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Sample records for perennial ryegrass lolium

  1. Early response mechanisms of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) to phosphorus deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Stephen L.; Foito, Alexandre; Hedley, Pete E.; Morris, Jenny A.; Stewart, Derek; Barth, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Improving phosphorus (P) nutrient efficiency in Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) is likely to result in considerable economic and ecological benefits. To date, research into the molecular and biochemical response of perennial ryegrass to P deficiency has been limited, particularly in relation to the early response mechanisms. This study aimed to identify molecular mechanisms activated in response to the initial stages of P deficiency. Methods A barley microarray was successfully used to study gene expression in perennial ryegrass and this was complemented with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolic profiling to obtain an overview of the plant response to early stages of P deficiency. Key Results After 24 h of P deficiency, internal phosphate concentrations were reduced and significant alterations were detected in the metabolome and transcriptome of two perennial ryegrass genotypes. Results indicated a replacement of phospholipids with sulfolipids and the utilization of glycolytic bypasses in response to P deficiency in perennial ryegrass. Conclusions The transcriptome and metabolome of perennial ryegrass undergo changes in response to reductions in P supply after 24 h. PMID:21148585

  2. Gene expression analysis of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) using cDNA microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Eng-Kok; Sawbridge, Tim; Webster, Tracie; Emmerling, Michael; Nguyen, Nga; Nunan, Katrina; O'Neill, Matthew; O'Toole, Fiona; Rhodes, Carolyn; Simmonds, Jason; Tian, Pei; Wearne, Katherine; Winkworth, Amanda; Spangenberg, German

    2003-07-01

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) is a major forage grass of temperate pastures. A genomics program has been undertaken generating over 52,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Cluster analysis of the ESTs identified approximately 14,600 ryegrass unigenes. In this report, we described the application of ryegrass unigene cDNAs to produce ryegrass 15K microarray. Fifteen microarray hybridisations were performed with labeled total RNA isolated from a variety of plant organs and developmental stages. In a proof of concept, gene expression profiling of ryegrass ESTs using the 15K unigene microarrays has been established using several known genes and two cluster analysis approaches (parallel coordinate planes plot and hierarchical clustering). The expression profile of the known genes (e.g. rubisco and invertase) corresponds well with published data. The microarray expression profile of a ryegrass putative root specific kinase gene was also verified with Northern blotting. This combination of DNA microarray hybridisations and cluster analysis can be applied as a tool for the identification of novel sequences of unknown function.

  3. Ergot alkaloid intoxication in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne): an emerging animal health concern in Ireland?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Four primary mycotoxicosis have been reported in livestock caused by fungal infections of grasses or cereals by members of the Clavicipitaceae family. Ergotism (generally associated with grasses, rye, triticale and other grains) and fescue toxicosis (associated with tall fescue grass, Festuca arundinacea) are both caused by ergot alkaloids, and referred to as ‘ergot alkaloid intoxication’. Ryegrass staggers (associated with perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne) is due to intoxication with an indole-diperpene, Lolitrem B, and metabolites. Fescue-associated oedema, recently described in Australia, may be associated with a pyrrolizidine alkaloid, N-acetyl norloline. Ergotism, caused by the fungus Claviceps purpurea, is visible and infects the outside of the plant seed. Fescue toxicosis and ryegrass staggers are caused by Neotyphodium coenophalium and N. lolii, respectively. Fescue-associated oedema has been associated with tall fescue varieties infected with a specific strain of N. coenophialum (AR542, Max P or Max Q). The name Neotyphodium refers to asexual derivatives of Epichloë spp., which have collectively been termed the epichloë fungi. These fungi exist symbiotically within the grass and are invisible to the naked eye. The primary toxicological effect of ergot alkaloid involves vasoconstriction and/or hypoprolactinaemia. Ingestion of ergot alkaloid by livestock can cause a range of effects, including poor weight gain, reduced fertility, hyperthermia, convulsions, gangrene of the extremities, and death. To date there are no published reports, either internationally or nationally, reporting ergot alkaloid intoxication specifically associated with perennial ryegrass endophytes. However, unpublished reports from the Irish Equine Centre have identified a potential emerging problem of ergot alkaloid intoxication with respect to equines and bovines, on primarily perennial ryegrass-based diets. Ergovaline has been isolated in varying concentrations in the herbage of

  4. Physiological effects of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles on perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and pumpkin (Cucurbita mixta) plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanhua; Kou, Xiaoming; Pei, Zhiguo; Xiao, John Q; Shan, Xiaoquan; Xing, Baoshan

    2011-03-01

    To date, knowledge gaps and associated uncertainties remain unaddressed on the effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on plants. This study was focused on revealing some of the physiological effects of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) NPs on perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and pumpkin (Cucurbita mixta cv. white cushaw) plants under hydroponic conditions. This study for the first time reports that Fe(3)O(4) NPs often induced more oxidative stress than Fe(3)O(4) bulk particles in the ryegrass and pumpkin roots and shoots as indicated by significantly increased: (i) superoxide dismutase and catalase enzyme activities, and (ii) lipid peroxidation. However, tested Fe(3)O(4) NPs appear unable to be translocated in the ryegrass and pumpkin plants. This was supported by the following data: (i) No magnetization was detected in the shoots of either plant treated with 30, 100 and 500 mg l(-1) Fe(3)O(4) NPs; (ii) Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic study confirmed that the coordination environment of Fe in these plant shoots was similar to that of Fe-citrate complexes, but not to that of Fe(3)O(4) NPs; and (iii) total Fe content in the ryegrass and pumpkin shoots treated with Fe(3)O(4) NPs was not significantly increased compared to that in the control shoots.

  5. Functional Analyses of Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase and Cinnamoyl-CoA-Reductase Genes from Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne)[W

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yi; Rochfort, Simone; Liu, Zhiqian; Ran, Yidong; Griffith, Megan; Badenhorst, Pieter; Louie, Gordon V.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Smith, Kevin F.; Noel, Joseph P.; Mouradov, Aidyn; Spangenberg, German

    2010-01-01

    Cinnamoyl CoA-reductase (CCR) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyze key steps in the biosynthesis of monolignols, which serve as building blocks in the formation of plant lignin. We identified candidate genes encoding these two enzymes in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and show that the spatio-temporal expression patterns of these genes in planta correlate well with the developmental profile of lignin deposition. Downregulation of CCR1 and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase 1 (OMT1) using an RNA interference–mediated silencing strategy caused dramatic changes in lignin level and composition in transgenic perennial ryegrass plants grown under both glasshouse and field conditions. In CCR1-deficient perennial ryegrass plants, metabolic profiling indicates the redirection of intermediates both within and beyond the core phenylpropanoid pathway. The combined results strongly support a key role for the OMT1 gene product in the biosynthesis of both syringyl- and guaiacyl-lignin subunits in perennial ryegrass. Both field-grown OMT1-deficient and CCR1-deficient perennial ryegrass plants showed enhanced digestibility without obvious detrimental effects on either plant fitness or biomass production. This highlights the potential of metabolic engineering not only to enhance the forage quality of grasses but also to produce optimal feedstock plants for biofuel production. PMID:20952635

  6. Aploneura lentisci (Homoptera: Aphididae) and Its Interactions with Fungal Endophytes in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne)

    PubMed Central

    Popay, Alison J.; Cox, Neil R.

    2016-01-01

    Aploneura lentisci Pass. is endemic to the Mediterranean region where it is holocyclic, forming galls on its primary host, Pistacia lentiscus and alternating over a 2-year period between Pistacia and secondary hosts, principally species of Gramineae. This aphid is widely distributed in Australia and New Zealand on the roots of the common forage grasses, ryegrass (Lolium spp.) and tall fescue (Schedonorus phoenix) where it exists as permanent, anholocyclic, parthenogenetic populations. Previous studies have indicated that infestations of A. lentisci significantly reduce plant growth and may account for differences in field performance of Lolium perenne infected with different strains of the fungal endophyte Epichloë festucae var. lolii. These obligate biotrophs protect their host grasses from herbivory via the production of alkaloids. To confirm the hypothesis that growth of L. perenne is associated with the effect of different endophyte strains on aphid populations, herbage and root growth were measured over time in two pot trials that compared three fungal endophyte strains with an endophyte-free control. In both pot trials, aphid numbers were lowest on plants infected with endophyte strain AR37 at all sampling times. In plants infected with a common toxic strain naturalized in New Zealand, aphid numbers overall were lower than on uninfected plants or those infected with strain AR1, but numbers did not always differ significantly from these treatments. Populations on AR1-infected plants were occasionally significantly higher than those on endophyte-free. Cumulative foliar growth was reduced in AR1 and Nil treatments relative to AR37 in association with population differences of A. lentisci in both trials and root dry weight was reduced in one trial. In four Petri dish experiments survival of A. lentisci on plants infected with AR37 declined to low levels after an initial phase of up to 19 days during which time aphids fed and populations were similar to those on

  7. Effect of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) cultivars on the milk yield of grazing dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Wims, C M; McEvoy, M; Delaby, L; Boland, T M; O'Donovan, M

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effect of four perennial ryegrass cultivars: Bealey, Astonenergy, Spelga and AberMagic on the milk yield and milk composition of grazing dairy cows. Two 4 × 4 latin square experiments were completed, one during the reproductive and the other during the vegetative growth phase of the cultivars. Thirty-two Holstein-Friesian dairy cows were divided into four groups, with each group assigned 17 days on each cultivar during both experiments. Within each observation period, milk yield and milk composition, sward morphology and pasture chemical composition were measured. During the reproductive growth phase, organic matter digestibility (OMD) was greater for Bealey and Astonenergy (P < 0.001; +1.6%). AberMagic contained a higher stem proportion (P < 0.01; +0.06) and a longer sheath height (P < 0.001; +1.9 cm). Consequently, cows grazing AberMagic recorded a lower milk yield (P < 0.001; -1.5 kg/day) and a lower milk solids yield (P < 0.001; -0.13 kg/day). During the vegetative growth phase, OMD was greater (P < 0.001; +1.1%) for Bealey, whereas the differences between the cultivars in terms of sward structure were smaller and did not appear to influence animal performance. As a result, cows grazing Bealey recorded a higher milk yield (P < 0.001; +0.9 kg/day) and a higher milk solids yield (P < 0.01; +0.08 kg/day). It was concluded that grass cultivar did influence milk yield due to variations in sward structure and chemical composition.

  8. Allelopathic potential of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) on perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Shui, Junfeng; An, Yu; Ma, Yongqing; Ichizen, Nobumasa

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated allelopathy and its chemical basis in nine switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) accessions. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) were used as test species. Undiluted aqueous extracts (5 g plant tissue in 50 ml water) from the shoots and roots of most of the switchgrass accessions inhibited the germination and growth of the test species. However, the allelopathic effect of switchgrass declined when extracts were diluted 5- or 50-fold. Seedling growth was more sensitive than seed germination as an indicator of allelopathic effect. Allelopathic effect was related to switchgrass ecotype but not related to ploidy level. Upland accessions displayed stronger allelopathic potential than lowland accessions. The aqueous extract from one switchgrass accession was separated into phenols, organic acids, neutral chemicals, and alkaloids, and then these fractions were bioassayed to test for allelopathic potential. Alkaloids had the strongest allelopathic effect among the four chemical fractions. In summary, the results indicated that switchgrass has allelopathic potential; however, there is not enough evidence to conclude that allelopathic advantage is the main factor that has contributed to the successful establishment of switchgrass on China's Loess Plateau.

  9. Allelopathic Potential of Switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.) on Perennial Ryegrass ( Lolium perenne L.) and Alfalfa ( Medicago sativa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, Junfeng; An, Yu; Ma, Yongqing; Ichizen, Nobumasa

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated allelopathy and its chemical basis in nine switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.) accessions. Perennial ryegrass ( Lolium perenne L.) and alfalfa ( Medicago sativa L.) were used as test species. Undiluted aqueous extracts (5 g plant tissue in 50 ml water) from the shoots and roots of most of the switchgrass accessions inhibited the germination and growth of the test species. However, the allelopathic effect of switchgrass declined when extracts were diluted 5- or 50-fold. Seedling growth was more sensitive than seed germination as an indicator of allelopathic effect. Allelopathic effect was related to switchgrass ecotype but not related to ploidy level. Upland accessions displayed stronger allelopathic potential than lowland accessions. The aqueous extract from one switchgrass accession was separated into phenols, organic acids, neutral chemicals, and alkaloids, and then these fractions were bioassayed to test for allelopathic potential. Alkaloids had the strongest allelopathic effect among the four chemical fractions. In summary, the results indicated that switchgrass has allelopathic potential; however, there is not enough evidence to conclude that allelopathic advantage is the main factor that has contributed to the successful establishment of switchgrass on China’s Loess Plateau.

  10. Heavy-metal absorption by perennial ryegrass and Swiss chard grown in potted soils amended with ashes from 18 municipal refuse incinerators. [Lolium perenne; Beta vulgaris L

    SciTech Connect

    Bache, C.A.; Lisk, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L.) were grown in pots of mardin silt loam soil amended with 5 or 10% by weight of fly ash, bottom ash, or mixtures of both from 18 municipal refuse incinerators representing about one-fourth of all those operating in the US. The ash and plant material were analyzed for total cadmium, lead, and zinc. The correlation coefficients (r) for the concentration of cadmium, lead, and zinc in the ashes and that in the following crops were, respectively, as follows: ryegrass (first cutting), 0.9964, 0.7600, 0.9699; ryegrass (second cutting), 0.9946, 0.6895, 0.9474; swiss chard, 0.9153, 0.7609., 0.9580. Poor plant growth occurred in a few of the treatments containing ash notably higher in dissolved solids, cadmium, and zinc. The origin and association of heavy metals in refuse ash and their reactions in soils are reviewed.

  11. Contrasting genetic structure between Magnaporthe grisea populations associated with the golf course turfgrasses Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) and Pennisetum clandestinum (kikuyugrass).

    PubMed

    Douhan, Greg W; de la Cerda, Karla A; Huryn, Karyn L; Greer, Christopher A; Wong, Francis P

    2011-01-01

    Gray leaf spot (GLS) disease of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and kikuyugrass (Pennisetum clandestinum) in golf courses in California was first noted in 2001 and 2003, respectively, and within 5 years had become well established. The causal agent of the disease is the fungus Magnaporthe grisea, which is known to consist primarily of clonal lineages that are highly host specific. Therefore, our objective was to investigate host specificity and population dynamics among isolates associated primarily from perennial ryegrass and kikuyugrass since the disease emerged at similar times in California. We also obtained isolates from additional hosts (tall fescue, St. Augustinegrass, weeping lovegrass, and rice) and from the eastern United States for comparative purposes. A total of 38 polymorphic amplified fragment length polymorphism makers were scored from 450 isolates which clustered by host with high bootstrap support (71 to 100%). Genetic structure between kikuyugrass and perennial ryegrass isolates differed significantly. Isolates from kikuyugrass were genotypically diverse (n = 34), possessed both mating types, and some tests for random mating could not be rejected, whereas isolates from perennial ryegrass were less genotypically diverse (n = 10) and only consisted of a single mating type. Low genotypic diversity was also found among the other host specific isolates which also only consisted of a single mating type. This is the first study to document evidence for the potential of sexual reproduction to occur in M. grisea isolates not associated with rice (Oryza sativa). Moreover, given the significant host specificity and contrasting genetic structures between turfgrass-associated isolates, the recent emergence of GLS on various grass hosts in California suggests that potential cultural practices or environmental changes have become conducive for the disease and that the primary inoculum may have already been present in the state, despite the fact that two

  12. Plant vigour at establishment and following defoliation are both associated with responses to drought in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Hatier, Jean-Hugues B; Faville, Marty J; Hickey, Michael J; Koolaard, John P; Schmidt, Jana; Carey, Brandi-Lee; Jones, Chris S

    2014-11-01

    Periodic drought events present a significant and, with climate change, increasing constraint on temperate forage plants' production. Consequently, improving plants' adaptive response to abiotic stress is a key goal to ensure agricultural productivity in these regions. In this study we developed a new methodology, using both area-based comparison and soil water content measurements of individual non-irrigated and irrigated clones, to assess performance of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) genotypes subjected to moisture stress in a simulated competitive environment. We applied this method to the evaluation of a full-sibling population from a pair cross between genotypes from a New Zealand cultivar and a Moroccan ecotype. Our hypothesis was that: (i) both leaf lamina regrowth after defoliation (LR) and plant vigour affect plant performance during drought and rehydration; and (ii) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with plant performance under moisture stress could be identified. Differences amongst genotypes in dry matter (DM) production, early vigour at establishment, leaf elongation rate and LR were measured. LR explained most of the variation in DM production during exposure to moisture deficit and rehydration followed by plant vigour, indicated by initial DM production in both treatments and subsequent measures of DM production of irrigated clones. We identified two main QTL regions associated with DM production and LR, both during drought exposure and rehydration. Further research focused on these regions should improve our understanding of the genetic control of drought response in this forage crop and potentially other grass species with significant synteny, and support improvement in performance through molecular breeding approaches.

  13. Exogenous Classic Phytohormones Have Limited Regulatory Effects on Fructan and Primary Carbohydrate Metabolism in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Fructans are polymers of fructose and one of the main constituents of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates. Fructans are involved in cold and drought resistance, regrowth following defoliation and early spring growth, seed filling, have beneficial effects on human health and are used for industrial processes. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) serves as model species to study fructan metabolism. Fructan metabolism is under the control of both synthesis by fructosyltransferases (FTs) and breakdown through fructan exohydrolases (FEHs). The accumulation of fructans can be triggered by high sucrose levels and abiotic stress conditions such as drought and cold stress. However, detailed studies on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of fructan metabolism are scarce. Since different phytohormones, especially abscisic acid (ABA), are known to play an important role in abiotic stress responses, the possible short term regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism by the five classical phytohormones was investigated. Therefore, the activities of enzymes involved in fructan synthesis and breakdown, the expression levels for the corresponding genes and levels for water-soluble carbohydrates were determined following pulse treatments with ABA, auxin (AUX), ethylene (ET), gibberellic acid (GA), or kinetin (KIN). The most pronounced fast effects were a transient increase of FT activities by AUX, KIN, ABA, and ET, while minor effects were evident for 1-FEH activity with an increased activity in response to KIN and a decrease by GA. Fructan and sucrose levels were not affected. This observed discrepancy demonstrates the importance of determining enzyme activities to obtain insight into the physiological traits and ultimately the plant phenotype. The comparative analyses of activities for seven key enzymes of primary carbohydrate metabolism revealed no co-regulation between enzymes of the fructan and sucrose pool.

  14. Exogenous Classic Phytohormones Have Limited Regulatory Effects on Fructan and Primary Carbohydrate Metabolism in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fructans are polymers of fructose and one of the main constituents of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates. Fructans are involved in cold and drought resistance, regrowth following defoliation and early spring growth, seed filling, have beneficial effects on human health and are used for industrial processes. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) serves as model species to study fructan metabolism. Fructan metabolism is under the control of both synthesis by fructosyltransferases (FTs) and breakdown through fructan exohydrolases (FEHs). The accumulation of fructans can be triggered by high sucrose levels and abiotic stress conditions such as drought and cold stress. However, detailed studies on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of fructan metabolism are scarce. Since different phytohormones, especially abscisic acid (ABA), are known to play an important role in abiotic stress responses, the possible short term regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism by the five classical phytohormones was investigated. Therefore, the activities of enzymes involved in fructan synthesis and breakdown, the expression levels for the corresponding genes and levels for water-soluble carbohydrates were determined following pulse treatments with ABA, auxin (AUX), ethylene (ET), gibberellic acid (GA), or kinetin (KIN). The most pronounced fast effects were a transient increase of FT activities by AUX, KIN, ABA, and ET, while minor effects were evident for 1-FEH activity with an increased activity in response to KIN and a decrease by GA. Fructan and sucrose levels were not affected. This observed discrepancy demonstrates the importance of determining enzyme activities to obtain insight into the physiological traits and ultimately the plant phenotype. The comparative analyses of activities for seven key enzymes of primary carbohydrate metabolism revealed no co-regulation between enzymes of the fructan and sucrose pool

  15. Plant vigour at establishment and following defoliation are both associated with responses to drought in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hatier, Jean-Hugues B.; Faville, Marty J.; Hickey, Michael J.; Koolaard, John P.; Schmidt, Jana; Carey, Brandi-Lee; Jones, Chris S.

    2014-01-01

    Periodic drought events present a significant and, with climate change, increasing constraint on temperate forage plants’ production. Consequently, improving plants’ adaptive response to abiotic stress is a key goal to ensure agricultural productivity in these regions. In this study we developed a new methodology, using both area-based comparison and soil water content measurements of individual non-irrigated and irrigated clones, to assess performance of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) genotypes subjected to moisture stress in a simulated competitive environment. We applied this method to the evaluation of a full-sibling population from a pair cross between genotypes from a New Zealand cultivar and a Moroccan ecotype. Our hypothesis was that: (i) both leaf lamina regrowth after defoliation (LR) and plant vigour affect plant performance during drought and rehydration; and (ii) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with plant performance under moisture stress could be identified. Differences amongst genotypes in dry matter (DM) production, early vigour at establishment, leaf elongation rate and LR were measured. LR explained most of the variation in DM production during exposure to moisture deficit and rehydration followed by plant vigour, indicated by initial DM production in both treatments and subsequent measures of DM production of irrigated clones. We identified two main QTL regions associated with DM production and LR, both during drought exposure and rehydration. Further research focused on these regions should improve our understanding of the genetic control of drought response in this forage crop and potentially other grass species with significant synteny, and support improvement in performance through molecular breeding approaches. PMID:25104762

  16. Nitrous oxide emission factors for urine and dung from sheep fed either fresh forage rape (Brassica napus L.) or fresh perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Sun, X Z; Pacheco, D; Ledgard, S F; Lindsey, S B; Hoogendoorn, C J; Wise, B; Watkins, N L

    2015-03-01

    In New Zealand, agriculture is predominantly based on pastoral grazing systems and animal excreta deposited on soil during grazing have been identified as a major source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Forage brassicas (Brassica spp.) have been increasingly used to improve lamb performance. Compared with conventional forage perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), a common forage in New Zealand, forage brassicas have faster growth rates, higher dry matter production and higher nutritive value. The aim of this study was to determine the partitioning of dietary nitrogen (N) between urine and dung in the excreta from sheep fed forage brassica rape (B. napus subsp. oleifera L.) or ryegrass, and then to measure N2O emissions when the excreta from the two different feed sources were applied to a pasture soil. A sheep metabolism study was conducted to determine urine and dung-N outputs from sheep fed forage rape or ryegrass, and N partitioning between urine and dung. Urine and dung were collected and then used in a field plot experiment for measuring N2O emissions. The experimental site contained a perennial ryegrass/white clover pasture on a poorly drained silt-loam soil. The treatments included urine from sheep fed forage rape or ryegrass, dung from sheep fed forage rape or ryegrass, and a control without dung or urine applied. N2O emission measurements were carried out using a static chamber technique. For each excreta type, the total N2O emissions and emission factor (EF3; N2O-N emitted during the 3- or 8-month measurement period as a per cent of animal urine or dung-N applied, respectively) were calculated. Our results indicate that, in terms of per unit of N intake, a similar amount of N was excreted in urine from sheep fed either forage rape or ryegrass, but less dung N was excreted from sheep fed forage rape than ryegrass. The EF3 for urine from sheep fed forage rape was lower compared with urine from sheep fed ryegrass. This may have been because of plant

  17. Identification of genomic loci associated with crown rust resistance in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) divergently selected populations.

    PubMed

    Brazauskas, Gintaras; Xing, Yongzhong; Studer, Bruno; Schejbel, Britt; Frei, Ursula; Berg, Paul Ragnar; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The inheritance of crown rust resistance in perennial ryegrass is complex with both major and minor quantitative trait loci (QTL) being detected on all seven linkage groups. However, QTL mapping populations have only few segregating alleles, limiting the transferability of results to other materials. In this study, a synthetic population was developed from four crown rust resistant and susceptible parents as starting material for a divergent selection experiment of crown rust resistance to be closer to practice in plant breeding programs, and to identify genome regions relevant across a broader range of genotypes. Following three cycles of directional selection, perennial ryegrass populations were produced with a two-fold difference in average rust resistance. Divergently selected populations were genotyped at 7 resistance gene analog-derived expressed sequence tag (RGA-derived EST) as well as 15 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci. A test for selective neutrality (Waples test), which tests the hypothesis of genetic drift versus selection, identified significant differences in allele frequencies for 7 loci (32%). The selection effect was bidirectional with the same loci showing significant response in both positively and negatively selected populations. A region under selection represented by markers LpSSR006 and EST13 on linkage group (LG) 4 was further confirmed by colocation with two separate QTL for crown rust resistance in a VrnA, a two-way pseudo-testcross mapping population. This suggests suitability of alleles identified for introgression into perennial ryegrass germplasm, where quantitative resistance to crown rust is desired.

  18. Lambs fed fresh winter forage rape (Brassica napus L.) emit less methane than those fed perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), and possible mechanisms behind the difference.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuezhao; Henderson, Gemma; Cox, Faith; Molano, German; Harrison, Scott J; Luo, Dongwen; Janssen, Peter H; Pacheco, David

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine long-term effects of feeding forage rape (Brassica napus L.) on methane yields (g methane per kg of feed dry matter intake), and to propose mechanisms that may be responsible for lower emissions from lambs fed forage rape compared to perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). The lambs were fed fresh winter forage rape or ryegrass as their sole diet for 15 weeks. Methane yields were measured using open circuit respiration chambers, and were 22-30% smaller from forage rape than from ryegrass (averages of 13.6 g versus 19.5 g after 7 weeks, and 17.8 g versus 22.9 g after 15 weeks). The difference therefore persisted consistently for at least 3 months. The smaller methane yields from forage rape were not related to nitrate or sulfate in the feed, which might act as alternative electron acceptors, or to the levels of the potential inhibitors glucosinolates and S-methyl L-cysteine sulfoxide. Ruminal microbial communities in forage rape-fed lambs were different from those in ryegrass-fed lambs, with greater proportions of potentially propionate-forming bacteria, and were consistent with less hydrogen and hence less methane being produced during fermentation. The molar proportions of ruminal acetate were smaller and those of propionate were greater in forage rape-fed lambs, consistent with the larger propionate-forming populations and less hydrogen production. Forage rape contained more readily fermentable carbohydrates and less structural carbohydrates than ryegrass, and was more rapidly degraded in the rumen, which might favour this fermentation profile. The ruminal pH was lower in forage rape-fed lambs, which might inhibit methanogenic activity, shifting the rumen fermentation to more propionate and less hydrogen and methane. The significance of these two mechanisms remains to be investigated. The results suggest that forage rape is a potential methane mitigation tool in pastoral-based sheep production systems.

  19. Variations in efficiency of plastidial RNA editing within ndh transcripts of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) are not linked to differences in drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Bekerom, Rob J. M.; Dix, Philip J.; Diekmann, Kerstin; Barth, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of healthy grasslands is essential for efficient livestock production, yet projected climate change is likely to place a heavy drought stress burden on key grassland species, such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne). It is therefore important to gather an in-depth knowledge of the underlying plant response to this stress. The present study is focused on RNA editing (post-transcriptional nucleotide modifications resulting in altered transcripts) within plastidial transcripts of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH) complex (NADH dehydrogenase complex) in relation to the drought response of several accessions of perennial ryegrass. Previous studies have shown that the NDH complex is involved in countering oxidative stress during environmental stresses like drought. Owing to the nature of RNA editing within this complex, the RNA editing machinery could play a potential role in regulating the activity of the NDH complex. The investigation revealed dramatic and reproducible differences in RNA editing efficiency between accessions, but efficiency was not influenced by imposition of drought stress, and a direct relationship between editing behaviour and drought response was not detected.

  20. Stress memory induced transcriptional and metabolic changes of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Jin, Yupei; Li, Huiying; Amombo, Erick; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-01-01

    Preexposure to a stress could induce stable signals and reactions on plant physiology and gene expression during future encounters as a 'stress memory'. In this study, we found that two trainable genes, BPSP encoding putative brown plant hopper susceptibility protein and sucs encoding sucrose synthase displayed transcriptional memory for their considerably higher transcript levels during two or more subsequent stresses (S3, S4) relative to the initial stress (S0), and their expression returning to basal transcript levels (non-stressed) during the recovery states (R1, R2 and R3). Removing the repetitive stress/recovery exercise, activated transcriptional memory from two trainable genes persisted for at least 4 days in perennial ryegrass. The pretrainable genes with stress memory effort had higher response to the subsequent elevated NaCl concentration treatment than the non-trainable plants, which was confirmed by lower electrolyte leakage and minimum H2 O2 and O2 (-) accumulation. Salt stress elevated the content of 41 metabolites in perennial ryegrass leaves, and sugars and sugar alcohol accounted for more than 74.1% of the total metabolite content. The salt stress memory was associated with higher contents of 11 sugars and 1 sugar alcohol in the pretrainable grass leaves. Similarly, six sugars showed greater content in the pretrainable grass roots. These novel phenomena associated with transcriptional memory and metabolite profiles could lead to new insights into improving plant salinity acclimation process.

  1. Four QTLs determine crown rust (Puccinia coronata f. sp. lolii) resistance in a perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) population.

    PubMed

    Muylle, H; Baert, J; Van Bockstaele, E; Pertijs, J; Roldán-Ruiz, I

    2005-11-01

    Crown rust resistance is an important selection criterion in ryegrass breeding. The disease, caused by the biotrophic fungus Puccinia coronata, causes yield losses and reduced quality. In this study, we used linkage mapping and QTL analysis to unravel the genomic organization of crown rust resistance in a Lolium perenne population. The progeny of a pair cross between a susceptible and a resistant plant were analysed for crown rust resistance. A linkage map, consisting of 227 loci (AFLP, SSR, RFLP and STS) and spanning 744 cM, was generated using the two-way pseudo-testcross approach from 252 individuals. QTL analysis revealed four genomic regions involved in crown rust resistance. Two QTLs were located on LG1 (LpPc4 and LpPc2) and two on LG2 (LpPc3 and LpPc1). They explain 12.5, 24.9, 5.5 and 2.6% of phenotypic variance, respectively. An STS marker, showing homology to R genes, maps in the proximity of LpPc2. Further research is, however, necessary to check the presence of functional R genes in this region. Synteny at the QTL level between homologous groups of chromosomes within the Gramineae was observed. LG1 and LG2 show homology with group A and B chromosomes of oat on which crown rust-resistance genes have been identified, and with the group 1 chromosomes of the Triticeae, on which leaf rust-resistance genes have been mapped. These results are of major importance for understanding the molecular background of crown rust resistance in ryegrasses. The identified markers linked to crown rust resistance have the potential for use in marker-assisted breeding.

  2. Responses of antioxidant gene, protein and enzymes to salinity stress in two genotypes of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) differing in salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Longxing; Li, Huiying; Pang, Huangcheng; Fu, Jinmin

    2012-01-15

    Salinity could damage cellular membranes through overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while antioxidant capacities play a vital role in protecting plants from salinity caused oxidative damages. The objective of this study was to investigate the toxic effect of salt on the antioxidant enzyme activities, isoforms and gene expressions in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). Salt-tolerant 'Quickstart II' and salt-sensitive 'DP1' were subjected to 0 and 250 mM NaCl for 12 d. Salt stress increased the content of lipid peroxidation (MDA), electrolyte leakage (EL) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), to a greater extent in salt-sensitive genotype. Salt-stressed plant leaves exhibited a greater activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) at 4d after treatment (DAT), but a lower level of enzyme activity at 8 and 12d, when compared to the control. Catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) activity was greater at 4 DAT and thereafter decreased in salt tolerant genotype relative to the control, whereas lower than the control during whole experiment period for salt-sensitive genotype. There were different patterns of five isoforms of SOD, POD and two isoforms of APX between two genotypes. Antioxidant gene expression was positively related to isoenzymatic and total enzymatic activities during 12-d salt-treated leaves of two genotypes, with a relatively higher level in salt-tolerant genotype. Thus, salt tolerance could be related to the constitutive/induced antioxidant gene, leading to more efficient enzyme stimulation and protection in perennial ryegrass.

  3. Leaf Rubisco turnover in a perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) mapping population: genetic variation, identification of associated QTL, and correlation with plant morphology and yield.

    PubMed

    Khaembah, Edith N; Irving, Louis J; Thom, Errol R; Faville, Marty J; Easton, H Sydney; Matthew, Cory

    2013-03-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that: (i) genetic variation in Rubisco turnover may exist in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.); (ii) such variation might affect nitrogen use efficiency and plant yield; and (iii) genetic control of Rubisco turnover might be amenable to identification by quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. A set of 135 full-sib F1 perennial ryegrass plants derived from a pair cross between genotypes from the cultivars 'Grasslands Impact' and 'Grasslands Samson' was studied to test these hypotheses. Leaf Rubisco concentration at different leaf ages was measured and modelled as a log-normal curve described by three mathematical parameters: D (peak Rubisco concentration), G (time of D), and F (curve standard deviation). Herbage dry matter (DM) yield and morphological traits (tiller weight (TW), tiller number (TN), leaf lamina length (LL), and an index of competitive ability (PI)) were also measured. The progeny exhibited continuous variation for all traits. Simple correlation and principal component analyses indicated that plant productivity was associated with peak Rubisco concentration and not Rubisco turnover. Lower DM was associated with higher leaf Rubisco concentration indicating that Rubisco turnover effects on plant productivity may relate to energy cost of Rubisco synthesis rather than photosynthetic capacity. QTL detection by a multiple QTL model identified seven significant QTL for Rubisco turnover and nine QTL for DM and morphological traits. An indication of the genetic interdependence of DM and the measures of Rubisco turnover was the support interval overlap involving QTL for D and QTL for TN on linkage group 5 in a cluster involving QTL for DM and PI. In this region, alleles associated with increased TN, DM, and PI were associated with decreased D, indicating that this region may regulate Rubisco concentration and plant productivity via increased tillering. A second cluster involving QTL for LL, TN, PI and DM was found on

  4. Feeding strategies for small-scale dairy systems based on perennial (Lolium perenne) or annual (Lolium multiflorum) ryegrass in the central highlands of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Nava, D; Espinoza-Ortega, A; González-Esquivel, C E; Arriaga-Jordán, C M

    2007-04-01

    Small-scale dairying is an option for campesinos in Mexico. The costs of feeding are high and strategies based on quality forages are a priority. The performance, agronomic variables and feeding costs were evaluated for dairy cows continuously grazing perennial ryegrass-white clover for 9 h/day (PRG) or fed cut herbage from annual ryegrass for 8 weeks followed by 9 h/day for 6 weeks on a tethered rotational grazing pattern (ARG). All cows received 3 kg/day of an 18% crude protein (CP) concentrate. A 14-week split-plot on-farm experiment was designed with 10 cows from two participating farmers, and 1.5 ha per strategy. Milk yield was recorded weekly and milk composition, live weight and body condition score were recorded every 14 days. Net herbage accumulation was greater for ARG (8222 kg organic matter (OM)/ha) than for PRG (5915 kg OM/ha) (p<0.05), with higher CP in PRG (p<0.05). Milk yield was 19 kg/cow per day for PRG and 15.9 kg/ cow per day for ARG (p>0.05). Over 14 weeks, PRG produced 1422 kg more milk. There were no differences for live weight or condition score (p>0.05), but linear regression shows a live weight gain of 0.200 kg/cow per day for PRG. Protein and fat content showed no differences (p>0.05), but milk fat content in PRG was below standard. ARG had 60% higher costs, and margins were 38% higher in PRG. ARG has a place in rain-fed fields. The results provide viable options for improving these systems that may be suitable in their socio-economic context and their social and personal objectives.

  5. Effect of pre-grazing herbage mass on dairy cow performance, grass dry matter production and output from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) pastures.

    PubMed

    Wims, C M; Delaby, L; Boland, T M; O'Donovan, M

    2014-01-01

    A grazing study was undertaken to examine the effect of maintaining three levels of pre-grazing herbage mass (HM) on dairy cow performance, grass dry matter (DM) production and output from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) pastures. Cows were randomly assigned to one of three pre-grazing HM treatments: 1150 - Low HM (L), 1400 - Medium HM (M) or 2000 kg DM/ha - High HM (H). Herbage accumulation under grazing was lowest (P<0.01) on the L treatment and cows grazing the L pastures required more grass silage supplementation during the grazing season (+73 kg DM/cow) to overcome pasture deficits due to lower pasture growth rates (P<0.05). Treatment did not affect daily milk production or pasture intake, although cows grazing the L pastures had to graze a greater daily area (P<0.01) and increase grazing time (P<0.05) to compensate for a lower pre-grazing HM (P<0.01). The results indicate that, while pre-grazing HM did not influence daily milk yield per cow, adapting the practise of grazing low HM (1150 kg DM/ha) pasture reduces pasture DM production and at a system level may increase the requirement for imported feed.

  6. Lipid metabolism in mixtures of red clover (Trifolium repens) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) in lab scale silages and in vitro rumen incubations.

    PubMed

    Van Ranst, G; Vandewalle, M; Gadeyne, F; De Riek, J; Fievez, V

    2013-09-01

    Most often, farmers consider red clover an unattractive forage because of its low ensilability. Nevertheless, several in vivo and in vitro experiments also showed advantages of red clover silages such as decreased rumen biohydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. This has been attributed to a possible protective role of protein-bound phenols, with polyphenol oxidase playing a key role in their formation. This enzyme is active in red clover, but not in other green forages, such as, for example, perennial ryegrass. Therefore, the aim was to study the lipid metabolism within red clover/ryegrass mixtures in lab scale silages and during in vitro rumen batch incubations. Ensilability of red clover increased with higher proportions of ryegrass in the silage mixture. However, the lipid-protecting mechanism of red clover does not seem to occur in the co-ensiled ryegrass as lipolysis of polar lipids linearly increased with increasing proportions of ryegrass (86.0%, 91.6%, 89.9%, 93.1% and 95.6% in 60-day-old silages with 100/0, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75 and 0/100 red clover/ryegrass, respectively). Rumen lipolysis and biohydrogenation of C18:3n-3 and C18:2n-6 were negatively related to red clover proportions in the silage mixtures. The lipid-protective mechanism in red clover silages is confirmed, but it seems not to be transferred to lipids in co-ensiled forages.

  7. Immunological cross-reactivity of the major allergen from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne), Lol p I, and the cysteine proteinase, bromelain.

    PubMed

    Pike, R N; Bagarozzi, D; Travis, J

    1997-04-01

    Antibodies prepared in rabbits against the major allergen from ryegrass (Lolium perenne), Lol p I, cross-reacted with the cysteine proteinase bromelain from pineapple and vice versa. Deglycosylation of the proteins showed that the cross-reaction was based on recognition of the carbohydrate moiety of the allergen, but for bromelain the cross-reaction was most likely due to a combination of factors. The results indicate that the carbohydrate residues from these allergens play an important role in cross-reactions found between them and possibly those from other species.

  8. Evaluating the use of plant hormones and biostimulators in forage pastures to enhance shoot dry biomass production by perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Zaman, Mohammad; Kurepin, Leonid V; Catto, Warwick; Pharis, Richard P

    2016-02-01

    Fertilisation of established perennial ryegrass forage pastures with nitrogen (N)-based fertilisers is currently the most common practice used on farms to increase pasture forage biomass yield. However, over-fertilisation can lead to undesired environmental impacts, including nitrate leaching into waterways and increased gaseous emissions of ammonia and nitrous oxide to the atmosphere. Additionally, there is growing interest from pastoral farmers to adopt methods for increasing pasture dry matter yield which use 'natural', environmentally safe plant growth stimulators, together with N-based fertilisers. Such plant growth stimulators include plant hormones and plant growth promotive microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi ('biostimulators', which may produce plant growth-inducing hormones), as well as extracts of seaweed (marine algae). This review presents examples and discusses current uses of plant hormones and biostimulators, applied alone or together with N-based fertilisers, to enhance shoot dry matter yield of forage pasture species, with an emphasis on perennial ryegrass.

  9. The effects of birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and chicory (Cichorium intybus) when compared with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) on ovine gastrointestinal parasite development, survival and migration.

    PubMed

    Marley, C L; Cook, R; Barrett, J; Keatinge, R; Lampkin, N H

    2006-06-15

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of birdsfoot trefoil and chicory on parasitic nematode development, survival and migration when compared with perennial ryegrass. In experiment one, sheep faeces, containing 10,385 Cooperia curticei eggs were added to 25 cm diameter pots containing birdsfoot trefoil, chicory or ryegrass, and the pots maintained under optimal conditions for nematode parasite development. Replicate pots of each forage type were destructively sampled on day 8, 16, 20, 28 and 37 to collect the nematode larvae. When forages were compared on a dry matter basis, by day 16 there were 31% and 19% fewer larvae on birdsfoot trefoil and chicory than on ryegrass, respectively (P<0.01). In the second experiment, replicate 1m(2) field plots of birdsfoot trefoil, chicory and ryegrass were sub-sampled on day 14, 21, 35 and 49 for larval counts following the application of sheep faeces containing 585,000 Teladorsagia circumcincta eggs to each plot on day 0. Results showed there were a minimum of 58% and 63% fewer infective stage parasitic larvae on birdsfoot trefoil and chicory, respectively, compared with ryegrass on day 14 and 35 when forages were compared on a forage dry matter, plot area sampled and leaf area basis (P<0.01). Overall, these results indicate that the number of infective stage larvae on birdsfoot trefoil and chicory pasture was reduced by the effect of their sward structure on the development/survival/migration of ovine parasitic nematodes. These effects may be one of the ways in which these forages may affect parasitic infections in grazing livestock.

  10. The perennial ryegrass GenomeZipper: targeted use of genome resources for comparative grass genomics.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Matthias; Martis, Mihaela; Asp, Torben; Mayer, Klaus F X; Lübberstedt, Thomas; Byrne, Stephen; Frei, Ursula; Studer, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Whole-genome sequences established for model and major crop species constitute a key resource for advanced genomic research. For outbreeding forage and turf grass species like ryegrasses (Lolium spp.), such resources have yet to be developed. Here, we present a model of the perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) genome on the basis of conserved synteny to barley (Hordeum vulgare) and the model grass genome Brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon) as well as rice (Oryza sativa) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). A transcriptome-based genetic linkage map of perennial ryegrass served as a scaffold to establish the chromosomal arrangement of syntenic genes from model grass species. This scaffold revealed a high degree of synteny and macrocollinearity and was then utilized to anchor a collection of perennial ryegrass genes in silico to their predicted genome positions. This resulted in the unambiguous assignment of 3,315 out of 8,876 previously unmapped genes to the respective chromosomes. In total, the GenomeZipper incorporates 4,035 conserved grass gene loci, which were used for the first genome-wide sequence divergence analysis between perennial ryegrass, barley, Brachypodium, rice, and sorghum. The perennial ryegrass GenomeZipper is an ordered, information-rich genome scaffold, facilitating map-based cloning and genome assembly in perennial ryegrass and closely related Poaceae species. It also represents a milestone in describing synteny between perennial ryegrass and fully sequenced model grass genomes, thereby increasing our understanding of genome organization and evolution in the most important temperate forage and turf grass species.

  11. Cultivar by environment effects of perennial ryegrass cultivars selected for high water soluble carbohydrates managed under differing precipitation levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historic results of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) breeding include improved disease resistance, biomass, and nutritional quality. Yet, lack of tolerance to water stress limits its wise use. Recent efforts to increase water soluble carbohydrate (WSC) content in perennial ryegrass may incre...

  12. Exogenous Melatonin Suppresses Dark-Induced Leaf Senescence by Activating the Superoxide Dismutase-Catalase Antioxidant Pathway and Down-Regulating Chlorophyll Degradation in Excised Leaves of Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Huibin; Xu, Bin; Li, Jing; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Leaf senescence is a typical symptom in plants exposed to dark and may be regulated by plant growth regulators. The objective of this study was to determine whether exogenous application of melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) suppresses dark-induced leaf senescence and the effects of melatonin on reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging system and chlorophyll degradation pathway in perennial grass species. Mature perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv. ‘Pinnacle’) leaves were excised and incubated in 3 mM 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic buffer (pH 5.8) supplemented with melatonin or water (control) and exposed to dark treatment for 8 days. Leaves treated with melatonin maintained significantly higher endogenous melatonin level, chlorophyll content, photochemical efficiency, and cell membrane stability expressed by lower electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA) content compared to the control. Exogenous melatonin treatment also reduced the transcript level of chlorophyll degradation-associated genes and senescence marker genes (LpSAG12.1, Lph36, and Lpl69) during the dark treatment. The endogenous O2- production rate and H2O2 content were significantly lower in these excised leaves treated with melatonin compared to the water control. Exogenous melatonin treatment caused increases in enzymatic activity and transcript levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase but had no significant effects on ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and monohydroascorbate reductase. The content of non-enzymatic antioxidants, such as ascorbate and dehydroascorbate, were decreased by melatonin treatment, while the content of glutathione and oxidized glutathione was not affected by melatonin. These results suggest that the suppression of dark-induced leaf senescence by exogenous melatonin may be associated with its roles in regulating ROS scavenging through activating the superoxide dismutase-catalase enzymatic antioxidant pathway and

  13. The photosynthetic response of the perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) in its fifth year of free-air CO(sub 2) enrichment (FACE) at Eschikon, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.P.; Long, S.P.; Williams, J.

    1998-12-31

    Stands of Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv.Bastion) were grown in the field at ambient or elevated (600 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}) [CO{sub 2}], high (560 kg Ha{sup {minus}1} y{sup {minus}1}) or low (140 kg Ha{sup {minus}1} y{sup {minus}1}) nitrogen addition and were harvested five times a year during the growing season. The plants were sown during 1992, additional plots being sown during 1995. These were in their fifth year and second year of growth respectively. Exposure to elevated [CO{sub 2}] was carried out with a Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) system which provides the most realistic system of fumigation currently available. Elevated [CO{sub 2}] increased diurnal CO{sub 2} uptake by between 40 to 83% while reducing stomatal conductance by between 1 and 38% in all of the 1992 grown plants measured at high [CO{sub 2}]. Analysis of the A/c{sub i} response of 1992 grown plants showed no acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated [CO{sub 2}] - both V{sub c,max} (a measure of the maximum in vivo rate of carboxylation) and J{sub max} (a measure of the maximum capacity for the regeneration of RuBP) showed no significant change during any of the periods of regrowth. In contrast the leaves of 1995 grown plants, appeared to be experiencing an acclimatory change in their photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated [CO{sub 2}]. However, this negative response seemed to be removed directly after a harvest when the source:sink balance had increased. The apparent lack of an acclimatory response after almost 5 years of growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}], suggests that L. perenne may be close to achieving the appropriate photosynthetic adjustments which would allow it to attain a significantly higher photosynthetic potential.

  14. THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC RESPONSE OF THE PERENNIAL RYEGRASS (LOLIUM PERENNE) IN ITS FIFTH YEAR OF FREE-AIR CO{sub 2} ENRICHMENT (FACE) AT ESCHIKON, SWITZERLAND

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON,J.P.; LONG,STEPHEN,P.; WILLIAMS,J.

    1998-12-31

    Stands of Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv.Bastion) were grown in the field at ambient or elevated (600 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}) [CO{sub 2}], high (560 kg Ha{sup {minus}1} y{sup {minus}1}) or low (140 kg Ha{sup {minus}1} y{sup {minus}1}) nitrogen addition and were harvested five times a year during the growing season. The plants were sown during 1992, additional plots being sown during 1995. These were in their fifth year and second year of growth respectively. Exposure to elevated [CO{sub 2}] was carried out with a Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) system which provides the most realistic system of fumigation currently available. Elevated [CO{sub 2}] increased diurnal CO{sub 2} uptake by between 40 to 83% while reducing stomatal conductance by between 1 and 38% in all of the 1992 grown plants measured at high [CO{sub 2}]. Analysis of the A/c{sub i} response of 1992 grown plants showed no acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated [CO{sub 2}]--both V{sub c,max} (a measure of the maximum in vivo rate of carboxylation) and J{sub max} (a measure of the maximum capacity for the regeneration of RuBP) showed no significant change during any of the periods of regrowth. In contrast the leaves of 1995 grown plants, appeared to be experiencing an acclimatory change in their photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated [CO{sub 2}]. However, this negative response seemed to be removed directly after a harvest when the source:sink balance had increased. The apparent lack of an acclimatory response after almost 5 years of growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}], suggests that L. perenne may be close to achieving the appropriate photosynthetic adjustments which would allow it to attain a significantly higher photosynthetic potential.

  15. Candidate gene association mapping for winter survival and spring regrowth in perennial ryegrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is a widely cultivated cool-season grass species because of its high quality for forage and turf. Susceptibility to freezing damage limits its further use in temperate zones. The objective of this study was to identify candidate genes significantly associated w...

  16. Effects of chicory/perennial ryegrass swards compared with perennial ryegrass swards on the performance and carcass quality of grazing beef steers.

    PubMed

    Marley, Christina L; Fychan, Rhun; Davies, John W; Scollan, Nigel D; Richardson, R Ian; Theobald, Vince J; Genever, Elizabeth; Forbes, Andy B; Sanderson, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    An experiment investigated whether the inclusion of chicory (Cichorium intybus) in swards grazed by beef steers altered their performance, carcass characteristics or parasitism when compared to steers grazing perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne). Triplicate 2-ha plots were established with a chicory/ryegrass mix or ryegrass control. Forty-eight Belgian Blue-cross steers were used in the first grazing season and a core group (n = 36) were retained for finishing in the second grazing season. The experiment comprised of a standardisation and measurement period. During standardisation, steers grazed a ryegrass/white clover pasture as one group. Animals were allocated to treatment on the basis of liveweight, body condition and faecal egg counts (FEC) determined 7 days prior to the measurement period. The measurement period ran from 25 May until 28 September 2010 and 12 April until 11 October 2011 in the first and second grazing year. Steers were weighed every 14 days at pasture or 28 days during housing. In the first grazing year, faecal samples were collected for FEC and parasite cultures. At the end of the first grazing year, individual blood samples were taken to determine O. ostertagi antibody and plasma pepsinogen levels. During winter, animals were housed as one group and fed silage. In the second grazing year, steers were slaughtered when deemed to reach fat class 3. Data on steer performance showed no differences in daily live-weight gain which averaged 1.04 kg/day. The conformation, fat grade and killing out proportion of beef steers grazing chicory/ryegrass or ryegrass were not found to differ. No differences in FEC, O. ostertagi antibody or plasma pepsinogen levels of beef steers grazing either chicory/ryegrass or ryegrass were observed. Overall, there were no detrimental effects of including chicory in swards grazed by beef cattle on their performance, carcass characteristics or helminth parasitism, when compared with steers grazing ryegrass.

  17. Effects of Chicory/Perennial Ryegrass Swards Compared with Perennial Ryegrass Swards on the Performance and Carcass Quality of Grazing Beef Steers

    PubMed Central

    Marley, Christina L.; Fychan, Rhun; Davies, John W.; Scollan, Nigel D.; Richardson, R. Ian; Theobald, Vince J.; Genever, Elizabeth; Forbes, Andy B.; Sanderson, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    An experiment investigated whether the inclusion of chicory (Cichorium intybus) in swards grazed by beef steers altered their performance, carcass characteristics or parasitism when compared to steers grazing perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne). Triplicate 2-ha plots were established with a chicory/ryegrass mix or ryegrass control. Forty-eight Belgian Blue-cross steers were used in the first grazing season and a core group (n = 36) were retained for finishing in the second grazing season. The experiment comprised of a standardisation and measurement period. During standardisation, steers grazed a ryegrass/white clover pasture as one group. Animals were allocated to treatment on the basis of liveweight, body condition and faecal egg counts (FEC) determined 7 days prior to the measurement period. The measurement period ran from 25 May until 28 September 2010 and 12 April until 11 October 2011in the first and second grazing year. Steers were weighed every 14 days at pasture or 28 days during housing. In the first grazing year, faecal samples were collected for FEC and parasite cultures. At the end of the first grazing year, individual blood samples were taken to determine O. ostertagi antibody and plasma pepsinogen levels. During winter, animals were housed as one group and fed silage. In the second grazing year, steers were slaughtered when deemed to reach fat class 3. Data on steer performance showed no differences in daily live-weight gain which averaged 1.04 kg/day. The conformation, fat grade and killing out proportion of beef steers grazing chicory/ryegrass or ryegrass were not found to differ. No differences in FEC, O. ostertagi antibody or plasma pepsinogen levels of beef steers grazing either chicory/ryegrass or ryegrass were observed. Overall, there were no detrimental effects of including chicory in swards grazed by beef cattle on their performance, carcass characteristics or helminth parasitism, when compared with steers grazing ryegrass. PMID:24489708

  18. Direct fermentation of fodder maize, chicory fructans and perennial ryegrass to hydrogen using mixed microflora.

    PubMed

    Kyazze, G; Dinsdale, R; Hawkes, F R; Guwy, A J; Premier, G C; Donnison, I S

    2008-12-01

    This study examined the feasibility of producing hydrogen by direct fermentation of fodder maize, chicory fructooligosaccharides and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) in batch culture (pH 5.2-5.3, 35 degrees C, heat-treated anaerobically digested sludge inoculum). Gas was produced from each substrate and contained up to 50-80% hydrogen during the peak periods of gas production with the remainder carbon dioxide. Hydrogen yields obtained were 62.4+/-6.1mL/g dry matter added for fodder maize, 218+/-28mL/g chicory fructooligosaccharides added, 75.6+/-8.8mL H(2)/g dry matter added for wilted perennial ryegrass and 21.8+/-8mL H(2)/g dry matter added for fresh perennial ryegrass. Butyrate, acetate and ethanol were the main soluble fermentation products. Hydrogen yields of 392-501m(3)/hectare of perennial ryegrass per year and 1060-1309m(3)/hectare of fodder maize per year can be obtained based on the UK annual yield per hectare of these crops. These results significantly extend the range of substrates that can be used for hydrogen production without pre-treatment.

  19. Cross-resistance to herbicides in annual ryegrass (lolium rigidum)

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher, J.T.; Powles, S.B.; Liljegren, D.R.; Holtum, J.A.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Lolium rigidum Gaud. biotype SLR31 is resistant to the herbicide diclofop-methyl and cross-resistant to several sulfonylurea herbicides. Wheat and the cross-resistant ryegrass exhibit similar patterns of resistance to sulfonylurea herbicides, suggesting that the mechanism of resistance may be similar. Cross-resistant ryegrass is also resistant to the wheat-selective imidazolinone herbicide imazamethabenz. The cross-resistant biotype SLR31 metabolized (phenyl-U-{sup 14}C)chlorsulfuron at a faster rate than a biotype which is susceptible to both diclofop-methyl and chlorsulfuron. A third biotype which is resistant to diclofop-methyl but not to chlorsulfuron metabolized chlorsulfuron at the same rate as the susceptible biotype. The increased metabolism of chlorsulfuron observed in the cross-resistant biotype is, therefore, correlated with the patterns of resistance observed in these L. rigidum biotypes. During high performance liquid chromatography analysis the major metabolite of chlorsulfuron in both susceptible and cross-resistant ryegrass coeluted with the major metabolite produced in wheat. The major product is clearly different from the major product in the tolerant dicot species, flax (Linium usitatissimum). The elution pattern of metabolites of chlorsulfuron was the same for both the susceptible and cross-resistant ryegrass but the cross-resistant ryegrass metabolized chlorsulfuron more rapidly. The investigation of the dose response to sulfonylurea herbicides at the whole plant level and the study of the metabolism of chlorsulfuron provide two independent sets of data which both suggest that the resistance to chlorsulfuron in cross-resistant ryegrass biotype SLR31 involves a wheat-like detoxification system.

  20. Toxicity and uptake of cyclic nitramine explosives in ryegrass Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Rocheleau, Sylvie; Lachance, Bernard; Kuperman, Roman G; Hawari, Jalal; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2008-11-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), and 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) are cyclic nitramines used as explosives. Their ecotoxicities have been characterized incompletely and little is known about their accumulation potential in soil organisms. We assessed the toxicity and uptake of these explosives in perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne L. exposed in a Sassafras sandy loam (SSL) or in a sandy soil (DRDC, CL-20 only) containing contrasting clay contents (11% and 0.3%, respectively). A 21-d exposure to RDX, HMX or CL-20 in either soil had no adverse effects on ryegrass growth. RDX and HMX were translocated to ryegrass shoots, with bioconcentration factors (BCF) of up to 15 and 11, respectively. In contrast, CL-20 was taken up by the roots (BCF up to 19) with no translocation to the shoots. These studies showed that RDX, HMX, and CL-20 can accumulate in plants and may potentially pose a risk of biomagnification across the food chain.

  1. Does mowing height influence alkaloid production in endophytic tall fescue and perennial ryegrass?

    PubMed

    Salminen, Seppo O; Grewal, Parwinder S; Quigley, Martin F

    2003-06-01

    The mutualistic symbiosis following infection of tall fescue, Festuca arundinacea, and perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne, by fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium spp.) results in the production of alkaloids that are feeding deterrents or toxic to insects and livestock. If the levels of the alkaloids can be manipulated by cultural practices in the grasses that are used for home lawns and golf courses, this could alleviate the need for pesticide applications in urban environments. We evaluated the influence of mowing height on the levels of some alkaloids in a greenhouse experiment for two consecutive months. In tall fescue, levels of four of the nine alkaloids, including one presumptive alkaloid, showed increased levels with increasing the mowing height from 2.5 to 7.5 cm. The alkaloids were ergonovine, ergocryptine, perloline methyl ether, and an unidentified alkaloid designated as unknown C. In perennial ryegrass, three out of six alkaloids, perloline methyl ether, chanoclavine, and unknown A, showed similar increases. The alkaloid levels in perennial ryegrass showed more variability than those in tall fescue between the two sampling dates. It was clear in both grasses that the relative levels of the alkaloids varied with mowing height, as well as over time.

  2. Association of candidate genes with drought tolerance traits in diverse perennial ryegrass accessions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yiwei

    2013-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental stress limiting growth of perennial grasses in temperate regions. Plant drought tolerance is a complex trait that is controlled by multiple genes. Candidate gene association mapping provides a powerful tool for dissection of complex traits. Candidate gene association mapping of drought tolerance traits was conducted in 192 diverse perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) accessions from 43 countries. The panel showed significant variations in leaf wilting, leaf water content, canopy and air temperature difference, and chlorophyll fluorescence under well-watered and drought conditions across six environments. Analysis of 109 simple sequence repeat markers revealed five population structures in the mapping panel. A total of 2520 expression-based sequence readings were obtained for a set of candidate genes involved in antioxidant metabolism, dehydration, water movement across membranes, and signal transduction, from which 346 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. Significant associations were identified between a putative LpLEA3 encoding late embryogenesis abundant group 3 protein and a putative LpFeSOD encoding iron superoxide dismutase and leaf water content, as well as between a putative LpCyt Cu-ZnSOD encoding cytosolic copper-zinc superoxide dismutase and chlorophyll fluorescence under drought conditions. Four of these identified significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphisms from these three genes were also translated to amino acid substitutions in different genotypes. These results indicate that allelic variation in these genes may affect whole-plant response to drought stress in perennial ryegrass. PMID:23386684

  3. Global transcriptome changes in perennial ryegrass during early infection by pink snow mould

    PubMed Central

    Kovi, Mallikarjuna Rao; Abdelhalim, Mohamed; Kunapareddy, Anil; Ergon, Åshild; Tronsmo, Anne Marte; Brurberg, May Bente; Hofgaard, Ingerd Skow; Asp, Torben; Rognli, Odd Arne

    2016-01-01

    Lack of resistance to pink snow mould (Microdochium nivale) is a major constraint for adaptation of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) to continental regions with long-lasting snow cover at higher latitudes. Almost all investigations of genetic variation in resistance have been performed using cold acclimated plants. However, there may be variation in resistance mechanisms that are functioning independently of cold acclimation. In this study our aim was to identify candidate genes involved in such resistance mechanisms. We first characterized variation in resistance to M. nivale among non-acclimated genotypes from the Norwegian cultivar ‘Fagerlin’ based on relative regrowth and fungal quantification by real-time qPCR. One resistant and one susceptible genotype were selected for transcriptome analysis using paired-end sequencing by Illumina Hiseq 2000. Transcriptome profiles, GO enrichment and KEGG pathway analysis indicate that defense response related genes are differentially expressed between the resistant and the susceptible genotype. A significant up-regulation of defense related genes, as well as genes involved in cell wall cellulose metabolic processes and aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (NADP+) activity, was observed in the resistant genotype. The candidate genes identified in this study might be potential molecular marker resources for breeding perennial ryegrass cultivars with improved resistance to pink snow mould. PMID:27346054

  4. Fructan metabolism and changes in fructan composition during cold acclimation in perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Abeynayake, Shamila W; Etzerodt, Thomas P; Jonavičienė, Kristina; Byrne, Stephen; Asp, Torben; Boelt, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) produces high levels of fructans as a mixture of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides with different degrees of polymerization (DP). The present study describes the analysis of the compositional changes in the full spectrum of fructans, fructan distribution between above ground biomass (top) and the roots, and the transcription of candidate genes involved in fructan metabolism during cold acclimation in perennial ryegrass variety "Veyo" and ecotype "Falster" from distinct geographical origins. We observed changes in fructan composition and induction of low-DP fructans, especially DP = 4, in both the top and the roots of "Veyo" and "Falster" in response to low-temperature stress. The accumulation of DP > 50 fructans was only apparent in the top tissues where the Lp1-FFT expression is higher compared to the roots in both "Veyo" and "Falster." Our results also show the accumulation and depolymerization of fructans with different DP, together with the induction of genes encoding fructosyltransferases and fructan exohydrolases in both "Veyo" and "Falster" during cold acclimation, supporting the hypothesis that fructan synthesis and depolymerization occurring simultaneously. The ecotype "Falster," adapted to cold climates, increased total fructan content and produced more DP > 7 fructans in the roots than the variety "Veyo," adapted to warmer climates. This indicates that high-DP fructan accumulation in roots may be an adaptive trait for plant recovery after abiotic stresses.

  5. Global transcriptome changes in perennial ryegrass during early infection by pink snow mould.

    PubMed

    Kovi, Mallikarjuna Rao; Abdelhalim, Mohamed; Kunapareddy, Anil; Ergon, Åshild; Tronsmo, Anne Marte; Brurberg, May Bente; Hofgaard, Ingerd Skow; Asp, Torben; Rognli, Odd Arne

    2016-06-27

    Lack of resistance to pink snow mould (Microdochium nivale) is a major constraint for adaptation of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) to continental regions with long-lasting snow cover at higher latitudes. Almost all investigations of genetic variation in resistance have been performed using cold acclimated plants. However, there may be variation in resistance mechanisms that are functioning independently of cold acclimation. In this study our aim was to identify candidate genes involved in such resistance mechanisms. We first characterized variation in resistance to M. nivale among non-acclimated genotypes from the Norwegian cultivar 'Fagerlin' based on relative regrowth and fungal quantification by real-time qPCR. One resistant and one susceptible genotype were selected for transcriptome analysis using paired-end sequencing by Illumina Hiseq 2000. Transcriptome profiles, GO enrichment and KEGG pathway analysis indicate that defense response related genes are differentially expressed between the resistant and the susceptible genotype. A significant up-regulation of defense related genes, as well as genes involved in cell wall cellulose metabolic processes and aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (NADP+) activity, was observed in the resistant genotype. The candidate genes identified in this study might be potential molecular marker resources for breeding perennial ryegrass cultivars with improved resistance to pink snow mould.

  6. Fructan metabolism and changes in fructan composition during cold acclimation in perennial ryegrass

    PubMed Central

    Abeynayake, Shamila W.; Etzerodt, Thomas P.; Jonavičienė, Kristina; Byrne, Stephen; Asp, Torben; Boelt, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) produces high levels of fructans as a mixture of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides with different degrees of polymerization (DP). The present study describes the analysis of the compositional changes in the full spectrum of fructans, fructan distribution between above ground biomass (top) and the roots, and the transcription of candidate genes involved in fructan metabolism during cold acclimation in perennial ryegrass variety “Veyo” and ecotype “Falster” from distinct geographical origins. We observed changes in fructan composition and induction of low-DP fructans, especially DP = 4, in both the top and the roots of “Veyo” and “Falster” in response to low-temperature stress. The accumulation of DP > 50 fructans was only apparent in the top tissues where the Lp1-FFT expression is higher compared to the roots in both “Veyo” and “Falster.” Our results also show the accumulation and depolymerization of fructans with different DP, together with the induction of genes encoding fructosyltransferases and fructan exohydrolases in both “Veyo” and “Falster” during cold acclimation, supporting the hypothesis that fructan synthesis and depolymerization occurring simultaneously. The ecotype “Falster,” adapted to cold climates, increased total fructan content and produced more DP > 7 fructans in the roots than the variety “Veyo,” adapted to warmer climates. This indicates that high-DP fructan accumulation in roots may be an adaptive trait for plant recovery after abiotic stresses. PMID:26029229

  7. A Terminal Flower1-Like Gene from Perennial Ryegrass Involved in Floral Transition and Axillary Meristem Identity1

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Christian S.; Salchert, Klaus; Nielsen, Klaus K.

    2001-01-01

    Control of flowering and the regulation of plant architecture have been thoroughly investigated in a number of well-studied dicot plants such as Arabidopsis, Antirrhinum, and tobacco. However, in many important monocot seed crops, molecular information on plant reproduction is still limited. To investigate the regulation of meristem identity and the control of floral transition in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) we isolated a ryegrass TERMINAL FLOWER1-like gene, LpTFL1, and characterized it for its function in ryegrass flower development. Perennial ryegrass requires a cold treatment of at least 12 weeks to induce flowering. During this period a decrease in LpTFL1 message was detected in the ryegrass apex. However, upon subsequent induction with elevated temperatures and long-day photoperiods, LpTFL1 message levels increased and reached a maximum when the ryegrass apex has formed visible spikelets. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing LpTFL1 were significantly delayed in flowering and exhibited dramatic changes in architecture such as extensive lateral branching, increased growth of all vegetative organs, and a highly increased trichome production. Furthermore, overexpression of LpTFL1 was able to complement the phenotype of the severe tfl1-14 mutant of Arabidopsis. Analysis of the LpTFL1 promoter fused to the UidA gene in Arabidopsis revealed that the promoter is active in axillary meristems, but not the apical meristem. Therefore, we suggest that LpTFL1 is a repressor of flowering and a controller of axillary meristem identity in ryegrass. PMID:11244130

  8. Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and corn (Zea mays)competition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Italian ryegrass is an annual/biennial grass that is typically used as a pasture crop or a cover crop along roadsides, rights-of-way, and industrial areas. Glyphosate-resistant (GR) Italian ryegrass populations have been documented around the world, mostly in orchard and vineyard situations. The fir...

  9. Physiological and biochemical responses to manganese toxicity in ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie; Berríos, Graciela; Rodrigues-Salvador, Acácio; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Deppe, Mariana; Demanet, Rolando; Rengel, Zed; Alberdi, Miren

    2017-04-01

    We studied resistance to manganese (Mn) toxicity under acidic conditions and its relationship with nutrients such as calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) in new perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) genotypes (One-50, Banquet-II and Halo-AR1) introduced in southern Chile, using the Nui genotype as the reference. Plants were grown in nutrient solution at increased Mn concentrations (0-750 μM) at pH 4.8, and physiological and biochemical features were determined. Under higher Mn concentration, the One-50 genotype had a significantly lower relative growth rate (RGR) of shoots and roots, whereas in the other cultivars this parameter did not change under variable Mn treatments. Increasing the Mn concentration led to an increased Mn concentration in roots and shoots, with Banquet-II and Halo-AR1 having higher Mn in roots than shoots. Shoot Mg and Ca concentrations in all genotypes (except Banquet-II) decreased concomitantly with increasing Mn applications. In contrast to the other genotypes, Banquet-II and Halo-AR1 maintained their net CO2 assimilation rate regardless of Mn treatment, whereas the chlorophyll concentration decreased in all genotypes with the exception of Banquet-II. In addition, lipid peroxidation in Banquet-II roots increased at 150 μM Mn, but decreased at higher Mn concentrations. This decrease was associated with an increase in antioxidant capacity as well as total phenol concentration. Banquet-II and Halo-AR1 appear to be the most Mn-resistant genotypes based on RGR and CO2 assimilation rate. In addition, Mn excess provoked a strong decrease in Ca and Mg concentrations in shoots of the Mn-sensitive genotype, whereas only slight variations in the Mn-resistant genotype were noted. When other evaluated parameters were taken into account, we concluded that among the perennial ryegrass genotypes introduced recently into southern Chile Banquet-II appears to be the most Mn-resistant, followed by Halo-AR1, with One-50 being the most sensitive.

  10. Improved fructan accumulation in perennial ryegrass transformed with the onion fructosyltransferase genes 1-SST and 6G-FFT.

    PubMed

    Gadegaard, Gitte; Didion, Thomas; Folling, Marianne; Storgaard, Morten; Andersen, Claus H; Nielsen, Klaus K

    2008-07-31

    Carbohydrate limitation has been identified as a main cause of inefficient nitrogen use in ruminant animals, which feed mainly on fresh forage, hay and silage. This inefficiency results in suboptimal meat and milk productivity. One important molecular breeding strategy is to improve the nutritional value of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) by increasing the fructan content through expression of heterologous fructan biosynthetic genes. We developed perennial ryegrass lines expressing sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase and fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase genes from onion (Allium cepa) which exhibited up to a 3-fold increased fructan content. Further, the high fructan content was stable during the growth period, whereas the fructan content in an elite variety, marketed as a high sugar variety, dropped rapidly after reaching its maximum and subsequently remained low.

  11. Towards a better understanding of the generation of fructan structure diversity in plants: molecular and functional characterization of a sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) cDNA from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne)

    PubMed Central

    Lasseur, Bertrand; Lothier, Jérémy; Wiemken, Andres; Van Laere, André; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; den Ende, Wim Van; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale

    2011-01-01

    The main storage compounds in Lolium perenne are fructans with prevailing β(2–6) linkages. A cDNA library of L. perenne was screened using Poa secunda sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) as a probe. A full-length Lp6-SFT clone was isolated as shown by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. High levels of Lp6-SFT transcription were found in the growth zone of elongating leaves and in mature leaf sheaths where fructans are synthesized. Upon fructan synthesis induction, Lp6-SFT transcription was high in mature leaf blades but with no concomitant accumulation of fructans. In vitro studies with the recombinant Lp6-SFT protein showed that both 1-kestotriose and 6G-kestotriose acted as fructosyl acceptors, producing 1- and 6-kestotetraose (bifurcose) and 6G,6-kestotetraose, respectively. Interestingly, bifurcose formation ceased and 6G,6-kestotetraose was formed instead, when recombinant fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase (6G-FFT) of L. perenne was introduced in the enzyme assay with sucrose and 1-kestotriose as substrates. The remarkable absence of bifurcose in L. perenne tissues might be explained by a higher affinity of 6G-FFT, as compared with 6-SFT, for 1-kestotriose, which is the first fructan formed. Surprisingly, recombinant 6-SFT from Hordeum vulgare, a plant devoid of fructans with internal glucosyl residues, also produced 6G,6-kestotetraose from sucrose and 6G-kestotriose. In the presence of recombinant L. perenne 6G-FFT, it produced 6G,6-kestotetraose from 1-kestotriose and sucrose, like L. perenne 6-SFT. Thus, we demonstrate that the two 6-SFTs have close catalytic properties and that the distinct fructans formed in L. perenne and H. vulgare can be explained by the presence of 6G-FFT activity in L. perenne and its absence in H. vulgare. PMID:21196473

  12. Towards a better understanding of the generation of fructan structure diversity in plants: molecular and functional characterization of a sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) cDNA from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne).

    PubMed

    Lasseur, Bertrand; Lothier, Jérémy; Wiemken, Andres; Van Laere, André; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Van den Ende, Wim; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale

    2011-03-01

    The main storage compounds in Lolium perenne are fructans with prevailing β(2-6) linkages. A cDNA library of L. perenne was screened using Poa secunda sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) as a probe. A full-length Lp6-SFT clone was isolated as shown by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. High levels of Lp6-SFT transcription were found in the growth zone of elongating leaves and in mature leaf sheaths where fructans are synthesized. Upon fructan synthesis induction, Lp6-SFT transcription was high in mature leaf blades but with no concomitant accumulation of fructans. In vitro studies with the recombinant Lp6-SFT protein showed that both 1-kestotriose and 6G-kestotriose acted as fructosyl acceptors, producing 1- and 6-kestotetraose (bifurcose) and 6G,6-kestotetraose, respectively. Interestingly, bifurcose formation ceased and 6G,6-kestotetraose was formed instead, when recombinant fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase (6G-FFT) of L. perenne was introduced in the enzyme assay with sucrose and 1-kestotriose as substrates. The remarkable absence of bifurcose in L. perenne tissues might be explained by a higher affinity of 6G-FFT, as compared with 6-SFT, for 1-kestotriose, which is the first fructan formed. Surprisingly, recombinant 6-SFT from Hordeum vulgare, a plant devoid of fructans with internal glucosyl residues, also produced 6G,6-kestotetraose from sucrose and 6G-kestotriose. In the presence of recombinant L. perenne 6G-FFT, it produced 6G,6-kestotetraose from 1-kestotriose and sucrose, like L. perenne 6-SFT. Thus, we demonstrate that the two 6-SFTs have close catalytic properties and that the distinct fructans formed in L. perenne and H. vulgare can be explained by the presence of 6G-FFT activity in L. perenne and its absence in H. vulgare.

  13. Molecular and functional characterization of a cDNA encoding fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase (6G-FFT)/fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferase (1-FFT) from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Lasseur, Bertrand; Lothier, Jérémy; Djoumad, Abdelmadjid; De Coninck, Barbara; Smeekens, Sjef; Van Laere, André; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Van den Ende, Wim; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale

    2006-01-01

    Fructans are the main storage compound in Lolium perenne. To account for the prevailing neokestose-based fructan synthesis in this species, a cDNA library of L. perenne was screened by using the onion (Allium cepa) fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase (6G-FFT) as a probe. A full length Lp6G-FFT clone was isolated with significant homologies to vacuolar type fructosyltransferases and invertases. The functionality of the cDNA was tested by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant protein demonstrated both 6G-FFT and fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferase activities (1-FFT) with a maximum 6G-FFT/1-FFT ratio of two. The activity of 6G-FFT was investigated with respect to developmental stage, tissue distribution, and alterations in carbohydrate status expression and compared to sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST). Lp6G-FFT and Lp1-SST were predominantly expressed in the basal part of elongating leaves and leaf sheaths. Expression of both genes declined along the leaf axis, in parallel with the spatial occurrence of fructan and fructosyltransferase activities. Surprisingly, Lp6G-FFT was highly expressed in photosynthetically active tissues where very low extractable fructosyltransferase activity and fructan amounts were detected, suggesting a post-transcriptional regulation of expression. Lp6G-FFT gene expression increased only in elongating leaves following similar increases of sucrose content in blades, sheaths, and elongating leaf bases. Regulation of Lp6G-FFT gene expression depends on the tissue according to its sink-source status.

  14. Endophytic fungus decreases plant virus infections in meadow ryegrass (Lolium pratense)

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, Päivi T; Helander, Marjo; Siddiqui, Shahid A; Lehto, Kirsi; Saikkonen, Kari

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effects of fungal endophyte infection of meadow ryegrass (Lolium pratense=Festuca pratensis) on the frequency of the barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV). The virus is transferred by aphids, which may be deterred by endophyte-origin alkaloids within the plant. In our experiment, we released viruliferous aphid vectors on endophyte-infected and endophyte-free plants in a common garden. The number of aphids and the percentage of BYDV infections were lower in endophyte-infected plants compared to endophyte-free plants, indicating that endophyte infection may protect meadow ryegrass from BYDV infections. PMID:17148304

  15. A Review of Perennial Ryegrass Endophytes and Their Potential Use in the Management of African Black Beetle in Perennial Grazing Systems in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Karpyn Esqueda, Mijail; Yen, Alan L.; Rochfort, Simone; Guthridge, Kathryn M.; Powell, Kevin S.; Edwards, Jacqueline; Spangenberg, German C.

    2017-01-01

    The major insect pest of Australian cool temperate pastures is the root-feeding insect Heteronychus arator (African black beetle, ABB). Significant pasture damage can occur even at low ABB densities (11 individuals per square meter), and often re-sowing of the whole paddock is required. Mitigation of the effects of pasture pests, and in particular subterranean species such as the larval form of ABB, can be challenging. Early detection is limited by the ability to visualize above-ground symptoms, and chemical control of insects in soil is often ineffective. This review takes a look at the historical events that molded the pastoral landscape in Australia. The importation route, changes in land management and pasture composition by European settlers may have aided the establishment of ABB in Australia. Perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne is discussed as it is one of the most important perennial agricultural grasses and is widely-sown in moderate-to-high-rainfall temperate zones of the world. Endophytic fungi from the genus Epichloë form symbiotic relationships with cool season grasses such as Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass). They have been studied extensively and are well documented for enhancing persistence in pasture via a suite of bioactive secondary metabolites produced by the fungal symbionts. Several well-characterized secondary metabolites are discussed. Some can have negative effects on cattle (e.g., ergovaline and lolitrems) while others have been shown to benefit the host plant through deterrence of insect pests from feeding and by insecticidal activity (e.g., peramine, lolines, ergopeptines). Various control methods for ABB are also discussed, with a focus on the potential role of asexual Epichloë endophytes. PMID:28154571

  16. Functional characterization and hormonal regulation of the PHEOPHYTINASE gene LpPPH controlling leaf senescence in perennial ryegrass

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Yu, Guohui; Wen, Wuwu; Ma, Xiqing; Xu, Bin; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) degradation occurs naturally during leaf maturation and senescence, and can be induced by stresses, both processes involving the regulation of plant hormones. The objective of this study was to determine the functional roles and hormonal regulation of a gene encoding pheophytin pheophorbide hydrolyase (PPH) that catabolizes Chl degradation during leaf senescence in perennial grass species. A PPH gene, LpPPH, was cloned from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). LpPPH was localized in the chloroplast. Overexpressing LpPPH accelerated Chl degradation in wild tobacco, and rescued the stay-green phenotype of the Arabidopsis pph null mutant. The expression level of LpPPH was positively related to the extent of leaf senescence. Exogenous application of abscisic acid (ABA) and ethephon (an ethylene-releasing agent) accelerated the decline in Chl content in leaves of perennial ryegrass, whereas cytokinin (CK) and aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG; an ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor) treatments suppressed leaf senescence, corresponding to the up- or down-regulation of LpPPH expression. The promoters of five orthologous PPH genes were predicted to share conserved cis-elements potentially recognized by transcription factors in the ABA and CK pathways. Taken together, the results suggested that LpPPH-mediated Chl breakdown could be regulated positively by ABA and ethylene, and negatively by CK, and LpPPH could be a direct downstream target gene of transcription factors in the ABA and CK signaling pathways. PMID:26643195

  17. Expression and characterization of an antifreeze protein from the perennial rye grass, Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Lauersen, Kyle J; Brown, Alan; Middleton, Adam; Davies, Peter L; Walker, Virginia K

    2011-06-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) are an evolutionarily diverse class of stress response products best known in certain metazoans that adopt a freeze-avoidance survival strategy. The perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne (Lp), cannot avoid winter temperatures below the crystallization point and is thought to use its LpAFP in a freeze-tolerant strategy. In order to examine properties of LpAFP in relation to L. perenne's life history, cDNA cloning, recombinant protein characterization, ice-binding activities, gene copy number, and expression responses to low temperature were examined. Transcripts, encoded by only a few gene copies, appeared to increase in abundance after diploid plants were transferred to 4°C for 1-2 days, and in parallel with the ice recrystallization inhibition activities. Circular dichroism spectra of recombinant LpAFP showed three clear folding transition temperatures including one between 10 and 15°C, suggesting to us that folding modifications of the secreted AFP could allow the targeted degradation of the protein in planta when temperatures increase. Although LpAFP showed low thermal hysteresis activity and partitioning into ice, it was similar to AFPs from freeze-avoiding organisms in other respects. Therefore, the type of low temperature resistance strategy adopted by a particular species may not depend on the type of AFP. The independence of AFP sequence and life-history has practical implications for the development of genetically-modified crops with enhanced freeze tolerance.

  18. Variation in the expression of ergot alkaloids between individual tillers of perennial ryegrass

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Wade J.; Lunn, Kristy L.; Kaur, Navjot; Lloyd-West, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    Epichloë fungal endophytes of cool season grasses are well-known to produce a range of alkaloids of benefit to the host. Some of these compounds are advantageous to agriculture due to qualities that promote pasture persistence (e.g., the loline class of alkaloids confer insect protection) while others are detrimental to the well-being of grazing livestock. The ergot alkaloids (e.g., ergovaline), produced in ryegrass and tall fescue associations, causes poor animal health in farming regions in many countries around the world and further study is required to improve our knowledge on this class of compounds. Here we present the application of a quantitative LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry) method measuring eight ergot alkaloids (chanoclavine, agroclavine, elymoclavine, lysergol, lysergic acid, ergine, lysergyl-alanine, ergovaline) produced by endophyte infected grasses, to monitor levels in individual tillers from multiple plants of a single cultivar of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne cv. “Grasslands Samson”) infected with a common toxic endophyte strain (Epichloë festucae var. lolii). Monitoring the expression in individual tillers allows an estimation of the variability within a plant (between tillers) as well as between plants. The study showed that there is significant variation in the concentration of the ergot alkaloids between tillers of a single plant, at or exceeding the level of variation observed between individual plants of a population. This result emphasizes the fundamental importance of robust experimental design and sampling procedures when alkaloid expression assessment is required and these need to be rigorously tailored to the hypothesis being tested. PMID:25505785

  19. Variation in the expression of ergot alkaloids between individual tillers of perennial ryegrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Wade; Lunn, Kristy; Lloyd-West, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    Epichloë fungal endophytes of cool season grasses are well known to produce a range of alkaloids of benefit to the host. Some of these compounds are advantageous to agriculture due to qualities that promote pasture persistence (e.g. the loline class of alkaloids confer insect protection) while others are detrimental to the wellbeing of grazing livestock. The ergot alkaloids (e.g. ergovaline), produced in ryegrass and tall fescue associations, causes poor animal health in farming regions in many countries around the world and further study is required to improve our knowledge on this class of compounds. Here we present the application of a quantitative LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry) method measuring eight ergot alkaloids (chanoclavine, agroclavine, elymoclavine, lysergol, lysergic acid, ergine, lysergyl alanine, ergovaline) produced by endophyte infected grasses, to monitor levels in individual tillers from multiple plants of a single cultivar of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne cv. ‘Grasslands Samson’) infected with a common toxic endophyte strain (Epichloë festucae var. lolii). Monitoring the expression in individual tillers allows an estimation of the variability within a plant (between tillers) as well as between plants. The study showed that there is significant variation in the concentration of the ergot alkaloids between tillers of a single plant, at or exceeding the level of variation observed between individual plants of a population. This result emphasizes the fundamental importance of robust experimental design and sampling procedures when alkaloid expression assessment is required and these need to be rigorously tailored to the hypothesis being tested.

  20. Differential regulation of two sucrose transporters by defoliation and light conditions in perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Furet, Pierre-Maxime; Berthier, Alexandre; Decau, Marie-Laure; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Noiraud-Romy, Nathalie; Meuriot, Frédéric

    2012-12-01

    Sucrose transport between source and sink tissues is supposed to be a key-step for an efficient regrowth of perennial rye-grass after defoliation and might be altered by light conditions. We assessed the effect of different light regimes (high vs low light applied before or after defoliation) on growth, fructans and sucrose mobilization, as well as on sucrose transporter expression during 14 days of regrowth. Our results reported that defoliation led to a mobilization of C reserves (first sucrose and then fructans), which was parallel to an induction of LpSUT1 sucrose transporter expression in source and sink tissues (i.e. leaf sheaths and elongating leaf bases, respectively) irrespective to light conditions. Light regime (high or low light) had little effects on regrowth and on C reserves mobilization during the first 48 h of regrowth after defoliation. Thereafter, low light conditions, delaying the recovery of photosynthetic capacities, had a negative effect on C reserves re-accumulation (especially sucrose). Surprisingly, high light did not enhance sucrose transporter expression. Indeed, while light conditions had no effect on LpSUT1 expression, LpSUT2 transcripts levels were enhanced for low light grown plants. These results indicate that two sucrose transporter currently identified in Lolium perenne L. are differentially regulated by light and sucrose.

  1. Isolation of prostrate turfgrass mutants via screening of dwarf phenotype and characterization of a perennial ryegrass prostrate mutant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junmei; Thammina, Chandra; Li, Wei; Yu, Hao; Yer, Huseyin; El-Tanbouly, Rania; Marron, Manon; Katin-Grazzini, Lorenzo; Chen, Yongqin; Inguagiato, John; McAvoy, Richard J.; Guillard, Karl; Zhang, Xian; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Prostrate turf varieties are desirable because of their increased low mowing tolerance, heat resistance, traffic resistance and ground coverage compared with upright varieties. Mutation breeding may provide a powerful tool to create prostrate varieties, but there are no simple, straightforward methods to screen for such mutants. Elucidation of the molecular basis of the major ‘green revolution’ traits, dwarfism and semi-dwarfism, guided us to design a simple strategy for isolating dwarf mutants of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). We have shown that gamma-ray-mediated dominant dwarf mutants can be easily screened for at the three-leaf stage. About 10% of dwarf mutant lines also displayed a prostrate phenotype at mature stages (>10 tillers). One prostrate line, Lowboy I, has been characterized in detail. Lowboy I had significantly shorter canopy, leaf blade and internode lengths compared with wild type. Lowboy I also exhibited greater tolerance to low mowing stress than wild type. Exogenous gibberellic acid (GA) restored Lowboy I to a wild-type phenotype, indicating that the dwarf and prostrate phenotypes were both due to GA deficiency. We further showed that phenotypes of Lowboy I were dominant and stably inherited through sexual reproduction. Prostrate turfgrass mutants are difficult to screen for because the phenotype is not observed at young seedling stages, therefore our method represents a simple strategy for easily isolating prostrate mutants. Furthermore, Lowboy I may provide an outstanding germplasm for breeding novel prostrate perennial ryegrass cultivars. PMID:26955481

  2. Ice recrystallization inhibition proteins of perennial ryegrass enhance freezing tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunzhen; Fei, Shui-zhang; Arora, Rajeev; Hannapel, David J

    2010-06-01

    Ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) proteins are thought to play an important role in conferring freezing tolerance in plants. Two genes encoding IRI proteins, LpIRI-a and LpIRI-b, were isolated from a relatively cold-tolerant perennial ryegrass cv. Caddyshack. Amino acid alignments among the IRI proteins revealed the presence of conserved repetitive IRI-domain motifs (NxVxxG/NxVxG) in both proteins. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that LpIRI-a was up-regulated approximately 40-fold while LpIRI-b was up-regulated sevenfold after just 1 h of cold acclimation, and by 7 days of cold acclimation the transcripts had increased 8,000-fold for LpIRI-a and 1,000-fold for LpIRI-b. Overexpression of either LpIRI-a or LpIRI-b gene in Arabidopsis increased survival rates of the seedlings following a freezing test under both cold-acclimated and nonacclimated conditions. For example, without cold acclimation a -4 degrees C treatment reduced the wild type's survival rate to an average of 73%, but resulted in survival rates of 85-100% for four transgenic lines. With cold acclimation, a -12 degrees C treatment reduced the wild type's survival rate to an average of 38.7%, while it resulted in a survival rate of 51-78.5% for transgenic lines. After cold acclimation, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing either LpIRI-a or LpIRI-b gene exhibited a consistent reduction in freezing-induced ion leakage at -8, -9, and -10 degrees C. Furthermore, the induced expression of the LpIRI-a and LpIRI-b proteins in transgenic E. coli enhanced the freezing tolerance in host cells. Our results suggest that IRI proteins play an important role in freezing tolerance in plants.

  3. Viability of Cryptosporidium parvum during ensilage of perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Merry, R J; Mawdsley, J L; Brooks, A E; Davies, D R

    1997-01-01

    The survival of Cryptosporidium parvum during ensilage of perennial ryegrass was examined in laboratory silos with herbage prepared in one of three different ways; either untreated, inoculated with a strain of Lactobacillus plantarum or by direct acidification with formic acid. The pH values of all silages initially fell below 4.5, but only formic acid-treated silage remained stable at less than pH 4 after 106 d, with the pH of the untreated and inoculant-treated silages rising to above 6. The formic acid-treated silage had a high lactic acid concentration (109 g kg-1 dry matter (DM)) and low concentrations of propionic and butyric acids after 106 d. However, the untreated and inoculant-treated silages showed an inverse relationship, with low lactic acid concentrations and high concentrations of acetic, propionic and butyric acids. These silages also contained ammonia-N concentrations in excess of 9 g kg-1 DM. In terms of the viability of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts very few differences were seen after 14 d of ensilage with ca 50% remaining viable, irrespective of treatment and total numbers had declined from the initial level of 5.9 x 10(4) to 1 x 10(4) g(-1) fresh matter. Total oocyst numbers remained approximately the same until the end of the ensiling period, with the percentage of viable oocysts declining to 46, 41 and 32% respectively for formic acid, inoculant and untreated silages. The results are discussed in terms of changes occurring during the silage fermentation, in particular the products which may influence the survival of Cryptosporidium and implications for agricultural practice and the health of silage fed livestock.

  4. A review of the Neotyphodium lolii / Lolium perenne symbiosis and its associated effects on animal and plant health, with particular emphasis on ryegrass staggers.

    PubMed

    di Menna, M E; Finch, S C; Popay, A J; Smith, B L

    2012-11-01

    Ryegrass staggers is a seasonal mycotoxicosis of grazing livestock characterised by tremors, in coordination and a staggering gait almost unaccompanied by physical lesions. Deaths occur only as a consequence of accident or starvation. Outbreaks, in summer and autumn, occur only on pasture in which endophyte (Neotyphodium lolii)-infected perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) predominates and usually on which animals are grazed intensively. Animals recover when moved to a different type of grazing or after rain has promoted pasture growth. The disease was recognised for 80 years before its cause was discovered as a consequence of a grazing trial of sheep on three ryegrass cultivars which happened to have three different levels of endophyte infection. The endophyte was first formally described as Acremonium loliae, later corrected to Acremonium lolii, and was finally placed in the genus Neotyphodium. It produces a number of secondary metabolites of which lolitrem B is the principal one causing ryegrass staggers symptoms. Ergopeptides are also produced which cause heat stress and lack of productivity. N. lolii is symptomless in the plant, seed borne and grows intercellularly in the aerial parts, mainly in reproductive tillers and leaf sheaths but sparsely in leaf blades. It dies in stored seed and infection rates of different ryegrass cultivars have depended on seed storage times during their production. In addition, N. Lolii produces insect feeding deterrents, among them peramine, which protects infected plants from pest predation. Because of this, control of ryegrass staggers by elimination of endophyte-infected ryegrass is not feasible in areas in which insect predation is a serious pasture problem. However, N. lolii strains vary in the secondary metabolites they produce allowing the selection of strains that produce desirable metabolites. By inoculating such strains into uninfected ryegrass plants it is possible to produce cultivars which do not cause ryegrass

  5. QTL analysis of lodging resistance and related traits in Italian ryegrass ( Lolium multiflorum Lam.).

    PubMed

    Inoue, Maiko; Gao, Zhensheng; Cai, Hongwei

    2004-11-01

    Italian ryegrass ( Lolium multiflorum Lam.) is the most widely cultivated annual forage grass in Japan. Lodging damage reduces both harvested yield and forage quality. To identify the chromosomal regions controlling lodging resistance in Italian ryegrass, we analyzed seven quantitative characters--heading date, plant height, culm weight, culm diameter, culm strength, tiller number, and culm pushing resistance--and evaluated lodging scores in the field in a two-way pseudo-testcross F1 population. Significant correlations between most combinations of the traits examined were found. Seventeen QTLs for all traits except culm weight were detected on six of seven linkage groups by simple interval mapping using cross-pollination (CP) algorithm, and 33 independent QTLs were also detected by composite interval mapping from both male and female parental linkage maps. In addition, up to 18 QTLs for lodging scores evaluated at nine different times were detected on all linkage groups. The flanking markers of those QTLs will serve as a useful tool for marker-assisted selection of lodging resistance in Italian ryegrass.

  6. Induced systemic resistance responses in perennial ryegrass against Magnaporthe oryzae elicited by semi-purified surfactin lipopeptides and live cells of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Alamgir; Uddin, Wakar; Wenner, Nancy G

    2015-08-01

    The suppressive ability of several strains of cyclic lipopeptide-producing Bacillus rhizobacteria to grey leaf spot disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae has been documented previously; however, the underlying mechanism(s) involved in the induced systemic resistance (ISR) activity in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) remains unknown. Root-drench application of solid-phase extraction (SPE)-enriched surfactin and live cells of mutant Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain FZB42-AK3 (produces surfactin, but not bacillomycin D and fengycin) significantly reduced disease incidence and severity on perennial ryegrass. The application of the treatments revealed a pronounced multilayered ISR defence response activation via timely and enhanced accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), elevated cell wall/apoplastic peroxidase activity, and deposition of callose and phenolic/polyphenolic compounds underneath the fungal appressoria in naïve leaves, which was significantly more intense in treated plants than in mock-treated controls. Moreover, a hypersensitive response (HR)-type reaction and enhanced expression of LpPrx (Prx, peroxidase), LpOXO4 (OXO, oxalate oxidase), LpPAL (PAL, phenylalanine ammonia lyase), LpLOXa (LOX, lipoxygenase), LpTHb (putative defensin) and LpDEFa (DEFa, putative defensin) in perennial ryegrass were associated with SPE-enriched surfactin and live AK3 cell treatments, acting as a second layer of defence when pre-invasive defence responses failed. The results indicate that ISR activity following surfactin perception may sensitize H2O2 -mediated defence responses, thereby providing perennial ryegrass with enhanced protection against M. oryzae.

  7. Development of EST-derived CAPS and AFLP markers linked to a gene for resistance to ryegrass blast (Pyricularia sp.) in Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.).

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuichi; Ding, Chenglong; Ozaki, Rie; Hirata, Mariko; Fujimori, Masahiro; Takahashi, Wataru; Cai, Hongwei; Mizuno, Kazuhiko

    2005-09-01

    Ryegrass blast, also called gray leaf spot, is caused by the fungus Pyricularia sp. It is one of the most serious diseases of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) in Japan. We analyzed segregation of resistance in an F(1) population from a cross between a resistant and a susceptible cultivar. The disease severity distribution in the F(1) population suggested that resistance was controlled by a major gene (Lm Pi1). Analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphisms with bulked segregant analysis identified several markers tightly linked to Lm Pi1. To identify other markers linked to Lm Pi1, we used expressed sequence tag-cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (EST-CAPS) markers mapped in a reference population of Italian ryegrass. Of the 30 EST-CAPS markers screened, one marker, p 56, flanking the Lm Pi1 locus was found. The restriction pattern of p 56 amplification showed a unique fragment corresponding to the resistant allele at the Lm Pi1 locus. A linkage map constructed from the reference population showed that the Lm Pi1 locus was located in linkage group 5 of Italian ryegrass. Genotype results obtained from resistant and susceptible cultivars indicate that the p 56 marker is useful for introduction of the Lm Pi1 gene into susceptible germ plasm in order to develop ryegrass cultivars with enhanced resistance to ryegrass blast.

  8. Silicon induced systemic defense responses in perennial ryegrass against Magnaporthe oryzae infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustainable integrated disease management for gray leaf spot of perennial ryegrass may involve use of plant defense elicitors with compatible traditional fungicides to reduce disease incidence and severity. Silicon (Si) is a potential inducer or modulator of plant defenses against different pathogen...

  9. Transforming a fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase from perennial ryegrass into a sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Lasseur, Bertrand; Schroeven, Lindsey; Lammens, Willem; Le Roy, Katrien; Spangenberg, German; Manduzio, Hélène; Vergauwen, Rudy; Lothier, Jérémy; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Van den Ende, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Fructosyltransferases (FTs) synthesize fructans, fructose polymers accumulating in economically important cool-season grasses and cereals. FTs might be crucial for plant survival under stress conditions in species in which fructans represent the major form of reserve carbohydrate, such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne). Two FT types can be distinguished: those using sucrose (S-type enzymes: sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase [1-SST], sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase) and those using fructans (F-type enzymes: fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferase [1-FFT], fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase [6G-FFT]) as preferential donor substrate. Here, we report, to our knowledge for the first time, the transformation of an F-type enzyme (6G-FFT/1-FFT) into an S-type enzyme (1-SST) using perennial ryegrass 6G-FFT/1-FFT (Lp6G-FFT/1-FFT) and 1-SST (Lp1-SST) as model enzymes. This transformation was accomplished by mutating three amino acids (N340D, W343R, and S415N) in the vicinity of the active site of Lp6G-FFT/1-FFT. In addition, effects of each amino acid mutation alone or in combination have been studied. Our results strongly suggest that the amino acid at position 343 (tryptophan or arginine) can greatly determine the donor substrate characteristics by influencing the position of the amino acid at position 340. Moreover, the presence of arginine-343 negatively affects the formation of neofructan-type linkages. The results are compared with recent findings on donor substrate selectivity within the group of plant cell wall invertases and fructan exohydrolases. Taken together, these insights contribute to our knowledge of structure/function relationships within plant family 32 glycosyl hydrolases and open the way to the production of tailor-made fructans on a larger scale.

  10. Olivine weathering in soil, and its effects on growth and nutrient uptake in Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.): a pot experiment.

    PubMed

    ten Berge, Hein F M; van der Meer, Hugo G; Steenhuizen, Johan W; Goedhart, Paul W; Knops, Pol; Verhagen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Mineral carbonation of basic silicate minerals regulates atmospheric CO(2) on geological time scales by locking up carbon. Mining and spreading onto the earth's surface of fast-weathering silicates, such as olivine, has been proposed to speed up this natural CO(2) sequestration ('enhanced weathering'). While agriculture may offer an existing infrastructure, weathering rate and impacts on soil and plant are largely unknown. Our objectives were to assess weathering of olivine in soil, and its effects on plant growth and nutrient uptake. In a pot experiment with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), weathering during 32 weeks was inferred from bioavailability of magnesium (Mg) in soil and plant. Olivine doses were equivalent to 1630 (OLIV1), 8150, 40700 and 204000 (OLIV4) kg ha(-1). Alternatively, the soluble Mg salt kieserite was applied for reference. Olivine increased plant growth (+15.6%) and plant K concentration (+16.5%) in OLIV4. At all doses, olivine increased bioavailability of Mg and Ni in soil, as well as uptake of Mg, Si and Ni in plants. Olivine suppressed Ca uptake. Weathering estimated from a Mg balance was equivalent to 240 kg ha(-1) (14.8% of dose, OLIV1) to 2240 kg ha(-1) (1.1%, OLIV4). This corresponds to gross CO(2) sequestration of 290 to 2690 kg ha(-1) (29 10(3) to 269 10(3) kg km(-2).) Alternatively, weathering estimated from similarity with kieserite treatments ranged from 13% to 58% for OLIV1. The Olsen model for olivine carbonation predicted 4.0% to 9.0% weathering for our case, independent of olivine dose. Our % values observed at high doses were smaller than this, suggesting negative feedbacks in soil. Yet, weathering appears fast enough to support the 'enhanced weathering' concept. In agriculture, olivine doses must remain within limits to avoid imbalances in plant nutrition, notably at low Ca availability; and to avoid Ni accumulation in soil and crop.

  11. Olivine Weathering in Soil, and Its Effects on Growth and Nutrient Uptake in Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.): A Pot Experiment

    PubMed Central

    ten Berge, Hein F. M.; van der Meer, Hugo G.; Steenhuizen, Johan W.; Goedhart, Paul W.; Knops, Pol; Verhagen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Mineral carbonation of basic silicate minerals regulates atmospheric CO2 on geological time scales by locking up carbon. Mining and spreading onto the earth's surface of fast-weathering silicates, such as olivine, has been proposed to speed up this natural CO2 sequestration (‘enhanced weathering’). While agriculture may offer an existing infrastructure, weathering rate and impacts on soil and plant are largely unknown. Our objectives were to assess weathering of olivine in soil, and its effects on plant growth and nutrient uptake. In a pot experiment with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), weathering during 32 weeks was inferred from bioavailability of magnesium (Mg) in soil and plant. Olivine doses were equivalent to 1630 (OLIV1), 8150, 40700 and 204000 (OLIV4) kg ha−1. Alternatively, the soluble Mg salt kieserite was applied for reference. Olivine increased plant growth (+15.6%) and plant K concentration (+16.5%) in OLIV4. At all doses, olivine increased bioavailability of Mg and Ni in soil, as well as uptake of Mg, Si and Ni in plants. Olivine suppressed Ca uptake. Weathering estimated from a Mg balance was equivalent to 240 kg ha−1 (14.8% of dose, OLIV1) to 2240 kg ha−1 (1.1%, OLIV4). This corresponds to gross CO2 sequestration of 290 to 2690 kg ha−1 (29 103 to 269 103 kg km−2.) Alternatively, weathering estimated from similarity with kieserite treatments ranged from 13% to 58% for OLIV1. The Olsen model for olivine carbonation predicted 4.0% to 9.0% weathering for our case, independent of olivine dose. Our % values observed at high doses were smaller than this, suggesting negative feedbacks in soil. Yet, weathering appears fast enough to support the ‘enhanced weathering’ concept. In agriculture, olivine doses must remain within limits to avoid imbalances in plant nutrition, notably at low Ca availability; and to avoid Ni accumulation in soil and crop. PMID:22912685

  12. De Novo Assembly of the Perennial Ryegrass Transcriptome Using an RNA-Seq Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Jacqueline D.; Byrne, Stephen; Paina, Cristiana; Asp, Torben

    2014-01-01

    Background Perennial ryegrass is a highly heterozygous outbreeding grass species used for turf and forage production. Heterozygosity can affect de-Bruijn graph assembly making de novo transcriptome assembly of species such as perennial ryegrass challenging. Creating a reference transcriptome from a homozygous perennial ryegrass genotype can circumvent the challenge of heterozygosity. The goals of this study were to perform RNA-sequencing on multiple tissues from a highly inbred genotype to develop a reference transcriptome. This was complemented with RNA-sequencing of a highly heterozygous genotype for SNP calling. Result De novo transcriptome assembly of the inbred genotype created 185,833 transcripts with an average length of 830 base pairs. Within the inbred reference transcriptome 78,560 predicted open reading frames were found of which 24,434 were predicted as complete. Functional annotation found 50,890 transcripts with a BLASTp hit from the Swiss-Prot non-redundant database, 58,941 transcripts with a Pfam protein domain and 1,151 transcripts encoding putative secreted peptides. To evaluate the reference transcriptome we targeted the high-affinity K+ transporter gene family and found multiple orthologs. Using the longest unique open reading frames as the reference sequence, 64,242 single nucleotide polymorphisms were found. One thousand sixty one open reading frames from the inbred genotype contained heterozygous sites, confirming the high degree of homozygosity. Conclusion Our study has developed an annotated, comprehensive transcriptome reference for perennial ryegrass that can aid in determining genetic variation, expression analysis, genome annotation, and gene mapping. PMID:25126744

  13. Using a Candidate Gene-Based Genetic Linkage Map to Identify QTL for Winter Survival in Perennial Ryegrass

    PubMed Central

    Paina, Cristiana; Byrne, Stephen L.; Studer, Bruno; Rognli, Odd Arne; Asp, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Important agronomical traits in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) breeding programs such as winter survival and heading date, are quantitative traits that are generally controlled by multiple loci. Individually, these loci have relatively small effects. The aim of this study was to develop a candidate gene based Illumina GoldenGate 1,536-plex assay, containing single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed from transcripts involved in response to cold acclimation, vernalization, and induction of flowering. The assay was used to genotype a mapping population that we have also phenotyped for winter survival to complement the heading date trait previously mapped in this population. A positive correlation was observed between strong vernalization requirement and winter survival, and some QTL for winter survival and heading date overlapped on the genetic map. Candidate genes were located in clusters along the genetic map, some of which co-localized with QTL for winter survival and heading date. These clusters of candidate genes may be used in candidate gene based association studies to identify alleles associated with winter survival and heading date. PMID:27010567

  14. Using a Candidate Gene-Based Genetic Linkage Map to Identify QTL for Winter Survival in Perennial Ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Paina, Cristiana; Byrne, Stephen L; Studer, Bruno; Rognli, Odd Arne; Asp, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Important agronomical traits in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) breeding programs such as winter survival and heading date, are quantitative traits that are generally controlled by multiple loci. Individually, these loci have relatively small effects. The aim of this study was to develop a candidate gene based Illumina GoldenGate 1,536-plex assay, containing single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed from transcripts involved in response to cold acclimation, vernalization, and induction of flowering. The assay was used to genotype a mapping population that we have also phenotyped for winter survival to complement the heading date trait previously mapped in this population. A positive correlation was observed between strong vernalization requirement and winter survival, and some QTL for winter survival and heading date overlapped on the genetic map. Candidate genes were located in clusters along the genetic map, some of which co-localized with QTL for winter survival and heading date. These clusters of candidate genes may be used in candidate gene based association studies to identify alleles associated with winter survival and heading date.

  15. Consistent detection of QTLs for crown rust resistance in Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) across environments and phenotyping methods.

    PubMed

    Studer, Bruno; Boller, Beat; Bauer, Eva; Posselt, Ulrich K; Widmer, Franco; Kölliker, Roland

    2007-06-01

    Crown rust, caused by Puccinia coronata f. sp. lolii, is one of the most important diseases of temperate forage grasses, such as ryegrasses (Lolium spp.), affecting yield and nutritional quality. Therefore, resistance to crown rust is a major goal in ryegrass breeding programmes. In a two-way pseudo-testcross population consisting of 306 Lolium multiflorum individuals, multisite field evaluations as well as alternative methods based on artificial inoculation with natural inoculate in controlled environments were used to identify QTLs controlling resistance to crown rust. Disease scores obtained from glasshouse and leaf segment test (LST) evaluations were highly correlated with scores from a multisite field assessment (r = 0.66 and 0.79, P < 0.01, respectively) and thus confirmed suitability of these methods for crown rust investigations. Moreover, QTL mapping based on a linkage map consisting of 368 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers revealed similar results across different phenotyping methods. Two major QTLs were consistently detected on linkage group (LG) 1 and LG 2, explaining up to 56% of total phenotypic variance (V (p)). Nevertheless, differences between position and magnitude of QTLs were observed among individual field locations and suggested the existence of specific local pathogen populations. The present study not only compared QTL results among crown rust evaluation methods and environments, but also identified molecular markers closely linked to previously undescribed QTLs for crown rust resistance in Italian ryegrass with the potential to be applied in marker-assisted forage crop breeding.

  16. Arsenic extractability and uptake by velvetgrass Holcus lanatus and ryegrass Lolium perenne in variously treated soils polluted by tailing spills.

    PubMed

    Karczewska, Anna; Lewińska, Karolina; Gałka, Bernard

    2013-11-15

    Phytostabilization should be considered as an appropriate phytoremediation technique to restore the area affected by tailing spills in Zloty Stok, where arsenic ores were mined and processed for several centuries. The study aimed to compare the suitability of velvetgrass (Holcus lanatus L.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) for development of plant cover in that area. Various treatments commonly applied to support phytostabilization were examined. A pot experiment was carried out to assess the effects of soil amendment with phosphate (P), sewage sludge (SS) and iron salts (Fe) on arsenic extractability and its uptake by grass. Four kinds of soil material, containing 356-5350 mg kg(-1) As, were examined. Velvetgrass proved to be more resistant than ryegrass to the toxicity of soil arsenic. Ammonium sulphate extractability of As in soils correlated well with As concentrations in the biomass of both grass species. In three of four tested soils, application of Fe failed to decrease As extractability and to reduce its concentrations in the aboveground parts of grasses. Application of P and SS resulted in increased As solubility in soils, but their effects on plant biomass and As uptake were ambiguous. SS had a strong beneficial influence on the growth of velvetgrass, while such an effect was not observed for ryegrass.

  17. Structure-Function Analyses of a Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase from Perennial Ryegrass Reveal the Molecular Basis for Substrate Preference[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Gordon V.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Tu, Yi; Mouradov, Aidyn; Spangenberg, German; Noel, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Lignin forms from the polymerization of phenylpropanoid-derived building blocks (the monolignols), whose modification through hydroxylation and O-methylation modulates the chemical and physical properties of the lignin polymer. The enzyme caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) is central to lignin biosynthesis. It is often targeted in attempts to engineer the lignin composition of transgenic plants for improved forage digestibility, pulping efficiency, or utility in biofuel production. Despite intensive investigation, the structural determinants of the regiospecificity and substrate selectivity of COMT remain poorly defined. Reported here are x-ray crystallographic structures of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) COMT (Lp OMT1) in open conformational state, apo- and holoenzyme forms and, most significantly, in a closed conformational state complexed with the products S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and sinapaldehyde. The product-bound complex reveals the post-methyl-transfer organization of COMT’s catalytic groups with reactant molecules and the fully formed phenolic-ligand binding site. The core scaffold of the phenolic ligand forges a hydrogen-bonding network involving the 4-hydroxy group that anchors the aromatic ring and thereby permits only metahydroxyl groups to be positioned for transmethylation. While distal from the site of transmethylation, the propanoid tail substituent governs the kinetic preference of ryegrass COMT for aldehydes over alcohols and acids due to a single hydrogen bond donor for the C9 oxygenated moiety dictating the preference for an aldehyde. PMID:21177481

  18. Overexpression of a Chimeric Gene, OsDST-SRDX, Improved Salt Tolerance of Perennial Ryegrass

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Huifang; Ye, Wenxing; Liu, Yanrong; Li, Dayong; Wang, Kexin; Zhang, Wanjun

    2016-01-01

    The Drought and Salt Tolerance gene (DST) encodes a C2H2 zinc finger transcription factor, which negatively regulates salt tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa). Phylogenetic analysis of six homologues of DST genes in different plant species revealed that DST genes were conserved evolutionarily. Here, the rice DST gene was linked to an SRDX domain for gene expression repression based on the Chimeric REpressor gene-Silencing Technology (CRES-T) to make a chimeric gene (OsDST-SRDX) construct and introduced into perennial ryegrass by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Integration and expression of the OsDST-SRDX in transgenic plants were tested by PCR and RT-PCR, respectively. Transgenic lines overexpressing the OsDST-SRDX fusion gene showed obvious phenotypic differences and clear resistance to salt-shock and to continuous salt stresses compared to non-transgenic plants. Physiological analyses including relative leaf water content, electrolyte leakage, proline content, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, H2O2 content and sodium and potassium accumulation indicated that the OsDST-SRDX fusion gene enhanced salt tolerance in transgenic perennial ryegrass by altering a wide range of physiological responses. To our best knowledge this study is the first report of utilizing Chimeric Repressor gene-Silencing Technology (CRES-T) in turfgrass and forage species for salt-tolerance improvement. PMID:27251327

  19. Linkage Disequilibrium Among Two Lolium Perenne CBF Genes and Association With Freezing Susceptibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial ryegrass(Lolium perenne) is one of the most abundantly utilized forage and turfgrass species; however, its lack of tolerance to freezing temperatures relative to other forage/turf grasses limits its use. A pseudo-testcross genetic mapping population was previously developed for perennial ...

  20. Transforming a Fructan:Fructan 6G-Fructosyltransferase from Perennial Ryegrass into a Sucrose:Sucrose 1-Fructosyltransferase1[C

    PubMed Central

    Lasseur, Bertrand; Schroeven, Lindsey; Lammens, Willem; Le Roy, Katrien; Spangenberg, German; Manduzio, Hélène; Vergauwen, Rudy; Lothier, Jérémy; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Van den Ende, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Fructosyltransferases (FTs) synthesize fructans, fructose polymers accumulating in economically important cool-season grasses and cereals. FTs might be crucial for plant survival under stress conditions in species in which fructans represent the major form of reserve carbohydrate, such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne). Two FT types can be distinguished: those using sucrose (S-type enzymes: sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase [1-SST], sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase) and those using fructans (F-type enzymes: fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferase [1-FFT], fructan:fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase [6G-FFT]) as preferential donor substrate. Here, we report, to our knowledge for the first time, the transformation of an F-type enzyme (6G-FFT/1-FFT) into an S-type enzyme (1-SST) using perennial ryegrass 6G-FFT/1-FFT (Lp6G-FFT/1-FFT) and 1-SST (Lp1-SST) as model enzymes. This transformation was accomplished by mutating three amino acids (N340D, W343R, and S415N) in the vicinity of the active site of Lp6G-FFT/1-FFT. In addition, effects of each amino acid mutation alone or in combination have been studied. Our results strongly suggest that the amino acid at position 343 (tryptophan or arginine) can greatly determine the donor substrate characteristics by influencing the position of the amino acid at position 340. Moreover, the presence of arginine-343 negatively affects the formation of neofructan-type linkages. The results are compared with recent findings on donor substrate selectivity within the group of plant cell wall invertases and fructan exohydrolases. Taken together, these insights contribute to our knowledge of structure/function relationships within plant family 32 glycosyl hydrolases and open the way to the production of tailor-made fructans on a larger scale. PMID:18952861

  1. Differential Responses of CO2 Assimilation, Carbohydrate Allocation and Gene Expression to NaCl Stress in Perennial Ryegrass with Different Salt Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Hu, Longxing; Zhang, Xunzhong; Zhang, Pingping; Zhao, Zhuangjun; Fu, Jinmin

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of NaCl stress on perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) photosynthesis and carbohydrate flux. The objective of this study was to understand the carbohydrate metabolism and identify the gene expression affected by salinity stress. Seventy-four days old seedlings of two perennial ryegrass accessions (salt-sensitive ‘PI 538976’ and salt-tolerant ‘Overdrive’) were subjected to three levels of salinity stress for 5 days. Turf quality in all tissues (leaves, stems and roots) of both grass accessions negatively and significantly correlated with GFS (Glu+Fru+Suc) content, except for ‘Overdrive’ stems. Relative growth rate (RGR) in leaves negatively and significantly correlated with GFS content in ‘Overdrive’ (P<0.01) and ‘PI 538976’ (P<0.05) under salt stress. ‘Overdrive’ had higher CO2 assimilation and Fv/Fm than ‘PI 538976’. Intercellular CO2 concentration, however, was higher in ‘PI 538976’ treated with 400 mM NaCl relative to that with 200 mM NaCl. GFS content negatively and significantly correlated with RGR in ‘Overdrive’ and ‘PI 538976’ leaves and in ‘PI 538976’ stems and roots under salt stress. In leaves, carbohydrate allocation negatively and significantly correlated with RGR (r2 = 0.83, P<0.01) and turf quality (r2 = 0.88, P<0.01) in salt-tolerant ‘Overdrive’, however, the opposite trend for salt-sensitive ‘PI 538976’ (r2 = 0.71, P<0.05 for RGR; r2 = 0.62, P>0.05 for turf quality). A greater up-regulation in the expression of SPS, SS, SI, 6-SFT gene was observed in ‘Overdrive’ than ‘PI 538976’. A higher level of SPS and SS expression in leaves was found in ‘PI 538976’ relative to ‘Overdrive’. Accumulation of hexoses in roots, stems and leaves can induce a feedback repression to photosynthesis in salt-stressed perennial ryegrass and the salt tolerance may be changed with the carbohydrate allocation in leaves and stems. PMID:23799072

  2. Integrated assessment of air pollution by metals and source apportionment using ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Illi, Júlia Carolina; Vancetta, Tafael; Alves, Darlan Daniel; Osório, Daniela Montanari Migliavacca; Bianchin, Liane; de Quevedo, Daniela Müller; Juchem, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    One of the biggest environmental problems existing today is air pollution, which is characterized by the presence of toxic gases and metal pollutants, the latter of which is generally associated with emissions of particulate matter (PM) from industries or automotive vehicles. Biomonitoring is a method that can be used to assess air pollution levels because it makes it possible to determine what effects these air pollutants cause in living organisms and their responses. The species Lolium multiflorum Lam., known as ryegrass, is considered a good bioindicator of metals, since it accumulates these substances during exposure. This study proposes to conduct an integrated assessment of air quality using two different monitoring methodologies: biomonitoring with L. multiflorum and active monitoring in areas with different levels of urbanization and industrialization. Concentrations found in ryegrass plants revealed high levels of Pb, Cr, Zn, and Cu, indicating that vehicular and industrial emissions were the main sources of pollution. Analysis of PM also revealed soot and biogenic particles, which can transport metals. Therefore, with the proposed method, the anthropogenic impact on air pollution in the investigated area could be clearly demonstrated.

  3. Geostatistics for spatial genetic structures: study of wild populations of perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Monestiez, P; Goulard, M; Charmet, G

    1994-04-01

    Methods based on geostatistics were applied to quantitative traits of agricultural interest measured on a collection of 547 wild populations of perennial ryegrass in France. The mathematical background of these methods, which resembles spatial autocorrelation analysis, is briefly described. When a single variable is studied, the spatial structure analysis is similar to spatial autocorrelation analysis, and a spatial prediction method, called "kriging", gives a filtered map of the spatial pattern over all the sampled area. When complex interactions of agronomic traits with different evaluation sites define a multivariate structure for the spatial analysis, geostatistical methods allow the spatial variations to be broken down into two main spatial structures with ranges of 120 km and 300 km, respectively. The predicted maps that corresponded to each range were interpreted as a result of the isolation-by-distance model and as a consequence of selection by environmental factors. Practical collecting methodology for breeders may be derived from such spatial structures.

  4. Investigating the Mechanism of Glyphosate Resistance in Rigid Ryegrass (Lolium rigidum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum herbicide that has been used extensively for more than 20 yr. The first glyphosate-resistant weed biotype appeared in 1996; it involved a rigid ryegrass population from Australia that exhibited an LD50 value approximately 10-fold higher than that of sensitive biotypes....

  5. Interannual variation in nitrous oxide emissions from perennial ryegrass/white clover grassland used for dairy production.

    PubMed

    Burchill, William; Li, Dejun; Lanigan, Gary J; Williams, Micheal; Humphreys, James

    2014-10-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions are subject to intra- and interannual variation due to changes in weather and management. This creates significant uncertainties when quantifying estimates of annual N2 O emissions from grazed grasslands. Despite these uncertainties, the majority of studies are short-term in nature (<1 year) and as a consequence, there is a lack of data on interannual variation in N2 O emissions. The objectives of this study were to (i) quantify annual N2 O emissions and (ii) assess the causes of interannual variation in emissions from grazed perennial ryegrass/white clover grassland. Nitrous oxide emissions were measured from fertilized and grazed perennial ryegrass/white clover grassland (WC) and from perennial ryegrass plots that were not grazed and did not receive N input (GB), over 4 years from 2008 to 2012 in Ireland (52°51'N, 08°21'W). The annual N2 O-N emissions (kg ha(-1); mean ± SE) ranged from 4.4 ± 0.2 to 34.4 ± 5.5 from WC and from 1.7 ± 0.8 to 6.3 ± 1.2 from GB. Interannual variation in N2 O emissions was attributed to differences in annual rainfall, monthly (December) soil temperatures and variation in N input. Such substantial interannual variation in N2 O emissions highlights the need for long-term studies of emissions from managed pastoral systems.

  6. Enhancement of nitrogen and phosphorus removal from eutrophic water by economic plant annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) with ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Sheng, Guo-ping; Wu, Yue-jin; Yu, Zeng-liang; Bañuelos, Gary S; Yu, Han-qing

    2014-01-01

    Severe eutrophication of surface water has been a major problem of increasing environmental concern worldwide. In the present study, economic plant annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) was grown in floating mats as an economic plant-based treatment system to evaluate its potential after ion implantation for removing nutrients in simulated eutrophic water. The specific weight growth rate of L. multiflorum with ion implantation was significantly greater than that of the control, and the peroxidase, nitrate reductase, and acid phosphatase activities of the irradiated L. multiflorum were found to be greater than those plants without ion implantation. Higher total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiencies were obtained for the L. multiflorum irradiated with 25 keV 5.2 × 10(16) N(+) ions/cm(2) and 30 keV 4.16 × 10(16) N(+) ions/cm(2), respectively (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the nitrogen and phosphorus contents in the plant biomass with ion implantation were also greater than those in the control and were positively correlated with TN and TP supplied. L. multiflorum itself was directly responsible for 39-49 and 47-58 % of the overall N and P removal in the experiment, respectively. The research results suggested that ion implantation could become a promising approach for increasing phytoremediation efficiency of nutrients from eutrophic water by L. multiflorum.

  7. Temporal dynamics of the metabolically active rumen bacteria colonizing fresh perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Huws, Sharon A; Edwards, Joan E; Creevey, Christopher J; Rees Stevens, Pauline; Lin, Wanchang; Girdwood, Susan E; Pachebat, Justin A; Kingston-Smith, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated successional colonization of fresh perennial ryegrass (PRG) by the rumen microbiota over time. Fresh PRG was incubated in sacco in the rumens of three Holstein × Friesian cows over a period of 8 h, with samples recovered at various times. The diversity of attached bacteria was assessed using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA (cDNA). Results showed that plant epiphytic communities either decreased to low relative abundances or disappeared following rumen incubation, and that temporal colonization of the PRG by the rumen bacteria was biphasic with primary (1 and 2 h) and secondary (4-8 h) events evident with the transition period being with 2-4 h. A decrease in sequence reads pertaining to Succinivibrio spp. and increases in Pseudobutyrivibrio, Roseburia and Ruminococcus spp. (the latter all order Clostridiales) were evident during secondary colonization. Irrespective of temporal changes, the continually high abundances of Butyrivibrio, Fibrobacter, Olsenella and Prevotella suggest that they play a major role in the degradation of the plant. It is clear that a temporal understanding of the functional roles of these microbiota within the rumen is now required to unravel the role of these bacteria in the ruminal degradation of fresh PRG.

  8. Mineral accumulation by perennial grasses in a high rainfall environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Straw produced as a co-product of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata), tall fescue (Schedonorus phoenix (Scop.) Holub), and Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) seed production in the high rainfall area of western Oregon as well as clippings from urban and recr...

  9. Allergenic fragments of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) pollen allergen Lol p IV.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, K S; Ekramoddoullah, A K; Kisil, F T

    1989-01-01

    To facilitate studies on establishing the nature of structure/function relationships of allergens, ryegrass pollen allergen, Lol p IV, was cleaved into smaller fragments by cyanogen bromide (CNBr) and the resulting peptides were further digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were then fractionated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a C-18 reverse phase column. The allergenic activity of the HPLC fractions was evaluated in terms of their ability to inhibit the binding of 125I-Lol p IV to serum IgE antibodies of a grass-allergic patient. Many of these fractions inhibited the binding between the native allergen and IgE antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitions were specific, i.e., the fractions did not inhibit the binding between 125I-Lol p I (a group-I ryegrass pollen allergen) and the IgE antibodies present in the allergic human serum. The possibility that the allergenic peptide fractions were contaminated by the native undegraded allergen, which might have accounted for the observed inhibition, was ruled out by the fact that the native allergen could not be detected by SDS-PAGE and the elution profiles of allergenically active peptides did not coincide with that of native allergen. One of the allergenic sites recognized by monoclonal antibody (Mab) 90, i.e., site A, was located in HPLC fractions 90-100 while another allergenic site B (recognized by Mab 12) appeared to be lost following the sequential digestion of Lol p IV with CNBr and trypsin.

  10. Genotype _ environment interactions for forage yield of Lolium perenne L. sward plots in Ireland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lolium perenne L. (perennial ryegrass) is by far the most widely sown grass species in Ireland. Genotype by environment (G by E) interactions are a frequent occurrence in forage yield evaluations. The objectives were to determine (i) the nature and relative magnitudes of the pertinent G by E interac...

  11. A damage function for stem rust of perennial ryegrass seed crops.

    PubMed

    Pfender, W

    2009-05-01

    Observations of naturally occurring stem rust epidemics and seed yields in perennial ryegrass were taken in 19 field experiments conducted over the course of 9 years. Epidemic severity differed among years and also among experimental treatments (fungicide regimes) within years. In each experiment, attainable yield was represented by the nondiseased treatment, and yields of other treatments were expressed as relative yield (a proportion of the attainable yield). Yield loss (difference between attainable and actual yield) in the nonprotected treatments was 0 to 98% due to yearly differences in epidemic conditions. Fungicides were effective in reducing stem rust injury and damage when properly timed. Disease severity in the upper canopy was estimated at approximately weekly intervals and converted to proportion of the plant area diseased. The complementary value, proportion of area healthy, and its integral over time, healthy area duration (HAD), were calculated. Regression analyses were conducted using various phenological time intervals of HAD as the independent variable. The best intervals of HAD for predicting relative yield were centered on the midpoint time between anthesis and harvest. The regression equation (r2=0.89) for relative yield as a function of HAD during the 3-week interval was selected and rearranged to produce a quadratic damage function. This damage function estimates yield loss at 5, 22, and 42% for critical-interval diseased proportions of 1, 5, and 10%, respectively. Yield data collected from field experiments not used in model development correlated well (r2=0.9) with yields predicted by the damage function from their observed disease severity.

  12. Effect of D2O on growth properties and chemical structure of annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barbara R; Bali, Garima; Reeves, David T; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Sun, Qining; Shah, Riddhi S; Ragauskas, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    In present paper, we report the production and detailed structural analysis of deuterium-enriched rye grass (Lolium multiflorum) for neutron scattering experiments. An efficient method to produce deuterated biomass was developed by designing hydroponic perfusion chambers. In preliminary studies, the partial deuterated rye samples were grown in increasing levels of D2O to study the seed germination and the level of deuterium incorporation as a function of D2O concentration. Solution NMR method indicated 36.9 % deuterium incorporation in 50 % D2O grown annual rye samples and further significant increase in the deuterium incorporation level was observed by germinating the rye seedlings in H2O and growing in 50 % D2O inside the perfusion chambers. Moreover, in an effort to compare the substrate characteristics related to enzymatic hydrolysis on deuterated and protiated version of biomass, annual rye grown in 50 % D2O was selected for detailed biomass characterization studies. The compositional analyses, degree of polymerization and cellulose crystallinity were compared with its protiated control. The cellulose molecular weight indicated slight variation with deuteration; however, hemicellulose molecular weights and cellulose crystallinity remain unaffected with the deuteration. Besides the minor differences in biomass components, the development of deuterated biomass for neutron scattering application is essential to understand the complex biomass conversion processes.

  13. Interannual variation in nitrous oxide emissions from perennial ryegrass/white clover grassland used for dairy production

    PubMed Central

    Burchill, William; Li, Dejun; Lanigan, Gary J; Williams, Micheal; Humphreys, James

    2014-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are subject to intra- and interannual variation due to changes in weather and management. This creates significant uncertainties when quantifying estimates of annual N2O emissions from grazed grasslands. Despite these uncertainties, the majority of studies are short-term in nature (<1 year) and as a consequence, there is a lack of data on interannual variation in N2O emissions. The objectives of this study were to (i) quantify annual N2O emissions and (ii) assess the causes of interannual variation in emissions from grazed perennial ryegrass/white clover grassland. Nitrous oxide emissions were measured from fertilized and grazed perennial ryegrass/white clover grassland (WC) and from perennial ryegrass plots that were not grazed and did not receive N input (GB), over 4 years from 2008 to 2012 in Ireland (52°51′N, 08°21′W). The annual N2O-N emissions (kg ha−1; mean ± SE) ranged from 4.4 ± 0.2 to 34.4 ± 5.5 from WC and from 1.7 ± 0.8 to 6.3 ± 1.2 from GB. Interannual variation in N2O emissions was attributed to differences in annual rainfall, monthly (December) soil temperatures and variation in N input. Such substantial interannual variation in N2O emissions highlights the need for long-term studies of emissions from managed pastoral systems. PMID:24706411

  14. Milk production and composition of mid-lactation cows consuming perennial ryegrass-and chicory-based diets.

    PubMed

    Muir, S K; Ward, G N; Jacobs, J L

    2014-02-01

    Dry matter intakes (DMI), nutrient selection, and milk production responses of dairy cows grazing 3 herbage-based diets offered at 2 allowances were measured. The 2 allowances were 20 (low) and 30 (high) kg of dry matter (DM)/cow per day and these were applied to 3 herbage types: perennial ryegrass (PRG) and chicory (CHIC+) monocultures and a mixed sward of chicory and perennial ryegrass (MIX). The CHIC+ diet was supplemented with alfalfa hay (approximately 2 kg of DM/cow per day) to maintain dietary neutral detergent fiber (NDF) concentration and all diets were supplemented with energy-based pellets (6 kg of DM/cow per day). Holstein-Friesian dairy cows averaging 136 ± 30 d in milk were allocated to 4 replicates of the 6 treatments using stratified randomization procedures. Cows were adapted to their experimental diets over a 14-d period, with measurements of DMI, milk yield, and composition conducted over the following 10 d. Herbage DMI was lowest (12.8 vs. 14.0 kg of DM/d) for CHIC+ compared with the MIX and PRG, although total forage intake (grazed herbage plus hay) was similar (14.0 to 15.0 kg of DM/d) across the 3 treatments. Milk production, milk protein, and milk fat concentrations were not different between herbage types. Grazed herbage DMI increased with increasing herbage allowance and this was associated with increased milk protein concentration (3.23 to 3.34%) and total casein production (41.7 to 43.6 mg/g). Concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk fat, particularly linoleic acid, were increased in milk from cows offered the CHIC+ or the MIX diets, indicating potential benefits of chicory herbage on milk fatty acid concentrations. Although feeding CHIC+ or MIX did not increase milk yield, these herbage types could be used as an alternative to perennial ryegrass pasture in spring.

  15. Phosphorus status and microbial community of paddy soil with the growth of annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) under different phosphorus fertilizer treatments*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hai-chao; Wang, Guang-huo

    2009-01-01

    Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) was grown in paddy soil in pots under different phosphorus (P) fertilizer treatments to investigate changes of P fractions and microbial community of the soil. The treatments included Kunyang phosphate rock (KPR) applications at 50 mg P/kg (KPR50) and 250 mg P/kg (KPR250), mono-calcium phosphate (MCP) application at 50 mg P/kg (MCP50), and the control without P application. The results showed that KPR50, KPR250, and MCP50 applications significantly increased the dry weight of the ryegrass by 13%, 38%, and 55%, and increased P uptake by 19%, 135%, and 324%, respectively. Compared with MCP50, the relative effectiveness of KPR50 and KPR250 treatments in ryegrass production was about 23% and 68%, respectively. After one season of ryegrass growth, the KPR50, KPR250, and MCP50 applications increased soil-available P by 13.4%, 26.8%, and 55.2%, respectively. More than 80% of the applied KPR-P remained as HCl-P fraction in the soil. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis showed that the total and bacterial PLFAs were significantly higher in the soils with KPR250 and MCP50 treatments compared with KPR50 and control. The latter had no significant difference in the total or bacterial PLFAs. The KPR50, KPR250, and MCP50 treatments increased fungal PLFA by 69%, 103%, and 69%, respectively. Both the principal component analysis and the cluster analysis of the PLFA data suggest that P treatments altered the microbial community composition of the soils, and that P availability might be an important contributor to the changes in the microbial community structure during the ryegrass growth in the paddy soils. PMID:19817001

  16. Temporal Metagenomic and Metabolomic Characterization of Fresh Perennial Ryegrass Degradation by Rumen Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mayorga, Olga L.; Kingston-Smith, Alison H.; Kim, Eun J.; Allison, Gordon G.; Wilkinson, Toby J.; Hegarty, Matthew J.; Theodorou, Michael K.; Newbold, Charles J.; Huws, Sharon A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between ingested plant material and the attached microbiome is essential for developing methodologies to improve ruminant nutrient use efficiency. We have previously shown that perennial ryegrass (PRG) rumen bacterial colonization events follow a primary (up to 4 h) and secondary (after 4 h) pattern based on the differences in diversity of the attached bacteria. In this study, we investigated temporal niche specialization of primary and secondary populations of attached rumen microbiota using metagenomic shotgun sequencing as well as monitoring changes in the plant chemistry using mid-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Metagenomic Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (MG-RAST) taxonomical analysis of shotgun metagenomic sequences showed that the genera Butyrivibrio, Clostridium, Eubacterium, Prevotella, and Selenomonas dominated the attached microbiome irrespective of time. MG-RAST also showed that Acidaminococcus, Bacillus, Butyrivibrio, and Prevotella rDNA increased in read abundance during secondary colonization, whilst Blautia decreased in read abundance. MG-RAST Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional analysis also showed that the primary function of the attached microbiome was categorized broadly within “metabolism;” predominantly amino acid, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism and transport. Most sequence read abundances (51.6, 43.8, and 50.0% of COG families pertaining to amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, respectively) within these categories were higher in abundance during secondary colonization. Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathways analysis confirmed that the PRG-attached microbiota present at 1 and 4 h of rumen incubation possess a similar functional capacity, with only a few pathways being uniquely found in only one incubation time point only. FT-IR data for the plant residues also showed that the main changes in plant chemistry between primary and secondary colonization was

  17. Conservation characteristics of wilted perennial ryegrass silage made using biological or chemical additives.

    PubMed

    Conaghan, P; O'Kiely, P; O'Mara, F P

    2010-02-01

    The effects of 7 additive treatments on the fermentation and aerobic stability characteristics of wilted grass silage were studied under laboratory conditions. Treatments included no additive applied (untreated control), ammonium tetraformate at 3 and 6 L/t, homofermentative lactic acid bacteria alone ((ho)LAB), a mixture of Lactobacillus buchneri plus homofermentative lactic acid bacteria ((he+ho)LAB), and an antimicrobial mixture of sodium benzoate, sodium propionate, sodium nitrite, and hexamethylenetetramine at 2.5 and 5 L/t. Additives were compared across 3 consecutive harvests of 2 perennial ryegrass cultivars (AberDart and Fennema) following a 24-h wilt. Silos were opened after at least 100 d of ensilage and aerobic stability was assessed. Season of harvest had a large effect on grass composition at ensiling, producing herbages of relatively low (approximately 145g/kg), medium (approximately 250g/kg), and high (approximately 365g/kg) dry matter (DM) concentrations. Within harvests there were lesser differences between cultivars. The untreated control and (ho)LAB additive produced badly fermented silage from the low-DM herbages and well-fermented silage from the medium- and high-DM herbages. The ammonium tetraformate treatments produced both well-fermented and badly fermented silage from the low-DM herbages depending on cultivar, and consistently well-fermented silage from the medium- and high-DM herbages. The (he+ho)LAB silages had similar or slightly lower standard of fermentation than the untreated and (ho)LAB silages. The antimicrobial mixture produced more silages of lower standard of fermentation than the untreated control and ammonium tetraformate and (ho)LAB additives. All additive treatments, including the untreated control, failed to consistently increase residual water-soluble carbohydrate concentrations at silo opening. Ammonium tetraformate at 6 L/t was the most successful and (he+ho)LAB the least successful additive at increasing residual WSC

  18. Phylogenetic and functional diversity of alkane degrading bacteria associated with Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) in a petroleum oil-contaminated environment.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Sohail; Andria, Verania; Reichenauer, Thomas G; Smalla, Kornelia; Sessitsch, Angela

    2010-12-15

    Twenty-six different plant species were analyzed regarding their performance in soil contaminated with petroleum oil. Two well-performing species, Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum var. Taurus), Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus var. Leo) and the combination of these two plants were selected to study the ecology of plant-associated, culturable alkane-degrading bacteria. Hydrocarbon degrading bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere, root interior and shoot interior and subjected to the analysis of 16S rRNA gene, the 16S and 23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and alkane hydroxylase genes. Furthermore, we investigated whether alkane hydroxylase genes are plasmid located. Higher numbers of culturable, alkane-degrading bacteria were associated with Italian ryegrass, which were also characterized by a higher diversity, particularly in the plant interior. Only half of the isolated bacteria hosted known alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and cytochrome P153-like). Degradation genes were found both on plasmids as well as in the chromosome. In regard to application of plants for rhizodegradation, where support of numerous degrading bacteria is essential for efficient break-down of pollutants, Italian ryegrass seems to be more appropriate than Birdsfoot trefoil.

  19. Anthelmintic and nutritional effects of heather supplementation on Cashmere goats grazing perennial ryegrass-white clover pastures.

    PubMed

    Osoro, K; Mateos-Sanz, A; Frutos, P; García, U; Ortega-Mora, L M; Ferreira, L M M; Celaya, R; Ferre, I

    2007-03-01

    To investigate anthelmintic and nutritional effects of heather supplementation in goats grazing perennial ryegrass-white clover pastures, 40 dry Cashmere goats were randomly assigned to 4 treatments in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement: 2 grazing management treatments (supplementation with heather vs. nonsupplementation) and 2 anthelmintic treatments (treatment vs. nontreatment). Goats grazed continuously from May to September 2004. At the end of the grazing period, the number of dead goats due to gastrointestinal parasitism was 1 in the group supplemented with heather and dosed with anthelmintic, 4 in the group that received neither supplementation nor anthelmintic, and 0 in the other 2 groups. For goats that did not receive anthelmintic treatment, the percentage of heather in the diet was negatively correlated with fecal egg count in August (r = -0.59, P < 0.05) and September (r = -0.49, P < 0.1) and positively correlated (r = 0.54, P < 0.05) with BW changes during the grazing season. Therefore, the correlation coefficient between BW change and fecal egg count was negative (r = -0.62, P < 0.05). Rumen ammonia concentrations were always lower in supplemented goats (P < 0.05). However, VFA concentrations were greater in goats consuming heather (58.9 vs. 50.9 mmol/L), which suggests that ruminal fermentation was not adversely affected by consumption of tannins. Heather availability in the vegetation might represent a valuable opportunity and sustainable method to control gastrointestinal nematode infections in a goat production system based on grazing perennial ryegrass-white clover pastures.

  20. Effect of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) roots inoculation using different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) species on sorption of iron-cyanide (Fe-CN) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sut, Magdalena; Boldt-Burisch, Katja; Raab, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Soils and groundwater on sites of the former Manufactured Gas Plants (MGPs) are contaminated with various complex iron-cyanides (Fe-CN). Phytoremediation is a promising tool in stabilization and remediation of Fe-CN affected soils, however, it can be a challenging task due to extreme adverse and toxic conditions. Phytoremediation may be enhanced via rhizosphere microbial activity, which can cooperate on the degradation, transformation and uptake of the contaminants. Recently, increasing number of scientist reports improved plants performance in the removal of toxic compounds with the support of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi (AMF). Series of batch experiments using potassium hexacyanoferrate (II) solutions, in varying concentrations, were used to study the effect of ryegrass roots (Lolium perenne L.) inoculation with Rhizophagus irregularis and a mixture of Rhizophagus irregularis, Funneliformis mosseae, Rhizophagus aggregatus, and Claroideoglomus etunicatum on Fe-CN sorption. Results indicated significantly higher colonization of R. irregularis than for the mixture of AMF species on ryegrass roots. Sorption experiments revealed significantly higher reduction of total CN and free CN content in the mycorrhizal roots, indicating greater cyanide decrease in the treatment inoculated with R. irregularis. Our study indicates contribution of AM fungi in phytoremediation of Fe-CN contaminated soil.

  1. Bioaccumulation of metals in ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) following the application of lime stabilised, thermally dried and anaerobically digested sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Healy, M G; Ryan, P C; Fenton, O; Peyton, D P; Wall, D P; Morrison, L

    2016-08-01

    The uptake and accumulation of metals in plants is a potential pathway for the transfer of environmental contaminants in the food chain, and poses potential health and environmental risks. In light of increased population growth and urbanisation, the safe disposal of sewage sludge, which can contain significant levels of toxic contaminants, remains an environmental challenge globally. The aims of this experiment were to apply municipal sludge, having undergone treatment by thermal drying, anaerobic digestion, and lime stabilisation, to permanent grassland in order to assess the bioaccumulation of metals (B, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Nb, Mo, Sb, Ba, W, Pb, Fe, Cd) by perennial ryegrass over a period of up to 18 weeks after application. The legislation currently prohibits use of grassland for fodder or grazing for at least three weeks after application of treated sewage sludge (biosolids). Five treatments were used: thermally dried (TD), anaerobically digested (AD) and lime stabilised (LS) sludge all from one wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), AD sludge from another WWTP, and a study control (grassland only, without application of biosolids). In general, there was no significant difference in metal content of the ryegrass between micro-plots that received treated municipal sludge and the control over the study duration. The metal content of the ryegrass was below the levels at which phytotoxicity occurs and below the maximum levels specified for animal feeds.

  2. A QTL analysis of host plant effects on fungal endophyte biomass and alkaloid expression in perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Faville, Marty J; Briggs, Lyn; Cao, Mingshu; Koulman, Albert; Jahufer, M Z Zulfi; Koolaard, John; Hume, David E

    The association between perennial ryegrass (Loliumperenne L.) and its Epichloë fungal endophyte symbiont, Epichloëfestucae var. lolii, supports the persistence of ryegrass-based pastures principally by producing bioactive alkaloid compounds that deter invertebrate herbivory. The host plant genotype affects endophyte trait expression, and elucidation of the underlying genetic mechanisms would enhance understanding of the symbiosis and support improvement of inplanta endophyte performance through plant breeding. Rapid metabolite profiling and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to quantify endophyte alkaloids and mycelial mass (MM) in leaves harvested, in consecutive autumns, from an F1 mapping population hosting standard toxic endophyte. Co-aligned quantitative trait loci (QTL) on linkage groups (LG)2, LG4 and LG7 for MM and concentrations of alkaloids peramine and ergovaline confirmed host plant effects on both MM and alkaloid level and inferred the effect on alkaloids was modulated through the quantity of endophyte present in the leaf tissue. For ergovaline, host regulation independent of endophyte concentration was also indicated, by the presence of MM-independent ergovaline QTL on LG4 and LG7. Partitioning of host genetic influence between MM-dependent and MM-independent mechanisms was also observed for the alkaloid N-formylloline (NFL), in a second mapping population harbouring a tall fescue-sourced endophyte. Single-marker analysis on repeated MM and NFL measures identified marker-trait associations at nine genome locations, four affecting both NFL and MM but five influencing NFL concentration alone. Co-occurrence of QTL on LG3, LG4 and LG7 in both mapping populations is evidence for host regulatory loci effective across genetic backgrounds and independent of endophyte variant. Variation at these loci may be exploited using marker-assisted breeding to improve endophyte trait expression in different host population × endophyte combinations.

  3. ESPS gene amplification endows resistance to glyphosate in Italian ryegrass (Lolium perene ssp multiflorum) from Arkansas, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to glyphosate in weed species is a major challenge for the sustainability of glyphosate use in crop and non-crop systems, and especially in glyphosate-resistant crops. A glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass population has been identified in Arkansas. This research was conducted to elucid...

  4. Seed size effects on early seedling growth and response to applied nitrogen in annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of individual plants as experimental units may be necessary when resources are limited, but inter-plant variation risks obscuring differences among treatments. Experiments were undertaken to measure the effects of seed size on seedling size and response to applied nitrogen of annual ryegrass (Lo...

  5. EPSPS gene amplification in glyphosate-resistant in Italian ryegrass (Lolium perenne ssp. multiflorum) populations from Arkansas, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass was detected in Arkansas, USA in 2007. In 2014, 45 populations were confirmed resistant in eight counties across the state. The level of resistance and resistance mechanisms in six populations was studied to assess the severity of the problem and identify altern...

  6. Association of candidate genes with drought tolerance traits in diverse perennial ryegrass accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought is a major environmental stress limiting growth of perennial grasses in temperate regions. Plant drought tolerance is a complex trait that is controlled by multiple genes. Candidate gene association mapping provides a powerful tool for dissection of complex traits. Candidate gene association...

  7. Complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p II.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Shenbagamurthi, P; Marsh, D G

    1989-07-05

    The complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p II was determined by automated Edman degradation of the protein and selected fragments. Cleavage of the protein by enzymatic and chemical techniques established an unambiguous sequence for the protein. Lol p II contains 97 amino acid residues, with a calculated molecular weight of 10,882. The protein lacks cysteine and glutamine and shows no evidence of glycosylation. Theoretical predictions by Fraga's (Fraga, S. (1982) Can. J. Chem. 60, 2606-2610) and Hopp and Woods' (Hopp, T. P., and Woods, K. R. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78, 3824-3828) methods indicate the presence of four hydrophilic regions, which may contribute to sequential or parts of conformational B-cell epitopes. Analysis of amphipathic regions by Berzofsky's method indicates the presence of a highly amphipathic region, which may contain, or contribute to, an Ia/T-cell epitope. This latter segment of Lol p II was found to be highly homologous with an antibody-binding segment of the major rye allergen Lol p I and may explain why immune responsiveness to both the allergens is associated with HLA-DR3.

  8. H2O2 and Ca2+-based signaling and associated ion accumulation, antioxidant systems and secondary metabolism orchestrate the response to NaCl stress in perennial ryegrass

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Chen, Ke; Hu, Longxing; Amombo, Erick; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the interplay between Ca2+ and H2O2 signaling in stressed cool-season turfgrass. To understand better how Ca2+ and H2O2 signals are integrated to enhance grass acclimation to stress conditions, we analyzed the rearrangements of endogenous ion accumulation, antioxidant systems and secondary metabolism in roots, stems and leaves of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) treated with exogenous Ca2+ and H2O2 under salinity. Ca2+ signaling remarkably enhanced the physiological response to salt conditions. Ca2+ signaling could maintain ROS homeostasis in stressed grass by increasing the responses of antioxidant genes, proteins and enzymes. H2O2 signaling could activate ROS homeostasis by inducing antioxidant genes but weakened Ca2+ signaling in leaves. Furthermore, the metabolic profiles revealed that sugars and sugar alcohol accounted for 49.5–88.2% of all metabolites accumulation in all treated leaves and roots. However, the accumulation of these sugars and sugar alcohols displayed opposing trends between Ca2+ and H2O2 application in salt-stressed plants, which suggests that these metabolites are the common regulatory factor for Ca2+ and H2O2 signals. These findings assist in understanding better the integrated network in Ca2+ and H2O2 of cool-season turfgrass’ response to salinity. PMID:27805022

  9. Differential growth response and carbohydrate metabolism of global collection of perennial ryegrass accessions to submergence and recovery following de-submergence.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoqing; Luo, Na; Yan, Jiapei; Tang, Jinchi; Liu, Shuwei; Jiang, Yiwei

    2012-07-15

    Submergence can severely affect the growth of perennial grasses. The variations in growth and the physiological responses of perennial grass germplasm to submergence stress are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize the responses of diverse perennial ryegrass accessions to submergence and their recovery following de-submergence. One hundred globally collected perennial ryegrass accessions were submerged for 7d followed by 7d of recovery in two experiments (Exp 1 and Exp 2), respectively. Compared to the pattern of the controls, the overall distribution in leaf color, chlorophyll fluorescence, plant height (HT), and growth rate (GR) shifted toward a high frequency of lower values under submergence in both experiments. The accessions were generally grouped into three types: fast growth with maintenance of color (escape, T1), slow growth with maintenance of color (quiescence, T2), and slow growth with loss of color (susceptible, ST). Under submergence, T1 had higher HT and GR than the other two groups except for GR of T2 in Exp 2 and had higher water-soluble carbohydrate (WSC) and fructan concentrations, as well as fructan to WSC ratio, than ST in Exp 1. Recovery of HT and GR were generally close to that of the control level except for HT of ST in Exp 2, but the carbohydrates fully recovered in all types of plants after 7d of de-submergence. Differential responses of perennial ryegrass accessions to submergence are useful in creating more tolerant materials and in further characterizing physiological and molecular mechanisms of submergence tolerance.

  10. Herbage intake and ruminal digestion of dairy cows grazed on perennial ryegrass pasture either in the morning or evening.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Koichiro; Mitani, Tomohiro; Kondo, Seiji

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to clarify diurnal fluctuations of herbage intake, ruminal fermentation of herbage carbohydrates and proteins, and digesta particulate weight in the rumen of grazing dairy cows. Six ruminally cannulated, non-lactating dairy cows were grazed on perennial ryegrass/white clover pasture either in the morning (04.00 to 08.00 hours) or the evening (16.00 to 20.00 hours). Cows grazed in the evening spent more time (P < 0.01) and consumed more herbage (P < 0.01) compared with cows grazed in the morning. Higher (P < 0.05) daily mean concentrations of total volatile fatty acid, propionate and n-butyrate in rumen fluid were observed for cows grazed in the evening compared with cows grazed in the morning. Although cows grazed in the evening ingested more crude protein compared with cows grazed in the morning, no significant difference in NH3 -N concentration in rumen fluid was observed between them. The ratio of purine-derivative concentration to creatinine concentrations was higher (P < 0.01) in the urine of cows grazed in the evening than in cows grazed in the morning. These results clearly indicated that evening grazing was advantageous for dairy cows compared with morning grazing, in terms of ruminal fermentable energy intake and nitrogen utilization efficiency.

  11. In-vitro assessment of the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus plantarum KCC-24 isolated from Italian rye-grass (Lolium multiflorum) forage.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Mayakrishnan; Ilavenil, Soundharrajan; Kim, Da Hye; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Priya, Kannappan; Choi, Ki Choon

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the probiotic potential of the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum KCC-24 (L. plantarum KCC-24), that was isolated and characterized from Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) forage. The following experiments were performed to assess the probiotic characteristics such as antifungal activity, antibiotic susceptibility, resistance to low pH, stimulated gastric juice and bile salts, proteolytic activity, auto-aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity, and in vitro antioxidant property. The isolated L. plantarum KCC-24 exhibited significant antifungal activity against the various fungal strains of Aspergillus fumigatus (73.43%), Penicillium chrysogenum (59.04%), Penicillium roqueforti (56.67%), Botrytis elliptica (40.23%), Fusarium oxysporum (52.47%) and it was susceptible to numerous antibiotics, survived in low pH, was resistant to stimulated gastric juices and bile salts (0.3% w/v). Moreover, L. plantarum KCC-24 exhibited good proteolytic activity. In addition L. plantarum KCC-24 showed potent antioxidant and hydrogen peroxide resistant property. In conclusion, the isolated L. plantarum KCC-24 exhibited several characteristics to prove it's excellent as a potential probiotic candidate for developing quality food for ruminant animals and human.

  12. Stable isotope tracing: a powerful tool for selenium speciation and metabolic studies in non-hyperaccumulator plants (ryegrass Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Di Tullo, Pamela; Versini, Antoine; Bueno, Maïté; Le Hécho, Isabelle; Thiry, Yves; Biron, Philippe; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse; Pannier, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Selenium is both essential and toxic for mammals; the range between the two roles is narrow and not only dose-dependent but also related to the chemical species present in foodstuff. Unraveling the metabolism of Se in plants as a function of Se source may thus lead to ways to increase efficiency of fertilization procedures in selenium deficient regions. In this study, stable-isotope tracing was applied for the first time in plants to simultaneously monitor the bio-incorporation of two inorganic Se species commonly used as foodstuff enrichment sources. Occurrence and speciation of Se coming from different Se sources were investigated in root and leaf extracts of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), which had been co-exposed to two labeled Se species ((77)SeIV and (82)SeVI). Although the plant absorbed similar amounts of Se when supplied in the form of selenite or selenate, the results evidenced marked differences in speciation and tissues allocation. Selenite was converted into organic forms incorporated mostly into high molecular weight compounds with limited translocation to leaves, whereas selenate was highly mobile being little assimilated into organic forms. Double-spike isotopic tracer methodology makes it possible to compare the metabolism of two species-specific Se sources simultaneously in a single experiment and to analyze Se behavior in not-hyperaccumulator plants, the ICP-MS sensitivity being improved by the use of enriched isotopes.

  13. Enzymic and physicochemical characterization of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from diploid and tetraploid cultivars of perennial ryegrass

    SciTech Connect

    Rejda, J.M.; Johal, S.; Chollet, R.

    1981-09-01

    Homogeneous preparations of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase were isolated from several diploid and tetraploid cultivars of perennial ryegrass by three different purification protocols. The apparent K/sub m/ values for substrate CO/sub 2/ were essentially identical for the fully CO/sub 2//Mg/sup 2 +/-activated diploid and tetraploid enzymes, as were the kinetics for deactivation and activation of the CO/sub 2//Mg/sup 2 +/-activated and -depleted carboxylases, respectively. Similarly, virtually indistinguishable electrophoretic properties were observed for both the native and dissociated diploid and tetraploid ryegrass proteins, including native and subunit molecular weights and the isoelectric points of the native proteins and the large and small subunit component polypeptides. The quantity of carboxylase protein or total soluble leaf protein did not differ significantly between the diploid and tetraploid cultivars. Contrary to a previous report, these results indicate that increased ploidy level has had essentially no effect on the quantity or enzymic and physicochemical properties of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in perennial ryegrass.

  14. Phenanthrene and Pyrene Modify the Composition and Structure of the Cultivable Endophytic Bacterial Community in Ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuezhu; Jin, Li; Sun, Kai; Li, Shuang; Li, Xuelin; Ling, Wanting

    2016-01-01

    This study provides new insights into the dynamics of bacterial community structure during phytoremediation. The communities of cultivable autochthonous endophytic bacteria in ryegrass exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated with regard to their potential to biodegrade PAHs. Bacterial counts and 16S rRNA gene sequence were used in the microbiological evaluation. A total of 33 endophytic bacterial strains were isolated from ryegrass plants, which represented 15 different genera and eight different classes, respectively. Moreover, PAH contamination modified the composition and structure of the endophytic bacterial community in the plants. Bacillus sp., Pantoea sp., Pseudomonas sp., Arthrobacter sp., Pedobacter sp. and Delftia sp. were only isolated from the seedlings exposed to PAHs. Furthermore, the dominant genera in roots shifted from Enterobacter sp. to Serratia sp., Bacillus sp., Pantoea sp., and Stenotrophomonas sp., which could highly biodegrade phenanthrene (PHE). However, the diversity of endophytic bacterial community was decreased by exposure to the mixture of PAHs, and increased by respective exposure to PHE and pyrene (PYR), while the abundance was increased by PAH exposure. The results clearly indicated that the exposure of plants to PAHs would be beneficial for improving the effectiveness of phytoremediation of PAHs. PMID:27827894

  15. Identification of T-cell epitopes of Lol p 9, a major allergen of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) pollen.

    PubMed

    Blaher, B; Suphioglu, C; Knox, R B; Singh, M B; McCluskey, J; Rolland, J M

    1996-07-01

    T-cell recognition of Lol p 9, a major allergen of ryegrass pollen, was investigated by using a T-cell line and T-cell clones generated from the peripheral blood of an atopic donor. The T-cell line reacted with purified Lol p 9, as well as with crude ryegrass pollen extract, but failed to cross-react with Bermuda grass pollen extract. All of six T-cell clones generated from this line proliferated in response to Lol p 9. Epitope mapping was carried out with a panel of 34 overlapping synthetic peptides, which spanned the entire sequence of the Lol p 9 12R isoform. The T-cell line responded to two of the peptides, Lol p 9 (105-116) and Lol p 9 (193-204), whereas reactivity with one or other of these peptides was shown by five T-cell clones. These two peptides contained sequences consistent with motifs previously reported for major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted peptides. HLA antibody blocking studies showed that presentation of peptide Lol p 9 (105-116) to one T-cell clone was HLA-DR-restricted; this clone expressed a T helper cell phenotype (CD3+, CD4+) and the T-cell receptor alpha beta. The identification of immunodominant T-cell epitope(s) on allergens is essential for devising safer and more effective immunotherapy strategies, which can interrupt the chain of events leading to allergic disease.

  16. Digestion during continuous culture fermentation when replacing perennial ryegrass with barley and steam-flaked corn.

    PubMed

    Wales, W J; Kolver, E S; Egan, A R

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the optimal inclusion rate of grain required to maximize nutrient digestion of a diet based on highly digestible pasture. It was hypothesized that maximum digestion would occur at a rate of grain inclusion that resulted in a culture pH of 6.0, reflecting the pH below which fiber digestion would be expected to be compromised. Four dual-flow continuous culture fermenters were used to establish the effects on digestion of replacing freeze-dried, highly digestible ryegrass with 0, 15, 30, and 45% of dry matter as 60% barley, 35% steam-flaked corn, and 5% molasses mix. The respective composite diets were fed twice daily to mimic intake patterns observed in dairy cows offered supplements during milking and offered half their daily allowance of pasture after each milking. Digesta samples were collected during the last 3 d of each of four 9-d experimental periods. Average daily culture pH decreased linearly as proportion of cereal grain in the diet increased, with average daily pH ranging from 6.29 to 5.74. Concentrations of neutral detergent fiber and total fatty acids decreased linearly with increasing proportion of cereal grain in the diet. Digestion of organic matter (OM) was maximized at an interpolated value of 24% grain inclusion and culture pH of 6.0, but the difference in the OM digestibility over the range of grain treatments from 0 to 45% was small (3 percentage units) despite pH changes over a range of 6.3 to 5.7. The relatively small change in OM digestibility was explained by reduced fiber and crude protein digestibilities being balanced by an increased digestion of nonstructural carbohydrate. Although different relationships between ruminal pH and digestibility appear to exist when cows are fed pasture alone compared with a total mixed ration, when starch supplements are included in pasture diets, the relationships associated with feeding a total mixed ration may then be more likely to apply.

  17. Tilletia vankyi, a new species of reticulate-spored bunt fungus with non-conjugating basidiospores infecting species of Festuca and Lolium.

    PubMed

    Carris, Lori M; Castlebury, Lisa A; Huang, Guoming; Alderman, Steve C; Luo, Jiafeng; Bao, Xiaodong

    2007-12-01

    A bunt fungus, exhibiting a spore germination pattern unique to known reticulate-spored species of Tilletia was found infecting plants in seed production fields of Festuca rubra ssp. rubra (red fescue) and F. rubra ssp. fallax (Chewing's fescue) in Oregon, and in seed lots of Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) from Australia and Germany. Teliospores germinated to form 20-40 uninucleate, non-conjugating basidiospores, and colonies derived from single basidiospores produced teliospores in culture. In inoculation studies using single basidiospore colonies, perennial ryegrass and L. perenne ssp. multiflorum (Italian or annual ryegrass) were infected. A phylogenetic analysis, based on ITS region rDNA, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha, and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II demonstrated that the fescue and ryegrass bunts are conspecific, and distinct from known species of Tilletia.

  18. Simultaneous enhancement of methane production and methane content in biogas from waste activated sludge and perennial ryegrass anaerobic co-digestion: The effects of pH and C/N ratio.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaohu; Li, Xiaoshuai; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Yinguang; Dai, Lingling

    2016-09-01

    It is necessary to find an appropriate strategy to simultaneously enhance the methane production and methane content in biogas from waste activated sludge (WAS) and grass co-digestion. In this study an efficient strategy, i.e., adjusting the initial pH 12 and C/N ratio 17/1, for simultaneous enhancement of methane production and methane content in biogas from WAS and perennial ryegrass co-digestion was reported. Experimental results indicated that the maximal methane production was 310mL/gVSadd at the optimum conditions after 30-d anaerobic digestion, which was, respectively, about 1.5- and 3.8-fold of the sole WAS and sole perennial ryegrass anaerobic digestion. Meanwhile, the methane content in biogas was about 74%, which was much higher than that of sole WAS (64%) or sole perennial ryegrass (54%) anaerobic digestion.

  19. A Simple and Fast Kinetic Assay for the Determination of Fructan Exohydrolase Activity in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that fructans are the main constituent of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates, little knowledge is available on the regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism. The analysis of enzyme activities involved in this process has been hampered by the low affinity of the fructan enzymes for sucrose and fructans used as fructosyl donor. Further, the analysis of fructan composition and enzyme activities is restricted to specialized labs with access to suited HPLC equipment and appropriate fructan standards. The degradation of fructan polymers with high degree of polymerization (DP) by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) to fructosyloligomers is important to liberate energy in the form of fructan, but also under conditions where the generation of low DP polymers is required. Based on published protocols employing enzyme coupled endpoint reactions in single cuvettes, we developed a simple and fast kinetic 1-FEH assay. This assay can be performed in multi-well plate format using plate readers to determine the activity of 1-FEH against 1-kestotriose, resulting in a significant time reduction. Kinetic assays allow an optimal and more precise determination of enzyme activities compared to endpoint assays, and enable to check the quality of any reaction with respect to linearity of the assay. The enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay was validated in a case study showing the expected increase in 1-FEH activity during cold treatment. This assay is cost effective and could be performed by any lab with access to a plate reader suited for kinetic measurements and readings at 340 nm, and is highly suited to assess temporal changes and relative differences in 1-FEH activities. Thus, this enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay is of high importance both to the field of basic fructan research and plant breeding.

  20. A Simple and Fast Kinetic Assay for the Determination of Fructan Exohydrolase Activity in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud’homme, Marie-Pascale; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that fructans are the main constituent of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates, little knowledge is available on the regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism. The analysis of enzyme activities involved in this process has been hampered by the low affinity of the fructan enzymes for sucrose and fructans used as fructosyl donor. Further, the analysis of fructan composition and enzyme activities is restricted to specialized labs with access to suited HPLC equipment and appropriate fructan standards. The degradation of fructan polymers with high degree of polymerization (DP) by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) to fructosyloligomers is important to liberate energy in the form of fructan, but also under conditions where the generation of low DP polymers is required. Based on published protocols employing enzyme coupled endpoint reactions in single cuvettes, we developed a simple and fast kinetic 1-FEH assay. This assay can be performed in multi-well plate format using plate readers to determine the activity of 1-FEH against 1-kestotriose, resulting in a significant time reduction. Kinetic assays allow an optimal and more precise determination of enzyme activities compared to endpoint assays, and enable to check the quality of any reaction with respect to linearity of the assay. The enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay was validated in a case study showing the expected increase in 1-FEH activity during cold treatment. This assay is cost effective and could be performed by any lab with access to a plate reader suited for kinetic measurements and readings at 340 nm, and is highly suited to assess temporal changes and relative differences in 1-FEH activities. Thus, this enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay is of high importance both to the field of basic fructan research and plant breeding. PMID:26734049

  1. Short-term changes of fructans in ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum 'Lema') in response to urban air pollutants and meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Carla Zuliani; Figueiredo-Ribeiro, Rita de Cássia Leone; Delitti, Welington Braz Carvalho; Domingos, Marisa

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether the fructan content, a storage carbohydrate, of Lolium multiflorum 'Lema' plants grown in a subtropical urban environment characterized by typical diurnal profiles of air pollutants and meteorological conditions changed over the course of a day during different seasons. Plants were collected every 2h on the last day of each two-month seasonal field experiment and separated into shoot (stubble or stubble+leaf blades) and roots for carbohydrate analyses and biomass determination. Diurnal contents of total fructose in the stubbles increased with high temperatures. In the roots, fructose accumulation showed a positive relation with hourly variations of both temperature and particulate matter and a negative relation with irradiance and SO2. Seasonal variation in shoot and root biomasses coincided with the seasonal variation of total fructose and were negatively affected by relative humidity and SO2, respectively. We concluded that hourly changes of fructans over the course of a day may increase the ability of L. multiflorum to tolerate short-term oscillations in weather and air pollution commonly observed in the subtropical urban environment, increasing its efficiency in monitoring air quality.

  2. Toxicity of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds to red clover (Trifolium pratense), ryegrass (Lolium perenne), and mustard (Sinapsis alba).

    PubMed

    Sverdrup, Line E; Krogh, Paul Henning; Nielsen, Torben; Kjaer, Christian; Stenersen, Jørgen

    2003-12-01

    The effect of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) on the seed emergence and early life-stage growth of three terrestrial plants (Sinapsis alba, Trifolium pratense and Lolium perenne) were studied in a greenhouse, using a Danish agricultural soil with an organic carbon content of 1.6%. After three weeks of exposure, seed emergence and seedling weight (fresh weight and dry weight) were determined. Exposure concentrations were verified with chemical analysis. The substances tested were four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (fluoranthene, pyrene, phenanthrene and fluorene), the N-, S-, and O-substituted analogues of fluorene (carbazole, dibenzothiophene and dibenzofuran, respectively), and the quinoline representative acridine. Seedling growth was a far more sensitive endpoint than seed emergence for all substances. Concentrations estimated to give a 20% reduction of seedling fresh weight (EC20-values) ranged from 36 to 290 mgkg(-1) for carbazole, 43 to 93 mgkg(-1) for dibenzofuran, 37 to 110 mgkg(-1) for dibenzothiophene, 140 to 650 mgkg(-1) for fluoranthene, 55 to 380 mgkg(-1) for fluorene, 37 to 300 mgkg(-1) for phenanthrene, and 49 to 1300 mgkg(-1) for pyrene. For acridine, no toxicity was observed within the concentration range tested (1-1000 mgkg(-1)). As illustrated by the EC20-values, there was a rather large difference in sensitivity between the species, and T. pratense was the most sensitive of the species tested.

  3. Enhanced remediation of chlorpyrifos by ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and a chlorpyrifos degrading bacterial endophyte Mezorhizobium sp. HN3.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Hina; Iqbal, Samina; Ahmad, Fiaz; Afzal, Muhammad; Firdous, Sadiqa

    2016-01-01

    For effective remediation of contaminants, plant-endophyte partnership is a promising field to be explored. Generally endophytic bacteria assist their host plant by withstanding the stress induced by the contaminants. The objective of this study was to explore the suitability of plant-bacterial partnership for chlorpyrifos (CP) remediation using ryegrass and a CP degrading endophyte, Mesorhizobium sp. HN3 which belongs to plant growth promoting rhizobia. The inoculated yfp-tagged Mesorhizobium sp. HN3 efficiently colonized in the rhizosphere, enhanced plant growth and degradation of CP and its metabolite 3,5,6 trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP). Significantly lower CP residues were observed in the roots and shoots of plants vegetated in inoculated soil which might be attributed to the efficient root colonization of HN3yfp. These results suggest the involvement of Mesorhizobium sp. HN3yfp in CP degradation inside the roots and rhizosphere of plants and further emphasize on the effectiveness of endophytic bacteria in stimulating the remediation of pesticide contaminants. This is the first report which demonstrates the efficacy of bacterial endophyte for degradation of CP residues taken up by the plant and enhanced remediation of chlorpyrifos contaminated soil.

  4. EPSPS Gene Amplification in Glyphosate-Resistant Italian Ryegrass (Lolium perenne ssp. multiflorum) Populations from Arkansas (United States).

    PubMed

    Salas, Reiofeli A; Scott, Robert C; Dayan, Franck E; Burgos, Nilda R

    2015-07-01

    Glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass was detected in Arkansas (United States) in 2007. In 2014, 45 populations were confirmed resistant in eight counties across the state. The level of resistance and resistance mechanisms in six populations were studied to assess the severity of the problem and identify alternative management approaches. Dose-response bioassays, glyphosate absorption and translocation experiments, herbicide target (EPSPS) gene sequence analysis, and gene amplification assays were conducted. The dose causing 50% growth reduction (GR50) was 7-19 times higher for the resistant population than for the susceptible standard. Uptake and translocation of (14)C-glyphosate were similar in resistant and susceptible plants, and no mutation in the EPSPS gene known to be associated with resistance to glyphosate was detected. Resistant plants contained from 11- to >100-fold more copies of the EPSPS gene than the susceptible plants, whereas the susceptible plants had only one copy of EPSPS. Plants surviving the recommended dose of glyphosate contained at least 10 copies. The EPSPS copy number was positively related to glyphosate resistance level (r = 80). Therefore, resistance to glyphosate in these populations is due to multiplication of the target site. Resistance mechanisms could be location-specific. Suppressing the mechanism for gene amplification may overcome resistance.

  5. Growth and Metal Accumulation of an Alyssum murale Nickel Hyperaccumulator Ecotype Co-cropped with Alyssum montanum and Perennial Ryegrass in Serpentine Soil.

    PubMed

    Broadhurst, Catherine L; Chaney, Rufus L

    2016-01-01

    The genus Alyssum (Brassicaceae) contains Ni hyperaccumulators (50), many of which can achieve 30 g kg(-1) Ni in dry leaf. Some Alyssum hyperaccumulators are viable candidates for commercial Ni phytoremediation and phytomining technologies. It is not known whether these species secrete organic and/or amino acids into the rhizosphere to solubilize Ni, or can make use of such acids within the soil to facilitate uptake. It has been hypothesized that in fields with mixed plant species, mobilization of metals by phytosiderophores secreted by Graminaceae plants could affect Alyssum Ni, Fe, Cu, and Mn uptake. We co-cropped the Ni hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale, non-hyperaccumulator A. montanum and perennial ryegrass in a natural serpentine soil. All treatments had standard inorganic fertilization required for ryegrass growth and one treatment was compost amended. After 4 months A. murale leaves and stems contained 3600 mg kg(-1) Ni which did not differ significantly with co-cropping. Overall Ni and Mn concentrations were significantly higher in A. murale than in A. montanum or L. perenne. Copper was not accumulated by either Alyssum species, but L. perenne accumulated up to 10 mg kg(-1). A. montanum could not compete with either A. murale or ryegrass, and neither Alyssum species survived in the compost-amended soil. Co-cropping with ryegrass reduced Fe and Mn concentrations in A. murale but not to the extent of either increasing Ni uptake or affecting plant nutrition. The hypothesized Alyssum Ni accumulation in response to phytosiderophores secreted by co-cropped grass did not occur. Our data do not support increased mobilization of Mn by a phytosiderophore mechanism either, but the converse: mobilization of Mn by the Alyssum hyperaccumulator species significantly increased Mn levels in L. perenne. Tilling soil to maximize root penetration, adequate inorganic fertilization and appropriate plant densities are more important for developing efficient phytoremediation and

  6. Growth and Metal Accumulation of an Alyssum murale Nickel Hyperaccumulator Ecotype Co-cropped with Alyssum montanum and Perennial Ryegrass in Serpentine Soil

    PubMed Central

    Broadhurst, Catherine L.; Chaney, Rufus L.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Alyssum (Brassicaceae) contains Ni hyperaccumulators (50), many of which can achieve 30 g kg−1 Ni in dry leaf. Some Alyssum hyperaccumulators are viable candidates for commercial Ni phytoremediation and phytomining technologies. It is not known whether these species secrete organic and/or amino acids into the rhizosphere to solubilize Ni, or can make use of such acids within the soil to facilitate uptake. It has been hypothesized that in fields with mixed plant species, mobilization of metals by phytosiderophores secreted by Graminaceae plants could affect Alyssum Ni, Fe, Cu, and Mn uptake. We co-cropped the Ni hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale, non-hyperaccumulator A. montanum and perennial ryegrass in a natural serpentine soil. All treatments had standard inorganic fertilization required for ryegrass growth and one treatment was compost amended. After 4 months A. murale leaves and stems contained 3600 mg kg−1 Ni which did not differ significantly with co-cropping. Overall Ni and Mn concentrations were significantly higher in A. murale than in A. montanum or L. perenne. Copper was not accumulated by either Alyssum species, but L. perenne accumulated up to 10 mg kg−1. A. montanum could not compete with either A. murale or ryegrass, and neither Alyssum species survived in the compost-amended soil. Co-cropping with ryegrass reduced Fe and Mn concentrations in A. murale but not to the extent of either increasing Ni uptake or affecting plant nutrition. The hypothesized Alyssum Ni accumulation in response to phytosiderophores secreted by co-cropped grass did not occur. Our data do not support increased mobilization of Mn by a phytosiderophore mechanism either, but the converse: mobilization of Mn by the Alyssum hyperaccumulator species significantly increased Mn levels in L. perenne. Tilling soil to maximize root penetration, adequate inorganic fertilization and appropriate plant densities are more important for developing efficient phytoremediation and

  7. Germplasm dynamics: the role of ecotypic diversity in shaping the patterns of genetic variation in Lolium perenne

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, T.; Thorogood, D.; Skøt, L.; McMahon, R.; Powell, W.; Hegarty, M.

    2016-01-01

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) is the most widely grown temperate grass species globally. Intensive plant breeding in ryegrass compared to many other crops species is a relatively recent exercise (last 100 years) and provides an interesting experimental system to trace the extent, impact and trajectory of undomesticated ecotypic variation represented in modern ryegrass cultivars. To explore germplasm dynamics in Lolium perenne, 2199 SNPs were genotyped in 716 ecotypes sampled from 90 European locations together with 249 cultivars representing 33 forage/amenity accessions. In addition three pseudo-cross mapping populations (450 individual recombinants) were genotyped to create a consensus genetic linkage map. Multivariate analyses revealed strong differentiation between cultivars with a small proportion of the ecotypic variation captured in improved cultivars. Ryegrass cultivars generated as part of a recurrent selection programme (RSP) are strongly associated with a small number of geographically localised Italian ecotypes which were among the founders of the RSP. Changes in haplotype frequency revealed signatures of selection in genes putatively involved in water-soluble carbohydrate (WSC) accumulation (a trait selected in the RSP). Retrospective analysis of germplasm in breeding programmes (germplasm dynamics) provides an experimental framework for the identification of candidate genes for novel traits such as WSC accumulation in ryegrass. PMID:26935901

  8. Bale Location Effects on Nutritive Value and Fermentation Characteristics of Annual Ryegrass Bale Stored in In-line Wrapping Silage

    PubMed Central

    Han, K. J.; McCormick, M. E.; Derouen, S. M.; Blouin, D. C.

    2014-01-01

    In southeastern regions of the US, herbage systems are primarily based on grazing or hay feeding with low nutritive value warm-season perennial grasses. Nutritious herbage such as annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) may be more suitable for preserving as baleage for winter feeding even with more intensive production inputs. Emerging in-line wrapped baleage storage systems featuring rapid wrapping and low polyethylene film requirements need to be tested for consistency of storing nutritive value of a range of annual ryegrass herbage. A ryegrass storage trial was conducted with 24-h wilted ‘Marshall’ annual ryegrass harvested at booting, heading and anthesis stages using three replicated in-line wrapped tubes containing ten round bales per tube. After a six-month storage period, nutritive value changes and fermentation end products differed significantly by harvest stage but not by bale location. Although wilted annual ryegrass exhibited a restricted fermentation across harvest stages characterized by high pH and low fermentation end product concentrations, butyric acid concentrations were less than 1 g/kg dry matter, and lactic acid was the major organic acid in the bales. Mold coverage and bale aroma did not differ substantially with harvest stage or bale location. Booting and heading stage-harvested ryegrass baleage were superior in nutritive value to anthesis stage-harvested herbage. Based on the investigated nutritive value and fermentation characteristics, individual bale location within in-line tubes did not significantly affect preservation quality of ryegrass round bale silages. PMID:25178371

  9. Early induction of Fe-SOD gene expression is involved in tolerance to Mn toxicity in perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Ribera-Fonseca, Alejandra; Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Cartes, Paula; Rengel, Zed; Mora, M L

    2013-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity limits plant growth in acid soils. Although Mn toxicity induces oxidative stress, the role of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC.1.15.1.1) isoforms in conferring Mn tolerance remains unclear. Seedlings of ryegrass cultivars Nui (Mn-sensitive) and Kingston (Mn-tolerant) were hydroponically grown at 2.4 (optimal) or 750 μM Mn (toxic) concentration, and harvested from 2 to 48 h. Kingston showed higher shoot Mn than Nui at 2.4 μM Mn. At toxic supply, shoot Mn concentration steadily increased in both cultivars, with Kingston having the highest accumulation at 48 h. An early (2 h) increase in lipid peroxidation under Mn excess occurred, but it returned (after 6 h) to the basal level in Kingston only. Kingston exhibited higher SOD activity than Nui, and that difference increased due to toxic Mn. In general, Mn-induced gene expression of Mn- and Cu/Zn-SOD isoforms was higher in Nui than Kingston. Nevertheless, under Mn excess, we found a greater Fe-SOD up-regulation (up to 5-fold) in Kingston compared to Nui. Thus, Fe-SOD induction in Kingston might explain, at least partly, its high tolerance to Mn toxicity. This is the first evidence that Mn toxicity causes differential gene expression of SOD isoforms in ryegrass cultivars in the short-term.

  10. Comparison of specific methane yield of perennial ryegrass prepared by thermal drying versus non-thermal drying in small-scale batch digestion tests.

    PubMed

    Nolan, P; McEniry, J; Doyle, E M; O'Kiely, P

    2014-10-01

    Dried milled biomass samples are frequently utilised in small-scale batch digestion tests. However, herbage chemical composition can be altered by thermal drying, and this may affect specific methane (CH4) yields. Thus, the specific CH4 yield of herbage pre- and post-ensiling, prepared by two preparation methods were compared. Perennial ryegrass samples were either non-thermally dried (i.e. subject to cryogenic conditions, -196 °C) or thermally dried (40 °C), prior to milling. Specific CH4 yield was subsequently determined in a small-scale batch digestion test. Herbage pre-ensiling yielded 204 and 243 L CH4 kg(-1)VS(added) and herbage post-ensiling yielded 212 and 188 L CH4 kg(-1)VS(added) with non-thermal dried and thermal dried sample preparation methods, respectively. Due to opposing effects of thermal drying on CH4 yields of herbage either pre- or post-ensiling, it is not recommended to use thermal drying. Instead, it is recommended that non-thermal dried herbage samples are used in small-scale batch digestion tests.

  11. Heat Shock Factor Genes of Tall Fescue and Perennial Ryegrass in Response to Temperature Stress by RNA-Seq Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Dai, Ya; Tao, Xiang; Wang, Jia-Zhen; Cheng, Hai-Yang; Yang, Hong; Ma, Xin-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factors (Hsfs) are important regulators of stress-response in plants. However, our understanding of Hsf genes and their responses to temperature stresses in two Pooideae cool-season grasses, Festuca arundinacea, and Lolium perenne, is limited. Here we conducted comparative transcriptome analyses of plant leaves exposed to heat or cold stress for 10 h. Approximately, 30% and 25% of the genes expressed in the two species showed significant changes under heat and cold stress, respectively, including subsets of Hsfs and their target genes. We uncovered 74 Hsfs in F. arundinacea and 52 Hsfs in L. perenne, and categorized these genes into three subfamilies, HsfA, HsfB, and HsfC based on protein sequence homology to known Hsf members in model organisms. The Hsfs showed a strong response to heat and/or cold stress. The expression of HsfAs was elevated under heat stress, especially in class HsfA2, which exhibited the most dramatic responses. HsfBs were upregulated by the both temperature conditions, and HsfCs mainly showed an increase in expression under cold stress. The target genes of Hsfs, such as heat shock protein (HSP), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), inositol-3-phosphate synthase (IPS), and galactinol synthase (GOLS1), showed strong and unique responses to different stressors. We comprehensively detected Hsfs and their target genes in F. arundinacea and L. perenne, providing a foundation for future gene function studies and genetic engineering to improve stress tolerance in grasses and other crops. PMID:26793208

  12. Exploring the potential of phyllosilicate minerals as potassium fertilizers using sodium tetraphenylboron and intensive cropping with perennial ryegrass

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Wang, Huoyan; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Zijun; Zhou, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    In response to addressing potassium (K) deficiency in soil and decreasing agricultural production costs, the potential of K-bearing phyllosilicate minerals that can be directly used as an alternative K source has been investigated using sodium tetraphenylboron (NaTPB) extraction and an intensive cropping experiment. The results showed that the critical value of K-release rate and leaf K concentration was 3.30 g kg−1 h−1 and 30.64 g (kg dry matter)−1, respectively under the experimental conditions. According to this critical value, the maximum amount of released K that could be utilized by a plant with no K deficiency symptoms was from biotite (27.80 g kg−1) and vermiculite (5.58 g kg−1), followed by illite, smectite and muscovite with 2.76, 0.88 and 0.49 g kg−1, respectively. Ryegrass grown on phlogopite showed K deficiency symptoms during the overall growth period. It is concluded that biotite and vermiculite can be directly applied as a promising and sustainable alternative to the use of classical K fertilizers, illite can be utilized in combination with soluble K fertilizers, whereas muscovite, phlogopite and smectite may not be suitable for plant growth. Further field experiments are needed to assess the use of these phyllosilicate minerals as sources of K fertilizer. PMID:25782771

  13. Exploring the potential of phyllosilicate minerals as potassium fertilizers using sodium tetraphenylboron and intensive cropping with perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Wang, Huoyan; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Zijun; Zhou, Jianmin

    2015-03-18

    In response to addressing potassium (K) deficiency in soil and decreasing agricultural production costs, the potential of K-bearing phyllosilicate minerals that can be directly used as an alternative K source has been investigated using sodium tetraphenylboron (NaTPB) extraction and an intensive cropping experiment. The results showed that the critical value of K-release rate and leaf K concentration was 3.30 g kg(-1) h(-1) and 30.64 g (kg dry matter)(-1), respectively under the experimental conditions. According to this critical value, the maximum amount of released K that could be utilized by a plant with no K deficiency symptoms was from biotite (27.80 g kg(-1)) and vermiculite (5.58 g kg(-1)), followed by illite, smectite and muscovite with 2.76, 0.88 and 0.49 g kg(-1), respectively. Ryegrass grown on phlogopite showed K deficiency symptoms during the overall growth period. It is concluded that biotite and vermiculite can be directly applied as a promising and sustainable alternative to the use of classical K fertilizers, illite can be utilized in combination with soluble K fertilizers, whereas muscovite, phlogopite and smectite may not be suitable for plant growth. Further field experiments are needed to assess the use of these phyllosilicate minerals as sources of K fertilizer.

  14. Exploring the potential of phyllosilicate minerals as potassium fertilizers using sodium tetraphenylboron and intensive cropping with perennial ryegrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Wang, Huoyan; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Zijun; Zhou, Jianmin

    2015-03-01

    In response to addressing potassium (K) deficiency in soil and decreasing agricultural production costs, the potential of K-bearing phyllosilicate minerals that can be directly used as an alternative K source has been investigated using sodium tetraphenylboron (NaTPB) extraction and an intensive cropping experiment. The results showed that the critical value of K-release rate and leaf K concentration was 3.30 g kg-1 h-1 and 30.64 g (kg dry matter)-1, respectively under the experimental conditions. According to this critical value, the maximum amount of released K that could be utilized by a plant with no K deficiency symptoms was from biotite (27.80 g kg-1) and vermiculite (5.58 g kg-1), followed by illite, smectite and muscovite with 2.76, 0.88 and 0.49 g kg-1, respectively. Ryegrass grown on phlogopite showed K deficiency symptoms during the overall growth period. It is concluded that biotite and vermiculite can be directly applied as a promising and sustainable alternative to the use of classical K fertilizers, illite can be utilized in combination with soluble K fertilizers, whereas muscovite, phlogopite and smectite may not be suitable for plant growth. Further field experiments are needed to assess the use of these phyllosilicate minerals as sources of K fertilizer.

  15. Development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and construction of an SSR-based linkage map in Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.).

    PubMed

    Hirata, Mariko; Cai, Hongwei; Inoue, Maiko; Yuyama, Nana; Miura, Yuichi; Komatsu, Toshinori; Takamizo, Tadashi; Fujimori, Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    In order to develop simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in Italian ryegrass, we constructed a genomic library enriched for (CA)n-containing SSR repeats. A total of 1,544 clones were sequenced, of which 1,044 (67.6%) contained SSR motifs, and 395 unique clones were chosen for primer design. Three hundred and fifty-seven of these clones amplified products of the expected size in both parents of a two-way pseudo-testcross F(1) mapping population, and 260 primer pairs detected genetic polymorphism in the F(1) population. Genetic loci detected by a total of 218 primer pairs were assigned to locations on seven linkage groups, representing the seven chromosomes of the haploid Italian ryegrass karyotype. The SSR markers covered 887.8 cM of the female map and 795.8 cM of the male map. The average distance between two flanking SSR markers was 3.2 cM. The SSR markers developed in this study will be useful in cultivar discrimination, linkage analysis, and marker-assisted selection of Italian ryegrass and closely related species.

  16. Effects of zinc and influence of Acremonium lolii on growth parameters, chlorophyll a fluorescence and antioxidant enzyme activities of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv Apollo).

    PubMed

    Bonnet, M; Camares, O; Veisseire, P

    2000-05-01

    The effects of zinc on growth, mineral content, chlorophyll a fluorescence, and detoxifying enzyme activity (ascorbate peroxidase (APX), EC 1.11.1.11; superoxide dismutase (SOD), EC 1.15.1.1) of ryegrass infected or not by Acremonium lolii, and treated with nutrient solution containing 0-50 mM ZnSO(4) were studied. The introduction of zinc induces stress with a decrease in growth at 1, 5 and 10 mM ZnSO(4) and a cessation of growth at 50 mM ZnSO(4), in ryegrass plants infected by A. lolii or not. This decrease in growth may be due to an accumulation of zinc in leaves. Nevertheless, symbiotic plants showed higher values in tiller number, an advantage conferred by the fungus. After 24 d of Zn exposure, leaf fresh weights and leaf water content were lower in plants growing with Zn in the culture medium and no advantage was conferred by the fungus to its host. An increase in Zn supply resulted in a decrease of the Ca, K, Mg, and Cu content of the leaves, a reduction in the quantum yield of electron flow throughout photosystem II (DeltaF/F(1)(m))and a lowering of the efficiency of photosynthetic energy conversion (F(v)/F(m)), compared to control plants. To counter this zinc stress, detoxifying enzymes APX and SOD increased (100%) when Zn reached the value of 50 mM in the nutrient solution. At 10 mM ZnSO(4), the presence of the fungus in the plant led to an increase in the threshold toxicity of plants to zinc by a diminution of APX activity.

  17. Effect of supplemental concentrate type on milk production and metabolic status in early-lactation dairy cows grazing perennial ryegrass-based pasture.

    PubMed

    Whelan, S J; Pierce, K M; Flynn, B; Mulligan, F J

    2012-08-01

    , rumen NH(3)-N and volatile fatty acid concentration in the rumen were not affected by supplemental concentrate type. Reducing supplemental concentrate CP reduced milk yield. However, milk fat production and energy-corrected milk were not different, reducing the likelihood of an improved energy balance or a more favorable blood metabolic profile in early-lactation dairy cows grazing perennial ryegrass. Offering HMBi with low-CP concentrates or replacing rolled barley with ground maize improves milk production relative to low-CP concentrates and metabolic status relative to high-CP concentrates.

  18. The photosynthetic acclimation of Lolium perenne growing in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) system

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Jonathan B.

    1994-11-01

    Stands of Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv. Bastion) were grown in the field at ambient or elevated (600μmol/mol) CO2 concentration, high (560Kg/ha) or low (140Kg/ha) nitrogen addition and with a frequent (every 4 weeks) or infrequent (every 8 weeks) cutting regime. Plants were in the second year of a 3 year experiment. Exposure to elevated CO2 was carried out with a Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) system which provides the most "realistic" system of CO2 fumigation currently available. Elevated CO2 increased diurnal CO2 assimilation by between 34 and 88% whilst reducing rates of stomatal conductance by between 1 and 42%. However, analysis of the A vs. Ci response showed considerable acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated CO2 - Vcmax as an in vivo measure of RubisCO activity, decreased by between 29 and 35% in high CO2, whilst Jmax, as a measure of the RubP regeneration capacity, showed no significant change. Two out of three additional perennial grassland species studied showed similar acclamatory behavior to Ryegrass. Diurnal assimilation rate, Jmax and, in most cases, Vcmax, increased significantly directly after cutting of Ryegrass stands, but nitrogen treatment had little effect on any of these parameters. Neither stomatal density, stomatal index nor stomatal pore length of Ryegrass were significantly altered by growth in elevated CO2. The results are discussed in terms of the limitation imposed on maximizing photosynthetic and growth responses of Ryegrass at elevated CO2, by the ability of perennial species to increase long-term sink capacity under these conditions.

  19. Recovery from drought stress in Lolium perenne (Poaceae): are fungal endophytes detrimental?

    PubMed

    Cheplick, Gregory P

    2004-12-01

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) is a cool-season, perennial species widely used for forage and turf. It is often infected by a clandestine, endophytic fungus (Neotyphodium lolii) that has the potential to affect host growth responses to abiotically stressful conditions. In some species, the grass-endophyte symbiosis is mutualistic, but the relationship is reported to be contingent on environmental conditions and host genotype in L. perenne. The objective of this research was to determine the potential effects of endophyte infection on recovery from severe drought stress in variable genotypes of a perennial ryegrass cultivar. Sixteen infected (+E) and 16 uninfected (-E) ramets were planted in the greenhouse for each of 10 ryegrass genotypes. Eight +E and eight -E plants per genotype were exposed to three sequential droughts where water was withheld for 11-14 d, resulting in <5% soil moisture; the others (control) were watered as needed. Response variables were tiller numbers 1 wk and 4 wk after drought, and leaf area and dry mass of shoots and roots 7 wk after drought. In both control and drought, -E plants had more tillers, and greater leaf area and total mass, than +E plants, suggesting a detrimental effect of endophytic fungi. Fungal hyphae survived the drought and were abundant in post-drought, +E plants. The effects of endophytes were specific for particular host genotypes, as exemplified by significant genotype × endophyte interactions. Root : shoot ratio and percent of mass allocated to tiller bases (a rough measure of resource storage) showed genotype × endophyte × drought interactions. There was plasticity for root : shoot ratio and genetic variation in the ability to restore root growth during recovery from drought. For 7 of 10 genotypes, -E plants showed an equal or greater allocation to tiller bases than +E plants following drought recovery, illustrating a cost to endophyte infection for some genotypes. The symbiotic relationship between L

  20. Temperature and Plant Genotype Alter Alkaloid Concentrations in Ryegrass Infected with an Epichloë Endophyte and This Affects an Insect Herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Louise M.; Popay, Alison J.; Finch, Sarah C.; Clearwater, Michael J.; Cave, Vanessa M.

    2016-01-01

    Asexual Epichloë endophytes colonize agricultural forage grasses in a relationship which is mutually beneficial and provides the host plant with protection against herbivorous insects. The endophyte strain AR37 (Epichloë festucae var. lolii) produces epoxy-janthitrem alkaloids and is the only endophyte known to provide ryegrass with resistance against porina larvae (Wiseana cervinata (Walker)), a major pasture pest in cooler areas of New Zealand. This study examined the effect of temperature on concentrations of epoxy-janthitrems in AR37-infected ryegrass and determined how the resulting variations in concentration affected consumption, growth and survival of porina larvae. Twenty replicate pairs of perennial (Lolium perenne L.) and Italian ryegrass (L. multiflorum Lam.) plants with and without endophyte were prepared by cloning, with one of each pair grown at either high (20°C) or low (7°C) temperature. After 10 weeks, herbage on each plant was harvested, divided into leaf and pseudostem, then freeze dried and ground. Leaf and pseudostem material was then incorporated separately into semi-synthetic diets which were fed to porina larvae in a bioassay over 3 weeks. Epoxy-janthitrem concentrations within the plant materials and the semi-synthetic diets were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. AR37-infected ryegrass grown at high temperature contained high in planta concentrations of epoxy-janthitrem (30.6 μg/g in leaves and 83.9 μg/g in pseudostems) that had a strong anti-feedant effect on porina larvae when incorporated into their diets, reducing their survival by 25–42% on pseudostems. In comparison, in planta epoxy-janthitrem concentrations in AR37-infected ryegrass grown at low temperature were very low (0.67 μg/g in leaves and 7.4 μg/g in pseudostems) resulting in a small anti-feedant effect in perennial but not in Italian ryegrass. Although alkaloid concentrations were greatly reduced by low temperature this reduction did not occur

  1. Effects of a perennial ryegrass diet or total mixed ration diet offered to spring-calving Holstein-Friesian dairy cows on methane emissions, dry matter intake, and milk production.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, B F; Deighton, M H; O'Loughlin, B M; Mulligan, F J; Boland, T M; O'Donovan, M; Lewis, E

    2011-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the enteric methane (CH4) emissions and milk production of spring-calving Holstein-Friesian cows offered either a grazed perennial ryegrass diet or a total mixed ration (TMR) diet for 10 wk in early lactation. Forty-eight spring-calving Holstein-Friesian dairy cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 nutritional treatments for 10 wk: 1) grass or 2) TMR. The grass group received an allocation of 17 kg of dry matter (DM) of grass per cow per day with a pre-grazing herbage mass of 1,492 kg of DM/ha. The TMR offered per cow per day was composed of maize silage (7.5 kg of DM), concentrate blend (8.6 kg of DM), grass silage (3.5 kg of DM), molasses (0.7 kg of DM), and straw (0.5 kg of DM). Daily CH4 emissions were determined via the emissions from ruminants using a calibrated tracer technique for 5 consecutive days during wk 4 and 10 of the study. Simultaneously, herbage dry matter intake (DMI) for the grass group was estimated using the n-alkane technique, whereas DMI for the TMR group was recorded using the Griffith Elder feeding system. Cows offered TMR had higher milk yield (29.5 vs. 21.1 kg/d), solids-corrected milk yield (27.7 vs. 20.1 kg/d), fat and protein (FP) yield (2.09 vs. 1.54 kg/d), bodyweight change (0.54 kg of gain/d vs. 0.37 kg of loss/d), and body condition score change (0.36 unit gain vs. 0.33 unit loss) than did the grass group over the course of the 10-wk study. Methane emissions were higher for the TMR group than the grass group (397 vs. 251 g/cow per day). The TMR group also emitted more CH4 per kg of FP (200 vs. 174 g/kg of FP) than did the grass group. They also emitted more CH4 per kg of DMI (20.28 vs. 18.06 g/kg of DMI) than did the grass group. In this study, spring-calving cows, consuming a high quality perennial ryegrass diet in the spring, produced less enteric CH4 emissions per cow, per unit of intake, and per unit of FP than did cows offered a standard TMR diet.

  2. Complete primary structure of a Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p III: comparison with known Lol p I and II sequences.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Shenbagamurthi, P; Marsh, D G

    1989-10-17

    The complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p III, determined by the automated Edman degradation of the protein and its selected fragments, is reported in this paper. Cleavage by enzymatic and chemical techniques established unambiguously the sequence for this 97-residue protein (Mr = 10,909), which lacks cysteine and shows no evidence of glycosylation. The sequence of Lol p III is very similar to that of another L. perenne allergen, Lol p II, which was sequenced recently; of the 97 positions in the two proteins, 57 are occupied by identical amino acids (59% identity). In addition, both allergens share a similar structure with an antibody-binding fragment of a third L. perenne allergen, Lol p I. Since human antibody responsiveness to all these three allergens is associated with HLA-DR3, and since the structure common to the three molecules shows high degrees of amphipathicity in Lol p II and III, we speculate that this common segment in the three molecules might contain or contribute to the respectively Ia/T-cell sites.

  3. Mycorrhizal colonisation and P-supplement effects on N uptake and N assimilation in perennial ryegrass under well-watered and drought-stressed conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bok-Rye; Muneer, Sowbiya; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Jung, Woo-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2012-10-01

    To compare the effect of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and P-supplement on N uptake and N assimilation under well-watered or drought-stressed conditions, Glomus intraradices-colonised, P-supplemented non-mycorrhizal (P) and non-mycorrhizal (control) plants of Lolium perenne were exposed to 12 days of water treatment. Leaf water potential (Ψ (w)), photosynthetic ability, and N and P nutritional status were measured at the beginning (day 0) and end (day 12) of water treatment. N absorption, amino acid and protein synthesis were quantified using the isotopic tracer (15)N at day 12. Under well-watered conditions, growth response and physiological parameters were similar in AM and P plants, as compared to controls. Drought (10% water) significantly decreased these parameters in all three treatments. As compared to control plants, the negative impact of water deficit on the Ψ (w), photosynthesis, biomass, and N and P content was highly alleviated in AM plants, while only slightly improved or remained the same level in P plants. The effect of AM symbiosis on N absorption and N assimilation was greater than that of the P supplement under well-watered and drought-stressed conditions, and this effect was highly enhanced under drought-stressed conditions. At terminal drought stress on day 12, the effect of AM colonisation on de novo synthesis of amino acids and proteins was 4.4- and 4.8-fold higher than that of the P supplement. These results indicate that the AM symbiosis plays an integrative role in N nutrition by alleviating the negative impacts of drought on N or P uptake and N assimilation, whereas the efficiency of a direct P supplement is very limited under drought-stressed conditions.

  4. Untargeted Metabotyping Lolium perenne Reveals Population-Level Variation in Plant Flavonoids and Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mingshu; Fraser, Karl; Jones, Chris; Stewart, Alan; Lyons, Thomas; Faville, Marty; Barrett, Brent

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics provides a powerful platform to characterize plants at the biochemical level, allowing a search for underlying genes and associations with higher level complex traits such as yield and nutritional value. Efficient and reliable methods to characterize metabolic variation in economically important species are considered of high value to the evaluation and prioritization of germplasm and breeding lines. In this investigation, a large-scale metabolomic survey was performed on a collection of diverse perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) plants. A total of 2,708 data files, derived from liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (LCMS), were selected to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of applying high throughput metabolomics to survey chemical diversity in plant populations. The data set was generated from 23 ryegrass populations, with 3–25 genotypes per population, and five clonal replicates per genotype. We demonstrate an integrated approach to rapidly mine and analyze metabolic variation from this large, multi-batch LCMS data set. After performing quality control, statistical data mining and peak annotation, a wide range of variation for flavonoid glycosides and plant alkaloids was discovered among the populations. Structural variation of flavonoids occurs both in aglycone structures and acetylated/malonylated/feruloylated sugar moieties. The discovery of comprehensive metabolic variation among the plant populations offers opportunities to probe into the genetic basis of the variation, and provides a valuable resource to gain insight into biochemical functions and to relate metabolic variation with higher level traits in the species. PMID:28223996

  5. Animal physiology and genetic aspects of ryegrass staggers in grazing sheep.

    PubMed

    Morris, C A; Wheeler, T T; Henderson, H V; Towers, N R; Phua, S H

    2017-03-19

    Ryegrass staggers (RGS) is a metabolic disease of herbivores, caused by the ingestion of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) containing a fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium lolii) which produces a tremorgenic toxin, lolitrem B. RGS has a major economic impact for agriculture in New Zealand as well as internationally. Management of RGS in grazing sheep can be problematic, and there is an incomplete knowledge of the interaction between the toxin and the grazing animal. This review is focused on recent advances in understanding the molecular physiology of RGS in the affected animal as well as the influence of animal genetics on the degree of susceptibility to RGS. Investigations to date suggest that the primary target for toxin is the large conductance, calcium-activated, potassium (BK) channel, resulting in disruption of neuromuscular junction signalling. Genetic investigation has established the existence of genes influencing resistance to RGS, however their identity has not been confirmed and their impact has not been established. Studies to date suggest that a multi-gene selection approach will be necessary in order to develop an effective selection tool for use in the agricultural industries.

  6. Silage from maize (Zea mays), annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) or their mixture in the dry season feeding of grazing dairy cows in small-scale dairy production systems in the highlands of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Ortega, J P; Garduño-Castro, G; Espinoza-Ortega, A; Rojo-Rubio, R; Arriaga-Jordán, C M

    2009-04-01

    Small-scale dairy systems based on grazing have dry-season herbage shortages. A repeated 3 x 3 Latin Square experiment evaluated grazing with silage from maize (MS), annual ryegrass (ARG) or a mixture (MIX) with 9 cows with 3 week periods; continuously grazed at 3.6 cows/ha with 3.6 kg DM/day of concentrate. Treatments were 7 kg DM of MS, ARG or a 2 MS:1 ARG mixture. Milk yield (MY), milk composition, live-weight, body condition, silage and concentrate intake were recorded. Herbage DM intake was estimated indirectly. Activity budgets were done for economic analysis. MY on MS (21.5 kg/cow/d) was 0.06 higher than on ARG (P < 0.09) with no differences on MIX. There were no differences for milk fat, milk protein, or body condition score. Live-weight on ARG was higher (P < 0.01) than on MS or MIX. Silage intake was higher (P < 0.01) on ARG and MS than on MIX. Herbage intake was lower (P < 0.05) on MS, compared with MIX and ARG. Total DM intake on ARG was higher than MS (P < 0.01), and MIX in between. MS resulted in 0.12 higher economic returns over ARG which had highest costs. Annual ryegrass may have a place in small-scale systems, but not as silage due to higher costs.

  7. Implementation of Genomic Prediction in Lolium perenne (L.) Breeding Populations

    PubMed Central

    Grinberg, Nastasiya F.; Lovatt, Alan; Hegarty, Matt; Lovatt, Andi; Skøt, Kirsten P.; Kelly, Rhys; Blackmore, Tina; Thorogood, Danny; King, Ross D.; Armstead, Ian; Powell, Wayne; Skøt, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is one of the most widely grown forage grasses in temperate agriculture. In order to maintain and increase its usage as forage in livestock agriculture, there is a continued need for improvement in biomass yield, quality, disease resistance, and seed yield. Genetic gain for traits such as biomass yield has been relatively modest. This has been attributed to its long breeding cycle, and the necessity to use population based breeding methods. Thanks to recent advances in genotyping techniques there is increasing interest in genomic selection from which genomically estimated breeding values are derived. In this paper we compare the classical RRBLUP model with state-of-the-art machine learning techniques that should yield themselves easily to use in GS and demonstrate their application to predicting quantitative traits in a breeding population of L. perenne. Prediction accuracies varied from 0 to 0.59 depending on trait, prediction model and composition of the training population. The BLUP model produced the highest prediction accuracies for most traits and training populations. Forage quality traits had the highest accuracies compared to yield related traits. There appeared to be no clear pattern to the effect of the training population composition on the prediction accuracies. The heritability of the forage quality traits was generally higher than for the yield related traits, and could partly explain the difference in accuracy. Some population structure was evident in the breeding populations, and probably contributed to the varying effects of training population on the predictions. The average linkage disequilibrium between adjacent markers ranged from 0.121 to 0.215. Higher marker density and larger training population closely related with the test population are likely to improve the prediction accuracy. PMID:26904088

  8. Metabolic changes and associated cytokinin signals in response to nitrate assimilation in roots and shoots of Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Roche, Jessica; Love, Jonathan; Guo, Qianqian; Song, Jiancheng; Cao, Mingshu; Fraser, Karl; Huege, Jan; Jones, Chris; Novák, Ondřej; Turnbull, Matthew H; Jameson, Paula E

    2016-04-01

    The efficiency of inorganic nitrogen (N) assimilation is a critical component of fertilizer use by plants and of forage production in Lolium perenne, an important pasture species worldwide. We present a spatiotemporal description of nitrate use efficiency in terms of metabolic responses and carbohydrate remobilization, together with components of cytokinin signal transduction following nitrate addition to N-impoverished plants. Perennial ryegrass (L. perenne cv. Grasslands Nui) plants were grown for 10 weeks in unfertilized soil and then treated with nitrate (5 mM) hydroponically. Metabolomic analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed a dynamic interaction between N and carbon metabolism over a week-long time course represented by the relative abundance of amino acids, tricarboxylic acid intermediates and stored water-soluble carbohydrates (WSCs). The initial response to N addition was characterized by a rapid remobilization of carbon stores from the low-molecular weight WSC, along with an increase in N content and assimilation into free amino acids. Subsequently, the shoot became the main source of carbon through remobilization of a large pool of high-molecular weight WSC. Associated quantification of cytokinin levels and expression profiling of putative cytokinin response regulator genes by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction support a role for cytokinin in the mediation of the response to N addition in perennial ryegrass. The presence of high levels of cis-zeatin-type cytokinins is discussed in the context of hormonal homeostasis under the stress of steady-state N deficiency.

  9. Metabolite profiling during cold acclimation of Lolium perenne genotypes distinct in the level of frost tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Aleksandra; Zwierzykowski, Zbigniew; Rapacz, Marcin; Koczyk, Grzegorz; Ciesiołka, Danuta; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2015-11-01

    Abiotic stresses, including low temperature, can significantly reduce plant yielding. The knowledge on the molecular basis of stress tolerance could help to improve its level in species of relatively high importance to agriculture. Unfortunately, the complex research performed so far mainly on model species and also, to some extent, on cereals does not fully cover the demands of other agricultural plants of temperate climate, including forage grasses. Two Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) genotypes with contrasting levels of frost tolerance, the high frost tolerant (HFT) and the low frost tolerant (LFT) genotypes, were selected for comparative metabolomic research. The work focused on the analysis of leaf metabolite accumulation before and after seven separate time points of cold acclimation. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to identify amino acids (alanine, proline, glycine, glutamic and aspartic acid, serine, lysine and asparagine), carbohydrates (fructose, glucose, sucrose, raffinose and trehalose) and their derivatives (mannitol, sorbitol and inositol) accumulated in leaves in low temperature. The observed differences in the level of frost tolerance between the analysed genotypes could be partially due to the time point of cold acclimation at which the accumulation level of crucial metabolite started to increase. In the HFT genotype, earlier accumulation was observed for proline and asparagine. The increased amounts of alanine, glutamic and aspartic acids, and asparagine during cold acclimation could be involved in the regulation of photosynthesis intensity in L. perenne. Among the analysed carbohydrates, only raffinose revealed a significant association with the acclimation process in this species.

  10. High nitrogen supply and carbohydrate content reduce fungal endophyte and alkaloid concentration in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Parsons, Anthony J; Bassett, Shalome; Christensen, Michael J; Hume, David E; Johnson, Linda J; Johnson, Richard D; Simpson, Wayne R; Stacke, Christina; Voisey, Christine R; Xue, Hong; Newman, Jonathan A

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between cool-season grasses and fungal endophytes is widely regarded as mutualistic, but there is growing uncertainty about whether changes in resource supply and environment benefit both organisms to a similar extent. Here, we infected two perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) cultivars (AberDove, Fennema) that differ in carbohydrate content with three strains of Neotyphodium lolii (AR1, AR37, common strain) that differ intrinsically in alkaloid profile. We grew endophyte-free and infected plants under high and low nitrogen (N) supply and used quantitative PCR (qPCR) to estimate endophyte concentrations in harvested leaf tissues. Endophyte concentration was reduced by 40% under high N supply, and by 50% in the higher sugar cultivar. These two effects were additive (together resulting in 75% reduction). Alkaloid production was also reduced under both increased N supply and high sugar cultivar, and for three of the four alkaloids quantified, concentrations were linearly related to endophyte concentration. The results stress the need for wider quantification of fungal endophytes in the grassland-foliar endophyte context, and have implications for how introducing new cultivars, novel endophytes or increasing N inputs affect the role of endophytes in grassland ecosystems.

  11. Italian ryegrass for the phytoremediation of solutions polluted with terbuthylazine.

    PubMed

    Mimmo, Tanja; Bartucca, Maria Luce; Del Buono, Daniele; Cesco, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The phytoextraction capacity of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) to remove terbuthylazine (TBA) from aqueous solution has been assessed using a plant-based biotest (RHIZOtest). Three TBA concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg L(-1)) were chosen to evaluate the tolerance capacity of the ryegrass. Even though the treatments negatively affected plants, they were able to remove up to 30-40% of TBA. In addition, some enzymatic activities involved in the response to TBA-induced stress were determined. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) has been activated with a TBA-dose dependent trend; ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities have been induced within the first hours after the treatments, followed by decreases or disappearance in plants exposed to two higher dosages. In conclusion, this case-study highlights that the combination of ryegrass and RHIZOtest resulted to be effective in the remediation of aqueous solutions polluted by TBA.

  12. Cross-resistance profile of mesosulfuron-methyl-resistant Italian ryegrass in the southern United States.

    PubMed

    Kuk, Yong In; Bugos, Nilda R

    2007-04-01

    Diclofop-resistant Lolium species (ryegrass) is a major weed problem in wheat production worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the resistance pattern of diclofop-resistant ryegrass accessions from the southern United States to mesosulfuron-methyl, a recently commercialized herbicide for ryegrass control in wheat; to determine the cross-resistance pattern of a Lolium multiflorum Lam. (Italian ryegrass) accession, 03-1, to acetolactate synthase (ALS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors; and to determine the resistance mechanism of Italian ryegrass to mesosulfuron-methyl. Seventeen ryegrass accessions from Arkansas and Louisiana, including standard resistant and susceptible accessions, were used in this experiment. Fourteen of the 17 accessions were more resistant (four- to > 308-fold) to diclofop than the standard susceptible biotype. One accession, 03-1, was resistant to mesosulfuron-methyl as well as to other ALS inhibitor herbicides such as chlorsulfuron, imazamox and sulfometuron. Accession 03-1, however, did not show multiple resistance to the ACCase inhibitor herbicides diclofop, fluazifop, clethodim, sethoxydim and pinoxaden, nor to glyphosate. The in vivo ALS activity of the 03-1 biotype was less affected by mesosulfuron-methyl than the susceptible biotype. This indicates that the resistance mechanism of Italian ryegrass to mesosulfuron-methyl is partly due to an alteration in the target enzyme, ALS. It is concluded that diclofop-resistant ryegrass in the southern United States can be generally controlled by mesosulfuron-methyl. However, mesosulfuron-methyl must be used with caution because not all ryegrass populations are susceptible to it. There is a need for more thorough profiling of ryegrass resistance to herbicides.

  13. Spring nitrogen fertilization of ryegrass-bermudagrass for phytoremediation of phosphorus-enriched soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen fertilization of forage grasses is critical for optimizing biomass and utilization of manure soil nutrients. Field studies were conducted in 2007-09 to determine the effects of spring N fertilization on amelioration of high soil P when cool-season, annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) is...

  14. Stocker growth on rye and ryegrass pastures affects subsequent feedlot gains and carcass traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stocker calves were stocked on annual rye (Secale cereale L.) and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) pastures using stocking strategies (STK) to create graded levels of gain to assess subsequent growth rates, feedlot performance, and carcass traits. During two consecutive years, yearling Angus, Here...

  15. Phytoremediation of high phosphorus soil by annual ryegrass and common bermudagrass harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Removal of soil phosphorus (P) in crop harvest is a remediation option for soils high in P. This four-year field-plot study determined P uptake by annual ryegrass (ARG, Lolium multiflorum Lam.) and common bermudagrass (CB, Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.) from Ruston soil (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic...

  16. Morphological traits associated with weed-suppressive ability of winter wheat against Italian ryegrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed-suppressive wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars have been suggested as a complement to chemical and cultural methods of weed control. The objectives of this study were to assess the range of weed-suppressive ability against Italian ryegrass [Lolium perenne L. ssp. multiflorum (Lam.) Husnot] ...

  17. Enhanced dissipation of PAHs from soil using mycorrhizal ryegrass and PAH-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yu, X Z; Wu, S C; Wu, F Y; Wong, M H

    2011-02-28

    The major aim of this experiment was to test the effects of a multi-component bioremediation system consisting of ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-degrading bacteria (Acinetobacter sp.), and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus mosseae) for cleaning up PAHs contaminated soil. Higher dissipation rates were observed in combination treatments: i.e., bacteria+ryegrass (BR), mycorrhizae+ryegrass (MR), and bacteria+mycorrhizae+ryegrass (BMR); than bacteria (B) and ryegrass (R) alone. The growth of ryegrass significantly (p<0.05) increased soil peroxidase activities, leading to enhanced dissipation of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) from soil. Interactions between ryegrass with the two microbes further enhanced the dissipation of PHE and PYR. Mycorrhizal ryegrass (MR) significantly enhanced the dissipation of PYR from soil, PYR accumulation by ryegrass roots and soil peroxidase activities under lower PHE and PYR levels (0 and 50+50 mg kg(-1)). The present results highlighted the contribution of mycorrhiza and PAH-degrading bacteria in phytoremediation of PAH contaminated soil, however more detailed studies are needed.

  18. Fragments of the key flowering gene GIGANTEA are associated with helitron-type sequences in the Pooideae grass Lolium perenne

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Tim; Thomas, Ann; Huang, Lin; Farrar, Kerrie; King, Julie; Armstead, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Background Helitrons are a class of transposable elements which have been identified in a number of species of plants, animals and fungi. They are unique in their proposed rolling-circle mode of replication, have a highly variable copy-number and have been implicated in the restructuring of coding sequences both by their insertion into existing genes and by their incorporation of transcriptionally competent gene fragments. Helitron discovery depends on identifying associated DNA signature sequences and comprehensive evaluation of helitron contribution to a particular genome requires detailed computational analysis of whole genome sequence. Therefore, the role which helitrons have played in modelling non-model plant genomes is largely unknown. Results Cloning of the flowering gene GIGANTEA (GI) from a BAC library of the Pooideae grass Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) identified the target gene and several GI pseudogene fragments spanning the first five exons. Analysis of genomic sequence 5' and 3' of one these GI fragments revealed motifs consistent with helitron-type transposon insertion, specifically a putative 5'-A↓T-3' insertion site containing 5'-TC and CTAG-3' borders with a sub-terminal 16 bp hairpin. Screening of a BAC library of the closely related grass species Festuca pratensis (meadow fescue) indicated similar helitron-associated GI fragments present in this genome, as well as non-helitron associated GI fragments derived from the same region of GI. In order to investigate the possible extent of ancestral helitron-activity in L. perenne, a methylation-filtered GeneThresher® genomic library developed from this species was screened for potential helitron 3' hairpin sequences associated with a 3'-CTRR motif. This identified 7 potential helitron hairpin-types present between at least 9 and 51 times within the L. perenne methylation-filtered library. Conclusion This represents evidence for a possible ancestral role for helitrons in modelling the genomes

  19. Effect of saponin on the phytoextraction of Pb, Cd and Zn from soil using Italian ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tengyi; Fu, Dafang; Yang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Chemically enhanced phytoextraction has been proposed as an effective approach to remove metals from contaminated soil through the Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.). The bioconcentration factor (BCF) and translocation factor (TF) are important determinants for phytoextraction of metals. In microcosm experiments, effects of saponin on the uptake of Pb, Zn and Cd by Italian ryegrass were studied. Results of BCF indicated that Italian ryegrass was the most efficient in Zn uptake, followed by Cd and Pb (Zn > Cd > Pb). TF results were identical to the BCF results. In addition, the effect of metal stress on antioxidative enzyme activity was studied. Results revealed that under the metal stress, saponin played an important role in the antioxidative activities of Italian ryegrass.

  20. First report of Fusarium graminearum, F. asiaticum and F. cortaderiae as head blight pathogens of annual ryegrass in Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) cause Fusarium head blight (FHB) of small grains and several grasses, including annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), an important forage crop, but also a common weed in wheat, rice and maize agroecosystem in southern Brazil. Although i...

  1. Mineralization of pyrene induced by interaction between Ochrobactrum sp. PW and ryegrass in spiked soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tuo; Wei, Lianshuang; Qiao, Min; Zou, Dexun; Yang, Xiaojin; Lin, Aijun

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the capability of pyrene-degrading bacterium Ochrobactrum sp. PW and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) grown alone and in combination on the degradation of pyrene in soil. After 60 days of ryegrass growth, plant biomass, pyrene-degrading microbial mass, soil enzyme activity (catalase activity and polyphenol oxidase activity) and residual concentration of pyrene in soils were determined. Higher dissipation rates were observed in PW inoculation treatments: ryegrass+PW rhizosphere soil (RP-r) and ryegrass+PW non-rhizosphere soil (RP-nr), than planting of ryegrass alone, rhizosphere (R-r) or non-rhizosphere (R-nr). The inoculation with PW significantly (p<0.05) increased the dry weight of ryegrass root and shoot, nearly 2.8 and 3.3 times higher than ryegrass treatment. The pyrene-degrading microbial mass indicated that a much larger mass of bacteria, actinobacteria were present in RP treatment. The catalase activity in all different treatments were significantly (p<0.05) higher than in with treatment R-nr, and the polyphenol oxidase activity was also significantly (p<0.05) increased by inoculation with PW, leading to enhanced mineralization of pyrene from soil. Our results suggest that adding of PAHs-degrading bacteria to soil can enhance remediation of PAHs contaminated soil, while improving plant growth.

  2. Impact of no-till cover cropping of Italian ryegrass on above and below ground faunal communities inhabiting a soybean field with special emphasis on soybean cyst nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two field trials were conducted in Maryland to evaluate the ability of an Italian ryegrass (IR) (Lolium multiflorum) cover crop in a no-till soybean (Glycine max) planting to 1) reduce populations of plant-parasitic nematodes (i.e., the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines and lesion nematodes...

  3. Bioenergy production from perennial energy crops: a consequential LCA of 12 bioenergy scenarios including land use changes.

    PubMed

    Tonini, Davide; Hamelin, Lorie; Wenzel, Henrik; Astrup, Thomas

    2012-12-18

    In the endeavor of optimizing the sustainability of bioenergy production in Denmark, this consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) evaluated the environmental impacts associated with the production of heat and electricity from one hectare of Danish arable land cultivated with three perennial crops: ryegrass (Lolium perenne), willow (Salix viminalis) and Miscanthus giganteus. For each, four conversion pathways were assessed against a fossil fuel reference: (I) anaerobic co-digestion with manure, (II) gasification, (III) combustion in small-to-medium scale biomass combined heat and power (CHP) plants and IV) co-firing in large scale coal-fired CHP plants. Soil carbon changes, direct and indirect land use changes as well as uncertainty analysis (sensitivity, MonteCarlo) were included in the LCA. Results showed that global warming was the bottleneck impact, where only two scenarios, namely willow and Miscanthus co-firing, allowed for an improvement as compared with the reference (-82 and -45 t CO₂-eq. ha⁻¹, respectively). The indirect land use changes impact was quantified as 310 ± 170 t CO₂-eq. ha⁻¹, representing a paramount average of 41% of the induced greenhouse gas emissions. The uncertainty analysis confirmed the results robustness and highlighted the indirect land use changes uncertainty as the only uncertainty that can significantly change the outcome of the LCA results.

  4. A simulation model for epidemics of stem rust in ryegrass seed crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simulation model (STEMRUST_G, named for stem rust of grasses) was created for stem rust (caused by Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola) in perennial ryegrass grown to maturity as a seed crop. The model has a daily time step and is driven by weather data and an initial input of disease severity fr...

  5. Methanol and acetaldehyde fluxes over ryegrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Thomas; Schade, Gunnar

    2007-09-01

    Oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) play an active role in tropospheric chemistry but our knowledge concerning their release and ultimate fate is limited. However, the recent introduction of Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTRMS) has improved our capability to make direct field observations of OVOC mixing ratios and fluxes. We used PTRMS in an eddy covariance setup to measure selected OVOC exchange rates above a well-characterized agricultural plot in Northern Germany. In fall 2003, mixing ratios of methanol and acetaldehyde 2 m above the field ranged from 1 to 10 and 0.4 to 2.1 ppb, respectively, well correlated with one another. Fluxes of both gases were followed for growing Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) over a significant portion of its life cycle. Diurnally fluctuating emissions of methanol and very small acetaldehyde fluxes were observed up to the cutting and removal of the grass. Methanol emissions were exponentially related to ambient temperatures and appeared to be higher during the grass' rapid leaf area expansion and after a rain event. Acetaldehyde exchanges averaged over the whole period indicated very slow deposition. Our measurements confirm previous, similar results, as well as presumptions that grasses are comparatively low methanol emitters compared to non-grass species.

  6. Competition for /sup 15/N labelled ammonium between Trifolium subterraneum L. and Lolium multiflorium L. when grown in a mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz Espinoza, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Grasses and legumes are often grown in association in pastures because total herbage yield and forage quality is often higher than a monoculture grass sward. The competitive ability of the forage species for mineral N influences the stability of the mixed pasture. Mt. Barker subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum L.) Gulf ryegrass (Lolium multiflorium L.) were grown in pure stands and in mixtures in 3.8 I pots filled with exploded vermiculite to quantity the competition for applied mineral nitrogen (N). The isotope dilution technique using /sup 15/NH/sub 4/ was used. Also, the effect of increasing rates of fertilizer N on nodulation and fixation by subterranean clover and the rate of N uptake of subterranean clover and ryegrass was measured. The acetylene-ethylene technique and nodulation rating were used to examine the effect of N fertilization on fixation and nodulation. The uptake of N fertilizer by subterranean clover and ryegrass in both pure stands and the mixtures increased as the rate of fertilizer N applied increased. When grown in a pure stand, subterranean clover recovered a comparable amount of fertilizer N, but when grown in mixture with ryegrass, subterranean clover recovered from 44 to 364 mg of N. Ryegrass recovered 2 times the amount of labelled N in 6 hours than subterranean clover. The rate of N uptake was not due to differences in root fresh weight or dry weight. Ryegrass appeared to be a better competitor for NH/sub 4/ than subterranean clover because of the greater rate of uptake.

  7. Effects of poultry manure on phosphorus availability to perennial ryegrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil phosphorus (P) exists in numerous forms that differ in plant availability. High-P organic fertilizers, including poultry manure (PM), can alter the balance of these soil P forms and may affect plant nutrient status. To investigate the effects of PM on soil P distribution and plant utilization...

  8. Evaluation of the ryegrass stem rust model STEMRUST_G and its implementation as a decision aid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    STEMRUST_G, a simulation model for epidemics of stem rust in perennial ryegrass grown to maturity as a seed crop, was validated for use as an heuristic tool and as a decision aid for disease management with fungicides. Model validation was by comparison of model output with observed disease severit...

  9. Cloning, gene mapping, and functional analysis of a fructan 1-exohydrolase (1-FEH) from Lolium perenne implicated in fructan synthesis rather than in fructan mobilization.

    PubMed

    Lothier, Jérémy; Lasseur, Bertrand; Le Roy, Katrien; Van Laere, André; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Barre, Philippe; Van den Ende, Wim; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette

    2007-01-01

    Fructans, which are beta-(2,1) and/or beta-(2,6) linked polymers of fructose, are important storage carbohydrates in many plants. They are mobilized via fructan exohydrolases (FEHs). The cloning, mapping, and functional analysis of the first 1-FEH (EC 3.2.1.153) from Lolium perenne L. var. Bravo is described here. By screening a perennial ryegrass cDNA library, a 1-FEH cDNA named Lp1-FEHa was cloned. The Lp1-FEHa deduced protein has a low iso-electric point (5.22) and it groups together with plant FEHs and cell-wall type invertases. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 75% identity to wheat 1-FEH w2. The Lp1-FEHa gene was mapped at a distal position on the linkage group 3 (LG3). Functional characterization of the recombinant protein in Pichia pastoris demonstrated that it had high FEH activity towards 1-kestotriose, 1,1-kestotetraose, and inulin, but low activity against 6-kestotriose and levan. Like other fructan-plant FEHs, no hydrolase activity could be detected towards sucrose, convincingly demonstrating that the enzyme is not a classic invertase. The expression pattern analysis of Lp1-FEHa revealed transcript accumulation in leaf tissues accumulating fructans while transcript level was low in the photosynthetic tissues. The high expression level of this 1-FEH in conditions of active fructan synthesis, together with its low expression level when fructan contents are low, suggest that it might play a role as a beta-(2,1) trimming enzyme acting during fructan synthesis in concert with fructan synthesis enzymes.

  10. Variation in Alkaloid Production from Genetically Diverse Lolium Accessions Infected with Epichloë Species.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joseph R; Pratley, James E; Mace, Wade J; Weston, Leslie A

    2015-12-09

    Widespread infection of Epichloë occultans in annual ryegrass in Australia suggests that infection provides its weedy host, Lolium rigidum, some ecological advantage. Initial studies determined the distribution and profiles of known Epichloë alkaloids (epoxy-janthitrems, ergovaline, lolines, lolitrem B, and peramine) in plant extracts using a combination of GC-FID and HPLC techniques utilizing a single accession of Australian L. rigidum. However, the lolines N-acetylnorloline (NANL) and N-formylloline (NFL) were the only alkaloids detected and were highly concentrated in the immature inflorescences of mature plants. Additional glasshouse studies subjected a wide range of Australian L. rigidum haplotypes and international annual Lolium accessions to a suite of analyses to determine alkaloid levels and profiles. Again, NFL and NANL were the key lolines produced, with NFL consistently predominating. Considerable variation in alkaloid production was found both within and between biotypes and accessions evaluated under identical conditions, at the same maturation stage and on the same tissue type. The pyrrolopyrazine alkaloid peramine was also present in 8 out of 17 Australian biotypes of L. rigidum and 7 out of 33 international accessions infected with Epichloë spp.; the highest peramine concentrations were observed in seed extracts from L. rigidum collected from Australia. This study represents the first report of alkaloids from a geographically diverse collection of annual ryegrass germplasm infected with Epichloë spp. when grown under identical controlled conditions.

  11. Effect of silage from ryegrass intercropped with winter or common vetch for grazing dairy cows in small-scale dairy systems in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ortega, Martha; Heredia-Nava, Darwin; Espinoza-Ortega, Angelica; Sánchez-Vera, Ernesto; Arriaga-Jordán, Carlos M

    2011-06-01

    The objective was to determine the effect of including silages of annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) intercropped with winter vetch (Vicia villosa) (ARG-VV) or with common vetch (Vicia sativa) (ARG-VS) compared with maize silage (MS) on milk yield and milk composition of dairy cows grazing cultivated perennial ryegrass-white clover pastures with supplemented concentrate during the dry season. Six Holstein dairy cows with a mean yield of 19.0 kg/cow/day at the beginning of the experiment were randomly assigned to a 3 × 3 repeated Latin square. Treatments were: 8 h/day intensive grazing, 3.6 kg of dry matter (DM) per cow per day of concentrate plus MS, and ARG-VV or ARG-VS ad libitum at a stocking rate of 3.0 cows/ha for three experimental periods of 3 weeks each. Milk yield (MY) and milk composition, live weight and body condition score as well as silage and concentrate intakes were recorded during the third week of each experimental period, and pasture intake was estimated indirectly from utilised metabolisable energy. Economic analysis was obtained by preparing partial budgets. There were no statistical differences (P > 0.10) in MY, milk fat or protein content nor for live weight, but there was significant difference (P < 0.10) in body condition score. There were non-statistical differences in silage DM intake (P < 0.11); however, significant differences (P < 0.10) were obtained for estimated grazed herbage intake whilst no differences for total DM intake. Slightly higher economic returns (10%) were obtained with ARG-VS over MS, and this was 7% higher than ARG-VV. It is concluded that ARG-VS could be an option for complementing grazing for small-scale dairy production systems in the dry season as it is comparable to MS in animal performance and slightly better in economic terms.

  12. Transcriptional Profiles of Drought-Related Genes in Modulating Metabolic Processes and Antioxidant Defenses in Lolium multiflorum

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ling; Zhang, Xinquan; Wang, Jianping; Ma, Xiao; Zhou, Meiliang; Huang, LinKai; Nie, Gang; Wang, Pengxi; Yang, Zhongfu; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental stress that limits growth and development of cool-season annual grasses. Drought transcriptional profiles of resistant and susceptible lines were studied to understand the molecular mechanisms of drought tolerance in annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.). A total of 4718 genes exhibited significantly differential expression in two L. multiflorum lines. Additionally, up-regulated genes associated with drought response in the resistant lines were compared with susceptible lines. Gene ontology enrichment and pathway analyses revealed that genes partially encoding drought-responsive proteins as key regulators were significantly involved in carbon metabolism, lipid metabolism, and signal transduction. Comparable gene expression was used to identify the genes that contribute to the high drought tolerance in resistant lines of annual ryegrass. Moreover, we proposed the hypothesis that short-term drought have a beneficial effect on oxidation stress, which may be ascribed to a direct effect on the drought tolerance of annual ryegrass. Evidence suggests that some of the genes encoding antioxidants (HPTs, GGT, AP, 6-PGD, and G6PDH) function as antioxidant in lipid metabolism and signal transduction pathways, which have indispensable and promoting roles in drought resistance. This study provides the first transcriptome data on the induction of drought-related gene expression in annual ryegrass, especially via modulation of metabolic homeostasis, signal transduction, and antioxidant defenses to improve drought tolerance response to short-term drought stress. PMID:27200005

  13. Measured and Simulated Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Ryegrass- and Ryegrass/White Clover-Based Grasslands in a Moist Temperate Climate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dejun; Lanigan, Gary; Humphreys, James

    2011-01-01

    There is uncertainty about the potential reduction of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emission when fertilizer nitrogen (FN) is partially or completely replaced by biological N fixation (BNF) in temperate grassland. The objectives of this study were to 1) investigate the changes in N2O emissions when BNF is used to replace FN in permanent grassland, and 2) evaluate the applicability of the process-based model DNDC to simulate N2O emissions from Irish grasslands. Three grazing treatments were: (i) ryegrass (Lolium perenne) grasslands receiving 226 kg FN ha−1 yr−1 (GG+FN), (ii) ryegrass/white clover (Trifolium repens) grasslands receiving 58 kg FN ha−1 yr−1 (GWC+FN) applied in spring, and (iii) ryegrass/white clover grasslands receiving no FN (GWC-FN). Two background treatments, un-grazed swards with ryegrass only (G–B) or ryegrass/white clover (WC–B), did not receive slurry or FN and the herbage was harvested by mowing. There was no significant difference in annual N2O emissions between G–B (2.38±0.12 kg N ha−1 yr−1 (mean±SE)) and WC-B (2.45±0.85 kg N ha−1 yr−1), indicating that N2O emission due to BNF itself and clover residual decomposition from permanent ryegrass/clover grassland was negligible. N2O emissions were 7.82±1.67, 6.35±1.14 and 6.54±1.70 kg N ha−1 yr−1, respectively, from GG+FN, GWC+FN and GWC-FN. N2O fluxes simulated by DNDC agreed well with the measured values with significant correlation between simulated and measured daily fluxes for the three grazing treatments, but the simulation did not agree very well for the background treatments. DNDC overestimated annual emission by 61% for GG+FN, and underestimated by 45% for GWC-FN, but simulated very well for GWC+FN. Both the measured and simulated results supported that there was a clear reduction of N2O emissions when FN was replaced by BNF. PMID:22028829

  14. Fertilization regimes affect the soil biological characteristics of a sudangrass and ryegrass rotation system.

    PubMed

    Li, WenXi; Lu, JianWei; Li, FangBai; Wang, Yan; Lu, JunMing; Li, XiaoKun

    2011-06-01

    The sudangrass (Sorghum sudanense) and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) rotation is an intensive and new cropping system in Central China. Nutrient management practices in this rotation system may influence soil fertility, the important aspects of which are soil biological properties and quality. As sensitive soil biological properties and quality indicators, soil microbial community activity, microbial biomass, enzyme activities, soil organic matter (SOM) and total N resulting from different fertilization regimes in this rotation system were studied through a four-year field experiment from April 2005 to May 2009. Treatments included control (CK), fertilizer phosphorus and potassium (PK), fertilizer nitrogen and potassium (NK), fertilizer nitrogen and phosphorus (NP) and a fertilizer nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium combination (NPK). Soil microbial community activities in the NK, NP and NPK treatments were significantly lower than those in the CK and PK treatments after the sudangrass and ryegrass trial. The highest microbial biomass C, microbial biomass N, SOM, total N, sucrase and urease activities were found in the NPK treatment, and these soil quality indicators were significantly higher in the NK, NP and NPK treatments than in the PK and CK treatments. Soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities were positively associated with SOM in the sudangrass and ryegrass rotation system, indicating that fertilization regimes, especially N application, reduced microbial community activity in the soil. Proper fertilization regimes will increase microbial biomass, enzyme activity and SOM and improve soil fertility.

  15. Modification of senescence in ryegrass transformed with IPT under the control of a monocot senescence-enhanced promoter.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Robson, P R H; Bettany, A J E; Donnison, I S; Thomas, H; Scott, I M

    2004-06-01

    We report here the genetic modification of ryegrass senescence. Embryogenic cell suspensions of Lolium multiflorum were transformed by microprojectile bombardment with plasmid constructs containing 1.98 kb of the 5' flanking sequence of SEE1 (a maize cysteine protease gene showing enhanced expression during senescence) fused either to the Agrobacterium tumefaciens cytokinin biosynthesis gene IPT (designated PSEE1::IPT) or to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene UIDA (PSEE1::UIDA). Plants were regenerated under selection for the HPH hygromycin resistance gene in the vector. PSEE1::UIDA transformants confirmed that the SEE1 flanking sequence functioned as a senescence-enhanced promoter in ryegrass. The IPT transgene was detected in 28 regenerants (PSEE1::IPT) from five independent transformation events. PSEE1::IPT leaves displayed a stay-green phenotype. Some PSEE1::IPT lines developed spontaneous lesions.

  16. Protecting effect of recycled urban wastes (sewage sludge and wastewater) on ryegrass against the toxicity of pesticides at high concentrations.

    PubMed

    Peña, Aránzazu; Mingorance, Ma Dolores; Guzmán, Ignacio; Sánchez, Lourdes; Fernández-Espinosa, Antonio J; Valdés, Benito; Rossini-Oliva, Sabina

    2014-09-01

    Degraded landscapes, like those from abandoned mine areas, could be restored by revegetating them with appropriate plant species, after correction for acidity and improvement by adding exogenous organic material. Application of urban wastes to large areas of derelict land helps in the sustainable development of this landscape. However, the development of plant species in these soils could require in the future the management of possible pests or diseases by pesticide applications which could also affect plant yield. Therefore, ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) was planted in a limed soil from the mining area of Riotinto (SW Spain), using an indoor pot experiment and the effects of amendment with sewage sludge, as well as irrigation with urban wastewater on plant uptake of the insecticide thiacloprid and the fungicide fenarimol were examined. Ryegrass biomass was reduced up to 3-fold by pesticide application. Fenarimol residues were the highest in soil, while those of thiacloprid were lower in soil and higher in ryegrass. Addition of sewage sludge and irrigation with wastewater led to a reduction of pesticide translocation to the aerial plant parts, representing a lower hazard to ryegrass quality grown in this mine soil.

  17. Windrow burning eliminates Italian Ryegrass (Lolium perenne ssp. multiflorum) seed viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Burning of crop residues that have been concentrated behind the harvest combine (windrowed) is one of several harvest weed seed control strategies that have been developed and evaluated in Australia to address the widespread evolution of multiple herbicide resistance in annual weeds. Herbicide-resis...

  18. ABA inhibits germination but not dormancy release in mature imbibed seeds of Lolium rigidum Gaud.

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Steadman, Kathryn J.; Emery, R. J. Neil; Farrow, Scott C.; Benech-Arnold, Roberto L.; Powles, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    Dormancy release in imbibed annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum Gaud.) seeds is promoted in the dark but inhibited in the light. The role of abscisic acid (ABA) in inhibition of dormancy release was found to be negligible, compared with its subsequent effect on germination of dormant and non-dormant seeds. Inhibitors of ABA metabolism had the expected effects on seed germination but did not influence ABA concentration, suggesting that they act upon other (unknown) factors regulating dormancy. Although gibberellin (GA) synthesis was required for germination, the influence of exogenous GA on both germination and dormancy release was minor or non-existent. Embryo ABA concentration was the same following treatments to promote (dark stratification) and inhibit (light stratification) dormancy release; exogenous ABA had no effect on this process. However, the sensitivity of dark-stratified seeds to ABA supplied during germination was lower than that of light-stratified seeds. Therefore, although ABA definitely plays a role in the germination of annual ryegrass seeds, it is not the major factor mediating inhibition of dormancy release in imbibed seeds. PMID:19487389

  19. ABA inhibits germination but not dormancy release in mature imbibed seeds of Lolium rigidum Gaud.

    PubMed

    Goggin, Danica E; Steadman, Kathryn J; Emery, R J Neil; Farrow, Scott C; Benech-Arnold, Roberto L; Powles, Stephen B

    2009-01-01

    Dormancy release in imbibed annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum Gaud.) seeds is promoted in the dark but inhibited in the light. The role of abscisic acid (ABA) in inhibition of dormancy release was found to be negligible, compared with its subsequent effect on germination of dormant and non-dormant seeds. Inhibitors of ABA metabolism had the expected effects on seed germination but did not influence ABA concentration, suggesting that they act upon other (unknown) factors regulating dormancy. Although gibberellin (GA) synthesis was required for germination, the influence of exogenous GA on both germination and dormancy release was minor or non-existent. Embryo ABA concentration was the same following treatments to promote (dark stratification) and inhibit (light stratification) dormancy release; exogenous ABA had no effect on this process. However, the sensitivity of dark-stratified seeds to ABA supplied during germination was lower than that of light-stratified seeds. Therefore, although ABA definitely plays a role in the germination of annual ryegrass seeds, it is not the major factor mediating inhibition of dormancy release in imbibed seeds.

  20. Effects of elevated ultraviolet radiation and endophytic fungi on plant growth and insect feeding in Lolium perenne, Festuca rubra, F. arundinacea and F. pratensis.

    PubMed

    McLeod, A R; Rey, A; Newsham, K K; Lewis, G C; Wolferstam, P

    2001-09-01

    Plants of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), red fescue (Festuca rubra L.), tall fescue (F. arundinacea Schreb.) and meadow fescue (F. pratensis Huds) were exposed at an outdoor facility located in Edinburgh, UK to modulated levels of UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) using banks of cellulose diacetate filtered UV-B fluorescent lamps that also produce UV-A radiation (315-400 nm). The plants were derived from a single clone of each species and were grown both with and without colonization by naturally-occurring fungal endophytes. The UV-B treatment was a 30% elevation above the ambient erythemally-weighted level of UV-B during July to October. Growth of treated plants was compared with plants grown under elevated UV-A radiation alone produced by banks of polyester filtered lamps and with plants grown at ambient levels of solar radiation under banks of unenergized lamps. At the end of the treatment period, sample leaves were collected for feeding trials with the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria (Forsk). The UV-B treatment produced no effects on the aboveground biomass of any of the four grasses. The UV-B treatment and the UV-A control exposure both increased plant height and the number of daughter plants formed by rhizome growth in F. rubra. There were significant effects of endophyte presence on the total fresh and dry weights of F. arundinacea and F. rubra, on fresh weight only in F. pratensis, and on the fresh and dry weights of inflorescence in F. arundinacea and L. perenne. There were no effects of UV treatments on the absolute amounts of leaf consumed or on the feeding preferences of locusts for leaves with or without endophyte in three species: F. rubra, F. arundinacea and L. perenne. In F. pratensis there was no effect of UV treatment on the weight of leaves consumed but a significant UV x endophyte interaction caused by a marked change in feeding preference between leaves with and without endophyte that differed between the UV-B treatment and UV-A control

  1. Perennial roots to immortality.

    PubMed

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-10-01

    Maximum lifespan greatly varies among species, and it is not strictly determined; it can change with species evolution. Clonal growth is a major factor governing maximum lifespan. In the plant kingdom, the maximum lifespans described for clonal and nonclonal plants vary by an order of magnitude, with 43,600 and 5,062 years for Lomatia tasmanica and Pinus longaeva, respectively. Nonclonal perennial plants (those plants exclusively using sexual reproduction) also present a huge diversity in maximum lifespans (from a few to thousands of years) and even more interestingly, contrasting differences in aging patterns. Some plants show a clear physiological deterioration with aging, whereas others do not. Indeed, some plants can even improve their physiological performance as they age (a phenomenon called negative senescence). This diversity in aging patterns responds to species-specific life history traits and mechanisms evolved by each species to adapt to its habitat. Particularities of roots in perennial plants, such as meristem indeterminacy, modular growth, stress resistance, and patterns of senescence, are crucial in establishing perenniality and understanding adaptation of perennial plants to their habitats. Here, the key role of roots for perennial plant longevity will be discussed, taking into account current knowledge and highlighting additional aspects that still require investigation.

  2. Interplanting annual ryegrass, wheat, oat, and corn to mitigate iron deficiency in dry beans.

    PubMed

    Omondi, Emmanuel Chiwo; Kniss, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated whether grass intercropping can be used to alleviate Fe deficiency chlorosis in dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown in high pH, calcareous soils with low organic matter. Field studies were conducted at the University of Wyoming Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center in 2009 and 2010. Black- and navy beans were grown alone or intercropped with annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), oat (Avena sativa L.), corn (Zea mays L.), or spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in a two-factor factorial strip-plot randomized complete block design. All four grass species increased chlorophyll intensity in dry beans. However, grass species did not increase iron (Fe) concentration in dry bean tissues suggesting inefficient utilization of Fe present in the dry bean tissues. In 2009, nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) and manganese (Mn) concentration in bean tissue were greater in bean monoculture than in grass intercropped beans. Bean monoculture also had greater soil NO3-N concentrations than grass intercropped treatments. In 2009, grass intercrops reduced dry bean yield >25% compared to bean monoculture. Annual ryegrass was the least competitive of the four annual grass species. This suggests that competition from grasses for nutrients, water, or light may have outweighed benefits accruing from grass intercropping. Additional studies are required to determine the appropriate grass and dry bean densities, as well as the optimum time of grass removal.

  3. Interplanting Annual Ryegrass, Wheat, Oat, and Corn to Mitigate Iron Deficiency in Dry Beans

    PubMed Central

    Omondi, Emmanuel Chiwo; Kniss, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated whether grass intercropping can be used to alleviate Fe deficiency chlorosis in dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown in high pH, calcareous soils with low organic matter. Field studies were conducted at the University of Wyoming Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center in 2009 and 2010. Black- and navy beans were grown alone or intercropped with annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), oat (Avena sativa L.), corn (Zea mays L.), or spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in a two-factor factorial strip-plot randomized complete block design. All four grass species increased chlorophyll intensity in dry beans. However, grass species did not increase iron (Fe) concentration in dry bean tissues suggesting inefficient utilization of Fe present in the dry bean tissues. In 2009, nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) and manganese (Mn) concentration in bean tissue were greater in bean monoculture than in grass intercropped beans. Bean monoculture also had greater soil NO3-N concentrations than grass intercropped treatments. In 2009, grass intercrops reduced dry bean yield >25% compared to bean monoculture. Annual ryegrass was the least competitive of the four annual grass species. This suggests that competition from grasses for nutrients, water, or light may have outweighed benefits accruing from grass intercropping. Additional studies are required to determine the appropriate grass and dry bean densities, as well as the optimum time of grass removal. PMID:25536084

  4. Nutrients can enhance the abundance and expression of alkane hydroxylase CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass planted in hydrocarbon-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Muhammad; Afzal, Muhammad; Amin, Imran; Iqbal, Samina; Khan, Qaiser M

    2014-01-01

    Plant-bacteria partnership is a promising strategy for the remediation of soil and water polluted with hydrocarbons. However, the limitation of major nutrients (N, P and K) in soil affects the survival and metabolic activity of plant associated bacteria. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of nutrients on survival and metabolic activity of an alkane degrading rhizo-bacterium. Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) was grown in diesel-contaminated soil and inoculated with an alkane degrading bacterium, Pantoea sp. strain BTRH79, in greenhouse experiments. Two levels of nutrients were applied and plant growth, hydrocarbon removal, and gene abundance and expression were determined after 100 days of sowing of ryegrass. Results obtained from these experiments showed that the bacterial inoculation improved plant growth and hydrocarbon degradation and these were further enhanced by nutrients application. Maximum plant biomass production and hydrocarbon mineralization was observed by the combined use of inoculum and higher level of nutrients. The presence of nutrients in soil enhanced the colonization and metabolic activity of the inoculated bacterium in the rhizosphere. The abundance and expression of CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass was found to be directly associated with the level of applied nutrients. Enhanced hydrocarbon degradation was associated with the population of the inoculum bacterium, the abundance and expression of CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass. It is thus concluded that the combination between vegetation, inoculation with pollutant-degrading bacteria and nutrients amendment was an efficient approach to reduce hydrocarbon contamination.

  5. Virus induced gene silencing in Lolium temulentum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lolium temulentum L. is valuable as a model species for studying abiotic stress in closely related forage and turf grasses, many of which are polyploid outcrossing species. As with most monocot species, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of L. temulentum is still challenging, time consuming and n...

  6. The effect of fungicides on seed yield and disease control in Italian ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Rijckaert, G

    2009-01-01

    Under Belgian climatic conditions, the incidence of fungal diseases like mildew, crown rust and stem rust is much lower in seed crops of Italian ryegrass than crops of perennial ryegrass, because of the cleaning effect of the preceding forage cut and the much quicker growing rate of Italian ryegrass. However, in some mild and warm seasons, above diseases can give detrimental effects on seed yield, so a preventive fungicide programme would be very recommended in order to obtain consistently high seed yields over the years. Six different fungicides and an untreated control were tested on two tetraploid varieties of Italian ryegrass, namely cv. Meroa and cv. Salomé (more tolerant to crown rust); one fungicide application took place at early ear emergence for all three trials (2006-07-08). Only in the 2007-trial with very severe rust pressure, the most efficient fungicides increased seed yield by 22-25 % against the control (100%) and the tebuconazol-treatment (106.6%). Yield differences could be attributed to a healthier seed crop, i.e., less withered flag leaf and to a higher thousand seed weight. As both years 2006 and 2008 had very little disease pressure throughout the season, the best treatments (Allegro and Opera) resulted in a moderate seed yield increase of 6-7% in 2006, while 2008 did not give any yield response at all between the fungicide treatments and the untreated check. Seed yield, yield components and disease development are discussed and explained in relation to the seasonal meteorological conditions.

  7. Nitrogen losses from perennial grass species.

    PubMed

    Vázquez de Aldana, B R; Geerts, R H E M; Berendse, F

    1996-04-01

    Nitrogen losses from plants may occur through a variety of pathways, but so far, most studies have only quantified losses of nutrients by above-ground litter production. We used (15)N pulse labelling to quantify total nitrogen losses from above- and below-ground plant parts. Using this method we were able to include also pathways other than above-ground litter production. To test the hypothesis that species from nutrient-poor habitats lose less nitrogen than species from more fertile soils, six perennial grasses from habitats with a wide range of nutrient availability were investigated: Lolium perenne, Arrhenatherum elatius, Anthoxanthum odoratum, Festuca rubra, F. ovina and Molinia caerulea. The results of an experiment carried out in pots in a green-house at two fertility levels show that statistically significant losses occur through pathways other than above-ground litter production. In the low fertility treatment, most (70%) losses from L. perenne occurred by litter production, but in Ar. elatius, F. rubra, F. ovina and M. caerulea, more than 50% of labelled N losses took place by root turn-over, leaching or exudation from roots. When nutrient supply increased, the (15)N losses in above-ground dead material increased in all species and in Ar. elatius, A. odoratum and F. rubra the (15)N losses via other pathways decreased. Ranked according to decreasing turnover coefficient the sequence of species was: L. perenne, A. odoratum, F. rubra, F. ovina, Ar. elatius, M. caerulea. These results suggest that species adapted to sites with low availability of nutrients lose less nitrogen (including above- and below-ground losses) than species adapted to more fertile soils.

  8. Differentiating glyphosate-resistant and glyphosate-sensitive Italian ryegrass using hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Matthew A.; Huang, Yanbo; Nandula, Vijay K.; Reddy, Krishna N.

    2014-05-01

    Glyphosate based herbicide programs are most preferred in current row crop weed control practices. With the increased use of glyphosate, weeds, including Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), have developed resistance to glyphosate. The identification of glyphosate resistant weeds in crop fields is critical because they must be controlled before they reduce the crop yield. Conventionally, the method for the identification with whole plant or leaf segment/disc shikimate assays is tedious and labor-intensive. In this research, we investigated the use of high spatial resolution hyperspectral imagery to extract spectral curves derived from the whole plant of Italian ryegrass to determine if the plant is glyphosate resistant (GR) or glyphosate sensitive (GS), which provides a way for rapid, non-contact measurement for differentiation between GR and GS weeds for effective site-specific weed management. The data set consists of 226 greenhouse grown plants (119 GR, 107 GS), which were imaged at three and four weeks after emergence. In image preprocessing, the spectral curves are normalized to remove lighting artifacts caused by height variation in the plants. In image analysis, a subset of hyperspectral bands is chosen using a forward selection algorithm to optimize the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) between GR and GS plants. Then, the dimensionality of selected bands is reduced using linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Finally, the maximum likelihood classification was conducted for plant sample differentiation. The results show that the overall classification accuracy is between 75% and 80% depending on the age of the plants. Further refinement of the described methodology is needed to correlate better with plant age.

  9. Efficiency of green waste compost and biochar soil amendments for reducing lead and copper mobility and uptake to ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Karami, Nadia; Clemente, Rafael; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Lepp, Nicholas W; Beesley, Luke

    2011-07-15

    Green waste compost and biochar amendments were assessed for their assistance in regulating the mobility of copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) and the resultant uptake of these metals into vegetation. The amendments were mixed with a heavily Cu and Pb contaminated soil (600 and 21,000 mg kg(-1), respectively) from a former copper mine in Cheshire (UK), on a volume basis both singly and in combination in greenhouse pot trials. Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. var. Cadix) was grown for the following 4 months during which biomass, metals in soil pore water and plant uptake were measured in three consecutive harvests. Very high Pb concentrations in pore water from untreated soil (>80 mg l(-1)) were reduced furthest by compost amendment (<5 mg l(-1)) whereas biochar was the more effective treatment at reducing pore water Cu concentrations. Duly, ryegrass shoot Cu levels were reduced and large, significant reductions in shoot Pb levels were observed after biochar and compost amendments, respectively during successive harvests. However, because green waste compost singly and in combination with biochar vividly enhanced biomass yields, harvestable amounts of Pb were only significantly reduced by the compost amendment which had reduced shoot Pb levels furthest. The low biomass of ryegrass with biochar amendment meant that this was the only amendment which did not significantly increase harvestable amounts of Cu. Therefore the two amendments have opposing metal specific suitability for treating this contaminated soil regarding whether it is a maximum reduction in plant tissue metal concentration or a maximum reduction in harvestable amount of metal that is required.

  10. Comparative “Golgi” Proteome Study of Lolium multiflorum and Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kristina L.; Chin, Tony; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Zeng, Wei; Doblin, Monika S.; Bulone, Vincent; Bacic, Antony

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus (GA) is a crucial organelle in the biosynthesis of non-cellulosic polysaccharides, glycoproteins and proteoglycans that are primarily destined for secretion to the cell surface (plasma membrane, cell wall and apoplast). Only a small proportion of the proteins involved in these processes have been identified in plants, with the majority of their functions still unknown. The availability of a GA proteome would greatly assist plant biochemists, cell and molecular biologists in determining the precise function of the cell wall-related proteins. There has been some progress towards defining the GA proteome in the model plant system Arabidopsis thaliana, yet in commercially important species, such as either the cereals or woody species there has been relatively less progress. In this study, we applied discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifugation to partially enrich GA from suspension cell cultures (SCCs) and combined this with stable isotope labelling (iTRAQ) to determine protein sub-cellular locations. Results from a representative grass species, Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and a dicot species, black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) are compared. The results confirm that membrane fractionation approaches that provide effective GA-enriched fractions for proteomic analyses in Arabidopsis are much less effective in the species examined here and highlight the complexity of the GA, both within and between species. PMID:28248233

  11. The influence of nitrilotriacetate on heavy metal uptake of lettuce and ryegrass

    SciTech Connect

    Kulli, B.; Balmer, M.; Krebs, R.; Lothenbach, B.; Geiger, G.; Schulin, R.

    1999-12-01

    Metal uptake and removal from the soil by plants may be a useful measure to remediate contaminated soils. These processes can be enhanced by adding metal chelators to soil. The authors investigated the effect of nitrolotriacetate (NTA) and urea on the uptake of Cd, Cu, and Zn by lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. ev. Orion) and Italian ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. ev. Bastion) in pot experiments. Nitric acid-extractable heavy metal concentrations in the contaminated soil were 2 mg Cd, 530 mg Cu, and 700 mg Zn/kg. Three NTA treatments were compared with two urea treatments, and a control. Nitrilotriacetate and urea increased the NaNO{sub 3}-extractable soil concentrations of the three metals. At the highest NTA dose, metal concentrations in the aboveground plant biomass was 4 to 24 times greater than in the control plants. While NTA increased plant metal concentrations, it reduced plant matter production. At lower doses, this effect was small. At the highest NTA dose, plant growth was almost completely inhibited. Severe visual symptoms indicated metal toxicity as the likely cause. The urea treatments generally increased the plant matter production. Total metal uptake was in general larger at the lowest or at the intermediate NTA dose than at the highest doses. Little additional total metal uptake was achieved with NTA treatments than with urea. Compared with the controls, neither NTA nor urea enhanced total uptake under the given conditions by more than threefold.

  12. Airborne trace element pollution in 11 European cities assessed by exposure of standardised ryegrass cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Andreas; Ansel, Wolfgang; Klumpp, Gabriele; Breuer, Jörn; Vergne, Philippe; Sanz, María José; Rasmussen, Stine; Ro-Poulsen, Helge; Ribas Artola, Àngela; Peñuelas, Josep; He, Shang; Garrec, Jean Pierre; Calatayud, Vicent

    Within a European biomonitoring programme, Italian ryegrass ( Lolium multiflorum Lam.) was employed as accumulative bioindicator of airborne trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Sb, V, Zn) in urban agglomerations. Applying a highly standardised method, grass cultures were exposed for consecutive periods of four weeks each to ambient air at up to 100 sites in 11 cities during 2000-2002. Results of the 2001 exposure experiments revealed a clear differentiation of trace element pollution within and among local monitoring networks. Pollution was influenced particularly by traffic emissions. Especially Sb, Pb, Cr, Fe, and Cu exhibited a very uneven distribution within the municipal areas with strong accumulation in plants from traffic-exposed sites in the city centres and close to major roads, and moderate to low levels in plants exposed at suburban or rural sites. Accumulation of Ni and V was influenced by other emission sources. The biomonitoring sites located in Spanish city centres featured a much higher pollution load by trace elements than those in other cities of the network, confirming previously reported findings obtained by chemical analyses of dust deposition and aerosols. At some heavily-trafficked sites, legal thresholds for Cu, Pb, and V contents in foodstuff and animal feed were reached or even surpassed. The study confirmed that the standardised grass exposure is a useful and reliable tool to monitor and to assess environmental levels of potentially toxic compounds of particulate matter.

  13. Treatment of an acid soil with bentonite used for wine fining: effects on soil properties and the growth of Lolium multiflorum.

    PubMed

    Arias-Estévez, Manuel; López-Periago, Eugenio; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan C; Torrado-Agrasar, Ana; Simal-Gándara, Jesus

    2007-09-05

    When used to fine wines, bentonite acquires a protein load that makes it a potentially useful fertilizer. Other properties of bentonite are also potentially useful for soil amendment. In the work described in this paper, waste bentonite from a winery was applied to an acid soil, and its effects on soil properties and on the growth of Lolium multiflorum were evaluated. Soil N, K, and P contents all increased, as did pH and cation exchange capacity. Biomass production increased as the dose of bentonite increased up to 5 g kg(-1), decreasing at larger doses (possibly as a result of falling potassium/magnesium ratio and increasing electrical conductivity). Environmental drawbacks of waste bentonite include its high soluble copper content, although its conversion in the soil to less soluble forms reduces its potential phytotoxicity. The copper, manganese, and zinc contents of the ryegrass crop were low.

  14. Current efforts to develop perennial wheat and domesticate Thinopyrum intermedium as a perennial grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Land Institute is developing a new perennial grain by domesticating the perennial grass Thinopyrum intermedium (intermediate wheatgrass). In 1983, intermediate wheatgrass was selected for domestication by the Rodale Research Center (Kutztown, Penn., USA). Nearly 100 species of perennial grasse...

  15. Biodegradation of phenanthrene, spatial distribution of bacterial populations and dioxygenase expression in the mycorrhizosphere of Lolium perenne inoculated with Glomus mosseae.

    PubMed

    Corgié, S C; Fons, F; Beguiristain, T; Leyval, C

    2006-05-01

    Interactions between the plant and its microbial communities in the rhizosphere control microbial polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) biodegradation processes. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can influence plant survival and PAH degradation in polluted soil. This work was aimed at studying the contribution of the mycorrhizosphere to PAH biodegradation in the presence of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L., cv. Barclay) inoculated with Glomus mosseae (BEG 69) by taking into account the structure and activity of bacterial communities, PAH degrading culturable bacteria as a function of the distance from roots. Ryegrass was grown in compartmentalized systems designed to harvest successive sections of rhizosphere in lateral compartments polluted or not with phenanthrene (PHE). Colonization of roots by G. mosseae (BEG 69) modified the structure and density of bacterial populations in the mycorrhizosphere, compared to the rhizosphere of non-mycorrhizal plants. G. mosseae increased the density of culturable heterotrophic and PAH degrading bacteria beyond the immediate rhizosphere in the presence of PHE, and increased the density of PAH degraders in the absence of the pollutant. Biodegradation was not significantly increased in the mycorrhizosphere, compared to control non-mycorrhizal plants, where PHE biodegradation already reached 92% after 6 weeks. However, dioxygenase transcriptional activity was found to be higher in the immediate mycorrhizosphere in the presence of G. mosseae (BEG 69).

  16. Annual and perennial peanut forage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut hay can be a valuable feed for livestock in the Southeast. Perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) cultivars have been developed and are grown on limited acres in Georgia and Florida. The cost and time for establishment of this vegetatively propagated crop can be prohibitive to some grow...

  17. Interaction between BSM-contaminated soils and Italian ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Li, Huashou; Li, Na; Lin, Chuxia; He, Hongzhi; Chen, Guikui

    2012-01-01

    The interaction among the bensulfuron-methyl, growth of Italian ryegrass, and soil chemical/biochemical/microbiological parameters was investigated in a microcosm experiment. The bensulfuron-methyl added to the soil can be rapidly degraded by certain fungi and actinomycetes present in the original paddy rice soil. The growth of Italian ryegrass significantly accelerated the in-soil degradation of bensulfuron-methyl in its rhizosphere. The uptake of bensulfuron-methyl by ryegrass increased with increasing dosage level of bensulfuron-methyl. However, the phytoextraction of bensulfuron-methyl by ryegrass contributed insignificantly to the total removal of the soil bensulfuron-methyl. Within the dosage range set in this study, the root development of ryegrass was not adversely affected by the presence of the soil bensulfuron-methyl although the fresh biomass of shoot was slightly reduced in the higher dosage treatments. This can be attributed to the adsorption of the added bensulfuron-methyl by soil colloids and consequently the reduction of bensulfuron-methyl level in the soil pore water to a concentration sufficiently lower than the toxic level. The growth of ryegrass significantly increased soil pH and the activities of phosphatase and peroxidase but reduced the EC and the activities of urease in the rhizospheric soil.

  18. Pollen-Mediated Movement of Herbicide Resistance Genes in Lolium rigidum

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Iñigo; Escorial, María-Concepción; Chueca, María-Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of herbicide resistance genes by pollen is a major concern in cross-pollinated species such as annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum). A two-year study was conducted in the greenhouse, under favorable conditions for pollination, to generate information on potential maximum cross-pollination. This maximum cross-pollination rate was 56.1%. A three-year field trial was also conducted to study the cross-pollination rates in terms of distance and orientation to an herbicide-resistant pollen source. Under field conditions, cross-pollination rates varied from 5.5% to 11.6% in plants adjacent to the pollen source and decreased with increasing distances (1.5 to 8.9% at 15 m distance and up to 4.1% at 25 m in the downwind direction). Environmental conditions influenced the cross-pollination both under greenhouse and field conditions. Data were fit to an exponential decay model to predict gene flow at increasing distances. This model predicted an average gene flow of 7.1% when the pollen donor and recipient plants were at 0 m distance from each other. Pollen-mediated gene flow declined by 50% at 16.7 m from the pollen source, yet under downwind conditions gene flow of 5.2% was predicted at 25 m, the farthest distance studied. Knowledge of cross-pollination rates will be useful for assessing the spread of herbicide resistance genes in L. rigidum and in developing appropriate strategies for its mitigation. PMID:27336441

  19. Hydrocarbon degradation and plant colonization of selected bacterial strains isolated from the rhizsophere and plant interior of Italian ryegrass and Birdsfoot trefoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohail, Y.; Andria, V.; Reichenauer, T. G.; Sessitsch, A.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading strains were isolated from the rhizosphere, root and shoot interior of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum var. Taurus), Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus var. Leo) grown in a soil contaminated with petroleum oil. Strains were tested regarding their phylogeny and their degradation efficiency. The most efficient strains were tested regarding their suitability to be applied for phytoremediation of diesel oils. Sterilized and non-sterilized agricultural soil, with and with out compost, were spiked with diesel and used for planting Italian ryegrass and birdsfoot trefoil. Four selected strains with high degradation activities, derived from the rhizosphere and plant interior, were selected for individual inoculation. Plants were harvested at flowering stage and plant biomass and hydrocarbon degradation was determined. Furthermore, it was investigated to which extent the inoculant strains were able to survive and colonize plants. Microbial community structures were analysed by 16S rRNA and alkB gene analysis. Results showed efficient colonization by the inoculant strains and improved degradation by the application of compost combined with inoculation as well as on microbial community structures will be presented.

  20. Impact of No-till Cover Cropping of Italian Ryegrass on Above and Below Ground Faunal Communities Inhabiting a Soybean Field with Emphasis on Soybean Cyst Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Hooks, Cerruti R. R.; Wang, Koon-Hui; Meyer, Susan L. F.; Lekveishvili, Mariam; Hinds, Jermaine; Zobel, Emily; Rosario-Lebron, Armando; Lee-Bullock, Mason

    2011-01-01

    Two field trials were conducted between 2008 and 2010 in Maryland to evaluate the ability of an Italian ryegrass (IR) (Lolium multiflorum) cover crop to reduce populations of plant-parasitic nematodes while enhancing beneficial nematodes, soil mites and arthropods in the foliage of a no-till soybean (Glycine max) planting. Preplant treatments were: 1) previous year soybean stubble (SBS); and 2) herbicide-killed IR cover crop + previous year soybean stubble (referred to as IR). Heterodera glycines population densities were very low and no significant difference in population densities of H. glycines or Pratylenchus spp. were observed between IR and SBS. Planting of IR increased abundance of bacterivorous nematodes in 2009. A reverse trend was observed in 2010 where SBS had higher abundance of bacterivorous nematodes and nematode richness at the end of the cover cropping period. Italian ryegrass also did not affect insect pests on soybean foliage. However, greater populations of spiders were found on soybean foliage in IR treatments during both field trials. Potential causes of these findings are discussed. PMID:23430284

  1. Ryegrass pasture combined with partial total mixed ration reduces enteric methane emissions and maintains the performance of dairy cows during mid to late lactation.

    PubMed

    Dall-Orsoletta, Aline C; Almeida, João Gabriel R; Carvalho, Paulo C F; Savian, Jean V; Ribeiro-Filho, Henrique M N

    2016-06-01

    The inclusion of grazed pasture in dairy feeding systems based on a total mixed ration (TMR) reduces feed costs, benefits herd health, and reduces environmental impact. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of ryegrass pasture combined with a partial TMR on enteric methane emissions, dry matter intake (DMI), and performance of dairy cows from mid to late lactation. The experimental treatments included 100% TMR (control), partial TMR + 6h of continuous grazing (0900-1500 h), and partial TMR + 6h of grazing that was divided into 2 periods of 3h each that took place after milking (0900-1200 h; 1530-1830 h). Twelve F1 cows (Holstein × Jersey; 132±44 DIM) were divided into 6 lots and distributed in a 3×3 Latin square design with 3 periods of 21 d (15 d of adaptation and 6 d of evaluation). Ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) pasture was used, and the TMR was composed of 80% corn silage, 18% soybean meal, and 2% mineral and vitamin mixture, based on dry matter. The same mixture was used for cows with access to pasture. The total DMI, milk production, and 4% fat-corrected milk were similar for all cows; however, the pasture DMI (7.4 vs. 6.0kg/d) and grazing period (+ 40 min/d) were higher in cows that had access to pasture for 2 periods of 3h compared with those that grazed for a continuous 6-h period. Methane emission was higher (656 vs. 547g/d) in confined cows than in those that received partial TMR + pasture. The inclusion of annual ryegrass pasture in the diet of dairy cows maintained animal performance and reduced enteric methane emissions. The percentage of grazed forage in the cows' diet increased when access to pasture was provided in 2 periods after the morning and afternoon milking.

  2. A potential role for endogenous microflora in dormancy release, cytokinin metabolism and the response to fluridone in Lolium rigidum seeds

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Emery, R. J. Neil; Kurepin, Leonid V.; Powles, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Dormancy in Lolium rigidum (annual ryegrass) seeds can be alleviated by warm stratification in the dark or by application of fluridone, an inhibitor of plant abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis via phytoene desaturase. However, germination and absolute ABA concentration are not particularly strongly correlated. The aim of this study was to determine if cytokinins of both plant and bacterial origin are involved in mediating dormancy status and in the response to fluridone. Methods Seeds with normal or greatly decreased (by dry heat pre-treatment) bacterial populations were stratified in the light or dark and in the presence or absence of fluridone in order to modify their dormancy status. Germination was assessed and seed cytokinin concentration and composition were measured in embryo-containing or embryo-free seed portions. Key Results Seeds lacking bacteria were no longer able to lose dormancy in the dark unless supplied with exogenous gibberellin or fluridone. Although these seeds showed a dramatic switch from active cytokinin free bases to O-glucosylated storage forms, the concentrations of individual cytokinin species were only weakly correlated to dormancy status. However, cytokinins of apparently bacterial origin were affected by fluridone and light treatment of the seeds. Conclusions It is probable that resident microflora contribute to dormancy status in L. rigidum seeds via a complex interaction between hormones of both plant and bacterial origin. This interaction needs to be taken into account in studies on endogenous seed hormones or the response of seeds to plant growth regulators. PMID:25471097

  3. Molecular basis of IgE-recognition of Lol p 5, a major allergen of rye-grass pollen.

    PubMed

    Suphioglu, C; Blaher, B; Rolland, J M; McCluskey, J; Schäppi, G; Kenrick, J; Singh, M B; Knox, R B

    1998-04-01

    Grass pollen, especially of rye-grass (Lolium perenne). represents an important cause of type I allergy. Identification of IgE-binding (allergenic) epitopes of major grass pollen allergens is essential for understanding the molecular basis of interaction between allergens and human IgE antibodies and therefore facilitates the devising of safer and more effective diagnostic and immunotherapy reagents. The aim of this study was to identify the allergenic epitopes of Lol p 5, a major allergen of rye-grass pollen, immunodissect these epitopes further so that the amino acid residues critical for antibody binding can be determined and investigate the conservation and nature of these epitopes within the context of the natural grass pollen allergens. Peptides, 12-13 amino acid residues long and overlapping each other by 4 amino acid residues, based on the entire deduced amino acid sequence of the coding region of Lol p 5, were synthesised and assayed for IgE-binding. Two strong IgE-binding epitopes (Lol p 5 (49-60) and (265-276), referred to as peptides 7 and 34, respectively) were identified. These epitopes were further resolved by truncated peptides and amino acid replacement studies and the amino acid residues critical for IgE-binding determined (Lol p 5 (49-60) residue Lys57 and (265-276) residue Lys275). Sequences of these epitopes were conserved in related allergens and may form the conserved allergenic domains responsible for the cross-reactivity observed between pollen allergens of taxonomically related grasses. Furthermore, due to its strong IgE-reactivity, synthetic peptide Lol p 5 (265-276) was used to affinity-purify specific IgE antibodies which recognised proteins of other clinically important grass pollens. further indicating presence of allergenic cross-reactivity at the level of allergenic epitope. Moreover, Lol p 5 (265 276) demonstrated a strong capacity to inhibit IgE-binding to natural rye-grass pollen proteins highlighting the antibody accessibility

  4. Seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alex H C; Barg, Stefani S N; Leung, Alexander K C

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis are IgE-mediated, hypersensitivity conditions characterized by ocular pruritus, epiphora, and hyperemia. Proper diagnosis is usually made clinically based on history and physical examination. Diagnostic procedures are rarely necessary. Non-pharmacological measures, such as environmental modification and proper eye care, should be considered for all patients with allergic conjunctivitis. Pharmacological interventions may also be required. Milder cases can be treated with short-term topical ophthalmic therapy such as a decongestant/ antihistamine combination, a mast cell stabilizer, or a multi-action agent. Moderate to severe cases may require longer usage of the above agents and/or the addition of an oral antihistamine. Refractory cases may necessitate the use of topical ophthalmic corticosteroids and topical NSAIDs. Immunotherapy, whether via the subcutaneous route or the intranasal route, should be considered in the treatment of persistent severe cases refractory to conventional treatment. Despite all the available therapeutic agents, there continues to be a constant need to discover more effective ways to treat seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis. This article also discusses recent patents related to the field.

  5. 7 CFR 201.61 - Fluorescence percentages in ryegrasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fluorescence percentages in ryegrasses. 201.61 Section 201.61 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL...

  6. Remediation of polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil by using a combination of ryegrass, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and earthworms.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan-Fei; Lu, Mang; Peng, Fang; Wan, Yun; Liao, Min-Hong

    2014-07-01

    In this work, a laboratory experiment was performed to investigate the influences of inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus caledoniun L. and/or epigeic earthworms (Eisenia foetida) on phytoremediation of a PCB-contaminated soil by ryegrass grown for 180d. Planting ryegrass, ryegrass inoculated with earthworms, ryegrass inoculated with AMF, and ryegrass co-inoculated with AMF and earthworms decreased significantly initial soil PCB contents by 58.4%, 62.6%, 74.3%, and 79.5%, respectively. Inoculation with AMF and/or earthworms increased the yield of plants, and the accumulation of PCBs in ryegrass. However, PCB uptake by ryegrass accounted for a negligible portion of soil PCB removal. The number of soil PCB-degrading populations increased when ryegrass was inoculated with AMF and/or earthworms. The data show that fungal inoculation may significantly increase the remedial potential of ryegrass for soil contaminated with PCBs.

  7. MINERAL CHARACTERIZATION OF TEMPERATE GRASSES FROM A HIGH RAINFALL ENVIRONMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Straw produced as a co-product of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), tall fescue [Schedonorus phoenix (Scop.) Holub] (formerly Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), and Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) seed production in the high rainfall area of western Orego...

  8. Performance of low-input turfgrass species as affected by mowing and nitrogen fertilization in Minnesota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Minnesota, most lawns and higher cut turfgrass areas consist primarily of species such as Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) that require significant management inputs such as frequent mowing and nitrogen fertility. Several studies have shown that oth...

  9. Comparative trends in forage nutritional quality across the growing season in thirteen grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on recent climate change models, landscapes are likely going to get drier and hotter; thus reducing the available water to support herbage production in species heavily dependent on water for persistence and production such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), orchardgrass (Dactylis glom...

  10. Planning pastures: taking species attributes to the landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter hardiness limits the use of the productive forage grass perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) in the northeastern United States. Both efforts to breed more cold-tolerant varieties and the changing climate increase the potential of this grass in pastures. Growth chamber studies of thirteen co...

  11. Immunochemical studies of Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergens, Lol p I, II, and III.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Kihara, T K; Marsh, D G

    1987-12-15

    It was reported earlier that human immune responses to three perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne) pollen allergens, Lol p I, II, and III, are associated with histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3. Rye-allergic people are often concordantly sensitive to all three of these allergens. Since earlier studies suggested that these antigens are non-cross-reactive, their immunologic relatedness by double antibody radioimmunoassay (DARIA) was studied in order to understand further the immunochemical basis for the concordant recognition of the three allergens. Direct binding DARIA studies were performed with human sera from 189 allergic subjects. Inhibition DARIA studies were carried out with 17 human sera from grass-allergic patients who were on grass immunotherapy, one goat anti-serum, and six rabbit antisera. None of the sera detected any significant degree of two-way cross-reactivity between Lol p I and II, or between Lol p I and III. However, the degree of two-way cross-reactivity between Lol p II and III exhibited by individual human and animal antisera varied between undetectable and 100%. In general, the degree of cross-reactivity between Lol p II and III was higher among human sera than among animal sera. Taken together with earlier findings that antibody responses to Lol p I, II and III are associated with HLA-HDR3, and that most Lol p II and III responders are also Lol p I responders, but not vice versa, our present results suggest the following: the HLA-DR3-encoded Ia molecule recognizes a similar immunodominant Ia recognition site (agretope) shared between Lol p I and Lol p II and/or III; in addition, Lol p I appears to contain unique Ia recognition site(s) not present in Lol p II and III. However, further epitope analyses are required to investigate these possibilities.

  12. Diversity of endophytic bacteria in Lolium perenne and their potential to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons and promote plant growth.

    PubMed

    Kukla, M; Płociniczak, T; Piotrowska-Seget, Z

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of twenty-nine endophytic bacteria isolated from the tissues of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) to promote plant growth and the degradation of hydrocarbon. Most of the isolates belonged to the genus Pseudomonas and showed multiple plant growth-promoting abilities. All of the bacteria that were tested exhibited the ability to produce indole-3-acetic acid and were sensitive to streptomycin. These strains were capable of phosphate solubilization (62%), cellulolytic enzyme production (62%), a capacity for motility (55%) as well as for the production of siderophore (45%), ammonium (41%) and hydrogen cyanide (38%). Only five endophytes had the emulsification ability that results from the production of biosurfactants. The 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCD) gene (acdS) was found in ten strains. These bacteria exhibited ACCD activities in the range from 1.8 to 56.6 μmol of α-ketobutyrate mg(-1)h(-1), which suggests that these strains may be able to modulate ethylene levels and enhance plant growth. The potential for hydrocarbon degradation was assessed by PCR amplification on the following genes: alkH, alkB, C23O, P450 and pah. The thirteen strains that were tested had the P450 gene but the alkH and pah genes were found only in the Rhodococcus fascians strain (L11). Four endophytic bacteria belonging to Microbacterium sp. and Rhodococcus sp. (L7, S12, S23, S25) showed positive results for the alkB gene.

  13. A dynamic perennial firn aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, J.; Christianson, K.; van Pelt, W. J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Ice-penetrating radar and GPS observations are used to reveal a perennial firn aquifer (PFA) on a high icefield in Svalbard. This PFA appears to be fully analogous to those found in Greenland. A bright, widespread radar reflector separates relatively dry and water-saturated firn. This surface, the phreatic firn water table, is deeper beneath local surface elevation maxima, shallower in surface lows, and steeper where the surface is steep. The PFA is recharged by downward percolation of near-surface meltwater, and drained by flow subparallel to ice flow and the glacier surface. The water table of the PFA rises with increasing meltwater supply during summer, especially during warm years, and drops during winter. The reflector cross-cuts snow stratigraphy; we use the apparent deflection of accumulation layers due to the higher dielectric permittivity below the water table to infer that the firn pore space becomes progressively more saturated as depth increases. Radar data collected over several years indicate that the PFA responds rapidly (sub-annually) to the surface melt forcing. We use a coupled surface energy-balance and firn model, forced with from regional climate model data for the years 1961-2012, to estimate the amount of retained surface melt available to recharge the PFA. Results suggest that the water amount flowing into and out of the PFA is substantial, such that the PFA is capable of providing significant input to the englacial hydrology system.

  14. Ryegrass uptake of carbamazepine and ibuprofen applied by urine fertilization.

    PubMed

    Winker, Martina; Clemens, Joachim; Reich, Margrit; Gulyas, Holger; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2010-03-15

    Human urine is a potential alternative fertilizer for agriculture. However, its usage is associated with a risk of spreading pharmaceutical residues to fields. The individual and combined behavior of carbamazepine and ibuprofen was investigated by GC/MS analysis in a greenhouse experiment using ryegrass fertilized with pharmaceutical-spiked urine. Only carbamazepine could be detected in soil, roots, and aerial plant parts. Fifty-three per cent of carbamazepine originally present in the urine was recovered in soil samples taken after three months. Additionally, 34% of carbamazepine was found in aerial plant parts and 0.3% in roots. Model calculations showed that neither roots nor Casparian strip posed a considerable barrier to uptake. Carbamazepine transport was clearly driven by transpiration. Ibuprofen was not detected in the soil or in any plant parts after three months. This was assumed to be due to biodegradation of ibuprofen. Carbamazepine and ibuprofen, singly or in combination, did not adversely affect the growth of ryegrass.

  15. [Seasonal and perennial allergic rhinoconjunctivitis].

    PubMed

    Schröder, K; Finis, D; Meller, S; Buhren, B A; Wagenmann, M; Geerling, G

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC) and perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC) as well as intermittent and persistent allergic rhinitis are widespread diseases. Because a combined occurrence of ocular and nasal symptoms is very common the summarising term allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is frequently used. SAC and PAC representing the two acute forms of allergic conjunctivitis account for more than 90 % of all cases of allergic conjunctivitis. Compared to the chronic forms of allergic conjunctivitis their course of disease is milder. Nevertheless because of their high prevalence and the proven influence on patients' quality of life they possess clinical and socioeconomic relevance. Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is caused by a type 1 IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction that is provoked by aeroallergens in the majority of cases. The pathognomonic sign is itching. Besides, typical ocular findings are chemosis, conjunctival injection, watery secretion and lid swelling. Otorhinolaryngologists' findings include rhinorrhea, postnasal drip and sneezing. Problems in breathing through the nose resulting from nasal obstruction can cause impaired nighttime sleep and daytime somnolence. In addition to a reduction of allergen exposure by modification of environment and life style factors, in mild forms of SAC and PAC artificial tears are recommended. Topical antihistamines can generate rapid relief from acute symptoms and itching. Topical mast cell stabilisers however provide long-term effects. Dual action drugs that combine antihistamines and mast cell stabilisers show increased patient compliance due to reduced application frequency. Use of topical steroids should be cautious and only temporary. For prolonged treatment periods unpreserved anti-allergic eye-drops should be preferred. Combined topical antihistamines and new-generation topical nasal steroids often used by otorhinolaryngologists demonstrate a good safety profile without systemic side effects. In summary

  16. Selection for low or high primary dormancy in Lolium rigidum Gaud seeds results in constitutive differences in stress protein expression and peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Powles, Stephen B.; Steadman, Kathryn J.

    2011-01-01

    Seed dormancy in wild Lolium rigidum Gaud (annual ryegrass) populations is highly variable and not well characterized at the biochemical level. To identify some of the determinants of dormancy level in these seeds, the proteomes of subpopulations selected for low and high levels of primary dormancy were compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracts from mature, dry seeds. High-dormancy seeds showed higher expression of small heat shock proteins, enolase, and glyoxalase I than the low-dormancy seeds. The functional relevance of these differences in protein expression was confirmed by the fact that high-dormancy seeds were more tolerant to high temperatures imposed at imbibition and had consistently higher glyoxalase I activity over 0–42 d dark stratification. Higher expression of a putative glutathione peroxidase in low-dormancy seeds was not accompanied by higher activity, but these seeds had a slightly more oxidized glutathione pool and higher total peroxidase activity. Overall, these biochemical and physiological differences suggest that L. rigidum seeds selected for low dormancy are more prepared for rapid germination via peroxidase-mediated cell wall weakening, whilst seeds selected for high dormancy are constitutively prepared to survive environmental stresses, even in the absence of stress during seed development. PMID:20974739

  17. Specificity of binding of beta-glucoside activators of ryegrass (1-->3)-beta-glucan synthase and the synthesis of some potential photoaffinity activators.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, K; Johnson, E; Stone, B A

    1996-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships among glycoside activators of ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) (1-->3)-beta-glucan synthase were investigated using a number of natural and synthetic glycosides, including some carrying photoaffinity functions. There is an absolute requirement for a beta-D-glycosyl moiety in the activator, both S- and N-glucosides are active, and the position of the glucosidic linkage in beta-glucose disaccharides has a significant effect on the affinity of binding. However, the binding requirement does not extend beyond a single beta-D-glucosyl residue, and beta-D-oligoglucosides are less effective than disaccharides. The nature of the aglycon has a major influence on the binding affinity. Hydrophobic aglycons lower the concentration required for half-maximal stimulation of the enzyme obtained from an Eadie-Hofstee plot of kinetic data (Ka) for activation, but charge aglycons increase Ka. Relative to methyl-beta-D-glucoside and cellobiose (Ka 1.1 mM), the most potent compounds tested were N-[4-(benzoyl)benzoyl]-beta-D-glucosylamine and 2'-[4-azidosalicylamino]ethyl-1-thio-beta-D-glucoside with K(a)s of approximately 30 microM. The latter also was tested for its potential to specifically label the beta-glucoside-binding site on the synthase, but under the conditions used the binding was found to be nonspecific. PMID:8756503

  18. Perennial crop phase effects on soil fertility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to develop agricultural management systems that enhance soil fertility and reduce reliance on external inputs. Perennial phases in crop rotations are effective at restoring soil fertility, though little information exists in the northern Great Plains regarding soil-based outcomes re...

  19. Increased carrying capacity with perennial forage kochia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrying capacity can be increased on grass-dominated rangeland pastures by including perennial forage kochia (Kochia prostrata) as one of the plant components. The objectives of the study reported here were to compare the differences of traditional winter pastures versus pastures with forage kochi...

  20. Managing Perennial Monocultures for Ecosystem Services

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) are perennial grasses that can provide both renewable energy and ecosystem services, but the extent to which they do depends strongly on crop management. Nutrient use efficiency and wildlife habitat provision are influenced pr...

  1. Establishing and managing perennial grasses for bioenergy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) is native to every U.S. state east of the Rocky Mountains, is the most advanced herbaceous perennial bioenergy feedstock, and best management practices (BMPs) have been developed for bioenergy production in most agro-ecoregions. Additionally, big bluestem (Andropogon g...

  2. Differential composition of bacterial communities as influenced by phenanthrene and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Corgié, S C; Beguiristain, T; Leyval, C

    2006-12-01

    Bioremediation technologies of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) are often limited by the recalcitrance to biodegradation of high molecular weight (HMW) PAH. Rhizosphere is known to increase the biodegradation of PAH but little is known about the biodegradability of these HMW compounds by rhizosphere bacteria. This study compared the effects of a 3 and a 5-ring PAH, phenanthrene (PHE) and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene (dBA) respectively, on the composition of bacterial community, the bacterial density and the biodegradation activity. Compartmentalized devices were designed to harvest three consecutive sections of the rhizosphere. Rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere compartments were filled with PHE or dBA spiked or unspiked sand and inoculated with a soil bacterial inoculum. Different bacterial communities and degradation values were found 5 weeks after spiking with PHE (41-76% biodegradation) and dBA (12-51% biodegradation). In sections closer to the root surface, bacterial populations differed as a function of the distance to roots and the PAH added, whereas in further rhizosphere sections, communities were closer to those of the non-planted treatments. Biodegradation of PHE was also a function of the distance to roots, and decreased from 76 to 42% within 9 mm from the roots. However, biodegradation of dBA was significantly higher in the middle section (3-6 mm from roots) than the others. Rhizosphere degradation of PAH varies with the nature of the PAH, and C fluxes from roots could limit the degradation of dBA.

  3. Phytoextraction of metals and rhizoremediation of PAHs in co-contaminated soil by co-planting of Sedum alfredii with ryegrass (Lolium perenne) or castor (Ricinus communis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Main challenge of phytoremediation of co-contaminated soils is developing strategies for efficient and simultaneous removal of multiple pollutants. A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the potential for phytoextraction of heavy metals and rhizoremediaiton of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons...

  4. Transpiration flow controls Zn transport in Brassica napus and Lolium multiflorum under toxic levels as evidenced from isotopic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couder, Eléonore; Mattielli, Nadine; Drouet, Thomas; Smolders, Erik; Delvaux, Bruno; Iserentant, Anne; Meeus, Coralie; Maerschalk, Claude; Opfergelt, Sophie; Houben, David

    2015-11-01

    Stable zinc (Zn) isotope fractionation between soil and plant has been used to suggest the mechanisms affecting Zn uptake under toxic conditions. Here, changes in Zn isotope composition in soil, soil solution, root and shoot were studied for ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) and rape (Brassica napus L.) grown on three distinct metal-contaminated soils collected near Zn smelters (total Zn 0.7-7.5%, pH 4.8-7.3). The Zn concentrations in plants reflected a toxic Zn supply. The Zn isotopic fingerprint of total soil Zn varied from -0.05‰ to +0.26 ± 0.02‰ (δ66Zn values relative to the JMC 3-0749L standard) among soils, but the soil solution Zn was depleted in 66Zn, with a constant Zn isotope fractionation of about -0.1‰ δ66Zn unit compared to the bulk soil. Roots were enriched with 66Zn relative to soil solution (δ66Znroot - δ66Znsoil solution = Δ66Znroot-soil solution = +0.05 to +0.2 ‰) and shoots were strongly depleted in 66Zn relative to roots (Δ66Znshoot-root = -0.40 to -0.04 ‰). The overall δ66Zn values in shoots reflected that of the bulk soil, but were lowered by 0.1-0.3 ‰ units as compared to the latter. The isotope fractionation between root and shoot exhibited a markedly strong negative correlation (R2 = 0.83) with transpiration per unit of plant weight. Thus, the enrichment with light Zn isotopes in shoot progressed with increasing water flux per unit plant biomass dry weight, showing a passive mode of Zn transport by transpiration. Besides, the light isotope enrichment in shoots compared to roots was larger for rape than for rye grass, which may be related to the higher Zn retention in rape roots. This in turn may be related to the higher cation exchange capacity of rape roots. Our finding can be of use to trace the biogeochemical cycles of Zn and evidence the tolerance strategies developed by plants in Zn-excess conditions.

  5. Antisense-mediated silencing of a gene encoding a major ryegrass pollen allergen.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, P L; Swoboda, I; Singh, M B

    1999-09-28

    Type 1 allergic reactions, such as hay fever and allergic asthma, triggered by grass pollen allergens are a global health problem that affects approximately 20% of the population in cool, temperate climates. Ryegrass is the dominant source of allergens because of its prodigious production of airborne pollen. Lol p 5 is the major allergenic protein of ryegrass pollen, judging from the fact that almost all of the individuals allergic to grass pollen show presence of serum IgE antibodies against this protein. Moreover, nearly two-thirds of the IgE reactivity of ryegrass pollen has been attributed to this protein. Therefore, it can be expected that down-regulation of Lol p 5 production can significantly reduce the allergic potential of ryegrass pollen. Here, we report down-regulation of Lol p 5 with an antisense construct targeted to the Lol p 5 gene in ryegrass. The expression of antisense RNA was regulated by a pollen-specific promoter. Immunoblot analysis of proteins with allergen-specific antibodies did not detect Lol p 5 in the transgenic pollen. The transgenic pollen showed remarkably reduced allergenicity as reflected by low IgE-binding capacity of pollen extract as compared with that of control pollen. The transgenic ryegrass plants in which Lol p 5 gene expression is perturbed showed normal fertile pollen development, indicating that genetic engineering of hypoallergenic grass plants is possible.

  6. Influence of different acid and alkaline cleaning agents on the effects of irrigation of synthetic dairy factory effluent on soil quality, ryegrass growth and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-Y; Haynes, R J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of replacement of phosphoric acid with nitric or acetic acid, and replacement of NaOH with KOH, as cleaning agents in dairy factories, on the effects that irrigation of dairy factory effluent (DFE) has on the soil-plant system. A 16-week greenhouse study was carried out in which the effects of addition of synthetic dairy factory effluent containing (a) milk residues alone or milk residues plus (b) H(3)PO(4)/NaOH, (c) H(3)PO(4)/HNO(3)/NaOH or (d) CH(3)COOH/KOH, on soil's chemical, physical and microbial properties and perennial ryegrass growth and nutrient uptake were investigated. The cumulative effect of DFE addition was to increase exchangeable Na, K, Ca, Mg, exchangeable sodium percentage, microbial biomass C and N and basal respiration in the soil. Dry matter yields of ryegrass were increased by additions of DFE other than that containing CH(3)COOH. Plant uptake of P, Ca and Mg was in the same order as their inputs in DFE but for Na; inputs were an order of magnitude greater than plant uptake. Replacement of NaOH by KOH resulted in increased accumulation of exchangeable K. The effects of added NaOH and KOH on promoting breakdown of soil aggregates during wet sieving (and formation of a < 0.25 mm size class) were similar. Replacement of H(2)PO(4) by HNO(3) is a viable but CH(3)COOH appears to have detrimental effects on plant growth. Replacement of NaOH by KOH lowers the likelihood of phytotoxic effects of Na, but K and Na have similar effects on disaggregation.

  7. Remodeling of Leaf Cellular Glycerolipid Composition under Drought and Re-hydration Conditions in Grasses from the Lolium-Festuca Complex.

    PubMed

    Perlikowski, Dawid; Kierszniowska, Sylwia; Sawikowska, Aneta; Krajewski, Paweł; Rapacz, Marcin; Eckhardt, Änne; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Drought tolerant plant genotypes are able to maintain stability and integrity of cellular membranes in unfavorable conditions, and to regenerate damaged membranes after stress cessation. The profiling of cellular glycerolipids during drought stress performed on model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana does not fully cover the picture of lipidome in monocots, including grasses. Herein, two closely related introgression genotypes of Lolium multiflorum (Italian ryegrass) × Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue) were used as a model for other grass species to describe lipid rearrangements during drought and re-hydration. The genotypes differed in their level of photosynthetic capacity during drought, and in their capacity for membrane regeneration after stress cessation. A total of 120 lipids, comprising the classes of monogalactosyldiacyloglycerol, digalactosyldiacyloglycerol, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, diacylglicerol, and triacylglicerol, were analyzed. The results clearly showed that water deficit had a significant impact on lipid metabolism in studied forage grasses. It was revealed that structural and metabolic lipid species changed their abundance during drought and re-watering periods and some crucial genotype-dependent differences were also observed. The introgression genotype characterized by an ability to regenerate membranes after re-hydration demonstrated a higher accumulation level of most chloroplast and numerous extra-chloroplast membrane lipid species at the beginning of drought. Furthermore, this genotype also revealed a significant reduction in the accumulation of most chloroplast lipids after re-hydration, compared with the other introgression genotype without the capacity for membrane regeneration. The potential influence of observed lipidomic alterations on a cellular membrane stability and photosynthetic capacity, are discussed

  8. Remodeling of Leaf Cellular Glycerolipid Composition under Drought and Re-hydration Conditions in Grasses from the Lolium-Festuca Complex

    PubMed Central

    Perlikowski, Dawid; Kierszniowska, Sylwia; Sawikowska, Aneta; Krajewski, Paweł; Rapacz, Marcin; Eckhardt, Änne; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Drought tolerant plant genotypes are able to maintain stability and integrity of cellular membranes in unfavorable conditions, and to regenerate damaged membranes after stress cessation. The profiling of cellular glycerolipids during drought stress performed on model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana does not fully cover the picture of lipidome in monocots, including grasses. Herein, two closely related introgression genotypes of Lolium multiflorum (Italian ryegrass) × Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue) were used as a model for other grass species to describe lipid rearrangements during drought and re-hydration. The genotypes differed in their level of photosynthetic capacity during drought, and in their capacity for membrane regeneration after stress cessation. A total of 120 lipids, comprising the classes of monogalactosyldiacyloglycerol, digalactosyldiacyloglycerol, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, diacylglicerol, and triacylglicerol, were analyzed. The results clearly showed that water deficit had a significant impact on lipid metabolism in studied forage grasses. It was revealed that structural and metabolic lipid species changed their abundance during drought and re-watering periods and some crucial genotype-dependent differences were also observed. The introgression genotype characterized by an ability to regenerate membranes after re-hydration demonstrated a higher accumulation level of most chloroplast and numerous extra-chloroplast membrane lipid species at the beginning of drought. Furthermore, this genotype also revealed a significant reduction in the accumulation of most chloroplast lipids after re-hydration, compared with the other introgression genotype without the capacity for membrane regeneration. The potential influence of observed lipidomic alterations on a cellular membrane stability and photosynthetic capacity, are discussed

  9. Productivity and carbon footprint of perennial grass-forage legume intercropping strategies with high or low nitrogen fertilizer input.

    PubMed

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Lachouani, Petra; Knudsen, Marie Trydeman; Ambus, Per; Boelt, Birte; Gislum, René

    2016-01-15

    A three-season field experiment was established and repeated twice with spring barley used as cover crop for different perennial grass-legume intercrops followed by a full year pasture cropping and winter wheat after sward incorporation. Two fertilization regimes were applied with plots fertilized with either a high or a low rate of mineral nitrogen (N) fertilizer. Life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to evaluate the carbon footprint (global warming potential) of the grassland management including measured nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions after sward incorporation. Without applying any mineral N fertilizer, the forage legume pure stand, especially red clover, was able to produce about 15 t above ground dry matter ha(-1) year(-1) saving around 325 kg mineral Nfertilizer ha(-1) compared to the cocksfoot and tall fescue grass treatments. The pure stand ryegrass yielded around 3t DM more than red clover in the high fertilizer treatment. Nitrous oxide emissions were highest in the treatments containing legumes. The LCA showed that the low input N systems had markedly lower carbon footprint values than crops from the high N input system with the pure stand legumes without N fertilization having the lowest carbon footprint. Thus, a reduction in N fertilizer application rates in the low input systems offsets increased N2O emissions after forage legume treatments compared to grass plots due to the N fertilizer production-related emissions. When including the subsequent wheat yield in the total aboveground production across the three-season rotation, the pure stand red clover without N application and pure stand ryegrass treatments with the highest N input equalled. The present study illustrate how leguminous biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) represents an important low impact renewable N source without reducing crop yields and thereby farmers earnings.

  10. Effect of ensiling and silage additives on fatty acid composition of ryegrass and corn experimental silages.

    PubMed

    Alves, S P; Cabrita, A R J; Jerónimo, E; Bessa, R J B; Fonseca, A J M

    2011-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted using laboratory mini-silos to study the effect of ensiling and silage additives on fatty acid (FA) composition, including minor or unusual FA, of ryegrass and corn silages. Ryegrass was ensiled for 12 wk with no additives, with the addition of a bacterial inoculant or formic acid. Corn was ensiled for 9 wk without additives, with the addition of a bacterial inoculant or calcium formate. Ensiling affected both total FA content and FA composition of ryegrass silages. Total FA concentration increased (P < 0.001) during ryegrass ensiling. The proportions (g/100 g of total FA) of the major unsaturated FA, 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6, were not affected (P > 0.05) by ensiling. However, their concentration (mg/g of DM) in silages was greater (P=0.017 and P=0.001, respectively) than in fresh ryegrass. Two 18:2 FA (trans-11,cis-15 and cis-9,cis-15) that were not originally present in the fresh ryegrass were detected in silages. Silage additives affected the FA composition of ryegrass silages, mostly by increasing the proportions of SFA, but not on total FA concentration. Ensiling did not affect (P=0.83) total FA content of corn silages; however, FA composition was affected, mostly by decreasing the proportions of 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3. Silage additives had no effect on corn silage FA composition. Exposing corn silages to air resulted in no oxidation of FA or reduction in total FA content or composition.

  11. Evaluation of the Ryegrass Stem Rust Model STEMRUST_G and Its Implementation as a Decision Aid.

    PubMed

    Pfender, W F; Coop, L B; Seguin, S G; Mellbye, M E; Gingrich, G A; Silberstein, T B

    2015-01-01

    STEMRUST_G, a simulation model for epidemics of stem rust in perennial ryegrass grown to maturity as a seed crop, was validated for use as a heuristic tool and as a decision aid for disease management with fungicides. Multistage validation had been used in model creation by incorporating previously validated submodels for infection, latent period duration, sporulation, fungicide effects, and plant growth. Validation of the complete model was by comparison of model output with observed disease severities in 35 epidemics at nine location-years in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. We judge the model acceptable for its purposes, based on several tests. Graphs of modeled disease progress were generally congruent with plotted disease severity observations. There was negligible average bias in the 570 modeled-versus-observed comparisons across all data, although there was large variance in size of the deviances. Modeled severities were accurate in >80% of the comparisons, where accuracy is defined as the modeled value being within twice the 95% confidence interval of the observed value, within ±1 day of the observation date. An interactive website was created to produce disease estimates by running STEMRUST_G with user-supplied disease scouting information and automated daily weather data inputs from field sites. The model and decision aid supplement disease managers' information by estimating the level of latent (invisible) and expressed disease since the last scouting observation, given season-long weather conditions up to the present, and it estimates effects of fungicides on epidemic development. In additional large-plot experiments conducted in grower fields, the decision aid produced disease management outcomes (management cost and seed yield) as good as or better than the growers' standard practice. In future, STEMRUST_G could be modified to create similar models and decision aids for stem rust of wheat and barley, after additional experiments to

  12. Photoperiodic growth control in perennial trees.

    PubMed

    Azeez, Abdul; Sane, Aniruddha P

    2015-01-01

    Plants have to cope with changing seasons and adverse environmental conditions. Being sessile, plants have developed elaborate mechanisms for their survival that allow them to sense and adapt to the environment and reproduce successfully. A major adaptive trait for the survival of trees of temperate and boreal forests is the induction of growth cessation in anticipation of winters. In the last few years enormous progress has been made to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying SDs induced growth cessation in model perennial tree hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × P. tremuloides). In this review we discuss the molecular mechanism underlying photoperiodic control of growth cessation and adaptive responses.

  13. Photoperiodic growth control in perennial trees

    PubMed Central

    Azeez, Abdul; Sane, Aniruddha P

    2015-01-01

    Plants have to cope with changing seasons and adverse environmental conditions. Being sessile, plants have developed elaborate mechanisms for their survival that allow them to sense and adapt to the environment and reproduce successfully. A major adaptive trait for the survival of trees of temperate and boreal forests is the induction of growth cessation in anticipation of winters. In the last few years enormous progress has been made to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying SDs induced growth cessation in model perennial tree hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × P. tremuloides). In this review we discuss the molecular mechanism underlying photoperiodic control of growth cessation and adaptive responses. PMID:26340077

  14. Denitrification and N2O emissions in annual croplands, perennial grass buffers, and restored perennial grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inclusion of perennial vegetation filter strips (PFS) in the toeslope of annual cropland watersheds can decrease nitrate (NO3) losses to ground and surface waters. Although PFS are similar to riparian buffers, PFS are a relatively new conservation tool and the processes responsible for NO3 removal f...

  15. Regulation of levels of serum antibodies to ryegrass pollen allergen Lol pIV by an internal image anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhou, E M; Kisil, F T

    1995-03-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody (anti-Id), designated B1/1, was produced against an idiotope of a murine antibody (mAb91), which recognizes the epitope, site A, of allergen Lol pIV, one of the major groups of allergens in ryegrass (Lolium perenne) pollen. The ability of B1/1 to modulate the antibody responses to Lol pIV was investigated in murine model systems. In the first system, B1/1-keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) conjugate was administered to treat three different strains of mice (C57BL/6, BALB/c and C3H). In the second and third model systems, a solution of B1/1 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was used to treat syngeneic BALB/c mice at various doses and time intervals, respectively. The treatment with either form of B1/1, administered at doses ranging from 100 ng to 100 micrograms mouse, resulted in a reduction of the levels of the antibodies to Lol pIV. In particular, the level of IgE antibodies to Lol pIV was greatly reduced. The administration of a single intravenous (i.v.) injection of a solution of B1/1 8 weeks prior to the challenge with Lol pIV was still effective in reducing the level of antibodies to the allergen. Moreover, the level of antibodies to Lol pIV that expressed the idiotope mAb91 was also markedly decreased. By contrast, it was observed that the level of antibodies to Lol pIV in mice pretreated with B1/1 in PBS at a dose of 10 ng/mouse increased (albeit slightly) compared to that in mice treated with control mAb. These experimental models lend themselves for investigating the mechanism(s) by which an anti-Id modulates antibody responses to a grass pollen allergen.

  16. Human immune responsiveness to Lolium perenne pollen allergen Lol p III (rye III) is associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Freidhoff, L R; Meyers, D A; Bias, W B; Marsh, D G

    1989-05-01

    A well-characterized allergen of Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen, Lol p III, has been used as a model antigen to study the genetic control of the human immune response. Associations between HLA type and IgE or IgG antibody (Ab) responsiveness to Lol p III were studied in two groups of skin-test-positive Caucasoid adults (N = 135 and 67). We found by nonparametric and parametric analyses that immune responsiveness to Lol p III was significantly associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5. No association was found between any DQ type and immune responsiveness to Lol p III. Geometric mean IgE or IgG Ab levels to Lol p III were not different between B8+, DR3+ subjects and B8-, DR3+ subjects, showing that HLA-B8 had no influence on the association. Lol p III IgG Ab data obtained on subjects after grass antigen immunotherapy showed that 100% of DR3 subjects and 100% of DR5 subjects were Ab+. A comparison of all the available protein sequences of DRB gene products showed that the first hypervariable region of DR3 and DR5 (and DRw6), and no other region, contains the sequence Glu9-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Ser13. Our observations are consistent with the possibility that immune responsiveness to the allergen Lol p III is associated with this amino acid sequence in the first hypervariable region of the DR beta 1 polypeptide chain.

  17. Abiotic stresses activate a MAPkinase in the model grass species Lolium temulentum L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage and turf grasses are utilized in diverse environments which exposes them to a variety of abiotic stresses, however very little is known concerning the perception or molecular responses to these various stresses. In the model grass species Lolium temulentum (Lt), a 46 kDa mitogen-activated pro...

  18. Lolium latent virus (Alphaflexiviridae) coat proteins: expression and functions in infected plant tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lolium latent virus (LoLV, Lolavirus, Alphaflexiviridae) viral genome is encapsidated by two carboxy-coterminal coat protein (CP) variants (about 28 and 33 kDa), in equimolar proportion. The CP ORF contains two 5'-proximal AUGs, encoding Met 1 and Met 49, respectively promoting translation of th...

  19. Transcriptome response of Lolium arundinaceum to the fungal endophyte Epichloe coenophiala

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) is one of the principal cool-season species used as a forage and turf within the USA. A number of benefits associated with the persistence of tall fescue have been attributed to the presence of its seed-transmissible symbiont, the fungal endophyte Epichloë coenophi...

  20. Transcriptome response in different tissues of Lolium arundinaceum to the fungal endophyte Epichloe coenophiala

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) plants symbiotic with the endophytic fungus, Epichloe coenophiala , (E+), have been shown to have better survivability and persistence than plants lacking the endophyte (E-). To understand more about the grass-endophyte interactions and how endophyte affects the ho...

  1. Closing the Carbon Budget in Perennial Biofuel Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantola, I. B.; Anderson-Teixeira, K. J.; Bernacchi, C.; Hudiburg, T. W.; Masters, M. D.; DeLucia, E. H.

    2013-12-01

    At present, some 40% of corn grown in the United States, accounting for more than 26 million acres of farmland, is processed for bioethanol. Interest has arisen in converting biofuel production from corn grain ethanol to cellulosic ethanol, derived primarily from cellulose from dedicated energy crops. As many cellulosic biofuel feedstocks are perennial grasses, conversion from annual corn cropping to perennials represents a substantial change in farming practices with the potential to alter the plant-soil relationship in the Midwestern United States. Elimination of annual tillage preserves soils structure, conserving soil carbon and maintaining plant root systems. Five years of perennial grass establishment in former agricultural land in Illinois has shown a significant change in soil carbon pools and fluxes. Atmospheric carbon exchange monitoring combined with vegetation and soil sampling and respiration measurements confirm that in the first 3 years (establishment phase), perennial giant grasses Miscanthus x giganteus and Panicum virgatum rapidly increased belowground carbon allocation >400% and belowground biomass 400-750% compared to corn. Following establishment, perennial grasses maintained below- and aboveground annual biomass production, out-performing corn in both average and drought conditions. Here we offer a quantitative comparison of the carbon allocation pathways of corn and perennial biofuel crops in Midwestern landscapes, demonstrating the carbon benefits of perennial cropping through increased C allocation to root and rhizome structures. Long rotation periods in perennial grasses combined with annual carbon inputs to the soil system are expected to convert these agricultural soils from atmospheric carbon sources to carbon sinks.

  2. Developing Sclerotinia Resistant Sunflower Germplasm Utilizing Wild Perennial Helianthus Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated sunflower lacks a sufficient level of resistance to both Sclerotinia stalk and head rot, but abundant resistance in perennial Helianthus species has been confirmed. The objectives of this project were to transfer Sclerotinia head and stalk rot resistance genes from wild perennial hexaploi...

  3. Characterization of seed storage proteins of several perennial glycine species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial Glycine species, distant relatives of soybean, have been recognized as a potential source of new genetic diversity for soybean improvement. The subgenus Glycine includes around 30 perennial species, which are well adapted to drought conditions and possess resistance to a number of soybean ...

  4. Growth-Promoting Hormone DA-6 Assists Phytoextraction and Detoxification of Cd by Ryegrass.

    PubMed

    He, Shanying; Wu, Qiuling; He, Zhenli

    2015-01-01

    A pot experiment was carried out to study the effect of growth-promoting hormone diethyl aminoethyl hexanoate (DA-6) on Cd phytoextraction and detoxification in ryegrass. Foliar spray of DA-6 significantly enhanced Cd extraction efficiency (P<0.05), with 1 μM DA-6 the most effective. At the subcellular level, 43-53% of Cd was soluble fraction and 23-46% in cell wall, and 9-25% in organelles. Chemical speciation analysis showed that 52.7-58.5% of Cd was NaCl extractable, 12.1-22.7% ethanol extractable, followed by other fractions. DA-6 alleviated metal toxicity by fixing more Cd in cell wall and decreasing Cd migration in plant. In conclusion, ryegrass tolerates Cd by cell wall compartmentalization along with protein and organic acids combination, and the treatment of 1 μM DA-6 appears to be optimal for enhancing the remediation efficiency of ryegrass for Cd contaminated soil.

  5. A feasibility study of perennial/annual plant species to restore soils contaminated with heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacarías, Montserrat; Beltrán, Margarita; Gilberto Torres, Luis; González, Abelardo

    A feasibility study was carried out to evaluate the application of perennial/annual plant species in a phytoextraction process of a previously washed industrial urban soil contaminated by nickel, arsenic and cupper. The plant species selected for this study were Ipomea (Ipomea variada); grass (Poa pratensis); grass mixture (Festuca rubra, Cynodon dactylon, Lolium multiforum, Pennisetum sp.); Monks Cress (Tropaeolum majus); ficus (Ficus benajamina) and fern (Pteris cretica). Soil was characterized and it presented the following heavy metals concentrations (dry weight): 80 mg of Ni/kg, 456-656 mg of As/kg and 1684-3166 mg of Cu/kg. Germination and survival in contaminated soil tests were conducted, from these, P. pratensis was discarded and the rest of plant species tested were used for the phytoextraction selection test. After 4 months of growth, biomass production was determined, and content of Ni, As and Cu was analyzed in plant’s tissue. Metal biological absorption coefficient (BAC), bio-concentration factor (BCF) and translocation factor (TF), were calculated. Regarding to biomass generation it was observed, in every case, an inhibition of the plant growth compared with blanks sown in a non contaminated soil; inhibition ranged from 22.5% for the Monk cress to 98% for Ipomea. Even though the later presented high BAC, BCF and TF, its growth was severely inhibited, and therefore, due its low biomass generation, it is not recommended for phytoextraction under conditions for this study. Heavy metals concentrations in plant’s tissue (dry weight) were as high as 866 mg Cu/kg and 602 mg As/kg for grass mixture; and 825 mg As/kg was observed for Monks cress. Grass mixture and monks cress had high BAC, BCF and TF, also they had high metal concentrations in its plants tissues and the lowest growth inhibition rates; hence the application in phytoextraction processes of these plants is advisable.

  6. Thickness of ice on perennially frozen lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKay, C.P.; Clow, G.D.; Wharton, R.A.; Squyres, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    The dry valleys of southern Victoria Land, constituting the largest ice-free expanse in the Antarctic, contain numerous lakes whose perennial ice cover is the cause of some unique physical and biological properties 1-3. Although the depth, temperature and salinity of the liquid water varies considerably from lake to lake, the thickness of the ice cover is remarkably consistent1, ranging from 3.5 to 6m, which is determined primarily by the balance between conduction of energy out of the ice and the release of latent heat at the ice-water interface and is also affected by the transmission and absorption of sunlight. In the steady state, the release of latent heat at the ice bottom is controlled by ablation from the ice surface. Here we present a simple energy-balance model, using the measured ablation rate of 30 cm yr-1, which can explain the observed ice thickness. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. Ecological Soil Screening Levels for Plants Exposed to Tnt: Supporting Range Sustainability for Training and Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    sativa L.), Japanese millet (Echinochloa crusgalli L. (Beauv.)), and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) in five natural soils: Sassafras sandy...METHODS Five soils, Sassafras sandy loam (SSL), Teller sandy loam (TSL), Richfield clay loam (RCL), Kirkland clay loam (KCL), and Webster clay loam...capacity. Soil param eter T eller Sassafras R ichfield K irkland W ebster Sand (% ) 65 69 29 37 33 S ilt (% ) 22 13 42 34 39 C lay

  8. Combined remediation of pyrene-contaminated soil with a coupled system of persulfate oxidation and phytoremediation with ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Li, Hongbing; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xinying; Liang, Xia; He, Chiquan; Cao, Liya

    2016-10-01

    The in situ chemical oxidation technology (ISCO) and phytoremediation for PAHs have been studied respectively, but few focus on the feasibility of combining persulfate with ryegrass. This literature revealed the effect of persulfate oxidation on the growth of ryegrass and the removal ratios of pyrene in the couple system of persulfate oxidation and phytoremediation. The results demonstrated that half of pyrene in test soil was oxidized by persulfate in 7 days and then the residual pyrene concentration was decreased to a lower level by ryegrass in the following 2 months in oxidation treatment and drip washing and plants (OWP) and oxidation treatment and drip washing and plants and fertilization (OWFP) treatment. Ryegrass could grow well after persulfate oxidation with the oxidized soil washed by water. Ryegrass in OWP and OWFP treatments had higher ratios of overground and underground biomass. However, the seeds of ryegrass cannot germinate when drip washing was omitted. Pyrene together with residual persulfate changed soil enzyme activities. Drip washing and the growth of ryegrass made soil enzyme activities tend to returned to normal levels. Persulfate oxidation and phytoremediation were compatible to make contributions to the dissipation of pyrene. Persulfate oxidation activated by heat had higher removal efficiency of PAHs and phytoremediation could further decrease the pyrene concentration in spiked soil.

  9. Daylength mediated control of seasonal growth patterns in perennial trees.

    PubMed

    Petterle, Anna; Karlberg, Anna; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P

    2013-06-01

    Daylength is a key regulator of seasonal growth patterns in perennial trees in temperate regions. Cessation of growth is induced by short day signal in these trees before the advent of winter and constitutes a major adaptive developmental program. In this review, we report on the recent progress made in identifying the molecular mechanisms that underlie the daylength mediated control of seasonal growth in perennial trees. A major finding that has emerged from the analysis of this process is that the regulation of growth cessation in perennial trees and flowering time by daylength in annuals such as Arabidopsis thaliana involves identical signalling components.

  10. Anaerobic Digestion of Saline Creeping Wild Ryegrass for Biogas Production and Pretreatment of Particleboard Material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to develop an integrated process to produce biogas and high-quality particleboard using saline creeping wild ryegrass (CWR), Leymus triticoides through anaerobic digestion (AD). Besides producing biogas, AD also serves as a pretreatment method to remove the wax la...

  11. Annual ryegrass-associated bacteria with potential for plant growth promotion.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Nádia; Dourado, Ana Catarina; Alves, Paula Isabel; Cortés-Pallero, Alícia Maria; Delgado-Rodríguez, Ana Isabel; Prazeres, Ângela; Borges, Nuno; Sánchez, Claudia; Barreto Crespo, Maria Teresa; Fareleira, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Annual ryegrass is a fast-growing cool-season grass broadly present in the Portuguese "montado", a typically Mediterranean agro-forestry-pastoral ecosystem. A culture-dependent approach was used to investigate natural associations of this crop with potentially beneficial bacteria, aiming to identify strains suitable for biofertilization purposes. Annual ryegrass seedlings were used to trap bacteria from three different soils in laboratory conditions. Using a nitrogen-free microaerophilic medium, 147 isolates were recovered from the rhizosphere, rhizoplane, and surface-sterilized plant tissues, which were assigned to 12 genera in classes Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria. All isolates were able to grow in the absence of nitrogen and several of them were able to perform in vitro activities related to plant growth promotion. Isolates of the genera Sphingomonas and Achromobacter were found to be the most effective stimulators of annual ryegrass growth under nitrogen limitation (47-92% biomass increases). Major enhancements were obtained with isolates G3Dc4 (Achromobacter sp.) and G2Ac10 (Sphingomonas sp.). The latest isolate was also able to increment plant growth in nitrogen-supplemented medium, as well as the phosphate solubilizer and siderophore producer, G1Dc10 (Pseudomonas sp.), and the cellulose/pectin hydrolyser, G3Ac9 (Paenibacillus sp.). This study represents the first survey of annual ryegrass-associated bacteria in the "montado" ecosystem and unveiled a set of strains with potential for use as inoculants.

  12. Guidelines for growing perennial grasses for biofuel and bioproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guidelines for growing perennial grasses for biofuel and bioproducts Rob Mitchell Abstract: Switchgrass, big bluestem, and warm-season grass mixtures provide numerous benefits. Existing field equipment, herbicides, and cultivar improvement promote rapid establishment in the planting year. These gra...

  13. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in 11 expressed resistance candidate genes in Lolium perenne

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yongzhong; Frei, Uschi; Schejbel, Britt; Asp, Torben; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Background Association analysis is an alternative way for QTL mapping in ryegrass. So far, knowledge on nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in ryegrass is lacking, which is essential for the efficiency of association analyses. Results 11 expressed disease resistance candidate (R) genes including 6 nucleotide binding site and leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) like genes and 5 non-NBS-LRR genes were analyzed for nucleotide diversity. For each of the genes about 1 kb genomic fragments were isolated from 20 heterozygous genotypes in ryegrass. The number of haplotypes per gene ranged from 9 to 27. On average, one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was present per 33 bp between two randomly sampled sequences for the 11 genes. NBS-LRR like gene fragments showed a high degree of nucleotide diversity, with one SNP every 22 bp between two randomly sampled sequences. NBS-LRR like gene fragments showed very high non-synonymous mutation rates, leading to altered amino acid sequences. Particularly LRR regions showed very high diversity with on average one SNP every 10 bp between two sequences. In contrast, non-NBS LRR resistance candidate genes showed a lower degree of nucleotide diversity, with one SNP every 112 bp. 78% of haplotypes occurred at low frequency (<5%) within the collection of 20 genotypes. Low intragenic LD was detected for most R genes, and rapid LD decay within 500 bp was detected. Conclusion Substantial LD decay was found within a distance of 500 bp for most resistance candidate genes in this study. Hence, LD based association analysis is feasible and promising for QTL fine mapping of resistance traits in ryegrass. PMID:17683574

  14. The photosynthetic acclimation of Lolium perenne in response to three years growth in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) system

    SciTech Connect

    Hymus, Graham J.

    1996-08-01

    Pure stands of Ryegrass were in their third year of growth in the field, exposed to either ambient (355 μmol mol-1), or elevated (600 μmol mol-1) atmospheric CO2 concentration. A Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) system was used to maintain the elevated CO2 concentration whilst limiting experimental constraints on the field conditions. The theoretically predicted increase in the net rates of CO2 uptake per unit leaf area (A {mu}mol mol-1) as a consequence, primarily, of the suppression of photorespiration by CO2 a competitive inhibitor of RubP oxygenation by Rubisco, was observed for the Lolium perenne studied. Also observed was a general decline in leaf evapotranspiration (E) consistent with observations of increased water use efficiency of crops grown in elevated CO2. Enhancement of leaf A in the FACE grown L. perenne ranged from 26.5 1 % to 44.95% over the course of a diurnal set of measurements. Whilst reductions in leaf E reached a maximum of 16.61% over the same diurnal course of-measurements. The increase in A was reconciled with an absence of the commonly observed decline in Vcmax as a measure of the maximum in vivo carboxylation capacity of the primary carboxylasing enzyme Rubisco and Jmax a measure of the maximum rate of electron transport. The manipulation of the source sink balance of the crop, stage of canopy regrowth or height in the canopy had no effect on the observation of a lack of response. The findings of this study will be interpreted with respect to the long term implications of C3 crops being able to adapt physiologically to maximize the potential benefits conferred by growth in elevated CO2.

  15. Transcript profiling of fructan biosynthetic pathway genes reveals association of a specific fructosyltransferase isoform with the high sugar trait in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Parsons, Anthony J; Xue, Hong; Liu, Qianhe; Jones, Christopher S; Ryan, Geraldine D; Newman, Jonathan A

    2014-04-15

    Lolium perenne cultivars with elevated levels of fructans in leaf blades (high sugar-content grasses) have been developed to improve animal nutrition and reduce adverse environmental impacts of pastoral agricultural systems. Expression of the high sugar trait can vary substantially depending on genotype×environment (G×E) interactions. We grew three potential high sugar-content and a control cultivar in three temperature regimes and quantified water soluble carbohydrates (WSCs) and the expression of all functionally characterised L. perenne fructan pathway genes in leaf tissues. We also analysed the distribution, expression and sequence variation of two specific isoforms of Lp6G-FFT (fructan: fructan 6G-fructosyltransferase). Our study confirmed a significant G×E interaction affecting the accumulation of fructans in the high sugar-content cultivar AberDart, which accumulated higher levels of high DP (degree of polymerisation) fructans in blades compared to the control cultivar only when grown at 20°C (day)/10°C (night) temperatures. The cultivar Expo on the other hand accumulated significantly higher levels of high DP fructans in blades independent of temperature. Fructan levels in pseudostems were higher than in blades, and they increased markedly with decreasing temperature, but there was no consistent effect of cultivar in this tissue. The expression of the high sugar trait was generally positively correlated with transcript levels of fructosyltransferases. Presence and expression of only one of the two known 6G-FFT isoforms was positively correlated with high fructan biosynthesis, while the second isoform was associated with low fructan concentrations and positively correlated with fructan exohydrolase gene expression. The presence of distinct 6G-FFT sequence variants appears to be associated with the capacity of high sugar-content grasses to accumulate higher fructan levels particularly at warmer temperatures. These findings might be exploited for the

  16. Milk production and enteric methane emissions by dairy cows grazing fertilized perennial ryegrass pasture with or without inclusion of white clover.

    PubMed

    Enriquez-Hidalgo, D; Gilliland, T; Deighton, M H; O'Donovan, M; Hennessy, D

    2014-03-01

    An experiment was undertaken to investigate the effect of white clover inclusion in grass swards (GWc) compared with grass-only (GO) swards receiving high nitrogen fertilization and subjected to frequent and tight grazing on herbage and dairy cow productivity and enteric methane (CH4) emissions. Thirty cows were allocated to graze either a GO or GWc sward (n=15) from April 17 to October 31, 2011. Fresh herbage [16 kg of dry matter (DM)/cow] and 1 kg of concentrate/cow were offered daily. Herbage DM intake (DMI) was estimated on 3 occasions (May, July, and September) during which 17 kg of DM/cow per day was offered (and concentrate supplementation was withdrawn). In September, an additional 5 cows were added to each sward treatment (n=20) and individual CH4 emissions were estimated using the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) technique. Annual clover proportion (± SE) in the GWc swards was 0.20 ± 0.011. Swards had similar pregrazing herbage mass (1,800 ± 96 kg of DM/ha) and herbage production (13,110 ± 80 kg of DM/ha). The GWc swards tended to have lower DM and NDF contents but greater CP content than GO swards, but only significant differences were observed in the last part of the grazing season. Cows had similar milk and milk solids yields (19.4 ± 0.59 and 1.49 ± 0.049 kg/d, respectively) and similar milk composition. Cows also had similar DMI in the 3 measurement periods (16.0 ± 0.70 kg DM/cow per d). Similar sward and animal performance was observed during the CH4 estimation period, but GWc swards had 7.4% less NDF than GO swards. Cows had similar daily and per-unit-of-output CH4 emissions (357.1 ± 13.6g of CH4/cow per day, 26.3 ± 1.14 g of CH4/kg of milk, and 312.3 ± 11.5 g of CH4/kg of milk solids) but cows grazing GWc swards had 11.9% lower CH4 emissions per unit of feed intake than cows grazing GO swards due to the numerically lower CH4 per cow per day and a tendency for the GWc cows to have greater DMI compared with the GO cows. As a conclusion, under the conditions of this study, sward clover content in the GWc swards was not sufficient to improve overall sward herbage production and quality, or dairy cow productivity. Although GWc cows had a tendency to consume more and emitted less CH4 per unit of feed intake than GO cows, no difference was observed in daily or per-unit-of-output CH4 emissions.

  17. Growth and metal accumulation of an Alyssum murale nickel hyperaccumulator ecotype co-cropped with Alyssum montanum or perennial ryegrass in serpentine soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 400 plant species naturally accumulate high levels of metals such as Cd, Cu, Co, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The genus Alyssum (Brassicaceae) contains the greatest number of reported Ni hyperaccumulators (50), many of which can achieve 3 wt% Ni in dry leaves. Some Alyssum hyperaccumulators are viabl...

  18. Feasibility of Pb phytoextraction using nano-materials assisted ryegrass: Results of a one-year field-scale experiment.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shu-Xuan; Jin, Yu; Liu, Wei; Li, Xiliang; Shen, Shi-Gang; Ding, Ling

    2017-04-01

    The effect of the combined application of nano-hydroxyapatite (NHAP) or nano-carbon black (NCB) on the phytoextraction of Pb by ryegrass was investigated as an enhanced remediation technique for soils by field-scale experiment. After the addition of 0.2% NHAP or NCB to the soil, temporal variation of the uptake of Pb in aboveground parts and roots were observed. Ryegrass shoot concentrations of Pb were lower with nano-materials application than without nano-materials for the first month. However, the shoot concentrations of Pb were significantly increased with nano-materials application, in particular NHAP groups. The ryegrass root concentrations of Pb were lower with nano-materials application for the first month. These results indicated that nano-materials had significant effects on stabilization of lead, especially at the beginning of the experiment. Along with the experimental proceeding, phytotoxicity was alleviated after the incorporation of nano-materials. The ryegrass biomass was significantly higher with nano-materials application. Consequently, the Pb phytoextraction potential of ryegrass significantly increased with nano-materials application compared to the gounps without nano-materials application. The total removal rates of soil Pb were higher after combined application of NHAP than NCB. NHAP is more suitable than NCB for in-situ remediation of Pb-contaminated soils. The ryegrass translocation factor exhibited a marked increase with time. It was thought that the major role of NHP and NBA might be to alleviate the Pb phytotoxicity and increase biomass of plants.

  19. Responses of photosynthetic capacity to soil moisture gradient in perennial rhizome grass and perennial bunchgrass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Changing water condition represents a dramatic impact on global terrestrial ecosystem productivity, mainly by limiting plant functions, including growth and photosynthesis, particularly in arid and semiarid areas. However, responses of the potential photosynthetic capacity to soil water status in a wide range of soil moisture levels, and determination of their thresholds are poorly understood. This study examined the response patterns of plant photosynthetic capacity and their thresholds to a soil moisture gradient in a perennial rhizome grass, Leymus chinensis, and a perennial bunchgrass, Stipa grandis, both dominant in the Eurasian Steppe. Results Severe water deficit produced negative effects on light-saturated net CO2 assimilation rate (Asat), stomatal conductance (gs), mesophyll conductance (gm), maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc,max), and maximal efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm). Photosynthetic activity was enhanced under moderate soil moisture with reductions under both severe water deficit and excessive water conditions, which may represent the response patterns of plant growth and photosynthetic capacity to the soil water gradient. Our results also showed that S. grandis had lower productivity and photosynthetic potentials under moderate water status, although it demonstrated generally similar relationship patterns between photosynthetic potentials and water status relative to L. chinensis. Conclusions The experiments tested and confirmed the hypothesis that responsive threshold points appear when plants are exposed to a broad water status range, with different responses between the two key species. It is suggested that vegetation structure and function may be shifted when a turning point of soil moisture occurs, which translates to terms of future climatic change prediction in semiarid grasslands. PMID:21266062

  20. Slow recovery in desert perennial vegetation following prolonged human disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.

    2004-01-01

    Questions: How long may it take for desert perennial vegetation to recover from prolonged human disturbance and how do different plant community variables (i.e. diversity, density and cover) change during the recovery process? Location: Sonoran Desert, Arizona, USA. Methods: Since protection from grazing from 1907 onwards, plant diversity, density and cover of perennial species were monitored intermittently on ten 10 m x 10 m permanent plots on Tumamoc Hill, Tucson, Arizona, USA. Results: The study shows an exceptionally slow recovery of perennial vegetation from prolonged heavy grazing and other human impacts. Since protection, overall species richness and habitat heterogeneity at the study site continued to increase until the 1960s when diversity, density and cover had been stabilized. During the same period, overall plant density and cover also increased. Species turnover increased gradually with time but no significant relation between any of the three community variables and precipitation or Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) was detected. Conclusions: It took more than 50 yr for the perennial vegetation to recover from prolonged human disturbance. The increases in plant species richness, density, and cover of the perennial vegetation were mostly due to the increase of herbaceous species, especially palatable species. The lack of a clear relationship between environment (e.g. precipitation) and community variables suggests that site history and plant life history must be taken into account in examining the nature of vegetation recovery processes after disturbance.

  1. Seasonal versus perennial immunotherapy: evaluation after three years of treatment.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Lejarazu, D; Bernaola, G; Fernández, E; Audícana, M; Ventas, P; Martín, S; Fernández de Corres, L

    1993-01-01

    We have performed a comparative study to evaluate seasonal and perennial schedules after 3 years of immunotherapy. Sixty patients suffering from rhinitis and/or asthma due to grass pollen sensitization were randomly allocated to receive a semi-depot extract of Phleum pratense according to a perennial or seasonal schedule. The last year of the study, 14 patients were recruited as a control group without immunotherapy. The cumulative dose was 602 BU in the perennial group and 372 BU in the seasonal group. The frequency and severity of side-effects were similar and very low in both treated groups. The IgE level was significantly lower after perennial immunotherapy at the end of the first 2 years. A seasonal decrease in specific IgG levels was observed in patients who interrupted immunotherapy, while this was not observed in patients under the perennial schedule. Symptoms and medication scores did not show differences between groups. Nevertheless, we found a significant difference between treated patients and the control group.

  2. Nitrogen recycling and flowering time in perennial bioenergy crops.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Christopher; Amasino, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Perennials have a number of traits important for profitability and sustainability of a biofuel crop. Perennialism is generally defined as the ability to grow and reproduce in multiple years. In temperate climates, many perennial plants enter dormancy during winter and recycle nutrients, such as nitrogen, to below ground structures for the next growing season. Nitrogen is expensive to produce and application of nitrogen increases the potent greenhouse gas NO x . Perennial bioenergy crops have been evaluated for biomass yields with nitrogen fertilization, location, year, and genotype as variables. Flowering time and dormancy are closely related to the N recycling program. Substantial variation for flowering time and dormancy has been identified in the switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) species, which provides a source to identify the genetic components of N recycling, and for use in breeding programs. Some studies have addressed recycling specifically, but flowering time and developmental differences were largely ignored, complicating interpretation of the results. Future studies on recycling need to appreciate plant developmental stage to allow comparison between experiments. A perennial/annual model(s) and more environmentally controlled experiments would be useful to determine the genetic components of nitrogen recycling. Increasing biomass yield per unit of nitrogen by maximizing recycling might mean the difference for profitability of a biofuel crop and has the added benefit of minimizing negative environmental effects from agriculture.

  3. Comparison of Early Development of Three Grasses: Lolium perenne, Agrostis stolonifera and Poa pratensis

    PubMed Central

    FUSTEC, JOELLE; GUILLEUX, JOELLE; LE CORFF, JOSIANE; MAITRE, JEAN-PAUL

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims To improve the management of grass communities, early plant development was compared in three species with contrasting growth forms, a caespitose (Lolium perenne), a rhizomatous (Poa pratensis) and a caespitose–stoloniferous species (Agrostis stolonifera). • Methods Isolated seedlings were grown in a glasshouse without trophic constraints for 37 d (761 °Cd). The appearance of leaves and their location on tillers were recorded. Leaf appearance rate (LAR) on the tillers and site-filling were calculated. Tillering was modelled based on the assumption that tiller number increases with the number of leaves produced on the seedling main stem. Above- and below-ground parts were harvested to compare biomass. • Key Results Lolium perenne and A. stolonifera expressed similar bunch-type developments. However, root biomass was approx. 30 % lower in A. stolonifera than in L. perenne. Poa pratensis was rhizomatous. Nevertheless, the ratio of above-ground : below-ground biomass of P. pratensis was similar to that of L. perenne. LAR was approximately equal to 0·30 leaf d−1 in L. perenne, and on the main stem and first primary tillers of A. stolonifera. LAR on the other tillers of A. stolonifera was 30 % higher than on L. perenne. For P. pratensis, LAR was 30 % lower than on L. perenne, but the interval between the appearance of two successive shoots from rhizomes was 30 % higher than the interval between two successive leaf stages on the main stem. Above-ground parts of P. pratensis first grew slower than in the other species to the benefit of the rhizomes, whose development enhanced tiller production. • Conclusions Lolium perenne had the fastest tiller production at the earliest stages of seedling development. Agrostis stolonifera and P. pratensis compensated almost completely for the delay due to higher LAR on tillers or ramets compared with L. perenne. This study provides a basis for modelling plant development. PMID:15932884

  4. Stability of Chloropyromorphite in Ryegrass Rhizosphere as Affected by Root-Secreted Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zheng; Han, Ruiming; Li, Shiyin; Wei, Zhenggui; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the stability of chloropyromorphite (CPY) is of considerable benefit for improving risk assessment and remediation strategies in contaminated water and soil. The stability of CPY in the rhizosphere of phosphorus-deficient ryegrass was evaluated to elucidate the role of root-secreted low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the dissolution of CPY. Results showed that CPY treatments significantly reduced the ryegrass biomass and rhizosphere pH. The presence of calcium nitrate extractable lead (Pb) and phosphorus (P) suggested that CPY in the rhizosphere could be bioavailable, because P and Pb uptake by ryegrass potentially provided a significant concentration gradient that would promote CPY dissolution. Pb accumulation and translocation in ryegrass was found to be significantly higher in P-sufficient conditions than in P-deficient conditions. CPY treatments significantly enhanced root exudation of LMWOAs irrigated with P-nutrient solution or P-free nutrient solution. Oxalic acid was the dominant species in root-secreted LMWOAs of ryegrass under P-free nutrient solution treatments, suggesting that root-secreted oxalic acid may be the driving force of root-induced dissolution of CPY. Hence, our work, provides clarifying hints on the role of LMWOAs in controlling the stability of CPY in the rhizosphere. PMID:27494023

  5. Soil nutrient dynamics in a perennial biomass production system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the upper Midwest, economic and social interests in bioenergy and low-carbon fuels are stimulating the conversion of cropland into perennial biomass systems. Landowners are embracing the change by developing diverse whole-farm management systems that can balance economic and environmental risk of...

  6. Response of perennial specialty crops to climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial specialty crop production is sensitive to temperature, water availability, solar radiation, air pollution, and carbon dioxide. Elevated atmospheric cabon dioxide generally increases growth rate and yield, resulting in a higher accumulation of biomass, and fruit production and quality in f...

  7. The Perennial and the Particular Challenges of Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruecker, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Education in design shares with other disciplines a number of perennial challenges, including the need to transfer human culture, the choice of what parts of human culture to transfer and the decision as to what approaches work best in accomplishing that transfer. Design education also faces particular challenges, which are shared with only a few…

  8. Totally impermeable film (TIF) reduces emissions in perennial crop fumigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orchard/vineyard replanting for fruit trees, nut trees, and grapevines in many situations still depends on soil fumigation for control of soil-borne pests and replanting diseases in California. Perennial tree and grapevine nurseries also rely heavily on soil fumigation to meet the state’s requiremen...

  9. Water, temperature, and defoliation effects on perennial grassland respiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in respiration can have a profound effect on ecosystem C balance. This talk will present results from eddy covariance studies describing environment and management effects on ecosystem C flux from cool- and warm-season perennial grasslands. In addition, stable C isotope studies that partitio...

  10. Evaluating perennial sunflower for wildlife and food uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research is to use current genetics and plant breeding techniques to introgress genes for perennial habit from Helianthus tuberosus L. (2n=6x=102) into domesticated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., 2n=2x=34). H. tuberosusis part of the secondary gene pool of sunflower and has b...

  11. Converting perennial legumes to organic cropland without tillage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic producers are interested in developing a no-till system for crop production. In this study, we examined management tactics to convert perennial legumes to annual crops without tillage. Our hypothesis was that reducing carbohydrate production in the fall by mowing would favor winterkill. M...

  12. Transgenic perennial biofuel feedstocks and strategies for bioconfinement

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of transgenic tools for the improvement of plant feedstocks will be required to realize the full economic and environmental benefits of cellulosic and other biofuels, particularly from perennial plants. Traits that are targets for improvement of biofuels crops include he...

  13. Suppression of cheatgrass by established perennial grasses: I. mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cheatgrass is often considered a competitive species. In a greenhouse experiment using rhizotrons, we tested the effect of established perennial grasses (Indian ricegrass, creeping wildrye, and Snake River wheatgrass) on the growth of cheatgrass. The soil was a sandy loam A horizon of a Xeric Haploc...

  14. Rhetorical Transcendence Revisited: The "Thin Red Line" as Perennial Philosophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroud, Scott R.

    Fifteen years ago, J. H. Rushing published a seminal article addressing the fragmentation within contemporary society and the ways in which myths (films) may address this exigence. The exigence of fragmentation is relieved, according to her analysis, by mediated recourse to the perennial philosophy of monistic holism that is found across the…

  15. Evaluation of a Non-Flowering Perennial Sorghum spp. Hybrid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial Sorghum spp. hybrids (PSSHs) such as Columbusgrass (Sorghum almum Parodi; S. bicolor [L.] Moench x S. halepense [L.] Pers.) and the reciprocal hybridization (S. halepense x S. bicolor; e.g. Cv 'Krish') are high-biomass feedstocks currently utilized as forage but with potential as dual-...

  16. Treatment of perennial rhinitis with 2% solution of sodium cromoglycate.

    PubMed

    Lobaton, P; Seranno, V; Rubio, N; Gomez, D

    1975-08-01

    This trial has demonstrated that S.C.G. is significantly better than placebo and therefore that a 2% solution of S.C.G. is effective in the treatment of perennial rhinitis. It would appear that better results can be obtained in patients who have a demonstrable allergic aetiology with a nasal eosinophilia.

  17. Soil C storage and greenhouse gas emission perennial grasses managed for bio energy feedstock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial grasses like switchgrass or big bluestem when managed as bioenergy feedstock require nitrogenous inputs. Nitrogen fertilizer frequently cause nitrous oxide emission. Therefore, managing grasses as feedstock may reduce the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential expected from perennial. ...

  18. Ionomics: Genes and QTLs controlling heavy metal uptake in perennial grasses grown on phytoxic soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial grasses occupy diverse soils throughout the world, including many sites contaminated with heavy metals. Uncovering the genetic architecture of QTLs controlling mineral homoeostasis is critical for understanding the biochemical pathways that determine the elemental profiles of perennial pl...

  19. Plastome Sequence Determination and Comparative Analysis for Members of the Lolium-Festuca Grass Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Melanie L.; Spangenberg, German C.; Forster, John W.; Cogan, Noel O. I.

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplast genome sequences are of broad significance in plant biology, due to frequent use in molecular phylogenetics, comparative genomics, population genetics, and genetic modification studies. The present study used a second-generation sequencing approach to determine and assemble the plastid genomes (plastomes) of four representatives from the agriculturally important Lolium-Festuca species complex of pasture grasses (Lolium multiflorum, Festuca pratensis, Festuca altissima, and Festuca ovina). Total cellular DNA was extracted from either roots or leaves, was sequenced, and the output was filtered for plastome-related reads. A comparison between sources revealed fewer plastome-related reads from root-derived template but an increase in incidental bacterium-derived sequences. Plastome assembly and annotation indicated high levels of sequence identity and a conserved organization and gene content between species. However, frequent deletions within the F. ovina plastome appeared to contribute to a smaller plastid genome size. Comparative analysis with complete plastome sequences from other members of the Poaceae confirmed conservation of most grass-specific features. Detailed analysis of the rbcL–psaI intergenic region, however, revealed a “hot-spot” of variation characterized by independent deletion events. The evolutionary implications of this observation are discussed. The complete plastome sequences are anticipated to provide the basis for potential organelle-specific genetic modification of pasture grasses. PMID:23550121

  20. Utilization of flow cytometry to identify chimeral sectors in leaf tissue of Lolium multiflorum x L. arundinaceum hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified a method whereby Lolium multiflorum (Lm) or L. arundinaceum (Fa) genomes are preferentially eliminated through a mitotic loss behavior in interspecific Lm x Fa F1 hybrids, generating either dihaploid Lm lines or Fa lines. Flow cytometry, a method for rapidly characterizing optical...

  1. Slow recovery in desert perennial vegetation following prolonged human disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.

    2004-01-01

    The study shows an exceptionally long-term recovery of perennial vegetation from prolonged heavy grazing and other human impacts. Since protection in 1906, overall species richness and habitat heterogeneity at the study site continued to increase until the 1960s when diversity, density and cover stabilized. During the same period, overall plant density and cover also increased. Species turnover increased gradually with time but no significant relation between any of the three community variables and precipitation or Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) was detected. The increases in plant species richness, density, and cover of the perennial vegetation were mostly due to the increase of herbaceous species, especially palatable species. The lack of clear relationship between environment (e.g., precipitation) and community variables suggests that site history and plant life history must be taken into account in examining the nature of vegetation recovery process after disturbances.

  2. [Efficacy of nedocromil sodium in perennial allergic conjunctivitis].

    PubMed

    Pacor, M L; Biasi, D; Carletto, A; Corrocher, R; Lunardi, C

    1998-10-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of nedocromil sodium 2% eye drops in 35 patients (18 males and 17 females, mean age 32.8 yrs) suffering from perennial allergic conjunctivitis due to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus diagnosed on the basis of anamnesis, Skin Prick Test and RAST. Patients were treated for 8 weeks with nedocromil sodium one drop each eye, four times daily and had to report the severity of the symptoms considered (photophobia, lacrimation, hyperaemia and itching) on a daily card. During the study no other medication was allowed. After 4 weeks symptoms were statistically improved and this beneficial effect increased at the end of the treatment. No side effects were reported. Nedocromil sodium eye drops is therefore a useful treatment in perennial allergic conjunctivitis due to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus.

  3. A Rapidly Declining Arctic Perennial Sea Ice Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The perennial sea ice cover in the Arctic is shown to be declining at -8.9 plus or minus 2.0% per decade, using 22 years of satellite data. A sustained decline at this rate would mean the disappearance of the multiyear ice cover during this century and drastic changes in the seasonal characteristics of the Arctic ice cover. An apparent increase in the fraction of second year ice in the 1990s is also inferred suggesting an overall thinning of the ice cover while co-registered satellite surface temperatures show a warming trend of 0.8 plus or minus 0.6 K per decade in summer and a good correlation with the perennial ice data.

  4. Response of Perennial Herbaceous Ornamentals to Meloidogyne hapla

    PubMed Central

    LaMondia, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Sixty-nine herbaceous perennial ornamentals in 56 genera were evaluated for root galling after 2 months in soil infested with Meloidogyne hapla under greenhouse conditions. Plants were rated susceptible or resistant based on the number of galls present on the root system. Thirty-six percent had more than 100 galls on the roots (similar to 'Rutgers' tomato controls) and were rated susceptible. Thirty percent of the plants tested did not have galls or egg masses present on the root system and were rated resistant. The remaining 34 percent were intermediate in response. Variation in response to M. hapla was observed within plant genera and species. The identification of M. hapla-resistant perennial ornamentals will aid in management of this nematode in landscapes and production fields. PMID:19277335

  5. Allelochemical stress inhibits growth, leaf water relations, PSII photochemistry, non-photochemical fluorescence quenching, and heat energy dissipation in three C3 perennial species

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the effect of two allelochemicals, benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one (BOA) and cinnamic acid (CA), on different physiological and morphological characteristics of 1-month-old C3 plant species (Dactylis glomerata, Lolium perenne, and Rumex acetosa) was analysed. BOA inhibited the shoot length of D. glomerata, L. perenne, and R. acetosa by 49%, 19%, and 19% of the control. The root length of D. glomerata, L. perenne, and R. acetosa growing in the presence of 1.5 mM BOA and CA was decreased compared with the control. Both allelochemicals (BOA, CA) inhibited leaf osmotic potential (LOP) in L. perenne and D. glomerata. In L. perenne, Fv/Fm decreased after treatment with BOA (1.5 mM) while CA (1.5 mM) also significantly reduced Fv/Fm in L. perenne. Both allelochemicals decreased ΦPSII in D. glomerata and L. perenne within 24 h of treatment, while in R. acetosa, ΦPSII levels decreased by 72 h following treatment with BOA and CA. There was a decrease in qP and NPQ on the first, fourth, fifth, and sixth days after treatment with BOA in D. glomerata, while both allelochemicals reduced the qP level in R. acetosa. There was a gradual decrease in the fraction of light absorbed by PSII allocated to PSII photochemistry (P) in R. acetosa treated with BOA and CA. The P values in D. glomerata were reduced by both allelochemicals and the portion of absorbed photon energy that was thermally dissipated (D) in D. glomerata and L. perenne was decreased by BOA and CA. Photon energy absorbed by PSII antennae and trapped by ‘closed’ PSII reaction centres (E) was decreased after CA exposure in D. glomerata. BOA and CA (1.5 mM concentration) decreased the leaf protein contents in all three perennial species. This study provides new understanding of the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of action of BOA and CA in one perennial dicotyledon and two perennial grasses. The acquisition of such knowledge may ultimately provide a rational and scientific basis for the design of safe

  6. Perennial Polyculture Farming: Seeds of Another Agricultural Revolution?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Most of the cereals that people eat (such as wheat, rice, oats, and corn / maize ) are grown in annual plant- ings and often in monocultures. Since...concluded that: Cultivating perennial cereal grains that can be harvested continuously for 4 to 5 years with- out tilling and replanting—in place of annual... grain is 27% while that of wheat and corn is about 17 and 10%, respectively. Gama- grass grain also has twice as much of the amino acid methionine as

  7. Rapid disappearance of perennial ice on Canada's most northern lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquette, Michel; Fortier, Daniel; Mueller, Derek R.; Sarrazin, Denis; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2015-03-01

    Field records, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery show that the perennial ice cover on Ward Hunt Lake at Canada's northern coast experienced rapid contraction and thinning after at least 50 years of relative stability. On all dates of sampling from 1953 to 2007, 3.5 to 4.3 m of perennial ice covered 65-85% of the lake surface in summer. The ice cover thinned from 2008 onward, and the lake became ice free in 2011, an event followed by 26 days of open water conditions in 2012. This rapid ice loss corresponded to a significant increase in melting degree days (MDD), from a mean (±SD) of 80.4 (±36.5) MDD (1996-2007) to 136.2 (±16.4) MDD (2008-2012). The shallow bathymetry combined with heat advection by warm inflows caused feedback effects that accelerated the ice decay. These observations show how changes across a critical threshold can result in the rapid disappearance of thick perennial ice.

  8. Comparison studies of unsaturated flow below annual and perennial plants.

    PubMed

    Scott, Bill; Lantzke, Ross; Nicholson, Dave; Findlater, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Values of unsaturated water content determined with neutron moisture measurements (NMM) reveal different water profiles below different plantings. In the extremes, calibration requires a linear and logarithmic response (using the Lambert-W function) along with the normal submersion in a drum of water. Nevertheless a post-calibration with a hydraulic push sampler was used for confirmation. Data were collected at six pastures near the Western Australia coast near Geraldton, with four replicates through the profile. The sites have mostly sandy soils and receive 300-500 mm of rainfall annually. Findings generally showed that, if there was sufficient water, as in 2006, the perennials were able to use the water evenly throughout the vertical profile. Otherwise, with low rainfall, as in 2009, perennials struggle to survive and use less water than the annuals. Modelling of the soil water movement, plant growth and calibration/recalibration is and will be used to get a maximum likehood fit. Clearly, in desert conditions and little or no vegetation, rainfall tends to build up deep in the profile, increase salinity in groundwater, and create waterlogging. Any vegetation is helpful; perennials more so; provided they have sufficient water and are not significantly harvested.

  9. Perennial grass production for biofuels: Soil conversion considerations

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Bransby, D.I.; Parrish, D.

    1994-10-01

    The increased use of renewable fuels for energy offers the United States a mechanism for significantly reducing national dependency on imported oil, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and improving regional agricultural economies. As mandated by law, a wide range of issues have been raised regarding the net environmental impacts of implementation of these new technologies. While uncertainties regarding both positive and negative environmental influences still exist in many areas of this new technology, it is now possible to address with substantial certainty the positive aspects of perennial herbaceous energy crops on several important soil conservation issues. Past experience with forage grasses and recent research with switchgrass. A warm season perennial forage grass selected as one of the model bioenergy species, indicates that important benefits will be gained in the area of soil conservation as grasses replace energy-intensive annual row crops. These include reduced erosion, improved conservation of water and nutrients, and increased productivity of soils by the deep and vigorous rooting systems of perennial warm-season gasses.

  10. Genetic regulation of flowering time in annual and perennial plants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Rehman Gul; Ai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Flowering time plays a significant role in the reproductive success of plants. So far, five major pathways to flowering have been characterized in Arabidopsis, including environmental induction through photoperiod, vernalization, and gibberellins and autonomous floral iation, and aging by sequentially operating miRNAs (typically miR156 and miR172) responding to endogenous cues. The balance of signals from these pathways is integrated by a common set of genes (FLOWERING LOCUS C, FLOWERING LOCUS T, LEAFY, and SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1) that determine the flowering time. Recent studies have indicated that epigenetic modification, alternative splicing, antisense RNA and chromatin silencing regulatory mechanisms play an important role in this process by regulating related flowering gene expression. In this review, we discuss the current understanding in genetic regulation of the phase transition from vegetative to reproductive growth by using Arabidopsis as a model. We also describe how this knowledge has been successfully applied for identifying homologous genes from perennial crops. Furthermore, detailed analysis of the similarities and differences between annual and perennial plants flowering will help elucidate the mechanisms of perennial plant maturation and regulation of floral initiation.

  11. Feasibility of incorporating waste grass clippings (Lolium perenne L.) in particleboard composites.

    PubMed

    Nemli, Gökay; Demirel, Samet; Gümüşkaya, Esat; Aslan, Mustafa; Acar, Cengiz

    2009-03-01

    This study investigated some of the important physical (thickness swelling) and mechanical (modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity and internal bond) properties of single-layer particleboard panels made from eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn.), waste of grass clippings (Lolium perenne L.) and combinations of the two. The chemical properties (pH, holocelluse and alpha cellulose contents, and water, alcohol-benzene and 1% sodium hydroxide solubilities) of the raw materials were also determined. Panels with a 6:94 ratio of grass-to-eucalyptus particles had the required mechanical properties for interior fitments including furniture and general uses. Boards manufactured with 100% grass clippings exhibited the lowest quality. The overall panel properties improved with a lower percentage of grass clippings added. Based on initial results, it also appears that grass should compose no more than 13% to achieve acceptable panel properties for interior fitments and general uses.

  12. [Control of the fermentation activity during ensilage of Lolium italicum A. Br. and Medicago sativa L].

    PubMed

    Ozino Marletto, O I; Ambrosoli, R; Piccone, G; Biasiol, B

    1982-01-01

    Samples with different dry matter contents of Lolium italicum A. Br., Medicago sativa L., have been ensiled in hermetically sealed containers, in order to study the evolution of microflora and its activity. The principal microbial groups (coliforms, proteolytics , lactic acid bacteria, clostridia, yeasts) have been detected and enumerated, in anaerobic atmosphere, after ensiling periods of 3, 6, 10, 13, 20, 100 days. At the same time, the samples were chemically analyzed for the detection of: pH, moisture, ashes, total and ammoniacal nitrogen, total reducing sugars, lactic acid, volatile fatty acids, short chain alcohols. The relations found between chemical and microbiological data, show that a strong lactic fermentation is not enough for the inhibition of silage spoiling microorganisms, such as coliforms, yeasts, and (less) proteolytics . This phenomenon may be related to the "quality" of the lactic acid microflora, more than to the characteristics of the environment.

  13. Fragipan Horizon Fragmentation in Slaking Experiments with Amendment Materials and Ryegrass Root Tissue Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Karathanasis, A. D.; Murdock, L. W.; Matocha, C. J.; Grove, J.; Thompson, Y. L.

    2014-01-01

    Slaking experiments were conducted of fragipan clods immersed in solutions of poultry manure, aerobically digested biosolid waste (ADB), fluidized bed combustion byproduct (FBC), D-H2O, CaCO3, NaF, Na-hexa-metaphosphate, and ryegrass root biomass. The fragipan clods were sampled from the Btx horizon of an Oxyaquic Fragiudalf in Kentucky. Wet sieving aggregate analysis showed significantly better fragmentation in the NaF, Na-hexa-metaphosphate, and ryegrass root solutions with a mean weight diameter range of 15.5–18.8 mm compared to the 44.2–47.9 mm of the poultry manure, ADB, and FBC treatments. Dissolved Si, Al, Fe, and Mn levels released in solution were ambiguous. The poor efficiency of the poultry manure, ADB, and FBC treatments was attributed to their high ionic strength, while the high efficiency of the NaF, Na-hexa-metaphosphate, and rye grass root solutions to their high sodium soluble ratio (SSR). A slaking mechanism is proposed suggesting that aqueous solutions with high SSR penetrate faster into the fragipan capillaries and generate the critical swelling pressure and shearing stress required to rupture the fragipan into several fragments. Additional fragmentation occurs in a followup stage during which potential Si, Al, Fe, and Mn binding agents may be released into solution. Field experiments testing these findings are in progress. PMID:25254233

  14. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  15. Double-cropping annual ryegrass and bermudagrass to reduce phosphorus levels in soil with history of poultry litter application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Double-cropping forages may help to ameliorate excess soil nutrients in manure-impacted fields. Studies were conducted on Savannah soil with a 30+ yr history of broiler litter to determine the yield of biomass and P in bermudagrass (summer) and ryegrass-bermudagrass (year-round) forage systems. Duri...

  16. Senescence, dormancy and tillering in perennial C4 grasses.

    PubMed

    Sarath, Gautam; Baird, Lisa M; Mitchell, Robert B

    2014-03-01

    Perennial, temperate, C4 grasses, such as switchgrass and miscanthus have been tabbed as sources of herbaceous biomass for the production of green fuels and chemicals based on a number of positive agronomic traits. Although there is important literature on the management of these species for biomass production on marginal lands, numerous aspects of their biology are as yet unexplored at the molecular level. Perenniality, a key agronomic trait, is a function of plant dormancy and winter survival of the below-ground parts of the plants. These include the crowns, rhizomes and meristems that will produce tillers. Maintaining meristem viability is critical for the continued survival of the plants. Plant tillers emerge from the dormant crown and rhizome meristems at the start of the growing period in the spring, progress through a phase of vegetative growth, followed by flowering and eventually undergo senescence. There is nutrient mobilization from the aerial portions of the plant to the crowns and rhizomes during tiller senescence. Signals arising from the shoots and from the environment can be expected to be integrated as the plants enter into dormancy. Plant senescence and dormancy have been well studied in several dicot species and offer a potential framework to understand these processes in temperate C4 perennial grasses. The availability of latitudinally adapted populations for switchgrass presents an opportunity to dissect molecular mechanisms that can impact senescence, dormancy and winter survival. Given the large increase in genomic and other resources for switchgrass, it is anticipated that projected molecular studies with switchgrass will have a broader impact on related species.

  17. Mapping perennial vegetation cover in the Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Cynthia S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey's Western Geographic Science Center have recently created a regional map of perennial vegetation cover for the Mojave Desert. The scientists used existing field data collected for a variety of previous studies and satellite data available for free through USGS archives to create a calibrated model of percent vegetation cover, an important attribute of desert ecosystems. This map is being used to inform ongoing scientific investigations and land-management efforts, including endangered species habitat mapping and vulnerability and recoverability studies of desert landscapes in the arid Southwest.

  18. Effects of biochars on the availability of heavy metals to ryegrass in an alkaline contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guixiang; Guo, Xiaofang; Zhao, Zhihua; He, Qiusheng; Wang, Shuifeng; Zhu, Yuen; Yan, Yulong; Liu, Xitao; Sun, Ke; Zhao, Ye; Qian, Tianwei

    2016-11-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of biochars on the availability of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) to ryegrass in an alkaline contaminated soil. Biochars only slightly decreased or even increased the availability of heavy metals assesses by chemical extractant (a mixture of 0.05 mol L(-1) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium, 0.01 mol L(-1) CaCl2, and 0.1 mol L(-1) triethanolamine). The significantly positive correlation between most chemical-extractable heavy metals and the ash content in biochars indicated the positive role of ash in this extraction. Biochars significantly reduced the plant uptake of heavy metals, excluding Mn. The absence of a positive correlation between the chemical-extractable heavy metals and the plant uptake counterparts (except for Mn) indicates that chemical extractability is probably not a reliable indicator to predict the phytoavailability of most heavy metals in alkaline soils treated with biochars. The obviously negative correlation between the plant uptake of heavy metals (except for Mn) and the (O + N)/C and H/C indicates that biochars with more polar groups, which were produced at lower temperatures, had higher efficiency for reducing the phytoavailability of heavy metals. The significantly negative correlations between the plant uptake of Mn and ryegrass biomass indicated the "dilution effect" caused by the improvement of biomass. These observations will be helpful for designing biochars as soil amendments to reduce the availability of heavy metals to plants in soils, especially in alkaline soils.

  19. Colonization and beneficial effects on annual ryegrass by mixed inoculation with plant growth promoting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Nádia L; Dourado, Ana Catarina; Pais, Isabel; Semedo, José; Scotti-Campos, Paula; Borges, Nuno; Carvalho, Gilda; Barreto Crespo, Maria Teresa; Fareleira, Paula

    2017-05-01

    Multi-strain inoculants have increased potential to accomplish a diversity of plant needs, mainly attributed to its multi-functionality. This work evaluated the ability of a mixture of three bacteria to colonize and induce a beneficial response on the pasture crop annual ryegrass. Pseudomonas G1Dc10 and Paenibacillus G3Ac9 were previously isolated from annual ryegrass and were selected for their ability to perform multiple functions related to plant growth promotion. Sphingomonas azotifigens DSMZ 18530(T) was included due to nitrogen fixing ability. The effects of the bacterial mixture were assessed in gnotobiotic plant inoculation assays and compared with single and dual inoculation treatments. Triple inoculation with 3×10(8) bacteria significantly increased plant dry weight and leaf pigments, indicating improved photosynthetic performance. Plant lipid biosynthesis was enhanced by 65%, mainly due to the rise of linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid with high dietary value. Electrolyte leakage, an indicator of plant membrane stability under stress, was decreased pointing to a beneficial effect by inoculation. Plants physiological condition was more favoured by triple inoculation than by single, although benefits on biomass were only evident relative to non-inoculated plants. The colonization behaviour and coexistence in plant tissues were assessed using FISH and GFP-labelling, combined with confocal microscopy and a cultivation-based approach for quantification. The three strains occupied the same sites, localizing preferentially along root hairs and in stem epidermis. Endophytic colonization was observed as bacteria entered root and stem inner tissues. This study reveals the potential of this mixture of strains for biofertilization, contributing to improve crop productivity and nutritional value.

  20. Performance of lactating dairy cows fed ryegrass silage and corn silage with ground corn, steam-flaked corn, or hominy feed.

    PubMed

    Cooke, K M; Bernard, J K; West, J W

    2009-03-01

    Forty-eight mid-lactation Holstein cows were used in a 6-wk completely randomized block design trial with a 4 x 3 factorial arrangement of treatments to determine the effects of feeding different proportions of corn silage and ryegrass silage with supplemental ground corn (GC), steam-flaked corn (SFC), and hominy feed (HF) on the performance of lactating dairy cows. Forage provided 49% of the dietary dry matter in the experimental diets, which were formulated to meet National Research Council requirements. Ryegrass silage provided 100, 75, 50, or 25% of the total forage dry matter, with corn silage supplying the remainder. There were no interactions between the proportion of forage provided by ryegrass silage and energy supplement. Dry matter intake and milk protein percentage decreased linearly with increasing proportions of ryegrass silage, but milk protein yield was similar among forage treatments. There were no differences among forage treatments in milk yield, milk fat percentage and yield, and energy-corrected milk yield. Dry matter intake was higher and there was a tendency for increased milk fat percentage for GC compared with SFC or HF. No other differences were observed in milk yield or composition among energy supplements. Plasma urea nitrogen and glucose concentrations were similar among treatments. Under the conditions of this trial, our results indicate that feeding a combination of corn silage and ryegrass silage is more desirable than feeding ryegrass silage alone, whereas supplementation with GC, SFC, or HF supports similar levels of milk production.

  1. Patterns of Dissolved Organic Matter Characteristics in perennial and non-perennial streams of a Maryland Coastal Plain Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosen, J. D.; Mcdonough, O. T.; Palmer, M.

    2011-12-01

    DOM represents the largest flux of organic matter in freshwater systems, yet processing and export of DOM from non-perennial headwaters is poorly-understood. We collected and quantified DOM in a stream network, measuring how DOM quantity and quality changed longitudinally across stream reaches with a range of flow permanence. Samples were collected from intermittent first-order reaches and perennial third- and fifth-order reaches within the watershed of Parker's Creek, a Maryland coastal plain stream. First-order stream samples were collected from streams draining both urban and forested catchments. Bulk DOM was determined by analyzing for total organic carbon (TOC). Specific ultra-violet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA-254) was used to determine aromaticity of DOM. DOM was also characterized fluorometrically using excitation-emissions matrices (EEMs). DOM structural data was extracted from EEMs using a fluorescence index (FI) and parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis. No significant differences in TOC concentrations were detected between forested and urban streams nor were longitudinal differences observed from first- through fifth-order streams. There were also no significant differences found with respect to SUVA-254. FI values were significantly higher for urban reaches compared to forested reaches, and mean FI values were greater for downstream reaches compared to upstream reaches. PARAFAC analysis identified four types of DOM: a fulvic acid with terrestrial and aquatic sources, an anthropogenically-derived humic acid, a fulvic acid of terrestrial origin, and a proteinaceous DOM. PARAFAC analysis indicated that DOM composition was similar across all reaches sampled with the exception of the proteinaceous DOM which was more abundant in urban compared to forested streams. DOM composition in downstream reaches was intermediate relative to urban and forested reaches. Homogeneity of DOM quantity and composition across reaches suggests a common source for a large proportion

  2. Azelastine eye drops in the treatment of perennial allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Ozod; Petzold, Ursula; Haase, Hans; Nguyen, Duc Tung; Ellers-Lenz, Barbara; Hermann, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Azelastine (CAS 58581-89-8) is a selective H1-receptor antagonist that inhibits histamine release and interferes with activation of other mediators of allergic inflammation. The present double-blind study aimed to evaluate azelastine eye drops (Allergodil) in patients with perennial allergic conjunctivitis compared to placebo. A total of 116 patients with an ocular symptoms score for itching and conjunctival redness > or = 3 (0-6 scale) were randomized to twice-daily 0.05% azelastine eye drops treatment (n = 58) or placebo. Patients maintained daily logs and were clinically evaluated after 7, 21 and 42 days of treatment. Azelastine significantly improved itching and conjunctival redness versus placebo (p < 0.001). Tolerability was rated good or better by 97% of patients with only bitter taste and application site reaction notable adverse experiences. On Day 7, ocular symptoms score improved by 1.5 +/- 0.9 (versus 0.5 +/- 0.8 placebo) with score improvement > or = 2 in 55% with azelastine (versus 14% placebo). Itching and redness further improved at Day 42 (score improvement > or = 2 in 95% with azelastine versus 33% placebo) and completely resolved for 47% azelastine patients (versus 10% placebo). Daily patient logs confirmed the clinically assessed scores. Topical azelastine progressively improved itching and conjunctival redness in patients with moderate to severe perennial allergic conjunctivitis. Continued improvement with prolonged use is consistent with mechanisms other than H1-receptor blockade, such as possible down regulation of adhesion molecule receptors.

  3. Activation of sucrose transport in defoliated Lolium perenne L.: an example of apoplastic phloem loading plasticity.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Alexandre; Desclos, Marie; Amiard, Véronique; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Adams, William W; Turgeon, Robert; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Noiraud-Romy, Nathalie

    2009-07-01

    The pathway of carbon phloem loading was examined in leaf tissues of the forage grass Lolium perenne. The effect of defoliation (leaf blade removal) on sucrose transport capacity was assessed in leaf sheaths as the major carbon source for regrowth. The pathway of carbon transport was assessed via a combination of electron microscopy, plasmolysis experiments and plasma membrane vesicles (PMVs) purified by aqueous two-phase partitioning from the microsomal fraction. Results support an apoplastic phloem loading mechanism. Imposition of an artificial proton-motive force to PMVs from leaf sheaths energized an active, transient and saturable uptake of sucrose (Suc). The affinity of Suc carriers for Suc was 580 microM in leaf sheaths of undefoliated plants. Defoliation induced a decrease of K(m) followed by an increase of V(max). A transporter was isolated from stubble (including leaf sheaths) cDNA libraries and functionally expressed in yeast. The level of L.perenne SUcrose Transporter 1 (LpSUT1) expression increased in leaf sheaths in response to defoliation. Taken together, the results indicate that Suc transport capacity increased in leaf sheaths of L. perenne in response to leaf blade removal. This increase might imply de novo synthesis of Suc transporters, including LpSUT1, and may represent one of the mechanisms contributing to rapid refoliation.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to the major Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen Lol p I (Rye I).

    PubMed

    Kahn, C R; Marsh, D G

    1986-12-01

    Thirteen monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against Lol p I (Rye I), the major Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen. Spleen cells from A/J and SJL mice immunized with highly purified Lol p I (Lol I) were allowed to fuse with cells from the non-secreting Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma cell line. Each MAb was analyzed for antigenic specificity by radioimmunoassay (RIA) using 125I-Lol I. The epitope specificities of seven of the MAbs were examined by competitive binding against a labelled standard MAb for the Lol I antigen (Ag). The dissociation constant, Kd, of one MAb (No. 3.2) that was studied most extensively was determined by double Ab RIA to be 3.5 X 10(-6) L/M. This MAb recognized the related 27,000-30,000 Group I glycoproteins found in the pollens of nine other species of grass pollens tested, including weak binding to Bermuda grass Group I (Cyn d I), which by conventional analysis using polyclonal anti-Lol I serum shows no detectable binding. Monoclonal antibody No. 3.2 was coupled covalently to Sepharose 4B and used to prepare highly purified Lol I from a partially purified rye pollen extract. Finally, an RIA was developed which permitted the analysis of the Group I components in rye grass and nine other grass pollen species. The latter assay is likely to prove useful in the standardization of grass pollen extracts according to their Group I contents.

  5. Isolation of N2 -fixing rhizobacteria from Lolium perenne and evaluating their plant growth promoting traits.

    PubMed

    Castellano-Hinojosa, Antonio; Correa-Galeote, David; Palau, Josep; Bedmar, Eulogio J

    2016-01-01

    Twenty one dinitrogen (N2 )-fixing bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere of Lolium perenne grown for more than 10 years without N-fertilization. The nearly complete sequence of the 16S rRNA gene of each strain and pairwise alignments among globally aligned sequences of the 16S rRNA genes clustered them into nine different groups. Out of the 21 strains, 11 were members of genus Bacillus, 3 belonged to each one of genera Paenibacillus and Pseudoxanthomonas, and the remaining 2 strains to each one of genera Burkholderia and Staphylococcus, respectively. A representative strain from each group contained the nifH gene and fixed atmospheric N2 as determined by the acetylene-dependent ethylene production assay (acetylene reduction activity, ARA). The nine selected strains were also examined to behave as plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPRs) including their ability to act as a biocontrol agent. The nine representative strains produced indol acetic acid (IAA) and solubilized calcium triphosphate, five of them, strains C2, C3, C12, C15, and C16, had ACC deaminase activity, and strains C2, C3, C4, C12, C16, and C17 produced siderophores. Strains C13, C16, and C17 had the capability to control growth of the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum mycelial growth in vitro. PCA analysis of determined PGPR properties showed that ARA, ACC deaminase activity, and siderophore production were the most valuable as they had the maximal contribution to the total variance.

  6. Root growth and plant biomass in Lolium perenne exploring a nutrient-rich patch in soil.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryoji; Kachi, Naoki; Suzuki, Jun-Ichirou

    2008-11-01

    We investigated soil exploration by roots and plant growth in a heterogeneous environment to determine whether roots can selectively explore a nutrient-rich patch, and how nutrient heterogeneity affects biomass allocation and total biomass before a patch is reached. Lolium perenne L. plants were grown in a factorial experiment with combinations of fertilization (heterogeneous and homogeneous) and day of harvest (14, 28, 42, or 56 days after transplanting). The plant in the heterogeneous treatment was smaller in its mean total biomass, and allocated more biomass to roots. The distributions of root length and root biomass in the heterogeneous treatment did not favor the nutrient-rich patch, and did not correspond to the patchy distribution of inorganic nitrogen. Specific root length (length/biomass) was higher and root elongation was more extensive both laterally and vertically in the heterogeneous treatment. These characteristics may enable plants to acquire nutrients efficiently and increase the probability of encountering nutrient-rich patches in a heterogeneous soil. However, heterogeneity of soil nutrients would hold back plant growth before a patch was reached. Therefore, although no significant selective root placement in the nutrient-rich patch was observed, plant growth before reaching nutrient-rich patches differed between heterogeneous and homogeneous environments.

  7. A study of the human immune response to Lolium perenne (rye) pollen and its components, Lol p I and Lol p II (Rye I and Rye II). II. Longitudinal variation of antibody levels in relation to symptomatology and pollen exposure and correction of seasonally elevated antibody levels to basal values.

    PubMed

    Freidhoff, L R; Ehrlich-Kautzky, E; Meyers, D A; Marsh, D G

    1987-11-01

    This study used a standardized, dialyzed, Lolium perenne (ryegrass) pollen extract and two of its well-characterized components, Lol p I (Rye I) and Lol p II (Rye II), to characterize the longitudinal variation of both IgE and IgG antibody (Ab) levels, as well as total serum IgE levels, in 20 grass-allergic subjects followed for 13 months. Ab levels declined toward a basal level just before, and increased just after, the grass-pollination season, returning to the same basal level just before the next grass-pollination season. The least complex allergen, Lol II, demonstrated the most uniform pattern of variation in both IgE and IgG Ab levels. Total serum IgE levels demonstrated the least regular pattern of variation. Grass-pollen counts were strongly correlated with symptom-medication scores for these subjects (rs = 0.87). Initial values were correlated with the rise in total IgE and IgE Ab to Lol II across the grass-pollen season. Skin test results were correlated with initial IgE Ab levels for L. perenne pollen extract and Lol II. Finally, a procedure for correcting IgE Ab levels to basal values was proposed and tested. The correction procedure, for each IgE Ab, was based on the average rise during the grass-pollination season (or average decline after the grass-pollination season) observed for all subjects with that IgE Ab.

  8. Growth and Quality of Cool-Season Perennial Grass Species in the Southern Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Annually planted winter wheat is the major cool-season livestock forage enterprise in a large part of the southern Great Plains and is a good complement to warm-season perennials. However, gaps in both fall and spring exist in the system. Cool-season perennial grasses that have origins in the Nort...

  9. Nitrate sinks in perennial vegetation filter strips in the toeslopes of agricultural watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of perennial filter strips (PFS) into the toeslope of agricultural watersheds may decrease downstream NO3 losses, especially if subsurface flow interacts with the rooting zone of the perennial vegetation. However, the long-term effectiveness of NO3 removal depends on the relative importa...

  10. Perennial grassland establishment and production response following different annual cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developing efficient, economical methods of perennial mixture establishment in a semi-arid environment is needed for grazing and conservation purposes. We evaluated different perennial monocultures and mixtures planted into various annual crops (spring wheat, corn, soybean, dry pea, and canola) to ...

  11. Adaptive management of perennial pepperweed for endangered specias and tidal marsh recovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial pepperweed has invaded a wide range of habitat types in the far west. In the San Francisco Estuary, dense infestations have impacted sensitive tidal wetlands and compromised endangered species recovery efforts. An adaptive management effort to reduce perennial pepperweed was initiated by...

  12. Studies on the Host Range, Biology, and Pathogenicity of Punctodera punctata Infecting Turfgrasses

    PubMed Central

    Radice, A. D.; Myers, R. F.; Halisky, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    Punctodera punctata completed its life cycle on Poa annua (annual bluegrass), P. pratensis (Merion Kentucky bluegrass), Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass), and Festuca rubra rubra (spreading fescue). Minimum time for completion of a life cycle from second-stage juvenile to mature brown cyst was 40 days at 22-28 C. Inoculation by single juveniles indicated that reproduction was most likely by amphimixis. Infestation levels of 50 or 500 juveniles/250 cm³ soil did not affect top dry weight, root dry weight, or total dry weight of Poa annua. PMID:19294077

  13. Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Philip J.; Pysklywec, Russell N.; Stephenson, Randell

    2016-01-01

    Mid-ocean ridges, transform faults, subduction and continental collisions form the conventional theory of plate tectonics to explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries. However, the theory does not explain directly the processes involved in intraplate deformation and seismicity. Recently, damage structures in the lithosphere have been linked to the origin of plate tectonics. Despite seismological imaging suggesting that inherited mantle lithosphere heterogeneities are ubiquitous, their plate tectonic role is rarely considered. Here we show that deep lithospheric anomalies can dominate shallow geological features in activating tectonics in plate interiors. In numerical experiments, we found that structures frozen into the mantle lithosphere through plate tectonic processes can behave as quasi-plate boundaries reactivated under far-field compressional forcing. Intraplate locations where proto-lithospheric plates have been scarred by earlier suturing could be regions where latent plate boundaries remain, and where plate tectonics processes are expressed as a ‘perennial' phenomenon. PMID:27282541

  14. Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Heron, Philip J; Pysklywec, Russell N; Stephenson, Randell

    2016-06-10

    Mid-ocean ridges, transform faults, subduction and continental collisions form the conventional theory of plate tectonics to explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries. However, the theory does not explain directly the processes involved in intraplate deformation and seismicity. Recently, damage structures in the lithosphere have been linked to the origin of plate tectonics. Despite seismological imaging suggesting that inherited mantle lithosphere heterogeneities are ubiquitous, their plate tectonic role is rarely considered. Here we show that deep lithospheric anomalies can dominate shallow geological features in activating tectonics in plate interiors. In numerical experiments, we found that structures frozen into the mantle lithosphere through plate tectonic processes can behave as quasi-plate boundaries reactivated under far-field compressional forcing. Intraplate locations where proto-lithospheric plates have been scarred by earlier suturing could be regions where latent plate boundaries remain, and where plate tectonics processes are expressed as a 'perennial' phenomenon.

  15. Dynamic perennial firn aquifer on an Arctic glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianson, Knut; Kohler, Jack; Alley, Richard B.; Nuth, Christopher; Pelt, Ward J. J.

    2015-03-01

    Ice-penetrating radar and GPS observations reveal a perennial firn aquifer (PFA) on a Svalbard ice field, similar to those recently discovered in southeastern Greenland. A bright, widespread radar reflector separates relatively dry and water-saturated firn. This surface, the phreatic firn water table, is deeper beneath local surface elevation maxima, shallower in surface lows, and steeper where the surface is steep. The reflector crosscuts snow stratigraphy; we use the apparent deflection of accumulation layers due to the higher dielectric permittivity below the water table to infer that the firn pore space becomes progressively more saturated as depth increases. Our observations indicate that PFAs respond rapidly (subannually) to surface forcing, and are capable of providing significant input to the englacial hydrology system.

  16. Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip J.; Pysklywec, Russell N.; Stephenson, Randell

    2016-06-01

    Mid-ocean ridges, transform faults, subduction and continental collisions form the conventional theory of plate tectonics to explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries. However, the theory does not explain directly the processes involved in intraplate deformation and seismicity. Recently, damage structures in the lithosphere have been linked to the origin of plate tectonics. Despite seismological imaging suggesting that inherited mantle lithosphere heterogeneities are ubiquitous, their plate tectonic role is rarely considered. Here we show that deep lithospheric anomalies can dominate shallow geological features in activating tectonics in plate interiors. In numerical experiments, we found that structures frozen into the mantle lithosphere through plate tectonic processes can behave as quasi-plate boundaries reactivated under far-field compressional forcing. Intraplate locations where proto-lithospheric plates have been scarred by earlier suturing could be regions where latent plate boundaries remain, and where plate tectonics processes are expressed as a `perennial' phenomenon.

  17. Matrix population models from 20 studies of perennial plant populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Martha M.; Williams, Jennifer L.; Lesica, Peter; Bell, Timothy J.; Bierzychudek, Paulette; Bowles, Marlin; Crone, Elizabeth E.; Doak, Daniel F.; Ehrlen, Johan; Ellis-Adam, Albertine; McEachern, Kathryn; Ganesan, Rengaian; Latham, Penelope; Luijten, Sheila; Kaye, Thomas N.; Knight, Tiffany M.; Menges, Eric S.; Morris, William F.; den Nijs, Hans; Oostermeijer, Gerard; Quintana-Ascencio, Pedro F.; Shelly, J. Stephen; Stanley, Amanda; Thorpe, Andrea; Tamara, Ticktin; Valverde, Teresa; Weekley, Carl W.

    2012-01-01

    Demographic transition matrices are one of the most commonly applied population models for both basic and applied ecological research. The relatively simple framework of these models and simple, easily interpretable summary statistics they produce have prompted the wide use of these models across an exceptionally broad range of taxa. Here, we provide annual transition matrices and observed stage structures/population sizes for 20 perennial plant species which have been the focal species for long-term demographic monitoring. These data were assembled as part of the "Testing Matrix Models" working group through the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). In sum, these data represent 82 populations with >460 total population-years of data. It is our hope that making these data available will help promote and improve our ability to monitor and understand plant population dynamics.

  18. Matrix population models from 20 studies of perennial plant populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Martha M.; Williams, Jennifer L.; Lesica, Peter; Bell, Timothy J.; Bierzychudek, Paulette; Bowles, Marlin; Crone, Elizabeth E.; Doak, Daniel F.; Ehrlen, Johan; Ellis-Adam, Albertine; McEachern, Kathryn; Ganesan, Rengaian; Latham, Penelope; Luijten, Sheila; Kaye, Thomas N.; Knight, Tiffany M.; Menges, Eric S.; Morris, William F.; den Nijs, Hans; Oostermeijer, Gerard; Quintana-Ascencio, Pedro F.; Shelly, J. Stephen; Stanley, Amanda; Thorpe, Andrea; Tamara, Ticktin; Valverde, Teresa; Weekley, Carl W.

    2012-01-01

    Demographic transition matrices are one of the most commonly applied population models for both basic and applied ecological research. The relatively simple framework of these models and simple, easily interpretable summary statistics they produce have prompted the wide use of these models across an exceptionally broad range of taxa. Here, we provide annual transition matrices and observed stage structures/population sizes for 20 perennial plant species which have been the focal species for long-term demographic monitoring. These data were assembled as part of the 'Testing Matrix Models' working group through the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). In sum, these data represent 82 populations with >460 total population-years of data. It is our hope that making these data available will help promote and improve our ability to monitor and understand plant population dynamics.

  19. Soil Moisture Dynamics under Corn, Soybean, and Perennial Kura Clover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsner, T.; Venterea, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Rising global food and energy consumption call for increased agricultural production, whereas rising concerns for environmental quality call for farming systems with more favorable environmental impacts. Improved understanding and management of plant-soil water interactions are central to meeting these twin challenges. The objective of this research was to compare the temporal dynamics of soil moisture under contrasting cropping systems suited for the Midwestern region of the United States. Precipitation, infiltration, drainage, evapotranspiration, soil water storage, and freeze/thaw processes were measured hourly for three years in field plots of continuous corn (Zea mays L.), corn/soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotation, and perennial kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum M. Bieb.) in southeastern Minnesota. The evapotranspiration from the perennial clover most closely followed the temporal dynamics of precipitation, resulting in deep drainage which was reduced up to 50% relative to the annual crops. Soil moisture utilization also continued later into the fall under the clover than under the annual crops. In the annual cropping systems, crop sequence influenced the soil moisture dynamics. Soybean following corn and continuous corn exhibited evapotranspiration which was 80 mm less than and deep drainage which was 80 mm greater than that of corn following soybean. These differences occurred primarily during the spring and were associated with differences in early season plant growth between the systems. In the summer, soil moisture depletion was up to 30 mm greater under corn than soybean. Crop residue also played an important role in the soil moisture dynamics. Higher amounts of residue were associated with reduced soil freezing. This presentation will highlight key aspects of the soil moisture dynamics for these contrasting cropping systems across temporal scales ranging from hours to years. The links between soil moisture dynamics, crop yields, and nutrient leaching

  20. Lake Hoare, Antarctica: sedimentation through a thick perennial ice cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S. W.; Andersen, D. W.; Nedell, S. S.; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    Lake Hoare in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica is covered with a perennial ice cover more than 3 m thick, yet there is a complex record of sedimentation and of growth of microbial mats on the lake bottom. Rough topography on the ice covering the lake surface traps sand that is transported by the wind. In late summer, vertical conduits form by melting and fracturing, making the ice permeable to both liquid water and gases. Cross-sections of the ice cover show that sand is able to penetrate into and apparently through it by descending through these conduits. This is the primary sedimentation mechanism in the lake. Sediment traps retrieved from the lake bottom indicate that rates of deposition can vary by large amounts over lateral scales as small as 1 m. This conclusion is supported by cores taken in a 3 x 3 grid with a spacing of 1.5 m. Despite the close spacing of the cores, the poor stratigraphic correlation that is observed indicates substantial lateral variability in sedimentation rate. Apparently, sand descends into the lake from discrete, highly localized sources in the ice that may in some cases deposit a large amount of sand into the lake in a very short time. In some locations on the lake bottom, distinctive sand mounds have been formed by this process. They are primary sedimentary structures and appear unique to the perennially ice-covered lacustrine environment. In some locations they are tens of centimetres high and gently rounded with stable slopes; in others they reach approximately 1 m in height and have a conical shape with slopes at angle of repose. A simple formation model suggests that these differences can be explained by local variations in water depth and sedimentation rate. Rapid colonization of fresh sand surfaces by microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae, and heterotrophic bacteria produces a complex intercalation of organic and sandy layers that are a distinctive form of modern stromatolites.

  1. Lake Hoare, Antarctica: sedimentation through a thick perennial ice cover.

    PubMed

    Squyres, S W; Andersen, D W; Nedell, S S; Wharton, R A

    1991-01-01

    Lake Hoare in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica is covered with a perennial ice cover more than 3 m thick, yet there is a complex record of sedimentation and of growth of microbial mats on the lake bottom. Rough topography on the ice covering the lake surface traps sand that is transported by the wind. In late summer, vertical conduits form by melting and fracturing, making the ice permeable to both liquid water and gases. Cross-sections of the ice cover show that sand is able to penetrate into and apparently through it by descending through these conduits. This is the primary sedimentation mechanism in the lake. Sediment traps retrieved from the lake bottom indicate that rates of deposition can vary by large amounts over lateral scales as small as 1 m. This conclusion is supported by cores taken in a 3 x 3 grid with a spacing of 1.5 m. Despite the close spacing of the cores, the poor stratigraphic correlation that is observed indicates substantial lateral variability in sedimentation rate. Apparently, sand descends into the lake from discrete, highly localized sources in the ice that may in some cases deposit a large amount of sand into the lake in a very short time. In some locations on the lake bottom, distinctive sand mounds have been formed by this process. They are primary sedimentary structures and appear unique to the perennially ice-covered lacustrine environment. In some locations they are tens of centimetres high and gently rounded with stable slopes; in others they reach approximately 1 m in height and have a conical shape with slopes at angle of repose. A simple formation model suggests that these differences can be explained by local variations in water depth and sedimentation rate. Rapid colonization of fresh sand surfaces by microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae, and heterotrophic bacteria produces a complex intercalation of organic and sandy layers that are a distinctive form of modern stromatolites.

  2. Perennial plate tectonics with lasting mantle lithosphere scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, P.; Pysklywec, R. N.; Stephenson, R.

    2015-12-01

    Although the conventional theory of plate tectonics can explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries, it cannot adequately explain the processes involved in deformation and seismicity within plate interiors. Here, we consider that the pre-existing deformation or "scarring" within the mantle lithosphere may have a very long lived presence that could incorporate deformation of the plate interior and plate boundary. Mantle lithosphere scars from continent-continent collisions could generate virtual plate boundaries that remain over long timescales, producing "perennial" plate tectonics. Local geophysical studies can map the crustal environment well, and global whole mantle tomography models are rapidly improving, yet high-resolution images of the mantle lithosphere are often not available in regions where scarring may be present. Where mantle lithosphere heterogeneities have been observed (usually interpreted simply as subduction scars), the same attention has not been afforded to them as, for example, re-activation of faults within the Earth's crust. In idealized numerical simulations, we compare how relic scarring at varying depths in the lithosphere affects patterns of deformation. High-resolution thermal-mechanical numerical experiments explore continental lithospheric deformation featuring a weakened crust and mantle lithosphere scars. Our models show that deep lithospheric scars can control the tectonic evolution of a region over shallow geological features, indicating the importance of mantle lithosphere heterogeneities. The Altyn Tagh Fault (ATF) in central China is an example of an ancient continental collision zone that undergoes periodic deformation during times of regional compression. We suggest that the ATF may be a locale where a long-lasting mantle lithosphere scar can control the subsequent crustal evolution and deformation, with ancient plate boundaries having a "perennial" plate tectonic presence.

  3. Native perennial forb variation between mountain big sagebrush and Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kirk W; Bates, Jon D

    2010-09-01

    Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) occupies large portions of the western United States and provides valuable wildlife habitat. However, information is lacking quantifying differences in native perennial forb characteristics between mountain big sagebrush [A. tridentata spp. vaseyana (Rydb.) Beetle] and Wyoming big sagebrush [A. tridentata spp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh] plant communities. This information is critical to accurately evaluate the quality of habitat and forage that these communities can produce because many wildlife species consume large quantities of native perennial forbs and depend on them for hiding cover. To compare native perennial forb characteristics on sites dominated by these two subspecies of big sagebrush, we sampled 106 intact big sagebrush plant communities. Mountain big sagebrush plant communities produced almost 4.5-fold more native perennial forb biomass and had greater native perennial forb species richness and diversity compared to Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities (P < 0.001). Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) and the multiple-response permutation procedure (MRPP) demonstrated that native perennial forb composition varied between these plant communities (P < 0.001). Native perennial forb composition was more similar within plant communities grouped by big sagebrush subspecies than expected by chance (A = 0.112) and composition varied between community groups (P < 0.001). Indicator analysis did not identify any perennial forbs that were completely exclusive and faithful, but did identify several perennial forbs that were relatively good indicators of either mountain big sagebrush or Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities. Our results suggest that management plans and habitat guidelines should recognize differences in native perennial forb characteristics between mountain and Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities.

  4. Phytostabilization of copper mine tailings with biosolids: implications for metal uptake and productivity of Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Santibáñez, Claudia; Verdugo, Cesar; Ginocchio, Rosanna

    2008-05-20

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using biosolids and Lolium perenne for the phytostabilization of copper mine tailings and to evaluate the patterns of metal accumulation and translocation in plants. Biosolids were applied either on the surface or mixed with the tailings at rates of 0, 6, and 12% w/w. All pots were seeded with L. perenne and after six months, the plants were harvested and separated into roots and shoots for metal concentrations analyses as well as some physiological characteristics of the plants. In order to correlate the metal content in plant tissues with some chemical properties, the pore-water of the substrates was analyzed for metals, pH and dissolved organic carbon. Results showed that biosolids application increased the dry biomass production of L. perenne and the shoot concentrations of N and chlorophyll. On the other hand, biosolids increased the concentration of Cu and Zn in the pore-water and in plant tissues. Despite this, there were no evident symptoms of phytotoxicity and the concentration of metals was within the normal ranges described for plants and below the maximum tolerable level for animals. In addition, plant tissue analysis showed that the application of biosolids could significantly reduce Mo uptake and shoot accumulation in plants. The metals were taken up by plants in the following order: Cu>Zn>Mo>Cd. The distribution patterns of metals in plants showed that metals were mainly accumulated in the roots and only a small amount of them were transported to the shoots. These results suggest that mixed application of biosolids (6%) and the use of L. perenne could be appropriate for use in programs of phytostabilization of copper mine tailings. However, these results should be tested under field conditions in order to confirm their efficacy under semi-arid Mediterranean climate conditions.

  5. Evolution of glyphosate resistance in a Lolium rigidum population by glyphosate selection at sublethal doses.

    PubMed

    Busi, R; Powles, S B

    2009-10-01

    The majority of the documented cases of field-evolved herbicide-resistant weed biotypes established that single major genes confer glyphosate resistance. However, the contribution of minor genes endowing substantial plant survival at sublethal herbicide doses may be a potential complementary path to herbicide resistance evolution in weed populations under selection. Here, we subjected a number of susceptible individuals of Lolium rigidum to recurrent glyphosate selection to test the potential for sublethal glyphosate doses to additively select for glyphosate resistance. After 3-4 cycles of glyphosate selection in two distinct environments, the progenies of the initially susceptible population were shifted toward glyphosate resistance. The results indicate progressive enrichment of minor gene trait(s) contributing toward plant survival in the glyphosate-selected progenies. After three generations of selection, the estimated LD(50) values were doubled compared with the original population and up to 33% plant survival was obtained in the glyphosate-selected progeny at the recommended glyphosate label rate. This level of resistance probably was the maximum shift achievable with sublethal glyphosate dose selection in this small population. Cross-pollination was a crucial factor enabling the rapid rate of accumulation of minor glyphosate resistance gene trait(s) that are likely to be present at a relatively high frequency in a small susceptible population. The mechanistic basis of the moderate glyphosate resistance level selected by sublethal glyphosate doses remains unknown and warrants future research. Studying the main factors influencing the evolution of resistant weed populations is crucial for understanding, predicting and managing herbicide resistance.

  6. Cloning, expression, and immunological characterization of recombinant Lolium perenne allergen Lol p II.

    PubMed

    Sidoli, A; Tamborini, E; Giuntini, I; Levi, S; Volonté, G; Paini, C; De Lalla, C; Siccardi, A G; Baralle, F E; Galliani, S

    1993-10-15

    The molecular cloning of the cDNA encoding for an isoallergenic form of Lol p II, a major rye grass (Lolium perenne) pollen allergen, was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification on mRNA extracted from pollen. The amino acid sequence derived from the cDNA was truncated by 4 and 5 residues at the NH2- and COOH-terminal ends, respectively, and differed only in one position from that previously reported. This cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli by fusion to the carboxyl terminus of the human ferritin H-chain. The molecule was produced in high yields as a soluble protein and was easily purified. The protein retains the multimeric quaternary structure of ferritin, and it exposes on the surface the allergenic moiety, which can be recognized in Western blotting and in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay experiments by specific IgE from allergic patients. The recombinant allergen was used to analyze the sera of 26 patients allergic to L. perenne compared with control sera. The results were in good agreement with the values obtained with the radioallergosorbent test assay. In addition, histamine release experiments in whole blood from an allergic patient and skin prick tests showed that the recombinant allergen retains some of the biological properties of the natural compound. These findings indicate that the availability of homogeneous recombinant allergens may be useful for the development of more specific diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Moreover, this expression system may be of more general interest for producing large amounts of soluble protein domains in E. coli.

  7. Molecular genetics of human immune responsiveness to Lolium perenne (rye) allergen, Lol p III.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Freidhoff, L R; Marsh, D G

    1989-01-01

    Lol p II and III are each about 11-kD protein allergens from the pollen of Lolium perenne (rye grass). We have found that human immune responses (IgE and IgG antibodies) to both proteins are significantly associated with HLA-DR3. In addition, the two proteins are cross-reactive with the antibodies in many human sera (about 84% human sera showed the cross-reactivity). We have determined greater than 90% of the amino acid sequences of the two proteins and found that they are at least 54% homologous. Berzofsky found that 75% of the 23 known T cell sites in various proteins had an amphipathic structure. Our analysis by the same method showed that both Lol p II and III have a major region of amphipathicity (at residues 61-67, Lol p III numbering) which might contain sites for binding to an Ia molecule and a T cell receptor. This region is identical between Lol p II and III, except for an Arg-Lys substitution, and could account, in part, for the DR3 association with responsiveness to both molecules. An interesting difference between the two proteins is that immune response to Lol p III is associated with DR5 (in addition to DR3), whereas no DR5 association is found in the case of Lol p II. One possibility is that Lol p III has an additional site which binds to the DR5 Ia molecule. Lol p III indeed has a second highly amphiphathic peptide, 24-30 (Lol p III 24 R P G D T L A 30), which is different and not amphipathic in Lol p II.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Reproductive Allocation of Biomass and Nitrogen in Annual and Perennial Lesquerella Crops

    PubMed Central

    PLOSCHUK, E. L.; SLAFER, G. A.; RAVETTA, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims The use of perennial crops could contribute to increase agricultural sustainability. However, almost all of the major grain crops are herbaceous annuals and opportunities to replace them with more long-lived perennials have been poorly explored. This follows the presumption that the perennial life cycle is associated with a lower potential yield, due to a reduced allocation of biomass to grains. The hypothesis was tested that allocation to perpetuation organs in the perennial L. mendocina would not be directly related to a lower allocation to seeds. • Methods Two field experiments were carried on with the annual Lesquerella fendleri and the iteroparous perennial L. mendocina, two promising oil-seed crops for low-productivity environments, subjected to different water and nitrogen availability. • Key Results Seed biomass allocation was similar for both species, and unresponsive to water and nitrogen availability. Greater root and vegetative shoot allocation in the perennial was counterbalanced by a lower allocation to other reproductive structures compared with the annual Lesquerella. Allometric relationships revealed that allocation differences between the annual and the perennial increased linearly with plant size. The general allocation patterns for nitrogen did not differ from those of biomass. However, nitrogen concentrations were higher in the vegetative shoot and root of L. mendocina than of L. fendleri but remained stable in seeds of both species. • Conclusions It is concluded that vegetative organs are more hierarchically important sinks in L. mendocina than in the annual L. fendleri, but without disadvantages in seed hierarchy. PMID:15863469

  9. Fructans, ascorbate peroxidase, and hydrogen peroxide in ryegrass exposed to ozone under contrasting meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Pasqualetti, C B; Sandrin, C Z; Pedroso, A N V; Domingos, M; Figueiredo-Ribeiro, R C L

    2015-03-01

    Ozone (O3) is the most abundant tropospheric oxidant as well as an important component of photochemical pollution. Once inside the plant, ozone can produce reactive oxygen species that change the antioxidative pool and the carbohydrate metabolism. The current study aimed to analyze whether the contents and the composition of the fructan, the ascorbate peroxidase activity, and the H2O2 accumulation were changed in Lolium multiflorum ssp. italicum cv. Lema plants as response to short-term exposure to ozone and/or to different meteorological conditions, in two contrasting seasons (winter and summer). Results showed that higher solar radiation tends to decrease fructose content and, along with temperature, increases the ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity. Such activity and levels of fructans practically did not vary during the time the experiment was being done, but APX daylight variation was modified by the ozone. Thus, the higher levels of this pollutant decreased the APX activity and increased fructose content, as well as changed the size of the fructan chains. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation was higher in plants that were fumigated with ozone when compared to the control, and it decreased throughout the day. As a conclusion, fructan contents increased when the APX activity decreased. It suggested that fructans could also help the defense system when there is a reduction on the APX activity in the plant.

  10. Evaluation of fecal contamination indicators (fecal coliforms, somatic phages, and helminth eggs) in ryegrass sward farming.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Martha; Moreno, Gerardo; Campos, Claudia

    2009-02-15

    The effect of soil supplementation with biosolids at various ratios on fecal-origin microorganism activity was evaluated in a ryegrass sward farm. Fifteen plots with 3 different soil and biosolid mixture ratios were assessed. Soil and grass were sampled over a period of 4 months (days 0, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 120) for soil and on days 75 and 120 for grass, corresponding to first and second grass harvest periods. We analyzed fecal coliforms, somatic phages, helminth eggs, and environmental factors, such as rainfall, temperature, and moisture. The fecal coliforms decreased by 2 logarithmic units (LU) in all soils containing biosolids and by 1 LU in the soil alone and in biosolid control plots alone. The concentration of somatic phages decreased to 2 to 3 LU in the soil containing biosolids and to 1 to 2 LU in the control plots. In contrast, however, there was a noticeable increase in helminth eggs on days 75 ad 120, but not in the soil control alone. Maximum concentrations (10(2) CFU/g TS; colony forming units per gram total solids) of fecal coliforms were found on the grass and in other samples, but the concentrations of phages and helminth eggs were below detection limits. Environmental factors did not significantly influence the results, and grass production increased from 35 to 50 Ton/Ha (tons per hectare) with biosolid supplementation, as compared with controls (14 Ton/Ha).

  11. Identification of two distinct allergenic sites on ryegrass-pollen allergen, Lol p IV.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, K S; Ekramoddoullah, A K; Kisil, F T; Dzuba-Fischer, J M; Rector, E S; Sehon, A H

    1989-04-01

    Lol p IV is an important allergen of ryegrass pollen. For the immunochemical identification of antigenic and/or allergenic site(s), murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were prepared against Lol p IV. The hybridoma cell-culture supernatants were screened for anti-Lol p IV antibodies by a combination of ELISA and Western immunoblot analyses. The MAbs were finally purified from ascites on a Mono Q ion-exchange column. In a competitive radioimmunoassay with Lol p IV as the solid phase and 125I-labeled MAbs, it was established that MAbs 90, 91, 92, 93, and 94, although they differed in their relative affinities, recognized in common with one another an epitope designated as antigenic site A, whereas MAb 12 recognized a different epitope referred to as site B. Sites A and B were also demonstrated to constitute allergenic determinants of Lol p IV. Differences in the repertoire of specificities of the human IgE antibodies directed to Lol p IV were also demonstrated. Interestingly, it was found that sera from both allergic as well as from nonatopic individuals had IgG antibodies to sites A and/or B.

  12. Cumulative drought and land-use impacts on perennial vegetation across a North American dryland region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munson, Seth M.; Long, A. Lexine; Wallace, Cynthia; Webb, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Question The decline and loss of perennial vegetation in dryland ecosystems due to global change pressures can alter ecosystem properties and initiate land degradation processes. We tracked changes of perennial vegetation using remote sensing to address the question of how prolonged drought and land-use intensification have affected perennial vegetation cover across a desert region in the early 21st century? Location Mojave Desert, southeastern California, southern Nevada, southwestern Utah and northwestern Arizona, USA. Methods We coupled the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Enhanced Vegetation Index (MODIS-EVI) with ground-based measurements of perennial vegetation cover taken in about 2000 and about 2010. Using the difference between these years, we determined perennial vegetation changes in the early 21st century and related these shifts to climate, soil and landscape properties, and patterns of land use. Results We found a good fit between MODIS-EVI and perennial vegetation cover (2000: R2 = 0.83 and 2010: R2 = 0.74). The southwestern, far southeastern and central Mojave Desert had large declines in perennial vegetation cover in the early 21st century, while the northeastern and southeastern portions of the desert had increases. These changes were explained by 10-yr precipitation anomalies, particularly in the cool season and during extreme dry or wet years. Areas heavily impacted by visitor use or wildfire lost perennial vegetation cover, and vegetation in protected areas increased to a greater degree than in unprotected areas. Conclusions We find that we can extrapolate previously documented declines of perennial plant cover to an entire desert, and demonstrate that prolonged water shortages coupled with land-use intensification create identifiable patterns of vegetation change in dryland regions.

  13. Identification of flowering genes in strawberry, a perennial SD plant

    PubMed Central

    Mouhu, Katriina; Hytönen, Timo; Folta, Kevin; Rantanen, Marja; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Elomaa, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Background We are studying the regulation of flowering in perennial plants by using diploid wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) as a model. Wild strawberry is a facultative short-day plant with an obligatory short-day requirement at temperatures above 15°C. At lower temperatures, however, flowering induction occurs irrespective of photoperiod. In addition to short-day genotypes, everbearing forms of wild strawberry are known. In 'Baron Solemacher' recessive alleles of an unknown repressor, SEASONAL FLOWERING LOCUS (SFL), are responsible for continuous flowering habit. Although flower induction has a central effect on the cropping potential, the molecular control of flowering in strawberries has not been studied and the genetic flowering pathways are still poorly understood. The comparison of everbearing and short-day genotypes of wild strawberry could facilitate our understanding of fundamental molecular mechanisms regulating perennial growth cycle in plants. Results We have searched homologs for 118 Arabidopsis flowering time genes from Fragaria by EST sequencing and bioinformatics analysis and identified 66 gene homologs that by sequence similarity, putatively correspond to genes of all known genetic flowering pathways. The expression analysis of 25 selected genes representing various flowering pathways did not reveal large differences between the everbearing and the short-day genotypes. However, putative floral identity and floral integrator genes AP1 and LFY were co-regulated during early floral development. AP1 mRNA was specifically accumulating in the shoot apices of the everbearing genotype, indicating its usability as a marker for floral initiation. Moreover, we showed that flowering induction in everbearing 'Baron Solemacher' and 'Hawaii-4' was inhibited by short-day and low temperature, in contrast to short-day genotypes. Conclusion We have shown that many central genetic components of the flowering pathways in Arabidopsis can be identified from

  14. Microbiota within the perennial ice cover of Lake Vida, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Annika C; Murray, Alison E; Fritsen, Christian H

    2007-02-01

    Lake Vida, located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, is an 'ice-sealed' lake with approximately 19 m of ice covering a highly saline water column (approximately 245 ppt). The lower portions of the ice cover and the lake beneath have been isolated from the atmosphere and land for circa 2800 years. Analysis of microbial assemblages within the perennial ice cover of the lake revealed a diverse array of bacteria and eukarya. Bacterial and eukaryal denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis phylotype profile similarities were low (<59%) between all of the depths compared (five depths spanning 11 m of the ice cover), with the greatest differences occurring between surface and deep ice. The majority of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences in the surface ice were related to Actinobacteria (42%) while Gammaproteobacteria (52%) dominated the deep ice community. Comparisons of assemblage composition suggest differences in ice habitability and organismal origin in the upper and lower portions of ice cover. Specifically, the upper ice cover microbiota likely reflect the modern day transport and colonization of biota from the terrestrial landscape, whereas assemblages in the deeper ice are more likely to be persistent remnant biota that originated from the ancient liquid water column of the lake that froze.

  15. Bellis perennis: a useful tool for protein localization studies.

    PubMed

    Jaedicke, Katharina; Rösler, Jutta; Gans, Tanja; Hughes, Jon

    2011-10-01

    Fluorescent fusion proteins together with transient transformation techniques are commonly used to investigate intracellular protein localisation in vivo. Biolistic transfection is reliable, efficient and avoids experimental problems associated with producing and handling fragile protoplasts. Onion epidermis pavement cells are frequently used with this technique, their excellent properties for microscopy resulting from their easy removal from the underlying tissues and large size. They also have advantages over mesophyll cells for fluorescence microscopy, as they are devoid of chloroplasts whose autofluorescence can pose problems. The arrested plastid development is peculiar to epidermal cells, however, and stands in the way of studies on protein targeting to plastids. We have developed a system enabling studies of in vivo protein targeting to organelles including chloroplasts within a photosynthetically active plant cell with excellent optical properties using a transient transformation procedure. We established biolistic transfection in epidermal pavement cells of the lawn daisy (Bellis perennis L., cultivar "Galaxy red") which unusually contain a moderate number of functional chloroplasts. These cells are excellent objects for fluorescence microscopy using current reporters, combining the advantages of the ease of biolistic transfection, the excellent optical properties of a single cell layer and access to chloroplast protein targeting. We demonstrate chloroplast targeting of plastid-localised heme oxygenase, and two further proteins whose localisation was equivocal. We also demonstrate unambiguous targeting to mitochondria, peroxisomes and nuclei. We thus propose that the Bellis system represents a valuable tool for protein localisation studies in living plant cells.

  16. Rootstock scion somatogenetic interactions in perennial composite plants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The ancient plant production practice of grafting which instantly imparts new physiological properties to the desirable scion still remains shrouded in mystery. Yet, grafting remains a widely used technique in the production of several horticultural species. In a composite grafted plant, rootstocks control many aspects of scion growth and physiology including yield and quality attributes as well as biotic and abiotic stress tolerance. Broadly, physical, physiological, biochemical and molecular mechanisms have been reviewed to develop an integrated understanding of this enigmatic process that challenges existing genetic paradigms. This review summarizes the reported mechanisms underlying some of the economically important traits and identifies several key points to consider when conducting rootstock scion interaction experiments. Study of the somatogenetic interactions between rootstock and scion is a field that is ripe for discovery and vast improvements in the coming decade. Further, utilization of rootstocks based on a better understanding of the somatogenetic interactions is highly relevant in the current agricultural environment where there is a need for sustainable production practices. Rootstocks may offer a non-transgenic approach to rapidly respond to the changing environment and expand agricultural production of annual and perennial crops where grafting is feasible in order to meet the global food, fiber and fuel demands of the future. PMID:23793453

  17. Gene flow in genetically engineered perennial grasses: Lessons for modification of dedicated bioenergy crops

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential ecological consequences of the commercialization of genetically engineered (GD) crops have been the subject of intense debate, particularly when the GE crops are perennial and capable of outcrossing to wild relatives. The essential ecological impact issues for engi...

  18. Leaves it cleaner than they found it: perennial forages and water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Topics to be discussed: 1) perennial forage root growth, water use, and nitrate uptake; 2) reducing ground water nitrate; 3) protecting surface water quality; and 4) potential role in nitrate TMDLs for cold water streams....

  19. 30 CFR 816.57 - Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in perennial or intermittent streams only where those activities would not cause or contribute to the... and provisions have been made for sound future maintenance by the permittee or the landowner...

  20. Molecular relationships between Australian annual wild rice, Oryza meridionalis, and two related perennial forms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The perennial, Oryza rufipogon distributed from Asia to Australia and the annual O. meridionalis indigenous to Australia are AA genome species in the Oryza. However, recent research has demonstrated that the Australian AA genome perennial populations have maternal genomes more closely related to those of O. meridionalis than to those found in Asian populations of O. rufipogon suggesting that the Australian perennials may represent a new distinct gene pool for rice. Results Analysis of an Oryza core collection covering AA genome species from Asia to Oceania revealed that some Oceania perennials had organellar genomes closely related to that of O meridionalis (meridionalis-type). O. rufipogon accessions from New Guinea carried either the meridionalis-type or rufirpogon-type (like O. rufipogon) organellar genomes. Australian perennials carried only the meridionalis-type organellar genomes when accompanied by the rufipogon-type nuclear genome. New accessions were collected to better characterize the Australian perennials, and their life histories (annual or perennial) were confirmed by field observations. All of the material collected carried only meridionalis-type organellar genomes. However, there were two distinct perennial groups. One of them carried an rufipogon-type nuclear genome similar to the Australian O. rufipogon in the core collection and the other carried an meridionalis-type nuclear genome not represented in the existing collection. Morphologically the rufipogon-type shared similarity with Asian O. rufipogon. The meridionalis-type showed some similarities to O. meridionalis such as the short anthers usually characteristic of annual populations. However, the meridionalis-type perennial was readily distinguished from O. meridionalis by the presence of a larger lemma and higher number of spikelets. Conclusion Analysis of current accessions clearly indicated that there are two distinct types of Australian perennials. Both of them differed

  1. Performance of dairy cows fed annual ryegrass silage and corn silage with steam-flaked or ground corn.

    PubMed

    Cooke, K M; Bernard, J K; West, J W

    2008-06-01

    Twenty-four lactating Holstein cows were used in a 6-wk randomized block design trial with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to determine the effects of feeding ground corn (GC) or steam-flaked corn (SFC) in diets based on either annual ryegrass silage (RS) or a 50:50 blend of annual ryegrass and corn silages (BLEND). Experimental diets contained 49.6% forage and were fed as a total mixed ration once daily for 4 wk after a 2-wk preliminary period. No interactions were observed among treatments. Cows fed BLEND consumed more dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and acid detergent fiber (ADF) than those fed RS, but total-tract digestibility of OM, NDF, and ADF was greater for RS than for BLEND. No differences in nutrient intake were observed among treatments during wk 4 when nutrient digestibility was measured, but digestibility of DM and OM was greater for SFC than for GC. Cows fed BLEND tended to produce more energy-corrected milk than those fed RS, resulting in improved efficiency (kg of milk per kg of DM intake). When diets were supplemented with SFC, cows consumed less DM and produced more milk that tended to have lower milk fat percentage. Yield of milk protein and efficiency was greatest with SFC compared with GC. Blood glucose and milk urea nitrogen concentrations were similar among treatments, but blood urea nitrogen was greater for cows fed GC compared with those fed SFC. Results of this trial indicate that feeding a blend of annual ryegrass and corn silage is more desirable than feeding diets based on RS as the sole forage. Supplementing diets with SFC improved performance and efficiency compared with GC across forage sources.

  2. Ryegrass cv. Lema and guava cv. Paluma biomonitoring suitability for estimating nutritional contamination risks under seasonal climate in Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bulbovas, Patricia; Camargo, Carla Z S; Domingos, Marisa

    2015-08-01

    The risks posed by nutrient deposition due to air pollution on ecosystems and their respective services to human beings can be appropriately estimated by bioindicator plants when they are well acclimated to the study region environmental conditions. This assumption encouraged us to comparatively evaluate the accumulation potential of ryegrass cv. Lema and guava cv. Paluma macro and micronutrients. We also indicated the most appropriate species for biomonitoring nutrient contamination risks in tropical areas of Southeastern Brazil, which are characterized by marked dry and wet seasons and complex mixtures of air pollutants from different sources (industries, vehicle traffic and agriculture). The study was conducted in 14 sites with different neighboring land uses, within the Metropolitan Region of Campinas, central-eastern region of São Paulo State. The exposure experiments with ryegrass and guava were consecutively repeated 40 (28 days each) and 12 (84 days each) times, respectively, from Oct/2010 to Sept/2013. Macro and micronutrients were analyzed and background concentrations and enrichment ratios (ER) were estimated to classify the contamination risk within the study region. Significantly higher ER suggested that ryegrass were the most appropriate accumulator species for N, S, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn deposition and guava for K, Ca, P and B deposition. Based on these biomonitoring adjustments, we concluded that the nutrient deposition was spatially homogeneous in the study area, but clear seasonality in the contamination risk by nutritional inputs was evidenced. Significantly higher contamination risk by S, Fe, K and B occurred during the dry season and enhanced contamination risk by Mn, Cu and Zn were highlighted during the wet season. Distinctly high contamination risk was estimated for S, Fe and Mn in several exposure experiments.

  3. Seed vs. microsite limitation for seedling emergence in the perennial grass Stipa tenacissima L. (Poaceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Fayos, Patricio; Gasque, María

    2006-09-01

    This paper examines the relative influence of seed and microsite availability in the seedling emergence of Stipa tenacissima, a perennial grass inhabiting semi-arid Mediterranean steppes. A correlative approximation was used to establish 21 (10 × 10 m) plots along a climatic gradient in the Northern limit of the geographic distribution in East Spain. Seed production, seed removal by ants, ant nest density, and the relative cover of S. tenacissima, other perennial plants and bare ground, as explanatory variables, were measured in each plot. Multiple linear regression with forward stepwise selection procedure was used to analyze the relationships between seedling emergence and the explanatory variables. There was large variation between and within plots of all the studied variables, but cover of perennial plants was the only explanatory variable included in the regression model when all the plots were used for the analysis. We suggest that this result was the consequence that high annual precipitation on the Northernmost plots had on the cover of perennial plants and it is consistent with the experimental evidence that shadowing by perennial plants negatively affects germination and performance of the S. tenacissima seedlings. Once the Northernmost plots were removed from the model of regression then seed production, seed removal by ants and ant nest density significantly affected seedling emergence. We concluded that microsite quality, defined in relation to the shadowing capacity of perennial species, was more influential than seed and microsite availability at the Northern limit of the geographic distribution of S. tenacissima.

  4. Oat and ryegrass silage for small-scale dairy systems in the highlands of central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Celis-Alvarez, Maria Danaee; López-González, Felipe; Martínez-García, Carlos Galdino; Estrada-Flores, Julieta Gertrudis; Arriaga-Jordán, Carlos Manuel

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of the inclusion of oat-ryegrass silage (ORGS) in combination with maize silage (MSLG) in four treatments: T1 = 100 % ORGS, T2 = 67 % ORGS/33 % MSLG, T3 = 67 % ORGS/33 % MSLG, and T4 = 100 % MSLG to milking cows on continuous grazing with 4.7 kg DM of commercial dairy concentrate 18 % CP. Daily milk yield and composition, live weight, body condition score, and chemical composition of feeds were recorded during the last 4 days of the experimental periods. Feeding costs were calculated by partial budgets. Eight Holstein lactating cows were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square, with 14-day periods. There were no statistical differences (P > 0.05) for milk yield (mean 15.5 ± 5.0 kg/day/cow) or composition (mean milk fat 34.6 ± 4.4 g/kg, protein 32.4 ± 3.1 g/kg, lactose 46.9 ± 1.6 g/kg), milk urea nitrogen (11.3 ± 2.1 mg/dl), live weight (434 ± 38 kg), or body condition score (2.4 ± 0.15). The silage cost of ORGS was 2.5 times higher than MSLG, so the feeding cost in T1 was 26 % higher per kilogram of milk than for T4, with T2 and T3 as intermediates. ORGS can be a substitute to maize silage in the proportions studied, although feeding costs were higher.

  5. Increased heterosis in selfing populations of a perennial forb

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Christopher G.; Spoelhof, Jonathan P.; Schemske, Douglas W.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the importance of random genetic drift in natural populations is central to understanding the potential limits to natural selection. One approach is to estimate the magnitude of heterosis, the increased fitness of progeny derived from crosses between populations relative to crosses within populations caused by the heterozygous masking of deleterious recessive or nearly recessive alleles that have been fixed by drift within populations. Self-fertilization is expected to reduce the effective population size by half relative to outcrossing, and population bottlenecks may be common during the transition to selfing. Therefore, chance fixation of deleterious alleles due to drift in selfing populations should increase heterosis between populations. Increased homozygosity due to fixation or loss of alleles should also decrease inbreeding depression within populations. Most populations of the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. lyrata are self-incompatible (SI), but several have evolved self-compatibility and are highly selfing. We quantified heterosis and inbreeding depression in two predominantly self-compatible (SC) and seven SI populations in a field common garden experiment within the species' native range and examined the correlation between these metrics to gauge the similarity in their genetic basis. We measured proportion germination in the lab, and survival and fecundity (flower and seed production) for 2 years in the field, and calculated estimates of cumulative fitness. We found 7.2-fold greater heterosis in SC compared with SI populations, despite substantial heterosis in SI populations (56 %). Inbreeding depression was >61 %, and not significantly different between SC and SI populations. There was no correlation between population estimates of heterosis and inbreeding depression, suggesting that they have somewhat different genetic bases. Combined with other sources of information, our results suggest a history of bottlenecks in all of these

  6. Carbon relations of flowering in a semelparous clonal desert perennial

    SciTech Connect

    Tissue, D.T.; Nobel, P.S. )

    1990-02-01

    Agave deserti is a long-lived, semelparous perennial of the northwestern Sonoran Desert that flowers after {approx} 50-55 yr. Measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange over 24-h periods indicated that leaves of flowering rosettes had 24% more net CO{sub 2} uptake than leaves of adjacent nonflowering rosettes during the first month of inflorescence production. Net CO{sub 2} uptake for leaves of flowering rosettes was 32% less thereafter than for leaves of nonflowering rosettes, as senescing leaves of flowering rosettes exhibited dramatic reductions in nitrogen and chlorophyll contents. During the course of flowering, levels of total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) in the leaves of flowering rosettes dropped from 38 to 6% of the leaf dry mass, indicating substantial translocation of stored carbon to the inflorescence. TNC reserves of the rosette provided 70% of the carbon required to produce the 1.53 kg inflorescence, and CO{sub 2} uptake by the leaves and the inflorescence provided the remaining 30%. Rosettes must attain a minimum size (> 1,000 g dry mass) to initiate flowering, unless they are connected to a large flowering rosette. Small rosettes did not produce inflorescences when their rhizome connection to a large rosette was severed {approx} 4 wk before inflorescences emerged, suggesting that a chemical signal is transmitted through the rhizome that induces the small rosette to flower precociously. Small flowering rosettes could not complete formation of the inflorescence unless partially supported by carbon supplied by the connected large rosette. The contribution of the large rosette declined from 74% for a 0-30 g dry mass connected rosette to 35% for a 200-600 g rosette. For both small and large flowering rosettes, the translocation of substantial carbohydrate reserves from the leaves is essential for production of the inflorescence.

  7. Heavy metals in ryegrass species versus metal concentrations in atmospheric particulate measured in an industrial area of Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Caggiano, Rosa; d'Emilio, Mariagrazia; Macchiato, Maria; Ragosta, Maria

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the reliability of ryegrass species as active biomonitors by assessing atmospheric metal concentrations. We show a procedure for measuring atmospheric concentrations of heavy metals by means of biomonitors and present the data collected between July 1997 and October 2000 in the industrial area of Tito Scalo (Basilicata region, Southern Italy). In particular, we discuss the reproducibility of the biomonitoring measures, the influence of plant age and the correlation between metal concentrations in plants and in atmospheric particulate. Statistical analysis of measured data suggests us that in the investigated site, Cd, Cr and Ni are suitable to be monitored by means of ryegrass species. For the other metals, their emission patterns in atmosphere make it difficult to identify the correlation structure between plants and particulate, and as a result the interpretation of the biomonitoring data is complex. On the basis of the results, we believe that for correct application of active biomonitoring procedure, a careful preliminary analysis of the monitoring site and integration of the biomonitoring and chemical-physical observation is necessary.

  8. Particulate Organic Matter Responses to Perennial Grass Production in Midwestern Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantola, I. B.; Masters, M. D.; DeLucia, E. H.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial carbon sequestration is essential to mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. While annual row crop agriculture contributes to soil carbon loss in the Midwest, the establishment of perennial crops has the potential to increase soil carbon stocks through increased organic inputs and changes soil carbon pools and fluxes. Perennial grasses eliminate the need for tillage and increase belowground biomass, both critical to the conservation of soil organic matter and soil carbon sequestration. The effect of C4 perennial grasses on particulate organic matter (POM) was evaluated in Illinois, where native switchgrass and a sterile hybrid of the Asian grass Miscanthus were planted at the University of Illinois Energy Farm in 2008. During 6 years after establishment of perennial crops, POM was compared with plots growing a corn-corn-soy rotation typical of the area and a 26-species restored prairie. POM concentrations increased for all crops between 67 and 79% over 6 years, with the greatest increases in prairie and miscanthus soils. POM concentrations were highest at the 0-10 cm depth, however POM accrued faster in the 10-30 cm depth. Isotopic analyses of POM material showed that after 6 years, POM carbon consisted of 22-33% C4 material under perennial monoculture crops, indicating the incorporation of newly-established plant material to the POM fraction. As POM carbon is primarily plant-derived, increases in POM reflect increases in organic matter inputs as well as the cessation of tillage. While increases in POM under annual row crops reflect the incorporation of aboveground organic matter by tillage, POM increases in untilled perennial crops mirror increases in belowground biomass and the formation large soil aggregates, structures which protect POM carbon from microbial degradation and result in longer residence times for soil carbon. Therefore untilled soils under long-term perennial crop production provide an important environment for the storage and

  9. A Systematic Review of Perennial Staple Crops Literature Using Topic Modeling and Bibliometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Research on perennial staple crops has increased in the past ten years due to their potential to improve ecosystem services in agricultural systems. However, multiple past breeding efforts as well as research on traditional ratoon systems mean there is already a broad body of literature on perennial crops. In this review, we compare the development of research on perennial staple crops, including wheat, rice, rye, sorghum, and pigeon pea. We utilized the advanced search capabilities of Web of Science, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Agricola to gather a library of 914 articles published from 1930 to the present. We analyzed the metadata in the entire library and in collections of literature on each crop to understand trends in research and publishing. In addition, we applied topic modeling to the article abstracts, a type of text analysis that identifies frequently co-occurring terms and latent topics. We found: 1.) Research on perennials is increasing overall, but individual crops have each seen periods of heightened interest and research activity; 2.) Specialist journals play an important role in supporting early research efforts. Research often begins within communities of specialists or breeders for the individual crop before transitioning to a more general scientific audience; 3.) Existing perennial agricultural systems and their domesticated crop material, such as ratoon rice systems, can provide a useful foundation for breeding efforts, accelerating the development of truly perennial crops and farming systems; 4.) Primary research is lacking for crops that are produced on a smaller scale globally, such as pigeon pea and sorghum, and on the ecosystem service benefits of perennial agricultural systems. PMID:27213283

  10. Dinosaur demise in light of their alleged perennial polar residency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, Zeev

    2016-12-01

    The end-Cretaceous biological crisis is represented by the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs. However, most crucial biologically was the elimination of the photosynthesizing marine phyto- and zooplankton forming the base of the marine food chain. Their abrupt demise attests to sunlight screening darkening the atmosphere for a few years. Alvarez et al. (Science 208:1095-1108, 1980. doi: 10.1126/science.208.44) noticed in deep marine end-Cretaceous sediments an anomalous rise in the chemical element iridium (Ir), which is rare on planet Earth and thus suggests an extraterrestrial origin through an impact of a large asteroid. This impact would have ejected enormous quantities of particles and aerosols, shading the solar illumination as attested to by the elimination of the marine photosynthesizing plankton. Such a dark period must have affected life on land. The apparent cold-blooded non-avian dinosaurs, which were used to living in open terrains to absorb the solar illumination, became inactive during the dark period and were incapable of withstanding predators. This was in contrast to cold-blooded crocodilians, turtles and lizards that could hide in refuge sites on land and in the water. Dinosaur relics discovered in Cretaceous Polar Regions were attributed to perennial residents, surviving the nearly half-year-long dark winter despite their ability to leave. The polar concentrations of disarticulated dinosaur bones were suggested as having resulted from a catastrophic burial of a population by floods. However, this should have fossilized complete skeletons. Alternatively, herds of dinosaurs living in high latitudes might have been sexually driven to spend the half year of continuously illuminated polar summer for mating rather than for nourishment, in which the lower latitudes provided as well. The aggressive mating competitions would have left victims among the rivals and of young ones incidentally trampled over, all being consumed and their skeletons

  11. Thermal insights of the Greenland ice sheet perennial firn aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, R. R.; Miège, C.; Koenig, L.; Brucker, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet hydrology is characterized by a complex system and is triggered essentially by surface melt starting late spring to early summer each year. Understanding the hydrologic system for the ice sheet remains important to address ice dynamics and surface mass balance questions. In April 2011, in Southeast Greenland, field work was conducted and firn-core drilling identified the presence of liquid water persisting through the winter without freezing. This observed feature is named perennial firn aquifer (PFA) and can be mapped by the Accumulation Radar on board of the NASA Operation IceBridge mission. Even if the extent of this feature can be constrained by remote sensing techniques its formation and persistence mechanism remain unclear. Thermal behavior of the PFA is a key parameter to monitor in order to understand melting and refreezing processes at the PFA location. The PFA-13 site (66.18°N, 39.04°W and 1563 m), located near the 2011 site where the PFA was first identified, was revisited in early April 2013 for further investigations of the aquifer. To characterize the PFA thermal regime and seasonal evolution, we installed two thermistor strings . They are used to record the vertical temperature evolution for a year, from the surface to the bottom of the PFA and below. The data are being uploaded daily via satellite link. Progressive heating of the firn pack is observed from June 15th to the end of July 2013, by then, the entire firn column from the surface to 12 m depth (top of PFA) is at 0 °C. This observation brings evidence that meltwater can reach the depth of 12 m in the firn, during one and a half months. By the end of the summer, refreezing is expected from near the surface and the cold surface temperatures will slowly penetrate into the firn. In addition, freshly fallen snow, usually > 2 m over the course of a winter, will help insulate the remaining liquid water within the firn from the surface. We will present the time series of

  12. Variability of ribosomal DNA sites in Festuca pratensis, Lolium perenne, and their intergeneric hybrids, revealed by FISH and GISH.

    PubMed

    Ksiazczyk, T; Taciak, M; Zwierzykowski, Z

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the variability of chromosomal location and number of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sites in some diploid and autotetraploid Festuca pratensis and Lolium perenne cultivars, as well as on identification of rDNA-bearing chromosomes in their triploid and tetraploid F. pratensis × L. perenne hybrids. The rDNA loci were mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 25S rDNA probes, and the origin of parental genomes was verified by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) with L. perenne genomic DNA as a probe, and F. pratensis genomic DNA as a block. FISH detected variation in the number and chromosomal location of both 5S and 45S rDNA sites. In F. pratensis mostly additional signals of 5S rDNA loci occurred, as compared with standard F. pratensis karyotypes. Losses of 45S rDNA loci were more frequent in L. perenne cultivars and intergeneric hybrids. Comparison of the F. pratensis and L. perenne genomes approved a higher number of rDNA sites as well as variation in chromosomal rDNA location in L. perenne. A greater instability of F. pratensis-genome-like and L. perenne-genome-like chromosomes in tetraploid hybrids was revealed, indicating gains and losses of rDNA loci, respectively. Our data indicate that the rDNA loci physically mapped on chromosomes 2 and 3 in F. pratensis and on chromosome 3 in L. perenne are useful markers for these chromosomes in intergeneric Festuca × Lolium hybrids.

  13. Variation in the establishment of a non-native annual grass influences competitive interactions with Mojave Desert perennials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeFalco, L.A.; Fernandez, G.C.J.; Nowak, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts, the highly variable timing of resource availability also influences non-native plant establishment, thus modulating their impacts on native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native Mojave Desert perennials-Larrea tridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida-in either winter or spring. For comparison, additional plots were prepared for the same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species as neighbors. Growth of perennials declined when Bromus was established in winter because Bromus stands had 2-3 months of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, water potentials for the perennials were not significantly reduced, suggesting that direct competition for water may not be the major mechanism driving reduced perennial growth. The impact of Bromus on Larrea was lower than for the two perennial grasses, likely because Larrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This result contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology completely overlaps with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus. In comparison, Bromus plants established in spring were smaller than those established in winter and thus did not effectively reduce growth of the perennials. Growth of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors also did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but stands of these native annuals did not achieve the high biomass of Bromus stands that were necessary to reduce perennial growth. Seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship of native annuals produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus; thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert

  14. Seasonal Variations in Sugar Contents and Microbial Community Behavior in a Ryegrass Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, P. M.; Fernandes, M. F.; Dick, R. P.; Simoneit, B. R.

    2004-12-01

    Soil is a complex mixture of numerous inorganic and organic constituents that vary in size, shape, chemical constitution and reactivity, and hosts numerous organisms. Total sugars have been estimated to constitute 10% (average) of soil organic matter, occurring in living and decaying organisms, as well as in extracellular materials. The role of sugars in soils is attributed to their influence on soil structure, chemical processes, plant nutrition and microbial activity. The sources of sugars in soils are: a) plants (the primary source); b) animals (the minor source), and c) microorganisms (fungi, bacteria, algae), which decompose the primary plant and animal material, and synthesize the major part of soil carbohydrates. A particular soil sample provides a momentary glimpse into a dynamic system (continuous addition, degradation and synthesis) that might, except for seasonal variations, be in equilibrium. The purpose of this study is to identify and quantify the major sugars in a grass soil and characterize the relationship between their concentration variations and soil microbial behavior over an annual cycle. Soil samples were collected monthly in a ryegrass field close to Corvallis, Oregon, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as total silylated extracts for sugar composition, and by gas chromatography-flame ionization as fatty acid methyl esters derived from phospholipids and neutral lipids (PLFA and NLFA, respectively). The preliminary results of the first six-month experiment (from January to June, 2004) show that as the ambient temperatures increase the sugar concentrations (glucose, fructose, sucrose and trehalose) also tend to increase in the soil. A decrease is observed in March when precipitation was low during the whole month. The same trend is observed for the active biomass of fungi and bacteria estimated by their fatty acids derived from phospholipids. Fatty acids 18:2ω 6c and 18:3ω 6c are used as fungal biomarkers. Branched (15:0i

  15. Hydroclimatic Impacts of Perennial Biofuel Crop Growth during an Extreme Drought Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M.; Wang, M.; Miguez-Macho, G.; Mahalov, A.; Georgescu, M.

    2013-12-01

    Perennial biofuel crops (e.g, miscanthus and switchgrass) offer a potentially viable energy pathway that can increase U.S. domestic energy security and mitigate greenhouse gas induced climate change. Recent work has shown a positive feedback between evapotranspiration and near-surface cooling resulting from annual to perennial biofuel crop conversion. However, whether near-surface cooling is sustainable remains a critical question requiring further examination, as the conversion to perennial biofuel crops may lead to unintended consequences of soil moisture and groundwater depletion. We conduct continuous, high resolution (5km grid spacing) simulations with and without biofuel crop representation during an extreme drought year (2012). We quantify hydroclimatic impacts associated with the deployment of perennial biofuel crops in recently identified abandoned and degraded farmland over the Central U.S. using WRF coupled to a land surface model linked to a dynamic water table and rivers module (LEAF-Hydro). This is an initial step towards exploration of hydroclimatic sustainability associated with the conversion of large swaths of land to perennial biofuel crops during extreme hydrometeorological conditions aimed at highlighting mechanisms and processes associated with this energy pathway.

  16. Effects of Perennial Peanut (Arachis glabrata) Ground Cover on Nematode Communities in Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Macchia, E. T.; McSorley, R.; Duncan, L. W.; Syvertsen, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata) ground cover on the nematode community in a citrus orchard were examined. Samples were taken from two different ground cover treatments (perennial peanut or bare ground) at each of three distances from the tree trunk. Richness, measured as total numbers of nematode genera per sample, and total numbers of nematodes were greatest in the perennial peanut treatment (P < 0.05). Abundance of many genera of bacterivores, fungivores, and omnivores were increased by the perennial peanut ground cover. Total numbers of plant parasites were greater in perennial peanut treatments on three of the five sampling dates (P < 0.05), mainly due to trends in numbers of Mesocriconema. Distance from a tree trunk and the interaction of ground cover treatments and proximity to a tree trunk were most influential for Belonolaimus and Hoplolaimus. Although differences among treatments were observed for nematode genera and trophic groups, ecological indices were not consistently sensitive to treatments. Among several ecological indices evaluated, richness was most often affected by ground cover treatment. PMID:19262779

  17. Effects of Perennial Peanut (Arachis glabrata) Ground Cover on Nematode Communities in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Macchia, E T; McSorley, R; Duncan, L W; Syvertsen, J S

    2003-12-01

    The effects of perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata) ground cover on the nematode community in a citrus orchard were examined. Samples were taken from two different ground cover treatments (perennial peanut or bare ground) at each of three distances from the tree trunk. Richness, measured as total numbers of nematode genera per sample, and total numbers of nematodes were greatest in the perennial peanut treatment (P < 0.05). Abundance of many genera of bacterivores, fungivores, and omnivores were increased by the perennial peanut ground cover. Total numbers of plant parasites were greater in perennial peanut treatments on three of the five sampling dates (P < 0.05), mainly due to trends in numbers of Mesocriconema. Distance from a tree trunk and the interaction of ground cover treatments and proximity to a tree trunk were most influential for Belonolaimus and Hoplolaimus. Although differences among treatments were observed for nematode genera and trophic groups, ecological indices were not consistently sensitive to treatments. Among several ecological indices evaluated, richness was most often affected by ground cover treatment.

  18. Brachypodium sylvaticum, a model for perennial grasses: transformation and inbred line development.

    PubMed

    Steinwand, Michael A; Young, Hugh A; Bragg, Jennifer N; Tobias, Christian M; Vogel, John P

    2013-01-01

    Perennial species offer significant advantages as crops including reduced soil erosion, lower energy inputs after the first year, deeper root systems that access more soil moisture, and decreased fertilizer inputs due to the remobilization of nutrients at the end of the growing season. These advantages are particularly relevant for emerging biomass crops and it is projected that perennial grasses will be among the most important dedicated biomass crops. The advantages offered by perennial crops could also prove favorable for incorporation into annual grain crops like wheat, rice, sorghum and barley, especially under the dryer and more variable climate conditions projected for many grain-producing regions. Thus, it would be useful to have a perennial model system to test biotechnological approaches to crop improvement and for fundamental research. The perennial grass Brachypodiumsylvaticum is a candidate for such a model because it is diploid, has a small genome, is self-fertile, has a modest stature, and short generation time. Its close relationship to the annual model Brachypodiumdistachyon will facilitate comparative studies and allow researchers to leverage the resources developed for B. distachyon. Here we report on the development of two keystone resources that are essential for a model plant: high-efficiency transformation and inbred lines. Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation we achieved an average transformation efficiency of 67%. We also surveyed the genetic diversity of 19 accessions from the National Plant Germplasm System using SSR markers and created 15 inbred lines.

  19. Brachypodium sylvaticum, a Model for Perennial Grasses: Transformation and Inbred Line Development

    PubMed Central

    Steinwand, Michael A.; Young, Hugh A.; Bragg, Jennifer N.; Tobias, Christian M.; Vogel, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Perennial species offer significant advantages as crops including reduced soil erosion, lower energy inputs after the first year, deeper root systems that access more soil moisture, and decreased fertilizer inputs due to the remobilization of nutrients at the end of the growing season. These advantages are particularly relevant for emerging biomass crops and it is projected that perennial grasses will be among the most important dedicated biomass crops. The advantages offered by perennial crops could also prove favorable for incorporation into annual grain crops like wheat, rice, sorghum and barley, especially under the dryer and more variable climate conditions projected for many grain-producing regions. Thus, it would be useful to have a perennial model system to test biotechnological approaches to crop improvement and for fundamental research. The perennial grass Brachypodiumsylvaticum is a candidate for such a model because it is diploid, has a small genome, is self-fertile, has a modest stature, and short generation time. Its close relationship to the annual model Brachypodiumdistachyon will facilitate comparative studies and allow researchers to leverage the resources developed for B. distachyon. Here we report on the development of two keystone resources that are essential for a model plant: high-efficiency transformation and inbred lines. Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation we achieved an average transformation efficiency of 67%. We also surveyed the genetic diversity of 19 accessions from the National Plant Germplasm System using SSR markers and created 15 inbred lines. PMID:24073248

  20. A comparative study of AMF diversity in annual and perennial plant species from semiarid gypsum soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alguacil, M. M.; Torrecillas, E.; Roldán, A.; Díaz, G.; Torres, P.

    2012-04-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities composition regulate plant interactions and determine the structure of plant communities. In this study we analysed the diversity of AMF in the roots of two perennial gypsophyte plant species, Herniaria fruticosa and Senecio auricula, and an annual herbaceous species, Bromus rubens, growing in a gypsum soil from a semiarid area. The objective was to determine whether perennial and annual host plants support different AMF communities in their roots and whether there are AMF species that might be indicators of specific functional plant roles in these ecosystems. The roots were analysed by nested PCR, cloning, sequencing of the ribosomal DNA small subunit region and phylogenetic analysis. Twenty AMF sequence types, belonging to the Glomus group A, Glomus group B, Diversisporaceae, Acaulosporaceae, Archaeosporaceae and Paraglomeraceae, were identified. Both gypsophyte perennial species had differing compositions of the AMF community and higher diversity when compared with the annual species, showing preferential selection by specific AMF sequences types. B. rubens did not show host specificity, sharing the full composition of its AMF community with both perennial plant species. Seasonal variations in the competitiveness of AM fungi could explain the observed differences in AMF community composition, but this is still a working hypothesis that requires the analysis of further data obtained from a higher number of both annual and perennial plant species in order to be fully tested.

  1. Effects of concentrate crude protein content on nutrient digestibility, energy utilization, and methane emissions in lactating dairy cows fed fresh-cut perennial grass.

    PubMed

    Hynes, D N; Stergiadis, S; Gordon, A; Yan, T

    2016-11-01

    Although many studies have investigated mitigation strategies for methane (CH4) output from dairy cows fed a wide variety of diets, research on the effects of concentrate crude protein (CP) content on CH4 emissions from dairy cows offered fresh grass is limited. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of cow genotype and concentrate CP level on nutrient digestibility, energy utilization, and CH4 emissions in dairy cows offered fresh-grass diets. Twelve multiparous lactating dairy cows (6 Holstein and 6 Holstein × Swedish Red) were blocked into 3 groups for each breed and assigned to a low-, medium-, or high-CP concentrate diet [14.1, 16.1, and 18.1% CP on a dry matter (DM) basis, respectively], in a 3-period changeover study (25d per period). Total diets contained (DM basis) 32.8% concentrates and 67.2% perennial ryegrass, which was harvested daily. All measurements were undertaken during the final 6d of each period: digestibility measurements for 6d and calorimetric measurements in respiration chambers for 3d. Feed intake and milk production data were reported in a previous paper. We observed no significant interaction between concentrate CP level and cow genotype on any parameter. Concentrate CP level had no significant effect on any energy utilization parameter, except for urinary energy output, which was positively related to concentrate CP level. Similarly, concentrate CP content had no effect on CH4 emission (g/d), CH4 per kg feed intake, or nutrient digestibility. Cross breeding of Holstein cows significantly reduced gross energy, digestible energy, and metabolizable energy intake, heat production, and milk energy output. However, cow genotype had no significant effect on energy utilization efficiency or CH4 parameters. Furthermore, the present study yielded a value for gross energy lost as CH4 (5.6%) on fresh grass-based diets that was lower than the widely accepted value of 6.5%. The present findings indicate that reducing concentrate CP

  2. Effects of crude protein level in concentrate supplements on animal performance and nitrogen utilization of lactating dairy cows fed fresh-cut perennial grass.

    PubMed

    Hynes, D N; Stergiadis, S; Gordon, A; Yan, T

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen pollution of air and ground water from grazing cattle is of increasing concern. Although several studies have investigated mitigation strategies for nitrogen output from dairy cows fed conserved forages and concentrates, similar research on fresh-cut grass in addition to production parameters is limited. The current study, using 3dietary treatments and incorporating 2 genotypes, was designed to evaluate the effects of concentrate crude protein (CP) levels on animal production and nitrogen utilization efficiency (NUE) in lactating dairy cows. Twelve multiparous cows (6 Holstein and 6 Holstein × Swedish Red) were used in a changeover study with three 25-d periods and 3 diet treatments. Low, medium and high CP concentrate [14.1, 16.1, and 18.1%, respectively, dry matter (DM) basis] diets were fed at 32.8% DM intake combined with good-quality zero-grazed perennial ryegrass (18.2% CP, DM basis). Each period consisted of an adaptation phase (18d) housed as a single group, a 1-d adaptation phase in individual stalls, and a 6-d measurement phase with feed intake and feces, urine, and milk output recorded. We observed no significant interaction between cow genotype and concentrate CP level on any animal performance or NUE parameter. Total DM intake, milk yield and composition, and NUE were not affected by dietary treatment. However, increasing concentrate CP level increased (1) N intake by 42g/d and excretion in urine and manure by 38 and 40g/d, respectively, and (2) the ratio of urine N over manure N. Feeding high CP rather than low CP concentrate increased milk urea N (MUN) content by 3.6mg/dL and total MUN output by 1.08g/d. Crossbred cows had lower grass DM intake, total DM intake, total N intake, and energy-corrected milk yield. However, cow genotype had no significant effect on NUE or MUN parameters. Equations have been developed to predict urine N excretion using MUN output as a sole predictor or in combination with dietary CP level. The present study

  3. Comparison of phytoremediation potential capacity of Spartina densiflora and Sarcocornia perennis for metal polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Idaszkin, Yanina L; Lancelotti, Julio L; Pollicelli, María P; Marcovecchio, Jorge E; Bouza, Pablo J

    2017-03-10

    Phytoremediation is considered the most appropriate technique to restore metal polluted soil, given its low cost, high efficiency and low environmental impact. Spartina densiflora and Sarcocornia perennis are perennial halophytes growing under similar environmental conditions in San Antonio marsh (Patagonia Argentina), therefore it is interesting to compare their phytoremediation potential capacity. To this end, we compared concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cu, and Fe in soils and in below- and above-ground structures of S. perennis and S. densiflora. It was concluded that both species are able to inhabit Pb, Zn, and Cu polluted soils. Although Sarcocornia translocated more metals to the aerial structures than Spartina, both species translocated only when they were growing in soils with low metal concentrations. It seems that the plants translocate only a certain proportion of the metal contained in the soil. These results suggest that both species could be considered candidates to phytostabilize these metals in polluted soils.

  4. Perennial grasses for energy and conservation: Evaluating some ecological agricultural, and economic issues

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, M.; Walsh, M.; McLaughlin, S.

    1995-11-01

    Perennial prairie grasses offer many advantages to the developing biofuels industry. High yielding varieties of native prairie grasses such as switchgrass, which combine lower levels of nutrient demand, diverse geographical growing range, high net energy yields and high soil and water conservation potential indicate that these grasses could and should supplement annual row crops such as corn in developing alternative fuels markets. Favorable net energy returns, increased soil erosion prevention, and a geographically diverse land base that can incorporate energy grasses into conventional farm practices will provide direct benefits to local and regional farm economies and lead to accelerated commercialization of conversion technologies. Displacement of row crops with perennial grasses will have major agricultural, economic, sociologic and cross-market implications. Thus, perennial grass production for biofuels offers significant economic advantages to a national energy strategy which considers both agricultural and environmental issues.

  5. Scaling water use of perennial grasses from the plot to Midwestern U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernacchi, C. J.; VanLoocke, A. D.; Hickman, G. C.; Zeri, M.; Twine, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    Perennial rhizomatous C4 grasses are currently considered, in many regions, one of the most promising vegetation types to supply biomass for bioenergy production. Because one goal of bioenergy production is to benefit the environment, the potential environmental impacts and services that would be associated with large scale production must be investigated. Of particular interest is the impact that altering the composition of vegetation at the landscape scale would have on regional hydrological cycles driven by higher rates of evapotranspiration (ET). To assess this, we implemented micrometeorological measurements using two independent techniques over multiple growing seasons for replicated plots of two perennial rhizomatous grasses, Miscanthus giganteus (miscanthus) and Panicum virgatum (switchgrass), and two traditional crop species, Zea mays (maize) and Glycine Max (soybean), planted throughout Central Illinois. When averaged across the entire growing season, ET for miscanthus was double relative to annual crops, and 140% of P. virgatum ET. The differences between the perennial grasses and annual crops were primarily due to longer growing season associated with the perennial grasses, but Miscanthus also demonstrated higher instantaneous water use. These results, coupled with physiological measurements of these species, were then used to parameterize and validate a dynamic vegetation model, Agro-IBIS, to investigate the large-scale consequences of land-use change on ecosystem hydrology from existing agriculture to various perennial grass production scenarios ranging from 10% to 100%. Results show that uniform production scenarios of less than 25% have little impact on regional hydrology but 'hotspots' with higher percentage land cover devoted to perennial grasses can have important consequences in localized areas. Given the increasing demand on water, we investigated whether the increased carbon gain associated with bioenergy crops was sufficient to offset the

  6. Hybrid incompatibility is acquired faster in annual than in perennial species of sunflower and tarweed.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gregory L; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2014-03-01

    Hybrid sterility is an important species barrier, especially in plants where hybrids can often form between divergent taxa. Here we explore how life history affects the acquisition of hybrid sterility in two groups in the sunflower family. We analyzed genetic distance and F1 pollen sterility for interspecific crosses in annual and perennial groups. We find that reproductive isolation is acquired in a steady manner and that annual species acquire hybrid sterility barriers faster than perennial species. Potential causes of the observed sterility pattern are discussed.

  7. The interaction between early life upper respiratory tract infection and birth during the pollen season on rye-sensitized hay fever and ryegrass sensitization--a birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Andrew; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Dwyer, Terry; Cochrane, Jennifer; Pezic, Angela; Carmichael, Alan; Carlin, John; Jones, Graeme

    2009-09-01

    Studies on early life viral respiratory infection and subsequent atopic disease in childhood have conflicting findings. Animal models show that viral respiratory infection in conjunction with allergen presentation can enhance sensitization. This prospective study assesses the influence of an upper respiratory tract infection (URI) in the first month of life and the season of birth on the development of hay fever and ryegrass allergen sensitization in childhood. From a Tasmanian cohort born during 1988 and 1989, a group of 498 children were followed up at 8 yr and another different group of 415 children were followed up at 16 yr. The ryegrass pollen season in Tasmania occurs in November and December. Forty-four (9.6%) children in Follow-up sample 1 and 47 (12.5%) children in Follow-up sample 2 were born in the pollen season. The parental report of an early upper respiratory tract infection (EURI) was documented prospectively by a home interview at 1 month of age (median age 5.1 wk). Sensitization to ryegrass and house dust mite (HDM) was determined at 8 yr of age by skin prick testing and at 16 yr by ImmunoCap. Ryegrass sensitized hay fever was defined as a positive response to a question on hay fever plus the presence of ryegrass allergy. For children tested at age 8 and born in the pollen season, a EURI by postnatal interview was associated with an increased risk of ryegrass sensitization (OR 5.80 95% CI 1.07, 31.31) but not for children with a EURI born outside the pollen season (OR 0.62 95% CI 0.35, 1.08). Similarly, EURI was significantly associated with early onset (< or = 8 yr) ryegrass sensitized hay fever for children born in the pollen season (AOR 4.78 95% CI 1.17, 19.47) but was not associated with early onset ryegrass sensitized hay fever for children born outside the pollen season (AOR 0.76 95% CI 0.43, 1.33). These findings suggest that early life viral URI interacts with ryegrass allergen exposure in the development of ryegrass allergen sensitization

  8. Profile of Hanwoo Steer Carcass Characteristics, Meat Quality and Fatty Acid Composition after Feeding Italian Ryegrass Silage

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Suk-Nam; Chu, Gyo-Moon; Kim, Da Hye; Park, Jae-Hong; Oh, Young Kyoon

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the growth performance, feed intake, slaughter characteristics, meat quantity and quality characteristics of Hanwoo steers fed with Italian ryegrass (IRG) silage (TRT). IRG silage consisted 11.70% protein, 2.84% ether extract, 53.50% dry matter digestibility and 63.34% total digestible nutrients. The daily weight gain and feed conversion ratio of TRT were significantly (p<0.01) higher than that of control diet (CON; fed rice straw) in the whole periods. However, the slaughter weight, dressing percentage, quantity grade and quantity traits (marbling score, meat color, fat color, and quality grade) of either TRT or CON were similar. Meat fed TRT diet showed higher crude fat and lightness (L*) value and lower moisture content and pH value compared with the CON diet (p<0.05). Overall the carcass yield was 12.5% higher than CON diet. PMID:26761843

  9. Cloning and sequencing of Lol pI, the major allergenic protein of rye-grass pollen.

    PubMed

    Griffith, I J; Smith, P M; Pollock, J; Theerakulpisut, P; Avjioglu, A; Davies, S; Hough, T; Singh, M B; Simpson, R J; Ward, L D

    1991-02-25

    We have isolated a full length cDNA clone encoding the major glycoprotein allergen Lol pI. The clone was selected using a combination of immunological screening of a cDNA expression library and PCR amplification of Lol pI-specific transcripts. Lol pI expressed in bacteria as a fusion protein shows recognition by specific IgE antibodies present in sera of grass pollen-allergic subjects. Northern analysis has shown that the Lol pI transcripts are expressed only in pollen of rye-grass. Molecular cloning of Lol pI provides a molecular genetic approach to study the structure-function relationship of allergens.

  10. Tradeoffs between production and perennial forages in dairy farming systems vary among counties in the Northeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy farms that grow more perennial vegetation for grazing pastures or conserved forages can offer many environmental benefits but may show reduced milk production relative to systems feeding higher amounts of grain and corn silage. Because yields of annual and perennial crops vary with soil type, ...

  11. Evolutionary history of tall fescue morphotypes inferred from molecular phylogenetics of the Lolium-Festuca species complex

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The agriculturally important pasture grass tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb. syn. Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh.) is an outbreeding allohexaploid, that may be more accurately described as a species complex consisting of three major (Continental, Mediterranean and rhizomatous) morphotypes. Observation of hybrid infertility in some crossing combinations between morphotypes suggests the possibility of independent origins from different diploid progenitors. This study aims to clarify the evolutionary relationships between each tall fescue morphotype through phylogenetic analysis using two low-copy nuclear genes (encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase [Acc1] and centroradialis [CEN]), the nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (rDNA ITS) and the chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) genome-located matK gene. Other taxa within the closely related Lolium-Festuca species complex were also included in the study, to increase understanding of evolutionary processes in a taxonomic group characterised by multiple inter-specific hybridisation events. Results Putative homoeologous sequences from both nuclear genes were obtained from each polyploid species and compared to counterparts from 15 diploid taxa. Phylogenetic reconstruction confirmed F. pratensis and F. arundinacea var. glaucescens as probable progenitors to Continental tall fescue, and these species are also likely to be ancestral to the rhizomatous morphotype. However, these two morphotypes are sufficiently distinct to be located in separate clades based on the ITS-derived data set. All four of the generated data sets suggest independent evolution of the Mediterranean and Continental morphotypes, with minimal affinity between cognate sequence haplotypes. No obvious candidate progenitor species for Mediterranean tall fescues were identified, and only two putative sub-genome-specific haplotypes were identified for this morphotype. Conclusions This study describes the first phylogenetic analysis of

  12. Growth and Quality of Perennial C3 Grasses in the Southern Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spring and fall gaps in forage production for systems utilizing winter wheat forage in the Southern Great Plains have led to an interest in additional resources such as C3 perennial grasses. We evaluated the potential of nine cool-season grass entries for forage production and quality through the fa...

  13. Non-flowering Sorghum spp. hybrids: Perennial, sterile, high-biomass feedstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial Sorghum spp. hybrids such as Columbusgrass (Sorghum almum Parodi; S. bicolor [L.] Moench x S. halepense [L.] Pers.) and the reciprocal hybridization (S. halepense x S. bicolor; e.g. Cv 'Krish') are high-biomass forage feedstocks. Utilization of such hybrids is limited, however, by both th...

  14. From the Lab Bench: Differences in annual and perennial grasses in meeting cattle production goals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A column was written that provided the advantages and disadvantages of annual warm- and cool-season grasses. Warm-season annual grasses can increase the supply of forage during the summer slump in cool-season perennial grass growth. Utilization of toxic endophyte-infected tall fescue pastures can ...

  15. Soil response to perennial herbaceous biofeedstocks under rainfed conditions in the northern Great Plains, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial herbaceous biofeedstocks (PHB) have been proposed to confer multiple ecosystem services to agricultural lands. However, the role of PHBs to affect change in soil condition is not well documented, particularly for treatments with multiple species. The objective of this study was to quanti...

  16. Collection and evaluation of wild perennial Helianthus pumilus achenes for oil concentration and fatty acid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Helianthus consists of 52 species and 19 subspecies with 14 annual and 38 perennial species. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from the wild species, which have provided a continued source of desirable agronomic traits. There has ...

  17. Collection and evaluation of wild perennial Helianthus pumilus achenes for oil concentration and fatty acid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Helianthus consists of 51 species and 19 subspecies with 14 annual and 37 perennial species. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from the wild species, which have provided a continued source of desirable agronomic traits. There has ...

  18. Natural enemies of perennial pepperweed, lepidium latifolium L., in its introduced range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial pepperweed, Lepidium latifolium L., is a member of the Brassicaceae native to Eurasia. It was unintentionally introduced to North America in the early 1900s, where it has since spread over millions of acres. This weed is an aggressive invader of wetlands, meadows, roadsides, and agricult...

  19. Minimal genetic diversity in the facultatively outcrossing perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium) invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium L.) is a Eurasian plant species that is invasive in North America. The invasion often forms large, dense monocultural stands. We investigated the genetic diversity along transects in dense populations in the western USA using Amplified Fragment Length Polymo...

  20. Molecular mechanisms responsive to dehydration may impact the invasiveness of perennial weeds under global climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leafy spurge is an invasive perennial weed in the great plains of the US and Canada. The ability of this herbaceous weed to regenerate new shoot growth from an abundance of crown and root buds after severe abiotic stress is critical for survival. Due to its adaptable and aggressive nature, global cl...

  1. Genome analysis of biomass heterosis and other functionally important perennial grass traits in hybrid leymus wildryes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leymus is an allopolyploid perennial Triticeae genus with about 30 species that display remarkable adaptations to extreme cold, saline, and many other harsh growing environments throughout temperature regions of the World. Caespitose basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus) grows up to 3 m tall and is consi...

  2. 30 CFR 816.57 - Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 816.57 Section 816.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.57 Hydrologic balance: Activities...

  3. 30 CFR 816.57 - Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams. 816.57 Section 816.57 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.57 Hydrologic balance: Activities...

  4. Those Nagging Headaches: Perennial Issues and Tensions in the Politics of Education Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bob L., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Examines perennial issues, needs, and tensions within the politics of education field: issues associated with defining and focusing the field, problems with theoretical hegemony and group-think, addressing and bridging the macro-micro politics divide, and the challenges of sustaining conceptual and theoretical rigor. Draws implications for the…

  5. Evaluating winter/spring seeding of a native perennial bunchgrass in the sagebrush steppe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) plant communities in the US Great Basin region are being severely impacted by increasingly frequent wildfires in association with the expansion of exotic annual grasses. Maintenance of native perennial bunchgrasses is key to controlling annual grass expansion,...

  6. Returning succession to downy brome dominated rangelands: roadblocks to perennial grass establishment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most common cause of successional retrogression in the Great Basin is wildfires fueled by downy brome (Bromus tectorum). Downy brome invasion has reduced fire intervals from an estimated 60-100 years down to 5-10 years. Our previous research found that establishment of long-lived perennial grass...

  7. Comparison of signaling interactions determining annual and perennial plant growth in response to low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wingler, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature inhibits plant growth despite the fact that considerable rates of photosynthetic activity can be maintained. Instead of lower rates of photosynthesis, active inhibition of cell division and expansion is primarily responsible for reduced growth. This results in sink limitation and enables plants to accumulate carbohydrates that act as compatible solutes or are stored throughout the winter to enable re-growth in spring. Regulation of growth in response to temperature therefore requires coordination with carbon metabolism, e.g., via the signaling metabolite trehalose-6-phosphate. The phytohormones gibberellin (GA) and jasmonate (JA) play an important role in regulating growth in response to temperature. Growth restriction at low temperature is mainly mediated by DELLA proteins, whose degradation is promoted by GA. For annual plants, it has been shown that the GA/DELLA pathway interacts with JA signaling and C-repeat binding factor dependent cold acclimation, but these interactions have not been explored in detail for perennials. Growth regulation in response to seasonal factors is, however, particularly important in perennials, especially at high latitudes. In autumn, growth cessation in trees is caused by shortening of the daylength in interaction with phytohormone signaling. In perennial grasses seasonal differences in the sensitivity to GA may enable enhanced growth in spring. This review provides an overview of the signaling interactions that determine plant growth at low temperature and highlights gaps in our knowledge, especially concerning the seasonality of signaling responses in perennial plants. PMID:25628637

  8. Microbiological quality of runoff from manure-amended fields as affected by perennial grass buffer strip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Runoff from manure-amended agricultural fields can provide a transmission route for pathogens and fecal indicator organisms to surface waters. Establishment of stiff-stemmed perennial grass hedges along the contours of agricultural fields has been shown to reduce both soil and nutrient ...

  9. COMPARISON OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES FROM INTERMITTENT AND PERENNIAL STREAMS IN THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic macroinvertebrate samples were collected using a kick net from 21 intermittent and 245 perennial sites in first-order streams to evaluate the relationship between assemblage structure and hydrologic permanence. Samples were divided into riffle and pool habitats, as well ...

  10. Identifying resistance to Sclerotinia stalk and root rot in perennial sunflower germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the research was to identify resistance to Sclerotinia stalk and root rot in perennial sunflower species from the USDA germplasm collection. Two diploid species, Helianthus grosseserratus and H. salicifolius, and four hexaploid species, H. californicus, H. pauciflorus, H. resinosus,...

  11. Candidate perennial bioenergy grasses have a higher albedo than annual row crops in the Midwestern US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of perennial cellulosic feedstocks for bioenergy presents the potential to diversify regional economies and the national energy supply, while also serving as climate ‘regulators’ due to a number of biogeochemical and biogeophysical differences relative to row crops. Numerous observati...

  12. Energy-conserving perennial agriculture for marginal land in southern Appalachia. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.

    1982-01-30

    USDA economists predict the end of surplus farm production in the US within this decade. More and more marginal land will be cropped to provide feed for the growing world population and to produce energy. Much of this potential cropland in Southern Appalachia is poorly suited to annual crops, such as corn. Perennial crops are much better suited to steep, rocky, and wet sites. Research was undertaken on the theoretical potentials of perennial species with high predicted yields of protein, carbohydrates, or oils. Several candidate staple perennial crops for marginal land in Southern Appalachia were identified, and estimates were made of their yields, energy input requirements, and general suitabilities. Cropping systems incorporating honeylocust, persimmon, mulberry, jujube, and beech were compared with corn cropping systems. It appears that these candidate staple perennials show distinct advantages for energy conservation and environmental preservation. Detailed economic analyses must await actual demonstration trials, but preliminary indications for ethanol conversion systems with honeylocust are encouraging. It is suggested that short-term loans to farmers undertaking this new type of agriculture would be appropriate to solve cash-flow problems.

  13. Transferring sclerotinia resistance genes from wild perennial Helianthus species into cultivated sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the lack of highly tolerant cultivated sunflower germplasm, new sources of Sclerotinia resistance from wild Helianthus species need to be identified and incorporated into a cultivated background. Wild perennial Helianthus species are highly resistant to Sclerotinia and have provided good sou...

  14. Progress on the introgression of Sclerotinia resistance genes from wild perennial Helianthus species into cultivated sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary attacks sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) causing root, stalk, and head rot, and is one of the most damaging and difficult-to-control sunflower diseases. Some wild perennial Helianthus species have been identified to contain abundant res...

  15. Nitrous oxide emission and soil carbon sequestration from herbaceous perennial biofuel feedstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation and renewable, domestic fuels are needed in the United States. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and big bluestem (Andropogon gerdardii Vitman) are potential bioenergy feedstocks that may meet this need. However, managing perennial grasses for feedstock requires nitro...

  16. 30 CFR 784.28 - Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... itself, and those activities would occur on the surface of land subject to the buffer requirement of... buffer that you propose to implement instead of maintaining a 100-foot undisturbed buffer between surface activities and the perennial or intermittent stream; and (3) Explain how the lesser buffer, together with...

  17. On the long-term hydroclimatic sustainability of perennial bioenergy crop expansion over the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large-scale cultivation of perennial bioenergy crops (e.g., miscanthus and switchgrass) offers unique opportunities to mitigate climate change through avoided fossil fuel use and associated greenhouse gas reduction. Although conversion of existing agriculturally intensive lands (e.g., maize and soy)...

  18. Biomass composition of perennial grasses for biofuel production in North Dakota, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful development of biofuels from biomass feedstocks depends on high yields and acceptable quality. We investigated the chemical composition of ten perennial grasses and mixtures across environments in North Dakota, USA. The contents of neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, acid deter...

  19. Registration of perennial Sorghum bicolor x S. propinquum line 'PSH12TX09'

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel sorghum x Sorghum propinquum recombinant inbred line, named PSSH12TX09, was identified that successfully overwintered across plant hardiness zones 8a, 8b, and 9a between 2013 and 2015. Overwintering perenniality of PSSH12TX09 exceeded 90% at all locations across both evaluation years, with ...

  20. Absorption across the nasal airway mucosa in house dust mite perennial allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Greiff, Lennart; Andersson, Morgan; Svensson, Jenny; Wollmer, Per; Lundin, Stefan; Persson, Carl G A

    2002-01-01

    House dust mite allergens express protease activity and it has been suggested that this property has pathogenic effects by increasing airway absorption. In accordance, house dust mite allergens may increase mucosal permeability in vitro. The objective of the present study was to examine nasal absorption of desmopressin (1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin) in patients with perennial house dust mite allergic rhinitis and in healthy subjects in vivo. Patients with perennial allergic rhinitis were examined after a 4-week treatment withdrawal period, when symptoms of allergic rhinitis occurred, and healthy subjects were examined together with the patients. Desmopressin (20 microg ml(-1)) was moved into the nasal cavity using a nasal pool-device that contained 15 ml fluid. The fluid was kept in the nasal cavity for 15 min and then recovered. Urine was collected for 24 h after the nasal administration and the urinary excretion of desmopressin was determined as an index of nasal absorption. The urinary excretion of desmopressin was 1148+/-535 pmol 24 h(-1) in patients with perennial house dust mite allergic rhinitis and 1012+/-291 pmol 24 h(-1) in healthy subjects. We conclude that nasal airway absorption of the 1067 Da peptide desmopressin is unaffected in perennial house dust mite allergic rhinitis compared with healthy subjects.

  1. Genetic Analysis of Recombinant Inbred Lines For Sorghum Bicolor x Perennial S. Propinquum.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From an annual S. bicolor x perennial S. propinquum F2 population used in early-generation genetic analysis, we have produced and describe here a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of 161 F5 genotypes that segregates for rhizomatousness and many other traits. The genetic map of the recombinant...

  2. Remote sensing of perennial crop stand duration and pre-crop identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field to field variability in soil erosion and off-site transport of nutrients and pesticides in western Oregon in any single year is primarily driven by the question of whether individual fields were disturbed for planting of new crop stands or remained in production of established perennial crops...

  3. Novel application of ALMANAC: Modelling a functional group, exotic warm-season perennial grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduced perennial C4 grasses such buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare [(L.) Link]) and old world bluestems (OWB), including genera such as Bothriochloa Kuntze, Capillipedium Stapf, and Dichanthium Willemet have the potential to dominate landscapes. A process-based model that realistically simulates ...

  4. Genes and quantitative trait loci controlling biomass yield and forage quality traits in perennial wildrye

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Native perennial grasses provide vital ecosystem services and have potential use as low-input feedstocks in diverse environments. Cool-season grasses, in particular, dominate temperate growing regions throughout higher elevations and latitudes of the World. However, innovative breeding methods are...

  5. Response-Additional Implications of Perennial Bioenergy Crops: Hydrology and Climate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a response to a letter submitted in response to the Science article "Increasing Food and Ecosystem Security via Perennial Grains" written by Glover, et al. It details the balance of "precipitation use efficiency" in agroecosystems with the needs of sustainable food production and resiliency ...

  6. Effects of integrating mowing and imazapyr application on African rue (Peganum harmala) and native perennial grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African rue (Peganum harmala L.) is a poisonous perennial forb that readily invades salt desert shrub and sagebrush steppe rangelands. Information detailing options for integrated management of African rue are lacking. To date, a limited number of studies have researched the efficacy of different ...

  7. Biosystematics and evolutionary relationships of perennial Triticeae species revealed by genomic analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Literature published after 1984 were reviewed to address: (1) genome relationships among monogenomic diploid species, (2) progenitors of the unknown Y genome in Elymus polyploids, X in Thinopyrum intermedium, and Xm in Leymus, and (3) genome constitutions of some perennial Triticeae species that wer...

  8. Application Methods for Liquid Manure on Perennial Forages: North American Experience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liquid manure has the potential to supply much needed nutrients, especially N, for perennial forages. However, the value of this practice is limited because typical broadcast application results in large losses of NH3-N, and can create other problems such as odor, contamination and damage of forage,...

  9. A logistic regression equation for estimating the probability of a stream flowing perennially in Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bent, Gardner C.; Archfield, Stacey A.

    2002-01-01

    A logistic regression equation was developed for estimating the probability of a stream flowing perennially at a specific site in Massachusetts. The equation provides city and town conservation commissions and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection with an additional method for assessing whether streams are perennial or intermittent at a specific site in Massachusetts. This information is needed to assist these environmental agencies, who administer the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act of 1996, which establishes a 200-foot-wide protected riverfront area extending along the length of each side of the stream from the mean annual high-water line along each side of perennial streams, with exceptions in some urban areas. The equation was developed by relating the verified perennial or intermittent status of a stream site to selected basin characteristics of naturally flowing streams (no regulation by dams, surface-water withdrawals, ground-water withdrawals, diversion, waste-water discharge, and so forth) in Massachusetts. Stream sites used in the analysis were identified as perennial or intermittent on the basis of review of measured streamflow at sites throughout Massachusetts and on visual observation at sites in the South Coastal Basin, southeastern Massachusetts. Measured or observed zero flow(s) during months of extended drought as defined by the 310 Code of Massachusetts Regulations (CMR) 10.58(2)(a) were not considered when designating the perennial or intermittent status of a stream site. The database used to develop the equation included a total of 305 stream sites (84 intermittent- and 89 perennial-stream sites in the State, and 50 intermittent- and 82 perennial-stream sites in the South Coastal Basin). Stream sites included in the database had drainage areas that ranged from 0.14 to 8.94 square miles in the State and from 0.02 to 7.00 square miles in the South Coastal Basin.Results of the logistic regression analysis

  10. Dune crests serve as preferential habitats for perennial plants during frequent drought years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidron, Giora J.

    2015-03-01

    Following frequent droughts in the last 19 years, high mortality of perennial plants was noted in the Hallamish dune field in the Negev Desert (P = 95 mm). To evaluate the vegetation change, vegetation cover and species composition were studied in 20 plots located at the semi-stable non-crusted dune crest (CR) and 20 plots located at the crusted interdune (ID) during the summer of 2012 and compared to data from 1994. In addition, periodical moisture measurements were carried out in a pair of plots, 50-100 m apart, at CR and ID between October 2009 and September 2012. The findings exhibit a substantial decrease in the living perennials (mainly consisting of shrubs), with ID exhibiting the highest reduction in living shrubs. The findings are in agreement with measurements of the available water content, AWC (i.e., above the wilting point) during 2010-2012. While being recorded at >60 cm at CR, AWC was not recorded at ID at 60-120 cm depth during the summer months. Lower evaporation rates due to higher albedo and especially subsurface flow from the adjacent highly active crest are mainly seen responsible for deeper infiltration and higher AWC at CR. It is concluded that while sufficient AWC was present at CR to sustain most of the perennial shrubs also during frequent drought years, insufficient moisture was retained at ID to sustain most perennials. Non-crusted dune crests may thus serve as preferential habitats (fertility belts) for perennial plants, providing refugia for shrubs during frequent drought years.

  11. Evaporite deposition in a shallow perennial lake, Qaidam basin, western China

    SciTech Connect

    Schubel, K.A.; Lowenstein, T.K. ); Spencer, R.J. ); Pengxi, Z. )

    1991-03-01

    Evaporites accumulate in ephemeral saline-pans, shallow perennial lakes or lagoons, and deep perennial systems. Continuous brine trench exposures of Holocene evaporites from the Qaidam basin provide criteria for the recognition of shallow perennial lake sediments. Based on Landsat photographs, lateral extent of beds (at least 7 km), and sequence thicknesses (maximum 2.5 m), the paleolake is interpreted to have been less than 2.5 m deep and at least 120 km{sup 2} in area. Sediments consist of laminated siliciclastic mud overlain by mud-halite couplets (mm- to cm-scale layers), which represent one vertical shallowing- and concentrating-upwards sequence. The basal laminite marks the onset of deposition in this shallow perennial paleolake. Syndepositional halite textures and fabrics in the overlying mud-halite couplets include cumulates, rafts, and chevrons, draped by mud laminae, and halite layers truncated by horizontal dissolution surfaces (increasing in frequency upwards). Paleolake brines, determined from fluid inclusion melting temperatures, are Na-Mg-Cl-rich and evolve from 0.84 m Mg{sup 2} to 1.52 m Mg{sup 2+} (near the surface). Combinations of the following criteria may be used for the recognition of shallow, nonstratified, perennial lake sediments: lateral continuity of layers; muds undisrupted by subaerial exposure; vertical bottom-growth of halite; halite layers conformably overlain by mud; halite layers truncated by nonuniformly spaced horizontal dissolution surfaces; erosional scours and channels filled with cross-laminated gypsum, halite, and siliciclastic sand and mud; and salinity fluctuations over small stratigraphic intervals within an overall concentrating-upwards sequence.

  12. Comparative water use by maize, perennial crops, restored prairie, and poplar trees in the US Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, S. K.; Hussain, M. Z.; Bhardwaj, A. K.; Basso, B.; Robertson, G. P.

    2015-06-01

    Water use by plant communities across years of varying water availability indicates how terrestrial water balances will respond to climate change and variability as well as to land cover change. Perennial biofuel crops, likely grown mainly on marginal lands of limited water availability, provide an example of a potentially extensive future land cover conversion. We measured growing-season evapotranspiration (ET) based on daily changes in soil profile water contents in five perennial systems—switchgrass, miscanthus, native grasses, restored prairie, and hybrid poplar—and in annual maize (corn) in a temperate humid climate (Michigan, USA). Three study years (2010, 2011 and 2013) had normal growing-season rainfall (480-610 mm) whereas 2012 was a drought year (210 mm). Over all four years, mean (±SEM) growing-season ET for perennial systems did not greatly differ from corn (496 ± 21 mm), averaging 559 (±14), 458 (±31), 573 (±37), 519 (±30), and 492 (±58) mm for switchgrass, miscanthus, native grasses, prairie, and poplar, respectively. Differences in biomass production largely determined variation in water use efficiency (WUE). Miscanthus had the highest WUE in both normal and drought years (52-67 and 43 kg dry biomass ha-1 mm-1, respectively), followed by maize (40-59 and 29 kg ha-1 mm-1) the native grasses and prairie were lower and poplar was intermediate. That measured water use by perennial systems was similar to maize across normal and drought years contrasts with earlier modeling studies and suggests that rain-fed perennial biomass crops in this climate have little impact on landscape water balances, whether replacing rain-fed maize on arable lands or successional vegetation on marginal lands. Results also suggest that crop ET rates, and thus groundwater recharge, streamflow, and lake levels, may be less sensitive to climate change than has been assumed.

  13. Spread dynamics of perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium) in two seasonal wetland areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renz, Mark J.; Steinmaus, Scott J.; Gilmer, David S.; DiTomaso, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Perennial pepperweed is an invasive plant that is expanding rapidly in several plant communities in the western United States. In California, perennial pepperweed has aggressively invaded seasonal wetlands, resulting in degradation of habitat quality. We evaluated the rate and dynamics of population spread, assessed the effect of disturbance on spread, and determined the biotic and abiotic factors influencing the likelihood of invasion. The study was conducted at eight sites within two wetland regions of California. Results indicate that in undisturbed sites, spread was almost exclusively through vegetative expansion, and the average rate of spread was 0.85 m yr−1 from the leading edge. Spread in sites that were disked was more than three times greater than in undisturbed sites. While smaller infestations increased at a faster rate compared with larger populations, larger infestations accumulated more newly infested areas than smaller infestations from year to year. Stem density was consistently higher in the center of the infestations, with about 2.4 times more stems per square meter compared with the leading edge at the perimeter of the population. The invasion by perennial pepperweed was positively correlated with increased water availability but was negatively correlated with the cover of perennial and annual species. Thus, high cover of resident vegetation can have a suppressive effect on the rate of invasion, even in wetland ecosystems. On the basis of these results, we recommend that resident plant cover not be disturbed, especially in wet areas adjacent to areas currently infested with perennial pepperweed. For infested areas, management efforts should be prioritized to focus on controlling satellite populations as well as the leading edge of larger infestations first. This strategy could reduce the need for costly active restoration efforts by maximizing the probability of successful re-establishment of resident vegetation from the adjacent seedbank.

  14. Candidate perennial bioenergy grasses have a higher albedo than annual row crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. N.; VanLoocke, A.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The production of perennial cellulosic feedstocks for bioenergy presents the potential to diversify regional economies and the national energy supply, while also serving as climate 'regulators' due to a number of biogeochemical and biogeophysical differences relative to row crops. Numerous observational and model based approaches have investigated biogeochemical tradeoffs, such as increased carbon sequestration and increased water use, associated with growing cellulosic feedstocks. A less understood aspect is the biogeophysical changes associated with the difference in albedo (α), which could alter the local energy balance and cause local to regional cooling several times larger than that associated with offsetting carbon. Here, we established paired fields of Miscanthus × giganteus (miscanthus) and Panicum virgatum (switchgrass), two of the leading perennial cellulosic feedstock candidates, and traditional annual row crops in the highly productive "Corn-belt". Our results show that miscanthus did and switchgrass did not have an overall higher α than current row crops but a strong seasonal pattern existed. Both perennials had consistently higher growing season α than row crops and winter α did not differ. The lack of observed differences in winter α, however, masked an interaction between snow cover and species differences, with the perennial species, compared with the row crops, having a higher α when snow was absent and a much lower α when snow was present. Overall, these changes resulted in an average net reduction in annual absorbed energy of about 5 W/m2 for switchgrass and about 8 W/m2 for miscanthus relative to annual crops. Therefore, the conversion from annual row to perennial crops alters the radiative balance of the surface via changes in α and could lead to regional cooling.

  15. Chemical Composition, In vivo Digestibility and Metabolizable Energy Values of Caramba (Lolium multiflorum cv. caramba) Fresh, Silage and Hay.

    PubMed

    Özelçam, H; Kırkpınar, F; Tan, K

    2015-10-01

    The experiment was conducted to determine nutritive values of caramba (Lolium multiflorum cv. caramba) fresh, silage and hay by in vivo and in vitro methods. There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.01) in crude protein content value between fresh caramba (12.83%) and silage (8.91%) and hay (6.35%). According to results of experiment, the crude fiber, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber (ADF), acid detergent lignin contents of the three forms of caramba varied between 30.22% to 35.06%, 57.41% to 63.70%, 35.32% to 43.29%, and 5.55% to 8.86% respectively. There were no significant differences between the three forms of caramba in digestibility of nutrients and in vivo metabolizable energy (ME) values (p>0.05). However, the highest MECN (ME was estimated using crude nutrients) and MEADF values were found in fresh caramba (p<0.01). As a result, it could be said that, there were no differences between the three forms of caramba in nutrient composition, digestibility and ME value, besides drying and ensiling did not affect digestibility of hay. Consequently, caramba either as fresh, silage or hay is a good alternative source of forage for ruminants.

  16. Chemical Composition, In vivo Digestibility and Metabolizable Energy Values of Caramba (Lolium multiflorum cv. caramba) Fresh, Silage and Hay

    PubMed Central

    Özelçam, H.; Kırkpınar, F.; Tan, K.

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was conducted to determine nutritive values of caramba (Lolium multiflorum cv. caramba) fresh, silage and hay by in vivo and in vitro methods. There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.01) in crude protein content value between fresh caramba (12.83%) and silage (8.91%) and hay (6.35%). According to results of experiment, the crude fiber, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber (ADF), acid detergent lignin contents of the three forms of caramba varied between 30.22% to 35.06%, 57.41% to 63.70%, 35.32% to 43.29%, and 5.55% to 8.86% respectively. There were no significant differences between the three forms of caramba in digestibility of nutrients and in vivo metabolizable energy (ME) values (p>0.05). However, the highest MECN (ME was estimated using crude nutrients) and MEADF values were found in fresh caramba (p<0.01). As a result, it could be said that, there were no differences between the three forms of caramba in nutrient composition, digestibility and ME value, besides drying and ensiling did not affect digestibility of hay. Consequently, caramba either as fresh, silage or hay is a good alternative source of forage for ruminants. PMID:26323399

  17. Comparison of EDTA-enhanced phytoextraction and phytostabilisation strategies with Lolium perenne on a heavy metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Thomas; Gustot, Quentin; Couder, Eléonore; Houben, David; Iserentant, Anne; Lutts, Stanley

    2011-11-01

    Phytoremediation is a promising and cost-effective strategy to manage heavy metal polluted sites. In this experiment, we compared simultaneously phytoextraction and phytostabilisation techniques on a Cd and Zn contaminated soil, through monitoring of plant accumulation and leaching. Lolium perenne plants were cultivated for 2 months under controlled environmental conditions in a 27.6 dm(3)-pot experiment allowing the collect of leachates. The heavy metal phytoextraction was promoted by adding Na-EDTA (0.5 g kg(-1) of soil) in watering solution. Phytostabilisation was assessed by mixing soil with steel shots (1%) before L. perenne sowing. Presence of plants exacerbated heavy metal leaching, by improving soil hydraulic conductivity. Use of EDTA for phytoextraction led to higher concentration of heavy metal in shoots. However, this higher heavy metal extraction was insufficient to satisfactory reduce the heavy metal content in soil, and led to important heavy metal leaching induced by EDTA. On the other hand, addition of steel shots efficiently decreased both Cd and Zn mobility, according to 0.01 M CaCl(2) extraction, and leaching. However, improvement of growth conditions by steel shots led to higher heavy metal mass in shoot tissues. Therefore, soil heavy metal mobility and plant metal uptake are not systematically positively correlated.

  18. Metabolic profiling of Lolium perenne shows functional integration of metabolic responses to diverse subtoxic conditions of chemical stress.

    PubMed

    Serra, Anne-Antonella; Couée, Ivan; Renault, David; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    Plant communities are confronted with a great variety of environmental chemical stresses. Characterization of chemical stress in higher plants has often been focused on single or closely related stressors under acute exposure, or restricted to a selective number of molecular targets. In order to understand plant functioning under chemical stress conditions close to environmental pollution conditions, the C3 grass Lolium perenne was subjected to a panel of different chemical stressors (pesticide, pesticide degradation compound, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and heavy metal) under conditions of seed-level or root-level subtoxic exposure. Physiological and metabolic profiling analysis on roots and shoots revealed that all of these subtoxic chemical stresses resulted in discrete physiological perturbations and complex metabolic shifts. These metabolic shifts involved stressor-specific effects, indicating multilevel mechanisms of action, such as the effects of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid on quinate levels. They also involved major generic effects that linked all of the subtoxic chemical stresses with major modifications of nitrogen metabolism, especially affecting asparagine, and of photorespiration, especially affecting alanine and glycerate. Stress-related physiological effects and metabolic adjustments were shown to be integrated through a complex network of metabolic correlations converging on Asn, Leu, Ser, and glucose-6-phosphate, which could potentially be modulated by differential dynamics and interconversion of soluble sugars (sucrose, trehalose, fructose, and glucose). Underlying metabolic, regulatory, and signalling mechanisms linking these subtoxic chemical stresses with a generic impact on nitrogen metabolism and photorespiration are discussed in relation to carbohydrate and low-energy sensing.

  19. Influence of tea saponin on enhancing accessibility of pyrene and cadmium phytoremediated with Lolium multiflorum in co-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xinying; Hou, Yunyun; Hu, Xiaoxin; Liang, Xia; Chen, Xueping

    2016-03-01

    Tea saponin (TS), a kind of biodegradable surfactant, was chosen to improve the accessible solubilization of pyrene and cadmium (Cd) in co-contaminated soils cultivated Lolium multiflorum. TS obviously improved the accessibility of pyrene and Cd for L. multiflorum to accelerate the process of accumulation and elimination of the pollutants. The chemical forms of Cd was transformed from Fe-Mn oxides and associated to carbonates fractions into exchangeable fractions by adding TS in single Cd and pyrene-Cd contaminated soils. Moreover, the chemical forms of pyrene were transformed from associated fraction into bioaccessible fraction by adding TS in pyrene and pyrene-Cd contaminated soils. In pyrene-Cd contaminated soil, the exchangeable fraction of Cd was hindered in the existence of pyrene, and bioaccessible fraction of pyrene was promoted by the cadmium. Besides, in the process of the pyrene degradation and Cd accumulation, the effect could be improved by the elongation of roots with adding TS, and the microorganism activity was stimulated by TS to accelerate the removal of pollutions. Therefore, Planting L. multiflorum combined with adding TS would be an effective method on the phytoremediation of organics and heavy metals co-contaminated soils.

  20. The role of sulfur- and phosphorus-mobilizing bacteria in biochar-induced growth promotion of Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Fox, Aaron; Kwapinski, Witold; Griffiths, Bryan S; Schmalenberger, Achim

    2014-10-01

    Plants rely on microorganisms to mobilize organically and inorganically bound sulfur (S) and phosphorus (P) in which the plant can then readily utilize. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of S- and P-mobilizing bacteria in plant growth promotion in biochar-amended soil, which has been rarely investigated so far. Pot experiments of Lolium perenne were established on S and P limited soil with 1% or 2% biochar (Miscanthus × giganteus) or without biochar (control) for a period of 126 days. Both biochar amendments resulted in significant plant growth promotion. Rhizobacteria capable of growing with (1) S from aromatic sulfonates, (2) P from phosphate esters, (3) P from phosphonates, and (4) P from tri-calcium phosphates as sole source of S or P, respectively, were significantly more abundant in the biochar treatments. 16S rRNA gene-based rhizobacteria community analysis revealed a significant biochar treatment effect. Abundance of nematodes feeding on bacteria was also significantly increased in the biochar treatments. Diversity analysis of rhizospheric asfA and phnJ genes revealed broad sequence diversities in bacterial sulfonate and phosphonate-mineralizing capabilities. These findings suggest that biochar amendment enhances microbially mediated nutrient mobilization of S and P resulting in improved plant growth.

  1. NEWER SDHI FUNGICIDES AND GRASSES: EFFECTS ON SEED YIELD AND DISEASE CONTROL.

    PubMed

    Rijckaert, G; Vanden Nest, T

    2015-01-01

    Grass seed crops (ryegrass), a minor crop in Belgium, should be managed more intensively and in an arable way, comparable with the intensive wheat culture. Even more important than higher seed yields are stable, higher yields over time, Integrated pest management (IPM) forms the framework around this intensification. Two similar seed production field trials--one with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and one with Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.)--were conducted in 2014, dealing with 4 SDHI fungicides (bixafen, boscalid, fluxapyroxad and isopyrazam) that were compared with an untreated control and some reference treatments. There were four application times (stages): i.e. early stem elongation--BBCH 33 (T1), ear tips visible--BBCH 51 (T2), full ear, begin of flowering--BBCH 61 (T3) and end of flowering--BBCH 69 (T4). Except for the Italian ryegrass trial, only the last three stages were used. In the Italian ryegrass trial, which had only sporadic incidence of disease, all T3 treatments clearly increased seed yield compared with the untreated control, by 13% on average. For the T2 treatments only Fandango and Adexar clearly out yielded the control. The curative T4 treatment (Tilt + Corbel) tended to increase seed yield, but this was not significant. Seed yield differences could not be explained by variations in thousand seed weight (TSW), leaf withering and NDVI scores (crop reflectance). The disease pressure (crown rust) was very low before flowering, but stem rust developed strongly during the last 2 weeks before harvest of the perennial ryegrass trial. Yield responses were mostly pronounced at the T3 treatment. Except for Fandango and Horizon, all T3 treatments clearly increased yield in comparison with the untreated control, by 18.4% on average. The T4 treatment (Tilt + Corbel) could not repair the crop damage. Further seed yield data are discussed in relation to yield components, TSW, leaf withering and vegetation index (NDVI). An integrated

  2. Changes in the bacterial community and composition of fermentation products during ensiling of wilted Italian ryegrass and wilted guinea grass silages.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanbing; Nishino, Naoki

    2013-08-01

    To gain further insights into temperate and tropical grass ensiling, fermentation products and bacterial communities were examined at both the initial and late stages of ensiling of wilted Italian ryegrass and wilted guinea grass silages. 2,3-Butanediol and ethanol fermentation were observed in wilted Italian ryegrass silage. Enterobacteria such as Rahnella sp. and Enterobacter sp. may have been involved in fermentation; however, alcohol production was intensified after the silage enterobacterial community overwhelmed the pre-ensiled enterobacterial community. Pediococcus spp. appeared in silage stored for 4 months, when a significant increase in lactic acid content was seen compared with that at 2 months. Prolonged storage enhanced acetic acid fermentation in wilted guinea grass silage. The disappearance of Enterococcus sulfureus and appearance of Lactobacillus plantarum may have been associated with the increased acetic acid content. Although many species of enterobacteria were found in common between the pre-ensiled crop and silages of Italian ryegrass and guinea grass, marked differences were seen in the type of fermentation from the initial stages. These results indicate that the bacterial community of pre-ensiled crops may be immediately replaced by one that is adapted to ensiling environments, although metabolic changes may continue over the course of ensiling.

  3. Effects of the coordination mechanism between roots and leaves induced by root-breaking and exogenous cytokinin spraying on the grazing tolerance of ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Dan; Li, Zhen-Qing

    2012-05-01

    The grazing tolerance mechanism of ryegrass was investigated by examining the effects of roots on leaves under frequent defoliation. The study consisted of four treatments: (1) with root breaking and cytokinin spraying, (2) root breaking without cytokinin spraying, (3) cytokinin spraying with no root breaking, and (4) no root breaking and no cytokinin spraying. Results showed that root breaking or frequent defoliation inhibited the ryegrass regrowth, which resulted in low biomass of the newly grown leaves and roots, as well as low soluble carbohydrate content and xylem sap quantity in the roots. Spraying with exogenous cytokinin promoted the increase in newly grown leaf biomass, but decreased root biomass, root soluble carbohydrate content, and root xylem sap quantity. Determination of gibberellic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, abscisic acid, and zeatin riboside (ZR) in roots, newly grown leaves, and stubbles showed that cytokinin is a key factor in ryegrass regrowth under frequent defoliation. Root breaking and frequent defoliation both decreased the ZR content in roots and in newly grown leaves, whereas spraying with exogenous cytokinin increased the ZR content in roots and in newly grown leaves. Therefore, cytokinin enhances the above ground productivity at the cost of root growth under frequent defoliation.

  4. Selenium bioavailability and uptake as affected by four different plants in a loamy clay soil with particular attention to mycorrhizae inoculated ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Munier-Lamy, C; Deneux-Mustin, S; Mustin, C; Merlet, D; Berthelin, J; Leyval, C

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of plant species, especially of their rhizosphere soil, and of inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus on the bioavailability of selenium and its transfer in soil-plant systems. A pot experiment was performed with a loamy clay soil and four plant species: maize, lettuce, radish and ryegrass, the last one being inoculated or not with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant biomass and Se concentration in shoots and roots were estimated at harvest. Se bioavailability in rhizosphere and unplanted soil was evaluated using sequential extractions. Plant biomass and selenium uptake varied with plant species. The quantity of rhizosphere soil also differed between plants and was not proportional to plant biomass. The highest plant biomass, Se concentration in plants, and soil to plant transfer factor were obtained with radish. The lowest Se transfer factors were obtained with ryegrass. For the latter, mycorrhizal inoculation did not significantly affect plant growth, but reduced selenium transfer from soil to plant by 30%. In unplanted soil after 65 days aging, more than 90% of added Se was water-extractable. On the contrary, Se concentration in water extracts of rhizosphere soil represented less than 1% and 20% of added Se for ryegrass and maize, respectively. No correlation was found between the water-extractable fraction and Se concentration in plants. The speciation of selenium in the water extracts indicated that selenate was reduced, may be under organic forms, in the rhizosphere soil.

  5. Potential phytoextraction and phytostabilization of perennial peanut on copper-contaminated vineyard soils and copper mining waste.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, Robson; Bortolon, Leandro; Pieniz, Simone; Giacometti, Marcelo; Roehrs, Dione D; Lambais, Mácio R; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2011-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the potential of perennial peanut (Arachis pintoi) for copper phytoremediation in vineyard soils (Inceptisol and Mollisol) contaminated with copper and copper mining waste. Our results showed high phytomass production of perennial peanut in both vineyard soils. Macronutrient uptakes were not negatively affected by perennial peanut cultivated in all contaminated soils. Plants cultivated in Mollisol showed high copper concentrations in the roots and shoots of 475 and 52 mg kg(-1), respectively. Perennial peanut plants showed low translocation factor values for Cu, although these plants showed high bioaccumulation factor (BCF) for both vineyard soils, Inceptisol and Mollisol, with BCF values of 3.83 and 3.24, respectively, being characterized as a copper hyperaccumulator plant in these soils. Copper phytoextraction from Inceptisol soil was the highest for both roots and entire plant biomass, with more than 800 mg kg(-1) of copper in whole plant. The highest potential copper phytoextraction by perennial peanut was in Inceptisol soil with copper removal of 2,500 g ha(-1). Also, perennial peanut showed high potential for copper phytoremoval in copper mining waste and Mollisol with 1,700 and 1,500 g of copper per hectare, respectively. In addition, perennial peanuts characterized high potential for phytoextraction and phytostabilization of copper in vineyard soils and copper mining waste.

  6. Allergic Sensitization to Perennial Allergens in Adults and Children Sensitized to Japanese Cedar or Japanese Cypress Pollen in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In Japan, seasonal allergic rhinitis in the spring due to exposure to Japanese cedar or Japanese cypress pollen is common. However, the allergic profile for perennial allergens in spring pollinosis remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the allergic profiles of 652 patients with rhinitis. Total serum IgE, serum-specific IgE, and blood eosinophil counts were measured. Allergic sensitization, determined by the serum allergen-specific IgE level, did not always correspond with the patient's symptoms. Only 27% of patients with allergic symptoms in response to spring pollens were sensitized to these allergens alone; 31% of patients were also sensitized to perennial allergens, even without symptoms due to perennial allergens. Total serum IgE and eosinophil cell counts were significantly elevated in patients sensitized to perennial allergens and spring pollens, as compared to patients sensitized only to spring pollens. Most children sensitized to spring pollen (84%) were sensitized to perennial allergens, at a higher rate than adults (49%). Patients sensitized to spring pollens are likely to be latently sensitized to perennial allergens. This is especially true for children and should be monitored closely. Improvement in seasonal allergic conditions, including latent perennial allergy, is important to prevent symptoms that could advance to asthma. PMID:24757445

  7. Herbage intake and milk production of late-lactation dairy cows offered a second-year chicory crop during summer.

    PubMed

    Muir, S K; Ward, G N; Jacobs, J L

    2015-12-01

    Chicory (Cichorum intybus L.) is a summer-active forage herb which has been proposed as an option to increase summer feed supply, increase dry matter intake, nutrient intake, and milk yield from nonirrigated dairy production systems in southern Australia. Dry matter intake, nutrient intake, milk yield, and yield of milk fat and protein of predominantly Holstein-Friesian dairy cows in late lactation consuming 3 herbage-based diets (4 replicates per treatment) were measured. The 3 grazed herbages were second-year chicory (CHIC) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.; PRG) monocultures and a mixed sward (~50:50) of chicory and perennial ryegrass (MIX). All diets (CHIC, PRG, and MIX) were supplemented with alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) hay (5.5kg of DM/cow per day) and an energy-based concentrate pellet (4.0kg of DM/cow per day). There were no significant differences in milk yield (12.0 to 12.6kg/d across the treatments) or the yield of milk fat (539 to 585g/d) and milk protein (433 to 447g/d) between the 3 herbage-based diets. No differences in DMI (17.9 to 19.2kg/d) or estimated metabolizable energy intake (173 to 185MJ/d) were noted between treatments. Estimated metabolizable energy concentrations in the forages on offer were lower in CHIC than PRG (7.6 vs. 8.2MJ/kg of dry matter), but the concentration in consumed herbage was not different (9.1 vs. 9.2MJ/kg of dry matter); as such, potential for increased milk yield in cows offered CHIC was limited. Increased concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids was observed in chicory herbage compared with perennial ryegrass. This was associated with increased milk conjugated linoleic acid and milk polyunsaturated fatty acids when chicory formed part of the diet (CHIC compared to PRG and MIX). Chicory could be used as an alternative to perennial ryegrass in summer; however, the developmental stage of chicory will influence concentrations of metabolizable energy and neutral detergent fiber and, therefore, intake and milk

  8. Perennial vegetation data from permanent plots on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, Robert H.; Murov, Marilyn B.; Esque, Todd C.; Boyer, Diane E.; DeFalco, Lesley A.; Haines, Dustin F.; Oldershaw, Dominic; Scoles, Sara J.; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Blainey, Joan B.; Medica, Philip A.

    2003-01-01

    Perennial vegetation data from 68 permanent plots on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, are given for the period of 1963 through 2002. Dr. Janice C. Beatley established the plots in 1962 and then remeasured them periodically from 1963 through 1975. We remeasured 67 of these plots between 2000 and 2003; the remaining plot was destroyed at some time between 1975 and 1993. The plots ranged from 935 to 2,274 m in elevation and are representative of common plant associations of the Mojave Desert, the transition to Great Basin Desert, and pinyon-juniper woodlands. The purpose of this report is to describe the complete set of ecological data that Beatley collected from the Nevada Test Site from 1963 through 1975 and to present the data for perennial vegetation collected from 2000 through 2003.

  9. In vitro culture of pods from annual and perennial Medicago species.

    PubMed

    Wang, J W; Sorensen, E L; Liang, G H

    1984-08-01

    Because most interspecific Medicago embryos abort before they can be excised and cultured, our objective was to grow young pods in vitro. Various media were used to grow three-day-old pods of annuals [diploids, M. blancheana Boiss., M. disciformis DC., tetraploid M. scutellata (L.) Mill.] and perennials (diploid M. falcata L., tetraploid M. sativa L.).Few pods of perennial species grew to maturity on media containing modified Hoagland's plus 1% glucose or sucrose with or without 5% potato extract. Increasing sucrose to 6% increased the percentage of M. sativa pods that produced mature seeds. On DM (differentiation medium), the best medium, the percentage of pods producing viable seeds was: M. blancheana (82), M. disciformis (81), M. scutellata (48), M. sativa (63), M. falcata (15). DM plus 1 ppm indoleacetic or gibberellic acid did not enhance seed production.

  10. Nitrogen removal and nitrate leaching for two perennial, sod-based forage systems receiving dairy effluent.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Kenneth R; French, Edwin C; Sweat, Lewin A; Graetz, Donald A; Sollenberger, Lynn E; Macoon, Bisoondat; Portier, Kenneth M; Rymph, Stuart J; Wade, Brett L; Prine, Gordon M; Van Horn, Harold H

    2003-01-01

    In northern Florida, year-round forage systems are used in dairy effluent sprayfields to reduce nitrate leaching. Our purpose was to quantify forage N removal and monitor nitrate N (NO3(-)-N) concentration below the rooting zone for two perennial, sod-based, triple-cropping systems over four 12-mo cycles (1996-2000). The soil is an excessively drained Kershaw sand (thermic, uncoated Typic Quartzip-samment). Effluent N rates were 500, 690, and 910 kg ha(-1) per cycle. Differences in N removal between a corn (Zea mays L.)-bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.)-rye (Secale cereale L.) system (CBR) and corn-perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.)-rye system (CPR) were primarily related to the performance of the perennial forages. Nitrogen removal of corn (125-170 kg ha(-1)) and rye (62-90 kg ha(-1)) was relatively stable between systems and among cycles. The greatest N removal was measured for CBR in the first cycle (408 kg ha(-1)), with the bermudagrass removing an average of 191 kg N ha(-1). In later cycles, N removal for bermudagrass declined because dry matter (DM) yield declined. Yield and N removal of perennial peanut increased over the four cycles. Nitrate N concentrations below the rooting zone were lower for CBR than CPR in the first two cycles, but differences were inconsistent in the latter two. The CBR system maintained low NO3(-)-N leaching in the first cycle when the bermudagrass was the most productive; however, it was not a sustainable system for long-term prevention of NO3(-)-N leaching due to declining bermudagrass yield in subsequent cycles. For CPR, effluent N rates > or = 500 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) have the potential to negatively affect ground water quality.

  11. PERPHECLIM ACCAF Project - Perennial fruit crops and forest phenology evolution facing climatic changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Cortazar-Atauri, Iñaki; Audergon, Jean Marc; Bertuzzi, Patrick; Anger, Christel; Bonhomme, Marc; Chuine, Isabelle; Davi, Hendrik; Delzon, Sylvain; Duchêne, Eric; Legave, Jean Michel; Raynal, Hélène; Pichot, Christian; Van Leeuwen, Cornelis; Perpheclim Team

    2015-04-01

    Phenology is a bio-indicator of climate evolutions. Measurements of phenological stages on perennial species provide actually significant illustrations and assessments of the impact of climate change. Phenology is also one of the main key characteristics of the capacity of adaptation of perennial species, generating questions about their consequences on plant growth and development or on fruit quality. Predicting phenology evolution and adaptative capacities of perennial species need to override three main methodological limitations: 1) existing observations and associated databases are scattered and sometimes incomplete, rendering difficult implementation of multi-site study of genotype-environment interaction analyses; 2) there are not common protocols to observe phenological stages; 3) access to generic phenological models platforms is still very limited. In this context, the PERPHECLIM project, which is funded by the Adapting Agriculture and Forestry to Climate Change Meta-Program (ACCAF) from INRA (French National Institute of Agronomic Research), has the objective to develop the necessary infrastructure at INRA level (observatories, information system, modeling tools) to enable partners to study the phenology of various perennial species (grapevine, fruit trees and forest trees). Currently the PERPHECLIM project involves 27 research units in France. The main activities currently developed are: define protocols and observation forms to observe phenology for various species of interest for the project; organizing observation training; develop generic modeling solutions to simulate phenology (Phenological Modelling Platform and modelling platform solutions); support in building research projects at national and international level; develop environment/genotype observation networks for fruit trees species; develop an information system managing data and documentation concerning phenology. Finally, PERPHECLIM project aims to build strong collaborations with public

  12. Effect of Contamination with Perennial Permafrost Microorganisms on the Outcome of Closed Brain Neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Malchevskii, V A; Subbotin, A M; Nemkov, A G; Petrov, S A

    2016-07-01

    We studied the effect of contamination with Bacillus genus microorganisms isolated from perennial permafrost samples on the outcome of closed brain neurotrauma in Wistar rats. It was found that contamination with different Bacillus strains produced different effects on the mortality of experimental animals with closed neurotrauma. The complex of metabolites from strain Ch2/9 - Bacillus spp. (pumilus) produced a protective effect in experimental closed brain neurotrauma.

  13. Evaluation of a cost effective technique for treating aquaculture water discharge using Lolium perenne Lam as a biofilter.

    PubMed

    Nduwimana, André; Yang, Xiang-Long; Wang, Li-Ren

    2007-01-01

    Wastewater stabilization ponds generate low cost by-products that are useful for agriculture. The utilization of these by-products for soil amendment and as a source of nutrients for plants requires a high level of sanitation and stabilization of the organic matter, to maintain acceptable levels of soil, water and air quality. In this study, two aquaculture wastewater treatment systems; recirculating system and a floating plant bed system were designed to improve the quality of irrigation water in local communities with low income. In both systems the grass species Lolium perenne Lam was used as a plant biofilter while vegetable specie Amaranthus viridis was used to evaluate the performance of the system and the suitability of the phyto-treated water for irrigation. It was found that the harmful material removal rate for recirculating system was 88.9% for TAN (total ammonia nitrogen), 90% for NO2(-)-N, 64.8% for NO3(-)-N while for floating plant bed system 82.7% for TAN, 82% for NO2(-)-N and 60.5% for NO3(-)-N. Comparative analysis of the efficiency of waste element removal between the two systems revealed that both systems performed well, however, plant growth was not robust for floating plant bed system while recirculating system is energy consuming. Although both systems did not attain sufficient levels of TN (total nitrogen) and TP (total phosphorus) load reduction, the treatment with L. perenne remarkably improved the irrigation water quality. A. viridis plants irrigated with the phyto-treated discharge water had lesser concentrations of heavy metals in their tissues compared to those irrigated with untreated discharge. The control plants irrigated with untreated discharge were also found to be highly lignified with few stems and small leaves.

  14. Latitudinal variation in ambient UV-B radiation is an important determinant of Lolium perenne forage production, quality, and digestibility

    PubMed Central

    Comont, David; Winters, Ana; Gomez, Leonardo D; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    Few studies to date have considered the responses of agriculturally important forage grasses to UV-B radiation. Yet grasses such as Lolium perenne have a wide current distribution, representing exposure to a significant variation in ambient UV-B. The current study investigated the responses of L. perenne (cv. AberDart) to a simulated latitudinal gradient of UV-B exposure, representing biologically effective UV-B doses at simulated 70, 60, 50, 40, and 30° N latitudes. Aspects of growth, soluble compounds, and digestibility were assessed, and results are discussed in relation to UV-B effects on forage properties and the implications for livestock and bio-ethanol production. Aboveground biomass production was reduced by approximately 12.67% with every 1 kJ m–2 day–1 increase in biologically weighted UV-B. As a result, plants grown in the highest UV-B treatment had a total biomass of just 13.7% of controls. Total flavonoids were increased by approximately 76% by all UV-B treatments, while hydroxycinnamic acids increased in proportion to the UV-B dose. Conversely, the digestibility of the aboveground biomass and concentrations of soluble fructans were reduced by UV-B exposure, although soluble sucrose, glucose, and fructose concentrations were unaffected. These results highlight the capacity for UV-B to directly affect forage productivity and chemistry, with negative consequences for digestibility and bioethanol production. Results emphasize the need for future development and distribution of L. perenne varieties to take UV-B irradiance into consideration. PMID:23580749

  15. Exogenous Application of Citric Acid Ameliorates the Adverse Effect of Heat Stress in Tall Fescue (Lolium arundinaceum)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Longxing; Zhang, Zhifei; Xiang, Zuoxiang; Yang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Citric acid may be involved in plant response to high temperature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether exogenous citric acid could improve heat tolerance in a cool-season turfgrass species, tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum), and to determine the physiological mechanisms of citric acid effects on heat stress tolerance. The grasses were subjected to four citric acid levels (0, 0.2, 2, and 20 mM) and two temperature levels (25/20 and 35/30 ± 0.5°C, day/night) treatments in growth chambers. Heat stress increased an electrolyte leakage (EL) and malonaldehyde (MDA) content, while reduced plant growth, chlorophyll (Chl) content, photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), root activity and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; peroxidase, POD). External citric acid alleviated the detrimental effects of heat stress on tall fescue, which was evidenced by decreased EL and MDA content, and improved plant growth under stress conditions. Additionally, the reduction in Chl content, Fv/Fm, SOD, POD, CAT and root activity were ameliorated in citric acid treated plants under heat stressed conditions. High temperature induced the expression of heat shock protein (HSP) genes, which exhibited greater expression levels after citric acid treatment under heat stress. These results suggest that exogenous citric acid application may alleviate growth and physiological damage caused by high temperature. In addition, the exogenously applied citric acid might be responsible for maintaining membrane stability, root activity, and activation of antioxidant response and HSP genes which could contribute to the protective roles of citric acid in tall fescue responses to heat stress. PMID:26925085

  16. Mapping with RAD (restriction-site associated DNA) markers to rapidly identify QTL for stem rust resistance in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Pfender, W F; Saha, M C; Johnson, E A; Slabaugh, M B

    2011-05-01

    A mapping population was created to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola in Lolium perenne. A susceptible and a resistant plant were crossed to produce a pseudo-testcross population of 193 F(1) individuals. Markers were produced by the restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) process, which uses massively parallel and multiplexed sequencing of reduced-representation libraries. Additional simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers were combined with the RAD markers to produce maps for the female (738 cM) and male (721 cM) parents. Stem rust phenotypes (number of pustules per plant) were determined in replicated greenhouse trials by inoculation with a field-collected, genetically heterogeneous population of urediniospores. The F(1) progeny displayed continuous distribution of phenotypes and transgressive segregation. We detected three resistance QTL. The most prominent QTL (qLpPg1) is located near 41 cM on linkage group (LG) 7 with a 2-LOD interval of 8 cM, and accounts for 30-38% of the stem rust phenotypic variance. QTL were detected also on LG1 (qLpPg2) and LG6 (qLpPg3), each accounting for approximately 10% of phenotypic variance. Alleles of loci closely linked to these QTL originated from the resistant parent for qLpPg1 and from both parents for qLpPg2 and qLpPg3. Observed quantitative nature of the resistance may be due to partial-resistance effects against all pathogen genotypes, or qualitative effects completely preventing infection by only some genotypes in the genetically mixed inoculum. RAD markers facilitated rapid construction of new genetic maps in this outcrossing species and will enable development of sequence-based markers linked to stem rust resistance in L. perenne.

  17. Orthology Guided Assembly in highly heterozygous crops: creating a reference transcriptome to uncover genetic diversity in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Ruttink, Tom; Sterck, Lieven; Rohde, Antje; Bendixen, Christian; Rouzé, Pierre; Asp, Torben; Van de Peer, Yves; Roldan-Ruiz, Isabel

    2013-06-01

    Despite current advances in next-generation sequencing data analysis procedures, de novo assembly of a reference sequence required for SNP discovery and expression analysis is still a major challenge in genetically uncharacterized, highly heterozygous species. High levels of polymorphism inherent to outbreeding crop species hamper De Bruijn Graph-based de novo assembly algorithms, causing transcript fragmentation and the redundant assembly of allelic contigs. If multiple genotypes are sequenced to study genetic diversity, primary de novo assembly is best performed per genotype to limit the level of polymorphism and avoid transcript fragmentation. Here, we propose an Orthology Guided Assembly procedure that first uses sequence similarity (tBLASTn) to proteins of a model species to select allelic and fragmented contigs from all genotypes and then performs CAP3 clustering on a gene-by-gene basis. Thus, we simultaneously annotate putative orthologues for each protein of the model species, resolve allelic redundancy and fragmentation and create a de novo transcript sequence representing the consensus of all alleles present in the sequenced genotypes. We demonstrate the procedure using RNA-seq data from 14 genotypes of Lolium perenne to generate a reference transcriptome for gene discovery and translational research, to reveal the transcriptome-wide distribution and density of SNPs in an outbreeding crop and to illustrate the effect of polymorphisms on the assembly procedure. The results presented here illustrate that constructing a non-redundant reference sequence is essential for comparative genomics, orthology-based annotation and candidate gene selection but also for read mapping and subsequent polymorphism discovery and/or read count-based gene expression analysis.

  18. Synergetic effects of DA-6/GA₃ with EDTA on plant growth, extraction and detoxification of Cd by Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    He, Shanying; Wu, Qiuling; He, Zhenli

    2014-12-01

    Research is needed to improve efficiency of phytoextraction of heavy metals from contaminated soils. A pot experiment was carried out to study the effects of plant growth regulators (PGRs) (diethyl aminoethyl hexanoate (C18H33NO8, DA-6) and gibberellic acid 3 (C19H22O6, GA3)) and/or EDTA on Cd extraction, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in Lolium perenne. The addition of EDTA or PGRs significantly enhanced Cd extraction efficiency (P<0.05), with the decreasing order of: 1 μM DA-6>10 μM DA-6>10 μM GA3>2.5 mmol kg(-1) EDTA>other treatments of PGR alone. PGRs+EDTA resulted in a further increase in Cd extraction efficiency, with EDTA+1 μM DA-6 being the most efficient. At the subcellular level, about 44-57% of Cd was soluble fraction, 18-44% in cell walls, and 12-25% in cellular organelles fraction. Chemical speciation analysis showed that 40-54% of Cd was NaCl extractable, 7-23% HAc extractable, followed by other fractions. EDTA increased the proportions of Cd in soluble and cellular organelles fraction, as well as the metal migration in shoot; therefore, the toxicity to plant increased and plant growth was inhibited. Conversely, PGRs fixed more Cd in cell walls and reduced Cd migration in shoot; thus, metal toxicity was reduced. In addition, PGRs promoted plant biomass growth significantly (P<0.05), with 1 μM DA-6 being the most effective. A combination of DA-6/GA3 with EDTA can alleviate the adverse effect of EDTA on plant growth, and the treatment of EDTA+1 μM DA-6 appears to be optimal for improving the remediation efficiency of L. perenne for Cd contaminated soil.

  19. Effect of combined pollution of chromium and benzo(a)pyrene on seed growth of Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Chigbo, Chibuike; Batty, Lesley

    2013-01-01

    The single and joint effects of chromium (Cr) and benzo (a) pyrene (B (a) P) on the seed germination and the elongation of root and shoot of Lolium perenne were investigated. Seed germination represents the first important step to effective phytoremediation. Young seedlings may be susceptible to PAH and heavy metal contaminants. The results showed that in solution, increasing concentration of Cr could inhibit the germination rate as well as root and shoot elongation of L. perenne. Also, the increasing concentration of B (a) P (1-4 mg L(-1)) could accelerate the germination rate. The joint toxicity of Cr and B (a) P showed that increasing concentration of Cr and B (a) P had significant antagonistic effect on the germination rate of L. perenne. In the single factor experiments and joint effect tests of Cr and B (a) P on the seedling growth, the root and shoot elongation were inhibited significantly (p<0.05) for higher concentration of Cr whereas increasing concentration of B (a) P accelerated the shoot elongation. There were significant relationships between the concentration of pollutants and root and shoot elongation (p<0.05). Higher concentration of B (a) P with low concentration of Cr had significant antagonistic effect on shoot and root elongation of L. perenne in solution tests. Also, low concentration of B (a) P with increasing concentration of Cr had a significant synergistic effect on shoot elongation. The toxicity effects of Cr and B (a) P to seed germination, root and shoot elongation are-root elongation>shoot elongation>germination rate.

  20. Clade classification of monolignol biosynthesis gene family members reveals target genes to decrease lignin in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    van Parijs, F R D; Ruttink, T; Boerjan, W; Haesaert, G; Byrne, S L; Asp, T; Roldán-Ruiz, I; Muylle, H

    2015-07-01

    In monocots, lignin content has a strong impact on the digestibility of the cell wall fraction. Engineering lignin biosynthesis requires a profound knowledge of the role of paralogues in the multigene families that constitute the monolignol biosynthesis pathway. We applied a bioinformatics approach for genome-wide identification of candidate genes in Lolium perenne that are likely to be involved in the biosynthesis of monolignols. More specifically, we performed functional subtyping of phylogenetic clades in four multigene families: 4CL, COMT, CAD and CCR. Essential residues were considered for functional clade delineation within these families. This classification was complemented with previously published experimental evidence on gene expression, gene function and enzymatic activity in closely related crops and model species. This allowed us to assign functions to novel identified L. perenne genes, and to assess functional redundancy among paralogues. We found that two 4CL paralogues, two COMT paralogues, three CCR paralogues and one CAD gene are prime targets for genetic studies to engineer developmentally regulated lignin in this species. Based on the delineation of sequence conservation between paralogues and a first analysis of allelic diversity, we discuss possibilities to further study the roles of these paralogues in lignin biosynthesis, including expression analysis, reverse genetics and forward genetics, such as association mapping. We propose criteria to prioritise paralogues within multigene families and certain SNPs within these genes for developing genotyping assays or increasing power in association mapping studies. Although L. perenne was the target of the analyses presented here, this functional subtyping of phylogenetic clades represents a valuable tool for studies investigating monolignol biosynthesis genes in other monocot species.

  1. Comparison of sensitivity of grasses (Lolium perenne L. and Festuca rubra L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) exposed to water contaminated with microcystins.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Silvia; Saker, Martin L; Vale, Micaela; Vasconcelos, Vitor M

    2009-07-01

    The effects of aqueous extracts from Microcysts aeruginosa strains (both microcystin-producers and non-microcystin producers) on germination and root growth were investigated for three economically important plant species: Festuca rubra L., Lolium perenne L., and Lactuca sativa L. There was a clear inhibition of root growth for L. sativa exposed to strains containing microcystins (5.9-56.4 microg L(-1)). The strain that produced the most pronounced effects contained the lowest concentration of microcystin suggesting that other cellular compounds may also affect growth.

  2. Fast-cycling unit of root turnover in perennial herbaceous plants in a cold temperate ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai; Luke McCormack, M.; Li, Le; Ma, Zeqing; Guo, Dali

    2016-01-01

    Roots of perennial plants have both persistent portion and fast-cycling units represented by different levels of branching. In woody species, the distal nonwoody branch orders as a unit are born and die together relatively rapidly (within 1–2 years). However, whether the fast-cycling units also exist in perennial herbs is unknown. We monitored root demography of seven perennial herbs over two years in a cold temperate ecosystem and we classified the largest roots on the root collar or rhizome as basal roots, and associated finer laterals as secondary, tertiary and quaternary roots. Parallel to woody plants in which distal root orders form a fast-cycling module, basal root and its finer laterals also represent a fast-cycling module in herbaceous plants. Within this module, basal roots had a lifespan of 0.5–2 years and represented 62–87% of total root biomass, thus dominating annual root turnover (60%–81% of the total). Moreover, root traits including root length, tissue density, and biomass were useful predictors of root lifespan. We conclude that both herbaceous and woody plants have fast-cycling modular units and future studies identifying the fast-cycling module across plant species should allow better understanding of how root construction and turnover are linked to whole-plant strategies.

  3. Implementing Perennial Kitchen Garden Model to Improve Diet Diversity in Melghat, India

    PubMed Central

    Birdi, Tannaz J.; Shah, Shimoni U.

    2016-01-01

    Lack of diet diversity causing micronutrient deficiency is common in developing countries and is gaining attention due to the hidden consequences of impaired physical and cognitive development. This paper describes the propagation of a sustainable perennial kitchen garden (KG) model to address household (HH) diet diversity in Melghat. Nutrient dense plants, comprising of minimum one tree (perennial) and one green leafy vegetable (GLV) were given to participating HHs along with qualitative interventions. Baseline survey was conducted in winter 2011 followed by seasonal surveys over 2 years to record changes in KG practices, dietary intake and childcare practices. Marked increase from 4% at baseline to 95% at endline was seen in the KG maintainance. Increased diversity was seen in all food categories other than cereals and pulses. Variety of GLVs consumed increased over the two winters as well as the 2 summers. However, no change in the quantity of GLV consumed was noted which was attributed to the duration of the study period being insufficient for the trees to grow and provide adequate leaves for consumption. Notably, livelihood component was not promoted and HHs were encouraged to harvest and distribute excess seeds to relatives and neighbours. The study generated huge demand from HHs within the intervention and neighbouring villages. It concludes that a well designed perennial KG along with imparting adequate knowledge can be a sustainable practice to increase diet diversity and GLV intake which would help address micronutrient deficiencies in the community. PMID:26573040

  4. Evidence of deep circulation in two perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tyler, S.W.; Cook, P.G.; Butt, A.Z.; Thomas, J.M.; Doran, P.T.; Lyons, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    The perennial ice covers found on many of the lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valley region of the Antarctic have been postulated to severely limit mixing and convective turnover of these unique lakes. In this work, we utilize chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) concentration profiles from Lakes Hoare and Fryxell in the McMurdo Dry Valley to determine the extent of deep vertical mixing occurring over the last 50 years. Near the ice-water interface, CFC concentrations in both lakes were well above saturation, in accordance with atmospheric gas supersaturations resulting from freezing under the perennial ice covers. Evidence of mixing throughout the water column at Lake Hoare was confirmed by the presence of CFCs throughout the water column and suggests vertical mixing times of 20-30 years. In Lake Fryxell, CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113 were found in the upper water column; however, degradation of CFC-11 and CFC-12 in the anoxic bottom waters appears to be occurring with CFC-113 only present in these bottom waters. The presence of CFC-113 in the bottom waters, in conjunction with previous work detecting tritium in these waters, strongly argues for the presence of convective mixing in Lake Fryxell. The evidence for deep mixing in these lakes may be an important, yet overlooked, phenomenon in the limnology of perennially ice-covered lakes.

  5. Fast-cycling unit of root turnover in perennial herbaceous plants in a cold temperate ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kai; Luke McCormack, M.; Li, Le; Ma, Zeqing; Guo, Dali

    2016-01-01

    Roots of perennial plants have both persistent portion and fast-cycling units represented by different levels of branching. In woody species, the distal nonwoody branch orders as a unit are born and die together relatively rapidly (within 1–2 years). However, whether the fast-cycling units also exist in perennial herbs is unknown. We monitored root demography of seven perennial herbs over two years in a cold temperate ecosystem and we classified the largest roots on the root collar or rhizome as basal roots, and associated finer laterals as secondary, tertiary and quaternary roots. Parallel to woody plants in which distal root orders form a fast-cycling module, basal root and its finer laterals also represent a fast-cycling module in herbaceous plants. Within this module, basal roots had a lifespan of 0.5–2 years and represented 62–87% of total root biomass, thus dominating annual root turnover (60%–81% of the total). Moreover, root traits including root length, tissue density, and biomass were useful predictors of root lifespan. We conclude that both herbaceous and woody plants have fast-cycling modular units and future studies identifying the fast-cycling module across plant species should allow better understanding of how root construction and turnover are linked to whole-plant strategies. PMID:26791578

  6. Fast-cycling unit of root turnover in perennial herbaceous plants in a cold temperate ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; McCormack, M Luke; Li, Le; Ma, Zeqing; Guo, Dali

    2016-01-21

    Roots of perennial plants have both persistent portion and fast-cycling units represented by different levels of branching. In woody species, the distal nonwoody branch orders as a unit are born and die together relatively rapidly (within 1-2 years). However, whether the fast-cycling units also exist in perennial herbs is unknown. We monitored root demography of seven perennial herbs over two years in a cold temperate ecosystem and we classified the largest roots on the root collar or rhizome as basal roots, and associated finer laterals as secondary, tertiary and quaternary roots. Parallel to woody plants in which distal root orders form a fast-cycling module, basal root and its finer laterals also represent a fast-cycling module in herbaceous plants. Within this module, basal roots had a lifespan of 0.5-2 years and represented 62-87% of total root biomass, thus dominating annual root turnover (60%-81% of the total). Moreover, root traits including root length, tissue density, and biomass were useful predictors of root lifespan. We conclude that both herbaceous and woody plants have fast-cycling modular units and future studies identifying the fast-cycling module across plant species should allow better understanding of how root construction and turnover are linked to whole-plant strategies.

  7. Classification of ephemeral, intermittent, and perennial stream reaches using a TOPMODEL-based approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Tanja N.; Agouridis, Carmen T.; Barton, Christopher D.; Villines, Jonathan A.; Lant, Jeremiah G.

    2015-01-01

    Whether a waterway is temporary or permanent influences regulatory protection guidelines, however, classification can be subjective due to a combination of factors, including time of year, antecedent moisture conditions, and previous experience of the field investigator. Our objective was to develop a standardized protocol using publically available spatial information to classify ephemeral, intermittent, and perennial streams. Our hypothesis was that field observations of flow along the stream channel could be compared to results from a hydrologic model, providing an objective method of how these stream reaches can be identified. Flow-state sensors were placed at ephemeral, intermittent, and perennial stream reaches from May to December 2011 in the Appalachian coal basin of eastern Kentucky. This observed flow record was then used to calibrate the simulated saturation deficit in each channel reach based on the topographic wetness index used by TOPMODEL. Saturation deficit values were categorized as flow or no-flow days, and the simulated record of streamflow was compared to the observed record. The hydrologic model was more accurate for simulating flow during the spring and fall seasons. However, the model effectively identified stream reaches as intermittent and perennial in each of the two basins.

  8. Genetic control of rhizomes and genomic localization of a major-effect growth habit QTL in perennial wildrye

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subterranean rhizome branches facilitate vegetative dispersal, survival, and regrowth of perennial grasses. Developmental differences between upright, prostrate, and subterranean stem branching patterns may involve auxin-mediated responses to gravity or light, but genetic mechanisms controlling the...

  9. Drought survival and perennial grass success in the face of cheatgrass invasion: germination, emergence, seedling die-off and reproduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dominance and competitiveness is often attributed to early (fall) germination. We hypothesize that cheatgrass germinates earlier compared to three commonly used restoration/rehabilitation perennial grass species [‘Hycrest’ crested wheatgrass( Agropyron desertorum ssp. c...

  10. 30 CFR 817.57 - Hydrologic balance: Surface activities in or adjacent to perennial or intermittent streams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in perennial or intermittent streams only where those activities would not cause or contribute to the... and provisions have been made for sound future maintenance by the permittee or the landowner...

  11. Micrometeorological measurements over 3 years reveal differences in N2 O emissions between annual and perennial crops.

    PubMed

    Abalos, Diego; Brown, Shannon E; Vanderzaag, Andrew C; Gordon, Robert J; Dunfield, Kari E; Wagner-Riddle, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Perennial crops can deliver a wide range of ecosystem services compared to annual crops. Some of these benefits are achieved by lengthening the growing season, which increases the period of crop water and nutrient uptake, pointing to a potential role for perennial systems to mitigate soil nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions. Employing a micrometeorological method, we tested this hypothesis in a 3-year field experiment with a perennial grass-legume mixture and an annual corn monoculture. Given that N2 O emissions are strongly dependent on the method of fertilizer application, two manure application options commonly used by farmers for each crop were studied: injection vs. broadcast application for the perennial; fall vs. spring application for the annual. Across the 3 years, lower N2 O emissions (P < 0.001) were measured for the perennial compared to the annual crop, even though annual N2 O emissions increased tenfold for the perennial after ploughing. The percentage of N2 O lost per unit of fertilizer applied was 3.7, 3.1 and 1.3 times higher for the annual for each consecutive year. Differences in soil organic matter due to the contrasting root systems of these crops are probably a major factor behind the N2 O reduction. We found that a specific manure management practice can lead to increases or reductions in annual N2 O emissions depending on environmental variables. The number of freeze-thaw cycles during winter and the amount of rainfall after fertilization in spring were key factors. Therefore, general manure management recommendations should be avoided because interannual weather variability has the potential to determine if a specific practice is beneficial or detrimental. The lower N2 O emissions of perennial crops deserve further research attention and must be considered in future land-use decisions. Increasing the proportion of perennial crops in agricultural landscapes may provide an overlooked opportunity to regulate N2 O emissions.

  12. A revised logistic regression equation and an automated procedure for mapping the probability of a stream flowing perennially in Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bent, Gardner C.; Steeves, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    A revised logistic regression equation and an automated procedure were developed for mapping the probability of a stream flowing perennially in Massachusetts. The equation provides city and town conservation commissions and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection a method for assessing whether streams are intermittent or perennial at a specific site in Massachusetts by estimating the probability of a stream flowing perennially at that site. This information could assist the environmental agencies who administer the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act of 1996, which establishes a 200-foot-wide protected riverfront area extending from the mean annual high-water line along each side of a perennial stream, with exceptions for some urban areas. The equation was developed by relating the observed intermittent or perennial status of a stream site to selected basin characteristics of naturally flowing streams (defined as having no regulation by dams, surface-water withdrawals, ground-water withdrawals, diversion, wastewater discharge, and so forth) in Massachusetts. This revised equation differs from the equation developed in a previous U.S. Geological Survey study in that it is solely based on visual observations of the intermittent or perennial status of stream sites across Massachusetts and on the evaluation of several additional basin and land-use characteristics as potential explanatory variables in the logistic regression analysis. The revised equation estimated more accurately the intermittent or perennial status of the observed stream sites than the equation from the previous study. Stream sites used in the analysis were identified as intermittent or perennial based on visual observation during low-flow periods from late July through early September 2001. The database of intermittent and perennial streams included a total of 351 naturally flowing (no regulation) sites, of which 85 were observed to be intermittent and 266 perennial

  13. Energy balance and cost-benefit analysis of biogas production from perennial energy crops pretreated by wet oxidation.

    PubMed

    Uellendahl, H; Wang, G; Møller, H B; Jørgensen, U; Skiadas, I V; Gavala, H N; Ahring, B K

    2008-01-01

    Perennial crops need far less energy to plant, require less fertilizer and pesticides, and show a lower negative environmental impact compared with annual crops like for example corn. This makes the cultivation of perennial crops as energy crops more sustainable than the use of annual crops. The conversion into biogas in anaerobic digestion plants shows however much lower specific methane yields for the raw perennial crops like miscanthus and willow due to their lignocellulosic structure. Without pretreatment the net energy gain is therefore lower for the perennials than for corn. When applying wet oxidation to the perennial crops, however, the specific methane yield increases significantly and the ratio of energy output to input and of costs to benefit for the whole chain of biomass supply and conversion into biogas becomes higher than for corn. This will make the use of perennial crops as energy crops competitive to the use of corn and this combination will make the production of biogas from energy crops more sustainable.

  14. Heavy metals uptake from contaminated soils as affected by peat, lime, and chelates

    SciTech Connect

    Albasel, N.; Cottenie, A.

    1985-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination of soils may reduce yields as well as the suitability for consumption of crop growth (Keeney et al., Leeper). In an effort to find possible ways to counter this danger, the effect of lime, chelating agents, and peat applied to Zn-, Cu- and Pb-contaminated soils on the uptake of metal ions were studied. Pot experiments with barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) plants and soils, humic podzols (haplohumads) contaminated with Zn (3030 mg kg/sup -1/) and with Pb, Zn and Cu (110, 630, and 40 mg kg/sup -//sub 1/, respectively) were carried out. The concentration of the acid extracts of soils and plants were determined with the aid of the simultaneous direct reading spectrograph and atomic absorption. In all cases, raising the pH of the soil by liming appeared to be the most efficient method for reducing plant absorption of toxic micronutrients and heavy metals. However, the uptake of Fe and Mn was more markedly dependent on pH than that of Zn and Cu.

  15. Transcriptome sequencing identifies novel persistent viruses in herbicide resistant wild-grasses.

    PubMed

    Sabbadin, Federico; Glover, Rachel; Stafford, Rebecca; Rozado-Aguirre, Zuriñe; Boonham, Neil; Adams, Ian; Mumford, Rick; Edwards, Robert

    2017-02-06

    Herbicide resistance in wild grasses is widespread in the UK, with non-target site resistance (NTSR) to multiple chemistries being particularly problematic in weed control. As a complex trait, NTSR is driven by complex evolutionary pressures and the growing awareness of the role of the phytobiome in plant abiotic stress tolerance, led us to sequence the transcriptomes of herbicide resistant and susceptible populations of black-grass and annual rye-grass for the presence of endophytes. Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides; Am) populations, displaying no overt disease symptoms, contained three previously undescribed viruses belonging to the Partititiviridae (AMPV1 and AMPV2) and Rhabdoviridae (AMVV1) families. These infections were widespread in UK black-grass populations and evidence was obtained for similar viruses being present in annual rye grass (Lolium rigidum), perennial rye-grass (Lolium perenne) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis). In black-grass, while no direct causative link was established linking viral infection to herbicide resistance, transcriptome sequencing showed a high incidence of infection in the NTSR Peldon population. The widespread infection of these weeds by little characterised and persistent viruses and their potential evolutionary role in enhancing plant stress tolerance mechanisms including NTSR warrants further investigation.

  16. Transcriptome sequencing identifies novel persistent viruses in herbicide resistant wild-grasses

    PubMed Central

    Sabbadin, Federico; Glover, Rachel; Stafford, Rebecca; Rozado-Aguirre, Zuriñe; Boonham, Neil; Adams, Ian; Mumford, Rick; Edwards, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Herbicide resistance in wild grasses is widespread in the UK, with non-target site resistance (NTSR) to multiple chemistries being particularly problematic in weed control. As a complex trait, NTSR is driven by complex evolutionary pressures and the growing awareness of the role of the phytobiome in plant abiotic stress tolerance, led us to sequence the transcriptomes of herbicide resistant and susceptible populations of black-grass and annual rye-grass for the presence of endophytes. Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides; Am) populations, displaying no overt disease symptoms, contained three previously undescribed viruses belonging to the Partititiviridae (AMPV1 and AMPV2) and Rhabdoviridae (AMVV1) families. These infections were widespread in UK black-grass populations and evidence was obtained for similar viruses being present in annual rye grass (Lolium rigidum), perennial rye-grass (Lolium perenne) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis). In black-grass, while no direct causative link was established linking viral infection to herbicide resistance, transcriptome sequencing showed a high incidence of infection in the NTSR Peldon population. The widespread infection of these weeds by little characterised and persistent viruses and their potential evolutionary role in enhancing plant stress tolerance mechanisms including NTSR warrants further investigation. PMID:28165016

  17. SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS

    SciTech Connect

    L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts

  18. An Epichloë festucae homologue of MOB3, a component of the STRIPAK complex, is required for the establishment of a mutualistic symbiotic interaction with Lolium perenne

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kimberly A.; Becker, Yvonne; Fitzsimons, Helen L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In both Sordaria macrospora and Neurospora crassa, components of the conserved STRIPAK (striatin‐interacting phosphatase and kinase) complex regulate cell–cell fusion, hyphal network development and fruiting body formation. Interestingly, a number of Epichloë festucae genes that are required for hyphal cell–cell fusion, such as noxA, noxR, proA, mpkA and mkkA, are also required for the establishment of a mutualistic symbiotic interaction with Lolium perenne. To determine whether MobC, a homologue of the STRIPAK complex component MOB3 in S. macrospora and N. crassa, is required for E. festucae hyphal fusion and symbiosis, a mobC deletion strain was generated. The ΔmobC mutant showed reduced rates of hyphal cell–cell fusion, formed intrahyphal hyphae and exhibited enhanced conidiation. Plants infected with ΔmobC were severely stunted. Hyphae of ΔmobC showed a proliferative pattern of growth within the leaves of Lolium perenne with increased colonization of the intercellular spaces and vascular bundles. Although hyphae were still able to form expressoria, structures allowing the colonization of the leaf surface, the frequency of formation was significantly reduced. Collectively, these results show that the STRIPAK component MobC is required for the establishment of a mutualistic symbiotic association between E. festucae and L. perenne, and plays an accessory role in the regulation of hyphal cell–cell fusion and expressorium development in E. festucae. PMID:27277141

  19. Host genotype overrides fungal endophyte infection in influencing tiller and spike production of Lolium perenne (Poaceae) in a common garden experiment.

    PubMed

    Cheplick, Gregory P

    2008-09-01

    Leaves of many cool-season grasses are infected by endophytic fungi that can impact their populations. A common garden experiment with Lolium perenne was established in a lawn in New Jersey, USA, to investigate the impact of endophyte infection and host genotype on tiller and spike production over three years. Infected (E+) and uninfected (E-) plants of each genotype were monitored every 2-3 mo. Infection intensity within plants varied significantly among genotypes and years, but there was no evidence of directional change over time. Tiller production varied significantly among genotypes and was affected by endophytes: E+ plants of several genotypes produced more tillers than E- plants during the third year. E+ plants had greater aboveground biomass, but host genotype explained a far greater proportion of variation in tiller production, number, and biomass than infection. Plant survival, percentage flowering, flowering date, number of spikes, and mean tiller mass were unaffected by endophytes. However, the last three variables showed significant variation among host genotypes. Although studies have demonstrated a positive growth effect of endophytes on several grass hosts, in this experiment host genotype accounted for far more of the variation in tiller and spike production and in biomass of Lolium perenne than endophyte infection.

  20. The annual variation in stomatal ammonia compensation point of rye grass ( Lolium perenne L.) leaves in an intensively managed grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hove, L. W. A.; Heeres, P.; Bossen, M. E.

    The stomatal ammonia compensation point for ammonia (NH 3) of an intensively managed pasture of rye grass ( Lolium perenne L.) was followed from mid January till November 2000. Leaf samples were taken every week. Simultaneously, the ambient NH 3 concentration was measured. Meteorological data (temperature, wind speed, rainfall and radiance) were collected from a nearby field station. The vacuum infiltration technique was used to isolate the apoplastic solution of the leaves. From the determined ammonium (NH 4+) concentration and pH in the apoplast, the gaseous NH 3 concentration inside the leaves was calculated, i.e. the so-called stomatal compensation point ( χs). Temperature appeared to have a predominant effect on χs, partly by affecting the equilibrium between gaseous NH 3 inside the leaf and NH 3 dissolved in the apoplast and partly by affecting physiological processes influencing the NH 4+ concentration in the apoplast. Results of the present study suggest that these temperature effects were counteracting. On one hand temperature increase during early spring stimulated NH 3 volatilisation from the apoplast, on the other hand it led to a decline in apoplastic NH 4+ from 0.9 to 0.2 mM, thereby diminishing the emission potential of the leaf. The low NH 4+ concentrations during spring and summer coincided with a low total leaf N content (<3% dw). However, there was no clear relationship between these two variables. The total N content of the leaf tissue is therefore an inadequate parameter for prediction of the potential NH 3 emission from rye grass leaves. No annual trend was found for the apoplast pH. With a few exceptions, pH varied between 5.9 and 6.5 throughout the experimental period. The calculated values for χs varied between 0.5 and 4 μg m -3. The gaseous NH 3 concentrations inside the grass leaves were, with a few exceptions, always smaller than the measured ambient NH 3 concentrations. The present study indicates that under the current ambient NH 3

  1. [Enhancement of GA3 and EDTA on Lolium perenne to remediate Pb contaminated soil and its detoxification mechanism].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiu-Ling; Wang, Wen-Chu; He, Shan-Ying

    2014-10-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of plant growth regulator GA3 and metal chelate EDTA on enhancing the remediation of Pb contaminated soil, and the detoxification mechanism of Lolium perenne grown on Pb contaminated soil at 250 and 500 mg · kg(-1). The results showed that cell wall deposition and vacuolar compartmentalization played important roles in the detoxification of Pb in L. perenne shoot. The addition of EDTA alone increased Pb concentration in plants and Pb proportions in soluble fraction and organelles fraction, and enhanced the toxicity of Pb to plant, leading to the significant reduction of the plant biomass (P < 0.05). Foliar spray of lower concentration of GA3 (1 μmol · L(-1) or 10 μmol · L(-1)) alone significantly increased Pb accumulation by L. perenne (P < 0.05), but Pb proportions in soluble and organelles fraction were decreased, which alleviated the adverse effects of Pb on plant, thus improving the growth of plants (P < 0.05), with 1 μmol · L(-1) GA3 being the most effective. In contract, the addition of 100 μmol · L(-1) GA3 decreased Pb concentration in L. perenne, but increased the proportions of Pb in soluble fraction and organelles fraction, resulting in the reduction of plant biomass. Lower concen- tration of GA3 might alleviate the adverse effects of Pb and/or EDTA on plant, since the biomass amounts in the different treatments were in order of GA3 alone of lower concentration > GA3 of lower concentration + EDTA > EDTA alone. The combination application of low concentration of GA3 and EDTA showed a synergistic effect on the Pb accumulation in L. perenne (P < 0.05). Especially, Pb concentration in shoot and Pb extraction efficiency reached 1250.6 mg · kg(-1) and 1.1%, respec- tively, under the treatment of EDTA + 1 μmol L(-1) GA3 on the Pb 500 mg · kg(-1) soil. Therefore, the application of 1 μmol · L(-1) GA3 along with EDTA appeared to be a potential approach for phytoremediation of Pb contaminated soil.

  2. Comparing Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics in Perennial Grasses and Shrubs in a Saline-Alkaline Arid Region, Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jiaqi; Zhang, Jingli; Zheng, Yuanrun; Ni, Jian; Xiao, Chunwang; Wang, Renzhong

    2012-01-01

    Background Although semi-arid and arid regions account for about 40% of terrestrial surface of the Earth and contain approximately 10% of the global soil organic carbon stock, our understanding of soil organic carbon dynamics in these regions is limited. Methodology/Principal Findings A field experiment was conducted to compare soil organic carbon dynamics between a perennial grass community dominated by Cleistogenes squarrosa and an adjacent shrub community co-dominated by Reaumuria soongorica and Haloxylon ammodendron, two typical plant life forms in arid ecosystems of saline-alkaline arid regions in northwestern China during the growing season 2010. We found that both fine root biomass and necromass in two life forms varied greatly during the growing season. Annual fine root production in the perennial grasses was 45.6% significantly higher than in the shrubs, and fine root turnover rates were 2.52 and 2.17 yr−1 for the perennial grasses and the shrubs, respectively. Floor mass was significantly higher in the perennial grasses than in the shrubs due to the decomposition rate of leaf litter in the perennial grasses was 61.8% lower than in the shrubs even though no significance was detected in litterfall production. Soil microbial biomass and activity demonstrated a strong seasonal variation with larger values in May and September and minimum values in the dry month of July. Observed higher soil organic carbon stocks in the perennial grasses (1.32 Kg C m−2) than in the shrubs (1.12 Kg C m−2) might be attributed to both greater inputs of poor quality litter that is relatively resistant to decay and the lower ability of microorganism to decompose these organic matter. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the perennial grasses might accumulate more soil organic carbon with time than the shrubs because of larger amounts of inputs from litter and slower return of carbon through decomposition. PMID:22900067

  3. QTL for resistance in Lolium perenne to a mixed population of Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola: use of RAD (restriction site associated DNA) markers to rapidly populate a new linkage map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mapping population was created to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to stem rust caused by Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola in Lolium perenne. Susceptible and resistant plants were crossed to produce a pseudo-testcross population. Markers were produced by the Restriction-sit...

  4. Non-ionic Surfactants and Non-Catalytic Protein Treatment on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Creeping Wild Ryegrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Pan, Zhongli; Zhang, Ruihong; Wang, Donghai; Jenkins, Bryan

    Our previous research has shown that saline Creeping Wild Ryegrass (CWR), Leymus triticoides, has a great potential to be used for bioethanol production because of its high fermentable sugar yield, up to 85% cellulose conversion of pretreated CWR. However, the high cost of enzyme is still one of the obstacles making large-scale lignocellulosic bioethanol production economically difficult. It is desirable to use reduced enzyme loading to produce fermentable sugars with high yield and low cost. To reduce the enzyme loading, the effect of addition of non-ionic surfactants and non-catalytic protein on the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated CWR was investigated in this study. Tween 20, Tween 80, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were used as additives to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of dilute sulfuric-acid-pretreated CWR. Under the loading of 0.1 g additives/g dry solid, Tween 20 was the most effective additive, followed by Tween 80 and BSA. With the addition of Tween 20 mixed with cellulase loading of 15 FPU/g cellulose, the cellulose conversion increased 14% (from 75 to 89%), which was similar to that with cellulase loading of 30 FPU/g cellulose and without additive addition. The results of cellulase and BSA adsorption on the Avicel PH101, pretreated CWR, and lignaceous residue of pretreated CWR support the theory that the primary mechanism behind the additives is prevention of non-productive adsorption of enzymes on lignaceous material of pretreated CWR. The addition of additives could be a promising technology to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis by reducing the enzyme activity loss caused by non-productive adsorption.

  5. Perennial stream discharge in the hyperarid Atacama Desert of northern Chile during the latest Pleistocene

    PubMed Central

    Nester, Peter L.; Gayó, Eugenia; Latorre, Claudio; Jordan, Teresa E.; Blanco, Nicolás

    2007-01-01

    A large fraction of the vital groundwater in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile is likely composed of “fossil” or “ancient” reserves that receive little or no recharge in today's hyperarid climate. Here, we present evidence for latest Pleistocene perennial streamflow in canyons from the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. Fluvial terraces in the Pampa del Tamarugal (PdT) basin (21°S) contain widespread fossil wood, in situ roots, and well preserved leaf litter deposits indicative of perennial surface flow currently absent in these channels. Nineteen radiocarbon dates on these deposits from four separate drainages within this endorheic basin indicate ages from 16,380 to 13,740 cal yr BP, synchronous with paleolake Tauca on the Bolivian Altiplano and other regional evidence for wetter conditions during the latest Pleistocene. Groundwater-fed riparian ecosystems and associated fluvial deposits abound today in the absence of direct rainfall in northern Atacama canyons with perennial discharge. Our relict riparian ecosystems from the PdT basin are indicative of conditions similar to these northern canyons. Given that discharge was higher than present during this time, we propose that these deposits represent the most important groundwater recharge events of the last 18,000 years. A lesser recharge event occurred during the Holocene, when phreatophytic trees also grew in these drainages between 1,070 and 700 cal yr BP, during the Medieval Climatic Anomaly. Taken together, our evidence lends further support for gradient changes in the equatorial Pacific as a major driver of hydrologic change in the Atacama on both centennial and millennial time scales. PMID:18056645

  6. Habitat change and plant demography: assessing the extinction risk of a formerly common grassland perennial.

    PubMed

    Schleuning, Matthias; Matthies, Diethart

    2009-02-01

    An important aim of conservation biology is to understand how habitat change affects the dynamics and extinction risk of populations. We used matrix models to analyze the effect of habitat degradation on the demography of the declining perennial plant Trifolium montanum in 9 calcareous grasslands in Germany over 4 years and experimentally tested the effect of grassland management. Finite population growth rates (lambda) decreased with light competition, measured as leaf-area index above T. montanum plants. At unmanaged sites lambda was <1 due to lower recruitment and lower survival and flowering probability of large plants. Nevertheless, in stochastic simulations, extinction of unmanaged populations of 100 flowering plants was delayed for several decades. Clipping as a management technique rapidly increased population growth because of higher survival and flowering probability of large plants in managed than in unmanaged plots. Transition-matrix simulations from these plots indicated grazing or mowing every second year would be sufficient to ensure a growth rate > or =1 if conditions stayed the same. At frequently grazed sites, the finite growth rate was approximately 1 in most populations of T. montanum. In stochastic simulations, the extinction risk of even relatively small grazed populations was low, but about half the extant populations of T. montanum in central Germany are smaller than would be sufficient for a probability of survival of >95% over 100 years. We conclude that habitat change after cessation of management strongly reduces recruitment and survival of established individuals of this perennial plant. Nevertheless, our results suggest extinction processes may take a long time in perennial plants, resulting in an extinction debt. Even if management is frequent, many remnant populations of T. montanum may be at risk because of their small size, but even a slight increase in size could considerably reduce their extinction risk.

  7. A comparison of canopy evapotranspiration between perennial rhizomatous grasses and Zea mays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, G.; Bernacchi, C.; Dohleman, F.

    2008-12-01

    Perennial rhizomatous C4 grasses are currently considered one of the most promising vegetation types to accommodate a cellulosic feedstock based liquid fuel economy. The current focus on using these vegetation types as a source of renewable fuel has sparked numerous concerns associated with environmental impacts. Of particular interest is the impact that altering the composition of vegetation at the landscape scale would have on local and regional hydrological cycles. We hypothesize that evapotranspiration, ET, will be higher for perennial grasses relative to maize as a result higher leaf area, higher above-ground biomass and prolonged growing seasons. To test this hypothesis, a technique in which ET is estimated as the residual in the energy balance equation from measurements of net radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes was employed. Measurements were made during the 2007 growing season for three replicate plots of the perennial rhizomatous grasses Miscanthus giganteus and Panicum virgatum, as well as for Zea mays planted at the University of Illinois South Farms. When averaged across the entire growing season, ET for M. giganteus was double relative to Z. mays, and 130% of P. virgatum ET. When compared over the periods in which all three species experienced mature and closed canopies (from day of year 200 to 250), M. giganteus still showed higher rates of ET compared with Z. mays, however, the increase was only ~15%. We conclude that ET associated with perennial alternative energy crops are higher relative to annual row crop; with most ET disparity, particularly for P. virgatum, being driven by phenology, quicker canopy closure and a prolonged growing season. Physiological rates of ET were highest for M. giganteus, followed by Z. mays, followed P. virgatum. Differences in phenology were more important than those of physiology for ET overshadowing effects from increased biomass associated with M. giganteus and/or a physiological difference between these

  8. Channel and perennial flow initiation in headwater streams: management implications of variability in source-area size.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Kristin L; Montgomery, David R; Bolton, Susan M

    2007-11-01

    Despite increasing attention to management of headwater streams as sources of water, sediment, and wood to downstream rivers, the extent of headwater channels and perennial flow remain poorly known and inaccurately depicted on topographic maps and in digital hydrographic data. This study reports field mapping of channel head and perennial flow initiation locations in forested landscapes underlain by sandstone and basalt lithologies in Washington State, USA. Contributing source areas were delineated for each feature using a digital elevation model (DEM) as well as a Global Positioning System device in the field. Systematic source area-slope relationships described in other landscapes were not evident for channel heads in either lithology. In addition, substantial variability in DEM-derived source area sizes relative to field-delineated source areas indicates that in this area, identification of an area-slope relationship, should one even exist, would be difficult. However, channel heads and stream heads, here defined as the start of perennial flow, appear to be co-located within both of the lithologies, which together with lateral expansion and contraction of surface water around channel heads on a seasonal cycle in the basalt lithology, suggest a controlling influence of bedrock springs for that location. While management strategies for determining locations of channel heads and perennial flow initiation in comparable areas could assign standard source area sizes based on limited field data collection within that landscape, field-mapped source areas that support perennial flow are much smaller than recognized by current Washington State regulations.

  9. Extraction of hemicellulose from ryegrass straw for the production of glucose isomerase and use of the resulting straw residue for animal feed

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.P.; Anderson, A.W.

    1980-03-01

    The hemicellulose fraction of ryegrass straw was extracted with NaOH and used for the production of glucose isomerase by Streptomyces flavogriseus. The level of hemicellulose extracted increased proportionately with increasing NaOH concentration up to about 4%, then the rate of increase slowed down. Hemicellulose extraction was facilitated by the combined application of heat and NaOH. Approximately 15% hemicellulose (12% as pentosan) could be obtained by treating straw with 4% NaOH for either 3 hours at 90/sup 0/C or 24 hour at room temperature. The highest level (3.04 units/ml culture) of intracellular glucose isomerase was obtained when the organism was grown at 30 degrees Centigrade for two days on 2% straw hemicellulose. The organism also produced a high yield of glucose isomerase on xylose or xylan. The NaOH treated straw residue, after removal of hemicellulose, had approximately 75% higher digestibility and 20% higher feed efficiency for weanling meadow voles than untreated straw, but almost the equivalent to that obtained by NaOH treatment without removal of the hemicellulose. Thus, the residue could be used as animal feed. A process for the production of glucose isomerase and animal feed from ryegrass straw was also proposed.

  10. Biomass, decomposition and nutrient cycling in a SW Atlantic Sarcocornia perennis marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrin, Vanesa L.; Pratolongo, Paula D.; de Villalobos, Ana E.; Botté, Sandra E.; Marcovecchio, Jorge E.

    2015-03-01

    Biomass dynamics, decomposition and nutrient cycling were studied in a Sarcocornia perennis salt marsh in the Bahia Blanca estuary (Argentina) to achieve a better understanding of these processes and provide information about a species and a region underrepresented in the literature. Above and belowground biomass stocks and carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentration in plant tissues were monitored every 2 months during a year. The decomposition rate and the concentration of C, N and P during the process were also estimated in above and belowground tissues. Biomass values were low (mean of 363 ± 43 and 242 ± 27 g m- 2 for aboveground and belowground tissues, respectively), presumably associated with the high salinity of this estuary. The general trend of higher values for aboveground biomass is in agreement with other reports for this species and has an effect on nutrients pools, which are higher for aboveground tissues for C and N. Above and belowground decomposition rates were high (64 and 70% after a year, respectively), meaning this process plays a significant role in the cycling of organic matter. C/N and C/P ratios changed during decomposition, but final ratios were usually higher, suggesting a net release of nutrients. Our results indicate that significant amounts of C, N and P are recycled by S. perennis, highlighting the role of this species and suggesting important consequences of its lost in the study area.

  11. IQ Score of Children with Persistent or Perennial Allergic Rhinitis: A Comparison with Healthy Children

    PubMed Central

    GHAFFARI, Javad; ABBASKHANIAN, Ali; JALILI, Masumeh; YAZDANI CHARATI, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Objective Prevalence of allergies is different around the world. Allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disease in children. Intelligence quotient (IQ) is an indicator of efficacy and many factors including chronic diseases may affect it. This study compares the IQs of children diagnosed with persistent or perennial allergic rhinitis with healthy children. Material & Methods This was a comparative study that was conducted from June 2011–May 2013 in an academic referral clinic. In this study, 90 patients aged 6- to 14-yearsold who were diagnosed with persistent or perennial allergic rhinitis and were compared to 90 age and gender match healthy patients from their respective families. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children was used to divide and calculate overall IQ, verbal IQ, and practical IQ. The t-test and chi square were used to analyze quantitative variables and qualitative variables, respectively. Results In this study, out of total 180 children, 90 (50%) in the case group and 90 children (50%), the control group participated for IQ comparison. One hundred (57%) were male and 80 (43%) were female. The overall IQ for allergic rhinitis patients and healthy patients was 109.2 and 107.5, respectively. This difference was not considered significant. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the IQ scores of males and females. Conclusion Although allergic rhinitis is a chronic disease and effects quality of life, there were no identifiable negative effects on IQ. PMID:25143773

  12. Role of antioxidants on the clinical outcome of patients with perennial allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Manish; Chauhan, Komal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antioxidants have a preventive or therapeutic role in oxygen free radical–mediated cell and tissue damage. The study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects of antioxidants and intranasal steroid fluticasone furoate (FF) on the clinical outcome of patients with perennial allergic rhinitis. Methods: Subjects with perennial allergic rhinitis (n = 61) were randomly divided into two groups, group A (n = 30) received FF and group B (n = 31) received FF with antioxidants for 6 weeks. Nasal and ocular symptoms were evaluated weekly by using a four-point categoric scale. The efficacy of the study drug was assessed based on the mean change from baseline of the total daytime nasal symptom scores, total nighttime nasal symptom scores, and the composite symptom scores. Results: The combined therapy (FF with antioxidants) resulted in marked improvements (p ≤ 0.05) in the mean total daytime nasal symptom scores, total nighttime nasal symptom scores, and composite symptom scores of subjects compared with ones treated with intranasal steroid (FF) alone, which highlighted the therapeutic effect of antioxidants in allergic rhinitis. Conclusion: Significant improvement in clinical outcome was observed in subjects who received antioxidants along with FF. However, because this was an open-label study, the results must be interpreted with caution, and further double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trials supplemented with different antioxidants together with intranasal steroids are suggested. PMID:27658183

  13. Modelling the perennial energy crop market: the role of spatial diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Peter; Moran, Dominic; Rounsevell, Mark D. A.; Smith, Pete

    2013-01-01

    Biomass produced from energy crops, such as Miscanthus and short rotation coppice is expected to contribute to renewable energy targets, but the slower than anticipated development of the UK market implies the need for greater understanding of the factors that govern adoption. Here, we apply an agent-based model of the UK perennial energy crop market, including the contingent interaction of supply and demand, to understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of energy crop adoption. Results indicate that perennial energy crop supply will be between six and nine times lower than previously published, because of time lags in adoption arising from a spatial diffusion process. The model simulates time lags of at least 20 years, which is supported empirically by the analogue of oilseed rape adoption in the UK from the 1970s. This implies the need to account for time lags arising from spatial diffusion in evaluating land-use change, climate change (mitigation or adaptation) or the adoption of novel technologies. PMID:24026474

  14. Mercury in soil and perennial plants in a mining-affected urban area from Northwestern Romania.

    PubMed

    Senilă, Marin; Levei, Erika A; Senilă, Lăcrimioara R; Oprea, Gabriela M; Roman, Cecilia M

    2012-01-01

    The mercury (Hg) concentrations were evaluated in soils and perennial plants sampled in four districts of Baia Mare city, a historical mining and ore processing center in Northwestern Romania. The results showed that the Hg concentration exceeded the guideline value of 1.0 mg kg(-1) dry weight (dw) established by the Romanian Legislation, in 24 % of the analyzed soil samples, while the median Hg concentration (0.70 mg kg(-1) dw) was lower than the guideline value. However, Hg content in soil was generally higher than typical values in soils from residential and agricultural areas of the cities all over the world. The median Hg concentration was 0.22 mg kg(-1) dw in the perennial plants, and exceeded the maximum level of Hg (0.10 mg kg(-1)) established by European Directive 2002/32/EC for plants used in animal feed in order to prevent its transfer and further accumulation in the higher levels of food chain. No significant correlations were found between soil Hg and other analyzed metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) resulted from the non-ferrous smelting activities, probably due to the different physicochemical properties, that led to different dispersion patterns.

  15. Perennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Werling, Ben P.; Dickson, Timothy L.; Isaacs, Rufus; Gaines, Hannah; Gratton, Claudio; Gross, Katherine L.; Liere, Heidi; Malmstrom, Carolyn M.; Meehan, Timothy D.; Ruan, Leilei; Robertson, Bruce A.; Robertson, G. Philip; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Schrotenboer, Abbie C.; Teal, Tracy K.; Wilson, Julianna K.; Landis, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture is being challenged to provide food, and increasingly fuel, for an expanding global population. Producing bioenergy crops on marginal lands—farmland suboptimal for food crops—could help meet energy goals while minimizing competition with food production. However, the ecological costs and benefits of growing bioenergy feedstocks—primarily annual grain crops—on marginal lands have been questioned. Here we show that perennial bioenergy crops provide an alternative to annual grains that increases biodiversity of multiple taxa and sustain a variety of ecosystem functions, promoting the creation of multifunctional agricultural landscapes. We found that switchgrass and prairie plantings harbored significantly greater plant, methanotrophic bacteria, arthropod, and bird diversity than maize. Although biomass production was greater in maize, all other ecosystem services, including methane consumption, pest suppression, pollination, and conservation of grassland birds, were higher in perennial grasslands. Moreover, we found that the linkage between biodiversity and ecosystem services is dependent not only on the choice of bioenergy crop but also on its location relative to other habitats, with local landscape context as important as crop choice in determining provision of some services. Our study suggests that bioenergy policy that supports coordinated land use can diversify agricultural landscapes and sustain multiple critical ecosystem services. PMID:24474791

  16. Perennial is more effective than preseasonal subcutaneous immunotherapy in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Bochenska-Marciniak, Malgorzata; Kuprys-Lipinska, Izabela; Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Background: Two different regimens of subcutaneous immunotherapy (IT), perennial or preseasonal, may be used in the treatment of seasonal allergy. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of perennial IT (PIT) and preseasonal IT (PSIT) in patients suffering from seasonal rhinoconjunctivitis. Methods: The study was planned as a randomized, double-blind, comparative study on the efficacy and safety of PIT and PSIT. The study group comprised 120 patients allergic to grass and rye pollen. After the observational season they were randomized to receive PIT or PSIT for 3 years. The effect of IT was assessed based on symptom severity and medication use recorded in diaries. Results: Ninety-nine patients completed the study. No difference was seen between the groups regarding combined symptom medication score (SMS) in the first season of IT. During the second season, the difference between PIT and PSIT regarding combined SMS was 27.9% (p = 0.063) and reached 42.7% (p = 0.012) in favor of PIT in the third season. Both treatments had a similar safety profile. Conclusion: PIT was more effective than PSIT in the treatment of rhinoconjunctivitis in patients allergic to grass and rye pollens. Clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT01555736. PMID:23636036

  17. Complete Plastome Sequences from Glycine syndetika and Six Additional Perennial Wild Relatives of Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Sherman-Broyles, Sue; Bombarely, Aureliano; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Doyle, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Organelle sequences have a long history of utility in phylogenetic analyses. Chloroplast sequences when combined with nuclear data can help resolve relationships among flowering plant genera, and within genera incongruence can point to reticulate evolution. Plastome sequences are becoming plentiful because they are increasingly easier to obtain. Complete plastome sequences allow us to detect rare rearrangements and test the tempo of sequence evolution. Chloroplast sequences are generally considered a nuisance to be kept to a minimum in bacterial artificial chromosome libraries. Here, we sequenced two bacterial artificial chromosomes per species to generate complete plastome sequences from seven species. The plastome sequences from Glycine syndetika and six other perennial Glycine species are similar in arrangement and gene content to the previously published soybean plastome. Repetitive sequences were detected in high frequencies as in soybean, but further analysis showed that repeat sequence numbers are inflated. Previous chloroplast-based phylogenetic trees for perennial Glycine were incongruent with nuclear gene–based phylogenetic trees. We tested whether the hypothesis of introgression was supported by the complete plastomes. Alignment of complete plastome sequences and Bayesian analysis allowed us to date putative hybridization events supporting the hypothesis of introgression and chloroplast “capture.” PMID:25155272

  18. Antiinflammatory effects of Bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sien-Hung; Yu, Chia-Li

    2008-01-04

    Bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang, an ancient formula of Chinese medicine usually used in the treatment of allergic diseases, was evaluated in the treatment of patients with perennial allergic rhinitis. In this study, 60 patients allergic to house dust mite allergen confirmed by skin test and MAST test were recruited and randomized. An experimental group of 36 patients was treated with Bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang, whereas a control group of 24 patients was treated with a non-effective formula Ping-wei-san for 3 months. The nasal symptomatic scores and the responses of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to IL-4-stimulation were measured after treatment. The nasal symptomatic scores in the experimental group were significantly improved (3.78+/-0.09 before treatment vs. 0.57+/-0.06 after treatment). In contrast, no change was found in symptomatic scores in the control group (3.17+/-0.12 before treatment vs. 2.79+/-0.14 after treatment). Moreover, total serum IgE and the IL-4-stimulated production of PGE(2) and LTC(4) by PMN was significantly suppressed in the experimental group after treatment compared to the control group. The COX-2 mRNA expression in IL-4-stimulated PMN was also significantly suppressed after Bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang treatment. These results suggest that Bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang but not Ping-wei-san was beneficial to the patients with perennial allergic rhinitis via suppressed nasal inflammation by an antiinflammatory effect.

  19. Modelling the perennial energy crop market: the role of spatial diffusion.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Peter; Moran, Dominic; Rounsevell, Mark D A; Smith, Pete

    2013-11-06

    Biomass produced from energy crops, such as Miscanthus and short rotation coppice is expected to contribute to renewable energy targets, but the slower than anticipated development of the UK market implies the need for greater understanding of the factors that govern adoption. Here, we apply an agent-based model of the UK perennial energy crop market, including the contingent interaction of supply and demand, to understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of energy crop adoption. Results indicate that perennial energy crop supply will be between six and nine times lower than previously published, because of time lags in adoption arising from a spatial diffusion process. The model simulates time lags of at least 20 years, which is supported empirically by the analogue of oilseed rape adoption in the UK from the 1970s. This implies the need to account for time lags arising from spatial diffusion in evaluating land-use change, climate change (mitigation or adaptation) or the adoption of novel technologies.

  20. Syngas Production from Pyrolysis of Nine Composts Obtained from Nonhybrid and Hybrid Perennial Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Hlavsová, Adéla; Raclavská, Helena; Juchelková, Dagmar; Škrobánková, Hana; Frydrych, Jan

    2014-01-01

    A pyrolysis of compost for the production of syngas with an explicit H2/CO = 2 or H2/CO = 3 was investigated in this study. The composts were obtained from nonhybrid (perennial) grasses (NHG) and hybrid (perennial) grasses (HG). Discrepancies in H2 evolution profiles were found between NHG and HG composts. In addition, positive correlations for NHG composts were obtained between (i) H2 yield and lignin content, (ii) H2 yield and potassium content, and (iii) CO yield and cellulose content. All composts resulted in H2/CO = 2 and five of the nine composts resulted in H2/CO = 3. Exceptionally large higher heating values (HHVs) of pyrolysis gas, very close to HHVs of feedstock, were obtained for composts made from mountain brome (MB, 16.23 MJ/kg), hybrid Becva (FB, 16.45 MJ/kg), and tall fescue (TF, 17.43 MJ/kg). The MB and FB composts resulted in the highest syngas formation with H2/CO = 2, whereas TF compost resulted in the highest syngas formation with H2/CO = 3. PMID:25101320

  1. Perennial species for optimum production of herbaceous biomass in the Piedmont

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, D.J.; Wolf, D.D.; Daniels, W.L.; Vaughn, D.H.; Cundiff, J.S. )

    1990-07-01

    We have investigated eight biomass candidates grown on marginal Piedmont sites. The species include four grasses; sorghum-sundangrass hybrid, switchgrass, weeping lovegrass, and tall fescue; and four legumes: birdsfoot trefoil, crownvetch, flatpea, and sericea lespedeza. The candidate species were planted using no-till methods on twelve sites underlain by three different soils, Davidson, Cecil, and Appling. Initial establishment was good, but some plots had to be replanted after freezes and/or drought reduced stands. The two warm-season perennial grasses, switchgrass and weeping lovegrass, consistently provided the most biomass across all sites; average biomass yields in years following establishment ranged from 8 to 16 Mg/ha for the two. The legumes were generally lower than the grasses in biomass production, with sericea being the most productive legume overall, averaging about 6 Mg/ha/yr. Other studies indicated the experimental sites were quite variable in key soil morphological and chemical characteristics. Rooting depth of switchgrass was particularly notable, exceeding 0.7 m in all the soils studied. Erosion estimates using the Universal Soil Loss Equation suggested no-till production of perennial species limits soil losses. Economic analyses showed distinct differences among the candidates in costs of production. Physiological studies of switchgrass seed dormancy and photosynthesis were also conducted. 19 refs., 11 figs., 49 tabs.

  2. Implications of perennial saline springs for abnormally high fluid pressures and active thrusting in western California

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, J.R.; Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.; Moores, E.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Perennial saline springs in the Rumsey Hills area, southwestern Sacramento Valley, California, locally discharge at high elevations and near ridgetops. The springs are cold, are commonly associated with natural gas seeps, and typically emerge along west-vergent thrust faults. Stable isotope analyses indicate that the spring waters are similar to oil-field formation fluids and they have had a significant residence time in the subsurface at moderate temperatures. The nonmeteoric character of the springs demonstrates that they are not being fed by perched water tables. The authors propose that these subsurface formation waters are being forced to the surface by anomalously high porefluid pressures. The Rumsey Hills area is one of Quaternary uplift, thrusting, and crustal shortening, and prospect wells drilled there have encountered anomalously high fluid pressures at shallow depths. They attribute these high fluid pressures to active tectonic compression and shortening of Cretaceous marine sedimentary rocks. The widespread occurrence of anomalously high pore-fluid pressures and perennial saline springs in the Coast Ranges and western Great Valley suggests that much of western California may be characterized as a seismically active, overpressured thrust belt. The emergence of formation waters along thrust faults further suggests that patterns of subsurface fluid flow in western California may be similar to those in overpressured accretionary prisms, and that excess fluid pressures may also play a role in the distribution of seismicity.

  3. PypeTree: a tool for reconstructing tree perennial tissues from point clouds.

    PubMed

    Delagrange, Sylvain; Jauvin, Christian; Rochon, Pascal

    2014-03-04

    The reconstruction of trees from point clouds that were acquired with terrestrial LiDAR scanning (TLS) may become a significant breakthrough in the study and modelling of tree development. Here, we develop an efficient method and a tool based on extensive modifications to the skeletal extraction method that was first introduced by Verroust and Lazarus in 2000. PypeTree, a user-friendly and open-source visual modelling environment, incorporates a number of improvements into the original skeletal extraction technique, making it better adapted to tackle the challenge of tree perennial tissue reconstruction. Within PypeTree, we also introduce the idea of using semi-supervised adjustment tools to address methodological challenges that are associated with imperfect point cloud datasets and which further improve reconstruction accuracy. The performance of these automatic and semi-supervised approaches was tested with the help of synthetic models and subsequently validated on real trees. Accuracy of automatic reconstruction greatly varied in terms of axis detection because small (length < 3.5 cm) branches were difficult to detect. However, as small branches account for little in terms of total skeleton length, mean reconstruction error for cumulated skeleton length only reached 5.1% and 1.8% with automatic or semi-supervised reconstruction, respectively. In some cases, using the supervised tools, a perfect reconstruction of the perennial tissue could be achieved.

  4. Not dead yet: the seasonal water relations of two perennial ferns during California's exceptional drought.

    PubMed

    Baer, Alex; Wheeler, James K; Pittermann, Jarmila

    2016-04-01

    The understory of the redwood forests of California's coast harbors perennial ferns, including Polystichum munitum and Dryopteris arguta. Unusual for ferns, these species are adapted to the characteristic Mediterranean-type dry season, but the mechanisms of tolerance have not been studied. The water relations of P. munitum and D. arguta were surveyed for over a year, including measures of water potential (Ψ), stomatal conductance (gs) and frond stipe hydraulic conductivity (K). A dehydration and re-watering experiment on potted P. munitum plants corroborated the field data. The seasonal Ψ varied from 0 to below -3 MPa in both species, with gs and K generally tracking Ψ; the loss of K rarely exceeded 80%. Quantile regression analysis showed that, at the 0.1 quantile, 50% of K was lost at -2.58 and -3.84 MPa in P. munitum and D. arguta, respectively. The hydraulic recovery of re-watered plants was attributed to capillarity. The seasonal water relations of P. munitum and D. arguta are variable, but consistent with laboratory-based estimates of drought tolerance. Hydraulic and Ψ recovery following rain allows perennial ferns to survive severe drought, but prolonged water deficit, coupled with insect damage, may hamper frond survival. The legacy effects of drought on reproductive capacity and community dynamics are unknown.

  5. A novel method of protein extraction from perennial Bupleurum root for 2-DE.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Pan, Shengli; Liu, Shufen; Ye, Kan; Huo, Keke

    2007-03-01

    The perennial Bupleurum root is thick and woody and contains high levels of interfering compounds. Common protein extraction methods have proved refractory towards the isolation of proteins suitable for 2-DE, due to the presence of interfering compounds. A novel method for extracting proteins suitable for 2-DE was established to overcome these problems. The main characteristic of this protocol is the partitioning of the proteins into the aqueous (fraction A-2), chloroform and isoamyl alcohol phases (A-3), and the interphase (A-1). The proteins are then extracted from each of these phases. From A-1, 85% (extracted protein against total proteins) proteins could be extracted and purified. For fraction A-2, a novel phenol extraction step is employed for the extraction of proteins. Based on the well-resolved 2-DE patterns, our protein preparation is free of interfering compounds. Using these methods (A-1, A-2, and A-3-3), a total of 3662 (1526 + 1128 + 1008) spots could be separated, and a protein yield of about 1.41 mg per 1.0 g fresh root material was obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a protocol for protein extraction from perennial Bupleurum root has been reported that gives reproducible results. The protocol is expected to be applicable to other recalcitrant plant tissues as well.

  6. Perennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Werling, Ben P; Dickson, Timothy L; Isaacs, Rufus; Gaines, Hannah; Gratton, Claudio; Gross, Katherine L; Liere, Heidi; Malmstrom, Carolyn M; Meehan, Timothy D; Ruan, Leilei; Robertson, Bruce A; Robertson, G Philip; Schmidt, Thomas M; Schrotenboer, Abbie C; Teal, Tracy K; Wilson, Julianna K; Landis, Douglas A

    2014-01-28

    Agriculture is being challenged to provide food, and increasingly fuel, for an expanding global population. Producing bioenergy crops on marginal lands--farmland suboptimal for food crops--could help meet energy goals while minimizing competition with food production. However, the ecological costs and benefits of growing bioenergy feedstocks--primarily annual grain crops--on marginal lands have been questioned. Here we show that perennial bioenergy crops provide an alternative to annual grains that increases biodiversity of multiple taxa and sustain a variety of ecosystem functions, promoting the creation of multifunctional agricultural landscapes. We found that switchgrass and prairie plantings harbored significantly greater plant, methanotrophic bacteria, arthropod, and bird diversity than maize. Although biomass production was greater in maize, all other ecosystem services, including methane consumption, pest suppression, pollination, and conservation of grassland birds, were higher in perennial grasslands. Moreover, we found that the linkage between biodiversity and ecosystem services is dependent not only on the choice of bioenergy crop but also on its location relative to other habitats, with local landscape context as important as crop choice in determining provision of some services. Our study suggests that bioenergy policy that supports coordinated land use can diversify agricultural landscapes and sustain multiple critical ecosystem services.

  7. Facilitation of a native pest of rice, Stenotus rubrovittatus (Hemiptera: Miridae), by the non-native Lolium multiflorum (Cyperales: Poaceae) in an agricultural landscape.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Akira; Takada, Mayura; Washitani, Izumi

    2011-10-01

    Source populations of polyphagous pests often occur on host plants other than the economically damaged crop. We evaluated the contribution of patches of a non-native meadow grass, Lolium multiflorum Lam. (Poaceae), and other weeds growing in fallow fields or meadows as source hosts of an important native pest of rice, Stenotus rubrovittatus (Matsumura) (Hemiptera: Miridae), in an agricultural landscape of northern Japan. Periodical censuses of this mirid bug by using the sweeping method, vegetation surveys, and statistical analysis revealed that L. multiflorum was the only plant species that was positively correlated with the density of adult S. rubrovittatus through two generations and thus may be the most stable and important host of the mirid bug early in the season before the colonization of rice paddies. The risk and cost of such an indirect negative effect on a crop plant through facilitation of a native pest by a non-native plant in the agricultural landscape should not be overlooked.

  8. Designing hybrid grass genomes to control runoff generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, C.; Binley, A.; Humphreys, M.; King, I. P.; O'Donovan, S.; Papadopoulos, A.; Turner, L. B.; Watts, C.; Whalley, W. R.; Haygarth, P.

    2010-12-01

    Sustainable management of water in landscapes requires balancing demands of agricultural production whilst moderating downstream effects like flooding. Pasture comprises 69% of global agricultural areas and is essential for producing food and fibre alongside environmental goods and services. Thus there is a need to breed forage grasses that deliver multiple benefits through increased levels of productivity whilst moderating fluxes of water. Here we show that a novel grass hybrid that combines the entire genomes of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne - the grass of choice for Europe’s forage agriculture) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis) has a significant role in flood prevention. Field plot experiments established differences in runoff generation with the hybrid cultivar reducing runoff by 50% compared to perennial ryegrass cultivar, and by 35% compared to a meadow fescue cultivar (34 events over two years, replicated randomized-block design, statistically significant differences). This important research outcome was the result of a project that combined plant genetics, soil physics and plot scale hydrology to identify novel grass genotypes that can reduce runoff from grassland systems. Through a coordinated series of experiments examining effects from the gene to plot scale, we have identified that the rapid growth and then turnover of roots in the L. perenne x F. pratensis hybrid is likely to be a key mechanism in reducing runoff generation. More broadly this is an exciting first step to realizing the potential to design grass genomes to achieve both food production, and to deliver flood control, a key ecosystem service.

  9. Plant-bacterial combinations to phytoremediate soil contaminated with high concentrations of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, S.D.; Greer, C.W.

    2000-02-01

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a contaminant of concern at abandoned manufacturing and military sites because of its mobility and toxicity. Phytoremediation may play a role in natural attenuation scenarios by reducing TNT levels at point sources. The purpose of this study was to develop a phytoremediation system suitable for use in soils contaminated with high TNT levels. Sixteen grasses were screened for their tolerance to 41 g TNT kg{sup 1} soil. Meadow bromegrass (Bromus erectus Huds.), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and sweet vernalgrass (Anthoxanthum odoratum L.) grew in this soil. Inoculating these grasses with Pseudomonas sp. Strain 14, capable of transforming TNT into mono- and di-amino metabolites, increased the growth of meadow bromegrass but was lethal to perennial ryegrass and sweet vernalgrass. Meadow bromegrass inoculated with strain 14 reduced TNT levels by 30% compared with the control soil and had 50% more plant biomass than noninoculated plants. Meadow bromegrass, combined with strain 14, increased the percentage of the culturable soil heterotrophic population containing the genes involved in 2-nitrotoluene (ntdAa) metabolism 3-fold, as well as the population containing the genes involved in 4-nitrotoluene (ntnM) metabolism 14-fold. strain 14 inoculation of meadow bromegrass altered the portion of the rhizosphere community involved in nitroaromatic metabolism and led to a reduction in soil TNT levels.

  10. Use of pruning waste compost as a component in soilless growing media.

    PubMed

    Benito, Marta; Masaguer, Alberto; De Antonio, Roberto; Moliner, Ana

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this work was to study the use of pruning wastes compost (PWC) as a growing media component for ornamental plants. The main physical, chemical and biological characteristics of PWC were analysed in order to evaluate its suitability for use in soil-less cultivation. Six growth substrates were prepared by mixing PWC with peat (P), ground leaves (GL), sand (S) and spent mushroom compost (SMC) in different proportions. Two different pot experiments were carried out to test its characteristics of production using perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and cypress (Cupressus sempervirens L.) as indicators and the different media as treatments. The growth experiments showed that PWC required mixing with a nutrient-richer material to produce higher results. Therefore, substrates containing SMC (PWC+P+SMC and PWC+SMC) seems to be the most adequate growing media. After the statistical analysis, we concluded that the PWC could be used as a growing media component.

  11. Fungal endophyte N-acetylglucosaminidase expression in the infected host grass.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaijun Michael; Crouch, Jo Anne; Belanger, Faith C

    2005-03-01

    Fungal endophytes of the genera Neotyphodium and Epichlolë are important mutualistic symbionts and pathogens of many cool-season grass species. Here we report the characterization of a secreted N-acetylglucosaminidase from the Neotyphodium sp. endophyte that infects the grass Poa ampla. The enzyme was expressed at low levels within the host, and activity could be detected in the apoplastic protein fraction. Low-level expression could also be detected in endophyte-infected perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne), Chewings fescue (Festuca rubra subsp. fallax), and tall fescue (L. arundinaceum). The enzyme may function in the recycling of chitin oligomers generated from turnover of the fungal cell wall. This is the first report of a secreted N-acetylglucosaminidase expressed by an endophytic fungus in the infected host plant.

  12. A novel grass hybrid to reduce flood generation in temperate regions

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Christopher (Kit) J. A.; Humphreys, Mike W.; Whalley, W. Richard; Turner, Lesley; Binley, Andrew; Watts, Chris W.; Skøt, Leif; Joynes, Adrian; Hawkins, Sarah; King, Ian P.; O'Donovan, Sally; Haygarth, Phil M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the evaluation of a novel grass hybrid that provides efficient forage production and could help mitigate flooding. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) is the grass species of choice for most farmers, but lacks resilience against extremes of climate. We hybridised L. perenne onto a closely related and more stress-resistant grass species, meadow fescue Festuca pratensis. We