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Sample records for performance carbon beam

  1. Characterization and performance of carbon films deposited by plasma and ion beam based techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K C; Kung, H; Levine, T

    1994-12-31

    Plasma and ion beam based techniques have been used to deposit carbon-based films. The ion beam based method, a cathodic arc process, used a magnetically mass analyzed beam and is inherently a line-of-sight process. Two hydrocarbon plasma-based, non-line-of-sight techniques were also used and have the advantage of being capable of coating complicated geometries. The self-bias technique can produce hard carbon films, but is dependent on rf power and the surface area of the target. The pulsed-bias technique can also produce hard carbon films but has the additional advantage of being independent of rf power and target surface area. Tribological results indicated the coefficient of friction is nearly the same for carbon films from each deposition process, but the wear rate of the cathodic arc film was five times less than for the self-bias or pulsed-bias films. Although the cathodic arc film was the hardest, contained the highest fraction of sp{sup 3} bonds and exhibited the lowest wear rate, the cathodic arc film also produced the highest wear on the 440C stainless steel counterface during tribological testing. Thus, for tribological applications requiring low wear rates for both counterfaces, coating one surface with a very hard, wear resistant film may detrimentally affect the tribological behavior of the counterface.

  2. Prestressing Effects on the Performance of Concrete Beams with Near-surface-mounted Carbon-fiber-reinforced Polymer Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungnam; Park, Sun-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The effects of various prestressing levels on the flexural behavior of concrete beams strengthened with prestressed near-surface-mounted (NSM) carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bars were investigated in this study. Four-point flexural tests up to failure were performed using a total of six strengthened prestressed and nonprestressed concrete beams. The nonprestressed strengthened beam failed by premature debonding at the interface of concrete and the epoxy adhesive, but the prestressed one failed owing due to rupture of the CFRP bar. As the prestressing level of the CFRP bar increased, the cracking and yield loads of the prestressed beams increased, but its effect on their deflections was insignificant. The ultimate load was constant regardless of prestressing level, but the ultimate deflection was almost inversely proportional to the level.

  3. Friction and wear performance of ion-beam deposited diamondlike carbon films on steel substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Nichols, F.A.; Pan, X.Z. . Materials and Components Technology Div.); Wei, R.; Wilbur, P. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the friction and wear performance of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike-carbon (DLC) films (1.5 [mu]m thick) on AISI 440C steel substrates. Furthermore, we ran a series of long-duration wear tests under 5, 10, and 20 N load to assess the load-bearing capacity and durability limits of these films under each load. Tests were performed on a ball-on-disk machine in open air at room temperature [approx] 22[plus minus]1[degrees]C, and humidity, [approx] 30[plus minus]5%. For the test conditions explored, we found that (1) the steady-state friction coefficients of pairs without a DLC film were in the range of 0.7 to 0.9 and the average wear rates of 440C balls (9.55 mm diameter) sliding against uncoated 440C disks were on the order of 10[sup [minus]5] mm[sup 3]/N.m, depending on contact load; (2) DLC films reduced the steady-state friction coefficients of test pairs by factors of 6 to 8, and the wear rates of pins by factors of 500 to 2000; (3) The wear of disks coated with a DLC film was virtually unmeasurable while the wear of uncoated disks was quite substantial, (4) these DLC films were able to endure the range of loads, 5 to 20 N, without any delamination and to last over a million cycles before wearing out. During long-duration wear tests, the friction coefficients were initially on the order of 0.15, but decreased to some low values of 0.05 to 0.07 after sliding for 15 to 25 km, depending on the load, and remained low until wearing out. This low-friction regime was correlated with the formation of a carbon-rich transfer film on the wear scar of 440C balls. Micro-laser-Raman spectroscopy and scanning-electron microscopy were used to examine the structure and chemistry of worn surfaces and to elucidate the wear- and friction-reducing mechanisms of the DLC film.

  4. Friction and wear performance of ion-beam deposited diamondlike carbon films on steel substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Nichols, F.A.; Pan, X.Z.; Wei, R.; Wilbur, P.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the friction and wear performance of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike-carbon (DLC) films (1.5 {mu}m thick) on AISI 440C steel substrates. Furthermore, we ran a series of long-duration wear tests under 5, 10, and 20 N load to assess the load-bearing capacity and durability limits of these films under each load. Tests were performed on a ball-on-disk machine in open air at room temperature {approx} 22{plus_minus}1{degrees}C, and humidity, {approx} 30{plus_minus}5%. For the test conditions explored, we found that (1) the steady-state friction coefficients of pairs without a DLC film were in the range of 0.7 to 0.9 and the average wear rates of 440C balls (9.55 mm diameter) sliding against uncoated 440C disks were on the order of 10{sup {minus}5} mm{sup 3}/N.m, depending on contact load; (2) DLC films reduced the steady-state friction coefficients of test pairs by factors of 6 to 8, and the wear rates of pins by factors of 500 to 2000; (3) The wear of disks coated with a DLC film was virtually unmeasurable while the wear of uncoated disks was quite substantial, (4) these DLC films were able to endure the range of loads, 5 to 20 N, without any delamination and to last over a million cycles before wearing out. During long-duration wear tests, the friction coefficients were initially on the order of 0.15, but decreased to some low values of 0.05 to 0.07 after sliding for 15 to 25 km, depending on the load, and remained low until wearing out. This low-friction regime was correlated with the formation of a carbon-rich transfer film on the wear scar of 440C balls. Micro-laser-Raman spectroscopy and scanning-electron microscopy were used to examine the structure and chemistry of worn surfaces and to elucidate the wear- and friction-reducing mechanisms of the DLC film.

  5. Ion recombination correction in carbon ion beams.

    PubMed

    Rossomme, S; Hopfgartner, J; Lee, N D; Delor, A; Thomas, R A S; Romano, F; Fukumura, A; Vynckier, S; Palmans, H

    2016-07-01

    In this work, ion recombination is studied as a function of energy and depth in carbon ion beams. Measurements were performed in three different passively scattered carbon ion beams with energies of 62 MeV/n, 135 MeV/n, and 290 MeV/n using various types of plane-parallel ionization chambers. Experimental results were compared with two analytical models for initial recombination. One model is generally used for photon beams and the other model, developed by Jaffé, takes into account the ionization density along the ion track. An investigation was carried out to ascertain the effect on the ion recombination correction with varying ionization chamber orientation with respect to the direction of the ion tracks. The variation of the ion recombination correction factors as a function of depth was studied for a Markus ionization chamber in the 62 MeV/n nonmodulated carbon ion beam. This variation can be related to the depth distribution of linear energy transfer. Results show that the theory for photon beams is not applicable to carbon ion beams. On the other hand, by optimizing the value of the ionization density and the initial mean-square radius, good agreement is found between Jaffé's theory and the experimental results. As predicted by Jaffé's theory, the results confirm that ion recombination corrections strongly decrease with an increasing angle between the ion tracks and the electric field lines. For the Markus ionization chamber, the variation of the ion recombination correction factor with depth was modeled adequately by a sigmoid function, which is approximately constant in the plateau and strongly increasing in the Bragg peak region to values of up to 1.06. Except in the distal edge region, all experimental results are accurately described by Jaffé's theory. Experimental results confirm that ion recombination in the investigated carbon ion beams is dominated by initial recombination. Ion recombination corrections are found to be significant and cannot be

  6. Electron Beam Exposure of Thermal Control Paints on Carbon-Carbon and Carbon-Polyimide Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites are being considered for use as radiator face sheets or fins for space radiator applications. Several traditional white thermal control paints are being considered for the surface of the composite face sheets or fins. One threat to radiator performance is high energy electrons. The durability of the thermal control paints applied to the carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites was evaluated after extended exposure to 4.5 MeV electrons. Electron exposure was conducted under argon utilizing a Mylar™ bag enclosure. Solar absorptance and infrared emittance was evaluated before and after exposure to identify optical properties degradation. Adhesion of the paints to the carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composite substrates was also of interest. Adhesion was evaluated on pristine and electron beam exposed coupons using a variation of the ASTM D-3359 tape test. Results of the optical properties evaluation and the adhesion tape tests are summarized.

  7. Particle radiotherapy with carbon ion beams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy offers superior dose conformity in the treatment of deep-seated malignant tumours compared with conventional X-ray therapy. In addition, carbon ion beams have a higher relative biological effectiveness compared with protons or X-ray beams. The algorithm of treatment planning and beam delivery system is tailored to the individual parameters of the patient. The present article reviews the available literatures for various disease sites including the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer as well as physical and biological properties. PMID:23497542

  8. Radiotherapy with beams of carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, Ugo; Kraft, Gerhard

    2005-08-01

    In cancer treatment, the introduction of MeV bremsstrahlung photons has been instrumental in delivering higher doses to deep-seated tumours, while reducing the doses absorbed by the surrounding healthy tissues. Beams of protons and carbon ions have a much more favourable dose-depth distribution than photons (called 'x-rays' by medical doctors) and are the new frontiers of cancer radiation therapy. Section 2 presents the status of the first form of hadrontherapy which uses beams of 200-250 MeV protons. The central part of this review is devoted to the discussion of the physical, radiobiological and clinical bases of the use of 400 MeV µ-1 carbon ions in the treatment of radio-resistant tumours. These resist irradiation with photon as well as proton beams. The following section describes the carbon ion facilities that are either running or under construction. Finally, the projects recently approved or proposed are reviewed here.

  9. Scanned Carbon Pencil Beams for Tumor Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmel, A.; Saito, N.; Chaudhri, N.; Lü; chtenborg, R.; Schardt, D.; Rietzel, E.; Bert, Ch.

    2009-03-01

    At GSI a fully active beam application has been developed for tumor therapy with carbon ions. In this so-called rasterscan system the tumor volume is typically split into ˜60 slices of iso-energies taken from a list of 252 energies ranging from ˜90-430 MeV/u (range: 1.8-30.7 cm). The energies can be combined with variable beam diameters and intensities. For each iso-energy slice beam is requested from the synchrotron and delivered as a narrow pencil beam (beam's full width at half maximum 3-10 mm). For lateral target coverage this pencil beam is deflected to several hundreds of grid positions per iso-energy slice by orthogonal dipole magnets. At each grid position an optimized number of particles is deposited intensity-controlled, i.e. ionization chambers monitor the dose deposition and trigger deflection to the next grid position once the required dose level is achieved. This method allows intensity-modulated treatment fields necessary to deposit a uniform biological effective dose. Additionally, it allows for simultaneous optimization of multiple fields that allow better sparing of organs at risk partially or fully surrounded by the tumor. Scanned beam delivery facilitates target conformal and homogeneous dose delivery for stationary targets. For tumors located in the head & neck as well as tumors in the pelvic region very promising results were achieved in the carbon therapy pilot project started at GSI in 1993. A comparable project is conducted at Paul-Scherrer-Institut (PSI) in Switzerland with a scanned proton beam. One of the current research topics is the treatment of moving targets such as lung tumors. Scanned beam delivery requires but also offers possibilities to conformably irradiate moving target sites.

  10. Electron Beam Exposure of Thermal Control Paints on Carbon-Carbon and Carbon-Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites are being considered for use as radiator face sheets or fins for space radiator applications. Several traditional white thermal control paints are being considered for the surface of the composite face sheets or fins. One threat to radiator performance is high energy electrons. The durability of the thermal control paints applied to the carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composites was evaluated after extended exposure to 4.5 MeV electrons. Electron exposure was conducted under argon utilizing a Mylar(TradeMark) bag enclosure. Solar absorptance and infrared emittance was evaluated before and after exposure to identify optical properties degradation. Adhesion of the paints to the carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide composite substrates was also of interest. Adhesion was evaluated on pristine and electron beam exposed coupons using a variation of the ASTM D-3359 tape test. Results of the optical properties evaluation and the adhesion tape tests are summarized.

  11. Clinical evidence of particle beam therapy (carbon).

    PubMed

    Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-04-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) is unique as it possesses well-localized and superior-depth dose distribution in addition to less repairable radiobiological effects. The use of CIRT for various diseases has been explored as clinical trials at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. Since 1994, when the first clinical study of cancer therapy with carbon ion beams was started, about 50 clinical studies have been completed safely and effectively. These studies revealed that intractable cancers such as inoperable bone and soft-tissue sarcomas can be cured safely in a shorter overall treatment time, as can cancers in the head, neck, lung, liver, prostate, and postoperative pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer. The number of patients receiving CIRT has reached 6,000, and the therapy was approved as a highly advanced medical technology in 2003. Based on these experiences, we embarked on the research and development of new-generation beam delivery facilities such as a 3D scanning method with a pencil beam and a compact rotating gantry. Clinical research using pencil-beam scanning has been in operation since May 2011.

  12. Application of ion beams for polymeric carbon based biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evelyn, A. L.

    2001-07-01

    Ion beams have been shown to be quite suitable for the modification and analysis of carbon based biomaterials. Glassy polymeric carbon (GPC), made from cured phenolic resins, has a high chemical inertness that makes it useful as a biomaterial in medicine for drug delivery systems and for the manufacture of heart valves and other prosthetic devices. Low and high-energy ion beams have been used, with both partially and fully cured phenolic resins, to enhance biological cell/tissue growth on, and to increase tissue adhesion to GPC surfaces. Samples bombarded with energetic ion beams in the keV to MeV range exhibited increased surface roughness, measured using optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Ion beams were also used to perform nuclear reaction analyses of GPC encapsulated drugs for use in internal drug delivery systems. The results from the high energy bombardment were more dramatic and are shown in this paper. The interaction of energetic ions has demonstrated the useful application of ion beams to enhance the properties of carbon-based biomaterials.

  13. Joining Carbon-Carbon Composites and High-Temperature Materials with High Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Daniel; Singler, Robert

    1998-01-01

    1. Program goals addressed during this period. Experimental work was directed at formation of a low-stress bond between carbon- carbon and aluminum, with the objective of minimizing the heating of the aluminum substrate, thereby minimizing stresses resulting from the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) difference between the aluminum and carbon-carbon. A second objective was to form a bond between carbon-carbon and aluminum with good thermal conductivity for electronic thermal management (SEM-E) application. 2. Substrates and joining materials selected during this period. Carbon-Carbon Composite (CCC) to Aluminum. CCC (Cu coated) to Aluminum. Soldering compounds based on Sn/Pb and Sn/Ag/Cu/Bi compositions. 3. Soldering experiments performed. Conventional techniques. High Energy Electron Beam (HEEB) process.

  14. Radiation Therapy Using High-Energy Carbon Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, T.

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy using high-energy carbon beams has been performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan. The physical frameworks for heavy-ion radiotherapy are established using an understanding of radiation physics. In this chapter, the biophysical and medical physics aspects of heavy-ion radiotherapy are presented. In order to increase the accuracy of heavy-ion radiotherapy, many physical problems should be solved. A calorimeter was developed to measure the absolute dose of the heavy-ion beams. From a comparison of the dosimetry, it was found that the dose indicated by the ionization chamber was underestimated by 3-4%. The clinical results of carbon therapy at heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) are assessed using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model of radiation effect. Development of new scintillation and Rossi counters will allow simultaneous measurement of the radiation dose and quality of heavy-ion beams. Further research is required to provide a comprehensive biophysical model for clinical applications.

  15. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  16. Performance Comparison: Superbeams, Beta Beams, Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Walter

    2011-10-06

    In this talk, the performance comparison among superbeams (SB), beta beams (BB), and the Neutrino Factory (NF) is discussed. The ingredients to such a comparison are described, and the optimization and status of BB and NF are addressed. Finally, one example for the performance comparison is shown.

  17. Beam commissioning of a superconducting rotating-gantry for carbon-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Y.; Fujimoto, T.; Matsuba, S.; Fujita, T.; Sato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Hara, Y.; Mizushima, K.; Saraya, Y.; Tansho, R.; Saotome, N.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2016-10-01

    A superconducting rotating-gantry for carbon-ion radiotherapy was developed. This isocentric gantry can transport carbon ions having kinetic energies of between E=430 and 48 MeV/u to an isocenter over an angle of ±180°, and is further capable of performing three-dimensional raster-scanning irradiation. Construction of the entire rotating-gantry system was completed by the end of September 2015. Prior to beam commissioning, phase-space distributions of extracted carbon beams from the synchrotron were deduced by using an empirical method. In this method, phase-space distributions at the extraction channel of the synchrotron were modeled with 8 parameters, and the best parameters were determined so as to minimize a difference between the calculated and measured beam profiles by using a simplex method. Based on the phase-space distributions, beam optics through the beam-transport lines as well as the rotating gantry were designed. Since horizontal and vertical beam emittances, as extracted slowly from the synchrotron, generally differ with each other, a horizontal-vertical beam coupling would occur when the gantry rotates. Thus, the size and shape of beam spots at the isocenter should vary depending on the gantry angle. To compensate for the difference in the emittances, we employed a method to utilize multiple Coulomb scattering of the beam particles by a thin scatterer. Having compensated for the emittances and designed beam optics through the rotating gantry, beam commissioning over various combinations of gantry angles and beam energies was performed. By finely tuning the superconducting quadrupoles of the rotating gantry, we could successfully obtain the designed beam quality, which satisfies the requirements of scanning irradiation.

  18. Dose-response of EBT3 radiochromic films to proton and carbon ion clinical beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castriconi, Roberta; Ciocca, Mario; Mirandola, Alfredo; Sini, Carla; Broggi, Sara; Schwarz, Marco; Fracchiolla, Francesco; Martišíková, Mária; Aricò, Giulia; Mettivier, Giovanni; Russo, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the dose-response of the external beam therapy 3 (EBT3) films for proton and carbon ion clinical beams, in comparison with conventional radiotherapy beams; we also measured the film response along the energy deposition-curve in water. We performed measurements at three hadrontherapy centres by delivering monoenergetic pencil beams (protons: 63-230 MeV; carbon ions: 115-400 MeV/u), at 0.4-20 Gy dose to water, in the plateau of the depth-dose curve. We also irradiated the films to clinical MV-photon and electron beams. We placed the EBT3 films in water along the whole depth-dose curve for 148.8 MeV protons and 398.9 MeV/u carbon ions, in comparison with measurements provided by a plane-parallel ionization chamber. For protons, the response of EBT3 in the plateau of the depth-dose curve is not different from that of photons, within experimental uncertainties. For carbon ions, we observed an energy dependent under-response of EBT3 film, from 16% to 29% with respect to photon beams. Moreover, we observed an under-response in the Bragg peak region of about 10% for 148.8 MeV protons and of about 42% for 398.9 MeV/u carbon ions. For proton and carbon ion clinical beams, an under-response occurs at the Bragg peak. For carbon ions, we also observed an under-response of the EBT3 in the plateau of the depth-dose curve. This effect is the highest at the lowest initial energy of the clinical beams, a phenomenon related to the corresponding higher LET in the film sensitive layer. This behavior should be properly modeled when using EBT3 films for accurate 3D dosimetry.

  19. Dose-response of EBT3 radiochromic films to proton and carbon ion clinical beams.

    PubMed

    Castriconi, Roberta; Ciocca, Mario; Mirandola, Alfredo; Sini, Carla; Broggi, Sara; Schwarz, Marco; Fracchiolla, Francesco; Martišíková, Mária; Aricò, Giulia; Mettivier, Giovanni; Russo, Paolo

    2017-01-21

    We investigated the dose-response of the external beam therapy 3 (EBT3) films for proton and carbon ion clinical beams, in comparison with conventional radiotherapy beams; we also measured the film response along the energy deposition-curve in water. We performed measurements at three hadrontherapy centres by delivering monoenergetic pencil beams (protons: 63-230 MeV; carbon ions: 115-400 MeV/u), at 0.4-20 Gy dose to water, in the plateau of the depth-dose curve. We also irradiated the films to clinical MV-photon and electron beams. We placed the EBT3 films in water along the whole depth-dose curve for 148.8 MeV protons and 398.9 MeV/u carbon ions, in comparison with measurements provided by a plane-parallel ionization chamber. For protons, the response of EBT3 in the plateau of the depth-dose curve is not different from that of photons, within experimental uncertainties. For carbon ions, we observed an energy dependent under-response of EBT3 film, from 16% to 29% with respect to photon beams. Moreover, we observed an under-response in the Bragg peak region of about 10% for 148.8 MeV protons and of about 42% for 398.9 MeV/u carbon ions. For proton and carbon ion clinical beams, an under-response occurs at the Bragg peak. For carbon ions, we also observed an under-response of the EBT3 in the plateau of the depth-dose curve. This effect is the highest at the lowest initial energy of the clinical beams, a phenomenon related to the corresponding higher LET in the film sensitive layer. This behavior should be properly modeled when using EBT3 films for accurate 3D dosimetry.

  20. Performance of the HIMAC beam control system using multiple-energy synchrotron operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, K.; Furukawa, T.; Iwata, Y.; Hara, Y.; Saotome, N.; Saraya, Y.; Tansho, R.; Sato, S.; Fujimoto, T.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2017-09-01

    Multiple-energy synchrotron operation was developed to realize fast 3D scanning irradiation for carbon-ion radiotherapy. This type of operation can output various carbon-ion beams with different energies in a single synchrotron cycle. The beam control system used in this kind of operation was developed to quickly provide the beam energy and intensity required from the irradiation control system. The performance of the system was verified by experimental tests. The system could output beams of 197 different energies in 63 s. The beam intensity could be controlled for all the output beams without large ripples or overshooting. The experimental test of irradiation for prostate cancer treatment was also successfully performed, and the test results proved that our system can greatly reduce the irradiation time.

  1. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Mitsutaka

    2007-05-01

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this requirement, design study of the facility and the R&D's of the key components in this design are promoted by NIRS. According successful results of these activities, the dedicated compact facility will be realized in Gunma University. In this facility, the established irradiation method is expected to use, which is passive irradiation method with wobbler magnets and ridge filter. In this presentation, above R&D's will be presented together with clinical results and basic research activities at HIMAC.

  2. Focused Ion Beam Microscopy of ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    Our aim is to understand the mechanism(s) of formation of carbonate assemblages in ALH84001. A prerequisite is that a detailed characterization of the chemical and physical properties of the carbonate be established. We present here analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of carbonate thin sections produced by both focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning and ultramicrotomy. Our results suggest that the formation of ALH84001 carbonate assemblages were produced by considerably more complex process(es) than simple aqueous precipitation followed by partial thermal decomposition as proposed by other investigators [e.g., 1-3].

  3. Graphitic carbon grown on fluorides by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Lee, Jae Hong; Kim, Yong Seung; Chun, Seung-Hyun

    2013-01-03

    We study the growth mechanism of carbon molecules supplied by molecular beam epitaxy on fluoride substrates (MgF2, CaF2, and BaF2). All the carbon layers form graphitic carbon with different crystallinities depending on the cation. Especially, the growth on MgF2 results in the formation of nanocrystalline graphite (NCG). Such dependence on the cation is a new observation and calls for further systematic studies with other series of substrates. At the same growth temperature, the NCG on MgF2 has larger clusters than those on oxides. This is contrary to the general expectation because the bond strength of the carbon-fluorine bond is larger than that of the carbon-oxygen bond. Our results show that the growth of graphitic carbon does not simply depend on the chemical bonding between the carbon and the anion in the substrate.

  4. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.

  5. Carbon-nanotube electron-beam (C-beam) crystallization technique for silicon TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Su Woong; Kang, Jung Su; Park, Kyu Chang

    2016-02-01

    We introduced a carbon-nanotube (CNT) electron beam (C-beam) for thin film crystallization and thin film transistor (TFT) applications. As a source of electron emission, a CNT emitter which had been grown on a silicon wafer with a resist-assisted patterning (RAP) process was used. By using the C-beam exposure, we successfully crystallized a silicon thin film that had nano-sized crystalline grains. The distribution of crystalline grain size was about 10 ˜ 30 nm. This nanocrystalline silicon thin film definitely had three crystalline directions which are (111), (220) and (311), respectively. The silicon TFTs crystallized by using a C-beam exposure showed a field effect mobility of 20 cm2/Vs and an on/off ratio of more than 107. The C-beam exposure can modify the bonding network of amorphous silicon with its proper energy.

  6. Hadron Cancer Therapy - relative merits of X-ray, proton and carbon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakel, Oliver

    2014-03-01

    -Heidelberg University has a long experience in radiotherapy with carbon ions, starting with a pilot project at GSI in 1997. This project was jointly run by the Dep. for Radiation Oncology of Heidelberg University, GSI and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ). A hospital based heavy ion center at Heidelberg University, the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) was proposed by the same group in 1998 and started clinical operation in late 2009. Since then nearly 2000 patients were treated with beams of carbon ions and protons. Just recently the operation of the world's first and only gantry for heavy ions also started at HIT. Patient treatments are performed in three rooms. Besides that, a lot of research projects are run in the field of Medical Physics and Radiobiology using a dedicated experimental area and the possibility to use beams of protons, carbon, helium and oxygen ions being delivered with the raster scanning technique.

  7. FIDDLING CARBON STRINGS WITH POLARIZED PROTON BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, H.; KURITA, K.

    2006-05-01

    An innovative polarimeter based on proton carbon elastic scattering in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region was first tested in the Brookhaven AGS successfully. CNI Polarimeters were then installed in the AGS and both RHIC rings. The polarimeter consists of ultra-thin carbon targets and silicon strip detectors. The waveform digitizers are used for signal readout, which allows deadtime-less data processing on the fly. Polarimeters are crucial instrumentation for the RHIC spin physics program. This paper summarizes the polarimeter design issues and operation results.

  8. Operational Performance of LCLS Beam Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, Henrik; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Edstrom, S.; Emma, P.; Fisher, A.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Messerschmidt, M.; Miahnahri, A.; Moeller, S.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore

    2010-06-15

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray FEL utilizing the last km of the SLAC linac has been operational since April 2009 and finished its first successful user run last December. The various diagnostics for electron beam properties including beam position monitors, wire scanners, beam profile monitors, and bunch length diagnostics are presented as well as diagnostics for the X-ray beam. The low emittance and ultra-short electron beam required for X-ray FEL operation has implications on the transverse and longitudinal diagnostics. The coherence effects of the beam profile monitors and the challenges of measuring fs long bunches are discussed.

  9. Ion beam and plasma methods of producing diamondlike carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swec, Diane M.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of plasma and ion beam techniques was employed to generate diamondlike carbon films. These methods included the use of RF sputtering, dc glow discharge, vacuum arc, plasma gun, ion beam sputtering, and both single and dual ion beam deposition. Since films were generated using a wide variety of techniques, the physico-chemical properties of these films varied considerably. In general, these films had characteristics that were desirable in a number of applications. For example, the films generated using both single and dual ion beam systems were evaluated for applications including power electronics as insulated gates and protective coatings on transmitting windows. These films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicated hydrogen to carbon ratios to be 1.00, which allowed the films to have good transmittance not only in the infrared, but also in the visible. Other evaluated properties of these films include band gap, resistivity, adherence, density, microhardness, and intrinsic stress. The results of these studies and those of the other techniques for depositing diamondlike carbon films are presented.

  10. Relativistic electron beam transport through cold and shock-heated carbon samples from aerogel to diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, C. M.; Wei, M.; Zhang, S.; Santos, J.; Nicolai, P.; Theobald, W.; Kim, J.; Forestier-Colleoni, P.; Beg, F.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the transport physics of a relativistic electron beam in various plasma regimes is crucial for many high-energy-density applications, such as fast heating for advanced ICF schemes and ion sources. Most short pulse laser-matter interaction experiments for transport studies have been performed with initially cold targets where the resistivity is far from that in warm dense plasmas. We present three experiments that have been performed on OMEGA EP in order to extend fast electron transport and energy coupling studies in pre-assembled plasmas from different carbon samples. Each experiment has used one 4 ns long pulse UV beam (1014 W/cm2) to drive a shockwave through the target and a 10 ps IR beam (1019 W/cm2) to create an electron beam moving opposite the shock propagation direction. These shots were compared with initially cold target shots without the UV beam. We fielded three different samples including 340 mg/cc CRF foam, vitreous carbon at 1.4 g/cc, and high density carbon at 3.4 g/cc. Electrons were diagnosed via x-ray fluorescence measurements from a buried Cu tracer in the target, as well as bremsstrahlung emission and escaped electrons reaching an electron spectrometer. Proton radiograph was also performed in the foam shots. Details of each experiment, available data and particle-in-cell simulations will be presented. This work is supported by US DOE NLUF Program, Grant Number DE-NA0002728.

  11. Carbon molecular beam epitaxy on various semiconductor substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Jerng, S.K.; Yu, D.S.; Lee, J.H.; Kim, Y.S.; Kim, C.; Yoon, S.; Chun, S.H.

    2012-10-15

    Direct graphene growth on semiconductor substrates is an important goal for successful integration of graphene with the existing semiconductor technology. We test the feasibility of this goal by using molecular beam epitaxy on various semiconductor substrates: group IV (Si, SiC), group III–V (GaAs, GaN, InP), and group II–VI (ZnSe, ZnO). Graphitic carbon has been formed on most substrates except Si. In general, the crystallinities of carbon layers are better on substrates of hexagonal symmetry than those on cubic substrates. The flatness of graphitic carbon grown by molecular beam epitaxy is noticeable, which may help the integration with semiconductor structures.

  12. Electron Cloud in Steel Beam Pipe vs Titanium Nitride Coated and Amorphous Carbon Coated Beam Pipes in Fermilab's Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Backfish, Michael

    2013-04-01

    This paper documents the use of four retarding field analyzers (RFAs) to measure electron cloud signals created in Fermilab’s Main Injector during 120 GeV operations. The first data set was taken from September 11, 2009 to July 4, 2010. This data set is used to compare two different types of beam pipe that were installed in the accelerator. Two RFAs were installed in a normal steel beam pipe like the rest of the Main Injector while another two were installed in a one meter section of beam pipe that was coated on the inside with titanium nitride (TiN). A second data run started on August 23, 2010 and ended on January 10, 2011 when Main Injector beam intensities were reduced thus eliminating the electron cloud. This second run uses the same RFA setup but the TiN coated beam pipe was replaced by a one meter section coated with amorphous carbon (aC). This section of beam pipe was provided by CERN in an effort to better understand how an aC coating will perform over time in an accelerator. The research consists of three basic parts: (a) continuously monitoring the conditioning of the three different types of beam pipe over both time and absorbed electrons (b) measurement of the characteristics of the surrounding magnetic fields in the Main Injector in order to better relate actual data observed in the Main Injector with that of simulations (c) measurement of the energy spectrum of the electron cloud signals using retarding field analyzers in all three types of beam pipe.

  13. Residual motion mitigation in scanned carbon ion beam therapy of liver tumors using enlarged pencil beam overlap.

    PubMed

    Richter, Daniel; Graeff, Christian; Jäkel, Oliver; Combs, Stephanie E; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2014-11-01

    Interplay effects may limit the applicability of scanned ion beam therapy for moving tumors even if the motion amplitude is reduced by techniques such as gating or abdominal compression (AC). We investigate the potential of enhanced pencil beam overlap to mitigate residual motion interplay effects in scanned ion beam therapy. Eight patients with hepato cellular carcinoma were selected who were either treated under AC (5 clinical target volumes (CTVs)) or with gating (6 CTVs). We performed 4D dose calculations for treatment plans with variable beam parameters (lateral raster spacing, beam full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM), iso-energy slice spacing, gating window (GW)) and assessed under- and overdose (V95 and V107), dose homogeneity (HI=D5-D95), and dose volume histograms. The influence of the beam parameters on HI was studied by multivariate regression models. Motion amplitude and FWHM had the largest impact on dose homogeneity, while decreased iso-energy slice spacing and lateral raster spacing had a much smaller or no significant effect, respectively. The multivariate regression models including FWHM, motion amplitude, and IES-spacing explained 86%, 42%, and 71% of the observed variance for AC, 30% and 50% GW, respectively. Residual motion in scanned carbon ion therapy of liver tumors can lead to considerable dose heterogeneities. Using an increased beam spot size dose degradation can be significantly mitigated. Especially for large tumors, increasing the beam spot size is an efficient motion mitigation option readily available at most scanning facilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Response of synthetic diamond detectors in proton, carbon, and oxygen ion beams.

    PubMed

    Rossomme, Séverine; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, Gianluca; Romano, Francesco; Cirrone, Pablo Antonio Giuseppe; Kacperek, Andrzej; Vynckier, Stefaan; Palmans, Hugo

    2017-07-15

    In this work, the LET-dependence of the response of synthetic diamond detectors is investigated in different particle beams. Measurements were performed in three nonmodulated particle beams (proton, carbon, and oxygen). The response of five synthetic diamond detectors was compared to the response of a Markus or an Advanced Markus ionization chamber. The synthetic diamond detectors were used with their axis parallel to the beam axis and without any bias voltage. A high bias voltage was applied to the ionization chambers, to minimize ion recombination, for which no correction is applied (+300 V and +400 V were applied to the Markus and Advanced Markus ionization chambers respectively). The ratio between the normalized response of the synthetic diamond detectors and the normalized response of the ionization chamber shows an under-response of the synthetic diamond detectors in carbon and oxygen ion beams. No under-response of the synthetic diamond detectors is observed in protons. For each beam, combining results obtained for the five synthetic diamond detectors and considering the uncertainties, a linear fit of the ratio between the normalized response of the synthetic diamond detectors and the normalized response of the ionization chamber is determined. The response of the synthetic diamond detectors can be described as a function of LET as (-6.22E-4 ± 3.17E-3) • LET + (0.99 ± 0.01) in proton beam, (-2.51E-4 ± 1.18E-4) • LET + (1.01 ± 0.01) in carbon ion beam and (-2.77E-4 ± 0.56E-4) • LET + (1.03 ± 0.01) in oxygen ion beam. Combining results obtained in carbon and oxygen ion beams, a LET dependence of about 0.026% (±0.013%) per keV/μm is estimated. Due to the high LET value, a LET dependence of the response of the synthetic diamond detector was observed in the case of carbon and oxygen beams. The effect was found to be negligible in proton beams, due to the low LET value. The under-response of the synthetic diamond detector may result from the

  15. Performance of Advanced Light Source particle beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, is complete. The particle beam diagnostics have been installed and tested. The beam injection systems have been running for two years. We have performance data on beam position monitors, beam intensity monitors, scintillators, beam collimators, a 50 {Omega} Faraday cup, and broad-band striplines and kickers used in the linac, transport lines, and the booster synchrotron. The single-turn monitoring capability of the booster beam position monitoring system has been particularly useful for studying beam dynamics. Beam diagnostics for the storage ring are being commissioned. In this paper we describe each instrument, show its performance, and outline how the instruments are controlled and their output data displayed.

  16. Reinforcing multiwall carbon nanotubes by electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Duchamp, Martial; Meunier, Richard; Smajda, Rita; Mionic, Marijana; Forro, Laszlo; Magrez, Arnaud; Seo, Jin Won; Song, Bo; Tomanek, David

    2010-10-15

    We study the effect of electron beam irradiation on the bending modulus of multiwall carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapor deposition. Atomic force microscopy observations of the nanotube deflection in the suspended-beam geometry suggest an internal, reversible stick-slip motion prior to irradiation, indicating presence of extended defects. Upon electron beam irradiation, nanotubes with an initial bending modulus exceeding 10 GPa initially get stiffer, before softening at high doses. Highly defective nanotubes with smaller initial bending moduli do not exhibit the initial reinforcement. These data are explained by ab initio molecular dynamics calculations suggesting a spontaneous cross-linking of neighboring nanotube walls at extended vacancy defects created by the electron beam, in agreement with electron microscopy observations. At low defect concentration, depending on the edge morphology, the covalent bonds between neighboring nanotube walls cause reinforcement by resisting relative motion of neighboring walls. At high concentration of defects that are present initially or induced by high electron beam dose, the structural integrity of the entire system suffers from increasing electron beam damage.

  17. Beam-induced graphitic carbon cage transformation from sumanene aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Jun-ichi Tachi, Masashi; Murakami, Katsuhisa; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Morita, Yuki; Higashibayashi, Shuhei; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2014-01-27

    We found that electron-beam irradiation of sumanene aggregates strongly enhanced their transformation into a graphitic carbon cage, having a diameter of about 20 nm. The threshold electron dose was about 32 mC/cm{sup 2} at 200 keV, but the transformation is still induced at 20 keV. The transformation sequence suggested that the cage was constructed accompanied by the dynamical movement of the transiently linked sumanene molecules in order to pile up inside the shell. Thus, bond excitation in the sumanene molecules rather than a knock-on of carbon atoms seems to be the main cause of the cage transformation.

  18. A pixel chamber to monitor the beam performances in hadron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, R.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Marchetto, F.; Peroni, C.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Simonetti, L.

    2004-03-01

    In this paper we describe the design, construction, and tests of a parallel plate ionization chamber with the anode segmented in (32×32) square pixels. The performance of the read out and data acquisition systems is also discussed. The design of the chamber has been finalized to be used as a beam monitor for therapeutical treatments. Position and flux resolution obtained with a carbon ion beam are presented.

  19. Nuclear microprobe performance in high-current proton beam mode for micro-PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavpetič, P.; Kelemen, M.; Jenčič, B.; Pelicon, P.

    2017-08-01

    The performance of a nuclear microprobe is dominantly determined by the brightness of the injected ion beam. At Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI), negative hydrogen ion beams are created in a multicusp ion source and injected into a 2 MV tandetron accelerator. The output characteristics of the multicusp ion source were tuned in order to obtain matching proton beam intensities for the ion accelerator and for the object slits as well. For the optimal focusing of the proton beam in a high-current mode (I > 100 pA) to the sub-micrometer dimensions, dedicated thin nanostructures with sharp edges have been manufactured. Set of nanostructures was micromachined by focused ion beam (FIB) at film reference material, produced by Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) and constituted of 57 μg/cm2 of titanium on vitreous carbon substrate. The proton beam profiles were measured by beam scans across the nanostructures over long measuring times, indicating eventual slow drifts of the sample from a reference beam direction. Overall, proton beam dimensions of 600 nm were obtained, demonstrating appropriate stability for micro-PIXE (micro-Particle Induced X-ray Emission) at sub-micrometer resolution for elemental analysis of biological tissue samples prepared in a freeze-dried state or in a frozen-hydrated state. The resulting performance required for micro-PIXE analysis in a high current mode with a 3 MeV proton beam is presented.

  20. Coherent beam combining performance in harsh environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, L.; Canat, G.; Durecu, A.; Bourdon, P.

    2014-03-01

    Coherent beam combining (CBC) is a promising solution for high power directed energy weapons. We investigate several particular issues for this application: First, we study the evolution of phase noise spectrum for increasing pump power in 100 W MOPFA. The main variations in the spectrum are located in the low frequency region corresponding to thermal transfer between the fiber core heated by the pump absorption and the fiber environment. The phase noise root mean square evolves linearly with the pump power. Noise spectrum is not shifted to higher frequencies. Second, we investigate the influence of fiber packaging and amplifier packaging on the phase noise and estimate the LOCSET controller bandwidth (BW) requirement in each case. Results show large variation of BW depending on the packaging, and not on the power. Then, we investigate the performances of CBC in harsh environment. For this purpose, we implement CBC of a 20-W fiber amplifier and a passive fiber using the LOCSET technique and simulate harsh environment by applying strong vibrations with a hammering drill on the optical table. The applied vibration spectrum ranges from 1 Hz to ~10 kHz with a standard deviation of 9 m/s2. CBC of the amplifier output and the passive fiber output is performed on a second table, isolated from vibrations. Measurements of the phase difference between both outputs and of the applied vibrations are simultaneously performed. Residual phase error of λ/40 (i.e. > 99 % CBC efficiency) is achieved under strong vibrations at 20 W. The -3 dB bandwidth of the LOCSET controller has been measured to be ~4.5 kHz. Results are in agreement with simulations.

  1. Dosimetric characterization of a microDiamond detector in clinical scanned carbon ion beams.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, G; Verona, C; Verona-Rinati, G; Ciocca, M; Mirandola, A; Mairani, A; Raffaele, L; Magro, G

    2015-04-01

    peak measurement was observed, confirming manufacturer recommendation on avoiding such configuration. Very good results were obtained for SOBP measurements, with a difference below 1% between measured and TPS-calculated doses. The stability of detector sensitivity in the observation period was within the experimental uncertainty. Dosimetric characterization of a PTW microDiamond detector in high-energy scanned carbon ion beams was performed. The results of the present study showed that this detector is suitable for dosimetry of clinical carbon ion beams, with a negligible LET and dose-rate dependence.

  2. Dosimetric characterization of a microDiamond detector in clinical scanned carbon ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, G. Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Ciocca, M.; Mirandola, A.; Mairani, A.; Raffaele, L.; Magro, G.

    2015-04-15

    direction. A strong distortion in Bragg peak measurement was observed, confirming manufacturer recommendation on avoiding such configuration. Very good results were obtained for SOBP measurements, with a difference below 1% between measured and TPS-calculated doses. The stability of detector sensitivity in the observation period was within the experimental uncertainty. Conclusions: Dosimetric characterization of a PTW microDiamond detector in high-energy scanned carbon ion beams was performed. The results of the present study showed that this detector is suitable for dosimetry of clinical carbon ion beams, with a negligible LET and dose-rate dependence.

  3. In vivo radiobiological assessment of the new clinical carbon ion beams at CNAO.

    PubMed

    Facoetti, A; Vischioni, B; Ciocca, M; Ferrarini, M; Furusawa, Y; Mairani, A; Matsumoto, Y; Mirandola, A; Molinelli, S; Uzawa, A; Vilches, Freixas G; Orecchia, R

    2015-09-01

    In this article, the in vivo study performed to evaluate the uniformity of biological doses within an hypothetical target volume and calculate the values of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at different depths in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the new CNAO (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy) carbon beams is presented, in the framework of a typical radiobiological beam calibration procedure. The RBE values (relative to (60)Co γ rays) of the CNAO active scanning carbon ion beams were determined using jejunal crypt regeneration in mice as biological system at the entrance, centre and distal end of a 6-cm SOBP. The RBE values calculated from the iso-effective doses to reduce crypt survival per circumference to 10, ranged from 1.52 at the middle of the SOBP to 1.75 at the distal position and are in agreement with those previously reported from other carbon ion facilities. In conclusion, this first set of in vivo experiments shows that the CNAO carbon beam is radiobiologically comparable with the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan) and GSI (Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany) ones.

  4. Carbon-Ion Beam Irradiation Effectively Suppresses Migration and Invasion of Human Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Teshima, Teruki Kihara, Ayaka; Kodera-Suzumoto, Yuko; Inaoka, Miho; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: Control of cancer metastasis is one of the most important issues in cancer treatment. We previously demonstrated that carbon particle irradiation suppresses the metastatic potential of cancer cells, and many studies have reported that photon irradiation promotes it. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carbon beam on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell aggressiveness and gene expression. Methods and Materials: A549 (lung adenocarcinoma) and EBC-1 (lung squamous cell carcinoma) cells were treated with 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ion beam at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba or with 4-MV X-ray at Osaka University. We tested proliferative, migratory, and invasive activities by cell proliferation assay, Boyden chamber assay, and Matrigel chemoinvasion assay, respectively. cDNA microarray and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were also performed to assess mRNA expression alteration. Results: X-irradiation increased cell proliferation of A549 cells at 0.5 Gy, whereas high-dose X-ray reduced migration and invasion of A549 cells. By contrast, carbon beam irradiation did not enhance proliferation, and it reduced the migration and invasion capabilities of both A549 and EBC-1 cells more effectively than did X-irradiation. Carbon beam irradiation induced alteration of various gene expression profiles differently from X-ray irradiation. mRNA expression of ANLN, a homologue of anillin, was suppressed to 60% levels of basal expression in carbon beam-irradiated A549 cells after 12 h. Conclusion: Carbon beam effectively suppresses the metastatic potential of A549 and EBC-1 cells. Carbon beam also has different effects on gene expressions, and downregulation of ANLN was induced only by carbon beam irradiation.

  5. Fluence correction factor for graphite calorimetry in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, A.; Thomas, R.; Homer, M.; Bouchard, H.; Rossomme, S.; Renaud, J.; Kanai, T.; Royle, G.; Palmans, H.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work is to develop and adapt a formalism to determine absorbed dose to water from graphite calorimetry measurements in carbon-ion beams. Fluence correction factors, {{k}\\text{fl}} , needed when using a graphite calorimeter to derive dose to water, were determined in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam. Measurements were performed in a 290 MeV/n carbon-ion beam with a field size of 11  ×  11 cm2, without modulation. In order to sample the beam, a plane-parallel Roos ionization chamber was chosen for its small collecting volume in comparison with the field size. Experimental information on fluence corrections was obtained from depth-dose measurements in water. This procedure was repeated with graphite plates in front of the water phantom. Fluence corrections were also obtained with Monte Carlo simulations through the implementation of three methods based on (i) the fluence distributions differential in energy, (ii) a ratio of calculated doses in water and graphite at equivalent depths and (iii) simulations of the experimental setup. The {{k}\\text{fl}} term increased in depth from 1.00 at the entrance toward 1.02 at a depth near the Bragg peak, and the average difference between experimental and numerical simulations was about 0.13%. Compared to proton beams, there was no reduction of the {{k}\\text{fl}} due to alpha particles because the secondary particle spectrum is dominated by projectile fragmentation. By developing a practical dose conversion technique, this work contributes to improving the determination of absolute dose to water from graphite calorimetry in carbon-ion beams.

  6. [Heavy charged particles radiotherapy--mainly carbon ion beams].

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Takeshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2003-12-01

    Carbon ion beams have superior dose distribution allowing selective irradiation to the tumor while minimizing irradiation to the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions produce an increased density of local energy deposition with high-energy transfer (LET) components, resulting in radiobiological advantages. Stimulated by the favorable results in fast neutrons, helium ions, and neon ions, a clinical trial of carbon ion therapy was begun at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in 1994. Carbon ions were generated by a medically dedicated accelerator (HIMAC, Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan), which was the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. In general, patients were selected for treatment when their tumors could not be expected to respond favorably to conventional forms of therapy. A total of 1601 patients were registered in this clinical trial so far. The normal tissue reactions were acceptable, and there were no carbon related deaths. Carbon ion radiotherapy seemed to be a clinically feasible curative treatment modality, and appears to offer improved results not only over conventional X-rays but also even over surgery in some selected carcinomas.

  7. High performance computing for beam physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryne, R. D.; Habib, S.

    Several countries are now involved in efforts aimed at utilizing accelerator-driven technologies to solve problems of national and international importance. These technologies have both economic and environmental implications. The technologies include waste transmutation, plutonium conversion, neutron production for materials science and biological science research, neutron production for fusion materials testing, fission energy production systems, and tritium production. All of these projects require a high-intensity linear accelerator that operates with extremely low beam loss. This presents a formidable computational challenge: One must design and optimize over a kilometer of complex accelerating structures while taking into account beam loss to an accuracy of 10 parts per billion per meter. Such modeling is essential if one is to have confidence that the accelerator will meet its beam loss requirement, which ultimately affects system reliability, safety and cost. At Los Alamos, the authors are developing a capability to model ultra-low loss accelerators using the CM-5 at the Advanced Computing Laboratory. They are developing PIC, Vlasov/Poisson, and Langevin/Fokker-Planck codes for this purpose. With slight modification, they have also applied their codes to modeling mesoscopic systems and astrophysical systems. In this paper, they will first describe HPC activities in the accelerator community. Then they will discuss the tools they have developed to model classical and quantum evolution equations. Lastly they will describe how these tools have been used to study beam halo in high current, mismatched charged particle beams.

  8. High performance computing for beam physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.

    1994-09-01

    Several countries are now involved in efforts aimed at utilizing accelerator-driven technologies to solve problems of national and international importance. These technologies have both economic and environmental implications. The technologies include waste transmutation, plutonium conversion, neutron production for materials science and biological science research, neutron production for fusion materials testing, fission energy production systems, and tritium production. All of these projects require a high-intensity linear accelerator that operates with extremely low beam loss. This presents a formidable computational challenge: One must design and optimize over a kilometer of complex accelerating structures while taking into account beam loss to an accuracy of 10 parts per billion per meter. Such modeling is essential if one is to have confidence that the accelerator will meet its beam loss requirement, which ultimately affects system reliability, safety and cost. At Los Alamos, the authors are developing a capability to model ultra-low loss accelerators using the CM-5 at the Advanced Computing Laboratory. They are developing PIC, Vlasov/Poisson, and Langevin/Fokker-Planck codes for this purpose. With slight modification, they have also applied their codes to modeling mesoscopic systems and astrophysical systems. In this paper, they will first describe HPC activities in the accelerator community. Then they will discuss the tools they have developed to model classical and quantum evolution equations. Lastly they will describe how these tools have been used to study beam halo in high current, mismatched charged particle beams.

  9. Antares beam-alignment-system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Appert, Q.D.; Bender, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    The beam alignment system for the 24-beam-sector Antares CO/sub 2/ fusion laser automatically aligns more than 200 optical elements. A visible-wavelength alignment technique is employed which uses a telescope/TV system to view point-light sources appropriately located down the beamline. The centroids of the light spots are determined by a video tracker, which generates error signals used by the computer control system to move appropriate mirrors in a closed-loop system. Final touch-up alignment is accomplished by projecting a CO/sub 2/ alignment laser beam through the system and sensing its position at the target location. The techniques and control algorithms employed have resulted in alignment accuracies exceeding design requirements. By employing video processing to determine the centroids of diffraction images and by averaging over multiple TV frames, we achieve alignment accuracies better than 0.1 times system diffraction limits in the presence of air turbulence.

  10. Design study of a superconducting gantry for carbon beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Yoon, M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes beam-optics design of a gantry for carbon ions in cancer therapy accelerators. A compact design is important for such a gantry. The designed gantry is compact such that its size is comparable to the size of the existing proton gantries. This is made possible by introducing superconducting double helical coils for dipole magnets. The gantry optics is designed in such a way that it provides rotation-invariant optics, a variable beam size, and point-to-parallel scanning of a beam. For large-aperture magnet, a three-dimensional magnetic field distribution is obtained by invoking a computer code, and a number of particles are tracked by integrating equations of motion numerically together with a three-dimensional interpolation. The beam-shape distortion due to the fringe field is reduced to an acceptable level by optimizing the coil windings with the help of a genetic algorithm. Higher-order transfer coefficients are calculated and shown to be reduced greatly with appropriate optimization of the coil windings.

  11. Performance and Controllability of Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Yazawa, Masaru; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    We propose novel propulsion driven by ablation plasma pressures produced by the irradiation of pulsed ion beams onto a propellant. The ion beam ablation propulsion demonstrates by a thin foil (50 {mu}mt), and the flyer velocity of 7.7 km/s at the ion beam energy density of 2 kJ/cm2 adopted by using the Time-of-flight method is observed numerically and experimentally. We estimate the performance of the ion beam ablation propulsion as specific impulse of 3600 s and impulse bit density of 1700 Ns/m2 obtained from the demonstration results. In the numerical analysis, a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model with ion beam energy depositions is used. The control of the ion beam kinetic energy is only improvement of the performance but also propellant consumption. The spacecraft driven by the ion beam ablation provides high performance efficiency with short-pulsed ion beam irradiation. The numerical results of the advanced model explained latent heat and real gas equation of state agreed well with experimental ones over a wide range of the incident ion beam energy density.

  12. Piezoelectric performance of continuous beam and narrow supported beam arrays for artificial basilar membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Won Joon; Jang, Jongmoon; Kim, Sangwon; Choi, Hongsoo

    2014-09-01

    We report an experimental assessment of the electrical performance of two piezoelectric beam arrays for artificial basilar membranes (ABMs): a continuous beam array (CBA) and a narrow-supports beam array (NSBA). Both arrays consist of piezoelectric beams of sequentially varying lengths that mimic the frequency selectivity of mammalian cochleae. The narrow supports of the NSBA resulted in lateral deformation of the beams, whereas the CBA beams were flat. The displacement and piezoelectric output of each beam were measured at the resonance frequency of each beam using a scanning laser-Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). Both ABM prototypes showed mechanical frequency selectivity that depended on the beam length. The CBA generated a piezoelectric output in the range 6.6-23.2 μV and exhibited electrical frequency separability, whereas the NSBA failed to generate sufficient electrical potential due to the lateral deformation of the piezoelectric beams. The CBA was found to be more effective as an ABM, with potential for use in cochlear implants.

  13. High performance carbon nanocomposites for ultracapacitors

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to composite electrodes for electrochemical devices, particularly to carbon nanotube composite electrodes for high performance electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors.

  14. Performance characterization of scanning beam steered by tilting double prisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Anhu; Yi, Wanli; Zuo, Qiyou; Sun, Wansong

    2016-10-03

    A pair of orthogonal tilting double prisms with a tracking precision better than submicroradian order exhibits a good application potential in laser tracking fields. In the paper, the beam scanning performance determined by both the structure parameters and the tilting motions of two prisms is overall investigated. The functional relation between the structure parameters and the exact beam scanning range is established, the capability of high-accuracy beam steering is validated together with the investigation of the scanning error sources and the nonlinear control laws, and the beam shape distortion degree under multi-parameter combinations is demonstrated. These studies can provide important references for the development of tilting double prisms.

  15. Carbon dust particles in a beam-plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, O. A.; Vizgalov, V.; Shalpegin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on dynamics of micro-sized carbon dust grains in beam-plasma discharge (BPD) plasmas. It was demonstrated that injected dust particles can be captured and transported along the discharge. Longitudinal average velocity of the particles in the central area of the plasma column was 17 m/sec, and 2 m/sec in the periphery. Dust injection caused a decrease of emission intensity of metastable nitrogen molecular ion. This effect is suggested for a spectroscopy method for particles’ potential measurements. Five-micron radius carbon dust grains obtained potential above 500 V in the experiments on PR-2 installation, proving the feasibility of BPDs for the charging of fine dust particles up to high potential values, unattainable in similar plasma conditions.

  16. Dual ion beam deposition of carbon films with diamondlike properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamondlike films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  17. Dual ion beam deposition of carbon films with diamondlike properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamondlike films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  18. Molecular sputter depth profiling using carbon cluster beams.

    PubMed

    Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Sputter depth profiling of organic films while maintaining the molecular integrity of the sample has long been deemed impossible because of the accumulation of ion bombardment-induced chemical damage. Only recently, it was found that this problem can be greatly reduced if cluster ion beams are used for sputter erosion. For organic samples, carbon cluster ions appear to be particularly well suited for such a task. Analysis of available data reveals that a projectile appears to be more effective as the number of carbon atoms in the cluster is increased, leaving fullerene ions as the most promising candidates to date. Using a commercially available, highly focused C (60) (q+) cluster ion beam, we demonstrate the versatility of the technique for depth profiling various organic films deposited on a silicon substrate and elucidate the dependence of the results on properties such as projectile ion impact energy and angle, and sample temperature. Moreover, examples are shown where the technique is applied to organic multilayer structures in order to investigate the depth resolution across film-film interfaces. These model experiments allow collection of valuable information on how cluster impact molecular depth profiling works and how to understand and optimize the depth resolution achieved using this technique.

  19. Non-invasive monitoring of therapeutic carbon ion beams in a homogeneous phantom by tracking of secondary ions.

    PubMed

    Gwosch, K; Hartmann, B; Jakubek, J; Granja, C; Soukup, P; Jäkel, O; Martišíková, M

    2013-06-07

    Radiotherapy with narrow scanned carbon ion beams enables a highly accurate treatment of tumours while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Changes in the patient's geometry can alter the actual ion range in tissue and result in unfavourable changes in the dose distribution. Consequently, it is desired to verify the actual beam delivery within the patient. Real-time and non-invasive measurement methods are preferable. Currently, the only technically feasible method to monitor the delivered dose distribution within the patient is based on tissue activation measurements by means of positron emission tomography (PET). An alternative monitoring method based on tracking of prompt secondary ions leaving a patient irradiated with carbon ion beams has been previously suggested. It is expected to help in overcoming the limitations of the PET-based technique like physiological washout of the beam induced activity, low signal and to allow for real-time measurements. In this paper, measurements of secondary charged particle tracks around a head-sized homogeneous PMMA phantom irradiated with pencil-like carbon ion beams are presented. The investigated energies and beam widths are within the therapeutically used range. The aim of the study is to deduce properties of the primary beam from the distribution of the secondary charged particles. Experiments were performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, Germany. The directions of secondary charged particles emerging from the PMMA phantom were measured using an arrangement of two parallel pixelated silicon detectors (Timepix). The distribution of the registered particle tracks was analysed to deduce its dependence on clinically important beam parameters: beam range, width and position. Distinct dependencies of the secondary particle tracks on the properties of the primary carbon ion beam were observed. In the particular experimental set-up used, beam range differences of 1.3 mm were detectable. In addition, variations in

  20. High-Performance Beam Simulator for the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Baily, Scott A.

    2012-05-14

    A high performance multiparticle tracking simulator is currently under development at Los Alamos. The heart of the simulator is based upon the beam dynamics simulation algorithms of the PARMILA code, but implemented in C++ on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) hardware using NVIDIA's CUDA platform. Linac operating set points are provided to the simulator via the EPICS control system so that changes of the real time linac parameters are tracked and the simulation results updated automatically. This simulator will provide valuable insight into the beam dynamics along a linac in pseudo real-time, especially where direct measurements of the beam properties do not exist. Details regarding the approach, benefits and performance are presented.

  1. Mini-TEPC Microdosimetric Study of Carbon Ion Therapeutic Beams at CNAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, V.; Colautti, P.; Chiriotti, S.; Moros, D.; Ciocca, M.; Mairani, A.

    2017-09-01

    Mono-energetic carbon ion scanning beams of 195.2 MeV/u at the Italian National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) have been used to study the microdosimetric features of an "active" carbon ion beam used in hadrontherapy. A 30x30 mm2 area has been scanned by a 6 mm beam with scanning steps of 2 mm. A mini TEPC of 0.57 mm3 has been used to perform measurements in a water phantom at different depths on the beam axis. The detector small size allowed for measuring, with good spatial resolution, also inside the relatively small Bragg peak region and inside the distal edge, where the radiation quality varies quickly. In spite of the high event rate (up to 105 s-1), no pile-up effects were observed. Results showed that the frequency-mean lineal energy scaled well with the absorbed dose. Moreover, the dose-mean lineal energy itself seemed to be a good descriptor of the radiation quality.

  2. Results of Beam Extraction Performance for the KSTAR Neutral Beam Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Doo-Hee; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Tae-Seong; Lee, Kwang Won; Ryul In, Sang; Jin, Jung-Tae; Chang, Dae-Sik; Oh, Byung-Hoon; Bae, Young-Soon; Kim, Jong-Su; Cho, Wook; Park, Hyun-Taek; Park, Young-Min; Yang, Hyung-Lyeol; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Dairaku, Masayuki; Tobari, Hiroyuki; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Hanada, Masaya; Inoue, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    The first neutral beam injector (NBI-1) has been developed for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak. The first long pulse ion source (LPIS-1) has been installed on the NBI-1 for an auxiliary heating and current drive of KSTAR plasmas. The performance of ion and neutral beam extractions in the LPIS-1 was investigated initially on the KSTAR NBI-1 system, prior to the neutral beam injection into the main plasmas. The ion source consists of a magnetic bucket plasma generator with multipole cusp fields and a set of prototype tetrode accelerators with circular apertures. The inner volume of the plasma generator and accelerator column in the LPIS-1 is approximately 123 L. Design requirements for the ion source were a 120 kV/65 A deuterium beam and a 300 s pulse length. The extraction of ion beams was initiated by the formation of arc plasmas in the LPIS-1, called the arc-beam extraction method. A stable ion beam extraction of the LPIS-1 was achieved up to 85 kV/32 A for a 5 s pulse length and 80 kV/25 A for a 14 s pulse length. An optimum beam perveance of 1.15 µperv was observed at an acceleration voltage of 60 kV. Neutralization efficiency was measured by a water-flow calorimetry (WFC) method using a calorimeter and the operation of a bending magnet. The full-energy species of ion beams were detected by using the diagnostic method of optical multichannel analyzer (OMA). An arc efficiency of the LPIS was 0.6-1.1 A/kW depending on the operating conditions of arc discharge. A neutral beam power of ˜1.0 MW must be sufficiently injected into the KSTAR plasmas from the LPIS-1 at a beam energy of 80 keV.

  3. Dosimetric characterization of the iBEAM evo carbon fiber couch for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David W.; Christophides, Damianos; Dean, Christopher; Naisbit, Mitchell; Mason, Joshua; Morgan, Andrew

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: This study characterizes the dosimetric properties of the iBEAM evo carbon fiber couch manufactured by Medical Intelligence and examines the accuracy of the CMS XiO and Nucletron Oncentra Masterplan (OMP) treatment planning systems for calculating beam attenuation due to the presence of the couch. Methods: To assess the homogeneity of the couch, it was CT scanned at isocentric height and a number of signal intensity profiles were generated and analyzed. To simplify experimental procedures, surface dose and central axis depth dose measurements were performed in a solid water slab phantom using Gafchromic film for 6 and 10 MV photon beams at gantry angles of 0 deg. (normal incidence), 30 deg., and 60 deg. with an inverted iBEAM couch placed on top of the phantom. Attenuation measurements were performed in a cylindrical solid water phantom with an ionization chamber positioned at the isocenter. Measurements were taken for gantry angles from 0 deg. to 90 deg. in 10 deg. increments for both 6 and 10 MV photon beams. This setup was replicated in the XiO and OMP treatment planning systems. Dose was calculated using the pencil beam, collapsed cone, convolution, and superposition algorithms. Results: The CT scan of the couch showed that it was uniformly constructed. Surface dose increased by (510{+-}30)% for a 6 MV beam and (600{+-}20)% for a 10 MV beam passing through the couch at normal incidence. Obliquely incident beams resulted in a higher surface dose compared to normally incident beams for both open fields and fields with the couch present. Depth dose curves showed that the presence of the couch resulted in an increase in dose in the build up region. For 6 and 10 MV beams incident at 60 deg., nearly all skin sparing was lost. Attenuation measurements derived using the ionization chamber varied from 2.7% (0 deg.) to a maximum of 4.6% (50 deg.) for a 6 MV beam and from 1.9% (0 deg.) to a maximum of 4.0% (50 deg.) for a 10 MV beam. The pencil beam and

  4. High Performance Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Bolometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-21

    REPORT High performance multiwall carbon nanotube bolometers 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: High infrared bolometric photoresponse has...been observed in multiwall carbon nanotube MWCNT films at room temperature. The observed detectivity D in exceeding 3.3 106 cm Hz1/2 /W on MWCNT film...U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS carbon nanotube, infrared detector, bolometer

  5. Performance of 200 kW Diagnostic Neutral Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartman, E.; Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F.; Kwan, J.; Leung, K. N.; Wells, R.; Wu, Y.; Vainionpaa, H.

    2010-11-01

    The interaction of neutral beam atoms with a magnetized plasma provides diagnostic access to the interiors of fusion experiments. Measurable parameters include ion temperature and velocity, density fluctuations and also local magnetic field direction. Nova Photonics, Inc and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are developing a diagnostic neutral beam for use in fusion experiments which lack neutral heating beams, or on which a heating beam is not suitable for diagnostics. Our beam was designed to produce a 1 s duration, 5 x 8 cm elliptical cross section hydrogen beam at energies up to 40 kV and up to 5 A current. Details of the beam performance at 40 kV operation will be presented. The accelerator grids will be re-gapped to operate at 15-20 kV for deployment on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment. Simulations of the re-gapped grids and initial performance will be presented. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under grant DE-FG02-05ER86256.

  6. A simulation study of a C-shaped in-beam PET system for dose verification in carbon ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung An, Su; Beak, Cheol-Ha; Lee, Kisung; Hyun Chung, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The application of hadrons such as carbon ions is being developed for the treatment of cancer. The effectiveness of such a technique is due to the eligibility of charged particles in delivering most of their energy near the end of the range, called the Bragg peak. However, accurate verification of dose delivery is required since misalignment of the hadron beam can cause serious damage to normal tissue. PET scanners can be utilized to track the carbon beam to the tumor by imaging the trail of the hadron-induced positron emitters in the irradiated volume. In this study, we designed and evaluated (through Monte Carlo simulations) an in-beam PET scanner for monitoring patient dose in carbon beam therapy. A C-shaped PET and a partial-ring PET were designed to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the therapeutic carbon beam delivery. Their performance was compared with that of a full-ring PET scanner. The C-shaped, partial-ring, and full-ring scanners consisted of 14, 12, and 16 detector modules, respectively, with a 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module was composed of a 13×13 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals and four round 25.4 mm diameter PMTs. To estimate the production yield of positron emitters such as 10C, 11C, and 15O, a cylindrical PMMA phantom (diameter, 20 cm; thickness, 20 cm) was irradiated with 170, 290, and 350 AMeV 12C beams using the GATE code. Phantom images of the three types of scanner were evaluated by comparing the longitudinal profile of the positron emitters, measured along the carbon beam as it passed a simulated positron emitter distribution. The results demonstrated that the development of a C-shaped PET scanner to characterize carbon dose distribution for therapy planning is feasible.

  7. Hadrontherapy: Cancer Treatment With Proton and Carbon Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, Ugo; Kraft, Gerhard

    Sixty years ago accelerator pioneer Robert Wilson published the paper in which he proposed using protons for cancer therapy. The introduction of protontherapy has been very slow, but in the last 10 years the field is booming and five companies offer turn-key centres. Fully stripped ions leave much more energy in the nuclei of the traversed cells than protons of the same range and are thus effective in controlling radio-resistant tumours which cannot be controlled neither with X-rays nor with protons. Paying particular attention to the European contributions, this contribution shortly reviews the history and the developments of carbon ion therapy, a recent chapter of the "hadrontherapy" which covers also radiotherapy with proton and neutron beams.

  8. Experimental investigation of connection performance for prefabricated timber beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesmana, C.; Suhendi, S.

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation of connection performance for a simple supported prefabricated timber beams using Meranti hardwood (Shorea sp.). The good connection is crucial for the proper functioning of the timber structures. The adequate connection condition should be assured to achieve the requirement capacity design and performance of the system. The property of material was tested according to [1]. The proposed design of bolted connections has been evaluated through experimental investigation and compared to the simple supported beam without connection. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed connection design although the ultimate load of the beam with connection is only half of the beam without connection. The test results obtained the purposed connection should be improved.

  9. Contributions of secondary fragmentation by carbon ion beams in water phantom: Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, C. K.; Bolst, David; Tran, Linh T.; Guatelli, Susanna; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Kamil, W. A.

    2017-05-01

    Heavy-particle therapy such as carbon ion therapy is currently very popular because of its superior conformality in terms of dose distribution and higher Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE). However, carbon ion beams produce a complex mixed radiation field, which needs to be fully characterised. In this study, the fragmentation of a 290 MeV/u primary carbon ion beam was studied using the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit. When the primary carbon ion beam interacts with water, secondary light charged particles (H, He, Li, Be, B) and fast neutrons are produced, contributing to the dose, especially after the distal edge of the Bragg peak.

  10. Electron beam-induced nanopatterning of multilayer graphene and amorphous carbon films with metal layers

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Manzo, Julio A.; Banhart, Florian

    2011-05-02

    Thin Co and Ni lamellae grow under electron irradiation of metal crystals supported on multilayer graphene or amorphous carbon films. The lateral growth of a lamella from a source crystal is achieved by directing an electron beam to the periphery of the metal crystal and moving the beam over the surrounding carbon. Patterns of linear, branched, or ringlike metal lamellae can be created. The patterning is carried out in situ in a transmission electron microscope, allowing simultaneous structuring and imaging. The process is driven by the metal-carbon interaction at a beam-activated carbon surface.

  11. Resolution of a High Performance Cavity Beam Positron Monitor System

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, S.; Chung, C.; Fitsos, P.; Gronberg, J.; Ross, M.; Khainovski, O.; Kolomensky, Y.; Loscutoff, P.; Slater, M.; Thomson, M.; Ward, D.; Boogert, S.; Vogel, V.; Meller, R.; Lyapin, A.; Malton, S.; Miller, D.; Frisch, J.; Hinton, S.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; /SLAC /Caltech /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-07-06

    International Linear Collider (ILC) interaction region beam sizes and component position stability requirements will be as small as a few nanometers. It is important to the ILC design effort to demonstrate that these tolerances can be achieved--ideally using beam-based stability measurements. It has been estimated that RF cavity beam position monitors (BPMs) could provide position measurement resolutions of less than one nanometer and could form the basis of the desired beam-based stability measurement. We have developed a high resolution RF cavity BPM system. A triplet of these BPMs has been installed in the extraction line of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. A metrology system for the three BPMs was recently installed. This system employed optical encoders to measure each BPM's position and orientation relative to a zero-coefficient of thermal expansion carbon fiber frame and has demonstrated that the three BPMs behave as a rigid-body to less than 5 nm. To date, we have demonstrated a BPM resolution of less than 20 nm over a dynamic range of +/- 20 microns.

  12. Resolution of a High Performance Cavity Beam Position Monitor System

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, S; Chung, C; Fitsos, P; Gronberg, J; Ross, M; Khainovski, O; Kolomensky, Y; Loscutoff, P; Slater, M; Thomson, M; Ward, D; Boogert, S; Vogel, V; Meller, R; Lyapin, A; Malton, S; Miller, D; Frisch, J; Hinton, S; May, J; McCormick, D; Smith, S; Smith, T; White, G; Orimoto, T; Hayano, H; Honda, Y; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J

    2005-09-12

    International Linear Collider (ILC) interaction region beam sizes and component position stability requirements will be as small as a few nanometers. It is important to the ILC design effort to demonstrate that these tolerances can be achieved - ideally using beam-based stability measurements. It has been estimated that RF cavity beam position monitors (BPMs) could provide position measurement resolutions of less than one nanometer and could form the basis of the desired beam-based stability measurement. We have developed a high resolution RF cavity BPM system. A triplet of these BPMs has been installed in the extraction line of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. A metrology system for the three BPMs was recently installed. This system employed optical encoders to measure each BPM's position and orientation relative to a zero-coefficient of thermal expansion carbon fiber frame and has demonstrated that the three BPMs behave as a rigid-body to less than 5 nm. To date, we have demonstrated a BPM resolution of less than 20 nm over a dynamic range of +/- 20 microns.

  13. Dissociation phenomena in electron-beam sustained carbon dioxide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.; Willetts, David V.

    1990-01-01

    A number of applications are emerging requiring efficient, long pulse, long-life sealed CO2 lasers. Examples include the proposed NASA and ESA wind lidars. Electron-beam sustained discharge devices are strong contenders. Unlike self-sustained discharges, e-beam sustenance readily provides efficient performance from large volume discharges and offers pulse lengths well in excess of the microsecond or so generally associated with self-sustained devices. In the case of the e-beam sustained laser, since the plasma is externally maintained and operated at electric field strengths less than that associated with the glow to arc transition, the discharges can be run even in the presence of strongly attacking species such as O2. Build up of large levels of attacking contaminants is nevertheless undesirable as their presence reduces the current drawn by the plasma and thus the pumping rate to the upper laser level. The impedance rise leads to a mismatch of the pulse forming network with a consequent loss of control over energy deposition, operating E/N, and gain. Clearly CO2 dissociation rates, the influence of dissociation products on the discharge and gain, and tolerance of the discharge to these products need to be determined. This information can then be used to assess co-oxidation catalyst requirements for sealed operation.

  14. Dissociation phenomena in electron-beam sustained carbon dioxide lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael R.; Willetts, David V.

    1990-06-01

    A number of applications are emerging requiring efficient, long pulse, long-life sealed CO2 lasers. Examples include the proposed NASA and ESA wind lidars. Electron-beam sustained discharge devices are strong contenders. Unlike self-sustained discharges, e-beam sustenance readily provides efficient performance from large volume discharges and offers pulse lengths well in excess of the microsecond or so generally associated with self-sustained devices. In the case of the e-beam sustained laser, since the plasma is externally maintained and operated at electric field strengths less than that associated with the glow to arc transition, the discharges can be run even in the presence of strongly attacking species such as O2. Build up of large levels of attacking contaminants is nevertheless undesirable as their presence reduces the current drawn by the plasma and thus the pumping rate to the upper laser level. The impedance rise leads to a mismatch of the pulse forming network with a consequent loss of control over energy deposition, operating E/N, and gain. Clearly CO2 dissociation rates, the influence of dissociation products on the discharge and gain, and tolerance of the discharge to these products need to be determined. This information can then be used to assess co-oxidation catalyst requirements for sealed operation.

  15. Performance predictions of a focused ion beam from a laser cooled and compressed atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Haaf, G.; Wouters, S. H. W.; van der Geer, S. B.; Vredenbregt, E. J. D.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Focused ion beams are indispensable tools in the semiconductor industry because of their ability to image and modify structures at the nanometer length scale. Here, we report on performance predictions of a new type of focused ion beam based on photo-ionization of a laser cooled and compressed atomic beam. Particle tracing simulations are performed to investigate the effects of disorder-induced heating after ionization in a large electric field. They lead to a constraint on this electric field strength which is used as input for an analytical model which predicts the minimum attainable spot size as a function of, amongst others, the flux density of the atomic beam, the temperature of this beam, and the total current. At low currents (I < 10 pA), the spot size will be limited by a combination of spherical aberration and brightness, while at higher currents, this is a combination of chromatic aberration and brightness. It is expected that a nanometer size spot is possible at a current of 1 pA. The analytical model was verified with particle tracing simulations of a complete focused ion beam setup. A genetic algorithm was used to find the optimum acceleration electric field as a function of the current. At low currents, the result agrees well with the analytical model, while at higher currents, the spot sizes found are even lower due to effects that are not taken into account in the analytical model.

  16. Assessment of carbon layer growth induced by resists outgassing in multi e-beams lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marusic, JC; Pourteau, ML; Cêtre, S.; Pain, L.; Mebiene-Engohang, AP; David, S.; Labau, S.; Boussey, J.

    2014-10-01

    The development of multiple e-beam lithography equipment is seen as an alternative for next generation lithography. However, similarly to EUV lithography, this technology faces important challenges in controlling the contamination of the optics due to deposition of carbon layer induced by the outgassed chemical species from resist under electron bombardment. An experimental setup was designed and built at LETI to study the outgassed species and observe the carbon layer. In this setup, resist coated wafers 100 mm size are exposed under a 5 kV e-beam gun. During exposure, byproducts from outgassed species are monitored with a Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). The identification of outgassed chemical species is done with an ex-situ TD-GC-MS analysis (ThermoDesorption-Gaz Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry). In a second part of this investigation, we observed the contamination carbon layer growth induced by the outgassing. Thereby, we fabricated a device which consists of a silicon membrane with micro-machined apertures. During e-beam exposure, this device simulates the multiple parallel beams of the optic system of a maskless lithography tool. The deposited contamination layer on device is then observed and thickness measured under SEM. In this paper, we present the results of outgassing and contamination on 3 chemically amplified resists showing that contamination is not directly dependent of the overall outgassing rate but on first order of the outgassing from Photo Acid Generator (PAG). It also reports on the performance in reducing outgassing and contamination of applying a top-coat layer on top of the resist and shows that reduction is more important for contamination than for outgassing.

  17. Full-beam performances of a PET detector with synchrotron therapeutic proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piliero, M. A.; Pennazio, F.; Bisogni, M. G.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cerello, P. G.; Del Guerra, A.; Ferrero, V.; Fiorina, E.; Giraudo, G.; Morrocchi, M.; Peroni, C.; Pirrone, G.; Sportelli, G.; Wheadon, R.

    2016-12-01

    Treatment quality assessment is a crucial feature for both present and next-generation ion therapy facilities. Several approaches are being explored, based on prompt radiation emission or on PET signals by {β+} -decaying isotopes generated by beam interactions with the body. In-beam PET monitoring at synchrotron-based ion therapy facilities has already been performed, either based on inter-spill data only, to avoid the influence of the prompt radiation, or including both in-spill and inter-spill data. However, the PET images either suffer of poor statistics (inter-spill) or are more influenced by the background induced by prompt radiation (in-spill). Both those problems are expected to worsen for accelerators with improved duty cycle where the inter-spill interval is reduced to shorten the treatment time. With the aim of assessing the detector performance and developing techniques for background reduction, a test of an in-beam PET detector prototype was performed at the CNAO synchrotron-based ion therapy facility in full-beam acquisition modality. Data taken with proton beams impinging on PMMA phantoms showed the system acquisition capability and the resulting activity distribution, separately reconstructed for the in-spill and the inter-spill data. The coincidence time resolution for in-spill and inter-spill data shows a good agreement, with a slight deterioration during the spill. The data selection technique allows the identification and rejection of most of the background originated during the beam delivery. The activity range difference between two different proton beam energies (68 and 72 MeV) was measured and found to be in sub-millimeter agreement with the expected result. However, a slightly longer (2 mm) absolute profile length is obtained for in-spill data when compared to inter-spill data.

  18. Full-beam performances of a PET detector with synchrotron therapeutic proton beams.

    PubMed

    Piliero, M A; Pennazio, F; Bisogni, M G; Camarlinghi, N; Cerello, P G; Del Guerra, A; Ferrero, V; Fiorina, E; Giraudo, G; Morrocchi, M; Peroni, C; Pirrone, G; Sportelli, G; Wheadon, R

    2016-12-07

    Treatment quality assessment is a crucial feature for both present and next-generation ion therapy facilities. Several approaches are being explored, based on prompt radiation emission or on PET signals by [Formula: see text]-decaying isotopes generated by beam interactions with the body. In-beam PET monitoring at synchrotron-based ion therapy facilities has already been performed, either based on inter-spill data only, to avoid the influence of the prompt radiation, or including both in-spill and inter-spill data. However, the PET images either suffer of poor statistics (inter-spill) or are more influenced by the background induced by prompt radiation (in-spill). Both those problems are expected to worsen for accelerators with improved duty cycle where the inter-spill interval is reduced to shorten the treatment time. With the aim of assessing the detector performance and developing techniques for background reduction, a test of an in-beam PET detector prototype was performed at the CNAO synchrotron-based ion therapy facility in full-beam acquisition modality. Data taken with proton beams impinging on PMMA phantoms showed the system acquisition capability and the resulting activity distribution, separately reconstructed for the in-spill and the inter-spill data. The coincidence time resolution for in-spill and inter-spill data shows a good agreement, with a slight deterioration during the spill. The data selection technique allows the identification and rejection of most of the background originated during the beam delivery. The activity range difference between two different proton beam energies (68 and 72 MeV) was measured and found to be in sub-millimeter agreement with the expected result. However, a slightly longer (2 mm) absolute profile length is obtained for in-spill data when compared to inter-spill data.

  19. Treatment planning for a scanned carbon beam with a modified microdosimetric kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, Taku; Furukawa, Takuji; Kase, Yuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Noda, Koji

    2010-11-01

    We describe a method to calculate the relative biological effectiveness in mixed radiation fields of therapeutic ion beams based on the modified microdosimetric kinetic model (modified MKM). In addition, we show the procedure for integrating the modified MKM into a treatment planning system for a scanned carbon beam. With this procedure, the model is fully integrated into our research version of the treatment planning system. To account for the change in radiosensitivity of a cell line, we measured one of the three MKM parameters from a single survival curve of the current cells and used the parameter in biological optimization. Irradiation of human salivary gland tumor cells was performed with a scanned carbon beam in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), and we then compared the measured depth-survival curve with the modified MKM predicted survival curve. Good agreement between the two curves proves that the proposed method is a candidate for calculating the biological effects in treatment planning for ion irradiation.

  20. Behavior of Insulated Carbon-FRP-Strengthened RC Beams Exposed to Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayin, B.

    2014-09-01

    There are two main approaches to improving the fire resistance of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) systems. While the most common method is to protect or insulate the FRP system, an other way is to use fibers and resins with a better fire performance. This paper presents a numerical investigation into the five protection behavior of insulated carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer (CFRP)-strengthened reinforced concrete (RC) beams. The effects of external loading and thermal expansion of materials at elevated temperatures are taken into consideration in a finite-element model. The validity of the numerical model is demonstrated with results from an existing experimental study on insulated CFRP-strengthened RC beams. Conclusions of this investigation are employed to predict the structural behavior of CFRP-strengthened concrete structures.

  1. Dose-Response Effect of Charged Carbon Beam on Normal Rat Retina Assessed by Electroretinography

    SciTech Connect

    Mizota, Atsushi; Tanaka, Minoru; Kubota, Mariko; Negishi, Hisanari; Watanabe, Emiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the effects of carbon beam irradiation with those of proton beam irradiation on the physiology of the retina of rats. Methods and Materials: Eight-week-old Wister rats were used. The right eyes were irradiated with carbon beam (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 Gy) or proton beam (4, 8, 16, and 24 Gy) with the rats under general anesthesia. Electroretinograms were recorded 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the irradiation, and the amplitudes of the a and b waves were compared with those of control rats. Results: The amplitude of b waves was reduced more than that of a waves at lower irradiation doses with both types of irradiation. With carbon ion irradiation, the amplitudes of the b wave were significantly reduced after radiation doses of 8 and 16 Gy at 6 months and by radiation doses of 4, 8, and 16 Gy at 12 months. With proton beam irradiation, the b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced after 16 and 24 Gy at 6 months and with doses of 8 Gy or greater at 12 months. For the maximum b-wave amplitude, a significant difference was observed in rats irradiated with carbon beams of 4 Gy or more and with proton beams of 8 Gy or more at 12 months after irradiation. Conclusions: These results indicate that carbon beam irradiation is about two times more damaging than proton beam irradiation on the rat retina at the same dose.

  2. The fabrication of carbon nanostructures using electron beam resist pyrolysis and nanomachining processes for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung A; Lee, Kwang-Cheol; Park, Se Il; Lee, Seung S

    2008-05-28

    We present a facile, yet versatile carbon nanofabrication method using electron beam lithography and resist pyrolysis. Various resist nanopatterns were fabricated using a negative electron beam resist, SAL-601, and they were then subjected to heat treatment in an inert atmosphere to obtain carbon nanopatterns. Suspended carbon nanostructures were fabricated by the wet-etching of an underlying sacrificial oxide layer. Free-standing carbon nanostructures, which contain 130 nm wide, 15 nm thick, and 4 µm long nanobridges, were fabricated by resist pyrolysis and nanomachining processes. Electron beam exposure dose effects on resist thickness and pattern widening were studied. The thickness of the carbon nanostructures was thinned down by etching with oxygen plasma. An electrical biosensor utilizing carbon nanostructures as a conducting channel was studied. Conductance modulations of the carbon device due to streptavidin-biotin binding and pH variations were observed.

  3. Effects of Siemens TT-D carbon fiber table top on beam attenuation, and build up region of 6 MV photon beam.

    PubMed

    Sheykhoo, Asma; Abdollahi, Sara; Hadizadeh Yazdi, Mohammad Hadi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This study deals with Monte Carlo simulations of the effects which the 550 TXT carbon fiber couch can have on the relevant parameters of a 6 MV clinical photon beam in three field sizes. According to the reports issued by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), the calculated dose across a high gradient distribution should be within 2% of the relative dose, or within 0.2 cm of the isodose curve position in the target volume. Nowadays, the use of posterior oblique beam has become a common practice. It is clear that, in radiotherapy, the presence of the couch affects the beam intensity and, as a result, the skin dose. Firstly, Siemens linear accelerator validation for 6 MV photon beam was performed, and satisfactory agreement between Monte Carlo and experimental data for various field sizes was observed. Secondly, the couch transmission factor for the reference field size and depth was computed, and the skin dose enhancement by the couch was assessed. The largest impact of the carbon fiber couch effect was observed for the 5 × 5 cm(2) field size. Such evaluation has not been reported for this couch before. Despite providing minimal attenuation for the primary radiation, the assumption that carbon fiber couches are radiotranslucent is not valid, and the effects of couches of this type on the transmission factor, and on the skin dose should be carefully investigated for each field size and depth.

  4. Quantitative carbon ion beam radiography and tomography with a flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Telsemeyer, Julia; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2012-12-07

    High dose gradients are inherent to ion beam therapy. This results in high sensitivity to discrepancies between planned and delivered dose distributions. Therefore an accurate knowledge of the ion stopping power of the traversed tissue is critical. One proposed method to ensure high quality dose deposition is to measure the stopping power by ion radiography. Although the idea of imaging with highly energetic ions is more than forty years old, there is a lack of simple detectors suitable for this purpose. In this study the performance of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector, originally designed for photon imaging, was investigated for quantitative carbon ion radiography and tomography. The flat-panel detector was exploited to measure the water equivalent thickness (WET) and water equivalent path length (WEPL) of a phantom at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). To do so, the ambiguous correlation of detector signal to particle energy was overcome by active or passive variation of carbon ion beam energy and measurement of the signal-to-beam energy correlation. The active method enables one to determine the WET of the imaged object with an uncertainty of 0.5 mm WET. For tomographic WEPL measurements the passive method was exploited resulting in an accuracy of 0.01 WEPL. The developed imaging technique presents a method to measure the two-dimensional maps of WET and WEPL of phantoms with a simple and commercially available detector. High spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 mm(2) is given by the detector design. In the future this powerful tool will be used to evaluate the performance of the treatment planning algorithm by studying WET uncertainties.

  5. Performance of the PDX neutral beam wall armor

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Williams, M.D.

    1985-02-01

    The PDX wall armor was designed to function as an inner wall thermal armor, a neutral beam diagnostic, and a large area inner toroidal plasma limiter. In this paper we discuss its thermal performance as wall armor during two years of PDX neutral beam heating experiments. During this period it provided sufficient inner wall protection to permit perpendicular heating injections into normal and disruptive plasmas as well as injections in the absence of plasma involving special experiments, calibrations, and tests important for the optimization and development of the PDX neutral beam injection system. Many of the design constraints and performance issues encountered in this work are relevant to the design of larger fusion devices.

  6. Integration and evaluation of automated Monte Carlo simulations in the clinical practice of scanned proton and carbon ion beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J; Sommerer, F; Mairani, A; Unholtz, D; Farook, R; Handrack, J; Frey, K; Marcelos, T; Tessonnier, T; Ecker, S; Ackermann, B; Ellerbrock, M; Debus, J; Parodi, K

    2014-08-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of beam interaction and transport in matter are increasingly considered as essential tools to support several aspects of radiation therapy. Despite the vast application of MC to photon therapy and scattered proton therapy, clinical experience in scanned ion beam therapy is still scarce. This is especially the case for ions heavier than protons, which pose additional issues like nuclear fragmentation and varying biological effectiveness. In this work, we present the evaluation of a dedicated framework which has been developed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center to provide automated FLUKA MC simulations of clinical patient treatments with scanned proton and carbon ion beams. Investigations on the number of transported primaries and the dimension of the geometry and scoring grids have been performed for a representative class of patient cases in order to provide recommendations on the simulation settings, showing that recommendations derived from the experience in proton therapy cannot be directly translated to the case of carbon ion beams. The MC results with the optimized settings have been compared to the calculations of the analytical treatment planning system (TPS), showing that regardless of the consistency of the two systems (in terms of beam model in water and range calculation in different materials) relevant differences can be found in dosimetric quantities and range, especially in the case of heterogeneous and deep seated treatment sites depending on the ion beam species and energies, homogeneity of the traversed tissue and size of the treated volume. The analysis of typical TPS speed-up approximations highlighted effects which deserve accurate treatment, in contrast to adequate beam model simplifications for scanned ion beam therapy. In terms of biological dose calculations, the investigation of the mixed field components in realistic anatomical situations confirmed the findings of previous groups so far reported only in

  7. Performance of the beam phase measurement system for LEDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, J. F.; Barr, D.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Kasemir, K.; Shurter, R. B.; Stettler, M.

    2000-11-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility diagnostics include beam phase measurements [1]. Beam signals at 350 MHz from capacitive probes are down-converted to 2 MHz for processing. The phase measurement process includes amplitude leveling, digital sampling of the I and Q vectors, DSP filtering and calibration, and serving of the data to the network. All hardware is fielded in the VXI format and controlled with a PC. Running under Windows NT, a LabVIEW® program controls the operation of the system and serves the data, via channel access, to the EPICS control system. The design and operational performance to date of the system is described.

  8. Comparison of the TESLA, NLC and CLIC beam collimation performance

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I Drozhdin et al.

    2003-03-27

    This note describes studies performed in the framework of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects, and does not always meet the original design goals. But these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible. The post-TRC plans of the Collimation Task Force are briefly outlined in closing.

  9. Ion beam deposition of amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, John C.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1982-01-01

    Carbon films were deposited on silicon, quartz, and potassium bromide substrates from an ion beam. Growth rates were approximately 0.3 micron/hour. The films were featureless and amorphous and contained only carbon and hydrogen in significant amounts. The density and carbon/hydrogen ratio indicate the film is a hydrogen deficient polymer. One possible structure, consistent with the data, is a random network of methylene linkages and tetrahedrally coordinated carbon atoms.

  10. Performance of a beam monitor in the Fermilab Tevatron using synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Harry W.K. Cheung; Alan Hahn; Aimin Xiao

    2003-06-04

    Synclite, the beam monitor in the Fermilab Tevatron using synchrotron light is described. The calibration, monitoring and performance of the system is discussed. Observation of some effects of long range beam-beam interactions seen in the beam monitor will be presented as well as a measurement of DC beam in the Tevatron.

  11. Robust, easily shaped, and epoxy-free carbon-fiber-aluminum cathodes for generating high-current electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lie; Li, Limin; Wen, Jianchun; Wan, Hong

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the construction of carbon-fiber-aluminum (CFA) cathode by squeezing casting and its applications for generating high-current electron beams to drive high-power microwave sources. The fabrication process avoided using epoxy, a volatile deteriorating the vacuum system. These cathodes had a higher hardness than conventional aluminum, facilitating machining. After surface treatment, carbon fibers became the dominator determining emission property. A multineedle CFA cathode was utilized in a triode virtual cathode oscillator (vircator), powered by a ˜450 kV, ˜400 ns pulse. It was found that 300-400 MW, ˜250 ns microwave was radiated at a dominant frequency of 2.6 GHz. Further, this cathode can endure high-current-density emission without detectable degradation in performance as the pulse shot proceeded, showing the robust nature of carbon fibers as explosive emitters. Overall, this new class of cold cathodes offers a potential prospect of developing high-current electron beam sources.

  12. Robust, easily shaped, and epoxy-free carbon-fiber-aluminum cathodes for generating high-current electron beams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lie; Li, Limin; Wen, Jianchun; Wan, Hong

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the construction of carbon-fiber-aluminum (CFA) cathode by squeezing casting and its applications for generating high-current electron beams to drive high-power microwave sources. The fabrication process avoided using epoxy, a volatile deteriorating the vacuum system. These cathodes had a higher hardness than conventional aluminum, facilitating machining. After surface treatment, carbon fibers became the dominator determining emission property. A multineedle CFA cathode was utilized in a triode virtual cathode oscillator (vircator), powered by a approximately 450 kV, approximately 400 ns pulse. It was found that 300-400 MW, approximately 250 ns microwave was radiated at a dominant frequency of 2.6 GHz. Further, this cathode can endure high-current-density emission without detectable degradation in performance as the pulse shot proceeded, showing the robust nature of carbon fibers as explosive emitters. Overall, this new class of cold cathodes offers a potential prospect of developing high-current electron beam sources.

  13. Physical and engineering aspect of carbon beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Minohara, Shinichi; Yusa, Ken; Urakabe, Eriko; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Tomitani, Takehiro; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Iseki, Yasushi

    2003-08-26

    Conformal irradiation system of HIMAC has been up-graded for a clinical trial using a technique of a layer-stacking method. The system has been developed for localizing irradiation dose to target volume more effectively than the present irradiation dose. With dynamic control of the beam modifying devices, a pair of wobbler magnets, and multileaf collimator and range shifter, during the irradiation, more conformal radiotherapy can be achieved. The system, which has to be adequately safe for patient irradiations, was constructed and tested from a viewpoint of safety and the quality of the dose localization realized. A secondary beam line has been constructed for use of radioactive beam in heavy-ion radiotherapy. Spot scanning method has been adapted for the beam delivery system of the radioactive beam. Dose distributions of the spot beam were measured and analyzed taking into account of aberration of the beam optics. Distributions of the stopped positron-emitter beam can be observed by PET. Pencil beam of the positron-emitter, about 1 mm size, can also be used for measurements ranges of the test beam in patients using positron camera. The positron camera, consisting of a pair of Anger-type scintillation detectors, has been developed for this verification before treatment. Wash-out effect of the positron-emitter was examined using the positron camera installed. In this report, present status of the HIMAC irradiation system is described in detail.

  14. Physical and engineering aspect of carbon beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Minohara, Shinichi; Yusa, Ken; Urakabe, Eriko; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Iseki, Yasushi; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Tomitani, Takehiro

    2003-08-01

    Conformal irradiation system of HIMAC has been up-graded for a clinical trial using a technique of a layer-stacking method. The system has been developed for localizing irradiation dose to target volume more effectively than the present irradiation dose. With dynamic control of the beam modifying devices, a pair of wobbler magnets, and multileaf collimator and range shifter, during the irradiation, more conformal radiotherapy can be achieved. The system, which has to be adequately safe for patient irradiations, was constructed and tested from a viewpoint of safety and the quality of the dose localization realized. A secondary beam line has been constructed for use of radioactive beam in heavy-ion radiotherapy. Spot scanning method has been adapted for the beam delivery system of the radioactive beam. Dose distributions of the spot beam were measured and analyzed taking into account of aberration of the beam optics. Distributions of the stopped positron-emitter beam can be observed by PET. Pencil beam of the positron-emitter, about 1 mm size, can also be used for measurements ranges of the test beam in patients using positron camera. The positron camera, consisting of a pair of Anger-type scintillation detectors, has been developed for this verification before treatment. Wash-out effect of the positron-emitter was examined using the positron camera installed. In this report, present status of the HIMAC irradiation system is described in detail.

  15. Parallel beam dynamics calculations on high performance computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, Robert; Habib, Salman

    1997-02-01

    Faced with a backlog of nuclear waste and weapons plutonium, as well as an ever-increasing public concern about safety and environmental issues associated with conventional nuclear reactors, many countries are studying new, accelerator-driven technologies that hold the promise of providing safe and effective solutions to these problems. Proposed projects include accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW), accelerator-based conversion of plutonium (ABC), accelerator-driven energy production (ADEP), and accelerator production of tritium (APT). Also, next-generation spallation neutron sources based on similar technology will play a major role in materials science and biological science research. The design of accelerators for these projects will require a major advance in numerical modeling capability. For example, beam dynamics simulations with approximately 100 million particles will be needed to ensure that extremely stringent beam loss requirements (less than a nanoampere per meter) can be met. Compared with typical present-day modeling using 10,000-100,000 particles, this represents an increase of 3-4 orders of magnitude. High performance computing (HPC) platforms make it possible to perform such large scale simulations, which require 10's of GBytes of memory. They also make it possible to perform smaller simulations in a matter of hours that would require months to run on a single processor workstation. This paper will describe how HPC platforms can be used to perform the numerically intensive beam dynamics simulations required for development of these new accelerator-driven technologies.

  16. Parellel beam dynamics calculations on high performance computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.; Habib, S.

    1996-12-01

    Faced with a backlog of nuclear waste and weapons plutonium, as well as an ever-increasing public concern about safety and environmental issues associated with conventional nuclear reactors, many countries are studying new, accelerator-driven technologies that hold the promise of providing safe and effective solutions to these problems. Proposed projects include accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW), accelerator-based conversion of plutonium (ABC), accelerator-driven energy production (ADEP), and accelerator production of tritium (APT). Also, next-generation spallation neutron sources based on similar technology will play a major role in materials science and biological science research. The design of accelerators for these projects will require a major advance in numerical modeling capability. For example, beam dynamics simulations with approximately 100 million particles will be needed to ensure that extremely stringent beam loss requirements (less than a nanoampere per meter) can be met. Compared with typical present-day modeling using 10,000-100,000 particles, this represents an increase of 3-4 orders of magnitude. High performance computing (HPC) platforms make it possible to perform such large scale simulations, which require 10`s of GBytes of memory. They also make it possible to perform smaller simulations in a matter of hours that would require months to run on a single processor workstation. This paper will describe how HPC platforms can be used to perform the numerically intensive beam dynamics simulations required for development of these new accelerator-driven technologies.

  17. Measurement of large angle fragments induced by 400 MeV n-1 carbon ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, Andrey; Consiglio, Lucia; De Lellis, Giovanni; Di Crescenzo, Antonia; Lauria, Adele; Montesi, Maria Cristina; Patera, Vincenzo; Sirignano, Chiara; Tioukov, Valeri

    2015-09-01

    The use of carbon ion beams in radiotherapy presents significant advantages when compared to traditional x-ray. In fact, carbon ions deposit their energy inside the human body at the end of their range, the Bragg peak. Unlike x-ray beams, where the energy deposition decreases exponentially inside the irradiated volume, the shape of carbon beams is sharp and focused. Advantages are an increased energy released in the cancer volume while minimizing the irradiation to healthy tissues. Currently, the use of carbon beams is limited by the poor knowledge we have about the effects of the secondary fragments on the irradiated tissues. The secondary particles produced and their angular distribution is crucial to determine the global dose deposition. The knowledge of the flux of secondary particles plays a key role in the real time monitoring of the dose profile in hadron therapy. We present a detector based on nuclear emulsions for fragmentation measurements that performs a sub-micrometric tridimensional spatial resolution, excellent multi-particle separation and large angle track recognition. Nuclear emulsions are assembled in order to realize a hybrid detector (emulsion cloud chamber (ECC)) made of 300 μm nuclear emulsion films alternated with lead as passive material. Data reported here have been obtained by exposing two ECC detectors to the fragments produced by a 400 MeV n-1 12C beam on a composite target at the GSI laboratory in Germany. The ECC was exposed inside a more complex detector, named FIRST, in order to collect fragments with a continuous angular distribution in the range 47°-81° with respect to the beam axis. Results on the angular distribution of fragments as well as their momentum estimations are reported here.

  18. Conformity and robustness of gated rescanned carbon ion pencil beam scanning of liver tumors at NIRS.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shinichiro; Zenklusen, Silvan; Inaniwa, Taku; Furukawa, Takuji; Imada, Hiroshi; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Yasuda, Shigeo

    2014-06-01

    Pencil beam scanning offers excellent conformity, but is sensitive to organ motion. We conducted a simulation study to validate our rescanning approach in combination with gating in the irradiation of liver tumors. 4DCT imaging was performed under free-breathing conditions in 30 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Dose distributions for a two-field approach were calculated for layered phase controlled rescannings (PCR) under organ motion conditions. A total dose of 45 Gy(RBE) was delivered to respective field-specific target volumes (FTVs) in two fractions, each composed of two orthogonal uniform fields of 11.25 Gy(RBE) at beam angles of either 0° and 90° or 0° and 270°. The number of rescannings was changed from 1 to 10. Good dose conformity was achieved with 4× PCR or more, and over 95% of the prescribed dose was delivered to the CTV independent of the use of gating. D95, Dmax/min and dose homogeneity were similar with or without gating, whereas V10 dose to the liver as well as maximal doses to healthy tissue (esophagus and cord) were about 40% lower with gating. However, total time increased by about 50% with gating. Gated rescanning provides good target coverage and homogeneity with maximal sparing of healthy tissue. Our results suggest that carbon-ion pencil beam scanning may soon be available for the safe treatment of liver tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Test beam performance of the CDF plug upgrade hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    de Barbaro, P.; CDF Plug Upgrade Group

    1998-01-13

    We report on the performance of the CDF End Plug Hadron Calorimeter in a test beam. The sampling calorimeter is constructed using 2 inch iron absorber plates and scintillator planes with wavelength shifting fibers for readout. The linearity and energy resolution of the calorimeter response to pions, and the transverse uniformity of the response to muons and pions are presented. The parameter e/h, representing the ratio of the electromagnetic to hadronic response, is extracted from the data.

  20. Modeling the biophysical effects in a carbon beam delivery line by using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ilsung; Yoo, SeungHoon; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Shin, Jae-ik; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2016-09-01

    The Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) plays an important role in designing a uniform dose response for ion-beam therapy. In this study, the biological effectiveness of a carbon-ion beam delivery system was investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. A carbon-ion beam delivery line was designed for the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project. The GEANT4 simulation tool kit was used to simulate carbon-ion beam transport into media. An incident energy carbon-ion beam with energy in the range between 220 MeV/u and 290 MeV/u was chosen to generate secondary particles. The microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model was applied to describe the RBE of 10% survival in human salivary-gland (HSG) cells. The RBE weighted dose was estimated as a function of the penetration depth in the water phantom along the incident beam's direction. A biologically photon-equivalent Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) was designed using the RBE-weighted absorbed dose. Finally, the RBE of mixed beams was predicted as a function of the depth in the water phantom.

  1. Enhanced piezoelectric performance from carbon fluoropolymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, Cary; DiMaio, Jeffrey R.; McAllister, Elliot; Hossini, Reza; Wagener, Earl; Ballato, John; Priya, Shashank; Ballato, Arthur; Smith, Dennis W.

    2012-12-01

    The piezoelectric performance of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is shown to double through the controlled incorporation of carbon nanomaterial. Specifically, PVDF composites containing carbon fullerenes (C60) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are fabricated over a range of compositions and optimized for their Young's modulus, dielectric constant, and d31 piezoelectric coefficient. Thermally stimulated current measurements show a large increase in internal charge and polarization in the composites over pure PVDF. The electromechanical coupling coefficients (k31) at optimal loading levels are found to be 1.84 and 2 times greater than pure PVDF for the PVDF-C60 and PVDF-SWNT composites, respectively. Such property-enhanced nanocomposites could have significant benefit to electromechanical systems employed for structural sensing, energy scavenging, sonar, and biomedical imaging.

  2. Effect of different ion beam energy on properties of amorphous carbon film fabricated by ion beam sputtering deposition (IBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lichun; Zhang, Guangan; Wu, Zhiguo; Wang, Jun; Yan, Pengxun

    2011-09-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) films were fabricated by ion beam sputtering technique. The influence of sputtering ion beam energy on bonding structure, morphologic, mechanical properties, tribological properties and corrosion resistance of a-C films are investigated systematically. Morphology study shows that lowest surface roughness exists for mid-ion beam energy. Improved adhesion is observed for the films that are prepared under high ion beam energy, attributed to film graphitization, low residual stress and mixed interface. Relatively, a-C films prepared with ion beam energy of 2 keV exhibits optimum sp 3 bond content, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. It is found that the wear rate of DLC films decrease with increased ion beam energy in general, consistent with the varied trend of the H/ E value which has been regarded as a suitable parameter for predicting wear resistance of the coatings. The correlation of the sp 3 bond fraction in the films estimated from Raman spectroscopy with residual stress, nanohardness and corrosion resistance has been established.

  3. Fabrication of carbon layer coated FE-nanoparticles using an electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Bin; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun; Oh, Seung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A novel synthesis of carbon encapsulated Fe nanoparticles was developed in this study. Fe chloride (III) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were used as precursors. The crosslinking of PAN molecules and the nucleation of Fe nanoparticles were controlled by the electron beam irradiation dose. Stabilization and carbonization processes were carried out using a vacuum furnace at 275 °C and 1000 °C, respectively. Micro structures were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fe nanoparticles were formed with diameters of 100 nm, and the Fe nanoparticles were encapsulated by carbon layers. As the electron beam irradiation dose increased, it was observed that the particle sizes decreased.

  4. Cladding of the carbon fiber on the steel base using electron beam in the air atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losinskaya, A.; Lozhkina, E.; Bardin, A.; Stepanova, N.

    2016-11-01

    The formation of the high-carbon layers on the low-carbon steel (0.18 % C) using the method of electron-beam partial melting of the carbon fibers is considered. A 1.4 MeV electron beam extracted into air was used. The features of the cladded layers formation using different binders for a reliable fixation of the cladding material are studied. It is revealed that the best results are obtained using the phenol-formaldehyde glue as the binder. A 3 mm thickness layers with 2.2 % C are shown to be formed.

  5. Water equivalent thickness values of materials used in beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Taddei, Phillip J; Fitzek, Markus M; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-01-01

    Heavy charged particle beam radiotherapy for cancer is of increasing interest because it delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume. Accurate knowledge of the range of a heavy charged particle beam after it penetrates a patient’s body or other materials in the beam line is very important and is usually stated in terms of the water equivalent thickness (WET). However, methods of calculating WET for heavy charged particle beams are lacking. Our objective was to test several simple analytical formulas previously developed for proton beams for their ability to calculate WET values for materials exposed to beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions. Experimentally measured heavy charged particle beam ranges and WET values from an iterative numerical method were compared with the WET values calculated by the analytical formulas. Inmost cases, the deviations were within 1 mm. We conclude that the analytical formulas originally developed for proton beams can also be used to calculate WET values for helium, carbon and iron ion beams with good accuracy. PMID:20371908

  6. Water equivalent thickness values of materials used in beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Taddei, Phillip J; Fitzek, Markus M; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-05-07

    Heavy charged particle beam radiotherapy for cancer is of increasing interest because it delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume. Accurate knowledge of the range of a heavy charged particle beam after it penetrates a patient's body or other materials in the beam line is very important and is usually stated in terms of the water equivalent thickness (WET). However, methods of calculating WET for heavy charged particle beams are lacking. Our objective was to test several simple analytical formulas previously developed for proton beams for their ability to calculate WET values for materials exposed to beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions. Experimentally measured heavy charged particle beam ranges and WET values from an iterative numerical method were compared with the WET values calculated by the analytical formulas. In most cases, the deviations were within 1 mm. We conclude that the analytical formulas originally developed for proton beams can also be used to calculate WET values for helium, carbon and iron ion beams with good accuracy.

  7. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  8. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A. E.; Nikolaev, P.; Amama, P. B.; Zakharov, D.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Stach, E. A.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. With the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  9. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    DOE PAGES

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; ...

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only inmore » the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.« less

  10. Metformin enhances the radiosensitivity of human liver cancer cells to γ–rays and carbon ion beams

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Mi-Sook; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uzawa, Akiko; Han, Soorim; Jung, Won-Gyun; Sai, Sei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of metformin on the responses of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells to γ–rays (low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation) and carbon-ion beams (high-LET radiation). HCC cells were pretreated with metformin and exposed to a single dose of γ–rays or carbon ion beams. Metformin treatment increased radiation-induced clonogenic cell death, DNA damage, and apoptosis. Carbon ion beams combined with metformin were more effective than carbon ion beams or γ-rays alone at inducing subG1 and decreasing G2/M arrest, reducing the expression of vimentin, enhancing phospho-AMPK expression, and suppressing phospho-mTOR and phospho-Akt. Thus, metformin effectively enhanced the therapeutic effect of radiation with a wide range of LET, in particular carbon ion beams and it may be useful for increasing the clinical efficacy of carbon ion beams. PMID:27802188

  11. Metformin enhances the radiosensitivity of human liver cancer cells to γ-rays and carbon ion beams.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Mi-Sook; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uzawa, Akiko; Han, Soorim; Jung, Won-Gyun; Sai, Sei

    2016-12-06

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of metformin on the responses of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells to γ-rays (low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation) and carbon-ion beams (high-LET radiation). HCC cells were pretreated with metformin and exposed to a single dose of γ-rays or carbon ion beams. Metformin treatment increased radiation-induced clonogenic cell death, DNA damage, and apoptosis. Carbon ion beams combined with metformin were more effective than carbon ion beams or γ-rays alone at inducing subG1 and decreasing G2/M arrest, reducing the expression of vimentin, enhancing phospho-AMPK expression, and suppressing phospho-mTOR and phospho-Akt. Thus, metformin effectively enhanced the therapeutic effect of radiation with a wide range of LET, in particular carbon ion beams and it may be useful for increasing the clinical efficacy of carbon ion beams.

  12. Low dose megavoltage cone beam computed tomography with an unflattened 4 MV beam from a carbon target.

    PubMed

    Faddegon, Bruce A; Wu, Vincent; Pouliot, Jean; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bani-Hashemi, Ali

    2008-12-01

    Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) is routinely used for visualizing anatomical structures and implanted fiducials for patient positioning in radiotherapy. MVCBCT using a 6 MV treatment beam with high atomic number (Z) target and flattening filter in the beamline, as done conventionally, has lower image quality than can be achieved with a MV beam due to heavy filtration of the low-energy bremsstrahlung. The unflattened beam of a low Z target has an abundance of diagnostic energy photons, detected with modern flat panel detectors with much higher efficiency given the same dose to the patient. This principle guided the development of a new megavoltage imaging beamline (IBL) for a commercial radiotherapy linear accelerator. A carbon target was placed in one of the electron primary scattering foil slots on the target-foil slide. A PROM on a function controller board was programed to put the carbon target in place for MVCBCT. A low accelerating potential of 4.2 MV was used for the IBL to restrict leakage of primary electrons through the target such that dose from x rays dominated the signal in the monitor chamber and the patient surface dose. Results from phantom and cadaver images demonstrated that the IBL had much improved image quality over the treatment beam. For similar imaging dose, the IBL improved the contrast-to-noise ratio by as much as a factor of 3 in soft tissue over that of the treatment beam. The IBL increased the spatial resolution by about a factor of 2, allowing the visualization of finer anatomical details. Images of the cadaver contained useful information with doses as low as 1 cGy. The IBL may be installed on certain models of linear accelerators without mechanical modification and results in significant improvement in the image quality with the same dose, or images of the same quality with less than one-third of the dose.

  13. Low dose megavoltage cone beam computed tomography with an unflattened 4 MV beam from a carbon target

    SciTech Connect

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Wu, Vincent; Pouliot, Jean; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bani-Hashemi, Ali

    2008-12-15

    Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) is routinely used for visualizing anatomical structures and implanted fiducials for patient positioning in radiotherapy. MVCBCT using a 6 MV treatment beam with high atomic number (Z) target and flattening filter in the beamline, as done conventionally, has lower image quality than can be achieved with a MV beam due to heavy filtration of the low-energy bremsstrahlung. The unflattened beam of a low Z target has an abundance of diagnostic energy photons, detected with modern flat panel detectors with much higher efficiency given the same dose to the patient. This principle guided the development of a new megavoltage imaging beamline (IBL) for a commercial radiotherapy linear accelerator. A carbon target was placed in one of the electron primary scattering foil slots on the target-foil slide. A PROM on a function controller board was programed to put the carbon target in place for MVCBCT. A low accelerating potential of 4.2 MV was used for the IBL to restrict leakage of primary electrons through the target such that dose from x rays dominated the signal in the monitor chamber and the patient surface dose. Results from phantom and cadaver images demonstrated that the IBL had much improved image quality over the treatment beam. For similar imaging dose, the IBL improved the contrast-to-noise ratio by as much as a factor of 3 in soft tissue over that of the treatment beam. The IBL increased the spatial resolution by about a factor of 2, allowing the visualization of finer anatomical details. Images of the cadaver contained useful information with doses as low as 1 cGy. The IBL may be installed on certain models of linear accelerators without mechanical modification and results in significant improvement in the image quality with the same dose, or images of the same quality with less than one-third of the dose.

  14. Effect of carbon on ion beam mixing of Fe-Ti bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvonen, J.P.; Nastasi, M.; Lappalainen, R.; Sickafus, K.; Helsinki Univ. . Dept. of Physics; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    The influence of implanted carbon on ion beam mixing of a Fe-Ti system was investigated. Carbon was introduced into bilayer samples by implanting {sup 13}C isotopes. The implantation energies were selected to set the mean range of carbon ions in either the iron or titanium layer. The effect of implanted carbon on 400 keV Ar ion mixing in the temperature range from 0 to 300{degree}C was studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy at the energy of 5 MeV. Changes in carbon concentration profiles were probed utilizing the resonance of the nuclear reaction {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N at the proton energy of 1.748 MeV. The measurements revealed that mixing was not affected by carbon implanted into the titanium layer. However, carbon in the iron layer remarkably retarded mixing at all temperatures investigated. Significant changes in carbon depth distributions were observed only when the sample with implanted carbon in the iron layer was mixed at 300{degree}C. These results are explained in terms of the enhanced mobility of carbon in an evaporated iron film which allows segregation to the interface. At low temperatures, however, vacancy-carbon interaction in iron may have a contribution to the retarded ion beam mixing. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Precise measurement of single carbon nanocoils using focused ion beam technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Yasushi; Suda, Yoshiyuki Kunimoto, Ryuji; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Iida, Tamio; Ue, Hitoshi; Shima, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-11

    We have developed a precise resistivity measurement system for quasi-one-dimensional nanomaterials using a focused ion beam. The system enables the resistivity of carbon nanocoils (CNCs) to be measured and its dependence on coil geometry to be elucidated. At room temperature, the resistivity of CNCs tended to increase with coil diameter, while that of artificially graphitized CNCs remained constant. These contrasting behaviors indicate coil-diameter-induced enhancement in structural disorder internal to CNCs. Low-temperature resistivity measurements performed on the CNCs revealed that electron transport through the helical axis is governed by the variable range hopping mechanism. The characteristic temperature in variable range hopping theory was found to systematically increase with coil diameter, which supports our theory that the population of sp{sup 2}-domains in CNCs decreases considerably with coil diameter.

  16. Three dimensional reconstruction of therapeutic carbon ion beams in phantoms using single secondary ion tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhart, Anna Merle; Spindeldreier, Claudia Katharina; Jakubek, Jan; Martišíková, Mária

    2017-06-01

    Carbon ion beam radiotherapy enables a very localised dose deposition. However, even small changes in the patient geometry or positioning errors can significantly distort the dose distribution. A live, non-invasive monitoring system of the beam delivery within the patient is therefore highly desirable, and could improve patient treatment. We present a novel three-dimensional method for imaging the beam in the irradiated object, exploiting the measured tracks of single secondary ions emerging under irradiation. The secondary particle tracks are detected with a TimePix stack—a set of parallel pixelated semiconductor detectors. We developed a three-dimensional reconstruction algorithm based on maximum likelihood expectation maximization. We demonstrate the applicability of the new method in the irradiation of a cylindrical PMMA phantom of human head size with a carbon ion pencil beam of {226} MeV u-1. The beam image in the phantom is reconstructed from a set of nine discrete detector positions between {-80}^\\circ and {50}^\\circ from the beam axis. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential to visualize inhomogeneities by irradiating a PMMA phantom with an air gap as well as bone and adipose tissue surrogate inserts. We successfully reconstructed a three-dimensional image of the treatment beam in the phantom from single secondary ion tracks. The beam image corresponds well to the beam direction and energy. In addition, cylindrical inhomogeneities with a diameter of {2.85} cm and density differences down to {0.3} g cm-3 to the surrounding material are clearly visualized. This novel three-dimensional method to image a therapeutic carbon ion beam in the irradiated object does not interfere with the treatment and requires knowledge only of single secondary ion tracks. Even with detectors with only a small angular coverage, the three-dimensional reconstruction of the fragmentation points presented in this work was found to be feasible.

  17. Effects of the Amount and Shape of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Strengthening Elements on the Ductile Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungnam

    2014-09-01

    A series of beam tests were performed to evaluate the ductility of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) elements. A total of nine RC beams were produced and loaded up to failure in three-point bending under deflection control. In addition, the amount and shape of the CFRP elements (plates/sheets) were considered as the key test variables. Test results revealed that the strengthening with CFRP elements in the width direction was more effective than the strengthening across their height. The energy method used in an analysis showed that the energy ratio of the beams strengthened with CFRP plates were half or less than half of the energy ratio of the beams strengthened with CFRP sheets. In addition, the ductility of the beams decreased as the strengthening ratio of the CFRP elements increased.

  18. Neutron beam design, development, and performance for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A. ); Zamenhof, R.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The report presents topics presented at a workshop on neutron beams and neutron capture therapy. Topics include: neutron beam design; reactor-based neutron beams; accelerator-based neutron beams; and dosimetry and treatment planning. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS)

  19. A study of the thermal diffusivities of carbons using optical beam deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monzyk, John W.

    The thermal diffusivity is a property which completely characterizes the thermal wave in a material. The thermal diffusivity determines the speed, the wavelength, and the rate of extinction of the thermal wave. Optical beam deflection (OBD) is an experimental method of directly measuring the thermal diffusivity of a material parallel to the sample surface. Chopped light impingent upon the surface of a sample generates thermal waves in the material. The thermal waves propagate outward in all directions from the illuminated region. The temperature of the layer of gas immediately above the sample is driven by the temperature of the surface of the material. The time-dependent gradient of the index of refraction of the gas corresponds to the gradient of the time-dependent temperature field. Therefore, a probe laser beam propagating in this layer of gas is deflected by each passing heat pulse. The time required for the heat pulse to reach the probe laser beam causes a phase shift in the deflection of the probe beam measured relative to the phase of the illumination. This phase shift increases with probe-beam distance from the region of illumination. The thermal diffusivity is determined from the change of the phase with respect to the displacement of the probe beam. At sufficient probe-beam distances from the illuminated region, OBD theory predicts a linear dependence of the phase on the probe-beam displacement. The thermal diffusivities of five carbon materials were determined by OBD at room temperature after each was heat treated at six temperatures ranging from 1000oC to 2600oC. Two materials, an isotropic carbon and an anisotropic carbon, were made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). After the anisotropic carbon was heat- treated beyond 2400oC, an increase in the carbon network was evidenced by a significant rise in the thermal diffusivity. The thermal diffusivity of the isotropic CVD carbon remained unchanged with heat treatment. Like the anisotropic CVD carbon, the

  20. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES FOR A COMPACT CARBON ION LINAC FOR THERAPY

    SciTech Connect

    Plastun, A.; Mustapha, B.; Nassiri, A.; Ostroumov, P.

    2016-05-01

    Feasibility of an Advanced Compact Carbon Ion Linac (ACCIL) for hadron therapy is being studied at Argonne National Laboratory in collaboration with RadiaBeam Technologies. The 45-meter long linac is designed to deliver 109 carbon ions per second with variable energy from 45 MeV/u to 450 MeV/u. S-band structure provides the acceleration in this range. The carbon beam energy can be adjusted from pulse to pulse, making 3D tumor scanning straightforward and fast. Front end accelerating structures such as RFQ, DTL and coupled DTL are designed to operate at lower frequencies. The design of the linac was accompanied with extensive end-to-end beam dynamics studies which are presented in this paper.

  1. Nonlocal continuum theories of beams for the analysis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, J. N.; Pang, S. D.

    2008-01-01

    The equations of motion of the Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories are reformulated using the nonlocal differential constitutive relations of Eringen [International Journal of Engineering Science 10, 1-16 (1972)]. The equations of motion are then used to evaluate the static bending, vibration, and buckling responses of beams with various boundary conditions. Numerical results are presented using the nonlocal theories to bring out the effect of the nonlocal behavior on deflections, buckling loads, and natural frequencies of carbon nanotubes.

  2. Buckling Analysis of Chiral Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Using the Nonlocal Timoshenko Beam Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidour, M.; Daouadji, T. H.; Benrahou, K. H.; Tounsi, A.; Adda Bedia, El A.; Hadji, L.

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of the nonlocal elasticity theory, the Timoshenko beam model is utilized to investigate the elastic buckling of chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under axial compression. Based on the governing equations of the nonlocal Timoshenko beam model, an analytical solution for nonlocal critical buckling loads is obtained. The influence of a nonlocal small-scale coefficient, the vibration mode number, the chirality of SWWCNTs, and their aspect ratio on the nonlocal critical buckling loads is studied and discussed.

  3. Cancer stem cells: The potential of carbon ion beam radiation and new radiosensitizers (Review).

    PubMed

    Baek, Sung-Jae; Ishii, Hideshi; Tamari, Keisuke; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Nishida, Naohiro; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Koseki, Jun; Fukusumi, Takahito; Hasegawa, Shinichiro; Ogawa, Hisataka; Hamabe, Atsushi; Miyo, Masaaki; Noguchi, Kozo; Seo, Yuji; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small population of cells in cancer with stem-like properties such as cell proliferation, multiple differentiation and tumor initiation capacities. CSCs are therapy-resistant and cause cancer metastasis and recurrence. One key issue in cancer therapy is how to target and eliminate CSCs, in order to cure cancer completely without relapse and metastasis. To target CSCs, many cell surface markers, DNAs and microRNAs are considered as CSC markers. To date, the majority of the reported markers are not very specific to CSCs and are also present in non-CSCs. However, the combination of several markers is quite valuable for identifying and targeting CSCs, although more specific identification methods are needed. While CSCs are considered as critical therapeutic targets, useful treatment methods remain to be established. Epigenetic gene regulators, microRNAs, are associated with tumor initiation and progression. MicroRNAs have been recently considered as promising therapeutic targets, which can alter the therapeutic resistance of CSCs through epigenetic modification. Moreover, carbon ion beam radiotherapy is a promising treatment for CSCs. Evidence indicates that the carbon ion beam is more effective against CSCs than the conventional X-ray beam. Combination therapies of radiosensitizing microRNAs and carbon ion beam radiotherapy may be a promising cancer strategy. This review focuses on the identification and treatment resistance of CSCs and the potential of microRNAs as new radiosensitizers and carbon ion beam radiotherapy as a promising therapeutic strategy against CSCs.

  4. Experimental behavior of concrete beams with externally bonded carbon fiber tow sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Javed, S.; Kumar, S.V.; GangaRao, H.V.S.

    1996-11-01

    The durability of structural materials is affected by the presence of air borne pollutants in combination with humidity and temperature variations that is harsh environment. Hence strength and stiffness degradation phenomenon in the bonded concrete beams exposed to harsh environment must be understood properly. The effects of weathering or aging of materials are being studied in the Major Units laboratory using an environmental chamber. In this research, effects of acidic and alkaline conditions and humidity at constant and varying temperature on the durability of steel reinforced concrete beams externally bonded with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Tow Sheet are studied. A total of thirty-six beams are tested after conditioning for accelerated aging to failure under static loads. Two wrapped and unwrapped control beams are tested under static loads. In addition to the above said beams, concrete cylinders and bond strength specimens were subjected to environmental conditions.

  5. Thin film growth rate effects for primary ion beam deposited diamondlike carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, D.; Mirtich, M.

    1986-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were grown by primary ion beam deposition and the growth rates were measured for various beam energies, types of hydrocarbon gases and their ratio to Ar, and substrate materials. The growth rate had a linear dependence upon hydrocarbon content in the discharge chamber, and only small dependence on other parameters. For given deposition conditions a threshold in the atomic ratio of carbon to argon gas was identified below which films did not grow on fused silica substrate, but grew on Si substrate and on existing DLC films. Ion source deposition parameters and substrate material were found to affect the deposition threshold and film growth rates.

  6. Electromechanical Actuator Performance of Carbon Nanotube Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Edgar; Kozlov, Mikhail; Collins, Steve; Dalton, Alan B.; Razal, Joselito; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2003-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) assemblies (sheets and fibers) have been investigated as electromechanical actuators. SWNT fibers provide maximum isometric actuator stress values of 20-26 MPa, which is about 5-10 times larger that those corresponding to SWNT sheets. This actuation performance is about 100 timer larger than the stress generation capability of natural muscle. The effect of employing different electrolytes as well as SWNTs produced by different routes, and the potential applications of these actuators will be also discussed.

  7. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammazzalorso, F.; Bednarz, T.; Jelen, U.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  8. Rehabilitation of notch damaged steel beam using a carbon fiber reinforced multiphase-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, HongYu; Attard, Dr. Thomas L.; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The retrofit of notch damaged steel beams is investigated via the experimental testing of nine wide-flange steel beam specimens and finite element simulation. Three notch configurations representing various damage levels were identified, and the beam specimens were retrofitted using CFRP laminates and a recently developed polymeric matrix composite - CarbonFlex - that exhibits superior energy dissipation and ductility properties, where the peak-load deflections were between 49.4% and 65.2% higher using the CarbonFlex-retrofitted beams. The results are attributed to the substantially higher damage tolerance capability of CarbonFlex than conventional CFRP. Finite element models were developed to investigate the damage processes and strain/ stress distributions near the notch tips. The numerical results match closely with the experimentally determined load-deflection curves and the strain fields obtained by the digital imaging correlations (DIC) system. Both experimental and numerical results clearly indicate the effectiveness of CarbonFlex, as a candidate retrofitting material, to retrofit damaged steel structures. Lastly, the micro-mechanisms by which CarbonFlex could sufficiently sustain a significant amount of the peak strength at large displacement ductility values are discussed with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures.

  9. Influence of laser array performance on spectrally combined beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhen; Yang, Lei; Zhong, Zheqiang; Zhang, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Incoherent spectral beam combining (SBC) of multiple laser beams is accomplished along the emitters' arraying direction. Considering that the output beams from a laser array (LA) usually have deflection angles, positional displacements and divergence angles even after being collimated, a propagation model of SBC systems based on multilayer dielectric gratings has been built up. On the basis, properties of the spectrally combined beam affected by parameters of the LA have been discussed in detail. Simulation results show that with the increase in the deflection angle, both the power and the beam quality of the combined beam degrade dramatically. The positional displacement has little impact on the intensity distribution and the beam quality of combined beam but change the wavelength composition of the combined beam. The divergence angle strongly affects the intensity distribution and the beam quality of the combined beam. Additionally, the effect of the deflection angle on the output beam quality is more obvious and may shift the beam spot when comparing with that of the divergence angle.

  10. Future carbon beams at SPIRAL1 facility: Which method is the most efficient?

    SciTech Connect

    Maunoury, L. Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Dupuis, M.; Frigot, R.; Grinyer, J.; Jardin, P.; Leboucher, C.

    2014-02-15

    Compared to in-flight facilities, Isotope Separator On-Line ones can in principle produce significantly higher radioactive ion beam intensities. On the other hand, they have to cope with delays for the release and ionization which make the production of short-lived isotopes ion beams of reactive and refractory elements particularly difficult. Many efforts are focused on extending the capabilities of ISOL facilities to those challenging beams. In this context, the development of carbon beams is triggering interest [H. Frånberg, M. Ammann, H. W. Gäggeler, and U. Köster, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A708 (2006); M. Kronberger, A. Gottberg, T. M. Mendonca, J. P. Ramos, C. Seiffert, P. Suominen, and T. Stora, in Proceedings of the EMIS 2012 [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B Production of molecular sideband radioisotope beams at CERN-ISOLDE using a Helicon-type plasma ion source (to be published)]: despite its refractory nature, radioactive carbon beams can be produced from molecules (CO or CO{sub 2}), which can subsequently be broken up and multi-ionized to the required charge state in charge breeders or ECR sources. This contribution will present results of experiments conducted at LPSC with the Phoenix charge breeder and at GANIL with the Nanogan ECR ion source for the ionization of carbon beams in the frame of the ENSAR and EMILIE projects. Carbon is to date the lightest condensable element charge bred with an ECR ion source. Charge breeding efficiencies will be compared with those obtained using Nanogan ECRIS and charge breeding times will be presented as well.

  11. Future carbon beams at SPIRAL1 facility: which method is the most efficient?

    PubMed

    Maunoury, L; Delahaye, P; Angot, J; Dubois, M; Dupuis, M; Frigot, R; Grinyer, J; Jardin, P; Leboucher, C; Lamy, T

    2014-02-01

    Compared to in-flight facilities, Isotope Separator On-Line ones can in principle produce significantly higher radioactive ion beam intensities. On the other hand, they have to cope with delays for the release and ionization which make the production of short-lived isotopes ion beams of reactive and refractory elements particularly difficult. Many efforts are focused on extending the capabilities of ISOL facilities to those challenging beams. In this context, the development of carbon beams is triggering interest [H. Frånberg, M. Ammann, H. W. Gäggeler, and U. Köster, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A708 (2006); M. Kronberger, A. Gottberg, T. M. Mendonca, J. P. Ramos, C. Seiffert, P. Suominen, and T. Stora, in Proceedings of the EMIS 2012 [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B Production of molecular sideband radioisotope beams at CERN-ISOLDE using a Helicon-type plasma ion source (to be published)]: despite its refractory nature, radioactive carbon beams can be produced from molecules (CO or CO2), which can subsequently be broken up and multi-ionized to the required charge state in charge breeders or ECR sources. This contribution will present results of experiments conducted at LPSC with the Phoenix charge breeder and at GANIL with the Nanogan ECR ion source for the ionization of carbon beams in the frame of the ENSAR and EMILIE projects. Carbon is to date the lightest condensable element charge bred with an ECR ion source. Charge breeding efficiencies will be compared with those obtained using Nanogan ECRIS and charge breeding times will be presented as well.

  12. Future carbon beams at SPIRAL1 facility: Which method is the most efficient?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunoury, L.; Delahaye, P.; Angot, J.; Dubois, M.; Dupuis, M.; Frigot, R.; Grinyer, J.; Jardin, P.; Leboucher, C.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    Compared to in-flight facilities, Isotope Separator On-Line ones can in principle produce significantly higher radioactive ion beam intensities. On the other hand, they have to cope with delays for the release and ionization which make the production of short-lived isotopes ion beams of reactive and refractory elements particularly difficult. Many efforts are focused on extending the capabilities of ISOL facilities to those challenging beams. In this context, the development of carbon beams is triggering interest [H. Frånberg, M. Ammann, H. W. Gäggeler, and U. Köster, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A708 (2006); M. Kronberger, A. Gottberg, T. M. Mendonca, J. P. Ramos, C. Seiffert, P. Suominen, and T. Stora, in Proceedings of the EMIS 2012 [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B Production of molecular sideband radioisotope beams at CERN-ISOLDE using a Helicon-type plasma ion source (to be published)]: despite its refractory nature, radioactive carbon beams can be produced from molecules (CO or CO2), which can subsequently be broken up and multi-ionized to the required charge state in charge breeders or ECR sources. This contribution will present results of experiments conducted at LPSC with the Phoenix charge breeder and at GANIL with the Nanogan ECR ion source for the ionization of carbon beams in the frame of the ENSAR and EMILIE projects. Carbon is to date the lightest condensable element charge bred with an ECR ion source. Charge breeding efficiencies will be compared with those obtained using Nanogan ECRIS and charge breeding times will be presented as well.

  13. Three-dimensional ultrashort optical Airy beams in an inhomogeneous medium with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Alexander V.; Bouffanais, Roland; Belonenko, Mikhail B.; Dvuzhilov, Ilya S.

    2017-03-01

    In this Letter, we consider the problem of the dynamics of propagation of three-dimensional optical pulses (a.k.a. light bullets) with an Airy profile through a heterogeneous environment of carbon nanotubes. We show numerically that such beams exhibit sustained and stable propagation. Moreover, we demonstrate that by varying the density modulation period of the carbon nanotubes one can indirectly control the pulse velocity, which is a particularly valuable feature for the design and manufacturing of novel pulse delay devices.

  14. SU-E-T-509: Validation of the Use of OSLD for Carbon Beam Remote Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, P; Lowenstein, J; Alvarez, P; Followill, D; Jakel, O; Prokesch, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To describe the commissioning of Aluminum Oxide Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeters (OSLD) for the use in Carbon beam remote dosimetry for centers participating in NCI-funded cooperative group clinical trials. Methods: As Carbon therapy centers express interest in participating in cooperative group clinical trials, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group (IROC) Houston QA Center (formerly RPC) is developing a way to remotely monitor the machine output of these Carbon facilities. OSLD have been commissioned for photon, electron and proton dosimetry, so an experiment was designed to commission the same dosimeters for Carbon. OSLD were irradiated in a Carbon therapy beam produced by the Siemens synchrotron at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy facility in Heidelberg, Germany. The OSLD were placed in acrylic phantoms, imaged with a CT scanner, and plans were developed using the Siemens treatment planning system. The OSLD were irradiated in uniform fields with maximum energies of 216, 301, and 402 MeV and at dose levels of 50, 100, 200 and 300 cGy. Results: The response of the OSLD in the Carbon beam, as compared to the Cobalt-60 reference condition, required an energy correction of 1.85 to account for the particle correction. OSLD dose calculations typically have a linearity correction to account for the change in response relative to the change in dose delivered. However, the response of the OSLD in the Carbon beam was found to be independent of the dose level; thus the linearity correction is 1.00. Conclusion: IROC Houston has commissioned OSLD for the use of remote output checks for Carbon therapy facilities to help ensure consistency across clinical trial participants. Work supported by grant CA10953 (NCI, DHHS)

  15. Beam-hardening artifacts on computed tomography images caused by lanthanum carbonate hydrate in a patient on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Machida, Minoru; Sekine, Tetsuro; Yamaguchi, Hidenori; Kiriyama, Tomonari; Kumita, Shin-Ichiro

    2010-05-01

    Lanthanum carbonate hydrate is a nonaluminum, noncalcium phosphate binder containing lanthanum (La). It is effective in decreasing the serum phosphate level in patients on dialysis. Because the atomic number of the La contained in lanthanum carbonate hydrate is relatively high, at 57, this agent may cause strong artifacts on computed tomography (CT) images, which may be mistakenly interpreted as foreign bodies. We recently performed CT examination of a patient on Fosrenol chewable tablets (i.e., lanthanum carbonate hydrate). The CT images were difficult to evaluate because of strong beam hardening artifacts, and differentiation from foreign body aspiration was required. We report here our experience and a discussion of the characteristics of this artifact.

  16. Quantitative analysis of isolated and clustered DNA damage induced by gamma-rays, carbon ion beams, and iron ion beams.

    PubMed

    Terato, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Ruri; Nakaarai, Yusuke; Nohara, Tomonori; Doi, Yusuke; Iwai, Shigenori; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ide, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    Ionizing radiation induces multiple damaged sites (clustered damage) together with isolated lesions in DNA. Clustered damage consists of closely spaced lesions within a few helical turns of DNA and is considered to be crucial for understanding the biological consequences of ionizing radiation. In the present study, two types of DNA, supercoiled plasmid DNA and linear lambda DNA, were irradiated with gamma-rays, carbon ion beams, and iron ion beams, and the spectra and yield of isolated DNA damage and bistranded clustered DNA damage were fully analyzed. Despite using different methods for damage analysis, the experiments with plasmid and lambda DNA gave largely consistent results. The spectra of both isolated and clustered damage were essentially independent of the quality of the ionizing radiation used for irradiation. The yields of clustered damage as well as of isolated damage decreased with the different radiation beams in the order gamma> C > Fe, thus exhibiting an inverse correlation with LET [gamma (0.2 keV/microm) < C (13 keV/microm) < Fe (200 keV/microm)]. Consistent with in vitro data, the yield of chromosomal DNA DSBs decreased with increasing LET in Chinese hamster cells irradiated with carbon ion beams with different LETs, suggesting that the decrease in the yield of clustered damage with increasing LET is not peculiar to in vitro irradiation of DNA, but is common for both in vitro and in vivo irradiation. These results suggest that the adverse biological effect of the ionizing radiation is not simply accounted for by the yield of clustered DNA damage, and that the complexity of the clustered damage needs to be considered to understand the biological consequences of ionizing radiation.

  17. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2014-02-01

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ∼3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration.

  18. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Koguchi, H. Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2014-02-15

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ∼3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration.

  19. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ˜3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration.

  20. DNA damage response signaling in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells following gamma and carbon beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Narang, Himanshi; Sarma, Asitikantha; Krishna, Malini

    2011-11-01

    Carbon beams (5.16MeV/u, LET=290keV/μm) are high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation characterized by higher relative biological effectiveness than low LET radiation. The aim of the current study was to determine the signaling differences between γ-rays and carbon ion-irradiation. A549 cells were irradiated with 1Gy carbon or γ-rays. Carbon beam was found to be three times more cytotoxic than γ-rays despite the fact that the numbers of γ-H2AX foci were same. Percentage of cells showing ATM/ATR foci were more with γ-rays however number of foci per cell were more in case of carbon irradiation. Large BRCA1 foci were found in all carbon irradiated cells unlike γ-rays irradiated cells and prosurvival ERK pathway was activated after γ-rays irradiation but not carbon. The noteworthy finding of this study is the early phase apoptosis induction by carbon ions. In the present study in A549 lung adenocarcinoma, authors conclude that despite activation of same repair molecules such as ATM and BRCA1, differences in low and high LET damage responses might be due to their distinct macromolecular complexes rather than their individual activation and the activation of cytoplasmic pathways such as ERK, whether it applies to all the cell lines need to be further explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Preliminary studies of PQS PET detector module for dose verification of carbon beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.-I.; An, S. Jung; Lee, C. Y.; Jo, W. J.; Min, E.; Lee, K.; Kim, Y.; Joung, J.; Chung, Y. H.

    2014-05-01

    PET imaging can be used to verify dose distributions of therapeutic particle beams such as carbon ion beams. The purpose of this study was to develop a PET detector module which was designed for an in-beam PET scanner geometry integrated into a carbon beam therapy system, and to evaluate its feasibility as a monitoring system of patient dose distribution. A C-shaped PET geometry was proposed to avoid blockage of the carbon beam by the detector modules. The proposed PET system consisted of 14 detector modules forming a bore with 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module is composed of a 9 × 9 array of 4.0 mm × 4.0 mm × 20.0 mm LYSO crystal module optically coupled with four 29 mm diameter PMTs using Photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technique. Because the crystal pixel was identified based upon the distribution of scintillation lights of four PMTs, the design of the reflector between crystal elements should be well optimized. The optical design of reflectors was optimized using DETECT2000, a Monte Carlo code for light photon transport. A laser-cut reflector set was developed using the Enhanced Specular Reflector (ESR, 3M Co.) mirror-film with a high reflectance of 98% and a thickness of 0.064 mm. All 81 crystal elements of detector module were identified. Our result demonstrates that the C-shaped PET system is under development and we present the first reconstructed image.

  2. Electron-Muon Ranger: Performance in the MICE muon beam

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, D.

    2015-12-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. Lastly, the EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta inmore » the range 100–280 MeV/c.« less

  3. Electron-Muon Ranger: Performance in the MICE muon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.

    2015-12-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. Lastly, the EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100–280 MeV/c.

  4. High performance image processing and laser beam recording system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, A. R.

    1981-06-01

    A high-performance image processing system which includes a laser image recorder has been developed to cover a full range of digital image processing techniques and capabilities. The Digital Interactive Image Processing System (DIIPS) consists of an HP3000 series II computer and subsystems consisting of a high-speed array processor, a high-speed tape drive, a series display system, a stereo optics viewing position, a printer/plotter and a CPU link which provides the capacity for the mensuration and exploitation of digital imagery with both mono and stereo digital images. Software employed includes the Hewlett-Packard standard system software composed of operating system, utilities, compilers and standard function library packages, the standard IDIMS software, and specially developed software relating to photographic and stereo mensuration. The Ultra High Resolution Image Recorder is a modification of a standard laser beam recorder with a capability of recording in excess of 18 K pixels per image line.

  5. Electron-muon ranger: performance in the MICE muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bene, P.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradshaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Cadoux, F.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Debieux, S.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Graulich, J. S.; Greis, J.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Husi, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Masciocchi, F.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nicola, L.; Noah Messomo, E.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rothenfusser, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Sandström, R.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Wisting, H.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. The EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100-280 MeV/c.

  6. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reisler, H.

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  7. Characterization of laser beam interaction with carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janićijević, Milovan; Srećković, Milesa; Kaluđerović, Branka; Bojanić, Slobodan; Družijanić, Dragan; Dinulović, Mirko; Kovačević, Aleksander

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents simulation and experimental results for the exposure of some carbon-based materials to alexandrite and Nd3+:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser radiation. Simulation of the heating effects was carried out using the COMSOL Multiphysics 3.5 package for samples of carbon-based P7295-2 fiber irradiated using an alexandrite laser and carbon-based P4396-2 fiber irradiated using an Nd3+:YAG laser, as well as by applying finite element modeling for P7295-2 samples irradiated using an Nd3+:YAG laser. In the experimental part, P7295-2 samples were exposed to alexandrite laser radiation while samples of carbon-based composite 3D C/C were exposed to Nd3+:YAG laser radiation. Micrographs of the laser induced craters were obtained by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the images analyzed using the ImageJ software. The results obtained enable identification of the laser-material interaction spots, and characterization of the laser induced changes in the materials investigated.

  8. Effect of the transverse parasitic mode on beam performance for the ADS driver linac in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Pei, Shi-Lun; Wang, Jiu-Qing; Li, Zhi-Hui

    2015-05-01

    The ADS (Accelerator Driven subcritical System) driver linac in China is designed to run in CW (Continuous Wave) mode with 10 mA designed beam current. In this scenario, the beam-induced parasitic modes in the ADS driver linac may make the beam unstable or deteriorate the beam performance. To evaluate the parasitic mode effect on the beam dynamics systematically, simulation studies using the ROOT-based numerical code SMD have been conducted. The longitudinal beam instability induced by the HOMs (High Order Modes) and SOMs (Same Order Modes) has little effect on the longitudinal beam performance for the current ADS driver linac design based on the 10 MeV/325 MHz injector I from previous studies. Here the transverse parasitic mode (i.e., dipole HOM) effect on the transverse beam performance at the ADS driver linac exit is investigated. To more reasonably quantify the dipole mode effect, the multi-bunch effective emittance is introduced in this paper.

  9. Studies on the Performance of RC Beam-Column Joints Strengthened Using Different Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheela, S.; Anu Geetha, B.

    2012-02-01

    Many reinforced concrete structures in our country are in a deteriorated or distressed state. Hence strengthening such structures or reducing the load limit on them is becoming necessary to extend their service life. Beam-column joint is the crucial zone in a reinforced concrete moment resisting frame since it is subjected to large forces during severe ground shaking. In the present study, an attempt has been made to determine the cost-effective composite material and optimum number of layers of composite material for strengthening beam-column joints. Specimens were strengthened using ferrocement, glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) and carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) and studied their behaviour under static as well as cyclic loading. It was found that the rotation at ultimate moment of all the strengthened beam-column joints were greater than that of the control specimens. The specimens strengthened with more number of layers of strengthening material showed better moment-rotation characteristics. The joints strengthened using GFRP showed better performance in terms of ultimate load, moment rotation characteristics, ductility, energy absorption capacity and strength-to-cost ratio, when compared to that of the specimens strengthened with other composite materials. However, CFRP strengthened specimens showed good ductility and better cracking characteristics and prevented the failure at the joint.

  10. Engineering the Activity and Lifetime of Heterogeneous Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth via Substrate Ion Beam Bombardment (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-31

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2014-0159 ENGINEERING THE ACTIVITY AND LIFETIME OF HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR CARBON NANOTUBE GROWTH VIA SUBSTRATE ION BEAM...July 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ENGINEERING THE ACTIVITY AND LIFETIME OF HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR CARBON NANOTUBE GROWTH VIA SUBSTRATE ION BEAM... heterogeneous catalyst, catalyst support, ion beam bombardment 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 11

  11. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY Supercritical carbon dioxide process for releasing stuck cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Chaoqun, Gao; Lei, Wang; Yupeng, Jing

    2010-10-01

    The multi-SCCO2 (supercritical carbon dioxide) release and dry process based on our specialized SCCO2 semiconductor process equipment is investigated and the releasing mechanism is discussed. The experiment results show that stuck cantilever beams were held up again under SCCO2 high pressure treatment and the repeatability of this process is nearly 100%.

  12. Morphological and structural modifications of multiwalled carbon nanotubes by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsehly, Emad M.; Chechenin, N. G.; Makunin, A. V.; Motaweh, H. A.

    2016-10-01

    Effects of electron beam irradiation on a morphology and structure of multiwalled carbon nanotubes sample in a normal imaging regime of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) were investigated. Direct SEM observations give evidence that irradiation by electron beam in SEM eliminates morphological unevenness, in the form of round spots of white contrast, on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and makes the tubes thinner. Electron dispersive analysis and Raman spectroscopy are used to explore the origin and nature of these spots. From this analysis we found that e-beam irradiation improves the CNTs graphitization. The synergy of thermal heating and ionization produced by the irradiation are discussed as possible mechanisms of the observed effects.

  13. Protective effects of shikonin on brain injury induced by carbon ion beam irradiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Wang, Zhen Hua; Zhang, Hong; Zhou, Rong; Sun, Chao; Liu, Yang; Si, Jing; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Wang, Zhen Guo

    2015-02-01

    Radiation encephalopathy is the main complication of cranial radiotherapy. It can cause necrosis of brain tissue and cognitive dysfunction. Our previous work had proved that a natural antioxidant shikonin possessed protective effect on cerebral ischemic injury. Here we investigated the effects of shikonin on carbon ion beam induced radiation brain injury in mice. Pretreatment with shikonin significantly increased the SOD and CAT activities and the ratio of GSH/GSSG in mouse brain tissues compared with irradiated group (P<0.01), while obviously reduced the MDA and PCO contents and the ROS levels derived from of the brain mitochondria. The shikonin also noticeably improved the spatial memory deficits caused by carbon ion beam irradiation. All results demonstrated that shikonin could improve the irradiated brain injury which might resulted from its modulation effects on the oxidative stress induced by the 12C6+ ion beam.

  14. Investigation of industrial-scale carbon dioxide reduction using pulsed electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, G. M.; Apruzese, J. P.; Petrova, Tz. B.; Wolford, M. F.

    2016-03-14

    Carbon dioxide is the most important greenhouse gas contributing to global warming. To help mitigate increasing CO{sub 2} concentrations, we investigate a method of carbon dioxide reduction using high-power electron beams, which can be used on an industrial scale. A series of experiments are conducted in which the reduction of CO{sub 2} is measured for different gas compositions and power deposition rates. An electron beam deposition model is applied to compute reduction rates of CO{sub 2} and energy cost for breaking a CO{sub 2} molecule in flue gas and pure carbon dioxide at atmospheric pressure. For flue gas consisting of 82% N{sub 2}, 6% O{sub 2}, and 12% CO{sub 2}, the calculated energy cost is 85 eV per molecule. In order to dissociate 50% of the CO{sub 2} molecules, beam energy density deposition on the order of 20 J/cm{sup 3} is required. Electron beam irradiation of 12.6 liter gas volume containing 90% CO{sub 2} and 10% CH{sub 4} at beam energy density deposition of 4.2 J/cm{sup 3}, accumulated over 43 shots in a 20 min interval, reduced the CO{sub 2} concentration to 78%. Analogous experiments with a gas mixture containing 11.5% CO{sub 2}, 11.5% CH{sub 4}, and balance of Ar, reduced the CO{sub 2} concentration to below 11% with energy deposition 0.71 J/cm{sup 3}, accumulated over 10 shots in a 5 min interval. The experimental data and the theoretical predictions of CO{sub 2} reduction using pulsed electron beams are in agreement within the experimental error. Other techniques to enhance the removal of CO{sub 2} with pulsed electron beams are also explored, yielding new possible avenues of research.

  15. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on the Tensile Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Sheets and Yarns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Tiffany S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Baker, James S.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube sheets and yarns were irradiated using electron beam (e-beam) energy to determine the effect of irradiation dose on the tensile properties. Results showed that a slight change in tensile strength occurred after irradiating as-received CNT sheets for 20 minutes, and a slight decrease in tensile strength as the irradiation time approached 90 minutes. On the other hand, the addition of small molecules to the CNT sheet surface had a greater effect on the tensile properties of e-beam irradiated CNT sheets. Some functionalized CNT sheets displayed up to a 57% increase in tensile strength following 90 minutes of e-beam exposure. In addition, as-received CNT yarns showed a significant increase in tensile strength as the irradiation time increased.

  16. Planarization of amorphous carbon films on patterned substrates using gas cluster ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao; Nagato, Keisuke; Nakao, Masayuki; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Tani, Hiroshi; Sakane, Yasuo

    2009-04-01

    Surface planarization and modification of a patterned surface were demonstrated using gas cluster ion beam (GCIB). Grooves with 100-400 nm intervals were formed on amorphous carbon films using focused ion beams to study the special frequency dependence of the planarization. Also, line and space patterns were fabricated on Si substrates, and amorphous carbons were deposited as a model structure of discrete track media. Subsequently, surface planarization using Ar-GCIB was carried out. After GCIB irradiations, all of the grooves were completely removed, and a flat surface was realized. And it showed that GCIB irradiation planarized grooves without huge thickness loss. From the power spectrum density of an atomic force microscope, GCIB preferentially removed grooves with small intervals. It was found from energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy that surface planarization without severe damage in the amorphous carbon and magnetic layers was carried out with GCIB.

  17. Friction and Wear of Ion-Beam-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon on Chemical-Vapor-Deposited, Fine-Grain Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Lanter, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films coated on chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD), fine-grain diamond coatings were examined in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air environments. The DLC films were produced by the direct impact of an ion beam (composed of a 3:17 mixture of Ar and CH4) at ion energies of 1500 and 700 eV and an RF power of 99 W. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical CVD diamond pins sliding on four different carbon-base coating systems: DLC films on CVD diamond; DLC films on silicon; as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond; and carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond on silicon. Results indicate that in ultrahigh vacuum the ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond (similar to the ion-implanted CVD diamond) greatly decrease both the friction and wear of fine-grain CVD diamond films and provide solid lubrication. In dry nitrogen and in humid air, ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond films also had a low steady-state coefficient of friction and a low wear rate. These tribological performance benefits, coupled with a wider range of coating thicknesses, led to longer endurance life and improved wear resistance for the DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond in comparison to the ion-implanted diamond films. Thus, DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond films can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating regardless of environment.

  18. Performance studies of four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhihua; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-10-01

    Four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has been proposed to characterize the breathing motion of tumors before radiotherapy treatment. However, when the acquired cone beam projection data are retrospectively gated into several respiratory phases, the available data to reconstruct each phase is under-sampled and thus causes streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images. To solve the under-sampling problem and improve image quality in 4DCBCT, various methods have been developed. This paper presents performance studies of three different 4DCBCT methods based on different reconstruction algorithms. The aims of this paper are to study (1) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the data acquisition time of a 4DCBCT scan and (2) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the number of phase bins used to sort projection data. These aims will be applied to three different 4DCBCT methods: conventional filtered backprojection reconstruction (FBP), FBP with McKinnon-Bates correction (MB) and prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) reconstruction. A hybrid phantom consisting of realistic chest anatomy and a moving elliptical object with known 3D motion trajectories was constructed by superimposing the analytical projection data of the moving object to the simulated projection data from a chest CT volume dataset. CBCT scans with gantry rotation times from 1 to 4 min were simulated, and the generated projection data were sorted into 5, 10 and 20 phase bins before different methods were used to reconstruct 4D images. The motion trajectories of the moving object were extracted using a fast free-form deformable registration algorithm. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of the extracted motion trajectories were evaluated for all simulated cases to quantitatively study the performance. The results demonstrate (1) longer acquisition times result in more accurate motion delineation

  19. Some aspects of the two beam performance of DCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnagopal, S.; Siemann, R.

    1992-03-01

    The results of beam-beam simulations that model DCI operating as an e+ e- collider are reported. The simulation techniques, including a new procedure for incorporating synchrotron radiation, are described. Phase advance errors between the interaction points explain the beam-beam limit at the operating point qx = qy = 0.725 (q denotes the fractional part of the tune). The effects of radiation damping are also studied near that operating point. Simulation and experiments disagree in a second operating region, qx = qy ˜ 0.795, indicating additional physics outside the scope of our model.

  20. The E-beam resist test facility: performance testing and benchmarking of E-beam resists for advanced mask writers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Jang, Il Yong; Mellish, Mac; Litt, Lloyd C.; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Hartley, John

    2012-11-01

    With each new generation of e-beam mask writers comes the ability to write leading edge photomasks with improved patterning performance and increased throughput. However, these cutting-edge e-beam tools are often used with older generation resists, preventing the end-user from taking full advantage of the tool's potential. The generation gap between tool and resist will become even more apparent with the commercialization of multi-beam mask writers, which are expected to be available for pilot line use around 2015. The mask industry needs resists capable of meeting the resolution, roughness, and sensitivity requirements of these advanced tools and applications. The E-beam Resist Test Facility (ERTF) has been established to fill the need for consortium-based testing of e-beam resists for mask writing applications on advanced mask writers out to the 11nm half-pitch node and beyond. SEMATECH and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) began establishing the ERTF in early 2012 to test e-beam resist samples from commercial suppliers and university labs against the required performance metrics for each application at the target node. Operations officially began on June 12, 2012, at which time the first e-beam resist samples were tested. The ERTF uses the process and metrology infrastructure available at CNSE, including a Vistec VB300 Vectorscan e-beam tool adjusted to operate at 50kv. Initial testing results show that multiple resists already meet, or are close to meeting, the resolution requirements for mask writing at the 11nm node, but other metrics such as line width roughness still need improvement. An overview of the ERTF and its capabilities is provided here. Tools, baseline processes, and operation strategy details are discussed, and resist testing and benchmarking results are shown. The long-term outlook for the ERTF and plans to expand capability and testing capacity, including resist testing for e-beam direct write lithography, are also

  1. Performance of laser inter-satellite links with dynamic beam waist adjustment.

    PubMed

    Song, Tianyu; Wang, Qian; Wu, Ming-Wei; Kam, Pooi-Yuen

    2016-05-30

    In this paper, we propose the idea of dynamic beam waist adjustment for laser inter-satellite communications, and study the performance of this dynamic-beam scheme. The beam waist adjustment is based on continuous detection of the instantaneous pointing error angle, which is performed at the transmitter side. Using a square to approximate the circular detector region, we obtain a closed-form expression for calculating the proportion of power that can be collected by the receiver aperture, and derive a simple algebraic solution for the optimum dynamic beam waist. Due to its simple form, the dynamic beam waist value can be computed in real time at the transmitter, and therefore, the adjustment is practically implementable. It is shown that the performance of laser inter-satellite links with dynamic beam waist is better than that with fixed beam waist.

  2. Design of a new tracking device for on-line beam range monitor in carbon therapy.

    PubMed

    Traini, Giacomo; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bollella, Angela; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Frallicciardi, Paola Maria; Mancini-Terracciano, Carlo; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Miraglia, Federico; Muraro, Silvia; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Senzacqua, Martina; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2017-02-01

    Charged particle therapy is a technique for cancer treatment that exploits hadron beams, mostly protons and carbon ions. A critical issue is the monitoring of the beam range so to check the correct dose deposition to the tumor and surrounding tissues. The design of a new tracking device for beam range real-time monitoring in pencil beam carbon ion therapy is presented. The proposed device tracks secondary charged particles produced by beam interactions in the patient tissue and exploits the correlation of the charged particle emission profile with the spatial dose deposition and the Bragg peak position. The detector, currently under construction, uses the information provided by 12 layers of scintillating fibers followed by a plastic scintillator and a pixelated Lutetium Fine Silicate (LFS) crystal calorimeter. An algorithm to account and correct for emission profile distortion due to charged secondaries absorption inside the patient tissue is also proposed. Finally detector reconstruction efficiency for charged particle emission profile is evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation considering a quasi-realistic case of a non-homogenous phantom.

  3. Optical and scratch resistant properties of diamondlike carbon films deposited with single and dual ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussmaul, Michael T.; Bogdanski, Michael S.; Banks, Bruce A.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited using both single and dual ion beam techniques utilizing filament and hollow cathode ion sources. Continuous DLC films up to 3000 A thick were deposited on fused quartz plates. Ion beam process parameters were varied in an effort to create hard, clear films. Total DLC film absorption over visible wavelengths was obtained using a Perkin-Elmer spectrophotometer. An ellipsometer, with an Ar-He laser (wavelength 6328 A) was used to determine index of refraction for the DLC films. Scratch resistance and frictional and adherence properties were determined for select films. Applications for these films range from military to the ophthalmic industries.

  4. Optical and Scratch Resistant Properties of Diamondlike Carbon Films Deposited with Single and Dual Ion Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussmaul, Michael T.; Bogdanski, Michael S.; Banks, Bruce A.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited using both single and dual ion beam techniques utilizing filament and hollow cathode ion sources. Continuous DLC films up to 3000 A thick were deposited on fused quartz plates. Ion beam process parameters were varied in an effort to create hard, clear films. Total DLC film absorption over visible wavelengths was obtained using a Perkin-Elmer spectrophotometer. An ellipsometer, with an Ar-He laser (wavelength 6328 A) was used to determine index of refraction for the DLC films. Scratch resistance, frictional, and adherence properties were determined for select films. Applications for these films range from military to the ophthalmic industries.

  5. Performance of Current-Mode Ion Chambers as Beam Monitors in a Pulsed Cold Neutron Beam for the NPDGamma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, R. Chad

    2006-10-01

    The NPDGamma collaboration has built and commissioned an apparatus to measure the parity-violating gamma asymmetry A in the low energy np capture process n+p->d+ γ. The asymmetry in question is a 10-8 correlation between the spin of the incident (polarized) neutron and the outgoing 2.2 MeV gamma ray. A set of purpose-built, 3He-filled ionization chambers read out in current mode is used to monitor the incident neutron flux, the beam polarization, and the transmission of the liquid para-hydrogen target during the NPDGamma measurements. As will be described in the talk, these beam monitors are simple, reliable, low-noise detectors that have performed excellently for NPDGamma. We have verified that the beam monitor signals can be interpreted to reproduce the known time-of-flight dependence of beam flux from the LANSCE pulsed cold neutron source, and that the neutron beam polarization can be measured at the 2% level from direct measurements of the transmission of the beam through the beam polarizer.

  6. Carbon ion beam focusing using laser irradiated heated diamond hemispherical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, Dustin T; Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine A

    2009-01-01

    Experiments preformed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident Laser Facility were conducted to observe the acceleration and focusing of carbon ions via the TNSA mechanism using hemispherical diamond targets. Trident is a 200TW class laser system with 80J of 1 {micro}m, short-pulse light delivered in 0.5ps, with a peak intensity of 5 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Targets where Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamonds formed into hemispheres with a radius of curvature of 400{micro}m and a thickness of 5{micro}m. The accelerated ions from the hemisphere were diagnosed by imaging the shadow of a witness copper mesh grid located 2mm behind the target onto a film pack located 5cm behind the target. Ray tracing was used to determine the location of the ion focal spot. The TNSA mechanism favorably accelerates hydrogen found in and on the targets. To make the carbon beam detectable, targets were first heated to several hundred degrees Celsius using a CW, 532nm, 8W laser. Imaging of the carbon beam was accomplished via an auto-radiograph of a nuclear activated lithium fluoride window in the first layer of the film pack. The focus of the carbon ion beam was determined to be located 630 {+-} 110 {micro}m from the vertex of the hemisphere.

  7. Investigating treatment dose error due to beam attenuation by a carbon fiber tabletop.

    PubMed

    Myint, W Kenji; Niedbala, Malgorzata; Wilkins, David; Gerig, Lee H

    2006-08-24

    Carbon fiber is commonly used in radiation therapy for treatment tabletops and various immobilization and support devices, partially because it is generally perceived to be almost radiotransparent to high-energy photons. To avoid exposure to normal tissue during modern radiation therapy, one must deliver the radiation from all gantry angles; hence, beams often transit the couch proximal to the patient. The effects of the beam attenuation by the support structure of the couch are often neglected in the planning process. In this study, we investigate the attenuation of 6-MV and 18-MV photon beams by a Medtec (Orange City, IA) carbon fiber couch. We have determined that neglecting the attenuation of oblique treatment fields by the carbon fiber couch can result in localized dose reduction from 4% to 16%, depending on energy, field size, and geometry. Further, we investigate the ability of a commercial treatment-planning system (Theraplan Plus v3.8) to account for the attenuation by the treatment couch. Results show that incorporating the carbon fiber couch in the patient model reduces the dose error to less than 2%. The variation in dose reduction as a function of longitudinal couch position was also measured. In the triangular strut region of the couch, the attenuation varied +/- 0.5% following the periodic nature of the support structure. Based on these findings, we propose the routine incorporation of the treatment tabletop into patient treatment planning dose calculations.

  8. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L; Roy, Ajit K

    2016-05-05

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.

  9. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, N.; Zhong, Z.; Ghose, S.; Kirk, H. G.; Trung, L.-P.; McDonald, K. T.; Kotsina, Z.; Nocera, P.; Assmann, R.; Redaelli, S.; Bertarelli, A.; Quaranta, E.; Rossi, A.; Zwaska, R.; Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Mokhov, N.

    2016-11-01

    A comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace industries due to their unique combination of high temperature stability, low density, and high strength. The performance of carbon-carbon composites and compounds under intense proton beams and long-term irradiation have been studied in a series of experiments and compared with the performance of graphite. The 24-GeV proton beam experiments confirmed the inherent ability of a 3D C/C fiber composite to withstand a thermal shock. A series of irradiation damage campaigns explored the response of different C/C structures as a function of the proton fluence and irradiating environment. Radiolytic oxidation resulting from the interaction of oxygen molecules, the result of beam-induced radiolysis encountered during some of the irradiation campaigns, with carbon atoms during irradiation with the presence of a water coolant emerged as a dominant contributor to the observed structural integrity loss at proton fluences ≥5 ×1020 p /cm2 . The carbon-fiber composites were shown to exhibit significant anisotropy in their dimensional stability driven by the fiber weave and the microstructural behavior of the fiber and carbon matrix accompanied by the presence of manufacturing porosity and defects. Carbon-fiber-reinforced molybdenum-graphite compounds (MoGRCF) selected for their impedance properties in the Large Hadron Collider beam collimation exhibited significant decrease in postirradiation load-displacement behavior even after low dose levels (˜5 ×1018 p cm-2 ). In addition, the

  10. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    DOE PAGES

    Simos, N.; Zhong, Z.; Ghose, S.; ...

    2016-11-16

    Here, a comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace industries due to their unique combination of high temperature stability, low density, and high strength. The performance of carbon-carbon composites and compounds under intense proton beams and long-term irradiation have beenmore » studied in a series of experiments and compared with the performance of graphite. The 24-GeV proton beam experiments confirmed the inherent ability of a 3D C/C fiber composite to withstand a thermal shock. A series of irradiation damage campaigns explored the response of different C/C structures as a function of the proton fluence and irradiating environment. Radiolytic oxidation resulting from the interaction of oxygen molecules, the result of beam-induced radiolysis encountered during some of the irradiation campaigns, with carbon atoms during irradiation with the presence of a water coolant emerged as a dominant contributor to the observed structural integrity loss at proton fluences ≥5×1020 p/cm2. The carbon-fiber composites were shown to exhibit significant anisotropy in their dimensional stability driven by the fiber weave and the microstructural behavior of the fiber and carbon matrix accompanied by the presence of manufacturing porosity and defects. Carbon-fiber-reinforced molybdenum-graphite compounds (MoGRCF) selected for their impedance properties in the Large Hadron Collider beam collimation exhibited significant decrease in postirradiation load-displacement behavior even after low dose levels (~5×1018 p cm-2). In addition

  11. The Effect of p53 Status of Tumor Cells on Radiosensitivity of Irradiated Tumors With Carbon-Ion Beams Compared With γ-Rays or Reactor Neutron Beams.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Uzawa, Akiko; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Tano, Keizo; Sanada, Yu; Suzuki, Minoru; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to clarify the effect of p53 status of tumor cells on radiosensitivity of solid tumors following accelerated carbon-ion beam irradiation compared with γ-rays or reactor neutron beams, referring to the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. Human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells transfected with mutant TP53 (SAS/mp53) or with neo vector (SAS/neo) were injected subcutaneously into hind legs of nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously to label all intratumor proliferating (P) cells. They received γ-rays or accelerated carbon-ion beams at a high or reduced dose-rate. Other tumor-bearing mice received reactor thermal or epithermal neutrons at a reduced dose-rate. Immediately or 9 hours after the high dose-rate irradiation (HDRI), or immediately after the reduced dose-rate irradiation (RDRI), the tumor cells were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker, and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (Q cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The difference in radiosensitivity between the total (P + Q) and Q cells after γ-ray irradiation was markedly reduced with reactor neutron beams or carbon-ion beams, especially with a higher linear energy transfer (LET) value. Following γ-ray irradiation, SAS/neo tumor cells, especially intratumor Q cells, showed a marked reduction in sensitivity due to the recovery from radiation-induced damage, compared with the total or Q cells within SAS/mp53 tumors that showed little repair capacity. In both total and Q cells within both SAS/neo and SAS/mp53 tumors, carbon-ion beam irradiation, especially with a higher LET, showed little recovery capacity through leaving an interval between HDRI and the assay or decreasing the dose-rate. The recovery from radiation-induced damage after γ-ray irradiation was a p53-dependent event, but little recovery was found after carbon-ion beam irradiation. With RDRI

  12. The Effect of p53 Status of Tumor Cells on Radiosensitivity of Irradiated Tumors With Carbon-Ion Beams Compared With γ-Rays or Reactor Neutron Beams

    PubMed Central

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Uzawa, Akiko; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Tano, Keizo; Sanada, Yu; Suzuki, Minoru; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to clarify the effect of p53 status of tumor cells on radiosensitivity of solid tumors following accelerated carbon-ion beam irradiation compared with γ-rays or reactor neutron beams, referring to the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. Methods Human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells transfected with mutant TP53 (SAS/mp53) or with neo vector (SAS/neo) were injected subcutaneously into hind legs of nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice received 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously to label all intratumor proliferating (P) cells. They received γ-rays or accelerated carbon-ion beams at a high or reduced dose-rate. Other tumor-bearing mice received reactor thermal or epithermal neutrons at a reduced dose-rate. Immediately or 9 hours after the high dose-rate irradiation (HDRI), or immediately after the reduced dose-rate irradiation (RDRI), the tumor cells were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker, and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (Q cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Results The difference in radiosensitivity between the total (P + Q) and Q cells after γ-ray irradiation was markedly reduced with reactor neutron beams or carbon-ion beams, especially with a higher linear energy transfer (LET) value. Following γ-ray irradiation, SAS/neo tumor cells, especially intratumor Q cells, showed a marked reduction in sensitivity due to the recovery from radiation-induced damage, compared with the total or Q cells within SAS/mp53 tumors that showed little repair capacity. In both total and Q cells within both SAS/neo and SAS/mp53 tumors, carbon-ion beam irradiation, especially with a higher LET, showed little recovery capacity through leaving an interval between HDRI and the assay or decreasing the dose-rate. The recovery from radiation-induced damage after γ-ray irradiation was a p53-dependent event, but little recovery was found after carbon

  13. Formation of Carbonized Polystyrene Sphere/hemisphere Shell Arrays by Ion Beam Irradiation and Subsequent Annealing or Chloroform Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xianyin; Dai, Zhigao; Xiao, Xiangheng; Li, Wenqing; Zheng, Xudong; Shang, Xunzhong; Zhang, Xiaolei; Cai, Guangxu; Wu, Wei; Meng, Fanli; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Heat-resistant two-dimensional (2D) sphere/hemisphere shell array is significant for the fabrication of novel nanostructures. Here large-area, well-ordered arrays of carbonized polystyrene (PS) hollow sphere/hemisphere with controlled size and morphology are prepared by combining the nanosphere self-assembly, kV Ag ion beam modification, and subsequent annealing or chloroform treatment. Potential mechanisms for the formation and evolution of the heat-resistant carbonized PS spherical shell with increasing ion fluence and energy are discussed. Combined with noble metal or semiconductor, these modified PS sphere arrays should open up new possibilities for high-performance nanoscale optical sensors or photoelectric devices. PMID:26640125

  14. High performance hydrophobic solvent, carbon dioxide capture

    DOEpatents

    Nulwala, Hunaid; Luebke, David

    2017-05-09

    Methods and compositions useful, for example, for physical solvent carbon capture. A method comprising: contacting at least one first composition comprising carbon dioxide with at least one second composition to at least partially dissolve the carbon dioxide of the first composition in the second composition, wherein the second composition comprises at least one siloxane compound which is covalently modified with at least one non-siloxane group comprising at least one heteroatom. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) materials and ethylene-glycol based materials have high carbon dioxide solubility but suffer from various problems. PDMS is hydrophobic but suffers from low selectivity. Ethylene-glycol based systems have good solubility and selectivity, but suffer from high affinity to water. Solvents were developed which keep the desired combinations of properties, and result in a simplified, overall process for carbon dioxide removal from a mixed gas stream.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations of ripple filters designed for proton and carbon ion beams in hadrontherapy with active scanning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourhaleb, F.; Attili, A.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, P.; Marchetto, F.; Donetti, M.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; Iliescu, S.; La Rosa, A.; Pardo, J.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.

    2008-02-01

    Proton and carbon ion beams have a very sharp Bragg peak. For proton beams of energies smaller than 100 MeV, fitting with a gaussian the region of the maximum of the Bragg peak, the sigma along the beam direction is smaller than 1 mm, while for carbon ion beams, the sigma derived with the same technique is smaller than 1 mm for energies up to 360 MeV. In order to use low energy proton and carbon ion beams in hadrontherapy and to achieve an acceptable homogeneity of the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) either the peak positions along the beam have to be quite close to each other or the longitudinal peak shape needs to be broaden at least few millimeters by means of a properly designed ripple filter. With a synchrotron accelerator in conjunction with active scanning techniques the use of a ripple filter is necessary to reduce the numbers of energy switches necessary to obtain a smooth SOBP, leading also to shorter overall irradiation times. We studied the impact of the design of the ripple filter on the dose uniformity in the SOBP region by means of Monte Carlo simulations, implemented using the package Geant4. We simulated the beam delivery line supporting both proton and carbon ion beams using different energies of the beams. We compared the effect of different kind of ripple filters and their advantages.

  16. Variational principles for transversely vibrating multiwalled carbon nanotubes based on nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model.

    PubMed

    Adali, Sarp

    2009-05-01

    Variational principles are derived for multiwalled carbon nanotubes undergoing vibrations. Derivations are based on the continuum modeling with the Euler-Bernoulli beam representing the nanotubes and small scale effects taken into account via the nonlocal elastic theory. Hamilton's principle for multiwalled nanotubes is given and Rayleigh's quotient for the frequencies is derived for nanotubes undergoing free vibrations. Natural and geometric boundary conditions are derived which lead to a set of coupled boundary conditions due to nonlocal effects.

  17. Antimony-assisted carbonization of Si(111) with solid source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hackley, Justin; Richardson, Christopher J. K.; Sarney, Wendy L.

    2013-11-15

    The carbonization of an antimony-terminated Si (111) surface in a solid source molecular beam epitaxy system is presented. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize samples grown with and without antimony termination. It is shown that the antimony-terminated surface promotes the formation of thin, smooth and continuous SiC films at a relatively low temperature of 800 °C.

  18. Enhanced carbon and beryllium influxes during high performance operation in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, D.; Summers, D.; Philipps, V.; Weisen, H.; De Esch, H.; Jones, T.; Deksnis, E.; Lomas, P.; Lowry, C.; McCracken, G.; Mandl, W.; Nielsen, P.; Reichle, R.; Stamp, M.; Von Hellermann, M.

    1990-12-01

    During high-power operation in JET, a sudden and large increase in the flux of impurities (carbon and beryllium) entering the discharge is often observed shortly after the start of additional heating, especially at the low plasma density required for high ion temperature and fusion yield. This influx leads to a degradation of the plasma performance due to an increase of the impurity concentration and associated deuterium dilution, reduced beam penetration and a reduction in the ion temperature. There is good evidence that these influxes result from a small fraction of the total area of the carbon (beryllium) surfaces in contact with the plasma (tile edges particularly) reaching temperatures where radiation-enhanced sublimation and thermal sublimation for carbon and evaporation for beryllium become important. In this paper we report on measurements of the phenomena observed during inner-wall and carbon or beryllium belt limiter discharges both with and without beryllium gettering.

  19. Mutagenic effects of carbon ion beam irradiations on dry Lotus japonicus seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shanwei; Zhou, Libin; Li, Wenjian; Du, Yan; Yu, Lixia; Feng, Hui; Mu, Jinhu; Chen, Yuze

    2016-09-01

    Carbon ion beam irradiation is a powerful method for creating mutants and has been used in crop breeding more and more. To investigate the effects of carbon ion beams on Lotus japonicus, dry seeds were irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam at dosages of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 Gy. The germination rate, survival rate and root length of M1 populations were explored and the dose of 400 Gy was selected as the median lethal dose (LD50) for a large-scale mutant screening. Among 2472 M2 plants, 127 morphological mutants including leaf, stem, flower and fruit phenotypic variation were found, and the mutation frequency was approximately 5.14%. Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) assays were utilized to investigate the DNA polymorphism between seven mutants and eight plants without phenotypic variation from M2 populations. No remarkable differences were detected between these two groups, and the total polymorphic rate was 0.567%.

  20. Carbon-ion pencil beam scanning for thoracic treatment – initiation report and dose metrics evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Karube, Masataka; Mori, Shinichiro; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Nakajima, Mio; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Kamada, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-ion beam scanning has not previously been used for moving tumor treatments. We have commenced respiratory-gated carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) in the thoracic and abdominal regions under free-breathing conditions as a clinical trial. This study aimed to investigate this treatment in the lungs in comparison with passive scattering CIRT. Five patients had thoracic tumors treated with carbon-ion scanned beams using respiratory gating. We analyzed the actual treatments and calculated passive scattering treatment plans based on the same planning CT. We evaluated tumor size until 3 months post treatment and each treatment plan regarding dose delivered to 95% of the clinical target volume (CTV-D95), mean lung dose, percentage of lung receiving at least 5 Gy (RBE) (Lung-V5), Lung-V10, Lung-V20, heart maximum dose (Dmax), esophagus Dmax, cord Dmax and skin Dmax. Obvious tumor deterioration was not observed up to 3 months post treatment. The dose evaluation metrics were similar item by item between respiratory-gated scanned CIRT and passive scattering CIRT. In conclusion, scanned beam CIRT provided treatments equivalent to passive scattering CIRT for thoracic tumors. Increased sample numbers and longer-term observation are needed. PMID:27380799

  1. Ion Beam Analysis of Diffusion in Diamondlike Carbon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaffee, Kevin Paul

    The van de Graaf accelerator facility at Case Western Reserve University was developed into an analytical research center capable of performing Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry, Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis for hydrogen profiling, Proton Enhanced Scattering, and ^4 He resonant scattering for ^{16 }O profiling. These techniques were applied to the study of Au, Na^+, Cs ^+, and H_2O water diffusion in a-C:H films. The results are consistent with the fully constrained network model of the microstructure as described by Angus and Jansen.

  2. Experimental research on flexural performance of concrete beams strengthened by hybrid fiber CGFRP sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Long; Xu, Xinsheng

    2017-04-01

    Concrete beams strengthened with Hybrid Fiber carbon/glass fiber strengthened polymer (C/GFRP) sheet can not only improve beam ductility, but reduce the cost of the project effectively. It is plays an important engineering application of meaning. In this paper, three concrete beams are strengthened with different fiber (CFRP, C / GFRP and GFRP) in the normal section and a loading failure test. The stress characteristics, failure form, reasonable reinforcement mode, strain condition, bearing capacity, rigidity and deformation capacity of C / GFRP hybrid fiber strengthened beams were studied. The results showed that the flexural load capability and the ductility of the beams strengthened with hybrid C/GFRP are better than that of normal FRP.

  3. Phase Space Generation for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams for External Users’ Applications at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center

    PubMed Central

    Tessonnier, Thomas; Marcelos, Tiago; Mairani, Andrea; Brons, Stephan; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    In the field of radiation therapy, accurate and robust dose calculation is required. For this purpose, precise modeling of the irradiation system and reliable computational platforms are needed. At the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the beamline has been already modeled in the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. However, this model was kept confidential for disclosure reasons and was not available for any external team. The main goal of this study was to create efficiently phase space (PS) files for proton and carbon ion beams, for all energies and foci available at HIT. PSs are representing the characteristics of each particle recorded (charge, mass, energy, coordinates, direction cosines, generation) at a certain position along the beam path. In order to achieve this goal, keeping a reasonable data size but maintaining the requested accuracy for the calculation, we developed a new approach of beam PS generation with the MC code FLUKA. The generated PSs were obtained using an infinitely narrow beam and recording the desired quantities after the last element of the beamline, with a discrimination of primaries or secondaries. In this way, a unique PS can be used for each energy to accommodate the different foci by combining the narrow-beam scenario with a random sampling of its theoretical Gaussian beam in vacuum. PS can also reproduce the different patterns from the delivery system, when properly combined with the beam scanning information. MC simulations using PS have been compared to simulations, including the full beamline geometry and have been found in very good agreement for several cases (depth dose distributions, lateral dose profiles), with relative dose differences below 0.5%. This approach has also been compared with measured data of ion beams with different energies and foci, resulting in a very satisfactory agreement. Hence, the proposed approach was able to fulfill the different requirements and has demonstrated its capability for application to

  4. Low-Z gas stripper as an alternative to carbon foils for the acceleration of high-power uranium beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Goto, A.; Hasebe, H.; Imao, H.; Kamigaito, O.; Kase, M.; Kuboki, H.; Yano, Y.; Yokouchi, S.; Hershcovitch, A.

    2011-03-01

    The RIKEN accelerator complex started feeding the next-generation exotic beam facility radioisotope beam factory (RIBF) with heavy-ion beams from 2007 after the successful commissioning of RIBF at the end of 2006. Many improvements made from 2007 to 2010 were instrumental in increasing the intensity of various heavy-ion beams. However, the available beam intensity of very heavy ion beams, especially uranium beams, is far below our goal of 1pμA (6×1012particles/s). In order to achieve this goal, upgrade programs are already in progress; the programs include the construction of a new 28-GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a new injector linac. However, the most serious problem, that of a charge stripper for high-power uranium beams, still remains unsolved, despite extensive research and development work using large foils mounted on a rotating cylinder and a N2 gas stripper. A gas stripper is free from problems related to lifetime, though the equilibrium charge state in this stripper is considerably lower than that in a carbon foil, owing to the absence of the density effect. Nevertheless, the merits of gas strippers motivated us to develop a low-Z gas stripper to achieve a higher equilibrium charge state even in gases. We measured the electron-loss and electron-capture cross sections of uranium ions in He gas as a function of their charge state at 11, 14, and 15MeV/nucleon. The equilibrium charge states extracted from the intersection of the lines of the two cross sections were promisingly higher than those in N2 gas by more than 10. Simple simulations of charge development along the stripper thickness were performed by assuming the measured cross sections. The simulation results show that about 1mg/cm2 of He gas should be accumulated to achieve a charge state higher than that of N2 gas, notwithstanding the difficulty in accumulation of this helium amount owing to its fast dispersion. However, we now believe that the following two

  5. Structural and optical properties of 70-keV carbon ion beam synthesized carbon nanoclusters in thermally grown silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, P. R.; Poudel, P. P.; Paramo, J. A.; Strzhemechny, Y. M.; Rout, B.; McDaniel, F. D.

    2014-09-01

    The structural and optical properties of carbon nanoclusters formed in thermally grown silicon dioxide film via the ion beam synthesis process have been investigated. A low-energy (70 keV) carbon ion beam (C-) at a fluence of 3 × 1017 atoms/cm2 was used for implantation into a thermally grown silicon dioxide layer (500 nm thick) on a Si (100) wafer. Several parts of the implanted samples were subsequently annealed in a gas mixture (4 % H2 + 96 % Ar) at 900 °C for different time periods. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The carbon ion implantation depth profile was simulated using a widely used Monte Carlo-based simulation code SRIM-2012. Additionally, the elemental depth profile of the implanted carbon along with host elements of silicon and oxygen were simulated using a dynamic ion-solid interaction code T-DYN, which incorporates the effects of the surface sputtering and gradual change in the elemental composition in the implanted layers due to high-fluence ion implantation. The elemental depth profile obtained from the XPS measurements matches closely to the T-DYN predictions. Raman measurements indicate the formation of graphitic phases in the annealed samples. The graphitic peak (G-peak) was found to be increased with the annealing time duration. In the sample annealed for 10 min, the sizes of the carbon nanoclusters were found to be 1-4 nm in diameter using TEM. The PL measurements at room temperature using a 325-nm laser show broad-band emissions in the ultraviolet to visible range in the as-implanted sample. Intense narrow bands along with the broad bands were observed in the annealed samples. The defects present in the as-grown samples along with carbon ion-induced defect centers in the as-implanted samples are the main contributors to the observed

  6. Structural and optical properties of 70-keV carbon ion beam synthesized carbon nanoclusters in thermally grown silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, P. R.; Poudel, P. P.; Paramo, J. A.; Strzhemechny, Y. M.; Rout, B.; McDaniel, F. D.

    2015-02-01

    The structural and optical properties of carbon nanoclusters formed in thermally grown silicon dioxide film via the ion beam synthesis process have been investigated. A low-energy (70 keV) carbon ion beam (C-) at a fluence of 3 × 1017 atoms/cm2 was used for implantation into a thermally grown silicon dioxide layer (500 nm thick) on a Si (100) wafer. Several parts of the implanted samples were subsequently annealed in a gas mixture (4 % H2 + 96 % Ar) at 900 °C for different time periods. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The carbon ion implantation depth profile was simulated using a widely used Monte Carlo-based simulation code SRIM-2012. Additionally, the elemental depth profile of the implanted carbon along with host elements of silicon and oxygen were simulated using a dynamic ion-solid interaction code T-DYN, which incorporates the effects of the surface sputtering and gradual change in the elemental composition in the implanted layers due to high-fluence ion implantation. The elemental depth profile obtained from the XPS measurements matches closely to the T-DYN predictions. Raman measurements indicate the formation of graphitic phases in the annealed samples. The graphitic peak (G-peak) was found to be increased with the annealing time duration. In the sample annealed for 10 min, the sizes of the carbon nanoclusters were found to be 1-4 nm in diameter using TEM. The PL measurements at room temperature using a 325-nm laser show broad-band emissions in the ultraviolet to visible range in the as-implanted sample. Intense narrow bands along with the broad bands were observed in the annealed samples. The defects present in the as-grown samples along with carbon ion-induced defect centers in the as-implanted samples are the main contributors to the observed

  7. Modeling and simulation performance of sucker rod beam pump

    SciTech Connect

    Aditsania, Annisa; Rahmawati, Silvy Dewi Sukarno, Pudjo; Soewono, Edy

    2015-09-30

    Artificial lift is a mechanism to lift hydrocarbon, generally petroleum, from a well to surface. This is used in the case that the natural pressure from the reservoir has significantly decreased. Sucker rod beam pumping is a method of artificial lift. Sucker rod beam pump is modeled in this research as a function of geometry of the surface part, the size of sucker rod string, and fluid properties. Besides its length, sucker rod string also classified into tapered and un-tapered. At the beginning of this research, for easy modeling, the sucker rod string was assumed as un-tapered. The assumption proved non-realistic to use. Therefore, the tapered sucker rod string modeling needs building. The numerical solution of this sucker rod beam pump model is computed using finite difference method. The numerical result shows that the peak of polished rod load for sucker rod beam pump unit C-456-D-256-120, for non-tapered sucker rod string is 38504.2 lb, while for tapered rod string is 25723.3 lb. For that reason, to avoid the sucker rod string breaks due to the overload, the use of tapered sucker rod beam string is suggested in this research.

  8. Modeling and simulation performance of sucker rod beam pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aditsania, Annisa; Rahmawati, Silvy Dewi; Sukarno, Pudjo; Soewono, Edy

    2015-09-01

    Artificial lift is a mechanism to lift hydrocarbon, generally petroleum, from a well to surface. This is used in the case that the natural pressure from the reservoir has significantly decreased. Sucker rod beam pumping is a method of artificial lift. Sucker rod beam pump is modeled in this research as a function of geometry of the surface part, the size of sucker rod string, and fluid properties. Besides its length, sucker rod string also classified into tapered and un-tapered. At the beginning of this research, for easy modeling, the sucker rod string was assumed as un-tapered. The assumption proved non-realistic to use. Therefore, the tapered sucker rod string modeling needs building. The numerical solution of this sucker rod beam pump model is computed using finite difference method. The numerical result shows that the peak of polished rod load for sucker rod beam pump unit C-456-D-256-120, for non-tapered sucker rod string is 38504.2 lb, while for tapered rod string is 25723.3 lb. For that reason, to avoid the sucker rod string breaks due to the overload, the use of tapered sucker rod beam string is suggested in this research.

  9. Large amplitude nonlinear response of flat aluminum, and carbon fiber plastic beams and plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Howard F.; Shroyer, Cynthia A.

    1994-06-01

    This progress report presents the results of a continuing study to improve the understanding of nonlinear dynamic behavior of aerospace structures subjected to high levels of excitation. Tests were continued with a clamped-clamped (C-C) aluminum beam. A summary of the results is presented. Tests were conducted with a C-C carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) beam and a pinned-pinned (P-P) aluminum beam. A summary of these results is also presented. Flat plate tests began with an aluminum plate. The shapes of the total, axial, and bending strain power spectral densities for the C-C aluminum and the CFRP beams were quite similar. Both showed a small frequency increase and slight peak broadening as the levels of excitation increased. The nonlinear displacement shapes for the two cases were also quite similar. Further analysis is needed for the P-P aluminum beam case. Finally, a method of estimating the RMS stress for the multimodal response of a panel is presented.

  10. Development of NIRS pencil beam scanning system for carbon ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, T.; Hara, Y.; Mizushima, K.; Saotome, N.; Tansho, R.; Saraya, Y.; Inaniwa, T.; Mori, S.; Iwata, Y.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2017-09-01

    At Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 9000 patients have been successfully treated by carbon ion beams since 1994. The successful results of treatments have led us to construct a new treatment facility equipped with a three-dimensional pencil beam scanning irradiation system, which is one of sophisticated techniques for cancer therapy with high energetic ion beam. This new facility comprises two treatment rooms having fixed beam lines and one treatment room having rotating gantry line. The challenge of this project is to realize treatment of a moving target by scanning irradiation. Thus, to realize this, the development of the fast scanning system is one of the most important issues in this project. After intense commissioning and quality assurance tests, the treatment with scanned ion beam was started in May 2011. After treatment of static target starts, we have developed related technologies. As a result, we can start treatment of moving target and treatment without range shifter plates since 2015. In this paper, the developments of the scanning irradiation system are described.

  11. Interaction of pulsed carbon dioxide laser beams with teeth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brune, D

    1980-08-01

    Beams of pulsed carbon dioxide lasers with energy densities of about 10, 100 or 200 J/mm2 have been applied perpendicularly to third molars in vitro for the purpose of preparing cavities or pin holes for retention. A pulsed beam with an energy density of about 10 J/mm2 produced a hole approximately 2 mm deep with a diameter of about 0.2 mm. With a beam of 100 J/mm2 the hole produced penetrated the tooth to a depth of 4 mm. Minor cracks around the hole in both enamel and dentin could be observed. Around the position where the beam entered the enamel matrix a white mineralized layer was observed, while a brown discoloration was formed around the hole in the dentin at the beam exit. With an energy density of 200 J/mm2 the formation of cracks and discoloration was very pronounced. X-ray diffraction of lased tissue revealed an apatite structure. The wall in the lased hole exhibited a Vicker hardness number similar to that of enamel.

  12. Beam shaping to improve the free-electron laser performance at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Ding, Y.; Bane, K. L. F.; Colocho, W.; ...

    2016-10-27

    A new operating mode has been developed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in which we shape the longitudinal phase space of the electron beam. This mode of operation is realized using a horizontal collimator located in the middle of the first bunch compressor to truncate the head and tail of the beam. With this method, the electron beam longitudinal phase space and current profile are reshaped, and improvement in lasing performance can be realized. As a result, we present experimental studies at the LCLS of the beam shaping effects on the free-electron laser performance.

  13. Implementation and performance of beam smoothing on 10 beams of the Nova laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, Deanna M.; Dixit, Sham N.; Weiland, Timothy L.; Ehrlich, Robert B.; Rothenberg, Joshua E.

    1997-12-01

    Recent simulations and experiments on Nova indicate that some level of smoothing may be required to suppress filamentation in plasmas on the National Ignition Facility, resulting in the addition of 1D smoothing capability to the current baseline design. Control of stimulated Brillouin scattering and filamentation is considered essential to the success of laser fusion because they affect the amount and location of laser energy delivered to the x-ray conversion region (holhraum wall) for indirect drive and to the absorptive region for direct drive. Smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), reduces these instabilities by reducing nonuniformities in the focal irradiance when averaged over a finite time interval. We have installed SSD on Nova to produce beam smoothing on all 10 beam lines. A single dispersion grating is located in a position common to all 10 beam lines early in the preamplifier chain. This location limits the 1(omega) bandwidth to 2.2 angstroms with sufficient dispersion to displace the speckle field of each frequency component at the target plane by one half speckle diameter. Several beam lines were modified to allow orientation of the dispersion on each arm relative to the holhraum wall. After conversion to the third harmonic the beam passes through a kinoform phase plate (KPP) designed to produce an elliptical spot at best focus. The KPPs produce a focal spot having an elliptical flat-top envelope with a superimposed speckle pattern. Over 93% of the energy is contained in the central 400 micrometers . Calculations indicate a 16% rms intensity variance will be reached after 330 ps for a single beam.

  14. Implementation and performance of beam smoothing on 10 beams of the Nova Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D. M.; Dixit, S. N.; Weiland, T. L.; Ehrlich, R.; Rothenberg, J. E.

    1997-03-11

    Recent simulations and experiments on Nova indicate that some level of smoothing may be required to suppress filamentation in plasmas on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), resulting in the addition of 1-D smoothing capability to the current baseline design. Control of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and filamentation is considered essential to the success of laser fusion because they affect the amount and location of laser energy delivered to the x-ray conversion region (hohlraum wall) for indirect drive and to the absorptive region for direct drive, Smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD)[1], reduces these instabilities by reducing nonuniformities in the focal irradiance when averaged over a finite time interval. We have installed SSD on Nova to produce beam smoothing on all 10 beam lines. A single dispersion grating is located in a position common to all 10 beam lines early in the preamplifier chain. This location limits the 1{omega} bandwidth to 2.2 {angstrom} with sufficient dispersion to displace the speckle field of each frequency component at the target plane by one half speckle diameter. Several beam lines were modified to allow orientation of the dispersion on each arm relative to the hohlraum wall. After conversion to the third harmonic the beam passes through a kinoform phase plate (KPP) designed to produce an elliptical spot at best focus. The KPPs produce a focal spot having an elliptical flat-top envelope with a superimposed speckle pattern. Over 93% of the energy is contained in the central 400 km. Calculations indicate a 16% rms. intensity variance will be reached after 330 ps for a single beam.

  15. Tilting of carbon encapsulated metallic nanocolumns in carbon-nickel nanocomposite films by ion beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Matthias; Muecklich, Arndt; Zschornak, Matthias; Wintz, Sebastian; Gemming, Sibylle; Abrasonis, Gintautas; Oates, Thomas W. H.; Luis Endrino, Jose

    2012-07-30

    The influence of assisting low-energy ({approx}50-100 eV) ion irradiation effects on the morphology of C:Ni ({approx}15 at. %) nanocomposite films during ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is investigated. It is shown that IBAD promotes the columnar growth of carbon encapsulated metallic nanoparticles. The momentum transfer from assisting ions results in tilting of the columns in relation to the growing film surface. Complex secondary structures are obtained, in which a significant part of the columns grows under local epitaxy via the junction of sequentially deposited thin film fractions. The influence of such anisotropic film morphology on the optical properties is highlighted.

  16. Development of a 2 ns duration high current electron beam source using CsI coated carbon fibre cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Romesh; Kumar, Ranjeet; Mitra, S.; Sharma, D.K.; Sharma, Archana; Mittal, K.C.; Patil, D.S.

    2014-07-01

    A 50 ampere beam current having a rise time lesser than 500 pico-seconds with its energy 50 keV is generated using field emission mechanism. Beam duration was 2 ns. CsI coating on carbon fibre cathode was done using plasma spray coating. The results obtained from this cathode were compared to the carbon fibre cathode and the reason behind higher current density in the case of CsI coating has been explained. (author)

  17. Performance of a high resolution cavity beam position monitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walston, Sean; Boogert, Stewart; Chung, Carl; Fitsos, Pete; Frisch, Joe; Gronberg, Jeff; Hayano, Hitoshi; Honda, Yosuke; Kolomensky, Yury; Lyapin, Alexey; Malton, Stephen; May, Justin; McCormick, Douglas; Meller, Robert; Miller, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Ross, Marc; Slater, Mark; Smith, Steve; Smith, Tonee; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Thomson, Mark; Urakawa, Junji; Vogel, Vladimir; Ward, David; White, Glen

    2007-07-01

    It has been estimated that an RF cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) could provide a position measurement resolution of less than 1 nm. We have developed a high resolution cavity BPM and associated electronics. A triplet comprised of these BPMs was installed in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs were each rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on six variable-length struts which could be used to move the BPMs in position and angle. We have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a robust calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, we have demonstrated a position resolution of 15.6 nm and a tilt resolution of 2.1 μrad over a dynamic range of approximately ±20 μm.

  18. Performance of a High Resolution Cavity Beam Position Monitor System

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, S; Boogert, S; Chung, C; Fitsos, P; Frisch, J; Gronberg, J; Hayano, H; Honda, Y; Kolomensky, Y; Lyapin, A; Malton, S; May, J; McCormick, D; Meller, R; Miller, D; Orimoto, T; Ross, M; Slater, M; Smith, S; Smith, T; Terunuma, N; Thomson, M; Urakawa, J; Vogel, V; Ward, D; White, G

    2006-12-18

    It has been estimated that an RF cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) could provide a position measurement resolution of less than one nanometer. We have developed a high resolution cavity BPM and associated electronics. A triplet comprised of these BPMs was installed in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs were each rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on six variable-length struts which could be used to move the BPMs in position and angle. We have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a robust calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, we have demonstrated a position resolution of 15.6 nm and a tilt resolution of 2.1 {micro}rad over a dynamic range of approximately {+-} 20 {micro}m.

  19. Performance of a High Resolution Cavity Beam Position Monitor System

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, Sean; Boogert, Stewart; Chung, Carl; Fitsos, Joe; Frisch, Joe; Gronberg, Jeff; Hayano, Hitoshi; Honda, Yosuke; Kolomensky, Yury; Lyapin, Alexey; Malton, Stephen; May, Justin; McCormick, Douglas; Meller, Robert; Miller, David John; Orimoto, Toyoko; Ross, Marc; Slater, Mark; Smith, Steve; Smith, Tonee; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; /Fermilab /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /Cambridge U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Cornell U., LNS /LLNL, Livermore /University Coll. London /SLAC /Caltech /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-06-08

    It has been estimated that an RF cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) could provide a position measurement resolution of less than one nanometer. We have developed a high resolution cavity BPM and associated electronics. A triplet comprised of these BPMs was installed in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs were each rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on six variable-length struts which could be used to move the BPMs in position and angle. We have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a robust calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, we have demonstrated a position resolution of 15.6 nm and a tilt resolution of 2.1 {mu}rad over a dynamic range of approximately {+-} 20 {mu}m.

  20. A Novel Evaluation Method for Displacement between Carbon Beam Axis and Positioning X-ray Axis Using an Imaging Plate.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Yuji; Kubota, Yoshiki; Takeshita, Eri; Okada, Ryosuke; Ohashi, Yoshiaki; Souda, Hikaru; Ishii, Takayoshi; Sutou, Takayuki; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    We developed an evaluation method for easily calculating displacement directly between the carbon beam axis and positioning X-ray axis. A verification image was acquired by irradiating an imaging plate with a carbon beam and X-ray. The X-ray passed through a lead plate inserted in the range compensator holder. The displacement was calculated on the verification image from the center of a wire irradiated with carbon using a multi leaf collimator (MLC) and a wire irradiated with X-ray also using MLC. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by moving the carbon beam axis, the X-ray axis, and the setup angle. The weekly changes of vertical and lateral beams in all rooms were also evaluated. The displacements of the carbon beam axis and the setup angle did not influence the calculation results, whereas the displacement of the X-ray axis did (R=0.999). The displacements including weekly changes were all less than 1.00 mm. An evaluation method for calculating the displacement directly and simply between the carbon beam axis and positioning X-ray axis was developed and verified. The weekly changes of displacement between axes were evaluated to be acceptable at our facility.

  1. Performance Studies of the Vibration Wire Monitor on the Test Stand with Low Energy Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Kota; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Kinsho, Michikazu

    In the high intensity proton accelerator as the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) accelerators, serious radiation and residual dose is induced by a small beam loss such a beam halo. Therefore, diagnostics of the beam halo formation is one of the most important issues to control the beam loss. For the beam halo monitor, the vibration wire monitor (VWM) has a potential for investigating the beam halo and weak beam scanning. The VWM has a wide dynamic range, high resolution and the VWM is not susceptible to secondary electrons and electric noises. We have studied the VWM features as a new beam-halo monitor on the test stand with low energy electron gun. The frequency shift of the irradiated vibration wire was confirmed about wire material and the electron beam profile measured by using the VWM was consistent with the results of the Faraday cup measurement. Also we calculated a temperature distribution on the vibration wire which is irradiated by the electron beam with the numerical simulation. The simulations have been fairly successful in reproducing the transient of the irradiated vibration wire frequency measured by test stand experiments. In this paper, we will report a result of performance evaluation for the VWM on the test stands and discuss the VWM for beam halo diagnostic

  2. Performance of MACACO Compton telescope for ion-beam therapy monitoring: first test with proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solevi, Paola; Muñoz, Enrique; Solaz, Carles; Trovato, Marco; Dendooven, Peter; Gillam, John E.; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F.; Rafecas, Magdalena; Torres-Espallardo, Irene; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    In order to exploit the advantages of ion-beam therapy in a clinical setting, delivery verification techniques are necessary to detect deviations from the planned treatment. Efforts are currently oriented towards the development of devices for real-time range monitoring. Among the different detector concepts proposed, Compton cameras are employed to detect prompt gammas and represent a valid candidate for real-time range verification. We present the first on-beam test of MACACO, a Compton telescope (multi-layer Compton camera) based on lanthanum bromide crystals and silicon photo-multipliers. The Compton telescope was first characterized through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The detector linearity was measured employing 22Na and Am-Be sources, obtaining about 10% deviation from linearity at 3.44 MeV. A spectral image reconstruction algorithm was tested on synthetic data. Point-like sources emitting gamma rays with energy between 2 and 7 MeV were reconstructed with 3-5 mm resolution. The two-layer Compton telescope was employed to measure radiation emitted from a beam of 150 MeV protons impinging on a cylindrical PMMA target. Bragg-peak shifts were achieved via adjustment of the PMMA target location and the resulting measurements used during image reconstruction. Reconstructed Bragg peak profiles proved sufficient to observe peak-location differences within 10 mm demonstrating the potential of the MACACO Compton Telescope as a monitoring device for ion-beam therapy.

  3. Performance of MACACO Compton telescope for ion-beam therapy monitoring: first test with proton beams.

    PubMed

    Solevi, Paola; Muñoz, Enrique; Solaz, Carles; Trovato, Marco; Dendooven, Peter; Gillam, John E; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F; Rafecas, Magdalena; Torres-Espallardo, Irene; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-07-21

    In order to exploit the advantages of ion-beam therapy in a clinical setting, delivery verification techniques are necessary to detect deviations from the planned treatment. Efforts are currently oriented towards the development of devices for real-time range monitoring. Among the different detector concepts proposed, Compton cameras are employed to detect prompt gammas and represent a valid candidate for real-time range verification. We present the first on-beam test of MACACO, a Compton telescope (multi-layer Compton camera) based on lanthanum bromide crystals and silicon photo-multipliers. The Compton telescope was first characterized through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The detector linearity was measured employing (22)Na and Am-Be sources, obtaining about 10% deviation from linearity at 3.44 MeV. A spectral image reconstruction algorithm was tested on synthetic data. Point-like sources emitting gamma rays with energy between 2 and 7 MeV were reconstructed with 3-5 mm resolution. The two-layer Compton telescope was employed to measure radiation emitted from a beam of 150 MeV protons impinging on a cylindrical PMMA target. Bragg-peak shifts were achieved via adjustment of the PMMA target location and the resulting measurements used during image reconstruction. Reconstructed Bragg peak profiles proved sufficient to observe peak-location differences within 10 mm demonstrating the potential of the MACACO Compton Telescope as a monitoring device for ion-beam therapy.

  4. Preferential refilling and planarization of grooves with amorphous carbon by using gas cluster ion beam irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, K.; Toyoda, N.; Yamada, I.

    2011-01-07

    Surface planarization is important for fabrication of patterned media. One of the methods is smoothing of the patterned surface after deposition of refilling materials. However it requires two process steps. In this study, we studied planarization of patterned media by formation of refilling films with gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) assisted deposition to reduce the process step. Hard amorphous carbon films were deposited on line-and-space pattern (100 nm pitch, 20 nm in depth) by using Ar-GCIB assisted deposition. From the atomic force microscope and the cross-sectional transmission electron microscope observations, the line-and-space patterns were refilled with amorphous carbon films with Ar-GCIB assisted deposition and smooth surface was obtained. The thickness of the amorphous carbon film required for surface planarization was 32 nm, which was very small compared to the initial peak to valley (20 nm). By using this method, sputtering process for planarization can be omitted.

  5. Thermal performance enhancement of erythritol/carbon foam composites via surface modification of carbon foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfeng; Lu, Wu; Luo, Zhengping; Zeng, Yibing

    2017-03-01

    The thermal performance of the erythritol/carbon foam composites, including thermal diffusivity, thermal capacity, thermal conductivity and latent heat, were investigated via surface modification of carbon foam using hydrogen peroxide as oxider. It was found that the surface modification enhanced the wetting ability of carbon foam surface to the liquid erythritol of the carbon foam surface and promoted the increase of erythritol content in the erythritol/carbon foam composites. The dense interfaces were formed between erythritol and carbon foam, which is due to that the formation of oxygen functional groups C=O and C-OH on the carbon surface increased the surface polarity and reduced the interface resistance of carbon foam surface to the liquid erythritol. The latent heat of the erythritol/carbon foam composites increased from 202.0 to 217.2 J/g through surface modification of carbon foam. The thermal conductivity of the erythritol/carbon foam composite before and after surface modification further increased from 40.35 to 51.05 W/(m·K). The supercooling degree of erythritol also had a large decrease from 97 to 54 °C. Additionally, the simple and effective surface modification method of carbon foam provided an extendable way to enhance the thermal performances of the composites composed of carbon foams and PCMs.

  6. Impact of Intrafractional Bowel Gas Movement on Carbon Ion Beam Dose Distribution in Pancreatic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, Motoki; Hara, Ryusuke; Mori, Shinichiro Yanagi, Takeshi; Asakura, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Riwa; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kandatsu, Susumu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess carbon ion beam dose variation due to bowel gas movement in pancreatic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten pancreatic cancer inpatients were subject to diagnostic contrast-enhanced dynamic helical CT examination under breath-holding conditions, which included multiple-phase dynamic CT with arterial, venous, and delayed phases. The arterial-venous phase and arterial-delayed phase intervals were 35 and 145 s, respectively. A compensating bolus was designed to cover the target obtained at the arterial phase. Carbon ion dose distribution was calculated by applying the bolus to the CT data sets at the other two phases. Results: Dose conformation to the clinical target volume was degraded by beam overshoot/undershoot due to bowel gas movement. The D95 for clinical target volume was degraded from 98.2% (range, 98.0-99.1%) of the prescribed dose to 94.7% (range, 88.0-99.0%) at 145 s. Excessive dosing to normal tissues varied among tissues and was, for example, 12.2 GyE/13.1 GyE (0 s/145 s) for the cord and 38.8 GyE/39.8 GyE (0 s/145 s) for the duodenum. The magnitude of beam overshoot/undershoot was particularly exacerbated from the anterior and left directions. Conclusions: Bowel gas movement causes dosimetric variation to the target during treatment for radiotherapy. The effect of bowel gas movement varies with beam angle, with greatest influence on the anterior-posterior and left-right beams.

  7. Theoretical and experimental characterization of novel water-equivalent plastics in clinical high-energy carbon-ion beams.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, A; Wellock, N; Thomas, R; Homer, M; Bouchard, H; Kanai, T; MacDougall, N; Royle, G; Palmans, H

    2016-11-07

    Water-equivalent plastics are frequently used in dosimetry for experimental simplicity. This work evaluates the water-equivalence of novel water-equivalent plastics specifically designed for light-ion beams, as well as commercially available plastics in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam. A plastic- to-water conversion factor [Formula: see text] was established to derive absorbed dose to water in a water phantom from ionization chamber readings performed in a plastic phantom. Three trial plastic materials with varying atomic compositions were produced and experimentally characterized in a high-energy carbon-ion beam. Measurements were performed with a Roos ionization chamber, using a broad un-modulated beam of 11  ×  11 cm(2), to measure the plastic-to-water conversion factor for the novel materials. The experimental results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Commercially available plastics were also simulated for comparison with the plastics tested experimentally, with particular attention to the influence of nuclear interaction cross sections. The measured [Formula: see text] correction increased gradually from 0% at the surface to 0.7% at a depth near the Bragg peak for one of the plastics prepared in this work, while for the other two plastics a maximum correction of 0.8%-1.3% was found. Average differences between experimental and numerical simulations were 0.2%. Monte Carlo results showed that for polyethylene, polystyrene, Rando phantom soft tissue and A-150, the correction increased from 0% to 2.5%-4.0% with depth, while for PMMA it increased to 2%. Water-equivalent plastics such as, Plastic Water, RMI-457, Gammex 457-CTG, WT1 and Virtual Water, gave similar results where maximum corrections were of the order of 2%. Considering the results from Monte Carlo simulations, one of the novel plastics was found to be superior in comparison with the plastic materials currently used in dosimetry, demonstrating that it is feasible to tailor

  8. Theoretical and experimental characterization of novel water-equivalent plastics in clinical high-energy carbon-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, A.; Wellock, N.; Thomas, R.; Homer, M.; Bouchard, H.; Kanai, T.; MacDougall, N.; Royle, G.; Palmans, H.

    2016-11-01

    Water-equivalent plastics are frequently used in dosimetry for experimental simplicity. This work evaluates the water-equivalence of novel water-equivalent plastics specifically designed for light-ion beams, as well as commercially available plastics in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam. A plastic- to-water conversion factor {{H}\\text{pl,w}} was established to derive absorbed dose to water in a water phantom from ionization chamber readings performed in a plastic phantom. Three trial plastic materials with varying atomic compositions were produced and experimentally characterized in a high-energy carbon-ion beam. Measurements were performed with a Roos ionization chamber, using a broad un-modulated beam of 11  ×  11 cm2, to measure the plastic-to-water conversion factor for the novel materials. The experimental results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Commercially available plastics were also simulated for comparison with the plastics tested experimentally, with particular attention to the influence of nuclear interaction cross sections. The measured H\\text{pl,w}\\exp correction increased gradually from 0% at the surface to 0.7% at a depth near the Bragg peak for one of the plastics prepared in this work, while for the other two plastics a maximum correction of 0.8%-1.3% was found. Average differences between experimental and numerical simulations were 0.2%. Monte Carlo results showed that for polyethylene, polystyrene, Rando phantom soft tissue and A-150, the correction increased from 0% to 2.5%-4.0% with depth, while for PMMA it increased to 2%. Water-equivalent plastics such as, Plastic Water, RMI-457, Gammex 457-CTG, WT1 and Virtual Water, gave similar results where maximum corrections were of the order of 2%. Considering the results from Monte Carlo simulations, one of the novel plastics was found to be superior in comparison with the plastic materials currently used in dosimetry, demonstrating that it is feasible to tailor plastic

  9. Carbon doping in molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs from a heated graphite filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, R. J.; Nottenberg, R. N.; Schubert, E. F.; Walker, J. F.; Ryan, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon doping of GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been obtained for the first time by use of a heated graphite filament. Controlled carbon acceptor concentrations over the range of 10 to the 17th-10 to the 20th/cu cm were achieved by resistively heating a graphite filament with a direct current power supply. Capacitance-voltage, p/n junction and secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurements indicate that there is negligible diffusion of carbon during growth and with postgrowth rapid thermal annealing. Carbon was used for p-type doping in the base of Npn AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors. Current gains greater than 100 and near-ideal emitter heterojunctions were obtained in transistors with a carbon base doping of 1 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm. These preliminary results indicate that carbon doping from a solid graphite source may be an attractive substitute for beryllium, which is known to have a relatively high diffusion coefficient in GaAs.

  10. Carbon doping in molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs from a heated graphite filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, R. J.; Nottenberg, R. N.; Schubert, E. F.; Walker, J. F.; Ryan, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon doping of GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been obtained for the first time by use of a heated graphite filament. Controlled carbon acceptor concentrations over the range of 10 to the 17th-10 to the 20th/cu cm were achieved by resistively heating a graphite filament with a direct current power supply. Capacitance-voltage, p/n junction and secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurements indicate that there is negligible diffusion of carbon during growth and with postgrowth rapid thermal annealing. Carbon was used for p-type doping in the base of Npn AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors. Current gains greater than 100 and near-ideal emitter heterojunctions were obtained in transistors with a carbon base doping of 1 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm. These preliminary results indicate that carbon doping from a solid graphite source may be an attractive substitute for beryllium, which is known to have a relatively high diffusion coefficient in GaAs.

  11. Optimization of Compton Source Performance through Electron Beam Shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Malyzhenkov, Alexander; Yampolsky, Nikolai

    2016-09-26

    We investigate a novel scheme for significantly increasing the brightness of x-ray light sources based on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) - scattering laser pulses off relativistic electron beams. The brightness of ICS sources is limited by the electron beam quality since electrons traveling at different angles, and/or having different energies, produce photons with different energies. Therefore, the spectral brightness of the source is defined by the 6d electron phase space shape and size, as well as laser beam parameters. The peak brightness of the ICS source can be maximized then if the electron phase space is transformed in a way so that all electrons scatter off the x-ray photons of same frequency in the same direction, arriving to the observer at the same time. We describe the x-ray photon beam quality through the Wigner function (6d photon phase space distribution) and derive it for the ICS source when the electron and laser rms matrices are arbitrary.

  12. Optimization of compton source performance through electron beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyzhenkov, Alexander; Yampolsky, Nikolai

    2017-03-01

    We investigate a novel scheme for significantly increasing the brightness of x-ray light sources based on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) - scattering laser pulses off relativistic electron beams. The brightness of ICS sources is limited by the electron beam quality, since electrons traveling at different angles, and/or having different energies, produce photons with different energies. Therefore, the spectral brightness of the source is defined by the 6D electron phase space shape and size, as well as laser beam parameters. The peak brightness of the ICS source can be maximized, then, if the electron phase space is transformed in a way such that all electrons scatter off the x-ray photons of same frequency in the same direction, arriving to the observer at the same time. We describe the x-ray photon beam quality through the Wigner function (6D photon phase space distribution), and derive it for the ICS source when the electron and laser rms matrices are arbitrary.

  13. Performance evaluation of a liquid crystal beam-steering/beam-spoiling device developed for space communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandernoth, Bernhard; Oleski, Paul J.

    1996-04-01

    For inter satellite cross links the use of optical communications technology has the potential of reducing the size, weight and power consumption of current rf communication terminals. Since the electromechanical hardware for pointing, acquisition and tracking i.e. mirrors, motors and actuators are counter productive to these goals, several technologies for non- mechanical beam steering and beam diverging have been developed as an alternative. This paper describes a nematic liquid crystal phased array which is capable of simultaneously steering and diverging a laser beam. Characteristics such as insertion loss, steer range, steering speed are considered for the application of optical satellite communication. Since liquid crystals respond very slowly to a change in drive voltage, methods for increasing the speed were investigated. A series of measurements was performed to evaluate an optimized drive algorithm. As a result of these measurements ideas for an improved design are presented.

  14. Mechanical Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams Bonded with External Carbon Fiber Sheets.

    PubMed

    Gribniak, Viktor; Tamulenas, Vytautas; Ng, Pui-Lam; Arnautov, Aleksandr K; Gudonis, Eugenijus; Misiunaite, Ieva

    2017-06-17

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams internally reinforced with steel bars and externally bonded with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets fixed by adhesive and hybrid jointing techniques. In particular, attention is paid to the load resistance and failure modes of composite beams. The steel fibers were used to avoiding the rip-off failure of the concrete cover. The CFRP sheets were fixed to the concrete surface by epoxy adhesive as well as combined with various configurations of small-diameter steel pins for mechanical fastening to form a hybrid connection. Such hybrid jointing techniques were found to be particularly advantageous in avoiding brittle debonding failure, by promoting progressive failure within the hybrid joints. The use of CFRP sheets was also effective in suppressing the localization of the discrete cracks. The development of the crack pattern was monitored using the digital image correlation method. As revealed from the image analyses, with an appropriate layout of the steel pins, brittle failure of the concrete-carbon fiber interface could be effectively prevented. Inverse analysis of the moment-curvature diagrams was conducted, and it was found that a simplified tension-stiffening model with a constant residual stress level at 90% of the strength of the SFRC is adequate for numerically simulating the deformation behavior of beams up to the debonding of the CFRP sheets.

  15. Mechanical Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams Bonded with External Carbon Fiber Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Gribniak, Viktor; Tamulenas, Vytautas; Ng, Pui-Lam; Arnautov, Aleksandr K.; Gudonis, Eugenijus; Misiunaite, Ieva

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams internally reinforced with steel bars and externally bonded with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets fixed by adhesive and hybrid jointing techniques. In particular, attention is paid to the load resistance and failure modes of composite beams. The steel fibers were used to avoiding the rip-off failure of the concrete cover. The CFRP sheets were fixed to the concrete surface by epoxy adhesive as well as combined with various configurations of small-diameter steel pins for mechanical fastening to form a hybrid connection. Such hybrid jointing techniques were found to be particularly advantageous in avoiding brittle debonding failure, by promoting progressive failure within the hybrid joints. The use of CFRP sheets was also effective in suppressing the localization of the discrete cracks. The development of the crack pattern was monitored using the digital image correlation method. As revealed from the image analyses, with an appropriate layout of the steel pins, brittle failure of the concrete-carbon fiber interface could be effectively prevented. Inverse analysis of the moment-curvature diagrams was conducted, and it was found that a simplified tension-stiffening model with a constant residual stress level at 90% of the strength of the SFRC is adequate for numerically simulating the deformation behavior of beams up to the debonding of the CFRP sheets. PMID:28773024

  16. Influence of thermal history on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-acrylate composites cured by electron beam and thermal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Vautard, Frederic; Ozcan, Soydan; Poland, Laura E; Meyer III, Harry M

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of an acrylate resin and its carbon fiber composite, as well as the adhesion strength between them, were characterized in the case of thermal and electron beam curing. The thermal history during the cure was also recorded. It was shown that the properties of the matrix were similar but that the thermal history during the curing had a direct influence on the type of interactions that were generated at the interface, leading to different level of adhesion strength and level of performance for the associated composites. In the case of a thermal cure, the thermal profile allowed the generation of covalent bonding at the interface, leading to a high level of adhesion strength, which was not the case for electron beam curing. The thermal history during the cure appeared to be a determining parameter for the level of performance of composites cured by electron beam.

  17. Performance of the (n,{gamma})-Based Positron Beam Facility NEPOMUC

    SciTech Connect

    Schreckenbach, K.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Piochacz, C.; Stadlbauer, M.; Loewe, B.; Maier, J.; Pikart, P.

    2009-01-28

    The in-pile positron source of NEPOMUC at the neutron source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) provides at the experimental site an intense beam of monoenergetic positrons with selectable energy between 15 eV and 3 keV. The principle of the source is based on neutron capture gamma rays produced by cadmium in a beam tube tip close to the reactor core. The gamma ray absorption in platinum produces positrons which are moderated and formed to the beam. An unprecedented beam intensity of 9.10{sup 8} e{sup +}/s is achieved (1 keV). The performance and applications of the facility are presented.

  18. Performance of a slow positron beam using a hybrid lens design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. K.; Naik, P. S.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.; Weng, H. M.

    2006-02-01

    The University of Hong Kong positron beam employs conventional magnetic field transport to the target, but has a special hybrid lens design around the positron moderator that allows the beam to be focused to millimeter spot sizes at the target. The good focusing capabilities of the beam are made possible by extracting work-function positrons from the moderator in a magnetic field free region using a conventional Soa lens thus minimizing beam canonical angular momentum. An Einzel lens is used to focus the positrons into the magnetic funnel at the end of transportation magnetic field while at the same time bringing up the beam energy to the intermediate value of 7.5 keV. The beam is E × B filtered at this intermediate energy. The final beam energy is obtained by floating the Soa-Einzel system, E × B filter and flight tube, and accelerating the positrons just before the target. External beam steering saddle coils fine tune the position, and the magnetic field around the target chamber is adjusted so as to keep one of the beam foci always on the target. The system is fully computer controlled. Variable energy-Doppler broadened annihilation radiation (VEDBAR) data for a GaN sample are shown which demonstrate the performance of the positron beam system.

  19. Performance of a fast acquisition system for in-beam PET monitoring tested with clinical proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piliero, M. A.; Bisogni, M. G.; Cerello, P.; Del Guerra, A.; Fiorina, E.; Liu, B.; Morrocchi, M.; Pennazio, F.; Pirrone, G.; Wheadon, R.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present the performance of a fast acquisition system for in-beam PET monitoring during the irradiation of a PMMA phantom with a clinical proton beam. The experimental set-up was based on 4 independent detection modules. Two detection modules were placed at one side of a PMMA phantom and the other two modules were placed at the opposite side of the phantom. One detection module was composed of a Silicon Photon Multiplier produced by AdvanSiD coupled to a single scintillating LYSO crystal. The read-out system was based on the TOFPET ASIC managed by a Xilinx ML605 FPGA Evaluation Board (Virtex 6). The irradiation of the PMMA phantom was performed at the CNAO hadrontherapy facility (Pavia, Italy) with a 95 MeV pulsed proton beam. The pulsed time structure of the proton beam was reconstructed by each detection module. The β+ annihilation peak was successfully measured and the production of β+ isotopes emitters was observed as increasing number of 511 keV events detected during irradiation. Finally, after the irradiation, the half lives of the 11C and 15O radioactive isotopes were estimated.

  20. Thermal and Mechanical Performance of a Carbon/Carbon Composite Spacecraft Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Benner, Steve; Butler, Dan; Silk, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composite materials offer greater thermal efficiency, stiffness to weight ratio, tailorability, and dimensional stability than aluminum. These lightweight thermal materials could significantly reduce the overall costs associated with satellite thermal control and weight. However, the high cost and long lead-time for carbon-carbon manufacture have limited their widespread usage. Consequently, an informal partnership between government and industrial personnel called the Carbon-Carbon Spacecraft Radiator Partnership (CSRP) was created to foster carbon-carbon composite use for thermally and structurally demanding space radiator applications. The first CSRP flight opportunity is on the New Millennium Program (NMP) Earth Orbiter-1 (EO-1) spacecraft, scheduled for launch in late 1999. For EO-1, the CSRP designed and fabricated a Carbon-Carbon Radiator (CCR) with carbon-carbon facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core, which will also serve as a structural shear panel. While carbon-carbon is an ideal thermal candidate for spacecraft radiators, in practice there are technical challenges that may compromise performance. In this work, the thermal and mechanical performance of the EO-1 CCR is assessed by analysis and testing. Both then-nal and mechanical analyses were conducted to predict the radiator response to anticipated launch and on-orbit loads. The thermal model developed was based on thermal balance test conditions. The thermal analysis was performed using SINDA version 4.0. Structural finite element modeling and analysis were performed using SDRC/1-DEAS and UAI/NASTRAN, respectively. In addition, the CCR was subjected to flight qualification thermal/vacuum and vibration tests. The panel meets or exceeds the requirements for space flight and demonstrates promise for future satellite missions.

  1. A two-bunch beam position monitor performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traller, Robert; Medvedko, Evgeny; Smith, Steve; Aiello, Roberto

    1998-12-01

    New beam position processing electronics for the Linear Accelerator allow faster feedback and processing of both positron and electron bunch positions in a single machine pulse. More than 30 electron-positron beam position monitors (epBPMs) have been installed at SLAC in various applications and have met all design requirements. The SLC production electron bunch follows the positron bunch down the linac separated by 58.8 nS. The epBPM measures the position of both bunches with an accuracy of better than 5 μm at nominal operating intensities. For SLC, the epBPMs have measured the position of bunches consisting of from 1 to 8×1010 particles per bunch. For PEP-II (B Factory) injection, epBPMs have been used with larger electrodes and several BPMs have been combined on a single cable set. The signals are separated for measurement in the epBPM by timing. In PEP-II injection we have measured the position of bunches of as little as 2×109 particles per bunch. To meet the demands of SLC and PEP-II injection, the epBPM has been designed with three triggering modes: 1. As a self-triggering detector, it can trigger off the beam and hold the peak signal until read out by the control program. 2. The gated mode uses external timing signals to gate the beam trigger. 3. The external trigger mode uses the external timing signals offset with internal vernier delays to precisely catch peak signals in noisy environments. Finally, the epBPM also has built-in timing verniers capable of nulling errors in cable set fabrication and differences in channel-to-channel signal delay. Software has made all this functionality available through the SLC control system.

  2. High Performance Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Alan; Collins, Steve; Munoz, Edgar; Razal, Joselito; Ebron, Von; Ferraris, John; Baughman, Ray

    2003-03-01

    Exploiting the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes has remained somewhat elusive due to the inability to process the as produced insoluble soot into functional macroscopic assemblies. To this end we have developed a simple but effective method to produce continuous, homogeneous fibers containing carbon nanotubes having as-spun mechanical properties that compare very favorably to recognized synthetic and natural "super fibers" such as Kevlar and spider silk. By using novel spinning apparatus, spinning solutions, and spinning coagulants, we have spun nanotube fibers having record lengths, record tensile strengths, and having an energy-to-break (toughness) higher than any material that we have found. As an example of the potential multi-functionalities of our fibers, we have fabricated fiber supercapacitors, which we weave into textiles.

  3. Visualization of air and metal inhomogeneities in phantoms irradiated by carbon ion beams using prompt secondary ions.

    PubMed

    Gaa, T; Reinhart, M; Hartmann, B; Jakubek, J; Soukup, P; Jäkel, O; Martišíková, M

    2017-06-01

    Non-invasive methods for monitoring of the therapeutic ion beam extension in the patient are desired in order to handle deteriorations of the dose distribution related to changes of the patient geometry. In carbon ion radiotherapy, secondary light ions represent one of potential sources of information about the dose distribution in the irradiated target. The capability to detect range-changing inhomogeneities inside of an otherwise homogeneous phantom, based on single track measurements, is addressed in this paper. Air and stainless steel inhomogeneities, with PMMA equivalent thickness of 10mm and 4.8mm respectively, were inserted into a PMMA-phantom at different positions in depth. Irradiations of the phantom with therapeutic carbon ion pencil beams were performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center. Tracks of single secondary ions escaping the phantom under irradiation were detected with a pixelized semiconductor detector Timepix. The statistical relevance of the found differences between the track distributions with and without inhomogeneities was evaluated. Measured shifts of the distal edge and changes in the fragmentation probability make the presence of inhomogeneities inserted into the traversed medium detectable for both, 10mm air cavities and 1mm thick stainless steel. Moreover, the method was shown to be sensitive also on their position in the observed body, even when localized behind the Bragg-peak. The presented results demonstrate experimentally, that the method using distributions of single secondary ion tracks is sensitive to the changes of homogeneity of the traversed material for the studied geometries of the target. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A high-performance electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi,J.; Beebe, E.; Bellavia, S.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lambiase, R.; Lockey, R.; McCafferty, D.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A. I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Syndstrup, L.

    2009-06-08

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory, a high current Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has been developed as part of a new preinjector that is under construction to replace the Tandem Van de Graaffs as the heavy ion preinjector for the RHIC and NASA experimental programs. This preinjector will produce milliampere-level currents of essentially any ion species, with q/A {ge} 1/6, in short pulses, for injection into the Booster synchrotron. In order to produce the required intensities, this EBIS uses a 10A electron gun, and an electron collector designed to handle 300 kW of pulsed electron beam power. The EBIS trap region is 1.5 m long, inside a 5T, 2m long, 8-inch bore superconducting solenoid. The source is designed to switch ion species on a pulse-to-pulse basis, at a 5 Hz repetition rate. Singly-charged ions of the appropriate species, produced external to the EBIS, are injected into the trap and confined until the desired charge state is reached via stepwise ionization by the electron beam. Ions are then extracted and matched into an RFQ, followed by a short IH Linac, for acceleration to 2 MeV/A, prior to injection into the Booster synchrotron. An overview of the preinjector is presented, along with experimental results from the prototype EBIS, where all essential requirements have already been demonstrated. Design features and status of construction of the final high intensity EBIS is also be presented.

  5. Modeling the biological response of normal human cells, including repair processes, to fractionated carbon beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Mami; Suzuki, Masao; Liu, Cuihua; Kaneko, Yumiko; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Ando, Koichi; Matsufuji, Naruhiro

    2013-01-01

    To understand the biological response of normal cells to fractionated carbon beam irradiation, the effects of potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and sublethal damage repair (SLDR) were both taken into account in a linear-quadratic (LQ) model. The model was verified by the results of a fractionated cell survival experiment with normal human fibroblast cells. Cells were irradiated with 200-kV X-rays and monoenergetic carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u) at two irradiation depths, corresponding to linear energy transfers (LETs) of approximately 13 keV/μm and 75 keV/μm, respectively, at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. When we only took into account the repair factor of PLDR, γ, which was derived from the delayed assay, the cell survival response to fractionated carbon ion irradiation was not fully explained in some cases. When both the effects of SLDR and PLDR were taken into account in the LQ model, the cell survival response was well reproduced. The model analysis suggested that PLDR occurs in any type of radiation. The γ factors ranged from 0.36–0.93. In addition, SLD was perfectly repaired during the fraction interval for the lower LET irradiations but remained at about 30% for the high-LET irradiation. PMID:23449640

  6. Focus Ion Beam Fabrication of Individual Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Guangyu; Byahut, Sitaram; Chow, Lee

    2003-11-01

    Individual CNTs are excellent candidates as electron sources for electron microscopes. Comparing to conventional electron sources, CNTs have the following advantages: (1) unique geometry, (2) highly coherent electron beams, and (3) stability. In our laboratory, carbon fibers with a nanotube core have been synthesized with a conventional chemical vapor deposition method. The whole assembly of nanotube/fiber is similar to a coaxial cable with CNT sticking out from one end of the carbon fiber. In order to pick up individual CNT field emitters, focus ion beam (FIB) technique is applied for cutting and adhering the samples. The carbon fiber with nanotube tip was first welded onto a micro-manipulator. Afterwards, by applying the FIB milling function, the fiber was cut from the base. This enables us to handle the individual CNT tips conveniently. By the same method, we can attach the nanotube tip on a sharpened clean tungsten wire for field emission experiment. FIB is proven to be appropriate and powerful for the nano-fabrication.

  7. Vibration analysis of single-walled carbon peapods based on nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiri, Majid; Hajbarati, Hamid; Safi, Mohsen

    2017-04-01

    In this article, vibration behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube encapsulating C60 molecules is studied using the Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory within the frame work of Timoshenko beam theory. The governing equation and boundary conditions are derived using Hamilton's principle. It is considered that the nanopeapod is embedded in an elastic medium and the C60 molecules are modeled as lumped masses attached to the nanobeam. The Galerkin's method is applied to determine the natural frequency of the nanobeam with clamped-clamped boundary conditions. Effects of nonlocality, foundation stiffness, and ratio of the fullerenes' mass to the nanotube's mass on the natural frequencies are investigated. In addition, by vanishing effects of shear deformation and rotary inertia, the results based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory are presented.

  8. Post-synthesis carbon doping of individual multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes via electron-beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xianlong; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2010-10-06

    We report on post-synthesis carbon doping of individual boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) via in situ electron-beam irradiation inside an energy-filtering 300 keV high-resolution transmission electron microscope. The substitution of C for B and N atoms in the honeycomb lattice was demonstrated through electron energy loss spectroscopy, spatially resolved energy-filtered elemental mapping, and in situ electrical measurements. Substitutional C doping transformed BNNTs from electrical insulators to conductors. In comparison with the existing post-synthesis doping methods for nanoscale materials (e.g., ion implantation and diffusion), the discovered electron-beam-induced doping is a well-controlled, little-damaging, room-temperature, and simple strategy that is expected to demonstrate great promise for post-synthesis doping of diverse nanomaterials in the future.

  9. Ranges of applicability for the continuum beam model in the mechanics of carbon nanotubes and nanorods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harik, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Limitations in the validity of the continuum beam model for carbon nanotubes (NTs) and nanorods are examined. Applicability of all assumptions used in the model is restricted by the two criteria for geometric parameters that characterize the structure of NTs. The key non-dimensional parameters that control the NT buckling behavior are derived via dimensional analysis of the nanomechanical problem. A mechanical law of geometric similitude for NT buckling is extended from continuum mechanics for different molecular structures. A model applicability map, where two classes of beam-like NTs are identified, is constructed for distinct ranges of non-dimensional parameters. Expressions for the critical buckling loads and strains are tailored for two classes of NTs and compared with the data provided by the molecular dynamics simulations. copyright 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ranges of applicability for the continuum beam model in the mechanics of carbon nanotubes and nanorods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harik, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Limitations in the validity of the continuum beam model for carbon nanotubes (NTs) and nanorods are examined. Applicability of all assumptions used in the model is restricted by the two criteria for geometric parameters that characterize the structure of NTs. The key non-dimensional parameters that control the NT buckling behavior are derived via dimensional analysis of the nanomechanical problem. A mechanical law of geometric similitude for NT buckling is extended from continuum mechanics for different molecular structures. A model applicability map, where two classes of beam-like NTs are identified, is constructed for distinct ranges of non-dimensional parameters. Expressions for the critical buckling loads and strains are tailored for two classes of NTs and compared with the data provided by the molecular dynamics simulations. copyright 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Non uniform shrinkages of double-walled carbon nanotube as induced by electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xianfang Li, Lunxiong; Gong, Huimin; Yang, Lan; Sun, Chenghua

    2014-09-01

    Electron beam-induced nanoinstabilities of pristine double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) of two different configurations, one fixed at both ends and another fixed at only one end, were in-situ investigated in transmission electron microscope at room temperature. It was observed that the DWCNT fixed at both ends shrank in its diameter uniformly. Meanwhile, the DWCNT fixed at only one end intriguingly shrank preferentially from its free cap end along its axial direction whereas its diameter shrinkage was offset. A mechanism of “diffusion” along with “evaporation” at room temperature which is driven by the nanocurvature of the DWCNTs, and the athermal activation induced by the electron beam was proposed to elucidate the observed phenomena. The effect of the interlayer interaction of the DWCNTs was also discussed.

  12. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2016-05-01

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon

  13. Granular Activated Carbon Performance Capability and Availability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    5-11 Notes: 1. As total nitrobodies 2. Combined with RDX 3. Includes dissolved air flotation, sand filter, and GAC 4. Can be achieved with moderate...RDX-HMX Water and Air Research Inc Feoruary 1976 Facility Newoort Army Aunition Plant 0-27 ater Quality Assessment for the Proposed RDX-HMX Water and... Air Research Inc February 1976 Facility, McAlester Naval munition Depot. Vol I 0-28 luorovin Granular Carbon Treatment FMC Corp/EPA 1792-6D" N 07 71

  14. Formation of a crystalline phase in amorphous hydrogenated carbon-germanium films by electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tyczkowski, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Mazurczyk, R.; Polanski, K.; Balcerski, J.; Delamar, M.

    1997-11-01

    The influence of electron beam irradiation on morphology of plasma deposited amorphous hydrogenated carbon-germanium films produced from tetramethylgermanium in a three-electrode af reactor has been studied. It has been found that the insulating films are insensitive to this treatment, whereas a crystalline phase occurs in the semiconducting films. Although the molar content of germanium in these films amounts only to about 0.2, the crystalline phase is composed of pure germanium nanocrystals which contain about 70{percent} of the whole amount of germanium existing in the films. The nanocrystals are agglomerated in globules of 50{endash}500 nm in diameter. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Fullerenelike arrangements in carbon nitride thin films grown by direct ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Gago, R.; Abrasonis, G.; Muecklich, A.; Moeller, W.; Czigany, Zs.; Radnoczi, G.

    2005-08-15

    Carbon nitride (CN{sub x}) thin films were grown by direct N{sub 2}/Ar ion beam sputtering of a graphite target at moderate substrate temperatures (300-750 K). The resulting microstructure of the films was studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The images showed the presence of curved basal planes in fullerenelike arrangements. The achievement and evolution of these microstructural features are discussed in terms of nitrogen incorporation, film-forming flux, and ion bombardment effects, thus adding to the understanding of the formation mechanisms of curved graphitic structures in CN{sub x} materials.

  16. Nonlocal beam model for axial buckling of carbon nanotubes with surface effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu-Gang; Yao, Xiao-Hu; Liang, Ying-Jing; Han, Qiang

    2012-09-01

    Small-size effect and surface effect are two of the most specific intrinsic properties of nanostructures, both of which are of great significance to the related applications. In this letter, the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model, together with surface elasticity and surface tension are implemented to investigate the buckling behavior of axially compressed carbon nanotubes. Explicit expression of solutions to the critical buckling loads corresponding to typical boundary conditions is presented. Through contrast to molecular dynamics results, it is vitally important to note that both small-size effect and surface effect have a profound consequence and should be taken into account thoroughly.

  17. Control of tunnel barriers in multi-wall carbon nanotubes using focused ion beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, H; Suzuki, K; Yamaguchi, T; Akita, S; Ishibashi, K

    2017-04-21

    We have formed tunnel barriers in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes using the Ga focused ion beam irradiation. The barrier height was estimated by the temperature dependence of the current (Arrhenius plot) and the current-voltage curves (Fowler-Nordheim plot). It is shown that the barrier height has a strong correlation with the barrier resistance that is controlled by the dose. Possible origins for the variation in observed barrier characteristics are discussed. Finally, the single electron transistor with two barriers is demonstrated.

  18. Geant4 simulation of clinical proton and carbon ion beams for the treatment of ocular melanomas with the full 3-D pencil beam scanning system

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Edoardo; Riccardi, Cristina; Rimoldi, Adele; Tamborini, Aurora; Piersimoni, Pierluigi; Ciocca, Mario

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the possibility to use carbon ion beams delivered with active scanning modality, for the treatment of ocular melanomas at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) in Pavia. The radiotherapy with carbon ions offers many advantages with respect to the radiotherapy with protons or photons, such as a higher relative radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) and a dose release better localized to the tumor. The Monte Carlo (MC) Geant4 10.00 patch-03 toolkit is used to reproduce the complete CNAO extraction beam line, including all the active and passive components characterizing it. The simulation of proton and carbon ion beams and radiation scanned field is validated against CNAO experimental data. For the irradiation study of the ocular melanoma an eye-detector, representing a model of a human eye, is implemented in the simulation. Each element of the eye is reproduced with its chemical and physical properties. Inside the eye-detector a realistic tumor volume is placed and used as the irradiation target. A comparison between protons and carbon ions eye irradiations allows to study possible treatment benefits if carbon ions are used instead of protons. (authors)

  19. Laboratory performance of the Keck interferometer nulling beam combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, B.; Crawford, S. L.; Serabyn, E.; Martin, S.; Creech-Eakman, M.; Hardy, G.

    2003-01-01

    Now that regular visibility squared measurements are routinely achieved, mid-infrared nulling is the next observing mode to be implemented on the Keck Interferometer. This mode's main objective is the characterization of exo-zodiacal dust disks around nearby main sequence stars in support of the TPF space mission. Keck Nuller also shares numerious characteristics with an interferometric TPF, and will then serve as a technical precursor for this mission. We report here the results obtained in the laboratory with the KI mid-IR nulling beam combiner, which is based on a dual polarization Modified Mach Zender combiner and dispersion and achromatic nulling through zinc-selenide dielectric plates.

  20. Laboratory performance of the Keck interferometer nulling beam combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, B.; Crawford, S. L.; Serabyn, E.; Martin, S.; Creech-Eakman, M.; Hardy, G.

    2003-01-01

    Now that regular visibility squared measurements are routinely achieved, mid-infrared nulling is the next observing mode to be implemented on the Keck Interferometer. This mode's main objective is the characterization of exo-zodiacal dust disks around nearby main sequence stars in support of the TPF space mission. Keck Nuller also shares numerious characteristics with an interferometric TPF, and will then serve as a technical precursor for this mission. We report here the results obtained in the laboratory with the KI mid-IR nulling beam combiner, which is based on a dual polarization Modified Mach Zender combiner and dispersion and achromatic nulling through zinc-selenide dielectric plates.

  1. Performance of a 10 Gbps FSO System Implementing Novel Beam Tracking a Dynamic Buffering Modem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiriazes, John; Valencia, J. Emilio; Peach, Robert; Visone, Chris; Burdge, Geoffrey; Vickers, John; Leclerc, Troy; Sauer, Paul; Andrews, Larry; Phillips, Ron

    2012-01-01

    A 10 Gbps Free space optical (FSO) system implements beam tracking, a high dynamic range optical receiver, and a dynamic buffering packet modem. Performance was characterized at the 4.5 km Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center Florida.

  2. Charged particle's flux measurement from PMMA irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Agodi, C; Battistoni, G; Bellini, F; Cirrone, G A P; Collamati, F; Cuttone, G; De Lucia, E; De Napoli, M; Domenico, A Di; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Gauzzi, P; Iarocci, E; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Muraro, S; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Romano, F; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Vitale, E; Voena, C

    2012-09-21

    Hadrontherapy is an emerging technique in cancer therapy that uses beams of charged particles. To meet the improved capability of hadrontherapy in matching the dose release with the cancer position, new dose-monitoring techniques need to be developed and introduced into clinical use. The measurement of the fluxes of the secondary particles produced by the hadron beam is of fundamental importance in the design of any dose-monitoring device and is eagerly needed to tune Monte Carlo simulations. We report the measurements carried out with charged secondary particles produced from the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, with a poly-methyl methacrylate target. Charged secondary particles, produced at 90° with respect to the beam axis, have been tracked with a drift chamber, while their energy and time of flight have been measured by means of a LYSO scintillator. Secondary protons have been identified exploiting the energy and time-of-flight information, and their emission region has been reconstructed backtracking from the drift chamber to the target. Moreover, a position scan of the target indicates that the reconstructed emission region follows the movement of the expected Bragg peak position. Exploiting the reconstruction of the emission region, an accuracy on the Bragg peak determination in the submillimeter range has been obtained. The measured differential production rate for protons produced with E(Prod)(kin) > 83 MeV and emitted at 90° with respect to the beam line is dN(P)/(dN(C)dΩ) (E(Prod)(kin) > 83 MeV, θ = 90°) = (2.69 ± 0.08(stat) ± 0.12(sys)) × 10⁻⁴ sr⁻¹.

  3. Structural performance of notch damaged steel beams repaired with composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Taly, Boshra

    2016-06-01

    An experimental program and an analytical model using ANSYS program were employed to estimate the structural performance of repaired damaged steel beams using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials. The beams were artificially notched in the tension flanges at mid-spans and retrofitted by FRP flexible sheets on the tension flanges and the sheets were extended to cover parts of the beams webs with different heights. Eleven box steel beams, including one intact beam, one notch damaged beam and nine notches damaged beam and retrofitted with composite materials, were tested in two-point loading up to failure. The parameters considered were the FRP type (GFRP and CFRP) and number of layers. The results indicated that bonding CFRP sheets to both of the tension steel flange and part of the webs, instead of the tension flange only, enhances the ultimate load of the retrofitted beams, avoids the occurrence of the debonding and increases the beam ductility. Also the numerical models give acceptable results in comparison with the experimental results.

  4. Measurement of inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; Kubo, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Nakaya, T.; Orme, D.; Otani, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Alcaraz-Aunion, J. L.; Jover-Manas, G.; Sanchez, F.; Brice, S. J.; Finley, D. A.; Kobilarcik, T.; Moore, C. D.; Russell, A. D.; Stefanski, R. J.; Tesarek, R. J.; White, H. B.; Zeller, G. P.; Bugel, L.

    2011-01-01

    We report a measurement of inclusive charged current interactions of muon neutrinos on carbon with an average energy of 0.8 GeV using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. We compare our measurement with two neutrino interaction simulations: NEUT and NUANCE. The charged current interaction rates (product of flux and cross section) are extracted by fitting the muon kinematics, with a precision of 6%-15% for the energy dependent and 3% for the energy integrated analyses. We also extract charged current inclusive interaction cross sections from the observed rates, with a precision of 10%-30% for the energy dependent and 8% for the energy integrated analyses. This is the first measurement of the charged current inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. These results can be used to convert previous SciBooNE cross-section ratio measurements to absolute cross-section values.

  5. Measurement of inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; jima, Y.Naka; Alcaraz-Aunion, J.L.; Brice, S.J.; Bugel, L.; Catala-Perez, J.; Cheng, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dore, U.; Finley, D.A.; /Kyoto U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Fermilab /MIT /Valencia U. /Columbia U. /MIT /Columbia U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Fermilab /Columbia U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U.

    2010-11-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of inclusive charged current interactions of muon neutrinos on carbon with an average energy of 0.8 GeV using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. We compare our measurement with two neutrino interaction simulations: NEUT and NUANCE. The charged current interaction rates (product of flux and cross section) are extracted by fitting the muon kinematics, with a precision of 6-15% for the energy dependent and 3% for the energy integrated analyses. We also extract CC inclusive interaction cross sections from the observed rates, with a precision of 10-30% for the energy dependent and 8% for the energy integrated analyses. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. These results can be used to convert previous SciBooNE cross section ratio measurements to absolute cross section values.

  6. Cracking of Saturated Hydrocarbon Gas Molecular Beam for Carbonization of Si(001) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinobu, Tatsuo; Mitsui, Hideaki; Tarui, Yoichiro; Fuyuki, Takashi; Matsunami, Hiroyuki

    1992-11-01

    Carbonization of Si(001) surfaces by saturated hydrocarbon gas molecular beams in a high vacuum was carried out employing a thermal cracking technique. In the case of C3H8 and C2H6, the Si surfaces were carbonized at 750°C with a cracking temperature of 1300°C, and 3C-SiC layers were obtained. Decomposition of C3H8 by cracking was observed in quadrupole mass analyzer (QMA) measurements. In the case of C2H6, the effect of cracking was less obvious, and decomposed species were not observed except for H2 in QMA measurements. In the case of CH4, no effect of cracking was observed. This result seems to be related to the difference in the bond strengths of molecules.

  7. ENGINEERED INTERFACE CHEMISTRY TO IMPROVE THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES CURED BY ELECTRON BEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Vautard, Frederic; Grappe, Hippolyte A.; Ozcan, Soydan

    2014-01-01

    A reactive sizing was designed to achieve high levels of interfacial adhesion and mechanical properties with a carbon fiber-acrylate system cured by electron beam (EB). The sizing was made of a partially cured epoxy sizing with a high density of pendant functional groups (acrylate functionality) able to generate a covalent bonding with the matrix. The interlaminar shear strength was clearly improved from 61 MPa to 81 MPa (+ 33 %) without any post-processing, reaching a similar value to the one obtained with the same system cured by a thermal treatment. Observation of the fracture profiles clearly highlighted a change in the fracture mechanism from a purely adhesive failure to a cohesive failure. Such improvements of the mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites cured by EB, without any post-cure, have not been reported previously to the best of our knowledge. This constitutes a breakthrough for the industrial development of composites EB curing.

  8. Optimizing the thermoelectric performance of zigzag and chiral carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and nonequilibrium Green's function method, we investigate the thermoelectric properties of a series of zigzag and chiral carbon nanotubes which exhibit interesting diameter and chirality dependence. Our calculated results indicate that these carbon nanotubes could have higher ZT values at appropriate carrier concentration and operating temperature. Moreover, their thermoelectric performance can be significantly enhanced via isotope substitution, isoelectronic impurities, and hydrogen adsorption. It is thus reasonable to expect that carbon nanotubes may be promising candidates for high-performance thermoelectric materials. PMID:22325623

  9. Improved rate control for electron-beam evaporation and evaluation of optical performance improvements.

    PubMed

    Gevelber, Michael; Xu, Bing; Smith, Douglas

    2006-03-01

    A new deposition-rate-control and electron-beam-gun (e-gun) strategy was developed that significantly reduces the growth-rate variations for e-beam-deposited SiO2 coatings. The resulting improvements in optical performance are evaluated for multilayer bandpass filters. The adverse effect of uneven silica-source depletion on coating spectral performances during long deposition runs is discussed.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the contamination in an energy modulated carbon ion beam for hadron therapy delivered by cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morone, M. Cristina; Calabretta, Luciano; Cuttone, Giacomo; Fiorini, Francesca

    2008-11-01

    Protons and carbon ion beams for hadron therapy can be delivered by cyclotrons with a fixed energy. In order to treat patients, an energy degrader along the beam line will be used to match the particle range with the target depth. Fragmentation reactions of carbon ions inside the degrader material could introduce a small amount of unwanted contaminants to the beam, giving additional dose to the patient out of the target volume. A simulation study using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code has been carried out by considering three different materials as the degrader. Two situations have been studied: a realistic one, lowering the carbon beam energy from 300 MeV/n to 220 MeV/n, corresponding to a range of 10 cm in water, and the worst possible case, lowering the carbon energy to 50 MeV/n, corresponding to the millimeter range. The main component of the contaminant is represented by alpha particles and protons, with a typical momentum after the degrader greater than that of the primary beam, and can be eliminated by the action of a momentum analyzing system and slits, and by a second thin absorber. The residual component of fragments reaching the patient is negligible with respect to the fragment quantity generated by the primary beam inside the patient before arriving at the end of the target volume.

  11. Nitrogen incorporation in carbon nitride films produced by direct and dual ion-beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Abrasonis, G.; Gago, R.; Jimenez, I.; Kreissig, U.; Kolitsch, A.; Moeller, W.

    2005-10-01

    Carbon (C) and carbon nitride (CN{sub x}) films were grown on Si(100) substrates by direct ion-beam sputtering (IBS) of a carbon target at different substrate temperatures (room temperature-450 deg. C) and Ar/N{sub 2} sputtering gas mixtures. Additionally, the effect of concurrent nitrogen-ion assistance during the growth of CN{sub x} films by IBS was also investigated. The samples were analyzed by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). The ERDA results showed that significant nitrogen amount (up to 20 at. %) was incorporated in the films, without any other nitrogen source but the N{sub 2}-containing sputtering gas. The nitrogen concentration is proportional to the N{sub 2} content in the sputtering beam and no saturation limit is reached under the present working conditions. The film areal density derived from ERDA revealed a decrease in the amount of deposited material at increasing growth temperature, with a correlation between the C and N losses. The XANES results indicate that N atoms are efficiently incorporated into the carbon network and can be found in different bonding environments, such as pyridinelike, nitrilelike, graphitelike, and embedded N{sub 2} molecules. The contribution of molecular and pyridinelike nitrogen decreases when the temperature increases while the contribution of the nitrilelike nitrogen increases. The concurrent nitrogen ion assistance resulted in the significant increase of the nitrogen content in the film but it induced a further reduction of the deposited material. Additionally, the assisting ions inhibited the formation of the nitrilelike configurations while promoting nitrogen environments in graphitelike positions. The nitrogen incorporation and release mechanisms are discussed in terms of film growth precursors, ion bombardment effects, and chemical sputtering.

  12. Correlation between cell death and induction of non-rejoining PCC breaks by carbon-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, M.; Kase, Y.; Kanai, T.; Ando, K.

    We have shown a correlation between cell death and induction of non-rejoining chromatin breaks in two normal human cells and three human tumor cell lines irradiated by carbon-ion beams and X rays. Non-rejoining chromatin breaks were measured by counting the number of remaining chromatin fragments detected by the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Carbon-ion beams were accelerated by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). The cells were irradiated by two different mono-LET beams (LET = 13 keV/mum and 77 keV/mum) and 200kV X rays. The RBE values of cell death for carbon-ion beams relative to X rays were 1.1 to 1.4 for 13 keV/mum beams and 2.5 to 2.9 for 77 keV/mum beams. The induction rate of non-rejoining PCC breaks per cell per Gy was found to be highest for the 77 keV/mum beams for all of the cell lines. The results found in this study show that there is a good correlation between cell death and induction of non-rejoining PCC breaks for these human cell lines.

  13. Correlation between cell death and induction of non-rejoining PCC breaks by carbon-ion beams.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Kase, Y; Kanai, T; Ando, K

    1998-01-01

    We have shown a correlation between cell death and induction of non-rejoining chromatin breaks in two normal human cells and three human tumor cell lines irradiated by carbon-ion beams and X rays. Non-rejoining chromatin breaks were measured by counting the number of remaining chromatin fragments detected by the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Carbon-ion beams were accelerated by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). The cells were irradiated by two different mono-LET beams (LET = 13 keV/micrometer and 77 keV/micrometer ) and 200 kV X rays. The RBE values of cell death for carbon-ion beams relative to X rays were 1.1 to 1.4 for 13 keV/micrometer beams and 2.5 to 2.9 for 77 keV/micrometer beams. The induction rate of non-rejoining PCC breaks per cell per Gy was found to be highest for the 77 keV/micrometer beams for all of the cell lines. The results found in this study show that there is a good correlation between cell death and induction of non-rejoining PCC breaks for these human cell lines.

  14. Imperfection Sensitivity of Nonlinear Vibration of Curved Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Based on Nonlocal Timoshenko Beam Theory

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi, Iman; Jalali, Seyed K.; Pugno, Nicola Maria

    2016-01-01

    Imperfection sensitivity of large amplitude vibration of curved single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is considered in this study. The SWCNT is modeled as a Timoshenko nano-beam and its curved shape is included as an initial geometric imperfection term in the displacement field. Geometric nonlinearities of von Kármán type and nonlocal elasticity theory of Eringen are employed to derive governing equations of motion. Spatial discretization of governing equations and associated boundary conditions is performed using differential quadrature (DQ) method and the corresponding nonlinear eigenvalue problem is iteratively solved. Effects of amplitude and location of the geometric imperfection, and the nonlocal small-scale parameter on the nonlinear frequency for various boundary conditions are investigated. The results show that the geometric imperfection and non-locality play a significant role in the nonlinear vibration characteristics of curved SWCNTs. PMID:28773911

  15. Imperfection Sensitivity of Nonlinear Vibration of Curved Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Based on Nonlocal Timoshenko Beam Theory.

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Iman; Jalali, Seyed K; Pugno, Nicola Maria

    2016-09-21

    Imperfection sensitivity of large amplitude vibration of curved single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is considered in this study. The SWCNT is modeled as a Timoshenko nano-beam and its curved shape is included as an initial geometric imperfection term in the displacement field. Geometric nonlinearities of von Kármán type and nonlocal elasticity theory of Eringen are employed to derive governing equations of motion. Spatial discretization of governing equations and associated boundary conditions is performed using differential quadrature (DQ) method and the corresponding nonlinear eigenvalue problem is iteratively solved. Effects of amplitude and location of the geometric imperfection, and the nonlocal small-scale parameter on the nonlinear frequency for various boundary conditions are investigated. The results show that the geometric imperfection and non-locality play a significant role in the nonlinear vibration characteristics of curved SWCNTs.

  16. Thermally induced transformations of amorphous carbon nanostructures fabricated by electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Dhaval D; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Kim, Songkil; Fedorov, Andrei G; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2011-03-01

    We studied the thermally induced phase transformations of electron-beam-induced deposited (EBID) amorphous carbon nanostructures by correlating the changes in its morphology with internal microstructure by using combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution confocal Raman microscopy. These carbon deposits can be used to create heterogeneous junctions in electronic devices commonly known as carbon-metal interconnects. We compared two basic shapes of EBID deposits: dots/pillars with widths from 50 to 600 nm and heights from 50 to 500 nm and lines with variable heights from 10 to 150 nm but having a constant length of 6 μm. We observed that during thermal annealing, the nanoscale amorphous deposits go through multistage transformation including dehydration and stress-relaxation around 150 °C, dehydrogenation within 150-300 °C, followed by graphitization (>350 °C) and formation of nanocrystalline, highly densified graphitic deposits around 450 °C. The later stage of transformation occurs well below commonly observed graphitization for bulk carbon (600-800 °C). It was observed that the shape of the deposits contribute significantly to the phase transformations. We suggested that this difference is controlled by different contributions from interfacial footprints area. Moreover, the rate of graphitization was different for deposits of different shapes with the lines showing a much stronger dependence of its structure on the density than the dots.

  17. SU-E-T-403: Evaluation of the Beam Performance of a Varian TrueBeam Linear Accelerator Under External Device-Based Gated Delivery Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kobulnicky, K; Pawlak, D; Purwar, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the beam performance of a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator under external device-based gated delivery conditions. Methods: Six gating cycles were used to evaluate the gating performance of a standard production TrueBeam system that was not specially tuned in any way. The system was equipped with a factory installed external gating interface (EXGI). An in-house EXGI tester box was used to simulate the input gating signals. The gating cycles were selected based on long beam-on and short beam-off times, short beam-on and long beam-off times, or equal beam on and off times to check linac performance. The beam latencies were measured as the time difference between the logic high gating signal and the first or last target pulses with an oscilloscope. Tissue-Phantom Ratio, beam flatness, and dose distributions from 5 different plans were measured using the 6 different gating durations and the un-gated irradiation. A PTW 729 2-D array was used to compare 5 plans versus the un-gated delivery with a 1%/1mm gamma index passing criteria. Results: The beam latencies of the linac were based off of 20 samples for beam-on and beam-off, for each gating cycle. The average beam-on delays were measured to be between 57 and 66msec, with a maximum of 88 msec. The beam off latencies averaged between 19 and 26msec, with a maximum of 48 msec. TPR20,10 measurements showed beam energy stability within 0.5% of the un-gated delivery. Beam flatness was better than 2.5% for all gated cycles. All but two deliveries, the open field with 4 seconds on, 1 second off, and a five field IMRT plan with 0.5 seconds on, 2.5 seconds off, had >90% passing rate. Conclusion: TrueBeam demonstrates excellent beam stability with minimal beam latencies under external device-based gated operations. Dosimetric measurements show minimal variation in beam energy, flatness, and plan delivery. Authors are employees of Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  18. Algorithm and performance of a clinical IMRT beam-angle optimization system.

    PubMed

    Djajaputra, David; Wu, Qiuwen; Wu, Yan; Mohan, Radhe

    2003-10-07

    This paper describes the algorithm and examines the performance of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beam-angle optimization (BAO) system. In this algorithm successive sets of beam angles are selected from a set of predefined directions using a fast simulated annealing (FSA) algorithm. An IMRT beam-profile optimization is performed on each generated set of beams. The IMRT optimization is accelerated by using a fast dose calculation method that utilizes a precomputed dose kernel. A compact kernel is constructed for each of the predefined beams prior to starting the FSA algorithm. The IMRT optimizations during the BAO are then performed using these kernels in a fast dose calculation engine. This technique allows the IMRT optimization to be performed more than two orders of magnitude faster than a similar optimization that uses a convolution dose calculation engine. Any type of optimization criterion present in the IMRT system can be used in this BAO system. An objective function based on clinically-relevant dose-volume (DV) criteria is used in this study. This facilitates the comparison between a BAO plan and the corresponding plan produced by a planner since the latter is usually optimized using a DV-based objective function. A simple prostate case and a complex head-and-neck (HN) case were used to evaluate the usefulness and performance of this BAO method. For the prostate case we compared the BAO results for three, five and seven coplanar beams with those of the same number of equispaced coplanar beams. For the HN case we compare the BAO results for seven and nine non-coplanar beams with that for nine equispaced coplanar beams. In each case the BAO algorithm was allowed to search up to 1000 different sets of beams. The BAO for the prostate cases were finished in about 1-2 h on a moderate 400 MHz workstation while that for the head-and-neck cases were completed in 13-17 h on a 750 MHz machine. No a priori beam-selection criteria have been used in

  19. Physical properties of nitrogenated amorphous carbon films produced by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francois; Andre, Bernard; Veen, A. Van; Mijnarends, P. E.; Schut, H.; Labohm, F.; Delplancke, Marie Paule; Dunlop, Hugh; Anger, Eric

    1994-12-01

    Carbon films with up to 32 at.% N (a-C:N) have been prepared using an ion-beam-assisted magnetron, with an N2(+) beam at energies between 50 and 300 eV. The composition and density of the films vary strongly with the deposition parameters. Electron energy loss spectroscopy shows that these a-C:N films are mostly graphitic with up to 20% C Sp3 bonding. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and neutron depth profiling show that the density goes through a maximum as the average deposited energy per unit depth increases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that nitrogen is mostly combined with carbon in triple (C(triple bond)N and double (C=N) bonds. Positron annihilation spectroscopy shows that the void concentration in the films goes through a minimum with deposited energy. These results are consistent with a densification induced by the collisions at low deposited energy, and damage-induced graphitization at high deposited energy values.

  20. Dual-ion-beam deposition of carbon films with diamond-like properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamond like films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  1. Localized surface grafting reactions on carbon nanofibers induced by gamma and e-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evora, M. C.; Araujo, J. R.; Ferreira, E. H. M.; Strohmeier, B. R.; Silva, L. G. A.; Achete, C. A.

    2015-04-01

    Electron beam and gamma-ray irradiation have potential application to modify the carbon fiber nanostructures in order to produce useful defects in the graphitic structure and create reactive sites. In this study, the methodology to functionalize carbon nanofiber (CNF), via a radiation process and using acrylic acid as a source of oxygen functional groups, was investigated. The samples were submitted to a direct grafting radiation process with electron beam and gamma-ray source. Several parameters were changed such as: acrylic acid concentration, radiation dose and percentage of inhibitor necessary to achieve functionalization, with higher percentage of oxygen functional groups on CNF surface, and better dispersion. The better results achieved were when mixing CNF in a solution of acrylic acid with 6% of inhibitor (FeSO4·7H2O) and irradiated at 100 kGy. The samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the surface composition (atomic%) showed a significant increase of oxygen content for the samples after irradiation. Also, the dispersion of the functionalized CNF in water was stable during months which may be a good indication that the functionalization process of CNF via ionizing radiation was successful.

  2. Use of plasma polymerization to improve adhesion strength in carbon fiber composites cured by electron beam.

    PubMed

    Vautard, Frédéric; Fioux, Philippe; Vidal, Loïc; Siffer, Frédéric; Roucoules, Vincent; Schultz, Jacques; Nardin, Michel; Defoort, Brigitte

    2014-02-12

    Maleic anhydride plasma polymer was deposited at the surface of carbon fibers and functionalized with vinyl and thiol groups to improve its adhesion strength with an acrylate matrix cured by an electron beam. A characterization of the fiber surface properties was done before and after coating (topography, surface chemistry, and surface energy). Sharp improvements of the interfacial shear strength (+ 120%), measured by a micromechanical test derived from the pull-out test, were obtained and, to the best of our knowledge, never reported before. The values were close to the ones obtained with a thermal cure. The comparison of this approach with other types of surface treatments (oxidation, grafting of coupling agents) enabled the establishment of a general strategy for the improvement of the interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber composites cured by an electron beam and potentially the improvement of their mechanical properties. This strategy is based on a high surface density of functionalities that are generating covalent bonding during the polymerization of the matrix and on the insertion of a polymer layer strongly attached to the fiber surface and acting as a buffer between the fiber surface and the matrix to counteract the generation of stress in the interphase.

  3. Design and performance of a high resolution, low latency stripline beam position monitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Bett, D. R.; Blaskovic Kraljevic, N.; Burrows, P. N.; Christian, G. B.; Clarke, C. I.; Constance, B. D.; Dabiri Khah, H.; Davis, M. R.; Perry, C.; Resta López, J.; Swinson, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    A high-resolution, low-latency beam position monitor (BPM) system has been developed for use in particle accelerators and beam lines that operate with trains of particle bunches with bunch separations as low as several tens of nanoseconds, such as future linear electron-positron colliders and free-electron lasers. The system was tested with electron beams in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Japan. It consists of three stripline BPMs instrumented with analogue signal-processing electronics and a custom digitizer for logging the data. The design of the analogue processor units is presented in detail, along with measurements of the system performance. The processor latency is 15.6 ±0.1 ns . A single-pass beam position resolution of 291 ±10 nm has been achieved, using a beam with a bunch charge of approximately 1 nC.

  4. Investigation of local registration performance of IMS Nanofabrication's Multi-Beam Mask Writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalom, Daniel; Klikovits, Jan; Geist, David; Hudek, Peter; Eder-Kapl, Stefan; Daneshpanah, Mehdi; Laske, Frank; Eyring, Stefan; Roeth, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-07-01

    Reticles for manufacturing upcoming 10nm and 7nm Logic devices will become very complex, no matter whether 193nm water immersion lithography will continue as main stream production path or EUV lithography will be able to take over volume production of critical layers for the 7nm node. The economic manufacturing of future masks for 193i, EUV and imprint lithography with further increasing complexity drives the need for multi-beam mask writing as this technology can overcome the influence of complexity on write time of today's common variable shape beam writers. Local registration of the multi-beam array is a critical component which greatly differs from variable shape beam systems. In this paper we would like to present the local registration performance of the IMS Multi-Beam Mask Writer system and the metrology tools that enable the characterization optimization.

  5. Electron-beam-induced substitutional carbon doping of boron nitride nanosheets, nanoribbons, and nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xianlong; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2011-04-26

    Substitutional carbon doping of the honeycomb-like boron nitride (BN) lattices in two-dimensional (nanosheets) and one-dimensional (nanoribbons and nanotubes) nanostructures was achieved via in situ electron beam irradiation in an energy-filtering 300 kV high-resolution transmission electron microscope using a C atoms feedstock intentionally introduced into the microscope. The C substitutions for B and N atoms in the honeycomb lattices were demonstrated through electron energy loss spectroscopy, spatially resolved energy-filtered elemental mapping, and in situ electrical measurements. The preferential doping was found to occur at the sites more vulnerable to electron beam irradiation. This transformed BN nanostructures from electrical insulators to conductors. It was shown that B and N atoms in a BN nanotube could be nearly completely replaced with C atoms via electron-beam-induced doping. The doping mechanism was proposed to rely on the knockout ejections of B and N atoms and subsequent healing of vacancies with supplying C atoms.

  6. Comparison of Biological Effectiveness of Carbon-Ion Beams in Japan and Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Uzawa, Akiko; Ando, Koichi Koike, Sachiko; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Takai, Nobuhiko; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Scholz, Michael; Elsaesser, Thilo; Peschke, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the biological effectiveness of 290 MeV/amu carbon-ion beams in Chiba, Japan and in Darmstadt, Germany, given that different methods for beam delivery are used for each. Methods and Materials: Murine small intestine and human salivary gland tumor (HSG) cells exponentially growing in vitro were irradiated with 6-cm width of spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) adjusted to achieve nearly identical beam depth-dose profiles at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, and the SchwerIonen Synchrotron in Darmstadt. Cell kill efficiencies of carbon ions were measured by colony formation for HSG cells and jejunum crypts survival in mice. Cobalt-60 {gamma} rays were used as the reference radiation. Isoeffective doses at given survivals were used for relative biological effectiveness (RBE) calculations and interinstitutional comparisons. Results: Isoeffective D{sub 10} doses (mean {+-} standard deviation) of HSG cells ranged from 2.37 {+-} 0.14 Gy to 3.47 {+-} 0.19 Gy for Chiba and from 2.31 {+-} 0.11 Gy to 3.66 {+-} 0.17 Gy for Darmstadt. Isoeffective D{sub 10} doses of gut crypts after single doses ranged from 8.25 {+-} 0.17 Gy to 10.32 {+-} 0.14 Gy for Chiba and from 8.27 {+-} 0.10 Gy to 10.27 {+-} 0.27 Gy for Darmstadt, whereas isoeffective D{sub 30} doses after three fractionated doses were 9.89 {+-} 0.17 Gy through 13.70 {+-} 0.54 Gy and 10.14 {+-} 0.20 Gy through 13.30 {+-} 0.41 Gy for Chiba and Darmstadt, respectively. Overall difference of RBE between the two facilities was 0-5% or 3-7% for gut crypt survival or HSG cell kill, respectively. Conclusion: The carbon-ion beams at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany are biologically identical after single and daily fractionated irradiation.

  7. Effects of carbon ion beam irradiation on the shoot regeneration from in vitro axillary bud explants of the Impatiens hawkeri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Libin; Zhou, Libin; Li, Wenjian; Li, Ping; Dong, Xicun; Qu, Ying; Ma, Shuang; Li, Qiang

    Accelerated ion beams is an excellent mutagen in plant breeding which can induce higher mutation frequencies and wider mutation spectrum than those of low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiations, such as X-rays (Okamura et al. 2003, Yamaguchi et al. 2003). Mutation breeding operation of two Saintpaulia ionahta cultivars using the method combining plant tissue culture technique and carbon ion beam irradiations were set out at Institute of Modern Physics from 2005 (Zhou et al. 2006). The effects of 960 MeV carbon ion beam and 8 MeV X-ray irradiations on regenerated shoots of Impatiens hawkeri from another kind of explants named in vitro axillary buds explants were studied recently. The biology endpoints in this study included relative number of roots (RNR), relative length of roots (RLR), relative height of shoots (RHS), relative number of nodes (RNN), survival fraction (SF) and morphology changes in the regenerated shoots. The experimental results showed that carbon ion beams inhibited the root and stem developments of axillary bud explants more severely than X-rays did. And the 50% lethal dose (LD50 ) is about 23.3 Gy for the carbon ion beam and 49.1 Gy for the X-rays, respectively. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of Impatiens hawkeri with respect to X-rays according to 50% SF was about two. Secondly, the percentage of shoots regenerated with malformed shoots including curliness, carnification, nicks in all Impatiens hawkeri axillary bud explants irradiated with carbon ion beam at 20 Gy accounted for 55.6%, while the highest number for the 40 Gy X-ray irradiation was 40%. Last, many regenerated shoots whose vascular bundle fused together were obtained only from explants irradiated with carbon ion beams. Based on the results above, it can be concluded that the effect of mutation induction by carbon ion beam irradiation on the axillary explants of Impatiens hawkeri is better than that by X-ray irradiation; and the optimal mutagenic dose varies from 20 Gy

  8. Maximizing carbon uptake and performance gain in slag-containing concretes through early carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkman, Sean

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have been identified as a major contributor to climate change. Current CO2 mitigation efforts focus on the removal, recovery and disposal of CO2 at point sources. Finding beneficial uses of as-captured or recovered CO2 is a critical challenge in greenhouse gas mitigation. This thesis investigates the possibility of the beneficial use of carbon dioxide in precast concrete production and the performance, both short-term and long-term, of the concretes so produced. The calcium compounds in cementitious materials react readily with carbon dioxide to convert CO2 to thermodynamically stable carbonates. The reaction accelerates strength development and makes the technology appropriate for early age curing. Paste, mortar and concrete samples were examined to quantify such aspects as the carbon dioxide uptake, strength development, and durability of carbonated concrete. It was found that the uptake by the cementitious binders was significant. Compared to their theoretical capacity, cement could reach a carbonation degree of over 25% when treated as pastes and about 20% when used as a part of concrete. The study compared carbonation-cured and hydrated Portland cement concrete and slag cement concretes in terms of their early strength, late strength, weathering carbonation shrinkage, freeze/thaw durability, water absorption, and pH. The carbonated concrete was generally comparable, or superior, to the hydrated concrete except for the case of a 50% GGBF slag blend which had a slower strength development due to reduced secondary cementitious reaction. A second method of binding carbon into concrete was considered by carbonating ladle slag fines and using them as a fine aggregate. The 28-day strength of concrete, either hydrated or carbonation-cured, made with the manufactured slag aggregate was comparable to that of a hydrated concrete made with conventional fine aggregate. Carbon dioxide uptake by concrete was nearly doubled if carbonation

  9. Magneto-carbonization method for production of carbon fiber, and high performance carbon fibers made thereby

    DOEpatents

    Naskar, Amit K.; Ozcan, Soydan; Eberle, Claude C.; Abdallah, Mohamed Gabr; Mackiewicz, Ludtka Gail; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Paulauskas, Felix Leonard; Rivard, John Daniel Kennedy

    2017-08-08

    Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from fiber precursor, wherein the fiber precursor is subjected to a magnetic field of at least 3 Tesla during a carbonization process. The carbonization process is generally conducted at a temperature of at least 400.degree. C. and less than 2200.degree. C., wherein, in particular embodiments, the carbonization process includes a low temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 400.degree. C. or 500.degree. C. and less than or up to 1000.degree. C., 1100.degree. C., or 1200.degree. C., followed by a high temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 1200.degree. C. In particular embodiments, particularly in the case of a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber precursor, the resulting carbon fiber may possess a minimum tensile strength of at least 600 ksi, a tensile modulus of at least 30 Msi, and an ultimate elongation of at least 1.5%.

  10. COMPARISON OF THE TESLA, NLC AND CLIC BEAM-COLLIMATION SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei

    2003-05-28

    This report describes studies performed in the frame-work of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the second International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects, and does not always meet the original design goals. But these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible.

  11. Comparison of the TESLA, NLC and CLIC beam-collimation system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I Drozhdin; Grahame Blair; Lewis P Keller

    2003-05-28

    This report describes studies performed in the framework of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects, and does not always meet the original design goals. But these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy and electrical transport investigations performed on the same single-walled carbon nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Philipp, G.; Burghard, M.; Roth, S.

    1998-08-11

    Electrical transport measurements and high resolution transmission electron microscopy performed on the same (rope of) single-walled carbon nanotube(s) (SWCNTs) allow to establish links between structural and electronic properties of the tubes. The tubes are deposited on electron transparent ultrathin Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-membranes bearing Cr/AuPd-electrodes defined by electron beam lithography. TEM-micrographs of the setup reveal mostly ropes consisting of 2-3 tubes which also appear on a scanning force microscope image of the same area. A current-voltage trace of the ropes at 4.2 K is also presented.

  13. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-15

    We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  14. Performance of Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Jeremy; Fan, Wendy; Stackpoole, Mairead; Kao, David; Skokova, Kristina; Chavez-Garcia, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICA's performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  15. Unusual High Oxygen Reduction Performance in All-Carbon Electrocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Tao, Ying; Lv, Wei; Su, Fang-Yuan; Ke, Lei; Li, Jia; Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Baohua; Kang, Feiyu; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-based electrocatalysts are more durable and cost-effective than noble materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is an important process in energy conversion technologies. Heteroatoms are considered responsible for the excellent ORR performance in many carbon-based electrocatalysts. But whether an all-carbon electrocatalyst can effectively reduce oxygen is unknown. We subtly engineered the interfaces between planar graphene sheets and curved carbon nanotubes (G-CNT) and gained a remarkable activity/selectivity for ORR (larger current, and n = 3.86, ~93% hydroxide + ~7% peroxide). This performance is close to that of Pt; and the durability is much better than Pt. We further demonstrate the application of this G-CNT hybrid as an all-carbon cathode catalyst for lithium oxygen batteries.We speculate that the high ORR activity of this G-CNT hybrid stems from the localized charge separation at the interface of the graphene and carbon nanotube, which results from the tunneling electron transfer due to the Fermi level mismatch on the planar and curved sp2 surfaces. Our result represents a conceptual breakthrough and pioneers the new avenues towards practical all-carbon electrocatalysis. PMID:25189141

  16. Unusual High Oxygen Reduction Performance in All-Carbon Electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Tao, Ying; Lv, Wei; Su, Fang-Yuan; Ke, Lei; Li, Jia; Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Baohua; Kang, Feiyu; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Carbon-based electrocatalysts are more durable and cost-effective than noble materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is an important process in energy conversion technologies. Heteroatoms are considered responsible for the excellent ORR performance in many carbon-based electrocatalysts. But whether an all-carbon electrocatalyst can effectively reduce oxygen is unknown. We subtly engineered the interfaces between planar graphene sheets and curved carbon nanotubes (G-CNT) and gained a remarkable activity/selectivity for ORR (larger current, and n = 3.86, ~93% hydroxide + ~7% peroxide). This performance is close to that of Pt; and the durability is much better than Pt. We further demonstrate the application of this G-CNT hybrid as an all-carbon cathode catalyst for lithium oxygen batteries.We speculate that the high ORR activity of this G-CNT hybrid stems from the localized charge separation at the interface of the graphene and carbon nanotube, which results from the tunneling electron transfer due to the Fermi level mismatch on the planar and curved sp2 surfaces. Our result represents a conceptual breakthrough and pioneers the new avenues towards practical all-carbon electrocatalysis.

  17. Robustness of target dose coverage to motion uncertainties for scanned carbon ion beam tracking therapy of moving tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eley, John Gordon; Newhauser, Wayne David; Richter, Daniel; Lüchtenborg, Robert; Saito, Nami; Bert, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Beam tracking with scanned carbon ion radiotherapy achieves highly conformal target dose by steering carbon pencil beams to follow moving tumors using real-time magnetic deflection and range modulation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the robustness of target dose coverage from beam tracking in light of positional uncertainties of moving targets and beams. To accomplish this, we simulated beam tracking for moving targets in both water phantoms and a sample of lung cancer patients using a research treatment planning system. We modeled various deviations from perfect tracking that could arise due to uncertainty in organ motion and limited precision of a scanned ion beam tracking system. We also investigated the effects of interfractional changes in organ motion on target dose coverage by simulating a complete course of treatment using serial (weekly) 4DCTs from six lung cancer patients. For perfect tracking of moving targets, we found that target dose coverage was high ({{\\overline{V}}95} was 94.8% for phantoms and 94.3% for lung cancer patients, respectively) but sensitive to changes in the phase of respiration at the start of treatment and to the respiratory period. Phase delays in tracking the moving targets led to large degradation of target dose coverage (up to 22% drop for a 15° delay). Sensitivity to technical uncertainties in beam tracking delivery was minimal for a lung cancer case. However, interfractional changes in anatomy and organ motion led to large decreases in target dose coverage (target coverage dropped approximately 8% due to anatomy and motion changes after 1 week). Our findings provide a better understand of the importance of each of these uncertainties for beam tracking with scanned carbon ion therapy and can be used to inform the design of future scanned ion beam tracking systems.

  18. Robustness of target dose coverage to motion uncertainties for scanned carbon ion beam tracking therapy of moving tumors.

    PubMed

    Eley, John Gordon; Newhauser, Wayne David; Richter, Daniel; Lüchtenborg, Robert; Saito, Nami; Bert, Christoph

    2015-02-21

    Beam tracking with scanned carbon ion radiotherapy achieves highly conformal target dose by steering carbon pencil beams to follow moving tumors using real-time magnetic deflection and range modulation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the robustness of target dose coverage from beam tracking in light of positional uncertainties of moving targets and beams. To accomplish this, we simulated beam tracking for moving targets in both water phantoms and a sample of lung cancer patients using a research treatment planning system. We modeled various deviations from perfect tracking that could arise due to uncertainty in organ motion and limited precision of a scanned ion beam tracking system. We also investigated the effects of interfractional changes in organ motion on target dose coverage by simulating a complete course of treatment using serial (weekly) 4DCTs from six lung cancer patients. For perfect tracking of moving targets, we found that target dose coverage was high ([Formula: see text] was 94.8% for phantoms and 94.3% for lung cancer patients, respectively) but sensitive to changes in the phase of respiration at the start of treatment and to the respiratory period. Phase delays in tracking the moving targets led to large degradation of target dose coverage (up to 22% drop for a 15° delay). Sensitivity to technical uncertainties in beam tracking delivery was minimal for a lung cancer case. However, interfractional changes in anatomy and organ motion led to large decreases in target dose coverage (target coverage dropped approximately 8% due to anatomy and motion changes after 1 week). Our findings provide a better understand of the importance of each of these uncertainties for beam tracking with scanned carbon ion therapy and can be used to inform the design of future scanned ion beam tracking systems.

  19. Robustness of Target Dose Coverage to Motion Uncertainties for Scanned Carbon Ion Beam Tracking Therapy of Moving Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eley, John Gordon; Newhauser, Wayne David; Richter, Daniel; Lüchtenborg, Robert; Saito, Nami; Bert, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Beam tracking with scanned carbon ion radiotherapy achieves highly conformal target dose by steering carbon pencil beams to follow moving tumors using real-time magnetic deflection and range modulation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the robustness of target dose coverage from beam tracking in light of positional uncertainties of moving targets and beams. To accomplish this, we simulated beam tracking for moving targets in both water phantoms and a sample of lung cancer patients using a research treatment planning system. We modeled various deviations from perfect tracking that could arise due to uncertainty in organ motion and limited precision of a scanned ion beam tracking system. We also investigated the effects of interfractional changes in organ motion on target dose coverage by simulating a complete course of treatment using serial (weekly) 4DCTs from 6 lung cancer patients. For perfect tracking of moving targets, we found that target dose coverage was high (V̄95 was 94.8% for phantoms and 94.3% for lung cancer patients, respectively) but sensitive to changes in the phase of respiration at the start of treatment and to the respiratory period. Phase delays in tracking the moving targets led to large degradation of target dose coverage (up to 22% drop for a 15 degree delay). Sensitivity to technical uncertainties in beam tracking delivery was minimal for a lung cancer case. However, interfractional changes in anatomy and organ motion led to large decreases in target dose coverage (target coverage dropped approximately 8% due to anatomy and motion changes after 1 week). Our findings provide a better understand of the importance of each of these uncertainties for beam tracking with scanned carbon ion therapy and can be used to inform the design of future scanned ion beam tracking systems. PMID:25650520

  20. High performance testbed for four-beam infrared interferometric nulling and exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stefan; Booth, Andrew; Liewer, Kurt; Raouf, Nasrat; Loya, Frank; Tang, Hong

    2012-06-10

    Technology development for a space-based infrared nulling interferometer capable of earthlike exoplanet detection and characterization started in earnest in the last 10 years. At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the planet detection testbed was developed to demonstrate the principal components of the beam combiner train for a high performance four-beam nulling interferometer. Early in the development of the testbed, the importance of "instability noise" for nulling interferometer sensitivity was recognized, and the four-beam testbed would produce this noise, allowing investigation of methods for mitigating this noise source. The testbed contains the required features of a four-beam combiner for a space interferometer and performs at a level matching that needed for the space mission. This paper describes in detail the design, functions, and controls of the testbed.

  1. Monte Carlo-based parametrization of the lateral dose spread for clinical treatment planning of scanned proton and carbon ion beams.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Katia; Mairani, Andrea; Sommerer, Florian

    2013-07-01

    Ion beam therapy using state-of-the-art pencil-beam scanning offers unprecedented tumour-dose conformality with superior sparing of healthy tissue and critical organs compared to conventional radiation modalities for external treatment of deep-seated tumours. For inverse plan optimization, the commonly employed analytical treatment-planning systems (TPSs) have to meet reasonable compromises in the accuracy of the pencil-beam modelling to ensure good performances in clinically tolerable execution times. In particular, the complex lateral spreading of ion beams in air and in the traversed tissue is typically approximated with ideal Gaussian-shaped distributions, enabling straightforward superimposition of several scattering contributions. This work presents the double Gaussian parametrization of scanned proton and carbon ion beams in water that has been introduced in an upgraded version of the worldwide first commercial ion TPS for clinical use at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT). First, the Monte Carlo results obtained from a detailed implementation of the HIT beamline have been validated against available experimental data. Then, for generating the TPS lateral parametrization, radial beam broadening has been calculated in a water target placed at a representative position after scattering in the beamline elements and air for 20 initial beam energies for each ion species. The simulated profiles were finally fitted with an idealized double Gaussian distribution that did not perfectly describe the nature of the data, thus requiring a careful choice of the fitting conditions. The obtained parametrization is in clinical use not only at the HIT center, but also at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica.

  2. Rapid phase-correlated rescanning irradiation improves treatment time in carbon-ion scanning beam treatment under irregular breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Takuji

    2016-05-01

    To shorten treatment time in pencil beam scanning irradiation, we developed rapid phase-controlled rescanning (rPCR), which irradiates two or more isoenergy layers in a single gating window. Here, we evaluated carbon-ion beam dose distribution with rapid and conventional PCR (cPCR). 4 dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) imaging was performed on 12 subjects with lung or liver tumors. To compensate for intrafractional range variation, the field-specific target volume (FTV) was calculated using 4DCT within the gating window (T20-T80). We applied an amplitude-based gating strategy, in which the beam is on when the tumor is within the gating window defined by treatment planning. Dose distributions were calculated for layered phase-controlled rescanning under an irregular respiratory pattern, although a single 4DCT data set was used. The number of rescannings was eight times. The prescribed doses were 48 Gy(RBE)/1 fr (where RBE is relative biological effectiveness) delivered via four beam ports to the FTV for the lung cases and 45 Gy(RBE)/2 fr delivered via two beam ports to the FTV for the liver cases. In the liver cases, the accumulated dose distributions showed an increased magnitude of hot/cold spots with rPCR compared with cPCR. The results of the dose assessment metrics for the cPCR and rPCR were very similar. The D 95, D max, and D min values (cPCR/rPCR) averaged over all the patients were 96.3  ±  0.9%/96.0  ±  1.2%, 107.3  ±  3.6%/107.1  ±  2.9%, and 88.8  ±  3.2%/88.1  ±  3.1%, respectively. The treatment times in cPCR and rPCR were 110.7 s and 53.5 s, respectively. rPCR preserved dose conformation under irregular respiratory motion and reduced the total treatment time compared with cPCR.

  3. Research about tensile sensitive characteristics of carbon fibre reinforced concrete and security self-diagnosis system of beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Longnan; Wang, Xinbo; Zhang, Dongxing

    2009-07-01

    Based on real-time diagnosis of health status of reinforced concrete beam, intellectual supervisory layer of carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) was set up at the bottom of girder structure. The intrinsic law of tensile sensitive characteristic of CFRC was studied and the electrical property collection and the stress transformation system of structure intellectual layer were established. It depends on the premise that carbon fibers are conductive, and that a stable relationship between electric resistivity and stress field exists. The security self-diagnosis of girder structure was fulfilled through online real-time monitoring and evaluation on electrical signal of intelligence layer of reinforced concrete beam.

  4. Combination of carbon ion beam and gemcitabine causes irreparable DNA damage and death of radioresistant pancreatic cancer stem-like cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sai, Sei; Wakai, Toshifumi; Vares, Guillaume; Yamada, Shigeru; Kamijo, Takehiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Shirai, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    We try to elucidate whether a carbon ion beam alone or in combination with gemcitabine has advantages over X-ray in targeting putative pancreatic cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Colony, spheroid formation and tumorigenicity assays confirmed that CD44+/ESA+ cells sorted from PANC1 and PK45 cells have more CSC properties than CD44−/ESA− cells. The number of colonies and spheroids formed from CSCs after carbon ion beam irradiation was significantly reduced compared to after X-ray irradiation, and they were extremely highly suppressed when carbon ion beam combined with gemcitabine. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for the carbon ion beam relative to X-ray at the D10 levels for CSCs were 2.23-2.66. Expressions of multiple cell death-related genes were remarkably highly induced, and large numbers of γH2AX foci in CSCs were formed after carbon ion beam combined with gemcitabine. The highly expressed CSC markers were significantly inhibited after 30 Gy of carbon ion beam and almost lost after 25 Gy carbon ion beam combined with 50 mg/kg gemcitabine. In conclusion, a carbon ion beam combined with gemcitabine has superior potential to kill pancreatic CSCs via irreparable clustered DSB compared to a carbon ion alone or X-rays combined with gemcitabine. PMID:25849939

  5. {gamma}-Spectroscopy and Radioactive Beams: How To Perform Channel Selection ?

    SciTech Connect

    Rosse, B.; Redon, N.; Stezowski, O.; Schmitt, Ch.; Guinet, D.; Meyer, M.; Lautesse, Ph.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2006-04-26

    An experiment has been performed using a SPIRAL 76Kr radioactive beam at GANIL to investigate rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The EXOGAM gamma array was coupled with the DIAMANT light charged-particle detector and the VAMOS spectrometer. We report here on the powerful of this setup to extract fusion-evaporation {gamma}-rays from a large beam contamination.

  6. Ion Beam Optimized Mechanical Characteristics of Glassy Polymeric Carbon for Medical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M.G.; Cruz, N.C. da; Rangel, E.C.; Zimmerman, R.L.; Ila, D.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.

    2003-08-26

    Glassy Polymeric Carbon (GPC) has medical applications owing to its inertness and biocompatible characteristics. Commercial GPC prosthetics include mitral, aortic and hydrocephalic valves. Surface treatment of GPC increases the adhesion of endothelic tissue on GPC and avoids the occurrence of thrombus in cardiac implant. In this work, ion beam was used to improve the mechanical characteristics of GPC surface. Hardness was measured as a function of depth in precursor and GPC samples heat treated from 300 to 2500 deg. C before and after bombardment with energetic ions of silicon, carbon, oxygen and gold at energies of 5, 6, 8 and 10 MeV and fluences between 1.0x1013 and 1.0x1016 ions/cm2. Comparison shows that hardness increases of the bombarded samples depend on heat treatment temperature. We verify that ion bombardment promotes carbonization due to an increased linkage between the chains of the polymeric material in lateral groups that are more numerous for samples heat treated to 700 deg. C.

  7. A technique to evaluate the good operation of FBG sensors embedded in a carbon fiber beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzulani, Gabriele; Cinquemani, Simone; Comolli, Lorenzo

    2013-05-01

    Embedding FBG sensors in carbon fiber structures is a very attractive solution, due to the small fiber diameter, and the possibility to manufacture arrays of many gratings into a single optical fiber. These embedding is particularly useful for the manufacturing of smart structures, able to improve their characteristics thanks to embedded sensors and actuators. In this work a carbon fiber beam of 3 m length, with an array of 30 FBG sensors and 3 piezoelectric actuators, is described. The focus of the work is on the evaluation of the good operation of embedded FBG sensors, that is not easy due to the microstructure of woven carbon fiber layers, producing non-homogeneous strain field, a well known problem for the reliability of FBG strain measurements. The proposed technique looks at the standard deviation of the full width at -6 dB of the spectra of each FBG sensors, during a quasi-static motion producing quasi-static strains. 37% of the 30 FBG sensors have been found to produce measurements corrupted by a small error. At the end, vibration control of the described structure is shown.

  8. A Monte Carlo study for the calculation of the average linear energy transfer (LET) distributions for a clinical proton beam line and a radiobiological carbon ion beam line.

    PubMed

    Romano, F; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Rosa, F Di; Mazzaglia, S E; Petrovic, I; Fira, A Ristic; Varisano, A

    2014-06-21

    Fluence, depth absorbed dose and linear energy transfer (LET) distributions of proton and carbon ion beams have been investigated using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 (GEometry ANd Tracking). An open source application was developed with the aim to simulate two typical transport beam lines, one used for ocular therapy and cell irradiations with protons and the other for cell irradiations with carbon ions. This tool allows evaluation of the primary and total dose averaged LET and predict their spatial distribution in voxelized or sliced geometries. In order to reproduce the LET distributions in a realistic way, and also the secondary particles' contributions due to nuclear interactions were considered in the computations. Pristine and spread-out Bragg peaks were taken into account both for proton and carbon ion beams, with the maximum energy of 62 MeV/n. Depth dose distributions were compared with experimental data, showing good agreement. Primary and total LET distributions were analysed in order to study the influence of contributions of secondary particles in regions at different depths. A non-negligible influence of high-LET components was found in the entrance channel for proton beams, determining the total dose averaged LET by the factor 3 higher than the primary one. A completely different situation was obtained for carbon ions. In this case, secondary particles mainly contributed in the tail that is after the peak. The results showed how the weight of light and heavy secondary ions can considerably influence the computation of LET depth distributions. This has an important role in the interpretation of results coming from radiobiological experiments and, therefore, in hadron treatment planning procedures.

  9. Tribological performance of hard carbon coatings on 440C bearing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustas, Frank N.; Misra, Mohan S.; Shepard, Donald F.; Froechtenigt, Joseph F.

    1990-12-01

    Hard carbon coating such as diamond and diamond-like c :bon (also referred to as amorphous carbon) have received considerable attention for tribological applications due to their high hardness high modulus and desirable surface properties. Unfortunately most of the deposition techniques induce high substrate temperatures that temper traditional bearing steels and reduce the substrate load-carrying capability. Therefore to effectively use these desirable coatings a lower temperature deposition technique is required. Ion beam deposition offers essentially ambient temperature conditions accurate control ofprocess parameters and good coating-substrate adhesion. To use these attributes a test program was initiated to deposit mass analyzed high purity carbon and methane ions onto molybdenum and 440C bearing steel for subsequent characterization by Raman spectroscopy and friction-wear tests. Preliminary results for a coating deposited from a CO source showed an amorphous carbon/microcrystalline graphite structure which exhibited very high microhardness and a 3-fold reduction in coefficient of friction for unlubricated tests compared to untreated 440C steel. In addition incrementally increasing the applied load up to a factor of 5 resulted in progressively lower coefficients of friction only a minor increase (about 11) in the wear scar depth and no dramatic coating delamination or damage. Therefore an amorphous carbon/graphite coating applied to 440C steel at ambient temperature exhibits solid lubricating film characteristics with extremely high load-carrying capability. *Work performed under Martin Marietta Independent Research and Development Project D-8 1R Materials Technology. 116

  10. Investigation of beamed-energy ERH thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, Leik N.; Strayer, T. Darton; Bossard, John A.; Richard, Jacques C.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the performance of an External Radiation Heated (ERH) thruster. In this thruster, high intensity laser energy is focused to ignite either a Laser Supported Combustion (LSC) wave or a Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) wave. Thrust is generated as the LSC or LSD wave propagates over the thruster's surface, or in the proposed thruster configuration, the vehicle afterbody. Thrust models for the LSC and LSD waves were developed and simulated on a computer. Performance parameters investigated include the effect of laser intensity, flight Mach number, and altitude on mean-thrust and coupling coefficient of the ERH thruster. Results from these models suggest that the ERH thruster using LSC/LSD wave ignition could provide propulsion performance considerably greater than any propulsion system currently available.

  11. Investigation of beamed-energy ERH thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, Leik N.; Strayer, T. Darton; Bossard, John A.; Richard, Jacques C.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the performance of an External Radiation Heated (ERH) thruster. In this thruster, high intensity laser energy is focused to ignite either a Laser Supported Combustion (LSC) wave or a Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) wave. Thrust is generated as the LSC or LSD wave propagates over the thruster's surface, or in the proposed thruster configuration, the vehicle afterbody. Thrust models for the LSC and LSD waves were developed and simulated on a computer. Performance parameters investigated include the effect of laser intensity, flight Mach number, and altitude on mean-thrust and coupling coefficient of the ERH thruster. Results from these models suggest that the ERH thruster using LSC/LSD wave ignition could provide propulsion performance considerably greater than any propulsion system currently available.

  12. Carbon Material Optimized Biocathode for Improving Microbial Fuel Cell Performance

    PubMed Central

    Tursun, Hairti; Liu, Rui; Li, Jing; Abro, Rashid; Wang, Xiaohui; Gao, Yanmei; Li, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    To improve the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), the biocathode electrode material of double-chamber was optimized. Alongside the basic carbon fiber brush, three carbon materials namely graphite granules, activated carbon granules (ACG) and activated carbon powder, were added to the cathode-chambers to improve power generation. The result shows that the addition of carbon materials increased the amount of available electroactive microbes on the electrode surface and thus promote oxygen reduction rate, which improved the generation performance of the MFCs. The Output current (external resistance = 1000 Ω) greatly increased after addition of the three carbon materials and maximum power densities in current stable phase increased by 47.4, 166.1, and 33.5%, respectively. Additionally, coulombic efficiencies of the MFC increased by 16.3, 64.3, and 20.1%, respectively. These results show that MFC when optimized with ACG show better power generation, higher chemical oxygen demands removal rate and coulombic efficiency. PMID:26858695

  13. Production of clinically useful positron emitter beams during carbon ion deceleration.

    PubMed

    Lazzeroni, M; Brahme, A

    2011-03-21

    In external beam radiation therapy, radioactive beams offer the best clinical solution to simultaneously treat and in vivo monitor the dose delivery and tumor response using PET or PET-CT imaging. However, difficulties mainly linked to the low production efficiency have so far limited their use. This study is devoted to the analysis of the production of high energy (11)C fragments, preferably by projectile fragmentation of a stable monodirectional and monoenergetic primary (12)C beam in different absorbing materials (decelerators) in order to identify the optimal elemental composition. The study was performed using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT07. The track length and fluence of generated secondary particles were scored in a uniform absorber of 300 cm length and 10 cm radius, divided into slices of 1 cm thickness. The (11)C fluence build-up and mean energy variation with increasing decelerator depth are presented. Furthermore, the fluence of the secondary (11)C beam was studied as a function of its mean energy and the corresponding remaining range in water. It is shown that the maximum (11)C fluence build-up is high in compounds where the fraction by weight of hydrogen is high, being the highest in liquid hydrogen. Furthermore, a cost effective alternative solution to the single medium initially envisaged is presented: a two-media decelerator that comprises a first liquid hydrogen section followed by a second decelerating section made of a hydrogen-rich material, such as polyethylene (C(2)H(4)). The purpose of the first section is to achieve a fast initial (11)C fluence build-up, while the second section is primarily designed to modulate the mean energy of the generated (11)C beam in order to reach the tumor depth. Finally, it was demonstrated that, if the intensity of the primary (12)C beam can be increased by an order of magnitude, a sufficient intensity of the secondary (11)C beam is achieved for therapy and subsequent therapeutic PET imaging sessions. Such an

  14. Production of clinically useful positron emitter beams during carbon ion deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeroni, M.; Brahme, A.

    2011-03-01

    In external beam radiation therapy, radioactive beams offer the best clinical solution to simultaneously treat and in vivo monitor the dose delivery and tumor response using PET or PET-CT imaging. However, difficulties mainly linked to the low production efficiency have so far limited their use. This study is devoted to the analysis of the production of high energy 11C fragments, preferably by projectile fragmentation of a stable monodirectional and monoenergetic primary 12C beam in different absorbing materials (decelerators) in order to identify the optimal elemental composition. The study was performed using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT07. The track length and fluence of generated secondary particles were scored in a uniform absorber of 300 cm length and 10 cm radius, divided into slices of 1 cm thickness. The 11C fluence build-up and mean energy variation with increasing decelerator depth are presented. Furthermore, the fluence of the secondary 11C beam was studied as a function of its mean energy and the corresponding remaining range in water. It is shown that the maximum 11C fluence build-up is high in compounds where the fraction by weight of hydrogen is high, being the highest in liquid hydrogen. Furthermore, a cost effective alternative solution to the single medium initially envisaged is presented: a two-media decelerator that comprises a first liquid hydrogen section followed by a second decelerating section made of a hydrogen-rich material, such as polyethylene (C2H4). The purpose of the first section is to achieve a fast initial 11C fluence build-up, while the second section is primarily designed to modulate the mean energy of the generated 11C beam in order to reach the tumor depth. Finally, it was demonstrated that, if the intensity of the primary 12C beam can be increased by an order of magnitude, a sufficient intensity of the secondary 11C beam is achieved for therapy and subsequent therapeutic PET imaging sessions. Such an increase in the

  15. Quantification of the Relative Biological Effectiveness for Ion Beam Radiotherapy: Direct Experimental Comparison of Proton and Carbon Ion Beams and a Novel Approach for Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Elsaesser, Thilo; Weyrather, Wilma K.; Friedrich, Thomas; Durante, Marco; Iancu, Gheorghe; Kraemer, Michael; Kragl, Gabriele; Brons, Stephan; Winter, Marcus; Weber, Klaus-Josef; Scholz, Michael

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To present the first direct experimental in vitro comparison of the biological effectiveness of range-equivalent protons and carbon ion beams for Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed in a three-dimensional phantom using a pencil beam scanning technique and to compare the experimental data with a novel biophysical model. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was measured in the phantom after irradiation with two opposing fields, thus mimicking the typical patient treatment scenario. The novel biophysical model represents a substantial extension of the local effect model, previously used for treatment planning in carbon ion therapy for more than 400 patients, and potentially can be used to predict effectiveness of all ion species relevant for radiotherapy. A key feature of the new approach is the more sophisticated consideration of spatially correlated damage induced by ion irradiation. Results: The experimental data obtained for Chinese hamster ovary cells clearly demonstrate that higher cell killing is achieved in the target region with carbon ions as compared with protons when the effects in the entrance channel are comparable. The model predictions demonstrate agreement with these experimental data and with data obtained with helium ions under similar conditions. Good agreement is also achieved with relative biological effectiveness values reported in the literature for other cell lines for monoenergetic proton, helium, and carbon ions. Conclusion: Both the experimental data and the new modeling approach are supportive of the advantages of carbon ions as compared with protons for treatment-like field configurations. Because the model predicts the effectiveness for several ion species with similar accuracy, it represents a powerful tool for further optimization and utilization of the potential of ion beams in tumor therapy.

  16. Electron beam induced etching of carbon nanotubes enhanced by secondary electrons in oxygen.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideto; Tomita, Yuto; Soma, Kentaro; Takeda, Seiji

    2017-05-12

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are subjected to electron-beam-induced etching (EBIE) in oxygen. The EBIE process is observed in situ by environmental transmission electron microscopy. The partial pressure of oxygen (10 and 100 Pa), energy of the primary electrons (80 and 200 keV), and environment of the CNTs (suspended or supported on a silicon nitride membrane) are investigated as factors affecting the etching rate. The EBIE rate of CNTs was markedly promoted by the effects of secondary electrons that were emitted from a silicon nitride membrane under irradiation by primary electrons. Membrane supported CNTs can be cut by EBIE with a spatial accuracy better than 3 nm, and a nanogap of 2 nm can be successfully achieved between the ends of two suspended CNTs.

  17. Laser Cutting of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers using Highly Brilliant Laser Beam Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzbach, Annett; Hauser, Markus; Beyer, Eckhard

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) are applied more and more in the aircraft industry as well as in the automobile industry. The principal reason is the highly mechanical load capacity along with the low density. Moreover, the corrosion resistance plus the damping behavior of the material can be utilized fully in highly stressed structures. However, the concept of manufacture CFRP-parts close to the final contour does not substitute the need of cutting them. The different properties of fiberand matrix-material constitute an ambitious challenge while cutting CFRP using a laser beam. This paper deals with elementary analysis of the laser remote cutting process and the gas assisted laser cutting of CFRP.

  18. Experimental Comparison of Different Carbon Fiber Composites in Reinforcement Layouts for Wooden Beams of Historical Buildings.

    PubMed

    Rescalvo, Francisco J; Valverde-Palacios, Ignacio; Suarez, Elisabet; Gallego, Antolino

    2017-09-21

    This paper offers a detailed, quantitative and exhaustive experimental comparison in terms of mechanical properties of three different layouts of carbon composite materials (CFRP) used to strengthen existing old timber beams highly affected by diverse natural defects and biological attacks, testing the use of pultruded laminate attached on the tension side of the element (LR), CFRP fabrics totally U-shape wrapping the timber element (UR), and the combined use of both reinforcement solutions (UR-P). Moreover, unidirectional and bidirectional fabrics were considered and compared. Timber elements used for the experimental program were extracted from a recent rehabilitation of the roof of the current Faculty of Law building, University of Granada (Spain), catalogued as a historical edifice. Experimental results from bending tests show that in all cases reinforcement provides a clear improvement in terms of bending capacity and stiffness as compared with the control specimens (without reinforcement). However, improvements in terms of ductility differ considerably depending on the kind of layout.

  19. Shear deformable deformation of carbon nanotubes based on a new analytical nonlocal Timoshenko beam nodel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianming; Yang, Yang

    2015-03-10

    According to Hamilton’s principle, a new mathematical model and analytical solutions for nonlocal Timoshenko beam model (ANT) is established based on nonlocal elastic continuum theory when shear deformation and nonlocal effect are considered. The new ANT equilibrium equations and boundary conditions are derived for bending analysis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with simply supported, clamped and cantilever. The ANT deflection solutions demonstrate that the CNT stiffness is enhanced by the presence of nonlocal stress effects. Furthermore, the new ANT model concluded verifiable bending behaviors for a cantilever CNT with point load at the free end, which depends on the strength of nonlocal stress. Therefore, this new model will gives a better prediction for mechanical behaviors of nanostructures.

  20. Nanoindentation on carbon thin films obtained from a C 60 ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Asén, A. G.; Verdier, M.; Huck, H.; Halac, E. B.; Reinoso, M.

    2006-09-01

    Raman spectra, atomic force microscope (AFM) images, hardness ( H) and Young's modulus ( E) measurements were carried out in order to characterize carbon thin films obtained from a C 60 ion beam on silicon substrates at different deposition energies (from 100 up to 500 eV). The mechanical properties were studied via the nanoindentation technique. It has been observed by Raman spectroscopy and AFM that the microstructure presents significant changes for films deposited at energies close to 300 eV. However, these remarkable changes have not been noticeable on the mechanical properties: apparently H and E increase with higher deposition energy up to ˜11 and ˜116 GPa, respectively. These values are underestimated if the influence of the film roughness is not taken into account.

  1. Carbon transport and escape fraction in a high density plasma beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Swaaij, G. A.; Bystrov, K.; Borodin, D.; Kirschner, A.; Zaharia, T.; van der Vegt, L. B.; De Temmerman, G.; Goedheer, W. J.

    2013-07-01

    Hydrocarbon injection experiments on molybdenum targets facing high-density plasmas in Pilot-PSI were simulated with the 3D Monte Carlo impurity transport and PSI code ERO. Impurity transport and calculation of redeposition profiles were decoupled by calculating carbon redistribution matrices with ERO. Redeposition was found to be strongly dependent on the electron density: greater densities result in a much more localized redeposition pattern. The calculated average number of recycling events of hydrocarbon molecules on the surface went up from 1.5 for ne=5×1019 m to 19.2 for ne=4×1020 m; at the latter density, only 2.4% of the hydrocarbon molecules escapes the simulated plasma beam without returning to the target at least once. Agreement with experimental deposition profiles in argon was fair. The results in hydrogen point towards a strong gradient in chemical erosion yield along the target.

  2. High-resolution adaptive nulling performance for a lightweight agile EHF multiple beam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenn, A. J.; Johnson, J. R.; Rispin, L. W.; Cummings, W. C.; Potts, B. M.

    The design and experimental performance of a lightweight high-resolution adaptive nulling extremely high-frequency multiple beam antenna (MBA) are addressed. A 127-beam MBA and a four-channel RF nulling network operating over the 43.5-to-45.5-GHz band were used to adaptively null a jammer in anechoic chamber measurements. Lightweight waveguide transmission lines together with ferrite switches were used to select beam ports from the 127-beam MBA. The MBA was designed to provide simultaneous coverage for three communications system users while providing pattern discrimination or nulling of jammers located within 0.1 deg of the user. Cancellation greater than 30 dB when operating in a wideband mode was experimentally demonstrated.

  3. Beam tail effect of a performance-enhanced EC-ITC RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tong-Ning; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Qin, Bin; Chen, Qu-Shan

    2013-12-01

    The beam tail effect of multi-bunches will influence the electron beam performance in a high intensity thermionic RF gun. Beam dynamic calculations that illustrate the working states of single beam tail and multi-pulse feed-in of a performance-enhanced EC-ITC (external cathode independent tunable cavity) RF gun for an FEL (free electron laser) injector are performed to estimate the extracted bunch properties. By using both Parmela and homemade MATLAB codes, the effects of a single beam tail as well as interactions of multi-pulses are analyzed, where a ring-based electron algorithm is adopted to calculated RF fields and the space-charge field. Furthermore, the procedure of unexpected deviated-energy particles mixed with an effective bunch head is described by the MATLAB code as well. As a result, the performance-enhanced EC-ITC RF gun is proved to have the capability to extract continual stable bunches suitable for a high requirement THz-FEL.

  4. Performance and measurements of the AGS and Booster beams

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1995-12-31

    Analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGSC) ashes and descriptions of filter performance were made to address the problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to the collected ash. This task is designed to generate data base of the key properties of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Activities including initial formatting of the data base and entry, modification of the permeability model, and initial design of a high-temperature test device for measuring uncompacted bulk porosity of ash aggregates (indicator of relative cohesivity of the ash, filter cake porosity/permeability). Chemical analyses of hopper and filter cake ashes from Tidd showed that the consolidation degree could not be accounted for by condensation/adsorption from the flue gas; the mechanism is likely physical rearrangement of the ash particles.

  5. Deployable Air Beam Fender System (DAFS): Energy Absorption Performance Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    its energy absorption performance. Quarter-scale and full-scale models were evaluated and compared to protot ype tests for a variety of inflation...pressures, impact berthing conditions, and ballast levels. Model predictions were validated with correlated test data. The explicit FEA method captured...was used. In step 1, the fender was inflated to the specified inflation pressure and the acceleration caused by gravity (386.4 in./s 2) was applied

  6. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell performance degradation at different synchrotron beam intensities.

    PubMed

    Eller, Jens; Büchi, Felix N

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of cell performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under monochromatic X-ray irradiation at 13.5 keV was studied in galvanostatic and potentiostatic operation modes in a through-plane imaging direction over a range of two orders of magnitude beam intensity at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source. The performance degradation was found to be a function of X-ray dose and independent of beam intensity, whereas the degradation rate correlates with beam intensity. The cell performance was more sensitive to X-ray irradiation at higher temperature and gas feed humidity. High-frequency resistance measurements and the analysis of product water allow conclusions to be drawn on the dominating degradation processes, namely change of hydrophobicity of the electrode and sulfate contamination of the electrocatalyst.

  7. Performance of a scanning pencil-beam spaceborne scatterometer for ocean wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Kennett, R. G.; Fuk, K.

    1988-01-01

    Simulation results show that a scatterometer design using two pencil beams scanning at different incidence angles measures the near-surface oceanic winds from a satellite better under most conditions than previous designs. The return signals from the ocean surface are much stronger than those from the fan beams used previously. Performance on a polar-orbiting satellite is compared with that of a fan beam spaceborne scatterometer. A wider and continuous swath is covered. The improvement in performance is higher at low wind speeds, so it is particularly suitable for measuring the low-mean-speed tropical wind fields. Performance on a low altitude tropic-orbiting platform such as the Space Station is also shown.

  8. Crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticle assisted photothermal delivery into cells using CW near-infrared laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Koymen, Ali R.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery of impermeable exogenous material such as small molecules, proteins, and plasmids into cells in culture as well as in vivo is of great importance for drug, vaccine and gene delivery for different therapeutic strategies. Though advent of optoporation by ultrafast laser microbeam has allowed spatial targeting in cells, the requirement of high peak power to create holes on the cell membrane is not practical and also challenging in vivo. Here, we report development and use of uniquely non-reactive crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticles (CMCNPs) for photothermal delivery (PTD) of impermeable dyes and plasmids encoding light-sensitive proteins into cells using low power continuous wave near-infrared (NIR) laser beam. Further, we utilized the magnetic nature of these CMCNPs to localize them in desired region by external magnetic field, thus minimizing the required number of nanoparticles. We discovered that irradiation of the CMCNPs near the desired cell(s) with NIR laser beam leads to temperature rise that not only stretch the cell-membrane to ease delivery, it also creates fluid flow to allow mobilization of exogenous substances to the delivery. Due to significant absorption properties of the CMCNPs in the NIR therapeutic window, PTD under in vivo condition is highly possible.

  9. Crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticle assisted photothermal delivery into cells using CW near-infrared laser beam.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ling; Koymen, Ali R; Mohanty, Samarendra K

    2014-05-29

    Efficient and targeted delivery of impermeable exogenous material such as small molecules, proteins, and plasmids into cells in culture as well as in vivo is of great importance for drug, vaccine and gene delivery for different therapeutic strategies. Though advent of optoporation by ultrafast laser microbeam has allowed spatial targeting in cells, the requirement of high peak power to create holes on the cell membrane is not practical and also challenging in vivo. Here, we report development and use of uniquely non-reactive crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticles (CMCNPs) for photothermal delivery (PTD) of impermeable dyes and plasmids encoding light-sensitive proteins into cells using low power continuous wave near-infrared (NIR) laser beam. Further, we utilized the magnetic nature of these CMCNPs to localize them in desired region by external magnetic field, thus minimizing the required number of nanoparticles. We discovered that irradiation of the CMCNPs near the desired cell(s) with NIR laser beam leads to temperature rise that not only stretch the cell-membrane to ease delivery, it also creates fluid flow to allow mobilization of exogenous substances to the delivery. Due to significant absorption properties of the CMCNPs in the NIR therapeutic window, PTD under in vivo condition is highly possible.

  10. Prediction of oxidation performance of reinforced carbon-carbon material for Space Shuttle leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medford, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A method was developed for predicting oxidation performance, in an earth atmospheric entry environment, of reinforced carbon-carbon material, coated for oxidation resistance. A model was developed which describes oxidation control mechanisms, and the equations defining these mechanisms were derived. These relations were used to correlate oxidation test data, and to infer pertinent rate constants. Predictions were made of material oxidation performance in a representative entry environment, and the predictions were compared with ground test data. Results indicate that the method can be successfully used for predicting material oxidation performance.

  11. An Ultra-Lightweight, High Performance Carbon-Carbon Space Radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, W. O.; Wang, Mike; Shih, Wei; Ramirez, Rogelio; Beach, Duane; Youchison, Dennis; Lenard, Roger; Liguori, Justin; Liguori, Ed

    2007-01-01

    Propulsion systems for deep space exploration that rely on nuclear energy require innovative advancements in radiator technology, both materials and construction technique, to meet the demands associated with high rejection temperatures. A five fold reduction in radiator specific mass is achievable and will be needed to meet the demanding challenge of space exploration. Our development of a carbon-carbon (C-C) based radiator design unaffected by long term exposure to high temperature and radiation has wide ranging application, for both small and large power conversion systems. Our results stem from a NASA SBIR program focused on demonstrating thermal performance in a high temperature carbon-carbon (C-C) radiator configured with titanium water- heat pipes, using approximately 500 K water for the working fluid. However, joining strategy and material choices employed are appropriate for very high temperature alkali fluids. Distinct design advantages of carbon-carbon material are its low density, unlimited life, and ability to tailor its physical properties through fiber selection, fiber orientation, and special processing. We will report on our experience in joining of titanium to carbonized materials through direct carbonization and brazing. Results of thermal tests at Sandia National Laboratories on a 1 kW thermal radiator will be presented, along with construction progress and testing of a 2.6 m2 sandwich radiator for NASA Glenn.

  12. SU-E-T-470: Beam Performance of the Radiance 330 Proton Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaryan, H; Nazaryan, V; Wang, F; Flanz, J; Alexandrov, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The ProTom Radiance 330 proton radiotherapy system is a fully functional, compact proton radiotherapy system that provides advanced proton delivery capabilities. It supports three-dimensional beam scanning with energy and intensity modulation. A series of measurements have been conducted to characterize the beam performance of the first installation of the system at the McLaren Proton Therapy Center in Flint, Michigan. These measurements were part of the technical commissioning of the system. Select measurements and results are presented. Methods: The Radiance 330 proton beam energy range is 70–250 MeV for treatment, and up to 330 MeV for proton tomography and radiography. Its 3-D scanning capability, together with a small beam emittance and momentum spread, provides a highly efficient beam delivery. During the technical commissioning, treatment plans were created to deliver uniform maps at various energies to perform Gamma Index analysis. EBT3 Gafchromic films were irradiated using the Planned irradiation maps. Bragg Peak chamber was used to test the dynamic range during a scan in one layer for high (250 MeV) and Low (70 MeV) energies. The maximum and minimum range, range adjustment and modulation, distal dose falloff (80%–20%), pencil beam spot size, spot placement accuracy were also measured. The accuracy testing included acquiring images, image registration, receiving correction vectors and applying the corrections to the robotic patient positioner. Results: Gamma Index analysis of the Treatment Planning System (TPS) data vs. Measured data showed more than 90% of points within (3%, 3mm) for the maps created by the TPS. At Isocenter Beam Size (One sigma) < 3mm at highest energy (250 MeV) in air. Beam delivery was within 0.6 mm of the intended target at the entrance and the exit of the beam, through the phantom. Conclusion: The Radiance 330 Beam Performance Measurements have confirmed that the system operates as designed with excellent clinical

  13. Lithium Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Bogart, Timothy D.; Oka, Daichi; Lu, Xiaotang; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2013-12-06

    Silicon (Si) nanomaterials have emerged as a leading candidate for next generation lithium-ion battery anodes. However, the low electrical conductivity of Si requires the use of conductive additives in the anode film. Here we report a solution-based synthesis of Si nanowires with a conductive carbon skin. Without any conductive additive, the Si nanowire electrodes exhibited capacities of over 2000 mA h g-1 for 100 cycles when cycled at C/10 and over 1200 mA h g-1 when cycled more rapidly at 1C against Li metal.. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation reveals that the carbon skin performs dual roles: it speeds lithiation of the Si nanowires significantly, while also constraining the final volume expansion. The present work sheds light on ways to optimize lithium battery performance by smartly tailoring the nanostructure of composition of materials based on silicon and carbon.

  14. Qualitative and quantitative difference in mutation induction between carbon- and neon-ion beams in normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kato, Takeshi; Yatagai, Fumio; Watanabe, Masami

    2003-12-01

    We investigated the difference in cell-killing effect and mutation induction between carbon- and neon-ion beams in normal human cells. Carbon- and neon-ion beams were accelerated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron (RRC) at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Japan. Cell-killing effect was measured as the reproductive cell death using the colony formation assay. Mutation induction at the HPRT locus was detected to measure 6-thioguanine-resistant clones. The mutation spectrum of the deletion pattern of exons of induced mutants was analyzed using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Cell-killing effect was almost the same between carbon- and neon-ion beams with similar linear energy transfer (LET) values, while there observed a large difference in mutation frequency. Furthermore, in the case of neon-ion beams 60% of mutants showed total deletions and 35-40% showed partial deletions, while 95-100% of carbon-ion induced mutants showed total deletions. The results suggest that different ion species may cause qualitative and quantitative difference in mutation induction even if the LET values are similar.

  15. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes from the plateau region of the Bragg curve for a carbon-ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manti, L.; Durante, M.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Scampoli, P.; Gialanella, G.

    2007-06-01

    Radiotherapy with high-energy carbon ion beams can be more advantageous compared to photons because of better physical dose distribution and higher biological efficiency in tumour cell sterilization. Despite enhanced normal tissue sparing, damage incurred by normal cells at the beam entrance is unavoidable and may affect the progeny of surviving cells in the form of inheritable cytogenetic alterations. Furthermore, the quality of the beam along the Bragg curve is modified by nuclear fragmentation of projectile and target nuclei in the body. We present an experimental approach based on the use of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom that allows the simultaneous exposure to a particle beam of several biological samples positioned at various depths along the beam path. The device was used to measure the biological effectiveness of a 60 MeV/amu carbon-ion beam at inducing chromosomal aberrations in G0-human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Chromosome spreads were obtained from prematurely condensed cells and all structural aberration types were scored in Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH)-painted chromosomes 1 and 2. Our results show a marked increase with depth in the aberration frequency prior to the Bragg peak, which is consistent with a linear energy transfer (LET)-dependent increase in biological effectiveness.

  16. Operational performance of the CERN injector complex with transversely split beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernethy, S.; Akroh, A.; Bartosik, H.; Blas, A.; Bohl, T.; Cettour-Cave, S.; Cornelis, K.; Damerau, H.; Gilardoni, S.; Giovannozzi, M.; Hernalsteens, C.; Huschauer, A.; Kain, V.; Manglunki, D.; Métral, G.; Mikulec, B.; Salvant, B.; Sanchez Alvarez, J.-L.; Steerenberg, R.; Sterbini, G.; Wu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    With the progress made in 2015, the beams produced by the CERN Proton Synchrotron using multiturn extraction (MTE) have been delivered to the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) for the fixed-target physics run. Operation successfully started in the second half of September 2015 and continued until the end of the proton physics program by mid November. In this paper the overall performance and beam quality is discussed in detail considering the complete chain of accelerators, from the PS-Booster to the SPS. Moreover, a thorough comparison of the global performance of the MTE scheme against the previously used technique, the so-called continuous transfer (CT), is also carried out.

  17. Curative treatment of Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer with carbon ion beams using a hypofractionated regimen

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Tadaaki . E-mail: t_miyamt@nirs.go.jp; Baba, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Koto, Masashi; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Yashiro, Tomoyasu; Kadono, Kennoshuke; Ezawa, Hidefumi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Kandatsu, Susumu; Fujisawa, Takehiko

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: A phase I/II study on carbon ion radiotherapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was first conducted between 1994 and 1999 and determined the optimal dose. Second, a Phase II study using the optimal dose was performed. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the local control and 5-year survival rates. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and December 2000, 50 patients with 51 primary lesions were treated. Using a fixed dose of 72 GyE in nine fractions over 3 weeks, the primary tumors were irradiated with carbon ion beams alone. The average age of the patients was 74.5 years. Thirty-three (66%) of these were medically inoperable. Local control and survival were determined by using the Kaplan-Meier method and the data were statistically processed by using the log-rank test. Results: All patients were observed for a minimum of 5 years or until death with a median follow-up time of 59.2 months (range, 6.0-83.0 months). The local control rate for all patients was 94.7%. The patients' 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 75.7% (IA: 89.4; IB: 55.1), and overall survival 50.0% (IA: 55.2; IB: 42.9). No toxic reactions in the lung greater than Grade 3 were detected. Conclusions: Carbon ion radiotherapy, a new treatment modality with superior benefits in terms of quality of life and activity of daily living, has been proven as a valid alternative to surgery for Stage I NSCLC and to offer particular benefits, especially for elderly and inoperable patients.

  18. Plasma and ion beam enhanced chemical vapour deposition of diamond and diamond-like carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongji

    WC-Co cutting tools are widely used in the machining industry. The application of diamond coatings on the surfaces of the tools would prolong the cutting lifetime and improves the manufacturing efficiency. However, direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond coatings on WC-Co suffer from severe premature adhesion failure due to interfacial graphitization induced by the binder phase Co. In this research, a combination of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrogen (H2) plasma pretreatments and a novel double interlayer of carbide forming element (CFE)/Al were developed to enhance diamond nucleation and adhesion. The results showed that both the pretreatments and interlayers were effective in forming continuous and adhesive nanocrystalline diamond coatings. The method is a promising replacement of the hazardous Murakami's regent currently used in WC-Co pretreatment with a more environmental friendly approach. Apart from coatings, diamond can be fabricated into other forms of nanostructures, such as nanotips. In this work, it was demonstrated that oriented diamond nanotip arrays can be fabricated by ion beam etching of as-grown CVD diamond. The orientation of diamond nanotips can be controlled by adjusting the direction of incident ion beam. This method overcomes the limits of other techniques in producing nanotip arrays on large areas with controlled orientation. Oriented diamond nano-tip arrays have been used to produce anisotropic frictional surface, which is successfully used in ultra-precision positioning systems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) has many properties comparable to diamond. In this thesis, the preparation of alpha-C:H thin films by end-Hall (EH) ion source and the effects of ion energy and nitrogen doping on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-deposited thin films were investigated. The results have demonstrated that smooth and uniform alpha-C:H and alpha-C:H:N films with large area and reasonably high hardness and Young's modulus can be

  19. Dosimetric verification in water of a Monte Carlo treatment planning tool for proton, helium, carbon and oxygen ion beams at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessonnier, T.; Böhlen, T. T.; Ceruti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Sala, P.; Brons, S.; Haberer, T.; Debus, J.; Parodi, K.; Mairani, A.

    2017-08-01

    The introduction of ‘new’ ion species in particle therapy needs to be supported by a thorough assessment of their dosimetric properties and by treatment planning comparisons with clinically used proton and carbon ion beams. In addition to the latter two ions, helium and oxygen ion beams are foreseen at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) as potential assets for improving clinical outcomes in the near future. We present in this study a dosimetric validation of a FLUKA-based Monte Carlo treatment planning tool (MCTP) for protons, helium, carbon and oxygen ions for spread-out Bragg peaks in water. The comparisons between the ions show the dosimetric advantages of helium and heavier ion beams in terms of their distal and lateral fall-offs with respect to protons, reducing the lateral size of the region receiving 50% of the planned dose up to 12 mm. However, carbon and oxygen ions showed significant doses beyond the target due to the higher fragmentation tail compared to lighter ions (p and He), up to 25%. The Monte Carlo predictions were found to be in excellent geometrical agreement with the measurements, with deviations below 1 mm for all parameters investigated such as target and lateral size as well as distal fall-offs. Measured and simulated absolute dose values agreed within about 2.5% on the overall dose distributions. The MCTP tool, which supports the usage of multiple state-of-the-art relative biological effectiveness models, will provide a solid engine for treatment planning comparisons at HIT.

  20. Dosimetric verification in water of a Monte Carlo treatment planning tool for proton, helium, carbon and oxygen ion beams at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center.

    PubMed

    Tessonnier, T; Böhlen, T T; Ceruti, F; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Brons, S; Haberer, T; Debus, J; Parodi, K; Mairani, A

    2017-07-31

    The introduction of 'new' ion species in particle therapy needs to be supported by a thorough assessment of their dosimetric properties and by treatment planning comparisons with clinically used proton and carbon ion beams. In addition to the latter two ions, helium and oxygen ion beams are foreseen at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) as potential assets for improving clinical outcomes in the near future. We present in this study a dosimetric validation of a FLUKA-based Monte Carlo treatment planning tool (MCTP) for protons, helium, carbon and oxygen ions for spread-out Bragg peaks in water. The comparisons between the ions show the dosimetric advantages of helium and heavier ion beams in terms of their distal and lateral fall-offs with respect to protons, reducing the lateral size of the region receiving 50% of the planned dose up to 12 mm. However, carbon and oxygen ions showed significant doses beyond the target due to the higher fragmentation tail compared to lighter ions (p and He), up to 25%. The Monte Carlo predictions were found to be in excellent geometrical agreement with the measurements, with deviations below 1 mm for all parameters investigated such as target and lateral size as well as distal fall-offs. Measured and simulated absolute dose values agreed within about 2.5% on the overall dose distributions. The MCTP tool, which supports the usage of multiple state-of-the-art relative biological effectiveness models, will provide a solid engine for treatment planning comparisons at HIT.

  1. Dosimetric and bremsstrahlung performance of a single convergent beam for teletherapy device.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, R G; Santibáñez, M; Valente, M

    2016-12-01

    The present work investigates preliminary feasibility and characteristics of a new type of radiation therapy modality based on a single convergent beam of photons. The proposal consists of the design of a device capable of generating convergent X-ray beams useful for radiotherapy. The main goal is to achieve high concentrated dose delivery. The first step is an analytical approach in order to characterize the dosimetric performance of the hypothetical convergent photon beam. Then, the validated FLUKA Monte Carlo main code is used to perform complete radiation transport to account also for scattering effects. The proposed method for producing convergent X-rays is mainly based on the bremsstrahlung effect. Hence the operating principle of the proposed device is described in terms of bremsstrahlung production. The work is mainly devoted characterizing the effect on the bremsstrahlung yield due to accessories present in the device, like anode material and geometry, filtration and collimation systems among others. The results obtained for in-depth dose distributions, by means of analytical and stochastic approaches, confirm the presence of a high dose concentration around the irradiated target, as expected. Moreover, it is shown how this spot of high dose concentration depends upon the relevant physical properties of the produced convergent photon beam. In summary, the proposed design for producing single convergent X-rays attained satisfactory performance for achieving high dose concentration around small targets depending on beam spot size that may be used for some applications in radiotherapy, like radiosurgery.

  2. High performance all-carbon thin film supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhang; Mirri, Francesca; Notarianni, Marco; Pasquali, Matteo; Motta, Nunzio

    2015-01-01

    We fabricated high performance supercapacitors by using all carbon electrodes, with volume energy in the order of 10-3 Whcm-3, comparable to Li-ion batteries, and power densities in the range of 10 Wcm-3, better than laser-scribed-graphene supercapacitors. All-carbon supercapacitor electrodes are made by solution processing and filtering electrochemically-exfoliated graphene sheets mixed with clusters of spontaneously entangled multiwall carbon nanotubes. We maximize the capacitance by using a 1:1 weight ratio of graphene to multi-wall carbon nanotubes and by controlling their packing in the electrode film so as to maximize accessible surface and further enhance the charge collection. This electrode is transferred onto a plastic-paper-supported double-wall carbon nanotube film used as current collector. These all-carbon thin films are combined with plastic paper and gelled electrolyte to produce solid-state bendable thin film supercapacitors. We assembled supercapacitor cells in series in a planar configuration to increase the operating voltage and find that the shape of our supercapacitor film strongly affects its capacitance. An in-line superposition of rectangular sheets is superior to a cross superposition in maintaining high capacitance when subject to fast charge/discharge cycles. The effect is explained by addressing the mechanism of ion diffusion into stacked graphene sheets.

  3. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Polf, Jerimy C; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from 12C (4.44 MeV) and 16O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 107 oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from 16O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring 16O PG emission. PMID:23920051

  4. Development and characterization of a 2D scintillation detector for quality assurance in scanned carbon ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborini, A.; Raffaele, L.; Mirandola, A.; Molinelli, S.; Viviani, C.; Spampinato, S.; Ciocca, M.

    2016-04-01

    At the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO Foundation), a two-dimensional high resolution scintillating dosimetry system has been developed and tested for daily Quality Assurance measurements (QA) in carbon ion radiotherapy with active scanning technique, for both single pencil beams and scanned fields produced by a synchrotron accelerator. The detector consists of a thin plane organic scintillator (25×25 cm2, 2 mm thick) coupled with a high spatial resolution CCD camera (0.25 mm) in a light-tight box. A dedicated Labview software was developed for image acquisition triggered with the beam extraction, data post-processing and analysis. The scintillator system was preliminary characterized in terms of short-term reproducibility (found to be within±0.5%), linearity with the number of particles (linear fit χ2 = 0.996) and dependence on particle flux (measured to be < 1.5 %). The detector was then tested for single beam spot measurements (Full Width at Half Maximum and position) and for 6×6 cm2 reference scanned field (determination of homogeneity) for carbon ions with energy from 115 MeV/u up to 400 MeV/u. No major differences in the investigated beam parameters measured with scintillator system and the radiochromic EBT3 reference films were observed. The system allows therefore real-time monitoring of the carbon ion beam relevant parameters, with a significant daily time saving with respect to films currently used. The results of this study show the suitability of the scintillation detector for daily QA in a carbon ion facility with an active beam delivery system.

  5. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Polf, Jerimy C; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-09-07

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from (12)C (4.44 MeV) and (16)O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 10(7) oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from (16)O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring (16)O PG emission.

  6. One-dimensional carbon nanostructures for terahertz electron-beam radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantiwanichapan, Khwanchai; Swan, Anna K.; Paiella, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    One-dimensional carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanoribbons can feature near-ballistic electronic transport over micron-scale distances even at room temperature. As a result, these materials provide a uniquely suited solid-state platform for radiation mechanisms that so far have been the exclusive domain of electron beams in vacuum. Here we consider the generation of terahertz light based on two such mechanisms, namely, the emission of cyclotronlike radiation in a sinusoidally corrugated nanowire (where periodic angular motion is produced by the mechanical corrugation rather than an externally applied magnetic field), and the Smith-Purcell effect in a rectilinear nanowire over a dielectric grating. In both cases, the radiation properties of the individual charge carriers are investigated via full-wave electrodynamic simulations, including dephasing effects caused by carrier collisions. The overall light output is then computed with a standard model of charge transport for two particularly suitable types of carbon nanostructures, i.e., zigzag graphene nanoribbons and armchair single-wall nanotubes. Relatively sharp emission peaks at geometrically tunable terahertz frequencies are obtained in each case. The corresponding output powers are experimentally accessible even with individual nanowires, and can be scaled to technologically significant levels using array configurations. These radiation mechanisms therefore represent a promising paradigm for light emission in condensed matter, which may find important applications in nanoelectronics and terahertz photonics.

  7. Nanoindentation mechanical properties characterization of glassy polymeric carbon treated with ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M. G.; da Cruz, N. C.; Rangel, E. C.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Ila, D.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.

    2002-05-01

    Phenolic resins when heat treated in inert atmosphere up to 1000 °C become glassy polymeric carbon (GPC), a chemically inert and biocompatible material useful for medical applications, such as in the manufacture of heart valves and prosthetic devices. In earlier work we have shown that ion bombardment can modify the surface of GPC, increasing its roughness. The enhanced roughness, which depends on the species, energy and fluence of the ion beam, can improve the biocompatibility of GPC prosthetic artifacts. In this work, ion bombardment was used to make a layer of implanted ions under the surface to avoid the propagation of microcracks in regions where cardiac valves should have pins for fixation of the leaflets. GPC samples prepared at 700 and 1500 °C were bombarded with ions of silicon, carbon, oxygen and gold at energies of 5, 6, 8 and 10 MeV, respectively, and fluences between 1.0×10 13 and 1.0×10 16 ions/cm 2. Nanoindentation hardness characterization was used to compare bombarded with non-bombarded samples prepared at temperatures up to 2500 °C. The results with samples not bombarded showed that the hardness of GPC increases strongly with the heat treatment temperature. Comparison with ion bombarded samples shows that the hardness changes according to the ion used, the energy and fluence.

  8. Increased Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotube Yarns and Sheets through Chemical Modification and Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Baker, James S.; Sola, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of carbon nanotube (CNT) forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading; and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated to macro-scale CNT forms where bulk material strength is limited by inter-tube electrostatic attraction and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess post processing of CNT sheet and yarn to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small molecule functionalization and e-beam irradiation was evaluated as a means to enhance tensile strength and Youngs modulus of the bulk CNT material. Mechanical testing results revealed a tensile strength increase in CNT sheets by 57 when functionalized, while an additional 48 increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated; compared to unfunctionalized sheets. Similarly, small molecule functionalization increased yarn tensile strength up to 25, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88 beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  9. Impact of 6MV photon beam attenuation by carbon fiber couch and immobilization devices in IMRT planning and dose delivery.

    PubMed

    Munjal, R K; Negi, P S; Babu, A G; Sinha, S N; Anand, A K; Kataria, T

    2006-04-01

    Multiple fields in IMRT and optimization allow conformal dose to the target and reduced dose to the surroundings and the regions of interest. Thus we can escalate the dose to the target to achieve better tumor control with low morbidity. Orientation of multiple beams can be achieved by i) different gantry angles, ii) rotating patient's couch isocentrically. In doing so, one or more beam may pass through different materials like the treatment couch, immobilization cast fixation plate, head and neck rest or any other supportive device. Our observations for 6MV photon beam on PRIMUS-KXE2 with MED-TEC carbon fiber tabletop and 10 × 10 cm(2) field size reveals that the maximum dose attenuation by the couch was of the order of 2.96% from gantry angle 120-160°. Attenuation due to cast fixation base plate of PMMA alone was of the order of 5.8-10.55% at gantry angle between 0 and 90°. Attenuation due to carbon fiber base plate alone was 3.8-7.98%. Attenuation coefficient of carbon fiber and PMMA was evaluated and was of the order of 0.082 cm(-1) and 0.064 cm(-1) respectively. Most of the TPS are configured for direct beam incidence attenuation correction factors only. Whereas when the beam is obliquely incident on the couch, base plate, headrest and any other immobilization device get attenuated more than the direct beam incidence. The correction factors for oblique incidence beam attenuation are not configured in most of the commercially available treatment planning systems. Therefore, such high variations in dose delivery could lead to under-dosage to the target volume for treatments requiring multiple fields in IMRT and 3D-CRT and need to be corrected for monitor unit calculations.

  10. Electroanalytical performance of carbon films with near-atomic flatness.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, S; McCreery, R L

    2001-03-01

    Physicochemical and electrochemical characterization of carbon films obtained by pyrolyzing a commercially available photoresist has been performed. Photoresist spin-coated on to a silicon wafer was pyrolyzed at 1,000 degrees C in a reducing atmosphere (95% nitrogen and 5% hydrogen) to produce conducting carbon films. The pyrolyzed photoresist films (PPF) show unusual surface properties compared to other carbon electrodes. The surfaces are nearly atomically smooth with a root-mean-square roughness of <0.5 nm. PPF have a very low background current and oxygen/carbon atomic ratio compared to conventional glassy carbon and show relatively weak adsorption of methylene blue and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. The low oxygen/carbon ratio and the relative stability of PPF indicate that surfaces may be partially hydrogen terminated. The pyrolyzed films were compared to glassy carbon (GC) heat treated under the same conditions as pyrolysis to evaluate the electroanalytical utility of PPF. Heterogeneous electron-transfer kinetics of various redox systems were evaluated. For Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+), Fe(CN)6(3-/4-), and chlorpromazine, fresh PPF surfaces show electron-transfer rates similar to those on GC, but for redox systems such as Fe3+/2+, ascorbic acid, dopamine, and oxygen, the kinetics on PPF are slower. Very weak interactions between the PPF surface and these redox systems lead to their slow electron-transfer kinetics. Electrochemical anodization results in a simultaneous increase in background current, adsorption, and electron-transfer kinetics. The PPF surfaces can be chemically modified via diazonium ion reduction to yield a covalently attached monolayer. Such a modification could help in the preparation of low-cost, high-volume analyte-specific electrodes for diverse electroanalytical applications. Overall, pyrolysis of the photoresist yields an electrode surface with properties similar to a very smooth version of glassy carbon, with some important differences in surface

  11. Investigating the energy harvesting capabilities of a hybrid ZnO nanowires/carbon fiber polymer composite beam.

    PubMed

    Masghouni, N; Burton, J; Philen, M K; Al-Haik, M

    2015-03-06

    Hybrid piezoelectric composite structures that are able to convert mechanical energy into electricity have gained growing attention in the past few years. In this work, an energy harvesting composite beam is developed by growing piezoelectric zinc oxide nanowires on the surface of carbon fiber prior to forming structural composites. The piezoelectric behavior of the composite beam was demonstrated under different vibration sources such as water bath sonicator and permanent magnet vibration shaker. The beam was excited at its fundamental natural frequency (43.2 Hz) and the open circuit voltage and the short circuit current were measured to be 3.1 mV and 23 nA, respectively. Upon connecting an optimal resistor (1.2 kΩ) in series with the beam a maximum power output 2.5 nW was achieved.

  12. Dynamic response of RC beams strengthened with near surface mounted Carbon-FRP rods subjected to damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozucca, R.; Blasi, M. G.; Corina, V.

    2015-07-01

    Near surface mounted (NSM) technique with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) is becoming a common method in the strengthening of concrete beams. The availability of NSM FRP technique depends on many factors linked to materials and geometry - dimensions of the rods used, type of FRP material employed, rods’ surface configuration, groove size - and to adhesion between concrete and FRP rods. In this paper detection of damage is investigated measuring the natural frequency values of beam in the case of free-free ends. Damage was due both to reduction of adhesion between concrete and carbon-FRP rectangular and circular rods and cracking of concrete under static bending tests on beams. Comparison between experimental and theoretical frequency values evaluating frequency changes due to damage permits to monitor actual behaviour of RC beams strengthened by NSM CFRP rods.

  13. Analysis of beamed-energy ramjet/scramjet performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Powers, M. V.; Zaretzky, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been performed on a laser-heated ramjet/scramjet vehicle concept for propulsion during the air-breathing portion of an orbital launch trajectory. The concept considers axisymmetric, high-thrust vehicles with external inlets and nozzles. Conceptual design and ramjet/scramjet cycle analysis are emphasized, with propulsive energy provided by combustion of on-board fuel. The conventional ramjet/scramjet combustion chamber is replaced by a laser energy absorption chamber. The elimination of on-board propellant can result in very high thrust-to-weight ratios and payload fractions, in a vehicle with a relatively small degree of mechanical complexity. The basic vehicle has a weight of 12,250 lbf, and a diameter of 5 meters, which is close to the size of the Apollo command module. The ramjet calculations are based on a Mach 3 isentropic inlet with a 13.7 degree half-angle conical tip. The scramjet analysis considers conical inlets with 10, 15, and 30 degree half-angles. Flight Mach numbers from 2 to 20 are considered in the calculations.

  14. Carbon dioxide utilization in a microalga-based biorefinery: Efficiency of carbon removal and economic performance under carbon taxation.

    PubMed

    Wiesberg, Igor Lapenda; Brigagão, George Victor; de Medeiros, José Luiz; de Queiroz Fernandes Araújo, Ofélia

    2017-12-01

    Coal-fired power plants are major stationary sources of carbon dioxide and environmental constraints demand technologies for abatement. Although Carbon Capture and Storage is the most mature route, it poses severe economic penalty to power generation. Alternatively, this penalty is potentially reduced by Carbon Capture and Utilization, which converts carbon dioxide to valuable products, monetizing it. This work evaluates a route consisting of carbon dioxide bio-capture by Chlorella pyrenoidosa and use of the resulting biomass as feedstock to a microalgae-based biorefinery; Carbon Capture and Storage route is evaluated as a reference technology. The integrated arrangement comprises: (a) carbon dioxide biocapture in a photobioreactor, (b) oil extraction from part of the produced biomass, (b) gasification of remaining biomass to obtain bio-syngas, and (c) conversion of bio-syngas to methanol. Calculation of capital and operational expenditures are estimated based on mass and energy balances obtained by process simulation for both routes (Carbon Capture and Storage and the biorefinery). Capital expenditure for the biorefinery is higher by a factor of 6.7, while operational expenditure is lower by a factor of 0.45 and revenues occur only for this route, with a ratio revenue/operational expenditure of 1.6. The photobioreactor is responsible for one fifth of the biorefinery capital expenditure, with footprint of about 1000 ha, posing the most significant barrier for technical and economic feasibility of the proposed biorefinery. The Biorefinery and Carbon Capture and Storage routes show carbon dioxide capture efficiency of 73% and 48%, respectively, with capture cost of 139$/t and 304$/t. Additionally, the biorefinery has superior performance in all evaluated metrics of environmental impacts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Performance characterization of a 3D liquid scintillation detector for discrete spot scanning proton beam systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darne, Chinmay D.; Alsanea, Fahed; Robertson, Daniel G.; Sahoo, Narayan; Beddar, Sam

    2017-07-01

    Existing systems for proton beam dosimetry are limited in their ability to provide a complete, accurate, and detailed account of volumetric dose distribution. In this work, we describe the design and development of a portable, fast, and reusable liquid scintillator-based three-dimensional (3D) optical detection system for use in proton therapy. Our long-term goal is to use this system clinically for beam characterization, dosimetry, and quality assurance studies of discrete spot scanning proton beam systems. The system used a 20  ×  20  ×  20 cm3 liquid scintillator volume. Three mutually orthogonal cameras surrounding this volume captured scintillation photons emitted in response to the proton beams. The cameras exhibited a mean spatial resolution of 0.21 mm over the complete detection volume and a temporal resolution of 11 ms. The system is shown to be capable of capturing all 94 beam energies delivered by a synchrotron and performing rapid beam range measurements with a mean accuracy of 0.073  ±  0.030 mm over all energies. The range measurement uncertainty for doses less than 1 cGy was found to be  ±0.355 mm, indicating high precision for low dose detection. Finally, we demonstrated that using multiple cameras allowed for the precise locations of the delivered beams to be tracked in 3D. We conclude that this detector is capable of real-time and accurate tracking of dynamic spot beam deliveries in 3D. The high-resolution light profiles it generates will be useful for future 3D construction of dose maps.

  16. Optical Design of High-Performance Beam Lines for X-Ray Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Eijiro

    1999-06-01

    In this paper is presented an optical design of high-performance beam lines for synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray lithography. The optical system is composed of a single toroidal scanning mirror and a movable beryllium window whose motions are synchronized. The use of a toroidal scanning mirror is thought to cause excessive deformation of beam shape during scanning and to suppress the light-condensing capacity. This problem has been solved by placing the rotating center of the mirror near the light source point. Thus, intense illumination power can be obtained. A beam reflected by the toroidal mirror forms an arc-shaped section, which causes nonuniformity in the exposure intensity. A beryllium window foil with a specific curvature can compensate the nonuniformity. A series of analytical studies and computer simulations have proven the performance of the optical design.

  17. Measurements of the performance of a beam condition monitor prototype in a 5 GeV electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, M.; Afanaciev, K.; Burtowy, P.; Dabrowski, A.; Henschel, H.; Idzik, M.; Karacheban, O.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Levy, I.; Lohmann, W.; Pollak, B.; Przyborowski, D.; Ryjov, V.; Schuwalow, S.; Stickland, D.; Walsh, R.; Zagozdzinska, A.

    2016-08-01

    The Fast Beam Conditions Monitor, BCM1F, in the Compact Muon Solenoid, CMS, experiment was operated since 2008 and delivered invaluable information on the machine induced background in the inner part of the CMS detector supporting a safe operation of the inner tracker and high quality data. Due to the shortening of the time between two bunch crossings from 50 ns to 25 ns and higher expected luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider, LHC, in 2015, BCM1F needed an upgrade to higher bandwidth. In addition, BCM1F is used as an on-line luminometer operated independently of CMS. To match these requirements, the number of single crystal diamond sensors was enhanced from 8 to 24. Each sensor is subdivided into two pads, leading to 48 readout channels. Dedicated fast front-end ASICs were developed in 130 nm technology, and the back-end electronics is completely upgraded. An assembled prototype BCM1F detector comprising sensors, a fast front-end ASIC and optical analog readout was studied in a 5 GeV electron beam at the DESY-II accelerator. Results on the performance are given.

  18. Collimated Propagation of Fast Electron Beams Accelerated by High-Contrast Laser Pulses in Highly Resistive Shocked Carbon.

    PubMed

    Vaisseau, X; Morace, A; Touati, M; Nakatsutsumi, M; Baton, S D; Hulin, S; Nicolaï, Ph; Nuter, R; Batani, D; Beg, F N; Breil, J; Fedosejevs, R; Feugeas, J-L; Forestier-Colleoni, P; Fourment, C; Fujioka, S; Giuffrida, L; Kerr, S; McLean, H S; Sawada, H; Tikhonchuk, V T; Santos, J J

    2017-05-19

    Collimated transport of ultrahigh intensity electron current was observed in cold and in laser-shocked vitreous carbon, in agreement with simulation predictions. The fast electron beams were created by coupling high-intensity and high-contrast laser pulses onto copper-coated cones drilled into the carbon samples. The guiding mechanism-observed only for times before the shock breakout at the inner cone tip-is due to self-generated resistive magnetic fields of ∼0.5-1  kT arising from the intense currents of fast electrons in vitreous carbon, by virtue of its specific high resistivity over the range of explored background temperatures. The spatial distribution of the electron beams, injected through the samples at different stages of compression, was characterized by side-on imaging of hard x-ray fluorescence.

  19. Electrical conductivity of cluster-assembled carbon/titania nanocomposite films irradiated by highly focused vacuum ultraviolet photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Amati, M.; Lenardi, C.; Agostino, R. G.; Caruso, T.; Ducati, C.; La Rosa, S.; Bongiorno, G.; Cassina, V.; Podesta, P.; Ravagnan, L.; Piseri, P.; Milani, P.

    2007-03-15

    We investigated the electrical transport properties of nanostructured carbon and carbon/titanium oxide nanocomposite films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition and irradiated by highly focused vacuum UV photon beam. We have observed a relevant increase of the density of states at Fermi level, suggesting that the films acquire a 'metallic' character. This is confirmed by the increment of the conductivity of four orders of magnitude for pure nanostructured carbon films and at least eight orders of magnitude for films containing 9 at. % of titanium. A partial reversibility of the process is observed by exposing the modified films to molecular oxygen or directly to air. We demonstrate the capability of writing micrometric conductive strips (2-3 {mu}m width and 60 {mu}m length) and controlling the variation of the conductivity as a function of the titanium concentration.

  20. Collimated Propagation of Fast Electron Beams Accelerated by High-Contrast Laser Pulses in Highly Resistive Shocked Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaisseau, X.; Morace, A.; Touati, M.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Baton, S. D.; Hulin, S.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Nuter, R.; Batani, D.; Beg, F. N.; Breil, J.; Fedosejevs, R.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Forestier-Colleoni, P.; Fourment, C.; Fujioka, S.; Giuffrida, L.; Kerr, S.; McLean, H. S.; Sawada, H.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Santos, J. J.

    2017-05-01

    Collimated transport of ultrahigh intensity electron current was observed in cold and in laser-shocked vitreous carbon, in agreement with simulation predictions. The fast electron beams were created by coupling high-intensity and high-contrast laser pulses onto copper-coated cones drilled into the carbon samples. The guiding mechanism—observed only for times before the shock breakout at the inner cone tip—is due to self-generated resistive magnetic fields of ˜0.5 - 1 kT arising from the intense currents of fast electrons in vitreous carbon, by virtue of its specific high resistivity over the range of explored background temperatures. The spatial distribution of the electron beams, injected through the samples at different stages of compression, was characterized by side-on imaging of hard x-ray fluorescence.

  1. Effects of Ion Beam on Nanoindentation Characteristics of Glassy Polymeric Carbon Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M. G.; Da Cruz, N. C.; Rangel, E. C.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Ila, Dr. Daryush; Poker, David B; Hensley, Dale K

    2005-01-01

    Glassy polymeric carbon (GPC) is a useful material for medical applications due to its chemical inertness and biocompatible characteristics. Mitral and aortic and hydrocephalic valves are examples of GPC prosthetic devices that have been fabricated and commercialized in Brazil. In this work, ion beam was used to improve the mechanical characteristics of GPC surface and therefore to avoid the propagation of microcracks where the cardiac valves are more fragile. A control group of phenolic resin samples heat-treated at 300, 400, 700, 1000, 1500, and 2500 C was characterized by measuring their hardness and Young's reduced elastic modulus with the depth of indentation. The control group was compared to results obtained with samples heat-treated at 700, 1000, and 1500 C and bombarded with energetic ions of silicon, carbon, oxygen, and gold at energies of 5, 6, 8, and 10 MeV, respectively, with fluences between 1.0 x 10{sup 13} and 1.0 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. GPC nonbombarded samples showed that hardness depends on the heat treatment temperature (HTT), with a maximum hardness for heat treatment at 1000 C. The comparison between the control group and bombarded group also showed that hardness, after bombardment, had a greater increase for samples prepared at 700 C than for samples prepared at higher temperatures. The Young's elastic modulus presents an exponential relationship with depth. The parameters obtained by fitting depend on the HTT and on the ion used in the bombardment more than on energy and fluence. The hardness results show clearly that bombardment can promote carbonization, increase the linkage between the chains of the polymeric material, and promote recombination of broken bonds in lateral groups that are more numerous for samples heat-treated at 700 C.

  2. Improving the electrochemical performance of carbon filaments by solvent cleansing

    SciTech Connect

    Shui, X.; Chung, D.D.L.; Frysz, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Found inherent in the submicron-diameter vapor-grown carbon filament fabrication process was a tarry residue, which comprised polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Cyclic voltammetry conducted using carbon working electrodes and an iron cyanide electrolyte showed that the residue harmed the electrochemical performance. Removal of the residue from the filaments using a solvent resulted in increases in the electron transfer rate (to values as high as 0.2 cm/s) and reversibility of the iron cyanide redox species, increase in the packing density and decrease in the filament-filament contact electrical resistivity.

  3. Wave propagation in double-walled carbon nanotubes on a novel analytically nonlocal Timoshenko-beam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Lixiang; Lim, C. W.

    2011-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the characteristics of wave propagation in double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs). The DWCNTs is simulated with a Timoshenko beam model based on the nonlocal continuum elasticity theory, referred to as an analytically nonlocal Timoshenko-beam (ANT) model. The governing equations of the DWCNTs beam consist of a set of four equations that are derived from the variational principle of the beam with high-order boundary conditions at the both ends, in which the effects of the nano-scale nonlocality and the van der Waals interaction between inner and outer tubes are inclusive. The characteristics of the wave propagation in the DWCNTs beam were analyzed with the new ANT model proposed and the comparisons with the partially nonlocal Timoshenko-beam (PNT) models in publication were made in details. The results show that the nonlocal effects of the ANT model proposed in the present study on the wave propagations are more significant because it is in stronger stiffness enhancement to the DWCNTs beam.

  4. Uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to improve predictions of laser beam control performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreras, Richard A.

    2017-05-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) is the study of the effects of uncertainty on the values of analytical results and the predictions of scientific models. Sources of uncertainty include imprecise knowledge of the exact values of parameters, lack of confidence in the physical models, use of imperfectly calibrated models, and irreducible uncertainties due to physical characteristics. The Air Force Research Laboratory has undertaken the challenge of understanding, developing and analyzing the techniques of UQ as they apply to Laser Beam Control. This paper proposes a simple methodology and simple results with our first attempt of applying UQ as a new analysis tool. The software toolkit which was chosen was an analytical group of algorithms from a Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) package called DAKOTA (Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications). The specific application of interest to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is the analytical prediction of the performance of a Laser Beam Control systems under various scenarios, conditions, and missions. The application of rigorous UQ techniques to the models used to predict beam control performance could greatly improve our confidence in these predictions and also improve the acceptance of advanced Laser Beam Control systems within the science and engineering communities1,2. The proposed work would follow a multi-step approach, analyzing the more easily quantified sources of uncertainty, and then including increasingly complicated physical phenomena as the work progresses. Will present the initial results, and the first steps in the incorporation of UQ into our Laser Beam Control Modeling and Simulation environments.

  5. Steady state performance test analysis of actively cooled extractor grids for SST-1 neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, M. R.; Mattoo, S. K.; Khan, M.

    2010-11-15

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) system is a workhorse to heat magnetically confined tokamak fusion plasma. The heart of any NBI system is an ion extractor system. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) needs 0.5 MW of hydrogen beam power at 30 kV to raise the plasma ion temperature to {approx}1 keV and 1.7 MW of hydrogen beam power at 55 kV for future upgradation. To meet this requirement, an ion extractor system consisting of three actively cooled grids has been designed, fabricated, and its performance test has been done at MARION test stand, IPP, Julich, Germany. During long pulse (14 s) operation, hydrogen ion beam of energy 31 MJ has been extracted at 41 kV. In this paper, we have presented detailed analysis of calorimetric data of actively cooled extractor grids and showed that by monitoring outlet water temperature, grid material temperature can be monitored for safe steady state operation of a NBI system. Steady state operation of NBI is the present day interest of fusion research. In the present experimental case, performance test analysis indicates that the actively cooled grids attain steady state heat removal condition and the grid material temperature rise is {approx}18 deg. C and saturates after 10 s of beam pulse.

  6. Steady state performance test analysis of actively cooled extractor grids for SST-1 neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Jana, M R; Mattoo, S K; Khan, M

    2010-11-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) system is a workhorse to heat magnetically confined tokamak fusion plasma. The heart of any NBI system is an ion extractor system. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) needs 0.5 MW of hydrogen beam power at 30 kV to raise the plasma ion temperature to ~1 keV and 1.7 MW of hydrogen beam power at 55 kV for future upgradation. To meet this requirement, an ion extractor system consisting of three actively cooled grids has been designed, fabricated, and its performance test has been done at MARION test stand, IPP, Julich, Germany. During long pulse (14 s) operation, hydrogen ion beam of energy 31 MJ has been extracted at 41 kV. In this paper, we have presented detailed analysis of calorimetric data of actively cooled extractor grids and showed that by monitoring outlet water temperature, grid material temperature can be monitored for safe steady state operation of a NBI system. Steady state operation of NBI is the present day interest of fusion research. In the present experimental case, performance test analysis indicates that the actively cooled grids attain steady state heat removal condition and the grid material temperature rise is ~18°C and saturates after 10 s of beam pulse.

  7. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Harvey, David; Dutta, Monica; Colbow, Vesna

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150oC and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metalic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  8. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; David Harvey; M. Dutta; V. Colbow; S. Wessel

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150 C and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metallic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  9. Field performance of timber bridges. 11, Spearfish Creek stress-laminated box-beam bridge

    Treesearch

    J. P. Wacker; M. A. Ritter; K. Stanfill-McMillan

    The Spearfish Creek bridge was constructed in 1992 in Spearfish, South Dakota. It is a single-span, stress-laminated, box-beam superstructure. Performance of the bridge is being monitored for 5 years, beginning at installation. This report summarizes results for the first 3-1/2 years of monitoring and includes information on the design, construction, and field...

  10. The Interaction of Functional and Dysfunctional Emotions during Balance Beam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottyn, Jorge; De Clercq, Dirk; Crombez, Geert; Lenoir, Matthieu

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between functional and dysfunctional emotions, as one of the major tenets of the Individual Zones of Optimal Functioning (IZOF) model (Hanin, 2000), was studied in a sport specific setting. Fourteen female gymnasts performed three attempts of a compulsory balance beam routine at three different heights. Heart rate and self-report…

  11. The Interaction of Functional and Dysfunctional Emotions during Balance Beam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottyn, Jorge; De Clercq, Dirk; Crombez, Geert; Lenoir, Matthieu

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between functional and dysfunctional emotions, as one of the major tenets of the Individual Zones of Optimal Functioning (IZOF) model (Hanin, 2000), was studied in a sport specific setting. Fourteen female gymnasts performed three attempts of a compulsory balance beam routine at three different heights. Heart rate and self-report…

  12. Structural changes of electron and ion beam-deposited contacts in annealed carbon-based electrical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Nitin M.; Patole, Shashikant P.; Abdelkader, Ahmed; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Deepak, Francis L.; Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2015-11-01

    The use of electron and ion beam deposition to make devices containing discrete nanostructures as interconnectors is a well-known nanofabrication process. Classically, one-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been electrically characterized by resorting to these beam deposition methods. While much attention has been given to the interconnectors, less is known about the contacting electrodes (or leads). In particular, the structure and chemistry of the electrode-interconnector interface is a topic that deserves more attention, as it is critical to understand the device behavior. Here, the structure and chemistry of Pt electrodes, deposited either with electron or ion beams and contacted to a CNT, are analyzed before and after thermally annealing the device in a vacuum. Free-standing Pt nanorods, acting as beam-deposited electrode models, are also characterized pre- and post-annealing. Overall, the as-deposited leads contain a non-negligible amount of amorphous carbon that is consolidated, upon heating, as a partially graphitized outer shell enveloping a Pt core. This observation raises pertinent questions regarding the definition of electrode-nanostructure interfaces in electrical devices, in particular long-standing assumptions of metal-CNT contacts fabricated by direct beam deposition methods.

  13. Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell performance analysis varying cathode operating conditions for carbon capture applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audasso, Emilio; Barelli, Linda; Bidini, Gianni; Bosio, Barbara; Discepoli, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    The results of a systematic experimental campaign to verify the impact of real operating conditions on the performance of a complete Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) are presented. In particular, the effects of ageing and composition of water, oxygen and carbon dioxide in the cathodic feeding stream are studied through the analysis of current-voltage curves and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Based on a proposed equivalent electrical circuit model and a fitting procedure, a correlation is found among specific operating parameters and single EIS coefficients. The obtained results suggest a new performance monitoring approach to be applied to MCFC for diagnostic purpose. Particular attention is devoted to operating conditions characteristic of MCFC application as CO2 concentrators, which, by feeding the cathode with exhaust gases, is a promising route for efficient and cheap carbon capture.

  14. Optical design and performance of the X25 hybrid wiggler beam line at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, L.E.; Hastings, J.B.; Oversluizen, T.; Woodle, M.

    1991-01-01

    The X25 beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) began full-power commissioning in 1990. It extracts radiation from a 27 pole hybrid wiggler, which produces up to 1.8 kW of total power with a peak horizontal density of 450 W/mrad and critical energy of 4.6 keV. The design and performance of the beam line optics are described, in particular the cooling of the first monochromator crystal. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Experimental Study on the Flexural Performance of Parallel Strand Bamboo Beams

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Aiping; Bian, Yuling

    2014-01-01

    Searching for materials to provide proper housing with less emission and low energy becomes an urgent demand with the ever-growing population. Bamboo has gained a reputation as an ecofriendly, highly renewable source of material. Parallel Strand Bamboo (PSB) is a new biocomposite made of bamboo strips which has superiority performances than wood products. It has attracted considerable interests as a sustainable alternative for more traditional building materials. But the mechanical performance study of PSB as construction materials is still inadequate. Also, the structural behavior of PSB is not quite understood as conventional construction materials, which results in the difficulties to predict the performances of PSB structural members. To achieve this purpose, 4-point bending experiments for PSB beams were carried out. The flexural performances, mode of failure in bending, and the damage mechanism of PSB beams were investigated in this paper. PMID:24701141

  16. Comparison of the TESLA, NLC and CLIC Beam Collimation Systems Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Lewis P

    2003-03-27

    This note describes studies performed in the framework of the Collimation Task Force organized to support the work of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee. The post-linac beam-collimation systems in the TESLA, JLC/NLC and CLIC linear-collider designs are compared using the same computer code under the same assumptions. Their performance is quantified in terms of beam-halo and synchrotron-radiation collimation efficiency. The performance of the current designs varies across projects and does not always meet the original design goals. However, these comparisons suggest that achieving the required performance in a future linear collider is feasible. The post-TRC plans of the Collimation Task Force are outlined briefly in closing.

  17. Experimental study on the flexural performance of parallel strand bamboo beams.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aiping; Bian, Yuling

    2014-01-01

    Searching for materials to provide proper housing with less emission and low energy becomes an urgent demand with the ever-growing population. Bamboo has gained a reputation as an ecofriendly, highly renewable source of material. Parallel Strand Bamboo (PSB) is a new biocomposite made of bamboo strips which has superiority performances than wood products. It has attracted considerable interests as a sustainable alternative for more traditional building materials. But the mechanical performance study of PSB as construction materials is still inadequate. Also, the structural behavior of PSB is not quite understood as conventional construction materials, which results in the difficulties to predict the performances of PSB structural members. To achieve this purpose, 4-point bending experiments for PSB beams were carried out. The flexural performances, mode of failure in bending, and the damage mechanism of PSB beams were investigated in this paper.

  18. Wear Performance of Calcium Carbonate-Containing Knee Spacers.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Ulrike; Reinders, Joern; Smith-Romanski, Sydney; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2017-07-15

    Articulating spacers should be wear-resistant and load-bearing to avoid prolonged immobilization of the patient and to reduce morbidity. However, due to the articulation of both components, a release of cement wear particles is to be expected. The aim of this study was to investigate the wear performance of a new spacer cement that contains calcium carbonate as a radio-opaque substance, in comparison to an established barium sulphate-containing spacer material, and also to characterize the amount, morphology, and size distributions of the released cement particles in detail. Force-controlled simulation was carried out on an AMTI knee simulator. The test parameters were in accordance with the standard ISO 14243-1 with a 50% reduced axial force. Tests were run for 500,000 cycles at a frequency of 1 Hz. For wear analysis, photographic documentation of the wear scars, gravimetric wear measurements and wear particle analysis were performed. The barium sulphate spacer material showed a total articular wear of 375.53 ± 161.22 mg. For the calcium carbonate-containing cement, reduced articular wear of 136.32 ± 37.58 mg was determined. Isolated cement wear particles of the barium sulphate-containing cement had a diameter of 0.429 ± 0.224 μm and were significantly larger compared to the calcium carbonate-containing cement (0.380 ± 0.216 μm, p = 0.02). The calcium carbonate-containing cement showed better wear performance in terms of gravimetric wear and particle release. Thus, calcium carbonate seems to be a promising material as a radio-opaque substrate in cement spacers.

  19. Performance of boron/carbon first wall materials under fusion relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, J.; Bolt, H.; Doerner, R.; Grübmeier, H.; Hirooka, Y.; Hoven, H.; Mingam, C.; Schulze, H.; Seki, M.; Wallura, E.; Weber, T.; Winter, J.

    1990-12-01

    The conditioning of the plasma facing wall in thermonuclear confinement experiments has been performed very successfully by the application of amorphous boron containing hydrogenated carbon films. Boronization leads to tokamak discharges with significantly reduced oxygen and carbon contaminations. For high heat flux components (especially in future quasi-stationary confinement experiments) new boron/carbon materials have to be developed: monolithic tiles of boronated graphites which can be brazed to watercooled substrates or thick B 4C-coatings on graphite or high-Z coolant tubes. A variety of bulk materials (boronated graphites with boron contents in the range from 3 to 30%, so-called coat mix material on the basis of B 4C) and coatings (amorphous B/C films, thick B 4C layers applied by LPPS or CVD methods) were characterized systematically. In addition the behaviour of these materials was investigated under thermal loads; erosion and disruption simulation experiments were performed in electron and ion beam high heat flux test facilities. Physical and chemical sputtering of the coat-mix-material was studied in the PISCES-B facility in dependence on the hydrogen ions fluence.

  20. Fabrication of carbon nanotube emitters on the graphite rod and their high field emission performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Hoon Shin, Dong; Nam Yun, Ki; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Jin Lee, Cheol

    2014-01-27

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters with small emission area were fabricated on graphite rods using CNT films. By introducing the edge polishing process, the field emission performance of the CNT emitter was much improved, which showed a very high emission current of 6.34 mA (1.6 A/cm{sup 2}) under an applied electric field of 5.3 V/μm. It also indicates good long-term emission stability, which reveals no degradation in the emission current for 20 h. The emission patterns demonstrate uniform and well-focused electron beam spots. The enhanced field emission performance is mainly attributed to the suppressed edge emission after the edge polishing process.

  1. A Precision Dose Control Circuit for Maskless E-Beam Lithography With Massively Parallel Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Eliza, Sazia A.; Islam, Syed K; Rahman, Touhidur; Bull, Nora D; Blalock, Benjamin; Baylor, Larry R; Ericson, Milton Nance; Gardner, Walter L

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a highly accurate dose control circuit (DCC) for the emission of a desired number of electrons from vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) in a massively parallel maskless e-beam lithography system. The parasitic components within the VACNF device cause a premature termination of the electron emission, resulting in underexposure of the photoresist. In this paper, we compensate for the effects of the parasitic components and noise while reducing the area of the chip and achieving a precise count of emitted electrons from the VACNFs to obtain the optimum dose for the e-beam lithography.

  2. Enhanced Performance Assessment System (EPAS) for carbon sequestration.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifeng; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; McNeish, Jerry A.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Hadgu, Teklu; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2010-09-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is an option to mitigate impacts of atmospheric carbon emission. Numerous factors are important in determining the overall effectiveness of long-term geologic storage of carbon, including leakage rates, volume of storage available, and system costs. Recent efforts have been made to apply an existing probabilistic performance assessment (PA) methodology developed for deep nuclear waste geologic repositories to evaluate the effectiveness of subsurface carbon storage (Viswanathan et al., 2008; Stauffer et al., 2009). However, to address the most pressing management, regulatory, and scientific concerns with subsurface carbon storage (CS), the existing PA methodology and tools must be enhanced and upgraded. For example, in the evaluation of a nuclear waste repository, a PA model is essentially a forward model that samples input parameters and runs multiple realizations to estimate future consequences and determine important parameters driving the system performance. In the CS evaluation, however, a PA model must be able to run both forward and inverse calculations to support optimization of CO{sub 2} injection and real-time site monitoring as an integral part of the system design and operation. The monitoring data must be continually fused into the PA model through model inversion and parameter estimation. Model calculations will in turn guide the design of optimal monitoring and carbon-injection strategies (e.g., in terms of monitoring techniques, locations, and time intervals). Under the support of Laboratory-Directed Research & Development (LDRD), a late-start LDRD project was initiated in June of Fiscal Year 2010 to explore the concept of an enhanced performance assessment system (EPAS) for carbon sequestration and storage. In spite of the tight time constraints, significant progress has been made on the project: (1) Following the general PA methodology, a preliminary Feature, Event, and Process (FEP) analysis was performed for

  3. Behaviour of fibre-reinforced high-performance concrete in exterior beam-column joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthupriya, P.; Boobalan, S. C.; Vishnuram, B. G.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the effect of reinforced high performance concrete (HPC) in exterior beam-column joint with and without fibre under monotonic loading. In this experimental investigation, cross-diagonal bars have been provided at the joint for reducing the congestion of reinforcement in joints, and also M75 grade of concrete with optimum mix proportion of 10 % silica fume and 0.3 % glass fibre was used. Four exterior beam-column joint sub-assemblages were tested. The specimens were divided into two types based on the reinforcement detailing. Type A comprises two joint sub-assemblages with joint detailing as per construction code of practice in India (IS 456-2000), and Type B comprises two joint sub-assemblages with joint detailing as per ductile detailing code of practice in India (IS 13920-1993). In each group there was one specimen of control mix and the remaining one specimen of fibre-reinforced mix. All the test specimens were designed to satisfy the strong column-weak beam concept. The performances of specimens were compared with the control mix and the fibre-reinforced mix. The results show that exterior beam-column joint specimens with silica fume and glass fibre in the HPC mix showed better performance.

  4. Microdosimetric study for secondary neutrons in phantom produced by a 290 MeV/nucleon carbon beam.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Takada, Masashi; Onizuka, Yoshihiko; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Ishikawa, Masayori; Maeda, Naoko; Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2007-09-01

    Absorbed doses from main charged-particle beams and charged-particle fragments have been measured with high accuracy for particle therapy, but there are few reports for doses from neutron components produced as fragments. This study describes the measurements on neutron doses produced by carbon beams; microdosimetric distributions of secondary neutrons produced by 290 MeV/nucleon carbon beams have been measured by using a tissue equivalent proportional counter at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The microdosimetric distributions of the secondary neutron were measured on the distal and lateral faces of a body-simulated acrylic phantom (300 mm height x 300 mm width x 253 mm thickness). To confirm the dose measurements, the neutron energy spectra produced by incident carbon beams in the acrylic phantom were simulated by the particle and heavy ion transport code system. The absorbed doses obtained by multiplying the simulated neutron energy spectra with the kerma factor calculated by MCNPX agree with the corresponding experimental data fairly well. Downstream of the Bragg peak, the ratio of the neutron dose to the carbon dose at the Bragg peak was found to be a maximum of 1.4 x 10(-4) and the ratio of neutron dose was a maximum of 3.0 x 10(-7) at a lateral face of the acrylic phantom. The ratios of neutrons to charged particle fragments were 11% to 89% in the absorbed doses at the lateral and the distal faces of the acrylic phantom. We can conclude that the treatment dose will not induce serious secondary neutron effects at distances greater than 90 mm from the Bragg peak in carbon particle therapy.

  5. ATR signaling cooperates with ATM in the mechanism of low dose hypersensitivity induced by carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lian; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Yu, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Little work has been done on the mechanism of low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) and later appeared radioresistance (termed induced radioresistance (IRR)) after irradiation with medium and high linear energy transfer (LET) particles. The aim of this study was to find out whether ATR pathway is involved in the mechanism of HRS induced by high LET radiation. GM0639 cells and two ATM deficient/mutant cells, AT5BIVA and AT2KY were irradiated by carbon ion beam. Thymidine block technique was developed to enrich the G2-phase population. Radiation induced early G2/M checkpoint was quantitatively assess with dual-parameter flow cytometry by detecting the cells positive for phospho-histone H3. The involvement of ATR pathway in HRS/IRR response was detected with pretreatment of specific inhibitors prior to carbon ion beam. The link between the early G2/M checkpoint and HRS/IRR under carbon ion beam was first confirmed in GM0639 cells, through the enrichment of cell population in G2-phase or with Aurora kinase inhibitor that attenuates the transition from G2 to M phase. Interestingly, the early G2/M arrest could still be observed in ATM deficient/mutant cells with an effect of ATR signaling, which was discovered to function in an LET-dependent manner, even as low as 0.2Gy for carbon ion radiation. The involvement of ATR pathway in heavy particles induced HRS/IRR was determined with the specific ATR inhibitor in GM0639 cells, which affected the HRS/IRR occurrence similarly as ATM inhibitor. These data demonstrate that ATR pathway may cooperate with ATM in the mechanism of low dose hypersensitivity induced by carbon ion beam.

  6. Performance of a Medium-Size Area nGEM Detector for Neutron Beam Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Albani, G.; Muraro, A.; Claps, G.; Cavenago, M.; Grosso, G.; Murtas, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    Fast neutron detectors with a sub-centimetric space resolution are required in order to qualify neutron beams in applications related to magnetically-controlled nuclear fusion plasmas and to spallation sources. Based on the results obtained with small area prototypes, the first medium-size (20 x 35.2 cm2 active area) nGEM detector has been realized for both the CNESM diagnostic system of the SPIDER NBI prototype for ITER and as a beam monitor for fast neutrons beam lines at spallation sources, too. The nGEM is a Triple GEM gaseous detector equipped with polyethylene layers used to convert fast neutrons into recoil protons through the elastic scattering process. This paper describes the performance of the medium-size nGEM detector tested at the VESUVIO beam line of the ISIS spallation source. Being this detector the actual largest area fast neutron detector based on the GEM technology, particular attention was paid in the study of detector response in different points over the active area. Measurements of GEM counting rate (both as a function of VGEM and of time) and of the capability of the detector to reconstruct the beam in different positions are presented. This detector serves as a basis for the realization of an even larger area detector that will be used in the MITICA NBI prototype for ITER that represents the evolution of SPIDER.

  7. Improvement of capacitive performances of symmetric carbon/carbon supercapacitors by addition of nanostructured polypyrrole powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhaddad, L.; Gamby, J.; Makhloufi, L.; Pailleret, A.; Pillier, F.; Takenouti, H.

    2016-03-01

    A nanostructured polypyrrole powder was synthesized in a previous work from the oxidation of pyrrole by a nanostructured MnO2 powder used simultaneously as an oxidizing agent and a sacrificial template in a redox heterogeneous mechanism. In this study, this original PPy powder was used as an active additive material with different ratio in carbon/carbon symmetrical supercapacitors whose performances were studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using a Swagelok-type cell. From the EIS spectra, the complex capacitance was extracted using a model involving two Cole-Cole type complex capacitances linked in series. The specific capacitance values evaluated by EIS and cyclic voltammetry are in a good agreement between them. The results show that the addition of nanostructured polypyrrole powder improves significantly the specific capacitance of the carbon electrode and consequently the performances of carbon/carbon supercapacitors. The original and versatile synthesis method used to produce this polypyrrole powder appears to be attractive for large scale production of promising additives for electrode materials of supercapacitors.

  8. Performance evaluation of nonlinear energy harvesting with magnetically coupled dual beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chunbo; Tang, Lihua; Qin, Weiyang

    2017-04-01

    To enhance the output power and broaden the operation bandwidth of vibration energy harvesters (VEH), nonlinear two degree-of-freedom (DOF) energy harvesters have attracted wide attention recently. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a nonlinear VEH with magnetically coupled dual beams and compare it with the typical Duffing-type VEH to find the advantages and drawbacks of this nonlinear 2-DOF VEH. First, based on the lumped parameter model, the characteristics of potential energy shapes and static equilibriums are analyzed. It is noted that the dual beam configuration is much easy to be transformed from a mono-stable state into a bi-stable state when the repulsive magnet force increases. Based on the equilibrium positions and different kinds of nonlinearities, four nonlinearity regimes are determined. Second, the performance of 1-DOF and 2-DOF configurations are compared respectively in these four nonlinearity regimes by simulating the forward sweep responses of these two nonlinear VEHs under different acceleration levels. Several meaningful conclusions are obtained. First, the main alternative to enlarge the operation bandwidth for dual-beam configuration is chaotic oscillation, in which two beams jump between two stable positions chaotically. However, the large-amplitude periodic oscillations, such as inter-well oscillation, cannot take place in both piezoelectric and parasitic beams at the same time. Generally speaking, both of the magnetically coupled dual-beam energy harvester and Duffingtype energy harvester, have their own advantages and disadvantages, while given a large enough base excitation, the maximum voltages of these two systems are almost the same in all these four regimes.

  9. Performance of the double multilayer monochromator on the NSLS wiggler beam line X25

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Lonny E.; Yin Zhijian; Dierker, Steven B.; Dufresne, Eric; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Tsui, Ophelia K. C.; Burley, Stephen K.; Shu Fong; Xie Xiaoling; Capel, Malcolm S.; Sweet, Robert M.

    1997-07-01

    A tunable, double multilayer x-ray monochromator has recently been implemented on the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X25 wiggler beam line. It is based on a parallel pair of tungsten-boron-carbide multilayer films grown on silicon substrates and purchased from Osmic, Inc. of Troy, Michigan, USA. It acts as an optional alternative to the conventional double silicon crystal monochromator, and uses the same alignment mechanism. Two other NSLS beam lines also have had this kind of monochromator installed recently, following the lead of the NSLS X20C IBM/MIT beam line which has used a double multilayer monochromator for several years. Owing to the 100 times broader bandwidth of a multilayer x-ray monochromator, compared with a silicon monochromator, the multilayer monochromator has the obvious advantage of delivering 100 times the flux of a silicon monochromator, and thereby makes more efficient use of the continuous synchrotron radiation spectrum, yet preserves the narrow collimation of the incident synchrotron beam. In particular, multilayer x-ray bandwidths, on the order of 1%, are well-matched to x-ray undulator linewidths. Performance results for the X25 multilayer monochromator are presented, comparing it with the silicon monochromator. Of note is its short- and long-term performance as an x-ray monochromator delivering the brightness of the wiggler source in the presence of the high-power white beam. Detailed measurements of its spatial beam profile and wavelength dispersion have been made, and it is shown how its resolution could be improved when desired. Finally, its peculiar, anisotropic resolution function in reciprocal space, and its bearing upon x-ray crystallography and scattering experiments, will be discussed, and highlighted by the results of a protein crystallography experiment.

  10. Performance of polyacrylonitrile-carbon nanotubes composite on carbon cloth as electrode material for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Il; Lee, Jae-Wook; Roh, Sung-Hee

    2011-02-01

    The performance of carbon nanotubes composite-modified carbon cloth electrodes in two-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) was investigated. The electrode modified with polyacrylonitrile-carbon nanotubes (PAN-CNTs) composite showed better electrochemical performance than that of plain carbon cloth. The MFC with the composite-modified anode containing 5 mg/cm2 PAN-CNTs exhibited a maximum power density of 480 mW/m2.

  11. Effects of carbon/hardmask interactions on hardmask performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neef, Charles J.; Smith, Brian; James, Chris; Zhu, Zhimin; Weigand, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Interactions between the silicon hardmask and the photoresist have received considerable attention for utilization of these materials in a trilayer scheme. In contrast, the interactions between the carbon layer and the silicon hardmask have received little or no consideration. In this paper, we present the effects of these interactions on the performance of the silicon hardmask. Poor interactions were observed to result in a more hydrophilic surface and poor lithographic performance of the silicon hardmask. However, beneficial interactions between the carbon layer and the silicon hardmask resulted in a silicon film that was denser with a hydrophobic surface. The resulting denser film had a slower CF4 etch rate and produced square, clean profiles.

  12. Performance of the beam chamber vacuum system of K = 500 cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Pal, Gautam; DuttaGupta, Anjan; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-07-01

    The beam chamber of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata's K = 500 superconducting cyclotron is pumped by liquid helium cooled cryopanel with liquid nitrogen cooled radiation shield. Performance of the vacuum system was evaluated by cooling the cryopanel assembly with liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. Direct measurement of beam chamber pressure is quite difficult because of space restrictions and the presence of high magnetic field. Pressure gauges were placed away from the beam chamber. The beam chamber pressure was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation software for vacuum system and compared with measurements. The details of the vacuum system, measurements, and estimation of pressure of the beam chamber are described in this paper.

  13. Evaluation of the Machine Performance Check application for TrueBeam Linac.

    PubMed

    Clivio, Alessandro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Rose, Steven; Nicolini, Giorgia; Belosi, Maria F; Cozzi, Luca; Baltes, Christof; Fogliata, Antonella

    2015-04-21

    Machine Performance Check (MPC) is an application to verify geometry and beam performances of TrueBeam Linacs, through automated checks based on their kV-MV imaging systems. In this study, preliminary tests with MPC were analyzed using all photon beam energies of our TrueBeam, comparing whenever possible with external independent checks. Data acquisition comprises a series of 39 images (12 with kV and 27 with MV detector) acquired at predefined positions without and with the IsoCal phantom in the beam, and with particular MLC pattern settings. MPC performs geometric and dosimetric checks. The geometric checks intend to test the treatment isocenter size and its coincidence with imaging devices, the positioning accuracy of the imaging systems, the collimator, the gantry, the jaws, the MLC leaves and the couch position. The dosimetric checks: refer to a reference MV image and give the beam output, uniformity and center change relative to the reference. MPC data were acquired during 10 repetitions on different consecutive days. Alternative independent checks were performed. Geometric: routine mechanical tests, Winston-Lutz test for treatment isocenter radius. Dosimetric: the 2D array StarCheck (PTW) was used just after the MPC data acquisition. Results were analyzed for 6, 10, 15 MV flattened, and 6, 10 MV FFF beams. Geometric checks: treatment isocenter was between 0.31 ± 0.01 mm and 0.42 ± 0.02 mm with MPC, compared to 0.27 ± 0.01 mm averaged on all energies with the Winston-Lutz test. Coincidence of kV and MV imaging isocenters was within 0.36 ± 0.0 and 0.43 ± 0.06 mm, respectively (0.4 ± 0.1 mm with external tests). Positioning accuracy of MLC was within 0.5 mm; accuracy of jaws was 0.04 ± 0.02, 0.10 ± 0.05, -1.01 ± 0.03, 0.92 ± 0.04 mm for X1, X2, Y1, Y2 jaws, respectively, with MPC. Dosimetric tests: the output stability relative to the baseline was in average 0.15 ± 0.07% for MPC to compare with 0.3 ± 0.2% with the independent measurement. MPC proved

  14. The D{O} intercryostat detector: Design considerations, test beam studies and initial performance

    SciTech Connect

    Geld, T.L.

    1993-12-31

    Reported herein are the development, test beam studies and initial performance results of a novel scientific device, the Intercryostat Detector (ICD). The ICD is a subsystem in the D{O} Experiment, a major high energy physics experiment running at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory`s p{bar p} Tevatron collider. The D{O} detector is designed to study fundamental particle interactions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. The ICD plays an integral role in these studies by significantly improving the ability of D{O} to measure the energy of particle showers in a critical region of the detector. The ICD uses a layer of scintillator to sample particle showers as they pass through the detector. Its readout system is a unique design of wavelength shifting fiber bundles embedded in the scintillator, which we specifically developed for use in the ICD. During its development, we studied the ICD in a test beam. The inclusion of the Intercryostat Detector into the test beam run represents the first use of a scintillator sampling device operating in a liquid argon environment. The feasibility studies performed to develop a modified version of the ICD to operate in liquid argon are discussed. The test beam project was critical to fully exploit the ability of the ICD to improve the D{O} detector performance. The specific calibration constants for the intercryostat detectors, used to relate the detector response to the actual energy deposition in the detector, are determined from the test beam data and are presented. In addition, comparisons are made to Monte Carlo simulation data and the impact of the ICD on the D{O} detector performance is discussed.

  15. The effect of Ar neutral beam treatment of screen-printed carbon nanotubes for enhanced field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kyung, Se Jin; Park, Jae Beom; Park, Byung Jae; Min, Kyung Seok; Lee, June Hee; Yeom, Geun Young; Shin, Yong Sook; Park, Chong Yun

    2007-04-15

    This study examined the effectiveness of an Ar neutral beam as a surface treatment for improving the field emission properties of screen-printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A short period of the neutral beam treatment on tape-activated CNTs enhanced the emission properties of the CNTs, showing a decrease in the turn-on field and an increase in the number of emission sites. The neutral beam treatment appeared to render the CNT surfaces more actively by exposing more CNTs from the CNT paste without cutting or kinking the already exposed long CNT emitters. The treated CNTs emitted more electrons than the CNTs treated using other methods. When the field emission properties were measured after the neutral beam treatment, the turn-on field decreased from 1.65 to 0.60 V/{mu}m and the emission field at 1 mA/cm{sup 2} decreased from 3.10 to 2.41 V/{mu}m. After the neutral beam treatment for 10 s, there was an improvement in the stability of the emission current at a constant electric field. It is expected that the neutral beam treatment introduced in this study will provide an easy way of improving the emission intensity and stability of screen-printed CNT emitters.

  16. Performance predictions for a laser-intensified thermal beam for use in high-resolution focused-ion-beam instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, S. H. W.; ten Haaf, G.; Notermans, R. P. M. J. W.; Debernardi, N.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Luiten, O. J.; Vredenbregt, E. J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Photoionization of a laser-cooled and compressed atomic beam from a high-flux thermal source can be used to create a high-brightness ion beam for use in focused-ion-beam instruments. Here we show using calculations and Doppler cooling simulations that an atomic rubidium beam with an equivalent brightness of 2.1 ×107 A /(m 2 sr eV ) can be created using a compact 5 cm long two-dimensional magneto-optical compressor. If this can be conserved during the photoionization process, this leads to an ion beam brightness an order of magnitude higher than produced by a liquid metal ion source. The source is also capable of producing a flux of 6.2 ×109 s -1 that results in a substantial beam current of 1 nA once fully ionized.

  17. Conversion from dose-to-graphite to dose-to-water in an 80 MeV/A carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Rossomme, S; Palmans, H; Shipley, D; Thomas, R; Lee, N; Romano, F; Cirrone, P; Cuttone, G; Bertrand, D; Vynckier, S

    2013-08-21

    Based on experiments and numerical simulations, a study is carried out pertaining to the conversion of dose-to-graphite to dose-to-water in a carbon ion beam. This conversion is needed to establish graphite calorimeters as primary standards of absorbed dose in these beams. It is governed by the water-to-graphite mass collision stopping power ratio and fluence correction factors, which depend on the particle fluence distributions in each of the two media. The paper focuses on the experimental and numerical determination of this fluence correction factor for an 80 MeV/A carbon ion beam. Measurements have been performed in the nuclear physics laboratory INFN-LNS in Catania (Sicily, Italy). The numerical simulations have been made with a Geant4 Monte Carlo code through the GATE simulation platform. The experimental data are in good agreement with the simulated results for the fluence correction factors and are found to be close to unity. The experimental values increase with depth reaching 1.010 before the Bragg peak region. They have been determined with an uncertainty of 0.25%. Different numerical results are obtained depending on the level of approximation made in calculating the fluence correction factors. When considering carbon ions only, the difference between measured and calculated values is maximal just before the Bragg peak, but its value is less than 1.005. The numerical value is close to unity at the surface and increases to 1.005 near the Bragg peak. When the fluence of all charged particles is considered, the fluence correction factors are lower than unity at the surface and increase with depth up to 1.025 before the Bragg peak. Besides carbon ions, secondary particles created due to nuclear interactions have to be included in the analysis: boron ions ((10)B and (11)B), beryllium ions ((7)Be), alpha particles and protons. At the conclusion of this work, we have the conversion of dose-to-graphite to dose-to-water to apply to the response of a graphite

  18. Calibration and performance of a secondary emission chamber as a beam intensity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Sivertz, M.; Chiang, I-H,; Rusek, A.

    2011-03-28

    We report on a study of the behavior of a secondary emission chamber (SEC). We show the dependence of the SEC signal on the charge and velocity of the primary beam for beams of protons, and heavy ions including Helium, Neon, Chlorine and Iron. We fill the SEC with a selection of different gases including Hydrogen, Helium, Nitrogen, Argon, and air, studying the SEC response when it is acting as an ion chamber. We also investigate the behavior of the SEC at intermediate pressures between 10{sup -8} torr and atmospheric pressure. The SEC uses thin conducting foils as the source and collector of electrons in a vacuum chamber. When charged particles traverse the vacuum chamber, they pass through a series of thin conducting foils, alternating anode and cathode. Ionization produced in the cathode foils travels across the intervening gap due to an applied high voltage and is collected on the anode foils. Electron production is very inefficient because most of the ionization in the foils remains trapped within the foil due to the short range of most delta-rays and the work function of the foil. It is this inefficiency that allows the SEC to operate at high dose rates and short pulse duration where the standard ion chambers cannot function reliably. The SEC was placed in the NSRL ion beam to receive a variety of heavy ion beams under different beam conditions. We used these ion beams to study the response of the SEC to different species of heavy ion, comparing with proton beams. We studied the response to beam of different energies, and as a function of different counting rate. We compared the behaviour of the SEC when operating under positive and negative high voltage. The SEC can operate as an ion chamber if it is filled with gas. We measured the response of the SEC when filled with a variety of gases, from Hydrogen to Helium, Nitrogen, Argon and air. The performance of the SEC as an ion chamber is compared with the standard NSRL ion chamber, QC3. By evacuating the SEC and

  19. Enhanced field emission from compound emitters of carbon nanotubes and ZnO tetrapods by electron beam bombardment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lei; Zhang, Xiaobing; Lou, Chaogang; Zhao, Zhiwei; Jing, Chen; Wang, Baoping

    2011-06-01

    The enhancement of field emission from compound emitters of carbon nanotubes and ZnO tetrapods by the electron beam bombardment is reported. After 20 minutes electron bombardment with 6 keV energy, a few bird-nest micro structures are formed in the compound emitters array. As the simulation results shown, the electric field and field emission current density at the tip of ZnO tetrapod are increased due to the influences of these bird-nest micro structures. From the measurement of the field emission performance, it can be seen that the turn-on electric field and threshold electric field of the field emitter array decrease to 0.4 V/microm and 2.4 V/microm respectively. They have decreased 62% and 15% after the electron bombardment. After the electron bombardment, the emission sites density is increased. The field emission images show that the uniformity of field emission has been improved obviously after the proper electron bombardment. The methodology proposed in this paper has a promising application in the field emission devices.

  20. Mutational effects of γ-rays and carbon ion beams on Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Nozawa, Shigeki; Hase, Yoshihiro; Narumi, Issay; Hidema, Jun; Sakamoto, Ayako N

    2013-11-01

    To assess the mutational effects of radiation on vigorously proliferating plant tissue, the mutation spectrum was analyzed with Arabidopsis seedlings using the plasmid-rescue method. Transgenic plants containing the Escherichia coli rpsL gene were irradiated with γ-rays and carbon ion beams (320-MeV (12)C(6+)), and mutations in the rpsL gene were analyzed. Mutant frequency increased significantly following irradiation by γ-rays, but not by 320-MeV (12)C(6+). Mutation spectra showed that both radiations increased the frequency of frameshifts and other mutations, including deletions and insertions, but only γ-rays increased the frequency of total base substitutions. These results suggest that the type of DNA lesions which cause base substitutions were less often induced by 320-MeV (12)C(6+) than by γ-rays in Arabidopsis seedlings. Furthermore, γ-rays never increased the frequencies of G:C to T:A or A:T to C:G transversions, which are caused by oxidized guanine; 320-MeV (12)C(6+), however, produced a slight increase in both transversions. Instead, γ-rays produced a significant increase in the frequency of G:C to A:T transitions. These results suggest that 8-oxoguanine has little effect on mutagenesis in Arabidopsis cells.

  1. Fast dose analysis of movement effects during treatments with scanned proton and carbon-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, A.; Varasteh Anvar, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.; Attili, A.; Donetti, M.; Marchetto, F.; Mas Milian, F.; Ciocca, M.; Russo, G.; Sacchi, R.; Cirio, R.

    2017-01-01

    Charged particle therapy delivered using scanned pencil beams shows the potential to produce better dose conformity than conventional radiotherapy, although the dose distributions are more sensitive to anatomical changes and patient motion. Therefore, the introduction of engines to monitor the dose as it is being delivered is highly desirable, in order to enhance the development of adaptive treatment techniques in hadrontherapy. A tool for fast dose distributions analysis is presented, which integrates on GPU a Fast Forward Planning, a Fast Image Deformation algorithm, a fast computation of Gamma-Index and Dose-Volume Histogram. The tool is being interfaced with the Dose Delivery System and the Optical Tracking System of a synchrotron-based facility to investigate the feasibility to quantify, spill by spill, the effects of organ movements on dose distributions during treatment deliveries with protons and carbon-ions. The dose calculation and comparison times for a patient treated with protons on a 61.3 cm3 planning target volume, a CT matrix of 512x512x125 voxels, and a computation matrix of 170x170x125 voxels are within 1 s per spill. In terms of accuracy, the absolute dose differences compared with benchmarked Treatment Planning System results are negligible (<10-4 Gy).

  2. Increased tensile strength of carbon nanotube yarns and sheets through chemical modification and electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sandi G; Williams, Tiffany S; Baker, James S; Solá, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S; Wilmoth, Nathan G; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A

    2014-05-14

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of CNT forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated into that of sheets and yarns, where the bulk material strength is limited by intertube electrostatic attractions and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess postprocessing of CNT sheets and yarns to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small-molecule functionalization and electron-beam irradiation were evaluated as means to enhance the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the bulk CNT materials. Mechanical testing revealed a 57% increase in tensile strength of CNT sheets upon functionalization compared with unfunctionalized sheets, while an additional 48% increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated. Similarly, small-molecule functionalization increased tensile strength of yarn by up to 25%, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88% beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  3. Mutational effects of γ-rays and carbon ion beams on Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Nozawa, Shigeki; Hase, Yoshihiro; Narumi, Issay; Hidema, Jun; Sakamoto, Ayako N.

    2013-01-01

    To assess the mutational effects of radiation on vigorously proliferating plant tissue, the mutation spectrum was analyzed with Arabidopsis seedlings using the plasmid-rescue method. Transgenic plants containing the Escherichia coli rpsL gene were irradiated with γ-rays and carbon ion beams (320-MeV 12C6+), and mutations in the rpsL gene were analyzed. Mutant frequency increased significantly following irradiation by γ-rays, but not by 320-MeV 12C6+. Mutation spectra showed that both radiations increased the frequency of frameshifts and other mutations, including deletions and insertions, but only γ-rays increased the frequency of total base substitutions. These results suggest that the type of DNA lesions which cause base substitutions were less often induced by 320-MeV 12C6+ than by γ-rays in Arabidopsis seedlings. Furthermore, γ-rays never increased the frequencies of G:C to T:A or A:T to C:G transversions, which are caused by oxidized guanine; 320-MeV 12C6+, however, produced a slight increase in both transversions. Instead, γ-rays produced a significant increase in the frequency of G:C to A:T transitions. These results suggest that 8-oxoguanine has little effect on mutagenesis in Arabidopsis cells. PMID:23728320

  4. The effect of the iBEAM Evo carbon fiber tabletop on skin sparing.

    PubMed

    Simpson, John B; Godwin, Guy A

    2011-01-01

    Replicating the attenuation properties of the treatment tabletop are of primary importance for accurate treatment planning; however, the effect of the tabletop on the skin-sparing properties of x-rays can be overlooked. Under some conditions, the reaction of skin to the radiation can be so serious as to be the dose-limiting organ for radiotherapy treatment. Hence, an understanding of the magnitude of the reduction in skin sparing is important. Because of the development of image-guided radiotherapy, modern tabletops have been developed without the use of metal supports that otherwise provided the necessary level of rigidity. Rigidity is instead provided by compressed foam within a carbon-fiber shell, which, although it provides artefact-free imaging and high levels of rigidity, has an adverse affect on the dose in the build-up region. Representative of this type is the iBEAM evo tabletop, whose effect on the skin dose was determined at 6-MV, 10-MV, and 18-MV x-rays. Skin dose was found to increase by 60-70% owing to the tabletop, with the effect increasing with field size and decreasing with energy. By considering an endpoint of erythema, a radiobiological advantage of selecting 10 MV over 6 MV for applicable treatments was demonstrated.

  5. Fatigue and post-fatigue performance of Fabry-Perot FOS installed on CFRP-strengthened RC-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Catalin; Labossiere, Pierre; Proulx, Jean

    2004-07-01

    There is a growing need for built-in monitoring systems for civil engineering infrastructures, due to problems such as increasing traffic loads and rising costs of maintenance and repair. Fibre optic sensors (FOS), capable of reading various parameters are promising candidates for life-long health monitoring of these structures. However, since FOS have only been introduced recently into the field of structural monitoring, their acceptance and widespread implementation will be conditioned by their durability under severe climatic and loading conditions. This paper reports on the performance of strain extrinsic FOS attached to carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) plates used to strengthen concrete structures. The specimens tested in this project are reinforced concrete (RC) beams with an additional external CFRP reinforcement. The FOS-instrumented beams were first subjected to fatigue loading for various numbers of cycles and load amplitudes. Then, they were tested monotonically to failure under four-point-bending. The test results provide an insight on the fatigue and post-fatigue behaviour of FOS used for monitoring reinforced concrete structures.

  6. An Overview of Brazilian Developments in Beamed Energy Aerospace Propulsion and Vehicle Performance Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-01

    Beamed energy propulsion and beamed energy vehicle performance control concepts are equally promising and challenging. In Brazil, the two concepts are being currently investigated at the Prof Henry T Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics, of the Institute for Advanced Studies—IEAv, in collaboration with the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute—RPI, Troy, NY, and the United States Air force Research Laboratory-AFRL. Until recently, only laser energy addition for hypersonic flow control was being investigated at the Laboratory using a 0.3 m nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T2, and two 7 joule CO2 TEA lasers. Flow visualization, model pressure and heat flux measurements of the laser energy addition perturbed flow around a model were produced as a result of this joint IEAv-RPI investigation. Presently, with the participation of AFRL and the newly commissioned 0.6 m. nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T3, a more ambitious project is underway. Two 400 Joule Lumonics 620 CO2 TEA lasers will deliver a 20 cm X 25 cm propulsive laser beam to a complete laser propelled air breather/rocket hypersonic engine, located inside T3 test section. Schlieren photographs of the flow inside de engine as well as surface and heat flux measurements will be performed for free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25. The present paper discusses past, present and future Brazilian activities on beamed energy propulsion and related technologies.

  7. An Overview of Brazilian Developments in Beamed Energy Aerospace Propulsion and Vehicle Performance Control

    SciTech Connect

    Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-28

    Beamed energy propulsion and beamed energy vehicle performance control concepts are equally promising and challenging. In Brazil, the two concepts are being currently investigated at the Prof Henry T Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics, of the Institute for Advanced Studies--IEAv, in collaboration with the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute--RPI, Troy, NY, and the United States Air force Research Laboratory-AFRL. Until recently, only laser energy addition for hypersonic flow control was being investigated at the Laboratory using a 0.3 m nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T2, and two 7 joule CO{sub 2} TEA lasers. Flow visualization, model pressure and heat flux measurements of the laser energy addition perturbed flow around a model were produced as a result of this joint IEAv-RPI investigation. Presently, with the participation of AFRL and the newly commissioned 0.6 m. nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T3, a more ambitious project is underway. Two 400 Joule Lumonics 620 CO{sub 2} TEA lasers will deliver a 20 cm X 25 cm propulsive laser beam to a complete laser propelled air breather/rocket hypersonic engine, located inside T3 test section. Schlieren photographs of the flow inside de engine as well as surface and heat flux measurements will be performed for free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25. The present paper discusses past, present and future Brazilian activities on beamed energy propulsion and related technologies.

  8. Performance of a carbon nanotube field emission electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; King, Todd T.; Bis, Rachael A.; Jones, Hollis H.; Herrero, Federico; Lynch, Bernard A.; Roman, Patrick; Mahaffy, Paul

    2007-04-01

    A cold cathode field emission electron gun (e-gun) based on a patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) film has been fabricated for use in a miniaturized reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOF MS), with future applications in other charged particle spectrometers, and performance of the CNT e-gun has been evaluated. A thermionic electron gun has also been fabricated and evaluated in parallel and its performance is used as a benchmark in the evaluation of our CNT e-gun. Implications for future improvements and integration into the RTOF MS are discussed.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation for calculation of fragments produced by 400 MeV/u carbon ion beam in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Shu-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulation was an important approach to obtain accurate characteristics of radiotherapy. In this work, a 400 MeV/u carbon ion beam incident on water phantom was simulated with Gate/Geant4 tools. The authors obtained the dose distributions of H, He, Li, Be, B, C and their isotopes in water phantom, and drew a conclusion that the dose of 11C was the main reason of causing the embossment of total dose curve around 252 mm depth. The authors also studied detailedly the dose contribution distributions, yield distributions and average energy distributions of all kinds of fragments. The information of four distributions was very meaningful for understanding the effect of fragments in carbon ion beam radiotherapy. The method of this simulation was easy to extend. For example, for obtaining a special result, we may change the particle energy, particle type, target material, target geometry, physics process, detector, etc.

  10. Advanced carbon-based material C{sub 60} modification using partially ionized cluster and energetic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuancheng; Ren Zhongmin; Ning Zhifeng; Xu Ning; Li Fuming

    1997-06-20

    Two processes have been undertaken using Partially ionized cluster deposition (PICBD) and energetic ion bombardment beams deposition (IBD) respectively. C{sub 60} films deposited by PICBD at V=0 and 65 V, which result in highly textured close-packed structure in orientation (110) and being more polycrystalline respectively, the resistance of C{sub 60} films to oxygen diffusion contamination will be improved. In the case of PICBD, the ionized C{sub 60} soccer-balls molecules in the evaporation beams will be fragmented in collision with the substrate under the elevated accelerating fields Va. As a new synthetic IBD processing, two low energy (400 and 1000 eV) nitrogen ion beams have been used to bombard C{sub 60} films to synthesize the carbon nitride films.

  11. Multifunctional structural supercapacitor composites based on carbon aerogel modified high performance carbon fiber fabric.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hui; Kucernak, Anthony R; Greenhalgh, Emile S; Bismarck, Alexander; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2013-07-10

    A novel multifunctional material has been designed to provide excellent mechanical properties while possessing a high electrochemical surface area suitable for electrochemical energy storage: structural carbon fiber fabrics are embedded in a continuous network of carbon aerogel (CAG) to form a coherent but porous monolith. The CAG-modification process was found to be scalable and to be compatible with a range of carbon fiber fabrics with different surface properties. The incorporation of CAG significantly increased the surface area of carbon fiber fabrics, and hence the electrochemical performance, by around 100-fold, resulting in a CAG-normalized specific electrode capacitance of around 62 F g(-1), determined by cyclic voltammetry in an aqueous electrolyte. Using an ionic liquid (IL) electrolyte, the estimated energy density increased from 0.003 to 1 Wh kg(-1), after introducing the CAG into the carbon fiber fabric. 'Proof-of-concept' multifunctional structural supercapacitor devices were fabricated using an IL-modified solid-state polymer electrolyte as a multifunctional matrix to provide both ionic transport and physical support for the primary fibers. Two CAG-impregnated carbon fabrics were sandwiched around an insulating separator to form a functioning structural electrochemical double layer capacitor composite. The CAG-modification not only improved the electrochemical surface area, but also reinforced the polymer matrix surrounding the primary fibers, leading to dramatic improvements in the matrix-dominated composite properties. Increases in in-plane shear strength and modulus, of up to 4.5-fold, were observed, demonstrating that CAG-modified structural carbon fiber fabrics have promise in both pure structural and multifunctional energy storage applications.

  12. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements in the extreme ultraviolet region of central carbon concentrations during high power neutral beam heating in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Ramsey, A.T.; Synakowski, E.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Taylor, G.; Valanju, P.M. . Plasma Physics Lab.; Texas Univ., Austin, TX . Fusion Research Center)

    1989-09-01

    The carbon concentration in the central region of TFTR discharges with high power neutral beam heating has been measured by charge-extracted recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) of the C{sup +5} n = 3--4 transition in the extreme ultraviolet region. The carbon concentrations were deduced from absolute measurements of the line brightness using a calculation of the beam attenuation and the appropriate cascade-corrected line excitation rates. As a result of the high ion temperatures in most of the discharges, the contribution of beam halo neutrals to the line brightness was significant and therefore had to be included in the modeling of the data. Carbon concentrations have been measured in discharges with I{sub p} = 1.0-1.6 MA and beam power in the range of 2.6-30 MW, including a number of supershots. The results are in good agreement with carbon concentrations deduced from the visible bremsstrahlung Z{sub eff} and metallic impurity concentrations measured by x-ray pulse-height analysis, demonstrating the reliability of the atomic rates used in the beam attenuation and line excitation calculations. Carbon is the dominant impurity species in these discharges; the oxygen concentration measured via CXRS in a high beam power case was 0.0006 of n{sub e}, compard to 0.04 for carbon. Trends with I{sub p} and beam power in the carbon concentration and the inferred deuteron concentration are presented. The carbon concentration is independent of I{sub p} and decreases from 0.13 at 2.6 MW beam power to 0.04 at 30 MW, while the deuteron concentration increases from 0.25 to 0.75 over the same range of beam power. These changes are primarily the result of beam particle fueling, as the carbon density did not vary significantly with beam power. The time evolutions of the carbon and deuteron concentrations during two high power beam pulses, one which exhibited a carbon bloom and one which did not, are compared. 30 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Performance of CVD and CVR coated carbon-carbon in high temperature hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. W.; Barletta, R. E.; Svandrlik, J.; Vanier, P. E.

    As a part of the component development process for the particle bed reactor (PBR), it is necessary to develop coatings which will be time and temperature stable at extremely high temperatures in flowing hydrogen. These coatings must protect the underlying carbon structure from attack by the hydrogen coolant. Degradation which causes small changes in the reactor component, e.g. hole diameter in the hot frit, can have a profound effect on operation. The ability of a component to withstand repeated temperature cycles is also a coating development issue. Coatings which crack or spall under these conditions would be unacceptable. While refractory carbides appear to be the coating material of choice for carbon substrates being used in PBR components, the method of applying these coatings can have a large effect on their performance. Two deposition processes for these refractory carbides, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and chemical vapor reaction (CVR), have been evaluated. Screening tests for these coatings consisted of testing of coated 2-D and 3-D weave carbon-carbon in flowing hot hydrogen at one atmosphere. Carbon loss from these samples was measured as a function of time. Exposure temperatures up to 3,000 K were used, and samples were exposed in a cyclical fashion cooling to room temperature between exposures. The results of these measurements are presented along with an evaluation of the relative merits of CVR and CVD coatings for this application.

  14. Effects of carbon-ion beams on human pancreatic cancer cell lines that differ in genetic status.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshifumi; Asano, Takehide; Kenmochi, Takashi; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi; Ochiai, Takenori

    2004-02-01

    The relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of carbon-ion beams at 3 different linear energy transfer (LET) values (13, 50, and 80 keV/microm) accelerated by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba on human pancreatic cancer cell lines differing in genetic status was determined. The RBE values were calculated as D10, the dose (Gy) required to reduce the surviving fraction to 10%, relative to X-rays. We also investigated apoptosis and the relationship between D10 and the cell cycle checkpoint using morphologic examination and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. The RBE values calculated by the D10 values ranged from 1.16 to 1.77 for the 13-keV/microm beam and from 1.83 to 2.46 for the 80-keV/microm beam. A correlation between the D10 values of each cell line and intensity of G2/M arrest was observed. In contrast, LET values did not clearly correlate with induction of apoptosis. These results suggest that carbon-ion beam therapy is a promising modality. Elucidation of the mechanisms of G2/M arrest and apoptosis may provide clues to enhancing the effects of radiation on pancreatic cancer.

  15. Pyrolytic-carbon coating in carbon nanotube foams for better performance in supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Nanfei; Yildiz, Ozkan; Pan, Qin; Zhu, Jiadeng; Zhang, Xiangwu; Bradford, Philip D.; Gao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, the wide-spread adoption of supercapacitors has been hindered by their inferior energy density to that of batteries. Here we report the use of our pyrolytic-carbon-coated carbon nanotube foams as lightweight, compressible, porous, and highly conductive current collectors in supercapacitors, which are infiltrated with chemically-reduced graphene oxide and later compressed via mechanical and capillary forces to generate the active electrodes. The pyrolytic carbon coatings, introduced by chemical vapor infiltration, wrap around the CNT junctions and increase the surface roughness. When active materials are infiltrated, the pyrolytic-carbon coatings help prevent the π-stacking, enlarge the accessible surface area, and increase the electrical conductivity of the scaffold. Our best-performing device offers 48% and 57% higher gravimetric energy and power density, 14% and 23% higher volumetric energy and power density, respectively, and two times higher knee frequency, than the device with commercial current collectors, while the "true-performance metrics" are strictly followed in our measurements. We have further clarified the solution resistance, charge transfer resistance/capacitance, double-layer capacitance, and Warburg resistance in our system via comprehensive impedance analysis, which will shed light on the design and optimization of similar systems.

  16. Electrochemical performance of Si anode modified with carbonized gelatin binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying; Mu, Daobin; Chen, Shi; Wu, Borong; Cheng, Kailin; Li, Luyu; Wu, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Gelatin is alternatively adopted as the binder to modify Si anode coupling with its carbonization treatment. The binder can provide good bonding and uniform dispersion of the particles besides its environmental benignancy. Importantly, the carbonized binder containing nitrogen will be advantageous to the electrical conductivity of the electrode. In addition, some spaces are formed in the electrode due to the decomposition and shrinkage of the gelatin binder during heat-treatment, which may facilitate electrolyte penetration and accommodate volume change during cycling. All these merits make contribution to the good electrochemical performance of the modified Si electrode. It exhibits a reversible capacity of 990.3 mA h g-1 after 70 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g-1 and 904 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles at 400 mA g-1.

  17. Design and performance of beam test electronics for the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Bryan, W.L.; Emery, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The system architecture and test results of the custom circuits and beam test system for the Multiplicity-Vertex Detector (MVD) for the PHENIX detector collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented in this paper. The final detector per-channel signal processing chain will consist of a preamplifier-gain stage, a current-mode summed multiplicity discriminator, a 64-deep analog memory (simultaneous read-write), a post-memory analog correlator, and a 10-bit 5 {mu}s ADC. The Heap Manager provides all timing control, data buffering, and data formatting for a single 256-channel multi-chip module (MCM). Each chip set is partitioned into 32-channel sets. Beam test (16-cell deep memory) performance for the various blocks will be presented as well as the ionizing radiation damage performance of the 1.2 {mu} n-well CMOS process used for preamplifier fabrication.

  18. Tumor induction in mice after local irradiation with single doses of either carbon-ion beams or gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Ando, Yutaka; Kobashi, Gen

    2014-12-01

    To determine the dose-dependent relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for tumor prevalence in mice receiving single localized doses to their right leg of either carbon ions (15, 45 or 75 keV/μm) or 137Cs gamma rays. A total of 1647 female C3H mice were irradiated to their hind legs with a localized dose of either reference gamma rays or 15, 45 or 75 keV/μm carbon-ion beams. Irradiated mice were evaluated for tumors twice a month during their three-year life span, and the dimensions of any tumors found were measured with a caliper. The tumor induction frequency was calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The incidence of tumors from 50 Gy of 45 keV/μm carbon ions was marginally higher than those from 50 Gy of gamma rays. However, 60 Gy of 15 keV/μm carbon ions induced significantly fewer tumors than did gamma rays. RBE values of 0.87 + 0.12, 1.29 + 0.08 or 2.06 + 0.39 for lifetime tumorigenesis were calculated for 15, 45 or 75 keV/μm carbon-ion beams, respectively. Fibrosarcoma predominated, with no Linear Energy Transfer (LET)-dependent differences in the tumor histology. Experiments measuring the late effect of leg skin shrinkage suggested that the carcinogenic damage of 15 keV/μm carbon ions would be less than that of gamma rays. We conclude that patients receiving radiation doses to their normal tissues would face less risk of secondary tumor induction by carbon ions of intermediate LET values compared to equivalent doses of photons.

  19. A comparative study on the lithium-ion storage performances of carbon nanotubes and tube-in-tube carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-Jun; Liu, Xi; Cui, Guanglei; Zhu, Bo; Weinberg, Gisela; Schlögl, Robert; Maier, Joachim; Su, Dang Sheng

    2010-03-22

    A comparative study of the electrochemical performances of carbon nanotubes and tube-in-tube carbon nanotubes reveals a dependence effect of lithium-ion storage behavior on the detailed nanostructure of carbon nanotubes. In particular, the impurity that graphitic particles or graphene fragments inherently present in carbon nanotubes plays a crucial role in the lithium-ion storage capacity of the carbon nanotubes. Compared to acid-washed carbon nanotubes, the assembly of graphitic impurity fragments in the tube-in-tube structures hinders lithium-ion diffusion, thus drastically decreasing the rate performance of lithium-ion storage. Significantly, our results indicate that the lithium-ion storage capacity of carbon nanotubes as anode electrodes can be improved or controlled by optimizing the microstructure composition of impurity graphitic nanoparticles or graphene fragments in the matrix of the carbon nanotubes.

  20. Performance of exponential coupler in the SPS with LHC type beam for transverse broadband instability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    de Maria,R.; Fox, J. D.; Hofle, W.; Kotzian, G.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Wehrle, U.

    2009-05-25

    We present the performance and limitations of the SPS exponential coupler [1] for transverse instability measurements with LHC type beam. Data were acquired in 2008 in the SPS in the time domain with a bandwidth of up to 2.5 GHz. The data were filtered to extract the time evolution of transverse oscillations within the less than 5 ns long LHC type bunches. We describe the data filtering techniques and show the limitations of the pick-up due to propagating modes.

  1. Field performance of timber bridges. 12, Christian Hollow stress-laminated box-beam bridge

    Treesearch

    J. P. Wacker; S. C. Catherman; R. G. Winnett

    In January 1992, the Christian Hollow bridge was constructed in Steuben County, New York. The bridge is a single-span, stress-laminated box-beam superstructure that is 9.1 m long, 9.8 m wide, and 502 mm deep (30 ft long, 32 ft wide, and 19-3/4 in. deep). The performance of the bridge was continuously monitored for 28 months, beginning shortly after installation....

  2. Space-to-Space Power Beaming Enabling High Performance Rapid Geocentric Orbit Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John W.; Vassallo, Corinne; Tadge, Megan

    2015-01-01

    The use of electric propulsion is more prevalent than ever, with industry pursuing all electric orbit transfers. Electric propulsion provides high mass utilization through efficient propellant transfer. However, the transfer times become detrimental as the delta V transitions from near-impulsive to low-thrust. Increasing power and therefore thrust has diminishing returns as the increasing mass of the power system limits the potential acceleration of the spacecraft. By using space-to-space power beaming, the power system can be decoupled from the spacecraft and allow significantly higher spacecraft alpha (W/kg) and therefore enable significantly higher accelerations while maintaining high performance. This project assesses the efficacy of space-to-space power beaming to enable rapid orbit transfer while maintaining high mass utilization. Concept assessment requires integrated techniques for low-thrust orbit transfer steering laws, efficient large-scale rectenna systems, and satellite constellation configuration optimization. This project includes the development of an integrated tool with implementation of IPOPT, Q-Law, and power-beaming models. The results highlight the viability of the concept, limits and paths to infusion, and comparison to state-of-the-art capabilities. The results indicate the viability of power beaming for what may be the only approach for achieving the desired transit times with high specific impulse.

  3. Recent performance of the SNS H- ion source and low-energy beam transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Ewald, K. D.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Tang, J.; Welton, R.

    2014-02-01

    Recent measurements of the H- beam current show that SNS is injecting about 55 mA into the RFQ compared to ˜45 mA in 2010. Since 2010, the H- beam exiting the RFQ dropped from ˜40 mA to ˜34 mA, which is sufficient for 1 MW of beam power. To minimize the impact of the RFQ degradation, the service cycle of the best performing source was extended to 6 weeks. The only degradation is fluctuations in the electron dump voltage towards the end of some service cycles, a problem that is being investigated. Very recently, the RFQ was retuned, which partly restored its transmission. In addition, the electrostatic low-energy beam transport system was reengineered to double its heat sinking and equipped with a thermocouple that monitors the temperature of the ground electrode between the two Einzel lenses. The recorded data show that emissions from the source at high voltage dominate the heat load. Emissions from the partly Cs-covered first lens cause the temperature to peak several hours after starting up. On rare occasions, the temperature can also peak due to corona discharges between the center ground electrode and one of the lenses.

  4. Recent performance of the SNS H(-) ion source and low-energy beam transport system.

    PubMed

    Stockli, Martin P; Ewald, K D; Han, B X; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Piller, C; Santana, M; Tang, J; Welton, R

    2014-02-01

    Recent measurements of the H(-) beam current show that SNS is injecting about 55 mA into the RFQ compared to ∼45 mA in 2010. Since 2010, the H(-) beam exiting the RFQ dropped from ∼40 mA to ∼34 mA, which is sufficient for 1 MW of beam power. To minimize the impact of the RFQ degradation, the service cycle of the best performing source was extended to 6 weeks. The only degradation is fluctuations in the electron dump voltage towards the end of some service cycles, a problem that is being investigated. Very recently, the RFQ was retuned, which partly restored its transmission. In addition, the electrostatic low-energy beam transport system was reengineered to double its heat sinking and equipped with a thermocouple that monitors the temperature of the ground electrode between the two Einzel lenses. The recorded data show that emissions from the source at high voltage dominate the heat load. Emissions from the partly Cs-covered first lens cause the temperature to peak several hours after starting up. On rare occasions, the temperature can also peak due to corona discharges between the center ground electrode and one of the lenses.

  5. Recent Performance of the SNS H- ion source and low-energy beam transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Ewald, Kerry D; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Tang, Johnny Y; Welton, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Recent measurements of the H beam current show that SNS is injecting about 55 mA into the RFQ compared to 45 mA in 2010. Since 2010, the H beam exiting the RFQ dropped from 40 mA to 34 mA, which is sufficient for 1 MW of beam power. To minimize the impact of the RFQ degradation, the service cycle of the best performing source was extended to 6 weeks. The only degradation is fluctuations in the electron dump voltage towards the end of some service cycles, a problem that is being investigated. Very recently, the RFQ was retuned, which partly restored its transmission. In addition, the electrostatic low-energy beam transport system was reengineered to double its heat sinking and equipped with a thermocouple that monitors the temperature of the ground electrode between the two Einzel lenses. The recorded data show that emissions from the source at high voltage dominate the heat load. Emissions from the partly Cs-covered first lens cause the temperature to peak several hours after starting up. On rare occasions, the temperature can also peak due to corona discharges between the center ground electrode and one of the lenses.

  6. Enhancing capacitive deionization performance of electrospun activated carbon nanofibers by coupling with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qiang; Wang, Gang; Wu, Tingting; Peng, Senpei; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-05-15

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is an alternative, effective and environmentally friendly technology for desalination of brackish water. The performance of the CDI device is highly determined by the electrode materials. In this paper, a composite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in activated carbon nanofiber (ACF) was prepared by a direct co-electrospinning way and subsequent CO2 activation. The introduction of CNTs can greatly improve the conductivity while the CO2-mediated activation can render the final product with high porosity. As such, the hybrid structure can provide an excellent storage space and pathways for ion adsorption and conduction. When evaluated as electrode materials for CDI, the as-prepared CNT/ACF composites with higher electrical conductivity and mesopore ratios exhibited higher electrosorption capacity and good regeneration performance in comparison with the pure ACF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Beam width and transmitter power adaptive to tracking system performance for free-space optical communication.

    PubMed

    Arnon, S; Rotman, S; Kopeika, N S

    1997-08-20

    The basic free-space optical communication system includes at least two satellites. To communicate between them, the transmitter satellite must track the beacon of the receiver satellite and point the information optical beam in its direction. Optical tracking and pointing systems for free space suffer during tracking from high-amplitude vibration because of background radiation from interstellar objects such as the Sun, Moon, Earth, and stars in the tracking field of view or the mechanical impact from satellite internal and external sources. The vibrations of beam pointing increase the bit error rate and jam communication between the two satellites. One way to overcome this problem is to increase the satellite receiver beacon power. However, this solution requires increased power consumption and weight, both of which are disadvantageous in satellite development. Considering these facts, we derive a mathematical model of a communication system that adapts optimally the transmitter beam width and the transmitted power to the tracking system performance. Based on this model, we investigate the performance of a communication system with discrete element optical phased array transmitter telescope gain. An example for a practical communication system between a Low Earth Orbit Satellite and a Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite is presented. From the results of this research it can be seen that a four-element adaptive transmitter telescope is sufficient to compensate for vibration amplitude doubling. The benefits of the proposed model are less required transmitter power and improved communication system performance.

  8. High performance ultracapacitors with carbon nanomaterials and ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen; Henry, Kent Douglas

    2012-10-09

    The present invention is directed to the use of carbon nanotubes and/or electrolyte structures in various electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors having an ionic liquid electrolyte. The carbon nanotubes are preferably aligned carbon nanotubes. Compared to randomly entangled carbon nanotubes, aligned carbon nanotubes can have better defined pore structures and higher specific surface areas.

  9. Design and performance of daily quality assurance system for carbon ion therapy at NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saotome, N.; Furukawa, T.; Hara, Y.; Mizushima, K.; Tansho, R.; Saraya, Y.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2017-09-01

    At National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), we have been commissioning a rotating-gantry system for carbon-ion radiotherapy. This rotating gantry can transport heavy ions at 430 MeV/u to an isocenter with irradiation angles of ±180° that can rotate around the patient so that the tumor can be irradiated from any direction. A three-dimensional pencil-beam scanning irradiation system equipped with the rotating gantry enables the optimal use of physical characteristics of carbon ions to provide accurate treatment. To ensure the treatment quality using such a complex system, the calibration of the primary dose monitor, output check, range check, dose rate check, machine safety check, and some mechanical tests should be performed efficiently. For this purpose, we have developed a measurement system dedicated for quality assurance (QA) of this gantry system: the Daily QA system. The system consists of an ionization chamber system and a scintillator system. The ionization chamber system is used for the calibration of the primary dose monitor, output check, and dose rate check, and the scintillator system is used for the range check, isocenter, and gantry angle. The performance of the Daily QA system was verified by a beam test. The stability of the output was within 0.5%, and the range was within 0.5 mm. The coincidence of the coordinates between the patient-positioning system and the irradiation system was verified using the Daily QA system. Our present findings verified that the new Daily QA system for a rotating gantry is capable of verifying the irradiation system with sufficient accuracy.

  10. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  11. Dynamic modulation of electronic properties of graphene by localized carbon doping using focused electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Russell, M; Henry, M; Kim, S S; Naik, R R; Voevodin, A A; Jang, S S; Tsukruk, V V; Fedorov, A G

    2015-09-28

    We report on the first demonstration of controllable carbon doping of graphene to engineer local electronic properties of a graphene conduction channel using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). Electrical measurements indicate that an "n-p-n" junction on graphene conduction channel is formed by partial carbon deposition near the source and drain metal contacts by low energy (<50 eV) secondary electrons due to inelastic collisions of long range backscattered primary electrons generated from a low dose of high energy (25 keV) electron beam (1 × 10(18) e(-) per cm(2)). Detailed AFM imaging provides direct evidence of the new mechanism responsible for dynamic evolution of the locally varying graphene doping. The FEBID carbon atoms, which are physisorbed and weakly bound to graphene, diffuse towards the middle of graphene conduction channel due to their surface chemical potential gradient, resulting in negative shift of Dirac voltage. Increasing a primary electron dose to 1 × 10(19) e(-) per cm(2) results in a significant increase of carbon deposition, such that it covers the entire graphene conduction channel at high surface density, leading to n-doping of graphene channel. Collectively, these findings establish a unique capability of FEBID technique to dynamically modulate the doping state of graphene, thus enabling a new route to resist-free, "direct-write" functional patterning of graphene-based electronic devices with potential for on-demand re-configurability.

  12. Preparation and electrochemical performance of ultra-short carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao X.; Wang, Jian N.; Su, Lian F.

    Current carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are typically synthesized with micrometer lengths, low dispersion and low purity and thus oppose their applications in many fields. In this study, we make the first report on using a Fe compound (FeS) as a catalyst for controlling the length of CNTs to be less than 300 nm. This is achieved by dissolution of a proper proportion of ferrocene and thiophene in alcohol and pyrolysis of this solution at high temperature. Sulfur, resulting from the decomposition of thiophene, is shown to play key roles in promoting the growth of CNTs and limiting their length. The reason is suggested to be that FeS retards the dissociation of carbon source and diffusion of carbon in it as compared with pure Fe. Short CNTs from the present direct synthesis and from our previous solid-state cutting are used as an electrode material in Li-ion batteries and catalyst supports in fuel cells. Compared with conventional long CNTs, short CNTs show much better electrochemical performance. Due to the simplicity of the present synthetic technique, it may be used for mass production of short CNTs. Furthermore, the application of such a new material may be investigated in wide areas such as information technology, biomedicine, environmental and energy industries.

  13. Nitrated carbon nanoblisters for high-performance glucose dehydrogenase bioanodes.

    PubMed

    de Souza, João C P; Iost, Rodrigo M; Crespilho, Frank N

    2016-03-15

    Recently, many strategies are being explored for efficiently wiring glucose dehydrogenase (GDh) enzymes capable of glucose (fuel) oxidation. For instance, the use of GDh NAD(+)-dependent for glucose oxidation is of great interest in biofuel cell technology because the enzyme are unaffected by the presence of molecular oxygen commonly present in electrolyte. Here we present the fabrication of flexible carbon fibers modified with nitrated carbon nanoblisters and their application as high-performance GDh bioanodes. These bioelectrodes could electro-oxidize glucose at -360 mV (vs. Ag/AgClsat) in the presence of a molecular oxygen saturated electrolyte with current densities higher than 1.0 mAcm(-2) at 0.0 V. It is corroborated by open circuit potential, where a potential stabilization occurs at -150 mV in a long term stability current-transient experiment. This value is in agreement with the quasi-steady current obtained at very low scan rate (0.1 mVs(-1)), where the onset potential for glucose oxidation is -180 mV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the nitrated blisters and edge-like carbon structures, enabling highly efficient enzyme immobilization and low overpotential for electron transfer, allowing for glucose oxidation with potential values close to the thermodynamic cofactor.

  14. Beam modeling and VMAT performance with the Agility 160-leaf multileaf collimator.

    PubMed

    Bedford, James L; Thomas, Michael D R; Smyth, Gregory

    2013-05-06

    The Agility multileaf collimator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) has 160 leaves of projected width 0.5 cm at the isocenter, with maximum leaf speed 3.5 cms-1. These characteristics promise to facilitate fast and accurate delivery of radiotherapy, particularly volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The aim of this study is therefore to create a beam model for the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI), and to use this beam model to explore the performance of the Agility MLC in delivery of VMAT. A 6 MV beam model was created and verified by measuring doses under irregularly shaped fields. VMAT treatment plans for five typical head-and-neck patients were created using the beam model and delivered using both binned and continuously variable dose rate (CVDR). Results were compared with those for an MLCi unit without CVDR. The beam model has similar parameters to those of an MLCi model, with interleaf leakage of only 0.2%. The verification of irregular fields shows a mean agreement between measured and planned dose of 1.3% (planned dose higher). The Agility VMAT head-and-neck plans show equivalent plan quality and delivery accuracy to those for an MLCi unit, with 95% of verification measurements within 3% and 3 mm of planned dose. Mean delivery time is 133 s with the Agility head and CVDR, 171 s without CVDR, and 282 s with an MLCi unit. Pinnacle3 has therefore been shown to model the Agility MLC accurately, and to provide accurate VMAT treatment plans which can be delivered significantly faster with Agility than with an MLCi.

  15. Experimental study on extinction performance of carbon nanotubes smoke to infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongxia; Wang, Lianfen; Xu, Bin; Zhu, Haifei

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are one of the most typical materials in the nanoscale world. In order to study the IR interference performance of carbon nanotubes as smoke agent, using indoor large smoke box, the infrared extinction performance of three kinds of carbon nanotubes were measured in 8µm∼12µm band. The smoke forming performance of carbon nanotubes were obtained by means of the testing of smoke mass concentration. Based on the experimental data, the dynamic mass extinction coefficients of three kinds of carbon nanotubes were calculated. The results show that carbon nanotubes smoke have good extinction performance to infrared radiation.

  16. Chemical elimination of amorphous carbon on amorphous carbon nanotubes and its electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaojun; Jiang, Li; Fan, Chuangang; Lei, Jiangwei; Zheng, Mingdong

    2007-04-01

    Chemical elimination of amorphous carbon on amorphous carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) was for the first time investigated by different treatment processes. Electrochemical performance of the modified ACNTs/carbon paste electrode (ACNTs/CPE) was measured by cyclic voltammetry. Field emission scanning and transmission electron microscope (STEM) observation reveals that the diameter of ACNTs is in the range of 60-100 nm. The amorphous nature of ACNTs was proved by the result of Raman analysis. FT-IR spectra showed that it might be one of the low-cost ways to eliminate amorphous carbon on the surface of ACNTs to treat ACNTs with HNO 3 in microwave oven. Further oxidation in air would lead to the decrease of electron transfer rate on the ACNTs/CPE because OH groups on the wall of ACNTs were partly eliminated by oxidation in air. The results of cyclic voltammetry showed that ACNTs/CPE treated with HNO 3 in microwave oven has optimal peak in relation to the highest redox peak current.

  17. Effects of porous carbon additives and induced fluorine on low dielectric constant polyimide synthesized with an e-beam

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Ji Sun; Bae, Tae-Sung; Lee, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sei-Hyun; Jeong, Euigyung; Kang, Phil Hyun; Lee, Young-Seak

    2010-11-15

    We report the synthesis of a polyimide matrix with a low dielectric constant for application as an intercalation material between metal interconnections in electronic devices. Porous activated carbon was embedded in the polyimide to reduce the dielectric constant, and a thin film of the complex was obtained using the spin-coating and e-beam irradiation methods. The surface of the thin film was modified with fluorine functional groups to impart water resistance and reduce the dielectric constant further. The water resistance was significantly improved by the modification with hydrophobic fluorine groups. The dielectric constant was effectively decreased by porous activated carbon. The fluorine modification also resulted in a low dielectric constant on the polyimide surface by reducing the polar surface free energy. The dielectric constant of polyimide film decreased from 2.98 to 1.9 by effects of porous activated carbon additive and fluorine surface modification.

  18. Performance of portable XRF and micro-XRF on carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Winter, Niels; Sinnesael, Matthias; Makarona, Christina; Claeys, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Variations in elemental abundances in various carbonate archives offer a wealth of paleoenvironmental proxy information. State of the art portable handheld X-Ray Fluorescence (pXRF) and laboratory micro X-Ray Fluorescence (μXRF) instruments provide a relatively inexpensive and fast way of acquiring elemental composition data. However, there are well-known issues and limitations regarding the conversion of XRF spectral data into elemental concentrations. This study aims to offer a guideline for the appropriate use of these XRF techniques for the study of carbonates. Using a certified calcium carbonate standard, accuracy and reproducibility of both a pXRF (Bruker AXS Tracer IV) and a μXRF (Bruker M4 Tornado) instrument are tested under various measurement conditions. The experimental set-up allowed for the variation of several parameters, including measurement area, integration time, quantification method and filter use. The effects on the accuracy and reproducibility of the quantified elemental abundance results are examined in order to investigate under which conditions both devices perform best in determining trace element abundances in natural carbonates. The limits of detection and quantification are evaluated for both instruments for a range of commonly used trace elements (e.g. Sr, Mg, Zn, Fe …). The quality of the XRF spectra is evaluated using spectral processing software. Additionally, different methods of quantification are discussed. As a result, optimized parameter combinations are proposed for a range of commonly used elements. Finally, a comparison between the two X-Ray Fluorescence instruments allows the evaluation of their respective advantages and disadvantages and helps to determine which technique is best suited for a specific research question.

  19. Ion beam synthesis of carbon assisted nanosystems in silicon based substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Prakash Raj

    The systematic study of the formation of beta-SiC formed by low energy carbon ion (C-) implantation into Si followed by high temperature annealing is presented. The research is performed to explore the optimal annealing conditions. The formation of crystalline beta-SiC is clearly observed in the sample annealed at 1100 °C for a period of 1 hr. Quantitative analysis is performed in the formation of beta-SiC by the process of implantation of different carbon ion fluences of 1x1017, 2x1017, 5x1017, and 8x1017 atoms /cm2 at an ion energy of 65 keV into Si. It is observed that the average size of beta-SiC crystals decreased and the amount of beta-SiC crystals increased with the increase in the implanted fluences when the samples were annealed at 1100°C for 1 hr. However, it is observed that the amount of beta-SiC linearly increased with the implanted fluences up to 5x1017 atoms /cm2. Above this fluence the amount of beta-SiC appears to saturate. The stability of graphitic C-C bonds at 1100°C limits the growth of SiC precipitates in the sample implanted at a fluence of 8x1017 atoms /cm2 which results in the saturation behavior of SiC formation in the present study. Secondly, the carbon cluster formation process in silica and the characterization of formed clusters is presented. Silicon dioxide layers ˜500 nm thick are thermally grown on a Si (100) wafer. The SiO2 layers are then implanted with 70 keV carbon ion at a fluence of 5x1017 atoms/cm2 . The implanted samples are annealed at 1100 °C for different time periods of 10 min., 30 min., 60 min., 90 min., and 120 min.,in the mixture of argon and hydrogen gas (96 % Ar + 4% hydrogen). Photoluminescence spectroscopy revealed UV to visible emission from the samples. A detail mechanism of the photoluminescence and its possible origin is discussed by correlating the structural and optical properties of the samples. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, photoluminescence

  20. Performances of PID and Different Fuzzy Methods for Controlling a Ball on Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Vu Trieu; Mart, Tamre; Moezzi, Reza; Oliver, Mets; Martin, Jurise; Ahti, Polder; Leo, Teder; Mart, Juurma

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops and analyses the performances evaluation of different control strategies applied for a nonlinear motion of a ball on a beam system. Comparison results provide in-depth comprehension on the stable ability of different controllers for this real mechanical application. The three different controllers are a conventional PID method, a Mamdani-type fuzzy rule method and a Sugeno-type fuzzy rule method. In this study, the PID shows the fastest sinuous reference tracking while the Mamdani-type fuzzy method proves the highest stability performance for tracking square wave motions.

  1. The interaction of functional and dysfunctional emotions during balance beam performance.

    PubMed

    Cottyn, Jorge; De Clercq, Dirk; Crombez, Geert; Lenoir, Matthieu

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between functional and dysfunctional emotions, as one of the major tenets of the individual zones of optimal functioning (IZOF) model (Hanin, 2000), was studied in a sport specific setting. Fourteen female gymnasts performed three attempts of a compulsory balance beam routine at three different heights. Heart rate and self-report of functional and dysfunctional emotions were measured during each routine. These data revealed the effectiveness of inducting emotions by manipulating height. Also, performance decreased on the most challenging condition, (i.e., the first attempt on the highest height). Moderated hierarchical regression analysis revealed a significant interaction between functional and dysfunctional emotions only when the dysfunctional emotion level was low.

  2. Effects of initial stress on transverse wave propagation in carbon nanotubes based on Timoshenko laminated beam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, H.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    Based on Timoshenko laminated beam models, this paper investigates the influence of initial stress on the vibration and transverse wave propagation in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) under ultrahigh frequency (above 1 THz), in which the initial stress in the MWNTs can occur due to thermal or lattice mismatch between different materials. Considering van der Waals force interaction between two adjacent tubes and effects of rotary inertia and shear deformation, results show that the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes not only affects the number of transverse wave speeds and the magnitude of transverse wave speeds, but also terahertz critical frequencies at which the number of wave speeds changes. When the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes is the compressive stress, transverse wave speeds decrease and the vibration amplitude ratio of two adjacent tubes increases. When the initial stress in individual multi-wall carbon nanotubes is the tensile stress, transverse wave speeds increase and the vibration amplitude ratio of two adjacent tubes decreases. The investigation of the effects of initial stress on transverse wave propagation in carbon nanotubes may be used as a useful reference for the application and the design of nanoelectronic and nanodrive devices, nano-oscillators, and nanosensors, in which carbon nanotubes act as basic elements.

  3. Seismic performance and comparison of three different I beam to box column joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saneei Nia, Z.; Mazroi, A.; Ghassemieh, M.; Pezeshki, H.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the inherently advantages of the box column, finding the best option for the I beam to the box column connection is the main challenge in using the box column as a structural member for special moment frames. In this paper, the seismic performance of unreinforced connection, weakened connection and strengthened connection was evaluated through a comprehensive experimental program. The seismic comparisons were fabricated by assessing the strength, ductility and energy dissipation in each configuration. Three full scale tests with several connections were carried out. All the specimens were subjected to cyclic loading and prior to failure by forming a plastic hinge in the beam, all the connections managed to reach an inelastic rotation of more than 6.0% rad. The experimental and analytical results showed that the seismic performance of the strengthened connection with flange and shear plates turned out to be the most effective in the beam to the box column connection. Moreover, the normalized stress distribution of the continuity plates revealed that the possibility of the weld fracture in unreinforced connection is more than other specimens.

  4. A collimation system for ELI-NP Gamma Beam System - design and simulation of performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paternò, G.; Cardarelli, P.; Marziani, M.; Bagli, E.; Evangelisti, F.; Andreotti, M.; Gambaccini, M.; Petrillo, V.; Drebot, I.; Bacci, A.; Vaccarezza, C.; Palumbo, L.; Variola, A.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance and refine the design of the collimation system for the gamma radiation source (GBS) currently being realised at ELI-NP facility. The gamma beam, produced by inverse Compton scattering, will provide a tunable average energy in the range between 0.2 and 20 MeV, an energy bandwidth 0.5% and a flux of about 108 photons/s. As a result of the inverse Compton interaction, the energy of the emitted radiation is related to the emission angle, it is maximum in the backscattering direction and decreases as the angle increase [1,2]. Therefore, the required energy bandwidth can be obtained only by developing a specific collimation system of the gamma beam, i.e. filtering out the radiation emitted at larger angles. The angular acceptance of the collimation for ELI-NP-GBS must be continuously adjustable in a range from about 700 to 60 μrad, to obtain the required parameters in the entire energy range. The solution identified is a stack of adjustable slits, arranged with a relative rotation around the beam axis to obtain an hole with an approximately circular shape. In this contribution, the final collimation design and its performance evaluated by carrying out a series of detailed Geant4 simulations both of the high-energy and the low-energy beamline are presented.

  5. A parametric analysis of performance characteristics of satellite-borne multiple-beam antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmasi, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical and empirical model is presented for parametric study of multiple beam antenna frequency reuse capacity and interbeam isolation. Two types of reflector antennas, the axisymmetric parabolic and the offset-parabolic reflectors, are utilized to demonstrate the model. The parameters of the model are introduced and their limitations are discussed in the context of parabolic reflector antennas. The model, however, is not restricted to analysis of reflector antenna performance. Results of the analyses are covered in two tables. The model parameters, objectives, and descriptions are given, multiple-beam antenna frequency reuse capacity and interbeam isolation analysis of the two types of reflectors are discussed as well as future developments of the program model.

  6. Performance of a beam-multiplexing diamond crystal monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Diling Feng, Yiping; Lemke, Henrik T.; Fritz, David M.; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, J. M.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Robert, Aymeric; Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.; Terentyev, Sergey A.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Driel, Tim B. van

    2014-06-15

    A double-crystal diamond monochromator was recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source. It enables splitting pulses generated by the free electron laser in the hard x-ray regime and thus allows the simultaneous operations of two instruments. Both monochromator crystals are High-Pressure High-Temperature grown type-IIa diamond crystal plates with the (111) orientation. The first crystal has a thickness of ∼100 μm to allow high reflectivity within the Bragg bandwidth and good transmission for the other wavelengths for downstream use. The second crystal is about 300 μm thick and makes the exit beam of the monochromator parallel to the incoming beam with an offset of 600 mm. Here we present details on the monochromator design and its performance.

  7. How to polarise all neutrons in one beam: a high performance polariser and neutron transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, D. Martin; Bentley, P. M.; Pappas, C.

    2016-09-01

    Polarised neutron beams are used in disciplines as diverse as magnetism,soft matter or biology. However, most of these applications often suffer from low flux also because the existing neutron polarising methods imply the filtering of one of the spin states, with a transmission of 50% at maximum. With the purpose of using all neutrons that are usually discarded, we propose a system that splits them according to their polarisation, flips them to match the spin direction, and then focuses them at the sample. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations show that this is achievable over a wide wavelength range and with an outstanding performance at the price of a more divergent neutron beam at the sample position.

  8. Effect of pointing errors and range on performance of dual-pencil-beam scatterometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    Short-range FM scatterometers with single antennas are plagued by interference set up by feedthrough and internal reflections. Dual-antenna systems have much lower internal interference, but there are problems associated with pointing the antennas at the same spot. This note quantifies these problems for Gaussian-shaped beams. The use of antennas with beamwidth ratios of up to 5:1 is shown to improve performance significantly over that obtained with identical beamwidths. For an angle between antenna centers (as viewed from the beam intersection) that is three times the beamwidth of the narrower antenna, the usable spread of range for equal beamwidths is only about 1.85:1, while for an angular ratio of 5, the usable spread of range is greater than 20:1.

  9. Performance of a beam-multiplexing diamond crystal monochromator at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Diling; Feng, Yiping; Stoupin, Stanislav; Terentyev, Sergey A; Lemke, Henrik T; Fritz, David M; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, J M; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; van Driel, Tim B; Williams, Garth J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Blank, Vladimir D; Shvyd'ko, Yuri V; Robert, Aymeric

    2014-06-01

    A double-crystal diamond monochromator was recently implemented at the Linac Coherent Light Source. It enables splitting pulses generated by the free electron laser in the hard x-ray regime and thus allows the simultaneous operations of two instruments. Both monochromator crystals are High-Pressure High-Temperature grown type-IIa diamond crystal plates with the (111) orientation. The first crystal has a thickness of ~100 μm to allow high reflectivity within the Bragg bandwidth and good transmission for the other wavelengths for downstream use. The second crystal is about 300 μm thick and makes the exit beam of the monochromator parallel to the incoming beam with an offset of 600 mm. Here we present details on the monochromator design and its performance.

  10. The new vertical neutron beam line at the CERN n_TOF facility design and outlook on the performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, C.; Chiaveri, E.; Girod, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Aberle, O.; Barros, S.; Bergström, I.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviani, M.; Guerrero, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Tsinganis, A.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea-Correa, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Beinrucker, C.; Belloni, F.; Bečvář, F.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cerutti, F.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L.; Deo, K.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Dressler, R.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frost, R.; Furman, V.; Ganesan, S.; Gheorghe, A.; Glodariu, T.; Göbel, K.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui, J.; Licata, M.; Lo Meo, S.; López, D.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Musumarra, A.; Nolte, R.; Palomo Pinto, R.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M. S.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, G.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Steinegger, P.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2015-11-01

    At the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN a new vertical beam line was constructed in 2014, in order to extend the experimental possibilities at this facility to an even wider range of challenging cross-section measurements of interest in astrophysics, nuclear technology and medical physics. The design of the beam line and the experimental hall was based on FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, aiming at maximizing the neutron flux, reducing the beam halo and minimizing the background from neutrons interacting with the collimator or back-scattered in the beam dump. The present paper gives an overview on the design of the beam line and the relevant elements and provides an outlook on the expected performance regarding the neutron beam intensity, shape and energy resolution, as well as the neutron and photon backgrounds.

  11. Reuse performance of granular-activated carbon and activated carbon fiber in catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiying; Li, Lei; Xiao, Tuo; Zhang, Jun; Shao, Xueting

    2017-03-01

    Recently, activated carbon was investigated as an efficient heterogeneous metal-free catalyst to directly activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for degradation of organic compounds. In this paper, the reuse performance and the possible deactivation reasons of granular-activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fiber (ACF) in PMS activation were investigated. As results indicated, the reusability of GAC, especially in the presence of high PMS dosage, was relatively superior to ACF in catalyzed PMS oxidation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7), which is much more easily adsorbed by ACF than by GAC. Pre-oxidation experiments were studied and it was demonstrated that PMS oxidation on ACF would retard ACF's deactivation to a big extent. After pre-adsorption with AO7, the catalytic ability of both GAC and ACF evidently diminished. However, when methanol was employed to extract the AO7-spent ACF, the catalytic ability could recover quite a bit. GAC and ACF could also effectively catalyze PMS to degrade Reactive Black 5 (RB5), which is very difficult to be adsorbed even by ACF, but both GAC and ACF have poor reuse performance for RB5 degradation. The original organic compounds or intermediate products adsorbed by GAC or ACF would be possibly responsible for the deactivation.

  12. Performance Characterization and Vibration Testing of 30-cm Carbon-Carbon Ion Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steven Snyder, John; Brophy, John R.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon-based ion optics have the potential to significantly increase the operable life and power ranges of ion thrusters because of reduced erosion rates compared to molybdenum optics. The development of 15-cm and larger diameter grids has encountered many problems, however, not the least of which is the ability to pass vibration testing. JPL has recently developed a new generation of 30-cm carbon-carbon ion optics in order to address these problems and demonstrate the viability of the technology. Perveance, electron backstreaming, and screen grid transparency data are presented for two sets of optics. Vibration testing was successfully performed on two different sets of ion optics with no damage and the results of those tests are compared to models of grid vibrational behavior. It will be shown that the vibration model is a conservative predictor of grid response and can accurately describe test results. There was no change in grid alignment as a result of vibration testing and a slight improvement, if any change at all, in optics performance.

  13. Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbons for high performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Liu, Qiming

    2016-08-01

    The mesoporous carbons have been synthesized by using α-D(+)-Glucose, D-Glucosamine hydrochloride or their mixture as carbon precursors and mesoporous silicas (SBA-15 or MCF) as hard templates. The as-prepared products show a large pore volume (0.59-0.97 cm3 g-1), high surface areas (352.72-1152.67 m2 g-1) and rational nitrogen content (ca. 2.5-3.9 wt.%). The results of electrochemical tests demonstrate that both heteroatom doping and suitable pore structure play a decisive role in the performance of supercapacitors. The representative sample of SBA-15 replica obtained using D-Glucosamine hydrochloride only exhibits high specific capacitance (212.8 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1) and good cycle durability (86.1% of the initial capacitance after 2000 cycles) in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, which is attributed to the contribution of double layer capacitance and pseudo-capacitance. The excellent electrochemical performance makes it a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  14. Investigation of Performance Envelope for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh; Milos, Frank S.; Stackpoole, Mairead

    2016-01-01

    The present work provides the results of a short exploratory study on the performance of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, or PICA, at high heat flux and pressure in an arcjet facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The primary objective of the study was to explore the thermal response of PICA at cold-wall heat fluxes well in excess of 1500 W/cm (exp 2). Based on the results of a series of flow simulations, multiple PICA samples were tested at an estimated cold wall heat flux and stagnation pressure of 1800 W/cm (exp 2) and 130 kPa, respectively. All samples survived the test, and no failure was observed either during or after the exposure. The results indicate that PICA has a potential to perform well at environments with significantly higher heat flux and pressure than it has currently been flown.

  15. Carbon nanotube-enhanced performance of microplasma devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-J.; Eden, J. G.; Park, K.-H.

    2004-05-01

    Incorporating multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) directly into the cylindrical cathode of Ni screen/BN/Ni microplasma devices significantly improves all device performance parameters—operating and ignition voltages, as well as radiative efficiency. Having a cathode diameter of 200 μm, these devices exhibit operating voltages as much as 30 V (˜22%) lower than those required for an identical structure without CNTs. For Ne pressures of 100-300 Torr, ignition voltages are reduced by 14%-18% with the introduction of CNTs. In contrast, radiative efficiencies in the 300-800 nm spectral region are increased with CNTs by 6%-9% over the entire pressure range studied (200-600 Torr Ne). Voltage-current characteristics for two device configurations suggest that electrons generated within the cathode microcavity by CNT field emission are most effective in impacting device performance.

  16. Optical Performance of Carbon-Nanotube Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jonge, Niels de; Allioux, Myriam; Oostveen, Jim T.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Milne, William I.

    2005-05-13

    The figure of merit for the electron optical performance of carbon-nanotube (CNT) electron sources is presented. This figure is given by the relation between the reduced brightness and the energy spread in the region of stable emission. It is shown experimentally that a CNT electron source exhibits a highly stable emission process that follows the Fowler-Nordheim theory for field emission, fixing the relationship among the energy spread, the current, and the radius. The performance of the CNT emitter under realistic operating conditions is compared with state-of-the-art electron point sources. It is demonstrated that the reduced brightness is a function of the tunneling parameter, a measure of the energy spread at low temperatures, only, independent of the geometry of the emitter.

  17. Extended high order sandwich panel theory for bending analysis of sandwich beams with carbon nanotube reinforced face sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedari Salami, S.

    2016-02-01

    Bending analysis of a sandwich beam with soft core and carbon nanotube reinforced composite (CNTRC) face sheets in the literature is presented based on Extended High order Sandwich Panel Theory (EHSAPT). Distribution of fibers through the thickness of the face sheets could be uniform or functionally graded (FG). In this theory the face sheets follow the first order shear deformation theory (FSDT). Besides, the two dimensional elasticity is used for the core. The field equations are derived via the Ritz based solution which is suitable for any essential boundary condition. The influences of boundary conditions on bending response of the sandwich panel with soft core and CNTRC face sheet are investigated. In each type of boundary condition the effect of distribution pattern of CNTRCs on many essential involved parameters of the sandwich beam with functionally graded carbon nanotube reinforced composite (FG- CNTRC) face sheets are studied in detail. Finally, experimental result have been compared with those obtained based on developed solution method. It is concluded that, the sandwich beam with X distribution figure of face sheets is the strongest with the smallest transverse displacement, and followed by the UD, O and ∧-ones, respectively.

  18. Soil carbon content and character in an old-growth forest in northwestern Pennsylvania: a case study introducing pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS)

    Treesearch

    C.M. Hoover; K.A. Magrini; R.J. Evans

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted to: (1) test the utility of a new and rapid analytical method, pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS), for the measurement and characterization of carbon in forest soils, and (2) examine the effects of natural disturbance on soil carbon dynamics. An additional objective was to test the ability of py-MBMS to distinguish recent from...

  19. Electron-beam induced diamond-like-carbon passivation of plasmonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaur, Eugeniu; Sadatnajafi, Catherine; Langley, Daniel; Lin, Jiao; Kou, Shan Shan; Abbey, Brian

    2015-12-01

    Engineered materials with feature sizes on the order of a few nanometres offer the potential for producing metamaterials with properties which may differ significantly from their bulk counterpart. Here we describe the production of plasmonic colour filters using periodic arrays of nanoscale cross shaped apertures fabricated in optically opaque silver films. Due to its relatively low loss in the visible and near infrared range, silver is a popular choice for plasmonic devices, however it is also unstable in wet or even ambient conditions. Here we show that ultra-thin layers of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) can be used to prevent degradation due to oxidative stress, ageing and corrosion. We demonstrate that DLC effectively protects the sub-micron features which make up the plasmonic colour filter under both atmospheric conditions and accelerated aging using iodine gas. Through a systematic study we confirm that the nanometre thick DLC layers have no effect on the device functionality or performance.

  20. Comparison of human and Hotelling observer performance for a fan-beam CT signal detection task

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Adrian A.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Reiser, Ingrid; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A human observer study was performed for a signal detection task for the case of fan-beam x-ray computed tomography. Hotelling observer (HO) performance was calculated for the same detection task without the use of efficient channels. By considering the full image covariance produced by the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and avoiding the use of channels in the computation of HO performance, the authors establish an absolute upper bound on signal detectability. Therefore, this study serves as a baseline for relating human and ideal observer performance in the case of fan-beam CT. Methods: Eight human observers participated in a two-alternative forced choice experiment where the signal of interest was a small simulated ellipsoid in the presence of independent, identically distributed Gaussian detector noise. Theoretical performance of the HO, which is equivalent to the ideal observer in this case (see Sec. 13.2.12 in Barrett and Myers [Foundations of Image Science (Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, 2004)], was also computed and compared to the performance of the human observers. In addition to a reference FBP implementation, two FBP implementations with inherent loss of HO signal detectability (e.g., by apodizing the ramp filter) were also investigated. Each of these latter two implementations takes the form of a discrete-to-discrete linear operator (i.e., a matrix), which has a nontrivial null-space resulting in the loss of detectability. Results: Estimated observer detectability index (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal}\\begin{document}$\\hat{d}_A$\\end{document}d^A) values for the human observers and SNR values for the HO were obtained. While Hanning filtering in the FBP implementation with a cutoff frequency of 1/4 of the Nyquist frequency reduces HO SNR (due to the reconstruction matrix's nontrivial null-space), this filtering was shown to consistently improve human observer performance. By contrast, increasing the image pixel size was seen to have a comparable

  1. Growth of high-quality p-type GaAs epitaxial layers using carbon tetrabromide by gas source molecular-beam epitaxy and molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Houng, Y.M.; Lester, S.D.; Mars, D.E.

    1993-05-01

    Heavily C-doped p-type GaAs epitaxial films have been grown using carbon tetrabromide (CBr{sub 4}) as a dopant source in both gas source molecular-beam epitaxy (GSMBE) and molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). It was found that CBr;{sub 4} has a great potential as a p-type dopant source for use in a conventional MBE chamber without any major modification of its pumping system because of its high-doping efficiency and low gas load. Hole concentrations in excess of 1x10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3} have been measured in CBr{sub 4}-doped GaAs grown from both the MBE or GSMBE techniques, using As{sub 4} or AsH{sub 3}, respectively. A Hall mobility of > 80 cm{sup 2}/V s was measured in layers with doping level of 5x10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3}, which is comparable to that from chemical beam exitaxially (CBE) grown TMGa-doped GaAs. Under GSMBE and MBE modes, the doping memory effect in AlGaAs was greatly reduced using CBr{sub 4} as compared to TMGa doping source. GSMBE grown heterojunction bipolar transistors with a CBr{sub 4} as compared to TMGa doping source. GSMBE grown heterojunction bipolar transistors with a CBr{sub 4}-doped base layer have a current gain as high as 79 and a base sheet resistance as low as 225 {Omega}/{open_square}. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. CRionScan: A stand-alone real time controller designed to perform ion beam imaging, dose controlled irradiation and proton beam writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudin, L.; Barberet, Ph.; Serani, L.; Moretto, Ph.

    2013-07-01

    High resolution ion microbeams, usually used to perform elemental mapping, low dose targeted irradiation or ion beam lithography needs a very flexible beam control system. For this purpose, we have developed a dedicated system (called “CRionScan”), on the AIFIRA facility (Applications Interdisciplinaires des Faisceaux d'Ions en Région Aquitaine). It consists of a stand-alone real-time scanning and imaging instrument based on a Compact Reconfigurable Input/Output (Compact RIO) device from National Instruments™. It is based on a real-time controller, a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), input/output modules and Ethernet connectivity. We have implemented a fast and deterministic beam scanning system interfaced with our commercial data acquisition system without any hardware development. CRionScan is built under LabVIEW™ and has been used on AIFIRA's nanobeam line since 2009 (Barberet et al., 2009, 2011) [1,2]. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) embedded in the Compact RIO as a web page is used to control the scanning parameters. In addition, a fast electrostatic beam blanking trigger has been included in the FPGA and high speed counters (15 MHz) have been implemented to perform dose controlled irradiation and on-line images on the GUI. Analog to Digital converters are used for the beam current measurement and in the near future for secondary electrons imaging. Other functionalities have been integrated in this controller like LED lighting using Pulse Width Modulation and a “NIM Wilkinson ADC” data acquisition.

  3. SU-E-T-198: Comparison Between a PTW MicroDiamond Dosimeter and a Markus Chamber in a 62 MeV/n Carbon Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Rossomme, S; Hopfgartner, J; Delor, A; Vynckier, S; Palmans, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of a PTW Freiburg microDiamond dosimeter, we compared its response to the response of a plane-parallel Markus chamber in a 62 MeV/n mono-energetic carbon ion beam. Methods: The response of both detectors has been studied as a function of depth in graphite by adding or removing graphite plates in front of the detectors. To account for fluctuations of the beam, we used two setups with different monitor chambers. The depth of the effective point of measurement of both detectors has been converted into a graphite equivalent depth using ICRU Report 73 data. As recommended by IAEA TRS-398, the response of the Markus chamber has been corrected for temperature, pressure, polarity effects and ion recombination. The latter required an additional experiment; to quantify the effect of volume recombination and initial recombination, measurements have been performed at different voltages and different dose rates. Results: As expected, the dominant process leading to ion recombination for carbon ion beam is the initial recombination. At the entrance, the ion recombination correction equals 1.1% and the value is approximately constant in the plateau region. Due to the increase of the LET in the Bragg peak region, we observe a strong increase of the ion recombination correction, up to 6.1% at the distal edge. Comparison between the microDiamond response and the Markus chamber response shows good agreement in the plateau region. However, we observe a 13.6% under response of the microDiamond in the Bragg peak. Conclusion: Increasing between 1% and 6%, the depth dependent ion recombination correction has to be applied to the Markus response. The comparison between the microDiamond and the Markus chamber indicates that there is an under-response of the microDiamond in the vicinity of the Bragg peak due to the increased LET.

  4. Ion-beam and microwave-stimulated functionalization and derivatization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makala, Raghuveer S.

    Derivatizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with other low-dimensional nanostructures is of widespread interest for creating CNT-based nanocomposites and devices. Conventional routes based on wet-chemical oxidation or hydrophobic adsorption do not allow premeditated control over the location or spatial extent of functionalization. Moreover, aggressive oxidative treatments and agitation in corrosive environments lead to CNT shortening, damage, and incorporation of excess impurity concentrations. Thus, it is imperative to explore and develop alternative functionalization methods to overcome these shortcomings. The work presented in this thesis outlines two such methodologies: one based on focused ion irradiation for siteselective functionalization and the other that employs microwave-stimulation for mild, yet rapid and homogenous CNT functionalization. The utility of 10 and 30 kcV Ga+ focused ion beams (FIB) to thin, slice, weld, and alter the structure and composition at precise locations along the CNT axis is presented. This strategy of harnessing ion-beam-induced defect generation and doping is attractive for modulating chemical and electrical properties along the CNT length, and fabricate CNT-based heterostructures and networks. A novel approach that utilizes focused ion irradiation to site-selectively derivatize preselected segments of CNTs with controlled micro-/nano-scale lateral spatial resolution is demonstrated. Irradiation followed by air-exposure results in functionalized CNT segments ranging from the nanoscopic to the macroscopic scale. The functional moieties are utilized to site-selectively anchor Au nanoparticles, fluorescent nanospheres, an amino acid---lysine, a charge-transfer metalloprotein---azurin, and a photoactive protein---bacteriorhodopsin by means of electrostatic or covalent interactions. This approach is versatile and can be extended to obtaining other molecular moieties and derivatives opening up possibilities for building new types of nano

  5. Application of Al2O3:C+fibre dosimeters for 290 MeV/n carbon therapeustic beam dosimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, L. F.; Vanhavere, F.; Kodaira, S.; Kitamura, H.; Verellen, D.; De Deene, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The capability of radioluminescence (RL) dosimeters composed of carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) detectors+optical fibre has been verified for absorbed dose-rate measurements during carbon radiotherapy. The RL signals from two separate Al2O3:C detectors (single crystal 'CG' and droplet 'P1') have been systematically measured and compared along the Bragg-curve and Spread-Out Bragg-Peak of 290 MeV/n carbon beams in the water. The absorbed dose response was assessed for the range of 0.5-10 Gy. For doses up to 6 Gy, we observed a linear response for both types of detectors, while for higher doses CG presented a more prominent supraliearity than P1. The RL response for low-LET protons in the entrance from the curve was found to closely resemble that observed for a clinical 6 MV X-ray beam, while it was found that P1 has a better agreement with the reference data from standard ionization chamber than CG. We observed a significant decrease in luminescence efficiency with LET in the Bragg peak region. The Al2O3:C RL luminescence efficiency differs from Al2O3:C OSL results, which implies that the signal can be corrected for LET dependency to match the correct SOBP and Bragg Peak.

  6. Toward Two-Dimensional All-Carbon Heterostructures via Ion Beam Patterning of Single-Layer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kotakoski, Jani; Brand, Christian; Lilach, Yigal; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Mangler, Clemens; Arndt, Markus; Meyer, Jannik C

    2015-09-09

    Graphene has many claims to fame: it is the thinnest possible membrane, it has unique electronic and excellent mechanical properties, and it provides the perfect model structure for studying materials science at the atomic level. However, for many practical studies and applications the ordered hexagon arrangement of carbon atoms in graphene is not directly suitable. Here, we show that the atoms can be locally either removed or rearranged into a random pattern of polygons using a focused ion beam (FIB). The atomic structure of the disordered regions is confirmed with atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images. These structural modifications can be made on macroscopic scales with a spatial resolution determined only by the size of the ion beam. With just one processing step, three types of structures can be defined within a graphene layer: chemically inert graphene, chemically active amorphous 2D carbon, and empty areas. This, along with the changes in properties, gives promise that FIB patterning of graphene will open the way for creating all-carbon heterostructures to be used in fields ranging from nanoelectronics and chemical sensing to composite materials.

  7. Dynamic performance of the beam position monitor support at the SSRF.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Cao, Yun; Du, Hanwen; Yin, Lixin

    2009-01-01

    Electron beam stability is very important for third-generation light sources, especially for the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility whose ground vibrations are much larger than those for other light sources. Beam position monitors (BPMs), used to monitor the position of the electron beam, require a greater stability than other mechanical structures. This paper concentrates on an investigation of the dynamic performance of the BPM support prototype. Modal and response analyses have been carried out by finite-element (FE) calculations and vibration measurements. Inconsistent results between calculation and measurement have motivated a change in the soft connections between the support and the ground from a ground bolt in the initial design to full grout. As a result the mechanical stability of the BPM support is greatly improved, showing an increase in the first eigenfrequency from 20.2 Hz to 50.2 Hz and a decrease in the ratio of the root-mean-square displacement (4-50 Hz) between the ground and the top of the support from 4.36 to 1.23 in the lateral direction. An example is given to show how FE analysis can guide the mechanical design and dynamic measurements (i.e. it is not just used as a verification method). Similar ideas can be applied to improve the stability of other mechanical structures.

  8. Simulated Beam Extraction Performance Characterization of a 50-cm Ion Thruster Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Hubble, Aimee; Nowak-Gucker, Sarah; Davis, Chris; Peterson, Peter; Viges, Eric; Chen, Dave

    2013-01-01

    A 50 cm ion thruster is being developed to operate at >65 percent total efficiency at 11 kW, 2700 s Isp and over 25 kW, 4500 s Isp at a total efficiency of >75 percent. The engine is being developed to address the need for a multimode system that can provide a range of thrust-to- power to service national and commercial near-earth onboard propulsion needs such as station-keeping and orbit transfer. Operating characteristics of the 50 cm ion thruster were measured under simulated beam extraction. The discharge current distribution at the various magnet rings was measured over a range of operating conditions. The relationship between the anode current distribution and the resulting plasma uniformity and ion flux measured at the thruster exit plane is discussed. The thermal envelope will also be investigated through the monitoring of magnet temperatures over the range of discharge powers investigated. Discharge losses as a function of propellant utilization was also characterized at multiple simulated beam currents. Bulk plasma conditions such as electron temperature and electron density near engine centerline was measured over a range of operating conditions using an internal Langmuir probe. Sensitivity of discharge performance to chamber length is also discussed. This data acquired from this discharge study will be used in the refinement of a throttle table in anticipation for eventual beam extraction testing.

  9. The Design and Performance Evaluation of Hydroformed Tubular Torsion Beam Axle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Oh, Jinho; Choi, Hanho

    2010-06-01

    Suspensions for vehicles are structural devices used for suspending a vehicle body and absorbing shocks from the road. Thus, the suspensions must be designed such that they can attenuate shocks from a road and make passengers feel comfortable despite the shocks, and improve steering stability, determined by the ground contact force of tires during running of vehicles. Another important factor to be considered while designing suspensions is that the suspensions must maintain desired stiffness and desired durability despite the repeated application of shocks from roads thereto. The present relates, in general, to a tubular torsion beam for rear suspensions of vehicles and a manufacturing method thereof and, more particularly, to the provision of tubular torsion beams having excellent roll stiffness and excellent roll strength, produced through hydroforming. The hydroforming technology has a lot of benefit which is shape accuracy, good durability caused by compressive pressure, and good forming quality. In this study, the performance evaluation of the hydroformed tubular torsion beam axle is evaluated.

  10. Enhanced electrochemical performance of carbon quantum dots-polyaniline hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhichao; Xie, Yibing

    2017-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots-polyaniline (CQDs-PANI) hybrid was developed as supercapacitor electorde material by incorporating CQDs into PANI. PANI nanowires were grown vertically on carbon fiber substrate to form an interconnected network structure. Meanwhile, CQDs were uniformly distributed in the interior and on the surface of well-established net-like PANI nanowires. High specific capacitance of 738.3 F g-1 at 1.0 A g-1 was obtained for CQDs-PANI compared to that of 432.5 F g-1 for pure PANI. The capacitance retention after 1000 cycles of CQDs-PANI and PANI is 78.0% and 68.0% at 5.0 A g-1, respectively. The high capacitance and reasonable cycle stability were ascribed to the incorporation of CQDs into PANI, which improved the conductivity and alleviated the volume change of the CQDs-PANI electrode during the charge/discharge process. In addition, a flexible solid-state CQDs-PANI supercapacitor was constructed using carbon paper as current collector and polyvinyl alcohol gel electrolyte, exhibiting the stable capacitive performance at planar and bending state. The specific capacitance, energy and power density were determined to be 169.2 mF cm-2, 33.8 μWh cm-2 and 0.3 mW cm-2 at a potential window of 1.2 V and a current density of 1.0 mA cm-2. CQDs-PANI presented the promising application in flexible energy-related device.

  11. Scuffing performance of amorphous carbon during dry-sliding contact.

    SciTech Connect

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Ajayi, O. O.; Woodford, J. B.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.; Energy Technology

    2001-10-01

    Scuffing is a major problem that limits the life and reliability of sliding tribo-components. When scuffing occurs, friction force rises sharply and is accompanied by an increase in noise and vibration; severe wear and plastic deformation also occur on the damaged surface. Attempts have been made over the years to combat scuffing by enhancing the surface properties of the machine elements, and by methods involving lubricant formulation and coating application. In this study, the authors evaluated the scuffing performance of an amorphous, near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coating that provides super-low friction under dry sliding conditions. The test configuration used a ball-on-flat contact in reciprocating sliding. The coating was deposited on HI3 steel. An uncoated 52100 steel ball was tested against various coated flats in room air. Compared to uncoated surfaces, the carbon coating increased the scuffing resistance of the sliding surfaces by two orders of magnitude. Microscopic analysis shows that scuffing occurred on coaled surfaces only if the coating had been completely removed. It appears that depending on coating type, the authors observed that coating failure occurs before scuffing failure by one of two distinct mechanisms: the coating failed in a brittle manner and by spoiling, or by gradual wear.

  12. High performance triboelectric nanogenerators with aligned carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Shi, Mayue; Zhu, Kai; Su, Zongming; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Song, Yu; Chen, Xuexian; Liao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Haixia

    2016-11-03

    As the essential element of a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG), friction layers play key roles that determine the device performance, which can be enhanced by material selection and surface modification. In this work, we have embedded aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface as the effective dielectric layer to donate electrons. This layer not only increases the electron generation for the output, but also shows notable stretchability. The length and the properties of the aligned CNTs can be controlled precisely. Using the 40 μm CNT as an example, the fabricated CNT-PDMS TENG shows an output voltage of 150 V and a current density of 60 mA m(-2), which are 250% and 300% enhancement compared to the TENG using directly doped PDMS/multiwall carbon nanotubes, respectively. The maximum power density of this TENG reaches 4.62 W m(-2) at an external load of 30 MΩ. The TENG has demonstrated superior stability during cyclic measurement of over 12 000 cycles. Besides, the aligned CNT-PDMS film shows superhydrophobicity (154°) and good sheet resistance of 280 Ω sq(-1). This stretchable aligned CNT-PDMS film can be universally utilized as a positive triboelectric layer pairing with polymeric materials such as polyethylene terephthalate, polyimide, PDMS and polytetrafluoroethylene for TENGs. This work provides an effective method of structure design for flexible and stretchable nanogenerators.

  13. Analysis of a wedge prism to perform small-angle beam deviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senderakova, Dagmar; Strba, Anton

    2003-07-01

    The contribution is to present both the theoretical and experimental analysis of a wedge prism, which allows us to perform very small angle deviation of a passing beam in a simply way. No high precise steering element is necessary. The results of the theoretical analysis, i.e. the dependence of the propagation vector on the angle of incidence had been verified experimentally, using both Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a holographic grating. The results obtained have proved the advantage of the method proposed, which may be of great importance anywhere if small-angle deviation of propagation wave vector is needed.

  14. Portable microwave test packages for beam-waveguide antenna performance evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, Tom Y.; Stewart, Scott R.; Franco, Manuel M.

    1992-01-01

    Portable microwave test packages used to evaluate a new 34-m-diameter beam-waveguide (BWG) antenna are described. The experimental methodology involved transporting test packages to different focal points of the BWG system and making noise temperature, antenna efficiency, and holography measurements. Comparisons of data measured at the different focal points enabled determinations of performance degradations caused by various mirrors in the BWG system. It is shown that, due to remarkable stabilities and accuracies of radiometric data obtained through the use of the microwave test packages, degradations caused by the BWG system were successfully determined.

  15. Investigation and performance assessment of hydraulic schemes for the beam screen cooling for the Future Circular Collider of hadron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotnig, C.; Tavian, L.; Brenn, G.

    2017-02-01

    The international study at CERN of a possible future circular collider (FCC) considers an option for a very high energy hadron-hadron collider located in a quasi-circular underground tunnel of about 100 km of length. The technical segmentation of the collider foresees continuously cooled sections of up to 10.4 km; throughout the entire section length, more than 600 kW of heat mainly generated by the beam synchrotron radiation must be removed from the beam screen circuits at a mean temperature of 50 K. The cryogenic system has to be designed to extract the heat load dependably with a high-efficiency refrigeration process. Reliable and efficient cooling of the FCC beam screen in all possible operational modes requires a solid basic design as well as well-matched components in the final arrangement. After illustrating the decision making process leading to the selection of an elementary hydraulic scheme, this paper presents preliminary conceptual designs of the FCC beam screen cooling system and compares the different schemes regarding the technical advantages and disadvantages with respect to the exergetic efficiency.

  16. Thin resist performance comparison for advanced e-beam reticle fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hideo; Higuchi, Takao; Asakawa, Keishi; Yokoya, Yasunori; Yamashiro, Kazuhide

    1997-07-01

    There seem to be much activities, in the mask-making industry at present, in re-establishing a new proces technique and condition for conventional high-molecular polymer resists such as EBR-9TM series rather than in seeking an alternative. This is because of infeasibility of an alternative such as DNQ-Novolak or chemical amplified resist. And 'thin resist' is a promising option for advanced e-beam reticle fabrication. We had investigated optimum coating thickness as thin resist, baking condition and exposure dose firstly on PBS and ZEP- 7000TM, and reported the results and its efficacy in pattering performance at 16th BACUS annual symposium in '96. This time, we tried to determine the optimum coating conditions for EBR-9, EBR-9 HS31TM and ZEP-810TM, and evaluated patterning performance, by which all major five resists to be covered for a comparison. We examined pre-baking latitude, coating thickness latitude, exposure dose latitude, develop latitude, and pattern linearity and fidelity, under the optimum conditions, in order to see advantages and disadvantages of thin resist coating on each individual resist. This paper describes our investigation results on the optimum condition in coating thickness, pre-baking and exposure dose, as well as comparison results on patterning performance of thin resist coating between major five conventional resists, PBSTM, EBR-9, EBR-9 HS31, ZEP-810 and ZEP-7000, for advanced e-beam reticle fabrication.

  17. Beam-waveguide antenna performance predictions with comparisons to experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathker, Dan A.; Veruttipong, Watt; Otoshi, Tom Y.; Cramer, Paul W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of a NASA/JPL antenna project is presented, with specific focus on the methodology used to predict the microwave performance of a 34-m-diameter beam-waveguide (BWG) reflector antenna, designated DSS 13 (Deep Space Station 13). DSS 13 is the R&D facility serving the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network. Microwave performance predictions as well as a summary of test results for the antenna are given. The antenna has Cassegrain and centerline BWG operating modes at X-band (8.450-GHz) and Ka-band (32-GHz) frequencies. The performance predictions regarding antenna area efficiencies, corresponding beampeak gains, and for several (but not all) operating noise temperatures are found to agree reasonably well with the corresponding experimental results.

  18. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of carbon nanotubes at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Jiang, P H; Liu, H J; Fan, D D; Cheng, L; Wei, J; Zhang, J; Liang, J H; Shi, J

    2015-11-07

    The electronic and transport properties of the (10, 0) single-walled carbon nanotube are studied by performing first-principles calculations and semi-classical Boltzmann theory. It is found that the (10, 0) tube exhibits a considerably large Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity which are highly desirable for good thermoelectric materials. Together with the lattice thermal conductivity predicted by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, the room temperature ZT value of the (10, 0) tube is estimated to be 0.15 for p-type carriers. Moreover, the ZT value exhibits strong temperature dependence and can reach to 0.77 at 1000 K. Such a ZT value can be further enhanced to as high as 1.9 by isotopic substitution and chemisorptions of hydrogen on the tube surface.

  19. Toward high-performance digital logic technology with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tulevski, George S; Franklin, Aaron D; Frank, David; Lobez, Jose M; Cao, Qing; Park, Hongsik; Afzali, Ali; Han, Shu-Jen; Hannon, James B; Haensch, Wilfried

    2014-09-23

    The slow-down in traditional silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) scaling (Moore's law) has created an opportunity for a disruptive innovation to bring the semiconductor industry into a postsilicon era. Due to their ultrathin body and ballistic transport, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the intrinsic transport and scaling properties to usher in this new era. The remaining challenges are largely materials-related and include obtaining purity levels suitable for logic technology, placement of CNTs at very tight (∼5 nm) pitch to allow for density scaling and source/drain contact scaling. This review examines the potential performance advantages of a CNT-based computing technology, outlines the remaining challenges, and describes the recent progress on these fronts. Although overcoming these issues will be challenging and will require a large, sustained effort from both industry and academia, the recent progress in the field is a cause for optimism that these materials can have an impact on future technologies.

  20. Single-walled carbon nanotubes for high-performance electronics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-jen

    2013-10-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) could replace silicon in high-performance electronics with their exceptional electrical properties and intrinsic ultra-thin body. During the past five years, the major focus of this field is gradually shifting from proof-of-concept prototyping in academia to technology development in industry with emphasis on manufacturability and integration issues. This article reviews recent advances, starting with experimental and modeling works that evaluate the potential of adopting SWNTs in ultimately scaled transistors. Techniques to separate nanotubes according to their electronic types and assemble them into aligned arrays are then discussed, followed by a description of the engineering aspects in their implementation in integrated circuits and systems. A concluding discussion provides some perspectives on future challenges and research opportunities.

  1. Ion beam induced charge collection (IBICC) from integrated circuit test structures using a 10 MeV carbon microbeam

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, B. N.; El Bouanani, M.; Duggan, J. L.; McDaniel, F. D.; Renfrow, S. N.; Doyle, B. L.; Walsh, D. S.; Aton, T. J.

    1999-06-10

    As feature sizes of Integrated Circuits (ICs) continue to shrink, the sensitivity of these devices, particularly SRAMs and DRAMs, to natural radiation is increasing. In this paper, the Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) technique is utilized to simulate neutron-induced Si recoil effects in ICs. The IBICC measurements, conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories, employed a 10 MeV carbon microbeam with 1{mu}m diameter spot to scan test structures on specifically designed ICs. With the aid of IC layout information, an analysis of the charge collection efficiency from different test areas is presented.

  2. All-carbon based graphene field effect transistor with graphitic electrodes fabricated by e-beam direct writing on PMMA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Yu, Yayun; Zheng, Xiaoming; Qin, Shiqiao; Wang, Fei; Fang, Jingyue; Wang, Guang; Wang, Chaocheng; Wang, Li; Peng, Gang; Zhang, Xue-Ao

    2015-07-21

    A so called all-carbon based graphene field effect transistor (GFET) in which the electrodes are composed of graphite-like nano-sheets instead of metals in the traditional devices is fabricated by one-step e-beam direct writing (EBDW). It is also found that the graphite-like nano-sheets in electrodes are perpendicular to the channel graphene, which is confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The one-step fabrication of the carbonaceous electrodes is more convenient and lower-cost comparing to the preparation of traditional metal electrodes and can be applied to many other nano-electronic devices.

  3. High-current long-duration uniform electron beam generation in a diode with multicapillary carbon-epoxy cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Queller, T.; Gleizer, J. Z.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2013-09-28

    The results of reproducibly generating an electron beam with a current density of up to 5 kA/cm{sup 2}, without the cathode-anode gap being shorted by the plasma formed inside the cathode carbon-epoxy capillaries, in a ∼350 kV, ∼600 ns diode, with and without an external guiding magnetic field, are presented. The cathode sustained hundreds of pulses without degradation of its emission properties. Time- and space-resolved emissions of the plasma and spectroscopy analyses were used to determine the cathode plasma's density, temperature, and expansion velocity.

  4. Charged particle’s flux measurement from PMMA irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agodi, C.; Battistoni, G.; Bellini, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Collamati, F.; Cuttone, G.; De Lucia, E.; De Napoli, M.; Di Domenico, A.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Fiore, S.; Gauzzi, P.; Iarocci, E.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Muraro, S.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Romano, F.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Vitale, E.; Voena, C.

    2012-09-01

    Hadrontherapy is an emerging technique in cancer therapy that uses beams of charged particles. To meet the improved capability of hadrontherapy in matching the dose release with the cancer position, new dose-monitoring techniques need to be developed and introduced into clinical use. The measurement of the fluxes of the secondary particles produced by the hadron beam is of fundamental importance in the design of any dose-monitoring device and is eagerly needed to tune Monte Carlo simulations. We report the measurements carried out with charged secondary particles produced from the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, with a poly-methyl methacrylate target. Charged secondary particles, produced at 90° with respect to the beam axis, have been tracked with a drift chamber, while their energy and time of flight have been measured by means of a LYSO scintillator. Secondary protons have been identified exploiting the energy and time-of-flight information, and their emission region has been reconstructed backtracking from the drift chamber to the target. Moreover, a position scan of the target indicates that the reconstructed emission region follows the movement of the expected Bragg peak position. Exploiting the reconstruction of the emission region, an accuracy on the Bragg peak determination in the submillimeter range has been obtained. The measured differential production rate for protons produced with EProdkin > 83 MeV and emitted at 90° with respect to the beam line is dNP/(dNCdΩ) (EProdkin > 83 MeV, θ = 90°) = (2.69 ± 0.08stat ± 0.12sys) × 10-4 sr-1.

  5. Synthesis of carbon-supported PtRh random alloy nanoparticles using electron beam irradiation reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yoshiyuki; Seino, Satoshi; Okazaki, Tomohisa; Akita, Tomoki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2016-05-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts of PtRh supported on carbon were synthesized using an electron beam irradiation reduction method. The PtRh nanoparticle catalysts were composed of particles 2-3 nm in size, which were well dispersed on the surface of the carbon support nanoparticles. Analyses of X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the PtRh nanoparticles have a randomly alloyed structure. The lattice constant of the PtRh nanoparticles showed good correlation with Vegard's law. These results are explained by the radiochemical formation process of the PtRh nanoparticles. Catalytic activities of PtRh/C nanoparticles for ethanol oxidation reaction were found to be higher than those obtained with Pt/C.

  6. Free vibration of super-graphene carbon nanotube networks via a beam element based coarse-grained method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ruifeng; Wang, Lifeng; He, Xiaoqiao

    2017-08-01

    A new beam element based coarse-grained model is developed to investigate efficiently the mechanical behavior of a large system of super-graphene carbon nanotube (SGCNT) networks with all boundaries clamped supported. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of the SGCNT networks made of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameters and lengths are obtained via the proposed coarse-grained model. The applicability of the coarse-grained model for the SGCNT networks is verified by comparison with the molecular structural mechanics model. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes obtained via the coarse-grained model agree well with the results obtained from the molecular structural mechanics method, indicating that the coarse-grained model developed in this study can be applied for the dynamic prediction of the SGCNT networks.

  7. External Beam Boost for Cancer of the Cervix Uteri When Intracavitary Therapy Cannot Be Performed

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, Lisa Helen Swindell, Ric; Livsey, Jacqueline E.; Hunter, Robin D.; Davidson, Susan E.

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the outcome of patients treated with radical radiotherapy for cervical cancer who received an external beam boost, in place of intracavitary brachytherapy (ICT), after irradiation to the whole pelvis. Methods and Materials: Case notes were reviewed for all patients treated in this way in a single center between 1996 and 2004. Patient and tumor details, the reasons why ICT was not possible, and treatment outcome were documented. Results: Forty-four patients were identified. The mean age was 56.4 years (range, 26-88 years). Clinical International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics or radiologic stage for Stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively, was 16%, 48%, 27%, and 7%. A total radiation dose of 54-70 Gy was given (75% received {>=}60 Gy). Reasons for ICT not being performed were technical limitations in 73%, comorbidity or isolation limitations in 23%, and patient choice in 4%. The median follow-up was 2.3 years. Recurrent disease was seen in 48%, with a median time to recurrence of 2.3 years. Central recurrence was seen in 16 of the 21 patients with recurrent disease. The 5-year overall survival rate was 49.3%. The 3-year cancer-specific survival rate by stage was 100%, 70%, and 42% for Stages I, II, and III, respectively. Late Grades 1 and 2 bowel, bladder, and vaginal toxicity were seen in 41%. Late Grade 3 toxicity was seen in 2%. Conclusion: An external beam boost is a reasonable option after external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis when it is not possible to perform ICT.

  8. Performance assessment of natural gas and biogas fueled molten carbonate fuel cells in carbon capture configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barelli, Linda; Bidini, Gianni; Campanari, Stefano; Discepoli, Gabriele; Spinelli, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The ability of MCFCs as carbon dioxide concentrator is an alternative solution among the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies to reduce the CO2 emission of an existing plant, providing energy instead of implying penalties. Moreover, the fuel flexibility exhibited by MCFCs increases the interest on such a solution. This paper provides the performance characterization of MCFCs operated in CCS configuration and fed with either natural gas or biogas. Experimental results are referred to a base CCS unit constituted by a MCFC stack fed from a reformer and integrated with an oxycombustor. A comparative analysis is carried out to evaluate the effect of fuel composition on energy efficiency and CO2 capture performance. A higher CO2 removal ability is revealed for the natural feeding case, bringing to a significant reduction in MCFC total area (-11.5%) and to an increase in produced net power (+13%). Moreover, the separated CO2 results in 89% (natural gas) and 86.5% (biogas) of the CO2 globally delivered by the CCS base unit. Further investigation will be carried out to provide a comprehensive assessment of the different solutions eco-efficiency considering also the biogas source and availability.

  9. Carbon Dots as Nontoxic and High-Performance Fluorescence Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haifang; Lu, Fushen; Luo, Pengju G.; Cao, Li; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Liu, Jia-Hui; Liu, Yuanfang; Chen, Min; Huang, Yipu; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent carbon dots (small carbon nanoparticles with the surface passivated by oligomeric PEG molecules) were evaluated for their cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity and also for their optical imaging performance in reference to that of the commercially supplied CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. The results suggested that the carbon dots were biocompatible, and their performance as fluorescence imaging agents was competitive. The implication to the use of carbon dots for in vitro and in vivo applications is discussed. PMID:20357893

  10. Comparison of the performance of two NCT treatment planning systems using the therapeutic beam of the RA-6 reactor.

    PubMed

    Casal, M R; González, S J; Blaumann, H R; Longhino, J; Calzetta Larrieu, O A; Wemple, C A

    2004-11-01

    This work evaluates the performance of two NCT treatment planning systems: NCTPlan, developed by the CNEA and the Harvard-MIT group, and SERA, developed by the INEEL/Montana State University group. The study was performed in some simple geometries with the therapeutical hyperthermal beam of the RA-6 facility at Bariloche, Argentina. The first geometry was a rectangular phantom and calculations and measurements were made along the central beam axis and along a parellel axis, 4 cm apart from the central beam axis. Measurements and calculations were also performed in a cylindrical phantom, to explore the behavior of the treatment planning systems in a geometry simulating an extremity, in accordance with the CNEA clinical protocol. Comments on differences in source definitions and cross sections libraries are also included in the text. It can be seen that both codes give acceptable results on the central beam axis and on a lateral axis, showing good agreement with experimental results.

  11. Computer and experimental modeling of target performance in particle beams and fusion or fission environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptelov, E. A.; Lebedev, S. G.; Matveev, V. A.; Sobolevsky, N. M.; Strebkov, Yu. S.; Subbotin, A. V.

    2002-03-01

    Computer simulation of target performance in particle beams for fusion or fission irradiation is considered. Such simulation is realized by means of a set of Russian computer codes SHIELD, RADDAM, etc. The set can permit the full modeling of irradiation conditions of any possible installation in terms of such parameters as: point defect generation by irradiation; rate of accumulation of He atoms produced in nuclear reactions; rate of accumulation of H atoms; spectra of primary knock-on atoms in collision displacements and temperature of the sample under irradiation. The evidence of possibilities for the modeling of different irradiation conditions (for example, fusion) at the RADEX facility of the INR RAS is presented. RADEX is the irradiation channel located inside the proton target of the beam stop of the INR RAS linear proton accelerator with energy up to 600 MeV. The proton target is situated in the bottom part of target's cylindrical container and is formed by tungsten plates, which are covered with a titanium coating and cooled by light water. The RADEX irradiation channel is located asymmetrically relatively to the vertical axis of the cylinder. The proton beam enters the irradiation channel through the aluminum alloy first wall, having passed through some of the tungsten plates, all of thickness ˜4 cm. Besides the proton flux, the irradiation channel is subjected to a neutron flux of a spallation spectrum. The location of the irradiation channel of the RADEX facility can be changed by rotation of the proton target about the vertical axis. There are six possible different positions of the irradiation channel, with angles of 0°, 60°, 120°, 180°, 240°, 300°, 360° relative to the proton beam direction. In the position 0, the proton and neutron fluxes are maximal in the irradiation channel, and the spectrum of primary knock-on atoms in the irradiated sample will be very hard due to the predominance of high-energy protons in the irradiation field. The

  12. Development of long-lived thick carbon stripper foils for high energy heavy ion accelerators by a heavy ion beam sputtering method

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Kawasaki, Katsunori; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2013-04-19

    In the past decade, we have developed extremely long-lived carbon stripper foils of 1-50 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} thickness prepared by a heavy ion beam sputtering method. These foils were mainly used for low energy heavy ion beams. Recently, high energy negative Hydrogen and heavy ion accelerators have started to use carbon stripper foils of over 100 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} in thickness. However, the heavy ion beam sputtering method was unsuccessful in production of foils thicker than about 50 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} because of the collapse of carbon particle build-up from substrates during the sputtering process. The reproduction probability of the foils was less than 25%, and most of them had surface defects. However, these defects were successfully eliminated by introducing higher beam energies of sputtering ions and a substrate heater during the sputtering process. In this report we describe a highly reproducible method for making thick carbon stripper foils by a heavy ion beam sputtering with a Krypton ion beam.

  13. Thermomechanical finite element simulations of selective electron beam melting processes: performance considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedlbauer, Daniel; Steinmann, Paul; Mergheim, Julia

    2014-07-01

    The present contribution is concerned with the macroscopic modelling of the selective electron beam melting process by using the finite element method. The modelling and simulation of the selective electron beam melting process involves various challenges: complex material behaviour, phase changes, thermomechanical coupling, high temperature gradients, different time and length scales etc. The present contribution focuses on performance considerations of solution approaches for thermomechanically coupled problems, i.e. the monolithic and the adiabatic split approach. The material model is restricted to nonlinear thermoelasticity with temperature-dependent material parameters. As a numerical example a straight scanning path is simulated, the predicted temperatures and stresses are analysed and the performance of the two algorithms is compared. The adiabatic split approach turned out to be much more efficient for linear thermomechanical problems, i.e. the solution time is three times less than with the monolithic approach. For nonlinear problems, stability issues necessitated the use of the Euler backward integration scheme, and therefore, the adiabatic split approach required small time steps for reasonable accuracy. Thus, for nonlinear problems and in combination with the Euler backward integration scheme, the monolithic solver turned out to be more efficient.

  14. Carbon ion beam is more effective to induce cell death in sphere-type A172 human glioblastoma cells compared with X-rays.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Momoko; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Yajima, Hirohiko; Izumi-Nakajima, Nakako; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Fujimori, Akira

    2014-12-01

    To obtain human glioblastoma cells A172 expressing stem cell-related protein and comparison of radiosensitivity in these cells with X-rays and carbon beam. Human monolayer-type A172 glioblastoma cells were maintained in normal medium with 10% bovine serum. In order to obtain sphere-type A172 cells the medium was replaced with serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors. Both types of A172 cells were irradiated with either X-rays or carbon ion beams and their radiosensitivity was evaluated. Serum-free medium induced expression of stem cell-related proteins in A172 cells along with the neurosphere-like appearance. These sphere-type cells were found resistant to both X-rays and carbon ion beams. Phosphorylation of histone H2A family member X persisted for a longer period in the cells exposed to carbon ion beams than in those exposed to X-rays and it disappeared quicker in the sphere type than in the monolayer type. Relative radioresistance of the sphere type cells was smaller for carbon ion beams than for X-rays. We demonstrated that glioblastoma A172 cells with induced stem cell-related proteins turned resistant to irradiation. Accelerated heavy ion particles may have advantage over X-rays in overcoming the tumor resistance due to cell stemness.

  15. [Performance of new solid carbon source materials for denitrification].

    PubMed

    Shao, Liu; Xu, Zu-Xin; Wang, Sheng; Jin, Wei; Yin, Hai-Long

    2011-08-01

    Organic carbon is needed as the electron donor in the process of reduction of nitrate transformation to nitrogen gas, which is essential for biological denitrification. Based on previous research, agriculture wastes including corncob, rice hull, rice straw and sawdust were selected as potential carbon source for denitrification. Using the static organic material of carbon source leaching kinetics test and orthogonal experiments of external factors on carbon emission process, carbon release and its mechanism of a variety of carbon materials were studied. Study showed that release process of various types of carbon source materials follows the second dynamics formula, the release curve displayed a better double-reciprocal relationship. It revealed that release amount of rice straw was the highest and sawdust was the lowest. Results showed that corncob could better be used as carbon source for denitrification. Orthogonal test indicated that the increasing of solid-liquid ratio and water temperature would lead to an enhanced release capacity of carbon, however, the change of pH had no significant effect on release capacity of carbon; according to significant degree of water temperature, pH, solid-liquid ratio impacted on the carbon release, it was sorted by solid-liquid ratio > temperature > pH.

  16. High performance gratings for DFB lasers fabricated by direct-write e-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steingrüber, R.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-10-01

    The fabrication of high performance gratings for distributed feedback (DFB) lasers by direct-write (DW) electron-beam lithography (EBL) is presented. This paper starts with a short introduction of the grating theory and various types of gratings commonly used in DFB lasers, laying out resolution requirements and other fabrication challenges. The development and optimization process of the adopted EBL technology is then disclosed to address these challenges. In the end, the state-of-the-art laser performance is demonstrated, validating the technology and also paving ways for more advanced applications in the modern optical networks. We concentrate on grating fabrication technology of DFB lasers for telecommunication applications as the technology has been continuously developed at Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI) for more than two decades.

  17. High Performance Palladium Supported on Nanoporous Carbon under Anhydrous Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zehui; Ling, Ying; Zhang, Yunfeng; Xu, Guodong

    2016-11-01

    Due to the high cost of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), replacing platinum (Pt) with some inexpensive metal was carried out. Here, we deposited palladium nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) on nanoporous carbon (NC) after wrapping by poly[2,2‧-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5‧-bibenzimidazole] (PyPBI) doped with phosphoric acid (PA) and the Pd-NPs size was successfully controlled by varying the weight ratio between Pd precursor and carbon support doped with PA. The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) fabricated from the optimized electrocatalyst with 0.05 mgPd cm-2 for both anode and cathode sides showed a power density of 76 mW cm-2 under 120 °C without any humidification, which was comparable to the commercial CB/Pt, 89 mW cm-2 with 0.45 mgPt cm-2 loaded in both anode and cathode. Meanwhile, the power density of hybrid MEA with 0.45 mgPt cm-2 in cathode and 0.05 mgPd cm-2 in anode reached 188 mW cm-2. The high performance of the Pt-free electrocatalyst was attributed to the porous structure enhancing the gas diffusion and the PyPBI-PA facilitating the proton conductivity in catalyst layer. Meanwhile, the durability of Pd electrocatalyst was enhanced by coating with acidic polymer. The newly fabricated Pt-free electrocatalyst is extremely promising for reducing the cost in the high-temperature PEFCs.

  18. High Performance Palladium Supported on Nanoporous Carbon under Anhydrous Condition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zehui; Ling, Ying; Zhang, Yunfeng; Xu, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high cost of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), replacing platinum (Pt) with some inexpensive metal was carried out. Here, we deposited palladium nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) on nanoporous carbon (NC) after wrapping by poly[2,2′-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5′-bibenzimidazole] (PyPBI) doped with phosphoric acid (PA) and the Pd-NPs size was successfully controlled by varying the weight ratio between Pd precursor and carbon support doped with PA. The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) fabricated from the optimized electrocatalyst with 0.05 mgPd cm−2 for both anode and cathode sides showed a power density of 76 mW cm−2 under 120 °C without any humidification, which was comparable to the commercial CB/Pt, 89 mW cm−2 with 0.45 mgPt cm−2 loaded in both anode and cathode. Meanwhile, the power density of hybrid MEA with 0.45 mgPt cm−2 in cathode and 0.05 mgPd cm−2 in anode reached 188 mW cm−2. The high performance of the Pt-free electrocatalyst was attributed to the porous structure enhancing the gas diffusion and the PyPBI-PA facilitating the proton conductivity in catalyst layer. Meanwhile, the durability of Pd electrocatalyst was enhanced by coating with acidic polymer. The newly fabricated Pt-free electrocatalyst is extremely promising for reducing the cost in the high-temperature PEFCs. PMID:27811971

  19. Cationic concentration effects on electron beam cured of carbon-epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitsuji, D. A.; Marinucci, G.; Evora, M. C.; Silva, L. G. A.

    2010-03-01

    Electron beam (e-beam) curing is a technology that offers advantages over the thermal curing process, that usually requires high temperature and are time-consuming. E-beam curing is faster and occurs at low temperatures that help reduce residual mechanical stresses in a thermoset composite. The aim of the present study is to analyze the effects of cationic initiator (diaryliodonium hexafluoroantimonate) ranged from 1 to 3 wt% in DGEBA (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) epoxy resin when cured by a 1.5 MeV electron beam. The specimens were cured to a total dose of 200.4 kGy for 40 min. Analyses by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) show that the e-beam irradiated samples with 2 wt% cationic initiator were 96% cured obtained a glass transition temperature (tan δ) of 167 °C. The same epoxy resin, thermally cured for 16 h with an anhydride hardener, reached a Tg (tan δ) of 136 °C. So, the irradiated sample had its Tg increased approximately 20% and the curing process was much less time consuming.

  20. Recent advances in electron-beam curing of carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coqueret, Xavier; Krzeminski, Mickael; Ponsaud, Philippe; Defoort, Brigitte

    2009-07-01

    Cross-linking polymerization initiated by high-energy radiation is a very attractive technique for the fabrication of high-performance composite materials. The method offers many advantages compared to conventional energy- and time-consuming thermal curing processes. Free radical and cationic poly-addition chemistries have been investigated in some details by various research groups along the previous years. A high degree of control over curing kinetics and material properties can be exerted by adjusting the composition of matrix precursors as well as by acting on process parameters. However, the comparison with state-of-the-art thermally cured composites revealed the lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured composites and the higher brittleness of the radiation-cured matrix. Improving fiber-matrix adhesion and upgrading polymer network toughness are thus two major challenges in this area. We have investigated several points related to these issues, and particularly the reduction of the matrix shrinkage on curing, the wettability of carbon fibers, the design of fiber-matrix interface and the use of thermoplastic toughening agents. Significant improvements were achieved on transverse strain at break by applying original surface treatments on the fibers so as to induce covalent coupling with the matrix. A drastic enhancement of the K IC value exceeding 2 MPa m 1/2 was also obtained for acrylate-based matrices toughened with high T g thermoplastics.

  1. Design and performance of coded aperture optical elements for the CESR-TA x-ray beam size monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, J. P.; Chatterjee, A.; Conolly, C.; Edwards, E.; Ehrlichman, M. P.; Flanagan, J. W.; Fontes, E.; Heltsley, B. K.; Lyndaker, A.; Peterson, D. P.; Rider, N. T.; Rubin, D. L.; Seeley, R.; Shanks, J.

    2014-12-01

    We describe the design and performance of optical elements for an x-ray beam size monitor (xBSM), a device measuring e+ and e- beam sizes in the CESR-TA storage ring. The device can measure vertical beam sizes of 10 - 100 μm on a turn-by-turn, bunch-by-bunch basis at e± beam energies of ~ 2 - 5 GeV. x-rays produced by a hard-bend magnet pass through a single- or multiple-slit (coded aperture) optical element onto a detector. The coded aperture slit pattern and thickness of masking material forming that pattern can both be tuned for optimal resolving power. We describe several such optical elements and show how well predictions of simple models track measured performances.

  2. Aligned Carbon Nanotubes for High-Performance Films and Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liwen

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with extraordinary properties and thus many potential applications have been predicted to be the best reinforcements for the next-generation multifunctional composite materials. Difficulties exist in transferring the most use of the unprecedented properties of individual CNTs to macroscopic forms of CNT assemblies. Therefore, this thesis focuses on two main goals: 1) discussing the issues that influence the performance of bulk CNT products, and 2) fabricating high-performance dry CNT films and composite films with an understanding of the fundamental structure-property relationship in these materials. Dry CNT films were fabricated by a winding process using CNT arrays with heights of 230 mum, 300 im and 360 mum. The structures of the as-produced films, as well as their mechanical and electrical properties were examined in order to find out the effects of different CNT lengths. It was found that the shorter CNTs synthesized by shorter time in the CVD furnace exhibited less structural defects and amorphous carbon, resulting in more compact packing and better nanotube alignment when made into dry films, thus, having better mechanical and electrical performance. A novel microcombing approach was developed to mitigate the CNT waviness and alignment in the dry films, and ultrahigh mechanical properties and exceptional electrical performance were obtained. This method utilized a pair of sharp surgical blades with microsized features at the blade edges as micro-combs to, for the first time, disentangle and straighten the wavy CNTs in the dry-drawn CNT sheet at single-layer level. The as-combed CNT sheet exhibited high level of nanotube alignment and straightness, reduced structural defects, and enhanced nanotube packing density. The dry CNT films produced by microcombing had a very high Young's modulus of 172 GPa, excellent tensile strength of 3.2 GPa, and unprecedented electrical conductivity of 1.8x10 5 S/m, which were records for CNT films or

  3. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams.

    PubMed

    Seravalli, E; de Boer, M; Geurink, F; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schippers, J M; van Eijk, C W E; Voss, B

    2008-09-07

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies.

  4. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seravalli, E.; de Boer, M.; Geurink, F.; Huizenga, J.; Kreuger, R.; Schippers, J. M.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Voss, B.

    2008-09-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies.

  5. e-beam irradiation effects on IR absorption bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Masao; Nagao, Katsunori; Ikemoto, Yuka; Okazaki, Toshiya; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Kawakami, Akira; Kataura, Hiromichi; Umezu, Ikurou; Ando, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the absorption and Raman spectral change induced by the irradiation of e-beam. By the irradiation of e-beam on SWNTs thin films, the intensity of defect related Raman band increase, and the peak energy of IR absorption bands shift to the higher energy side. These results indicate that the origin of infrared band is due to the plasmon resonance of finite-length SWNT. We have estimated the effective tube length and defect density from IR absorption peak energy.

  6. Study on laser and infrared attenuation performance of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang-cui; Liu, Qing-hai; Dai, Meng-yan; Cheng, Xiang; Fang, Guo-feng; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, the weapon systems of laser and infrared (IR) imaging guidance have been widely used in modern warfare because of their high precision and strong anti-interference. However, military smoke, a rapid and effective passive jamming method, can effectively counteract the attack of precision-guided weapons by their scattering and absorbing effects. The traditional smoke has good visible light (0.4-0.76μm) obscurant performance, but hardly any effects to other electromagnetic wave bands while the weapon systems of laser and IR imaging guidance usually work in broad band, including the near-infrared (1-3μm), middle-infrared (3-5μm), far-infrared (8-14μm), and so on. Accordingly, exploiting new effective obscurant materials has attracted tremendous interest worldwide nowadays. As is known, the nano-structured materials have lots of unique properties comparing with the traditional materials suggesting that they might be the perfect alternatives to solve the problems above. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are well-ordered, all-carbon hollow graphitic nano-structured materials with a high aspect ratio, lengths from several hundred nanometers to several millimeters. CNTs possess many unique intrinsic physical-chemical properties and are investigated in many areas reported by the previous studies. However, no application research about CNTs in smoke technology field is reported yet. In this paper, the attenuation performances of CNTs smoke to laser and IR were assessed in 20m3 smoke chamber. The testing wavebands employed in experiments are 1.06μm and 10.6μm laser, 3-5μm and 8-14μm IR radiation. The main parameters were obtained included the attenuation rate, transmission rate, mass extinction coefficient, etc. The experimental results suggest that CNTs smoke exhibits excellent attenuation ability to the broadband IR radiation. Their mass extinction coefficients are all above 1m2·g-1. Nevertheless, the mass extinction coefficients vary with the sampling time

  7. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Tribo-Performance of Brake Friction Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Tej; Patnaik, Amar; Satapathy, Bhabani K.

    2011-12-01

    Brake friction composites filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been fabricated and evaluated for their tribo-performance. The tribological behavior of the frictional composites has been evaluated on a krauss testing machine as per the ECE regulations. The friction performance (μP), frictions fade (μF) and friction recovery (μR) gets enhanced with the addition of carbon nanotubes. The wear performance and brake pad thickness loss of the composites decreased with the increase in carbon nanotubes.

  8. PERFORMING DIAGNOSTICS ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE VISION BEAM LINE TO ELIMINATE HIGH VIBRATION LEVELS AND PROVIDE A SUSTAINABLE OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoy, Blake W

    2014-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides variable energy neutrons for a variety of experiments. The neutrons proceed down beam lines to the experiment hall, which houses a variety of experiments and test articles. Each beam line has one or more neutron choppers which filter the neutron beam based on the neutron energy by using a rotating neutron absorbing material passing through the neutron beam. Excessive vibration of the Vision beam line, believed to be caused by the T0 chopper, prevented the Vision beam line from operating at full capacity. This problem had been addressed several times by rebalancing/reworking the T0 beam chopper but the problem stubbornly persisted. To determine the cause of the high vibration, dynamic testing was performed. Twenty-seven accelerometer and motor current channels of data were collected during drive up, drive down, coast down, and steady-state conditions; resonance testing and motor current signature analysis were also performed. The data was analyzed for traditional mechanical/machinery issues such as misalignment and imbalance using time series analysis, frequency domain analysis, and operating deflection shape analysis. The analysis showed that the chopper base plate was experiencing an amplified response to the excitation provided by the T0 beam chopper. The amplified response was diagnosed to be caused by higher than expected base plate flexibility, possibly due to improper grouting or loose floor anchors. Based on this diagnosis, a decision was made to dismantle the beam line chopper and remount the base plate. Neutron activation of the beam line components make modifications to the beam line especially expensive and time consuming due to the radiation handling requirements, so this decision had significant financial and schedule implications. It was found that the base plate was indeed loose because of improper grouting during its initial installation. The base plate was

  9. Performance of the beam position monitor for the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Y.; Kahana, E.

    1996-09-01

    Performance measurement and analysis of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beam position monitor (BPM) electronics are reported. The results indicate a BPM resolution of 0.16 μmṡmA/√Hz in terms of the single-bunch current and BPM bandwidth. For the miniature insertion device (ID) BPM, the result was 0.1 μmṡmA/√Hz. The improvement is due to the 3.6 times higher position sensitivity (in the vertical plane), which is partially canceled by the lower button signal by a factor of 2.3. The minimum single-bunch current required was roughly 0.03 mA. The long-term drift of the BPM electronics independent of the actual beam motion has measured at 2 μm/hr, which settled after approximately 1.5 hours. This drift can be attributed mainly to the temperature effect. Implications of the BPM resolution limit on the global and local orbit feedback systems for the APS storage ring will also be discussed.