pain-syndrome. Radial tunnel syndrome is generally assumed to be a rare nerve compression syndrome. This study intents to demonstrate that tennis elbow is the most common manifestation of radial tunnel syndrome or in other words, tennis elbow is nothing else but radial tunnel syndrome. In patients with tennis elbow one will always find the ramus profundus n. radialis compressed by the arcade of Frohse. The author is convinced that following the carpal tunnel syndrome, the radial tunnel syndrome is the second most common nerve compression in upper extremity.

  9. Diagnosis and Treatment of Symptomatic Carpal Bossing

    PubMed Central

    Radmer, Sebastian; Fresow, Robert; Tabibzada, Arash Mehdi; Kamusella, Peter; Scheer, Fabian; Andresen, Reimer

    2015-01-01

    Context Carpal bossing is an osseous formation at the dorsal portion of the quadrangular joint, which rarely becomes symptomatic. However, in some patients it causes pain, restricted mobility and can lead to complications like tendon rupture, inflammatory and degenerative joint disease. Aim In this article, we present our experiences with this rare disorder in order to improve diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings. Settings Design This is a multicenter and interdisciplinary observation made by orthopaedic surgeons and radiologists in the years 2010 to 2015. Retrospective observational study. The follow up period was 2 years. Materials and Methods In the observed time period, eight patients were diagnosed with symptomatic carpal bossing. Symptoms were pain at palmar flexion and limited mobility of the wrist in combination with a palpable protuberance over the quadrangular joint. All patients underwent X-ray, CT and MRI examinations. A conservative treatment strategy was initiated for 6 weeks in all patients, followed by a wedge resection when symptoms were persisting and disabling. Results After the conservative treatment schedule, five patients were asymptomatic. Three patients had persisting pain and were thus recommended for surgery. In the postoperative course, two patients were asymptomatic. One patient developed a type 1 complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in the first postoperative year, which was successfully treated with pain-adapted physiotherapy, pharmacotherapy with analgesics and calcitonin, and a triple CT-guided thoracic sympathetic nerve blockade. Conclusion Carpal bossing is a mostly asymptomatic entity, which in our experience gets symptomatic due to direct trauma or repetitive stress, especially in competitive racket sports players. It can be diagnosed by thorough clinical examination and multimodal diagnostic imaging. Conservative treatment comprises an excellent prognosis, however surgery, either wedge resection or arthrodesis, must be

  10. [Numerical variants and congenital fusions of carpal bones].

    PubMed

    Senecail, B; Perruez, H; Colin, D

    2007-03-01

    The number of carpal bones may be increased or decreased by the fact of anatomical variants or true congenital anomalies. Numerical increment arises from additional or from split bones. Over twenty accessory carpal bones have been described but the commonest are the os centrale carpi, the os radiale externum, the triangular bone and the styloideum bone. Additional carpal bones usually result from a failure of fusion of their ossification centers. A congenital origin is not clearly established for all these ossicles. The scaphoid and lunate may split into two or three bones and several cases of bipartite hamulus of the hamatum have been reported. A carpus with only seven bones results from the congenital absence of a normal bone, which mainly affects the scaphoid, lunate and triquetrum, or from a synostosis between two carpal bones, usually the lunate and triquetrum. Congenital fusions originate from an absence of joint cavitation into the embryo and chondrification of the joint interzone. Numerical carpal variants are uncommon as independent entities but occur with a relative high frequency in association with complex malformations of the hand. These anomalies are detectable on plain radiographs of the wrist, but CT-scan and MR-Imaging are useful to differentiate bipartite and accessory bones from carpal fractures or posttraumatic injuries, carpal fusions having to be distinguished from bony ankylosis.

  11. The carpal stretch test at the rheumatoid wrist.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Matsusita, Kazuhiko; Arai, Takeshi; Yoshida, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic changes of the carpus for rheumatoid wrists in patients who underwent the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure by examining the clinical results and comparing pre- and postoperative radiographic measurements. We studied 43 wrists in 37 patients who showed vertical laxity in the radiocarpal and midcarpal joint on preoperative carpal stretch test. Pain was improved in all patients and the forearm rotation angles of the wrist were significantly improved after the operation. The carpal collapse ratio was significantly reduced after the operation. The carpal collapse reduction rate was significantly greater in the group with than that in the group without midcarpal joint vertical laxity on the carpal stretch test. Although the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure was not sufficiently effective in preventing carpal collapse, it did have a protective effect against ulnar carpal shift. The results of our study showed that vertical laxity of the midcarpal joint was the risk factor of the carpal collapse after Sauvé-Kapandji procedure.

  12. [The pisiform bone: sesamoid or carpal bone?].

    PubMed

    May, O

    1996-01-01

    In man, the pisiform bone occupies an unusual place among the carpal bones. It is situated in an anterior plane to the other bones, sheathed within the tendon of the flexor carpi ulnaris, and ossifying almost four years the last of the carpal bones. Many theories have tried to explain the presence of this "exceptional" bone: the first theory, proposed by Flower and Mivart, suggested the possibility that this bone could be a sesamoid. The second theory supposes a polydactyl hand, assuming that polydactyly preceded pentadactyly; the pisiform would then be a post-minimus vestigial bone according to Bardeleben. Finally, Gegenbauer and Gillies, proposed a primary pentadactyl hand in which the carpus would be composed of three proximal elements, generally two central, and five distal. The pisiform would either be a derivative of the central series, or a distinct element in the carpus. This last theory appears to be the most likely. The primary carpus would therefore have consisted of 12 bones arranged in 3 distinct rows, a proximal row of 3 bones, a central row of 4 bones, and a distal row of 5 bones. According to this theory, the most ulnar of the central would have been displaced to the medial limit of the carpus, to become the pisiform. PMID:9026058

  13. Global point signature for shape analysis of carpal bones

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Leahy, Richard M; Wise, Barton L; Lane, Nancy E; Badawi, Ramsey D; Joshi, Anand A

    2014-01-01

    We present a method based on spectral theory for the shape analysis of carpal bones of the human wrist. We represent the cortical surface of the carpal bone in a coordinate system based on the eigensystem of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation. We employ a metric—global point signature (GPS)—that exploits the scale and isometric invariance of eigenfunctions to quantify overall bone shape. We use a fast finite-element-method to compute the GPS metric. We capitalize upon the properties of GPS representation—such as stability, a standard Euclidean (ℓ2) metric definition, and invariance to scaling, translation and rotation—to perform shape analysis of the carpal bones of ten women and ten men from a publicly-available database. We demonstrate the utility of the proposed GPS representation to provide a means for comparing shapes of the carpal bones across populations. PMID:24503490

  14. Global point signature for shape analysis of carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Leahy, Richard M; Wise, Barton L; Lane, Nancy E; Badawi, Ramsey D; Joshi, Anand A

    2014-02-21

    We present a method based on spectral theory for the shape analysis of carpal bones of the human wrist. We represent the cortical surface of the carpal bone in a coordinate system based on the eigensystem of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation. We employ a metric--global point signature (GPS)--that exploits the scale and isometric invariance of eigenfunctions to quantify overall bone shape. We use a fast finite-element-method to compute the GPS metric. We capitalize upon the properties of GPS representation--such as stability, a standard Euclidean (ℓ(2)) metric definition, and invariance to scaling, translation and rotation--to perform shape analysis of the carpal bones of ten women and ten men from a publicly-available database. We demonstrate the utility of the proposed GPS representation to provide a means for comparing shapes of the carpal bones across populations.

  15. The role of proprioception and neuromuscular stability in carpal instabilities.

    PubMed

    Hagert, E; Lluch, A; Rein, S

    2016-01-01

    Carpal stability has traditionally been defined as dependent on the articular congruity of joint surfaces, the static stability maintained by intact ligaments, and the dynamic stability caused by muscle contractions resulting in a compression of joint surfaces. In the past decade, a fourth factor in carpal stability has been proposed, involving the neuromuscular and proprioceptive control of joints. The proprioception of the wrist originates from afferent signals elicited by sensory end organs (mechanoreceptors) in ligaments and joint capsules that elicit spinal reflexes for immediate joint stability, as well as higher order neuromuscular influx to the cerebellum and sensorimotor cortices for planning and executing joint control. The aim of this review is to provide an understanding of the role of proprioception and neuromuscular control in carpal instabilities by delineating the sensory innervation and the neuromuscular control of the carpus, as well as descriptions of clinical applications of proprioception in carpal instabilities. PMID:26115684

  16. Global point signature for shape analysis of carpal bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Leahy, Richard M.; Wise, Barton L.; Lane, Nancy E.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Joshi, Anand A.

    2014-02-01

    We present a method based on spectral theory for the shape analysis of carpal bones of the human wrist. We represent the cortical surface of the carpal bone in a coordinate system based on the eigensystem of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation. We employ a metric—global point signature (GPS)—that exploits the scale and isometric invariance of eigenfunctions to quantify overall bone shape. We use a fast finite-element-method to compute the GPS metric. We capitalize upon the properties of GPS representation—such as stability, a standard Euclidean (ℓ2) metric definition, and invariance to scaling, translation and rotation—to perform shape analysis of the carpal bones of ten women and ten men from a publicly-available database. We demonstrate the utility of the proposed GPS representation to provide a means for comparing shapes of the carpal bones across populations.

  17. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3750 Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3770 Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3760 Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  20. Carpal ontogeny in Monodelphis domestica and Caluromys philander (Marsupialia).

    PubMed

    Prochel, J A N; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2003-01-01

    Carpal bones have experienced numerous changes during marsupial evolution, even though their diversity and development remain poorly studied. The aim of this work was to document adult form and the pattern of mesenchymal tissue condensation and formation of chondrification and ossification centers in the hand of two marsupials. Two fundamental questions were asked: whether the loss of embryonic precursors was associated with the loss of adult elements, or whether there were developmental signs of ancestral mammalian elements that have been fused or lost in marsupial taxa. We were also interested to find out whether there is sexual dimorphismus in the carpals, as has been reported for some didelphids. Histological sections, cleared and stained specimens and macerated skeletons representing an ontogenetic series of Monodelphis domestica were used to document carpal development. Comparisons were made with perinatal stages of Caluromys philander and with adult specimens of other marsupials. A prenatal M. domestica in the 13th day after conception has a cell condensation that because of its position is homologized with a centrale, which is at birth already lost or fused. Neonatal M. domestica and C. philander have the number and arrangement of their adult carpal anatomy. Trapezium and trapezoid start ossification later than most other carpals, while pisiform and prepollex are the last to do so. Adult males of M. domestica have relatively larger and more robust pisiforms, compared to other carpals, than females. This sexual dimorphism develops relatively late as it was not recorded in male specimens around 160 days old. An extra sesamoid bone located just distal to the radius and proximo-palmar to the scaphoid was recorded in specimens of C. philander, C. derbianus and Didelphis virginiana.

  1. Percutaneous liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Newton, Eric; Kar, Premashish

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous liver biopsy has been performed for more than 120 years, and remains an important diagnostic procedure for the management of hepatobiliary disorders. Modern biochemical, immunologic, and radiographic techniques have facilitated the diagnosis and management of liver diseases but have not made liver biopsy obsolete. This comprehensive review article will discuss the history of development of percutaneous liver biopsy, its indications, contraindications, complications and the various aspects of the biopsy procedure in detail.

  2. Ultrasonically guided percutaneous pyeloscopy.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, M; Watanabe, H

    1981-05-01

    A method for percutaneous endoscopic study of the renal pelvis has been developed in our clinic. A thin endoscope has been manufactured which is introduced into the dilated renal pelvis via a puncture under ultrasonic real-time guidance to allow inspection. This technique has been named percutaneous pyeloscopy. The method can also be applied to the inspection of the renal cyst, the retroperitoneal space, and the urinary bladder.

  3. Partial carpal arthrodesis in a calf with chronic infectious arthritis of the carpus and osteomyelitis of the carpal and metacarpal bones.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, C B; Farrow, C S

    1998-01-01

    A calf was treated for chronic infectious arthritis and osteomyelitis of the carpus and metacarpus by carpal bone excision, debridement, and cancellous bone graft placement in the metacarpal medullary cavity. Following 6 weeks of limb immobilization, carpal-metacarpal arthrodesis was achieved. The heifer is pain free, and has produced 3 calves. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9759514

  4. Simultaneous distal radial fractures and carpal bones injuries in children: a review article.

    PubMed

    Pretell-Mazzini, Juan; Carrigan, Robert B

    2011-09-01

    Accurate diagnosis is crucial in effectively managing and treating both the radial and carpal fractures. Injuries to the carpal bones are not usually associated with fractures of the distal radius; however, the presence of a distal radius fracture does not preclude an associated carpal injury. The purpose of this review article is to compile cases of past reported distal radius fractures and simultaneous carpal injuries to restate its low prevalence within the pediatric population while still serving as a collective reference for management and treatment. After an electronic literature search was performed, we identified 18 published articles and 28 cases dealing with combined distal radial and carpal bones injuries in the pediatric population. As the mechanism of injury is similar for both fractures, despite the low incidence, orthopedic surgeons need to rule out carpal injury with a distal forearm fracture. Failure to treat both injuries appropriately may result in an unsatisfactory clinical result.

  5. Percutaneous vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty.

    PubMed

    Anselmetti, G C; Muto, M; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Masala, S

    2010-05-01

    Percutaneous vertebral augmentation techniques performed with vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty are safe and effective for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, primary or secondary spine tumors, and selected traumatic fractures. This article compares the procedures and outlines their advantages and disadvantages. It concludes that vertebroplasty should be performed in most cases, but kyphoplasty is preferable in selected cases.

  6. Bilateral Second Carpal Row Duplication Associated with Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cladiere-Nassif, Victoire; Delaroche, Caroline; Pottier, Edwige; Feron, Jean-Marc

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting a hitherto undescribed condition of bilateral second carpal row duplication. She was diagnosed in childhood with both Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, with no clear evidence and no further medical follow-up. She presented throughout her life with various articular symptoms, which appeared to be compatible with a diagnosis of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, and underwent several surgical procedures on her knees and hips. Most recently, she was reporting pain at the base of the fifth metacarpal bone of the left hand. X-ray images and computed tomography (CT) were obtained for exploration and showed a total second row duplication in both carpi, with a total number of 18 carpal bones in each wrist. PMID:26649258

  7. Carpals and epiphyses of radius and ulna as age indicators.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; Ferrante, Luigi; Mirtella, Dora; Cingolani, Mariano

    2006-05-01

    Estimation of skeletal age using radiographic images is widely used for assessing biological growth in clinical and auxological studies. The most frequent areas used for age estimation in children and adolescents are tooth and wrist/hand, both giving good results with only a low level of radiation. In particular, ossification of the carpals shows good agreement with chronological age. This study of a sample of 150 Italian children and adolescents aged between 5 and 17 years focused on analyzing the possible applications of the proportion of carpal area (Ca) mineralization as a criterion of age estimation. The ratio between the total area of carpal bones and epiphyses of the ulna and radius (Bo) and Ca was calculated. This ratio (Bo/Ca) was used for linear regression analysis. The regression model, describing age as a linear function of the ratio Bo/Ca, yielded the following equation: Age=-3.253+0.719 g+20.610 Bo/Ca, and explained 83% of the total variance (R (2)=0.83). The median of the absolute values of residuals (observed age minus predicted age) was 0.08 years, with a quartile deviation of 1.59 years, and a standard error of estimate of 1.19 years.

  8. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  17. Morphometry by computerized three-dimensional reconstruction of the human carpal bones during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Durand, S; Delmas, V; Ho Ba Tho, M-C; Batchvarova, Z; Uhl, J F; Oberlin, C

    2006-08-01

    Carpal skeleton shows drastic developmental changes during embryogenesis. At this stage, the cartilaginous matrices appear and later form models of the limb bones. The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphometry of carpal bones in humans during embryological development. We obtained digitalized histological serial sections of 18 human embryos and early fetuses from the Institute of Anatomy in Paris. Surfdriver and MSC.Patran software were used for three-dimensional reconstruction and morphometry. There was a strong correlation between the volume of the carpal cartilaginous structure and the size of the embryos (P<0.001) and an exponential correlation between the carpal volume and the percentage of volume presented by the proximal carpal row (P=0.005). According to inertia parameters, the geometry of carpal cartilaginous structure, initially plane, becomes curved during embryogenesis. Carpal bones growth follows non-homothetic transformation. The innovations in embryo reconstruction serve as new tool for scientific investigation. A hypothesis of carpal development is proposed.

  18. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a...

  1. Inter-carpal soft tissue entrapment. A possible explanation for chronic dorsal wrist pain.

    PubMed

    Terng, S C A; Kuypers, K C; Koch, A R

    2006-02-01

    This retrospective study evaluates the surgical treatment of a group of patients with unknown chronic dorsal wrist pain. The cause of their symptoms was interpreted as a painful entrapment of fibrous tissue in the radio-carpal and inter-carpal joints during specific movements. Between 1997 and 2001, 30 patients were treated by surgical excision of this tissue and 26 patients were traced for follow-up. Twenty-three patients were symptom free, or experienced major benefit from surgery. Wrist function measurements using the VAS scale showed improvement in 24 patients. Microscopic examination of the removed specimen shows fibrous tissue with non-specific changes. Inter-carpal soft tissue entrapment can explain the typical clinical findings in some patients with unknown chronic dorsal wrist pain. After careful selection, surgical excision of all entrapped tissue in the radio-carpal and mid-carpal joint may give relief of pain and improvement of wrist function.

  2. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  3. Bone age assessment for young children from newborn to 7-year-old using carpal bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aifeng; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2007-03-01

    A computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) method has been previously developed based on features extracted from phalangeal regions of interest (ROI) in a digital hand atlas, which can assess bone age of children from ages 7 to 18 accurately. Therefore, in order to assess the bone age of children in younger ages, the inclusion of carpal bones is necessary. In this paper, we developed and implemented a knowledge-based method for fully automatic carpal bone segmentation and morphological feature analysis. Fuzzy classification was then used to assess the bone age based on the selected features. Last year, we presented carpal bone segmentation algorithm. This year, research works on procedures after carpal bone segmentation including carpal bone identification, feature analysis and fuzzy system for bone age assessment is presented. This method has been successfully applied on all cases in which carpal bones have not overlapped. CAD results of total about 205 cases from the digital hand atlas were evaluated against subject chronological age as well as readings of two radiologists. It was found that the carpal ROI provides reliable information in determining the bone age for young children from newborn to 7-year-old.

  4. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Placement

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary valve disease need multiple procedures over their lifetimes to replace their pulmonary valves. Chronic pulmonary stenosis, regurgitation, or both have untoward effects on ventricular function and on the clinical status of these patients. To date, all right ventricle–pulmonary artery conduits have had relatively short lifespans. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, although relatively new, will probably reduce the number of operative procedures that these patients will have to undergo over a lifetime. Refinement and further development of this procedure holds promise for the extension of this technology to other patient populations. PMID:26175629

  5. Percutaneous left ventricular restoration.

    PubMed

    Ige, Mobolaji; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Attizzani, Guilherme; Costa, Marco; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2015-04-01

    The ventricular partitioning device known as Parachute is the first and only percutaneously implantable device aimed at restoration of normal left ventricular geometry in humans. Since its conception, this technology has undergone extensive animal and human testing, with proved feasibility and safety, and is currently being studied in a pivotal randomized clinical trial. This article discusses ventricular remodeling and therapies attempted in the past, details the components of the ventricular partitioning device, describes the implanting technique, and reviews the most current experience of this device in humans.

  6. Percutaneous left ventricular restoration.

    PubMed

    Ige, Mobolaji; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Attizzani, Guilherme; Costa, Marco; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2015-04-01

    The ventricular partitioning device known as Parachute is the first and only percutaneously implantable device aimed at restoration of normal left ventricular geometry in humans. Since its conception, this technology has undergone extensive animal and human testing, with proved feasibility and safety, and is currently being studied in a pivotal randomized clinical trial. This article discusses ventricular remodeling and therapies attempted in the past, details the components of the ventricular partitioning device, describes the implanting technique, and reviews the most current experience of this device in humans. PMID:25834974

  7. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff.

  8. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff. PMID:25807772

  9. Malignant giant cell tumor in the carpal tunnel: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Theunissen, Carla I J M; Bras, Johannes; Lienden, Krijn P van; Obdeijn, Miryam C

    2013-08-01

    Background Malignant tenosynovial giant cell tumors (GCTs) are extremely rare, and their etiology is unknown. However, this type of malignancy is associated with high metastasis and mortality rates. Therefore, the treatment of choice is wide excision. Case Description A 66-year-old man complained of tingling and loss of sensation in the left hand, caused by a tumor that compressed the median nerve. The tumor was excised. Histopathologic examination revealed a ganglion cyst. Two years later, the patient visited our clinic with recurrent and similar complaints of the left hand. This time, however, the lesion turned out to be a malignant tenosynovial GCT and was treated by amputation of the forearm. Literature Review Since 1979, only 37 malignant tenosynovial GCTs have been reported in literature. Follow-up of these patients showed that 11 patients died of the disease, 4 patients were still living with the disease, and 14 patients had no evidence of disease after treatment. The other seven patients were lost to follow-up, and one patient died of other causes. In these 37 patients, a high incidence of lymph node metastasis (41%) and a high mortality rate (30%) were seen. Clinical Relevance Although this malignant tenosynovial GCT is very rare, high mortality rates have been observed because of the high incidence of lymph node metastases. Therefore, more awareness has to be created, to recognize and treat this tumor timely. PMID:24436827

  10. [Relationship between ultrasound measurements of the median nerve and electrophysiological severity in carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bueno-Gracia, Elena; Tricás-Moreno, José Miguel; Fanlo-Mazas, Pablo; Malo-Urriés, Miguel; Haddad-Garay, María; Estébanez-de-Miguel, Elena; Hidalgo-García, César; Ruiz-de-Escudero Zapico, Alazne

    2015-11-16

    Introduccion. La ecografia es una herramienta que ha experimentado un gran desarrollo en el diagnostico de patologias compresivas neurales, como el sindrome del tunel carpiano (STC). Para planificar el tratamiento es importante establecer la gravedad de la patologia, por lo que seria relevante conocer la capacidad de la ecografia para discriminar el grado de afectacion del nervio mediano a este nivel. Objetivo. Investigar la correlacion de las mediciones ecograficas con la gravedad electrofisiologica en pacientes con STC. Pacientes y metodos. Se realizaron mediciones ecograficas en 59 sujetos (97 muñecas) remitidos para recibir un electroneurograma (ENG) por sospecha de STC. Segun el ENG, los sujetos se clasificaron como sanos, STC leve, moderado o grave. Posteriormente, se analizo la relacion entre las mediciones ecograficas y los resultados del ENG segun su gravedad. Tambien se calcularon las curvas ROC (receiver operaing characteristic) para los valores de corte optimos en cada grupo atendiendo a su gravedad. Resultados. Ambas mediciones ecograficas mostraron correlacion con la gravedad del STC determinada por el ENG. El area de seccion transversal del nervio mediano en la muñeca (AST-M) mostro la mayor correlacion (r = 0,613). Conclusiones. Existe relacion entre las mediciones ecograficas del nervio mediano, especialmente en el AST-M, y la gravedad del STC en un contexto clinico. Dichas mediciones podrian ser complementarias para diagnosticar el STC y determinar su gravedad.

  11. [Ultrasonography in evaluating the character of lesions of the median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Klimkin, A V; Voitenkov, V B; Skripchenko, N V

    2016-01-01

    Цель исследования. Оценка связи между площадью поперечного сечения срединного нерва до и после запястного канала и характером его поражения — аксонотмезис и невропраксия при синдроме запястного канала (СЗК). Материал и методы. Обследовано 26 кистей с СЗК и 30 — контрольной группы. Всем обследованным проводилось ультразвуковое исследование с измерением площади поперечного сечения до и после запястного канала, стимуляционная электронейромиография моторных, сенсорных волокон срединного и локтевого нервов по стандартной методике. Пациентам с подтвержденным СЗК проводилась игольчатая электромиография m. abductor pollicis brevis. Пациенты с СЗК были разделены на две группы по типу поражения срединного нерва — аксонотмезис и невропраксия. Проводился корреляционный анализ связи ультразвуковых показателей с характером поражения нерва. Результаты и заключение. На основании полученных данных выявлена 89% чувствительность и 85% специфичность метода измерения площади сечения срединного нерва после выхода его из запястного канала в диагностике поражения нерва по типу аксонотмезиса, получены пороговые значения площади сечения в отношении характера поражения ствола срединного нерва.

  12. A three-dimensional quantitative analysis of carpal deformity in rheumatoid wrists.

    PubMed

    Arimitsu, S; Murase, T; Hashimoto, J; Oka, K; Sugamoto, K; Yoshikawa, H; Moritomo, H

    2007-04-01

    We have measured the three-dimensional patterns of carpal deformity in 20 wrists in 20 rheumatoid patients in which the carpal bones were shifted ulnarwards on plain radiography. Three-dimensional bone models of the carpus and radius were created by computerised tomography with the wrist in the neutral position. The location of the centroids and rotational angle of each carpal bone relative to the radius were calculated and compared with those of ten normal wrists. In the radiocarpal joint, the proximal row was flexed and the centroids of all carpal bones translocated in an ulnar, proximal and volar direction with loss of congruity. In the midcarpal joint, the distal row was extended and congruity generally well preserved. These findings may facilitate more positive use of radiocarpal fusion alone for the deformed rheumatoid wrist.

  13. Inferring 3D kinematics of carpal bones from single view fluoroscopic sequences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Graham, Jim; Hutchinson, Charles; Muir, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel framework for inferring 3D carpal bone kinematics and bone shapes from a single view fluoroscopic sequence. A hybrid statistical model representing both the kinematics and shape variation of the carpal bones is built, based on a number of 3D CT data sets obtained from different subjects at different poses. Given a fluoroscopic sequence, the wrist pose, carpal bone kinematics and bone shapes are estimated iteratively by matching the statistical model with the 2D images. A specially designed cost function enables smoothed parameter estimation across frames. We have evaluated the proposed method on both simulated data and real fluoroscopic sequences. It was found that the relative positions between carpal bones can be accurately estimated, which is potentially useful for detection of conditions such as scapholunate dissociation.

  14. A rare case of massive carpal osteoblastoma requiring complex reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Dunda, S E; Kauczok, J; Demir, E; Braunschweig, T; Pallua, N

    2013-07-01

    An osteoblastoma is a rare, commonly benign, osteoid-producing neoplasm of the bone with an incidence of 2% of all primary bone tumours. We present a case of a 54-year-old patient with persisting carpal pain and massive swelling of the hand for a period of 4 years. Incision biopsies revealed the histopathological finding of a carpal osteoblastoma. After complete tumour excision, including the carpal and, in parts, metacarpal bones, reconstructive surgery was performed with a free osteocutaneous iliac crest flap to obtain a natural hand contour and the best possible hand function. Follow-up revealed improvement of the hand function in terms of flexion, extension and strength without discomfort or further pain. Thus, ongoing carpal pain should lead to an intensive search with further diagnostic measures such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan as well as biopsies, if necessary, to obtain the correct diagnosis.

  15. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in children.

    PubMed

    Demarco, Romano T

    2011-01-01

    The surgical management of pediatric stone disease has evolved significantly over the last three decades. Prior to the introduction of shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) in the 1980s, open lithotomy was the lone therapy for children with upper tract calculi. Since then, SWL has been the procedure of choice in most pediatric centers for children with large renal calculi. While other therapies such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) were also being advanced around the same time, PNL was generally seen as a suitable therapy in adults because of the concerns for damage in the developing kidney. However, recent advances in endoscopic instrumentation and renal access techniques have led to an increase in its use in the pediatric population, particularly in those children with large upper tract stones. This paper is a review of the literature focusing on the indications, techniques, results, and complications of PNL in children with renal calculi.

  16. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  17. Percutaneous transtracheal ventilation.

    PubMed

    Smith, R B; Babinski, M; Klain, M; Pfaeffle, H

    1976-10-01

    The technique of percutaneous transtracheal ventilation (intermittent jets of oxygen under high pressure, 50 pounds per square inch [psi]) has been used for resuscitation during anesthesia and prior to tracheostomy, and has been established as an important adjunct to life-support techniques. The technical aspects are described together with experimental evidence that intermittent jet ventilation is necessary to eliminate carbon dioxide. The complications occurring with a series of 80 patients are reported along with experimental work in ventilation of dogs with compressed air sources, including truck tires. Emergency physicians should be familiar with this technique and equipment for its use should be readily available in the emergency department. The potential role of transtracheal ventilation in the mobile intensive care unit at accident sites has been explored and appears promising. Conventional airway support techniques should be applied prior to resorting to transtracheal ventilation.

  18. Homologies and homeotic transformation of the theropod ‘semilunate' carpal

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xing; Han, Fenglu; Zhao, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The homology of the ‘semilunate' carpal, an important structure linking non-avian and avian dinosaurs, has been controversial. Here we describe the morphology of some theropod wrists, demonstrating that the ‘semilunate' carpal is not formed by the same carpal elements in all theropods possessing this feature and that the involvement of the lateralmost distal carpal in forming the ‘semilunate' carpal of birds is an inheritance from their non-avian theropod ancestors. Optimization of relevant morphological features indicates that these features evolved in an incremental way and the ‘semilunate' structure underwent a lateral shift in position during theropod evolution, possibly as a result of selection for foldable wings in birds and their close theropod relatives. We propose that homeotic transformation was involved in the evolution of the ‘semilunate' carpal. In combination with developmental data on avian wing digits, this suggests that homeosis played a significant role in theropod hand evolution in general. PMID:25116378

  19. Image analysis for skeletal evaluation of carpal bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Chien-Chuan; Mao, Chi-Wu; Lin, Chi-Jen; Sun, Yung-Nien

    1995-04-01

    The assessment of bone age is an important field to the pediatric radiology. It provides very important information for treatment and prediction of skeletal growth in a developing child. So far, various computerized algorithms for automatically assessing the skeletal growth have been reported. Most of these methods made attempt to analyze the phalangeal growth. The most fundamental step in these automatic measurement methods is the image segmentation that extracts bones from soft-tissue and background. These automatic segmentation methods of hand radiographs can roughly be categorized into two main approaches that are edge and region based methods. This paper presents a region-based carpal-bone segmentation approach. It is organized into four stages: contrast enhancement, moment-preserving thresholding, morphological processing, and region-growing labeling.

  20. Osteoid osteoma of the carpal bones. Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Tricoire, Jean-Louis; Cantagrel, Alain; Wagner, Aude; Puget, Jean

    2006-10-01

    Osteoid osteoma rarely develops in the wrist. The symptoms resemble atypical tenosynovitis, with variations according to the location of the tumor. As a result, diagnostic wanderings are common. In addition, the pain may seem related to an injury, as illustrated by two cases reported herein. Conventional investigations often fail to contribute to the diagnosis. The most specific investigation is thin-slice computed tomography (CT), which can be coupled to magnetic resonance imaging. CT typically visualizes a round lucency surrounded by a rim of sclerosis; in addition, CT shows the exact location of the tumor, particularly relative to neighboring joints. Complete excision of the nidus must be achieved to ensure a permanent cure. Same-stage carpal bone fusion may be required in patients with extensive joint involvement.

  1. Looking into Tunnel Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to make tunnel books, which are viewed by looking into a "tunnel" created by accordion-folded expanding sides. Suggests possible themes. Describes how to create a walk-through tunnel book for first grade students. (CMK)

  2. Relative weights of the human carpal bones: biological and functional interests.

    PubMed

    Le Minor, J M; Rapp, E

    2001-11-01

    The relative carpal weights (Weight of each of the eight carpal bones/Weight of the complete carpus x 100) were studied in a series of 95 complete human adult carpi (dried bones). The greatest was the capitatum (19.92%; mean rank 1.16) and the smallest the pisiform (4.43%; mean rank 8.00). The scaphoideum and the hamatum presented very near values (17.19 and 15.81%; mean ranks 2.34 and 2.74), as did the lunatum and trapezium (12.56 and 12.52%; mean ranks 4.41 and 4.48), and the triquetrum and trapezoideum (9.21 and 8.36%; mean ranks 6.19 and 6.68). Within the proximal row, a regular radio-ulnar decrease was observed from the scaphoideum (39.58%) to the pisiform (10.20%). Within the distal row, a marked break existed between the trapezoideum (14.77%) and the capitatum (35.19%); the capitato-hamatal element represented 63.11% of the distal row. The distal row (mean 56.61%) was always a little heavier than the proximal row (mean 43.39%), resulting in a mean proximo-distal weight ratio of 0.77. A radio-ulnar decrease in the relative weights was observed from the radial to the ulnar carpal columns. The determination of the relative carpal weights is simple, reproducible, non-invasive, rapid, and inexpensive, and can be considered an interesting and valuable approach to the estimation of the relative carpal volumes. Relative carpal weights reveal the intrinsic proportions of the carpus and are the reflection of biological, functional and evolutionary constraints. Interesting relations appear with carpal growth and ossification, with functional characteristics, and with evolutionary processes.

  3. The effect of tendon loading on in-vitro carpal kinematics of the wrist joint.

    PubMed

    Foumani, M; Blankevoort, L; Stekelenburg, C; Strackee, S D; Carelsen, B; Jonges, R; Streekstra, G J

    2010-06-18

    Measurements of in-vitro carpal kinematics of the wrist provide valuable biomechanical data. Tendon loading is often applied during cadaver experiments to simulate natural stabilizing joint compression in the wrist joint. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tendon loading on carpal kinematics in-vitro. A cyclic movement was imposed on 7 cadaveric forearms while the carpal kinematics were acquired by a 4-dimensional rotational X-ray imaging system. The extensor- and flexor tendons were loaded with constant force springs of 50 N, respectively. The measurements were repeated without a load on the tendons. The effect of loading on the kinematics was tested statistically by using a linear mixed model. During flexion and extension, the proximal carpal bones were more extended with tendon loading. The lunate was on the average 2.0 degrees (p=0.012) more extended. With tendon loading the distal carpal bones were more ulnary deviated at each angle of wrist motion. The capitate was on the average 2.4 degrees (p=0.004) more ulnary deviated. During radioulnar deviation, the proximal carpal bones were more radially deviated with the lunate 0.7 degrees more into radial deviation with tendon loading (p<0.001). Conversely, the bones of distal row were more flexed and supinated with the capitate 1.5 degrees more into flexion (p=0.025) and 1.0 degrees more into supination (p=0.011). In conclusion, the application of a constant load onto the flexor and extensor tendons in cadaver experiments has a small but statistically significant effect on the carpal kinematics during flexion-extension and radioulnar deviation.

  4. Percutaneous nitroglycerin absorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Horhota, S T; Fung, H L

    1979-05-01

    Percutaneous nitroglycerin absorption was studied in shaved rats by monitoring unchanged plasma drug concentrations for up to 4 hr. Drug absorption from the neat liquid state or from an alcoholic solution was considerably poorer than that from a commercial ointment. This observation was unanticipated since the driving force for percutaneous drug absorption was assumed to be drug thermodynamics. Potential artifacts such as drug volatilization from the skin, reduction of surface area through droplet formation, and vehicle occlusion were investigated, but they did not appear to be responsible for the observed results. Two experimental aqueous nitroglycerin gels were prepared with polyethylene glycol 400. One gel contained just sufficient polyethylene glycol to solubilize the nitroglycerin; the other had excess polyethylene glycol to solubilize nitroglycerin far below saturation. Both gels gave extremely low plasma nitroglycerin levels. The composite data suggested that percutaneous nitroglycerin absorption is highly vehicle dependent and that this dependency cannot be explained by simple consideration of drug thermodynamic activity.

  5. Can carpal malalignment predict early and late instability in nonoperatively managed distal radius fractures?

    PubMed

    Batra, Sameer; Debnath, U; Kanvinde, R

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency of carpal instability as a concomitant lesion in distal radius fractures and identify other factors including carpal malalignment in an attempt to predict the final radiological outcome more accurately following conservative treatment of distal radius fractures. An observational study from patient records and standardised radiological follow-up examinations as data sources was used. The alignment of each wrist was checked radiographically immediately post-reduction and subsequently at 1- and 6-week follow-up assessments. Serial measurements of radial length, dorsal tilt, radial inclination, scapho-lunate, radio-lunate, radioscaphoid, scapho-capitate angles and effective radiolunate flexion angle were made. Regression analysis showed high correlation among the severity of axial shortening, pre-reduction dorsal angulation and radio-carpal malalignment pattern with early loss of reduction at 1 week. We found the age, severity of axial radial shortening, dorsal angulation, presence of dorsal comminution and radio-carpal malalignment pattern to be significant predictors of adverse radiological outcome at 6 weeks (late instability). Our study highlights the importance of radio-carpal instability pattern on post-reduction radiographs as a predictor of early and late instability.

  6. Tunneling nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Austefjord, Magnus Wiger; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann; Wang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are recently discovered thin membranous tubes that interconnect cells. During the last decade, research has shown TNTs to be diverse in morphology and composition, varying between and within cell systems. In addition, the discovery of TNT-like extracellular protrusions, as well as observations of TNTs in vivo, has further enriched our knowledge on the diversity of TNT-like structures. Considering the complex molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of TNTs, as well as their different functions in intercellular communication, it is important to decipher how heterogeneity of TNTs is established, and to address what roles the compositional elements have in the execution of various functions. Here, we review the current knowledge on the morphological and structural diversity of TNTs, and address the relation between the formation, the structure, and the function of TNTs. PMID:24778759

  7. Renopleural fistula after percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Palou Redorta, J; Banús Gassol, J M; Prera Vilaseca, A; Ramón Dalmau, M; Morote Robles, J; Ahmad Wahad, A

    1988-01-01

    We present here a 42-year-old female who developed a renopleural fistula after a percutaneous nephrolithotomy through the 11th intercostal space of a calculus of the upper calyces of the right kidney. The fistula was resolved with a chest tube and a double-J ureteral catheter. PMID:3388633

  8. The value of percutaneous cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Evison, Gordon; McNulty, Myles; Thomson, Colin

    1973-01-01

    Percutaneous cholangiograms performed on fifty patients in a district general hospital have been reviewed, and the advantages and limitations of the examination are described. The investigation is considered to have sufficient diagnostic value to warrant its inclusion in the diagnostic armamentarium of every general radiological department. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4788917

  9. Advances in percutaneous electrode systems.

    PubMed

    Mooney, V; Roth, A M

    1976-01-01

    In the past eight years, developing a percutaneous electrode system has advanced to a successful, yet simple, method to transmit electrical signals, overcoming the serious problems of excessive mechanical irritation at the skin interface. Experience with over 50-74% in the clinical applications of 1) chronic pain relief; 2) contracture correction; and 3) sensory feedback.

  10. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins—osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues—20%; paravertebral vein embolism—13%; intradiscal leakage—8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal—0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed

  11. The stepped hybrid plate for carpal panarthrodesis - Part II: a multicentre study of 52 arthrodeses.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Bertrana, C; Darnaculleta, F; Durall, I; Franch, Jordi; Puchol, J L; Martinez, J J; Rubio, A

    2009-01-01

    Fifty-two carpal panarthrodeses (CP) were carried out in 44 dogs (eight bilateral), in a multicentre study using a single (n = 47) or double (n = 5) stepped hybrid CP plate. Of these 44 cases, 39 were between 20-55 kg in bodyweight , 26 were males , and the carpometacarpal was the most common joint involved. Falling and other impact trauma were the most common aetiology. Pain of unknown origin, carpal luxation, chronic accessory carpal bone fracture, distal comminuted intra-articular radial fracture, bone tumour, degenerative joint disease, canine erosive idiopathic polyarthritis, avascular necrosis of the radial carpal bone and fractures of several metacarpal bones were some of the pathologies reported. Fracture of the third metacarpal bone during screw insertion was the only intrasurgical complication. Malpositioning of the plate or screws and over-tightened screws were technical errors observed in seven of the procedures. The radial carpal bone was not fixed with a screw in two cases due to bone deformity. Concurrent plate breakage and bending in the same patient operated on bilaterally was observed during the follow-up period, which represented a major complication rate of 3.8% for all procedures. Minor complications were: low grade infection, lick granuloma, digit hyperextension, screw loosening or failure, incomplete fusion of some joints and a fracture of the third metacarpal bone at the distal screw hole of the plate; which represented a rate of 44.2% on all procedures. Complete carpal healing was observed radiographically in 94.2% of all procedures. Limb function was excellent to good, and all of the owners, except for one, were satisfied with the procedure.

  12. Arthrography of the traumatized wrist: correlation with radiography and the carpal instability series

    SciTech Connect

    Levinsohn, E.M.; Palmer, A.K.

    1983-03-01

    Arthrography with fluoroscopic monitoring was used to assess the soft tissues of the wrist in 100 patients who had chronic traumatic pain but did not have rheumatoid arthritis. Findings were correlated with plain radiographs and the carpal instability series. Arthrograms were normal in 26% of cases and demonstrated perforation of the triangular fibrocartilage in 26%, radiocarpal-midcarpal communication in 30%, capsular lesions in 31%, lymphatic opacification in 12%, and tendon sheath filling in 10%. Communication between the radiocarpal and pisiform-troiquetral compartments, a normal finding, was seen in 69%. There was a significant association between perforation of the triangular fibrocartilage and both ulna-plus variance and carpal instability.

  13. Disabling hand injuries in boxing: boxer's knuckle and traumatic carpal boss.

    PubMed

    Melone, Charles P; Polatsch, Daniel B; Beldner, Steven

    2009-10-01

    This article describes the treatment of the two most debilitating hand-related boxing injuries: boxer's knuckle and traumatic carpal boss. Recognition of the normal anatomy as well as the predictable pathology facilitates an accurate diagnosis and precision surgery. For boxer's knuckle, direct repair of the disrupted extensor hood, without the need for tendon augmentation, has been consistently employed; for traumatic carpal boss, arthrodesis of the destabilized carpometacarpal joints has been the preferred method of treatment. Precisely executed operative treatment of both injuries has resulted in a favorable outcome, as in the vast majority of cases the boxers have experienced relief of pain, restoration of function, and an unrestricted return to competition.

  14. Capitolunate arthrodesis maintaining carpal height for the treatment of SNAC wrist.

    PubMed

    Giannikas, D; Dimitrios, G; Karageorgos, A; Athanasios, K; Karabasi, A; Ageliki, K; Syggelos, S; Spiridon, S

    2010-03-01

    The clinical and radiological results of a modified midcarpal fusion technique for scaphoid nonunion advance collapse were retrospectively studied in eight patients. All had partial resection of the proximal part of the fractured scaphoid, limited radial styloidectomy, scaphocapitate and lunocapitate arthrodesis, using a block of iliac crest graft to maintain carpal height. All united without complications and wrist motion, grip strength and carpal height were improved postoperatively. The modified Mayo wrist score at follow-up was 70%. Three patients continued to have some pain and one patient had a poor result.

  15. Carpal instability in rheumatoid arthritis and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. Pathogenesis and roentgen appearance.

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, D; Niwayama, G

    1977-01-01

    The roentgen appearance and pathogenesis of carpal instability are described in an evaluation of patients and cadavers with rheumatoid arthritis and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. Dorsiflexion (16%) and palmar flexion (8%) instability occurs in rheumatoid arthritis, particularly in patients with moderate to advanced disease. Navicular-lunate dissociation frequently accompanies dorsiflexion instability and results from involvement of the interosseous ligament between the two bones by rheumatoid pannus. Carpal instability and navicular-lunate dissociation also accompany pyrophosphate arthropathy, resulting from calcific deposition and cystic degeneration of ligamentous structures. Images PMID:901029

  16. Automatic bone age assessment for young children from newborn to 7-year-old using carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aifeng; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Liu, Brent J

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) method has been previously developed based on features extracted from phalangeal regions of interest (ROI) in a digital hand atlas, which can assess bone age of children from ages 7 to 18 accurately. Therefore, in order to assess the bone age of children in younger ages, the inclusion of carpal bones is necessary. However, due to various factors including the uncertain number of bones appearing, non-uniformity of soft tissue, low contrast between the bony structure and soft tissue, automatic segmentation and identification of carpal bone boundaries is an extremely challenging task. Past research works on carpal bone segmentation were performed utilizing dynamic thresholding. However, due to the limitation of the segmentation algorithm, carpal bones have not been taken into consideration in the bone age assessment procedure. In this paper, we developed and implemented a knowledge-based method for fully automatic carpal bone segmentation and morphological feature analysis. Fuzzy classification was then used to assess the bone age based on the selected features. This method has been successfully applied on all cases in which carpal bones have not overlapped. CAD results of total about 205 cases from the digital hand atlas were evaluated against subject chronological age as well as readings of two radiologists. It was found that the carpal ROI provides reliable information in determining the bone age for young children from newborn to 7-year-old.

  17. Duodenal diversion of percutaneous biliary drain through a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, K M; Swaroop, V S; Desai, D C; Nagral, A; Jagannath, P; Desouza, L J; Kamble, M

    1991-10-01

    Occasionally, percutaneous biliary drainage is the only possible form of treatment in a patient with a malignant obstruction at the porta hepatis. We report on a case of gallbladder carcinoma with a complete block at the porta hepatis, which was palliated with a percutaneous biliary drain. Enteral reinfusion of bile was accomplished through a duodenal tube placed through a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

  18. Percutaneous renal surgery for urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Tan, H M; Cheung, H S

    1990-06-01

    Sixty eight consecutive cases of percutaneous renal surgery, percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL), were performed on 64 patients (male-41, female-23) at the Subang Jaya Medical Centre from April 1988 to July 1989. All the cases were done as a one stage procedure. Fifty eight stones were large renal or staghorn and ten were ureteric. Thirty cases (41%) were stone free after PCNL alone. Thirty eight cases had residual fragments needing extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL). Mean operating time was 109.6 +/- 36.0 minutes. Mean hospital stay was 4.5 +/- 1.8 days. At three months follow-up, 86% of the cases were stone free. The remaining had residual sand (less than 3mm). Minor complications occurred in six patients. None required major surgical intervention post PCNL.

  19. Percutaneous endoscopic treatment of cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Griffith, D P; Rubio, P A; Gleeson, M J

    1990-01-01

    Surgical management of gallstones was first performed successfully in 1878. Over the past decade, several new treatment alternatives have evolved that challenge the supremacy of traditional surgical cholecystectomy. Two endoscopic alternatives, e.g., percutaneous cholecystolithotomy (PCCL) and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) are the latest additions to the growing armamentarium. Our initial experience with PCCL and LC as compared with our traditional cholecystectomy experience shows a 57% reduction in hospital days, a 58% reduction in postoperative analgesic dose, and 50% or more reduction in disabling convalescence in favor of the endoscopic alternatives. A review of the efficacy and morbidity of traditional surgery, peroral drug chemolysis (PDC), shockwave lithotripsy plus PDC, and percutaneous transhepatic lavage with methyl terbutyl ether suggests that the endoscopic alternatives are less morbid than traditional surgery and more efficacious and perhaps less morbid than other non-invasive or minimally invasive alternatives. Both original data and a literature review are presented.

  20. Percutaneous absorption in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    West, D P; Halket, J M; Harvey, D R; Hadgraft, J; Solomon, L M; Harper, J I

    1987-11-01

    The skin of preterm infants varies considerably in its level of maturity. To understand skin absorption in premature infants better, we report a technique for the assessment of percutaneous absorption at various gestational and postnatal ages using stable, isotope-labeled (13C6) benzoic acid. Our results indicate that in the preterm infant, this method detects enhanced skin absorption in the first postnatal days, which declines over three weeks to that expected of a full-term infant. This approach also indicates an inverse relationship between gestational age and skin absorption, as well as postnatal age and skin absorption. The reported technique is a safe and noninvasive method using a model skin penetrant for the study of percutaneous absorption in preterm infants from which basic data may be derived to add to our understanding of skin barrier function. PMID:3422856

  1. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Shah, A; Chandak, P; Tiptaft, R; Glass, J; Dasgupta, P

    2004-08-01

    Most cases of urolithiasis in pregnancy are managed conservatively either with ureteric stents or percutaneous nephrostomy tubes, which need to be changed at regular intervals. Definitive management of the stone is usually delayed till after delivery. We describe a patient who presented with pyonephrosis in the fifth week of gestation, due to a stone obstructing the right ureteropelvic junction. This was managed by insertion of a nephrostomy tube. She declined nephrostomy tube/stent changes during the rest of her pregnancy and requested termination as an alternative. She successfully underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy in the 14th week of pregnancy, with radiation exposure strictly localised to the kidney for 6 s. A healthy male baby was delivered at term.

  2. Percutaneous Ablation in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bradford J.; Gervais, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation in the kidney is now performed as a standard therapeutic nephron-sparing option in patients who are poor candidates for resection. Its increasing use has been largely prompted by the rising incidental detection of renal cell carcinomas with cross-sectional imaging and the need to preserve renal function in patients with comorbid conditions, multiple renal cell carcinomas, and/or heritable renal cancer syndromes. Clinical studies to date indicate that radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are effective therapies with acceptable short- to intermediate-term outcomes and with a low risk in the appropriate setting, with attention to pre-, peri-, and postprocedural detail. The results following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma are reviewed in this article, including those of several larger scale studies of ablation of T1a tumors. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the kidney are presented, and potential complications are discussed. © RSNA, 2011 PMID:22012904

  3. Percutaneous penetration--methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, Rikke; Benfeldt, Eva; Nielsen, Jesper B

    2014-07-01

    Studies on percutaneous penetration are needed to assess the hazards after unintended occupational skin exposures to industrial products as well as the efficacy after intended consumer exposure to topically applied medicinal or cosmetic products. During recent decades, a number of methods have been developed to replace methods involving experimental animals. The results obtained from these methods are decided not only by the chemical or product tested, but to a significant degree also by the experimental set-up and decisions made by the investigator during the planning phase. The present MiniReview discusses some of the existing and well-known experimental in vitro and in vivo methods for studies of percutaneous penetration together with some more recent and promising methods. After this, some considerations and recommendations about advantages and limitations of the different methods and their relevance for the prediction of percutaneous penetration are given. Which method to prefer will depend on the product to be tested and the question asked. Regulatory guidelines exist for studies on percutaneous penetration, but researchers as well as regulatory bodies need to pay specific attention to the vehicles and solvents used in donor and sampling fluids so that it reflects in-use conditions as closely as possible. Based on available experimental data, mathematical models have been developed to aid predictions of skin penetration. The authors question the general use of the present mathematical models in hazard assessment, as they seem to ignore outliers among chemicals as well as the heterogeneity of skin barrier properties and skin conditions within the exposed populations. PMID:24373389

  4. [Percutaneous therapy of painful arthritis].

    PubMed

    Chlud, K

    1991-01-01

    Pain in osteoarthrosis of the big weight bearing joints is either derived from periarticular ligaments, tendons, fasciae, muscles, bursae--peri-arthropathy as sign of decompensation--or from the reactive synovitis with or without effusion. NSAIDs systemically administered have been so far considered as first choice medication together with physical therapy. New pharmacokinetic data on the topical, percutaneous application of NSAIDs (ibuprofen, diclofenac, indomethacin, some salicylates and to a lesser degree for etofenamate and piroxicam) have demonstrated relevant advantages of the percutaneous route over the systemic one in soft tissue rheumatism. NSAIDs, mentioned above, locally administered as cream, gel or spray, quickly penetrate through the corneal layer of the skin at the site of application, reach high effective concentrations in subcutis, fasciae, tendons, ligaments and muscles, lesser in joint-capsule and -fluid indicating direct penetration. The blood levels of topical NSAIDs are extremely low with no systemic side effects, especially no gastric toxicity; however, local skin irritation is observed (1 to 2%). In contrast to this, systemic (oral) NSAIDs lead primarily via high blood levels to a much lesser concentration--only one tenth--in particular soft tissues with a high incidence of side effects. In conclusion the percutaneous application of certain NSAIDs has become a well established therapeutic regimen in painful osteoarthrosis and in all other inflammatory degenerative and posttraumatic alterations of soft tissue structures. PMID:2011838

  5. Scaphoid dislocation associated with axial carpal dissociation during volar flexion of the wrist: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Kohei; Wada, Takuro; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    We present the first report of a patient with an isolated scaphoid dislocation with axial carpal dissociation sustained during volar flexion of the wrist. The scaphoid was dislocated to the radial side of the radial styloid process and was slightly shifted to the dorsal side. It was shown that the position of the wrist played an irrelevant role for occurring scaphoid dislocation.

  6. Percutaneous transgastric endoscopic tube ileostomy in a porcine survival model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Chen, Su-Yu; Wang, Yong-Guang; Jiang, Sheng-Jun; Cai, He-Li; Lin, Kai; Xie, Zhao-Fei; Dong, Fen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To introduce natural orifice transgastric endoscopic surgery (NOTES) tube ileostomy using pelvis-directed submucosal tunneling endoscopic gastrostomy and endoscopic tube ileostomy. METHODS Six live pigs (three each in the non-survival and survival groups) were used. A double-channeled therapeutic endoscope was introduced perorally into the stomach. A gastrostomy was made using a 2-cm transversal mucosal incision following the creation of a 5-cm longitudinal pelvis-directed submucosal tunnel. The pneumoperitoneum was established via the endoscope. In the initial three operations of the series, a laparoscope was transumbilically inserted for guiding the tunnel direction, intraperitoneal spatial orientation and distal ileum identification. Endoscopic tube ileostomy was conducted by adopting an introducer method and using a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Catheter Kit equipped with the Loop Fixture. The distal tip of the 15 Fr catheter was placed toward the proximal limb of the ileum to optimize intestinal content drainage. Finally, the tunnel entrance of the gastrostomy was closed using nylon endoloops with the aid of a twin grasper. The gross and histopathological integrity of gastrostomy closure and the abdominal wall-ileum stoma tract formation were assessed 1 wk after the operation. RESULTS Transgastric endoscopic tube ileostomy was successful in all six pigs, without major bleeding. The mean operating time was 71 min (range: 60-110 min). There were no intraoperative complications or hemodynamic instability. The post-mortem, which was conducted 1-wk postoperatively, showed complete healing of the gastrostomy and adequate stoma tract formation of ileostomy. CONCLUSION Transgastric endoscopic tube ileostomy is technically feasible and reproducible in an animal model, and this technique is worthy of further improvement. PMID:27729743

  7. 4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific Standard Double-Track Tunnel, ca. 1913. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 18 (HAER No. CA-197), Tunnel 34 (HAER No. CA-206), and Tunnel 1 (HAER No. CA-207). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  8. Variable-Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    Wind Tunnel #2, building interior. Reinforced concrete foundation for Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT) under construction. The tank and contents weighed about 100 tons. Negative on roll #1 of copy negatives returned by National Archives on 70mm film rolls.

  9. Variable-Density Tunnel - Wind Tunnel #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Underside of the Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT). The compressors are to the left. Balance detail - entrance view of wind tunnel #2. The photographer was probably shooting film for Dr. Joseph Ames' Wilbur Wright Memorial Lecture given to the Royal Aeronautical Society on May 31, 1923.

  10. Studying primate carpal kinematics in three dimensions using a computed-tomography-based markerless registration method.

    PubMed

    Orr, Caley M; Leventhal, Evan L; Chivers, Spencer F; Marzke, Mary W; Wolfe, Scott W; Crisco, Joseph J

    2010-04-01

    The functional morphology of the wrist pertains to a number of important questions in primate evolutionary biology, including that of hominins. Reconstructing locomotor and manipulative capabilities of the wrist in extinct species requires a detailed understanding of wrist biomechanics in extant primates and the relationship between carpal form and function. The kinematics of carpal movement, and the role individual joints play in providing mobility and stability of the wrist, is central to such efforts. However, there have been few detailed biomechanical studies of the nonhuman primate wrist. This is largely because of the complexity of wrist morphology and the considerable technical challenges involved in tracking the movements of the many small bones that compose the carpus. The purpose of this article is to introduce and outline a method adapted from human clinical studies of three-dimensional (3D) carpal kinematics for use in a comparative context. The method employs computed tomography of primate cadaver forelimbs in increments throughout the wrist's range of motion, coupled with markerless registration of 3D polygon models based on inertial properties of each bone. The 3D kinematic principles involved in extracting motion axis parameters that describe bone movement are reviewed. In addition, a set of anatomically based coordinate systems embedded in the radius, capitate, hamate, lunate, and scaphoid is presented for the benefit of other primate functional morphologists interested in studying carpal kinematics. Finally, a brief demonstration of how the application of these methods can elucidate the mechanics of the wrist in primates illustrates the closer-packing of carpals in chimpanzees than in orangutans, which may help to stabilize the midcarpus and produce a more rigid wrist beneficial for efficient hand posturing during knuckle-walking locomotion.

  11. The Tunnels of Samos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This 'Project Mathematics' series video from CalTech presents the tunnel of Samos, a famous underground aquaduct tunnel located near the capital of Pithagorion (named after the famed Greek mathematician, Pythagoras, who lived there), on one of the Greek islands. This tunnel was constructed around 600 BC by King Samos and was built under a nearby mountain. Through film footage and computer animation, the mathematical principles and concepts of why and how this aquaduct tunnel was built are explained.

  12. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  13. Percutaneous cholecystolithotomy: the first 60 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Chiverton, S G; Inglis, J A; Hudd, C; Kellett, M J; Russell, R C; Wickham, J E

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the feasibility and possible complications of percutaneous removal of gall stones. DESIGN--Prospective study of the first 60 patients treated. SETTING--The London Clinic. PATIENTS--60 Consecutive patients with symptomatic gall stones who agreed to have them removed percutaneously. RESULTS--56 Patients had stones successfully removed percutaneously. In four patients failure of access necessitated a cholecystectomy under the same anaesthetic. Two patients had an empyema of the gall bladder drained initially, followed by a second operation to remove the stones one week later. Seven patients had postoperative complications, and two had recurrences of biliary calculi. CONCLUSIONS--The techniques and instruments used in percutaneous nephrolithotomy can successfully be adapted for percutaneous removal of gall stones. The procedure is suitable for a wider range of patients than other techniques that leave the gall bladder intact. PMID:2369662

  14. A theoretical consideration of percutaneous drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Kubota, K; Ishizaki, T

    1985-02-01

    The percutaneous drug absorption process and its clinical significance are not fully known. In this article we propose a theoretical method to obtain two parameters (kd and kc) of percutaneous drug absorption from in vivo data. These parameters are related to diffusion of a drug through the skin and removal process at the skin-capillary boundary, respectively, characterizing several pharmacokinetic aspects of the drug applied to the skin. Moreover, by employing these two kinetic constants, a simulation of percutaneous drug absorption can be theoretically generated. On the basis of our theoretical considerations on the percutaneous drug absorption process described herein, we conclude that the percutaneous drug absorption process is better understood by employing two kinetic constants in a mathematical model and that its clinical application would be highly possible. PMID:4020622

  15. [Anatomic features of the carpal joint of the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatuw), compared with the domestic cat (Felis catus)].

    PubMed

    Künzel, W; Probst, A

    1999-07-01

    The anatomy of the carpal joint of the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) was examined in seven specimens using dissection and corrosion casts as well as radiography, and compared to well-known data of the domestic cat (Felis catus). It was found that in the cheetah, as in the domestic cat, the intermedioradial, ulnar and accessory carpal bones, as well as the first, second, third and fourth carpal bones and the sesamoid bone of the abductor pollicis longus muscle, develop in a regular manner. The bones had a similar shape and the ligamentous apparatus was comparable, the most striking differences being the connection of all compartments of the joint cavity and the mediocarpal joint, working as a screw joint. The syndesmosis between the intermedioradial and ulnar carpal bones, instead of a synovial connection, is another adaptation for stabilization of the carpus of the cheetah during locomotion. The joint capsule is little spacious and in all three recesses can be differentiated. The first extends proximally palmar the ulnar carpal bone between the styloid process of the ulna and the accessory carpal bone, the second also extends proximally mediopalmar of the intermedioradial bone, and the largest third recess is located on the dorsal surface and extends proximally, laterally to the inserting tendon of the extensor carpi radialis muscle.

  16. Percutaneous diode laser disc nucleoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchetti, P. P.; Longo, Leonardo

    2004-09-01

    The treatment of herniated disc disease (HNP) over the years involved different miniinvasive surgical options. The classical microsurgical approach has been substituted over the years both by endoscopic approach in which is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, both by percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. In the last ten years, the percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty have been done worldwide in more than 40000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc, and in HNP pain is caused by the disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode laser introduced via a 22G needle under X-ray guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of nucleous polposus with a disc shrinkage and a relief of pressure on nerve root. Most patients get off the table pain free and are back to work in 5 to 7 days. Material and method: to date, 130 patients (155 cases) suffering for relevant symptoms therapy-resistant 6 months on average before consulting our department, have been treated. Eightyfour (72%) males and 46 (28%) females had a percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. The average age of patients operated was 48 years (22 - 69). The level of disc removal was L3/L4 in 12 cases, L4/L5 in 87 cases and L5/S1 in 56 cases. Two different levels were treated at the same time in 25 patients. Results: the success rate at a minimum follow-up of 6 months was 88% with a complication rate of 0.5%.

  17. [Anterior traumatic axial disruption of the middle carpal joint. Case report with literature review].

    PubMed

    Shimi, M; Mechchat, A; Elmrini, A

    2012-12-01

    We report a case of traumatic axial disruption of the radial mid carpal joint. This unusual type of scaphotrapezo-trapezoïdal dislocation occurred after falling from a height. We performed open reduction and wire fixation. At 12months follow-up, functional outcome was satisfactory with good muscle strength (clamping force, grip strength and pinch grip: 90% compared to the opposite side) and good range of motion was preserved. Work was resumed at the tenth week. Radial midcarpal disruption is uncommon. It includes the separation of the trapezium, trapezoïdal, first and second and third metacarpal bones from the remaining wrist. This pattern of carpal derangement has not been previously described in the literature. Mechanism of the injury and treatment are discussed.

  18. Load transmission characteristics of limited carpal fusions: a two-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Bicen, A C; Gokdemir, H; Seber, S; Aydin, R; Gunal, I

    2015-02-01

    Although limited carpal fusion is a choice of treatment in several wrist disorders, little is known about the biomechanics of these procedures, especially the loads carried by the ligaments. In a finite element study, four types of limited carpal fusions (scaphotrapeziotrapezoid, capitohamate, four corner fusion with and without scaphoid excision) were simulated and the loads carried by the ligaments were recorded. Measurements were repeated with and without implantation. The load transmission through the ligaments varied by the type of the fusion but, radioscaphoid and long radiolunate ligaments carried significantly more loads if not excised during the operation. Implantation did not affect the results in most cases. The model of the present study may be useful in preoperative planning.

  19. Three-dimensional modeling and animation of two carpal bones: a technique.

    PubMed

    Green, Jason K; Werner, Frederick W; Wang, Haoyu; Weiner, Marsha M; Sacks, Jonathan M; Short, Walter H

    2004-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to (a). create 3D reconstructions of two carpal bones from single CT data sets and animate these bones with experimental in vitro motion data collected during dynamic loading of the wrist joint, (b). develop a technique to calculate the minimum interbone distance between the two carpal bones, and (c). validate the interbone distance calculation process. This method utilized commercial software to create the animations and an in-house program to interface with three-dimensional CAD software to calculate the minimum distance between the irregular geometries of the bones. This interbone minimum distance provides quantitative information regarding the motion of the bones studied and may help to understand and quantify the effects of ligamentous injury.

  20. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  1. Carpal kinematics in quadrupedal monkeys: towards a better understanding of wrist morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Daver, Guillaume; Berillon, Gilles; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide new data on carpal kinematics in primates in order to deepen our understanding of the relationships between wrist morphology and function. To that end, we provide preliminary data on carpal kinematics in seven species of quadrupedal monkeys that have not been previously investigated in this regard (cercopithecoids, n = 4; ceboids, n = 3). We radiographed wrists from cadavers at their maximum radial and ulnar deviations, as well as at maximum flexion and extension. We took angular measurements to quantify the contribution of the mobility of the two main wrist joints (antebrachiocarpal and midcarpal) with respect to total wrist mobility. We also recorded qualitative observations. Our quantitative results show few clear differences among quadrupedal monkeys for radioulnar deviation and flexion-extension: all the primates studied exhibit a greater midcarpal mobility (approximately 54-83% of the total range of motion) than antebrachiocarpal mobility; however, we identified two patterns of carpal kinematics that show the functional impact of previously recognised morphological variations in quadrupedal monkeys. Firstly, qualitative results show that the partition that divides the proximal joint of the wrist in ceboids results in less mobility and more stability of the ulnar part of the wrist than is seen in cercopithecoids. Secondly, we show that the olive baboon specimen (Papio anubis) is characterised by limited antebrachiocarpal mobility for extension; this effect is likely the result of a radial process that projects on the scaphoid notch, as well as an intraarticular meniscus. Because of these close relationships between carpal kinematics and morphology in quadrupedal monkeys, we hypothesise that, to some extent, these functional tendencies are related to their locomotor hand postures.

  2. [A single metastasis in the carpal bones as the first clinical manifestation of a hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Corrales Pinzón, R; Alonso Sánchez, J M; de la Mano González, S; El Karzazi Tarazona, K

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary tumor of the liver. Spreading outside the liver usually takes place in advanced stages of the disease, and bone is the third most common site of metastases. We present a case of hepatocellular carcinoma in which the first clinical manifestation was a single metastasis to the carpal bones. The interest of this case lies in the way this hepatocellular carcinoma manifested as well as in the unusual site of the metastasis.

  3. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  4. Inelastic tunnel diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Power is extracted from plasmons, photons, or other guided electromagnetic waves at infrared to midultraviolet frequencies by inelastic tunneling in metal-insulator-semiconductor-metal diodes. Inelastic tunneling produces power by absorbing plasmons to pump electrons to higher potential. Specifically, an electron from a semiconductor layer absorbs a plasmon and simultaneously tunnels across an insulator into metal layer which is at higher potential. The diode voltage determines the fraction of energy extracted from the plasmons; any excess is lost to heat.

  5. Resonance enhanced tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Yoshimura, M.

    2000-12-01

    Time evolution of tunneling in thermal medium is examined using the real-time semiclassical formalism previously developed. Effect of anharmonic terms in the potential well is shown to give a new mechanism of resonance enhanced tunneling. If the friction from environment is small enough, this mechanism may give a very large enhancement for the tunneling rate. The case of the asymmetric wine bottle potential is worked out in detail.

  6. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  7. Atom Tunneling in Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Jan; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-04-25

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms is increasingly found to play an important role in many chemical transformations. Experimentally, atom tunneling can be indirectly detected by temperature-independent rate constants at low temperature or by enhanced kinetic isotope effects. In contrast, the influence of tunneling on the reaction rates can be monitored directly through computational investigations. The tunnel effect, for example, changes reaction paths and branching ratios, enables chemical reactions in an astrochemical environment that would be impossible by thermal transition, and influences biochemical processes. PMID:26990917

  8. Therapeutic effect of bone cement injection in the treatment of intraosseous ganglion of the carpal bones

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kunlun; Shao, Xinzhong; Tian, Dehu; Bai, Jiangbo; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Yingze

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to treat intraosseous ganglia of the carpal bones with injectable bone cement grafting. Between January 2012 and December 2013, 4 patients (3 men and 1 woman) presenting with wrist pain and activity limitation were diagnosed with intraosseous ganglion of the carpal bones by radiography. The patients were treated with minimal invasive curettage and bone cement injection surgery. All patients were followed up for a mean time of 17 months (range, 12–22 months). The wrist pain was significantly reduced in all patients following surgery. In addition, the activity range and grip strength were also improved compared with the preoperative parameters. Subsequent to treatment, the Mayo wrist score and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score presented mean values of 78.8 (range, 75–80) and 11 (range, 7.7–15.0), respectively. These results suggested that the patients showed a good recovery. All patients were satisfied with the postoperative results and returned to work within 4 weeks. In conclusion, bone cement injection is an effective and safe therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraosseous ganglia of the carpal bone. PMID:27588074

  9. Effect of wrist position on the measurement of carpal indices on the lateral radiograph.

    PubMed

    Koh, K H; Lee, H I; Lim, K S; Seo, J S; Park, M J

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether the carpal indices measured on lateral radiographs with a slightly malpositioned wrist are the same as those measured in the true neutral position. Lateral radiographic views of 25 wrists were taken with 5° intervals from 20° of flexion to 20° of extension. Most carpal indices measured in the flexed or extended position were significantly different from the wrist in zero flexion-extension, except scapholunate angle at 5° of extension and scaphocapitate angle at 5° and 10° of flexion. Starting from the flexed position, there was an average of -4.0° change in radioscaphoid angle, -1.0° in scapholunate angle, -1.0° in scaphocapitate angle, +3.0° in radiolunate angle, and +2.0° in lunocapitate angle for each 5° of extension with linear trends. The results from this study suggest that even minimal degrees of flexion-extension can affect the measurements of carpal indices on lateral radiographs.

  10. Percutaneous drainage of a pancreatic pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Hermans, P; Hubens, A

    1992-12-01

    We present a patient who developed a pancreatic pseudocyst after surgery for a retroperitoneal fibrous histiocytoma invading the pancreatic tail. The diagnosis was made on the basis of CT and the tail pseudocyst resolved with percutaneous drainage only.

  11. Renal drainage after percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Arun K; Herati, Amin; Okeke, Zeph; Smith, Arthur D

    2009-10-01

    Exit strategy after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is an area of continuing innovation to improve postoperative morbidity and operative outcomes for patients. The two important components of an exit strategy after PCNL are hemostasis and renal drainage. We review the different techniques of renal drainage after PCNL-ie, nephrostomy tube, ureteral stents, and totally tubeless strategy with critical discussion of available evidence for and against each of these techniques. We conclude that the optimal renal drainage method depends on patient characteristics and the operative course; hence, it should be individualized. To simplify this, we group patients undergoing PCNL as routine, problematic, and complicated, based on increasing complexity of the procedure and procedural complications. In routine PCNLs, we favor placement of an ureteral stent or a small-bore nephrostomy tube. In problematic and complicated PCNLs, we think the evidence directs toward placement of a nephrostomy tube, small bore being an option in problematic PCNLs.

  12. [Minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolitholapaxy (MIP)].

    PubMed

    Nagele, U; Schilling, D; Anastasiadis, A G; Walcher, U; Sievert, K D; Merseburger, A S; Kuczyk, M; Stenzl, A

    2008-09-01

    Minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithopaxy (MIP) was developed to combine the excellent stone-free rates of the conventional percutaneous nephrolithopaxy (PCNL) technique with the low morbidity of the miniaturized PCNL (Mini-Perc) and, at the same time, achieve a high level of patient comfort. The procedure is characterized not only by the diameter of the miniaturized 18-Fr Amplatz sheath that was adopted from the Mini-Perc but also by the following features: ultrasound-guided puncture of the kidney; single-step dilatation of the access tract; ballistic lithotripsy; a low-pressure irrigation system together with stone retraction by irrigation with a specially designed nephroscope sheath, for the so-called vacuum cleaner effect; and a sealed and tubeless access tract with primary closure of the channel independent of hemorrhage and without a second-look procedure.The results of the first 57 patients demonstrate primary stone-free rates of 92.9% with operating times averaging 62 (25-123) min. Severe complications, such as sepsis or bleeding requiring blood transfusion, did not occur. The high and predictable stone-free rate and a low morbidity comparable to that of ureteroscopy and extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy make MIP an attractive option for patients and urologists. The "vacuum cleaner effect" with quick removal of stone fragments reduces operating time and prevents new stone formation by avoiding residual fragments. The direct and primary closure of the access tract increases patient comfort and is justified by the reintervention rate of less than 8% in the presented cohort.The lack of a need for second-look nephroscopies, the vacuum cleaner effect, improved patient comfort without nephrostomy tubes, as well as surgery times comparable to that of traditional PCNL demonstrate a consequent evolution of the Mini-Perc. MIP therefore represents a promising and future-oriented module in modern stone therapy.

  13. The advantage of throwing the first stone: how understanding the evolutionary demands of Homo sapiens is helping us understand carpal motion.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Rachel S; Crisco, Joseph J; Wolfe, Scott W

    2010-01-01

    Unlike any other diarthrodial joint in the human body, the "wrist joint" is composed of numerous articulations between eight carpal bones, the distal radius, the distal ulna, and five metacarpal bones. The carpal bones articulate with each other as well as with the distal radius, distal ulna, and the metacarpal bases. Multiple theories explaining intercarpal motion have been proposed; however, controversy exists concerning the degree and direction of motion of the individual carpal bones within the two carpal rows during different planes of motion. Recent investigations have suggested that traditional explanations of carpal bone motion may not entirely account for carpal motion in all planes. Better understanding of the complexities of carpal motion through the use of advanced imaging techniques and simultaneous appreciation of human anatomic and functional evolution have led to the hypothesis that the "dart thrower's motion" of the wrist is uniquely human. Carpal kinematic research and current developments in both orthopaedic surgery and anthropology underscore the importance of the dart thrower's motion in human functional activities and the clinical implications of these concepts for orthopaedic surgery and rehabilitation.

  14. Percutaneous transhepatic management of complex biliary problems.

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, G D; Cameron, J L; Sitzmann, J V; Kadir, S; Smith, G W; Kaufman, S L; White, R I

    1983-01-01

    A series of 27 patients with complex biliary problems secondary to previous biliary operations is presented. The patients are divided into two groups: (1) patients with acute perioperative biliary problems; all had biliary leak with abscess, biliary cutaneous fistula, and/or stricture following cholecystectomy or common duct exploration and (2) patients with chronic postoperative biliary problems; all had previous repair of biliary stricture or injuries with late stricture formation. Early management of all patients included placement of a percutaneous biliary stent. Abscesses were drained operatively, and biliary leaks or fistulas were allowed to close spontaneously. Jaundice and cholangitis were allowed to resolve. Following stabilization, management of stricture, if present, was addressed. Eight acute patients had strictures, of which four were partial and three were dilated percutaneously. Four were complete and required operative repair. All 12 chronic patients had strictures, of which six were partial and successfully managed with percutaneous dilatation. Four patients also had common duct stones which were successfully crushed percutaneously. The authors conclude that percutaneous transhepatic drainage offers significant advantages in the early stabilization and treatment of patients with complex biliary problems, and that partial strictures of the biliary tree may be managed successfully by percutaneous dilatation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. PMID:6847278

  15. Carpal height and postoperative strength after proximal row carpectomy or four-corner arthrodesis: Clinical, anatomical and biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Laronde, Pascale; Christiaens, Nicolas; Aumar, Aurélien; Chantelot, Christophe; Fontaine, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) and four-corner arthrodesis (4CA) are the two most commonly performed surgical procedures to treat wrist arthritis. Postoperative strength is one of the criteria for choosing between the two techniques. Some authors believe that strength is correlated with residual carpal height. The goal of this study was to determine if postoperative carpal height was predictive of postoperative strength. This study consisted of two parts: a clinical evaluation of grip strength after 4CA or PRC; anatomical and radiological measurements of carpal height before and after 4CA or PRC. Grip strength was better preserved after PRC (87.5%) than after 4CA (76.1%), when expressed relative to the opposite hand (P=0.053). There was a significant decrease in carpal height for the PRC group with a Youm's index of 0.37 versus 0.50 for the 4CA group (P<0.0001). Our clinical results and analysis of the literature indicate that 4CA is not superior to PRC when it comes to grip strength, whereas carpal height is significantly decreased after PRC. The decreased tendon excursion after PRC is balanced by an increase in joint stresses after 4CA. PMID:27117123

  16. Carpal bone kinematics in combined wrist joint motions may differ from the bone kinematics during simple wrist motions.

    PubMed

    Upal, Mohammad Anwar

    2003-01-01

    Present in-vivo carpal kinematic studies have been limited to flexion-extension and radio-ulnar deviation. However these simple motions do not represent the full range of wrist motion employed during activities of daily living. In this study, we investigated combined carpal bone motions for one normal subject. A healthy left wrist from a 48 year old female was CT scanned in three positions: the clinical neutral position of the forearm, the pronated and maximum extended wrist posture, and the supinated and maximum flexed wrist posture. The scans were obtained using a GE8800 scanner at 120 kV and 40 mA. The voxel size was 0.234 mm X0.234 mm X1.0 mm. Principal axes registration methods were used to quantify the carpal bone kinematics. The movement of the carpal bones were described by the means of helical axis parameters. Our subject's carpal bone kinematics in the complex motions differed from the previously studied simple motions. For example, published studies have found that the primary motion of the capitate follows the global motion of the wrist during simple wrist flexion-extension. However, for the complex pronation and extension motion, the capitate rotated ulnarly out of the plane of motion. The only previous study of pisiform motion has shown that during flexion-extension the pisiform moves in the plane of motion. However during pronation and extension, the pisiform rotated ulnarly; while in flexion, the rotation was a combination of flexion and supination.

  17. Carpal height and postoperative strength after proximal row carpectomy or four-corner arthrodesis: Clinical, anatomical and biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Laronde, Pascale; Christiaens, Nicolas; Aumar, Aurélien; Chantelot, Christophe; Fontaine, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) and four-corner arthrodesis (4CA) are the two most commonly performed surgical procedures to treat wrist arthritis. Postoperative strength is one of the criteria for choosing between the two techniques. Some authors believe that strength is correlated with residual carpal height. The goal of this study was to determine if postoperative carpal height was predictive of postoperative strength. This study consisted of two parts: a clinical evaluation of grip strength after 4CA or PRC; anatomical and radiological measurements of carpal height before and after 4CA or PRC. Grip strength was better preserved after PRC (87.5%) than after 4CA (76.1%), when expressed relative to the opposite hand (P=0.053). There was a significant decrease in carpal height for the PRC group with a Youm's index of 0.37 versus 0.50 for the 4CA group (P<0.0001). Our clinical results and analysis of the literature indicate that 4CA is not superior to PRC when it comes to grip strength, whereas carpal height is significantly decreased after PRC. The decreased tendon excursion after PRC is balanced by an increase in joint stresses after 4CA.

  18. Shotcrete in tunnel design

    SciTech Connect

    Golser, J.; Galler, R.; Schubert, P.; Rabensteiner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Shotcrete is an important structural element for tunnel support. Green shotcrete is exposed to compression strain rates and tunnel design requires a realistic material law for shotcrete. A modified rate of flow method simulates shotcrete behavior very well and can be incorporated in Finite Element calculations.

  19. Micromachined Tunneling Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W.; Waltman, Stephen B.; Kaiser, William J.; Reynolds, Joseph K.

    1993-01-01

    Separation of tunneling electrodes adjusted by varying electrostatic force. Major components of tunneling transducer formed on two silicon chips by microfabrication techniques. Use of electrostatic deflection reduces sensitivity of transducer to thermal drift and simplifies design. Sensitivity suitable for applications in which larger acceleration-sensing instruments required.

  20. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  1. A comparison of opioid use between WCB recipients and other Manitobans for knee, shoulder, back and carpal tunnel release procedures

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Colette B.; Ekuma, Okechukwu; Shafer, Leigh Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background This study's objectives were to evaluate whether WCB claimants with conditions requiring certain surgical procedures are more likely to be prescribed outpatient opioids than other Manitobans and whether those prescribed opioids are more likely to still be on opioid medications 6 months post procedure. Methods We compared 7,246 WCB claims for a number of surgical procedures to 65,032 similar procedures performed in other Manitobans. Logistic regression was used to explore the association between being a WCB claimant and being prescribed opioids, while controlling for type of surgical procedure and other potential confounders. Results WCB claimants were more likely than other Manitobans to be prescribed opioids (adjusted OR 1.38; 95%CI 1.30–1.47). Amongst those prescribed opioids, the odds of being still on opioids 6 months post‐procedure were not significantly elevated for WCB claimants (adjusted OR 1.09 95%CI 0.97–1.23). Conclusions WCB claimants are prescribed opioids more often than non‐claimants for similar procedures. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:257–263, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26792402

  2. Variable-Density Tunnel - Wind Tunnel #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Underside of the Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT). The compressors are to the left. Circular screened cone is shown. The photographer was probably shooting film for Dr. Joseph Ames' Wilbur Wright Memorial Lecture given to the Royal Aeronautical Society on May 31, 1923.

  3. Carpal valgus in llamas and alpacas: Retrospective evaluation of patient characteristics, radiographic features and outcomes following surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Barbara; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F; Huber, Michael J; Parker, Jill E; Semevolos, Stacy A

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated outcomes of surgical treatment for carpal valgus in New World camelids and correlated successful outcome (absence of carpal valgus determined by a veterinarian) with patient characteristics and radiographic features. Univariable and multivariable analyses of retrospective case data in 19 camelids (33 limbs) treated for carpal valgus between 1987 and 2010 revealed that procedures incorporating a distal radial transphyseal bridge were more likely (P = 0.03) to result in success after a single surgical procedure. A greater degree of angulation (> 19°, P = 0.02) and younger age at surgery (< 4 months, P = 0.03) were associated with unsuccessful outcome. Overall, 74% of limbs straightened, 15% overcorrected, and 11% had persistent valgus following surgical intervention. To straighten, 22% of limbs required multiple procedures, not including implant removal. According to owners, valgus returned following implant removal in 4 limbs that had straightened after surgery.

  4. Variable-Density Tunnel - Wind Tunnel #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Equipment used for pressurizing the Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT): The VDT tunnel is on the right; the compressors are on the left. Figure 4 in the NACA Technical Report 227 (Part 2) identifies each piece of equipment visible in this diagram. Immediately visible in the lower left corner is the Booster Compressor. In the right rear (behind the tunnel) is Primary Compressor No. 1. (Primary Compressor No. 2 is not visible.) From NACA TR 227 (Part 2):'The air is compressed in two or three stages, according to the terminal pressure in the tank. A two-stage primary compressor is used up to a terminal pressure of about seven atmospheres. For pressures above this a booster compressor is used in conjunction with the primary compressor. The booster compressor may be used also as an exhauster when it is desired to operate the tunnel at pressures below that of the atmosphere. The primary compressors are driven by 250-horsepower synchronous motors and the booster compressor by a 150-horsepower squirrel-cage induction motor.' Jerome Hunsaker wrote in 'Forty Years of Aeronautical Research': 'In June 1921, the executive committee [of the NACA] decided to build a new kind of wind tunnel. Utilizing compressed air, it would allow for *scale effects in aerodynamic model experiments. This tunnel represented the first bold step by the NACA to provide its research personnel with the novel, often complicated, and usually expensive equipment necessary to press forward the frontiers of aeronautical science. It was designed by Dr. Max Munk, formerly of G*ttingen.' Eastman Jacobs wrote in an article in a 1927 article for Aviation that: 'The tunnel is inclosed (sic) within a steel shell, so that the density of the air inside may be increased by pumping air into the shell to a pressure of 300 lb. per sq. in. A 250 hp. motor, driving a propeller, circulates the air, drawing it through the five-foot test section at a velocity of about fifty miles per hour. The model is mounted in the throat of

  5. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  6. Percutaneous debridement of posttraumatic infected major hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Sacks, David; Ong, Adrian; Fernandez, Forrest

    2014-08-01

    Although percutaneous drainage of liver abscesses has long been the standard of care, percutaneous drainage of infected necrotic liver tissue is usually used only to stabilize a patient's condition in the setting of sepsis before surgical debridement is ultimately required, frequently in the form of a hepatic lobectomy. The present report describes three cases of curative percutaneous drainage and percutaneous debridement of posttraumatic infected major hepatic necrosis. Techniques used included catheter suction, lavage, and foreign body retrieval.

  7. Age estimation using carpals: study of a Slovenian sample to test Cameriere's method.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; Ferrante, Luigi; Ermenc, Branko; Mirtella, Dora; Strus, Katja

    2008-01-30

    Carpals are often used as age indicators. In a recent study, Cameriere et al. studied the use of the ratio between the total area of carpal bones and epiphyses of the ulna and radius (Bo) and carpals (Ca) as age indicators. The present study, of a sample of 158 Slovenian children and adolescents aged between 6 and 16 years, focused on analysing the best regression for age estimation. The regression model yielded the following equation: age=-3.411+0.942 g+20.927(Bo/Ca), and explained 91.6% of total variance (R(2)=0.916). The median of the absolute values of residuals (observed age minus predicted age) was 0.09 years, with a quartile deviation of 0.786 years, and a standard error of estimate of 0.658 years. Comparisons between the previous equation referring to Slovenian children and the equivalent linear equation proposed by Cameriere et al. did not reveal any significant differences between the intercepts and slopes of the two linear models. These results suggested a common regression model for both Italian and Slovenian samples. The common regression model, describing age as a linear function of gender and Bo/Ca ratio, yielded the following linear regression formula: age=-2.907+0.408 g+20.757(Bo/Ca). This model explained 86% of total variance (R(2)=0.86). The median of the absolute values of residuals (observed age minus predicted age) was 0.02 years, with a quartile deviation of 1.02 years and a standard error of estimate of 0.96 years.

  8. Computer-assisted three-dimensional gait analysis of amphotericin-induced carpal lameness in horses.

    PubMed

    Peloso, J G; Stick, J A; Soutas-Little, R W; Caron, J C; DeCamp, C E; Leach, D H

    1993-09-01

    Motion of 6 clinically sound horses trotting at a speed of 4 m/s on a treadmill was captured by video cameras before and 9, 16, and 23 days after amphotericin-induced lameness to determine the quantitative variables of three-dimensional computer-assisted image analysis that objectively describe carpal lameness. Amphotericin-B was used to induce lameness, and phenylbutazone (2.2 mg/kg of body weight, PO, once) and butorphanol tartrate (0.1 mg/kg IM, q 6 h, to effect) were used to control discomfort. Four 60-Hz cameras were symmetrically placed around the treadmill to capture 6 seconds of images from retro-reflective spheres taped to the trotting horses. Images were transferred to a video-based digitizer and a computer work station, where 4 files of two-dimensional data were reduced to 1 file of three-dimensional data. The effect of lameness on motion analyzed was assessed by use of two-way ANOVA. Differences between means were assessed, using the Student-Newman-Keul's test (P < or = 0.05). Head and withers excursions, (dorsal vertical displacement of head and withers targets, respectively) during the sound forelimb support phase were increased significantly during all lameness measurement periods. Head excursion, but not withers excursion, during the lame forelimb support phase, was decreased significantly during all lameness measurement periods. Computer determinations of stride length swing phase, stance phase, forelimb abduction, and carpal and fetlock ranges of motion did not consistently characterize the lameness. It was concluded that three-dimensional computer-assisted image analysis could be used for objective lameness evaluation in horses and that head and withers excursions were the most consistent variables for assessing equine carpal lameness.

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Recognition tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-07-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules.

  10. Bilateral Carpal Spasm Under Spinal Anaesthesia During Abdominal Hysterectomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Naithani, Udita; Betkekar, Sneha Arun; Verma, Devendra; Dindor, Basant Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acute hypocalcaemia is a medical emergency that can have catastrophic implications like tetany, seizures, cardiac arrythmias or laryngospasm if left untreated. We are presenting a case of a 30-year-old female patient undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingoopherectomy under spinal anaesthesia. She developed unexpected bilateral carpal spasm intraoperatively which was promptly diagnosed and successfully managed with intravenous calcium administration. We conclude that the anaesthetist should be aware of the clinical presentation of acute hypocalcaemia, its causes and emergency management in the perioperative period to prevent any adverse outcomes. PMID:26894157

  11. Channel-tunnels.

    PubMed

    Koronakis, V; Andersen, C; Hughes, C

    2001-08-01

    TolC and its many homologues comprise an alpha-helical transperiplasmic tunnel embedded in the bacterial outer membrane by a contiguous beta-barrel channel, providing a large exit duct for diverse substrates. The 'channel-tunnel' is closed at its periplasmic entrance, but can be opened by an 'iris-like' mechanism when recruited by substrate-engaged proteins in the cytosolic membrane.

  12. Six new examples of the bipartite trapezoid bone: morphology, significant population variation, and an examination of pre-existing criteria to identify bipartition of individual carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Scott E; Stojanowski, Christopher M; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2015-03-01

    Carpal bone bipartition is a developmental variant resulting in the division of a normally singular carpal into two distinct segments. Cases involving the scaphoid are best known, though many other carpals can be affected, including the trapezoid. Six new examples of bipartite trapezoids, identified in African and Asian anatomical and archeological samples, are reported here and compared with the eight previously known. While the site of bipartition is consistent, the resulting segments exhibit variability in their articulations with neighboring carpals. Five of the six affected trapezoids were identified in African or African-derived samples, yielding a significantly higher frequency (0.323%) of bipartite trapezoid than seen in anatomical or archeological series of European origin. Bilateral bipartite trapezoids in archeological remains from the Mid Holocene site of Gobero (Niger) are potentially the oldest bipartite carpals yet identified in humans. Their discovery may indicate that trapezoid bipartition is a condition that has been present in African populations since prehistoric times, though more data are needed. Because bipartite carpals may be symptomatic and can occur as part of syndromes, the significant population variation in frequency identified here has potential utility in both anatomical and clinical contexts. However, a comparison of the morphological appearance of bipartite trapezoids with the suggested criteria for bipartite scaphoid diagnosis indicates that these criteria are not equally applicable to other carpals. Fortunately, due to the rarity of fracture, identification of the bipartite trapezoid and separating it from pathological conditions is considerably easier than diagnosing a bipartite scaphoid.

  13. [Percutaneous surgery in renal lithiasis. Current indications].

    PubMed

    Escovar Díaz, P; Rey, M; López, J R; Rodríguez, M; González, R D; la Riva, F; Turinese, L; López, J

    1991-06-01

    The indiscriminate use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of urinary calculi has changed the place of percutaneous surgery in the treatment of renal lithiasis. The authors analyse current indications of PCN highlighting stone size. In their view, calculi greater than 2 cm warrant treatment by PCN since only 15-20% of patients are completely stone-free following a single session of ESWL. Attention is focussed on the staghorn calculus and the percutaneous approach. They describe the difficulty encountered in the fragmentation of the cystine calculus owing to its hardness and discuss the difficulties that may arise when using the percutaneous approach in patients with coexisting renoureteral conditions, in the treatment of lithiasis in children and in the obese patients.

  14. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  15. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Neuville, A.; Labreze, C.; Kind, M.; Bui, B.; Midy, D.; Palussiere, J.; Grenier, N.

    2013-06-15

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  16. Update on percutaneous mitral commissurotomy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Nascimento, Bruno Ramos; Lodi-Junqueira, Lucas; Tan, Timothy C; Athayde, Guilherme Rafael Sant'Anna; Hung, Judy

    2016-04-01

    Percutaneous mitral commissurotomy (PMC) is the first-line therapy for managing rheumatic mitral stenosis. Over the past two decades, the indications of the procedure have expanded to include patients with unfavourable valve anatomy as a consequence of epidemiological changes in patient population. The procedure is increasingly being performed in patients with increased age, more deformed valves and associated comorbidities. Echocardiography plays a crucial role in patient selection and to guide a more efficient procedure. The main echocardiographic predictors of immediate results after PMC are mitral valve area, subvalvular thickening and valve calcification, especially at the commissural level. However, procedural success rate is not only dependent on valve anatomy, but a number of other factors including patient characteristics, interventional management strategies and operator expertise. Severe mitral regurgitation continues to be the most common immediate procedural complication with unchanged incidence rates over time. The long-term outcome after PMC is mainly determined by the immediate procedural results. Postprocedural parameters associated with late adverse events include mitral valve area, mitral regurgitation severity, mean gradient and pulmonary artery pressure. Mitral restenosis is an important predictor of event-free survival rates after successful PMC, and repeat procedure can be considered in cases with commissural refusion. PMC can be performed in special situations, which include high-risk patients, during pregnancy and in the presence of left atrial thrombus, especially in centres with specialised expertise. Therefore, procedural decision-making should take into account the several determinant factors of PMC outcomes. This paper provides an overview and update of PMC techniques, complications, immediate and long-term results over time, and assessment of suitability for the procedure. PMID:26743926

  17. Non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of presumed intermedioradial carpal bone avascular necrosis in the dog.

    PubMed

    Pownder, Sarah L; Cooley, Stacy; Hayashi, Kei; Bezuidenhout, Abraham; Koff, Matthew F; Potter, Hollis G

    2016-08-01

    A 5-year-old, spayed female Weimaraner dog was evaluated for progressive left forelimb lameness localized to the carpus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to arrive at a presumptive diagnosis of intermedioradial carpal (IRC) bone fracture with avascular necrosis (AVN). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of naturally occurring AVN of the canine IRC diagnosed using MRI.

  18. Surgical treatment of multifocal giant cell tumor of carpal bones with preservation of wrist function: case report.

    PubMed

    Tarng, Yih-Wen; Yang, Shan-Wei; Hsu, Chien-Jen

    2009-02-01

    We report a rare case of multifocal giant cell tumor of bone involving the trapezium, trapezoid, capitate, and scaphoid with soft tissue extension. Following intralesional resection, an autogenous corticocancellous iliac crest bone graft was used to fill the resultant defect and preserve carpal height and radiocarpal motion. Successful union with no recurrence was noted at 1-year follow-up.

  19. Percutaneous Cyanoacrylate Glue Injection into the Renal Pseudoaneurysm to Control Intractable Hematuria After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Anupam Kumar, Ajay; Prakash, Mahesh; Singhal, Manphool; Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Sarkar, Debansu; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2009-07-15

    We report a case of a 43-year-old man who developed intractable hematuria after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Angiography detected a pseudoaneurysm arising from the lower polar artery; however, embolization could not be performed because of unfavorable vascular anatomy. A percutaneous thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance initially controlled the bleeding, but hematuria subsequently recurred as a result of recanalization of the aneurysm. The case was successfully managed with ultrasound- and fluoroscopic-guided direct injection of cyanoacrylate glue into the pseudoaneurysm.

  20. Subchondral lucency of the third carpal bone in Standardbred racehorses: 13 cases (1982-1988).

    PubMed

    Ross, M W; Richardson, D W; Beroza, G A

    1989-09-15

    Thirteen Standardbreds had subchondral lucency of the third carpal bone (C3), described as single or multiple central areas of C3 bone loss in the radial fossa. Sclerosis of the radial fossa was also detected. The mean age of 9 stallions, 3 mares, and 1 gelding was 4.1 years (range, 3 to 7 years). All horses had an acute moderate to severe lameness referable to the middle carpal joint. A dorsoproximal dorsodistal (skyline) radiographic projection was most useful and identified mild (3 horses), moderate (6 horses), and severe (4 horses) subchondral lucency and sclerosis of the radial fossa. The margin of C3 was intact dorsal to the lucent areas in all horses. In 12 horses, arthroscopic surgical evaluation and curettage of the lesion were performed. Of the 9 horses monitored long enough to allow racing, 8 horses (89%) returned to racing, although only 6 (75%) raced at the same degree of competition. Subchondral lucency of C3 resulted from chronic damage to C3 with subsequent osteochondral collapse or acute C3 proximal surface osteochondral fracture. PMID:2793549

  1. Carpal-metacarpal specializations for burrowing in South American octodontoid rodents

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Cecilia C; Verzi, Diego H

    2011-01-01

    Among the ecomorphologically diverse Octodontoidea rodents, fossorial habits are prevalent in Ctenomyidae and Octodontidae and occur in some members of Echimyidae. To detect traits linked to scratch-digging, we analyzed morpho-structural variation in the carpus and metacarpus of 27 species of extinct and living octodontoids with epigean, fossorial and subterranean habits. Within a context of relative morphological uniformity, we detected the following specialized traits in the burrowing Clyomys (Echimyidae), Spalacopus (Octodontidae), Ctenomys and †Eucelophorus (Ctenomyidae): broad shortened carpus, robust metacarpals, markedly broad and short metacarpal V, and predominance of ray III (mesaxony, incipient in Spalacopus). In addition, the specialized subterranean Ctenomys presented an enlarged scapholunar in extensive contact with the unciform, and with a complex-shaped proximal articular surface. These features are interpreted as responses to mechanical requirements of scratch-digging, providing greater carpal rigidity and resistance to direct forces exerted during the digging stroke. In Ctenomys, the radius-scapholunar joint restricts movement at wrist level. The phylogenetic distribution of traits shows that the most derived carpal and metacarpal morphologies occur among subterranean octodontoids, also possessing important craniodental adaptations, and supports the hypothesis that the acquisition of digging specializations would have been linked to increasing burrowing frequency in some lineages. Nevertheless, octodontoids with less morphological specializations have metacarpal modifications advantageous for digging, suggesting that scratch-digging specialization preceded the acquisition of tooth-digging traits, in agreement with the general claim that scratch-digging is the primary digging strategy in burrowing mammals. PMID:21557745

  2. Improvements in Intracorporeal Lithotripters for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ramsay L.

    2007-04-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is an effective minimally invasive surgical approach for the treatment of large renal stone burden. Intracorporeal lithotripters (ICL) are utilized during PNL to fragment calculi, with some devices capable of concurrently removing fragments as well. Much progress has been made in the design of ICL devices, resulting in potentially more efficient treatment of nephrolithiasis.

  3. Percutaneous Surgery for Severe Hallux Valgus.

    PubMed

    Vernois, Joel; Redfern, David J

    2016-09-01

    Severe hallux valgus is a challenge to treat. If the basal osteotomy is a well known surgery for severe deformity, the chevron osteotomy is usually used in mild to moderate deformity. With a accurent fixation the chevron can also be used in severe deformity. Both techniques can be performed percutaneously and offer reliable techniques. PMID:27524702

  4. Appropriateness of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul S.; Patel, Manesh R.; Klein, Lloyd W.; Krone, Ronald J.; Dehmer, Gregory J.; Kennedy, Kevin; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Douglas Weaver, W.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Rumsfeld, John S.; Brindis, Ralph G.; Spertus, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Context Despite the widespread use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), the appropriateness of these procedures in contemporary practice is unknown. Objective To assess the appropriateness of PCI in the United States. Design, Setting, and Patients Multicenter, prospective study of patients within the National Cardiovascular Data Registry undergoing PCI between July 1, 2009, and September 30, 2010, at 1091 US hospitals. The appropriateness of PCI was adjudicated using the appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization. Results were stratified by whether the procedure was performed for an acute (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, non–ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, or unstable angina with high-risk features) or nonacute indication. Main Outcome Measures Proportion of acute and nonacute PCIs classified as appropriate, uncertain, or inappropriate; extent of hospital-level variation in inappropriate procedures. Results Of 500 154 PCIs, 355 417 (71.1%) were for acute indications (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, 103 245 [20.6%]; non–ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, 105 708 [21.1%]; high-risk unstable angina, 146 464 [29.3%]), and 144 737 (28.9%) for nonacute indications. For acute indications, 350 469 PCIs (98.6%) were classified as appropriate, 1055 (0.3%) as uncertain, and 3893 (1.1%) as inappropriate. For nonacute indications, 72 911 PCIs (50.4%) were classified as appropriate, 54 988 (38.0%) as uncertain, and 16 838 (11.6%) as inappropriate. The majority of inappropriate PCIs for nonacute indications were performed in patients with no angina (53.8%), low-risk ischemia on noninvasive stress testing (71.6%), or suboptimal (≤1 medication) antianginal therapy (95.8%). Furthermore, although variation in the proportion of inappropriate PCI across hospitals was minimal for acute procedures, there was substantial hospital variation for nonacute procedures (median hospital rate for inappropriate PCI, 10

  5. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane. The resulting infrared sensor can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. An alternative embodiment is implemented using a corrugated membrane to permit large deflection without complicated clamping and high deflection voltages. The alternative embodiment also employs a pinhole aperture in a membrane to accommodate environmental temperature variation and a sealed chamber to eliminate environmental contamination of the tunneling electrodes and undesireable accoustic coupling to the sensor.

  6. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare L. Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 {+-} 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 {+-} 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  7. 203. Lickstone Ridge Tunnel. All but three of the tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    203. Lickstone Ridge Tunnel. All but three of the tunnel have minimum height of 13, which accommodates most large recreational vehicles. This tunnel has the lowest clearance at 11-3. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  8. View down tank tunnel (tunnel no. 2) showing pipes and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View down tank tunnel (tunnel no. 2) showing pipes and walkway of metal grating, side tunnel to tank 3 is on the left - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Diesel Purification Plant, North Road near Pierce Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Aorto-ventricular tunnel.

    PubMed

    McKay, Roxane

    2007-10-08

    Aorto-ventricular tunnel is a congenital, extracardiac channel which connects the ascending aorta above the sinutubular junction to the cavity of the left, or (less commonly) right ventricle. The exact incidence is unknown, estimates ranging from 0.5% of fetal cardiac malformations to less than 0.1% of congenitally malformed hearts in clinico-pathological series. Approximately 130 cases have been reported in the literature, about twice as many cases in males as in females. Associated defects, usually involving the proximal coronary arteries, or the aortic or pulmonary valves, are present in nearly half the cases. Occasional patients present with an asymptomatic heart murmur and cardiac enlargement, but most suffer heart failure in the first year of life. The etiology of aorto-ventricular tunnel is uncertain. It appears to result from a combination of maldevelopment of the cushions which give rise to the pulmonary and aortic roots, and abnormal separation of these structures. Echocardiography is the diagnostic investigation of choice. Antenatal diagnosis by fetal echocardiography is reliable after 18 weeks gestation. Aorto-ventricular tunnel must be distinguished from other lesions which cause rapid run-off of blood from the aorta and produce cardiac failure. Optimal management of symptomatic aorto-ventricular tunnel consists of diagnosis by echocardiography, complimented with cardiac catheterization as needed to elucidate coronary arterial origins or associated defects, and prompt surgical repair. Observation of the exceedingly rare, asymptomatic patient with a small tunnel may be justified by occasional spontaneous closure. All patients require life-long follow-up for recurrence of the tunnel, aortic valve incompetence, left ventricular function, and aneurysmal enlargement of the ascending aorta.

  10. Carpal boss in chronic wrist pain and its association with partial osseous coalition and osteoarthritis - A case report with focus on MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Poh, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The carpal boss is a bony prominence at the dorsal aspect of the 2(nd) and/or 3(rd) carpometacarpal joint, which has been linked to various etiologies, including trauma, os styloideum, osteophyte formation, and partial osseous coalition. It may result in symptoms through secondary degeneration, ganglion formation, bursitis, or extensor tendon abnormalities by altered biomechanics of wrist motion. We present a case of symptomatic carpal boss with the finding of a partial osseous coalition at the 2(nd) carpometacarpal (metacarpal-trapezoid) joint and highlight the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of carpal boss impingement and secondary osteoarthritis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report in the literature describing the imaging findings of partial osseous coalition and degenerative osteoarthritis in relation to carpal boss.

  11. Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Günter; Schmalhorst, Jan; Thomas, Andre; Hütten, Andreas; Yuasa, Shinji

    In magnetoelectronic devices large opportunities are opened by the spin dependent tunneling resistance, where a strong dependence of the tunneling current on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the electrodes is found. Within a short time, the amplitude of the resistance change of the junctions increased dramatically. We will cover Al-O and MgO based junctions and present highly spin-polarized electrode materials such as Heusler alloys. Furthermore, we will give a short overview on applications such as read heads in hard disk drives, storage cells in MRAMs, field programmable logic circuits and biochips. Finally, we will discuss the currently growing field of current induced magnetization switching.

  12. Tunneling in axion monodromy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    The Coleman formula for vacuum decay and bubble nucleation has been used to estimate the tunneling rate in models of axion monodromy in recent literature. However, several of Coleman's original assumptions do not hold for such models. Here we derive a new estimate with this in mind using a similar Euclidean procedure. We find that there are significant regions of parameter space for which the tunneling rate in axion monodromy is not well approximated by the Coleman formula. However, there is also a regime relevant to large field inflation in which both estimates parametrically agree. We also briefly comment on the applications of our results to the relaxion scenario.

  13. Eliminating Wind Tunnel Flow Breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Undesirable vortexes near floor in small wind tunnels suppressed by simple device that alters flow pattern there. Air is injected along floor and interacts with backflow from wind-tunnel model. Results in smoother, more correct air-flow and to more-reliable wind-tunnel data.

  14. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yun-Zhong; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Andres, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  15. Quiet wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, P. W.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    Simple and inexpensive technique suppresses background noise generated by pores in wind tunnel wall lining and makes aerodynamic data more accurate and reliable. Porous walls are covered with wire-mesh screen. Screen offers smoother surface to airflow and damps vortexes and resonance caused by wall perforations; yet it provides enough open area for perforations to cancel shock waves generated by model.

  16. Propeller Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    This picture shows a general view of the Propeller Research Tunnel engine room under construction. Workmen were installing the two submarine diesel engines that would power the PRT. The room was constructed of concrete with corrugated metal siding and roofing with the intention of making the engine room as fireproof as possible.

  17. Prions tunnel between cells.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Hans-Hermann

    2009-03-01

    Prions are abnormal isoforms of host proteins that are the infectious agents in certain mammalian neurodegenerative diseases. How prions travel from their peripheral entry sites to the brain where they cause disease is poorly understood. A new study finds that tunnelling nanotubes are important for the intercellular transfer of prions during neuroinvasion.

  18. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoldi, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-03-15

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. We discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in the literature.

  19. Full Scale Tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Interior view of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. (Small human figures have been added for scale.) On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow.

  20. Dry wind tunnel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ping-Chih (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a ground flutter testing system without a wind tunnel, called Dry Wind Tunnel (DWT) System. The DWT system consists of a Ground Vibration Test (GVT) hardware system, a multiple input multiple output (MIMO) force controller software, and a real-time unsteady aerodynamic force generation software, that is developed from an aerodynamic reduced order model (ROM). The ground flutter test using the DWT System operates on a real structural model, therefore no scaled-down structural model, which is required by the conventional wind tunnel flutter test, is involved. Furthermore, the impact of the structural nonlinearities on the aeroelastic stability can be included automatically. Moreover, the aeroservoelastic characteristics of the aircraft can be easily measured by simply including the flight control system in-the-loop. In addition, the unsteady aerodynamics generated computationally is interference-free from the wind tunnel walls. Finally, the DWT System can be conveniently and inexpensively carried out as a post GVT test with the same hardware, only with some possible rearrangement of the shakers and the inclusion of additional sensors.

  1. The Channel Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. The undersea section of the tunnel is unsurpassed in length in the world. A proposal for a Channel tunnel was first put forward by a French engineer in 1802. In 1881, a first attempt was made at boring a tunnel from the English side; the work was halted after 800 m. Again in 1922, English workers started boring a tunnel, and advanced 120 m before it too was halted for political reasons. The most recent attempt was begun in 1987, and the tunnel was officially opened in 1994. At completion it was estimated that the project cost around $18 billion. It has been operating at a significant loss since its opening, despite trips by over 7 million passengers per year on the Eurostar train, and over 3 million vehicles per year.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring

  2. Modified Retroperitoneal Access for Percutaneous Intervention after Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Lawrence H H

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous access to the surgical bed after pancreaticoduodenectomy can be a challenge, due to the post-operative anatomy alteration. However, immediate complications, such as surgical bed abscess or suspected tumor recurrence, are often best accessed percutaneously, as open surgical or endoscopic approaches are often difficult, if not impossible. We, hereby, describe a safe approach that is highly replicable, in accessing the surgical bed for percutaneous intervention, following pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:23690711

  3. Sagittal wrist motion of carpal bones following intraarticular fractures of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Lutz, M; Rudisch, A; Kralinger, F; Smekal, V; Goebel, G; Gabl, M; Pechlaner, S

    2005-06-01

    Forty patients (mean age, 37 years) with intraarticular C2 and C3 Colles fractures were treated by open reduction, internal fixation and bone grafting. At a mean follow-up of 8 years radiocarpal and midcarpal motion was evaluated, the depth of the articular surface of the distal radius in the sagittal plane was measured and the presence of arthritis was noted. The fractures healed with a mean palmar tilt of 6 degrees , a mean ulnar tilt of 18 degrees and ulna variance within 1 mm of the contralateral side. The depth of the articular surface of the distal radius was 1.3 mm greater than the uninvolved side. Measurement of carpal bone angles relative to the radius in maximum flexion and extension revealed lunate extension of 23 degrees , lunate flexion of 15 degrees , capitate extension of 62 degrees , capitate flexion of 40 degrees . There was a significant correlation between articular surface depth and radiocarpal motion.

  4. Introduction to cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The background to the evolution of the cryogenic wind tunnel is outlined, with particular reference to the late 60's/early 70's when efforts were begun to re-equip with larger wind tunnels. The problems of providing full scale Reynolds numbers in transonic testing were proving particularly intractible, when the notion of satisfying the needs with the cryogenic tunnel was proposed, and then adopted. The principles and advantages of the cryogenic tunnel are outlined, along with guidance on the coolant needs when this is liquid nitrogen, and with a note on energy recovery. Operational features of the tunnels are introduced with reference to a small low speed tunnel. Finally the outstanding contributions are highlighted of the 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) at NASA Langley Research Center, and its personnel, to the furtherance of knowledge and confidence in the concept.

  5. Emergency percutaneous nephrostomy in the septic kidney.

    PubMed

    Nicolescu, D; Boja, R; Osanu, V; Bakos, I; Negrut, I; Cantar, C; Schwartz, L

    1992-01-01

    From 250 upper tract obstructive uropathy cases we have studied 64 patients hospitalized with toxico-septic shock. The constant symptom was arterial hypotension. Other 3 patients with long-standing urinary infection due to lithiasis developed this dreaded complication after PNL (staghorn stones-2, pyelic stone-1). In complicated obstructive uropathy cases associated with toxico-septic shock, percutaneous nephrostomy for high urinary derivation in emergency is usually made under local anaesthesia. Its aim is rapid and efficient clearance of kidney obstruction, with minimal damage for the patient; then it is followed by strong antibiotherapy associated with other reanimation and intensive care measures. There were 11 deaths. The stone generating obstructive uropathy was removed subsequently, after the improvement of biological constants and general state of the patient, under the protection of percutaneous nephrostomy.

  6. Percutaneous heart valves; past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Rozeik, M M; Wheatley, D J; Gourlay, T

    2014-09-01

    Percutaneous heart valves provide a promising future for patients refused surgery on the grounds of significant technical challenges or high risk for complications. Since the first human intervention more than 10 years ago, over 50 different types of valves have been developed. The CoreValve and Edwards SAPIEN valves have both experienced clinical trials and the latter has gained FDA approval for implantation in patients considered inoperable. Current complications, such as major vascular bleeding and stroke, prevent these valves from being commonly deployed in patients considered operable in conventional surgery. This review focuses on the past and present achievements of these valves and highlights the design considerations required to progress development further. It is envisaged that, with continued improvement in valve design and with increased clinical and engineering experience, percutaneous heart valve replacement may one day be a viable option for lower-risk operable patients.

  7. Percutaneous Management of Malignant Biliary Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Christopher M; Ryu, Robert K

    2015-12-01

    Malignancy resulting in impaired biliary drainage includes a number of diagnoses familiar to the interventional radiologist. Adequate drainage of such a system can significantly improve patient quality of life, and can facilitate the further treatment options and care of such patients. In the setting of prior instrumentation, cholangitis can present as an urgent indication for drainage. Current initial interventional management of malignant biliary duct obstruction frequently includes endoscopic or percutaneous intervention, with local practices and preprocedural imaging guiding interventional approaches and subsequent management. This article addresses the indications for percutaneous drainage, technical considerations in performing such drainage, and specific techniques useful in attempting to achieve clinical end points in patients with malignant biliary duct obstruction.

  8. Brachiocephalic artery haemorrhage during percutaneous tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S D; Kumar, G; Hill, C S; Kaddour, H

    2015-03-01

    Percutaneous tracheostomy was performed on a 69-year-old woman to facilitate weaning. Insertion of the size 7 tracheostomy tube resulted in profuse bleeding around the tracheostomy site. On inflation of the tracheostomy balloon, the bleeding stopped. Urgent computed tomography demonstrated the brachiocephalic artery was abnormally high and lying in an oblique fashion over the trachea, and the tracheostomy tube was displacing the trachea posteriorly. Surgical repair of the defect in the brachiocephalic artery was undertaken and a surgical tracheostomy was performed in theatre. This case raises important issues about the potential dangers of percutaneous tracheostomy in cases of abnormal anatomy. It also emphasises the importance of direct visualisation of the seeker needle using the endoscope. In cases where there is a suspicion of abnormal anatomy, it is safer to obtain preprocedural imaging or perform a surgical tracheostomy. PMID:25723674

  9. Embolic protection devices in percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Meneguz Moreno, Rafael A; Costa, José R; Costa, Ricardo A; Abizaid, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Clinical benefit of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) depends on both angiographic success at lesion site as well as the restoration of adequate macro and microvascular perfusion. The pathophysiology of embolization from coronary lesions during PCI is multifactorial, being more frequently observed in patients with acute coronary syndrome and in those with lesions at saphenous vein graft (SVG). In this population, despite successful epicardial intervention, distal tissue perfusion may still be absent in up to a quarter of all PCI. Multiple devices and pharmacologic regimens have been developed and refined in an attempt to protect the microvascular circulation during PCI. Among them, embolic protection devices have raised as an attractive adjunctive toll due to their ability to retain debris and potentially prevent distal embolization, reducing major adverse cardiac events. Currently, their use has been validated for the treatment of SVG lesions but failed to show effectiveness in the percutaneous approach of acute coronary syndrome patients, including those with ST elevation myocardial infarction. PMID:27007782

  10. Antiseptic skin agents for percutaneous procedures.

    PubMed

    Lepor, Norman E; Madyoon, Hooman

    2009-01-01

    Infections associated with percutaneously implanted devices, such as pacemakers, internal cardiac defibrillators, and endovascular prostheses, create difficult and complex clinical scenarios because management can entail complete device removal, antibiotic therapy, and prolonged hospitalization. A source for pathogens is often thought to be the skin surface, making skin preparation at the time of the procedure a critical part of minimizing implantation of infected devices and prostheses. The most common skin preparation agents used today include products containing iodophors or chlorhexidine gluconate. Agents are further classified by whether they are aqueous-based or alcoholbased solutions. Traditional aqueous-based iodophors, such as povidone-iodine, are one of the few products that can be safely used on mucous membrane surfaces. Alcohol-based solutions are quick, sustained, and durable, with broader spectrum antimicrobial activity. These agents seem ideal for percutaneous procedures associated with prosthesis implantation, when it is critical to minimize skin colony counts to prevent hardware infection.

  11. Percutaneous endoscopic decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong

    2014-11-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy has become a representative minimally invasive spine surgery for lumbar disc herniation. Due to the remarkable evolution in the techniques available, the paradigm of spinal endoscopy is shifting from treatments of soft disc herniation to those of lumbar spinal stenosis. Lumbar spinal stenosis can be classified into three categories according to pathological zone as follows: central stenosis, lateral recess stenosis and foraminal stenosis. Moreover, percutaneous endoscopic decompression (PED) techniques may vary according to the type of lumbar stenosis, including interlaminar PED, transforaminal PED and endoscopic lumbar foraminotomy. However, these techniques are continuously evolving. In the near future, PED for lumbar stenosis may be an efficient alternative to conventional open lumbar decompression surgery.

  12. A Percutaneous Knotless Technique for SLAP Repair.

    PubMed

    Tennent, Duncan; Pearse, Eyiyemi

    2016-02-01

    We describe a percutaneous technique for repair of type II SLAP lesions. Through the Neviaser portal, a spinal needle is used to pass a FiberStick suture (Arthrex, Naples, FL) through the labrum to create 2 mattress sutures that are secured with PushLock anchors (Arthrex). This technique is simple, reproducible, and knotless and requires no cannulas. At the end of the procedure, minimal suture material remains in the joint.

  13. Percutaneous Vertebral Body Augmentation: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    There are many medical conditions like osteoporosis, tumor, or osteonecrosis that weaken the structural strength of the vertebral body and prone it to fracture. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation that is usually applied by polymethylmethacrylate is a relatively safe, effective, and long lasting procedure commonly performed in these situations. In this paper, we updated a review of biomechanics, indications, contraindications, surgical techniques, complications, and overall prognosis of these minimally invasive spinal procedures. PMID:25379561

  14. Percutaneous Retrieval of Chronic Intravascular Foreign Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, Clare; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Walser, Eric M.; Wang Dongfang; Zwischenberger, Joseph B.

    2003-09-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of intravascular retrieval of chronic foreign bodies, we retrospectively reviewed an 8 year experience (1993-2001) of percutaneous retrieval of chronically retained intravascular foreign bodies (n = 6). In 6 of 6 cases (4 catheter fragments, 2 guidewires), 5-90 days elapsed before retrieval via the femoral or internal jugular vein. Under fluoroscopy, we determined the foreign body's course, position and size. A guidewire was advanced through a multipurpose catheter to the foreign body. The multipurpose catheter was replaced with a gooseneck snare catheter and the snare advanced to grasp and remove the foreign body. Percutaneous retrieval was successful in all 6 cases. One patient experienced mild hemoptysis, which resolved within 24 hr of observation. No patient experienced long-term sequelae. Given the potential life-threatening complications from intravascular foreign bodies and the low complication rate from percutaneous retrieval, we recommend extraction of the foreign body even if it is asymptomatic in the chronic setting (> 24 hr)

  15. Percutaneous Zenith endografting for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Kamaldeep S; Resnick, Scott A; Matsumura, Jon S; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-03-01

    A completely percutaneous approach to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endografting has the theoretic benefits of being minimally invasive and more expedient. Our goal was to demonstrate the utility of this approach using a suprarenal fixation device and a suture-mediated closure system. We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent percutaneous AAA repair with the Zenith device between August 2003 and March 2007. Immediate and delayed access-related outcomes were examined over a mean follow-up of 12.1+/-2.0 months. Mean AAA size was 5.6 cm. Immediate arterial closure and technical success rate was 96% (27/28 vessels). One immediate hemostatic failure required open surgical repair. Over follow-up, one vessel required operative repair for new-onset claudication. No other immediate or delayed complications (thrombosis, pseudoaneurysm, infection, or deep venous thrombosis) were detected. A percutaneous approach for the treatment of AAA has several advantages over femoral artery cutdown but also has its own unique set of risks in the immediate and late postoperative period. Ultimately, the "preclose technique" can be safely applied for the Zenith device despite its large-bore delivery system.

  16. Transdermal anaesthesia for percutaneous trigger finger release.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulos, Christos K; Ignatiadis, Ioannis A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficiency of transdermal anaesthesia using eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA) in patients undergoing percutaneous trigger finger release and to compare it with lidocaine infiltration. In this prospective, randomised study percutaneous release of the A1 annular pulley was performed to treat stenosing tenosynovitis (trigger finger syndrome) in 50 patients (50 fingers). The procedure was performed either under transdermal anaesthesia using EMLA applied transcutaneously 120 minutes prior to the operation (Group A, n = 25) or using local infiltration anaesthesia using lidocaine (Group B, n = 25). Pain experienced during administration of anaesthesia and during the operation was assessed using a 10-point Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAPS), while all patients rated the effectiveness of anaesthesia with a 5-point scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the VAPS during the operation (1.33 +/- 0.52 versus 1.59 +/- 0.87) and the satisfaction scores (4.6 +/- 0.2 versus 4.4 +/- 0.3). The VAPS score during the administration of anaesthesia was statistically significantly less in the EMLA group (0 versus 5.96 +/- 2.41). All patients were satisfied with the final result of the operation. Percutaneous trigger finger release can be performed as an office procedure with the use of EMLA avoiding the use of injectable local infiltration anaesthesia. PMID:17405199

  17. Percutaneous Zenith endografting for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Kamaldeep S; Resnick, Scott A; Matsumura, Jon S; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-03-01

    A completely percutaneous approach to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endografting has the theoretic benefits of being minimally invasive and more expedient. Our goal was to demonstrate the utility of this approach using a suprarenal fixation device and a suture-mediated closure system. We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent percutaneous AAA repair with the Zenith device between August 2003 and March 2007. Immediate and delayed access-related outcomes were examined over a mean follow-up of 12.1+/-2.0 months. Mean AAA size was 5.6 cm. Immediate arterial closure and technical success rate was 96% (27/28 vessels). One immediate hemostatic failure required open surgical repair. Over follow-up, one vessel required operative repair for new-onset claudication. No other immediate or delayed complications (thrombosis, pseudoaneurysm, infection, or deep venous thrombosis) were detected. A percutaneous approach for the treatment of AAA has several advantages over femoral artery cutdown but also has its own unique set of risks in the immediate and late postoperative period. Ultimately, the "preclose technique" can be safely applied for the Zenith device despite its large-bore delivery system. PMID:18774684

  18. Simulations of percutaneous RF ablation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Kwok, Jonathan; Beetel, Robert J.

    2003-06-01

    Breast and liver cancers provide an ongoing challenge in regard to treatment efficacy and successful clinical outcomes. A variety of percutaneous technology has been applied for thermal treatment of the liver and breast, including laser, microwave, cryogenic and radiofrequency (RF) devices. When simplicity and cost are factored in, RF hardware and applicators offer the most cost-effective treatment pathway by interventional radiologists and surgeons. To model percutaneous RF treatments in liver and breast, simulations were done in 3D with a finite element model. Three RF systems were modeled, including 1) single needle; 2) clustered needle, cooled and uncooled; and 3) deployable, hook electrodes. The results show the limitations of the systems in percutaneous procedures, depending on temperature limits, duration of treatment, and whether the devices are cooled or uncooled. For thermal treatment, the isotherm of 55°C was considered the margin of coagulation necrosis. The 3-D volumes of 55°C and 65°C isotherm shells aid in the selection of the best method to improve clinical outcomes, while paying attention to the size and shape of the applicator and duration of treatment.

  19. Techniques For Mass Production Of Tunneling Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W.; Podosek, Judith A.; Reynolds, Joseph K.; Rockstad, Howard K.; Vote, Erika C.; Kaiser, William J.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques for mass production of tunneling electrodes developed from silicon-micromachining, lithographic patterning, and related microfabrication processes. Tunneling electrodes named because electrons travel between them by quantum-mechanical tunneling; tunneling electrodes integral parts of tunneling transducer/sensors, which act in conjunction with feedback circuitry to stabilize tunneling currents by maintaining electrode separations of order of 10 Angstrom. Essential parts of scanning tunneling microscopes and related instruments, and used as force and position transducers in novel microscopic accelerometers and infrared detectors.

  20. Tunneled central venous catheters: Experience from a single center.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, K; Ramakrishnan, M; Sah, A K; Sooraj, Y; Mahaldhar, A; Ajeshkumar, R

    2011-04-01

    In the past vascular surgeons were called in to place tunneled central venous catheter (TVC) for hemodialysis patients. Advent of percutaneous technique has resulted in an increasing number of interventional nephrologists inserting it. A single centre three year audit of 100 TVCs with a cumulative follow up of 492 patient months is presented here. From 2007 to 2010, 100 TVCs were placed by nephrologists in a percutaneous fashion in the operative room or the interventional nephrology suite. Those who completed minimum of three months on the catheter were included in analysis. There were 69 males and 31 females with a mean age of 52.3±13.6 years.(range: 25-76). Chronic glomerulonephritis was the commonest cause of CKD (45%) followed by diabetes (39%).Right internal jugular vein was the preferred site (94%). TVC was utilized as the primary access to initiate dialysis in 25% of patients in whom a live donor was available for renal transplant. The blood flow was 250-270 ml/min. The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that 3 months and 6 months catheter survival rates were 80% and 55%, respectively. The main complications were exit site blood ooze, catheter block and kink. Catheter related bacteremia rate was low at 0.4/1000 patient days. Primary cause of drop out was patient death unrelated to the TVCs. Those under the age of 40 years showed better survival, but there was no bearing of gender, catheter site, and etiology of CKD on survival. Tunneled central venous catheters could find a niche as the primary access of choice for pretransplant live donor renal transplants in view of its immediate usage, high blood flows, low infection rates and adequate patency rates for 3-6 months. PMID:21769173

  1. [Percutaneous gastrostomy complicated with abdominal wall hematoma; severe anemia secondary to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy].

    PubMed

    Chu, D; Chamorro, S; Arrieta, F; Cobo, M E; Calañas, A; Botella, J I; Balsa, J; Zamarrón, I; Vázquez, C

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) is a safe and effective procedure that offers clear advantages over nasogastric tube feeding to ensure adequate nutrition in patients with swallowing problems who have an intact digestive tract. With proper placement and monitoring methodology there are few complications in both the peritrack procedure as in the long run. However, despite being considered a safe technique it is not devoided of serious complications. We report a patient with dysphagia, requiring percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement developing a severe anemia with severe subcutaneous hematoma, given the exceptional case and literature review.

  2. Treatment of intraosseous ganglia and bone cysts of the carpal bones with injectable calcium phosphate bone cement.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Hiroshi; Murata, Keiichi; Kawamura, Kenji; Kawate, Kenji; Takakura, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    This article documents the outcome of treatment of intraosseous ganglia and simple bone cysts of the carpal bones by curettage and injectable calcium phosphate bone cement (CPC) grafting. The patients consisted of five men and three women. One had a cystic lesion in the scaphoid, one in the hamate, and five in the lunate. Curettage of the lesions was performed, and CPC was injected into the cavity. Five patients were diagnosed with a ganglion and three with a simple bone cyst. Among the five patients with wrist pain, the pain disappeared completely in four. Radiographs showed apparent partial absorption of CPC in four patients and no absorption in other four. There were no recurrence of tumours and no other complications were encountered. We conclude that calcium phosphate bone cement is a useful material for repairing bone defect after curettage of an intraosseous ganglion or bone cyst of a carpal bone.

  3. Possibility of hyperbolic tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, Jose P.

    2010-08-15

    Traversable wormholes are primarily useful as 'gedanken experiments' and as a theoretician's probe of the foundations of general relativity. In this work, we analyze the possibility of having tunnels in a hyperbolic spacetime. We obtain exact solutions of static and pseudo-spherically symmetric spacetime tunnels by adding exotic matter to a vacuum solution referred to as a degenerate solution of class A. The physical properties and characteristics of these intriguing solutions are explored, and through the mathematics of embedding it is shown that particular constraints are placed on the shape function, that differ significantly from the Morris-Thorne wormhole. In particular, it is shown that the energy density is always negative, and the radial pressure is positive, at the throat, contrary to the Morris-Thorne counterpart. Specific solutions are also presented by considering several equations of state, and by imposing restricted choices for the shape function or the redshift function.

  4. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Rockstad, Howard K. (Inventor); Reynolds, Joseph K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane which would otherwise change deflection depending upon incident infrared radiation. The resulting infrared sensor will meet or exceed the performance of all other broadband, uncooled, infrared sensors and can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. The technology is readily implemented as a small-format linear array suitable for commercial and spacecraft applications.

  5. Tunnel magnetoresistance of diamondoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-10-01

    Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of diamondoids has been predicted by first principles density functional theory. Diamantane was used as a basic molecular proxy for diamondoids because hydrogen atoms in the apical position are easily substituted for a thiol group. The pristine diamantane exhibited a low TMR ratio of 7%, and boron-substitution considerably decreased the TMR ratio. Conversely, nitrogen-substitution enhanced the TMR ratio by up to 20%. Heteroatom-substitution changes the tunneling probabilities by varying the molecular bond lengths. Furthermore, when the spins of the electrodes are parallel, the heteroatoms resulted in transmittance probabilities at an energy range near the Fermi level. Consequently, heteroatom-substitution can control the TMR ratios of diamondoids very well.

  6. On tunneling across horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzo, L.

    2011-07-01

    The tunneling method for stationary black holes in the Hamilton-Jacobi variant is reconsidered in the light of some critiques that have been moved against. It is shown that once the tunneling trajectories have been correctly identified the method is free from internal inconsistencies, it is manifestly covariant, it allows for the extension to spinning particles and it can even be used without solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. These conclusions borrow support on a simple analytic continuation of the classical action of a pointlike particle, made possible by the unique assumption that it should be analytic in the complexified Schwarzschild or Kerr-Newman space-time. A more general version of the Parikh-Wilczek method will also be proposed along these lines.

  7. Unitary Plan Supersonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    Unitary Plan Supersonic Tunnel: In this aerial photograph of construction in the early 1950s, the return air passages are shown in the rear, center. This area was later covered with walls and a roof so that upon completion of the facility, it was not visible from the exterior. Three air storage spheres and the cooling tower are at the extreme right of the building. The spheres store dry air at 150 pounds per square inch. The cooling tower dissipates heat from coolers that control the test air temperature. One of many research facilities at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel is used for experimental investigations at supersonic speeds.

  8. Light tunneling in clouds.

    PubMed

    Nussenzveig, H Moyses

    2003-03-20

    Solar radiation, traveling outside cloud water droplets, excites sharp resonances and surface waves by tunneling into the droplets. This effect contributes substantially to the total absorption (typically, of the order of 20%) and yields the major contribution to backscattering, producing the meteorological glory. Usual computational practices in atmospheric science misrepresent resonance contributions and cannot be relied on in the assessment of possible anomalies in cloud absorption.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament tunnel placement.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Britton, Carla L; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to analyze variation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tunnel placement between surgeons and the influence of preferred surgical technique and surgeon experience level using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). In this study, 12 surgeons drilled ACL tunnels on six cadaveric knees each. Surgeons were divided by experience level and preferred surgical technique (two-incision [TI], medial portal [MP], and transtibial [TT]). ACL tunnel aperture locations were analyzed using 3D CT scans and compared with radiographic ACL footprint criteria. The femoral tunnel location from front to back within the notch demonstrated a range of means of 16% with the TI tunnels the furthest back. A range of means of only 5% was found for femoral tunnel low to high positions by technique. The anterior to posterior tibial tunnel measure demonstrated wider variation than the medial to lateral position. The mean tibial tunnel location drilled by TT surgeons was more posterior than surgeons using the other techniques. Overall, 82% of femoral tunnels and 78% of tibial tunnels met all radiographic measurement criteria. Slight (1-7%) differences in mean tunnel placement on the femur and tibia were found between experienced and new surgeons. The location of the femoral tunnel aperture in the front to back plane relative to the notch roof and the anterior to posterior position on the tibia were the most variable measures. Surgeon experience level did not appear to significantly affect tunnel location. This study provides background information that may be beneficial when evaluating multisurgeon and multicenter collaborative ACL studies.

  10. Evaluating tunnel kiln performance

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, K.R.; Carty, W.M.; Ninos, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Process improvements in the production of whitewares provide the potential for substantial savings for manufacturers. A typical whiteware manufacturer incurs an annual defective product loss of {approximately}$20 million when accounting for raw materials, energy, labor and waste disposal. Reduction in defective product loss of 1% could result in a savings in excess of $1 million annually. This study was designed to establish benchmarks for two conventional tunnel kilns used to bisque-fire dinnerware at Buffalo China Inc. (Buffalo, NY). The benchmark was established by assessing the current conditions and variability of the two tunnel kilns as a function of the fracture strength of sample bars that were made from production body. Sample bars were fired in multiple locations in both kilns to assess the conditions and variability of firing within each kiln. Comparison of strength results between the two kilns also was assessed. These comparisons were accomplished through applied statistical analysis, wherein significant statistical variations were identified and isolated for both tunnel kilns. The statistical methods and tools used in this analysis are readily accessible to manufacturers, thus allowing implementation of similar analysis, or benchmarking, in-house.

  11. Ferroelectric tunnel memristor.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Lu, H; Ryu, S; Bark, C-W; Eom, C-B; Tsymbal, E Y; Gruverman, A

    2012-11-14

    Strong interest in resistive switching phenomena is driven by a possibility to develop electronic devices with novel functional properties not available in conventional systems. Bistable resistive devices are characterized by two resistance states that can be switched by an external voltage. Recently, memristors-electric circuit elements with continuously tunable resistive behavior-have emerged as a new paradigm for nonvolatile memories and adaptive electronic circuit elements. Employment of memristors can radically enhance the computational power and energy efficiency of electronic systems. Most of the existing memristor prototypes involve transition metal oxide resistive layers where conductive filaments formation and/or the interface contact resistance control the memristive behavior. In this paper, we demonstrate a new type of memristor that is based on a ferroelectric tunnel junction, where the tunneling conductance can be tuned in an analogous manner by several orders of magnitude by both the amplitude and the duration of the applied voltage. The ferroelectric tunnel memristors exhibit a reversible hysteretic nonvolatile resistive switching with a resistance ratio of up to 10(5) % at room temperature. The observed memristive behavior is attributed to the field-induced charge redistribution at the ferroelectric/electrode interface, resulting in the modulation of the interface barrier height. PMID:23039785

  12. Ferroelectric tunnel memristor.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Lu, H; Ryu, S; Bark, C-W; Eom, C-B; Tsymbal, E Y; Gruverman, A

    2012-11-14

    Strong interest in resistive switching phenomena is driven by a possibility to develop electronic devices with novel functional properties not available in conventional systems. Bistable resistive devices are characterized by two resistance states that can be switched by an external voltage. Recently, memristors-electric circuit elements with continuously tunable resistive behavior-have emerged as a new paradigm for nonvolatile memories and adaptive electronic circuit elements. Employment of memristors can radically enhance the computational power and energy efficiency of electronic systems. Most of the existing memristor prototypes involve transition metal oxide resistive layers where conductive filaments formation and/or the interface contact resistance control the memristive behavior. In this paper, we demonstrate a new type of memristor that is based on a ferroelectric tunnel junction, where the tunneling conductance can be tuned in an analogous manner by several orders of magnitude by both the amplitude and the duration of the applied voltage. The ferroelectric tunnel memristors exhibit a reversible hysteretic nonvolatile resistive switching with a resistance ratio of up to 10(5) % at room temperature. The observed memristive behavior is attributed to the field-induced charge redistribution at the ferroelectric/electrode interface, resulting in the modulation of the interface barrier height.

  13. Analysis of shield tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. Q.; Yue, Z. Q.; Tham, L. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Lee, C. F.; Hashimoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-dimensional finite element model for the analysis of shield tunnels by taking into account the construction process which is divided into four stages. The soil is assumed to behave as an elasto-plastic medium whereas the shield is simulated by beam-joint discontinuous model in which curved beam elements and joint elements are used to model the segments and joints, respectively. As grout is usually injected to fill the gap between the lining and the soil, the property parameters of the grout are chosen in such a way that they can reflect the state of the grout at each stage. Furthermore, the contact condition between the soil and lining will change with the construction stage, and therefore, different stress-releasing coefficients are used to account for the changes. To assess the accuracy that can be attained by the method in solving practical problems, the shield tunnelling in the No. 7 Subway Line Project in Osaka, Japan, is used as a case history for our study. The numerical results are compared with those measured in the field. The results presented in the paper show that the proposed numerical procedure can be used to effectively estimate the deformation, stresses and moments experienced by the surrounding soils and the concrete lining segments. The analysis and method presented in this paper can be considered to be useful for other subway construction projects involving shield tunnelling in soft soils. Copyright

  14. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  15. Tunnelling from black holes and tunnelling into white holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Bhramar; Ghosh, A.; Mitra, P.

    2008-03-01

    Hawking radiation is nowadays being understood as tunnelling through black hole horizons. Here, the extension of the Hamilton-Jacobi approach to tunnelling for non-rotating and rotating black holes in different non-singular coordinate systems not only confirms this quantum emission from black holes but also reveals the new phenomenon of absorption into white holes by quantum mechanical tunnelling. The rôle of a boundary condition of total absorption or emission is also clarified.

  16. Submucosal tunneling techniques: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Matsunaga, Tae; Tani, Johji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Morishita, Asahiro; Oryu, Makoto; Iwama, Hisakazu; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection include a submucosal tunneling technique, involving the introduction of tunnels into the submucosa. These tunnels permit safer offset entry into the peritoneal cavity for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Technical advantages include the visual identification of the layers of the gut, blood vessels, and subepithelial tumors. The creation of a mucosal flap that minimizes air and fluid leakage into the extraluminal cavity can enhance the safety and efficacy of surgery. This submucosal tunneling technique was adapted for esophageal myotomy, culminating in its application to patients with achalasia. This method, known as per oral endoscopic myotomy, has opened up the new discipline of submucosal endoscopic surgery. Other clinical applications of the submucosal tunneling technique include its use in the removal of gastrointestinal subepithelial tumors and endomicroscopy for the diagnosis of functional and motility disorders. This review suggests that the submucosal tunneling technique, involving a mucosal safety flap, can have potential values for future endoscopic developments. PMID:24741323

  17. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of radiation-induced arterial stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Guthaner, D.F.; Schmitz, L.

    1982-07-01

    A case of atherosclerosis resulting from previous irradiation was successfully treated using percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for recanalization of the vessel. Irradiation may result in extensive perivascular fibrosis around an area of arterial narrowing; percutaneous transluminal angioplasty appears to be the method of choice for treatment of such lesions.

  18. Carbon Dioxide and Gadopentetate Dimeglumine Venography to Guide Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, J. Kevin; Strnad, Bradley T.; Patzik, Shayle B.; Silber, Jeffrey S.; LaValley, Antoinette L.; Boorstein, Jeffrey M.

    2000-11-15

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is an effective procedure for relieving pain due to vertebral body compression fractures. The technique employs iodinated contrast venography to exclude needle placement directly within the basivertebral complex. We present two cases in which carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and gadopentetate dimeglumine venography was used to guide percutaneous vertebroplasty in patients with a contraindication to iodinated contrast.

  19. Acute endocarditis of a percutaneously placed pulmonary valve

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Karthik V; Olivieri, Laura; Jonas, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Endocarditis of percutaneously placed pulmonary valve is increasingly being recognized and reported as a potentially life-threatening complication. In this report, we discuss a 17-year-old male who presented with septic shock secondary to staphylococcal endocarditis of a percutaneously placed pulmonary valve. PMID:26556969

  20. Percutaneous feeding tube method for use in children.

    PubMed

    Long, B; Rafert, J; Cory, D

    1991-01-01

    Surgical gastrostomy has been a widely accepted method for introducing a percutaneous feeding tube for many years. However, complications are frequent, and many children who need them are not good surgical candidates. This study examines imaging guided percutaneous placement of feeding gastrostomy catheters as a safe and effective alternative to surgery. PMID:1902957