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Sample records for performance evaluation model

  1. Model Performance Evaluation and Scenario Analysis (MPESA)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Model Performance Evaluation and Scenario Analysis (MPESA) assesses the performance with which models predict time series data. The tool was developed Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF) and the Stormwater Management Model (SWMM)

  2. Performance Evaluation of Dense Gas Dispersion Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touma, Jawad S.; Cox, William M.; Thistle, Harold; Zapert, James G.

    1995-03-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a study to evaluate the performance of seven dense gas dispersion models using data from three field experiments. Two models (DEGADIS and SLAB) are in the public domain and the other five (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS, SAFEMODE, and TRACE) are proprietary. The field data used are the Desert Tortoise pressurized ammonia releases, Burro liquefied natural gas spill tests, and the Goldfish anhydrous hydrofluoric acid spill experiments. Desert Tortoise and Goldfish releases were simulated as horizontal jet releases, and Burro as a liquid pool. Performance statistics were used to compare maximum observed concentrations and plume half-width to those predicted by each model. Model performance varied and no model exhibited consistently good performance across all three databases. However, when combined across the three databases, all models performed within a factor of 2. Problems encountered are discussed in order to help future investigators.

  3. Model Performance Evaluation and Scenario Analysis (MPESA) Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    This tool consists of two parts: model performance evaluation and scenario analysis (MPESA). The model performance evaluation consists of two components: model performance evaluation metrics and model diagnostics. These metrics provides modelers with statistical goodness-of-fit m...

  4. Performance Evaluation Model for Application Layer Firewalls

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wu; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Jiangchuan

    2016-01-01

    Application layer firewalls protect the trusted area network against information security risks. However, firewall performance may affect user experience. Therefore, performance analysis plays a significant role in the evaluation of application layer firewalls. This paper presents an analytic model of the application layer firewall, based on a system analysis to evaluate the capability of the firewall. In order to enable users to improve the performance of the application layer firewall with limited resources, resource allocation was evaluated to obtain the optimal resource allocation scheme in terms of throughput, delay, and packet loss rate. The proposed model employs the Erlangian queuing model to analyze the performance parameters of the system with regard to the three layers (network, transport, and application layers). Then, the analysis results of all the layers are combined to obtain the overall system performance indicators. A discrete event simulation method was used to evaluate the proposed model. Finally, limited service desk resources were allocated to obtain the values of the performance indicators under different resource allocation scenarios in order to determine the optimal allocation scheme. Under limited resource allocation, this scheme enables users to maximize the performance of the application layer firewall. PMID:27893803

  5. Performance Evaluation Model for Application Layer Firewalls.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Shichang; Yang, Wu; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Jiangchuan

    2016-01-01

    Application layer firewalls protect the trusted area network against information security risks. However, firewall performance may affect user experience. Therefore, performance analysis plays a significant role in the evaluation of application layer firewalls. This paper presents an analytic model of the application layer firewall, based on a system analysis to evaluate the capability of the firewall. In order to enable users to improve the performance of the application layer firewall with limited resources, resource allocation was evaluated to obtain the optimal resource allocation scheme in terms of throughput, delay, and packet loss rate. The proposed model employs the Erlangian queuing model to analyze the performance parameters of the system with regard to the three layers (network, transport, and application layers). Then, the analysis results of all the layers are combined to obtain the overall system performance indicators. A discrete event simulation method was used to evaluate the proposed model. Finally, limited service desk resources were allocated to obtain the values of the performance indicators under different resource allocation scenarios in order to determine the optimal allocation scheme. Under limited resource allocation, this scheme enables users to maximize the performance of the application layer firewall.

  6. Optical Storage Performance Modeling and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behera, Bailochan; Singh, Harpreet

    1990-01-01

    Evaluates different types of storage media for long-term archival storage of large amounts of data. Existing storage media are reviewed, including optical disks, optical tape, magnetic storage, and microfilm; three models are proposed based on document storage requirements; performance analysis is considered; and cost effectiveness is discussed.…

  7. Performance Evaluation Modeling of Network Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clare, Loren P.; Jennings, Esther H.; Gao, Jay L.

    2003-01-01

    Substantial benefits are promised by operating many spatially separated sensors collectively. Such systems are envisioned to consist of sensor nodes that are connected by a communications network. A simulation tool is being developed to evaluate the performance of networked sensor systems, incorporating such metrics as target detection probabilities, false alarms rates, and classification confusion probabilities. The tool will be used to determine configuration impacts associated with such aspects as spatial laydown, and mixture of different types of sensors (acoustic, seismic, imaging, magnetic, RF, etc.), and fusion architecture. The QualNet discrete-event simulation environment serves as the underlying basis for model development and execution. This platform is recognized for its capabilities in efficiently simulating networking among mobile entities that communicate via wireless media. We are extending QualNet's communications modeling constructs to capture the sensing aspects of multi-target sensing (analogous to multiple access communications), unimodal multi-sensing (broadcast), and multi-modal sensing (multiple channels and correlated transmissions). Methods are also being developed for modeling the sensor signal sources (transmitters), signal propagation through the media, and sensors (receivers) that are consistent with the discrete event paradigm needed for performance determination of sensor network systems. This work is supported under the Microsensors Technical Area of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Advanced Sensors Collaborative Technology Alliance.

  8. Model Performance Evaluation and Scenario Analysis (MPESA) Tutorial

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The model performance evaluation consists of metrics and model diagnostics. These metrics provides modelers with statistical goodness-of-fit measures that capture magnitude only, sequence only, and combined magnitude and sequence errors.

  9. Evaluating Models of Human Performance: Safety-Critical Systems Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is part of panel discussion on Evaluating Models of Human Performance. The purpose of this panel is to discuss the increasing use of models in the world today and specifically focus on how to describe and evaluate models of human performance. My presentation will focus on discussions of generating distributions of performance, and the evaluation of different strategies for humans performing tasks with mixed initiative (Human-Automation) systems. I will also discuss issues with how to provide Human Performance modeling data to support decisions on acceptability and tradeoffs in the design of safety critical systems. I will conclude with challenges for the future.

  10. Models for evaluating the performability of degradable computing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L. T.

    1982-01-01

    Recent advances in multiprocessor technology established the need for unified methods to evaluate computing systems performance and reliability. In response to this modeling need, a general modeling framework that permits the modeling, analysis and evaluation of degradable computing systems is considered. Within this framework, several user oriented performance variables are identified and shown to be proper generalizations of the traditional notions of system performance and reliability. Furthermore, a time varying version of the model is developed to generalize the traditional fault tree reliability evaluation methods of phased missions.

  11. The CREATIVE Decontamination Performance Evaluation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Model to Describe Penetration of Skin by Sorbed Liquids by Contact”, CRDEC-CR-87100 5. Clarke, A., “Spreading and Imbibition of Liquid Drops on...δy and δz = f•δx δt ≤ δx2 2 D ( 2 + 1/f2) C @ next time step UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED Finite Difference Application Drop ...boundaries: 1) Drop : constant source until drop disappears 2) Base of substrate considered impenetrable 3) Sides and top of coupon allow mass to escape

  12. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 4: Program listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    All subprograms or routines associated with the solid rocket booster performance evaluation model are indexed in this computer listing. An alphanumeric list of each routine in the index is provided in a table of contents.

  13. Faculty performance evaluation: the CIPP-SAPS model.

    PubMed

    Mitcham, M

    1981-11-01

    The issues of faculty performance evaluation for allied health professionals are addressed. Daniel Stufflebeam's CIPP (content-input-process-product) model is introduced and its development in a CIPP-SAPS (self-administrative-peer-student) model is pursued. Data sources for the SAPS portion of the model are discussed. A suggestion for the use of the CIPP-SAPS model within a teaching contract plan is explored.

  14. Faculty Performance Evaluation: The CIPP-SAPS Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitcham, Maralynne

    1981-01-01

    The issues of faculty performance evaluation for allied health professionals are addressed. Daniel Stufflebeam's CIPP (content-imput-process-product) model is introduced and its development into a CIPP-SAPS (self-administrative-peer- student) model is pursued. (Author/CT)

  15. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    This users manual for the solid rocket booster performance evaluation model (SRB-II) contains descriptions of the model, the program options, the required program inputs, the program output format and the program error messages. SRB-II is written in FORTRAN and is operational on both the IBM 370/155 and the MSFC UNIVAC 1108 computers.

  16. Evaluating human performance modeling for system assessment: Promise and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Robert W.; Young, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The development and evaluation of computational human performance models is examined. An intention is to develop models which can be used to interact with system prototypes and simulations to perform system assessment. Currently LR is working on a set of models emulating cognitive, psychomotor, auditory, and visual activity for multiple operator positions of a command and control simulation system. These models, developed in conjunction with BBN Systems and Technologies, function within the simulation environment and allow for both unmanned system assessment and manned (human-in-loop) assessment of system interface and team interactions. These are relatively generic models with built-in flexibility which allows modification of some model parameters. These models have great potential for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of system design, test, and evaluation. However, the extent of the practical utility of these models is unclear. Initial verification efforts comparing model performance within the simulation to actual human operators on a similar, independent simulation have been performed and current efforts are directed at comparing human and model performance within the same simulation environment.

  17. Evaluation of performance of predictive models for deoxynivalenol in wheat.

    PubMed

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of two predictive models for deoxynivalenol contamination of wheat at harvest in the Netherlands, including the use of weather forecast data and external model validation. Data were collected in a different year and from different wheat fields than data used for model development. The two models were run for six preset scenarios, varying in the period for which weather forecast data were used, from zero-day (historical data only) to a 13-day period around wheat flowering. Model predictions using forecast weather data were compared to those using historical data. Furthermore, model predictions using historical weather data were evaluated against observed deoxynivalenol contamination of the wheat fields. Results showed that the use of weather forecast data rather than observed data only slightly influenced model predictions. The percent of correct model predictions, given a threshold of 1,250 μg/kg (legal limit in European Union), was about 95% for the two models. However, only three samples had a deoxynivalenol concentration above this threshold, and the models were not able to predict these samples correctly. It was concluded that two- week weather forecast data can reliable be used in descriptive models for deoxynivalenol contamination of wheat, resulting in more timely model predictions. The two models are able to predict lower deoxynivalenol contamination correctly, but model performance in situations with high deoxynivalenol contamination needs to be further validated. This will need years with conducive environmental conditions for deoxynivalenol contamination of wheat.

  18. New performance evaluation models for character detection in images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, YanWei; Ding, XiaoQing; Liu, ChangSong; Wang, Kongqiao

    2010-02-01

    Detection of characters regions is a meaningful research work for both highlighting region of interest and recognition for further information processing. A lot of researches have been performed on character localization and extraction and this leads to the great needs of performance evaluation scheme to inspect detection algorithms. In this paper, two probability models are established to accomplish evaluation tasks for different applications respectively. For highlighting region of interest, a Gaussian probability model, which simulates the property of a low-pass Gaussian filter of human vision system (HVS), was constructed to allocate different weights to different character parts. It reveals the greatest potential to describe the performance of detectors, especially, when the result detected is an incomplete character, where other methods cannot effectively work. For the recognition destination, we also introduced a weighted probability model to give an appropriate description for the contribution of detection results to final recognition results. The validity of performance evaluation models proposed in this paper are proved by experiments on web images and natural scene images. These models proposed in this paper may also be able to be applied in evaluating algorithms of locating other objects, like face detection and more wide experiments need to be done to examine the assumption.

  19. A Spectral Evaluation of Models Performances in Mediterranean Oak Woodlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, R.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Abramowitz, G.; Carrara, A.; Correia, A.; Kobayashi, H.; Papale, D.; Pearson, D.; Pereira, J.; Piao, S.; Rambal, S.; Sonnentag, O.

    2009-12-01

    Ecosystem processes are influenced by climatic trends at multiple temporal scales including diel patterns and other mid-term climatic modes, such as interannual and seasonal variability. Because interactions between biophysical components of ecosystem processes are complex, it is important to test how models perform in frequency (e.g. hours, days, weeks, months, years) and time (i.e. day of the year) domains in addition to traditional tests of annual or monthly sums. Here we present a spectral evaluation using wavelet time series analysis of model performance in seven Mediterranean Oak Woodlands that encompass three deciduous and four evergreen sites. We tested the performance of five models (CABLE, ORCHIDEE, BEPS, Biome-BGC, and JULES) on measured variables of gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET). In general, model performance fails at intermediate periods (e.g. weeks to months) likely because these models do not represent the water pulse dynamics that influence GPP and ET at these Mediterranean systems. To improve the performance of a model it is critical to identify first where and when the model fails. Only by identifying where a model fails we can improve the model performance and use them as prognostic tools and to generate further hypotheses that can be tested by new experiments and measurements.

  20. Performance evaluation and modeling techniques for parallel processors

    SciTech Connect

    Dimpsey, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis addresses the issue of application performance under real operational conditions. A technique is introduced which accurately models the behavior of an application in real workloads. The methodology can evaluate the performance of the application as well as predict the effects on performance of certain system design changes. The constructed model is based on measurements obtained during normal machine operation and captures various performance issues including multiprogramming and system overheads, and contentions for resources. Methodologies to measure multiprogramming overhead (MPO) are introduced and illustrated on an Alliant FX/8, an Alliant Fx/80, and the Cedar parallel supercomputer. The measurements collected suggest that multiprogramming and system overheads can significantly impact application performance. The mean MPO incurred by PERFECT benchmarks executing in real workloads on an Alliant FX/80 is found to consume 16% of the processing power. Flor applications executing Cedar, between 10% and 60% of the application completion time is attributable to overhead caused by multiprogramming. Measurements also identify a Cedar FORTRAN construct (SDOALL) which is susceptible to performance degradation due to multiprogramming. Using the MPO measurements, the application performance model discussed above is constructed for computationally bound, parallel jobs executing on an Alliant FX/80. It is shown that the model can predict application completion time under real workloads. This is illustrated with several examples from the Perfect Benchmark suite. It is also shown that the model can predict the performance impact of system design changes. For example, the completion times of applications under a new scheduling policy are predicted. The model-building methodology is then validated with a number of empirical experiments.

  1. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 1: Engineering description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The space shuttle solid rocket booster performance evaluation model (SRB-II) is made up of analytical and functional simulation techniques linked together so that a single pass through the model will predict the performance of the propulsion elements of a space shuttle solid rocket booster. The available options allow the user to predict static test performance, predict nominal and off nominal flight performance, and reconstruct actual flight and static test performance. Options selected by the user are dependent on the data available. These can include data derived from theoretical analysis, small scale motor test data, large motor test data and motor configuration data. The user has several options for output format that include print, cards, tape and plots. Output includes all major performance parameters (Isp, thrust, flowrate, mass accounting and operating pressures) as a function of time as well as calculated single point performance data. The engineering description of SRB-II discusses the engineering and programming fundamentals used, the function of each module, and the limitations of each module.

  2. Performance Evaluation of 3d Modeling Software for Uav Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, H.; Chikatsu, H.

    2016-06-01

    UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) photogrammetry, which combines UAV and freely available internet-based 3D modeling software, is widely used as a low-cost and user-friendly photogrammetry technique in the fields such as remote sensing and geosciences. In UAV photogrammetry, only the platform used in conventional aerial photogrammetry is changed. Consequently, 3D modeling software contributes significantly to its expansion. However, the algorithms of the 3D modelling software are black box algorithms. As a result, only a few studies have been able to evaluate their accuracy using 3D coordinate check points. With this motive, Smart3DCapture and Pix4Dmapper were downloaded from the Internet and commercial software PhotoScan was also employed; investigations were performed in this paper using check points and images obtained from UAV.

  3. Proper bibeta ROC model: algorithm, software, and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijie; Hu, Nan

    2016-03-01

    Semi-parametric models are often used to fit data collected in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiments to obtain a smooth ROC curve and ROC parameters for statistical inference purposes. The proper bibeta model as recently proposed by Mossman and Peng enjoys several theoretical properties. In addition to having explicit density functions for the latent decision variable and an explicit functional form of the ROC curve, the two parameter bibeta model also has simple closed-form expressions for true-positive fraction (TPF), false-positive fraction (FPF), and the area under the ROC curve (AUC). In this work, we developed a computational algorithm and R package implementing this model for ROC curve fitting. Our algorithm can deal with any ordinal data (categorical or continuous). To improve accuracy, efficiency, and reliability of our software, we adopted several strategies in our computational algorithm including: (1) the LABROC4 categorization to obtain the true maximum likelihood estimation of the ROC parameters; (2) a principled approach to initializing parameters; (3) analytical first-order and second-order derivatives of the likelihood function; (4) an efficient optimization procedure (the L-BFGS algorithm in the R package "nlopt"); and (5) an analytical delta method to estimate the variance of the AUC. We evaluated the performance of our software with intensive simulation studies and compared with the conventional binormal and the proper binormal-likelihood-ratio models developed at the University of Chicago. Our simulation results indicate that our software is highly accurate, efficient, and reliable.

  4. Evaluation of detection model performance in power-law noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.

    2001-06-01

    Two alternative forced-choice (2AFC) nodule detection performances of a number of model observers were evaluated for detection of simulated nodules in filtered power-law (1/f3) noise. The models included the ideal observer, the channelized Fisher-Hotelling (FH) model with two different basis function sets, the non-prewhitening matched filter with an eye filter (NPWE), and the Rose model with no DC response (RoseNDC). Detectability of the designer nodule signal was investigated. It has equation s((rho) )equalsA*Rect((rho) /2)(1-(rho) 2)v, where (rho) is a normalized distance (r/R), R is the nodule radius and A is signal amplitude. The nodule profile can be changed (designed) by changing the value of v. For example, the result is a sharp-edged, flat-topped disc for v equal to zero and the projection of a sphere for v equal to 0.5. Human observer experiments were done with nodules based on v equal to 0, 0.5 and 1.5. For the v equal to 1.5 case, human results could be well fitted using a variety of models. The human CD diagram slopes were -0.12, +0.27 and +0.44 for v equal to 0, 0.5 and 1.5 respectively.

  5. Experimental performance evaluation of human balance control models.

    PubMed

    Huryn, Thomas P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Croft, Elizabeth A; Koehle, Michael S; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2014-11-01

    Two factors commonly differentiate proposed balance control models for quiet human standing: 1) intermittent muscle activation and 2) prediction that overcomes sensorimotor time delays. In this experiment we assessed the viability and performance of intermittent activation and prediction in a balance control loop that included the neuromuscular dynamics of human calf muscles. Muscles were driven by functional electrical stimulation (FES). The performance of the different controllers was compared based on sway patterns and mechanical effort required to balance a human body load on a robotic balance simulator. All evaluated controllers balanced subjects with and without a neural block applied to their common peroneal and tibial nerves, showing that the models can produce stable balance in the absence of natural activation. Intermittent activation required less stimulation energy than continuous control but predisposed the system to increased sway. Relative to intermittent control, continuous control reproduced the sway size of natural standing better. Prediction was not necessary for stable balance control but did improve stability when control was intermittent, suggesting a possible benefit of a predictor for intermittent activation. Further application of intermittent activation and predictive control models may drive prolonged, stable FES-controlled standing that improves quality of life for people with balance impairments.

  6. An evaluation of sex-age-kill (SAK) model performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millspaugh, Joshua J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Diefenbach, Duane R.; Boyce, Mark S.; Hansen, Lonnie P.; Kammermeyer, Kent

    2009-01-01

    The sex-age-kill (SAK) model is widely used to estimate abundance of harvested large mammals, including white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Despite a long history of use, few formal evaluations of SAK performance exist. We investigated how violations of the stable age distribution and stationary population assumption, changes to male or female harvest, stochastic effects (i.e., random fluctuations in recruitment and survival), and sampling efforts influenced SAK estimation. When the simulated population had a stable age distribution and λ > 1, the SAK model underestimated abundance. Conversely, when λ < 1, the SAK overestimated abundance. When changes to male harvest were introduced, SAK estimates were opposite the true population trend. In contrast, SAK estimates were robust to changes in female harvest rates. Stochastic effects caused SAK estimates to fluctuate about their equilibrium abundance, but the effect dampened as the size of the surveyed population increased. When we considered both stochastic effects and sampling error at a deer management unit scale the resultant abundance estimates were within ±121.9% of the true population level 95% of the time. These combined results demonstrate extreme sensitivity to model violations and scale of analysis. Without changes to model formulation, the SAK model will be biased when λ ≠ 1. Furthermore, any factor that alters the male harvest rate, such as changes to regulations or changes in hunter attitudes, will bias population estimates. Sex-age-kill estimates may be precise at large spatial scales, such as the state level, but less so at the individual management unit level. Alternative models, such as statistical age-at-harvest models, which require similar data types, might allow for more robust, broad-scale demographic assessments.

  7. Novel Planar Electromagnetic Sensors: Modeling and Performance Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas C.

    2005-01-01

    High performance planar electromagnetic sensors, their modeling and a few applications have been reported in this paper. The researches employing planar type electromagnetic sensors have started quite a few years back with the initial emphasis on the inspection of defects on printed circuit board. The use of the planar type sensing system has been extended for the evaluation of near-surface material properties such as conductivity, permittivity, permeability etc and can also be used for the inspection of defects in the near-surface of materials. Recently the sensor has been used for the inspection of quality of saxophone reeds and dairy products. The electromagnetic responses of planar interdigital sensors with pork meats have been investigated.

  8. Evaluation of Turbulence-Model Performance in Jet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, S. L.; Seiner, J. M.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Erlebacher, G.

    2001-01-01

    The importance of reducing jet noise in both commercial and military aircraft applications has made jet acoustics a significant area of research. A technique for jet noise prediction commonly employed in practice is the MGB approach, based on the Lighthill acoustic analogy. This technique requires as aerodynamic input mean flow quantities and turbulence quantities like the kinetic energy and the dissipation. The purpose of the present paper is to assess existing capabilities for predicting these aerodynamic inputs. Two modern Navier-Stokes flow solvers, coupled with several modern turbulence models, are evaluated by comparison with experiment for their ability to predict mean flow properties in a supersonic jet plume. Potential weaknesses are identified for further investigation. Another comparison with similar intent is discussed by Barber et al. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a reliable flow solver applicable to the low-noise, propulsion-efficient, nozzle exhaust systems being developed in NASA focused programs. These programs address a broad range of complex nozzle geometries operating in high temperature, compressible, flows. Seiner et al. previously discussed the jet configuration examined here. This convergent-divergent nozzle with an exit diameter of 3.6 inches was designed for an exhaust Mach number of 2.0 and a total temperature of 1680 F. The acoustic and aerodynamic data reported by Seiner et al. covered a range of jet total temperatures from 104 F to 2200 F at the fully-expanded nozzle pressure ratio. The aerodynamic data included centerline mean velocity and total temperature profiles. Computations were performed independently with two computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, ISAAC and PAB3D. Turbulence models employed include the k-epsilon model, the Gatski-Speziale algebraic-stress model and the Girimaji model, with and without the Sarkar compressibility correction. Centerline values of mean velocity and mean temperature are

  9. Simulation Modeling and Performance Evaluation of Space Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Esther H.; Segui, John

    2006-01-01

    In space exploration missions, the coordinated use of spacecraft as communication relays increases the efficiency of the endeavors. To conduct trade-off studies of the performance and resource usage of different communication protocols and network designs, JPL designed a comprehensive extendable tool, the Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE). The design and development of MACHETE began in 2000 and is constantly evolving. Currently, MACHETE contains Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) protocol standards such as Proximity-1, Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS), Packet Telemetry/Telecommand, Space Communications Protocol Specification (SCPS), and the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP). MACHETE uses the Aerospace Corporation s Satellite Orbital Analysis Program (SOAP) to generate the orbital geometry information and contact opportunities. Matlab scripts provide the link characteristics. At the core of MACHETE is a discrete event simulator, QualNet. Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) is an end-to-end architecture providing communication in and/or through highly stressed networking environments. Stressed networking environments include those with intermittent connectivity, large and/or variable delays, and high bit error rates. To provide its services, the DTN protocols reside at the application layer of the constituent internets, forming a store-and-forward overlay network. The key capabilities of the bundling protocols include custody-based reliability, ability to cope with intermittent connectivity, ability to take advantage of scheduled and opportunistic connectivity, and late binding of names to addresses. In this presentation, we report on the addition of MACHETE models needed to support DTN, namely: the Bundle Protocol (BP) model. To illustrate the use of MACHETE with the additional DTN model, we provide an example simulation to benchmark its performance. We demonstrate the use of the DTN protocol

  10. Evaluating Organizational Performance: Rational, Natural, and Open System Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Wes

    2013-01-01

    As the definition of organization has evolved, so have the approaches used to evaluate organizational performance. During the past 60 years, organizational theorists and management scholars have developed a comprehensive line of thinking with respect to organizational assessment that serves to inform and be informed by the evaluation discipline.…

  11. Brief Lags in Interrupted Sequential Performance: Evaluating a Model and Model Evaluation Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    Task interruption Sequence errors Cognitive modeling Goodness-of- fit testing a b s t r a c t We examined effects of adding brief (1 second) lags...rehearsal mechanism in the model. To evaluate the model we developed a simple new goodness-of- fit test based on analysis of variance that offers an...andweincorporatearehearsalmechanisminthemodel.Toevaluatethemodelwe developed asimplenewgoodness-of- fit testbasedonanalysisofvariancethatoffersaninferentialbasis for

  12. Hydrologic and water quality models: Performance measures and evaluation criteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Performance measures and corresponding criteria constitute an important aspect of calibration and validation of any hydrological and water quality (H/WQ) model. As new and improved methods and information are developed, it is essential that performance measures and criteria be updated. Therefore, th...

  13. Evaluating performances of simplified physically based landslide susceptibility models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capparelli, Giovanna; Formetta, Giuseppe; Versace, Pasquale

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall induced shallow landslides cause significant damages involving loss of life and properties. Prediction of shallow landslides susceptible locations is a complex task that involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geomorphology, and statistics. Usually to accomplish this task two main approaches are used: statistical or physically based model. This paper presents a package of GIS based models for landslide susceptibility analysis. It was integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model using the Object Modeling System (OMS) modeling framework. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslides susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3) and a component for models verifications. It computes eight goodness of fit indices (GOF) by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurements data. Moreover, the package integration in NewAge-JGrass allows the use of other components such as geographic information system tools to manage inputs-output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system offers the possibility to investigate and fairly compare the quality and the robustness of models and models parameters, according a procedure that includes: i) model parameters estimation by optimizing each of the GOF index separately, ii) models evaluation in the ROC plane by using each of the optimal parameter set, and iii) GOF robustness evaluation by assessing their sensitivity to the input parameter variation. This procedure was repeated for all three models. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy) along the Salerno-Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia municipality. The analysis provided that among all the optimized indices and all the three models, Average Index (AI) optimization coupled with model M3 is the best modeling solution for our test case. This research was funded by PON Project No. 01_01503 "Integrated Systems for Hydrogeological Risk

  14. The Rasch Model for Evaluating Italian Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camminatiello, Ida; Gallo, Michele; Menini, Tullio

    2010-01-01

    In 1997 the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) launched the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) for collecting information about 15-year-old students in participating countries. Our study analyses the PISA 2006 cognitive test for evaluating the Italian student performance in mathematics, reading…

  15. Evaluating performances of simplified physically based models for landslide susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formetta, G.; Capparelli, G.; Versace, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall induced shallow landslides cause loss of life and significant damages involving private and public properties, transportation system, etc. Prediction of shallow landslides susceptible locations is a complex task that involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geomorphology, and statistics. Usually to accomplish this task two main approaches are used: statistical or physically based model. Reliable models' applications involve: automatic parameters calibration, objective quantification of the quality of susceptibility maps, model sensitivity analysis. This paper presents a methodology to systemically and objectively calibrate, verify and compare different models and different models performances indicators in order to individuate and eventually select the models whose behaviors are more reliable for a certain case study. The procedure was implemented in package of models for landslide susceptibility analysis and integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslides susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3) and a component for models verifications. It computes eight goodness of fit indices by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurements data. Moreover, the package integration in NewAge-JGrass allows the use of other components such as geographic information system tools to manage inputs-output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy) along the Salerno-Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia municipality. The analysis provided that among all the optimized indices and all the three models, the optimization of the index distance to perfect classification in the receiver operating characteristic plane (D2PC) coupled with model M3 is the best modeling solution for our test case.

  16. Evaluating hydrological model performance using information theory-based metrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accuracy-based model performance metrics not necessarily reflect the qualitative correspondence between simulated and measured streamflow time series. The objective of this work was to use the information theory-based metrics to see whether they can be used as complementary tool for hydrologic m...

  17. Photovoltaic performance models: an evaluation with actual field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TamizhMani, Govindasamy; Ishioye, John-Paul; Voropayev, Arseniy; Kang, Yi

    2008-08-01

    Prediction of energy production is crucial to the design and installation of the building integrated photovoltaic systems. This prediction should be attainable based on the commonly available parameters such as system size, orientation and tilt angle. Several commercially available as well as free downloadable software tools exist to predict energy production. Six software models have been evaluated in this study and they are: PV Watts, PVsyst, MAUI, Clean Power Estimator, Solar Advisor Model (SAM) and RETScreen. This evaluation has been done by comparing the monthly, seasonaly and annually predicted data with the actual, field data obtained over a year period on a large number of residential PV systems ranging between 2 and 3 kWdc. All the systems are located in Arizona, within the Phoenix metropolitan area which lies at latitude 33° North, and longitude 112 West, and are all connected to the electrical grid.

  18. Towards Modeling Realistic Mobility for Performance Evaluations in MANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, Alex; Tahir, Hassan

    Simulation modeling plays crucial role in conducting research on complex dynamic systems like mobile ad hoc networks and often the only way. Simulation has been successfully applied in MANET for more than two decades. In several recent studies, it is observed that the credibility of the simulation results in the field has decreased while the use of simulation has steadily increased. Part of this credibility crisis has been attributed to the simulation of mobility of the nodes in the system. Mobility has such a fundamental influence on the behavior and performance of mobile ad hoc networks. Accurate modeling and knowledge of mobility of the nodes in the system is not only helpful but also essential for the understanding and interpretation of the performance of the system under study. Several ideas, mostly in isolation, have been proposed in the literature to infuse realism in the mobility of nodes. In this paper, we attempt a holistic analysis of creating realistic mobility models and then demonstrate creation and analysis of realistic mobility models using a software tool we have developed. Using our software tool, desired mobility of the nodes in the system can be specified, generated, analyzed, and then the trace can be exported to be used in the performance studies of proposed algorithms or systems.

  19. Performance Evaluation of the Prototype Model NEXT Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The performance testing results of the first prototype model NEXT ion engine, PM1, are presented. The NEXT program has developed the next generation ion propulsion system to enhance and enable Discovery, New Frontiers, and Flagship-type NASA missions. The PM1 thruster exhibits operational behavior consistent with its predecessors, the engineering model thrusters, with substantial mass savings, enhanced thermal margins, and design improvements for environmental testing compliance. The dry mass of PM1 is 12.7 kg. Modifications made in the thruster design have resulted in improved performance and operating margins, as anticipated. PM1 beginning-of-life performance satisfies all of the electric propulsion thruster mission-derived technical requirements. It demonstrates a wide range of throttleability by processing input power levels from 0.5 to 6.9 kW. At 6.9 kW, the PM1 thruster demonstrates specific impulse of 4190 s, 237 mN of thrust, and a thrust efficiency of 0.71. The flat beam profile, flatness parameters vary from 0.66 at low-power to 0.88 at full-power, and advanced ion optics reduce localized accelerator grid erosion and increases margins for electron backstreaming, impingement-limited voltage, and screen grid ion transparency. The thruster throughput capability is predicted to exceed 750 kg of xenon, an equivalent of 36,500 hr of continuous operation at the full-power operating condition.

  20. Work performance evaluation using the exercising rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Stavert, D.M.; Lehnert, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    A treadmill-metabolic chamber system and a stress testing protocol have been developed to evaluate aerobic work performance on exercising rats that have inhaled toxic substances. The chamber with an enclosed treadmill provides the means to measure the physiologic status of rats during maximal work intensities in terms of O/sub 2/ consumption (V/sub 02/) and CO/sub 2/ production (V/sub c02/). The metabolic chamber can also accommodate instrumented rats for more detailed analyses of their cardiopulmonary status, e.g., ECG, cardiac output, arterial blood gases and pH, and arterial and venous blood pressures. For such studies, an arterial/venous catheter preparation is required. Because of the severe metabolic alterations after such surgery, a post surgical recovery strategy using hyperalimentation was developed to ensure maximal performance of instrumented animals during stress testing. Actual work performance studies are conducted using an eight minute stress test protocol in which the rat is subjected to increasing external work. The metabolic state of the animal is measured from resting levels to maximum oxygen consumption (V/sub 02max/). V/sub 02max/ has been shown to be reproducible in individual rats and is a sensitive indicator of oxidant gas-induced pulmonary damage. 3 tabs.

  1. Validation of Ultrafilter Performance Model Based on Systematic Simulant Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Billing, Justin M.; Smith, Harry D.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2009-11-18

    Because of limited availability of test data with actual Hanford tank waste samples, a method was developed to estimate expected filtration performance based on physical characterization data for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. A test with simulated waste was analyzed to demonstrate that filtration of this class of waste is consistent with a concentration polarization model. Subsequently, filtration data from actual waste samples were analyzed to demonstrate that centrifuged solids concentrations provide a reasonable estimate of the limiting concentration for filtration.

  2. Performance evaluation of four directional emissivity analytical models with thermal SAIL model and airborne images.

    PubMed

    Ren, Huazhong; Liu, Rongyuan; Yan, Guangjian; Li, Zhao-Liang; Qin, Qiming; Liu, Qiang; Nerry, Françoise

    2015-04-06

    Land surface emissivity is a crucial parameter in the surface status monitoring. This study aims at the evaluation of four directional emissivity models, including two bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) models and two gap-frequency-based models. Results showed that the kernel-driven BRDF model could well represent directional emissivity with an error less than 0.002, and was consequently used to retrieve emissivity with an accuracy of about 0.012 from an airborne multi-angular thermal infrared data set. Furthermore, we updated the cavity effect factor relating to multiple scattering inside canopy, which improved the performance of the gap-frequency-based models.

  3. visCOS: An R-package to evaluate model performance of hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, Daniel; Herrnegger, Mathew; Wesemann, Johannes; Schulz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    The evaluation of model performance is a central part of (hydrological) modelling. Much attention has been given to the development of evaluation criteria and diagnostic frameworks. (Klemeš, 1986; Gupta et al., 2008; among many others). Nevertheless, many applications exist for which objective functions do not yet provide satisfying summaries. Thus, the necessity to visualize results arises in order to explore a wider range of model capacities, be it strengths or deficiencies. Visualizations are usually devised for specific projects and these efforts are often not distributed to a broader community (e.g. via open source software packages). Hence, the opportunity to explicitly discuss a state-of-the-art presentation technique is often missed. We therefore present a comprehensive R-package for evaluating model performance by visualizing and exploring different aspects of hydrological time-series. The presented package comprises a set of useful plots and visualization methods, which complement existing packages, such as hydroGOF (Zambrano-Bigiarini et al., 2012). It is derived from practical applications of the hydrological models COSERO and COSEROreg (Kling et al., 2014). visCOS, providing an interface in R, represents an easy-to-use software package for visualizing and assessing model performance and can be implemented in the process of model calibration or model development. The package provides functions to load hydrological data into R, clean the data, process, visualize, explore and finally save the results in a consistent way. Together with an interactive zoom function of the time series, an online calculation of the objective functions for variable time-windows is included. Common hydrological objective functions, such as the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency and the Kling-Gupta Efficiency, can also be evaluated and visualized in different ways for defined sub-periods like hydrological years or seasonal sections. Many hydrologists use long-term water-balances as a

  4. Evaluation of the Service Review Model with Performance Scorecards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, Thomas G.; Williams, W. Larry; Rafacz, Sharlet D.; Newsome, William; Lydon, Christina A.

    2012-01-01

    The current study combined a management technique termed "Service Review" with performance scorecards to enhance staff and consumer behavior in a human service setting consisting of 11 supervisors and 56 front-line staff working with 9 adult consumers with challenging behaviors. Results of our intervention showed that service review and…

  5. Modeling soil vapor extraction to evaluate performance of a system

    SciTech Connect

    Struttman, T.J. ); Zachary, S.P. )

    1992-01-01

    The site described, located in northeast Ohio, originally had a 5,000 gallon UST that was used to supply gasoline. The tank was determined to be leaking from the fill port. Soil borings were augured to depth of 35 feet to determine the extent of soil contamination. At 20 to 30 feet in depth, contamination extended radially 50 to 60 feet. The estimated 1,600 cubic yard volume, as well as the proximity of existing buildings, made excavation, removal and disposal not cost effective. The depth of contaminated soils made bioremediation impractical. It was determined that sufficient information was available to install a vapor extraction system. The system includes 4 wells that can be individually drafted, a common vapor demister, and a 200 scfm induced draft fan. Vapor probes were installed to monitor both vacuum pressure and vapor concentration. The remediation was streamlined by focusing on installation of equipment and optimization of the system dynamics (operation). Data are collected monthly on individual well pressures, gas concentrations and mass loading in the exhaust. Analysis of these data yields radius of influence and contaminant mass withdrawal values. The draft to individual wells can be adjusted when needed to optimize system withdrawals. A model was developed, based on MODFLOW, and adapted to vapor extraction using known gas flow equations. The model was verified with known observed data. The results of this model were compared with data from the above site to determine appropriateness of using the model to design SVE system.

  6. The performance evaluation model of mining project founded on the weight optimization entropy value method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Chao; Chen, Shou

    2017-01-01

    According to the traditional entropy value method still have low evaluation accuracy when evaluating the performance of mining projects, a performance evaluation model of mineral project founded on improved entropy is proposed. First establish a new weight assignment model founded on compatible matrix analysis of analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and entropy value method, when the compatibility matrix analysis to achieve consistency requirements, if it has differences between subjective weights and objective weights, moderately adjust both proportions, then on this basis, the fuzzy evaluation matrix for performance evaluation. The simulation experiments show that, compared with traditional entropy and compatible matrix analysis method, the proposed performance evaluation model of mining project based on improved entropy value method has higher accuracy assessment.

  7. A model for evaluating the social performance of construction waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Hongping

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scant attention is paid to social performance of construction waste management (CWM). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We develop a model for assessing the social performance of CWM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With the model, the social performance of CWM can be quantitatively simulated. - Abstract: It has been determined by existing literature that a lot of research efforts have been made to the economic performance of construction waste management (CWM), but less attention is paid to investigation of the social performance of CWM. This study therefore attempts to develop a model for quantitatively evaluating the social performance of CWM by using a system dynamics (SD) approach. Firstly, major variables affecting the social performance of CWM are identified and a holistic system for assessing the social performance of CWM is formulated in line with feedback relationships underlying these variables. The developed system is then converted into a SD model through the software iThink. An empirical case study is finally conducted to demonstrate application of the model. Results of model validation indicate that the model is robust and reasonable to reflect the situation of the real system under study. Findings of the case study offer helpful insights into effectively promoting the social performance of CWM of the project investigated. Furthermore, the model exhibits great potential to function as an experimental platform for dynamically evaluating effects of management measures on improving the social performance of CWM of construction projects.

  8. Assessment of classical performance measures and signature indices from Flow Duration Curves for model evaluation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Rita; Hellebrand, Hugo; Casper, Markus C.; Fenicia, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    The result of model evaluation is strongly influenced by the choice of the used performance measures. There exist a large variety of performance measures, each with its strengths and weaknesses. Although all of them represent the ability of a hydrological model to reproduce observed stream flow, it is unclear which one is most appropriate for specific applications. The objective of this study is to investigate which performance measure is best suited to find a best performing model structure for a single basin out of multiple model structures. We compare the usability of a new performance measure, the Standardized Signature Index Sum, with several classical statistical performance measures and hydrological performance measures like the Root Mean Square Error or the Nash and Sutcliffe Efficiency. In contrast to the classical and hydrological performance measures, the Standardized Signature Index Sum is based on the comparison of observed and simulated Flow Duration Curves (FDCs). It combines the performance for different parts of the FDC to one measure considering the whole FDC and therefore the whole hydrograph. For this purpose 12 model structures were generated using the SUPERFLEX modeling framework and applied to 53 meso-scale basins in Rhineland Palatinate (Germany). For all calibrated models based on the 12 model structures and 53 basins, we calculate several performance measures and compare their usability to identify a best performing model structure for each basin. In many cases the classical performance measures and the hydrological performance measures assigned similar values to seemingly different hydrographs simulated with different model structures. Therefore, these measures are not well suited for model comparison. The proposed Standardized Signature Index Sum is more effective in revealing differences between model results. Furthermore, it provides information in which part of the hydrograph and how a model fails. The Signature Index Sum allows for a

  9. An integrated radiance throughput model for hypersonic interceptor seeker performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Charles L.; Andrzejewski, Joseph; Calhoun, Ronnie

    1992-05-01

    The integrated radiance throughput model is discussed that encompasses the trajectory dynamics and the atmospheric interactions involved in hypersonic endoatmospheric interceptors for strategic and theater missile defenses. The model is intended for medium fidelity performance analysis to enable overall systems performance evaluations and trades. The model is implemented to provide rapid results for numerous mission scenarios and geometries using various emerging window and seeker technologies.

  10. Smart low flow signature metrics for an improved overall performance evaluation of hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfannerstill, Matthias; Guse, Björn; Fohrer, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Hydrological models have to be calibrated accurately to provide reasonable model results. For a concise model evaluation, the different phases of the hydrograph have to be considered in multi-metric frameworks with appropriate performance metrics. Low and high flows need to be reproduced simultaneously without neglecting the other phases of the hydrograph. In this paper, we highlight the relevance of very low and low flows with separate performance metrics. We present a multi-metric evaluation framework to identify calibration runs, which represent the different phases of the hydrograph precisely. A stepwise evaluation was done with commonly used statistical performance metrics (Nash-Sutcliffe, percent bias) and signature metrics, which are based on the flow duration curve (FDC). In order to consider a fairly balanced evaluation between high and low flow phases, we divided the flow duration curve into segments of high, medium and low flow phases, and additionally into very high and very low flow phases. The model performance in these segments was evaluated separately with the root mean square error (RMSE). Our results show that this evaluation method leads to an improved selection of good calibration runs to enhance the overall model performance by the refined segmentation of FDC. By combining performance metrics for high flow conditions with low flow conditions, this study demonstrates the challenge of calibrating a model with a satisfactory performance in high and low phases simultaneously. Consequently, we conclude that an additional performance metric for very low flows should be included in model analyzes to improve the overall performance in all phases of the hydrograph.

  11. The third phase of AQMEII: evaluation strategy and multi-model performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solazzo, Efisio; Galmarini, Stefano; Hogrefe, Christian

    2016-04-01

    AQMEII (Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative) is an extraordinary effort promoting policy-relevant research on regional air quality model evaluation across the European and North American atmospheric modelling communities, providing the ideal platform for advancing the evaluation of air quality models at the regional scale. This study presents a comprehensive overview of the multi-model evaluation results achieved in the ongoing third phase of AQMEII. Sixteen regional-scale chemistry transport modelling systems have simulated the air quality for the year 2010 over the two continental areas of Europe and North America, providing pollutant concentration values at the surface as well as vertical profiles. The performance of the modelling systems have been evaluated against observational data for ozone, CO, NO2, PM10, PM2.5, wind speed and temperature, offering a valuable opportunity to learn about the models' behaviour by performing model-to-model and model-to-measurement comparisons. We make use of the error apportionment strategy, a novel approach to model evaluation developed within AQMEII that combines elements of operational and diagnostic evaluation. This method apportions the model error to its spectral components, thereby identifying the space/timescale at which it is most relevant and, when possible, to infer which process/es could have generated it. We investigate the deviation between modelled and observed time series of pollutants through a revised formulation for breaking down the mean square error into bias, variance, and the minimum achievable MSE (mMSE). Each of the error components is analysed independently and apportioned to specific processes based on the corresponding timescale (long scale, synoptic, diurnal, and intra-day). Compared to a conventional operational evaluation approach, the new method allows for a more precise identification of where each portion of the model error predominantly occurs. Information about the nature of

  12. Optical modeling and physical performances evaluations for the JT-60SA ECRF antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platania, P.; Figini, L.; Farina, D.; Isayama, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Micheletti, D.; Moriyama, S.; Moro, A.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is the optical modeling and physical performances evaluations of the JT-60SA ECRF launcher system. The beams have been simulated with the electromagnetic code GRASP® and used as input for ECCD calculations performed with the beam tracing code GRAY, capable of modeling propagation, absorption and current drive of an EC Gaussion beam with general astigmatism. Full details of the optical analysis has been taken into account to model the launched beams. Inductive and advanced reference scenarios has been analysed for physical evaluations in the full poloidal and toroidal steering ranges for two slightly different layouts of the launcher system.

  13. Optical modeling and physical performances evaluations for the JT-60SA ECRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Platania, P. Figini, L.; Farina, D.; Micheletti, D.; Moro, A.; Sozzi, C.; Isayama, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Moriyama, S.

    2015-12-10

    The purpose of this work is the optical modeling and physical performances evaluations of the JT-60SA ECRF launcher system. The beams have been simulated with the electromagnetic code GRASP® and used as input for ECCD calculations performed with the beam tracing code GRAY, capable of modeling propagation, absorption and current drive of an EC Gaussion beam with general astigmatism. Full details of the optical analysis has been taken into account to model the launched beams. Inductive and advanced reference scenarios has been analysed for physical evaluations in the full poloidal and toroidal steering ranges for two slightly different layouts of the launcher system.

  14. Validating the ACE Model for Evaluating Student Performance Using a Teaching-Learning Process Based on Computational Modeling Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louzada, Alexandre Neves; Elia, Marcos da Fonseca; Sampaio, Fábio Ferrentini; Vidal, Andre Luiz Pestana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to adapt and test, in a Brazilian public school, the ACE model proposed by Borkulo for evaluating student performance as a teaching-learning process based on computational modeling systems. The ACE model is based on different types of reasoning involving three dimensions. In addition to adapting the model and introducing…

  15. A mixed integer bi-level DEA model for bank branch performance evaluation by Stackelberg approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiee, Morteza; Lotfi, Farhad Hosseinzadeh; Saleh, Hilda; Ghaderi, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    One of the most complicated decision making problems for managers is the evaluation of bank performance, which involves various criteria. There are many studies about bank efficiency evaluation by network DEA in the literature review. These studies do not focus on multi-level network. Wu (Eur J Oper Res 207:856-864, 2010) proposed a bi-level structure for cost efficiency at the first time. In this model, multi-level programming and cost efficiency were used. He used a nonlinear programming to solve the model. In this paper, we have focused on multi-level structure and proposed a bi-level DEA model. We then used a liner programming to solve our model. In other hand, we significantly improved the way to achieve the optimum solution in comparison with the work by Wu (2010) by converting the NP-hard nonlinear programing into a mixed integer linear programming. This study uses a bi-level programming data envelopment analysis model that embodies internal structure with Stackelberg-game relationships to evaluate the performance of banking chain. The perspective of decentralized decisions is taken in this paper to cope with complex interactions in banking chain. The results derived from bi-level programming DEA can provide valuable insights and detailed information for managers to help them evaluate the performance of the banking chain as a whole using Stackelberg-game relationships. Finally, this model was applied in the Iranian bank to evaluate cost efficiency.

  16. A model for evaluating the social performance of construction waste management.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongping

    2012-06-01

    It has been determined by existing literature that a lot of research efforts have been made to the economic performance of construction waste management (CWM), but less attention is paid to investigation of the social performance of CWM. This study therefore attempts to develop a model for quantitatively evaluating the social performance of CWM by using a system dynamics (SD) approach. Firstly, major variables affecting the social performance of CWM are identified and a holistic system for assessing the social performance of CWM is formulated in line with feedback relationships underlying these variables. The developed system is then converted into a SD model through the software iThink. An empirical case study is finally conducted to demonstrate application of the model. Results of model validation indicate that the model is robust and reasonable to reflect the situation of the real system under study. Findings of the case study offer helpful insights into effectively promoting the social performance of CWM of the project investigated. Furthermore, the model exhibits great potential to function as an experimental platform for dynamically evaluating effects of management measures on improving the social performance of CWM of construction projects.

  17. Assessing the quality of classification models: Performance measures and evaluation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichosz, Paweł

    2011-06-01

    This article systematically reviews techniques used for the evaluation of classification models and provides guidelines for their proper application. This includes performance measures assessing the model's performance on a particular dataset and evaluation procedures applying the former to appropriately selected data subsets to produce estimates of their expected values on new data. Their common purpose is to assess model generalization capabilities, which are crucial for judging the applicability and usefulness of both classification and any other data mining models. The review presented in this article is expected to be sufficiently in-depth and complete for most practical needs, while remaining clear and easy to follow with little prior knowledge. Issues that receive special attention include incorporating instance weights to performance measures, combining the same set of evaluation procedures with arbitrary performance measures, and avoiding pitfalls related to separating data subsets used for evaluation from those used for model creation. With the classification task unquestionably being one of the central data mining tasks and the vastly increasing number of data mining applications — not only in business, but also in engineering and research — this is expected to be interesting and useful for a wide audience. All presented techniques are accompanied by simple R language implementations and usage examples, which — whereas created to serve the illustration purpose mostly — can be actually used in practice.

  18. Important Physiological Parameters and Physical Activity Data for Evaluating Exposure Modeling Performance: a Synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to develop a database of physiological parameters needed for understanding and evaluating performance of the APEX and SHEDS exposure/intake dose rate model used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of its regulatory activities. The A...

  19. Stochastic performance modeling and evaluation of obstacle detectability with imaging range sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthies, Larry; Grandjean, Pierrick

    1993-01-01

    Statistical modeling and evaluation of the performance of obstacle detection systems for Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) is essential for the design, evaluation, and comparison of sensor systems. In this report, we address this issue for imaging range sensors by dividing the evaluation problem into two levels: quality of the range data itself and quality of the obstacle detection algorithms applied to the range data. We review existing models of the quality of range data from stereo vision and AM-CW LADAR, then use these to derive a new model for the quality of a simple obstacle detection algorithm. This model predicts the probability of detecting obstacles and the probability of false alarms, as a function of the size and distance of the obstacle, the resolution of the sensor, and the level of noise in the range data. We evaluate these models experimentally using range data from stereo image pairs of a gravel road with known obstacles at several distances. The results show that the approach is a promising tool for predicting and evaluating the performance of obstacle detection with imaging range sensors.

  20. Source term model evaluations for the low-level waste facility performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, M.S.; Su, S.I.

    1995-12-31

    The estimation of release of radionuclides from various waste forms to the bottom boundary of the waste disposal facility (source term) is one of the most important aspects of LLW facility performance assessment. In this work, several currently used source term models are comparatively evaluated for the release of carbon-14 based on a test case problem. The models compared include PRESTO-EPA-CPG, IMPACTS, DUST and NEFTRAN-II. Major differences in assumptions and approaches between the models are described and key parameters are identified through sensitivity analysis. The source term results from different models are compared and other concerns or suggestions are discussed.

  1. Evaluating Nextgen Closely Spaced Parallel Operations Concepts with Validated Human Performance Models: Flight Deck Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooey, Becky Lee; Gore, Brian Francis; Mahlstedt, Eric; Foyle, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the current research were to develop valid human performance models (HPMs) of approach and land operations; use these models to evaluate the impact of NextGen Closely Spaced Parallel Operations (CSPO) on pilot performance; and draw conclusions regarding flight deck display design and pilot-ATC roles and responsibilities for NextGen CSPO concepts. This document presents guidelines and implications for flight deck display designs and candidate roles and responsibilities. A companion document (Gore, Hooey, Mahlstedt, & Foyle, 2013) provides complete scenario descriptions and results including predictions of pilot workload, visual attention and time to detect off-nominal events.

  2. Performance evaluation of four grid-based dispersion models in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesche, T. W.; Haney, J. L.; Morris, R. E.

    Four numerical grid-based dispersion models (Mathew/ADPIC, SMOG, Hybrid, and 2DFLOW) were adapted to the Geysers-Calistoga geothermal area in northern California. The models were operated using five intensive meteorological and tracer diffusion data sets collected during the 1981 ASCOT field experiment at the Geysers (three nocturnal drainage and two daytime valley stagnation episodes). The 2DFLOW and Hybrid Models were found to perform best for drainage and limited-mixing conditions, respectively. These two models were subsequently evaluated using data from five 1980 ASCOT drainage experiments. The Hybrid Model was also tested using data from nine limited-mixing and downwash tracer experiments performed at the Geysers prior to the ASCOT program. Overall, the 2DFLOW Model performed best for drainage flow conditions, whereas the Hybrid Model performed best for valley stagnation (limited-mixing) and moderate crossridge wind conditions. To aid new source review studies at the Geysers, a series of source-receptor transfer matrices were generated for several different meteorological regimes under a variety of emission scenarios using the Hybrid Model. These matrices supply ready estimates of cumulative hydrogen sulfide impacts from various geothermal sources in the region.

  3. Towards a benchmark simulation model for plant-wide control strategy performance evaluation of WWTPs.

    PubMed

    Jeppsson, U; Rosen, C; Alex, J; Copp, J; Gernaey, K V; Pons, M N; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2006-01-01

    The COST/IWA benchmark simulation model has been available for seven years. Its primary purpose has been to create a platform for control strategy benchmarking of activated sludge processes. The fact that the benchmark has resulted in more than 100 publications, not only in Europe but also worldwide, demonstrates the interest in such a tool within the research community In this paper, an extension of the benchmark simulation model no 1 (BSM1) is proposed. This extension aims at facilitating control strategy development and performance evaluation at a plant-wide level and, consequently, includes both pre-treatment of wastewater as well as the processes describing sludge treatment. The motivation for the extension is the increasing interest and need to operate and control wastewater treatment systems not only at an individual process level but also on a plant-wide basis. To facilitate the changes, the evaluation period has been extended to one year. A prolonged evaluation period allows for long-term control strategies to be assessed and enables the use of control handles that cannot be evaluated in a realistic fashion in the one-week BSM1 evaluation period. In the paper, the extended plant layout is proposed and the new suggested process models are described briefly. Models for influent file design, the benchmarking procedure and the evaluation criteria are also discussed. And finally, some important remaining topics, for which consensus is required, are identified.

  4. Wind farms providing secondary frequency regulation: Evaluating the performance of model-based receding horizon control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Carl R.; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles; Gayme, Dennice F.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the use of wind farms to provide secondary frequency regulation for a power grid. Our approach uses model-based receding horizon control of a wind farm that is tested using a large eddy simulation (LES) framework. In order to enable real-time implementation, the control actions are computed based on a time-varying one-dimensional wake model. This model describes wake advection and interactions, both of which play an important role in wind farm power production. This controller is implemented in an LES model of an 84-turbine wind farm represented by actuator disk turbine models. Differences between the velocities at each turbine predicted by the wake model and measured in LES are used for closed-loop feedback. The controller is tested on two types of regulation signals, “RegA” and “RegD”, obtained from PJM, an independent system operator in the eastern United States. Composite performance scores, which are used by PJM to qualify plants for regulation, are used to evaluate the performance of the controlled wind farm. Our results demonstrate that the controlled wind farm consistently performs well, passing the qualification threshold for all fastacting RegD signals. For the RegA signal, which changes over slower time scales, the controlled wind farm's average performance surpasses the threshold, but further work is needed to enable the controlled system to achieve qualifying performance all of the time.

  5. Evaluating Performance of Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Daniel; Tisdale, Edwin; Norton, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Parallel Component Performance Benchmarks is a computer program developed to aid the evaluation of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) - a software architecture, based on a component model, that was conceived to foster high-performance computing, including parallel computing. More specifically, this program compares the performances (principally by measuring computing times) of componentized versus conventional versions of the Parallel Pyramid 2D Adaptive Mesh Refinement library - a software library that is used to generate computational meshes for solving physical problems and that is typical of software libraries in use at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  6. Incorporating a 360 Degree Evaluation Model IOT Transform the USMC Performance Evaluation System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-08

    10 K. Kein . Searching 360 Degree For Employee Evaluation (Unknown: Incentive, 1996), Vol. 170, No. 10, Oct 40-42. 11 B. Brewer...Reviewing Officer Remarks. Quantico: Marine Corps Gazette, 2002. Kein , K., Searching 360 Degree For Employee Evaluation (New York: Incentive, 1996

  7. MODELING AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FOR AVIATION SECURITY CARGO INSPECTION QUEUING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, Glenn O; Olama, Mohammed M; Rose, Terri A; Brumback, Daryl L

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in 2010, the U.S. will require that all cargo loaded in passenger aircraft be inspected. This will require more efficient processing of cargo and will have a significant impact on the inspection protocols and business practices of government agencies and the airlines. In this paper, we conduct performance evaluation study for an aviation security cargo inspection queuing system for material flow and accountability. The overall performance of the aviation security cargo inspection system is computed, analyzed, and optimized for the different system dynamics. Various performance measures are considered such as system capacity, residual capacity, and throughput. These metrics are performance indicators of the system s ability to service current needs and response capacity to additional requests. The increased physical understanding resulting from execution of the queuing model utilizing these vetted performance measures will reduce the overall cost and shipping delays associated with the new inspection requirements.

  8. Evaluating stream health based environmental justice model performance at different spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshvar, Fariborz; Nejadhashemi, A. Pouyan; Zhang, Zhen; Herman, Matthew R.; Shortridge, Ashton; Marquart-Pyatt, Sandra

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effects of spatial resolution on environmental justice analysis concerning stream health. The Saginaw River Basin in Michigan was selected since it is an area of concern in the Great Lakes basin. Three Bayesian Conditional Autoregressive (CAR) models (ordinary regression, weighted regression and spatial) were developed for each stream health measure based on 17 socioeconomic and physiographical variables at three census levels. For all stream health measures, spatial models had better performance compared to the two non-spatial ones at the census tract and block group levels. Meanwhile no spatial dependency was found at the county level. Multilevel Bayesian CAR models were also developed to understand the spatial dependency at the three levels. Results showed that considering level interactions improved models' prediction. Residual plots also showed that models developed at the block group and census tract (in contrary to county level models) are able to capture spatial variations.

  9. Modeling and Performance Evaluation of Backoff Misbehaving Nodes in CSMA/CA Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Modeling and Performance Evaluation of Backoff Misbehaving Nodes in CSMA/CA Networks Zhuo Lu, Student Member, IEEE, Wenye Wang, Senior Member, IEEE...and Cliff Wang Abstract—Backoff misbehavior , in which a wireless node deliberately manipulates its backoff time, can induce significant network... misbehavior , little attention has been focused on quantifying the gain of backoff misbehaviors . In this paper, to assess the gain that misbehaving nodes can

  10. The Third Phase of AQMEII: Evaluation Strategy and Multi-Model Performance Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    AQMEII (Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative) is an extraordinary effort promoting policy-relevant research on regional air quality model evaluation across the European and North American atmospheric modelling communities, providing the ideal platform for advanci...

  11. Seasonal versus Episodic Performance Evaluation for an Eulerian Photochemical Air Quality Model

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Ling; Brown, Nancy J.; Harley, Robert A.; Bao, Jian-Wen; Michelson, Sara A; Wilczak, James M

    2010-04-16

    This study presents detailed evaluation of the seasonal and episodic performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system applied to simulate air quality at a fine grid spacing (4 km horizontal resolution) in central California, where ozone air pollution problems are severe. A rich aerometric database collected during the summer 2000 Central California Ozone Study (CCOS) is used to prepare model inputs and to evaluate meteorological simulations and chemical outputs. We examine both temporal and spatial behaviors of ozone predictions. We highlight synoptically driven high-ozone events (exemplified by the four intensive operating periods (IOPs)) for evaluating both meteorological inputs and chemical outputs (ozone and its precursors) and compare them to the summer average. For most of the summer days, cross-domain normalized gross errors are less than 25% for modeled hourly ozone, and normalized biases are between {+-}15% for both hourly and peak (1 h and 8 h) ozone. The domain-wide aggregated metrics indicate similar performance between the IOPs and the whole summer with respect to predicted ozone and its precursors. Episode-to-episode differences in ozone predictions are more pronounced at a subregional level. The model performs consistently better in the San Joaquin Valley than other air basins, and episodic ozone predictions there are similar to the summer average. Poorer model performance (normalized peak ozone biases <-15% or >15%) is found in the Sacramento Valley and the Bay Area and is most noticeable in episodes that are subject to the largest uncertainties in meteorological fields (wind directions in the Sacramento Valley and timing and strength of onshore flow in the Bay Area) within the boundary layer.

  12. Methodologies for evaluating performance and assessing uncertainty of atmospheric dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Joseph C.

    This thesis describes methodologies to evaluate the performance and to assess the uncertainty of atmospheric dispersion models, tools that predict the fate of gases and aerosols upon their release into the atmosphere. Because of the large economic and public-health impacts often associated with the use of the dispersion model results, these models should be properly evaluated, and their uncertainty should be properly accounted for and understood. The CALPUFF, HPAC, and VLSTRACK dispersion modeling systems were applied to the Dipole Pride (DP26) field data (˜20 km in scale), in order to demonstrate the evaluation and uncertainty assessment methodologies. Dispersion model performance was found to be strongly dependent on the wind models used to generate gridded wind fields from observed station data. This is because, despite the fact that the test site was a flat area, the observed surface wind fields still showed considerable spatial variability, partly because of the surrounding mountains. It was found that the two components were comparable for the DP26 field data, with variability more important than uncertainty closer to the source, and less important farther away from the source. Therefore, reducing data errors for input meteorology may not necessarily increase model accuracy due to random turbulence. DP26 was a research-grade field experiment, where the source, meteorological, and concentration data were all well-measured. Another typical application of dispersion modeling is a forensic study where the data are usually quite scarce. An example would be the modeling of the alleged releases of chemical warfare agents during the 1991 Persian Gulf War, where the source data had to rely on intelligence reports, and where Iraq had stopped reporting weather data to the World Meteorological Organization since the 1981 Iran-Iraq-war. Therefore the meteorological fields inside Iraq must be estimated by models such as prognostic mesoscale meteorological models, based on

  13. Engineering Process Model for High-Temperature Electrolysis System Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar; Grant L. Hawkes

    2005-11-01

    In order to evaluate the potential hydrogen production performance of large-scale High-Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) operations, we have developed an engineering process model at INL using the commercial systems-analysis code HYSYS. Using this code, a detailed process flowsheet has been defined that includes all of the components that would be present in an actual plant such as pumps, compressors, heat exchangers, turbines, and the electrolyzer. Since the electrolyzer is not a standard HYSYS component, a custom one-dimensional electrolyzer model was developed for incorporation into the overall HYSYS process flowsheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The one-dimensional electrolyzer model was validated by comparison with results obtained from a fully 3-D computational fluid dynamics model developed using FLUENT. This report provides details on the one-dimensional electrolyzer model, the HYSYS process model for a 300 MW HTE plant, and some representative results of parametric studies performed using the HYSYS process model.

  14. The School Improvement Model: Tailoring a Teacher and Administrator Performance Evaluation System to Meet the Needs of the School Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Retia Scott

    Described here are the planning and development stages of the Teacher Performance Evaluation (TPE) system and the Administrator Performance Evaluation (APE) system that are components of the School Improvement Model project undertaken by schools in Iowa and Minnesota. One goal is an evaluation system tailored to fit the needs of the school…

  15. Conceptualization of a robust performance assessment and evaluation model for consolidating community water systems.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jeffrey W; Louis, Garrick E

    2009-02-01

    Community water systems (CWS) face significant competing forces for change from decreasing water resource availability, stricter water quality regulations, decreasing federal subsidies, increasing public scrutiny, decreasing financial health, and increasing infrastructure replacement costs. These competing forces necessitate increasing consolidation responses among financially stressed CWS. Consolidation responses allow financially stressed CWS to increase levels of service by taking advantage of economy of scale benefits, such as eliminating service duplications across administration and operational functions. Consolidation responses also promote improved financial accountability among consolidating CWS, especially when operating as integral subsystems of a larger regional drinking water supply (RDWS) system. The goal of this paper is to propose a conceptual model for robust performance assessment and evaluation (PAE) among consolidating CWS. The objectives of this paper are to conceptualize methods for: (1) consistent performance assessment and (2) uniform summative performance evaluation among consolidating CWS. The expected outcome from implementing robust PAE among consolidating CWS is increased levels of service through transparent benchmarking and improved financial accountability. The proposed robust PAE model provides the basis for constructing decision support system (DSS) tools that estimate efficient solutions for allocating limited financial resources among consolidating CWS. The paper is a significant departure from current CWS PAE approaches in two ways. First, it provides a goal-oriented approach for robust PAE among consolidating CWS. Second, it constructs efficiency-based performance metrics to temporally and spatially monitor the degree of attainment of the RDWS systems' goal.

  16. Modeling network infrastructure and performance evaluation for PACS: DICOM over ethernet-based TCP/IP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Roth, David

    2001-08-01

    Studies of information and process modeling have demonstrated the importance and clinical impact of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems in the efficient operational management of imaging within the clinical setting. The appropriate identification of both clinical and technology requirements for the planning and deployment of such systems is essential to achieve cost-effectiveness in use. The understanding of the complexities of clinically viable network topologies and architectures for PACS can be achieved through realistic simulations and modeling. The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodology for modeling the DICOM session and application layer entities over Ethernet-based TCP/IP, by using the OPNET Modeler, and derive performance evaluation metrics for different PACS network topologies.

  17. Evaluation of Blade-Strike Models for Estimating the Biological Performance of Large Kaplan Hydro Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2005-11-30

    BioIndex testing of hydro-turbines is sought as an analog to the hydraulic index testing conducted on hydro-turbines to optimize their power production efficiency. In BioIndex testing the goal is to identify those operations within the range identified by Index testing where the survival of fish passing through the turbine is maximized. BioIndex testing includes the immediate tailrace region as well as the turbine environment between a turbine's intake trashracks and the exit of its draft tube. The US Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of Energy have been evaluating a variety of means, such as numerical and physical turbine models, to investigate the quality of flow through a hydro-turbine and other aspects of the turbine environment that determine its safety for fish. The goal is to use these tools to develop hypotheses identifying turbine operations and predictions of their biological performance that can be tested at prototype scales. Acceptance of hypotheses would be the means for validation of new operating rules for the turbine tested that would be in place when fish were passing through the turbines. The overall goal of this project is to evaluate the performance of numerical blade strike models as a tool to aid development of testable hypotheses for bioIndexing. Evaluation of the performance of numerical blade strike models is accomplished by comparing predictions of fish mortality resulting from strike by turbine runner blades with observations made using live test fish at mainstem Columbia River Dams and with other predictions of blade strike made using observations of beads passing through a 1:25 scale physical turbine model.

  18. Performance Evaluation and Modeling Techniques for Parallel Processors. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimpsey, Robert Tod

    1992-01-01

    In practice, the performance evaluation of supercomputers is still substantially driven by singlepoint estimates of metrics (e.g., MFLOPS) obtained by running characteristic benchmarks or workloads. With the rapid increase in the use of time-shared multiprogramming in these systems, such measurements are clearly inadequate. This is because multiprogramming and system overhead, as well as other degradations in performance due to time varying characteristics of workloads, are not taken into account. In multiprogrammed environments, multiple jobs and users can dramatically increase the amount of system overhead and degrade the performance of the machine. Performance techniques, such as benchmarking, which characterize performance on a dedicated machine ignore this major component of true computer performance. Due to the complexity of analysis, there has been little work done in analyzing, modeling, and predicting the performance of applications in multiprogrammed environments. This is especially true for parallel processors, where the costs and benefits of multi-user workloads are exacerbated. While some may claim that the issue of multiprogramming is not a viable one in the supercomputer market, experience shows otherwise. Even in recent massively parallel machines, multiprogramming is a key component. It has even been claimed that a partial cause of the demise of the CM2 was the fact that it did not efficiently support time-sharing. In the same paper, Gordon Bell postulates that, multicomputers will evolve to multiprocessors in order to support efficient multiprogramming. Therefore, it is clear that parallel processors of the future will be required to offer the user a time-shared environment with reasonable response times for the applications. In this type of environment, the most important performance metric is the completion of response time of a given application. However, there are a few evaluation efforts addressing this issue.

  19. Performance evaluation of RANS-based turbulence models in simulating a honeycomb heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasi, Abdussamet; Ozsipahi, Mustafa; Sahin, Bayram; Gunes, Hasan

    2017-02-01

    As well-known, there is not a universal turbulence model that can be used to model all engineering problems. There are specific applications for each turbulence model that make it appropriate to use, and it is vital to select an appropriate model and wall function combination that matches the physics of the problem considered. Therefore, in this study, performance of six well-known Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) based turbulence models which are the Standard k - ɛ, the Renormalized Group k - ɛ, the Realizable k - ɛ, the Reynolds Stress Model, the k - ω and the Shear Stress Transport k - ω and accompanying wall functions which are the standard, the non-equilibrium and the enhanced are evaluated via 3D simulation of a honeycomb heat sink. The CutCell method is used to generate grid for the part including heat sink called test section while a hexahedral mesh is employed to discretize to inlet and outlet sections. A grid convergence study is conducted for verification process while experimental data and well-known correlations are used to validate the numerical results. Prediction of pressure drop along the test section, mean base plate temperature of the heat sink and temperature at the test section outlet are regarded as a measure of the performance of employed models and wall functions. The results indicate that selection of turbulence models and wall functions has a great influence on the results and, therefore, need to be selected carefully. Hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the honeycomb heat sink can be determined in a reasonable accuracy using RANS-based turbulence models provided that a suitable turbulence model and wall function combination is selected.

  20. Evaluation of the performance of smoothing functions in generalized additive models for spatial variation in disease.

    PubMed

    Siangphoe, Umaporn; Wheeler, David C

    2015-01-01

    Generalized additive models (GAMs) with bivariate smoothing functions have been applied to estimate spatial variation in risk for many types of cancers. Only a handful of studies have evaluated the performance of smoothing functions applied in GAMs with regard to different geographical areas of elevated risk and different risk levels. This study evaluates the ability of different smoothing functions to detect overall spatial variation of risk and elevated risk in diverse geographical areas at various risk levels using a simulation study. We created five scenarios with different true risk area shapes (circle, triangle, linear) in a square study region. We applied four different smoothing functions in the GAMs, including two types of thin plate regression splines (TPRS) and two versions of locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (loess). We tested the null hypothesis of constant risk and detected areas of elevated risk using analysis of deviance with permutation methods and assessed the performance of the smoothing methods based on the spatial detection rate, sensitivity, accuracy, precision, power, and false-positive rate. The results showed that all methods had a higher sensitivity and a consistently moderate-to-high accuracy rate when the true disease risk was higher. The models generally performed better in detecting elevated risk areas than detecting overall spatial variation. One of the loess methods had the highest precision in detecting overall spatial variation across scenarios and outperformed the other methods in detecting a linear elevated risk area. The TPRS methods outperformed loess in detecting elevated risk in two circular areas.

  1. Evaluation of the Performance of Smoothing Functions in Generalized Additive Models for Spatial Variation in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siangphoe, Umaporn; Wheeler, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Generalized additive models (GAMs) with bivariate smoothing functions have been applied to estimate spatial variation in risk for many types of cancers. Only a handful of studies have evaluated the performance of smoothing functions applied in GAMs with regard to different geographical areas of elevated risk and different risk levels. This study evaluates the ability of different smoothing functions to detect overall spatial variation of risk and elevated risk in diverse geographical areas at various risk levels using a simulation study. We created five scenarios with different true risk area shapes (circle, triangle, linear) in a square study region. We applied four different smoothing functions in the GAMs, including two types of thin plate regression splines (TPRS) and two versions of locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (loess). We tested the null hypothesis of constant risk and detected areas of elevated risk using analysis of deviance with permutation methods and assessed the performance of the smoothing methods based on the spatial detection rate, sensitivity, accuracy, precision, power, and false-positive rate. The results showed that all methods had a higher sensitivity and a consistently moderate-to-high accuracy rate when the true disease risk was higher. The models generally performed better in detecting elevated risk areas than detecting overall spatial variation. One of the loess methods had the highest precision in detecting overall spatial variation across scenarios and outperformed the other methods in detecting a linear elevated risk area. The TPRS methods outperformed loess in detecting elevated risk in two circular areas. PMID:25983545

  2. Energy harvesting from the discrete gust response of a piezoaeroelastic wing: Modeling and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Jinwu; Wu, Yining; Li, Daochun

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate energy harvesting from the unfavorable gust response of a piezoelectric wing. An aeroelectroelastic model is built for the evaluation and improvement of the harvesting performance. The structural model is built based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The unsteady aerodynamics, combined with 1-cosine gust load, are obtained from Jones' approximation of the Wagner function. The state-space equation of the aeroelectroelastic model is derived and solved numerically. The energy conversion efficiency and output density are defined to evaluate the harvesting performance. The effects of the sizes and location of the piezoelectric transducers, the load resistance in the external circuit, and the locations of the elastic axis and gravity center axis of the wing are studied, respectively. The results show that, under a given width of the transducers in chordwise direction, there are one thickness of the transducers corresponding to highest conversion efficiency and one smaller optimal value for the output density. The conversion efficiency has an approximate linear relationship with the width. As the transducers are placed at the wing root, a maximum conversion efficiency is reached under a certain length in the spanwise direction, whereas a smaller length helps reaching a larger output density. One optimal resistance is found to maximize the conversion efficiency. The rearward shift of either the elastic axis or gravity center axis improves the energy output while reducing the conversion efficiency.

  3. Performance Evaluation of Public Hospital Information Systems by the Information System Success Model

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung Won; Bae, Sung-Kwon; Ryu, Ji-Hye; Kim, Kyeong Na; An, Chang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was to evaluate the performance of the newly developed information system (IS) implemented on July 1, 2014 at three public hospitals in Korea. Methods User satisfaction scores of twelve key performance indicators of six IS success factors based on the DeLone and McLean IS Success Model were utilized to evaluate IS performance before and after the newly developed system was introduced. Results All scores increased after system introduction except for the completeness of medical records and impact on the clinical environment. The relationships among six IS factors were also analyzed to identify the important factors influencing three IS success factors (Intention to Use, User Satisfaction, and Net Benefits). All relationships were significant except for the relationships among Service Quality, Intention to Use, and Net Benefits. Conclusions The results suggest that hospitals should not only focus on systems and information quality; rather, they should also continuously improve service quality to improve user satisfaction and eventually reach full the potential of IS performance. PMID:25705557

  4. A diagram for evaluating multiple aspects of model performance in simulating vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhongfeng; Hou, Zhaolu; Han, Ying; Guo, Weidong

    2016-12-01

    Vector quantities, e.g., vector winds, play an extremely important role in climate systems. The energy and water exchanges between different regions are strongly dominated by wind, which in turn shapes the regional climate. Thus, how well climate models can simulate vector fields directly affects model performance in reproducing the nature of a regional climate. This paper devises a new diagram, termed the vector field evaluation (VFE) diagram, which is a generalized Taylor diagram and able to provide a concise evaluation of model performance in simulating vector fields. The diagram can measure how well two vector fields match each other in terms of three statistical variables, i.e., the vector similarity coefficient, root mean square length (RMSL), and root mean square vector difference (RMSVD). Similar to the Taylor diagram, the VFE diagram is especially useful for evaluating climate models. The pattern similarity of two vector fields is measured by a vector similarity coefficient (VSC) that is defined by the arithmetic mean of the inner product of normalized vector pairs. Examples are provided, showing that VSC can identify how close one vector field resembles another. Note that VSC can only describe the pattern similarity, and it does not reflect the systematic difference in the mean vector length between two vector fields. To measure the vector length, RMSL is included in the diagram. The third variable, RMSVD, is used to identify the magnitude of the overall difference between two vector fields. Examples show that the VFE diagram can clearly illustrate the extent to which the overall RMSVD is attributed to the systematic difference in RMSL and how much is due to the poor pattern similarity.

  5. Unified performance evaluation of health centers with integrated model of data envelopment analysis and bargaining game.

    PubMed

    Jahangoshai Rezaee, Mustafa; Moini, Alireza; Haji-Ali Asgari, Fatema

    2012-12-01

    This paper introduces a new integrated approach to measure unified efficiency of the healthcare systems. Health centers as an important part of the healthcare systems are considered for evaluation. For this purpose, we define two categories of inputs to measure performance of health centers based on medical human resources and characteristics of spatial information by using geographic information system (GIS). Catching the balance in the spatial distribution of populations and services is one of the main problems in health centers evaluation. On the other hand, data envelopment analysis (DEA) is widely applied for measuring efficiency of the healthcare systems. But, the conventional DEA models may fail to integrated several categories of measures. In this paper, DEA and bargaining game model are integrated for evaluation of health centers. In other words, two categories of measures are used to measure unified efficiency for each health center in the competitive environment. Two models according to constant return to scale (CRS) and variable return to scale (VRS) assumptions are developed. The case study of health centers under supervising of Tehran university of medical sciences (TMUS) is presented to show the abilities of the proposed approach.

  6. Measuring Information Security Performance with 10 by 10 Model for Holistic State Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bernik, Igor; Prislan, Kaja

    Organizations should measure their information security performance if they wish to take the right decisions and develop it in line with their security needs. Since the measurement of information security is generally underdeveloped in practice and many organizations find the existing recommendations too complex, the paper presents a solution in the form of a 10 by 10 information security performance measurement model. The model-ISP 10×10M is composed of ten critical success factors, 100 key performance indicators and 6 performance levels. Its content was devised on the basis of findings presented in the current research studies and standards, while its structure results from an empirical research conducted among information security professionals from Slovenia. Results of the study show that a high level of information security performance is mostly dependent on measures aimed at managing information risks, employees and information sources, while formal and environmental factors have a lesser impact. Experts believe that information security should evolve systematically, where it's recommended that beginning steps include technical, logical and physical security controls, while advanced activities should relate predominantly strategic management activities. By applying the proposed model, organizations are able to determine the actual level of information security performance based on the weighted indexing technique. In this manner they identify the measures they ought to develop in order to improve the current situation. The ISP 10×10M is a useful tool for conducting internal system evaluations and decision-making. It may also be applied to a larger sample of organizations in order to determine the general state-of-play for research purposes.

  7. Integrating Soft Set Theory and Fuzzy Linguistic Model to Evaluate the Performance of Training Simulation Systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuei-Hu; Chang, Yung-Chia; Chain, Kai; Chung, Hsiang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of high technologies and the arrival of the information age have caused changes to the modern warfare. The military forces of many countries have replaced partially real training drills with training simulation systems to achieve combat readiness. However, considerable types of training simulation systems are used in military settings. In addition, differences in system set up time, functions, the environment, and the competency of system operators, as well as incomplete information have made it difficult to evaluate the performance of training simulation systems. To address the aforementioned problems, this study integrated analytic hierarchy process, soft set theory, and the fuzzy linguistic representation model to evaluate the performance of various training simulation systems. Furthermore, importance-performance analysis was adopted to examine the influence of saving costs and training safety of training simulation systems. The findings of this study are expected to facilitate applying military training simulation systems, avoiding wasting of resources (e.g., low utility and idle time), and providing data for subsequent applications and analysis. To verify the method proposed in this study, the numerical examples of the performance evaluation of training simulation systems were adopted and compared with the numerical results of an AHP and a novel AHP-based ranking technique. The results verified that not only could expert-provided questionnaire information be fully considered to lower the repetition rate of performance ranking, but a two-dimensional graph could also be used to help administrators allocate limited resources, thereby enhancing the investment benefits and training effectiveness of a training simulation system.

  8. Integrating Soft Set Theory and Fuzzy Linguistic Model to Evaluate the Performance of Training Simulation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kuei-Hu; Chang, Yung-Chia; Chain, Kai; Chung, Hsiang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of high technologies and the arrival of the information age have caused changes to the modern warfare. The military forces of many countries have replaced partially real training drills with training simulation systems to achieve combat readiness. However, considerable types of training simulation systems are used in military settings. In addition, differences in system set up time, functions, the environment, and the competency of system operators, as well as incomplete information have made it difficult to evaluate the performance of training simulation systems. To address the aforementioned problems, this study integrated analytic hierarchy process, soft set theory, and the fuzzy linguistic representation model to evaluate the performance of various training simulation systems. Furthermore, importance–performance analysis was adopted to examine the influence of saving costs and training safety of training simulation systems. The findings of this study are expected to facilitate applying military training simulation systems, avoiding wasting of resources (e.g., low utility and idle time), and providing data for subsequent applications and analysis. To verify the method proposed in this study, the numerical examples of the performance evaluation of training simulation systems were adopted and compared with the numerical results of an AHP and a novel AHP-based ranking technique. The results verified that not only could expert-provided questionnaire information be fully considered to lower the repetition rate of performance ranking, but a two-dimensional graph could also be used to help administrators allocate limited resources, thereby enhancing the investment benefits and training effectiveness of a training simulation system. PMID:27598390

  9. Formative Evaluation in the Performance Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Walter; King, Debby

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the traditional formative evaluation model used by instructional designers; summarizes Kirkpatrick's model of evaluation; proposes the integration of part of Kirkpatrick's model with traditional formative evaluation; and discusses performance-context formative evaluation. (three references) (LRW)

  10. Modelling and temporal performances evaluation of networked control systems using (max, +) algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammour, R.; Amari, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of temporal performances evaluation of producer/consumer networked control systems. The aim is to develop a formal method for evaluating the response time of this type of control systems. Our approach consists on modelling, using Petri nets classes, the behaviour of the whole architecture including the switches that support multicast communications used by this protocol. (max, +) algebra formalism is then exploited to obtain analytical formulas of the response time and the maximal and minimal bounds. The main novelty is that our approach takes into account all delays experienced at the different stages of networked automation systems. Finally, we show how to apply the obtained results through an example of networked control system.

  11. Apprentice Performance Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gast, Clyde W.

    The Granite City (Illinois) Steel apprentices are under a performance evaluation from entry to graduation. Federally approved, the program is guided by joint apprenticeship committees whose monthly meetings include performance evaluation from three information sources: journeymen, supervisors, and instructors. Journeymen's evaluations are made…

  12. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 3: Sample case. [propellant combustion simulation/internal ballistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The solid rocket booster performance evaluation model (SRB-11) is used to predict internal ballistics in a sample motor. This motor contains a five segmented grain. The first segment has a 14 pointed star configuration with a web which wraps partially around the forward dome. The other segments are circular in cross-section and are tapered along the interior burning surface. Two of the segments are inhibited on the forward face. The nozzle is not assumed to be submerged. The performance prediction is broken into two simulation parts: the delivered end item specific impulse and the propellant properties which are required as inputs for the internal ballistics module are determined; and the internal ballistics for the entire burn duration of the motor are simulated.

  13. A PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THE 2004 RELEASE OF MODELS-3 CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    This performance evaluation compares a full annual simulation (2001) of CMAQ (Version4.4) covering the contiguous United States against monitoring data from four nationwide networks. This effort, which represents one of the most spatially and temporally comprehensive performance...

  14. Measuring Information Security Performance with 10 by 10 Model for Holistic State Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Organizations should measure their information security performance if they wish to take the right decisions and develop it in line with their security needs. Since the measurement of information security is generally underdeveloped in practice and many organizations find the existing recommendations too complex, the paper presents a solution in the form of a 10 by 10 information security performance measurement model. The model—ISP 10×10M is composed of ten critical success factors, 100 key performance indicators and 6 performance levels. Its content was devised on the basis of findings presented in the current research studies and standards, while its structure results from an empirical research conducted among information security professionals from Slovenia. Results of the study show that a high level of information security performance is mostly dependent on measures aimed at managing information risks, employees and information sources, while formal and environmental factors have a lesser impact. Experts believe that information security should evolve systematically, where it’s recommended that beginning steps include technical, logical and physical security controls, while advanced activities should relate predominantly strategic management activities. By applying the proposed model, organizations are able to determine the actual level of information security performance based on the weighted indexing technique. In this manner they identify the measures they ought to develop in order to improve the current situation. The ISP 10×10M is a useful tool for conducting internal system evaluations and decision-making. It may also be applied to a larger sample of organizations in order to determine the general state-of-play for research purposes. PMID:27655001

  15. Evaluation of blade-strike models for estimating the biological performance of large Kaplan hydro turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Z.; Carlson, T. J.; Ploskey, G. R.; Richmond, M. C.

    2005-11-01

    Bio-indexing of hydro turbines has been identified as an important means to optimize passage conditions for fish by identifying operations for existing and new design turbines that minimize the probability of injury. Cost-effective implementation of bio-indexing requires the use of tools such as numerical and physical turbine models to generate hypotheses for turbine operations that can be tested at prototype scales using live fish. Blade strike has been proposed as an index variable for the biological performance of turbines. Report reviews an evaluation of the use of numerical blade-strike models as a means with which to predict the probability of blade strike and injury of juvenile salmon smolt passing through large Kaplan turbines on the mainstem Columbia River.

  16. Evaluation of GLAS Demonstration Model Loop Heat Pipe Thermal Vacuum Performance with Various Fluid Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Charles; Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Grob, Eric; Swanson, Ted; Nikitkin, Michael; Paquin, Krista C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Two loop heat pipes (LHPs) are to be used for tight thermal control of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument, planned for flight in late 2001. The LHPs are charged with Propylene as a working fluid. One LHP will be used to transport 110 W from a laser a radiator, the other will transport 190 W from electronic boxes to a separate radiator. The application includes a large amount of thermal mass in each LHP system and low initial startup powers. This along with some non-ideal flight design compromises, such as a less than ideal charge level for this design concept with a symmetrical secondary wick, lead to inadequate performance of the flight LHPs during the flight thermal vacuum test in October of 2000. This presentation focuses on identifying; the sources of the flight test difficulties by modifying the charge and test setup of the successfully tested Development Model Loop Heat Pipe (DM LHP). While very similar to the flight design, the DM L14P did have several significant difference in design and method of testing. These differences were evaluated for affect on performance by conforming the DM LHP to look more like the flight units. The major difference that was evaluated was the relative fill level of the working fluid within the concentrically design LHP compensation chamber. Other differences were also assessed through performance testing including starter heater size and "hot biasing" of major interior components. Performance was assessed with respect to startup, low power operation, conductance, and control heater power. The results of the testing showed that performance improves as initial charge increases, and when the starter heater is made smaller. The "hot biasing" of the major components did not appear to have a detrimental effect. As a result of test results of the DM LHP, modifications are being made to the flight units to increase the fluid charge and increase the watt-density of the starter heater.

  17. Evaluating and Improving the Performance of Common Land Model Using FLUXNET Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Dai, Y. J.; Dickinson, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Common Land Model(CoLM), combined the best features of LSM, BATS, and IAP94, has been widely applied and shown its good quality. However, land surface processes are crucial for weather and climate model initialization, hence it's necessary to constrain land surface model performances using observational data. In our preliminary work, eddy covariance measurements from 20 FLUXNET sites with over 100 site-years were used to evaluate CoLM while simulating energy balance fluxes in different climate conditions and vegetation categories. And the results show CoLM simulates well for all four energy fluxes, with sensible heat flux(H) better than latent heat flux(LE), net radiation (Rnet) the best. In terms of different vegetation categories, CoLM performs the best on evergreen needle-leaf forest among the 8 selected land cover types, and shows significant priority at evergreen broadleaf forest. Although a good agreement of simulation and observation is found on seasonal cycles at the 20 sample sites, it produces extreme bias mostly at summer noon, but not shows consistent bias among different seasons. This underestimate was associated with the weakness in simulating of soil water in dry seasons and incomplete description of photosynthesis as well, that's why we will first focus on implementing mesophyll diffusion in CoLM to improve the physical process of photosynthesis.

  18. The performance evaluation of WinOSPM model for urban street canyons of Nantes in France.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Sharad B; Rebours, Arnaud; Pavageau, Michel

    2005-01-01

    was done to evaluate the models performance using index of agreement and correlation coefficient. The index of agreement (d) and correlation coefficient (r) for all the streets show that estimated concentration levels are in good agreement with that of measurements. From the index of agreements, it can be inferred that model has very less potential for errors. The model's sensitivity to building-exceptions was also tested for the rue de Strasbourg. Results did not reflect this feature very well. It is perceived that the influence of this feature might have been suppressed in averaging the annual hourly values. This influence is apparently seen in hourly average time series variations. Finally, WinOSPM model was found a simple but very useful model. It could very well represent the detailed flow and dispersion conditions in urban streets.

  19. Evaluating NARCCAP model performance for frequencies of severe-storm environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilleland, Eric; Bukovsky, Melissa; Williams, Christopher L.; McGinnis, Seth; Ammann, Caspar M.; Brown, Barbara G.; Mearns, Linda O.

    2016-11-01

    An important topic for climate change investigation is the behavior of severe weather under future scenarios. Given the fine-scale nature of the phenomena, such changes can only be analyzed indirectly, for example, through large-scale indicators of environments conducive to severe weather. Climate models can account for changing physics over time, but if they cannot capture the relevant distributional properties of the current climate, then their use for inferring future regimes is limited. In this study, high-resolution climate models from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) are evaluated for the present climate state using cutting-edge spatial verification techniques recently popularized in the meteorology literature. While climate models are not intended to predict variables on a day-by-day basis, like weather models, they should be expected to mimic distributional properties of these processes, which is how they are increasingly used and therefore this study assesses the degree to which the models are actually suitable for this purpose. Of particular value for social applications would be to better simulate extremes, rather than inferring means of variables, which may only change by small increments thereby making it difficult to interpret in terms of the impact on society. In this study, it is found that the relatively high-resolution NARCCAP climate model runs capture areas, spatial patterns, and placement of the most common severe-storm environments reasonably well, but all of them underpredict the spatial extent of these high-frequency zones. Some of the models generally perform better than others, but some models capture spatial patterns of the highest frequency severe-storm environment areas better than they do more moderate frequency regions.

  20. Performance Metrics for Climate Model Evaluation: Application to CMIP5 Precipitation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehran, A.; AghaKouchak, A.; Phillips, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Validation of gridded climate model simulations is fundamental to future improvements in model developments. Among the metrics, the contingency table, which includes a number of categorical indices, is extensively used in evaluation studies. While the categorical indices offer invaluable information, they do not provide any insight into the volume of the variable detected correctly/incorrectly. In this study, the contingency table categorical metrics are extended to volumetric indices for evaluation of gridded data. The suggested indices include (a) Volumetric Hit Index (VHI): volume of correctly detected simulations relative to the volume of the correctly detected simulations and missed observations; (b) Volumetric False Alarm Ratio (VFAR): volume of false simulations relative to the sum of simulations; (c) Volumetric Miss Index (VMI): volume of missed observations relative to the sum of missed observations and correctly detected simulations; and (d) the Volumetric Critical Success Index (VCSI). The latter provides an overall measure of volumetric performance including volumetric hits, false alarms and misses. Numerous studies have emphasized that climate simulations are subject to various biases and uncertainties. The objective of this study is to cross-validate 34 Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) historical simulations of precipitation against the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data using the proposed performance metrics, quantifying model pattern discrepancies and biases for both entire data distributions and their upper tails. The results of the Volumetric Hit Index (VHI) analysis of the total monthly precipitation amounts show that most CMIP5 simulations are in good agreement with GPCP patterns in many areas, but their replication of observed precipitation over arid regions and certain sub-continental regions (e.g., northern Eurasia, eastern Russia, central Australia) is problematical. Overall, the VHI of the multi-model

  1. Evaluation of odometry algorithm performances using a railway vehicle dynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allotta, B.; Pugi, L.; Ridolfi, A.; Malvezzi, M.; Vettori, G.; Rindi, A.

    2012-05-01

    In modern railway Automatic Train Protection and Automatic Train Control systems, odometry is a safety relevant on-board subsystem which estimates the instantaneous speed and the travelled distance of the train; a high reliability of the odometry estimate is fundamental, since an error on the train position may lead to a potentially dangerous overestimation of the distance available for braking. To improve the odometry estimate accuracy, data fusion of different inputs coming from a redundant sensor layout may be used. Simplified two-dimensional models of railway vehicles have been usually used for Hardware in the Loop test rig testing of conventional odometry algorithms and of on-board safety relevant subsystems (like the Wheel Slide Protection braking system) in which the train speed is estimated from the measures of the wheel angular speed. Two-dimensional models are not suitable to develop solutions like the inertial type localisation algorithms (using 3D accelerometers and 3D gyroscopes) and the introduction of Global Positioning System (or similar) or the magnetometer. In order to test these algorithms correctly and increase odometry performances, a three-dimensional multibody model of a railway vehicle has been developed, using Matlab-Simulink™, including an efficient contact model which can simulate degraded adhesion conditions (the development and prototyping of odometry algorithms involve the simulation of realistic environmental conditions). In this paper, the authors show how a 3D railway vehicle model, able to simulate the complex interactions arising between different on-board subsystems, can be useful to evaluate the odometry algorithm and safety relevant to on-board subsystem performances.

  2. Evaluation of Contamination Inspection and Analysis Methods through Modeling System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasly, Elaine; Dever, Jason; Stuban, Steven M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Contamination is usually identified as a risk on the risk register for sensitive space systems hardware. Despite detailed, time-consuming, and costly contamination control efforts during assembly, integration, and test of space systems, contaminants are still found during visual inspections of hardware. Improved methods are needed to gather information during systems integration to catch potential contamination issues earlier and manage contamination risks better. This research explores evaluation of contamination inspection and analysis methods to determine optical system sensitivity to minimum detectable molecular contamination levels based on IEST-STD-CC1246E non-volatile residue (NVR) cleanliness levels. Potential future degradation of the system is modeled given chosen modules representative of optical elements in an optical system, minimum detectable molecular contamination levels for a chosen inspection and analysis method, and determining the effect of contamination on the system. By modeling system performance based on when molecular contamination is detected during systems integration and at what cleanliness level, the decision maker can perform trades amongst different inspection and analysis methods and determine if a planned method is adequate to meet system requirements and manage contamination risk.

  3. Field significance of performance measures in the context of regional climate model evaluation. Part 2: precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Martin; Warrach-Sagi, Kirsten; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2017-02-01

    A new approach for rigorous spatial analysis of the downscaling performance of regional climate model (RCM) simulations is introduced. It is based on a multiple comparison of the local tests at the grid cells and is also known as `field' or `global' significance. The block length for the local resampling tests is precisely determined to adequately account for the time series structure. New performance measures for estimating the added value of downscaled data relative to the large-scale forcing fields are developed. The methodology is exemplarily applied to a standard EURO-CORDEX hindcast simulation with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the land surface model NOAH at 0.11 ∘ grid resolution. Daily precipitation climatology for the 1990-2009 period is analysed for Germany for winter and summer in comparison with high-resolution gridded observations from the German Weather Service. The field significance test controls the proportion of falsely rejected local tests in a meaningful way and is robust to spatial dependence. Hence, the spatial patterns of the statistically significant local tests are also meaningful. We interpret them from a process-oriented perspective. While the downscaled precipitation distributions are statistically indistinguishable from the observed ones in most regions in summer, the biases of some distribution characteristics are significant over large areas in winter. WRF-NOAH generates appropriate stationary fine-scale climate features in the daily precipitation field over regions of complex topography in both seasons and appropriate transient fine-scale features almost everywhere in summer. As the added value of global climate model (GCM)-driven simulations cannot be smaller than this perfect-boundary estimate, this work demonstrates in a rigorous manner the clear additional value of dynamical downscaling over global climate simulations. The evaluation methodology has a broad spectrum of applicability as it is

  4. Model performance evaluation (validation and calibration) in model-based studies of therapeutic interventions for cardiovascular diseases : a review and suggested reporting framework.

    PubMed

    Haji Ali Afzali, Hossein; Gray, Jodi; Karnon, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    Decision analytic models play an increasingly important role in the economic evaluation of health technologies. Given uncertainties around the assumptions used to develop such models, several guidelines have been published to identify and assess 'best practice' in the model development process, including general modelling approach (e.g., time horizon), model structure, input data and model performance evaluation. This paper focuses on model performance evaluation. In the absence of a sufficient level of detail around model performance evaluation, concerns regarding the accuracy of model outputs, and hence the credibility of such models, are frequently raised. Following presentation of its components, a review of the application and reporting of model performance evaluation is presented. Taking cardiovascular disease as an illustrative example, the review investigates the use of face validity, internal validity, external validity, and cross model validity. As a part of the performance evaluation process, model calibration is also discussed and its use in applied studies investigated. The review found that the application and reporting of model performance evaluation across 81 studies of treatment for cardiovascular disease was variable. Cross-model validation was reported in 55 % of the reviewed studies, though the level of detail provided varied considerably. We found that very few studies documented other types of validity, and only 6 % of the reviewed articles reported a calibration process. Considering the above findings, we propose a comprehensive model performance evaluation framework (checklist), informed by a review of best-practice guidelines. This framework provides a basis for more accurate and consistent documentation of model performance evaluation. This will improve the peer review process and the comparability of modelling studies. Recognising the fundamental role of decision analytic models in informing public funding decisions, the proposed

  5. On the current state of the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model.

    PubMed

    Berger, Klaus U

    2015-04-01

    The Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model is the most widely applied model to calculate the water balance of cover and bottom liner systems for landfills. The paper summarizes the 30 year history of the model from HELP version 1 to HELP 3.95 D and includes references to the three current and simultaneously available versions (HELP 3.07, Visual HELP 2.2, and HELP 3.95 D). A sufficient validation is an essential precondition for the use of any model in planning. The paper summarizes validation approaches for HELP 3 focused on cover systems in the literature. Furthermore, measurement results are compared to simulation results of HELP 3.95 D for (1) a test field with a compacted clay liner in the final cover of the landfill Hamburg-Georgswerder from 1988 to 1995 and (2) a test field with a 2.3m thick so-called water balance layer on the landfill Deetz near Berlin from 2004 to 2011. On the Georgswerder site actual evapotranspiration was well reproduced by HELP on the yearly average as well as in the seasonal course if precipitation data with 10% systematic measurement errors were used. However, the increase of liner leakage due to the deterioration of the clayey soil liner was not considered by the model. On the landfill Deetz HELP overestimated largely the percolation through the water balance layer resulting from an extremely wet summer due to an underestimation of the water storage in the layer and presumably also due to an underestimation of the actual evapotranspiration. Finally based on validation results and requests from the practice, plans for improving the model to a future version HELP 4 D are described.

  6. Regionalized PM2.5 Community Multiscale Air Quality model performance evaluation across a continuous spatiotemporal domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Jeanette M.; Xu, Yadong; Vizuete, William; Serre, Marc L.

    2017-01-01

    The regulatory Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is a means to understanding the sources, concentrations and regulatory attainment of air pollutants within a model's domain. Substantial resources are allocated to the evaluation of model performance. The Regionalized Air quality Model Performance (RAMP) method introduced here explores novel ways of visualizing and evaluating CMAQ model performance and errors for daily Particulate Matter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) concentrations across the continental United States. The RAMP method performs a non-homogenous, non-linear, non-homoscedastic model performance evaluation at each CMAQ grid. This work demonstrates that CMAQ model performance, for a well-documented 2001 regulatory episode, is non-homogeneous across space/time. The RAMP correction of systematic errors outperforms other model evaluation methods as demonstrated by a 22.1% reduction in Mean Square Error compared to a constant domain wide correction. The RAMP method is able to accurately reproduce simulated performance with a correlation of r = 76.1%. Most of the error coming from CMAQ is random error with only a minority of error being systematic. Areas of high systematic error are collocated with areas of high random error, implying both error types originate from similar sources. Therefore, addressing underlying causes of systematic error will have the added benefit of also addressing underlying causes of random error.

  7. Performance evaluation of Al-Zahra academic medical center based on Iran balanced scorecard model

    PubMed Central

    Raeisi, Ahmad Reza; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Bakhsh, Roghayeh Mohammadi; Gangi, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Background: Growth and development in any country's national health system, without an efficient evaluation system, lacks the basic concepts and tools necessary for fulfilling the system's goals. The balanced scorecard (BSC) is a technique widely used to measure the performance of an organization. The basic core of the BSC is guided by the organization's vision and strategies, which are the bases for the formation of four perspectives of BSC. The goal of this research is the performance evaluation of Al-Zahra Academic Medical Center in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, based on Iran BSC model. Materials and Methods: This is a combination (quantitative–qualitative) research which was done at Al-Zahra Academic Medical Center in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2011. The research populations were hospital managers at different levels. Sampling method was purposive sampling in which the key informed personnel participated in determining the performance indicators of hospital as the BSC team members in focused discussion groups. After determining the conceptual elements in focused discussion groups, the performance objectives (targets) and indicators of hospital were determined and sorted in perspectives by the group discussion participants. Following that, the performance indicators were calculated by the experts according to the predetermined objectives; then, the score of each indicator and the mean score of each perspective were calculated. Results: Research findings included development of the organizational mission, vision, values, objectives, and strategies. The strategies agreed upon by the participants in the focus discussion group included five strategies, which were customer satisfaction, continuous quality improvement, development of human resources, supporting innovation, expansion of services and improving the productivity. Research participants also agreed upon four perspectives for the Al-Zahra hospital BSC. In the patients and community

  8. Performance Evaluation of Alcohol-Gasoline Blends in 1980 Model Automobiles. Phase II. Methanol-Gasoline Blends.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    renovation, re-inspection, and acceptance by CRC. These cars comprised three models by three automobile makers and two engine-emissions control groups for...EVALUATION OF ALCOHOL.GASOLINE BLENDS IN 1980 MODEL AUTOMOBILES PHASE II METHANOL-GASOLINE BLENDS January 1984 APPROVrD FOR pUBLIC RELEASE" DISTRIBUTION...Members: PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF ALCOHOL-GASOLINE BLENDS IN 1980 MODEL AUTOMOBILES : PHASE II - METHANOL-GASOLINE BLENDS (CRC Report No. 536) -I

  9. Modeling and performance evaluation of the DPS25 packet switching multiprocessor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitropoulos, Spyridon

    1987-05-01

    A packet switching communication network is evaluated via queue network modeling theory. Direct access memory systems, busses linking the network processors, commutation and signal processors, and virtual reference circuits are considered. All models are developed with the help of the QNAP2 program and listings of the models are given. The method is illustrated with results from simulations at the various system levels.

  10. Application of Wavelet Filters in an Evaluation of Photochemical Model Performance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality model evaluation can be enhanced with time-scale specific comparisons of outputs and observations. For example, high-frequency (hours to one day) time scale information in observed ozone is not well captured by deterministic models and its incorporation into model pe...

  11. Performance evaluation of groundwater model hydrostratigraphy from airborne electromagnetic data and lithological borehole logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marker, P. A.; Foged, N.; He, X.; Christiansen, A. V.; Refsgaard, J. C.; Auken, E.; Bauer-Gottwein, P.

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale hydrological models are important decision support tools in water resources management. The largest source of uncertainty in such models is the hydrostratigraphic model. Geometry and configuration of hydrogeological units are often poorly determined from hydrogeological data alone. Due to sparse sampling in space, lithological borehole logs may overlook structures that are important for groundwater flow at larger scales. Good spatial coverage along with high spatial resolution makes airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data valuable for the structural input to large-scale groundwater models. We present a novel method to automatically integrate large AEM data sets and lithological information into large-scale hydrological models. Clay-fraction maps are produced by translating geophysical resistivity into clay-fraction values using lithological borehole information. Voxel models of electrical resistivity and clay fraction are classified into hydrostratigraphic zones using k-means clustering. Hydraulic conductivity values of the zones are estimated by hydrological calibration using hydraulic head and stream discharge observations. The method is applied to a Danish case study. Benchmarking hydrological performance by comparison of performance statistics from comparable hydrological models, the cluster model performed competitively. Calibrations of 11 hydrostratigraphic cluster models with 1-11 hydraulic conductivity zones showed improved hydrological performance with an increasing number of clusters. Beyond the 5-cluster model hydrological performance did not improve. Due to reproducibility and possibility of method standardization and automation, we believe that hydrostratigraphic model generation with the proposed method has important prospects for groundwater models used in water resources management.

  12. Undergraduate Engineering Students' Beliefs, Coping Strategies, and Academic Performance: An Evaluation of Theoretical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Pei-Hsuan; Sullivan, Jeremy R.; Sass, Daniel A.; Guerra, Norma S.

    2012-01-01

    Research has identified factors associated with academic success by evaluating relations among psychological and academic variables, although few studies have examined theoretical models to understand the complex links. This study used structural equation modeling to investigate whether the relation between test anxiety and final course grades was…

  13. Applying the Many-Facet Rasch Model to Evaluate PowerPoint Presentation Performance in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basturk, Ramazan

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the usefulness of the many-facet Rasch model (MFRM) in evaluating the quality of performance related to PowerPoint presentations in higher education. The Rasch Model utilizes item response theory stating that the probability of a correct response to a test item/task depends largely on a single parameter, the ability of the…

  14. Goal Setting and Performance Evaluation with Different Starting Positions: The Modeling Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pray, Thomas F.; Gold, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Reviews 10 computerized business simulations used to teach business policy courses, discusses problems with measuring performance, and presents a statistically based approach to assessing performance that permits individual team goal setting as part of the computer model, and allows simulated firms to start with different financial and operating…

  15. Evaluating the Relationship between Team Performance and Joint Attention with Longitudinal Multivariate Mixed Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    models, with an emphasis on exploring the correlation structure between the variances in growth trajectories of team performance and joint attention...the correlation structure between the variances in growth trajectories of team performance and joint attention around estimated means. Observed...and transfer of human motor skills. Psychological Bulletin, 101(1), 41-74. Chung, S. (2015). Do friends perform better?: A meta-analytic review of

  16. Evaluating performance of simplified physically based models for shallow landslide susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formetta, Giuseppe; Capparelli, Giovanna; Versace, Pasquale

    2016-11-01

    Rainfall-induced shallow landslides can lead to loss of life and significant damage to private and public properties, transportation systems, etc. Predicting locations that might be susceptible to shallow landslides is a complex task and involves many disciplines: hydrology, geotechnical science, geology, hydrogeology, geomorphology, and statistics. Two main approaches are commonly used: statistical or physically based models. Reliable model applications involve automatic parameter calibration, objective quantification of the quality of susceptibility maps, and model sensitivity analyses. This paper presents a methodology to systemically and objectively calibrate, verify, and compare different models and model performance indicators in order to identify and select the models whose behavior is the most reliable for particular case studies.The procedure was implemented in a package of models for landslide susceptibility analysis and integrated in the NewAge-JGrass hydrological model. The package includes three simplified physically based models for landslide susceptibility analysis (M1, M2, and M3) and a component for model verification. It computes eight goodness-of-fit indices by comparing pixel-by-pixel model results and measurement data. The integration of the package in NewAge-JGrass uses other components, such as geographic information system tools, to manage input-output processes, and automatic calibration algorithms to estimate model parameters. The system was applied for a case study in Calabria (Italy) along the Salerno-Reggio Calabria highway, between Cosenza and Altilia. The area is extensively subject to rainfall-induced shallow landslides mainly because of its complex geology and climatology. The analysis was carried out considering all the combinations of the eight optimized indices and the three models. Parameter calibration, verification, and model performance assessment were performed by a comparison with a detailed landslide inventory map for the

  17. An Examination of Individual Performance Using Markov Models in the Hellenic Navy’s Officer-Performance Evaluation System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    58 3. Third Category of Data of HN Officers ...........................................59 B. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK/DESCRIPTION OF MARKOV...performance (Barrick & Mount,1991). Factor 4, Emotional Adjustment, is often labeled by its opposite, Neuroticism , which is the tendency to be...category of officers comprises the pool. B. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK/DESCRIPTION OF MARKOV-CHAIN MODELS Military organizations, as has been stated

  18. Evaluation of the complexity and performance of marine planktonic trophic models.

    PubMed

    Leles, Suzana G; Valentin, Jean L; Figueiredo, Gisela M

    2016-01-01

    Planktonic models represent a powerful tool for creating hypotheses and making predictions about the functioning of marine ecosystems. Their complexity varies according to the number of state variables and the choice of functional forms. We evaluated plankton models during the last 15 years (n =145) with the aims of understanding why they differ in complexity, evaluating model robustness, and describing studies of plankton modelling around the globe. We classified models into four groups: Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton (NPZ), Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD), Size-Structured (SS) and Plankton-Functional-Type (PFT). Our results revealed that the number of state variables varied according to the question being addressed: NPZ models were more frequently applied in physical-biological studies, while PFT models were more applied for investigating biogeochemical cycles. Most models were based on simple functional forms which neglect important feedback related to control of plankton dynamics. Modelling studies sometimes failed to describe sensitivity analysis, calibration and validation. The importance of testing different functional forms was commonly overlooked, and the lack of empirical data affected the verification of model robustness. Lastly, we highlight the need to develop modelling studies in the Southern Hemisphere, including Brazil, in order to provide predictions that assist the management of marine ecosystems.

  19. Evaluating steam trap performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, N.Y.

    1985-08-08

    This paper presents a method for evaluating the performance level of steam traps by preparing an economic analysis of several types to determine the equivalent uniform annual cost. A series of tests on steam traps supplied by six manufacturers provided data for determining the relative efficiencies of each unit. The comparison was made using a program developed for the Texas Instruments T1-59 programmable calculator to evaluate overall steam trap economics.

  20. The Effect of a Recorded Model on Band Students' Performance Self-Evaluations, Achievement, and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Steven J.; Montemayor, Mark; Wiltshire, Eric S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of recorded models in the context of ensemble rehearsals was examined. Over a 5-week treatment period, directors of three middle/junior high and two high school bands systematically included professional recordings as part of their preparation of selected pieces. Students completed weekly self-evaluation reports…

  1. Performance Evaluation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on the performance evaluation process and human resource development (HRD). "Assessing the Effectiveness of OJT (On the Job Training): A Case Study Approach" (Julie Furst-Bowe, Debra Gates) is a case study of the effectiveness of OJT in one of a high-tech manufacturing company's product…

  2. Modeling and Performance Evaluation of Backoff Misbehaving Nodes in CSMA/CA Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    range of backoff misbehaviors on network performance in CSMA/CA-based wireless networks. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...Layer Misbeha- vior in Wireless Networks,” ACM Trans. Information and Systems Security , vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 19:1-19:28, July 2008. [10] S. Choi, K...Park, and C. kwon Kim, “On the Performance Characteristics of WLANs : Revisited,” Proc. ACM SIGMETRICS Int’l Conf. Measurement and Modeling of Computer

  3. Discrete tyre model application for evaluation of vehicle limit handling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siramdasu, Y.; Taheri, S.

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this study is twofold, first, to understand the transient and nonlinear effects of anti-lock braking systems (ABS), road undulations and driving dynamics on lateral performance of tyre and second, to develop objective handling manoeuvres and respective metrics to characterise these effects on vehicle behaviour. For studying the transient and nonlinear handling performance of the vehicle, the variations of relaxation length of tyre and tyre inertial properties play significant roles [Pacejka HB. Tire and vehicle dynamics. 3rd ed. Butterworth-Heinemann; 2012]. To accurately simulate these nonlinear effects during high-frequency vehicle dynamic manoeuvres, requires a high-frequency dynamic tyre model (? Hz). A 6 DOF dynamic tyre model integrated with enveloping model is developed and validated using fixed axle high-speed oblique cleat experimental data. Commercially available vehicle dynamics software CarSim® is used for vehicle simulation. The vehicle model was validated by comparing simulation results with experimental sinusoidal steering tests. The validated tyre model is then integrated with vehicle model and a commercial grade rule-based ABS model to perform various objective simulations. Two test scenarios of ABS braking in turn on a smooth road and accelerating in a turn on uneven and smooth roads are considered. Both test cases reiterated that while the tyre is operating in the nonlinear region of slip or slip angle, any road disturbance or high-frequency brake torque input variations can excite the inertial belt vibrations of the tyre. It is shown that these inertial vibrations can directly affect the developed performance metrics and potentially degrade the handling performance of the vehicle.

  4. Evaluating ice sheet model performance over the last glacial cycle using paleo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alexander; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Montoya, Marisa

    2015-04-01

    Estimating the past evolution of ice sheets is important for improving our understanding of their role in the Earth system and for quantifying their contribution to sea-level changes. Limited but significant paleo data and proxies are available to give insights into past changes that are valid, at least, on a local scale. Meanwhile, models can be used to provide a mechanistic picture of ice sheet changes. Combined data-model comparisons are therefore useful exercises that allow models to be confronted with real-world information and lead to better understanding of the mechanisms driving changes. In turn, models can potentially be used to validate the data by providing a physical explanation for observed phenomena. Here we focus on the evolution of the Greenland ice sheet through the last glacial cycle to highlight common problems and potential opportunities for data-model comparisons. We will present several examples of how present generation model results are inconsistent with estimates from paleo data, either in terms of the boundary forcing given to the model or the resulting characteristics of the ice sheet. We also propose a set of data-model comparisons as the starting point for developing a more standardized paleo model performance check. Incorporating such a test into modeling efforts could generate new insights in coupled climate - ice sheet modeling.

  5. Modeling and simulation of a VTOL UAV for landing gear performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Brendan J.; Sandu, Corina; Ko, Andy; Streett, Tim

    2007-04-01

    A multibody dynamics model of a Vertical Take-off and Landing (VTOL) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is presented in this study. The scope of the project was to investigate a lightweight landing gear which has a stable and robust landing performance. Two original designs of the landing gear for the module of interest have been modeled and analyzed in this study. Two new designs have also been developed, modeled, and analyzed. A limited analysis of the forces that occur in the legs/struts has also been performed, to account for possible failure of the members due to buckling. The model incorporates a sloped surface of deformable terrain for stability analysis of the landing scenarios, and unilateral constraints to model the ground reaction forces upon contact. The lift forces on the UAV are modeled as mathematical relations dependent on the speed of the ducted fan to enable the variation of the impact velocities and the different landing scenarios. The simulations conducted illustrate that initial conditions at landing have a big impact on the stability of the module. The two new designs account for the worst possible scenario, and, for the material properties given, end with a larger weight than the one of the original design with three legs and a ring. Simulation data from several landing scenarios are presented in this paper, with analysis of the difference in performance among the different designs.

  6. Performance evaluation model of a pilot food waste collection system in Suzhou City, China.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zongguo; Wang, Yuanjia; De Clercq, Djavan

    2015-05-01

    This paper analyses the food waste collection and transportation (C&T) system in a pilot project in Suzhou by using a novel performance evaluation method. The method employed to conduct this analysis involves a unified performance evaluation index containing qualitative and quantitative indicators applied to data from Suzhou City. Two major inefficiencies were identified: a) low system efficiency due to insufficient processing capacity of commercial food waste facilities; and b) low waste resource utilization due to low efficiency of manual sorting. The performance evaluation indicated that the pilot project collection system's strong points included strong economics, low environmental impact and low social impact. This study also shows that Suzhou's integrated system has developed a comprehensive body of laws and clarified regulatory responsibilities for each of the various government departments to solve the problems of commercial food waste management. Based on Suzhou's experience, perspectives and lessons can be drawn for other cities and areas where food waste management systems are in the planning stage, or are encountering operational problems.

  7. A parametric analysis microcomputer model for evaluating the thermodynamic performance of a reciprocating Brayton cycle engine

    SciTech Connect

    Tsongas, G.A. ); White, T.J. )

    1989-10-01

    A Brayton open-cycle engine is under development. It operates similarly to a gas turbine engine, but uses reciprocating piston compressor and expander components. The design appears to have a number of advantages, including multifuel capability, the potential for lower cost, and the ability to be scaled to small sizes without significant loss in efficiency. An interactive microcomputer model has been developed that analyzes the thermodynamic performance of the engine. The model incorporates all the important irreversibilities found in piston devices, including heat transfer, mechanical friction, pressure losses, and mass loss and recirculation. There are 38 input parameters to the model. Key independent operating parameters are maximum temperature, compressor rpm, and pressure ratio. The development of the model and its assumptions are outlined in this paper. The emphasis is on model applications.

  8. An evaluation of the predictive performance of distributional models for flora and fauna in north-east New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J; Ferrier, S; Scotts, D

    2001-06-01

    To use models of species distributions effectively in conservation planning, it is important to determine the predictive accuracy of such models. Extensive modelling of the distribution of vascular plant and vertebrate fauna species within north-east New South Wales has been undertaken by linking field survey data to environmental and geographical predictors using logistic regression. These models have been used in the development of a comprehensive and adequate reserve system within the region. We evaluate the predictive accuracy of models for 153 small reptile, arboreal marsupial, diurnal bird and vascular plant species for which independent evaluation data were available. The predictive performance of each model was evaluated using the relative operating characteristic curve to measure discrimination capacity. Good discrimination ability implies that a model's predictions provide an acceptable index of species occurrence. The discrimination capacity of 89% of the models was significantly better than random, with 70% of the models providing high levels of discrimination. Predictions generated by this type of modelling therefore provide a reasonably sound basis for regional conservation planning. The discrimination ability of models was highest for the less mobile biological groups, particularly the vascular plants and small reptiles. In the case of diurnal birds, poor performing models tended to be for species which occur mainly within specific habitats not well sampled by either the model development or evaluation data, highly mobile species, species that are locally nomadic or those that display very broad habitat requirements. Particular care needs to be exercised when employing models for these types of species in conservation planning.

  9. Analytical performance evaluation of SAR ATR with inaccurate or estimated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Michael D.

    2004-09-01

    Hypothesis testing algorithms for automatic target recognition (ATR) are often formulated in terms of some assumed distribution family. The parameter values corresponding to a particular target class together with the distribution family constitute a model for the target's signature. In practice such models exhibit inaccuracy because of incorrect assumptions about the distribution family and/or because of errors in the assumed parameter values, which are often determined experimentally. Model inaccuracy can have a significant impact on performance predictions for target recognition systems. Such inaccuracy often causes model-based predictions that ignore the difference between assumed and actual distributions to be overly optimistic. This paper reports on research to quantify the effect of inaccurate models on performance prediction and to estimate the effect using only trained parameters. We demonstrate that for large observation vectors the class-conditional probabilities of error can be expressed as a simple function of the difference between two relative entropies. These relative entropies quantify the discrepancies between the actual and assumed distributions and can be used to express the difference between actual and predicted error rates. Focusing on the problem of ATR from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, we present estimators of the probabilities of error in both ideal and plug-in tests expressed in terms of the trained model parameters. These estimators are defined in terms of unbiased estimates for the first two moments of the sample statistic. We present an analytical treatment of these results and include demonstrations from simulated radar data.

  10. Evaluating the Sensitivity of Agricultural Model Performance to Different Climate Inputs: Supplemental Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glotter, Michael J.; Ruane, Alex C.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Elliott, Joshua W.

    2015-01-01

    Projections of future food production necessarily rely on models, which must themselves be validated through historical assessments comparing modeled and observed yields. Reliable historical validation requires both accurate agricultural models and accurate climate inputs. Problems with either may compromise the validation exercise. Previous studies have compared the effects of different climate inputs on agricultural projections but either incompletely or without a ground truth of observed yields that would allow distinguishing errors due to climate inputs from those intrinsic to the crop model. This study is a systematic evaluation of the reliability of a widely used crop model for simulating U.S. maize yields when driven by multiple observational data products. The parallelized Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (pDSSAT) is driven with climate inputs from multiple sources reanalysis, reanalysis that is bias corrected with observed climate, and a control dataset and compared with observed historical yields. The simulations show that model output is more accurate when driven by any observation-based precipitation product than when driven by non-bias-corrected reanalysis. The simulations also suggest, in contrast to previous studies, that biased precipitation distribution is significant for yields only in arid regions. Some issues persist for all choices of climate inputs: crop yields appear to be oversensitive to precipitation fluctuations but under sensitive to floods and heat waves. These results suggest that the most important issue for agricultural projections may be not climate inputs but structural limitations in the crop models themselves.

  11. Evaluating the performance of ENVI-met model in diurnal cycles for different meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Juan A.; Arrizabalaga, Jon

    2016-11-01

    Urban areas are known to modify meteorological variables producing important differences in small spatial scales (i.e. microscale). These affect human thermal comfort conditions and the dispersion of pollutants, especially those emitted inside the urban area, which finally influence quality of life and the use of public open spaces. In this study, the diurnal evolution of meteorological variables measured in four urban spaces is compared with the results provided by ENVI-met (v 4.0). Measurements were carried out during 3 days with different meteorological conditions in Bilbao in the north of the Iberian Peninsula. The evaluation of the model accuracy (i.e. the degree to which modelled values approach measured values) was carried out with several quantitative difference metrics. The results for air temperature and humidity show a good agreement of measured and modelled values independently of the regional meteorological conditions. However, in the case of mean radiant temperature and wind speed, relevant differences are encountered highlighting the limitation of the model to estimate these meteorological variables precisely during diurnal cycles, in the considered evaluation conditions (sites and weather).

  12. Evaluation of Model Results and Measured Performance of Net-Zero Energy Homes in Hawaii: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, P.; Kiatreungwattana, K.; Kelly, K. J.

    2013-03-01

    The Kaupuni community consists of 19 affordable net-zero energy homes that were built within the Waianae Valley of Oahu, Hawaii in 2011. The project was developed for the native Hawaiian community led by the Department of Hawaiian Homelands. This paper presents a comparison of the modeled and measured energy performance of the homes. Over the first year of occupancy, the community as a whole performed within 1% of the net-zero energy goals. The data show a range of performance from house to house with the majority of the homes consistently near or exceeding net-zero, while a few fall short of the predicted net-zero energy performance. The impact of building floor plan, weather, and cooling set point on this comparison is discussed. The project demonstrates the value of using building energy simulations as a tool to assist the project to achieve energy performance goals. Lessons learned from the energy performance monitoring has had immediate benefits in providing feedback to the homeowners, and will be used to influence future energy efficient designs in Hawaii and other tropical climates.

  13. On shrinkage and model extrapolation in the evaluation of clinical center performance

    PubMed Central

    Varewyck, Machteld; Goetghebeur, Els; Eriksson, Marie; Vansteelandt, Stijn

    2014-01-01

    We consider statistical methods for benchmarking clinical centers based on a dichotomous outcome indicator. Borrowing ideas from the causal inference literature, we aim to reveal how the entire study population would have fared under the current care level of each center. To this end, we evaluate direct standardization based on fixed versus random center effects outcome models that incorporate patient-specific baseline covariates to adjust for differential case-mix. We explore fixed effects (FE) regression with Firth correction and normal mixed effects (ME) regression to maintain convergence in the presence of very small centers. Moreover, we study doubly robust FE regression to avoid outcome model extrapolation. Simulation studies show that shrinkage following standard ME modeling can result in substantial power loss relative to the considered alternatives, especially for small centers. Results are consistent with findings in the analysis of 30-day mortality risk following acute stroke across 90 centers in the Swedish Stroke Register. PMID:24812420

  14. Performance Evaluation of Color Models in the Fusion of Functional and Anatomical Images.

    PubMed

    Ganasala, Padma; Kumar, Vinod; Prasad, A D

    2016-05-01

    Fusion of the functional image with an anatomical image provides additional diagnostic information. It is widely used in diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up of oncology. Functional image is a low-resolution pseudo color image representing the uptake of radioactive tracer that gives the important metabolic information. Whereas, anatomical image is a high-resolution gray scale image that gives structural details. Fused image should consist of all the anatomical details without any changes in the functional content. This is achieved through fusion in de-correlated color model and the choice of color model has greater impact on the fusion outcome. In the present work, suitability of different color models for functional and anatomical image fusion is studied. After converting the functional image into de-correlated color model, the achromatic component of functional image is fused with an anatomical image by using proposed nonsubsampled shearlet transform (NSST) based image fusion algorithm to get new achromatic component with all the anatomical details. This new achromatic and original chromatic channels of functional image are converted to RGB format to get fused functional and anatomical image. Fusion is performed in different color models. Different cases of SPECT-MRI images are used for this color model study. Based on visual and quantitative analysis of fused images, the best color model for the stated purpose is determined.

  15. Performance evaluation of continuity of care records (CCRs): parsing models in a mobile health management system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Ming; Liou, Yong-Zan

    2014-10-01

    In a mobile health management system, mobile devices act as the application hosting devices for personal health records (PHRs) and the healthcare servers construct to exchange and analyze PHRs. One of the most popular PHR standards is continuity of care record (CCR). The CCR is expressed in XML formats. However, parsing is an expensive operation that can degrade XML processing performance. Hence, the objective of this study was to identify different operational and performance characteristics for those CCR parsing models including the XML DOM parser, the SAX parser, the PULL parser, and the JSON parser with regard to JSON data converted from XML-based CCR. Thus, developers can make sensible choices for their target PHR applications to parse CCRs when using mobile devices or servers with different system resources. Furthermore, the simulation experiments of four case studies are conducted to compare the parsing performance on Android mobile devices and the server with large quantities of CCR data.

  16. A Predictive Performance Model to Evaluate the Contention Cost in Application Servers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shiping; Gorton, Ian )

    2002-12-04

    In multi-tier enterprise systems, application servers are key components that implement business logic and provide application services. To support a large number of simultaneous accesses from clients over the Internet and intranet, most application servers use replication and multi-threading to handle concurrent requests. While multiple processes and multiple threads enhance the processing bandwidth of servers, they also increase the contention for resources in application servers. This paper investigates this issue empirically based on a middleware benchmark. A cost model is proposed to estimate the overall performance of application servers, including the contention overhead. This model is then used to determine the optimal degree of the concurrency of application servers for a specific client load. A case study based on CORBA is presented to validate our model and demonstrate its application.

  17. Modeling and Evaluating Pilot Performance in NextGen: Review of and Recommendations Regarding Pilot Modeling Efforts, Architectures, and Validation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, Christopher; Sebok, Angelia; Keller, John; Peters, Steve; Small, Ronald; Hutchins, Shaun; Algarin, Liana; Gore, Brian Francis; Hooey, Becky Lee; Foyle, David C.

    2013-01-01

    NextGen operations are associated with a variety of changes to the national airspace system (NAS) including changes to the allocation of roles and responsibilities among operators and automation, the use of new technologies and automation, additional information presented on the flight deck, and the entire concept of operations (ConOps). In the transition to NextGen airspace, aviation and air operations designers need to consider the implications of design or system changes on human performance and the potential for error. To ensure continued safety of the NAS, it will be necessary for researchers to evaluate design concepts and potential NextGen scenarios well before implementation. One approach for such evaluations is through human performance modeling. Human performance models (HPMs) provide effective tools for predicting and evaluating operator performance in systems. HPMs offer significant advantages over empirical, human-in-the-loop testing in that (1) they allow detailed analyses of systems that have not yet been built, (2) they offer great flexibility for extensive data collection, (3) they do not require experimental participants, and thus can offer cost and time savings. HPMs differ in their ability to predict performance and safety with NextGen procedures, equipment and ConOps. Models also vary in terms of how they approach human performance (e.g., some focus on cognitive processing, others focus on discrete tasks performed by a human, while others consider perceptual processes), and in terms of their associated validation efforts. The objectives of this research effort were to support the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in identifying HPMs that are appropriate for predicting pilot performance in NextGen operations, to provide guidance on how to evaluate the quality of different models, and to identify gaps in pilot performance modeling research, that could guide future research opportunities. This research effort is intended to help the FAA

  18. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.

  19. Evaluation of a model to predict anomalous-observer performance with the 100-hue test.

    PubMed

    Moreland, Jack; Cheung, Vien; Westland, Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Two subjects, protanomalous and deuteranomalous, performed the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue test with and without prescribed ColorView spectacle aids under simulated D65 lighting. Errors were greater with aids than without. Using spectral measurements of test reflectance, aid transmittance and lighting, chromaticities of the 100-hue caps were calculated with and without aids in the uniform chromaticity diagrams for protanomaly and protanomaly [Ophthalmol. Physiol. Opt.30, 685 (2010).]. Errors were modeled from chromatic spacing on a smoothed 100-hue locus together with a distractor term, derived from the distances of raw data from that locus. Good correspondence was found between the measured test and model profiles for the major maxima as well as other aspects of shape and position.

  20. Evaluation of Round Window Stimulation Performance in Otosclerosis Using Finite Element Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shanguo; Xu, Dan; Liu, Xiaole

    2016-01-01

    Round window (RW) stimulation is a new type of middle ear implant's application for treating patients with middle ear disease, such as otosclerosis. However, clinical outcomes show a substantial degree of variability. One source of variability is the variation in the material properties of the ear components caused by the disease. To investigate the influence of the otosclerosis on the performance of the RW stimulation, a human ear finite element model including middle ear and cochlea was established based on a set of microcomputerized tomography section images of a human temporal bone. Three characteristic changes of the otosclerosis in the auditory system were simulated in the FE model: stapedial annular ligament stiffness enlargement, stapedial abnormal bone growth, and partial fixation of the malleus. The FE model was verified by comparing the model-predicted results with published experimental measurements. The equivalent sound pressure (ESP) of RW stimulation was calculated via comparing the differential intracochlear pressure produced by the RW stimulation and the normal eardrum sound stimulation. The results show that the increase of stapedial annular ligament and partial fixation of the malleus decreases RW stimulation's ESP prominently at lower frequencies. In contrast, the stapedial abnormal bone growth deteriorates RW stimulation's ESP severely at higher frequencies. PMID:27034709

  1. Evaluation of Round Window Stimulation Performance in Otosclerosis Using Finite Element Modeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shanguo; Xu, Dan; Liu, Xiaole

    2016-01-01

    Round window (RW) stimulation is a new type of middle ear implant's application for treating patients with middle ear disease, such as otosclerosis. However, clinical outcomes show a substantial degree of variability. One source of variability is the variation in the material properties of the ear components caused by the disease. To investigate the influence of the otosclerosis on the performance of the RW stimulation, a human ear finite element model including middle ear and cochlea was established based on a set of microcomputerized tomography section images of a human temporal bone. Three characteristic changes of the otosclerosis in the auditory system were simulated in the FE model: stapedial annular ligament stiffness enlargement, stapedial abnormal bone growth, and partial fixation of the malleus. The FE model was verified by comparing the model-predicted results with published experimental measurements. The equivalent sound pressure (ESP) of RW stimulation was calculated via comparing the differential intracochlear pressure produced by the RW stimulation and the normal eardrum sound stimulation. The results show that the increase of stapedial annular ligament and partial fixation of the malleus decreases RW stimulation's ESP prominently at lower frequencies. In contrast, the stapedial abnormal bone growth deteriorates RW stimulation's ESP severely at higher frequencies.

  2. Performance Evaluation of O-Ring Seals in Model 9975 Packaging Assemblies (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, Eric

    1998-12-28

    The Materials Consultation Group of SRTC has completed a review of existing literature and data regarding the useable service life of Viton{reg_sign} GLT fluoroelastomer O-rings currently used in the Model 9975 packaging assemblies. Although the shipping and transportation period is normally limited to 2 years, it is anticipated that these packages will be used for longer-term storage of Pu-bearing materials in KAMS (K-Area Materials Storage) prior to processing or disposition in the APSF (Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility). Based on the service conditions and review of available literature, Materials Consultation concludes that there is sufficient existing data to establish the technical basis for storage of Pu-bearing materials using Parker Seals O-ring compound V835-75 (or equivalent) for up to 10 years following the 2-year shipping period. Although significant physical deterioration of the O-rings and release of product is not expected, definite changes in physical properties will occur. However, due to the complex relationship between elastomer formulation, seal properties, and competing degradation mechanisms, the actual degree of property variation and impact upon seal performance is difficult to predict. Therefore, accelerated aging and/or surveillance programs are recommended to validate the assumptions outlined in this report and to assess the long-term performance of O-ring seals under actual service conditions. Such programs could provide a unique opportunity to develop nonexistent long-term performance data, as well as address storage extension issues if necessary.

  3. Performance Evaluation Test of the Orbit Screen Model 68A and the Komplet Model 48-25 Rock Crusher

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    screen and on a Komplet Italia , s.r.l., Model 48-25 rock crusher. The test was conducted during August 2008 at a U.S. Army test site in central... Italia , s.r.l., Model 48-25 Rock Crusher.......................................................... 2 2.3 ASV SR-80 Rubber-Tracked Skid-Steer Loader... Italia , s.r.l., Rock Crusher Testing ......................................................................... 16 5.1 Crushing Performance Test

  4. ATAMM enhancement and multiprocessor performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoughton, John W.; Mielke, Roland R.; Som, Sukhamoy; Obando, Rodrigo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Jones, Robert L., III; Mandala, Brij Mohan V.

    1991-01-01

    ATAMM (Algorithm To Architecture Mapping Model) enhancement and multiprocessor performance evaluation is discussed. The following topics are included: the ATAMM model; ATAMM enhancement; ADM (Advanced Development Model) implementation of ATAMM; and ATAMM support tools.

  5. Integrated DEA models and grey system theory to evaluate past-to-future performance: a case of Indian electricity industry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Nan; Nguyen, Nhu-Ty; Tran, Thanh-Tuyen

    2015-01-01

    The growth of economy and population together with the higher demand in energy has created many concerns for the Indian electricity industry whose capacity is at 211 gigawatts mostly in coal-fired plants. Due to insufficient fuel supply, India suffers from a shortage of electricity generation, leading to rolling blackouts; thus, performance evaluation and ranking the industry turn into significant issues. By this study, we expect to evaluate the rankings of these companies under control of the Ministry of Power. Also, this research would like to test if there are any significant differences between the two DEA models: Malmquist nonradial and Malmquist radial. Then, one advance model of MPI would be chosen to see these companies' performance in recent years and next few years by using forecasting results of Grey system theory. Totally, the realistic data 14 are considered to be in this evaluation after the strict selection from the whole industry. The results found that all companies have not shown many abrupt changes on their scores, and it is always not consistently good or consistently standing out, which demonstrated the high applicable usability of the integrated methods. This integrated numerical research gives a better "past-present-future" insights into performance evaluation in Indian electricity industry.

  6. Integrated DEA Models and Grey System Theory to Evaluate Past-to-Future Performance: A Case of Indian Electricity Industry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chia-Nan; Tran, Thanh-Tuyen

    2015-01-01

    The growth of economy and population together with the higher demand in energy has created many concerns for the Indian electricity industry whose capacity is at 211 gigawatts mostly in coal-fired plants. Due to insufficient fuel supply, India suffers from a shortage of electricity generation, leading to rolling blackouts; thus, performance evaluation and ranking the industry turn into significant issues. By this study, we expect to evaluate the rankings of these companies under control of the Ministry of Power. Also, this research would like to test if there are any significant differences between the two DEA models: Malmquist nonradial and Malmquist radial. Then, one advance model of MPI would be chosen to see these companies' performance in recent years and next few years by using forecasting results of Grey system theory. Totally, the realistic data 14 are considered to be in this evaluation after the strict selection from the whole industry. The results found that all companies have not shown many abrupt changes on their scores, and it is always not consistently good or consistently standing out, which demonstrated the high applicable usability of the integrated methods. This integrated numerical research gives a better “past-present-future” insights into performance evaluation in Indian electricity industry. PMID:25821854

  7. A parametric multiclass Bayes error estimator for the multispectral scanner spatial model performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobasseri, B. G.; Mcgillem, C. D.; Anuta, P. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The probability of correct classification of various populations in data was defined as the primary performance index. The multispectral data being of multiclass nature as well, required a Bayes error estimation procedure that was dependent on a set of class statistics alone. The classification error was expressed in terms of an N dimensional integral, where N was the dimensionality of the feature space. The multispectral scanner spatial model was represented by a linear shift, invariant multiple, port system where the N spectral bands comprised the input processes. The scanner characteristic function, the relationship governing the transformation of the input spatial, and hence, spectral correlation matrices through the systems, was developed.

  8. Functional Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenisen, Michael C.; Hayes, Judith C.; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Moore, Alan D.

    1999-01-01

    The Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was established to address specific issues associated with optimizing the ability of crews to complete mission tasks deemed essential to entry, landing, and egress for spaceflights lasting up to 16 days. The main objectives of this functional performance evaluation were to investigate the physiological effects of long-duration spaceflight on skeletal muscle strength and endurance, as well as aerobic capacity and orthostatic function. Long-duration exposure to a microgravity environment may produce physiological alterations that affect crew ability to complete critical tasks such as extravehicular activity (EVA), intravehicular activity (IVA), and nominal or emergency egress. Ultimately, this information will be used to develop and verify countermeasures. The answers to three specific functional performance questions were sought: (1) What are the performance decrements resulting from missions of varying durations? (2) What are the physical requirements for successful entry, landing, and emergency egress from the Shuttle? and (3) What combination of preflight fitness training and in-flight countermeasures will minimize in-flight muscle performance decrements? To answer these questions, the Exercise Countermeasures Project looked at physiological changes associated with muscle degradation as well as orthostatic intolerance. A means of ensuring motor coordination was necessary to maintain proficiency in piloting skills, EVA, and IVA tasks. In addition, it was necessary to maintain musculoskeletal strength and function to meet the rigors associated with moderate altitude bailout and with nominal or emergency egress from the landed Orbiter. Eight investigations, referred to as Detailed Supplementary Objectives (DSOs) 475, 476, 477, 606, 608, 617, 618, and 624, were conducted to study muscle degradation and the effects of exercise on exercise capacity and orthostatic function (Table 3-1). This chapter is divided into

  9. Simulation of air quality over Central-Eastern Europe - Performance evaluation of WRF-CAMx modelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewska, Katarzyna; Juda-Rezler, Katarzyna; Reizer, Magdalena

    2013-04-01

    The main goal of presented work is to evaluate the accuracy of modelling the atmospheric transport and transformation on regional scale, performed with 25 km grid spacing. The coupled Mesoscale Weather Model - Chemical Transport Model (CTM) has been applied for Europe under European-American AQMEII project (Air Quality Modelling Evaluation International Initiative - http://aqmeii.jrc.ec.europa.eu/). The modelling domain was centered over Denmark (57.00°N, 10.00°E) with 172 x 172 grid points in x and y direction. The map projection choice was Lambert conformal. In the applied modelling system the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx) from ENVIRON International Corporation (Novato, California) was coupled off-line to the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF), developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). WRF-CAMx simulations have been carried out for 2006. The anthropogenic emisions database has been provided by TNO (Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research) under AQMEII initiative. Area and line emissions were proceeded by emission model EMIL (Juda-Rezler et al., 2012) [1], while for the point sources the EPS3 model (Emission Processor v.3 from ENVIRON) was implemented in order to obtain vertical distribution of emission. Boundary conditions were acquired from coupling the GEMS (Global and regional Earth-system Monitoring using Satellite and in-situ data) modelling system results with satellite observations. The modelling system has been evaluated for the area of Central-Eastern Europe, regarding ozone and particulate matter (PM) concentrations. For each pollutant measured data from rural background AirBase and EMEP stations, with more than 75% of daily data, has been used. Original 'operational' evaluation methodology, proposed by Juda-Rezler et al. (2012) was applied. Selected set of metrics consists of 5 groups: bias measures, error measures, correlation measures, measures of model variance and spread, which

  10. Evaluation of tests of central nervous system performance after hypoxemia for a model for cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    van der Post, J; Noordzij, L A W; de Kam, M L; Blauw, G J; Cohen, A F; van Gerven, J M A

    2002-12-01

    The sensitivity of several neurophysiological and cognitive tests to different levels of hypoxia was investigated. Cerebral hypoxia in healthy volunteers may be a disease model for dementia or other forms of brain dysfunction. Twelve healthy subjects were included in a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, three-period cross-over trial. They received three air/N2 gas mixtures via mask breathing [aimed at peripheral oxygen saturation (SPO2) values of > 97% (placebo), 90% and 80%, with normal end-tidal CO2]. Central nervous system effects were tested regularly for 130 min by saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movements, electro-encephalogram, visual analogue scales and cognitive tests. Treatments were well tolerated. Compared to SPO2 90%, SPO2 80% reduced saccadic peak velocity by 16.4 degrees/s [confidence interval (CI) -26.3, -6.4], increased occipital delta power by 14.3% (CI 3.6, 25.1), and significantly increased most cognitive reaction times. SPO2 80% also decreased correct responses for the binary choice task and serial word recognition [-1.3 (-2.2, -0.3) and -3.5 (-6.2, -0.8), respectively] compared to SPO2 90%. Cognitive performance was decreased by SPO2 80% and increased by SPO2 90% compared to placebo. Sensitive effect measurements can be identified for these interventions. The applicability as a model for cognitive impairment should be investigated further.

  11. Performance evaluation of AERMOD, CALPUFF, and legacy air dispersion models using the Winter Validation Tracer Study dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, Arthur S.

    2014-06-01

    The performance of the steady-state air dispersion models AERMOD and Industrial Source Complex 2 (ISC2), and Lagrangian puff models CALPUFF and RATCHET were evaluated using the Winter Validation Tracer Study dataset. The Winter Validation Tracer Study was performed in February 1991 at the former Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Denver, Colorado. Twelve, 11-h tests were conducted where a conservative tracer was released and measured hourly at 140 samplers in concentric rings 8 km and 16 km from the release point. Performance objectives were unpaired maximum one- and nine-hour average concentration, location of plume maximum, plume impact area, arc-integrated concentration, unpaired nine-hour average concentration, and paired ensemble means. Performance objectives were aimed at addressing regulatory compliance, and dose reconstruction assessment questions. The objective of regulatory compliance is not to underestimate maximum concentrations whereas for dose reconstruction, the objective is an unbiased estimate of concentration in space and time. Performance measures included the fractional bias, normalized mean square error, geometric mean, geometric mean variance, correlation coefficient, and fraction of observations within a factor of two. The Lagrangian puff models tended to exhibit the smallest variance, highest correlation, and highest number of predictions within a factor of two compared to the steady-state models at both the 8-km and 16-km distance. Maximum one- and nine-hour average concentrations were less likely to be under-predicted by the steady-state models compared to the Lagrangian puff models. The characteristic of the steady-state models not to under-predict maximum concentrations make them well suited for regulatory compliance demonstration, whereas the Lagrangian puff models are better suited for dose reconstruction and long range transport.

  12. Validation of alternative models in genetic evaluation of racing performance in North Swedish and Norwegian cold-blooded trotters.

    PubMed

    Olsen, H F; Klemetsdal, G; Odegård, J; Arnason, T

    2012-04-01

    There have been several approaches to the estimation of breeding values of performance in trotters, and the objective of this study was to validate different alternatives for genetic evaluation of racing performance in the North Swedish and Norwegian cold-blooded trotters. The current bivariate approach with the traits racing status (RACE) and earnings (EARN) was compared with a threshold-linear animal model and the univariate alternative with the performance trait only. The models were compared based on cross-validation of standardized earnings, using mean-squared errors of prediction (MSEP) and the correlation between the phenotype (Y) and the estimated breeding value (EBV). Despite possible effects of selection, a rather high estimate of heritability of EARN was found in our univariate analysis. The genetic trend estimate for EARN was clearly higher in the bivariate specification than in the univariate model, as a consequence of the considerable size of estimated heritability of RACE and its high correlation with EARN (approximately 0.8). RACE is highly influenced by ancestry rather than the on-farm performance of the horse itself. Consequently, the use of RACE in the genetic analysis may inflate the genetic trend of EARN because of a double counting of pedigree information. Although, because of the higher predictive ability of the bivariate specification, the improved ranking of animals within a year-class and the inability to discriminate between models for genetic trend, we propose to base prediction of breeding values on the current bivariate model.

  13. Performance evaluation of partial differential equation models in electronic speckle pattern interferometry and the delta-mollification phase map method.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chen; Zhang, Fang; Li, Botao; Yan, Haiqing

    2006-10-01

    The ordinary differential equation (ODE) and partial differential equation (PDE) image- processing methods have been applied to reduce noise and enhance the contrast of electronic speckle pattern interferometry fringe patterns. We evaluate the performance of a few representative PDE denoising models quantitatively with two parameters called image fidelity and speckle index, and then we choose a good denoising model. Combining this denoising model with the ODE enhancement method, we make it possible to perform contrast enhancement and denoising simultaneously. Second, we introduce the delta-mollification method to smooth the unwrapped phase map. Finally, based on PDE image processing, delta mollification and some traditional techniques, an approach of phase extraction from a single fringe pattern is tested for computer-simulated and experimentally obtained fringe patterns. The method works well under a high noise level and limited visibility and can extract accurate phase values.

  14. Observed versus modelled u-, g-, r-, i-, z-band photometry of local galaxies - evaluation of model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, K. S. Alexander; Lisker, Thorsten; Grebel, Eva K.

    2012-12-01

    We test how well available stellar population models can reproduce observed u-, g-, r-, i-, z-band photometry of the local galaxy population (0.02 ≤ z ≤ 0.03) as probed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our study is conducted from the perspective of a user of the models, who has observational data in hand and seeks to convert them into physical quantities. Stellar population models for galaxies are created by synthesizing star formation histories and chemical enrichments using single stellar populations from several groups (STARBURST99, GALAXEV, the Maraston models, GALEV). The role of dust is addressed through a simplistic, but observationally motivated, dust model that couples the amplitude of the extinction to the star formation history, metallicity and the viewing angle. Moreover, the influence of emission lines is considered (for the subset of models for which this component is included). The performance of the models is investigated by (1) comparing their prediction with the observed galaxy population in the SDSS using the (u - g)-(r - i) and (g - r)-(i - z) colour planes, (2) comparing predicted stellar mass and luminosity weighted ages and metallicities, specific star formation rates, mass-to-light ratios and total extinctions with literature values from studies based on spectroscopy. Strong differences between the various models are seen with several models occupying regions in the colour-colour diagrams where no galaxies are observed. We would therefore like to emphasize the importance of the choice of model. Using our preferred model we find that the star formation history, metallicity and also dust content can be constrained over a large part of the parameter space through the use of u-, g-, r-, i-, z-band photometry. However, strong local degeneracies are present due to overlap of models with high and low extinction in certain parts of the colour space.

  15. Forest soil carbon stock estimates in a nationwide inventory: evaluating performance of the ROMULv and Yasso07 models in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtonen, Aleksi; Linkosalo, Tapio; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Sievänen, Risto; Mäkipää, Raisa; Tamminen, Pekka; Salemaa, Maija; Nieminen, Tiina; Ťupek, Boris; Heikkinen, Juha; Komarov, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic soil models are needed for estimating impact of weather and climate change on soil carbon stocks and fluxes. Here, we evaluate performance of Yasso07 and ROMULv models against forest soil carbon stock measurements. More specifically, we ask if litter quantity, litter quality and weather data are sufficient drivers for soil carbon stock estimation. We also test whether inclusion of soil water holding capacity improves reliability of modelled soil carbon stock estimates. Litter input of trees was estimated from stem volume maps provided by the National Forest Inventory, while understorey vegetation was estimated using new biomass models. The litter production rates of trees were based on earlier research, while for understorey biomass they were estimated from measured data. We applied Yasso07 and ROMULv models across Finland and ran those models into steady state; thereafter, measured soil carbon stocks were compared with model estimates. We found that the role of understorey litter input was underestimated when the Yasso07 model was parameterised, especially in northern Finland. We also found that the inclusion of soil water holding capacity in the ROMULv model improved predictions, especially in southern Finland. Our simulations and measurements show that models using only litter quality, litter quantity and weather data underestimate soil carbon stock in southern Finland, and this underestimation is due to omission of the impact of droughts to the decomposition of organic layers. Our results also imply that the ecosystem modelling community and greenhouse gas inventories should improve understorey litter estimation in the northern latitudes.

  16. RLS Instrument Radiometric Model: Instrument performance theoretical evaluation and experimental checks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, César; Ramos, Gonzalo; Moral, Andoni; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Pérez, Carlos; Hutchinson, Ian; INGLEY, Richard; Rull, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) is one of the Pasteur payload instruments located at the Rover of the ExoMars mission and within the ESA's Aurora Exploration Programme. RLS will explore the Mars surface composition through the Raman spectroscopy technique. The instrument is divided into several units: a laser for Raman emission stimulation, an internal optical head (iOH) for sample excitation and for Raman emission recovering, a spectrometer with a CCD located at its output (SPU), the optical harness (OH) for the units connection, from the laser to the excitation path of the iOH and from the iOH reception path to the spectrometer, and the corresponding electronics for the CCD operation.Due to the variability of the samples to be analyzed on Mars, a radiometry prediction for the instrument performance results to be of the critical importance. In such a framework, and taking into account the SNR (signal to noise ratio) required for the achievement of successful results from the scientific point of view (a proper information about the Mars surface composition), a radiometric model has been developed to provide the requirements for the different units, i.e. the laser irradiance, the iOH, OH, and SPU throughputs, and the samples that will be possible to be analyzed in terms of its Raman emission and the relationship of the Raman signal with respect to fluorescence emission, among others.The radiometric model fundamentals (calculations and approximations), as well as the first results obtained during the bread board characterization campaign are here reported on.

  17. The EMEFS model evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R. ); Dennis, R.L. ); Seilkop, S.K. ); Banic, C.M.; Davies, D.; Hoff, R.M.; Macdonald, A.M.; Mickle, R.E.; Padro, J.; Puckett, K. ); Byun, D.; McHenry, J.N.

    1991-12-01

    The binational Eulerian Model Evaluation Field Study (EMEFS) consisted of several coordinated data gathering and model evaluation activities. In the EMEFS, data were collected by five air and precipitation monitoring networks between June 1988 and June 1990. Model evaluation is continuing. This interim report summarizes the progress made in the evaluation of the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) and the Acid Deposition and Oxidant Model (ADOM) through the December 1990 completion of a State of Science and Technology report on model evaluation for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Because various assessment applications of RADM had to be evaluated for NAPAP, the report emphasizes the RADM component of the evaluation. A protocol for the evaluation was developed by the model evaluation team and defined the observed and predicted values to be used and the methods by which the observed and predicted values were to be compared. Scatter plots and time series of predicted and observed values were used to present the comparisons graphically. Difference statistics and correlations were used to quantify model performance. 64 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Methodology to evaluate the performance of simulation models for alternative compiler and operating system configurations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation modelers increasingly require greater flexibility for model implementation on diverse operating systems, and they demand high computational speed for efficient iterative simulations. Additionally, model users may differ in preference for proprietary versus open-source software environment...

  19. Evaluating the catching performance of aerodynamic rain gauges through field comparisons and CFD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Michael; Colli, Matteo; Stagnaro, Mattia; Lanza, Luca; Quinn, Paul; Dutton, Mark; O'Donnell, Greg; Wilkinson, Mark; Black, Andrew; O'Connell, Enda

    2016-04-01

    Accurate rainfall measurement is a fundamental requirement in a broad range of applications including flood risk and water resource management. The most widely used method of measuring rainfall is the rain gauge, which is often also considered to be the most accurate. In the context of hydrological modelling, measurements from rain gauges are interpolated to produce an areal representation, which forms an important input to drive hydrological models and calibrate rainfall radars. In each stage of this process another layer of uncertainty is introduced. The initial measurement errors are propagated through the chain, compounding the overall uncertainty. This study looks at the fundamental source of error, in the rainfall measurement itself; and specifically addresses the largest of these, the systematic 'wind-induced' error. Snowfall is outside the scope. The shape of a precipitation gauge significantly affects its collection efficiency (CE), with respect to a reference measurement. This is due to the airflow around the gauge, which causes a deflection in the trajectories of the raindrops near the gauge orifice. Computational Fluid-Dynamic (CFD) simulations are used to evaluate the time-averaged airflows realized around the EML ARG100, EML SBS500 and EML Kalyx-RG rain gauges, when impacted by wind. These gauges have a similar aerodynamic profile - a shape comparable to that of a champagne flute - and they are used globally. The funnel diameter of each gauge, respectively, is 252mm, 254mm and 127mm. The SBS500 is used by the UK Met Office and the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency. Terms of comparison are provided by the results obtained for standard rain gauge shapes manufactured by Casella and OTT which, respectively, have a uniform and a tapered cylindrical shape. The simulations were executed for five different wind speeds; 2, 5, 7, 10 and 18 ms-1. Results indicate that aerodynamic gauges have a different impact on the time-averaged airflow patterns

  20. THE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster describes a model evaluation tool that is currently being developed and applied for meteorological and air quality model evaluation. The poster outlines the framework and provides examples of statistical evaluations that can be performed with the model evaluation tool...

  1. Evaluating the performance of the Lee-Carter method and its variants in modelling and forecasting Malaysian mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakiyatussariroh, W. H. Wan; Said, Z. Mohammad; Norazan, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the performance of the Lee-Carter (LC) method and it variants in modeling and forecasting Malaysia mortality. These include the original LC, the Lee-Miller (LM) variant and the Booth-Maindonald-Smith (BMS) variant. These methods were evaluated using Malaysia's mortality data which was measured based on age specific death rates (ASDR) for 1971 to 2009 for overall population while those for 1980-2009 were used in separate models for male and female population. The performance of the variants has been examined in term of the goodness of fit of the models and forecasting accuracy. Comparison was made based on several criteria namely, mean square error (MSE), root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute deviation (MAD) and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). The results indicate that BMS method was outperformed in in-sample fitting for overall population and when the models were fitted separately for male and female population. However, in the case of out-sample forecast accuracy, BMS method only best when the data were fitted to overall population. When the data were fitted separately for male and female, LCnone performed better for male population and LM method is good for female population.

  2. Algorithm performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Richard N.; Greci, Anthony M.; Bradley, Philip A.

    1995-03-01

    Traditionally, the performance of adaptive antenna systems is measured using automated antenna array pattern measuring equipment. This measurement equipment produces a plot of the receive gain of the antenna array as a function of angle. However, communications system users more readily accept and understand bit error rate (BER) as a performance measure. The work reported on here was conducted to characterize adaptive antenna receiver performance in terms of overall communications system performance using BER as a performance measure. The adaptive antenna system selected for this work featured a linear array, least mean square (LMS) adaptive algorithm and a high speed phase shift keyed (PSK) communications modem.

  3. Evaluation of Blade-Strike Models for Estimating the Biological Performance of Kaplan Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2007-11-10

    Bio-indexing of hydroturbines is an important means to optimize passage conditions for fish by identifying operations for existing and new design turbines that minimize the probability of injury. Cost-effective implementation of bio-indexing requires the use of tools such as numerical and physical turbine models to generate hypotheses for turbine operations that can be tested at prototype scales using live fish. Numerical deterministic and stochastic blade strike models were developed for a 1:25-scale physical turbine model built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the original design turbine at McNary Dam and for prototype-scale original design and replacement minimum gap runner (MGR) turbines at Bonneville Dam's first powerhouse. Blade strike probabilities predicted by both models were comparable with the overall trends in blade strike probability observed in both prototype-scale live fish survival studies and physical turbine model using neutrally buoyant beads. The predictions from the stochastic model were closer to the experimental data than the predictions from the deterministic model because the stochastic model included more realistic consideration of the aspect of fish approaching to the leading edges of turbine runner blades. Therefore, the stochastic model should be the preferred method for the prediction of blade strike and injury probability for juvenile salmon and steelhead using numerical blade-strike models.

  4. Evaluation of a micro-scale wind model's performance over realistic building clusters using wind tunnel experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Du, Yunsong; Miao, Shiguang; Fang, Xiaoyi

    2016-08-01

    The simulation performance over complex building clusters of a wind simulation model (Wind Information Field Fast Analysis model, WIFFA) in a micro-scale air pollutant dispersion model system (Urban Microscale Air Pollution dispersion Simulation model, UMAPS) is evaluated using various wind tunnel experimental data including the CEDVAL (Compilation of Experimental Data for Validation of Micro-Scale Dispersion Models) wind tunnel experiment data and the NJU-FZ experiment data (Nanjing University-Fang Zhuang neighborhood wind tunnel experiment data). The results show that the wind model can reproduce the vortexes triggered by urban buildings well, and the flow patterns in urban street canyons and building clusters can also be represented. Due to the complex shapes of buildings and their distributions, the simulation deviations/discrepancies from the measurements are usually caused by the simplification of the building shapes and the determination of the key zone sizes. The computational efficiencies of different cases are also discussed in this paper. The model has a high computational efficiency compared to traditional numerical models that solve the Navier-Stokes equations, and can produce very high-resolution (1-5 m) wind fields of a complex neighborhood scale urban building canopy (~ 1 km ×1 km) in less than 3 min when run on a personal computer.

  5. An evaluation of 1D loss model collections for the off-design performance prediction of automotive turbocharger compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, P.; Spence, S.; Early, J.; Filsinger, D.; Dietrich, M.

    2013-12-01

    Single-zone modelling is used to assess different collections of impeller 1D loss models. Three collections of loss models have been identified in literature, and the background to each of these collections is discussed. Each collection is evaluated using three modern automotive turbocharger style centrifugal compressors; comparisons of performance for each of the collections are made. An empirical data set taken from standard hot gas stand tests for each turbocharger is used as a baseline for comparison. Compressor range is predicted in this study; impeller diffusion ratio is shown to be a useful method of predicting compressor surge in 1D, and choke is predicted using basic compressible flow theory. The compressor designer can use this as a guide to identify the most compatible collection of losses for turbocharger compressor design applications. The analysis indicates the most appropriate collection for the design of automotive turbocharger centrifugal compressors.

  6. GROUND-WATER MODEL TESTING: SYSTEMATIC EVALUATION AND TESTING OF CODE FUNCTIONALITY AND PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective use of ground-water simulation codes as management decision tools requires the establishment of their functionality, performance characteristics, and applicability to the problem at hand. This is accomplished through application of a systematic code-testing protocol and...

  7. BPACK -- A computer model package for boiler reburning/co-firing performance evaluations. User`s manual, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.T.; Li, B.; Payne, R.

    1992-06-01

    This manual presents and describes a package of computer models uniquely developed for boiler thermal performance and emissions evaluations by the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The model package permits boiler heat transfer, fuels combustion, and pollutant emissions predictions related to a number of practical boiler operations such as fuel-switching, fuels co-firing, and reburning NO{sub x} reductions. The models are adaptable to most boiler/combustor designs and can handle burner fuels in solid, liquid, gaseous, and slurried forms. The models are also capable of performing predictions for combustion applications involving gaseous-fuel reburning, and co-firing of solid/gas, liquid/gas, gas/gas, slurry/gas fuels. The model package is conveniently named as BPACK (Boiler Package) and consists of six computer codes, of which three of them are main computational codes and the other three are input codes. The three main codes are: (a) a two-dimensional furnace heat-transfer and combustion code: (b) a detailed chemical-kinetics code; and (c) a boiler convective passage code. This user`s manual presents the computer model package in two volumes. Volume 1 describes in detail a number of topics which are of general users` interest, including the physical and chemical basis of the models, a complete description of the model applicability, options, input/output, and the default inputs. Volume 2 contains a detailed record of the worked examples to assist users in applying the models, and to illustrate the versatility of the codes.

  8. Evaluating the performance of a glacier erosion model applied to Peyto Glacier, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, R.; Mlynowski, T. J.; Menounos, B.

    2013-12-01

    Glaciers are effective agents of erosion for many mountainous regions, but primary rates of erosion are difficult to quantify due to unknown conditions at the glacier bed. We develop a numerical model of subglacial erosion and passively couple it to a vertically integrated ice flow model (UBC regional glaciation model). The model accounts for seasonal changes in water pressure at the glacier bed which affect rates of abrasion and quarrying. We apply our erosion model to Peyto Glacier, and compare estimates of glacier erosion to the mass of fine sediment contained in a lake immediately down valley from the glacier. A series of experiments with our model and ones based on subglacial sliding rates are run to explore model sensitivity to bedrock hardness, seasonal hydrology, changes in mass balance, and longer-term dimensional changes of the glacier. Our experiments show that, as expected, erosion rates are most sensitive to bedrock hardness and changes in glacier mass balance. Silt and clay contained in Peyto Lake primarily originate from the glacier, and represent sediments derived from abrasion and comminution of material produced by quarrying. Average specific sediment yield during the period AD1917-1970 from the lake is 467×190 Mg km-2yr-1 and reaches a maximum of 928 Mg km-2yr-1 in AD1941. Converting to a specific sediment yield, modelled average abrasion and quarrying rates during the comparative period are 142×44 Mg km-2yr-1 and 1167×213 Mg km-2yr-1 respectively. Modelled quarrying accounts for approximately 85-95% of the erosion occurring beneath the glacier. The basal sliding model estimates combined abrasion and quarrying. During the comparative period, estimated yields average 427×136 Mg km-2yr-1, lower than the combined abrasion and quarrying models. Both models predict maximum sediment yield when Peyto Glacier reached its maximum extent. The simplistic erosion model shows higher sensitivity to climate, as seen by accentuated sediment yield peaks

  9. A Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS): Algorithm and performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yu; Sengupta, Manajit; Dudhia, Jimy

    2016-10-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) models simulating broadband solar radiation have been widely used by atmospheric scientists to model solar resources for various energy applications such as operational forecasting. Due to the complexity of solving the RT equation, the computation under cloudy conditions can be extremely time-consuming, though many approximations (e.g., two-stream approach and delta-M truncation scheme) have been utilized. Thus, a more efficient RT model is crucial for model developers as a new option for approximating solar radiation at the land surface with minimal loss of accuracy. In this study, we developed a fast all-sky radiation model for solar applications (FARMS) using the simplified clear-sky RT model, REST2, and simulated cloud transmittances and reflectances from the Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) with a 16-stream Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer (DISORT). Simulated lookup tables (LUTs) of cloud transmittances and reflectances are created by varying cloud optical thicknesses, cloud particle sizes, and solar zenith angles. Equations with optimized parameters are fitted to the cloud transmittances and reflectances to develop the model. The all-sky solar irradiance at the land surface can then be computed rapidly by combining REST2 with the cloud transmittances and reflectances. This new RT model is more than 1,000 times faster than those currently utilized in solar resource assessment and forecasting because it does not explicitly solve the RT equation for each individual cloud condition. Our results indicate that the accuracy of the fast radiative transfer model is comparable to or better than two-stream approximation in term of computing cloud transmittance and solar radiation.

  10. Application of Lidar Data to the Performance Evaluations of CMAQ Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tropospheric Ozone (O3) Lidar Network (TOLNet) provides time/height O3 measurements from near the surface to the top of the troposphere to describe in high-fidelity spatial-temporal distributions, which is uniquely useful to evaluate the temporal evolution of O3 profiles in a...

  11. Vender Performance Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Joan; Perelmuter, Susan

    1978-01-01

    Vendor selection can mean success or failure of an approval plan; this study evaluates three book vendors by comparing their plans on the bases of speed, bibliographic accuracy, and discounts. (Author/CWM)

  12. Distributed Space Mission Design for Earth Observation Using Model-Based Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nag, Sreeja; LeMoigne-Stewart, Jacqueline; Cervantes, Ben; DeWeck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Distributed Space Missions (DSMs) are gaining momentum in their application to earth observation missions owing to their unique ability to increase observation sampling in multiple dimensions. DSM design is a complex problem with many design variables, multiple objectives determining performance and cost and emergent, often unexpected, behaviors. There are very few open-access tools available to explore the tradespace of variables, minimize cost and maximize performance for pre-defined science goals, and therefore select the most optimal design. This paper presents a software tool that can multiple DSM architectures based on pre-defined design variable ranges and size those architectures in terms of predefined science and cost metrics. The tool will help a user select Pareto optimal DSM designs based on design of experiments techniques. The tool will be applied to some earth observation examples to demonstrate its applicability in making some key decisions between different performance metrics and cost metrics early in the design lifecycle.

  13. Surface characteristics modeling and performance evaluation of urban building materials using LiDAR data.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolu; Liang, Yu

    2015-05-20

    Analysis of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) intensity data to extract surface features is of great interest in remote sensing research. One potential application of LiDAR intensity data is target classification. A new bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model is derived for target characterization of rough and smooth surfaces. Based on the geometry of our coaxial full-waveform LiDAR system, the integration method is improved through coordinate transformation to establish the relationship between the BRDF model and intensity data of LiDAR. A series of experiments using typical urban building materials are implemented to validate the proposed BRDF model and integration method. The fitting results show that three parameters extracted from the proposed BRDF model can distinguish the urban building materials from perspectives of roughness, specular reflectance, and diffuse reflectance. A comprehensive analysis of these parameters will help characterize surface features in a physically rigorous manner.

  14. Artificial intelligence modeling to evaluate field performance of photocatalytic asphalt pavement for ambient air purification.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Somayeh; Hassan, Marwa; Nadiri, Ataallah; Dylla, Heather

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the application of titanium dioxide (TiO₂) as a photocatalyst in asphalt pavement has received considerable attention for purifying ambient air from traffic-emitted pollutants via photocatalytic processes. In order to control the increasing deterioration of ambient air quality, urgent and proper risk assessment tools are deemed necessary. However, in practice, monitoring all process parameters for various operating conditions is difficult due to the complex and non-linear nature of air pollution-based problems. Therefore, the development of models to predict air pollutant concentrations is very useful because it can provide early warnings to the population and also reduce the number of measuring sites. This study used artificial neural network (ANN) and neuro-fuzzy (NF) models to predict NOx concentration in the air as a function of traffic count (Tr) and climatic conditions including humidity (H), temperature (T), solar radiation (S), and wind speed (W) before and after the application of TiO₂ on the pavement surface. These models are useful for modeling because of their ability to be trained using historical data and because of their capability for modeling highly non-linear relationships. To build these models, data were collected from a field study where an aqueous nano TiO₂ solution was sprayed on a 0.2-mile of asphalt pavement in Baton Rouge, LA. Results of this study showed that the NF model provided a better fitting to NOx measurements than the ANN model in the training, validation, and test steps. Results of a parametric study indicated that traffic level, relative humidity, and solar radiation had the most influence on photocatalytic efficiency.

  15. Maritime Platform Sleep and Performance Study: Evaluating the SAFTE Model for Maritime Workplace Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    reaction time of the participant ( Pulsar Informatics, 2012). A blank black screen with the outline of a red rectangle is displayed to the crewmember...the performance and alertness 12-h shift workers. Journal of Sleep Research, 11, 219–227. Pulsar Informatics (2012). PVT. Retrieved from http

  16. Performance evaluation and channel modeling of MIMO free space optical communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tianping; Lu, Yimin; Lu, Gang; Peng, Kai

    2005-11-01

    Free space optical communication systems represent one of the most promising approaches for addressing the emerging broadband access market, it can provide high bandwidth with no physical contact, but are hampered by signal fading effects due to particulate scattering caused by atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, we propose a new channel model of MIMO free space optical communication system. The physics meaning of this model is very clear, and its format is very simple. Mathematic results show that MIMO is a very effective way for intensity fluctuation reduction induced by turbulence, thus reduce the bit-error-rate of the system.

  17. Development and Evaluation of a Performance Modeling Flight Test Approach Based on Quasi Steady-State Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yechout, T. R.; Braman, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    The development, implementation and flight test evaluation of a performance modeling technique which required a limited amount of quasisteady state flight test data to predict the overall one g performance characteristics of an aircraft. The concept definition phase of the program include development of: (1) the relationship for defining aerodynamic characteristics from quasi steady state maneuvers; (2) a simplified in flight thrust and airflow prediction technique; (3) a flight test maneuvering sequence which efficiently provided definition of baseline aerodynamic and engine characteristics including power effects on lift and drag; and (4) the algorithms necessary for cruise and flight trajectory predictions. Implementation of the concept include design of the overall flight test data flow, definition of instrumentation system and ground test requirements, development and verification of all applicable software and consolidation of the overall requirements in a flight test plan.

  18. Proposal for a Conceptual Model for Evaluating Lean Product Development Performance: A Study of LPD Enablers in Manufacturing Companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osezua Aikhuele, Daniel; Mohd Turan, Faiz

    2016-02-01

    The instability in today's market and the emerging demands for mass customized products by customers, are driving companies to seek for cost effective and time efficient improvements in their production system and this have led to real pressure for the adaptation of new developmental architecture and operational parameters to remain competitive in the market. Among such developmental architecture adopted, is the integration of lean thinking in the product development process. However, due to lack of clear understanding of the lean performance and its measurements, many companies are unable to implement and fully integrate the lean principle into their product development process and without a proper performance measurement, the performance level of the organizational value stream will be unknown and the specific area of improvement as it relates to the LPD program cannot be tracked. Hence, it will result in poor decision making in the LPD implementation. This paper therefore seeks to present a conceptual model for evaluation of LPD performances by identifying and analysing the core existing LPD enabler (Chief Engineer, Cross-functional teams, Set-based engineering, Poka-yoke (mistakeproofing), Knowledge-based environment, Value-focused planning and development, Top management support, Technology, Supplier integration, Workforce commitment and Continuous improvement culture) for assessing the LPD performance.

  19. Rank and Order: Evaluating the Performance of SNPs for Individual Assignment in a Non-Model Organism

    PubMed Central

    Storer, Caroline G.; Pascal, Carita E.; Roberts, Steven B.; Templin, William D.; Seeb, Lisa W.; Seeb, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are valuable tools for ecological and evolutionary studies. In non-model species, the use of SNPs has been limited by the number of markers available. However, new technologies and decreasing technology costs have facilitated the discovery of a constantly increasing number of SNPs. With hundreds or thousands of SNPs potentially available, there is interest in comparing and developing methods for evaluating SNPs to create panels of high-throughput assays that are customized for performance, research questions, and resources. Here we use five different methods to rank 43 new SNPs and 71 previously published SNPs for sockeye salmon: FST, informativeness (In), average contribution to principal components (LC), and the locus-ranking programs BELS and WHICHLOCI. We then tested the performance of these different ranking methods by creating 48- and 96-SNP panels of the top-ranked loci for each method and used empirical and simulated data to obtain the probability of assigning individuals to the correct population using each panel. All 96-SNP panels performed similarly and better than the 48-SNP panels except for the 96-SNP BELS panel. Among the 48-SNP panels, panels created from FST, In, and LC ranks performed better than panels formed using the top-ranked loci from the programs BELS and WHICHLOCI. The application of ranking methods to optimize panel performance will become more important as more high-throughput assays become available. PMID:23185290

  20. OBJECTIVE REDUCTION OF THE SPACE-TIME DOMAIN DIMENSIONALITY FOR EVALUATING MODEL PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States, photochemical air quality models are the principal tools used by governmental agencies to develop emission reduction strategies aimed at achieving National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Before they can be applied with confidence in a regulatory sett...

  1. Evaluation of the Logistic Model for GAC Performance in Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Full-scale field measurement and rapid small-scale column test data from the Greater Cincinnati (Ohio) Water Works (GCWW) were used to calibrate and investigate the application of the logistic model for simulating breakthrough of total organic carbon (TOC) in granular activated c...

  2. Instrument performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Swinth, K.L.

    1993-03-01

    Deficiencies exist in both the performance and the quality of health physics instruments. Recognizing the implications of such deficiencies for the protection of workers and the public, in the early 1980s the DOE and the NRC encouraged the development of a performance standard and established a program to test a series of instruments against criteria in the standard. The purpose of the testing was to establish the practicality of the criteria in the standard, to determine the performance of a cross section of available instruments, and to establish a testing capability. Over 100 instruments were tested, resulting in a practical standard and an understanding of the deficiencies in available instruments. In parallel with the instrument testing, a value-impact study clearly established the benefits of implementing a formal testing program. An ad hoc committee also met several times to establish recommendations for the voluntary implementation of a testing program based on the studies and the performance standard. For several reasons, a formal program did not materialize. Ongoing tests and studies have supported the development of specific instruments and have helped specific clients understand the performance of their instruments. The purpose of this presentation is to trace the history of instrument testing to date and suggest the benefits of a centralized formal program.

  3. Performance evaluation of a web-based system to exchange Electronic Health Records using Queueing model (M/M/1).

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Isabel; Díaz, Francisco Javier; Antón, Míriam; Martínez, Mario; Díez, José Fernando; Boto, Daniel; López, Miguel; Hornero, Roberto; López, María Isabel

    2012-04-01

    Response time measurement of a web-based system is essential to evaluate its performance. This paper shows a comparison of the response times of a Web-based system for Ophthalmologic Electronic Health Records (EHRs), TeleOftalWeb. It makes use of different database models like Oracle 10 g, dbXML 2.0, Xindice 1.2, and eXist 1.1.1. The system's modelling, which uses Tandem Queue networks, will allow us to estimate the service times of the different components of the system (CPU, network and databases). In order to calculate those times, associated to the different databases, benchmarking techniques are used. The final objective of the comparison is to choose the database system resulting in the lowest response time to TeleOftalWeb and to compare the obtained results using a new benchmarking.

  4. Validating Human Behavioral Models for Combat Simulations Using Techniques for the Evaluation of Human Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Bayesian-Network, Neural-Network, Agent-Based, and Multi - Agent System . ISBN: 1-56555-268-7 739 SCSC 󈧇 Rule-Based A rule-based or...situational awareness based on their previous knowledge of the world and current sensory inputs. [11] ISBN: 1-56555-268-7 740 SCSC 󈧇 Multi - Agent System (MAS...A multi - agent system (MAS) is a behavior model representation with autonomous or semi- autonomous software agents that produce

  5. Evaluating the performance of a climate-driven mortality model during heat waves and cold spells in Europe.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Rachel; Ballester, Joan; Creswick, James; Robine, Jean-Marie; Herrmann, François R; Rodó, Xavier

    2015-01-23

    The impact of climate change on human health is a serious concern. In particular, changes in the frequency and intensity of heat waves and cold spells are of high relevance in terms of mortality and morbidity. This demonstrates the urgent need for reliable early-warning systems to help authorities prepare and respond to emergency situations. In this study, we evaluate the performance of a climate-driven mortality model to provide probabilistic predictions of exceeding emergency mortality thresholds for heat wave and cold spell scenarios. Daily mortality data corresponding to 187 NUTS2 regions across 16 countries in Europe were obtained from 1998-2003. Data were aggregated to 54 larger regions in Europe, defined according to similarities in population structure and climate. Location-specific average mortality rates, at given temperature intervals over the time period, were modelled to account for the increased mortality observed during both high and low temperature extremes and differing comfort temperatures between regions. Model parameters were estimated in a Bayesian framework, in order to generate probabilistic simulations of mortality across Europe for time periods of interest. For the heat wave scenario (1-15 August 2003), the model was successfully able to anticipate the occurrence or non-occurrence of mortality rates exceeding the emergency threshold (75th percentile of the mortality distribution) for 89% of the 54 regions, given a probability decision threshold of 70%. For the cold spell scenario (1-15 January 2003), mortality events in 69% of the regions were correctly anticipated with a probability decision threshold of 70%. By using a more conservative decision threshold of 30%, this proportion increased to 87%. Overall, the model performed better for the heat wave scenario. By replacing observed temperature data in the model with forecast temperature, from state-of-the-art European forecasting systems, probabilistic mortality predictions could

  6. Combustion modeling and performance evaluation in a full-scale rotary kiln incinerator.

    PubMed

    Chen, K S; Hsu, W T; Lin, Y C; Ho, Y T; Wu, C H

    2001-06-01

    This work summarizes the results of numerical investigations and in situ measurements for turbulent combustion in a full-scale rotary kiln incinerator (RKI). The three-dimensional (3D) governing equations for mass, momentum, energy, and species, together with the kappa - epsilon turbulence model, are formulated and solved using a finite volume method. Volatile gases from solid waste were simulated by gaseous CH4 distributed nonuniformly along the kiln bed. The combustion process was considered to be a two-step stoichiometric reaction for primary air mixed with CH4 gas in the combustion chamber. The mixing-controlled eddy-dissipation model (EDM) was employed to predict the conversion rates of CH4, O2, CO2, and CO. The results of the prediction show that reverse flows occur near the entrance of the first combustion chamber (FCC) and the turning point at the entrance to the second combustion chamber (SCC). Temperature and species are nonuniform and are vertically stratified. Meanwhile, additional mixing in the SCC enhances postflame oxidation. A combustion efficiency of up to 99.96% can be achieved at approximately 150% excess air and 20-30% secondary air. Reasonable agreement is achieved between numerical predictions and in situ measurements.

  7. CMAQ Model Evaluation Framework

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    CMAQ is tested to establish the modeling system’s credibility in predicting pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter. Evaluation of CMAQ has been designed to assess the model’s performance for specific time periods and for specific uses.

  8. Numerical and experimental evaluation of the impact performance of advanced high-strength steel sheets based on a damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Park, Taejoon; Kim, Dongun; Kim, Chongmin; Chung, Kwansoo

    2010-06-01

    The impact performance in a Charpy impact test was experimentally and numerically studied for the advanced high-strength steel sheets (AHSS) TWIP940 and TRIP590 as well as the high-strength grade known as 340R. To characterize the mechanical properties, uni-axial simple tension tests were conducted to determine the anisotropic properties and strain rate sensitivities of these materials. In particular, the high-speed strain-rate sensitivity of TRIP590 and 340R (rate sensitive) was also characterized to account for the high strain rates involved in the Charpy impact test. To evaluate fracture behavior in the Charpy impact test, a new damage model including a triaxiality-dependent fracture criterion and hardening behavior with stiffness deterioration was introduced. The model was calibrated via numerical simulations and experiments involving simple tension and V-notch tests. The new damage model along with the anisotropic yield function Hill 1948 was incorporated into the ABAQUS/Explicit FEM code, which performed reasonably well to predict the impact energy absorbed during the Charpy impact test.

  9. Evaluating stress as a challenge is associated with superior attentional control and motor skill performance: testing the predictions of the biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat.

    PubMed

    Vine, Samuel J; Freeman, Paul; Moore, Lee J; Chandra-Ramanan, Roy; Wilson, Mark R

    2013-09-01

    The biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat (Blascovich, 2008) suggests that individuals who evaluate a performance situation as a challenge will perform better than those who evaluate it as a threat. However, limited research has examined (a) the influence of challenge and threat evaluations on learned motor performance under pressure and (b) the attentional processes by which this effect occurs. In the present study 52 novices performed a motor task (laparoscopic surgery), for which optimal visual attentional control has been established. Participants performed a Baseline trial (when the task was novel) and were then trained to proficiency before performing under pressurized conditions designed to increase anxiety (Pressure). At Baseline, regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between challenge/threat evaluations and the outcome variables (performance, cardiovascular response, and visual attention). At Pressure, hierarchical regression analyses (controlling for the degree of learning) were performed to examine the relationship between challenge/threat evaluations and the outcome variables. At both Baseline and Pressure tests evaluating the task as more of a challenge was associated with more effective attentional control and superior performance. In the Baseline test, evaluating the task as more of a challenge was associated with differential cardiovascular responses. Although there is some support for an attentional explanation of differential performance effects, additional analyses did not reveal mediators of the relationship between challenge/threat evaluations and motor performance. The findings have implications for the training and performance of motor skills in pressurized environments (e.g., surgery, sport, aviation).

  10. Modelling Performance: Opening Pandora's Box.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper argues that it is necessary for researchers and test developers in the area of language performance testing to have a clear understanding of the role of underlying performance capacities in second language performance. It critically evaluates the models proposed by Hymes, Canale and Swain, and Bachman. (71 references) (MDM)

  11. IR DIAL performance modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sharlemann, E.T.

    1994-07-01

    We are developing a DIAL performance model for CALIOPE at LLNL. The intent of the model is to provide quick and interactive parameter sensitivity calculations with immediate graphical output. A brief overview of the features of the performance model is given, along with an example of performance calculations for a non-CALIOPE application.

  12. Performance evaluation of the Enraf-Nonius Model 872 radar gage

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.J.; Park, W.R.

    1992-12-01

    There are indications that the Enraf-Nonius Radar Gage installed in Tank 241-SY-101 may not be providing an accurate reading of the true surface level in the waste tank. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) performed an initial study to determine the effect of the following items on the distance read by the gage: Tank riser; Material permittivity and conductivity Foam; Proportion of supernatant to solid material in the field of view of the instrument; Physical geometry of the supernatant and solid material changing in the field of view with respect to time; and Varying water content in the solid material. The results of the tests indicate that distance measured by the radar gage is affected by the permittivity, conductivity, and angle of the target surface. These parameters affect the complex input impedance of the signal received by the radar gage to measure the distance to the target. In Tank 101-SY, the radar gage is placed on top of a 12 in. diameter riser. The riser affects the field of view of the instrument, and a much smaller target surface is detected when the radar beam propagates through a riser. In addition, the riser acts as a waveguide, and standing waves are enhanced between the target surface and the radar gage. The result is a change in the level measured by the radar gage due to changing properties of the target surface even when the distance to the target does not change. The test results indicate that the radar will not detect dry crust or foam. However, if the crust or foam is stirred so that it becomes wet, then the crust or foam became detectable. The level read using the radar gage decreased as the moisture in the crust or foam evaporated.

  13. Formative evaluation of a telemedicine model for delivering clinical neurophysiology services part I: Utility, technical performance and service provider perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Formative evaluation is conducted in the early stages of system implementation to assess how it works in practice and to identify opportunities for improving technical and process performance. A formative evaluation of a teleneurophysiology service was conducted to examine its technical and sociological dimensions. Methods A teleneurophysiology service providing routine EEG investigation was established. Service use, technical performance and satisfaction of clinical neurophysiology personnel were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. These were contrasted with a previously reported analysis of the need for teleneurophysiology, and examination of expectation and satisfaction with clinical neurophysiology services in Ireland. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis was also conducted. Results Over the course of 40 clinical sessions during 20 weeks, 142 EEG investigations were recorded and stored on a file server at a satellite centre which was 130 miles away from the host clinical neurophysiology department. Using a virtual private network, the EEGs were accessed by a consultant neurophysiologist at the host centre for interpretation. The model resulted in a 5-fold increase in access to EEG services as well as reducing average waiting times for investigation by a half. Technically the model worked well, although a temporary loss of virtual private network connectivity highlighted the need for clarity in terms of responsibility for troubleshooting and repair of equipment problems. Referral quality, communication between host and satellite centres, quality of EEG recordings, and ease of EEG review and reporting indicated that appropriate organisational processes were adopted by the service. Compared to traditional CN service delivery, the teleneurophysiology model resulted in a comparable unit cost per EEG. Conclusion Observations suggest that when traditional organisational boundaries are crossed challenges associated with the social dimension of service

  14. Evaluation of nutrition models to estimate performance of young dairy calves: a meta-analytical study under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Souza, V L; Drackley, J K; Almeida, R; Bittar, C M M; Albertini, T Z; Morrison, S Y; Lanna, D P D

    2016-12-01

    Mathematical models are important tools to estimate nutritional requirements and animal growth. Very few calf models generated from other countries with different feeding programs, environment and production systems have been evaluated. The objective of this paper is to evaluate two calf models: (i) the National Research Council (NRC) in 2001 and (ii) the updates published by Van Amburgh and Drackley in 2005 and inputted into Agricultural Modeling and Training Systems (AMTS, version 3.5.8). Data from 16 previous studies involving 51 diets for dairy calves under tropical conditions (n=485 calves, initial BW 37.5±4.35 kg and weaning weight of 62.0±10.16 kg) were used. The calves were fed with whole milk, milk replacer or fermented colostrum, plus starter (20.9±1.78% of CP). The accuracy of the average daily gain (ADG) prediction was evaluated by mean bias, mean square prediction error (MSPE), concordance correlation coefficient, bias correction factor (Cb), and regression between the observed and predicted values. The ADG observed from birth to weaning was 0.452±0.121 kg/day. Calves fed with whole milk had greater ADG compared with calves fed milk replacer (0.477 v. 0.379 kg/day) during the milk-feeding period. When all data were pooled (n=51 diets), predictions had a mean bias of -0.019 and 0.068 kg/day for energy-allowable gain using NRC and AMTS models, respectively. The regression equation between observed and predicted values obtained from energy of diets showed an intercept different from zero (P0.05) indicate that the AMTS growth model resulted in accurate predictions for calves fed with milk replacer. However, within these latter two approaches, the goodness of fit (R 2) was low, representing low precision. The weight gain estimated by the energy available from the diet was overestimated by 19 g/day when calculated by the NRC and underestimated by 68 g/day when calculated by AMTS. The reasons for this discrepancy need to be understood, for only then new

  15. The statistical performance of an MCF-7 cell culture assay evaluated using generalized linear mixed models and a score test.

    PubMed

    Rey deCastro, B; Neuberg, Donna

    2007-05-30

    Biological assays often utilize experimental designs where observations are replicated at multiple levels, and where each level represents a separate component of the assay's overall variance. Statistical analysis of such data usually ignores these design effects, whereas more sophisticated methods would improve the statistical power of assays. This report evaluates the statistical performance of an in vitro MCF-7 cell proliferation assay (E-SCREEN) by identifying the optimal generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) that accurately represents the assay's experimental design and variance components. Our statistical assessment found that 17beta-oestradiol cell culture assay data were best modelled with a GLMM configured with a reciprocal link function, a gamma error distribution, and three sources of design variation: plate-to-plate; well-to-well, and the interaction between plate-to-plate variation and dose. The gamma-distributed random error of the assay was estimated to have a coefficient of variation (COV) = 3.2 per cent, and a variance component score test described by X. Lin found that each of the three variance components were statistically significant. The optimal GLMM also confirmed the estrogenicity of five weakly oestrogenic polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs 17, 49, 66, 74, and 128). Based on information criteria, the optimal gamma GLMM consistently out-performed equivalent naive normal and log-normal linear models, both with and without random effects terms. Because the gamma GLMM was by far the best model on conceptual and empirical grounds, and requires only trivially more effort to use, we encourage its use and suggest that naive models be avoided when possible.

  16. CMIP5 Global Climate Model Performance Evaluation and Climate Scenario Development over the South-Central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendahl, D. H.; Rupp, D. E.; Mcpherson, R. A.; Moore, B., III

    2015-12-01

    Future climate change projections from Global Climate Models (GCMs) are the primary drivers of regional downscaling and impacts research - from which relevant information for stakeholders is generated at the regional and local levels. Therefore understanding uncertainties in GCMs is a fundamental necessity if the scientific community is to provide useful and reliable future climate change information that can be utilized by end users and decision makers. Two different assessments of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) GCM ensemble were conducted for the south-central United States. The first was a performance evaluation over the historical period for metrics of near surface meteorological variables (e.g., temperature, precipitation) and system-based phenomena, which include large-scale processes that can influence the region (e.g., low-level jet, ENSO). These metrics were used to identify a subset of models of higher performance across the region which were then used to constrain future climate change projections. A second assessment explored climate scenario development where all model climate change projections were assumed equally likely and future projections with the highest impact were identified (e.g., temperature and precipitation combinations of hottest/driest, hottest/wettest, and highest variability). Each of these assessments identify a subset of models that may prove useful to regional downscaling and impacts researchers who may be restricted by the total number of GCMs they can utilize. Results from these assessments will be provided as well as a discussion on when each would be useful and appropriate to use.

  17. Evaluating and Improving Teacher Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manatt, Richard P.

    This workbook, coordinated with Manatt Teacher Performance Evaluation (TPE) workshops, summarizes large group presentation in sequence with the transparancies used. The first four modules of the workbook deal with the state of the art of evaluating and improving teacher performance; the development of the TPE system, including selection of…

  18. Evaluating, interpreting, and communicating performance of hydrologic/water quality models considering intended use: A review and recommendations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous publications have outlined recommended practices for hydrologic and water quality (H/WQ) modeling, but none have formulated comprehensive guidelines for the final stage of modeling applications, namely evaluation, interpretation, and communication of model results and the consideration of t...

  19. Multiprocessor performance modeling with ADAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Paul J.; Andrews, Asa M.

    1989-01-01

    A graph managing strategy referred to as the Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM) appears useful for the time-optimized execution of application algorithm graphs in embedded multiprocessors and for the performance prediction of graph designs. This paper reports the modeling of ATAMM in the Architecture Design and Assessment System (ADAS) to make an independent verification of ATAMM's performance prediction capability and to provide a user framework for the evaluation of arbitrary algorithm graphs. Following an overview of ATAMM and its major functional rules are descriptions of the ADAS model of ATAMM, methods to enter an arbitrary graph into the model, and techniques to analyze the simulation results. The performance of a 7-node graph example is evaluated using the ADAS model and verifies the ATAMM concept by substantiating previously published performance results.

  20. Photovoltaic array performance model.

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

    2004-08-01

    This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  1. Quantification of leachate discharged to groundwater using the water balance method and the hydrologic evaluation of landfill performance (HELP) model.

    PubMed

    Alslaibi, Tamer M; Abustan, Ismail; Mogheir, Yunes K; Afifi, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Landfills are a source of groundwater pollution in Gaza Strip. This study focused on Deir Al Balah landfill, which is a unique sanitary landfill site in Gaza Strip (i.e., it has a lining system and a leachate recirculation system). The objective of this article is to assess the generated leachate quantity and percolation to the groundwater aquifer at a specific site, using the approaches of (i) the hydrologic evaluation of landfill performance model (HELP) and (ii) the water balance method (WBM). The results show that when using the HELP model, the average volume of leachate discharged from Deir Al Balah landfill during the period 1997 to 2007 was around, 6800 m3/year. Meanwhile, the average volume of leachate percolated through the clay layer was 550 m3/year, which represents around 8% of the generated leachate. Meanwhile, the WBM indicated that the average volume of leachate discharged from Deir Al Balah landfill during the same period was around 7660 m3/year--about half of which comes from the moisture content of the waste, while the remainder comes from the infiltration of precipitation and re-circulated leachate. Therefore, the estimated quantity of leachate to groundwater by these two methods was very close. However, compared with the measured leachate quantity, these results were overestimated and indicated a dangerous threat to the groundwater aquifer, as there was no separation between municipal, hazardous and industrial wastes, in the area.

  2. Room for Improvement: Performance Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Gisela

    1989-01-01

    Describes a performance management approach to library personnel management that stresses communication, clarification of goals, and reinforcement of new practices and behaviors. Each phase of the evaluation process (preparation, rating, administrative review, appraisal interview, and follow-up) and special evaluations to be used in cases of…

  3. Evaluating Model Performance of an Ensemble-based Chemical Data Assimilation System During INTEX-B Field Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arellano, A. F., Jr.; Raeder, K.; Anderson, J. L.; Hess, P. G.; Emmons, L. K.; Edwards, D. P.; Pfister, G. G.; Campos, T. L.; Sachse, G. W.

    2007-01-01

    We present a global chemical data assimilation system using a global atmosphere model, the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3) with simplified chemistry and the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) assimilation package. DART is a community software facility for assimilation studies using the ensemble Kalman filter approach. Here, we apply the assimilation system to constrain global tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) by assimilating meteorological observations of temperature and horizontal wind velocity and satellite CO retrievals from the Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) satellite instrument. We verify the system performance using independent CO observations taken on board the NSFINCAR C-130 and NASA DC-8 aircrafts during the April 2006 part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX-B). Our evaluations show that MOPITT data assimilation provides significant improvements in terms of capturing the observed CO variability relative to no MOPITT assimilation (i.e. the correlation improves from 0.62 to 0.71, significant at 99% confidence). The assimilation provides evidence of median CO loading of about 150 ppbv at 700 hPa over the NE Pacific during April 2006. This is marginally higher than the modeled CO with no MOPITT assimilation (-140 ppbv). Our ensemble-based estimates of model uncertainty also show model overprediction over the source region (i.e. China) and underprediction over the NE Pacific, suggesting model errors that cannot be readily explained by emissions alone. These results have important implications for improving regional chemical forecasts and for inverse modeling of CO sources and further demonstrate the utility of the assimilation system in comparing non-coincident measurements, e.g. comparing satellite retrievals of CO with in-situ aircraft measurements. The work described above also brought to light several short-comings of the data assimilation approach for CO profiles. Because of the limited vertical

  4. Evaluation of the performance of the WRF 1-Dimensional Lake model over the East Africa Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudoshava, M.; Semazzi, F. H. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study seeks to investigate the performance of the 1-Dimensional lake model coupled to WRF over East Africa. The Africa Great lakes exert a great influence on the climate of the region and a number of studies have shown how the lake influences the circulation and the total precipitation over the region. The lakes have highly variable depths, with Lake Victoria having an average depth of 40m and Lake Tanganyika a depth of 450m. The Lake model for WRF was tested and calibrated for the Great lakes, however it was not tested for tropical lakes. We hypothesize that the inclusion of a 1-dimensional lake will reduce the precipitation bias as compared to the WRF model without the lake model. In addition initializing the lake temperature using a vertical temperature profile that closes resembles the one over these lakes will greatly reduce the spin up time. The simulations utilized three nested domains at 36, 12 and 4km. The 4km domain is centered over Lake Victoria Basin, while the 12 km domain includes all the lakes in East Africa. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) datasets are used in evaluating the precipitation, and the following statistics were calculated: root mean square error, standard deviation of the model and observations and mean bias. The results show that the use of the 1-dimensional lake model improves the precipitation over the region considerably compared to an uncoupled model. The asymmetrical rainfall pattern is evident in the simulations. However using the default vertical temperature profile with a three-month spin up is not adequate to transfer heat to the bottom of the lake. Hence the temperatures are still very cold at the bottom. A nine-month spin up improves the lake surface temperatures and lake temperatures at the bottom. A two year spin up greatly improves the lake surface temperatures and hence the total precipitation over the lake. Thus longer spin up time allows for adequate heat transfer in the lake. Initializing the

  5. The supervisor's performance appraisal: evaluating the evaluator.

    PubMed

    McConnell, C R

    1993-04-01

    The focus of much performance appraisal in the coming decade or so will likely be on the level of customer satisfaction achieved through performance. Ultimately, evaluating the evaluator--that is, appraising the supervisor--will likely become a matter of assessing how well the supervisor's department meets the needs of its customers. Since meeting the needs of one's customers can well become the strongest determinant of organizational success or failure, it follows that relative success in ensuring these needs are met can become the primary indicator of one's relative success as a supervisor. This has the effect of placing the emphasis on supervisory performance exactly at the point it belongs, right on the bottom-line results of the supervisor's efforts.

  6. Design and performance evaluation of a simplified dynamic model for combined sewer overflows in pumped sewer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Daal-Rombouts, Petra; Sun, Siao; Langeveld, Jeroen; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc; Clemens, François

    2016-07-01

    Optimisation or real time control (RTC) studies in wastewater systems increasingly require rapid simulations of sewer systems in extensive catchments. To reduce the simulation time calibrated simplified models are applied, with the performance generally based on the goodness of fit of the calibration. In this research the performance of three simplified and a full hydrodynamic (FH) model for two catchments are compared based on the correct determination of CSO event occurrences and of the total discharged volumes to the surface water. Simplified model M1 consists of a rainfall runoff outflow (RRO) model only. M2 combines the RRO model with a static reservoir model for the sewer behaviour. M3 comprises the RRO model and a dynamic reservoir model. The dynamic reservoir characteristics were derived from FH model simulations. It was found that M2 and M3 are able to describe the sewer behaviour of the catchments, contrary to M1. The preferred model structure depends on the quality of the information (geometrical database and monitoring data) available for the design and calibration of the model. Finally, calibrated simplified models are shown to be preferable to uncalibrated FH models when performing optimisation or RTC studies.

  7. Evaluation of atmospheric nitrogen deposition model performance in the context of U.S. critical load assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jason J.; Chung, Serena H.; Johansen, Anne M.; Lamb, Brian K.; Vaughan, Joseph K.; Beutel, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Air quality models are widely used to estimate pollutant deposition rates and thereby calculate critical loads and critical load exceedances (model deposition > critical load). However, model operational performance is not always quantified specifically to inform these applications. We developed a performance assessment approach designed to inform critical load and exceedance calculations, and applied it to the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. We quantified wet inorganic N deposition performance of several widely-used air quality models, including five different Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) simulations, the Tdep model, and 'PRISM x NTN' model. Modeled wet inorganic N deposition estimates were compared to wet inorganic N deposition measurements at 16 National Trends Network (NTN) monitoring sites, and to annual bulk inorganic N deposition measurements at Mount Rainier National Park. Model bias (model - observed) and error (|model - observed|) were expressed as a percentage of regional critical load values for diatoms and lichens. This novel approach demonstrated that wet inorganic N deposition bias in the Pacific Northwest approached or exceeded 100% of regional diatom and lichen critical load values at several individual monitoring sites, and approached or exceeded 50% of critical loads when averaged regionally. Even models that adjusted deposition estimates based on deposition measurements to reduce bias or that spatially-interpolated measurement data, had bias that approached or exceeded critical loads at some locations. While wet inorganic N deposition model bias is only one source of uncertainty that can affect critical load and exceedance calculations, results demonstrate expressing bias as a percentage of critical loads at a spatial scale consistent with calculations may be a useful exercise for those performing calculations. It may help decide if model performance is adequate for a particular calculation, help assess confidence in

  8. Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) Model: B (Set Includes, A- User's Guide for Version 3 w/disks, B-Engineering Documentation for Version 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) computer program is a quasi-two-dimensional hydrologic model of water movement across, into, through and out of landfills. The model accepts weather, soil and design data. Landfill systems including various combinations o...

  9. Evaluation of performance of a BLSS model in long-term operation in dynamic and steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, Jean-Bernard; Tikhomirov, Alex; Ushakova, Sofya; Velitchko, Vladimir; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Lasseur, Christophe

    Evaluation of performance of a BLSS model, including higher plants for food production and biodegradation of human waste, in long-term operation in dynamic and steady states was performed. The model system was conceived for supplying vegetarian food and oxygen to 0.07 human. The following data were obtained in steady-state operating conditions. Average rate of wheat, chufa, radish, lettuce and Salicornia edible biomass accumulation were 8.7, 5.5, 0.6, 0.6 and metricconverterProductID2.5 g2.5 g per day respectively. Thus, to mimic the vegetarian edible biomass consumption by a human it was necessary to withdraw 17.9 g/d from total mass ex-change. Simultaneously, human mineralized exometabolites (artificial mineralized urine, AMU) in the amount of approximately 7% of a daily norm were introduced into the nutrient solu-tion for irrigation of the plants cultivated on a neutral substrate (expanded clay aggregate). The estimated value of 5.8 g/d of wheat and Salicornia inedible biomass was introduced in the soil-like substrate (SLS) to fully meet the plants need in nitrogen. The rest of wheat and Salicornia inedible biomass, 5.7 g/d, was stored. Thus in all, 23.6g of vegetarian dry matter had been stored. Assuming edible biomass is eaten up by the human, the closure coefficient of the vegetarian biomass inclusion into matter recycling amounted to 88%. The analysis of the long-term model operation showed that the main factors limiting increase of recycling processes were the following: a) Partly unbalanced mineral composition of daily human waste with daily needs of plants culti-` vated in the system. Thus, when fully satisfied with respect to nitrogen, the plants experienced a lack of macro elements such as P, Mg and Ca by more than 50%; b) Partly unbalanced mineral composition of edible biomass of the plants cultivated in the SLS with that of inedible biomass of the plants cultivated by hydroponic method on neutral substrate introduced in the SLS; c) Accumulation of

  10. Evaluation of the Mesoscale Meteorological Model (MM5)-Community Multi-Scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) performance in hindcast and forecast of ground-level ozone.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Le Hoang; Kim Oanh, Nguyen Thi

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents the first attempt to apply the Mesoscale Meteorological Model (MM5)-Community Multi-Scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) model system to simulate ground-level ozone (O3) over the continental Southeast Asia (CSEA) region for both hindcast and forecast purposes. Hindcast simulation was done over the CSEA domain for two historical O3 episodes, January 26-29, 2004 (January episode, northeast monsoon) and March 24-26, 2004 (March episode, southwest monsoon). Experimental forecast was done for next-day hourly O3 during January 2006 over the central part of Thailand (CENTHAI). Available data from 20 ambient monitoring stations in Thailand and 3 stations in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, were used for the episode analysis and for the model performance evaluation. The year 2000 anthropogenic emission inventory prepared by the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research at the University of Iowa was projected to the simulation year on the basis of the regional average economic growth rate. Hourly emission in urban areas was prepared using ambient carbon monoxide concentration as a surrogate for the emission intensity. Biogenic emissions were estimated based on data from the Global Emissions Inventory Activity. Hindcast simulations (CSEA) were performed with 0.5 degree x 0.5 degree resolution, whereas forecast simulations (CENTHAI) were done with 0.1 degree x 0.1 degree hourly emission input data. MM5-CMAQ model system performance during the selected episodes satisfactorily met U.S. Environmental Protection Agency criteria for O3 for most simulated days. The experiment forecast for next-day hourly O3 in January 2006 yielded promising results. Modeled plumes of ozone in both hindcast and forecast cases agreed with the main wind fields and extended over considerable downwind distances from large urban areas.

  11. The Effect of Social Roles and Performance Cues on Self-Evaluations: Evidence for an Interpersonal Model of Loneliness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitkus, John

    Vitkus and Horowitz (1987) found that lonely people demonstrated adequate social behavior when they were assigned to controlling interpersonal roles. Despite this successful performance, they evaluated themselves and their behavior negatively. Study 1 replicated these findings and extended them to naturalistic interactions. In a hypothetical…

  12. 48 CFR 236.604 - Performance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Performance evaluation... Architect-Engineer Services 236.604 Performance evaluation. Prepare a separate performance evaluation after... familiar with the architect-engineer contractor's performance....

  13. Performance and evaluation of real-time multicomputer control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, K. G.

    1983-01-01

    New performance measures, detailed examples, modeling of error detection process, performance evaluation of rollback recovery methods, experiments on FTMP, and optimal size of an NMR cluster are discussed.

  14. Energy performance evaluation of AAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aybek, Hulya

    The U.S. building industry constitutes the largest consumer of energy (i.e., electricity, natural gas, petroleum) in the world. The building sector uses almost 41 percent of the primary energy and approximately 72 percent of the available electricity in the United States. As global energy-generating resources are being depleted at exponential rates, the amount of energy consumed and wasted cannot be ignored. Professionals concerned about the environment have placed a high priority on finding solutions that reduce energy consumption while maintaining occupant comfort. Sustainable design and the judicious combination of building materials comprise one solution to this problem. A future including sustainable energy may result from using energy simulation software to accurately estimate energy consumption and from applying building materials that achieve the potential results derived through simulation analysis. Energy-modeling tools assist professionals with making informed decisions about energy performance during the early planning phases of a design project, such as determining the most advantageous combination of building materials, choosing mechanical systems, and determining building orientation on the site. By implementing energy simulation software to estimate the effect of these factors on the energy consumption of a building, designers can make adjustments to their designs during the design phase when the effect on cost is minimal. The primary objective of this research consisted of identifying a method with which to properly select energy-efficient building materials and involved evaluating the potential of these materials to earn LEED credits when properly applied to a structure. In addition, this objective included establishing a framework that provides suggestions for improvements to currently available simulation software that enhance the viability of the estimates concerning energy efficiency and the achievements of LEED credits. The primary objective

  15. Using the coupled wake boundary layer model to evaluate the effect of turbulence intensity on wind farm performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard J. A. M.; Gayme, Dennice; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-01

    We use the recently introduced coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model to predict the effect of turbulence intensity on the performance of a wind farm. The CWBL model combines a standard wake model with a “top-down” approach to get improved predictions for the power output compared to a stand-alone wake model. Here we compare the CWBL model results for different turbulence intensities with the Horns Rev field measurements by Hansen et al., Wind Energy 15, 183196 (2012). We show that the main trends as function of the turbulence intensity are captured very well by the model and discuss differences between the field measurements and model results based on comparisons with LES results from Wu and Porté-Agel, Renewable Energy 75, 945-955 (2015).

  16. Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

  17. GUIDANCE FOR THE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL AIR QUALITY MODELING SYSTEMS FOR PARTICULATE MATTER AND VISIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter (PM) and the federal regional haze regulations place some emphasis on the assessment of fine particle (PM; 5) concentrations. Current air quality models need to be improved and evaluated against observations to a...

  18. ESMValTool (v1.0) - a community diagnostic and performance metrics tool for routine evaluation of Earth System Models in CMIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyring, V.; Righi, M.; Evaldsson, M.; Lauer, A.; Wenzel, S.; Jones, C.; Anav, A.; Andrews, O.; Cionni, I.; Davin, E. L.; Deser, C.; Ehbrecht, C.; Friedlingstein, P.; Gleckler, P.; Gottschaldt, K.-D.; Hagemann, S.; Juckes, M.; Kindermann, S.; Krasting, J.; Kunert, D.; Levine, R.; Loew, A.; Mäkelä, J.; Martin, G.; Mason, E.; Phillips, A.; Read, S.; Rio, C.; Roehrig, R.; Senftleben, D.; Sterl, A.; van Ulft, L. H.; Walton, J.; Wang, S.; Williams, K. D.

    2015-09-01

    A community diagnostics and performance metrics tool for the evaluation of Earth System Models (ESMs) has been developed that allows for routine comparison of single or multiple models, either against predecessor versions or against observations. The priority of the effort so far has been to target specific scientific themes focusing on selected Essential Climate Variables (ECVs), a range of known systematic biases common to ESMs, such as coupled tropical climate variability, monsoons, Southern Ocean processes, continental dry biases and soil hydrology-climate interactions, as well as atmospheric CO2 budgets, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone, and tropospheric aerosols. The tool is being developed in such a way that additional analyses can easily be added. A set of standard namelists for each scientific topic reproduces specific sets of diagnostics or performance metrics that have demonstrated their importance in ESM evaluation in the peer-reviewed literature. The Earth System Model Evaluation Tool (ESMValTool) is a community effort open to both users and developers encouraging open exchange of diagnostic source code and evaluation results from the CMIP ensemble. This will facilitate and improve ESM evaluation beyond the state-of-the-art and aims at supporting such activities within the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) and at individual modelling centres. Ultimately, we envisage running the ESMValTool alongside the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) as part of a more routine evaluation of CMIP model simulations while utilizing observations available in standard formats (obs4MIPs) or provided by the user.

  19. ESMValTool (v1.0) - a community diagnostic and performance metrics tool for routine evaluation of Earth system models in CMIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyring, Veronika; Righi, Mattia; Lauer, Axel; Evaldsson, Martin; Wenzel, Sabrina; Jones, Colin; Anav, Alessandro; Andrews, Oliver; Cionni, Irene; Davin, Edouard L.; Deser, Clara; Ehbrecht, Carsten; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gleckler, Peter; Gottschaldt, Klaus-Dirk; Hagemann, Stefan; Juckes, Martin; Kindermann, Stephan; Krasting, John; Kunert, Dominik; Levine, Richard; Loew, Alexander; Mäkelä, Jarmo; Martin, Gill; Mason, Erik; Phillips, Adam S.; Read, Simon; Rio, Catherine; Roehrig, Romain; Senftleben, Daniel; Sterl, Andreas; van Ulft, Lambertus H.; Walton, Jeremy; Wang, Shiyu; Williams, Keith D.

    2016-05-01

    A community diagnostics and performance metrics tool for the evaluation of Earth system models (ESMs) has been developed that allows for routine comparison of single or multiple models, either against predecessor versions or against observations. The priority of the effort so far has been to target specific scientific themes focusing on selected essential climate variables (ECVs), a range of known systematic biases common to ESMs, such as coupled tropical climate variability, monsoons, Southern Ocean processes, continental dry biases, and soil hydrology-climate interactions, as well as atmospheric CO2 budgets, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone, and tropospheric aerosols. The tool is being developed in such a way that additional analyses can easily be added. A set of standard namelists for each scientific topic reproduces specific sets of diagnostics or performance metrics that have demonstrated their importance in ESM evaluation in the peer-reviewed literature. The Earth System Model Evaluation Tool (ESMValTool) is a community effort open to both users and developers encouraging open exchange of diagnostic source code and evaluation results from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) ensemble. This will facilitate and improve ESM evaluation beyond the state-of-the-art and aims at supporting such activities within CMIP and at individual modelling centres. Ultimately, we envisage running the ESMValTool alongside the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) as part of a more routine evaluation of CMIP model simulations while utilizing observations available in standard formats (obs4MIPs) or provided by the user.

  20. Reliable estimations of extreme low flows by integrating very low flows in the model performance evaluation with a multi-metric framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfannerstill, Matthias; Guse, Björn; Fohrer, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological models are helpful tools to predict hydrological extremes and to understand the main governing processes for flood and drought events. For reliable predictions of extremes in future simulation such as climate change estimations, a precise representation of high and low flows in hydrological models is required. As a consequence, the hydrological models have to be calibrated accurately to provide reasonable model results for the different phases of the hydrograph simultaneously. For this challenge, the different phases of the hydrograph have to be considered in multi-metric frameworks with appropriate performance metrics. Low flows need to be reproduced together with high flows without neglecting the other phases of the hydrograph. In our study, we highlight the relevance of model evaluation for very low and low flows with separate performance metrics to achieve a satisfying model performance for the low flow prediction together with the overall discharge reproduction. Therefore, we present a multi-metric evaluation framework to identify calibration runs with a precise representation of the hydrograph. In order to consider a fairly balanced evaluation between high and low flow phases, we divided the flow duration curve into segments of high, medium and low flow phases, and additionally into extreme high and extreme low flow phases. The model performance was evaluated stepwise for these segments separately with the root mean square error (RMSE) together with further application of the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency and the percent bias for the whole discharge. Our results show that this evaluation method leads to an improved selection of model runs with enhanced overall model performance by the refined segmentation of FDC. By combining performance metrics for high flow conditions with low flow conditions, this study demonstrates the challenge of calibrating a model with a satisfactory performance in high and low phases simultaneously. Consequently, we conclude

  1. Development of a Performance Evaluation Tool (MMSOFE) for Detection of Failures with Multiple Model Adaptive Estimation (MMAE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Calculate the coefficient value which precedes the exponential used to calculate the density. 8. Perform calculations for Bayesian multiple model ...predicted standard deviations. 4. Figure B.8: One figure with two plots relating to the MMAE/ Bayesian parameter estimation: * One plot of the mean...CONTROLS THE CALCULATIONS RELATED TO C MULTIPLE MODEL CALCULATIONS. THE TABLE BELOW GIVES C MORE DETAIL ABOUT WHAT HAPPENS IN THE INDIVIDUAL OUTPUT C

  2. Using multi-year data to evaluate performance of one-layer and multi-layer models in snow hydrology: an example from Col De Porte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzi, Francesco; De Michele, Carlo; Morin, Samuel; Carmagnola, Carlo Maria; Ghezzi, Antonio; Lejeune, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Snow mass dynamics prediction represents an important task for snow hydrologists, since snow on the ground influences local/global water availability and streamflow timing and amount. Different modeling tools have been formulated for decades to predict snowmelt runoff dynamics and therefore to integrate snow mass dynamics in watershed hydrology modeling. Typical variables of interest include snow depth, snow bulk density, snow water equivalent (SWE) and snowmelt runoff. All these variables have been monitored at several locations worldwide for several decades in order to evaluate model performance. As a result, several multi-year datasets are now available to perform extensive evaluation tests. In this presentation, we report an example of these evaluations by discussing the performance of two models of different complexity in reproducing observed data of snow dynamics at a site in French Alps (Col De Porte, 1325 m AMSL), where 18 continuous-time years of observations are available. We consider Crocus as an example of multi-layer physically-based complex models and HyS (De Michele et al. 2013) as an example of a one-layer temperature-index models. Using multi-year data allows us to compare models performance over long periods of time, thus considering different climatic and snow conditions. Moreover, the use of continuous-time data allows to evaluate models performance at different temporal resolutions. De Michele, C., Avanzi, F., Ghezzi, A., and Jommi, C.: Investigating the dynamics of bulk snow density in dry and wet conditions using a one-dimensional model, The Cryosphere, 7, 433-444, doi:10.5194/tc-7-433-2013, 2013.

  3. Evaluation of the performance of four chemical transport models in predicting the aerosol chemical composition in Europe in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Marje; Sofiev, Mikhail; Tsyro, Svetlana; Hendriks, Carlijn; Semeena, Valiyaveetil; Vazhappilly Francis, Xavier; Butler, Tim; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Friedrich, Rainer; Hendricks, Johannes; Kong, Xin; Lawrence, Mark; Righi, Mattia; Samaras, Zissis; Sausen, Robert; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Sokhi, Ranjeet

    2016-05-01

    Four regional chemistry transport models were applied to simulate the concentration and composition of particulate matter (PM) in Europe for 2005 with horizontal resolution ~ 20 km. The modelled concentrations were compared with the measurements of PM chemical composition by the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) monitoring network. All models systematically underestimated PM10 and PM2.5 by 10-60 %, depending on the model and the season of the year, when the calculated dry PM mass was compared with the measurements. The average water content at laboratory conditions was estimated between 5 and 20 % for PM2.5 and between 10 and 25 % for PM10. For majority of the PM chemical components, the relative underestimation was smaller than it was for total PM, exceptions being the carbonaceous particles and mineral dust. Some species, such as sea salt and NO3-, were overpredicted by the models. There were notable differences between the models' predictions of the seasonal variations of PM, mainly attributable to different treatments or omission of some source categories and aerosol processes. Benzo(a)pyrene concentrations were overestimated by all the models over the whole year. The study stresses the importance of improving the models' skill in simulating mineral dust and carbonaceous compounds, necessity for high-quality emissions from wildland fires, as well as the need for an explicit consideration of aerosol water content in model-measurement comparison.

  4. Ion thruster performance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A model of ion thruster performance is developed for high flux density, cusped magnetic field thruster designs. This model is formulated in terms of the average energy required to produce an ion in the discharge chamber plasma and the fraction of these ions that are extracted to form the beam. The direct loss of high energy (primary) electrons from the plasma to the anode is shown to have a major effect on thruster performance. The model provides simple algebraic equations enabling one to calculate the beam ion energy cost, the average discharge chamber plasma ion energy cost, the primary electron density, the primary-to-Maxwellian electron density ratio and the Maxwellian electron temperature. Experiments indicate that the model correctly predicts the variation in plasma ion energy cost for changes in propellant gas (Ar, Kr and Xe), grid transparency to neutral atoms, beam extraction area, discharge voltage, and discharge chamber wall temperature. The model and experiments indicate that thruster performance may be described in terms of only four thruster configuration dependent parameters and two operating parameters. The model also suggests that improved performance should be exhibited by thruster designs which extract a large fraction of the ions produced in the discharge chamber, which have good primary electron and neutral atom containment and which operate at high propellant flow rates.

  5. A novel hybrid MCDM model for performance evaluation of research and technology organizations based on BSC approach.

    PubMed

    Varmazyar, Mohsen; Dehghanbaghi, Maryam; Afkhami, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Balanced Scorecard (BSC) is a strategic evaluation tool using both financial and non-financial indicators to determine the business performance of organizations or companies. In this paper, a new integrated approach based on the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) and multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) methods are proposed to evaluate the performance of research centers of research and technology organization (RTO) in Iran. Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) are employed to reflect the interdependencies among BSC perspectives. Then, Analytic Network Process (ANP) is utilized to weight the indices influencing the considered problem. In the next step, we apply four MCDM methods including Additive Ratio Assessment (ARAS), Complex Proportional Assessment (COPRAS), Multi-Objective Optimization by Ratio Analysis (MOORA), and Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) for ranking of alternatives. Finally, the utility interval technique is applied to combine the ranking results of MCDM methods. Weighted utility intervals are computed by constructing a correlation matrix between the ranking methods. A real case is presented to show the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  6. Application of 2D numerical model to unsteady performance evaluation of vertical-axis tidal current turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Qu, Hengliang; Shi, Hongda; Hu, Gexing; Hyun, Beom-Soo

    2016-12-01

    Tidal current energy is renewable and sustainable, which is a promising alternative energy resource for the future electricity supply. The straight-bladed vertical-axis turbine is regarded as a useful tool to capture the tidal current energy especially under low-speed conditions. A 2D unsteady numerical model based on Ansys-Fluent 12.0 is established to conduct the numerical simulation, which is validated by the corresponding experimental data. For the unsteady calculations, the SST model, 2×105 and 0.01 s are selected as the proper turbulence model, mesh number, and time step, respectively. Detailed contours of the velocity distributions around the rotor blade foils have been provided for a flow field analysis. The tip speed ratio (TSR) determines the azimuth angle of the appearance of the torque peak, which occurs once for a blade in a single revolution. It is also found that simply increasing the incident flow velocity could not improve the turbine performance accordingly. The peaks of the averaged power and torque coefficients appear at TSRs of 2.1 and 1.8, respectively. Furthermore, several shapes of the duct augmentation are proposed to improve the turbine performance by contracting the flow path gradually from the open mouth of the duct to the rotor. The duct augmentation can significantly enhance the power and torque output. Furthermore, the elliptic shape enables the best performance of the turbine. The numerical results prove the capability of the present 2D model for the unsteady hydrodynamics and an operating performance analysis of the vertical tidal stream turbine.

  7. EVALUATION OF THE COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODEL VERSION 4.5: UNCERTAINTIES AND SENSITIVITIES IMPACTING MODEL PERFORMANCE: PART II - PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an analysis of the CMAQ v4.5 model performance for particulate matter and its chemical components for the simulated year 2001. This is part two is two part series of papers that examines the model performance of CMAQ v4.5.

  8. Performance Evaluation of K-DEMO Cable-in-conduit Conductors Using the Florida Electro-Mechanical Cable Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Yuhu

    2013-07-16

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for design of the Toroidal Field (TF) insert coil, which will allow validation of the performance of significant lengths of the conductors to be used in the full scale TF coils in relevant conditions of field, current density and mechanical strain. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) will build the TF insert which will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test facility at JAEA, Naka, Japan. Three dimensional mathematical model of TF Insert was created based on the initial design geometry data, and included the following features: orthotropic material properties of superconductor material and insulation; external magnetic field from CSMC, temperature dependent properties of the materials; pre-compression and plastic deformation in lap joint. Major geometrical characteristics of the design were preserved including cable jacket and insulation shape, mandrel outline, and support clamps and spacers. The model is capable of performing coupled structural, thermal, and electromagnetic analysis using ANSYS. Numerical simulations were performed for room temperature conditions; cool down to 4K, and the operating regime with 68kA current at 11.8 Tesla background field. Numerical simulations led to the final design of the coil producing the required strain levels on the cable, while simultaneously satisfying the ITER magnet structural design criteria.

  9. NCCDS performance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Eric; Vallone, Antonio

    1994-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Network Control Center (NCC) provides communication services between ground facilities and spacecraft missions in near-earth orbit that use the Space Network. The NCC Data System (NCCDS) provides computational support and is expected to be highly utilized by the service requests needed in the future years. A performance model of the NCCDS has been developed to assess the future workload and possible enhancements. The model computes message volumes from mission request profiles and SN resource levels and generates the loads for NCCDS configurations as a function of operational scenarios and processing activities. The model has been calibrated using the results of benchmarks performed on the operational NCCDS facility and used to assess some future SN service request scenarios.

  10. Performance Evaluation of Nano-JASMINE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsutori, Y.; Kobayashi, Y.; Gouda, N.; Yano, T.; Murooka, J.; Niwa, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2011-02-01

    We report the results of performance evaluation of the first Japanese astrometry satellite, Nano-JASMINE. It is a very small satellite and weighs only 35 kg. It aims to carry out astrometry measurement of nearby bright stars (z ≤ 7.5 mag) with an accuracy of 3 milli-arcseconds. Nano-JASMINE will be launched by Cyclone-4 rocket in August 2011 from Brazil. The current status is in the process of evaluating the performances. A series of performance tests and numerical analysis were conducted. As a result, the engineering model (EM) of the telescope was measured to be achieving a diffraction-limited performance and confirmed that it has enough performance for scientific astrometry.

  11. ATR performance modeling concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Timothy D.; Baker, Hyatt B.; Nolan, Adam R.; McGinnis, Ryan E.; Paulson, Christopher R.

    2016-05-01

    Performance models are needed for automatic target recognition (ATR) development and use. ATRs consume sensor data and produce decisions about the scene observed. ATR performance models (APMs) on the other hand consume operating conditions (OCs) and produce probabilities about what the ATR will produce. APMs are needed for many modeling roles of many kinds of ATRs (each with different sensing modality and exploitation functionality combinations); moreover, there are different approaches to constructing the APMs. Therefore, although many APMs have been developed, there is rarely one that fits a particular need. Clarified APM concepts may allow us to recognize new uses of existing APMs and identify new APM technologies and components that better support coverage of the needed APMs. The concepts begin with thinking of ATRs as mapping OCs of the real scene (including the sensor data) to reports. An APM is then a mapping from explicit quantized OCs (represented with less resolution than the real OCs) and latent OC distributions to report distributions. The roles of APMs can be distinguished by the explicit OCs they consume. APMs used in simulations consume the true state that the ATR is attempting to report. APMs used online with the exploitation consume the sensor signal and derivatives, such as match scores. APMs used in sensor management consume neither of those, but estimate performance from other OCs. This paper will summarize the major building blocks for APMs, including knowledge sources, OC models, look-up tables, analytical and learned mappings, and tools for signal synthesis and exploitation.

  12. 48 CFR 436.604 - Performance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Performance evaluation... Performance evaluation. Preparation of performance evaluation reports. (a) In addition to the requirements of FAR 36.604, performance evaluation reports shall be prepared for indefinite-delivery type...

  13. METAPHOR (version 1): Users guide. [performability modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furchtgott, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    General information concerning METAPHOR, an interactive software package to facilitate performability modeling and evaluation, is presented. Example systems are studied and their performabilities are calculated. Each available METAPHOR command and array generator is described. Complete METAPHOR sessions are included.

  14. Performance evaluation of ant colony optimization-based solution strategies on the mixed-model assembly line balancing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpinar, Sener; Mirac Bayhan, G.

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article is to compare the performances of iterative ant colony optimization (ACO)-based solution strategies on a mixed-model assembly line balancing problem of type II (MMALBP-II) by addressing some particular features of real-world assembly line balancing problems such as parallel workstations and zoning constraints. To solve the problem, where the objective is to minimize the cycle time (i.e. maximize the production rate) for a predefined number of workstations in an existing assembly line, two ACO-based approaches which differ in the mission assigned to artificial ants are used. Furthermore, each ACO-based approach is conducted with two different pheromone release strategies: global and local pheromone updating rules. The four ACO-based approaches are used for solving 20 representative MMALBP-II to compare their performance in terms of computational time and solution quality. Detailed comparison results are presented.

  15. Small wind turbine performance evaluation using field test data and a coupled aero-electro-mechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Brian D.

    A series of field tests and theoretical analyses were performed on various wind turbine rotor designs at two Penn State residential-scale wind-electric facilities. This work involved the prediction and experimental measurement of the electrical and aerodynamic performance of three wind turbines; a 3 kW rated Whisper 175, 2.4 kW rated Skystream 3.7, and the Penn State designed Carolus wind turbine. Both the Skystream and Whisper 175 wind turbines are OEM blades which were originally installed at the facilities. The Carolus rotor is a carbon-fiber composite 2-bladed machine, designed and assembled at Penn State, with the intent of replacing the Whisper 175 rotor at the off-grid system. Rotor aerodynamic performance is modeled using WT_Perf, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed Blade Element Momentum theory based performance prediction code. Steady-state power curves are predicted by coupling experimentally determined electrical characteristics with the aerodynamic performance of the rotor simulated with WT_Perf. A dynamometer test stand is used to establish the electromechanical efficiencies of the wind-electric system generator. Through the coupling of WT_Perf and dynamometer test results, an aero-electro-mechanical analysis procedure is developed and provides accurate predictions of wind system performance. The analysis of three different wind turbines gives a comprehensive assessment of the capability of the field test facilities and the accuracy of aero-electro-mechanical analysis procedures. Results from this study show that the Carolus and Whisper 175 rotors are running at higher tip-speed ratios than are optimum for power production. The aero-electro-mechanical analysis predicted the high operating tip-speed ratios of the rotors and was accurate at predicting output power for the systems. It is shown that the wind turbines operate at high tip-speeds because of a miss-match between the aerodynamic drive torque and the operating torque of the wind

  16. Prospective safety performance evaluation on construction sites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianguo; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Limao; Skibniewski, Miroslaw J; Wang, Yanhong

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a systematic Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) based approach for Prospective Safety Performance Evaluation (PSPE) on construction sites, with causal relationships and interactions between enablers and the goals of PSPE taken into account. According to a sample of 450 valid questionnaire surveys from 30 Chinese construction enterprises, a SEM model with 26 items included for PSPE in the context of Chinese construction industry is established and then verified through the goodness-of-fit test. Three typical types of construction enterprises, namely the state-owned enterprise, private enterprise and Sino-foreign joint venture, are selected as samples to measure the level of safety performance given the enterprise scale, ownership and business strategy are different. Results provide a full understanding of safety performance practice in the construction industry, and indicate that the level of overall safety performance situation on working sites is rated at least a level of III (Fair) or above. This phenomenon can be explained that the construction industry has gradually matured with the norms, and construction enterprises should improve the level of safety performance as not to be eliminated from the government-led construction industry. The differences existing in the safety performance practice regarding different construction enterprise categories are compared and analyzed according to evaluation results. This research provides insights into cause-effect relationships among safety performance factors and goals, which, in turn, can facilitate the improvement of high safety performance in the construction industry.

  17. Evaluating the Performance of the CPTEC-INPE/FCT-UNESP Troposphere Dynamic Model Using the VRS Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, D. B.; Dalbelo, L. F.; Monico, J. F.; Sapucci, L. F.

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays, the use of Zenithal Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) prediction from Numeric Weather Prediction (NWP) models is a good alternative to minimize the effects of the troposphere in the radio frequency signs for real time and/or pos-processed applications. This process is denominated here after ZTD dynamic modeling. In Brazil, the procedure used to compute the ZTD by the NWP model was jointly developed by researchers from UNESP (São Paulo State University) and CPTEC (Center for Weather Forecasting and Climate Studies) of the INPE (National Institute for Space Research). The ZTD values are provided for all South America twice a day with predictions for a period of 66 hours. The database and the quality analysis are available by CPTEC-INPE in http:satelite.cptec.inpe.br/htmldocs/ztd/zenital.htm. In order to test the performance of the ZTD dynamic modeling in positioning applications, some experiments were carried out. Besides, the results obtained with dynamic modeling were compared with those obtained by Hopfield empirical model. These two tropospheric models were used to generate a VRS (Virtual Reference Station). In the VRS concept developed in this research, a reference station is generated near the user using data provided by a reference network station and atmospheric models. Therefore, the VRS data are not provided by a real receiver. But, the idea is that the VRS data resemble as much as possible a real receiver data at the same location. Therefore, the user has the possibility of using the VRS as if it were a real reference station in your proximities, and to accomplish the relative positioning with a single frequency receiver. This method was implemented in an software which has been developed at UNESP. In order to test the discussed method it was accomplished two experiments using data from two different networks: (a) Brazilian Continuous GPS Network (RBMC) and some extra stations; (b) GPS Active Network of West of São Paulo State. Using the first network

  18. Numerical Prediction of Cold Season Fog Events over Complex Terrain: the Performance of the WRF Model During MATERHORN-Fog and Early Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Zhaoxia; Chachere, Catherine N.; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Pardyjak, Eric; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-09-01

    A field campaign to study cold season fog in complex terrain was conducted as a component of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program from 07 January to 01 February 2015 in Salt Lake City and Heber City, Utah, United States. To support the field campaign, an advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to produce real-time forecasts and model evaluation. This paper summarizes the model performance and preliminary evaluation of the model against the observations. Results indicate that accurately forecasting fog is challenging for the WRF model, which produces large errors in the near-surface variables, such as relative humidity, temperature, and wind fields in the model forecasts. Specifically, compared with observations, the WRF model overpredicted fog events with extended duration in Salt Lake City because it produced higher moisture, lower wind speeds, and colder temperatures near the surface. In contrast, the WRF model missed all fog events in Heber City, as it reproduced lower moisture, higher wind speeds, and warmer temperatures against observations at the near-surface level. The inability of the model to produce proper levels of near-surface atmospheric conditions under fog conditions reflects uncertainties in model physical parameterizations, such as the surface layer, boundary layer, and microphysical schemes.

  19. Towards Fully Coupled Atmosphere-Hydrology Model Systems: Recent Developments and Performance Evaluation For Different Climate Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstmann, Harald; Fersch, Benjamin; Rummler, Thomas; Wagner, Sven; Arnault, Joel; Senatore, Alfonso; Gochis, David

    2015-04-01

    Limitations in the adequate representation of terrestrial hydrologic processes controlling the land-atmosphere coupling are assumed to be a significant factor currently limiting prediction skills of regional atmospheric models. The necessity for more comprehensive process descriptions accounting for the interdependencies between water- and energy fluxes at the compartmental interfaces are driving recent developments in hydrometeorological modeling towards more sophisticated treatment of terrestrial hydrologic processes. It is particularly the lateral surface and subsurface water fluxes that are neglected in standard regional atmospheric models. Current developments in enhanced lateral hydrological process descriptions in the WRF model system will be presented. Based on WRF and WRF-Hydro, new modules and concepts for integrating the saturated zone by a 2-dim groundwater scheme and coupling approaches to the unsaturated zone will be presented. The fully coupled model system allows to model the complete regional water cycle, from the top of the atmosphere, via the boundary layer, the land surface, the unsaturated zone and the saturated zone till the flow in the river beds. With this increasing complexity, that also allows to describe the complex interaction of the regional water cycle on different spatial and temporal scales, the reliability and predictability of model simulations can only be shown, if performance is tested for a variety of hydrological variables for different climatological environments. We will show results of fully coupled simulations for the regions of sempiternal humid Southern Bavaria/Germany (rivers Isar and Ammer) and semiarid to subhumid Westafrica (river Sissilli). In both regions, in addition to streamflow measurements, also the validation of heat fluxes is possible via Eddy-Covariance stations within hydrometeorological testbeds. In the German Isar/Ammer region, e.g., we apply the extended WRF-Hydro modeling system in 3km atmospheric- grid

  20. Evaluating Performance Portability of OpenACC

    SciTech Connect

    Sabne, Amit J; Sakdhnagool, Putt; Lee, Seyong; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Accelerator-based heterogeneous computing is gaining momentum in High Performance Computing arena. However, the increased complexity of the accelerator architectures demands more generic, high-level programming models. OpenACC is one such attempt to tackle the problem. While the abstraction endowed by OpenACC offers productivity, it raises questions on its portability. This paper evaluates the performance portability obtained by OpenACC on twelve OpenACC programs on NVIDIA CUDA, AMD GCN, and Intel MIC architectures. We study the effects of various compiler optimizations and OpenACC program settings on these architectures to provide insights into the achieved performance portability.

  1. How do current irrigation practices perform? Evaluation of different irrigation scheduling approaches based on experiements and crop model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Sabine J.; Werisch, Stefan; Barfus, Klemens; Wagner, Michael; Schütze, Niels; Laber, Hermann

    2014-05-01

    The increasing worldwide water scarcity, costs and negative off-site effects of irrigation are leading to the necessity of developing methods of irrigation that increase water productivity. Various approaches are available for irrigation scheduling. Traditionally schedules are calculated based on soil water balance (SWB) calculations using some measure of reference evaporation and empirical crop coeffcients. These crop-specific coefficients are provided by the FAO but are also available for different regions (e.g. Germany). The approach is simple but there are several inaccuracies due to simplifications and limitations such as poor transferability. Crop growth models - which simulate the main physiological plant processes through a set of assumptions and calibration parameter - are widely used to support decision making, but also for yield gap or scenario analyses. One major advantage of mechanistic models compared to empirical approaches is their spatial and temporal transferability. Irrigation scheduling can also be based on measurements of soil water tension which is closely related to plant stress. Advantages of precise and easy measurements are able to be automated but face difficulties of finding the place where to probe especially in heterogenous soils. In this study, a two-year field experiment was used to extensively evaluate the three mentioned irrigation scheduling approaches regarding their efficiency on irrigation water application with the aim to promote better agronomic practices in irrigated horticulture. To evaluate the tested irrigation scheduling approaches, an extensive plant and soil water data collection was used to precisely calibrate the mechanistic crop model Daisy. The experiment was conducted with white cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.) on a sandy loamy field in 2012/13 near Dresden, Germany. Hereby, three irrigation scheduling approaches were tested: (i) two schedules were estimated based on SWB calculations using different crop

  2. Evaluation of the imputation performance of the program IMPUTE in an admixed sample from Mexico City using several model designs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We explored the imputation performance of the program IMPUTE in an admixed sample from Mexico City. The following issues were evaluated: (a) the impact of different reference panels (HapMap vs. 1000 Genomes) on imputation; (b) potential differences in imputation performance between single-step vs. two-step (phasing and imputation) approaches; (c) the effect of different INFO score thresholds on imputation performance and (d) imputation performance in common vs. rare markers. Methods The sample from Mexico City comprised 1,310 individuals genotyped with the Affymetrix 5.0 array. We randomly masked 5% of the markers directly genotyped on chromosome 12 (n = 1,046) and compared the imputed genotypes with the microarray genotype calls. Imputation was carried out with the program IMPUTE. The concordance rates between the imputed and observed genotypes were used as a measure of imputation accuracy and the proportion of non-missing genotypes as a measure of imputation efficacy. Results The single-step imputation approach produced slightly higher concordance rates than the two-step strategy (99.1% vs. 98.4% when using the HapMap phase II combined panel), but at the expense of a lower proportion of non-missing genotypes (85.5% vs. 90.1%). The 1,000 Genomes reference sample produced similar concordance rates to the HapMap phase II panel (98.4% for both datasets, using the two-step strategy). However, the 1000 Genomes reference sample increased substantially the proportion of non-missing genotypes (94.7% vs. 90.1%). Rare variants (<1%) had lower imputation accuracy and efficacy than common markers. Conclusions The program IMPUTE had an excellent imputation performance for common alleles in an admixed sample from Mexico City, which has primarily Native American (62%) and European (33%) contributions. Genotype concordances were higher than 98.4% using all the imputation strategies, in spite of the fact that no Native American samples are present in the HapMap and

  3. Guidelines for Model Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    by a decisionmaker. The full-scale evaluation of a complex model can be an expensive, time- consuming effort requiring diverse talents and skills...relative to PIES, were documented in a report to the Congress. 2/ An important side- effect of that document was that a foundation was laid for model...while for model evaluation there are no generally accepted standards or methods. Hence, GAO perceives the need to expand upon the lessons learned in

  4. Evaluation of SUNY satellite-to-irradiance model performance using ECMWF GEMS daily aerosol optical depth reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itterly, Kyle F.

    The current version of the State University of New York (SUNY) radiative transfer model (RTM) uses climatological monthly averages derived from a National Renewable Energy Labs (NREL) gridded dataset to parameterize aerosol optical depth (AOD), water vapor and ozone. This is mostly due to the limited availability of high spatially and temporally resolved observations. Several global chemical transport models are analyzed and compared in depth to determine which daily AOD dataset should be implemented into the SUNY Model. After thorough comparison, the chemical transport model chosen was the Global and regional Earth-system Monitoring using satellite and in-situ data (GEMS) model developed by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Using daily AOD values instead of monthly climatological values, the SUNY Model better captures events of extreme aerosol loadings, which greatly improves the accuracy in calculations of direct normal irradiance (DNI) and to a lesser extent, global horizontal irradiance (GHI). In clear-sky conditions with the sun directly overhead, a change in AOD from 0.1 to 0.5 is found to cause a 55% (20%) decrease in DNI (GHI) for Desert Rock, Nevada in January. A calibration scheme is applied to the daily GEMS AOD reanalysis data. For each site, the monthly means of the GEMS daily AOD are corrected by a factor to match the currently used monthly climatological AOD in order to avoid large errors caused by changing the magnitude of the monthly average AOD. The performance of the SUNY model improved significantly for many of the stations analyzed in this work after applying the daily-calibrated GEMS AOD. The Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) was the most notable statistical improvement, which measures the model’s precision compared to the observed measurements from a ground station, and many other statistical improvements are also evident. All 7 SURFRAD locations showed improvements in DNI RMSE after using the calibrated GEMS

  5. Presentation of the EURODELTA III intercomparison exercise - evaluation of the chemistry transport models' performance on criteria pollutants and joint analysis with meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessagnet, Bertrand; Pirovano, Guido; Mircea, Mihaela; Cuvelier, Cornelius; Aulinger, Armin; Calori, Giuseppe; Ciarelli, Giancarlo; Manders, Astrid; Stern, Rainer; Tsyro, Svetlana; García Vivanco, Marta; Thunis, Philippe; Pay, Maria-Teresa; Colette, Augustin; Couvidat, Florian; Meleux, Frédérik; Rouïl, Laurence; Ung, Anthony; Aksoyoglu, Sebnem; María Baldasano, José; Bieser, Johannes; Briganti, Gino; Cappelletti, Andrea; D'Isidoro, Massimo; Finardi, Sandro; Kranenburg, Richard; Silibello, Camillo; Carnevale, Claudio; Aas, Wenche; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Fagerli, Hilde; Gonzalez, Lucia; Menut, Laurent; Prévôt, André S. H.; Roberts, Pete; White, Les

    2016-10-01

    The EURODELTA III exercise has facilitated a comprehensive intercomparison and evaluation of chemistry transport model performances. Participating models performed calculations for four 1-month periods in different seasons in the years 2006 to 2009, allowing the influence of different meteorological conditions on model performances to be evaluated. The exercise was performed with strict requirements for the input data, with few exceptions. As a consequence, most of differences in the outputs will be attributed to the differences in model formulations of chemical and physical processes. The models were evaluated mainly for background rural stations in Europe. The performance was assessed in terms of bias, root mean square error and correlation with respect to the concentrations of air pollutants (NO2, O3, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5), as well as key meteorological variables. Though most of meteorological parameters were prescribed, some variables like the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and the vertical diffusion coefficient were derived in the model preprocessors and can partly explain the spread in model results. In general, the daytime PBL height is underestimated by all models. The largest variability of predicted PBL is observed over the ocean and seas. For ozone, this study shows the importance of proper boundary conditions for accurate model calculations and then on the regime of the gas and particle chemistry. The models show similar and quite good performance for nitrogen dioxide, whereas they struggle to accurately reproduce measured sulfur dioxide concentrations (for which the agreement with observations is the poorest). In general, the models provide a close-to-observations map of particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) concentrations over Europe rather with correlations in the range 0.4-0.7 and a systematic underestimation reaching -10 µg m-3 for PM10. The highest concentrations are much more underestimated, particularly in wintertime. Further evaluation of

  6. Project Performance Evaluation Using Deep Belief Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguvulu, Alick; Yamato, Shoso; Honma, Toshihisa

    A Project Assessment Indicator (PAI) Model has recently been applied to evaluate monthly project performance based on 15 project elements derived from the project management (PM) knowledge areas. While the PAI Model comprehensively evaluates project performance, it lacks objectivity and universality. It lacks objectivity because experts assign model weights intuitively based on their PM skills and experience. It lacks universality because the allocation of ceiling scores to project elements is done ad hoc based on the empirical rule without taking into account the interactions between the project elements. This study overcomes these limitations by applying a DBN approach where the model automatically assigns weights and allocates ceiling scores to the project elements based on the DBN weights which capture the interaction between the project elements. We train our DBN on 5 IT projects of 12 months duration and test it on 8 IT projects with less than 12 months duration. We completely eliminate the manual assigning of weights and compute ceiling scores of project elements based on DBN weights. Our trained DBN evaluates monthly project performance of the 8 test projects based on the 15 project elements to within a monthly relative error margin of between ±1.03 and ±3.30%.

  7. Climate models and model evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.L.

    1994-12-31

    This brief overview addresses aspects of the nature, uses, evaluation and limitations of climate models. A comprehensive global modeling capability has been achieved only for the physical climate system, which is characterized by processes that serve to transport and exchange momentum, heat and moisture within and between the atmosphere, ocean and land surface. The fundamental aim of climate modeling, and the justification for the use of climate models, is the need to achieve a quantitative understanding of the operation of the climate system and to exploit any potential predictability that may exist.

  8. Applying Human-performance Models to Designing and Evaluating Nuclear Power Plants: Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.M.

    2009-11-30

    Human performance models (HPMs) are simulations of human behavior with which we can predict human performance. Designers use them to support their human factors engineering (HFE) programs for a wide range of complex systems, including commercial nuclear power plants. Applicants to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) can use HPMs for design certifications, operating licenses, and license amendments. In the context of nuclear-plant safety, it is important to assure that HPMs are verified and validated, and their usage is consistent with their intended purpose. Using HPMs improperly may generate misleading or incorrect information, entailing safety concerns. The objective of this research was to develop guidance to support the NRC staff's reviews of an applicant's use of HPMs in an HFE program. The guidance is divided into three topical areas: (1) HPM Verification, (2) HPM Validation, and (3) User Interface Verification. Following this guidance will help ensure the benefits of HPMs are achieved in a technically sound, defensible manner. During the course of developing this guidance, I identified several issues that could not be addressed; they also are discussed.

  9. Two Decades of WRF/CMAQ simulations over the continental United States: New approaches for performing dynamic model evaluation and determining confidence limits for ozone exceedances

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confidence in the application of models for forecasting and regulatory assessments is furthered by conducting four types of model evaluation: operational, dynamic, diagnostic, and probabilistic. Operational model evaluation alone does not reveal the confidence limits that can be ...

  10. 48 CFR 2936.604 - Performance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Performance evaluation... Performance evaluation. (a) The HCA must establish procedures to evaluate architect-engineer contractor performance as required in FAR 36.604. Normally, the performance report must be prepared by the...

  11. Evaluation of solar pond performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenberg, L.J.

    1980-01-01

    The City of Miamisburg, Ohio, constructed during 1978 a large, salt-gradient solar pond as part of its community park development project. The thermal energy stored in the pond is being used to heat an outdoor swimming pool in the summer and an adjacent recreational building during part of the winter. This solar pond, which occupies an area of 2020 m/sup 2/ (22,000 sq. ft.), was designed from experience obtained at smaller research ponds located at Ohio State University, the University of New Mexico and similar ponds operated in Israel. During the summer of 1979, the initial heat (40,000 kWh, 136 million Btu) was withdrawn from the solar pond to heat the outdoor swimming pool. All of the data collection systems were installed and functioned as designed so that operational data were obtained. The observed performance of the pond was compared with several of the predicted models for this type of pond. (MHR)

  12. Using a shared governance structure to evaluate the implementation of a new model of care: the shared experience of a performance improvement committee.

    PubMed

    Myers, Mary; Parchen, Debra; Geraci, Marilla; Brenholtz, Roger; Knisely-Carrigan, Denise; Hastings, Clare

    2013-10-01

    Sustaining change in the behaviors and habits of experienced practicing nurses can be frustrating and daunting, even when changes are based on evidence. Partnering with an active shared governance structure to communicate change and elicit feedback is an established method to foster partnership, equity, accountability, and ownership. Few recent exemplars in the literature link shared governance, change management, and evidence-based practice to transitions in care models. This article describes an innovative staff-driven approach used by nurses in a shared governance performance improvement committee to use evidence-based practice in determining the best methods to evaluate the implementation of a new model of care.

  13. Preclinical Performance Evaluation of Percutaneous Glucose Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Robert J.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    The utility of continuous glucose monitoring devices remains limited by an obstinate foreign body response (FBR) that degrades the analytical performance of the in vivo sensor. A number of novel materials that resist or delay the FBR have been proposed as outer, tissue-contacting glucose sensor membranes as a strategy to improve sensor accuracy. Traditionally, researchers have examined the ability of a material to minimize the host response by assessing adsorbed cell morphology and tissue histology. However, these techniques do not adequately predict in vivo glucose sensor function, necessitating sensor performance evaluation in a relevant animal model prior to human testing. Herein, the effects of critical experimental parameters, including the animal model and data processing methods, on the reliability and usefulness of preclinical sensor performance data are considered. PMID:26085566

  14. Performance evaluation of an automotive thermoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubitsky, Andrei O.

    Around 40% of the total fuel energy in typical internal combustion engines (ICEs) is rejected to the environment in the form of exhaust gas waste heat. Efficient recovery of this waste heat in automobiles can promise a fuel economy improvement of 5%. The thermal energy can be harvested through thermoelectric generators (TEGs) utilizing the Seebeck effect. In the present work, a versatile test bench has been designed and built in order to simulate conditions found on test vehicles. This allows experimental performance evaluation and model validation of automotive thermoelectric generators. An electrically heated exhaust gas circuit and a circulator based coolant loop enable integrated system testing of hot and cold side heat exchangers, thermoelectric modules (TEMs), and thermal interface materials at various scales. A transient thermal model of the coolant loop was created in order to design a system which can maintain constant coolant temperature under variable heat input. Additionally, as electrical heaters cannot match the transient response of an ICE, modelling was completed in order to design a relaxed exhaust flow and temperature history utilizing the system thermal lag. This profile reduced required heating power and gas flow rates by over 50%. The test bench was used to evaluate a DOE/GM initial prototype automotive TEG and validate analytical performance models. The maximum electrical power generation was found to be 54 W with a thermal conversion efficiency of 1.8%. It has been found that thermal interface management is critical for achieving maximum system performance, with novel designs being considered for further improvement.

  15. A system-level mathematical model for evaluation of power train performance of load-leveled electric-vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purohit, G. P.; Leising, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    The power train performance of load leveled electric vehicles can be compared with that of nonload leveled systems by use of a simple mathematical model. This method of measurement involves a number of parameters including the degree of load leveling and regeneration, the flywheel mechanical to electrical energy fraction, and efficiencies of the motor, generator, flywheel, and transmission. Basic efficiency terms are defined and representative comparisons of a variety of systems are presented. Results of the study indicate that mechanical transfer of energy into and out of the flywheel is more advantageous than electrical transfer. An optimum degree of load leveling may be achieved in terms of the driving cycle, battery characteristics, mode of mechanization, and the efficiency of the components. For state of the art mechanically coupled flyheel systems, load leveling losses can be held to a reasonable 10%; electrically coupled systems can have losses that are up to six times larger. Propulsion system efficiencies for mechanically coupled flywheel systems are predicted to be approximately the 60% achieved on conventional nonload leveled systems.

  16. Performance Evaluation of a Data Validation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Edmond (Technical Monitor); Sowers, T. Shane; Santi, L. Michael; Bickford, Randall L.

    2005-01-01

    Online data validation is a performance-enhancing component of modern control and health management systems. It is essential that performance of the data validation system be verified prior to its use in a control and health management system. A new Data Qualification and Validation (DQV) Test-bed application was developed to provide a systematic test environment for this performance verification. The DQV Test-bed was used to evaluate a model-based data validation package known as the Data Quality Validation Studio (DQVS). DQVS was employed as the primary data validation component of a rocket engine health management (EHM) system developed under NASA's NGLT (Next Generation Launch Technology) program. In this paper, the DQVS and DQV Test-bed software applications are described, and the DQV Test-bed verification procedure for this EHM system application is presented. Test-bed results are summarized and implications for EHM system performance improvements are discussed.

  17. Cavitation performance evaluation for a condensate pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, A.; Yu, W. P.; Pan, Z. B.; Luo, X. W.; Ji, B.; Y Xu, H.

    2013-12-01

    Cavitation in a condensate pump with specific speed of 95 m·m3s-1·min-1 was treated in this study. Cavitation performance for the pump was tested experimentally, and the steady state cavitating flows in the pump impeller were simulated by RANS method as well as a homogeneous cavitation model. It is noted that cavitating flow simulation reasonably depicted cavitation development in the pump. Compared to the tested results, the numerical simulation basically predicted later performance drops due to cavitation. Unfortunately, the cavitation simulation at the operation condition of 50% best efficiency point could not predict the head drop up to 3%. By applying the concept of relative cavity length cavitation performance evaluation is achieved. For better application, future study is necessary to establish the relation between relative cavity length and performance drop.

  18. Hydrological evaluation of landfill performance (HELP) model assessment of the geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Material Disposal Area J

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil-Holterman, L.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is: (1) conduct HELP model variations in weather data, profile characteristics, and hydraulic conductivities for major rock units; (2) compare and contrast the results of simulations; (3) obtain an estimation of leakage through the landfill from the surface to the aquifer; and (4) evaluate contaminant transport to the aquifer utilizing leakage estimation. The conclusions of this paper are: (1) the HELP model is useful to assess landfill design alternatives or the performance of a pre-existing landfill; (2) model results using site-specific data incorporated into the Weather Generator (Trail 4), varied significantly from generalized runs (Trials 1-3), consequently, models that lack site-specific data should be used cautiously; and (3) data from this study suggest that there will not be significant downward percolation of leachate from the surface of the landfill cap to the aquifer-leachate transport rates have been calculated to be slow.

  19. 13 CFR 304.4 - Performance evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Performance evaluations. 304.4... ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICTS § 304.4 Performance evaluations. (a) EDA shall evaluate the management standards, financial accountability and program performance of each District Organization within three...

  20. 48 CFR 36.604 - Performance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Performance evaluation. 36.604 Section 36.604 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL... Performance evaluation. See 42.1502(f) for the requirements for preparing past performance evaluations...

  1. 48 CFR 36.604 - Performance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance evaluation. 36.604 Section 36.604 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL... Performance evaluation. See 42.1502(f) for the requirements for preparing past performance evaluations...

  2. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF TYPE I MARINE SANITATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This performance test was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of two Type I Marine Sanitation Devices (MSDs): the Electro Scan Model EST 12, manufactured by Raritan Engineering Company, Inc., and the Thermopure-2, manufactured by Gross Mechanical Laboratories, Inc. Performance...

  3. Behavioral patterns of environmental performance evaluation programs.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanxin; Mauerhofer, Volker

    2016-11-01

    During the past decades numerous environmental performance evaluation programs have been developed and implemented on different geographic scales. This paper develops a taxonomy of environmental management behavioral patterns in order to provide a practical comparison tool for environmental performance evaluation programs. Ten such programs purposively selected are mapped against the identified four behavioral patterns in the form of diagnosis, negotiation, learning, and socialization and learning. Overall, we found that schemes which serve to diagnose environmental abnormalities are mainly externally imposed and have been developed as a result of technical debates concerning data sources, methodology and ranking criteria. Learning oriented scheme is featured by processes through which free exchange of ideas, mutual and adaptive learning can occur. Scheme developed by higher authority for influencing behaviors of lower levels of government has been adopted by the evaluated to signal their excellent environmental performance. The socializing and learning classified evaluation schemes have incorporated dialogue, participation, and capacity building in program design. In conclusion we consider the 'fitness for purpose' of the various schemes, the merits of our analytical model and the future possibilities of fostering capacity building in the realm of wicked environmental challenges.

  4. Error Reduction Program. [combustor performance evaluation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, S. A.; Chiappetta, L. M.; Gosman, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    The details of a study to select, incorporate and evaluate the best available finite difference scheme to reduce numerical error in combustor performance evaluation codes are described. The combustor performance computer programs chosen were the two dimensional and three dimensional versions of Pratt & Whitney's TEACH code. The criteria used to select schemes required that the difference equations mirror the properties of the governing differential equation, be more accurate than the current hybrid difference scheme, be stable and economical, be compatible with TEACH codes, use only modest amounts of additional storage, and be relatively simple. The methods of assessment used in the selection process consisted of examination of the difference equation, evaluation of the properties of the coefficient matrix, Taylor series analysis, and performance on model problems. Five schemes from the literature and three schemes developed during the course of the study were evaluated. This effort resulted in the incorporation of a scheme in 3D-TEACH which is usuallly more accurate than the hybrid differencing method and never less accurate.

  5. Performance Evaluation of Various Parameterization Schemes in Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model : A Case Study Subtropical Urban Agglomeration National Capital Region (NCR), India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhwani, R.; Kumar, S.; Goyal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Meteorological parameters play a very significant and crucial role in simulating regional air quality. This study has been carried to evaluate the performance of WRF model to various combinations of physical parameterization schemes for predicting surface and upper air meteorology around the capital city of India, Delhi popularly known as National Capital Region (NCR). Eight sensitivity experiments has been conducted to find the best combination of the parameterization schemes for the study area during summer (4th - 18th April, 2010 ) season. The model predicted surface temperatures at 2m, relative humidity at 2m and wind speeds at 10m are compared with the observations from Central Pollution Control Board (at Dwarka and Shadipur monitoring stations) and Indian Meteorological Department (VIDP and VIDD stations) whereas the upper-air potential temperature profile and wind speed profile are validated using Wyoming Weather Web data archive at VIDD station. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of simulations indicate that for temperature and relative humidity, the combination consisting of Yonsei Unversity (YSU) as the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) scheme, the Monin Obhukhov as the surface layer (SL) scheme along with NOAH land surface model (LSM) has been found to be performing better than other combinations. The combination consisting of Mellor Yamada Janjic (Eta) as the PBL scheme, Monin Obhukhov Janjic (Eta) as the SL scheme and Noah LSM performs reasonably well in reproducing the observed wind conditions. This indicates that the selection of parameterization schemes may depend on the intended application of the model for a given region.

  6. A Proposed RTN Officer Performance Evaluation System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    studiod at the Naval Postpraduate School and practical theories relating to personnel management and performance evaluation. 4 The research method includes...various systems are discussed as the researcher perceives them. The fact that there is probably no agreed upon, fool-proof method of evaluating an...Performance Evaluation System. The research methodology Includes the following three componen: (1) a study of pertinent performance evaluation

  7. Performance evaluation of carbon dioxide-alkanolamine- water system by equation of state/excess Gibbs energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleman, H.; Maulud, A. S.; Man, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Numerous thermodynamic techniques have been applied to correlate carbon dioxide- alkanolamine-water systems, with varying accuracy and complexity. With advent of high pressure carbon dioxide absorption in industry, the development of high pressure thermodynamic models have became an exigency. Equation of state/excess Gibbs energy models promises a substantial improvement in this field. Many researchers have shown application of these models to high pressure vapour liquid equilibria of said system with good correlation. However, no study shows the range of application of these models in presence of other competitive techniques. Therefore, this study quantitatively describes the range of application of equation of state/excess Gibbs energy models to carbon dioxide-alkanolamine systems. The model uses Linear Combination of Vidal and Michelsen mixing rule for correlation of carbon dioxide absorption in single aqueous monoethanolamine, diethanolamine and methyldiethanolamine mixtures. The results show that correlation of equation of state/excess Gibbs energy models show a transient change at carbon dioxide loadings of 0.8. Therefore, these models are applicable to the above mentioned system for carbon dioxide loadings beyond 0.8 mol/mol and higher. The observations are similar in behaviour for all tested alkanolamines and are therefore generalized for the system.

  8. Performance evaluation of traveling wave ultrasonic motor based on a model with visco-elastic friction layer on stator.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianjun; Sun, Fengyan; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2006-12-01

    A new visco-elastic contact model of traveling wave ultrasonic motor (TWUSM) is proposed. In this model, the rotor is assumed to be rigid body and the friction material on stator teeth surface to be visco-elastic body. Both load characteristics of TWUSM, such as rotation speed, torque and efficiency, and effects of interface parameters between stator and rotor on output characteristic of TWUSM can be calculated and simulated numerically by using MATLAB method based on this model. This model is compared with that one of compliant slider and rigid stator. The results show that this model can obtain bigger stall torque. The simulated results are compared with test results, and found that their load characteristics have good agreement.

  9. Predictive performance models and multiple task performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, Christopher D.; Larish, Inge; Contorer, Aaron

    1989-01-01

    Five models that predict how performance of multiple tasks will interact in complex task scenarios are discussed. The models are shown in terms of the assumptions they make about human operator divided attention. The different assumptions about attention are then empirically validated in a multitask helicopter flight simulation. It is concluded from this simulation that the most important assumption relates to the coding of demand level of different component tasks.

  10. Seismic Performance Evaluation of Concentrically Braced Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Po-Chien

    Concentrically braced frames (CBFs) are broadly used as lateral-load resisting systems in buildings throughout the US. In high seismic regions, special concentrically braced frames (SCBFs) where ductility under seismic loading is necessary. Their large elastic stiffness and strength efficiently sustains the seismic demands during smaller, more frequent earthquakes. During large, infrequent earthquakes, SCBFs exhibit highly nonlinear behavior due to brace buckling and yielding and the inelastic behavior induced by secondary deformation of the framing system. These response modes reduce the system demands relative to an elastic system without supplemental damping. In design the re reduced demands are estimated using a response modification coefficient, commonly termed the R factor. The R factor values are important to the seismic performance of a building. Procedures put forth in FEMAP695 developed to R factors through a formalized procedure with the objective of consistent level of collapse potential for all building types. The primary objective of the research was to evaluate the seismic performance of SCBFs. To achieve this goal, an improved model including a proposed gusset plate connection model for SCBFs that permits accurate simulation of inelastic deformations of the brace, gusset plate connections, beams and columns and brace fracture was developed and validated using a large number of experiments. Response history analyses were conducted using the validated model. A series of different story-height SCBF buildings were designed and evaluated. The FEMAP695 method and an alternate procedure were applied to SCBFs and NCBFs. NCBFs are designed without ductile detailing. The evaluation using P695 method shows contrary results to the alternate evaluation procedure and the current knowledge in which short-story SCBF structures are more venerable than taller counterparts and NCBFs are more vulnerable than SCBFs.

  11. 13 CFR 304.4 - Performance evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance evaluations. 304.4 Section 304.4 Business Credit and Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICTS § 304.4 Performance evaluations. (a) EDA shall evaluate the...

  12. 48 CFR 2936.604 - Performance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 2936.604 Performance evaluation. (a) The HCA must establish procedures to evaluate architect-engineer contractor... reports must be made using Standard Form 1421, Performance Evaluation (Architect-Engineer) as...

  13. A Model Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Bradley D.; Smalley, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Building information modeling (BIM) uses three-dimensional modeling concepts, information technology and interoperable software to design, construct and operate a facility. However, BIM can be more than a tool for virtual modeling--it can provide schools with a 3-D walkthrough of a project while it still is on the electronic drawing board. BIM can…

  14. On the use of the post-closure method uncertainty band to evaluate the performance of land surface models against eddy covariance flux data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingwersen, J.; Imukova, K.; Högy, P.; Streck, T.

    2014-12-01

    The energy balance of eddy covariance (EC) flux data is normally not closed. Therefore, at least if used for modeling, EC flux data are usually post-closed, i.e. the measured turbulent fluxes are adjusted so as to close the energy balance. At the current state of knowledge, however, it is not clear how to partition the missing energy in the right way. Eddy flux data therefore contain some uncertainty due to the unknown nature of the energy balance gap, which should be considered in model evaluation and the interpretation of simulation results. We propose to construct the post-closure method uncertainty band (PUB), which essentially designates the differences between non-adjusted flux data and flux data adjusted with the three post-closure methods (Bowen ratio, latent heat flux (LE) and sensible heat flux (H) method). To demonstrate this approach, simulations with the NOAH-MP land surface model were evaluated based on EC measurements conducted at a winter wheat stand in Southwest Germany in 2011, and the performance of the Jarvis and Ball-Berry stomatal resistance scheme was compared. The width of the PUB of the LE was up to 110 W m-2 (21% of net radiation). Our study shows that it is crucial to account for the uncertainty of EC flux data originating from lacking energy balance closure. Working with only a single post-closing method might result in severe misinterpretations in model-data comparisons.

  15. On the use of the post-closure methods uncertainty band to evaluate the performance of land surface models against eddy covariance flux data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingwersen, J.; Imukova, K.; Högy, P.; Streck, T.

    2015-04-01

    The energy balance of eddy covariance (EC) flux data is normally not closed. Therefore, at least if used for modelling, EC flux data are usually post-closed, i.e. the measured turbulent fluxes are adjusted so as to close the energy balance. At the current state of knowledge, however, it is not clear how to partition the missing energy in the right way. Eddy flux data therefore contain some uncertainty due to the unknown nature of the energy balance gap, which should be considered in model evaluation and the interpretation of simulation results. We propose to construct the post-closure methods uncertainty band (PUB), which essentially designates the differences between non-adjusted flux data and flux data adjusted with the three post-closure methods (Bowen ratio, latent heat flux (LE) and sensible heat flux (H) method). To demonstrate this approach, simulations with the NOAH-MP land surface model were evaluated based on EC measurements conducted at a winter wheat stand in southwest Germany in 2011, and the performance of the Jarvis and Ball-Berry stomatal resistance scheme was compared. The width of the PUB of the LE was up to 110 W m-2 (21% of net radiation). Our study shows that it is crucial to account for the uncertainty in EC flux data originating from lacking energy balance closure. Working with only a single post-closing method might result in severe misinterpretations in model-data comparisons.

  16. 48 CFR 236.604 - Performance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 236.604 Performance evaluation. (a) Preparation of performance reports. Use DD Form 2631, Performance Evaluation (Architect-Engineer), instead of SF 1421. (2) Prepare a...

  17. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  18. Model based evaluation of the effect of pH and electrode geometry on microbial fuel cell performance.

    PubMed

    Picioreanu, Cristian; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Curtis, Thomas P; Scott, Keith

    2010-04-01

    A mathematical model for microbial fuel cells (MFC) which integrates macro-scale time-dependent mass balances for solutes and biomass in the anodic liquid with a micro-scale individual-based two-dimensional biofilm model is developed. Computational fluid dynamics and Nernst-Plank mass and charge balances with diffusion, electromigration, convection and electroneutrality in the biofilm are combined to calculate spatial pH distribution and solutes speciation. Soluble redox mediators are the electron shuttle between microbial cells and the electrode. The model describes the generally observed variations of pH, solute concentrations and electrical current produced over time from electroactive biofilms. Numerical simulations also show the effect of bicarbonate buffer and mass transfer through the proton exchange membrane on the microbial population within a mixed anaerobic digestion sludge consortium of methanogenic and electrogenic microorganisms. In addition, the new modeling approach opens the way to study the influence of fluid flow and any two- or three-dimensional biofilm and electrode geometry on the MFC output parameters. Hydrodynamic calculations show that porous bio-electrodes with greater specific surface area do not necessarily produce more current, as long as convection through the pores is absent. An innovative model solution strategy combines in a very efficient and flexible way MATLAB, COMSOL finite element and Java codes.

  19. What makes a top research medical school? A call for a new model to evaluate academic physicians and medical school performance.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Matthew J; Lunn, Mitchell R; Peng, Lily

    2015-05-01

    Since the publication of the Flexner Report in 1910, the medical education enterprise has undergone many changes to ensure that medical schools meet a minimum standard for the curricula and clinical training they offer students. Although the efforts of the licensing and accrediting bodies have raised the quality of medical education, the educational processes that produce the physicians who provide the best patient care and conduct the best biomedical research have not been identified. Comparative analyses are powerful tools to understand the differences between institutions, but they are challenging to carry out. As a result, the analysis performed by U.S. News & World Report (USN&WR) has become the default tool to compare U.S. medical schools. Medical educators must explore more rigorous and equitable approaches to analyze and understand the performance of medical schools. In particular, a better understanding and more thorough evaluation of the most successful institutions in producing academic physicians with biomedical research careers are needed. In this Perspective, the authors present a new model to evaluate medical schools' production of academic physicians who advance medicine through basic, clinical, translational, and implementation science research. This model is based on relevant and accessible objective criteria that should replace the subjective criteria used in the current USN&WR rankings system. By fostering a national discussion about the most meaningful criteria that should be measured and reported, the authors hope to increase transparency of assessment standards and ultimately improve educational quality.

  20. EVALUATING THE PERFORMANCE OF REGIONAL-SCALE PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELING SYSTEMS. PART III-PRECURSOR PREDICTIONS. (R825260)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Two regional-scale photochemical modeling systems, RAMS/UAM-V and MM5/MAQSIP, are used to simulate precursor concentrations for 4 June¯31 August 1995 period. The time series of simulated and observed precursor concentrations are spectrally deco...

  1. Infrasound Sensor Models and Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    KROMER,RICHARD P.; MCDONALD,TIMOTHY S.

    2000-07-31

    Sandia National Laboratories has continued to evaluate the performance of infrasound sensors that are candidates for use by the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. The performance criteria against which these sensors are assessed are specified in ``Operational Manual for Infra-sound Monitoring and the International Exchange of Infrasound Data''. This presentation includes the results of efforts concerning two of these sensors: (1) Chaparral Physics Model 5; and (2) CEA MB2000. Sandia is working with Chaparral Physics in order to improve the capability of the Model 5 (a prototype sensor) to be calibrated and evaluated. With the assistance of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Sandia is also conducting tests to evaluate the performance of the CEA MB2000. Sensor models based on theoretical transfer functions and manufacturer specifications for these two devices have been developed. This presentation will feature the results of coherence-based data analysis of signals from a huddle test, utilizing several sensors of both types, in order to verify the sensor performance.

  2. Performance evaluation of generalized MSK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galko, P.; Pasupathy, S.

    The computation of the performance of several optimal and suboptimal receivers for generalized MSK is discussed. The optimal receivers considered are Viterbi receivers and the optimal receivers based on a finite observation interval. Two suboptimal receivers, (1) optimized linear receivers based on finite observation intervals and (2) linear receivers based on approximating generalized MSK as an OQPSK signal, are considered as well. It is shown that the former receiver's performance may be computed exactly, while for the latter receiver it is possible to provide arbitrarily tight bounds on the performance. These analyses are illustrated by application to the two popular generalized MSK schemes of duobinary MSK (or FSOQ) and (1 + D)squared/4 MSK.

  3. INTEGRATED WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON RA; MEEUWSEN WE

    2009-03-12

    This document describes the results of an evaluation of the current Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) operation against design performance and a determination of short term and long term actions recommended to sustain IWTS performance.

  4. GPS User Equipment Performance Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    Unit Device Controller Assembly ( UDCA ) * Satellite Signal Generator Assembly (SSGA) • Dynanic Frequency Synthesizer Assembly (DFSA) * Jamming...Post Run Data (PR)) under operator control. The UDCA performs the following primary functions: * Receive digital data from I)I’A, buffer and transfer to...collected by the 1IJKA, reformatted, and sent to the I)IA, and vice versa, via a data bus interface. The UDCA consists of the following elcliiti S

  5. Lubricant Evaluation and Performance 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    POWER DIRECTORATE WRIGHT LABORATORY AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND WRIGHT-PATrERSON AIR FORCE BASE , OHIO 45433-7103 94 5 10 011 NOTICE When government...INTRODUCTION I R DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED METHODS FOR MEASURING LUBRICANT PERFORMANCE 3 1 OXIDATIVE STABILITY OF ESTER BASE LUBRICANTS 3 a. Introduction 3 b...7) Conclusions 134 i. Stability Testing of Cyclophosphazene Based Fluids 134 (1) Introduction 134 (2) Effect of Metal Specimens 134 (3) Effect of a

  6. Performance Evaluation of the SPT-140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David; Sarmiento, Charles; Sankovic, John; Haag, Tom

    1997-01-01

    As part of an on-going cooperative program with industry, an engineering model SPT-140 Hall thruster, which may be suitable for orbit insertion and station-keeping of geosynchronous communication satellites, was evaluated with respect to thrust and radiated electromagnetic interference at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Performance measurements were made using a laboratory model propellant feed system and commercial power supplies. The engine was operated in a space simulation chamber capable of providing background pressures of 4 x 10(exp -6) Torr or less during thruster operation. Thrust was measured at input powers ranging from 1.5 to 5 kilowatts with two different output filter configurations. The broadband electromagnetic emission spectra generated by the engine was also measured for a range of frequencies from 0.01 to 18,000 Mhz. These results are compared to the noise threshold of the measurement system and MIL-STD-461C where appropriate.

  7. Performance Evaluation of PBL Schemes of ARW Model in Simulating Thermo-Dynamical Structure of Pre-Monsoon Convective Episodes over Kharagpur Using STORM Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madala, Srikanth; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Srinivas, C. V.; Tyagi, Bhishma

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, advanced research WRF (ARW) model is employed to simulate convective thunderstorm episodes over Kharagpur (22°30'N, 87°20'E) region of Gangetic West Bengal, India. High-resolution simulations are conducted using 1 × 1 degree NCEP final analysis meteorological fields for initial and boundary conditions for events. The performance of two non-local [Yonsei University (YSU), Asymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2)] and two local turbulence kinetic energy closures [Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ), Bougeault-Lacarrere (BouLac)] are evaluated in simulating planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameters and thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere. The model-simulated parameters are validated with available in situ meteorological observations obtained from micro-meteorological tower as well has high-resolution DigiCORA radiosonde ascents during STORM-2007 field experiment at the study location and Doppler Weather Radar (DWR) imageries. It has been found that the PBL structure simulated with the TKE closures MYJ and BouLac are in better agreement with observations than the non-local closures. The model simulations with these schemes also captured the reflectivity, surface pressure patterns such as wake-low, meso-high, pre-squall low and the convective updrafts and downdrafts reasonably well. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons reveal that the MYJ followed by BouLac schemes better simulated various features of the thunderstorm events over Kharagpur region. The better performance of MYJ followed by BouLac is evident in the lesser mean bias, mean absolute error, root mean square error and good correlation coefficient for various surface meteorological variables as well as thermo-dynamical structure of the atmosphere relative to other PBL schemes. The better performance of the TKE closures may be attributed to their higher mixing efficiency, larger convective energy and better simulation of humidity promoting moist convection relative to non

  8. Pragmatic geometric model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of subsurface model reliability is mathematically and technically demanding as there are many different sources of uncertainty and some of the factors can be assessed merely in a subjective way. For many practical applications in industry or risk assessment (e. g. geothermal drilling) a quantitative estimation of possible geometric variations in depth unit is preferred over relative numbers because of cost calculations for different scenarios. The talk gives an overview of several factors that affect the geometry of structural subsurface models that are based upon typical geological survey organization (GSO) data like geological maps, borehole data and conceptually driven construction of subsurface elements (e. g. fault network). Within the context of the trans-European project "GeoMol" uncertainty analysis has to be very pragmatic also because of different data rights, data policies and modelling software between the project partners. In a case study a two-step evaluation methodology for geometric subsurface model uncertainty is being developed. In a first step several models of the same volume of interest have been calculated by omitting successively more and more input data types (seismic constraints, fault network, outcrop data). The positions of the various horizon surfaces are then compared. The procedure is equivalent to comparing data of various levels of detail and therefore structural complexity. This gives a measure of the structural significance of each data set in space and as a consequence areas of geometric complexity are identified. These areas are usually very data sensitive hence geometric variability in between individual data points in these areas is higher than in areas of low structural complexity. Instead of calculating a multitude of different models by varying some input data or parameters as it is done by Monte-Carlo-simulations, the aim of the second step of the evaluation procedure (which is part of the ongoing work) is to

  9. Evaluation of the performance of SiBcrop model in predicting carbon fluxes and crop yields in the croplands of the US mid continental region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokupitiya, E.; Denning, S.; Paustian, K.; Corbin, K.; Baker, I.; Schaefer, K.

    2008-12-01

    The accurate representation of phenology, physiology, and major crop variables is important in the land- atmosphere carbon models being used to predict carbon and other exchanges of the man-made cropland ecosystems. We evaluated the performance of SiBcrop model (which is the Simple Biosphere model (SiB) with a new scheme for crop phenology and physiology) in predicting carbon exchanges of the US mid continental region which has several major crops. The use of the new phenology scheme within SiB remarkably improved the prediction of LAI and carbon fluxes for corn, soybean, and wheat crops as compared with the observed data at several Ameriflux eddy covariance flux tower sites with those crops. SiBcrop better predicted the onset and end of the growing season, harvest, interannual variability associated with crop rotation, day time carbon draw down, and day to day variability in the carbon exchanges. The model has been coupled with RAMS, the regional Atmospheric Modeling System (developed at Colorado State University), and the coupled SiBcrop-RAMS has predicted better carbon and other fluxes compared to the original SiB-RAMS. SiBcrop also predicted daily variation in biomass in different plant pools (i.e. roots, leaves, stems, and products). In this study, we further evaluated the performance of SiBcrop by comparing the yield estimates based on the grain/seed biomass at harvest predicted by SiBcrop for relevant major crops, against the county-level crop yields reported by the US National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). Initially, the model runs were based on crop maps scaled at 40 km resolution; the maps were used to derive the fraction of corn, soybean, and wheat at each grid cell across the US Mid Continental Intensive (MCI) region under the North American Carbon Program (NACP). The yield biomass carbon values (at harvest) predicted for each grid cell by SiBcrop were extrapolated to derive the county-level yield biomass carbon values, which were then

  10. Distributed Explosive Performance Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    18 Analytic Code ( DEPAC ). DEPAC is a restructured and an upgraded one-stop code of the previous version of the Linear Explosive Array Performance...findings1. 3. Developed the initial version of DEPAC (LEAP and LAM) 3. 4. Released three Technical Results (TRs). 5. Established the methodology for quick...the input files for each run for CTH, process the data generated by CTH, and create the input database files for DEPAC . The line charge is composed of

  11. Evaluating iterative reconstruction performance in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baiyu Solomon, Justin; Ramirez Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) offers notable advantages in computed tomography (CT). However, its performance characterization is complicated by its potentially nonlinear behavior, impacting performance in terms of specific tasks. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of IR with both task-specific and task-generic strategies. Methods: The performance of IR in CT was mathematically assessed with an observer model that predicted the detection accuracy in terms of the detectability index (d′). d′ was calculated based on the properties of the image noise and resolution, the observer, and the detection task. The characterizations of image noise and resolution were extended to accommodate the nonlinearity of IR. A library of tasks was mathematically modeled at a range of sizes (radius 1–4 mm), contrast levels (10–100 HU), and edge profiles (sharp and soft). Unique d′ values were calculated for each task with respect to five radiation exposure levels (volume CT dose index, CTDI{sub vol}: 3.4–64.8 mGy) and four reconstruction algorithms (filtered backprojection reconstruction, FBP; iterative reconstruction in imaging space, IRIS; and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction with strengths of 3 and 5, SAFIRE3 and SAFIRE5; all provided by Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). The d′ values were translated into the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) to represent human observer performance. For each task and reconstruction algorithm, a threshold dose was derived as the minimum dose required to achieve a threshold AUC of 0.9. A task-specific dose reduction potential of IR was calculated as the difference between the threshold doses for IR and FBP. A task-generic comparison was further made between IR and FBP in terms of the percent of all tasks yielding an AUC higher than the threshold. Results: IR required less dose than FBP to achieve the threshold AUC. In general, SAFIRE5 showed the most significant dose reduction

  12. Perspectives on human performance modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Pew, R.W.; Baron, S.

    1983-11-01

    A combination of psychologically-based and control-theoretic approaches to human performance modelling results in other models which have the potential for unifying related works in psychology, artificial intelligence, and system-oriented supervisory control. 33 references.

  13. Using Business Performance To Evaluate Multimedia Training in Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachenmaier, Lynn S.; Moor, William C.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses training evaluation and shows how an abbreviated form of Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation model can be used effectively to evaluate multimedia-based manufacturing training. Topics include trends in manufacturing training, quantifying performance improvement, and statistical comparisons using the Mann-Whitney test and the Tukey Quick…

  14. Performance evaluation and modeling of a submerged membrane bioreactor treating combined municipal and industrial wastewater using radial basis function artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Ahmad; Bagheri, Majid; Boudaghpour, Siamak; Ehteshami, Majid; Bagheri, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Treatment process models are efficient tools to assure proper operation and better control of wastewater treatment systems. The current research was an effort to evaluate performance of a submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) treating combined municipal and industrial wastewater and to simulate effluent quality parameters of the SMBR using a radial basis function artificial neural network (RBFANN). The results showed that the treatment efficiencies increase and hydraulic retention time (HRT) decreases for combined wastewater compared with municipal and industrial wastewaters. The BOD, COD, [Formula: see text] and total phosphorous (TP) removal efficiencies for combined wastewater at HRT of 7 hours were 96.9%, 96%, 96.7% and 92%, respectively. As desirable criteria for treating wastewater, the TBOD/TP ratio increased, the BOD and COD concentrations decreased to 700 and 1000 mg/L, respectively and the BOD/COD ratio was about 0.5 for combined wastewater. The training procedures of the RBFANN models were successful for all predicted components. The train and test models showed an almost perfect match between the experimental and predicted values of effluent BOD, COD, [Formula: see text] and TP. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) values were higher than 0.98 and root mean squared error (RMSE) values did not exceed 7% for train and test models.

  15. Theory and Practice on Teacher Performance Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonghong, Cai; Chongde, Lin

    2006-01-01

    Teacher performance evaluation plays a key role in educational personnel reform, so it has been an important yet difficult issue in educational reform. Previous evaluations on teachers failed to make strict distinction among the three dominant types of evaluation, namely, capability, achievement, and effectiveness. Moreover, teacher performance…

  16. Using the Many-Facet Rasch Model to Evaluate Standard-Setting Judgments: Setting Performance Standards for Advanced Placement® Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaliski, Pamela; Wind, Stefanie A.; Engelhard, George, Jr.; Morgan, Deanna; Plake, Barbara; Reshetar, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    The Many-Facet Rasch (MFR) Model is traditionally used to evaluate the quality of ratings on constructed response assessments; however, it can also be used to evaluate the quality of judgments from panel-based standard setting procedures. The current study illustrates the use of the MFR Model by examining the quality of ratings obtained from a…

  17. Performance evaluation of a non-hydrostatic regional climate model over the Mediterranean/Black Sea area and climate projections for the XXI century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercogliano, Paola; Bucchignani, Edoardo; Montesarchio, Myriam; Zollo, Alessandra Lucia

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of the Work Package 4 (Developing integrated tools for environmental assessment) of PERSEUS Project, high resolution climate simulations have been performed, with the aim of furthering knowledge in the field of climate variability at regional scale, its causes and impacts. CMCC is a no profit centre whose aims are the promotion, research coordination and scientific activities in the field of climate changes. In this work, we show results of numerical simulation performed over a very wide area (13W-46E; 29-56N) at spatial resolution of 14 km, which includes the Mediterranean and Black Seas, using the regional climate model COSMO-CLM. It is a non-hydrostatic model for the simulation of atmospheric processes, developed by the DWD-Germany for weather forecast services; successively, the model has been updated by the CLM-Community, in order to develop climatic applications. It is the only documented numerical model system in Europe designed for spatial resolutions down to 1 km with a range of applicability encompassing operational numerical weather prediction, regional climate modelling the dispersion of trace gases and aerosol and idealised studies and applicable in all regions of the world for a wide range of available climate simulations from global climate and NWP models. Different reasons justify the development of a regional model: the first is the increasing number of works in literature asserting that regional models have also the features to provide more detailed description of the climate extremes, that are often more important then their mean values for natural and human systems. The second one is that high resolution modelling shows adequate features to provide information for impact assessment studies. At CMCC, regional climate modelling is a part of an integrated simulation system and it has been used in different European and African projects to provide qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the hydrogeological and public health risks

  18. Evaluation of performance of bacterial culture of feces and serum ELISA across stages of Johne's disease in cattle using a Bayesian latent class model.

    PubMed

    Espejo, L A; Zagmutt, F J; Groenendaal, H; Muñoz-Zanzi, C; Wells, S J

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of bacterial culture of feces and serum ELISA to correctly identify cows with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) at heavy, light, and non-fecal-shedding levels. A total of 29,785 parallel test results from bacterial culture of feces and serum ELISA were collected from 17 dairy herds in Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and Colorado. Samples were obtained from adult cows from dairy herds enrolled for up to 10 yr in the National Johne's Disease Demonstration Herd Project. A Bayesian latent class model was fitted to estimate the probabilities that bacterial culture of feces (using 72-h sedimentation or 30-min centrifugation methods) and serum ELISA results correctly identified cows as high positive, low positive, or negative given that cows were heavy, light, and non-shedders, respectively. The model assumed that no gold standard test was available and conditional independency existed between diagnostic tests. The estimated conditional probabilities that bacterial culture of feces correctly identified heavy shedders, light shedders, and non-shedders were 70.9, 32.0, and 98.5%, respectively. The same values for the serum ELISA were 60.6, 18.7, and 99.5%, respectively. Differences in diagnostic test performance were observed among states. These results improve the interpretation of results from bacterial culture of feces and serum ELISA for detection of MAP and MAP antibody (respectively), which can support on-farm infection control decisions and can be used to evaluate disease-testing strategies, taking into account the accuracy of these tests.

  19. Towards Systematic Benchmarking of Climate Model Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The process by which climate models are evaluated has evolved substantially over the past decade, with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) serving as a centralizing activity for coordinating model experimentation and enabling research. Scientists with a broad spectrum of expertise have contributed to the CMIP model evaluation process, resulting in many hundreds of publications that have served as a key resource for the IPCC process. For several reasons, efforts are now underway to further systematize some aspects of the model evaluation process. First, some model evaluation can now be considered routine and should not require "re-inventing the wheel" or a journal publication simply to update results with newer models. Second, the benefit of CMIP research to model development has not been optimal because the publication of results generally takes several years and is usually not reproducible for benchmarking newer model versions. And third, there are now hundreds of model versions and many thousands of simulations, but there is no community-based mechanism for routinely monitoring model performance changes. An important change in the design of CMIP6 can help address these limitations. CMIP6 will include a small set standardized experiments as an ongoing exercise (CMIP "DECK": ongoing Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima), so that modeling groups can submit them at any time and not be overly constrained by deadlines. In this presentation, efforts to establish routine benchmarking of existing and future CMIP simulations will be described. To date, some benchmarking tools have been made available to all CMIP modeling groups to enable them to readily compare with CMIP5 simulations during the model development process. A natural extension of this effort is to make results from all CMIP simulations widely available, including the results from newer models as soon as the simulations become available for research. Making the results from routine

  20. Performance Evaluation of Emerging High Performance Computing Technologies using WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, G. B.; Morton, D.

    2008-12-01

    The Arctic Region Supercomputing Center (ARSC) has evaluated multicore processors and other emerging processor technologies for a variety of high performance computing applications in the earth and space sciences, especially climate and weather applications. A flagship effort has been to assess dual core processor nodes on ARSC's Midnight supercomputer, in which two-socket systems were compared to eight-socket systems. Midnight is utilized for ARSC's twice-daily weather research and forecasting (WRF) model runs, available at weather.arsc.edu. Among other findings on Midnight, it was found that the Hypertransport system for interconnecting Opteron processors, memory, and other subsystems does not scale as well on eight-socket (sixteen processor) systems as well as two-socket (four processor) systems. A fundamental limitation is the cache snooping operation performed whenever a computational thread accesses main memory. This increases memory latency as the number of processor sockets increases. This is particularly noticeable on applications such as WRF that are primarily CPU-bound, versus applications that are bound by input/output or communication. The new Cray XT5 supercomputer at ARSC features quad core processors, and will host a variety of scaling experiments for WRF, CCSM4, and other models. Early results will be presented, including a series of WRF runs for Alaska with grid resolutions under 2km. ARSC will discuss a set of standardized test cases for the Alaska domain, similar to existing test cases for CONUS. These test cases will provide different configuration sizes and resolutions, suitable for single processors up to thousands. Beyond multi-core Opteron-based supercomputers, ARSC has examined WRF and other applications on additional emerging technologies. One such technology is the graphics processing unit, or GPU. The 9800-series nVidia GPU was evaluated with the cuBLAS software library. While in-socket GPUs might be forthcoming in the future, current

  1. BioVapor Model Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    General background on modeling and specifics of modeling vapor intrusion are given. Three classical model applications are described and related to the problem of petroleum vapor intrusion. These indicate the need for model calibration and uncertainty analysis. Evaluation of Bi...

  2. Conductor gestures influence evaluations of ensemble performance

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Steven J.; Price, Harry E.; Smedley, Eric M.; Meals, Cory D.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has found that listener evaluations of ensemble performances vary depending on the expressivity of the conductor’s gestures, even when performances are otherwise identical. It was the purpose of the present study to test whether this effect of visual information was evident in the evaluation of specific aspects of ensemble performance: articulation and dynamics. We constructed a set of 32 music performances that combined auditory and visual information and were designed to feature a high degree of contrast along one of two target characteristics: articulation and dynamics. We paired each of four music excerpts recorded by a chamber ensemble in both a high- and low-contrast condition with video of four conductors demonstrating high- and low-contrast gesture specifically appropriate to either articulation or dynamics. Using one of two equivalent test forms, college music majors and non-majors (N = 285) viewed sixteen 30 s performances and evaluated the quality of the ensemble’s articulation, dynamics, technique, and tempo along with overall expressivity. Results showed significantly higher evaluations for performances featuring high rather than low conducting expressivity regardless of the ensemble’s performance quality. Evaluations for both articulation and dynamics were strongly and positively correlated with evaluations of overall ensemble expressivity. PMID:25104944

  3. LANDSAT-4 horizon scanner performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanow, S.; Chen, L. C.; Davis, W. M.; Stanley, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Representative data spans covering a little more than a year since the LANDSAT-4 launch were analyzed to evaluate the flight performance of the satellite's horizon scanner. High frequency noise was filtered out by 128-point averaging. The effects of Earth oblateness and spacecraft altitude variations are modeled, and residual systematic errors are analyzed. A model for the predicted radiance effects is compared with the flight data and deficiencies in the radiance effects modeling are noted. Correction coefficients are provided for a finite Fourier series representation of the systematic errors in the data. Analysis of the seasonal dependence of the coefficients indicates the effects of some early mission problems with the reference attitudes which were computed by the onboard computer using star trackers and gyro data. The effects of sun and moon interference, unexplained anomalies in the data, and sensor noise characteristics and their power spectrum are described. The variability of full orbit data averages is shown. Plots of the sensor data for all the available data spans are included.

  4. Evaluation Theory, Models, and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stufflebeam, Daniel L.; Shinkfield, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    "Evaluation Theory, Models, and Applications" is designed for evaluators and students who need to develop a commanding knowledge of the evaluation field: its history, theory and standards, models and approaches, procedures, and inclusion of personnel as well as program evaluation. This important book shows how to choose from a growing…

  5. Performance Evaluation of Undulator Radiation at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Chuyu Liu, Geoffrey Krafft, Guimei Wang

    2010-05-01

    The performance of undulator radiation (UR) at CEBAF with a 3.5 m helical undulator is evaluated and compared with APS undulator-A radiation in terms of brilliance, peak brilliance, spectral flux, flux density and intensity distribution.

  6. Evaluation of high-performance computing software

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, S.; Dongarra, J.; Rowan, T.

    1996-12-31

    The absence of unbiased and up to date comparative evaluations of high-performance computing software complicates a user`s search for the appropriate software package. The National HPCC Software Exchange (NHSE) is attacking this problem using an approach that includes independent evaluations of software, incorporation of author and user feedback into the evaluations, and Web access to the evaluations. We are applying this approach to the Parallel Tools Library (PTLIB), a new software repository for parallel systems software and tools, and HPC-Netlib, a high performance branch of the Netlib mathematical software repository. Updating the evaluations with feed-back and making it available via the Web helps ensure accuracy and timeliness, and using independent reviewers produces unbiased comparative evaluations difficult to find elsewhere.

  7. Improvement of Automotive Part Supplier Performance Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongmunee, Chalermkwan; Chutima, Parames

    2016-05-01

    This research investigates the problem of the part supplier performance evaluation in a major Japanese automotive plant in Thailand. Its current evaluation scheme is based on experiences and self-opinion of the evaluators. As a result, many poor performance suppliers are still considered as good suppliers and allow to supply parts to the plant without further improvement obligation. To alleviate this problem, the brainstorming session among stakeholders and evaluators are formally conducted. The result of which is the appropriate evaluation criteria and sub-criteria. The analytical hierarchy process is also used to find suitable weights for each criteria and sub-criteria. The results show that a newly developed evaluation method is significantly better than the previous one in segregating between good and poor suppliers.

  8. Validation of performance assessment models

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, M.P.; Kincaid, C.T.

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of model validation in a low-level waste site performance assessment is to increase confidence in predictions of the migration and fate of future releases from the wastes. Unlike the process of computer code verification, model validation is a site-specific process that requires site-specific data. This paper provides an overview of the topic of model validation and describes the general approaches, strategies, and limitations of model validation being considered by various researchers concerned with the subject.

  9. Actinide Sorption in a Brine/Dolomite Rock System: Evaluating the Degree of Conservatism in Kd Ranges used in Performance Assessment Modeling for the WIPP Nuclear Waste Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T. M.; Reed, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM is the only operating nuclear waste repository in the US and has been accepting transuranic (TRU) waste since 1999. The WIPP is located in a salt deposit approximately 650 m below the surface and performance assessment (PA) modeling for a 10,000 year period is required to recertify the operating license with the US EPA every five years. The main pathway of concern for environmental release of radioactivity is a human intrusion caused by drilling into a pressurized brine reservoir below the repository. This could result in the flooding of the repository and subsequent transport in the high transmissivity layer (dolomite-rich Culebra formation) above the waste disposal rooms. We evaluate the degree of conservatism in the estimated sorption partition coefficients (Kds) ranges used in the PA based on an approach developed with granite rock and actinides (Dittrich and Reimus, 2015; Dittrich et al., 2015). Sorption onto the waste storage material (Fe drums) may also play a role in mobile actinide concentrations. We will present (1) a conceptual overview of how Kds are used in the PA model, (2) technical background of the evolution of the ranges and (3) results from batch and column experiments and model predictions for Kds with WIPP dolomite and clays, brine with various actinides, and ligands (e.g., acetate, citrate, EDTA) that could promote transport. The current Kd ranges used in performance models are based on oxidation state and are 5-400, 0.5-10,000, 0.03-200, and 0.03-20 mL g-1 for elements with oxidation states of III, IV, V, and VI, respectively. Based on redox conditions predicted in the brines, possible actinide species include Pu(III), Pu(IV), U(IV), U(VI), Np(IV), Np(V), Am(III), and Th(IV). We will also discuss the challenges of upscaling from lab experiments to field scale predictions, the role of colloids, and the effect of engineered barrier materials (e.g., MgO) on transport conditions. Dittrich

  10. Building Leadership Talent through Performance Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Most states and districts scramble to provide professional development to support principals, but "principal evaluation" is often lost amid competing priorities. Evaluation is an important method for supporting principal growth, communicating performance expectations to principals, and improving leadership practice. It provides leaders…

  11. Automatic Singing Performance Evaluation for Untrained Singers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chuan; Li, Ming; Wu, Xiao; Suo, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Yan, Yonghong

    In this letter, we present an automatic approach of objective singing performance evaluation for untrained singers by relating acoustic measurements to perceptual ratings of singing voice quality. Several acoustic parameters and their combination features are investigated to find objective correspondences of the perceptual evaluation criteria. Experimental results show relative strong correlation between perceptual ratings and the combined features and the reliability of the proposed evaluation system is tested to be comparable to human judges.

  12. Principal Performance Areas and Principal Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Thomas E.; McInerney, William D.

    1995-01-01

    Summarizes a study that surveyed Indiana superintendents and examined their principal-evaluation instruments. Superintendents were asked which of 21 performance domains were most important and whether these were currently being assessed. Respondents generally agreed that all 21 performance domains identified by the National Policy Board for…

  13. Supplier Performance Evaluation and Rating System (SPEARS)

    SciTech Connect

    Oged, M.; Warner, D.; Gurbuz, E.

    1993-03-01

    The SSCL Magnet Quality Assurance Department has implemented a Supplier Performance Evaluation and Rating System (SPEARS) to assess supplier performance throughout the development and production stages of the SSCL program. The main objectives of SPEARS are to promote teamwork and recognize performance. This paper examines the current implementation of SPEARS. MSD QA supports the development and production of SSCsuperconducting magnets while implementing the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C. The MSD QA program is based on the concept of continuous improvement in quality and productivity. The QA program requires that procurement of items and services be controlled to assure conformance to specification. SPEARS has been implemented to meet DOE requirements and to enhance overall confidence in supplier performance. Key elements of SPEARS include supplier evaluation and selection as well as evaluation of furnished quality through source inspection, audit, and receipt inspection. These elements are described in this paper.

  14. EVALUATION OF THE COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODEL VERSION 4.5: UNCERTAINTIES AND SENSITIVITIES IMPACTING MODEL PERFORMANCE: PART I - OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines ozone (O3) predictions from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 4.5 and discusses potential factors influencing the model results. Daily maximum 8-hr average O3 levels are largely underpredicted when observed O...

  15. Large Signal Evaluation of Nonlinear HBT Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, Iltcho; Inoue, Akira; Watanabe, Shinsuke

    The performance of recently developed Large Signal (LS) HBT model was evaluated with extensive LS measurements like Power spectrum, Load pull and Inter-modulation investigations. Proposed model has adopted temperature dependent leakage resistance and a simplified capacitance models. The model was implemented in ADS as SDD. Important feature of the model is that the main model parameters are taken directly from measurements in rather simple and understandable way. Results show good accuracy despite the simplicity of the model. To our knowledge the HBT model is one of a few HBT models which can handle high current & Power HBT devices, with significantly less model parameters with good accuracy.

  16. Developing a Computerized Performance Based Curriculum Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagmeier, Jerry; And Others

    In developing a model for institutional assessment, John Wood Community College (JWCC), in Quincy, Illinois, decided to use student learning as the foundation of evaluation, as opposed to the activities and services offered by the college. This performance-based approach to institutional assessment was then expanded to reshape the process by which…

  17. Evaluating student performance in clinical dietetics.

    PubMed

    Novascone, M A

    1985-06-01

    The focus of this study was on the development and field-testing of a set of behaviorally anchored rating scales for evaluating the clinical performance of dietetic students. The scales emphasized the application of skills and knowledge. A variation of the Smith-Kendall technique was used to develop the scales. The 42 participants involved in instrument development included dietetic students, didactic and clinical instructors, and dietetic practitioners. The completed instrument contained 8 dimension statements and 70 behavioral anchors. The instrument was field-tested in 16 clinical rotations within 8 dietetic education programs. Evaluators not only rated student performance but also critiqued the format and content of the scales. The mid-to-upper portions of each scale were used most frequently, and little score variation within or across programs was noted. The scales were deemed appropriate for formative evaluation; however, some evaluators who had to grade students' performance expressed a desire for performance standards defined in terms of grades. Because the process used to develop the instrument facilitated the articulation of performance criteria, it is recommended as a practical approach to setting performance standards.

  18. Performance evaluation of Space Shuttle SRB parachutes from air drop and scaled model wind tunnel tests. [Solid Rocket Booster recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moog, R. D.; Bacchus, D. L.; Utreja, L. R.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance characteristics have been determined for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster drogue, main, and pilot parachutes. The performance evaluation on the 20-degree conical ribbon parachutes is based primarily on air drop tests of full scale prototype parachutes. In addition, parametric wind tunnel tests were performed and used in parachute configuration development and preliminary performance assessments. The wind tunnel test data are compared to the drop test results and both sets of data are used to determine the predicted performance of the Solid Rocket Booster flight parachutes. Data from other drop tests of large ribbon parachutes are also compared with the Solid Rocket Booster parachute performance characteristics. Parameters assessed include full open terminal drag coefficients, reefed drag area, opening characteristics, clustering effects, and forebody interference.

  19. Impact of Full-Day Head Start Prekindergarten Class Model on Student Academic Performance, Cognitive Skills, and Learning Behaviors by the End of Grade 2. Evaluation Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Huafang; Modarresi, Shahpar

    2013-01-01

    This brief describes the impact of the Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) 2007-2008 full-day Head Start prekindergarten (pre-K) class model on student academic performance, cognitive skills, and learning behaviors by the end of Grade 2. This is the fourth impact study of the MCPS full-day Head Start pre-K class model. The following…

  20. Evaluate reformer performance at a glance

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, A.

    1996-02-01

    Catalytic reforming is becoming increasingly important in replacing octane lost as the removal of lead from worldwide gasoline pools continues. A method has been developed that can quickly evaluate the performance of any catalytic reformer. The catalytic naphtha reforming process primarily involves three well-known reactions. These are aromatization of naphthenes, cyclization of paraffins and hydrocracking of paraffins. Hydrogen is produced in the process of aromatization and dehydrocyclization of paraffins. Reformer performance is normally evaluated with a reformate analysis (PONA) and yield of C{sub 5{sup +}} reformate. This method of quick evaluation of reformer performance is based upon the main assumption that the increase in hydrocarbon moles in the process is equal to the number of C{single_bond}C bond ruptures and one mole of hydrogen is absorbed to saturate the same. This new method calculates aromatization efficiency, paraffin conversion, aromatic selectivity and finally the paraffin, naphthene and aromatic content of C{sub 5{sup +}} reformate.

  1. Evaluation of the performance of a meso-scale NWP model to forecast solar irradiance on Reunion Island for photovoltaic power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalecinski, Natacha; Haeffelin, Martial; Badosa, Jordi; Periard, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    Solar photovoltaic power is a predominant source of electrical power on Reunion Island, regularly providing near 30% of electrical power demand for a few hours per day. However solar power on Reunion Island is strongly modulated by clouds in small temporal and spatial scales. Today regional regulations require that new solar photovoltaic plants be combined with storage systems to reduce electrical power fluctuations on the grid. Hence cloud and solar irradiance forecasting becomes an important tool to help optimize the operation of new solar photovoltaic plants on Reunion Island. Reunion Island, located in the South West of the Indian Ocean, is exposed to persistent trade winds, most of all in winter. In summer, the southward motion of the ITCZ brings atmospheric instabilities on the island and weakens trade winds. This context together with the complex topography of Reunion Island, which is about 60 km wide, with two high summits (3070 and 2512 m) connected by a 1500 m plateau, makes cloudiness very heterogeneous. High cloudiness variability is found between mountain and coastal areas and between the windward, leeward and lateral regions defined with respect to the synoptic wind direction. A detailed study of local dynamics variability is necessary to better understand cloud life cycles around the island. In the presented work, our approach to explore the short-term solar irradiance forecast at local scales is to use the deterministic output from a meso-scale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, AROME, developed by Meteo France. To start we evaluate the performance of the deterministic forecast from AROME by using meteorological measurements from 21 meteorological ground stations widely spread around the island (and with altitudes from 8 to 2245 m). Ground measurements include solar irradiation, wind speed and direction, relative humidity, air temperature, precipitation and pressure. Secondly we study in the model the local dynamics and thermodynamics that

  2. Using multifractals to evaluate oceanographic model skill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skákala, Jozef; Cazenave, Pierre W.; Smyth, Timothy J.; Torres, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    We are in an era of unprecedented data volumes generated from observations and model simulations. This is particularly true from satellite Earth Observations (EO) and global scale oceanographic models. This presents us with an opportunity to evaluate large-scale oceanographic model outputs using EO data. Previous work on model skill evaluation has led to a plethora of metrics. The paper defines two new model skill evaluation metrics. The metrics are based on the theory of universal multifractals and their purpose is to measure the structural similarity between the model predictions and the EO data. The two metrics have the following advantages over the standard techniques: (a) they are scale-free and (b) they carry important part of information about how model represents different oceanographic drivers. Those two metrics are then used in the paper to evaluate the performance of the FVCOM model in the shelf seas around the south-west coast of the UK.

  3. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-08-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles will build and deploy 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks. The trucks will be deployed in diverse climates across the country.

  4. Models for Automated Tube Performance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    C. Brunkhorst

    2002-12-12

    High power radio-frequency systems, as typically used in fusion research devices, utilize vacuum tubes. Evaluation of vacuum tube performance involves data taken from tube operating curves. The acquisition of data from such graphical sources is a tedious process. A simple modeling method is presented that will provide values of tube currents for a given set of element voltages. These models may be used as subroutines in iterative solutions of amplifier operating conditions for a specific loading impedance.

  5. Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking of Intelligent Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, Raj; Messina, Elena; Tunstel, Edward

    2009-09-01

    To design and develop capable, dependable, and affordable intelligent systems, their performance must be measurable. Scientific methodologies for standardization and benchmarking are crucial for quantitatively evaluating the performance of emerging robotic and intelligent systems technologies. There is currently no accepted standard for quantitatively measuring the performance of these systems against user-defined requirements; and furthermore, there is no consensus on what objective evaluation procedures need to be followed to understand the performance of these systems. The lack of reproducible and repeatable test methods has precluded researchers working towards a common goal from exchanging and communicating results, inter-comparing system performance, and leveraging previous work that could otherwise avoid duplication and expedite technology transfer. Currently, this lack of cohesion in the community hinders progress in many domains, such as manufacturing, service, healthcare, and security. By providing the research community with access to standardized tools, reference data sets, and open source libraries of solutions, researchers and consumers will be able to evaluate the cost and benefits associated with intelligent systems and associated technologies. In this vein, the edited book volume addresses performance evaluation and metrics for intelligent systems, in general, while emphasizing the need and solutions for standardized methods. To the knowledge of the editors, there is not a single book on the market that is solely dedicated to the subject of performance evaluation and benchmarking of intelligent systems. Even books that address this topic do so only marginally or are out of date. The research work presented in this volume fills this void by drawing from the experiences and insights of experts gained both through theoretical development and practical implementation of intelligent systems in a variety of diverse application domains. The book presents

  6. MPD Thruster Performance Analytic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James; Johnston, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are capable of accelerating quasi-neutral plasmas to high exhaust velocities using Megawatts (MW) of electric power. These characteristics make such devices worthy of consideration for demanding, far-term missions such as the human exploration of Mars or beyond. Assessment of MPD thrusters at the system and mission level is often difficult due to their status as ongoing experimental research topics rather than developed thrusters. However, in order to assess MPD thrusters utility in later missions, some adequate characterization of performance, or more exactly, projected performance, and system level definition are required for use in analyses. The most recent physical models of self-field MPD thrusters have been examined, assessed, and reconfigured for use by systems and mission analysts. The physical models allow for rational projections of thruster performance based on physical parameters that can be measured in the laboratory. The models and their implications for the design of future MPD thrusters are presented.

  7. MPD Thruster Performance Analytic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James; Johnston, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are capable of accelerating quasi-neutral plasmas to high exhaust velocities using Megawatts (MW) of electric power. These characteristics make such devices worthy of consideration for demanding, far-term missions such as the human exploration of Mars or beyond. Assessment of MPD thrusters at the system and mission level is often difficult due to their status as ongoing experimental research topics rather than developed thrusters. However, in order to assess MPD thrusters utility in later missions, some adequate characterization of performance, or more exactly, projected performance, and system level definition are required for use in analyses. The most recent physical models of self-field MPD thrusters have been examined, assessed, and reconfigured for use by systems and mission analysts. The physical models allow for rational projections of thruster performance based on physical parameters that can be measured in the laboratory. The models and their implications for the design of future MPD thrusters are presented.

  8. DRACS thermal performance evaluation for FHR

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Q.; Lin, H. C.; Kim, I. H.; Sun, X.; Christensen, R. N.; Blue, T. E.; Yoder, G. L.; Wilson, D. F.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-03-01

    Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) is a passive decay heat removal system proposed for the Fluoride-salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that combines coated particle fuel and a graphite moderator with a liquid fluoride salt as the coolant. The DRACS features three coupled natural circulation/convection loops, relying completely on buoyancy as the driving force. These loops are coupled through two heat exchangers, namely, the DRACS Heat Exchanger and the Natural Draft Heat Exchanger. In addition, a fluidic diode is employed to minimize the parasitic flow into the DRACS primary loop and correspondingly the heat loss to the DRACS during normal operation of the reactor, and to keep the DRACS ready for activation, if needed, during accidents. To help with the design and thermal performance evaluation of the DRACS, a computer code using MATLAB has been developed. This code is based on a one-dimensional formulation and its principle is to solve the energy balance and integral momentum equations. By discretizing the DRACS system in the axial direction, a bulk mean temperature is assumed for each mesh cell. The temperatures of all the cells, as well as the mass flow rates in the DRACS loops, are predicted by solving the governing equations that are obtained by integrating the energy conservation equation over each cell and integrating the momentum conservation equation over each of the DRACS loops. In addition, an intermediate heat transfer loop equipped with a pump has also been modeled in the code. This enables the study of flow reversal phenomenon in the DRACS primary loop, associated with the pump trip process. Experimental data from a High-Temperature DRACS Test Facility (HTDF) are not available yet to benchmark the code. A preliminary code validation is performed by using natural circulation experimental data available in the literature, which are as closely relevant as possible. The code is subsequently applied to the HTDF that is under

  9. Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation - Cumulative (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the performance of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks across the nation. U.S. companies participating in this evaluation project received funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to cover part of the cost of purchasing these vehicles. Through this project, Smith Electric Vehicles is building and deploying 500 all-electric medium-duty trucks that will be deployed by a variety of companies in diverse climates across the country.

  10. Performance evaluations of demountable electrical connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, R. C.; Cha, Y. S.; Hull, J. R.; Buckles, W. E.; Daugherty, M. A.

    Electrical conductors operating in cryogenic environments can require demountable connections along their lengths. The connections must have low resistance and high reliability and should allow ready assembly and disassembly. In this work, the performance of two types of connections has been evaluated. The first connection type is a clamped surface-to-surface joint. The second connection type is a screwed joint that incorporates male and female machine-thread components. The connections for copper conductors have been evaluated experimentally at 77 K. Experimental variables included thread surface treatment and assembly methods. The results of the evaluations are presented.

  11. Metrics for Evaluation of Student Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelanek, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Researchers use many different metrics for evaluation of performance of student models. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of commonly used metrics, to discuss properties, advantages, and disadvantages of different metrics, to summarize current practice in educational data mining, and to provide guidance for evaluation of student…

  12. Evaluation Model for Career Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerly, Richard L.; And Others

    A study was conducted to provide and test an evaluative model that could be utilized in providing curricular evaluation of the various career programs. Two career fields, dental assistant and auto mechanic, were chosen for study. A questionnaire based upon the actual job performance was completed by six groups connected with the auto mechanics and…

  13. In Vivo Hemodynamic Performance Evaluation of Novel Electrocardiogram-Synchronized Pulsatile and Nonpulsatile Extracorporeal Life Support Systems in an Adult Swine Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Izer, Jenelle M; Clark, Joseph B; Patel, Sunil; Pauliks, Linda; Kunselman, Allen R; Leach, Donald; Cooper, Timothy K; Wilson, Ronald P; Ündar, Akif

    2015-07-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate a novel electrocardiogram (ECG)-synchronized pulsatile extracorporeal life support (ECLS) system for adult partial mechanical circulatory support for adequate quality of pulsatility and enhanced hemodynamic energy generation in an in vivo animal model. The secondary aim was to assess end-organ protection during nonpulsatile versus synchronized pulsatile flow mode. Ten adult swine were randomly divided into a nonpulsatile group (NP, n = 5) and pulsatile group (P, n = 5), and placed on ECLS for 24 h using an i-cor system consisting of an i-cor diagonal pump, an iLA membrane ventilator, an 18 Fr femoral arterial cannula and a 23/25 Fr femoral venous cannula. Trials were conducted at a flow rate of 2.5 L/min using nonpulsatile or pulsatile mode (with assist ratio 1:1). Real-time pressure and flow data were recorded using a custom-based data acquisition system. To the best of our knowledge, the oxygenator and circuit pressure drops were the lowest for any available system in both groups. The ECG-synchronized i-cor ECLS system was able to trigger pulsatile flow in the porcine model. After 24-h ECLS, energy equivalent pressure, surplus hemodynamic energy, and total hemodynamic energy at preoxygenator and prearterial cannula sites were significantly higher in the P group than those in the NP group (P < 0.05). Urine output was higher in P versus NP (3379 ± 443 mL vs. NP, 2598 ± 1012 mL), and the P group seemed to require less inotropic support, but both did not reach statistical significances (P > 0.05). The novel i-cor system performed well in the nonpulsatile and ECG-synchronized pulsatile mode in an adult animal ECLS model. The iLA membrane oxygenator had an extremely lower transmembrane pressure gradient and excellent gas exchange capability. Our findings suggest that ECG-triggered pulsatile ECLS provides superior end-organ protection with improved renal function and systemic vascular

  14. A Management System for Computer Performance Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    1 Software . . . . . . . . . . . ............. Interaction; . . . . . . . . ............... 27 III. Design of a CPE Management...SEAFAC Workload. . . .............. SE WAC Computer H .ard.......... . . 57 SEAFAC Computer Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Summary...system hard--e/ software . It is a team that can either use or learn to use the tools and techniques of computer performance evaluation. The make-up of such

  15. GENERAL METHODS FOR REMEDIAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document was developed by an EPA-funded project to explain technical considerations and principles necessary to evaluated the performance of ground-water contamination remediations at hazardous waste sites. This is neither a "cookbook", nor an encyclopedia of recommended fi...

  16. Measures of Searcher Performance: A Psychometric Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study of medical students that was conducted to evaluate measures of performance on factual searches of INQUIRER, a full-text database in microbiology. Measures relating to recall, precision, search term overlap, and efficiency are discussed; reliability and construct validity are considered; and implications for future research are…

  17. Performance evaluation of lightweight piezocomposite curved actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo, Nam Seo; Kim, Cheol; Park, Hoon C.; Yoon, Kwang J.

    2001-07-01

    A numerical method for the performance evaluation of LIPCA actuators is proposed using a finite element method. Fully-coupled formulations for piezo-electric materials are introduced and eight-node incompatible elements used. After verifying the developed code, the behavior of LIPCA actuators is investigated.

  18. Performance evaluation of an air solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Indoor tests on signal-glazed flat-plate collector are described in report. Marhsall Space Flight Center solar simulator is used to make tests. Test included evaluations on thermal performance under various combinations of flow rate, incident flux, inlet temperature, and wind speed. Results are presented in graph/table form.

  19. Performance Evaluation of a Semantic Perception Classifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Performance Evaluation of a Semantic Perception Classifier by Craig Lennon, Barry Bodt, Marshal Childers, Rick Camden, Arne Suppe, Luis...Camden and Nicoleta Florea Engility Corporation Luis Navarro-Serment and Arne Suppe Carnegie Mellon University...Lennon, Barry Bodt, Marshal Childers, Rick Camden,* Arne Suppe, † Luis Navarro-Serment, † and Nicoleta Florea* 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK

  20. 48 CFR 436.604 - Performance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Service 436.604... require a performance evaluation report on the work done by the architect-engineer after the completion of or during the construction of the designed project....

  1. EVALUATION OF CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND. The confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) has enormous potential in many biological fields. Currently there is a subjective nature in the assessment of a confocal microscope's performance by primarily evaluating the system with a specific test slide provided by ea...

  2. Performance evaluation of two personal bioaerosol samplers.

    PubMed

    Tolchinsky, Alexander D; Sigaev, Vladimir I; Varfolomeev, Alexander N; Uspenskaya, Svetlana N; Cheng, Yung S; Su, Wei-Chung

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the performance of two newly developed personal bioaerosol samplers for monitoring the level of environmental and occupational airborne microorganisms was evaluated. These new personal bioaerosol samplers were designed based on a swirling cyclone with recirculating liquid film. The performance evaluation included collection efficiency tests using inert aerosols, the bioaerosol survival test using viable airborne microorganism, and the evaluation of using non-aqueous collection liquid for long-period sampling. The test results showed that these two newly developed personal bioaerosol samplers are capable of doing high efficiency, aerosol sampling (the cutoff diameters are around 0.7 μm for both samplers), and have proven to provide acceptable survival for the collected bioaerosols. By using an appropriate non-aqueous collection liquid, these two personal bioaerosol samplers should be able to permit continuous, long-period bioaerosol sampling with considerable viability for the captured bioaerosols.

  3. Evaluating the performance of a new model for predicting the growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked, uncured meat and poultry products under isothermal, heating, and dynamically cooling conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens Type A is a significant public health threat and may germinate, outgrow, and multiply during cooling of cooked meats. This study evaluates a new C. perfringens growth model in IPMP Dynamic Prediction using the same criteria and cooling data in Mohr and others (2015), but inc...

  4. The EMEFS model evaluation. An interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R.; Dennis, R.L.; Seilkop, S.K.; Banic, C.M.; Davies, D.; Hoff, R.M.; Macdonald, A.M.; Mickle, R.E.; Padro, J.; Puckett, K.; Byun, D.; McHenry, J.N.; Karamchandani, P.; Venkatram, A.; Fung, C.; Misra, P.K.; Hansen, D.A.; Chang, J.S.

    1991-12-01

    The binational Eulerian Model Evaluation Field Study (EMEFS) consisted of several coordinated data gathering and model evaluation activities. In the EMEFS, data were collected by five air and precipitation monitoring networks between June 1988 and June 1990. Model evaluation is continuing. This interim report summarizes the progress made in the evaluation of the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) and the Acid Deposition and Oxidant Model (ADOM) through the December 1990 completion of a State of Science and Technology report on model evaluation for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Because various assessment applications of RADM had to be evaluated for NAPAP, the report emphasizes the RADM component of the evaluation. A protocol for the evaluation was developed by the model evaluation team and defined the observed and predicted values to be used and the methods by which the observed and predicted values were to be compared. Scatter plots and time series of predicted and observed values were used to present the comparisons graphically. Difference statistics and correlations were used to quantify model performance. 64 refs., 34 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. PEAPOL (Program Evaluation at the Performance Objective Level) Outside Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auvil, Mary S.

    In evaluating this pilot project, which developed a computer system for assessing student progress and cost effectiveness as related to achievement of performance objectives, interviews were conducted with project participants, including project staff, school administrators, and the auto shop instructors. Project documents were reviewed and a…

  6. An identity verifier evaluation of performance

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Because the development of personnel identity verifiers is active in several areas, it is important that an independent comparative evaluation of such devices be continuously pursued for the security industry to apply such devices. An evaluation of several verifiers was recently conducted (in the winter of 1986/1987) at Sandia National Laboratories. In a nonrigorous attempt to comparatively evaluate these verifiers in a field security environment, about 80 individuals were enrolled in five different verifiers. The enrollees were than encouraged to attempt a verification on each device several times a day for about four months such that both single try and multiple try information could be extracted from the data. Results indicated a general improvement in verifier performance with regard to accuracy and operating time compared to previous similar evaluations of verifiers at Sandia.

  7. Application of MELCOR Code to a French PWR 900 MWe Severe Accident Sequence and Evaluation of Models Performance Focusing on In-Vessel Thermal Hydraulic Results

    SciTech Connect

    De Rosa, Felice

    2006-07-01

    In the ambit of the Severe Accident Network of Excellence Project (SARNET), funded by the European Union, 6. FISA (Fission Safety) Programme, one of the main tasks is the development and validation of the European Accident Source Term Evaluation Code (ASTEC Code). One of the reference codes used to compare ASTEC results, coming from experimental and Reactor Plant applications, is MELCOR. ENEA is a SARNET member and also an ASTEC and MELCOR user. During the first 18 months of this project, we performed a series of MELCOR and ASTEC calculations referring to a French PWR 900 MWe and to the accident sequence of 'Loss of Steam Generator (SG) Feedwater' (known as H2 sequence in the French classification). H2 is an accident sequence substantially equivalent to a Station Blackout scenario, like a TMLB accident, with the only difference that in H2 sequence the scram is forced to occur with a delay of 28 seconds. The main events during the accident sequence are a loss of normal and auxiliary SG feedwater (0 s), followed by a scram when the water level in SG is equal or less than 0.7 m (after 28 seconds). There is also a main coolant pumps trip when {delta}Tsat < 10 deg. C, a total opening of the three relief valves when Tric (core maximal outlet temperature) is above 603 K (330 deg. C) and accumulators isolation when primary pressure goes below 1.5 MPa (15 bar). Among many other points, it is worth noting that this was the first time that a MELCOR 1.8.5 input deck was available for a French PWR 900. The main ENEA effort in this period was devoted to prepare the MELCOR input deck using the code version v.1.8.5 (build QZ Oct 2000 with the latest patch 185003 Oct 2001). The input deck, completely new, was prepared taking into account structure, data and same conditions as those found inside ASTEC input decks. The main goal of the work presented in this paper is to put in evidence where and when MELCOR provides good enough results and why, in some cases mainly referring to its

  8. Visual Performance Prediction Using Schematic Eye Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiegerling, James Theodore

    The goal of visual modeling is to predict the visual performance or a change in performance of an individual from a model of the human visual system. In designing a model of the human visual system, two distinct functions are considered. The first is the production of an image incident on the retina by the optical system of the eye, and the second is the conversion of this image into a perceived image by the retina and brain. The eye optics are evaluated using raytracing techniques familiar to the optical engineer. The effect of the retinal and brain function are combined with the raytracing results by analyzing the modulation of the retinal image. Each of these processes is important far evaluating the performance of the entire visual system. Techniques for converting the abstract system performance measures used by optical engineers into clinically -applicable measures such as visual acuity and contrast sensitivity are developed in this dissertation. Furthermore, a methodology for applying videokeratoscopic height data to the visual model is outlined. These tools are useful in modeling the visual effects of corrective lenses, ocular maladies and refractive surgeries. The modeling techniques are applied to examples of soft contact lenses, keratoconus, radial keratotomy, photorefractive keratectomy and automated lamellar keratoplasty. The modeling tools developed in this dissertation are meant to be general and modular. As improvements to the measurements of the properties and functionality of the various visual components are made, the new information can be incorporated into the visual system model. Furthermore, the examples discussed here represent only a small subset of the applications of the visual model. Additional ocular maladies and emerging refractive surgeries can be modeled as well.

  9. Evaluating modeling tools for the EDOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoble, Gordon; Mccaleb, Frederick; Aslam, Tanweer; Nester, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Operations System (EDOS) Project is developing a functional, system performance model to support the system implementation phase of the EDOS which is being designed and built by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The EDOS Project will use modeling to meet two key objectives: (1) manage system design impacts introduced by unplanned changed in mission requirements; and (2) evaluate evolutionary technology insertions throughout the development of the EDOS. To select a suitable modeling tool, the EDOS modeling team developed an approach for evaluating modeling tools and languages by deriving evaluation criteria from both the EDOS modeling requirements and the development plan. Essential and optional features for an appropriate modeling tool were identified and compared with known capabilities of several modeling tools. Vendors were also provided the opportunity to model a representative EDOS processing function to demonstrate the applicability of their modeling tool to the EDOS modeling requirements. This paper emphasizes the importance of using a well defined approach for evaluating tools to model complex systems like the EDOS. The results of this evaluation study do not in any way signify the superiority of any one modeling tool since the results will vary with the specific modeling requirements of each project.

  10. Using hybrid method to evaluate the green performance in uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ming-Lang; Lan, Lawrence W; Wang, Ray; Chiu, Anthony; Cheng, Hui-Ping

    2011-04-01

    Green performance measure is vital for enterprises in making continuous improvements to maintain sustainable competitive advantages. Evaluation of green performance, however, is a challenging task due to the dependence complexity of the aspects, criteria, and the linguistic vagueness of some qualitative information and quantitative data together. To deal with this issue, this study proposes a novel approach to evaluate the dependence aspects and criteria of firm's green performance. The rationale of the proposed approach, namely green network balanced scorecard, is using balanced scorecard to combine fuzzy set theory with analytical network process (ANP) and importance-performance analysis (IPA) methods, wherein fuzzy set theory accounts for the linguistic vagueness of qualitative criteria and ANP converts the relations among the dependence aspects and criteria into an intelligible structural modeling used IPA. For the empirical case study, four dependence aspects and 34 green performance criteria for PCB firms in Taiwan were evaluated. The managerial implications are discussed.

  11. Evaluating Causal Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, James H., Jr.

    Pointing out that linear causal models can organize the interrelationships of a large number of variables, this paper contends that such models are particularly useful to mass communication research, which must by necessity deal with complex systems of variables. The paper first outlines briefly the philosophical requirements for establishing a…

  12. Model Program Evaluations. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Safe Schools Initiative Division, 2002

    2002-01-01

    There are probably thousands of programs and courses intended to prevent or reduce violence in this nation's schools. Evaluating these many programs has become a problem or goal in itself. There are now many evaluation programs, with many levels of designations, such as model, promising, best practice, exemplary and noteworthy. "Model program" is…

  13. Patterned Armor Performance Evaluation for Multiple Impacts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    return it to the originator. Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground , MD 21005-5069 ARL-TR-3038 August 2003 Patterned Armor ...patterned armor performance against multiple impacts. This performance measure can then be compared to a well-posed multiple-hit criterion to assess...Aberdeen Proving Ground , MD, September 2002. de Rosset, W. S. Reactive Armor Model Sensitivity Studies; ARL-TR-1849; U.S. Army Research Laboratory

  14. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOEpatents

    Dahlgran, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

  15. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOEpatents

    Dahlgran, J.R.

    1999-08-17

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation uses encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration. 1 fig.

  16. Evaluating the Performance of Wavelet-based Data-driven Models for Multistep-ahead Flood Forecasting in an Urbanized Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaee Roodsari, B.; Chandler, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    A real-time flood forecast system is presented to provide emergency management authorities sufficient lead time to execute plans for evacuation and asset protection in urban watersheds. This study investigates the performance of two hybrid models for real-time flood forecasting at different subcatchments of Ley Creek watershed, a heavily urbanized watershed in the vicinity of Syracuse, New York. Hybrid models include Wavelet-Based Artificial Neural Network (WANN) and Wavelet-Based Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (WANFIS). Both models are developed on the basis of real time stream network sensing. The wavelet approach is applied to decompose the collected water depth timeseries to Approximation and Detail components. The Approximation component is then used as an input to ANN and ANFIS models to forecast water level at lead times of 1 to 10 hours. The performance of WANN and WANFIS models are compared to ANN and ANFIS models for different lead times. Initial results demonstrated greater predictive power of hybrid models.

  17. Comprehensive system models: Strategies for evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, Christopher; Kutzbach, John E.; Ramanathan, V.; Maccracken, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The task of evaluating comprehensive earth system models is vast involving validations of every model component at every scale of organization, as well as tests of all the individual linkages. Even the most detailed evaluation of each of the component processes and the individual links among them should not, however, engender confidence in the performance of the whole. The integrated earth system is so rich with complex feedback loops, often involving components of the atmosphere, oceans, biosphere, and cryosphere, that it is certain to exhibit emergent properties very difficult to predict from the perspective of a narrow focus on any individual component of the system. Therefore, a substantial share of the task of evaluating comprehensive earth system models must reside at the level of whole system evaluations. Since complete, integrated atmosphere/ ocean/ biosphere/ hydrology models are not yet operational, questions of evaluation must be addressed at the level of the kinds of earth system processes that the models should be competent to simulate, rather than at the level of specific performance criteria. Here, we have tried to identify examples of earth system processes that are difficult to simulate with existing models and that involve a rich enough suite of feedbacks that they are unlikely to be satisfactorily described by highly simplified or toy models. Our purpose is not to specify a checklist of evaluation criteria but to introduce characteristics of the earth system that may present useful opportunities for model testing and, of course, improvement.

  18. Brookfield Homes Passive House Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    A. Herk; Poerschke, A.; Beach, R.

    2016-02-01

    In 2012-2013, IBACOS worked with a builder, Brookfield Homes in Denver, Colorado, to design and construct a Passive House certified model home. IBACOS used several modeling programs and calculation methods to complete the final design package along with Brookfield's architect KGA Studio. This design package included upgrades to the thermal enclosure, basement insulation, windows, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Short-term performance testing in the Passive House was done during construction and after construction.

  19. Stormwater quality models: performance and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Dotto, C B S; Kleidorfer, M; Deletic, A; Fletcher, T D; McCarthy, D T; Rauch, W

    2010-01-01

    The complex nature of pollutant accumulation and washoff, along with high temporal and spatial variations, pose challenges for the development and establishment of accurate and reliable models of the pollution generation process in urban environments. Therefore, the search for reliable stormwater quality models remains an important area of research. Model calibration and sensitivity analysis of such models are essential in order to evaluate model performance; it is very unlikely that non-calibrated models will lead to reasonable results. This paper reports on the testing of three models which aim to represent pollutant generation from urban catchments. Assessment of the models was undertaken using a simplified Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) method. Results are presented in terms of performance, sensitivity to the parameters and correlation between these parameters. In general, it was suggested that the tested models poorly represent reality and result in a high level of uncertainty. The conclusions provide useful information for the improvement of existing models and insights for the development of new model formulations.

  20. Performance Evaluation Methods for Assistive Robotic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Katherine M.; Feil-Seifer, David J.; Matarić, Maja J.; Yanco, Holly A.

    Robots have been developed for several assistive technology domains, including intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorders, eldercare, and post-stroke rehabilitation. Assistive robots have also been used to promote independent living through the use of devices such as intelligent wheelchairs, assistive robotic arms, and external limb prostheses. Work in the broad field of assistive robotic technology can be divided into two major research phases: technology development, in which new devices, software, and interfaces are created; and clinical, in which assistive technology is applied to a given end-user population. Moving from technology development towards clinical applications is a significant challenge. Developing performance metrics for assistive robots poses a related set of challenges. In this paper, we survey several areas of assistive robotic technology in order to derive and demonstrate domain-specific means for evaluating the performance of such systems. We also present two case studies of applied performance measures and a discussion regarding the ubiquity of functional performance measures across the sampled domains. Finally, we present guidelines for incorporating human performance metrics into end-user evaluations of assistive robotic technologies.

  1. Data management system performance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, Larry M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses analytical techniques that have been used to gain a better understanding of the Space Station Freedom's (SSF's) Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is a complex, distributed, real-time computer system that has been redesigned numerous times. The implications of these redesigns have not been fully analyzed. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages for static analytical techniques such as Rate Monotonic Analysis (RMA) and also provides a rationale for dynamic modeling. Factors such as system architecture, processor utilization, bus architecture, queuing, etc. are well suited for analysis with a dynamic model. The significance of performance measures for a real-time system are discussed.

  2. Performance Evaluation of Kitchen Exhaust Draft Hoods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    1-ACI827 JOHNS - MANVILLE SALES CORP DENVER CO RESEARCH AND DEV-ETC F/e 13/1 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF KITCHEN EXHAUST DRAFT HOOOS. (U) MAR 80 P 8...ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT PROJECT. TASK AREA a WOPK UNIT NUMOERS Johns - Manville Sales Corper a, t Research & Development Center /0004...P. B. SHEPHERD, R. H. NEISEL JOHNS - MANVILLE SALES CORPORATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT CENTER KEN-CARYL RANCH, DENVER, COLORADO 80217 MARCH 1980 FINAL

  3. Measurement-based reliability/performability models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsueh, Mei-Chen

    1987-01-01

    Measurement-based models based on real error-data collected on a multiprocessor system are described. Model development from the raw error-data to the estimation of cumulative reward is also described. A workload/reliability model is developed based on low-level error and resource usage data collected on an IBM 3081 system during its normal operation in order to evaluate the resource usage/error/recovery process in a large mainframe system. Thus, both normal and erroneous behavior of the system are modeled. The results provide an understanding of the different types of errors and recovery processes. The measured data show that the holding times in key operational and error states are not simple exponentials and that a semi-Markov process is necessary to model the system behavior. A sensitivity analysis is performed to investigate the significance of using a semi-Markov process, as opposed to a Markov process, to model the measured system.

  4. Performance modeling for large database systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaar, Stephen; Hum, Frank; Romano, Joe

    1997-02-01

    One of the unique approaches Science Applications International Corporation took to meet performance requirements was to start the modeling effort during the proposal phase of the Interstate Identification Index/Federal Bureau of Investigations (III/FBI) project. The III/FBI Performance Model uses analytical modeling techniques to represent the III/FBI system. Inputs to the model include workloads for each transaction type, record size for each record type, number of records for each file, hardware envelope characteristics, engineering margins and estimates for software instructions, memory, and I/O for each transaction type. The model uses queuing theory to calculate the average transaction queue length. The model calculates a response time and the resources needed for each transaction type. Outputs of the model include the total resources needed for the system, a hardware configuration, and projected inherent and operational availability. The III/FBI Performance Model is used to evaluate what-if scenarios and allows a rapid response to engineering change proposals and technical enhancements.

  5. Metrics for Offline Evaluation of Prognostic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Celaya, Jose; Saha, Bhaskar; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Prognostic performance evaluation has gained significant attention in the past few years. Currently, prognostics concepts lack standard definitions and suffer from ambiguous and inconsistent interpretations. This lack of standards is in part due to the varied end-user requirements for different applications, time scales, available information, domain dynamics, etc. to name a few. The research community has used a variety of metrics largely based on convenience and their respective requirements. Very little attention has been focused on establishing a standardized approach to compare different efforts. This paper presents several new evaluation metrics tailored for prognostics that were recently introduced and were shown to effectively evaluate various algorithms as compared to other conventional metrics. Specifically, this paper presents a detailed discussion on how these metrics should be interpreted and used. These metrics have the capability of incorporating probabilistic uncertainty estimates from prognostic algorithms. In addition to quantitative assessment they also offer a comprehensive visual perspective that can be used in designing the prognostic system. Several methods are suggested to customize these metrics for different applications. Guidelines are provided to help choose one method over another based on distribution characteristics. Various issues faced by prognostics and its performance evaluation are discussed followed by a formal notational framework to help standardize subsequent developments.

  6. Strapdown system performance optimization test evaluations (SPOT), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaha, R. J.; Gilmore, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    A three axis inertial system was packaged in an Apollo gimbal fixture for fine grain evaluation of strapdown system performance in dynamic environments. These evaluations have provided information to assess the effectiveness of real-time compensation techniques and to study system performance tradeoffs to factors such as quantization and iteration rate. The strapdown performance and tradeoff studies conducted include: (1) Compensation models and techniques for the inertial instrument first-order error terms were developed and compensation effectivity was demonstrated in four basic environments; single and multi-axis slew, and single and multi-axis oscillatory. (2) The theoretical coning bandwidth for the first-order quaternion algorithm expansion was verified. (3) Gyro loop quantization was identified to affect proportionally the system attitude uncertainty. (4) Land navigation evaluations identified the requirement for accurate initialization alignment in order to pursue fine grain navigation evaluations.

  7. Hierarchical Model Validation of Symbolic Performance Models of Scientific Kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Sadaf R; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2006-08-01

    Multi-resolution validation of hierarchical performance models of scientific applications is critical primarily for two reasons. First, the step-by-step validation determines the correctness of all essential components or phases in a science simulation. Second, a model that is validated at multiple resolution levels is the very first step to generate predictive performance models, for not only existing systems but also for emerging systems and future problem sizes. We present the design and validation of hierarchical performance models of two scientific benchmarks using a new technique called the modeling assertions (MA). Our MA prototype framework generates symbolic performance models that can be evaluated efficiently by generating the equivalent model representations in Octave and MATLAB. The multi-resolution modeling and validation is conducted on two contemporary, massively-parallel systems, XT3 and Blue Gene/L system. The workload distribution and the growth rates predictions generated by the MA models are confirmed by the experimental data collected on the MPP platforms. In addition, the physical memory requirements that are generated by the MA models are verified by the runtime values on the Blue Gene/L system, which has 512 MBytes and 256 MBytes physical memory capacity in its two unique execution modes.

  8. A fuzzy inference system to evaluate contract service provider performance.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Antonio Miguel; Denis, Ernesto Rodriguez

    2005-01-01

    This paper puts forward a fuzzy inference system for evaluating the quality performance of service contract providers. An Application Service Provider was designed and put online, featuring surveys to establish the most useful indicators to evaluate the quality of the service. This model was implemented in 10 separate hospitals. As a result, the service cost-acquisition cost ratio in these cases was reduced from 16.14% to 6.09% in the period 2001-January 2003.

  9. Modelling Human Performance in Maritime Interdiction Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    high-tempo operations generate heat and therefore clothing needs to reflect the thermoregulatory demands . Currently operators often under-dress for the...influencing the insertion and on-target phases need to be quantified. The initial strategy of evaluation should include, a formal Task Analysis , to assess...initially via formal Task Analysis , so as to assess the potential degradation to performance and operational effectiveness. The ability to model these

  10. Analytical performance evaluation for autonomous sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. C.

    2008-04-01

    A distributed data fusion system consists of a network of sensors, each capable of local processing and fusion of sensor data. There has been a great deal of work in developing distributed fusion algorithms applicable to a network centric architecture. Currently there are at least a few approaches including naive fusion, cross-correlation fusion, information graph fusion, maximum a posteriori (MAP) fusion, channel filter fusion, and covariance intersection fusion. However, in general, in a distributed system such as the ad hoc sensor networks, the communication architecture is not fixed. Each node has knowledge of only its local connectivity but not the global network topology. In those cases, the distributed fusion algorithm based on information graph type of approach may not scale due to its requirements to carry long pedigree information for decorrelation. In this paper, we focus on scalable fusion algorithms and conduct analytical performance evaluation to compare their performance. The goal is to understand the performance of those algorithms under different operating conditions. Specifically, we evaluate the performance of channel filter fusion, Chernoff fusion, Shannon Fusion, and Battachayya fusion algorithms. We also compare their results to NaÃve fusion and "optimal" centralized fusion algorithms under a specific communication pattern.

  11. A brief dataset on the model-based evaluation of the growth performance of Bacillus coagulans and l-lactic acid production in a lignin-supplemented medium.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Robert; Venus, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Model-based characterization of growth performance and l-lactic acid production with high optical purity by thermophilic Bacillus coagulans in a lignin-supplemented mixed substrate medium (R. Glaser and J. Venus, 2016) [1]". This data survey provides the information on characterization of three Bacillus coagulans strains. Information on cofermentation of lignocellulose-related sugars in lignin-containing media is given. Basic characterization data are supported by optical-density high-throughput screening and parameter adjustment to logistic growth models. Lab scale fermentation procedures are examined by model adjustment of a Monod kinetics-based growth model. Lignin consumption is analyzed using the data on decolorization of a lignin-supplemented minimal medium.

  12. Group 3: Performance evaluation and assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, A.

    1981-01-01

    Line-oriented flight training provides a unique learning experience and an opportunity to look at aspects of performance other types of training did not provide. Areas such as crew coordination, resource management, leadership, and so forth, can be readily evaluated in such a format. While individual performance is of the utmost importance, crew performance deserves equal emphasis, therefore, these areas should be carefully observed by the instructors as an rea for discussion in the same way that individual performane is observed. To be effective, it must be accepted by the crew members, and administered by the instructors as pure training-learning through experience. To keep open minds, to benefit most from the experience, both in the doing and in the follow-on discussion, it is essential that it be entered into with a feeling of freedom, openness, and enthusiasm. Reserve or defensiveness because of concern for failure must be inhibit participation.

  13. Evaluating Algorithm Performance Metrics Tailored for Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Celaya, Jose; Saha, Bhaskar; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Prognostics has taken a center stage in Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) where it is desired to estimate Remaining Useful Life (RUL) of the system so that remedial measures may be taken in advance to avoid catastrophic events or unwanted downtimes. Validation of such predictions is an important but difficult proposition and a lack of appropriate evaluation methods renders prognostics meaningless. Evaluation methods currently used in the research community are not standardized and in many cases do not sufficiently assess key performance aspects expected out of a prognostics algorithm. In this paper we introduce several new evaluation metrics tailored for prognostics and show that they can effectively evaluate various algorithms as compared to other conventional metrics. Specifically four algorithms namely; Relevance Vector Machine (RVM), Gaussian Process Regression (GPR), Artificial Neural Network (ANN), and Polynomial Regression (PR) are compared. These algorithms vary in complexity and their ability to manage uncertainty around predicted estimates. Results show that the new metrics rank these algorithms in different manner and depending on the requirements and constraints suitable metrics may be chosen. Beyond these results, these metrics offer ideas about how metrics suitable to prognostics may be designed so that the evaluation procedure can be standardized. 1

  14. High temperature furnace modeling and performance verifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical, numerical, and experimental studies were performed on two classes of high temperature materials processing sources for their potential use as directional solidification furnaces. The research concentrated on a commercially available high temperature furnace using a zirconia ceramic tube as the heating element and an Arc Furnace based on a tube welder. The first objective was to assemble the zirconia furnace and construct parts needed to successfully perform experiments. The 2nd objective was to evaluate the zirconia furnace performance as a directional solidification furnace element. The 3rd objective was to establish a data base on materials used in the furnace construction, with particular emphasis on emissivities, transmissivities, and absorptivities as functions of wavelength and temperature. A 1-D and 2-D spectral radiation heat transfer model was developed for comparison with standard modeling techniques, and were used to predict wall and crucible temperatures. The 4th objective addressed the development of a SINDA model for the Arc Furnace and was used to design sample holders and to estimate cooling media temperatures for the steady state operation of the furnace. And, the 5th objective addressed the initial performance evaluation of the Arc Furnace and associated equipment for directional solidification. Results of these objectives are presented.

  15. [Evaluation model for municipal health planning management].

    PubMed

    Berretta, Isabel Quint; Lacerda, Josimari Telino de; Calvo, Maria Cristina Marino

    2011-11-01

    This article presents an evaluation model for municipal health planning management. The basis was a methodological study using the health planning theoretical framework to construct the evaluation matrix, in addition to an understanding of the organization and functioning designed by the Planning System of the Unified National Health System (PlanejaSUS) and definition of responsibilities for the municipal level under the Health Management Pact. The indicators and measures were validated using the consensus technique with specialists in planning and evaluation. The applicability was tested in 271 municipalities (counties) in the State of Santa Catarina, Brazil, based on population size. The proposed model features two evaluative dimensions which reflect the municipal health administrator's commitment to planning: the guarantee of resources and the internal and external relations needed for developing the activities. The data were analyzed using indicators, sub-dimensions, and dimensions. The study concludes that the model is feasible and appropriate for evaluating municipal performance in health planning management.

  16. Performance evaluation of triangulation based range sensors.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Gabriele; Russo, Michele; Magrassi, Grazia; Bordegoni, Monica

    2010-01-01

    The performance of 2D digital imaging systems depends on several factors related with both optical and electronic processing. These concepts have originated standards, which have been conceived for photographic equipment and bi-dimensional scanning systems, and which have been aimed at estimating different parameters such as resolution, noise or dynamic range. Conversely, no standard test protocols currently exist for evaluating the corresponding performances of 3D imaging systems such as laser scanners or pattern projection range cameras. This paper is focused on investigating experimental processes for evaluating some critical parameters of 3D equipment, by extending the concepts defined by the ISO standards to the 3D domain. The experimental part of this work concerns the characterization of different range sensors through the extraction of their resolution, accuracy and uncertainty from sets of 3D data acquisitions of specifically designed test objects whose geometrical characteristics are known in advance. The major objective of this contribution is to suggest an easy characterization process for generating a reliable comparison between the performances of different range sensors and to check if a specific piece of equipment is compliant with the expected characteristics.

  17. ATAMM enhancement and multiprocessing performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoughton, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The algorithm to architecture mapping model (ATAAM) is a Petri net based model which provides a strategy for periodic execution of a class of real-time algorithms on multicomputer dataflow architecture. The execution of large-grained, decision-free algorithms on homogeneous processing elements is studied. The ATAAM provides an analytical basis for calculating performance bounds on throughput characteristics. Extension of the ATAMM as a strategy for cyclo-static scheduling provides for a truly distributed ATAMM multicomputer operating system. An ATAAM testbed consisting of a centralized graph manager and three processors is described using embedded firmware on 68HC11 microcontrollers.

  18. Data harmonization and model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Joint Committee on Urban Storm Drainage of the International Association for Hydraulic Research (IAHR) and International Association on Water Pollution Research and Control (IAWPRC) was formed in 1982. The current committee members are (no more than two from a country): B. C. Yen, Chairman (USA); P. Harremoes, Vice Chairman (Denmark); R. K. Price, Secretary (UK); P. J. Colyer (UK), M. Desbordes (France), W. C. Huber (USA), K. Krauth (FRG), A. Sjoberg (Sweden), and T. Sueishi (Japan).The IAHR/IAWPRC Joint Committee is forming a Task Group on Data Harmonization and Model Performance. One objective is to promote international urban drainage data harmonization for easy data and information exchange. Another objective is to publicize available models and data internationally. Comments and suggestions concerning the formation and charge of the Task Group are welcome and should be sent to: B. C. Yen, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Illinois, 208 N. Romine St., Urbana, IL 61801.

  19. Task-shifting to community health workers: evaluation of the performance of a peer-led model in an antiretroviral program in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Stella; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Kenneth, Ekoru; Sunday, Pamella; Laga, Marie; Colebunders, Robert Leon

    2012-02-01

    Task shifting to community health workers (CHW) has received recognition. We examined the performance of community antiretroviral therapy and tuberculosis treatment supporters (CATTS) in scaling up antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Reach Out, a community-based ART program in Uganda. Retrospective data on home visits made by CATTS were analyzed to examine the CATTS ability to perform home visits to patients based on the model's standard procedures. Qualitative interviews conducted with 347 randomly selected patients and 47 CATTS explored their satisfaction with the model. The CATTS ability to follow-up with patients worsened from patients requiring daily, weekly, monthly, to three-monthly home visits. Only 26% and 15% of them correctly home visited patients with drug side effects and a missed clinic appointment, respectively. Additionally, 83% visited stable pre-ART and ART patients (96%) more frequently than required. Six hundred eighty of the 3650 (18%) patients were lost to follow-up (LTFU) during the study period. The mean number of patients LTFU per CATTS was 40.5. Male (p = 0.005), worked for longer durations (p = 0.02), and had lower education (p = 0.005). An increased number of patients (p = 0.01) were associated with increased LTFU. Ninety-two percent of the CATTS felt the model could be improved by reducing the workload. CATTS who were HIV positive, female, not residing in the same village as their patients, more educated, married, on ART, and spent less time with the patients were rated better by their patients. The Reach-Out CHW model is labor-intensive. Triaged home visits could improve performance and allow CATTS time to focus on patients requiring more intensive follow-up.

  20. Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, M; Williams, W; House, R; Haynam, C

    2004-01-07

    The Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM) has been developed to provide real time predictive capabilities for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. LPOM uses diagnostic feedback from previous NIF shots to maintain accurate energetics models for each of the 192 NIF beamlines (utilizing one CPU per laser beamline). This model is used to determine the system setpoints (initial power, waveplate attenuations, laser diagnostic settings) required for all requested NIF shots. In addition, LPOM employs optical damage models to minimize the probability that a proposed shot may damage the system. LPOM provides post-shot diagnostic reporting to support the NIF community. LPOM was deployed prior to the first main laser shots in NIF, and has since been used to set up every shot in NIF's first quad (four beamlines). Real-time adjustments of the codes energetics parameters allows the LPOM to predict total energies within 5%, and provide energy balance within the four beamlines to within 2% for shots varying from 0.5 to 26 kJ (1.053 {micro}m) per beamline. The LPOM has been a crucial tool in the commissioning of the first quad of NIF.

  1. Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, M; Williams, W; House, R; Haynam, C

    2004-06-04

    The Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM) has been developed to provide real time predictive capabilities for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. LPOM uses diagnostic feedback from previous NIF shots to maintain accurate energetics models for each of the 192 NIF beamlines (utilizing one CPU per laser beamline). This model is used to determine the system setpoints (initial power, waveplate attenuations, laser diagnostic settings) required for all requested NIF shots. In addition, LPOM employs optical damage models to minimize the probability that a proposed shot may damage the system. LPOM provides post-shot diagnostic reporting to support the NIF community. LPOM was deployed prior to the first main laser shots in NIF, and has since been used to set up every shot in NIF's first quad (four beamlines). Real-time adjustments of the codes energetics parameters allows the LPOM to predict total energies within 5%, and provide energy balance within the four beamlines to within 2% for shots varying from 0.5 to 26 kJ (1.053 {micro}m) per beamline. The LPOM has been a crucial tool in the commissioning of the first quad of NIF.

  2. Performance evaluation of swimmers: scientific tools.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Norris, Stephen R; Hogg, John M

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a critical commentary of the physiological and psychological tools used in the evaluation of swimmers. The first-level evaluation should be the competitive performance itself, since it is at this juncture that all elements interplay and provide the 'highest form' of assessment. Competition video analysis of major swimming events has progressed to the point where it has become an indispensable tool for coaches, athletes, sport scientists, equipment manufacturers, and even the media. The breakdown of each swimming performance at the individual level to its constituent parts allows for comparison with the predicted or sought after execution, as well as allowing for comparison with identified world competition levels. The use of other 'on-going' monitoring protocols to evaluate training efficacy typically involves criterion 'effort' swims and specific training sets where certain aspects are scrutinised in depth. Physiological parameters that are often examined alongside swimming speed and technical aspects include oxygen uptake, heart rate, blood lactate concentration, blood lactate accumulation and clearance rates. Simple and more complex procedures are available for in-training examination of technical issues. Strength and power may be quantified via several modalities although, typically, tethered swimming and dry-land isokinetic devices are used. The availability of a 'swimming flume' does afford coaches and sport scientists a higher degree of flexibility in the type of monitoring and evaluation that can be undertaken. There is convincing evidence that athletes can be distinguished on the basis of their psychological skills and emotional competencies and that these differences become further accentuated as the athlete improves. No matter what test format is used (physiological, biomechanical or psychological), similar criteria of validity must be ensured so that the test provides useful and associative information

  3. Performance evaluation of MPEG internet video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiajia; Wang, Ronggang; Fan, Kui; Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Ge; Wang, Wenmin

    2016-09-01

    Internet Video Coding (IVC) has been developed in MPEG by combining well-known existing technology elements and new coding tools with royalty-free declarations. In June 2015, IVC project was approved as ISO/IEC 14496-33 (MPEG- 4 Internet Video Coding). It is believed that this standard can be highly beneficial for video services in the Internet domain. This paper evaluates the objective and subjective performances of IVC by comparing it against Web Video Coding (WVC), Video Coding for Browsers (VCB) and AVC High Profile. Experimental results show that IVC's compression performance is approximately equal to that of the AVC High Profile for typical operational settings, both for streaming and low-delay applications, and is better than WVC and VCB.

  4. Performance evaluation of bound diamond ring tools

    SciTech Connect

    Piscotty, M.A.; Taylor, J.S.; Blaedel, K.L.

    1995-07-14

    LLNL is collaborating with the Center for Optics Manufacturing (COM) and the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association (APOMA) to optimize bound diamond ring tools for the spherical generation of high quality optical surfaces. An important element of this work is establishing an experimentally-verified link between tooling properties and workpiece quality indicators such as roughness, subsurface damage and removal rate. In this paper, we report on a standardized methodology for assessing ring tool performance and its preliminary application to a set of commercially-available wheels. Our goals are to (1) assist optics manufacturers (users of the ring tools) in evaluating tools and in assessing their applicability for a given operation, and (2) provide performance feedback to wheel manufacturers to help optimize tooling for the optics industry. Our paper includes measurements of wheel performance for three 2-4 micron diamond bronze-bond wheels that were supplied by different manufacturers to nominally- identical specifications. Preliminary data suggests that the difference in performance levels among the wheels were small.

  5. Nonparametric temporal downscaling with event-based population generating algorithm for RCM daily precipitation to hourly: Model development and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taesam; Park, Taewoong

    2017-04-01

    It is critical to downscale temporally coarse GCM or RCM outputs (e.g., monthly or daily) to fine time scales, such as sub-daily or hourly. Recently, a temporal downscaling model employing a nonparametric framework (NTD) with k-nearest resampling and a genetic algorithm has been developed to preserve key statistics as well as the diurnal cycle. However, this model's usage can be limited in estimating precipitation for design storms or floods because the key statistics of annual maximum precipitation (AMP), especially for longer hourly durations, present a systematic bias that cannot be preserved due to the discontinuity of multiday consecutive precipitation events in the downscaling procedure. In the current study, we develop an approach to downscale a consecutive daily precipitation at once focusing on the reproduction of AMP totals for different durations instead of day-by-day downscaling. The proposed model has been verified with the precipitation datasets for the 60 stations across South Korea over the period 1979-2005. Additionally, two validation studies were performed with the recent datasets of 2006-2014 and nearest neighbor stations. The verification and the two validation tests conclude that the population-based NTD (PNTD) model proposed in the current study is superior to the existing NTD model in preserving the key statistics of the observed AMP series and suitable for downscaling future climate scenarios.

  6. Evaluation of impact limiter performance during end-on and slapdown drop tests of a one-third scale model storage/transport cask system

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Bronowski, D.R.; Uncapher, W.L.; Attaway, S.W.; Bateman, V.I.; Carne, T.G.; Gregory, D.L. ); Huerta, M. )

    1990-12-01

    This report describes drop testing of a one-third scale model shipping cask system. Two casks were designed and fabricated by Transnuclear, Inc., to ship spent fuel from the former Nuclear Fuel Services West Valley reprocessing facility in New York to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for a long-term spent fuel dry storage demonstration project. As part of the NRC's regulatory certification process, one-third scale model tests were performed to obtain experimental data on impact limiter performance during impact testing. The objectives of the testing program were to (1) obtain deceleration and displacement information for the cask and impact limiter system, (2) obtain dynamic force-displacement data for the impact limiters, (3) verify the integrity of the impact limiter retention system, and (4) examine the crush behavior of the limiters. Two 30-ft (9-m) drop tests were conducted on a mass model of the cask body and scaled balsa and redwood-filled impact limiters. This report describes the results of both tests in terms of measured decelerations, posttest deformation measurements, and the general structural response of the system. 3 refs., 32 figs.

  7. Performance Evaluation and Parameter Identification on DROID III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, Julianna J.

    2011-01-01

    The DROID III project consisted of two main parts. The former, performance evaluation, focused on the performance characteristics of the aircraft such as lift to drag ratio, thrust required for level flight, and rate of climb. The latter, parameter identification, focused on finding the aerodynamic coefficients for the aircraft using a system that creates a mathematical model to match the flight data of doublet maneuvers and the aircraft s response. Both portions of the project called for flight testing and that data is now available on account of this project. The conclusion of the project is that the performance evaluation data is well-within desired standards but could be improved with a thrust model, and that parameter identification is still in need of more data processing but seems to produce reasonable results thus far.

  8. Analysing the temporal dynamics of model performance for hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusser, D. E.; Blume, T.; Schaefli, B.; Zehe, E.

    2009-07-01

    The temporal dynamics of hydrological model performance gives insights into errors that cannot be obtained from global performance measures assigning a single number to the fit of a simulated time series to an observed reference series. These errors can include errors in data, model parameters, or model structure. Dealing with a set of performance measures evaluated at a high temporal resolution implies analyzing and interpreting a high dimensional data set. This paper presents a method for such a hydrological model performance assessment with a high temporal resolution and illustrates its application for two very different rainfall-runoff modeling case studies. The first is the Wilde Weisseritz case study, a headwater catchment in the eastern Ore Mountains, simulated with the conceptual model WaSiM-ETH. The second is the Malalcahuello case study, a headwater catchment in the Chilean Andes, simulated with the physics-based model Catflow. The proposed time-resolved performance assessment starts with the computation of a large set of classically used performance measures for a moving window. The key of the developed approach is a data-reduction method based on self-organizing maps (SOMs) and cluster analysis to classify the high-dimensional performance matrix. Synthetic peak errors are used to interpret the resulting error classes. The final outcome of the proposed method is a time series of the occurrence of dominant error types. For the two case studies analyzed here, 6 such error types have been identified. They show clear temporal patterns, which can lead to the identification of model structural errors.

  9. Analysing the temporal dynamics of model performance for hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusser, D. E.; Blume, T.; Schaefli, B.; Zehe, E.

    2008-11-01

    The temporal dynamics of hydrological model performance gives insights into errors that cannot be obtained from global performance measures assigning a single number to the fit of a simulated time series to an observed reference series. These errors can include errors in data, model parameters, or model structure. Dealing with a set of performance measures evaluated at a high temporal resolution implies analyzing and interpreting a high dimensional data set. This paper presents a method for such a hydrological model performance assessment with a high temporal resolution and illustrates its application for two very different rainfall-runoff modeling case studies. The first is the Wilde Weisseritz case study, a headwater catchment in the eastern Ore Mountains, simulated with the conceptual model WaSiM-ETH. The second is the Malalcahuello case study, a headwater catchment in the Chilean Andes, simulated with the physics-based model Catflow. The proposed time-resolved performance assessment starts with the computation of a large set of classically used performance measures for a moving window. The key of the developed approach is a data-reduction method based on self-organizing maps (SOMs) and cluster analysis to classify the high-dimensional performance matrix. Synthetic peak errors are used to interpret the resulting error classes. The final outcome of the proposed method is a time series of the occurrence of dominant error types. For the two case studies analyzed here, 6 such error types have been identified. They show clear temporal patterns which can lead to the identification of model structural errors.

  10. Behavior model for performance assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Borwn-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1999-07-23

    Every individual channels information differently based on their preference of the sensory modality or representational system (visual auditory or kinesthetic) we tend to favor most (our primary representational system (PRS)). Therefore, some of us access and store our information primarily visually first, some auditorily, and others kinesthetically (through feel and touch); which in turn establishes our information processing patterns and strategies and external to internal (and subsequently vice versa) experiential language representation. Because of the different ways we channel our information, each of us will respond differently to a task--the way we gather and process the external information (input), our response time (process), and the outcome (behavior). Traditional human models of decision making and response time focus on perception, cognitive and motor systems stimulated and influenced by the three sensory modalities, visual, auditory and kinesthetic. For us, these are the building blocks to knowing how someone is thinking. Being aware of what is taking place and how to ask questions is essential in assessing performance toward reducing human errors. Existing models give predications based on time values or response times for a particular event, and may be summed and averaged for a generalization of behavior(s). However, by our not establishing a basic understanding of the foundation of how the behavior was predicated through a decision making strategy process, predicative models are overall inefficient in their analysis of the means by which behavior was generated. What is seen is the end result.

  11. Evaluating performance of container terminal operation using simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd; Jamil, Fadhilah Che; Hamzah, Firdaus Mohamad

    2015-05-01

    A container terminal is a facility where containers are transshipped from one mode of transport to another. Congestion problem leads to the decreasing of the customer's level of satisfaction. This study presents the application of simulation technique with the main objective of this study is to develop the current model and evaluate the performance of the container terminal. The suitable performance measure used in this study to evaluate the container terminal model are the average waiting time in queue, average of process time at berth, number of vessels enter the berth and resource utilization. Simulation technique was found to be a suitable technique to conduct in this study. The results from the simulation model had proved to solve the problem occurred in the container terminal.

  12. Parametric modelling of cardiac system multiple measurement signals: an open-source computer framework for performance evaluation of ECG, PCG and ABP event detectors.

    PubMed

    Homaeinezhad, M R; Sabetian, P; Feizollahi, A; Ghaffari, A; Rahmani, R

    2012-02-01

    The major focus of this study is to present a performance accuracy assessment framework based on mathematical modelling of cardiac system multiple measurement signals. Three mathematical algebraic subroutines with simple structural functions for synthetic generation of the synchronously triggered electrocardiogram (ECG), phonocardiogram (PCG) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) signals are described. In the case of ECG signals, normal and abnormal PQRST cycles in complicated conditions such as fascicular ventricular tachycardia, rate dependent conduction block and acute Q-wave infarctions of inferior and anterolateral walls can be simulated. Also, continuous ABP waveform with corresponding individual events such as systolic, diastolic and dicrotic pressures with normal or abnormal morphologies can be generated by another part of the model. In addition, the mathematical synthetic PCG framework is able to generate the S4-S1-S2-S3 cycles in normal and in cardiac disorder conditions such as stenosis, insufficiency, regurgitation and gallop. In the PCG model, the amplitude and frequency content (5-700 Hz) of each sound and variation patterns can be specified. The three proposed models were implemented to generate artificial signals with varies abnormality types and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), for quantitative detection-delineation performance assessment of several ECG, PCG and ABP individual event detectors designed based on the Hilbert transform, discrete wavelet transform, geometric features such as area curve length (ACLM), the multiple higher order moments (MHOM) metric, and the principal components analysed geometric index (PCAGI). For each method the detection-delineation operating characteristics were obtained automatically in terms of sensitivity, positive predictivity and delineation (segmentation) error rms and checked by the cardiologist. The Matlab m-file script of the synthetic ECG, ABP and PCG signal generators are available in the Appendix.

  13. Performance evaluation of SAR/GMTI algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, Wendy; Pierson, William; Mcginnis, Ryan; Majumder, Uttam; Minardi, Michael; Sobota, David

    2016-05-01

    There is a history and understanding of exploiting moving targets within ground moving target indicator (GMTI) data, including methods for modeling performance. However, many assumptions valid for GMTI processing are invalid for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. For example, traditional GMTI processing assumes targets are exo-clutter and a system that uses a GMTI waveform, i.e. low bandwidth (BW) and low pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Conversely, SAR imagery is typically formed to focus data at zero Doppler and requires high BW and high PRF. Therefore, many of the techniques used in performance estimation of GMTI systems are not valid for SAR data. However, as demonstrated by papers in the recent literature,1-11 there is interest in exploiting moving targets within SAR data. The techniques employed vary widely, including filter banks to form images at multiple Dopplers, performing smear detection, and attempting to address the issue through waveform design. The above work validates the need for moving target exploitation in SAR data, but it does not represent a theory allowing for the prediction or bounding of performance. This work develops an approach to estimate and/or bound performance for moving target exploitation specific to SAR data. Synthetic SAR data is generated across a range of sensor, environment, and target parameters to test the exploitation algorithms under specific conditions. This provides a design tool allowing radar systems to be tuned for specific moving target exploitation applications. In summary, we derive a set of rules that bound the performance of specific moving target exploitation algorithms under variable operating conditions.

  14. Lithographic performance evaluation of a contaminated EUV mask after cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Dittmar, Kornelia; Holfeld, Christian; Wuest, Andrea

    2009-11-16

    The effect of surface contamination and subsequent mask surface cleaning on the lithographic performance of a EUV mask is investigated. SEMATECH's Berkeley micro-field exposure tool (MET) printed 40 nm and 50 nm line and space (L/S) patterns are evaluated to compare the performance of a contaminated and cleaned mask to an uncontaminated mask. Since the two EUV masks have distinct absorber architectures, optical imaging models and aerial image calculations were completed to determine any expected differences in performance. Measured and calculated Bossung curves, process windows, and exposure latitudes for the two sets of L/S patterns are compared to determine how the contamination and cleaning impacts the lithographic performance of EUV masks. The observed differences in mask performance are shown to be insignificant, indicating that the cleaning process did not appreciably affect mask performance.

  15. Performance evaluation of PBL and cumulus parameterization schemes of WRF ARW model in simulating severe thunderstorm events over Gadanki MST radar facility — Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madala, Srikanth; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Rao, T. Narayana

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to simulate three severe thunderstorm events that occurred over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E) region of the Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST) Radar facility using Weather Research Forecasting (WRF ARW version 3.2) model. We examined the performance of five planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes namely, the Yonsei University (YSU), Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ), Mellor-Yamada Nakanishi and Niino Level 2.5 PBL (MYNN2), and Medium-Range Forecast (MRF) and Asymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2) and three cumulus parameterization schemes Kain-Fritisch (KF), Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ) and Grell-Devenyi ensemble scheme (GD) in simulating boundary layer parameters, thermodynamic structure and vertical velocity profiles on the days of the thunderstorm events. Triple nested domain having the inner-most domain of 3 km grid resolution over the study area is considered. The model simulated parameters are validated with the available in situ meteorological observations obtained from micro-meteorological tower, radiosonde, MST radar wind profiler and observed rainfall along with the surface fluxes at Gadanki. After validating the model simulations with the available PBL observations and the statistical assessment reveal that the MYJ scheme could be able to capture the characteristic variations of surface meteorological variables such as air temperature, relative humidity, wind component, vertical profiles of wind, relative humidity and equivalent potential temperature and surface layer fluxes during the study period. Cores of strong convective updrafts with a time lag and lead of one and half hour are better represented by the model with MYJ scheme with GD as seen in the vertical velocity profiles obtained from MST radar observations. The present study advocates that the MYJ-GD combination is suitable for the simulation of thunderstorm events over the study region.

  16. Traction contact performance evaluation at high speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevaarwerk, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of traction tests performed on two fluids are presented. These tests covered a pressure range of 1.0 to 2.5 GPa, an inlet temperature range of 30 'C to 70 'C, a speed range of 10 to 80 m/sec, aspect ratios of .5 to 5 and spin from 0 to 2.1 percent. The test results are presented in the form of two dimensionless parameters, the initial traction slope and the maximum traction peak. With the use of a suitable rheological fluid model the actual traction curves measured can now be reconstituted from the two fluid parameters. More importantly, the knowledge of these parameters together with the fluid rheological model, allow the prediction of traction under conditions of spin, slip and any combination thereof. Comparison between theoretically predicted traction under these conditions and those measured in actual traction tests shows that this method gives good results.

  17. Manipulator Performance Evaluation Using Fitts' Taping Task

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Jared, B.C.; Noakes, M.W.

    1999-04-25

    Metaphorically, a teleoperator with master controllers projects the user's arms and hands into a re- mote area, Therefore, human users interact with teleoperators at a more fundamental level than they do with most human-machine systems. Instead of inputting decisions about how the system should func- tion, teleoperator users input the movements they might make if they were truly in the remote area and the remote machine must recreate their trajectories and impedance. This intense human-machine inter- action requires displays and controls more carefully attuned to human motor capabilities than is neces- sary with most systems. It is important for teleoperated manipulators to be able to recreate human trajectories and impedance in real time. One method for assessing manipulator performance is to observe how well a system be- haves while a human user completes human dexterity tasks with it. Fitts' tapping task has been, used many times in the past for this purpose. This report describes such a performance assessment. The International Submarine Engineering (ISE) Autonomous/Teleoperated Operations Manipulator (ATOM) servomanipulator system was evalu- ated using a generic positioning accuracy task. The task is a simple one but has the merits of (1) pro- ducing a performance function estimate rather than a point estimate and (2) being widely used in the past for human and servomanipulator dexterity tests. Results of testing using this task may, therefore, allow comparison with other manipulators, and is generically representative of a broad class of tasks. Results of the testing indicate that the ATOM manipulator is capable of performing the task. Force reflection had a negative impact on task efficiency in these data. This was most likely caused by the high resistance to movement the master controller exhibited with the force reflection engaged. Measurements of exerted forces were not made, so it is not possible to say whether the force reflection helped partici- pants

  18. Evaluation of a takeoff performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B.; Srivatsan, Raghavachari

    1987-01-01

    A takeoff performance monitoring system (TOPMS) has been developed to provide the pilot with graphic/numeric information pertinent to his decision to continue or abort a takeoff. The TOPMS instrument display consists primarily of a runway graphic overlaid with symbolic status, predictive, and advisory information including: (1) current position and airspeed, (2) predicted locations for reaching decision speed and rotation speed, (3) groundroll limit for reaching the rotation speed, (4) predicted stop point for an aborted takeoff from current conditions, (5) engine-failure flags, and (6) an overall situation advisory flag which recommends continuation or rejection of the takeoff. In this study, over 30 experienced multiengine pilots evaluated the TOPMS display on the Langley B-737 real-time research simulator. The display was judged to be easy to monitor and comprehend.

  19. Performance evaluation of mail-scanning cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajashekar, Umesh; Vu, Tony Tuan; Hooning, John E.; Bovik, Alan Conrad

    2010-04-01

    Letter-scanning cameras (LSCs) form the front- end imaging systems for virtually all mail-scanning systems that are currently used to automatically sort mail products. As with any vision-dependent technology, the quality of the images generated by the camera is fundamental to the overall performance of the system. We present novel techniques for objective evaluation of LSCs using comparative imaging-a technique that involves measuring the fidelity of target images produced by a camera with reference to an image of the same target captured at very high quality. Such a framework provides a unique opportunity to directly quantify the camera's ability to capture real-world targets, such as handwritten and printed text. Noncomparative techniques were also used to measure properties such as the camera's modulation transfer function, dynamic range, and signal-to-noise ratio. To simulate real-world imaging conditions, application-specific test samples were designed using actual mail product materials.

  20. Advocacy Evaluation: A Model for Internal Evaluation Offices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnichsen, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    As evaluations are more often implemented by internal staff, internal evaluators must begin to assume decision-making and advocacy tasks. This advocacy evaluation concept is described using the Federal Bureau of Investigation evaluation staff as a model. (TJH)

  1. Performance Evaluations of Ceramic Wafer Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2006-01-01

    Future hypersonic vehicles will require high temperature, dynamic seals in advanced ramjet/scramjet engines and on the vehicle airframe to seal the perimeters of movable panels, flaps, and doors. Seal temperatures in these locations can exceed 2000 F, especially when the seals are in contact with hot ceramic matrix composite sealing surfaces. NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced ceramic wafer seals to meet the needs of these applications. High temperature scrub tests performed between silicon nitride wafers and carbon-silicon carbide rub surfaces revealed high friction forces and evidence of material transfer from the rub surfaces to the wafer seals. Stickage between adjacent wafers was also observed after testing. Several design changes to the wafer seals were evaluated as possible solutions to these concerns. Wafers with recessed sides were evaluated as a potential means of reducing friction between adjacent wafers. Alternative wafer materials are also being considered as a means of reducing friction between the seals and their sealing surfaces and because the baseline silicon nitride wafer material (AS800) is no longer commercially available.

  2. Evaluation of help model replacement codes

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, Tad; Hang, Thong; Flach, Gregory

    2009-07-01

    This work evaluates the computer codes that are proposed to be used to predict percolation of water through the closure-cap and into the waste containment zone at the Department of Energy closure sites. This work compares the currently used water-balance code (HELP) with newly developed computer codes that use unsaturated flow (Richards’ equation). It provides a literature review of the HELP model and the proposed codes, which result in two recommended codes for further evaluation: HYDRUS-2D3D and VADOSE/W. This further evaluation involved performing actual simulations on a simple model and comparing the results of those simulations to those obtained with the HELP code and the field data. From the results of this work, we conclude that the new codes perform nearly the same, although moving forward, we recommend HYDRUS-2D3D.

  3. Performance Evaluation of Photovoltaic Solar Air Conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snegirjovs, A.; Shipkovs, P.; Lebedeva, K.; Kashkarova, G.; Migla, L.; Gantenbein, P.; Omlin, L.

    2016-12-01

    Information on the electrical-driven solar air conditioning (SAC) is rather scanty. A considerable body of technical data mostly concerns large-scale photo-voltaic solar air conditioning (PV-SAC) systems. Reliable information about the energy output has arisen only in recent years; however, it is still not easily accessible, and sometimes its sources are closed. Despite these facts, solar energy researchers, observers and designers devote special attention to this type of SAC systems. In this study, performance evaluation is performed for the PV-SAC technology, in which low-power (up to 15 kWp of cooling power on average) systems are used. Such a system contains a PV electric-driven compression chiller with cold and heat sensible thermal storage capacities, and a rejected energy unit used for preheating domestic hot water (DHW). In a non-cooling season, it is possible to partly employ the system in the reverse mode for DHW production. In this mode, the ambient air serves as a heat source. Besides, free cooling is integrated in the PV-SAC concept.

  4. Solar power plant performance evaluation: simulation and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsheh, E. M.; Albarbar, A.

    2012-05-01

    In this work the performance of solar power plant is evaluated based on a developed model comprise photovoltaic array, battery storage, controller and converters. The model is implemented using MATLAB/SIMULINK software package. Perturb and observe (P&O) algorithm is used for maximizing the generated power based on maximum power point tracker (MPPT) implementation. The outcome of the developed model are validated and supported by a case study carried out using operational 28.8kW grid-connected solar power plant located in central Manchester. Measurements were taken over 21 month's period; using hourly average irradiance and cell temperature. It was found that system degradation could be clearly monitored by determining the residual (the difference) between the output power predicted by the model and the actual measured power parameters. It was found that the residual exceeded the healthy threshold, 1.7kW, due to heavy snow in Manchester last winter. More important, the developed performance evaluation technique could be adopted to detect any other reasons that may degrade the performance of the P V panels such as shading and dirt. Repeatability and reliability of the developed system performance were validated during this period. Good agreement was achieved between the theoretical simulation and the real time measurement taken the online grid connected solar power plant.

  5. Analysis of Photovoltaic System Energy Performance Evaluation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Newmiller, J.; Kimber, A.; Flottemesch, R.; Riley, E.; Dierauf, T.; McKee, J.; Krishnani, P.

    2013-11-01

    Documentation of the energy yield of a large photovoltaic (PV) system over a substantial period can be useful to measure a performance guarantee, as an assessment of the health of the system, for verification of a performance model to then be applied to a new system, or for a variety of other purposes. Although the measurement of this performance metric might appear to be straight forward, there are a number of subtleties associated with variations in weather and imperfect data collection that complicate the determination and data analysis. A performance assessment is most valuable when it is completed with a very low uncertainty and when the subtleties are systematically addressed, yet currently no standard exists to guide this process. This report summarizes a draft methodology for an Energy Performance Evaluation Method, the philosophy behind the draft method, and the lessons that were learned by implementing the method.

  6. Performance and Perception in the Flipped Learning Model: An Initial Approach to Evaluate the Effectiveness of a New Teaching Methodology in a General Science Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Gómez, David; Jeong, Jin Su; Airado Rodríguez, Diego; Cañada-Cañada, Florentina

    2016-06-01

    "Flipped classroom" teaching methodology is a type of blended learning in which the traditional class setting is inverted. Lecture is shifted outside of class, while the classroom time is employed to solve problems or doing practical works through the discussion/peer collaboration of students and instructors. This relatively new instructional methodology claims that flipping your classroom engages more effectively students with the learning process, achieving better teaching results. Thus, this research aimed to evaluate the effects of the flipped classroom on the students' performance and perception of this new methodology. This study was conducted in a general science course, sophomore of the Primary Education bachelor degree in the Training Teaching School of the University of Extremadura (Spain) during the course 2014/2015. In order to assess the suitability of the proposed methodology, the class was divided in two groups. For the first group, a traditional methodology was followed, and it was used as control. On the other hand, the "flipped classroom" methodology was used in the second group, where the students were given diverse materials, such as video lessons and reading materials, before the class to be revised at home by them. Online questionnaires were as well provided to assess the progress of the students before the class. Finally, the results were compared in terms of students' achievements and a post-task survey was also conducted to know the students' perceptions. A statistically significant difference was found on all assessments with the flipped class students performing higher on average. In addition, most students had a favorable perception about the flipped classroom noting the ability to pause, rewind and review lectures, as well as increased individualized learning and increased teacher availability.

  7. Using Weibull Distribution Analysis to Evaluate ALARA Performance

    SciTech Connect

    E. L. Frome, J. P. Watkins, and D. A. Hagemeyer

    2009-10-01

    As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is the underlying principle for protecting nuclear workers from potential health outcomes related to occupational radiation exposure. Radiation protection performance is currently evaluated by measures such as collective dose and average measurable dose, which do not indicate ALARA performance. The purpose of this work is to show how statistical modeling of individual doses using the Weibull distribution can provide objective supplemental performance indicators for comparing ALARA implementation among sites and for insights into ALARA practices within a site. Maximum likelihood methods were employed to estimate the Weibull shape and scale parameters used for performance indicators. The shape parameter reflects the effectiveness of maximizing the number of workers receiving lower doses and is represented as the slope of the fitted line on a Weibull probability plot. Additional performance indicators derived from the model parameters include the 99th percentile and the exceedance fraction. When grouping sites by collective total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and ranking by 99th percentile with confidence intervals, differences in performance among sites can be readily identified. Applying this methodology will enable more efficient and complete evaluation of the effectiveness of ALARA implementation.

  8. Modeling and Performance Simulation of the Mass Storage Network Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chan M.; Sang, Janche

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the application of modeling and simulation in evaluating and predicting the performance of the mass storage network environment. Network traffic is generated to mimic the realistic pattern of file transfer, electronic mail, and web browsing. The behavior and performance of the mass storage network and a typical client-server Local Area Network (LAN) are investigated by modeling and simulation. Performance characteristics in throughput and delay demonstrate the important role of modeling and simulation in network engineering and capacity planning.

  9. Market behavior and performance of different strategy evaluation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Yongjoo; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Hawoong

    2010-08-01

    Strategy evaluation schemes are a crucial factor in any agent-based market model, as they determine the agents’ strategy preferences and consequently their behavioral pattern. This study investigates how the strategy evaluation schemes adopted by agents affect their performance in conjunction with the market circumstances. We observe the performance of three strategy evaluation schemes, the history-dependent wealth game, the trend-opposing minority game, and the trend-following majority game, in a stock market where the price is exogenously determined. The price is either directly adopted from the real stock market indices or generated with a Markov chain of order ≤2 . Each scheme’s success is quantified by average wealth accumulated by the traders equipped with the scheme. The wealth game, as it learns from the history, shows relatively good performance unless the market is highly unpredictable. The majority game is successful in a trendy market dominated by long periods of sustained price increase or decrease. On the other hand, the minority game is suitable for a market with persistent zigzag price patterns. We also discuss the consequence of implementing finite memory in the scoring processes of strategies. Our findings suggest under which market circumstances each evaluation scheme is appropriate for modeling the behavior of real market traders.

  10. High performance APCS conceptual design and evaluation scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, N.; Liekhus, K.; Chambers, A.; Anderson, G.

    1998-02-01

    This Air Pollution Control System (APCS) Conceptual Design and Evaluation study was conducted to evaluate a high-performance (APC) system for minimizing air emissions from mixed waste thermal treatment systems. Seven variations of high-performance APCS designs were conceptualized using several design objectives. One of the system designs was selected for detailed process simulation using ASPEN PLUS to determine material and energy balances and evaluate performance. Installed system capital costs were also estimated. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate the incremental cost and benefit of added carbon adsorber beds for mercury control, specific catalytic reduction for NO{sub x} control, and offgas retention tanks for holding the offgas until sample analysis is conducted to verify that the offgas meets emission limits. Results show that the high-performance dry-wet APCS can easily meet all expected emission limits except for possibly mercury. The capability to achieve high levels of mercury control (potentially necessary for thermally treating some DOE mixed streams) could not be validated using current performance data for mercury control technologies. The engineering approach and ASPEN PLUS modeling tool developed and used in this study identified APC equipment and system performance, size, cost, and other issues that are not yet resolved. These issues need to be addressed in feasibility studies and conceptual designs for new facilities or for determining how to modify existing facilities to meet expected emission limits. The ASPEN PLUS process simulation with current and refined input assumptions and calculations can be used to provide system performance information for decision-making, identifying best options, estimating costs, reducing the potential for emission violations, providing information needed for waste flow analysis, incorporating new APCS technologies in existing designs, or performing facility design and permitting activities.

  11. Battery performance models in ADVISOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, V. H.

    This paper summarizes battery modeling capabilities in ADVISOR—the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's advanced vehicle simulator written in the Matlab/Simulink environment. ADVISOR's Matlab-oriented battery models consist of the following: (1) an internal resistance model, (2) a resistance-capacitance ( RC) model, (3) a PNGV capacitance model, (4) a neural network (nnet) lead acid model, and (5) a fundamental lead acid battery model. For the models, the electric schematics (where applicable), thermal models, accuracy, existing datasets, and sample validation plots are presented. A brief summary of ADVISOR's capabilities for co-simulation with Saber is presented, which links ADVISOR with Saber's lead acid battery model. The models outlined in this paper were presented at the workshop on 'Development of Advanced Battery Engineering Models' in August 2001.

  12. Evaluating the Performance of a New Model for Predicting the Growth of Clostridium perfringens in Cooked, Uncured Meat and Poultry Products under Isothermal, Heating, and Dynamically Cooling Conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihan

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A is a significant public health threat and its spores may germinate, outgrow, and multiply during cooling of cooked meats. This study applies a new C. perfringens growth model in the USDA Integrated Pathogen Modeling Program-Dynamic Prediction (IPMP Dynamic Prediction) Dynamic Prediction to predict the growth from spores of C. perfringens in cooked uncured meat and poultry products using isothermal, dynamic heating, and cooling data reported in the literature. The residual errors of predictions (observation-prediction) are analyzed, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) calculated. For isothermal and heating profiles, each data point in growth curves is compared. The mean residual errors (MRE) of predictions range from -0.40 to 0.02 Log colony forming units (CFU)/g, with a RMSE of approximately 0.6 Log CFU/g. For cooling, the end point predictions are conservative in nature, with an MRE of -1.16 Log CFU/g for single-rate cooling and -0.66 Log CFU/g for dual-rate cooling. The RMSE is between 0.6 and 0.7 Log CFU/g. Compared with other models reported in the literature, this model makes more accurate and fail-safe predictions. For cooling, the percentage for accurate and fail-safe predictions is between 97.6% and 100%. Under criterion 1, the percentage of accurate predictions is 47.5% for single-rate cooling and 66.7% for dual-rate cooling, while the fail-dangerous predictions are between 0% and 2.4%. This study demonstrates that IPMP Dynamic Prediction can be used by food processors and regulatory agencies as a tool to predict the growth of C. perfringens in uncured cooked meats and evaluate the safety of cooked or heat-treated uncured meat and poultry products exposed to cooling deviations or to develop customized cooling schedules. This study also demonstrates the need for more accurate data collection during cooling.

  13. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Wwww of... - Basic Requirements for Performance Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New and Existing Sources Using Add-On Control... Performance Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New and Existing Sources Using Add-On... emissions to an add-on control device that is a PTE Meet the requirements for a PTE EPA method 204...

  14. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Wwww of... - Basic Requirements for Performance Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New and Existing Sources Using Add-On Control... Performance Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New and Existing Sources Using Add-On... emissions to an add-on control device that is a PTE Meet the requirements for a PTE EPA method 204...

  15. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Wwww of... - Basic Requirements for Performance Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New and Existing Sources Using Add-On Control... Performance Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New and Existing Sources Using Add-On... emissions to an add-on control device that is a PTE Meet the requirements for a PTE EPA method 204...

  16. A model evaluation checklist for process-based environmental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson-Blake, Leah

    2015-04-01

    Mechanistic catchment-scale phosphorus models appear to perform poorly where diffuse sources dominate. The reasons for this were investigated for one commonly-applied model, the INtegrated model of CAtchment Phosphorus (INCA-P). Model output was compared to 18 months of daily water quality monitoring data in a small agricultural catchment in Scotland, and model structure, key model processes and internal model responses were examined. Although the model broadly reproduced dissolved phosphorus dynamics, it struggled with particulates. The reasons for poor performance were explored, together with ways in which improvements could be made. The process of critiquing and assessing model performance was then generalised to provide a broadly-applicable model evaluation checklist, incorporating: (1) Calibration challenges, relating to difficulties in thoroughly searching a high-dimensional parameter space and in selecting appropriate means of evaluating model performance. In this study, for example, model simplification was identified as a necessary improvement to reduce the number of parameters requiring calibration, whilst the traditionally-used Nash Sutcliffe model performance statistic was not able to discriminate between realistic and unrealistic model simulations, and alternative statistics were needed. (2) Data limitations, relating to a lack of (or uncertainty in) input data, data to constrain model parameters, data for model calibration and testing, and data to test internal model processes. In this study, model reliability could be improved by addressing all four kinds of data limitation. For example, there was insufficient surface water monitoring data for model testing against an independent dataset to that used in calibration, whilst additional monitoring of groundwater and effluent phosphorus inputs would help distinguish between alternative plausible model parameterisations. (3) Model structural inadequacies, whereby model structure may inadequately represent

  17. Performance Evaluation and the Internet 2 Performance Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Explains the Internet 2 collaborative end-to-end performance initiative that focuses on performance measurement, analysis, and improvements that lead to a standard set of network capabilities and limitations. Discusses results of this performance initiative, including providing direction for current and future network development. (Author/LRW)

  18. High-Performance Monopropellants and Catalysts Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is sponsoring efforts to develop advanced monopropellant technology. The focus has been on monopropellant formulations composed of an aqueous solution of hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) and a fuel component. HAN-based monopropellants do not have a toxic vapor and do not need the extraordinary procedures for storage, handling, and disposal required of hydrazine (N2H4). Generically, HAN-based monopropellants are denser and have lower freezing points than N2H4. The performance of HAN-based monopropellants depends on the selection of fuel, the HAN-to-fuel ratio, and the amount of water in the formulation. HAN-based monopropellants are not seen as a replacement for N2H4 per se, but rather as a propulsion option in their own right. For example, HAN-based monopropellants would prove beneficial to the orbit insertion of small, power-limited satellites because of this propellant's high performance (reduced system mass), high density (reduced system volume), and low freezing point (elimination of tank and line heaters). Under a Glenn-contracted effort, Aerojet Redmond Rocket Center conducted testing to provide the foundation for the development of monopropellant thrusters with an I(sub sp) goal of 250 sec. A modular, workhorse reactor (representative of a 1-lbf thruster) was used to evaluate HAN formulations with catalyst materials. Stoichiometric, oxygen-rich, and fuelrich formulations of HAN-methanol and HAN-tris(aminoethyl)amine trinitrate were tested to investigate the effects of stoichiometry on combustion behavior. Aerojet found that fuelrich formulations degrade the catalyst and reactor faster than oxygen-rich and stoichiometric formulations do. A HAN-methanol formulation with a theoretical Isp of 269 sec (designated HAN269MEO) was selected as the baseline. With a combustion efficiency of at least 93 percent demonstrated for HAN-based monopropellants, HAN269MEO will meet the I(sub sp) 250 sec goal.

  19. Evaluating performance of high efficiency mist eliminators

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, Charles A.; Parsons, Michael S.; Giffin, Paxton K.

    2013-07-01

    Processing liquid wastes frequently generates off gas streams with high humidity and liquid aerosols. Droplet laden air streams can be produced from tank mixing or sparging and processes such as reforming or evaporative volume reduction. Unfortunately these wet air streams represent a genuine threat to HEPA filters. High efficiency mist eliminators (HEME) are one option for removal of liquid aerosols with high dissolved or suspended solids content. HEMEs have been used extensively in industrial applications, however they have not seen widespread use in the nuclear industry. Filtering efficiency data along with loading curves are not readily available for these units and data that exist are not easily translated to operational parameters in liquid waste treatment plants. A specialized test stand has been developed to evaluate the performance of HEME elements under use conditions of a US DOE facility. HEME elements were tested at three volumetric flow rates using aerosols produced from an iron-rich waste surrogate. The challenge aerosol included submicron particles produced from Laskin nozzles and super micron particles produced from a hollow cone spray nozzle. Test conditions included ambient temperature and relative humidities greater than 95%. Data collected during testing HEME elements from three different manufacturers included volumetric flow rate, differential temperature across the filter housing, downstream relative humidity, and differential pressure (dP) across the filter element. Filter challenge was discontinued at three intermediate dPs and the filter to allow determining filter efficiency using dioctyl phthalate and then with dry surrogate aerosols. Filtering efficiencies of the clean HEME, the clean HEME loaded with water, and the HEME at maximum dP were also collected using the two test aerosols. Results of the testing included differential pressure vs. time loading curves for the nine elements tested along with the mass of moisture and solid

  20. Evaluating the influence of physical, economic and managerial factors on sheet erosion in rangelands of SW Spain by performing a sensitivity analysis on an integrated dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, J; Lavado Contador, J F; Schnabel, S; Martínez Valderrama, J

    2016-02-15

    An integrated dynamic model was used to evaluate the influence of climatic, soil, pastoral, economic and managerial factors on sheet erosion in rangelands of SW Spain (dehesas). This was achieved by means of a variance-based sensitivity analysis. Topsoil erodibility, climate change and a combined factor related to soil water storage capacity and the pasture production function were the factors which influenced water erosion the most. Of them, climate change is the main source of uncertainty, though in this study it caused a reduction in the mean and the variance of long-term erosion rates. The economic and managerial factors showed scant influence on soil erosion, meaning that it is unlikely to find such influence in the study area for the time being. This is because the low profitability of the livestock business maintains stocking rates at low levels. However, the potential impact of livestock, through which economic and managerial factors affect soil erosion, proved to be greater in absolute value than the impact of climate change. Therefore, if changes in some economic or managerial factors led to higher stocking rates in the future, significant increases in erosion rates would be expected.

  1. Application of Lidar Data to the Performance Evaluations of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Tropospheric Ozone (O3) Lidar Network (TOLNet) provides time/height O3 measurements from near the surface to the top of the troposphere to describe in high-fidelity spatial-temporal distributions, which is uniquely useful to evaluate the temporal evolution of O3 profiles in air quality models. This presentation describes the application of the Lidar data to the performance evaluation of CMAQ simulated O3 vertical profiles during the summer, 2014. Two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ simulations with 12km and 4km domains centered over Boulder, Colorado were performed during this time period. The analysis on the time series of observed and modeled O3 mixing ratios at different vertical layers indicates that the model frequently underestimated the observed values, and the underestimation was amplified in the middle model layers (~1km above the ground). When the lightning strikes detected by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) were analyzed along with the observed O3 time series, it was found that the daily maximum O3 mixing ratios correlated well with the lightning strikes in the vicinity of the Lidar station. The analysis on temporal vertical profiles of both observed and modeled O3 mixing ratios on episodic days suggests that the model resolutions (12km and 4km) do not make any significant difference for this analysis (at this specific location and simulation period), but high O3 levels in the middle layers were linked to lightning activity that occurred in t

  2. Brookfield Homes Passive House Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Herk, A.; Poerschke, A.; Beach, R.

    2016-02-04

    In 2012-2013, IBACOS worked with a builder, Brookfield Homes in Denver, Colorado, to design and construct a Passive House certified model home. IBACOS used several modeling programs and calculation methods to complete the final design package along with Brookfield's architect KGA Studio. This design package included upgrades to the thermal enclosure, basement insulation, windows, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Short-term performance testing in the Passive House was done during construction and after construction. Testing with a blower door indicated that whole-building air leakage to the outside was 324 CFM and 0.60 ACH50. The other two test homes had little short-term testing done post-construction by the local energy rater. IBACOS then monitored the energy consumption and whole-house comfort conditions of that occupied Passive House after one year of operation and compared the monitoring results to those for two other occupied test houses in the same area with similar square footage but slightly different floor plans. IBACOS also assisted the builder, Brookfield Homes, in researching design scenarios for Zero Energy Ready Home and ENERGY STAR acceptance levels. IBACOS also assisted Brookfield in conceptualizing product for Denver's Brighton Heights area. Brookfield was considering building to Zero Energy Ready Home standards in that location. IBACOS provided strategies that Brookfield may draw from in the event the builder chooses to pursue a Zero Energy Ready Home plan for that market.

  3. Comparative Performance Evaluation of Rainfall-runoff Models, Six of Black-box Type and One of Conceptual Type, From The Galway Flow Forecasting System (gffs) Package, Applied On Two Irish Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, M.; O'Connor, K. M.; Shamseldin, A. Y.

    The "Galway Real-Time River Flow Forecasting System" (GFFS) is a software pack- age developed at the Department of Engineering Hydrology, of the National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. It is based on a selection of lumped black-box and con- ceptual rainfall-runoff models, all developed in Galway, consisting primarily of both the non-parametric (NP) and parametric (P) forms of two black-box-type rainfall- runoff models, namely, the Simple Linear Model (SLM-NP and SLM-P) and the seasonally-based Linear Perturbation Model (LPM-NP and LPM-P), together with the non-parametric wetness-index-based Linearly Varying Gain Factor Model (LVGFM), the black-box Artificial Neural Network (ANN) Model, and the conceptual Soil Mois- ture Accounting and Routing (SMAR) Model. Comprised of the above suite of mod- els, the system enables the user to calibrate each model individually, initially without updating, and it is capable also of producing combined (i.e. consensus) forecasts us- ing the Simple Average Method (SAM), the Weighted Average Method (WAM), or the Artificial Neural Network Method (NNM). The updating of each model output is achieved using one of four different techniques, namely, simple Auto-Regressive (AR) updating, Linear Transfer Function (LTF) updating, Artificial Neural Network updating (NNU), and updating by the Non-linear Auto-Regressive Exogenous-input method (NARXM). The models exhibit a considerable range of variation in degree of complexity of structure, with corresponding degrees of complication in objective func- tion evaluation. Operating in continuous river-flow simulation and updating modes, these models and techniques have been applied to two Irish catchments, namely, the Fergus and the Brosna. A number of performance evaluation criteria have been used to comparatively assess the model discharge forecast efficiency.

  4. Test suite for evaluating performance of multithreaded MPI communication.

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, R.; Gropp, W.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Illinois

    2009-12-01

    As parallel systems are commonly being built out of increasingly large multicore chips, application programmers are exploring the use of hybrid programming models combining MPI across nodes and multithreading within a node. Many MPI implementations, however, are just starting to support multithreaded MPI communication, often focussing on correctness first and performance later. As a result, both users and implementers need some measure for evaluating the multithreaded performance of an MPI implementation. In this paper, we propose a number of performance tests that are motivated by typical application scenarios. These tests cover the overhead of providing the MPI-THREAD-MULTIPLE level of thread safety for user programs, the amount of concurrency in different threads making MPI calls, the ability to overlap communication with computation, and other features. We present performance results with this test suite on several platforms (Linux cluster, Sun and IBM SMPs) and MPI implementations (MPICH2, Open MPI, IBM, and Sun).

  5. 48 CFR 2936.201 - Evaluation of contractor performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evaluation of contractor... Construction 2936.201 Evaluation of contractor performance. The HCA must establish procedures to evaluate construction contractor performance and prepare performance reports as required by FAR 36.201....

  6. 48 CFR 2452.216-73 - Performance evaluation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Performance evaluation plan... 2452.216-73 Performance evaluation plan. As prescribed in 2416.406(e)(3), insert the following clause in all award fee contracts: Performance Evaluation Plan (AUG 1987) (a) The Government...

  7. Performance Modeling: Understanding the Present and Predicting theFuture

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Snavely, Allan

    2005-11-30

    We present an overview of current research in performance modeling, focusing on efforts underway in the Performance Evaluation Research Center (PERC). Using some new techniques, we are able to construct performance models that can be used to project the sustained performance of large-scale scientific programs on different systems, over a range of job and system sizes. Such models can be used by vendors in system designs, by computing centers in system acquisitions, and by application scientists to improve the performance of their codes.

  8. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.

  9. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed

  10. Performance Evaluation in Network-Based Parallel Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezhgosha, Kamyar

    1996-01-01

    Network-based parallel computing is emerging as a cost-effective alternative for solving many problems which require use of supercomputers or massively parallel computers. The primary objective of this project has been to conduct experimental research on performance evaluation for clustered parallel computing. First, a testbed was established by augmenting our existing SUNSPARCs' network with PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) which is a software system for linking clusters of machines. Second, a set of three basic applications were selected. The applications consist of a parallel search, a parallel sort, a parallel matrix multiplication. These application programs were implemented in C programming language under PVM. Third, we conducted performance evaluation under various configurations and problem sizes. Alternative parallel computing models and workload allocations for application programs were explored. The performance metric was limited to elapsed time or response time which in the context of parallel computing can be expressed in terms of speedup. The results reveal that the overhead of communication latency between processes in many cases is the restricting factor to performance. That is, coarse-grain parallelism which requires less frequent communication between processes will result in higher performance in network-based computing. Finally, we are in the final stages of installing an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch and four ATM interfaces (each 155 Mbps) which will allow us to extend our study to newer applications, performance metrics, and configurations.

  11. Evaluation of a lake whitefish bioenergetics model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; O'Connor, Daniel V.; Pothoven, Steven A.; Schneeberger, Philip J.; Rediske, Richard R.; O'Keefe, James P.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Argyle, Ray L.; Brandt, Stephen B.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis in the laboratory and in the field. For the laboratory evaluation, lake whitefish were fed rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax in four laboratory tanks during a 133-d experiment. Based on a comparison of bioenergetics model predictions of lake whitefish food consumption and growth with observed consumption and growth, we concluded that the bioenergetics model furnished significantly biased estimates of both food consumption and growth. On average, the model overestimated consumption by 61% and underestimated growth by 16%. The source of the bias was probably an overestimation of the respiration rate. We therefore adjusted the respiration component of the bioenergetics model to obtain a good fit of the model to the observed consumption and growth in our laboratory tanks. Based on the adjusted model, predictions of food consumption over the 133-d period fell within 5% of observed consumption in three of the four tanks and within 9% of observed consumption in the remaining tank. We used polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as a tracer to evaluate model performance in the field. Based on our laboratory experiment, the efficiency with which lake whitefish retained PCBs from their food (I?) was estimated at 0.45. We applied the bioenergetics model to Lake Michigan lake whitefish and then used PCB determinations of both lake whitefish and their prey from Lake Michigan to estimate p in the field. Application of the original model to Lake Michigan lake whitefish yielded a field estimate of 0.28, implying that the original formulation of the model overestimated consumption in Lake Michigan by 61%. Application of the bioenergetics model with the adjusted respiration component resulted in a field I? estimate of 0.56, implying that this revised model underestimated consumption by 20%.

  12. Towards Reliable Evaluation of Anomaly-Based Intrusion Detection Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanathan, Arun

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the results of research into the effects of environment-induced noise on the evaluation process for anomaly detectors in the cyber security domain. This research was conducted during a 10-week summer internship program from the 19th of August, 2012 to the 23rd of August, 2012 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The research performed lies within the larger context of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) Smart Grid cyber security project, a Department of Energy (DoE) funded effort involving the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology and the University of Southern California/ Information Sciences Institute. The results of the present effort constitute an important contribution towards building more rigorous evaluation paradigms for anomaly-based intrusion detectors in complex cyber physical systems such as the Smart Grid. Anomaly detection is a key strategy for cyber intrusion detection and operates by identifying deviations from profiles of nominal behavior and are thus conceptually appealing for detecting "novel" attacks. Evaluating the performance of such a detector requires assessing: (a) how well it captures the model of nominal behavior, and (b) how well it detects attacks (deviations from normality). Current evaluation methods produce results that give insufficient insight into the operation of a detector, inevitably resulting in a significantly poor characterization of a detectors performance. In this work, we first describe a preliminary taxonomy of key evaluation constructs that are necessary for establishing rigor in the evaluation regime of an anomaly detector. We then focus on clarifying the impact of the operational environment on the manifestation of attacks in monitored data. We show how dynamic and evolving environments can introduce high variability into the data stream perturbing detector performance. Prior research has focused on understanding the impact of this

  13. A Taxonomy of Evaluation Models: Use of Evaluation Models in Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Wayne E.

    In the nine years following the passage of the Elementary Secondary Education Act (ESEA), several models have been developed to attempt to remedy the deficiencies in existing educational evaluation and decision theory noted by Stufflebeam and co-workers. Compilations of evaluation models have been undertaken and listings exist of models available…

  14. Performance evaluation of solar water sterilization system

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Takeo; El-Ghetany, H.H.

    1998-07-01

    In most countries, the contaminated water is the major cause of most of the water-born diseases. Solar energy can be used in this field because the inactivation of micro-organisms is done by the ultraviolet solar radiation. A pilot solar system for sterilizing the contaminated water is designed, constructed and tested. The experimental data showed good viability for using solar energy in the sterilization process. A mathematical model of the solar sterilizer is also presented. The governing equations are solved numerically using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The effects of environmental conditions (ambient temperature, wind speed and solar radiation) on the solar sterilizer performance are examined. It is found that the system is affected by the ambient temperature, wind speed, ultraviolet solar radiation intensity, level of contamination of water, quantity of water being exposed, contact area between the transparent water container in the solar sterilizer and absorber plate and system geometrical parameters. It is pointed that, for a partial cloud condition, low ambient temperature and high wind speed the thermal efficiency of the solar sterilizer was minimum.

  15. A performance evaluation framework for association mining in spatial data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios

    2010-12-01

    The evaluation of the process of mining associations is an important and challenging problem in database systems and especially those that store critical data and are used for making critical decisions. Within the context of spatial databases we present an evaluation framework in which we use probability distributions to model spatial regions, and Bayesian networks to model the joint probability distribution and the structural relationships among spatial and non-spatial predicates. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed framework by evaluating representatives from two well-known approaches that are used for learning associations, i.e., dependency analysis (using statistical tests of independence) and Bayesian methods. By controlling the parameters of the framework we provide extensive comparative results of the performance of the two approaches. We obtain measures of recovery of known associations as a function of the number of samples used, the strength, number and type of associations in the model, the number of spatial predicates associated with a particular non-spatial predicate, the prior probabilities of spatial predicates, the conditional probabilities of the non-spatial predicates, the image registration error, and the parameters that control the sensitivity of the methods. In addition to performance we investigate the processing efficiency of the two approaches.

  16. CTBT integrated verification system evaluation model supplement

    SciTech Connect

    EDENBURN,MICHAEL W.; BUNTING,MARCUS; PAYNE JR.,ARTHUR C.; TROST,LAWRENCE C.

    2000-03-02

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia's Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, ''top-level,'' modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM's unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, in sound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection), location accuracy, and identification capability of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system's performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. The original IVSEM report, CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model, SAND97-25 18, described version 1.2 of IVSEM. This report describes the changes made to IVSEM version 1.2 and the addition of identification capability estimates that have been incorporated into IVSEM version 2.0.

  17. Evaluating conflation methods using uncertainty modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doucette, Peter; Dolloff, John; Canavosio-Zuzelski, Roberto; Lenihan, Michael; Motsko, Dennis

    2013-05-01

    The classic problem of computer-assisted conflation involves the matching of individual features (e.g., point, polyline, or polygon vectors) as stored in a geographic information system (GIS), between two different sets (layers) of features. The classical goal of conflation is the transfer of feature metadata (attributes) from one layer to another. The age of free public and open source geospatial feature data has significantly increased the opportunity to conflate such data to create enhanced products. There are currently several spatial conflation tools in the marketplace with varying degrees of automation. An ability to evaluate conflation tool performance quantitatively is of operational value, although manual truthing of matched features is laborious and costly. In this paper, we present a novel methodology that uses spatial uncertainty modeling to simulate realistic feature layers to streamline evaluation of feature matching performance for conflation methods. Performance results are compiled for DCGIS street centerline features.

  18. [Evaluation of the Dresden Tympanoplasty Model (DTM)].

    PubMed

    Beleites, T; Neudert, M; Lasurashvili, N; Kemper, M; Offergeld, C; Hofmann, G; Zahnert, T

    2011-11-01

    The training of microsurgical motor skills is essentiell for surgical education if the interests of the patient are to be safeguarded. In otosurgery the complex anatomy of the temporal bone and variations necessitate a special training before performing surgery on a patient. We therefore developed and evaluated a simplified middle ear model for acquiring first microsurgical skills in tympanoplasty.The simplified tympanoplasty model consists of the outer ear canal and a tympanic cavity. A stapes model is placed in projection of the upper posterior tympanic membrane quadrant at the medial wall of the simulated tympanic cavity. To imitate the annular ligament flexibility the stapes is fixed on a soft plastic pad. 41 subjects evaluated the model´s anatomical analogy, the comparability to the real surgical situation and the general model properties the using a special questionnaire.The tympanoplasty model was very well evaluated by all participants. It is a reasonably priced model and a useful tool in microsurgical skills training. Thereby, it closes the gap between theoretical training and real operation conditions.

  19. Human Performance Models of Pilot Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foyle, David C.; Hooey, Becky L.; Byrne, Michael D.; Deutsch, Stephen; Lebiere, Christian; Leiden, Ken; Wickens, Christopher D.; Corker, Kevin M.

    2005-01-01

    Five modeling teams from industry and academia were chosen by the NASA Aviation Safety and Security Program to develop human performance models (HPM) of pilots performing taxi operations and runway instrument approaches with and without advanced displays. One representative from each team will serve as a panelist to discuss their team s model architecture, augmentations and advancements to HPMs, and aviation-safety related lessons learned. Panelists will discuss how modeling results are influenced by a model s architecture and structure, the role of the external environment, specific modeling advances and future directions and challenges for human performance modeling in aviation.

  20. Performance Evaluation of Voice Over Internet Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    Table 1. Codec Comparison ...........................................................................................17 Table 2. VoIP Packet Priority...31 Table 9. Comparison of VoIP Performance Measurement ............................................42 Table 10. Mean Opinion Score...environment. A VoIP performance measurement on a local Ethernet is used as the baseline for performance comparison . Furthermore, this research

  1. Maintenance personnel performance simulation (MAPPS): a model for predicting maintenance performance reliability in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Knee, H.E.; Krois, P.A.; Haas, P.M.; Siegel, A.I.; Ryan, T.G.

    1983-01-01

    The NRC has developed a structured, quantitative, predictive methodology in the form of a computerized simulation model for assessing maintainer task performance. Objective of the overall program is to develop, validate, and disseminate a practical, useful, and acceptable methodology for the quantitative assessment of NPP maintenance personnel reliability. The program was organized into four phases: (1) scoping study, (2) model development, (3) model evaluation, and (4) model dissemination. The program is currently nearing completion of Phase 2 - Model Development.

  2. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Wwww of... - Basic Requirements for Performance Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New and Existing Sources Using Add-On Control... Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New and Existing Sources Using Add-On Control... emissions to an add-on control device that is a PTE Meet the requirements for a PTE EPA method 204...

  3. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Wwww of... - Basic Requirements for Performance Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New and Existing Sources Using Add-On Control... Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New and Existing Sources Using Add-On Control... emissions to an add-on control device that is a PTE Meet the requirements for a PTE EPA method 204...

  4. Modeling lateral acceleration effects on pilot performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korn, J.; Kleinan, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Attendant to the direct side force maneuver of a Vectored Force Fighter is the transverse acceleration imposed on the pilot. This lateral acceleration (Gy), when combind with a positive Gz stress, is a potential source of pilot tracking performance impairment. A research effort to investigate these performance decrements includes experimental as well as anaytical pilot performance modeling using the Optimal Control Model.

  5. Findings and Preliminary Recommendations from the Michigan State and Indiana University Research Study of Value-Added Models to Evaluate Teacher Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.

    2013-01-01

    The push for accountability in public schooling has extended to the measurement of teacher performance, accelerated by federal efforts through Race to the Top. Currently, a large number of states and districts across the country are computing measures of teacher performance based on the standardized test scores of their students and using them in…

  6. The design and implementation of an operational model evaluation system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.T.

    1995-06-01

    An evaluation of an atmospheric transport and diffusion model`s operational performance typically involves the comparison of the model`s calculations with measurements of an atmospheric pollutant`s temporal and spatial distribution. These evaluations however often use data from a small number of experiments and may be limited to producing some of the commonly quoted statistics based on the differences between model calculations and the measurements. This paper presents efforts to develop a model evaluation system geared for both the objective statistical analysis and the more subjective visualization of the inter-relationships between a model`s calculations and the appropriate field measurement data.

  7. Evaluation strategies for CNSs: application of an evaluation model.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Malone, L M

    1996-07-01

    Program development has become an essential role function for today's CNS, who must be able to evaluate programs to determine their efficacy. A useful evaluation guide is Stufflebeam's CIPP (context, input, process, and product) model, which includes a framework to evaluate indirect care measures directly affecting cost-effectiveness and accountability. The model's core consists of (1) context evaluation leading to informed, contemplated decisions; (2) input evaluation directing structured decisions; (3) process evaluation guiding implemented decisions; and (4) product evaluation serving to recycle decisions. Strategies for using Stufflebeam's CIPP model are described.

  8. Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-19

    Analytical application performance models are critical for diagnosing performance-limiting resources, optimizing systems, and designing machines. Creating models, however, is difficult. Furthermore, models are frequently expressed in forms that are hard to distribute and validate. The Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling tool, or Palm, is a modeling tool designed to make application modeling easier. Palm provides a source code modeling annotation language. Not only does the modeling language divide the modeling task into sub problems, it formally links an application's source code with its model. This link is important because a model's purpose is to capture application behavior. Furthermore, this link makes it possible to define rules for generating models according to source code organization. Palm generates hierarchical models according to well-defined rules. Given an application, a set of annotations, and a representative execution environment, Palm will generate the same model. A generated model is a an executable program whose constituent parts directly correspond to the modeled application. Palm generates models by combining top-down (human-provided) semantic insight with bottom-up static and dynamic analysis. A model's hierarchy is defined by static and dynamic source code structure. Because Palm coordinates models and source code, Palm's models are 'first-class' and reproducible. Palm automates common modeling tasks. For instance, Palm incorporates measurements to focus attention, represent constant behavior, and validate models. Palm's workflow is as follows. The workflow's input is source code annotated with Palm modeling annotations. The most important annotation models an instance of a block of code. Given annotated source code, the Palm Compiler produces executables and the Palm Monitor collects a representative performance profile. The Palm Generator synthesizes a model based on the static and dynamic mapping of annotations to program behavior

  9. Development of task network models of human performance in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Manuel F.; Adam, Susan

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the utility of task-network modeling for quantifying human performance variability in microgravity. The data are gathered for: (1) improving current methodologies for assessing human performance and workload in the operational space environment; (2) developing tools for assessing alternative system designs; and (3) developing an integrated set of methodologies for the evaluation of performance degradation during extended duration spaceflight. The evaluation entailed an analysis of the Remote Manipulator System payload-grapple task performed on many shuttle missions. Task-network modeling can be used as a tool for assessing and enhancing human performance in man-machine systems, particularly for modeling long-duration manned spaceflight. Task-network modeling can be directed toward improving system efficiency by increasing the understanding of basic capabilities of the human component in the system and the factors that influence these capabilities.

  10. FLUORESCENT TRACER EVALUATION OF PROTECTIVE CLOTHING PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies evaluating chemical protective clothing (CPC), which is often employed as a primary control option to reduce occupational exposures during pesticide applications, are limited. This study, supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was designed to...

  11. Performance Evaluation of the NASA/KSC Transmission System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Kenneth J.

    2000-01-01

    NASA-KSC currently uses three bridged 100-Mbps FDDI segments as its backbone for data traffic. The FDDI Transmission System (FTXS) connects the KSC industrial area, KSC launch complex 39 area, and the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The report presents a performance modeling study of the FTXS and the proposed ATM Transmission System (ATXS). The focus of the study is on performance of MPEG video transmission on these networks. Commercial modeling tools - the CACI Predictor and Comnet tools - were used. In addition, custom software tools were developed to characterize conversation pairs in Sniffer trace (capture) files to use as input to these tools. A baseline study of both non-launch and launch day data traffic on the FTXS is presented. MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 video traffic was characterized and the shaping of it evaluated. It is shown that the characteristics of a video stream has a direct effect on its performance in a network. It is also shown that shaping of video streams is necessary to prevent overflow losses and resulting poor video quality. The developed models can be used to predict when the existing FTXS will 'run out of room' and for optimizing the parameters of ATM links used for transmission of MPEG video. Future work with these models can provide useful input and validation to set-top box projects within the Advanced Networks Development group in NASA-KSC Development Engineering.

  12. Evaluating Performances of Solar-Energy Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    CONC11 computer program calculates performances of dish-type solar thermal collectors and power systems. Solar thermal power system consists of one or more collectors, power-conversion subsystems, and powerprocessing subsystems. CONC11 intended to aid system designer in comparing performance of various design alternatives. Written in Athena FORTRAN and Assembler.

  13. Evaluation of a Mysis bioenergetics model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, S.R.; Bennett, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    Direct approaches for estimating the feeding rate of the opossum shrimp Mysis relicta can be hampered by variable gut residence time (evacuation rate models) and non-linear functional responses (clearance rate models). Bioenergetics modeling provides an alternative method, but the reliability of this approach needs to be evaluated using independent measures of growth and food consumption. In this study, we measured growth and food consumption for M. relicta and compared experimental results with those predicted from a Mysis bioenergetics model. For Mysis reared at 10??C, model predictions were not significantly different from observed values. Moreover, decomposition of mean square error indicated that 70% of the variation between model predictions and observed values was attributable to random error. On average, model predictions were within 12% of observed values. A sensitivity analysis revealed that Mysis respiration and prey energy density were the most sensitive parameters affecting model output. By accounting for uncertainty (95% CLs) in Mysis respiration, we observed a significant improvement in the accuracy of model output (within 5% of observed values), illustrating the importance of sensitive input parameters for model performance. These findings help corroborate the Mysis bioenergetics model and demonstrate the usefulness of this approach for estimating Mysis feeding rate.

  14. Evaluating snow models for hydrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, T.; Magnusson, J.; Wever, N.; Essery, R.; Helbig, N.

    2014-12-01

    Much effort has been invested in developing snow models over several decades, resulting in a wide variety of empirical and physically-based snow models. Within the two categories, models are built on the same principles but mainly differ in choices of model simplifications and parameterizations describing individual processes. In this study, we demonstrate an informative method for evaluating a large range of snow model structures for hydrological applications using an existing multi-model energy-balance framework and data from two well-instrumented sites with a seasonal snow cover. We also include two temperature-index snow models and one physically-based multi-layer snow model in our analyses. Our results show that the ability of models to predict snowpack runoff is strongly related to the agreement of observed and modelled snow water equivalent whereas such relationship is not present for snow depth or snow surface temperature measurements. For snow water equivalent and runoff, the models seem transferable between our two study sites, a behaviour which is not observed for snow surface temperature predictions due to site-specificity of turbulent heat transfer formulations. Uncertainties in the input and validation data, rather than model formulation, appear to contribute most to low model performances in some winters. More importantly, we find that model complexity is not a determinant for predicting daily snow water equivalent and runoff reliably, but choosing an appropriate model structure is. Our study shows the usefulness of the multi-model framework for identifying appropriate models under given constraints such as data availability, properties of interest and computational cost.

  15. Human visual performance model for crewstation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larimer, James O.; Prevost, Michael P.; Arditi, Aries R.; Azueta, Steven; Bergen, James R.; Lubin, Jeffrey

    1991-08-01

    In a cockpit, the crewstation of an airplane, the ability of the pilot to unambiguously perceive rapidly changing information both internal and external to the crewstation is critical. To assess the impact of crewstation design decisions on the pilot''s ability to perceive information, the designer needs a means of evaluating the trade-offs that result from different designs. The Visibility Modeling Tool (VMT) provides the designer with a CAD tool for assessing these trade-offs. It combines the technologies of computer graphics, computational geometry, human performance modeling and equipment modeling into a computer-based interactive design tool. Through a simple interactive interface, a designer can manipulate design parameters such as the geometry of the cockpit, environmental factors such as ambient lighting, pilot parameters such as point of regard and adaptation state, and equipment parameters such as the location of displays, their size and the contrast of displayed symbology. VMT provides an end-to-end analysis that answers questions such as ''Will the pilot be able to read the display?'' Performance data can be projected, in the form of 3D contours, into the crewstation graphic model, providing the designer with a footprint of the operator''s visual capabilities, defining, for example, the regions in which fonts of a particular type, size and contrast can be read without error. Geometrical data such as the pilot''s volume field of view, occlusions caused by facial geometry, helmet margins, and objects in the crewstation can also be projected into the crewstation graphic model with respect to the coordinates of the aviator''s eyes and fixation point. The intersections of the projections with objects in the crewstation, delineate the area of coverage, masking, or occlusion associated with the objects. Objects in the crewstation space can be projected onto models of the operator''s retinas. These projections can be used to provide the designer with the

  16. Team Primacy Concept (TPC) Based Employee Evaluation and Job Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muniute, Eivina I.; Alfred, Mary V.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study explored how employees learn from Team Primacy Concept (TPC) based employee evaluation and how they use the feedback in performing their jobs. TPC based evaluation is a form of multirater evaluation, during which the employee's performance is discussed by one's peers in a face-to-face team setting. The study used Kolb's…

  17. Sustainable Supplier Performance Evaluation and Selection with Neofuzzy TOPSIS Method

    PubMed Central

    Chaharsooghi, S. K.; Ashrafi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Supplier selection plays an important role in the supply chain management and traditional criteria such as price, quality, and flexibility are considered for supplier performance evaluation in researches. In recent years sustainability has received more attention in the supply chain management literature with triple bottom line (TBL) describing the sustainability in supply chain management with social, environmental, and economic initiatives. This paper explores sustainability in supply chain management and examines the problem of identifying a new model for supplier selection based on extended model of TBL approach in supply chain by presenting fuzzy multicriteria method. Linguistic values of experts' subjective preferences are expressed with fuzzy numbers and Neofuzzy TOPSIS is proposed for finding the best solution of supplier selection problem. Numerical results show that the proposed model is efficient for integrating sustainability in supplier selection problem. The importance of using complimentary aspects of sustainability and Neofuzzy TOPSIS concept in sustainable supplier selection process is shown with sensitivity analysis. PMID:27379267

  18. Sustainable Supplier Performance Evaluation and Selection with Neofuzzy TOPSIS Method.

    PubMed

    Chaharsooghi, S K; Ashrafi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Supplier selection plays an important role in the supply chain management and traditional criteria such as price, quality, and flexibility are considered for supplier performance evaluation in researches. In recent years sustainability has received more attention in the supply chain management literature with triple bottom line (TBL) describing the sustainability in supply chain management with social, environmental, and economic initiatives. This paper explores sustainability in supply chain management and examines the problem of identifying a new model for supplier selection based on extended model of TBL approach in supply chain by presenting fuzzy multicriteria method. Linguistic values of experts' subjective preferences are expressed with fuzzy numbers and Neofuzzy TOPSIS is proposed for finding the best solution of supplier selection problem. Numerical results show that the proposed model is efficient for integrating sustainability in supplier selection problem. The importance of using complimentary aspects of sustainability and Neofuzzy TOPSIS concept in sustainable supplier selection process is shown with sensitivity analysis.

  19. Assembly line performance and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, Arun B.; Sunnapwar, Vivek K.

    2017-03-01

    Automobile sector forms the backbone of manufacturing sector. Vehicle assembly line is important section in automobile plant where repetitive tasks are performed one after another at different workstations. In this thesis, a methodology is proposed to reduce cycle time and time loss due to important factors like equipment failure, shortage of inventory, absenteeism, set-up, material handling, rejection and fatigue to improve output within given cost constraints. Various relationships between these factors, corresponding cost and output are established by scientific approach. This methodology is validated in three different vehicle assembly plants. Proposed methodology may help practitioners to optimize the assembly line using lean techniques.

  20. EVALUATION OF VENTILATION PERFORMANCE FOR INDOOR SPACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a personal-computer-based application of computational fluid dynamics that can be used to determine the turbulent flow field and time-dependent/steady-state contaminant concentration distributions within isothermal indoor space. (NOTE: Ventilation performance ...

  1. 48 CFR 8.406-7 - Contractor Performance Evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contractor Performance... ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Federal Supply Schedules 8.406-7 Contractor Performance Evaluation. Ordering activities must prepare an evaluation of contractor performance for...

  2. Evaluation of performance impairment by spacecraft contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, I.; Hartman, R. J., Jr.; Mendez, V. M.

    1977-01-01

    The environmental contaminants (isolated as off-gases in Skylab and Apollo missions) were evaluated. Specifically, six contaminants were evaluated for their effects on the behavior of juvenile baboons. The concentrations of contaminants were determined through preliminary range-finding studies with laboratory rats. The contaminants evaluated were acetone, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), trichloroethylene (TCE), heptane and Freon 21. When the studies of the individual gases were completed, the baboons were also exposed to a mixture of MEK and TCE. The data obtained revealed alterations in the behavior of baboons exposed to relatively low levels of the contaminants. These findings were presented at the First International Symposium on Voluntary Inhalation of Industrial Solvents in Mexico City, June 21-24, 1976. A preprint of the proceedings is included.

  3. A Perspective on Computational Human Performance Models as Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    The design of interactive systems, including levels of automation, displays, and controls, is usually based on design guidelines and iterative empirical prototyping. A complementary approach is to use computational human performance models to evaluate designs. An integrated strategy of model-based and empirical test and evaluation activities is particularly attractive as a methodology for verification and validation of human-rated systems for commercial space. This talk will review several computational human performance modeling approaches and their applicability to design of display and control requirements.

  4. An Evaluation of Cluster Analytic Approaches to Initial Model Specification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Donald R.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the performance of several alternative cluster analytic approaches to initial model specification using population parameter analyses and a Monte Carlo simulation. Of the six cluster approaches evaluated, the one using the correlations of item correlations as a proximity metric and average linking as a clustering algorithm performed the…

  5. Seismic performance evaluation of substation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, H.H.M.; Huo, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an approach for evaluating seismic hazards at the site and generating fragility curves for structures such as the capacitor bank in one of the major substations in the Memphis electric transmission system. The results from this study will be used to determine the adequacy of electric supply to several major hospitals in downtown Memphis after a large New Madrid earthquake.

  6. Disaggregating Pupil Performance Scores: Evaluating School Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Henriette L.; Tadlock, James A.

    This report describes various components of the process of disaggregating student achievement data and provides examples of each component. Information is provided to allow school districts to conduct their own school effectiveness evaluation. Results of the California Achievement Tests form one of the bases of the analysis. The underlying…

  7. Performance Evaluation of Artificial Intelligence Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-17

    difficulty Veit and Callero (1981) have Aq developed an evaluation technique called the Subjective Transfer Function (STF) ’-~ ~approach. In the STF...Information Retrieval, Montreal, Canada. Veit, C.T., M. Callero . (1981) Subjective Transfer Function Approach to Complex System " 4Analysis. Rand Corp

  8. Development of the "performance competence evaluation measure": assessing qualitative aspects of dance performance.

    PubMed

    Krasnow, Donna; Chatfield, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a measurement tool, the "Performance Competence Evaluation Measure" (PCEM), for the evaluation of qualitative aspects of dance performance. The project had two phases. In the first phase a literature review was conducted to examine 1. the previous development of similar measurement tools, 2. descriptions of dance technique and dance performance applicable to the development of a qualitative measurement tool, and 3. theoretical models from somatic practices that evaluate and assess qualitative aspects of movement and dance activity. The second phase involved the development of a system for using PCEM, and testing its validity and reliability. Three judges from the professional dance community volunteered to test PCEM with a sample of 20 subjects from low-intermediate to advanced classes at a university dance program. The subjects learned a dance combination and were videotaped performing it on two separate occasions, eight weeks apart. The judges reviewed the videos in random order. Logical validity of PCEM was established through assessment by two faculty members of the university dance department and the three judges. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability demonstrated correlation coefficients of 0.95 and 0.94, respectively. It was concluded that PCEM can serve as a useful measurement tool for future dance science research.

  9. Summary of photovoltaic system performance models

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. H.; Reiter, L. J.

    1984-01-15

    The purpose of this study is to provide a detailed overview of photovoltaics (PV) performance modeling capabilities that have been developed during recent years for analyzing PV system and component design and policy issues. A set of 10 performance models have been selected which span a representative range of capabilities from generalized first-order calculations to highly specialized electrical network simulations. A set of performance modeling topics and characteristics is defined and used to examine some of the major issues associated with photovoltaic performance modeling. Next, each of the models is described in the context of these topics and characteristics to assess its purpose, approach, and level of detail. Then each of the issues is discussed in terms of the range of model capabilities available and summarized in tabular form for quick reference. Finally, the models are grouped into categories to illustrate their purposes and perspectives.

  10. Summary of photovoltaic system performance models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H.; Reiter, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed overview of photovoltaics (PV) performance modeling capabilities developed for analyzing PV system and component design and policy issues is provided. A set of 10 performance models are selected which span a representative range of capabilities from generalized first order calculations to highly specialized electrical network simulations. A set of performance modeling topics and characteristics is defined and used to examine some of the major issues associated with photovoltaic performance modeling. Each of the models is described in the context of these topics and characteristics to assess its purpose, approach, and level of detail. The issues are discussed in terms of the range of model capabilities available and summarized in tabular form for quick reference. The models are grouped into categories to illustrate their purposes and perspectives.

  11. Evaluation of genome-enabled selection for bacterial cold water disease resistance using progeny performance data in Rainbow Trout: Insights on genotyping methods and genomic prediction models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic losses in salmonid aquaculture, and traditional family-based breeding programs aimed at improving BCWD resistance have been limited to exploiting only between-family variation. We used genomic selection (GS) models to predict genomic br...

  12. A COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF THE ETA-CMAQ FORECAST MODEL PERFORMANCE FOR O3, ITS RELATED PRECURSORS, AND METEOROLOGICAL PARAMETERS DURING THE 2004 ICARTT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the ability of the Eta-CMAQ forecast model to represent the vertical profiles of O3, related chemical species (CO, NO, NO2, H2O2, CH2O, HNO3, SO2, PAN, isoprene, toluene), and meteorological paramete...

  13. Evaluation of Learning Performance of E-Learning in China: A Methodology Based on Change of Internal Mental Model of Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Lingxian; Zhang, Xiaoshuan; Duan, Yanqing; Fu, Zetian; Wang, Yanwei

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method of assessment on how Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and animation influence the psychological process of learning by comparing a traditional web design course and an e-learning web design course, based on the Change of Internal Mental Model of Learners. We constructed the e-learning course based on Gagne's learning…

  14. Performance evaluation of 1 kw PEFC

    SciTech Connect

    Komaki, Hideaki; Tsuchiyama, Syozo

    1996-12-31

    This report covers part of a joint study on a PEFC propulsion system for surface ships, summarized in a presentation to this Seminar, entitled {open_quote}Study on a PEFC Propulsion System for Surface Ships{close_quotes}, and which envisages application to a 1,500 DWT cargo vessel. The aspect treated here concerns the effects brought on PEFC operating performance by conditions particular to shipboard operation. The performance characteristics were examined through tests performed on a 1 kw stack and on a single cell (Manufactured by Fuji Electric Co., Ltd.). The tests covered the items (1) to (4) cited in the headings of the sections that follow. Specifications of the stack and single cell are as given.

  15. A Hybrid Evaluation System Framework (Shell & Web) with Standardized Access to Climate Model Data and Verification Tools for a Clear Climate Science Infrastructure on Big Data High Performance Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadow, C.; Illing, S.; Kunst, O.; Cubasch, U.

    2014-12-01

    The project 'Integrated Data and Evaluation System for Decadal Scale Prediction' (INTEGRATION) as part of the German decadal prediction project MiKlip develops a central evaluation system. The fully operational hybrid features a HPC shell access and an user friendly web-interface. It employs one common system with a variety of verification tools and validation data from different projects in- and outside of MiKlip. The evaluation system is located at the German Climate Computing Centre (DKRZ) and has direct access to the bulk of its ESGF node including millions of climate model data sets, e.g. from CMIP5 and CORDEX. The database is organized by the international CMOR standard using the meta information of the self-describing model, reanalysis and observational data sets. Apache Solr is used for indexing the different data projects into one common search environment. This implemented meta data system with its advanced but easy to handle search tool supports users, developers and their tools to retrieve the required information. A generic application programming interface (API) allows scientific developers to connect their analysis tools with the evaluation system independently of the programming language used. Users of the evaluation techniques benefit from the common interface of the evaluation system without any need to understand the different scripting languages. Facilitating the provision and usage of tools and climate data increases automatically the number of scientists working with the data sets and identify discrepancies. Additionally, the history and configuration sub-system stores every analysis performed with the evaluation system in a MySQL database. Configurations and results of the tools can be shared among scientists via shell or web-system. Therefore, plugged-in tools gain automatically from transparency and reproducibility. Furthermore, when configurations match while starting a evaluation tool, the system suggests to use results already produced

  16. A Hybrid Evaluation System Framework (Shell & Web) with Standardized Access to Climate Model Data and Verification Tools for a Clear Climate Science Infrastructure on Big Data High Performance Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadow, Christopher; Illing, Sebastian; Kunst, Oliver; Ulbrich, Uwe; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    The project 'Integrated Data and Evaluation System for Decadal Scale Prediction' (INTEGRATION) as part of the German decadal prediction project MiKlip develops a central evaluation system. The fully operational hybrid features a HPC shell access and an user friendly web-interface. It employs one common system with a variety of verification tools and validation data from different projects in- and outside of MiKlip. The evaluation system is located at the German Climate Computing Centre (DKRZ) and has direct access to the bulk of its ESGF node including millions of climate model data sets, e.g. from CMIP5 and CORDEX. The database is organized by the international CMOR standard using the meta information of the self-describing model, reanalysis and observational data sets. Apache Solr is used for indexing the different data projects into one common search environment. This implemented meta data system with its advanced but easy to handle search tool supports users, developers and their tools to retrieve the required information. A generic application programming interface (API) allows scientific developers to connect their analysis tools with the evaluation system independently of the programming language used. Users of the evaluation techniques benefit from the common interface of the evaluation system without any need to understand the different scripting languages. Facilitating the provision and usage of tools and climate data increases automatically the number of scientists working with the data sets and identify discrepancies. Additionally, the history and configuration sub-system stores every analysis performed with the evaluation system in a MySQL database. Configurations and results of the tools can be shared among scientists via shell or web-system. Therefore, plugged-in tools gain automatically from transparency and reproducibility. Furthermore, when configurations match while starting a evaluation tool, the system suggests to use results already produced

  17. Evaluating the factor structure of the Psychological Performance Inventory.

    PubMed

    Golby, Jim; Sheard, Michael; van Wersch, Anna

    2007-08-01

    This study assesses the construct validity of a measure of mental toughness, Loehr's Psychological Performance Inventory. Performers (N = 408, 303 men, 105 women, M age = 24.0 yr., SD = 6.7) drawn from eight sports (artistic rollerskating, basketball, canoeing, golf, rugby league, rugby union, soccer, swimming), and competing at either international, national, county and provincial, or club and regional standards. They completed the 42-item Psychological Performance Inventory during training camps. Principal components analysis provided minimal support for the factor structure. Instead, the exploratory analysis yielded a 4-factor 14-item model (PPI-A). A single factor underlying mental toughness (G(MT)) was identified with higher-order exploratory factor analysis using the Schmid-Leiman procedure. Psychometric analysis of the model, using confirmatory analysis techniques, fitted the data well. Collectively satisfying absolute and incremental fit index benchmarks, the inventory possesses satisfactory psychometric properties, with adequate reliability and convergent and discriminant validity. The results lend preliminary support to the factorial validity and reliability of the model; however, further investigation of its stability is required before recommending practitioners use changes in scores as an index for evaluating effects of training in psychological skills.

  18. Activity-Based Costing Model for Assessing Economic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHayes, Daniel W.; Lovrinic, Joseph G.

    1994-01-01

    An economic model for evaluating the cost performance of academic and administrative programs in higher education is described. Examples from its application at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis are used to illustrate how the model has been used to control costs and reengineer processes. (Author/MSE)

  19. Evaluating the performance of land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN v1.0 on water and energy flux estimation with a single- and multi-layer energy budget scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiying; Ryder, James; Bastrikov, Vladislav; McGrath, Matthew J.; Naudts, Kim; Otto, Juliane; Ottlé, Catherine; Peylin, Philippe; Polcher, Jan; Valade, Aude; Black, Andrew; Elbers, Jan A.; Moors, Eddy; Foken, Thomas; van Gorsel, Eva; Haverd, Vanessa; Heinesch, Bernard; Tiedemann, Frank; Knohl, Alexander; Launiainen, Samuli; Loustau, Denis; Ogée, Jérôme; Vessala, Timo; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2016-09-01

    Canopy structure is one of the most important vegetation characteristics for land-atmosphere interactions, as it determines the energy and scalar exchanges between the land surface and the overlying air mass. In this study we evaluated the performance of a newly developed multi-layer energy budget in the ORCHIDEE-CAN v1.0 land surface model (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - CANopy), which simulates canopy structure and can be coupled to an atmospheric model using an implicit coupling procedure. We aim to provide a set of acceptable parameter values for a range of forest types. Top-canopy and sub-canopy flux observations from eight sites were collected in order to conduct this evaluation. The sites crossed climate zones from temperate to boreal and the vegetation types included deciduous, evergreen broad-leaved and evergreen needle-leaved forest with a maximum leaf area index (LAI; all-sided) ranging from 3.5 to 7.0. The parametrization approach proposed in this study was based on three selected physical processes - namely the diffusion, advection, and turbulent mixing within the canopy. Short-term sub-canopy observations and long-term surface fluxes were used to calibrate the parameters in the sub-canopy radiation, turbulence, and resistance modules with an automatic tuning process. The multi-layer model was found to capture the dynamics of sub-canopy turbulence, temperature, and energy fluxes. The performance of the new multi-layer model was further compared against the existing single-layer model. Although the multi-layer model simulation results showed few or no improvements to both the nighttime energy balance and energy partitioning during winter compared with a single-layer model simulation, the increased model complexity does provide a more detailed description of the canopy micrometeorology of various forest types. The multi-layer model links to potential future environmental and ecological studies such as the assessment of in

  20. SAFIR operation and evaluation of it's performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Z.-I.; Yamamoto, K.; Matsuura, K.; Richard, P.; Matsui, Toshiaki; Sonoi, Yasuo; Shimokura, Naoyoshi

    1994-06-01

    SAFIR (Surveillance et d'Alerte Foudre par Interferometrie Radioelectrique) has been equipped and operated in Japan since June 12th, 1991 as a cooperative project among Osaka University, Kansai Electric Power Co. INC.(KEPCO), and the French manufacturer DIMENSIONS. The operational coverage covers Northern Kinki District, Wakasa District, and Hokuriku District. Hokuriku District is well known for its winter thunderstorm activity. The method for the evaluation was to take the cross-correlation between the meteorological radar echo pattern and the distribution pattern of lightning discharges detected by SAFIR. We obtained high cross-correlation coefficients and concluded that the SAFIR locations were shown to have statistically high accuracy. We also show the case study of the occurrence of the lightning strike, which is recorded by KEPCO, to evaluate the usefulness of the warning by SAFIR.

  1. Using Ratio Analysis to Evaluate Financial Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, John; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The ways in which ratio analysis can help in long-range planning, budgeting, and asset management to strengthen financial performance and help avoid financial difficulties are explained. Types of ratios considered include balance sheet ratios, net operating ratios, and contribution and demand ratios. (MSE)

  2. Performance evaluation of a liquid solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Report describes thermal performance and structural-load tests on commercial single glazed flat-plate solar collector with gross area of 63.5 sq ft that uses water as heat-transfer medium. Report documents test instrumentation and procedures and presents data as tables and graphs. Results are analyzed by standard data-reduction methods.

  3. Game Performance Evaluation in Male Goalball Players

    PubMed Central

    Molik, Bartosz; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Kosmol, Andrzej; Perkowski, Krzysztof; Bednarczuk, Grzegorz; Skowroński, Waldemar; Gomez, Miguel Angel; Koc, Krzysztof; Rutkowska, Izabela; Szyman, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Goalball is a Paralympic sport exclusively for athletes who are visually impaired and blind. The aims of this study were twofold: to describe game performance of elite male goalball players based upon the degree of visual impairment, and to determine if game performance was related to anthropometric characteristics of elite male goalball players. The study sample consisted of 44 male goalball athletes. A total of 38 games were recorded during the Summer Paralympic Games in London 2012. Observations were reported using the Game Efficiency Sheet for Goalball. Additional anthropometric measurements included body mass (kg), body height (cm), the arm span (cm) and length of the body in the defensive position (cm). The results differentiating both groups showed that the players with total blindness obtained higher means than the players with visual impairment for game indicators such as the sum of defense (p = 0.03) and the sum of good defense (p = 0.04). The players with visual impairment obtained higher results than those with total blindness for attack efficiency (p = 0.04), the sum of penalty defenses (p = 0.01), and fouls (p = 0.01). The study showed that athletes with blindness demonstrated higher game performance in defence. However, athletes with visual impairment presented higher efficiency in offensive actions. The analyses confirmed that body mass, body height, the arm span and length of the body in the defensive position did not differentiate players’ performance at the elite level. PMID:26834872

  4. NREL Evaluates Performance of Hydraulic Hybrid Refuse Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    This highlight describes NREL's evaluation of the in-service performance of 10 next-generation hydraulic hybrid refuse vehicles (HHVs), 8 previous-generation (model year 2013) HHVs, and 8 comparable conventional diesel vehicles operated by Miami-Dade County's Public Works and Waste Management Department in southern Florida. Launched in March 2015, the on-road portion of this 12-month evaluation focuses on collecting and analyzing vehicle performance data - fuel economy, maintenance costs, and drive cycles - from the HHVs and the conventional diesel vehicles. The fuel economy of heavy-duty vehicles, such as refuse trucks, is largely dependent on the load carried and the drive cycles on which they operate. In the right applications, HHVs offer a potential fuel-cost advantage over their conventional counterparts. This advantage is contingent, however, on driving behavior and drive cycles with high kinetic intensity that take advantage of regenerative braking. NREL's evaluation will assess the performance of this technology in commercial operation and help Miami-Dade County determine the ideal routes for maximizing the fuel-saving potential of its HHVs. Based on the field data, NREL will develop a validated vehicle model using the Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator, also known as FASTSim, to study the impacts of route selection and other vehicle parameters. NREL is also analyzing fueling and maintenance data to support total-cost-of-ownership estimations and forecasts. The study aims to improve understanding of the overall usage and effectiveness of HHVs in refuse operation compared to similar conventional vehicles and to provide unbiased technical information to interested stakeholders.

  5. The Idiographic Evaluation Model in Crime Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurwitz, Jacob I.

    1984-01-01

    Presents some recent developments in the evaluation of crime prevention and control programs, including the increased use of process evaluation models. Describes the nature, methods, and advantages of the idiographic (or single subject) model as used in social work. (JAC)

  6. Evaluating Suit Fit Using Performance Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margerum, Sarah E.; Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Benson, Elizabeth; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2012-01-01

    The Mark III planetary technology demonstrator space suit can be tailored to an individual by swapping the modular components of the suit, such as the arms, legs, and gloves, as well as adding or removing sizing inserts in key areas. A method was sought to identify the transition from an ideal suit fit to a bad fit and how to quantify this breakdown using a metric of mobility-based human performance data. To this end, the degradation of the range of motion of the elbow and wrist of the suit as a function of suit sizing modifications was investigated to attempt to improve suit fit. The sizing range tested spanned optimal and poor fit and was adjusted incrementally in order to compare each joint angle across five different sizing configurations. Suited range of motion data were collected using a motion capture system for nine isolated and functional tasks utilizing the elbow and wrist joints. A total of four subjects were tested with motions involving both arms simultaneously as well as the right arm by itself. Findings indicated that no single joint drives the performance of the arm as a function of suit size; instead it is based on the interaction of multiple joints along a limb. To determine a size adjustment range where an individual can operate the suit at an acceptable level, a performance detriment limit was set. This user-selected limit reveals the task-dependent tolerance of the suit fit around optimal size. For example, the isolated joint motion indicated that the suit can deviate from optimal by as little as -0.6 in to -2.6 in before experiencing a 10% performance drop in the wrist or elbow joint. The study identified a preliminary method to quantify the impact of size on performance and developed a new way to gauge tolerances around optimal size.

  7. Four-dimensional evaluation of regional air quality models

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present highlights of the results obtained in the third phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII3). Activities in AQMEII3 were focused on evaluating the performance of global, hemispheric and regional modeling systems over Europe and North Ame...

  8. Performance Evaluation of Resource Management in Cloud Computing Environments.

    PubMed

    Batista, Bruno Guazzelli; Estrella, Julio Cezar; Ferreira, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Filho, Dionisio Machado Leite; Nakamura, Luis Hideo Vasconcelos; Reiff-Marganiec, Stephan; Santana, Marcos José; Santana, Regina Helena Carlucci

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a computational model in which resource providers can offer on-demand services to clients in a transparent way. However, to be able to guarantee quality of service without limiting the number of accepted requests, providers must be able to dynamically manage the available resources so that they can be optimized. This dynamic resource management is not a trivial task, since it involves meeting several challenges related to workload modeling, virtualization, performance modeling, deployment and monitoring of applications on virtualized resources. This paper carries out a performance evaluation of a module for resource management in a cloud environment that includes handling available resources during execution time and ensuring the quality of service defined in the service level agreement. An analysis was conducted of different resource configurations to define which dimension of resource scaling has a real influence on client requests. The results were used to model and implement a simulated cloud system, in which the allocated resource can be changed on-the-fly, with a corresponding change in price. In this way, the proposed module seeks to satisfy both the client by ensuring quality of service, and the provider by ensuring the best use of resources at a fair price.

  9. A performance measure for evaluating aircraft landing trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, R. M.; Cook, G.

    1978-01-01

    A general performance index is developed for evaluating aircraft landing trajectories. The primary term in the index is the effect of noise on people residing near the air terminal. Other terms included are passenger comfort, fuel consumed, and the time spent in the near-terminal area. Models are developed for aircraft engine noise, passenger comfort, the population distribution about a specific airport, and the aircraft flight behavior. While this performance index may be used in computing optimal trajectories, it is also useful for comparing nonoptimal trajectories which, for one reason or another, may be worthy of consideration. Some examples of such comparisons are included through simulations of landing. The aircraft considered is a Boeing 737.

  10. Performance evaluation of advanced battery technologies for electric vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, W. H.; Tummillo, A. F.; Kulaga, J. E.; Webster, C. E.; Gillie, K. R.; Hogrefe, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    At the Argonne Analysis and Diagnostic Laboratory, advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions. During 1989 and the first quarter of 1990, single cell and multicell modules from seven developers were examined for the Department of Energy and Electric Power Research Institute. The results provide battery users, developers, and program managers with an interim measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and a source of basic data for modeling and continuing R&D. This paper summarizes the performance and life characterizations of two single cells and seven 3- to 960-cell modules that encompass six technologies (Na/S, Ni/Fe, Ni/Cd, Ni-metal hydride, lead-acid, and Zn/Br).

  11. Evaluation of Community Land Model Hydrologic Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. Y.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Bohn, T.; Delire, C.

    2005-12-01

    Confidence in representation and parameterization of land surface processes in coupled land-atmosphere models is strongly dependent on a diversity of opportunities for model testing, since such coupled models are usually intended for application in a wide range of conditions (regional models) or globally. Land surface models have been increasing in complexity over the past decade, which has increased the demands on data sets appropriate for model testing and evaluation. In this study, we compare the performance of two commonly used land surface schemes - the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) and Community Land Model (CLM) with respect to their ability to reproduce observed water and energy fluxes in off-line tests for two large river basins with contrasting hydroclimatic conditions spanning the range from temperate continental to arctic, and for five point (column flux) sites spanning the range from tropical to arctic. The two large river basins are the Arkansas-Red in U.S. southern Great Plains, and the Torne-Kalix in northern Scandinavia. The column flux evaluations are for a tropical forest site at Reserva Jaru (ABRACOS) in Brazil, a prairie site (FIFE) near Manhattan, Kansas in the central U.S., a soybean site at Caumont (HAPEX-Monbilhy) in France, a meadow site at Cabauw in the Netherlands, and a small grassland catchment at Valday, Russia. The results indicate that VIC can reasonably well capture the land surface biophysical processes, while CLM is somewhat less successful. We suggest changes to the CLM parameterizations that would improve its general performance with respect to its representation of land surface hydrologic processes.

  12. Performance Evaluation of Vinyl Replacement Windows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-15

    VINYL REPLACEMENT WINDOWS P. B. SHEPHERD JOHNS - MANVILLE SALES CORPORATION LEU ! RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT CENTER CLE 0 KEN-CARYL RANCH DENVER, COLORADO...PE F -I.. E RI.. Philip B.heperd/K^678D00 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS SO. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK Johns - Manville Sales Corporatp...Development Center Ken-Caryl Ranch Denver. Colorado 80217 (303) 979-1000 October 23, 1979 Dear Sir: The Johns - Manville R&D Center has been contacted

  13. Performance Evaluation Method for Dissimilar Aircraft Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    A rationale is presented for using the square of the wingspan rather than the wing reference area as a basis for nondimensional comparisons of the aerodynamic and performance characteristics of aircraft that differ substantially in planform and loading. Working relationships are developed and illustrated through application to several categories of aircraft covering a range of Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.00. For each application, direct comparisons of drag polars, lift-to-drag ratios, and maneuverability are shown for both nondimensional systems. The inaccuracies that may arise in the determination of aerodynamic efficiency based on reference area are noted. Span loading is introduced independently in comparing the combined effects of loading and aerodynamic efficiency on overall performance. Performance comparisons are made for the NACA research aircraft, lifting bodies, century-series fighter aircraft, F-111A aircraft with conventional and supercritical wings, and a group of supersonic aircraft including the B-58 and XB-70 bomber aircraft. An idealized configuration is included in each category to serve as a standard for comparing overall efficiency.

  14. Evaluation of Improvements to Brayton Cycle Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-29

    34 Report No. MTR-7274, The MITRE Corporation, July 1976. 10. Boyce, M.P., Vyas , Y.K., and Trevillion, W.L., "The External Combustion Steam Injected Gas...for Power, Vol. 102, January 1980, pp. 42-49. 27. Keenan, J.H., Keyes, F.G., Hill , P.G., and Moore, J.G., StamTables, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1978...Turbines and Power Vol. 107, October 1985, pp. 880-889. 29. Fraas, A P., Engineering Evaluation of Energy Systems, McGraw- Hill , New York, 1982

  15. Optical Performance Modeling of FUSE Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Friedman, Scott D.; Moos, H. Warren

    2000-01-01

    We describe the Metrology Data Processor (METDAT), the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC), and their application to the image evaluation of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) mirrors. The FUSE instrument - designed and developed by the Johns Hopkins University and launched in June 1999 is an astrophysics satellite which provides high resolution spectra (lambda/Delta(lambda) = 20,000 - 25,000) in the wavelength region from 90.5 to 118.7 nm The FUSE instrument is comprised of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors, four Rowland circle spectrograph channels with holographic gratings, and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The OSAC code provides a comprehensive analysis of optical system performance, including the effects of optical surface misalignments, low spatial frequency deformations described by discrete polynomial terms, mid- and high-spatial frequency deformations (surface roughness), and diffraction due to the finite size of the aperture. Both normal incidence (traditionally infrared, visible, and near ultraviolet mirror systems) and grazing incidence (x-ray mirror systems) systems can be analyzed. The code also properly accounts for reflectance losses on the mirror surfaces. Low frequency surface errors are described in OSAC by using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence mirrors and Legendre-Fourier polynomials for grazing incidence mirrors. The scatter analysis of the mirror is based on scalar scatter theory. The program accepts simple autocovariance (ACV) function models or power spectral density (PSD) models derived from mirror surface metrology data as input to the scatter calculation. The end product of the program is a user-defined pixel array containing the system Point Spread Function (PSF). The METDAT routine is used in conjunction with the OSAC program. This code reads in laboratory metrology data in a normalized format. The code then fits the data using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence

  16. Transmutation Fuel Performance Code Thermal Model Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory K. Miller; Pavel G. Medvedev

    2007-09-01

    FRAPCON fuel performance code is being modified to be able to model performance of the nuclear fuels of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). The present report documents the effort for verification of the FRAPCON thermal model. It was found that, with minor modifications, FRAPCON thermal model temperature calculation agrees with that of the commercial software ABAQUS (Version 6.4-4). This report outlines the methodology of the verification, code input, and calculation results.

  17. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Tidball, Rick; Bluestein, Joel; Rodriguez, Nick; Knoke, Stu

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  18. Evaluation of the drug solubility and rush ageing on drug release performance of various model drugs from the modified release polyethylene oxide matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Shojaee, Saeed; Nokhodchi, Ali; Maniruzzaman, Mohammed

    2017-02-01

    Hydrophilic matrix systems are currently some of the most widely used drug delivery systems for controlled-release oral dosage forms. Amongst a variety of polymers, polyethylene oxide (PEO) is considered an important material used in pharmaceutical formulations. As PEO is sensitive to thermal oxidation, it is susceptible to free radical oxidative attack. The aim of this study was to investigate the stability of PEO based formulations containing different model drugs with different water solubility, namely propranolol HCl, theophylline and zonisamide. Both polyox matrices 750 and 303 grade were used as model carriers for the manufacture of tablets stored at 40 °C. The results of the present study suggest that the drug release from the matrix was affected by the length of storage conditions, solubility of drugs and the molecular weight of the polymers. Generally, increased drug release rates were prevalent in soluble drug formulations (propranolol) when stored at the elevated temperature (40 °C). In contrast, it was not observed with semi soluble (theophylline) and poorly soluble (zonisamide) drugs especially when formulated with PEO 303 polymer. This indicates that the main parameters controlling the drug release from fresh polyox matrices are the solubility of the drug in the dissolution medium and the molecular weight of the polymer. DSC traces indicated that that there was a big difference in the enthalpy and melting points of fresh and aged PEO samples containing propranolol, whereas the melting point of the aged polyox samples containing theophylline and zonisamide was unaffected. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  19. Evaluating thermal performance of a single slope solar still

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badran, Omar O.; Abu-Khader, Mazen M.

    2007-08-01

    The distillation is one of the important methods of getting clean water from brackish and sea water using the free energy supply from the sun. An experimental work is conducted on a single slope solar still. The thermal performance of the single slope solar still is examined and evaluated through implementing the following effective parameters: (a) different insulation thicknesses of 1, 2.5 and 5 cm; (b) water depth of 2 and 3.5 cm; (c) solar intensity; (d) Overall heat loss coefficient (e) effective absorbtivity and transmissivity; and (f) ambient, water and vapor temperatures. Different effective parameters should be taken into account to increase the still productivity. A mathematical model is presented and compared with experimental results. The model gives a good match with experimental values.

  20. CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.; Bunting, M.L.; Payne, A.C. Jr.

    1997-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia`s Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, top-level, modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM`s unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, infrasound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection) and location accuracy of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system`s performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. This report describes version 1.2 of IVSEM.