Science.gov

Sample records for performance static latches

  1. High performance static latches with complete single event upset immunity

    DOEpatents

    Corbett, W.T.; Weaver, H.T.

    1994-04-26

    An asymmetric response latch providing immunity to single event upset without loss of speed is described. The latch has cross-coupled inverters having a hardened logic state and a soft state, wherein the logic state of the first inverter can only be changed when the voltage on the coupling node of that inverter is low and the logic state of the second inverter can only be changed when the coupling of that inverter is high. One of more of the asymmetric response latches may be configured into a memory cell having complete immunity, which protects information rather than logic states. 5 figures.

  2. High performance static latches with complete single event upset immunity

    DOEpatents

    Corbett, Wayne T.; Weaver, Harry T.

    1994-01-01

    An asymmetric response latch providing immunity to single event upset without loss of speed. The latch has cross-coupled inverters having a hardened logic state and a soft state, wherein the logic state of the first inverter can only be changed when the voltage on the coupling node of that inverter is low and the logic state of the second inverter can only be changed when the coupling of that inverter is high. One of more of the asymmetric response latches may be configured into a memory cell having complete immunity, which protects information rather than logic states.

  3. Static latching arrangement and method

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Larry

    1988-01-01

    A latching assembly for use in latching a cable to and unlatching it from a given object in order to move an object from one location to another is disclosed herein. This assembly includes a weighted sphere mounted to one end of a cable so as to rotate about a specific diameter of the sphere. The assembly also includes a static latch adapted for connection with the object to be moved. This latch includes an internal latching cavity for containing the sphere in a latching condition and a series of surfaces and openings which cooperate with the sphere in order to move the sphere into and out of the latching cavity and thereby connect the cable to and disconnect it from the latch without using any moving parts on the latch itself.

  4. Tendon latch

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A latch connects tendons run from a floating platform to a socket in a foundation on the sea floor. The latch includes a latch body having a plurality of dogs disposed within and urgible outward from the latch body. A piston is releasably disposed within the latch body above the dogs and moves downwardly when released to urge the dogs outwardly from the body into latching engagement with the socket. A trigger mechanism in the latch releases the piston when the latch body lands in the socket and contacts a trigger pin projecting upwardly from the bottom of the socket. A series of wedges are disposed exteriorally on the body and inhibit lateral movement of the body relative to the socket when the tendon is subjected to a cycle bending loads.

  5. Field use patterns and performance of child restraints secured by lower anchors and tethers for children (LATCH).

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Kristy B; Jermakian, Jessica Steps

    2007-05-01

    A revised attachment system for child restraint systems (CRS), Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children (LATCH), was introduced to address issues of misuse of attachment of the CRS to the vehicle. This study provides the first real-world experience of this new restraint system. Relevant cases were selected from the partners for child passenger safety (PCPS) child-specific crash surveillance system based in the United States. Vehicles qualifying for the PCPS study were those model year 1990 or newer involved in a crash with at least one passenger LATCH lower anchors were used was chosen for in-depth crash investigation and interview. Review of these data found misuse remained a frequent occurrence (5/7 cases). The presence of a loose harness in several cases demonstrated that the focus of LATCH on the attachment of the CRS to the vehicle did not remove one of the most common CRS misuses. Further, significant injuries still do occur although LATCH lower anchor performance was not necessarily a contributing factor to any of these injuries. This subset of cases demonstrates that consumers are using the LATCH technology, at times with significant misuse and that significant injury still may occur, despite use of LATCH. PMID:17270136

  6. Rotary latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Joel M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A rotary latch is disclosed, including a hollow, cylindrical outer member and a concentrically arranged inner rotor. The rotor is rotatable within the outer cylindrical member. The outer cylindrical member includes a pair of aligned openings as a cylinder first end facing a latch pin. The rotor includes a pair of aligned slots at a rotor first end facing the latch pin. Slot extensions are provided in the rotor, the slot extensions extending generally perpendicularly to the slots and generally parallel to the rotor first end. In a first position, the outer cylindrical member openings and the rotor slots are aligned to allow receipt of the latch pin. In a second position, the openings and the slot extensions are aligned thereby engaging the latch pin within a closed area defined by the rotor slot extensions and the outer cylinder openings.

  7. Strong-back safety latch

    SciTech Connect

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-03-06

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch.

  8. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, James R.; Harper, William H.; Perez, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing.

  9. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, J.R.; Harper, W.H.; Perez, R.

    1984-08-17

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing. 2 figs.

  10. Perpendicular-Force Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattei, John P.; Buck, Peter A.; Williams, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    Latching mechanism simultaneously applies force in two perpendicular directions to install or remove electronic-equipment modules. Used to simplify installation and removal of modular equipment where movement restricted by protective clothing as in hazardous environments or where installation and removal to be performed by robots or remote manipulators. Concept adaptable to hydraulic, pneumatic, and mechanical systems.

  11. Rotary mechanical latch

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Martinez, Michael A.; Marron, Lisa C.

    2012-11-13

    A rotary mechanical latch for positive latching and unlatching of a rotary device with a latchable rotating assembly having a latching gear that can be driven to latched and unlatched states by a drive mechanism such as an electric motor. A cam arm affixed to the latching gear interfaces with leading and trailing latch cams affixed to a flange within the drive mechanism. The interaction of the cam arm with leading and trailing latch cams prevents rotation of the rotating assembly by external forces such as those due to vibration or tampering.

  12. Load regulating latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleberry, W. T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A load regulating mechanical latch is described that has a pivotally mounted latch element having a hook-shaped end with a strike roller-engaging laterally open hook for engaging a stationary strike roller. The latch element or hook is pivotally mounted in a clevis end of an elongated latch stem that is adapted for axial movement through an opening in a support plate or bracket mounted to a structural member. A coil spring is disposed over and around the extending latch stem and the lower end of the coil spring engages the support bracket. A thrust washer is removably attached to the other end of the latch stem and engages the other end of the coil spring and compresses the coil spring thereby preloading the spring and the latch element carried by the latch stem. The hook-shaped latch element has a limited degree of axial travel for loading caused by structural distortion which may change the relative positions of the latch element hook and the strike roller. Means are also provided to permit limited tilt of the latch element due to loading of the hook.

  13. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

    1994-02-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

  14. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Kobsa, Irvin R.

    1994-01-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

  15. 15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, LATCH CRADLE, SPLIT COLLAR, ETC. - Niantic River Swing Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  16. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  17. Self indexing latch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, John C. (Inventor); Calvert, John A. (Inventor); Nesmith, Malcolm F. (Inventor); Cloyd, Richard A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A self-latching jaw assembly is described which includes a pair of jaws for latching a fitting of an associated structure such as the keel fitting of a space telescope. The jaw assembly automatically locates the fitting received on a positioning pedestal and latches it in its original location on the pedestal without need of precision alignment. The first jaw is actuated and moved to the right whereupon a reciprocating plunger, extended from the nose of the jaw senses the hub of the spool. A jaw position responsive switch is then actuated to terminate the drive motor of the jaw. The astronaut will then actuate the drive motor of the jaw and the jaw will move to the left, whereupon the standoff will engage the face of the jaw in a latching position. In the latching position, the noses of the jaws will be under the flanges of the spool.

  18. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small button'' in the latch mechanism had broken off of the lock plunger'' and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  19. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small ``button`` in the latch mechanism had broken off of the ``lock plunger`` and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  20. Design, testing and evaluation of latching end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, B.; Vandersluis, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Latching End Effector (LEE) forms part of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) for which Spar Aerospace Ltd, Space Systems Division is the prime contractor. The design, testing and performance evaluation of the Latching End Effector mechanisms is the subject of this paper focusing on: (1) ambient, thermal and vibration testing; (2) snare/rigidize performance testing and interaction during payload acquisition; and (3) latch/umbilical test results and performance.

  1. Optical data latch

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2010-08-31

    An optical data latch is formed on a substrate from a pair of optical logic gates in a cross-coupled arrangement in which optical waveguides are used to couple an output of each gate to an photodetector input of the other gate. This provides an optical bi-stability which can be used to store a bit of optical information in the latch. Each optical logic gate, which can be an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter) or an optical NOR gate, includes a waveguide photodetector electrically connected in series with a waveguide electroabsorption modulator. The optical data latch can be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or GaAs substrate) from III-V compound semiconductor layers. A number of optical data latches can be cascaded to form a clocked optical data shift register.

  2. Preloaded latching device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor); Nagy, Kornel (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A latching device is disclosed which is lever operated sequentially to actuate a set of collet fingers to provide a radial expansion and to actuate a force mechanism to provide a compressive gripping force for attaching first and second devices to one another. The latching device includes a body member having elongated collet fingers which, in a deactuated condition, is insertable through bores on the first and second devices so that gripping terminal portions on the collet fingers are proximate to the end of the bore of the first device while a spring assembly on the body member is located proximate to the outer surface of a second device. A lever is rotatable through 90 deg to move a latching rod to sequentially actuate and expand collet fingers and to actuate the spring assembly by compressing it. During the first 30 deg of movement of the lever, the collet fingers are actuated by the latching rod to provide a radial expansion and during the last 60 deg of movement of the lever, the spring assembly acts as a force mechanism and is actuated to develop a compressive latching force on the devices. The latching rod and lever are connected by a camming mechanism. The amount of spring force in the spring assembly can be adjusted; the body member can be permanently attached by a telescoping assembly to one of the devices; and the structure can be used as a pulling device for removing annular bearings or the like from blind bores.

  3. Rectifier cabinet static breaker

    SciTech Connect

    Costantino, R.A.; Gliebe, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    A rectifier cabinet static breaker replaces a blocking diode pair with an SCR and the installation of a power transistor in parallel with the latch contactor to commutate the SCR to the off state. The SCR serves as a static breaker with fast turnoff capability providing an alternative way of achieving reactor scram in addition to performing the function of the replaced blocking diodes. The control circuitry for the rectifier cabinet static breaker includes on-line test capability and an LED indicator light to denote successful test completion. Current limit circuitry provides high-speed protection in the event of overload.

  4. Rectifier cabinet static breaker

    DOEpatents

    Costantino, Jr, Roger A.; Gliebe, Ronald J.

    1992-09-01

    A rectifier cabinet static breaker replaces a blocking diode pair with an SCR and the installation of a power transistor in parallel with the latch contactor to commutate the SCR to the off state. The SCR serves as a static breaker with fast turnoff capability providing an alternative way of achieving reactor scram in addition to performing the function of the replaced blocking diodes. The control circuitry for the rectifier cabinet static breaker includes on-line test capability and an LED indicator light to denote successful test completion. Current limit circuitry provides high-speed protection in the event of overload.

  5. Low temperature latching solenoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W. S. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A magnetically latching solenoid includes a pull-in coil and a delatching coil. Each of the coils is constructed with a combination of wire materials, including material of low temperature coefficient of resistivity to enable the solenoid to be operated at cryogenic temperatures while maintaining sufficient coil resistance. An armature is spring-based toward a first position, that may extend beyond the field of force of a permanent magnet. When voltage is temporarily applied across the pull-in magnet, the induced electromagnetic forces overcome the spring force and pulls the armature to a second position within the field of the permanent magnet, which latches the armature in the pulled-in position. Application of voltage across the delatching coil induces electromagnetic force which at least partially temporarily nullifies the field of the permanent magnet at the armature, thereby delatching the armature and allowing the spring to move the armature to the first position.

  6. Magnetic latching solenoid

    DOEpatents

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.; Albano, R.K.; Morrison, J.L. Jr.

    1995-11-28

    This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized. 2 figs.

  7. Magnetic latching solenoid

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Richardson, John G.; Albano, Richard K.; Morrison, Jr., John L.

    1995-01-01

    This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized.

  8. Bistable Head Positioning Arm Latch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Ken; Endo, Juro; Mita, Masahiro; Abelein, Nathan

    A simple, low cost, yet effective device has been developed for immobilizing the head-arm assembly in a disk drive or similar mechanism during power-off conditions. The latching scheme also provides a consistent means of releasing the head-arm assembly from the immobilized position upon power up of the disk drive. The latch uses no electrical power in either immobilized or released state. This design is immune to extreme torque and linear shock forces applied to the disk drive case. The latch system can use the energy stored in the spinning disks to drive the head-arm assembly toward a safe position while simultaneously arming the latch mechanism to secure the head-arm assembly in the safe position upon arrival. A low energy five msec pulse of current drives the latch from one state to the other. Solenoids as presently used in latch mechanisms are bulky, expensive, have variable force characteristics, and often generate contaminants. The latch described in this paper is expected to replace such solenoids. It may also replace small magnet latches, which have limited latch force and apply unwanted torque to a proximate head positioning arm.

  9. Latching micro optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  10. Minimal Power Latch for Single-Slope ADCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    positive- true signals and is implemented using AND-OR-INVERT logic. In this implementation, both latches are cleared when the comparator is reset. Two redundant transistors are removed from the reset side of each latch, making for a compact layout. CMOS imagers with column-parallel ADCs have demonstrated high performance for remote sensing applications. With this latch circuit, the power consumption and noise can be further reduced. This innovation can be used in CMOS imagers and very-low-power electronics

  11. 49 CFR 236.801 - Shoe, latch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Shoe, latch. 236.801 Section 236.801 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Shoe, latch. The casting by means of which the latch rod and the latch block are held to a lever of...

  12. 49 CFR 236.801 - Shoe, latch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shoe, latch. 236.801 Section 236.801 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Shoe, latch. The casting by means of which the latch rod and the latch block are held to a lever of...

  13. Optical latches using optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenbo; Hu, Hongyu; Dutta, Niloy K.

    2013-05-01

    Optical latches are important for a wide range of applications including communication systems, optical logic systems, optical random access memory (RAM) and encryption. All optical logic operations using quantum dot (QD) based semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) have been studied. The building block of an optical latch such as NAND gate has been fabricated and their operation experimentally demonstrated at ~ 80 GHz. A rate equation model has been developed for the QD-SOA-MZI and it has been used to analyze the Boolean logic operation. The model has been used to analyze the Set-Reset (S-R) latch and the D-Flip-Flop (DFF) devices. The DFF is the basic device for building larger logic circuits. The results show that the latches would work to speeds of ~ 250 Gb/s.

  14. Performance tradeoffs in static and dynamic load balancing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iqbal, M. A.; Saltz, J. H.; Bokhart, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of uniformly distributing the load of a parallel program over a multiprocessor system was considered. A program was analyzed whose structure permits the computation of the optimal static solution. Then four strategies for load balancing were described and their performance compared. The strategies are: (1) the optimal static assignment algorithm which is guaranteed to yield the best static solution, (2) the static binary dissection method which is very fast but sub-optimal, (3) the greedy algorithm, a static fully polynomial time approximation scheme, which estimates the optimal solution to arbitrary accuracy, and (4) the predictive dynamic load balancing heuristic which uses information on the precedence relationships within the program and outperforms any of the static methods. It is also shown that the overhead incurred by the dynamic heuristic is reduced considerably if it is started off with a static assignment provided by either of the other three strategies.

  15. Retaining latch for a water pit gate

    DOEpatents

    Beale, Arden R.

    1997-01-01

    A retaining latch for use in a hazardous materials storage or handling facility to adjustably retain a water pit gate in a gate frame. A retaining latch is provided comprising a latch plate which is rotatably mounted to each end of the top of the gate and a recessed opening, formed in the gate frame, for engaging an edge of the latch plate. The latch plate is circular in profile with one side cut away or flat, such that the latch plate is D-shaped. The remaining circular edge of the latch plate comprises steps of successively reduced thickness. The stepped edge of the latch plate fits inside a recessed opening formed in the gate frame. As the latch plate is rotated, alternate steps of the latch plate are engaged by the recessed opening. When the latch plate is rotated such that the flat portion of the latch plate faces the recessed opening in the gate frame, there is no connection between the opening and the latch plate and the gate is unlatched from the gate frame.

  16. Retaining latch for a water pit gate

    DOEpatents

    Beale, A.R.

    1997-11-18

    A retaining latch is described for use in a hazardous materials storage or handling facility to adjustably retain a water pit gate in a gate frame. A retaining latch is provided comprising a latch plate which is rotatably mounted to each end of the top of the gate and a recessed opening, formed in the gate frame, for engaging an edge of the latch plate. The latch plate is circular in profile with one side cut away or flat, such that the latch plate is D-shaped. The remaining circular edge of the latch plate comprises steps of successively reduced thickness. The stepped edge of the latch plate fits inside a recessed opening formed in the gate frame. As the latch plate is rotated, alternate steps of the latch plate are engaged by the recessed opening. When the latch plate is rotated such that the flat portion of the latch plate faces the recessed opening in the gate frame, there is no connection between the opening and the latch plate and the gate is unlatched from the gate frame. 4 figs.

  17. K-Band Latching Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  18. Optical set-reset latch

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J.

    2013-01-29

    An optical set-reset (SR) latch is formed from a first electroabsorption modulator (EAM), a second EAM and a waveguide photodetector (PD) which are arranged in an optical and electrical feedback loop which controls the transmission of light through the first EAM to latch the first EAM in a light-transmissive state in response to a Set light input. A second waveguide PD controls the transmission of light through the second EAM and is used to switch the first EAM to a light-absorptive state in response to a Reset light input provided to the second waveguide PD. The optical SR latch, which may be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or a GaAs substrate) as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC), stores a bit of optical information and has an optical output for the logic state of that bit of information.

  19. Electrical latching of microelectromechanical devices

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Sleefe, Gerard E.

    2004-11-02

    Methods are disclosed for row and column addressing of an array of microelectromechanical (MEM) devices. The methods of the present invention are applicable to MEM micromirrors or memory elements and allow the MEM array to be programmed and maintained latched in a programmed state with a voltage that is generally lower than the voltage required for electrostatically switching the MEM devices.

  20. Manned maneuvering unit latching mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The astronaut/Manned Maneuvering Unit interface, which presented a challenging set of requirements for a latching mechanism, is described. A spring loaded cam segment with variable ratio pulley release actuator was developed to meet the requirements. To preclude jamming of the mechanism, special precautions were taken such as spring loaded bearing points and careful selection of materials to resist cold welding. The mechanism successfully passed a number of tests which partially simulated orbital conditions.

  1. Adaptive function allocation reduces performance costs of static automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasuraman, Raja; Mouloua, Mustapha; Molloy, Robert; Hilburn, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive automation offers the option of flexible function allocation between the pilot and on-board computer systems. One of the important claims for the superiority of adaptive over static automation is that such systems do not suffer from some of the drawbacks associated with conventional function allocation. Several experiments designed to test this claim are reported in this article. The efficacy of adaptive function allocation was examined using a laboratory flight-simulation task involving multiple functions of tracking, fuel-management, and systems monitoring. The results show that monitoring inefficiency represents one of the performance costs of static automation. Adaptive function allocation can reduce the performance cost associated with long-term static automation.

  2. Superconducting A/D converter using latching comparators

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, C.A.; Kautz, R.L.; Loyld, F.L.

    1985-03-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a six-bit A/D converter using fast edge latching comparators. Simulations predicting conversion times of 100 ps and 100 MHz signal bandwidth are verified experimentally. The addition of a superconducting track/hold circuit in front of the A/D converter is expected to substantially improve the signal bandwidth.

  3. Assessing the SEU resistance of CMOS latches using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Blaes, B.; Nixon, R.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of Cosmic Rays on the performance of integrated circuits (IC's) in a space environment is evident in the upset rate of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) launched in Apr. 1983. This satellite experiences a single-event-upset (SEU) per day which must be corrected from the ground. Such experience caused a redesign of the Galileo spacecraft with SEU resistant IC's. The solution to the SEU problem continues to be important as the complexity of spacecraft grows, the feature size of IC's decreases, and as space systems are designed with circuits fabricated at non-radiation hardened foundries. This paper describes an approach for verifying the susceptibility of CMOS latches to heavy-ion induced state changes. The approach utilizes alpha particles to induce the upsets in test circuits. These test circuits are standard cells that have offset voltages which sensitize the circuits to upsets. These results are then used to calculate the upsetability at operating voltages. In this study results are presented for the alpha particle upset of a six-transistor static random access memory (SRAM) cell. Then a methodology is described for the analysis of a standard-cell inverter latch.

  4. Quick-Connect, Self-Alining Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, G. C.; Williams, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    Sturdy latch tolerates 10 degrees of angular mismatch in joining structural elements. Hexagonal passive plate nests in active plate, guided by capture plates and alinement keys and grooves. Center hole in both active and passive plates is 1 meter in diameter. Latch has possible uses a pipe joint, connector for parts of portable structures, and fitting for marine risers on offshore drilling rigs.

  5. Quick release latch for reactor scram

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, M.L.; Shawver, B.M.

    1975-09-16

    A simple, reliable, and fast-acting means for releasing a control element and allowing it to be inserted rapidly into the core region of a nuclear reactor for scram purposes is described. A latch mechanism grips a coupling head on a nuclear control element to connect the control element to the control drive assembly. The latch mechanism is closed by tensioning a cable or rod with an actuator. The control element is released by de-energizing the actuator, providing fail-safe, rapid release of the control element to effect reactor shutdown. A sensing rod provides indication that the control element is properly positioned in the latch. Two embodiments are illustrated, one involving a collet- type latch mechanism, the other a pliers-type latch mechanism with the actuator located inside the reactor vessel. (auth)

  6. Quick release latch for reactor scram

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Melvin L.; Shawver, Bruce M.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, reliable, and fast-acting means for releasing a control element and allowing it to be inserted rapidly into the core region of a nuclear reactor for scram purposes. A latch mechanism grips a coupling head on a nuclear control element to connect the control element to the control drive assembly. The latch mechanism is closed by tensioning a cable or rod with an actuator. The control element is released by de-energizing the actuator, providing fail-safe, rapid release of the control element to effect reactor shutdown. A sensing rod provides indication that the control element is properly positioned in the latch. Two embodiments are illustrated, one involving a collet-type latch mechanism, the other a pliers-type latch mechanism with the actuator located inside the reactor vessel.

  7. Static performance tests of a flight-type STOVL ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barankiewicz, Wendy S.

    1991-01-01

    The design and development of thrust augmenting STOVL ejectors has typically been based on experimental iteration (i.e., trial and error). Static performance tests of a full scale vertical lift ejector were performed at primary flow temperatures up to 1560 R (1100 F). Flow visualization (smoke generators and yarn tufts) were used to view the inlet air flow, especially around the primary nozzle and end plates. Performance calculations are presented for ambient temperatures close to 480 R (20 F) and 535 R (75 F) which simulate seasonal aircraft operating conditions. Resulting thrust augmentation ratios are presented as functions of nozzle pressure ratio and temperature.

  8. Development of a high force thermal latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nygren, William D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary development of a high force thermal latch (HFTL). The HFTL has one moving part which is restrained in the latched position by a low melting temperature or fusible metal alloy. When heated the fusible alloy flows to a receiving chamber and in so doing at first releases the tension load in the latch bolt and later releases the bolt itself. The HFTL can be used in place of pyrotechnically activated spacecraft release devices in those instances where the elimination of both pyrotechnic shock-loading and rapid strain-energy release take precedence over the near instantaneous release offered by ordnance initiated devices.

  9. Fertilization test performance using Arbacia punctulata maintained in static culture

    SciTech Connect

    Serbst, J.R.; Wright, L.; Sheehan, C.V.; Fitzpatrick, K.

    1995-12-31

    The sea urchin fertilization test using the Atlantic urchin, Arbacia punctulata, is widely utilized in evaluating toxicity of receiving waters and effluents as part of the NPDES program. While this species is easily maintained in uncontaminated, flow-through seawater systems, laboratories without access to flowing seawater either obtain new urchins for each test or maintain populations in static cultures. This study was conducted to assess test success and reproducibility of fertilization tests conducted using urchins maintained in separate-sex, static, temperature-controlled aquaria containing filtered natural seawater. Test performance was evaluated by periodically conducting the standard sea urchin fertilization test (EPA 600/4-87-028) using a common reference toxicant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) Thirteen tests were conducted between September 1993 and May 1994 using one population of urchins, and five tests were conducted between June and December 1994 with a second population of urchins. Test success was 100% (control fertilization > 50%) with a control fertilization mean of 96.4% (S.D. = 3.3). There were no differences between mean EC{sub 50} values calculated for each set of tests (p < 0.05). The running mean value for toxicity was 7.1 mg/L (S.D. = 1.26) for 18 tests, with a CV of 17.7%, comparing favorably with values generated using urchins maintained in flowing seawater. The running mean value for toxicity in these tests was 2.4 mg/L (S.D. = 0.9) for 18 tests conducted between November 1987 and July 1989 (ASTM STP 1124). Data from all urchin tests were used to construct a control chart defining normal ranges for SDS toxicity. This study demonstrated that fertile, adult sea urchins can produce consistent toxicity responses with low variability while being maintained in static, temperature regulated culture facilities.

  10. A High-Speed and Low-Offset Dynamic Latch Comparator

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne; Yin, Chia Chieu; Rahman, Mohammad Anisur

    2014-01-01

    Circuit intricacy, speed, low-offset voltage, and resolution are essential factors for high-speed applications like analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The comparator circuit with preamplifier increases the power dissipation, as it requires higher amount of currents than the latch circuitry. In this research, a novel topology of dynamic latch comparator is illustrated, which is able to provide high speed, low offset, and high resolution. Moreover, the circuit is able to reduce the power dissipation as the topology is based on latch circuitry. The cross-coupled circuit mechanism with the regenerative latch is employed for enhancing the dynamic latch comparator performance. In addition, input-tracking phase is used to reduce the offset voltage. The Monte-Carlo simulation results for the designed comparator in 0.18 μm CMOS process show that the equivalent input-referred offset voltage is 720 μV with 3.44 mV standard deviation. The simulated result shows that the designed comparator has 8-bit resolution and dissipates 158.5 μW of power under 1.8 V supply while operating with a clock frequency of 50 MHz. In addition, the proposed dynamic latch comparator has a layout size of 148.80 μm × 59.70 μm. PMID:25114959

  11. A high-speed and low-offset dynamic latch comparator.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Bin Ibne Reaz, Mamun; Yin, Chia Chieu; Marufuzzaman, Mohammad; Rahman, Mohammad Anisur

    2014-01-01

    Circuit intricacy, speed, low-offset voltage, and resolution are essential factors for high-speed applications like analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The comparator circuit with preamplifier increases the power dissipation, as it requires higher amount of currents than the latch circuitry. In this research, a novel topology of dynamic latch comparator is illustrated, which is able to provide high speed, low offset, and high resolution. Moreover, the circuit is able to reduce the power dissipation as the topology is based on latch circuitry. The cross-coupled circuit mechanism with the regenerative latch is employed for enhancing the dynamic latch comparator performance. In addition, input-tracking phase is used to reduce the offset voltage. The Monte-Carlo simulation results for the designed comparator in 0.18 μm CMOS process show that the equivalent input-referred offset voltage is 720 μV with 3.44 mV standard deviation. The simulated result shows that the designed comparator has 8-bit resolution and dissipates 158.5 μW of power under 1.8 V supply while operating with a clock frequency of 50 MHz. In addition, the proposed dynamic latch comparator has a layout size of 148.80 μm × 59.70 μm. PMID:25114959

  12. A high-speed and low-offset dynamic latch comparator.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Bin Ibne Reaz, Mamun; Yin, Chia Chieu; Marufuzzaman, Mohammad; Rahman, Mohammad Anisur

    2014-01-01

    Circuit intricacy, speed, low-offset voltage, and resolution are essential factors for high-speed applications like analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The comparator circuit with preamplifier increases the power dissipation, as it requires higher amount of currents than the latch circuitry. In this research, a novel topology of dynamic latch comparator is illustrated, which is able to provide high speed, low offset, and high resolution. Moreover, the circuit is able to reduce the power dissipation as the topology is based on latch circuitry. The cross-coupled circuit mechanism with the regenerative latch is employed for enhancing the dynamic latch comparator performance. In addition, input-tracking phase is used to reduce the offset voltage. The Monte-Carlo simulation results for the designed comparator in 0.18 μm CMOS process show that the equivalent input-referred offset voltage is 720 μV with 3.44 mV standard deviation. The simulated result shows that the designed comparator has 8-bit resolution and dissipates 158.5 μW of power under 1.8 V supply while operating with a clock frequency of 50 MHz. In addition, the proposed dynamic latch comparator has a layout size of 148.80 μm × 59.70 μm.

  13. Minimal Power Latch for Single-Slope ADCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A latch circuit that uses two interoperating latches. The latch circuit has the beneficial feature that it switches only a single time during a measurement that uses a stair step or ramp function as an input signal in an analog to digital converter. This feature minimizes the amount of power that is consumed in the latch and also minimizes the amount of high frequency noise that is generated by the latch. An application using a plurality of such latch circuits in a parallel decoding ADC for use in an image sensor is given as an example.

  14. STATIC STRETCHING DOES NOT REDUCE VARIABILITY, JUMP AND SPEED PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Luís Manuel Pinto Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Background Stretching is often part of the warm-up routine prior to athletic participation; however, controversial evidence exists on the effects of stretching on countermovement jump (CMJ) and sprint performance. Additionally, analysis of variability between repeated tasks is useful for monitoring players, to analyze factors that could affect the performance, and to guide clinical decisions for training strategies. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine whether static stretching (SS) prior to CMJ and 20-meter (20-m) sprint would affect performance, and to investigate whether SS affects an athlete's ability to perform these tasks consistently. Methods Twenty-two trained healthy athletes (23.2 ± 5.0 years) attended, randomly, two testing sessions, separated by 48 hours. At session one, all participants underwent 10 minutes of dynamic running warm-up followed by the experimental tasks (three CMJ and three 20-m sprint), whereas five minutes of stretching was added after the warm-up routine at session two. All participants performed the same experimental tasks in both sessions. The stretching protocol consisted of five stretching exercises for each lower limb. Results The paired-samples t-test revealed no significant differences between the stretching protocol condition and no stretching condition for the 20-m sprint (t(21)=.920; p=.368) and CMJ (t(21)=.709; p=.486). There were no significant differences in trial-by-trial variability on 20-m sprint (t(21)=1.934; p=.067) and CMJ scores (t(21)=.793; p=.437) as result of SS. Conclusion The SS protocol did not modify jumping and running ability in trained healthy athletes. The SS prior to training or competition may not cause detrimental effects to athletic performance. Level of evidence Level III, Nonrandomized controlled trial. PMID:27104057

  15. Interpersonal synergies: static prehension tasks performed by two actors.

    PubMed

    Solnik, Stanislaw; Reschechtko, Sasha; Wu, Yen-Hsun; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    We investigated multidigit synergies stabilizing components of the resultant force vector during joint performance of a static prehension task by two persons as compared to similar tasks performed by a single person using both hands. Subjects transferred the instrumented handle from the right hand to the left hand (one-person condition) or passed that handle to another person (two-person condition) while keeping the handle's position and orientation stationary. Only three digits were involved per hand, the thumb, the index finger, and the middle finger; the forces and moments produced by the digits were measured by six-component sensors. We estimated the performance-stabilizing synergies within the uncontrolled manifold framework by quantifying the intertrial variance structure of digit forces and moments. The analysis was performed at three levels: between hands, between virtual finger and virtual thumb (imagined digits producing the same mechanical variables as the corresponding actual digits combined) produced by the two hands (in both interpersonal and intrapersonal conditions), and between the thumb and virtual finger for one hand only. Additionally, we performed correlation and phase synchronization analyses of resultant tangential forces and internal normal forces. Overall, the one-person conditions were characterized by higher amount of intertrial variance that did not affect resultant normal force components, higher internal components of normal forces, and stronger synchronization of the normal forces generated by the hands. Our observations suggest that in two-person tasks, when participants try to achieve a common mechanical outcome, the performance-stabilizing synergies depend on non-visual information exchange, possibly via the haptic and proprioceptive systems. Therefore, synergies quantified in tasks using visual feedback only may not be generalizable to more natural tasks. PMID:27021074

  16. Static Performance of a Wing-Mounted Thrust Reverser Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to study the static aerodynamic performance of a wing-mounted thrust reverser concept applicable to subsonic transport aircraft. This innovative engine powered thrust reverser system is designed to utilize wing-mounted flow deflectors to produce aircraft deceleration forces. Testing was conducted using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0, a supercritical left-hand wing section attached via a pylon, and wing-mounted flow deflectors attached to the wing section. Geometric variations of key design parameters investigated for the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept included flow deflector angle and chord length, deflector edge fences, and the yaw mount angle of the deflector system (normal to the engine centerline or parallel to the wing trailing edge). All tests were conducted with no external flow and high pressure air was used to simulate core and fan engine exhaust flows. Test results indicate that the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept can achieve overall thrust reverser effectiveness levels competitive with (parallel mount), or better than (normal mount) a conventional cascade thrust reverser system. By removing the thrust reverser system from the nacelle, the wing-mounted concept offers the nacelle designer more options for improving nacelle aero dynamics and propulsion-airframe integration, simplifying nacelle structural designs, reducing nacelle weight, and improving engine maintenance access.

  17. Tailless aircraft performance improvements with relaxed static stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenas, Irving L.; Klyde, David H.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the tailless aircraft performance improvements gained from relaxed static stability, to quantify this potential in terms of range-payload improvements, and to identify other possible operational and handling benefits or problems. Two configurations were chosen for the study: a modern high aspect ratio, short-chord wing proposed as a high-altitude long endurance (HALE) remotely piloted vehicle; a wider, lower aspect ratio, high volume wing suitable for internal stowage of all fuel and payload required for a manned long-range reconnaissance mission. Flying at best cruise altitude, both unstable configurations were found to have a 14 percent improvement in range and a 7 to 9 percent improvement in maximum endurance compared to the stable configurations. The unstable manned configuration also shows a 15 percent improvement in the 50 ft takeoff obstacle distance and an improved height response to elevator control. However, it is generally more deficient in control power due to its larger adverse aileron yaw and its higher takeoff and landing lift coefficient C(sub L), both due to the downward trimmed (vs. upward trimmed for stable configurations) trailing edge surfaces.

  18. Resettable binary latch mechanism for use with paraffin linear motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maus, Daryl; Tibbitts, Scott

    1991-01-01

    A new resettable Binary Latch Mechanism was developed utilizing a paraffin actuator as the motor. This linear actuator alternately latches between extended and retracted positions, maintaining either position with zero power consumption. The design evolution and kinematics of the latch mechanism are presented, as well as the development problems and lessons that were learned.

  19. Quasi-static rotor morphing concepts for rotorcraft performance improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Mihir

    The current research is focused on two separate quasi-static rotor morphing concepts: Variable span and variable camber. Both concepts were analyzed from the perspective of the performance improvements they allow for, as well as their design requirements. The goal of this body of work is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the benefits and implementation challenges of both systems. For the case of the variable span rotor concept, the effects on aircraft performance were evaluated for a UH-60A type aircraft. The parametric analysis included the performance effects of the rotor span and rotor speed variation, both individually as well as in combination. The design space considered the effect of three different gross weights (16000 lbs, 18300 lbs and 24000 lbs), for a window of +/-11% variation of the rotor speed and a range between +17% to --16% of radius variation (about the baseline) for a range of altitudes. The results of the analysis showed that variable span rotors by themselves are capable of reducing the power requirement of the helicopter by up to 20% for high altitude and gross weight conditions. However, when combined with rotor speed variation, it was possible to reduce the overall power required by the aircraft by up to 30%. Complimentary to the performance analysis, an analytical study of actuation concepts for a variable span rotor was also conducted. This study considered the design of two active actuation systems: Hydraulic pistons and threaded rods (jackscrews), and two passive systems which employed the use of an internal spring type restraining device. For all the configurations considered, it was determined that the design requirements could not be satisfied when considering the constraints defined. The performance improvements due to a variable camber system were evaluated for a BO-105 type rotor in hover. The design space considered included three different thrust levels (4800 lbs, 5500 lbs and 6400 lbs) for a range of altitudes and

  20. Computer programs for estimation of STOL takeoff, landing, and static performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    A set of computer programs has been developed for evaluating the performance of powered-lift STOL aircraft. Included are a static performance summary and dynamic calculations of takeoff and landing performance. The input, output, options, and calculations for each program are described. The programs are written in FORTRAN IV and are currently available on TSS 360. Three independent sections are presented corresponding to the three programs: (1) static performance, (2) takeoff performance, and (3) landing performance.

  1. Misuse study of latch attachment: a series of frontal sled tests.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rajiv; Ghati, Yoganand

    2007-01-01

    This study was initiated to quantify the effects of the misuse in LATCH lower webbing. In the short period since the implementation of the LATCH system several cases of potential misuses have been reported. A series of sled tests in frontal impact mode were conducted with various misuse conditions (loose attachment of LATCH lower webbing, misrouting of LATCH lower webbing and child seat back inclination) for both forward and rearward facing child safety seats (FFCSS and RFCSS). Results from these tests are compared and discussed with that of the standard test with no misuse and showed that as the slack in the lower LATCH webbing increased, ATD injury measures exceeded the limits. The FFCSS tests in the reclined condition yielded lower injury values for all except the chest G's when compared to the standard upright test. In the misrouting tests the ATD kinematics depended on the routing pivot point, the lower the pivot point the better the ATD kinematics. Similar findings were also observed in the RFCSS tests. The use of top tether with the FFCSS substantially improved the performance of the Hybrid III 3 year old ATD in spite of misuse conditions and the injury values were lower than the corresponding tests with no top tether. The effective reduction was 37% in the HIC values, 6% in the chest G's, 30% in the head excursion, 22 % in the knee excursion and finally 37 % reduction in the Nij values. PMID:18184489

  2. Misuse study of latch attachment: a series of frontal sled tests.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rajiv; Ghati, Yoganand

    2007-01-01

    This study was initiated to quantify the effects of the misuse in LATCH lower webbing. In the short period since the implementation of the LATCH system several cases of potential misuses have been reported. A series of sled tests in frontal impact mode were conducted with various misuse conditions (loose attachment of LATCH lower webbing, misrouting of LATCH lower webbing and child seat back inclination) for both forward and rearward facing child safety seats (FFCSS and RFCSS). Results from these tests are compared and discussed with that of the standard test with no misuse and showed that as the slack in the lower LATCH webbing increased, ATD injury measures exceeded the limits. The FFCSS tests in the reclined condition yielded lower injury values for all except the chest G's when compared to the standard upright test. In the misrouting tests the ATD kinematics depended on the routing pivot point, the lower the pivot point the better the ATD kinematics. Similar findings were also observed in the RFCSS tests. The use of top tether with the FFCSS substantially improved the performance of the Hybrid III 3 year old ATD in spite of misuse conditions and the injury values were lower than the corresponding tests with no top tether. The effective reduction was 37% in the HIC values, 6% in the chest G's, 30% in the head excursion, 22 % in the knee excursion and finally 37 % reduction in the Nij values.

  3. A novel latch-up free SCR-LDMOS with high holding voltage for a power-rail ESD clamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongwei, Pan; Siyang, Liu; Weifeng, Sun

    2013-01-01

    The low snapback holding voltage of the SCR-LDMOS device makes it susceptible to latch-up failure, when used in power-rail ESD (electro-static discharge) clamp circuits. In order to eliminate latch-up risk, this work presents a novel SCR-LDMOS structure with an N-type implantation layer to achieve a 17 V holding voltage and a 5.2 A second breakdown current. The device has been validated using TLP measurement analysis and is applied to a power-rail ESD clamp in half-bridge driver ICs.

  4. The actuated latch pin and its development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawlor, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    An actuated latch pin developed to meet the need for a reusable locking device is described. The unit can function as a pin puller or as a pin pusher latch. Initial prototype testing demonstrated the feasibility of the device with the unit being driven from a 28 V dc supply and using 15 W to drive a 12 mm diameter pin through a stroke of 10 mm with a side load of 100 N in 120 ms. High wear rates with a MOS2 lubrication on the ballscrew and angular contact bearings have necessitated the reduction in the duty cycle from 1000 cycles in air and vacuum to 100 in air and 1000 in vacuum.

  5. Magnetic latch trigger for inherent shutdown assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sowa, Edmund S.

    1976-01-01

    An inherent shutdown assembly for a nuclear reactor is provided. A neutron absorber is held ready to be inserted into the reactor core by a magnetic latch. The latch includes a magnet whose lines of force are linked by a yoke of material whose Curie point is at the critical temperature of the reactor at which the neutron absorber is to be inserted into the reactor core. The yoke is in contact with the core coolant or fissionable material so that when the coolant or the fissionable material increase in temperature above the Curie point the yoke loses its magnetic susceptibility and the magnetic link is broken, thereby causing the absorber to be released into the reactor core.

  6. Bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.; Deboi, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, assembly and test of a development configuration bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve suitable for the control hydrazine and liquid fluorine to an 800 pound thrust rocket engine is described. The valve features a balanced poppet, utilizing metal bellows, a hard poppet/seat interface and a flexure support system for the internal moving components. This support system eliminates sliding surfaces, thereby rendering the valve free of self generated particles.

  7. Non-latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A non-latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes a permanent magnet and an electromagnet. The respective sections are arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch has a "normal" position and is selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly. The switch returns to the "normal" position when the overriding electromagnetic assembly is inactive.

  8. Door latching recognition apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Eakle, Jr., Robert F.

    2012-05-15

    An acoustic door latch detector is provided in which a sound recognition sensor is integrated into a door or door lock mechanism. The programmable sound recognition sensor can be trained to recognize the acoustic signature of the door and door lock mechanism being properly engaged and secured. The acoustic sensor will signal a first indicator indicating that proper closure was detected or sound an alarm condition if the proper acoustic signature is not detected within a predetermined time interval.

  9. Static and dynamic performances of refrigerant-lubricated foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchehit, B.; Bou-Saïd, B.; Garcia, M.

    2016-08-01

    Gas bearings are successfully used over a large panel of turbo-machineries. Some of these systems run in controlled environments such as refrigerating gas. We present in this paper a theoretical and numerical model which consider the vapor/liquid lubricant transition, the laminar/turbulent flow transition and both temperature and viscosity 3D variations in the fluid and the solids for both static and dynamic situations. The foil deflection is considered using the Heshmat's approach. This model involves: the resolution of the generalized Reynolds equation for compressible fluids with 3D variable viscosity, the description of the turbulence effects by the phenomenological approach of Elrod, using a 3D eddy viscosity field, the resolution of a non-linear equation of state for the lubricant, able to describe the vapor/liquid transition and a local thermal approach to obtain a 3D estimation of the fluid temperature, thanks to the thin-film energy equation and an actualisation of the film thickness. The thermal effects in solids are also taken into account. Both static and dynamic behaviours of GFBs are analysed.

  10. A Modular, Reusable Latch and Decking System for Securing Payloads During Launch and Planetary Surface Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.; Dorsey, John T.; Jones, Thomas C.; King, Bruce D.; Mikulas, Martin M.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient handling of payloads destined for a planetary surface, such as the moon or Mars, requires robust systems to secure the payloads during transport on the ground, in-space and on the planetary surface. In addition, mechanisms to release the payloads need to be reliable to ensure successful transfer from one vehicle to another. An efficient payload handling strategy must also consider the devices available to support payload handling. Cranes used for overhead lifting are common to all phases of payload handling on Earth. Similarly, both recent and past studies have demonstrated that devices with comparable functionality will be needed to support lunar outpost operations. A first generation test-bed of a new high performance device that provides the capabilities of both a crane and a robotic manipulator, the Lunar Surface Manipulation System (LSMS), has been designed, built and field tested and is available for use in evaluating a system to secure payloads to transportation vehicles. National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton Va 23662 A payload handling approach must address all phases of payload management including: ground transportation, launch, planetary transfer and installation in the final system. In addition, storage may be required during any phase of operations. Each of these phases requires the payload to be lifted and secured to a vehicle, transported, released and lifted in preparation for the next transportation or storage phase. A critical component of a successful payload handling approach is a latch and associated carrier system. The latch and carrier system should minimize requirements on the: payload, carrier support structure and payload handling devices as well as be able to accommodate a wide range of payload sizes. In addition, the latch should; be small and lightweight, support a method to apply preload, be reusable, integrate into a minimal set of hard-points and have manual interfaces to actuate the latch should a problem occur. A

  11. A Modular, Reusable Latch and Decking System for Securing Payloads During Launch and Planetary Surface Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.; Dorsey, John T.; Jones, Thomas C.; King, Bruce D.; Mikulas, Martin M.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient handling of payloads destined for a planetary surface, such as the moon or mars, requires robust systems to secure the payloads during transport on the ground, in space and on the planetary surface. In addition, mechanisms to release the payloads need to be reliable to ensure successful transfer from one vehicle to another. An efficient payload handling strategy must also consider the devices available to support payload handling. Cranes used for overhead lifting are common to all phases of payload handling on Earth. Similarly, both recent and past studies have demonstrated that devices with comparable functionality will be needed to support lunar outpost operations. A first generation test-bed of a new high performance device that provides the capabilities of both a crane and a robotic manipulator, the Lunar Surface Manipulation System (LSMS), has been designed, built and field tested and is available for use in evaluating a system to secure payloads to transportation vehicles. A payload handling approach must address all phases of payload management including: ground transportation, launch, planetary transfer and installation in the final system. In addition, storage may be required during any phase of operations. Each of these phases requires the payload to be lifted and secured to a vehicle, transported, released and lifted in preparation for the next transportation or storage phase. A critical component of a successful payload handling approach is a latch and associated carrier system. The latch and carrier system should minimize requirements on the: payload, carrier support structure and payload handling devices as well as be able to accommodate a wide range of payload sizes. In addition, the latch should; be small and lightweight, support a method to apply preload, be reusable, integrate into a minimal set of hard-points and have manual interfaces to actuate the latch should a problem occur. A latching system which meets these requirements has been

  12. A novel tape spring hinge mechanism for quasi-static deployment of a satellite deployable using shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ju Won; Yoo, Young Ik; Shin, Dong Kil; Lim, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Jung Ju

    2014-02-01

    A tape spring hinge (TSH) is a typical flexible deployment device for a satellite and becomes frequently used due to its simplicity, lightweight, low cost, and high deployment reliability. However, the performance of a TSH is quite limited due to trade-offs among deployed stiffness, deployment torque, and latch-up shock despite its many advantages. In this study, a novel conceptual design that circumvents the trade-offs among functional requirements (FRs) is proposed. The trade-offs are obviated by a newly proposed shape memory alloy damper that converts the deployment behavior of a conventional TSH from unstable dynamic to stable quasi-static. This makes it possible to maximize the deployment stiffness and deployment torque of a conventional TSH, which are larger-the-better FR, without any increase in the latch-up shock. Therefore, in view of conceptual design, it is possible to design a highly improved TSH that has much higher deployed stiffness and deployment torque compared to a conventional TSH while minimizing latch-up shock and deployment unstableness. Detailed design was performed through response surface method and finite element analysis. Finally, a prototype was manufactured and tested in order to verify its performance (four point, deployment torque, and latch-up shock tests). The test results confirm the feasibility of the proposed TSH mechanism. PMID:24593388

  13. Iterative solution of large, sparse linear systems on a static data flow architecture - Performance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, D. A.; Patrick, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of static data flow architectures to the iterative solution of sparse linear systems of equations is investigated. An analytic performance model of a static data flow computation is developed. This model includes both spatial parallelism, concurrent execution in multiple PE's, and pipelining, the streaming of data from array memories through the PE's. The performance model is used to analyze a row partitioned iterative algorithm for solving sparse linear systems of algebraic equations. Based on this analysis, design parameters for the static data flow architecture as a function of matrix sparsity and dimension are proposed.

  14. Performance of D-bolts Under Static Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Charlie C.

    2012-03-01

    D-bolt is a type of energy-absorbing rock bolt. It is made of a smooth steel bar with anchors spaced along the bolt length. A typical section between adjacent anchors is approximately 1-m long, but it can be adjusted to adapt to the rock conditions. The bolt is fully encapsulated with either cement or resin grout in a borehole. The anchors are firmly fixed into the grout, while the smooth bolt sections can freely deform to absorb deformation energy. Full-scale static pull tests were carried out at different testing facilities in two laboratories. The tests show that a smooth bolt section between anchors may elongate by 110-167 mm depending on the section length. Field trials of the D-bolt were conducted in deep metal mines. The measurements showed that the D-bolts were equally loaded within every anchor-between section, avoiding load peaks and premature bolt failure due to stress concentrations caused by fracture/joint opening. The field trials of rebar and D-bolts in a largely deformed mine tunnel showed that the D-bolts behaved satisfactorily, with only a few failed bolts, while a number of the rebar bolts failed at the thread.

  15. Engineering Evaluation of International Low Impact Docking System Latch Hooks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, J.; Patin, R.; Figert, J.

    2013-01-01

    The international Low Impact Docking System (iLIDS) provides a structural arrangement that allows for visiting vehicles to dock with the International Space Station (ISS) (Fig 1). The iLIDS docking units are mechanically joined together by a series of active and passive latch hooks. In order to preserve docking capability at the existing Russian docking interfaces, the iLIDS latch hooks are required to conform to the existing Russian design. The latch hooks are classified as being fail-safe. Since the latch hooks are fail-safe, the hooks are not fracture critical and a fatigue based service life assessment will satisfy the structural integrity requirements. Constant amplitude fatigue testing to failure on four sets of active/passive iLIDS latch hooks was performed at load magnitudes of 10, 11, and 12 kips. Failure analysis of the hook fatigue failures identified multi-site fatigue initiation that was effectively centered about the hook mid-plane (consistent with the 3D model results). The fatigue crack initiation distribution implies that the fatigue damage accumulation effectively results in a very low aspect ratio surface crack (which can be simulated as thru-thickness crack). Fatigue damage progression resulted in numerous close proximity fatigue crack initiation sites. It was not possible to determine if fatigue crack coalescence occurs during cyclic loading or as result of the fast fracture response. The presence of multiple fatigue crack initiation sites on different planes will result in the formation of ratchet marks as the cracks coalesce. Once the stable fatigue crack becomes unstable and the fast fracture advances across the remaining ligament and the plane stress condition at a free-surface will result in failure along a 45 deg. shear plane (slant fracture) and the resulting inclined edge is called a shear lip. The hook thickness on the plane of fatigue crack initiation is 0.787". The distance between the shear lips on this plane was on the order of 0

  16. Evaluation of Pseudo-Static Coefficients According to Performance-Based Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Biondi, Giovanni; Maugeri, Michele; Cascone, Ernesto

    2008-07-08

    A rational procedure is presented for the selection of the equivalent seismic coefficient to be introduced in the pseudo-static analysis of geotechnical systems which, at failure, behave as a 1-degree of freedom system. It is shown that although pseudo-static and displacement analyses may be regarded as alternative methods of analysis, the seismic coefficient may be related to earthquake-induced permanent displacements and, then, to the expected level of damage. Following the proposed procedure a pseudo-static analysis in accordance with performance based design can be carried out.

  17. Latch Key: Developing Child Care Programs Through Community Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, James P.; And Others

    This guide to the Latch Key program for after-school day care explores rationale and methods for developing Latch Key programs in the public schools to provide low cost after-school care for children (grades 1-6) of working or student parents. (Some programs have been provided for kindergarten children and some have been expanded to full time…

  18. Gate drive latching circuit for an auxiliary resonant commutation circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Eladio Clemente (Inventor); Kheraluwala, Mustansir Hussainy (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A gate drive latching circuit for an auxiliary resonant commutation circuit for a power switching inverter includes a current monitor circuit providing a current signal to a pair of analog comparators to implement latching of one of a pair of auxiliary switching devices which are used to provide commutation current for commutating switching inverters in the circuit. Each of the pair of comparators feeds a latching circuit which responds to an active one of the comparators for latching the associated gate drive circuit for one of the pair of auxiliary commutating switches. An initial firing signal is applied to each of the commutating switches to gate each into conduction and the resulting current is monitored to determine current direction and therefore the one of the switches which is carrying current. The comparator provides a latching signal to the one of the auxiliary power switches which is actually conducting current and latches that particular power switch into an on state for the duration of current through the device. The latching circuit is so designed that the only time one of the auxiliary switching devices can be latched on is during the duration of an initial firing command signal.

  19. Performance analysis of static locking in replicated distributed database systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Yinghong; Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    Data replication and transaction deadlocks can severely affect the performance of distributed database systems. Many current evaluation techniques ignore these aspects, because it is difficult to evaluate through analysis and time consuming to evaluate through simulation. A technique is used that combines simulation and analysis to closely illustrate the impact of deadlock and evaluate performance of replicated distributed database with both shared and exclusive locks.

  20. Performance analysis of static locking in replicated distributed database systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Yinghong; Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    Data replications and transaction deadlocks can severely affect the performance of distributed database systems. Many current evaluation techniques ignore these aspects, because it is difficult to evaluate through analysis and time consuming to evaluate through simulation. Here, a technique is discussed that combines simulation and analysis to closely illustrate the impact of deadlock and evaluate performance of replicated distributed databases with both shared and exclusive locks.

  1. The effect of static, ballistic, and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching on vertical jump performance.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul S; Olsen, Peter D; Portas, Matthew D

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of different modes of stretching on vertical jump performance. Eighteen male university students (age, 24.3 +/- 3.2 years; height, 181.5 +/- 11.4 cm; body mass, 78.1 +/- 6.4 kg; mean +/- SD) completed 4 different conditions in a randomized order, on different days, interspersed by a minimum of 72 hours of rest. Each session consisted of a standard 5-minute cycle warm-up, accompanied by one of the subsequent conditions: (a) control, (b) 10-minute static stretching, (c) 10-minute ballistic stretching, or (d) 10-minute proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching. The subjects performed 3 trials of static and countermovement jumps prior to stretching and poststretching at 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes. Vertical jump height decreased after static and PNF stretching (4.0% and 5.1%, p < 0.05) and there was a smaller decrease after ballistic stretching (2.7%, p > 0.05). However, jumping performance had fully recovered 15 minutes after all stretching conditions. In conclusion, vertical jump performance is diminished for 15 minutes if performed after static or PNF stretching, whereas ballistic stretching has little effect on jumping performance. Consequently, PNF or static stretching should not be performed immediately prior to an explosive athletic movement.

  2. Characterization of an Autonomous Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Memory Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, Caroline S.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Evans, Joe; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    We present the electrical characterization of an autonomous non-volatile ferroelectric memory latch using the principle that when an electric field is applied to a ferroelectriccapacitor,the positive and negative remnant polarization charge states of the capacitor are denoted as either data 0 or data 1. The properties of the ferroelectric material to store an electric polarization in the absence of an electric field make the device non-volatile. Further the memory latch is autonomous as it operates with the ground, power and output node connections, without any externally clocked control line. The unique quality of this latch circuit is that it can be written when powered off. The advantages of this latch over flash memories are: a) It offers unlimited reads/writes b) works on symmetrical read/write cycles. c) The latch is asynchronous. The circuit was initially developed by Radiant Technologies Inc., Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  3. Valve latch device for drilling fluid telemetry systems

    SciTech Connect

    Larronde, M. L.; Hoos, R. G.

    1985-07-30

    A latch device for controlling a valve in a mud pulse telemetry system for imparting data pulses to drilling fluids circulating in a drill string is disclosed. A latch device and valve arrangement including an improved shear type, solenoid operated valve for modulating the pressure of the circulating drilling fluid is disclosed. A latching solenoid armature is connected to the valve gate through separate open and close solenoids having their armatures operatively connected to act as a single unit. The single unit armature is normally restrained from movement by the solenoid deactivated latch device. The latch device is arranged so that the vibrational and impact loads on the drill string serve to further maintain the modulating valve in a closed position.

  4. Miga Aero Actuator and 2D Machined Mechanical Binary Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummin, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    actuators. SMA actuators typically perform ideally as latch-release devices, wherein a spring-loaded device is released when the SMA actuator actuates in one direction. But many applications require cycling between two latched states open and closed.

  5. Pumping Performance of RBCC Engine under Sea Level Static Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchi, Toshinori; Tomioka, Sadatake; Kanda, Takeshi

    Two-stream flow model of ejector including heat and mass transfer was constructed by the comparison of the numerical simulations in the rocket-ramjet combined-cycle engine driven three different rocket gas; cold N2 gas, hot combustion gas and it within excess H2. The analysis of the ejector revealed that the heat and mass transfer from hot rocket plume with supersonic speed to cold airflow induced area change (expansion) of the airflow stream tube and the pressure rise in the constant-area section at the downstream of the rocket base. This pressure rise reduced the pumping performance of the ejector. To absorb the expansion of the airflow, the flowpath was changed from the constant area to the diverging area at the downstream of the rocket base. The numerical simulation in the modified engine demonstrated that the diverging-area section at the downstream of the rocket base improved the pumping performance.

  6. Static internal performance of single-expansion-ramp nozzles with various combinations of internal geometric parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of five geometric design parameters on the internal performance of single-expansion-ramp nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The geometric variables on the expansion-ramp surface of the upper flap consisted of ramp chordal angle, ramp length, and initial ramp angle. On the lower flap, the geometric variables consisted of flap angle and flap length. Both internal performance and static-pressure distributions on the centerlines of the upper and lower flaps were obtained for all 43 nozzle configurations tested.

  7. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. 571.113... Motor Vehicle Safety Standards § 571.113 Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. S1. Purpose and scope. This standard establishes the requirement for providing a hood latch system or hood latch systems....

  8. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. 571.113... Motor Vehicle Safety Standards § 571.113 Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. S1. Purpose and scope. This standard establishes the requirement for providing a hood latch system or hood latch systems....

  9. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. 571.113... Motor Vehicle Safety Standards § 571.113 Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. S1. Purpose and scope. This standard establishes the requirement for providing a hood latch system or hood latch systems....

  10. Performance comparison between static and dynamic cardiac CT on perfusion quantitation and patient classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac CT acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. In this simulation study, we evaluate the relative classification and quantification performance of these modes for assessing myocardial blood flow (MBF). In the dynamic method, a series of low dose cardiac CT acquisitions yields data on contrast bolus dynamics over time; these data are fit with a model to give a quantitative MBF estimate. In the static method, a single CT acquisition is obtained, and the relative CT numbers in the myocardium are used to infer perfusion states. The static method does not directly yield a quantitative estimate of MBF, but these estimates can be roughly approximated by introducing assumed linear relationships between CT number and MBF, consistent with the ways such images are typically visually interpreted. Data obtained by either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including 1) stratifying patients into differing categories of ischemia and 2) using the quantitative MBF estimate directly to evaluate ischemic disease severity. Through simulations, we evaluate the performance on each of these tasks. The dynamic method has very low bias in MBF estimates, making it particularly suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, ROC analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, has superior performance in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients.

  11. Comparative research on “high currents” induced by single event latch-up and transient-induced latch-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui; Han, Jian-Wei; Zheng, Han-Sheng; Yu, Yong-Tao; Shangguang, Shi-Peng; Feng, Guo-Qiang; Ma, Ying-Qi

    2015-04-01

    By using the pulsed laser single event effect facility and electro-static discharge (ESD) test system, the characteristics of the “high current”, relation with external stimulus and relevance to impacted modes of single event latch-up (SEL) and transient-induced latch-up (TLU) are studied, respectively, for a 12-bit complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) analog-to-digital converter. Furthermore, the sameness and difference in physical mechanism between “high current” induced by SEL and that by TLU are disclosed in this paper. The results show that the minority carrier diffusion in the PNPN structure of the CMOS device which initiates the active parasitic NPN and PNP transistors is the common reason for the “high current” induced by SEL and for that by TLU. However, for SEL, the minority carrier diffusion is induced by the ionizing radiation, and an underdamped sinusoidal voltage on the supply node (the ground node) is the cause of the minority carrier diffusion for TLU. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41304148).

  12. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Soli, G. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is described for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 micron was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 MeV sq cm/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV sq cm/mg was determined.

  13. Centerline latch tool for contingency orbiter door closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The centerline latch tool was designed and developed as an EVA manual backup device for latching the Space Shuttle Orbiter's payload bay doors for reentry in case of a failure of the existing centerline latches to operate properly. The tool was designed to satisfy a wide variety of structural, mechanical, and EVA requirements. It provides a load path for forces on the payload bay doors during reentry. Since the tool would be used by an EVA crewmember, control, handgrips, operating forces, and procedures must be within the capabilities of a partially restrained, suited crewmember in a zero-gravity environment. The centerline latch tool described was designed, developed, and tested to meet these requirements.

  14. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned: Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the lessons learned from heritage adoption designs. A general overview of cover deployment hardware that includes the three mechanisms of latch, hinge, and energy absorbers are also discussed.

  15. Static internal performance characteristics of two thrust reverser concepts for axisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, L. D.; Re, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The statis performance of two axisymmetric nozzle thrust reverser concepts was investigated. A rotating vane thrust reverser represented a concept in which reversing is accomplished upstream of the nozzle throat, and a three door reverser concept provided reversing downstream of the nozzle throat. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to approximately 6.0. The results of this investigation indicate that both the rotating vane and three door reverser concepts were effective static thrust spoilers with the landing approach nozzle geometry and were capable of providing at least a 50 percent reversal of static thrust when fully deployed with the ground roll nozzle geometry.

  16. Static internal performance of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle with thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bare, E. Ann; Reubush, David E.

    1987-01-01

    A parametric investigation of the static internal performance of multifunction two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles has been made in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. All nozzles had a constant throat area and aspect ratio. The effects of upper and lower flap angles, divergent flap length, throat approach angle, sidewall containment, and throat geometry were determined. All nozzles were tested at a thrust vector angle that varied from 5.60 tp 23.00 deg. The nozzle pressure ratio was varied up to 10 for all configurations.

  17. Dynamic performance and control of a static var generator using cascade multilevel inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    1996-10-01

    A cascade multilevel inverter is proposed for static VAR shifting, compensation/generation applications. The new cascade M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 single-phase full bridges in which each bridge has its own separate dc source. This inverter can generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage with only one time switching per cycle. It can eliminate the need for transformers in multipulse inverters. A prototype static VAR generator (SVG) system using 11- level cascade inverter (21-level line-to-line voltage waveform) has been built. The output voltage waveform is equivalent to that of a 60- pulse inverter. This paper focuses on dynamic performance of the cascade inverter based SVG system. Control schemes are proposed to achieve a fast response which is impossible for a conventional static VAR compensator (SVC). Analytical, simulated and experimental results show the superiority of the proposed SVG system.

  18. Static and dynamic performance of notched LDF{trademark}/PEKK composites

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, H.A.; Llorente, S.G.; Croman, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    Two different quasi-isotropic layups of carbon fiber reinforced PEKK (poly-ether-ketone-ketone) thermoplastic laminates were subjected to tensile static and tensile fatigue loadings. Some of the samples contained holes to access their notch sensitivity. In addition the AS-4 carbon fiber was of a long discontinuous form (LDF{trademark}) and the performance of the LDF{trademark} was compared with continuous fiber reinforcement. The two layups were: (90,0,{+-}45)s and (90,{+-}45,0)s and the specimens had either no hole, one hole, or three holes. These were tested for ultimate static strength and fatigued in tension at approximately 70% of static ultimate strength with R=0.1. The results were compared as to layup, fiber reinforcement type, and notch configuration. In addition the results obtained were compared with some previous work where the layups were (0,90,{+-}45)s and (0,{+-}45,90)s.

  19. Effects of Static Stretching on Squat Performance in Division I Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    HEISEY, CLARE F.; KINGSLEY, J. DEREK

    2016-01-01

    Static stretching was once recognized as a method of preparation for physical activity that would inhibit performance and increase risk of injury. However, a growing body of research suggests that static stretching may not have an inhibitory effect. Regardless, the data have not examined gender differences or the fatigue index (FI) and flexibility effects of static stretching on the back squat over multiple sets. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between a static-stretch condition (SC) and control condition (CC) on flexibility and the FI of Division I female athletes during 4 sets of the back squat. Eighteen subjects (mean ± SD; age 20 ± 1 yrs; height 164.5 ± 14.6 cm; mass 74.1 ± 26.8 kg; waist circumference 73.2 ± 5.4 cm) participated in 3 testing days over the course of 3 weeks. Each subject’s 1RM back squat was assessed during the first day of testing and verified during the second. On the third testing day, subjects assigned to the SC held 3 lower-body stretches twice for 30 second intervals and those assigned to the CC rested during the corresponding 7 minutes and 50 second time period. The subjects also performed a fatiguing squat protocol consisting of 4 sets of maximum repetitions on the third day of testing. A significant (p=0.04) interaction was noted for flexibility. No significant interaction (p=0.41) was observed between the FI of the CC (41.8 ± 24.1%) or the SC (27.6 ± 45.2%). These results indicate that static stretching does not have a significant effect on multiple sets of the back squat. Therefore, coaches may allow their athletes to engage in static stretching prior to resistance exercise ad libitum. PMID:27766127

  20. Comparison of User Performance with Interactive and Static 3d Visualization - Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, L.; Stachoň, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Interactive 3D visualizations of spatial data are currently available and popular through various applications such as Google Earth, ArcScene, etc. Several scientific studies have focused on user performance with 3D visualization, but static perspective views are used as stimuli in most of the studies. The main objective of this paper is to try to identify potential differences in user performance with static perspective views and interactive visualizations. This research is an exploratory study. An experiment was designed as a between-subject study and a customized testing tool based on open web technologies was used for the experiment. The testing set consists of an initial questionnaire, a training task and four experimental tasks. Selection of the highest point and determination of visibility from the top of a mountain were used as the experimental tasks. Speed and accuracy of each task performance of participants were recorded. The movement and actions in the virtual environment were also recorded within the interactive variant. The results show that participants deal with the tasks faster when using static visualization. The average error rate was also higher in the static variant. The findings from this pilot study will be used for further testing, especially for formulating of hypotheses and designing of subsequent experiments.

  1. The acute effects of static and ballistic stretching on vertical jump performance in trained women.

    PubMed

    Unick, Jessica; Kieffer, H Scott; Cheesman, Wendy; Feeney, Anna

    2005-02-01

    Traditionally stretching has been included as part of a warm-up that precedes athletic participation. However, there is mixed evidence as to whether stretching actually enhances or hinders athletic performance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of static (SS) and ballistic stretching (BS) on vertical jump (VJ) performance and to investigate whether power was altered at 15 and 30 minutes after stretching. Sixteen actively trained women performed a series of vertical jumps (countermovement and drop jumps) after an initial nonstretching (NS) session and after participating in BS and SS sessions that were conducted in a balanced and randomized order. The results indicated that there was no significant difference (p < 0.05) in VJ scores as a result of static or ballistic stretching, elapsed time, or initial flexibility scores. This suggests that stretching prior to competition may not negatively affect the performance of trained women.

  2. Noise and static performance characteristics of a STOL aircraft jet flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkonen, D. L.; Mcbride, J. F.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Static noise and performance tests were conducted on a 1/4-scale jet flap model with a multilobe nozzle of array area ratio of 2.7. The model nozzle and flap tested were a two-dimensional section of a distributed blowing system similar to previously investigated augmentor wing systems without the upper shroud and intake door. Noise data were measured with the nozzle alone and also during attached flow conditions with the flap at two turning angles representing takeoff and approach conditions. The noise data are scaled to a 200,000-lb TOGW four-engine airplane and are presented in terms of perceived noise level and one-third octave band sound pressure level. Comparisons are made with the noise levels produced by an augmentor wing airplane fitted with a three-element acoustically lined augmentor flap. The static performance is presented in terms of thrust recovery and effective turning angle.

  3. K-band high power latching switch. [communication satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlinar, M. J.; Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    A 19 GHz waveguide latching switch with a bandwidth of 1400 MHz and an exceptionally low insertion loss of 0.25 dB was demonstrated. The RF and driver ferrites are separate structures and can be optimized individually. This analysis for each structure is separately detailed. Basically, the RF section features a dual turnstile junction. The circulator consists of a dielectric tube which contains two ferrite rods, and a dielectric spacer separating the ferrite parts along the center of symmetry of the waveguide to form two turnstiles. This subassembly is indexed and locked in the center of symmetry of a uniform junction of three waveguides by the metallic transformers installed in the top and bottom walls of the housing. The switching junction and its actuating circuitry met all RF performance objectives and all shock and vibration requirements with no physical damage or performance degradation. It exceeds thermal requirements by operating over a 100 C temperature range (-44 C to +56 C) and has a high power handling capability allowing up to 100 W of CW input power.

  4. Dynamic vs. static-stretching warm up: the effect on power and agility performance.

    PubMed

    McMillian, Danny J; Moore, Josef H; Hatler, Brian S; Taylor, Dean C

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of a dynamic warm up (DWU) with a static-stretching warm up (SWU) on selected measures of power and agility. Thirty cadets at the United States Military Academy completed the study (14 women and 16 men, ages 18-24 years). On 3 consecutive days, subjects performed 1 of the 2 warm up routines (DWU or SWU) or performed no warm up (NWU). The 3 warm up protocols lasted 10 minutes each and were counterbalanced to avoid carryover effects. After 1-2 minutes of recovery, subjects performed 3 tests of power or agility. The order of the performance tests (T-shuttle run, underhand medicine ball throw for distance, and 5-step jump) also was counterbalanced. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed better performance scores after the DWU for all 3 performance tests (p < 0.01), relative to the SWU and NWU. There were no significant differences between the SWU and NWU for the medicine ball throw and the T-shuttle run, but the SWU was associated with better scores on the 5-step jump (p < 0.01). Because the results of this study indicate a relative performance enhancement with the DWU, the utility of warm up routines that use static stretching as a stand-alone activity should be reassessed.

  5. Dynamic performance of a static or throwing droplet impact onto a solid substrate with different properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Li, Ya-Dong

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic performance of a static or throwing droplet impact onto a solid substrate with different properties is numerically studied in this work. After being released or horizontally thrown out, a two-dimensional droplet can fall freely under gravity. The substrate, which is below the droplet, is either hydrophilic/hydrophobic or inhomogeneous. To conduct numerical simulations, a hybrid method is adopted, in which the flow field is solved by using the lattice Boltzmann method and the interface is captured by solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation directly. Given a fixed distance between the droplet and the substrate (H∗), the effects of Bond number (Bo), Weber number (We), and surface property on the performance of droplet impingement are investigated in detail. With the increase of Bond number, the surface coverage area of a static droplet also increases. A hydrophilic surface or an inhomogeneous surface with small advancing/receding angle difference can lead to the breakup of droplet rim due to the bubble entrapment. Moreover, dependent on the Weber number and the surface property, the leading edge rim of a throwing droplet developing on an inhomogeneous surface may break up before or after it contacts the substrate. As a result, compared to the case of static droplet, the surface coverage area will be reduced due to the diffusion of small droplet segment.

  6. Static internal performance of a single expansion ramp nozzle with multiaxis thrust vectoring capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Schirmer, Alberto W.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at static conditions in order to determine the internal performance characteristics of a multiaxis thrust vectoring single expansion ramp nozzle. Yaw vectoring was achieved by deflecting yaw flaps in the nozzle sidewall into the nozzle exhaust flow. In order to eliminate any physical interference between the variable angle yaw flap deflected into the exhaust flow and the nozzle upper ramp and lower flap which were deflected for pitch vectoring, the downstream corners of both the nozzle ramp and lower flap were cut off to allow for up to 30 deg of yaw vectoring. The effects of nozzle upper ramp and lower flap cutout, yaw flap hinge line location and hinge inclination angle, sidewall containment, geometric pitch vector angle, and geometric yaw vector angle were studied. This investigation was conducted in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at nozzle pressure ratios up to 8.0.

  7. Static internal performance including thrust vectoring and reversing of two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of geometric design parameters on two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to 12 in the static test facility. Forward flight (dry and afterburning power settings), vectored-thrust (afterburning power setting), and reverse-thrust (dry power setting) nozzles were investigated. The nozzles had thrust vector angles from 0 deg to 20.26 deg, throat aspect ratios of 3.696 to 7.612, throat radii from sharp to 2.738 cm, expansion ratios from 1.089 to 1.797, and various sidewall lengths. The results indicate that unvectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles have static internal performance comparable to axisymmetric nozzles with similar expansion ratios.

  8. Plastic latching accelerometer based on bistable compliant mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B. J.; Carron, C. J.; Jensen, B. D.; Hawkins, A. R.; Schultz, S. M.

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and testing of a miniature latching accelerometer that does not require electrical power. Latching is attained by using a bistable compliant mechanism that switches from one mechanical position to another when the force on the accelerometer exceeds a threshold value. Accelerometers were fabricated by laser cutting the compliant mechanism switch out of both ABS and Delrin plastic sheets. Packaging consisted of gluing the single compliant layer to a supporting substrate. The switching thresholds of the accelerometers were varied from 10g to 800g by varying the surface area of the free moving section between 100 and 500 mm2.

  9. Latch fittings for the scientific instruments on the space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J. D.; Kaelber, E.

    1983-01-01

    Latch fittings which kinematically mount the replaceable scientific instruments onto the Space Telescope must maintain precise alignment and thermal stability for on-orbit observations. Design features which are needed to meet stringent criteria include the use of ceramic isolators for thermal and electrical insulation, materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion for athermalization, precision manufacturing procedures, and extremely tight tolerances. A specific latch fitting to be discussed is a ball-and-socket design. In addition, testing, crew aids, and problems will be covered.

  10. Identifying performing and under performing graphic symbols for verbs and prepositions in animated and static formats: a research note.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Ralf W; Shane, Howard; Sorce, James; Koul, Rajinder; Bloomfield, Emma

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify graphic symbols for verbs and prepositions that were performing and underperforming in static and animated formats in a recent experiment on the effects of animation on transparency, name agreement, and identification of graphic symbols. Variable-specific criteria were developed in order to define when a symbol is considered to be performing in terms of its transparency, name agreement, and identification accuracy. Additionally, across-variable heuristic criteria were developed that allowed classification of symbols into four categories: (a) performing exceptionally, (b) performing effectively, (c) performing adequately, and (d) performing inadequately. These criteria were applied to 24 symbols for verbs and 8 symbols for prepositions in both animated and static formats. Results indicated that the vast majority of the symbols performed adequately or better while a few did not. Potential reasons as to why some of the symbols may have underperformed are discussed. Where appropriate, implications for modifying existing symbols and future research are drawn. Although the fact that the heuristic criteria were developed post-hoc is discussed as a limitation, the benefits of the proposed categories bode well for future applications.

  11. 49 CFR 236.341 - Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. 236.341 Section 236.341 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.341 Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. Latch shoes, rocker...

  12. 49 CFR 236.341 - Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. 236.341 Section 236.341 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.341 Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. Latch shoes, rocker...

  13. Effects of static stretching on energy cost and running endurance performance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jacob M; Hornbuckle, Lyndsey M; Kim, Jeong-Su; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Lee, Sang-Rok; Zourdos, Michael C; Sommer, Brian; Panton, Lynn B

    2010-09-01

    Stretching before anaerobic events has resulted in declines in performance; however, the immediate effects of stretching on endurance performance have not been investigated. This study investigated the effects of static stretching on energy cost and endurance performance in trained male runners. Ten trained male distance runners aged 25 +/- 7 years with an average VO2max of 63.8 +/- 2.8 ml/kg/min were recruited. Participants reported to the laboratory on 3 separate days. On day 1, anthropometrics and VO2max were measured. On days 2 and 3, participants performed a 60-minute treadmill run randomly under stretching or nonstretching conditions separated by at least 1 week. Stretching consisted of 16 minutes of static stretching using 5 exercises for the major lower body muscle groups, whereas nonstretching consisted of 16 minutes of quiet sitting. The run consisted of a 30-minute 65% VO2max preload followed by a 30-minute performance run where participants ran as far as possible without viewing distance or speed. Total calories expended were determined for the 30-minute preload run, whereas performance was measured as distance covered in the performance run. Performance was significantly greater in the nonstretching (6.0 +/- 1.1 km) vs. the stretching (5.8 +/- 1.0 km) condition (p < 0.05), with significantly greater energy expenditure during the stretching compared with the nonstretching condition (425 +/- 50 vs. 405 +/- 50 kcals). Our findings suggest that stretching before an endurance event may lower endurance performance and increase the energy cost of running. PMID:19918196

  14. Further result on guaranteed H∞ performance state estimation of delayed static neural networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Huang, Tingwen; Chen, Xiaoping

    2015-06-01

    This brief considers the guaranteed H∞ performance state estimation problem of delayed static neural networks. An Arcak-type state estimator, which is more general than the widely adopted Luenberger-type one, is chosen to tackle this issue. A delay-dependent criterion is derived under which the estimation error system is globally asymptotically stable with a prescribed H∞ performance. It is shown that the design of suitable gain matrices and the optimal performance index are accomplished by solving a convex optimization problem subject to two linear matrix inequalities. Compared with some previous results, much better performance is achieved by our approach, which is greatly benefited from introducing an additional gain matrix in the domain of activation function. An example is finally given to demonstrate the advantage of the developed result.

  15. Determination of the static performance of a Cuyuna cc model UL-430RR engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1983-01-01

    The results of static performance tests were carried out on an ultralight engine. A Cuyuna 430 cc, 2 stroke, 2 cylinder model was used to measure thrust, torque, propeller RPM, fuel flow, cylinder head temperature, and change in pressure through the propeller. Measurement of each of the above parameters was taken at specific values of RPM. The propeller's RPM's ranged from idle at approximately 750 RPM to a maximum value of 2810 RPM. The test results were then manipulated to obtain thrust coefficient, power coefficient, shaft horse power, and shaft specific fuel consumption.

  16. Static performance of an axisymmetric nozzle with post-exit vanes for multiaxis thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Mason, Mary L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the flow-turning capability and the nozzle internal performance of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle with post-exit vanes installed for multiaxis thrust vectoring. The effects of vane curvature, vane location relative to the nozzle exit, number of vanes, and vane deflection angle were determined. A comparison of the post-exit-vane thrust-vectoring concept with other thrust-vectoring concepts is provided. All tests were conducted with no external flow, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.6 to 6.0.

  17. Effects of nonlinear aerodynamics and static aeroelasticity on mission performance calculations for a fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.; Tatum, Kenneth E.; Foss, Willard E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    During conceptual design studies of advanced aircraft, the usual practice is to use linear theory to calculate the aerodynamic characteristics of candidate rigid (nonflexible) geometric external shapes. Recent developments and improvements in computational methods, especially computational fluid dynamics (CFD), provide significantly improved capability to generate detailed analysis data for the use of all disciplines involved in the evaluation of a proposed aircraft design. A multidisciplinary application of such analysis methods to calculate the effects of nonlinear aerodynamics and static aeroelasticity on the mission performance of a fighter aircraft concept is described. The aircraft configuration selected for study was defined in a previous study using linear aerodynamics and rigid geometry. The results from the previous study are used as a basis of comparison for the data generated herein. Aerodynamic characteristics are calculated using two different nonlinear theories, potential flow and rotational (Euler) flow. The aerodynamic calculations are performed in an iterative procedure with an equivalent plate structural analysis method to obtain lift and drag data for a flexible (nonrigid) aircraft. These static aeroelastic data are then used in calculating the combat and mission performance characteristics of the aircraft.

  18. Static/dynamic trade-off performance of PZT thick film micro-actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienaimé, Alex; Chalvet, Vincent; Clévy, Cédric; Gauthier-Manuel, Ludovic; Baron, Thomas; Rakotondrabe, Micky

    2015-07-01

    Piezoelectric actuators are widespread in the design of micro/nanorobotic tools and microsystems. Studies toward the integration of such actuators in complex micromechatronic systems require the size reduction of these actuators while retaining a wide range of performance. Two main fabrication processes are currently used for the fabrication of piezoelectric actuators, providing very different behaviors: (i) the use of a bulk lead zirconate titanate (PZT) layer and (ii) the use of thin film growth. In this paper, we propose a trade-off between these two extreme processes and technologies in order to explore the performance of new actuators. This resulted in the design and fabrication of thick film PZT unimorph cantilevers. They allowed a high level of performance, both in the static (displacement) and dynamic (first resonance frequency) regimes, in addition to being small in size. Such cantilever sizes are obtained through the wafer scale bonding and thinning of a PZT plate onto a silicon on insulator wafer. The piezoelectric cantilevers have a 26 μm thick PZT layer with a 5 μm thick silicon layer, over a length of 4 mm and a width of 150 μm. Experimental characterization has shown that the static displacements obtained are in excess of 4.8 μm V-1 and the resonance frequencies are up to 1103 Hz, which are useful for large displacements and low voltage actuators.

  19. 49 CFR 236.763 - Locking, latch operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locking, latch operated. 236.763 Section 236.763 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL...

  20. The 727 airplane target thrust reverser static performance model test for refanned JT8D engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, C. T. P.; Atkey, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a scale model static performance test of target thrust reverser configurations for the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft JT8D-100 series engine are presented. The objective of the test was to select a series of suitable candidate reverser configurations for the subsequent airplane model wind tunnel ingestion and flight controls tests. Test results indicate that adequate reverse thrust performance with compatible engine airflow match is achievable for the selected configurations. Tapering of the lips results in loss of performance and only minimal flow directivity. Door pressure surveys were conducted on a selected number of lip and fence configurations to obtain data to support the design of the thrust reverser system.

  1. Target-acquisition performance in undersampled infrared imagers: static imagery to motion video.

    PubMed

    Krapels, Keith; Driggers, Ronald G; Teaney, Brian

    2005-11-20

    In this research we show that the target-acquisition performance of an undersampled imager improves with sensor or target motion. We provide an experiment designed to evaluate the improvement in observer performance as a function of target motion rate in the video. We created the target motion by mounting a thermal imager on a precision two-axis gimbal and varying the sensor motion rate from 0.25 to 1 instantaneous field of view per frame. A midwave thermal imager was used to permit short integration times and remove the effects of motion blur. It is shown that the human visual system performs a superresolution reconstruction that mitigates some aliasing and provides a higher (than static imagery) effective resolution. This process appears to be relatively independent of motion velocity. The results suggest that the benefits of superresolution reconstruction techniques as applied to imaging systems with motion may be limited. PMID:16318174

  2. Acute effects of dynamic stretching, static stretching, and light aerobic activity on muscular performance in women.

    PubMed

    Curry, Brad S; Chengkalath, Devendra; Crouch, Gordon J; Romance, Michelle; Manns, Patricia J

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three warm-up protocols--static stretching, dynamic stretching, and light aerobic activity--on selected measures of range of motion and power in untrained females and to investigate the sustained effects at 5 and 30 minutes after warm-up. A total of 24 healthy females (ages 23-29 years) attended one familiarization session and three test sessions on nonconsecutive days within 2 weeks. A within-subject design protocol with the testing investigators blinded to the subjects' warm-up was followed. Each session started with 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling followed by pretest baseline measures. Another 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling was completed and followed by one of the three randomly selected warm-up interventions (static stretching, dynamic stretching, or light aerobic activity). The following posttest outcome measures were collected 5 and 30 minutes following the intervention: modified Thomas test, countermovement jump, and isometric time to peak force knee extension measured by dynamometer. Analysis of the data revealed significant time effects on range of motion and countermovement jump changes. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between the warm-up conditions on any of the variables. The variation in responses to warm-up conditions emphasizes the unique nature of individual reactions to different warm-ups; however, there was a tendency for warm-ups with an active component to have beneficial effects. The data suggests dynamic stretching has greater applicability to enhance performance on power outcomes compared to static stretching. PMID:19675479

  3. Non-Contacting Finger Seals Static Performance Test Results at Ambient and High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2016-01-01

    The non-contacting finger seal is an advanced seal concept with potential to reduce specific fuel consumption in gas turbine engines by 2 to 3 with little to no wear of the seal or rotor. Static performance tests and bind-up tests of eight different non-contacting finger seal configurations were conducted in air at pressure differentials up to 689.4 kPa and temperatures up to 922 K. Four of the seals tested were designed to have lift pads concentric to a herringbone-grooved rotor which generates hydrodynamic lift when rotating. The remaining seals were tested with a smooth rotor; one seal had a circumferential taper and one had an axial taper on the lift pad inner diameter to create hydrodynamic lift during rotation. The effects of the aft finger axial thickness and of the forward finger inner diameter on leakage performance were investigated as well and compared to analytical predictions.

  4. Non-Contacting Finger Seals Static Performance Test Results at Ambient and High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2016-01-01

    The non-contacting finger seal is an advanced seal concept with potential to reduce specific fuel consumption in gas turbine engines by 2 to 3 percent with little to no wear of the seal or rotor. Static performance tests and bind-up tests of eight different non-contacting finger seal configurations were conducted in air at pressure differentials up to 689.4 kPa and temperatures up to 922 K. Four of the seals tested were designed to have lift pads concentric to a herringbone-grooved rotor which generates hydrodynamic lift when rotating. The remaining seals were tested with a smooth rotor; one seal had a circumferential taper and one had an axial taper on the lift pad inner diameter to create hydrodynamic lift during rotation. The effects of the aft finger axial thickness and of the forward finger inner diameter on leakage performance were investigated as well and compared to analytical predictions.

  5. Effect of Eccentricity on the Static and Dynamic Performance of a Turbulent Hybrid Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanandres, Luis A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of journal eccentricity on the static and dynamic performance of a water lubricated, 5-recess hybrid bearing is presented in detail. The hydrostatic bearing has been designed to operate at a high speed and with a large level of external pressurization. The operating conditions determine the flow in the bearing to be highly turbulent and strongly dominated by fluid inertia effects. The analysis covers the spectrum of journal center displacements directed towards the middle of a recess and towards the mid-land portion between two consecutive recesses. Predicted dynamic force coefficients are uniform for small to moderate eccentricities. For large journal center displacements, fluid cavitation and recess position determine large changes in the bearing dynamic performance. The effect of fluid inertia force coefficients on the threshold speed of instability and whirl ratio of a single mass flexible rotor is discussed.

  6. Static performance of a cruciform nozzle with multiaxis thrust-vectoring and reverse-thrust capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Asbury, Scott C.

    1992-01-01

    A multiaxis thrust vectoring nozzle designed to have equal flow turning capability in pitch and yaw was conceived and experimentally tested for internal, static performance. The cruciform-shaped convergent-divergent nozzle turned the flow for thrust vectoring by deflecting the divergent surfaces of the nozzle, called flaps. Methods for eliminating physical interference between pitch and yaw flaps at the larger multiaxis deflection angles was studied. These methods included restricting the pitch flaps from the path of the yaw flaps and shifting the flow path at the throat off the nozzle centerline to permit larger pitch-flap deflections without interfering with the operation of the yaw flaps. Two flap widths were tested at both dry and afterburning settings. Vertical and reverse thrust configurations at dry power were also tested. Comparison with two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles showed lower but still competitive thrust performance and thrust vectoring capability.

  7. Static performance and noise tests on a thrust reverser for an augmentor wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkonen, D. L.; Marrs, C. C.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    A 1/3 scale model static test program was conducted to measure the noise levels and reverse thrust performance characteristics of wing-mounted thrust reverser that could be used on an advanced augmentor wing airplane. The configuration tested represents only the most fundamental designs where installation and packaging restraints are not considered. The thrust reverser performance is presented in terms of horizontal, vertical, and resultant effectiveness ratios and the reverser noise is compared on the basis of peak perceived noise level (PNL) and one-third octave band data (OASPL). From an analysis of the model force and acoustic data, an assessment is made on the stopping distance versus noise for a 90,900 kg (200,000 lb) airplane using this type of thrust reverser.

  8. Enhancing the force capability of permanent magnet latching actuators for electromechanical valve actuation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rens, J.; Clark, R. E.; Jewell, G. W.; Howe, D.

    2005-05-01

    This article introduces a topology of parallel-polarized permanent magnet latching actuator for use in electromagnetic valve actuation systems for internal combustion engines. The actuator has a number of advantages over reluctance actuators, commonly employed in such systems, in terms of reduced starting currents and fail-safe capability. The influence of a number of design features on actuator performance, such as tooth tapering, additional magnets to improve the main magnet flux path and prevent the onset of saturation, and mechanical clearances required to protect the permanent magnet from shock loads are investigated. The design study findings are verified by measurements on a prototype actuator.

  9. Static stretching can impair explosive performance for at least 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Monoem; Dridi, Amir; Chtara, Moktar; Chaouachi, Anis; Wong, Del P; Behm, David; Chamari, Karim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of static vs. dynamic stretching (DS) on explosive performances and repeated sprint ability (RSA) after a 24-hour delay. Sixteen young male soccer players performed 15 minutes of static stretching (SS), DS, or a no-stretch control condition (CC) 24 hours before performing explosive performances and RSA tests. This was a within-subject repeated measures study with SS, DS, and CC being counterbalanced. Stretching protocols included 2 sets of 7 minutes 30 seconds (2 repetitions of 30 seconds with a 15-second passive recovery) for 5 muscle groups (quadriceps, hamstring, calves, adductors, and hip flexors). Twenty-four hours later (without any kind of stretching in warm-up), the players were tested for the 30-m sprint test (with 10- and 20-m lap times), 5 jump test (5JT), and RSA test. Significant differences were observed between CC, SS, and DS with 5JT (F = 9.99, p < 0.00, effect size [ES] = 0.40), 10-m sprint time (F = 46.52, p < 0.00, ES = 0.76), 20-m sprint time (F = 18.44, p < 0.000, ES = 0.55), and 30-m sprint time (F = 34.25, p < 0.000, ES = 0.70). The significantly better performance (p < 0.05) was observed after DS as compared with that after CC and SS in 5JT, and sprint times for 10, 20, and 30 m. In contrast, significantly worse performance (p < 0.05) was observed after SS as compared with that after CC in 5JT, and sprint times for 10, 20, and 30 m. With RSA, no significant difference was observed between different stretching protocols in the total time (F = 1.55, p > 0.05), average time (F = 1.53, p > 0.05), and fastest time (F = 2.30, p > 0.05), except for the decline index (F = 3.54, p < 0.04, ES = 0.19). Therefore, the SS of the lower limbs and hip muscles had a negative effect on explosive performances up to 24 hours poststretching with no major effects on the RSA. Conversely, the DS of the same muscle groups are highly recommended 24 hours before performing sprint and long-jump performances. In

  10. Static and dynamic electrical performances of STI thin-SOI power LDMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, I.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; Flores, D.; Hidalgo, S.; Rebollo, J.

    2008-09-01

    The benefits of applying the shallow trench isolation (STI) concept to a higher voltage thin-SOI laterally diffused metal oxide semiconductor (LDMOS) (in the range of 80 V) are analysed in this paper by means of 2D technology computer-aided design (TCAD) numerical simulations. The TCAD simulation results allow comparing the electrical performance of the studied STI LDMOS structure with that of a conventional LDMOS in terms of the main static (breakdown voltage (VBR) and specific on-state resistance (RON-sp)) and dynamic (gate-drain capacitance (CGD) and cut-off frequency (fT)) characteristics. Moreover, the impact of the STI length (LSTI) and thickness (TSTI), and the N-drift implantation energy on the electrical characteristics is considered in detail. On the other hand, the STI block helps to move the harmful high electric field further away from the silicon surface, thus minimizing gate-oxide degradation by hot carriers.

  11. Performance, static stability, and control effectiveness of a parametric space shuttle launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchholz, R. E.; Gamble, M.

    1972-01-01

    This test was run as a continuation of a prior investigation of aerodynamic performance and static stability tests for a parametric space shuttle launch vehicle. The purposes of this test were: (1) to obtain a more complete set of data in the transonic flight region, (2) to investigate new H-0 tank noseshapes and tank diameters, (3) to obtain control effectiveness data for the orbiter at 0 degree incidence and with a smaller diameter H-0 tank, and (4) to determine the effects of varying solid rocket motor-to-H0 tank gap size. Experimental data were obtained for angles of attack from -10 to +10 degrees and for angles of sideslip from +10 to -10 degrees at Mach numbers ranging from .6 to 4.96.

  12. Fasting improves static apnea performance in elite divers without enhanced risk of syncope.

    PubMed

    Schagatay, Erika; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    In competitive apnea divers, the nutritional demands may be essentially different from those of, for example, endurance athletes, where energy resources need to be maximised for successful performance. In competitive apnea, the goal is instead to limit metabolism, as the length of the sustainable apneic period will depend to a great extent on minimising oxygen consumption. Many but not all elite divers fast before performing static apnea in competition. This may increase oxygen consumption as mainly lipid stores are metabolised but could also have beneficial effects on apneic duration. Our aim was to determine the effect of over-night fasting on apnea performance. Six female and seven male divers performed a series of three apneas after eating and fasting, respectively. The series consisted of two 2-min apneas spaced by 3 min rest and, after 5 min rest, one maximal effort apnea. Apneas were performed at supine rest and preceded by normal respiration and maximal inspiration. Mean (± SD) time since eating was 13 h (± 2 h 43 min) for the fasting and 1 h 34 min (± 33 min) for the eating condition (P < 0.001). Mean blood glucose was 5.1 (± 0.4) mmol/L after fasting and 5.9 (± 0.7) mmol/L after eating (P<0.01). Lung volumes were similar in both conditions (NS). For the 2-min apneas, nadir SaO2 during fasting was 95 (± 1)% and 92 (± 2)% (P < 0.001) on eating and ETCO2 was lower in the fasting condition (P < 0.01) while heart rate (HR) during apnea was 74 (± 10) bpm for fasting and 80 (± 10) bpm for eating conditions (P < 0.01). Maximal apnea durations were 4 min 41 s (± 43 s) during fasting and 3 min 51 s (± 37 s) after eating (P < 0.001), and time without respiratory contractions was 31 s (25%) longer after fasting (P < 0.01). At maximal apnea termination, SaO2 and ETCO2 were similar in both conditions (NS) and apneic HR was 63 (± 9) bpm for fasting and 70 (± 10) bpm for eating (P < 0.01). The 22% longer apnea duration after fasting with analogous end apnea

  13. Fasting improves static apnea performance in elite divers without enhanced risk of syncope.

    PubMed

    Schagatay, Erika; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    In competitive apnea divers, the nutritional demands may be essentially different from those of, for example, endurance athletes, where energy resources need to be maximised for successful performance. In competitive apnea, the goal is instead to limit metabolism, as the length of the sustainable apneic period will depend to a great extent on minimising oxygen consumption. Many but not all elite divers fast before performing static apnea in competition. This may increase oxygen consumption as mainly lipid stores are metabolised but could also have beneficial effects on apneic duration. Our aim was to determine the effect of over-night fasting on apnea performance. Six female and seven male divers performed a series of three apneas after eating and fasting, respectively. The series consisted of two 2-min apneas spaced by 3 min rest and, after 5 min rest, one maximal effort apnea. Apneas were performed at supine rest and preceded by normal respiration and maximal inspiration. Mean (± SD) time since eating was 13 h (± 2 h 43 min) for the fasting and 1 h 34 min (± 33 min) for the eating condition (P < 0.001). Mean blood glucose was 5.1 (± 0.4) mmol/L after fasting and 5.9 (± 0.7) mmol/L after eating (P<0.01). Lung volumes were similar in both conditions (NS). For the 2-min apneas, nadir SaO2 during fasting was 95 (± 1)% and 92 (± 2)% (P < 0.001) on eating and ETCO2 was lower in the fasting condition (P < 0.01) while heart rate (HR) during apnea was 74 (± 10) bpm for fasting and 80 (± 10) bpm for eating conditions (P < 0.01). Maximal apnea durations were 4 min 41 s (± 43 s) during fasting and 3 min 51 s (± 37 s) after eating (P < 0.001), and time without respiratory contractions was 31 s (25%) longer after fasting (P < 0.01). At maximal apnea termination, SaO2 and ETCO2 were similar in both conditions (NS) and apneic HR was 63 (± 9) bpm for fasting and 70 (± 10) bpm for eating (P < 0.01). The 22% longer apnea duration after fasting with analogous end apnea

  14. Novel latch for adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron logic

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Naoki Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Ortlepp, Thomas

    2014-03-14

    We herein propose the quantum-flux-latch (QFL) as a novel latch for adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic. A QFL is very compact and compatible with AQFP logic gates and can be read out in one clock cycle. Simulation results revealed that the QFL operates at 5 GHz with wide parameter margins of more than ±22%. The calculated energy dissipation was only ∼0.1 aJ/bit, which yields a small energy delay product of 20 aJ·ps. We also designed shift registers using QFLs to demonstrate more complex circuits with QFLs. Finally, we experimentally demonstrated correct operations of the QFL and a 1-bit shift register (a D flip-flop)

  15. Dual-Latching, Solenoid-Actuated Tube Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, Myron J.

    1993-01-01

    Tube-type shutoff valve electrically positioned to open or closed state by concentric solenoid. Solenoid dual latching: it holds position until changed electrically or manually. In tube valve, central tube slides axially, closing off flow when held against seat and allowing flow when backed away from seat. Simple to balance pressure on seal between seat and sharp edge of tube. With pressure-balanced seal, only small force needed to hold valve in position, regardless of pressure acting on valve.

  16. Dual-latching solenoid-actuated valve assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, Myron J. (Inventor); Yang, Jeff (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A tube-type shutoff valve is electrically positioned to its open or closed position by a concentric electromagnetic solenoid. The valve is dual latching in that the armature of the solenoid maintains the sliding tube of the valve in an open or closed position by means of permanent magnets which are effective when current is not supplied to the solenoid. The valve may also be actuated manually.

  17. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned: Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James

    2006-01-01

    Within JPL, there is a technology thrust need to develop a larger Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism (CDLM) for future missions. The approach taken was to adopt and scale the CDLM design as used on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) project. The three separate mechanisms that comprise the CDLM will be discussed in this paper in addition to a focus on heritage adoption lessons learned and specific examples. These lessons learned will be valuable to any project considering the use of heritage designs.

  18. Static performance investigation of a skewed-throat multiaxis thrust-vectoring nozzle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    The static performance of a jet exhaust nozzle which achieves multiaxis thrust vectoring by physically skewing the geometric throat has been characterized in the static test facility of the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle has an asymmetric internal geometry defined by four surfaces: a convergent-divergent upper surface with its ridge perpendicular to the nozzle centerline, a convergent-divergent lower surface with its ridge skewed relative to the nozzle centerline, an outwardly deflected sidewall, and a straight sidewall. The primary goal of the concept is to provide efficient yaw thrust vectoring by forcing the sonic plane (nozzle throat) to form at a yaw angle defined by the skewed ridge of the lower surface contour. A secondary goal is to provide multiaxis thrust vectoring by combining the skewed-throat yaw-vectoring concept with upper and lower pitch flap deflections. The geometric parameters varied in this investigation included lower surface ridge skew angle, nozzle expansion ratio (divergence angle), aspect ratio, pitch flap deflection angle, and sidewall deflection angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to a high of 11.5 for some configurations. The results of the investigation indicate that efficient, substantial multiaxis thrust vectoring was achieved by the skewed-throat nozzle concept. However, certain control surface deflections destabilized the internal flow field, which resulted in substantial shifts in the position and orientation of the sonic plane and had an adverse effect on thrust-vectoring and weight flow characteristics. By increasing the expansion ratio, the location of the sonic plane was stabilized. The asymmetric design resulted in interdependent pitch and yaw thrust vectoring as well as nonzero thrust-vector angles with undeflected control surfaces. By skewing the ridges of both the upper and lower surface contours, the interdependency between pitch and yaw thrust vectoring may be eliminated

  19. Static Thrust and Vectoring Performance of a Spherical Convergent Flap Nozzle with a Nonrectangular Divergent Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1998-01-01

    The static internal performance of a multiaxis-thrust-vectoring, spherical convergent flap (SCF) nozzle with a non-rectangular divergent duct was obtained in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Duct cross sections of hexagonal and bowtie shapes were tested. Additional geometric parameters included throat area (power setting), pitch flap deflection angle, and yaw gimbal angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to 12 for dry power configurations and from 2 to 6 for afterburning power configurations. Approximately a 1-percent loss in thrust efficiency from SCF nozzles with a rectangular divergent duct was incurred as a result of internal oblique shocks in the flow field. The internal oblique shocks were the result of cross flow generated by the vee-shaped geometric throat. The hexagonal and bowtie nozzles had mirror-imaged flow fields and therefore similar thrust performance. Thrust vectoring was not hampered by the three-dimensional internal geometry of the nozzles. Flow visualization indicates pitch thrust-vector angles larger than 10' may be achievable with minimal adverse effect on or a possible gain in resultant thrust efficiency as compared with the performance at a pitch thrust-vector angle of 10 deg.

  20. Unsteady vortex lattice techniques applied to wake formation and performance of the statically thrusting propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The application is considered of vortex lattice techniques to the problem of describing the aerodynamics and performance of statically thrusting propellers. A numerical lifting surface theory to predict the aerodynamic forces and power is performed. The chordwise and spanwise loading is modelled by bound vortices fixed to a twisted flat plate surface. In order to eliminate any apriori assumptions regarding the wake shape, it is assumed the propeller starts from rest. The wake is generated in time and allowed to deform under its own self-induced velocity field as the motion of the propeller progresses. The bound circulation distribution is then determined with time by applying the flow tangency boundary condition at certain selected control points on the blades. The aerodynamics of the infinite wing and finite wing are also considered. The details of wake formation and roll-up are investigated, particularly the localized induction effect. It is concluded that proper wake roll-up and roll-up rates can be established by considering the details of motion at the instant of start.

  1. Upper limb static-stretching protocol decreases maximal concentric jump performance.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Paulo H; Silva, Fernando H D de Oliveira; Soares, Enrico G; Serpa, Erica P; Nardi, Priscyla S M; Vilela, Guanis de B; Behm, David G

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of an upper limb static-stretching (SS) protocol on the maximal concentric jump performance. We recruited 25 young healthy, male, resistance trained individuals (stretched group, n = 15 and control group, n = 10) in this study. The randomized between group experimental protocol consisted of a three trials of maximal concentric jump task, before and after a SS of the upper limb. Vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) and surface electromyography (sEMG) of both gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and vastus lateralis (VL) were acquired. An extensive SS was employed consisting of ten stretches of 30 seconds, with 15 seconds of rest, and 70-90% of the point of discomfort (POD). ANOVA (2x2) (group x condition) was used for shoulder joint range of motion (ROM), vGRF and sEMG. A significant interaction for passive ROM of the shoulder joint revealed significant increases between pre- and post-SS protocol (p < 0.001). A significant interaction demonstrated decreased peak force and an increased peak propulsion duration between pre- and post-stretching only for stretch group (p = 0.021, and p = 0.024, respectively. There was a significant main effect between groups (stretch and control) for peak force for control group (p = 0.045). Regarding sEMG variables, there were no significant differences between groups (control versus stretched) or condition (pre-stretching versus post-stretching) for the peak amplitude of RMS and IEMG for both muscles (VL and GL). In conclusion, an acute extensive SS can increase the shoulder ROM, and negatively affect both the propulsion duration and peak force of the maximal concentric jump, without providing significant changes in muscle activation. Key pointsThe jump performance can be affected negatively by an intense extensive static-stretching protocol.An intense acute extensive SS protocol can affect positively the shoulder ROM.The intense acute extensive SS protocol does not change

  2. Upper Limb Static-Stretching Protocol Decreases Maximal Concentric Jump Performance

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Paulo H.; Silva, Fernando H. D. de Oliveira; Soares, Enrico G.; Serpa, Érica P.; Nardi, Priscyla S. M.; Vilela, Guanis de B.; Behm, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of an upper limb static-stretching (SS) protocol on the maximal concentric jump performance. We recruited 25 young healthy, male, resistance trained individuals (stretched group, n = 15 and control group, n = 10) in this study. The randomized between group experimental protocol consisted of a three trials of maximal concentric jump task, before and after a SS of the upper limb. Vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) and surface electromyography (sEMG) of both gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and vastus lateralis (VL) were acquired. An extensive SS was employed consisting of ten stretches of 30 seconds, with 15 seconds of rest, and 70-90% of the point of discomfort (POD). ANOVA (2x2) (group x condition) was used for shoulder joint range of motion (ROM), vGRF and sEMG. A significant interaction for passive ROM of the shoulder joint revealed significant increases between pre- and post-SS protocol (p < 0.001). A significant interaction demonstrated decreased peak force and an increased peak propulsion duration between pre- and post-stretching only for stretch group (p = 0.021, and p = 0.024, respectively. There was a significant main effect between groups (stretch and control) for peak force for control group (p = 0.045). Regarding sEMG variables, there were no significant differences between groups (control versus stretched) or condition (pre-stretching versus post-stretching) for the peak amplitude of RMS and IEMG for both muscles (VL and GL). In conclusion, an acute extensive SS can increase the shoulder ROM, and negatively affect both the propulsion duration and peak force of the maximal concentric jump, without providing significant changes in muscle activation. Key points The jump performance can be affected negatively by an intense extensive static-stretching protocol. An intense acute extensive SS protocol can affect positively the shoulder ROM. The intense acute extensive SS protocol does not

  3. A Note on the Comparative Statics of Pay-for-Performance in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Tisamarie B

    2016-05-01

    Pay-for-performance (P4P) is a widely implemented quality improvement strategy in health care that has generated much enthusiasm, but only limited empirical evidence to support its effectiveness. Researchers have speculated that flawed program designs or weak financial incentives may be to blame, but the reason for P4P's limited success may be more fundamental. When P4P rewards multiple services, it creates a special case of the well-known multitasking problem, where incentives to increase some rewarded activities are blunted by countervailing incentives to focus on other rewarded activities: these incentives may cancel each other out with little net effect on quality. This paper analyzes the comparative statics of a P4P model to show that when P4P rewards multiple services in a setting of multitasking and joint production, the change in both rewarded and unrewarded services is generally ambiguous. This result contrasts with the commonly held intuition that P4P should increase rewarded activities.

  4. A Study of TRMM Static Earth Sensor Performance Using On-Orbit Sensor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natanson, Gregory; Glickman, Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the Barnes static Earth sensor assembly (ESA) using on-orbit data collected from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. It is shown that there exist strong correlations between the large penetration angle residuals and the voltages produced by the Offset Radiation Source (ORS). It is conjectured that at certain times in the TRMM orbit the ORS is operating out of its calibrated range, and consequently corrupts the penetration angle information observed and processed by the ESA. The observed yaw drift between Digital Sun Sensor (DSS) observations is shown to be consistent with predictions by a simple roll-yaw coupling computation. This would explain the large drifts seen on TRMM, where the propagation of the yaw angle between DSS updates does not take into account the possibility of a non-zero roll angle error. Finally, the accuracy of the onboard algorithm used when only three of the four quadrants supply valid penetration angles is assessed. In terms of procedures used to perform this study, the analysis of ESA penetration angle residuals is discovered to be a very useful and insightful tool for assessing, the health and functionality of the ESA.

  5. Static Internal Performance of a Two-Dimensional Convergent-Divergent Nozzle with External Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Milton; Taylor, John G.; Frassinelli, Mark C.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. The nozzle design was tested with dry and afterburning throat areas, which represent different power settings and three expansion ratios. For each of these configurations, three trailing-edge geometries were tested. The baseline geometry had a straight trailing edge. Two different shaping techniques were applied to the baseline nozzle design to reduce radar observables: the scarfed design and the sawtooth design. A flat plate extended downstream of the lower divergent flap trailing edge parallel to the model centerline to form a shelf-like expansion surface. This shelf was designed to shield the plume from ground observation (infrared radiation (IR) signature suppression). The shelf represents the part of the aircraft structure that might be present in an installed configuration. These configurations were tested at nozzle pressure ratios from 2.0 to 12.0.

  6. Brush seal leakage performance with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlile, Julie A.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    The leakage performance of a brush seal with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions was studied. The leakage results included for air, helium, and carbon dioxide at several bristle/rotor interferences. Also, the effects of packing a lubricant into the bristles and also of reversing the pressure drop across the seal were studied. Results were compared to that of an annular seal at similar operating conditions. In order to generalize the results, they were correlated using corresponding state theory. The brush seal tested had a bore diameter of 3.792 cm (1.4930 in.), a fence height of 0.0635 cm (0.025 in.), and 1800 bristles/cm circumference (4500 bristles/in. circumference). Various bristle/rotor radial interferences were achieved by using a tapered rotor. The brush seal reduced the leakage in comparison to the annular seal, up to 9.5 times. Reversing the pressure drop across the brush seal produced leakage rates approximately the same as that of the annular seal. Addition of a lubricant reduced the leakage by 2.5 times. The air and carbon dioxide data were successfully correlated using corresponding state theory. However, the helium data followed a different curve than the air and carbon dioxide data.

  7. Brush seal leakage performance with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlile, Julie A.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    The leakage performance of a brush seal with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions was studied. The leakage results are included for air, helium, and carbon dioxide at several bristle/rotor interferences. Also, the effects of packing a lubricant into the bristles and also of reversing the pressure drop across the seal were studied. Results were compared to that of an annular seal at similar operating conditions. In order to generalize the results, they were correlated using corresponding state theory. The brush seal tested had a bore diameter of 3.792 cm (1.4930 in), a fence height of 0.0635 cm (0.025 in), and 1800 bristles/cm circumference (4500 bristles/in circumference). Various bristle/rotor radial interferences were achieved by using a tapered rotor. The brush seal reduced the leakage in comparison to the annular seal, up to 9.5 times. Reversing the pressure drop across the brush seal produced leakage rates approx. the same as that of the annular seal. Addition of a lubricant reduced the leakage by 2.5 times. The air and carbon dioxide data were successfully correlated using corresponding state theory. However, the helium data followed a different curve than the air and carbon dioxide data.

  8. Static and Wind Tunnel Aero-Performance Tests of NASA AST Separate Flow Nozzle Noise Reduction Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, Kevin L.; McDonald, Timothy J.; Saiyed, Naseem (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of cold flow model tests to determine the static and wind tunnel performance of several NASA AST separate flow nozzle noise reduction configurations. The tests were conducted by Aero Systems Engineering, Inc., for NASA Glenn Research Center. The tests were performed in the Channels 14 and 6 static thrust stands and the Channel 10 transonic wind tunnel at the FluiDyne Aerodynamics Laboratory in Plymouth, Minnesota. Facility checkout tests were made using standard ASME long-radius metering nozzles. These tests demonstrated facility data accuracy at flow conditions similar to the model tests. Channel 14 static tests reported here consisted of 21 ASME nozzle facility checkout tests and 57 static model performance tests (including 22 at no charge). Fan nozzle pressure ratio varied from 1.4 to 2.0, and fan to core total pressure ratio varied from 1.0 to 1.19. Core to fan total temperature ratio was 1.0. Channel 10 wind tunnel tests consisted of 15 tests at Mach number 0.28 and 31 tests at Mach 0.8. The sting was checked out statically in Channel 6 before the wind tunnel tests. In the Channel 6 facility, 12 ASME nozzle data points were taken and 7 model data points were taken. In the wind tunnel, fan nozzle pressure ratio varied from 1.73 to 2.8, and fan to core total pressure ratio varied from 1.0 to 1.19. Core to fan total temperature ratio was 1.0. Test results include thrust coefficients, thrust vector angle, core and fan nozzle discharge coefficients, total pressure and temperature charging station profiles, and boat-tail static pressure distributions in the wind tunnel.

  9. Static internal performance of convergent single-expansion-ramp nozzles with various combinations of internal geometric parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bare, E. Ann; Capone, Francis J.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of five geometric design parameters on the internal performance of convergent single expansion ramp nozzles. The effects of ramp chordal angle, initial ramp angle, flap angle, flap length, and ramp length were determined. All nozzles tested has a nominally constant throat area and aspect ratio. Static pressure distributions along the centerlines of the ramp and flap were also obtained for each configuration. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied up to 10.0 for all configurations.

  10. Performance comparison of fully adaptive and static passive polarimetric imagers in the presence of intensity and polarization contrast.

    PubMed

    Goudail, François; Boffety, Matthieu

    2016-09-01

    We address the comparison of contrast improvement obtained with a fully adaptive polarimetric imager and the best channel of a static polarimetric imager in the presence of both intensity and polarization differences between the target and the background. We develop an in-depth quantitative study of the performance loss incurred by a static imager compared to a fully adaptive one in this case. These results are useful to make a well-informed choice between these two polarimetric imaging architectures in a given application. PMID:27607513

  11. Static internal performance of single-expansion-ramp nozzles with thrust-vectoring capability up to 60 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted at static conditions (wind off) in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The effects of geometric thrust-vector angle, sidewall containment, ramp curvature, lower-flap lip angle, and ramp length on the internal performance of nonaxisymmetric single-expansion-ramp nozzles were investigated. Geometric thrust-vector angle was varied from -20 deg. to 60 deg., and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to approximately 10.0.

  12. The Association between Unilateral Heel-Rise Performance with Static and Dynamic Balance in Community Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hashish, Rami; Samarawickrame, Sachithra D.; Wang, Man-Ying; Yu, Sean S-Y; Salem, George J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION As a measure of both strength and muscle endurance of the plantar flexors, the unilateral heel rise (UHR) test has been suggested as a method to evaluate balance capabilities in older adults. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the association between UHR performance with biomechanical measures of balance in seniors. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-two older adults completed two testing sessions. The first visit included UHR performance; the second visit included dynamic and static motion analysis. RESULTS UHR performance was significantly associated with dynamic balance capability as measured by medial-lateral inclination angle during gait. As indicated by an analysis of center of pressure, there were significant associations between UHR performance and measures of static balance. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION Balance is influenced by plantar flexor performance as measured by the UHR test. We therefore suggest incorporating the UHR test in analyses of balance in seniors. PMID:25457285

  13. Rotational MEMS mirror with latching arm for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brière, Jonathan; Beaulieu, Philippe-Olivier; Saidani, Menouer; Nabki, Frederic; Menard, Michaël.

    2015-02-01

    We present an innovative rotational MEMS mirror that can control the direction of propagation of light beams inside of planar waveguides implemented in silicon photonics. Potential applications include but are not limited to optical telecommunications, medical imaging, scan and spectrometry. The mirror has a half-cylinder shape with a radius of 300 μm that provides low and constant optical losses over the full angular displacement range. A circular comb drive structure is anchored such that it allows free or latched rotation experimentally demonstrated over 8.5° (X-Y planar rotational movement) using 290V electrostatic actuation. The entire MEMS structure was implemented using the MEMSCAP SOIMUMPs process. The center of the anchor beam is designed to be the approximate rotation point of the circular comb drive to counter the rotation offset of the mirror displacement. A mechanical characterization of the MEMS mirror is presented. The latching mechanism provides up to 20 different angular locking positions allowing the mirror to counter any resonance or vibration effects and it is actuated with an electrostatic linear comb drive. An innovative gap closing structure was designed to reduce optical propagation losses due to beam divergence in the interstitial space between the mirror and the planar waveguide. The gap closing structure is also electrostatically actuated and includes two side stoppers to prevent stiction.

  14. Soil sampling device with latch assembly having a variable circumferential shape

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to an improved sampler which can be operated in any orientation. The design features a positive gripping of the operating rod in a manner to reduce point loads so as to reduce any possibility of jamming of the rod on a retraction stroke until such time as it is positively retained in the fully withdrawn position. In the preferred embodiment, a pair of mating cylindrical latch pieces, held together by a circumferential spring, are used for positive actuation. The inner rod has an angular cut-out which provides the base for the latch when aligned with the latch. A release fixture can be used to free the latch from the cone rod after actuation. The latches are formed in such a manner as they may support themselves within the housing of the sampler until they engage the operating rod.

  15. Soil sampling device with latch assembly having a variable circumferential shape

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, R.D.

    1996-12-24

    The invention relates to an improved sampler which can be operated in any orientation. The design features a positive gripping of the operating rod in a manner to reduce point loads so as to reduce any possibility of jamming of the rod on a retraction stroke until such time as it is positively retained in the fully withdrawn position. In the preferred embodiment, a pair of mating cylindrical latch pieces, held together by a circumferential spring, are used for positive actuation. The inner rod has an angular cut-out which provides the base for the latch when aligned with the latch. A release fixture can be used to free the latch from the cone rod after actuation. The latches are formed in such a manner as they may support themselves within the housing of the sampler until they engage the operating rod. 11 figs.

  16. Evolution of the IBDM Structural Latch Development into a Generic Simplified Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVriendt, K.; Dittmer, H.; Vrancken, D.; Urmston, P.; Gracia, O.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the evolution in the development of the structural latch for the International Berthing Docking Mechanism (IBDM, see Figure 1). It reports on the lessons learned since completion of the test program on the engineering development unit of the first generation latching system in 2007. The initial latch design has been through a second generation concept in 2008, and now evolved into a third generation of this mechanism. Functional and structural testing on the latest latch hardware has recently been completed with good results. The IBDM latching system will provide the structural connection between two mated space vehicles after berthing or docking. The mechanism guarantees that the interface seals become compressed to form a leak-tight pressure system that creates a passageway for the astronauts.

  17. Performance study of a PDMS-based microfluidic device for the detection of continuous distributed static and dynamic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Gu, Wenting; Shen, Jiayue; Ghosh, Arindam; Beskok, Ali; Hao, Zhili

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study on the performance of a polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic device for the detection of continuous distributed static and dynamic loads. The core of this device is a single-compliant polymer microstructure integrated with a set of electrolyte-enabled distributed transducers, which are equally spaced along the microstructure length. The microstructure converts continuous distributed loads to continuous deflection, which is translated to discrete resistance changes by the distributed transducers. One potential application of this device is to measure spatially varying elasticity/viscoelasticity of a heterogeneous soft material, through quasi-static, stress relaxation and dynamic mechanical analysis tests. Thus, by controlling the displacement of a rigid probe, three types of loads (i.e., static, step and sinusoidal) are exerted on the device, and the performance of the device is experimentally characterized and analytically examined. As a result, this work establishes not only an experimental method for characterizing the performance of the device under various loading conditions, which can be directly adopted to measure the spatially varying elasticity/viscoelasticity of a heterogeneous soft material, but also the correlation of the device performance to its design parameters.

  18. Modeling the Energy Performance of Event-Driven Wireless Sensor Network by Using Static Sink and Mobile Sink

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiehui; Salim, Mariam B.; Matsumoto, Mitsuji

    2010-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) designed for mission-critical applications suffer from limited sensing capacities, particularly fast energy depletion. Regarding this, mobile sinks can be used to balance the energy consumption in WSNs, but the frequent location updates of the mobile sinks can lead to data collisions and rapid energy consumption for some specific sensors. This paper explores an optimal barrier coverage based sensor deployment for event driven WSNs where a dual-sink model was designed to evaluate the energy performance of not only static sensors, but Static Sink (SS) and Mobile Sinks (MSs) simultaneously, based on parameters such as sensor transmission range r and the velocity of the mobile sink v, etc. Moreover, a MS mobility model was developed to enable SS and MSs to effectively collaborate, while achieving spatiotemporal energy performance efficiency by using the knowledge of the cumulative density function (cdf), Poisson process and M/G/1 queue. The simulation results verified that the improved energy performance of the whole network was demonstrated clearly and our eDSA algorithm is more efficient than the static-sink model, reducing energy consumption approximately in half. Moreover, we demonstrate that our results are robust to realistic sensing models and also validate the correctness of our results through extensive simulations. PMID:22163503

  19. Review of in vivo static and ELF electric fields studies performed at Gazi Biophysics Department.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Nesrin; Güler, Göknur

    2006-01-01

    In vivo effects of Static Electric and ELF Magnetic and Electric fields have been carried out for more than 20 years in the Bioelectromagnetic Laboratory at the Biophysics Department of the Medical Faculty of Gazi University. In this article, the results of in vivo ELF Electric field studies are presented as a review. Static and 50 Hz ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) Electric (E) fields effects on free radical synthesis, antioxidant enzyme level, and collagen synthesis were analyzed on tissues of guinea pigs, such as brain, liver, lung, kidney, spleen, testis, and plasma. Animals were exposed to static and ELF electric fields with intensities ranging from 0.3 kV/m to 1.9 kV/m in vertical and horizontal directions. Exposure periods were 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days. Electric fields were generated from a specially designed parallel plate capacitor system. The results indicate that the effects of electric fields on the tissues studied depend significantly on the type and magnitude of electric field and exposure period.

  20. Subsonic Maneuvering Effectiveness of High Performance Aircraft Which Employ Quasi-Static Shape Change Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C.; Scott, Michael A.; Weston, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper represents an initial study on the use of quasi-static shape change devices in aircraft maneuvering. The macroscopic effects and requirements for these devices in flight control are the focus of this study. Groups of devices are postulated to replace the conventional leading-edge flap (LEF) and the all-moving wing tip (AMT) on the tailless LMTAS-ICE (Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems - Innovative Control Effectors) configuration. The maximum quasi-static shape changes are 13.8% and 7.7% of the wing section thickness for the LEF and AMT replacement devices, respectively. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) panel code is used to determine the control effectiveness of groups of these devices. A preliminary design of a wings-leveler autopilot is presented. Initial evaluation at 0.6 Mach at 15,000 ft. altitude is made through batch simulation. Results show small disturbance stability is achieved, however, an increase in maximum distortion is needed to statically offset five degrees of sideslip. This only applies to the specific device groups studied, encouraging future research on optimal device placement.

  1. Latching chains in K-nearest-neighbor and modular small-world networks.

    PubMed

    Song, Sanming; Yao, Hongxun; Simonov, Alexander Yurievich

    2015-01-01

    Latching dynamics retrieve pattern sequences successively by neural adaption and pattern correlation. We have previously proposed a modular latching chain model in Song et al. (2014) to better accommodate the structured transitions in the brain. Different cortical areas have different network structures. To explore how structural parameters like rewiring probability, threshold, noise and feedback connections affect the latching dynamics, two different connection schemes, K-nearest-neighbor network and modular network both having modular structure are considered. Latching chains are measured using two proposed measures characterizing length of intra-modular latching chains and sequential inter-modular association transitions. Our main findings include: (1) With decreasing threshold coefficient and rewiring probability, both the K-nearest-neighbor network and the modular network experience quantitatively similar phase change processes. (2) The modular network exhibits selectively enhanced latching in the small-world range of connectivity. (3) The K-nearest-neighbor network is more robust to changes in rewiring probability, while the modular network is more robust to the presence of noise pattern pairs and to changes in the strength of feedback connections. According to our findings, the relationships between latching chains in K-nearest-neighbor and modular networks and different forms of cognition and information processing emerging in the brain are discussed.

  2. Driving and latching of the Starlab pointing mirror doors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaven, Herbert R., Jr.; Avina, Raymond R.

    1990-01-01

    The Starlab Experiment, a major SDIO technology initiative, is an attached payload which will be delivered into Earth orbit aboard NASA's Space Shuttle in 1991. Starlab will generate and aim an 80 cm diameter laser beam into space through a large opening in the structure which houses the pointing mirror. Two doors, each somewhat larger than a desktop, cover the opening when the laser optics system is nonoperational. Latch Mechanism Assemblies hold the doors shut during liftoff and ascent and, again, during Orbiter reentry. Each door is powered by a Door Drive System during the many open/close cycles between various experiments. The design, testing, and resultant failure modes of these mechanisms are examined.

  3. Static performance of nonaxisymmetric nozzles with yaw thrust-vectoring vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.

    1988-01-01

    A static test was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16 ft Transonic Tunnel to evaluate the effects of post exit vane vectoring on nonaxisymmetric nozzles. Three baseline nozzles were tested: an unvectored two dimensional convergent nozzle, an unvectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle, and a pitch vectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. Each nozzle geometry was tested with 3 exit aspect ratios (exit width divided by exit height) of 1.5, 2.5 and 4.0. Two post exit yaw vanes were externally mounted on the nozzle sidewalls at the nozzle exit to generate yaw thrust vectoring. Vane deflection angle (0, -20 and -30 deg), vane planform and vane curvature were varied during the test. Results indicate that the post exit vane concept produced resultant yaw vector angles which were always smaller than the geometric yaw vector angle. Losses in resultant thrust ratio increased with the magnitude of resultant yaw vector angle. The widest post exit vane produced the largest degree of flow turning, but vane curvature had little effect on thrust vectoring. Pitch vectoring was independent of yaw vectoring, indicating that multiaxis thrust vectoring is feasible for the nozzle concepts tested.

  4. Component-cost and performance based comparison of flow and static batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Brandon J.; Smith, Kyle C.; Slocum, Alexander H.; Chiang, Yet-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Flow batteries are a promising grid-storage technology that is scalable, inherently flexible in power/energy ratio, and potentially low cost in comparison to conventional or "static" battery architectures. Recent advances in flow chemistries are enabling significantly higher energy density flow electrodes. When the same battery chemistry can arguably be used in either a flow or static electrode design, the relative merits of either design choice become of interest. Here, we analyze the costs of the electrochemically active stack for both architectures under the constraint of constant energy efficiency and charge and discharge rates, using as case studies the aqueous vanadium-redox chemistry, widely used in conventional flow batteries, and aqueous lithium-iron-phosphate (LFP)/lithium-titanium-phosphate (LTP) suspensions, an example of a higher energy density suspension-based electrode. It is found that although flow batteries always have a cost advantage (kWh-1) at the stack level modeled, the advantage is a strong function of flow electrode energy density. For the LFP/LTP case, the cost advantages decreases from ∼50% to ∼10% over experimentally reasonable ranges of suspension loading. Such results are important input for design choices when both battery architectures are viable options.

  5. The Acute Effects of Static Stretching on Speed and Agility Performance Depend on Stretch Duration and Conditioning Level.

    PubMed

    Avloniti, Alexandra; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Avloniti, Christina; Protopapa, Maria; Draganidis, Dimitrios; Stampoulis, Theodoros; Leontsini, Diamanda; Mavropalias, George; Gounelas, George; Kambas, Antonios

    2016-10-01

    Avloniti, A, Chatzinikolaou, A, Fatouros, IG, Avloniti, C, Protopapa, M, Draganidis, D, Stampoulis, T, Leontsini, D, Mavropalias, G, Gounelas, G, and Kambas, A. The acute effects of static stretching on speed and agility performance depend on stretch duration and conditioning level. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2767-2773, 2016-Although static stretching (SS) is an integral part of physical preparation before training and competition, its usefulness in regards to power performance improvement has been questioned. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 SS durations on speed and agility performance. According to a cross-over design, 34 trained men (age, 20.5 ± 1.4 years; height, 1.81 ± 0.2 m; weight, 77.2 ± 2.6 kg; body fat, 8.2 ± 2.6%) participated in a control session (no stretch) and 6 experimental conditions (10, 15, 20, 30, 40, and 60 seconds) performed in a randomized order. Performance in speed (10 and 20 m) and agility (T-test) was measured after the control and experimental conditions. Static stretching, consisting of stretches for hip extensors, hip adductors, knee extensors, knee flexors, and ankle sole flexors, was performed after light cardiovascular exercise (8 minutes). A 1-way repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that speed was improved only by SS of short duration (15/20 seconds), whereas agility remained unaffected by all SS trials. When participants' speed and agility level was taken into account, it was revealed that only those of moderate performance demonstrated an improved speed (in 15- and 20-second trials) and agility (in 10- and 15-second trials) performance. These results suggest that short-duration SS protocols induce an acute improvement of speed and agility performance, whereas longer-duration SS protocols have neither positive nor negative effect. Furthermore, it seems that individuals of lower speed and agility performance level are more likely to benefit by a short-duration SS protocol.

  6. A performance comparison of static VAr compensator based on Goertzel and FFT algorithm and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Kececioglu, O Fatih; Gani, Ahmet; Sekkeli, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the present paper is to introduce a new approach for measuring and calculation of fundamental power components in the case of various distorted waveforms including those containing harmonics. The parameters of active, reactive, apparent power and power factor, are measured and calculated by using Goertzel algorithm instead of fast Fourier transformation which is commonly used. The main advantage of utilizing Goertzel algorithm is to minimize computational load and trigonometric equations. The parameters measured in the new technique are applied to a fixed capacitor-thyristor controlled reactor based static VAr compensation system to achieve accurate power factor correction for the first time. This study is implemented both simulation and experimentally. PMID:27047717

  7. Quasi-static RAM design for high performance operation at liquid nitrogen temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Richard C.; Blalock, Travis N.

    1990-12-01

    The leakage currents which cause information loss in dynamic random access memories (DRAMs) at room temperature disappear at liquid nitrogen temperature, permitting operation of the circuits without the need for refresh (quasi-static operation). The current drive characteristics of the MOS transistor also improve significantly at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Combining these factors leads to an exploration of high speed dynamic RAM design based upon cells with non-destructive readout. This paper describes an experimental high speed RAM based upon a new two-transistor (2T) memory cell designed to exploit the unique advantages of operation at low temperature. Non-destructive readout coupled with a large d.c. sensible output current yields a high speed RAM with low power consumption. An experimental 4 kbit memory, fabricated using a 2 μm CMOS technology, exhibits an access time of 7 nS at 77 K.

  8. Improvement on the dynamical performance of a power bipolar static induction transistor with a buried gate structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongshun, Wang; Jingjing, Feng; Chunjuan, Liu; Zaixing, Wang; Caizhen, Zhang; Peng, Chang

    2011-11-01

    The failure of a bipolar static induction transistor (BSIT) often occurs in the transient process between the conducting-state and the blocking-state, so a profound understanding of the physical mechanism of the switching process is of significance for designing and fabricating perfect devices. The dynamical characteristics of the transient process between conducting-state and blocking-state BSITs are represented in detail in this paper. The influences of material, structural and technological parameters on the dynamical performances of BSITs are discussed. The mechanism underlying the transient conversion process is analyzed in depth. The technological approaches are developed to improve the dynamical characteristics of BSITs.

  9. Numerical analysis of static performance comparison of friction stir welded versus riveted 2024-T3 aluminum alloy stiffened panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qing; He, Yuting; Zhang, Teng; Wu, Liming

    2014-07-01

    Most researches on the static performance of stiffened panel joined by friction stir welding(FSW) mainly focus on the compression stability rather than shear stability. To evaluate the potential of FSW as a replacement for traditional rivet fastening for stiffened panel assembly in aviation application, finite element method(FEM) is applied to compare compression and shear stability performances of FSW stiffened panels with stability performances of riveted stiffened panels. FEMs of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy FSW and riveted stiffened panels are developed and nonlinear static analysis method is applied to obtain buckling pattern, buckling load and load carrying capability of each panel model. The accuracy of each FEM of FSW stiffened panel is evaluated by stability experiment of FSW stiffened panel specimens with identical geometry and boundary condition and the accuracy of each FEM of riveted stiffened panel is evaluated by semi-empirical calculation formulas. It is found that FEMs without considering weld-induced initial imperfections notably overestimate the static strengths of FSW stiffened panels. FEM results show that, buckling patterns of both FSW and riveted compression stiffened panels represent local buckling of plate between stiffeners. The initial buckling waves of FSW stiffened panel emerge uniformly in each plate between stiffeners while those of riveted panel mainly emerge in the mid-plate. Buckling patterns of both FSW and riveted shear stiffened panels represent local buckling of plate close to the loading corner. FEM results indicate that, shear buckling of FSW stiffened panel is less sensitive to the initial imperfections than compression buckling. Load carrying capability of FSW stiffened panel is less sensitive to the initial imperfections than initial buckling. It can be concluded that buckling loads of FSW panels are a bit lower than those of riveted panels whereas carrying capabilities of FSW panels are almost equivalent to those of riveted

  10. Static internal performance of a nonaxisymmetric vaned thrust reverser with flow splay capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, Linda S.; Leavitt, Laurence D.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel on a dual-port, nonaxisymmetric, block-and-turn type thrust reverser model with vane cascades in the reverser ports which turned the flow in the splay direction and aided in turning the flow in the reverse direction. Splaying reverser flow is a method of delaying to lower landing ground roll speeds the reingestion of hot exhaust flow into the inlets. Exhaust flow splay can also help prevent the impingement of hot exhaust gases on the empennage surfaces when the reverser is integrated into an actual airframe. The vane cascades consisted of two sets of perpendicular vanes with a variable number of turning and splay vanes. A skewed vane box was also tested which had only one set of vanes angled to provide both turning and splay. Vane cascades were designed to provide different amounts of flow splay in the top and bottom ports. Inner doors, trim tabs, and an orifice plate all provided means of varying the port area for reverser flow modulation. The outer door position was varied as a means of influencing the flow reverse angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.75 to approximately 6.00.

  11. Predicting Material Performance in the Space Environment from Laboratory Test Data, Static Design Environments, and Space Weather Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Josep I.; Edwards, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Qualifying materials for use in the space environment is typically accomplished with laboratory exposures to simulated UV/EUV, atomic oxygen, and charged particle radiation environments with in-situ or subsequent measurements of material properties of interest to the particular application. Choice of environment exposure levels are derived from static design environments intended to represent either mean or extreme conditions that are anticipated to be encountered during a mission. The real space environment however is quite variable. Predictions of the on orbit performance of a material qualified to laboratory environments can be done using information on 'space weather' variations in the real environment. This presentation will first review the variability of space environments of concern for material degradation and then demonstrate techniques for using test data to predict material performance in a variety of space environments from low Earth orbit to interplanetary space using historical measurements and space weather models.

  12. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite materials have increased in the last four decades in high technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties and low weight. In the automotive industry carbon fiber have become popular exclusively in luxury cars because of its high cost. However, Carbon-glass hybrid composites offer an effective alternative to designers to implement fiber-reinforced composites into several conventional applications without a considerable price increase maintaining most of their mechanical properties. A door latch system is a complex mechanism that is under high loading conditions during car accidents such as side impacts and rollovers. Therefore, the Department of Transportation in The United States developed a series of tests that every door latch system comply in order to be installed in a vehicle. The implementation of fiber-reinforced composite materials in a door latch system was studied by analyzing the material behavior during the FMVSS No. 206 transverse test using computational efforts and experimental testing. Firstly, a computational model of the current forkbolt and detent structure was developed. Several efforts were conducted in order to create an effective and time efficient model. Two simplified models were implemented with two different contact interaction approaches. 9 composite materials were studied in forkbolt and 5 in detent including woven carbon fiber, unidirectional carbon fiber, woven carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites and unidirectional carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites. The computational model results showed that woven fiber-reinforced composite materials were stiffer than the unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite materials. For instance, a forkbolt made of woven carbon fibers was 20% stiffer than a forkbolt made of unidirectional fibers symmetrically stacked in 0° and 90° alternating directions. Furthermore, Hybrid composite materials behaved as expected in forkbolt noticing a decline

  13. Static internal performance of a thrust vectoring and reversing two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle with an aft flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    The static internal performance of a multifunction nozzle having some of the geometric characteristics of both two-dimensional convergent-divergent and single expansion ramp nozzles has been investigated in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The internal expansion portion of the nozzle consisted of two symmetrical flat surfaces of equal length, and the external expansion portion of the nozzle consisted of a single aft flap. The aft flap could be varied in angle independently of the upper internal expansion surface to which it was attached. The effects of internal expansion ratio, nozzle thrust-vector angle (-30 deg. to 30 deg., aft flap shape, aft flap angle, and sidewall containment were determined for dry and afterburning power settings. In addition, a partial afterburning power setting nozzle, a fully deployed thrust reverser, and four vertical takeoff or landing nozzle, configurations were investigated. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied up to 10 for the dry power nozzles and 7 for the afterburning power nozzles.

  14. Effects of acute static stretching of the throwing shoulder on pitching performance of national collegiate athletic association division III baseball players.

    PubMed

    Haag, Samuel J; Wright, Glenn A; Gillette, Cordial M; Greany, John F

    2010-02-01

    Stretching is a common component of an athletic warm-up even though many studies have demonstrated that pre-event static stretching can decrease strength and power performance. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of acute static stretching of the throwing shoulder on pitching velocity and accuracy of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III baseball players. Twelve collegiate baseball players, including 6 pitchers and 6 position players, participated in the study. Each participant completed 2 separate testing protocols over a span of 4-6 days. In the experimental condition (SS), 6 static stretches were applied to the throwing shoulder after an active warm-up. After a rest period of 5-10 minutes, participants were allowed 5 warm-up pitches from a pitching mound. Participants then threw 10 pitches measured for velocity and accuracy. The control condition (NS) followed the same procedure but did not include the 6 static stretches. Testing was conducted in an indoor practice facility during normal team practice. No significant differences were found in average velocity, maximum velocity, or accuracy measures when comparing the SS and NS conditions. These results suggest that acute static stretching of the throwing shoulder does not have a significant impact on baseball pitching performance. Static stretching of the shoulder may be performed during a warm-up before a throwing activity. PMID:20072054

  15. Effects of acute static stretching of the throwing shoulder on pitching performance of national collegiate athletic association division III baseball players.

    PubMed

    Haag, Samuel J; Wright, Glenn A; Gillette, Cordial M; Greany, John F

    2010-02-01

    Stretching is a common component of an athletic warm-up even though many studies have demonstrated that pre-event static stretching can decrease strength and power performance. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of acute static stretching of the throwing shoulder on pitching velocity and accuracy of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III baseball players. Twelve collegiate baseball players, including 6 pitchers and 6 position players, participated in the study. Each participant completed 2 separate testing protocols over a span of 4-6 days. In the experimental condition (SS), 6 static stretches were applied to the throwing shoulder after an active warm-up. After a rest period of 5-10 minutes, participants were allowed 5 warm-up pitches from a pitching mound. Participants then threw 10 pitches measured for velocity and accuracy. The control condition (NS) followed the same procedure but did not include the 6 static stretches. Testing was conducted in an indoor practice facility during normal team practice. No significant differences were found in average velocity, maximum velocity, or accuracy measures when comparing the SS and NS conditions. These results suggest that acute static stretching of the throwing shoulder does not have a significant impact on baseball pitching performance. Static stretching of the shoulder may be performed during a warm-up before a throwing activity.

  16. Short period of oxygenation releases latch on peat decomposition.

    PubMed

    Brouns, Karlijn; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Hefting, Mariet M

    2014-05-15

    Extreme summer droughts are expected to occur more often in the future in NW Europe due to climate change. These droughts might accelerate the rate of peat oxidation in drained peat areas, with impacts on soil subsidence, GHG emission and water quality. This study aimed at providing more insight in the oxidation of deep peat layers that had not previously been exposed to air, the so-called secondary decomposition. We incubated two types of peat (eutrophic and oligotrophic), sampled from permanently anoxic peat layers from nature reserves and agricultural peat meadows. Peat samples were incubated for thirteen weeks under anoxic conditions, but were exposed to air for one to eight weeks. The production of CO2 and CH4 was quantified as a proxy for decomposition; concentrations of soluble nutrients and phenolic compounds were also measured. The results showed that oxygenation led to a steep increase in the rate of decomposition, indicated by higher carbon loss rates during and after oxygenation compared to non-oxygenated samples. Carbon loss rates increased more for eutrophic peat (agricultural area: 352%, nature reserve: 182%) than for oligotrophic peat (83% and 159% respectively). Most peat samples investigated showed higher post-oxygenation CO2 and/or CH4 production compared to the anoxic pre-oxygenation period. This indicates that oxygenation stimulates decomposition, even after anoxic conditions have returned. Contrary to the enzymic latch theory, no effects of oxygenation on the concentrations of soluble or condensed phenolic compounds were detected. Soluble nutrient concentrations did not change due to oxygenation either. Noteworthy is the occurrence of pyrite mineralization and associated acidification in eutrophic peat. Thus, low summer water levels, for example due to climate change, should be avoided in order to limit exceptionally high decomposition rates and associated problems such as increasing subsidence rates, greenhouse gas emission, sulfate release

  17. Application of static var compensators for the dynamic performance of the Mead-Adelanto and Mead-Phoenix transmission projects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Beshir, M.J.; Finley, A.T.; Hayes, D.R.; Hsu, J.C.; Peterson, H.R.; DeShazo, G.L.; Gerlach, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the planning and pre-specification study analysis and results for the joint use of Static Var Compensators (SVCs), a form of Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) technology, for the Mead-Adelanto and Mead-Phoenix Projects in the Southwestern United States. Because of the insufficient system damping in the network, addition of these two transmission line projects must also be complemented by SVCs. These devices increase the system stability limit so that the projects` planned transfer capabilities can be economically attained. These are the first transmission projects in the region where a very closely coordinated planning effort permits the joint use of SVCs to provide mutual benefits to both projects. SVC dynamic performance enhancement studies, SVC control analysis, and studies related to the planning and specification requirements are among the topics addressed in the paper.

  18. Application of static VAR compensators for the dynamic performance of the Mead-Adelanto and Mead-Phoenix transmission projects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Beshir, M.J.; Finley, A.T.; Hayes, D.R.; Hsu, J.C.; Peterson, H.R.; DeShazo, G.L.; Gerlach, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the planning and pre-specification study analysis and results for the joint use of Static Var Compensators (SVCs), a form of Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) technology, for the Mead-Adelanto and Mead-Phoenix Projects in the Southwestern United States. Because of insufficient system damping in the network, addition of these two transmission line projects must also be complemented by SVCS. These devices increase the system stability limit so that the projects` planned transfer capabilities can be economically attained. These are the first transmission projects in the region where a very closely coordinated planning effort permits the joint use of SVCs to provide mutual benefits to both projects. SVC dynamic performance enhancement studies, SVC control analysis, and studies related to the planning and specification requirements are among the topics addressed in the paper.

  19. The acute effects of static stretching on the sprint performance of collegiate men in the 60- and 100-m dash after a dynamic warm-up.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Brandon M; Walsh, Mark S; Horn, Thelma S; Cox, Ronald H

    2010-09-01

    Previous research has shown that static stretching has an inhibitory effect on sprinting performances up to 50 m. The purpose of this study was to see what would happen to these effects at longer distances such as those seen in competition. This study used a within-subjects design to investigate the effects of passive static stretching vs. no stretching on the 60- and 100-m sprint performance of college track athletes after a dynamic warm-up. Eighteen male subjects completed both the static stretching and the no stretching conditions in counterbalanced order across 2 days of testing. On each day, all subjects first completed a generalized dynamic warm-up routine that included a self-paced 800-m run, followed by a series of dynamic movements, sprint, and hurdle drills. At the end of this generalized warm-up, athletes were assigned to either a static stretching or a no-stretching condition. They then immediately performed 2 100-m trials with timing gates set up at 20, 40, 60, and 100 m. Results revealed a significant slowing in performance with static stretching (p < 0.039) in the second 20 (20-40) m of the sprint trials. After the first 40 m, static stretching exhibited no additional inhibition of performance in a 100-m sprint. However, although there was no additional time loss, athletes never gained back the time that was originally lost in the first portion of the trials. Therefore, in strict terms of performance, it seems harmful to include static stretching in the warm-up protocol of collegiate male sprinters in distances up to 100 m.

  20. Linear static structural and vibration analysis on high-performance computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baddourah, M. A.; Storaasli, O. O.; Bostic, S. W.

    1993-01-01

    Parallel computers offer the oppurtunity to significantly reduce the computation time necessary to analyze large-scale aerospace structures. This paper presents algorithms developed for and implemented on massively-parallel computers hereafter referred to as Scalable High-Performance Computers (SHPC), for the most computationally intensive tasks involved in structural analysis, namely, generation and assembly of system matrices, solution of systems of equations and calculation of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Results on SHPC are presented for large-scale structural problems (i.e. models for High-Speed Civil Transport). The goal of this research is to develop a new, efficient technique which extends structural analysis to SHPC and makes large-scale structural analyses tractable.

  1. Linear Static Structural and Vibration Analysis on High-Performance Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baddourah, Majdi; Storaasli, Olaf O.; Bostic, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Parallel computers offer the opportunity to significantly reduce the computation time necessary to analyze large-scale aerospace structures. This paper presents algorithms developed for and implemented on a massively-parallel computers hereafter referred to as Scalable High Performance Computers (SHPC) for the most computationally intensive tasks involved in structural analysis, namely, generation and assembly of system matrices, solution of systems of equations and calculation of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Results on SHPC are presented for large-scale structural problems (i.e. Models of high speed civil transport). The goal of this research is to develop new efficient technique which extend structural analysis to SHPC and make large-scale structural analyses tractable.

  2. Static Performance of a Fixed-Geometry Exhaust Nozzle Incorporating Porous Cavities for Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Hunter, Craig A.

    1999-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance of a fixed-geometry exhaust nozzle incorporating porous cavities for shock-boundary layer interaction control. Testing was conducted at static conditions using a sub-scale nozzle model with one baseline and 27 porous configurations. For the porous configurations, the effects of percent open porosity, hole diameter, and cavity depth were determined. All tests were conducted with no external flow at nozzle pressure ratios from 1.25 to approximately 9.50. Results indicate that baseline nozzle performance was dominated by unstable, shock-induced, boundary-layer separation at over-expanded conditions. Porous configurations were capable of controlling off-design separation in the nozzle by either alleviating separation or encouraging stable separation of the exhaust flow. The ability of the porous nozzle concept to alternately alleviate separation or encourage stable separation of exhaust flow through shock-boundary layer interaction control offers tremendous off-design performance benefits for fixed-geometry nozzle installations. In addition, the ability to encourage separation on one divergent flap while alleviating it on the other makes it possible to generate thrust vectoring using a fixed-geometry nozzle.

  3. Latch-up based bidirectional npn selector for bipolar resistance-change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungho; Moon, Dong-Il; Lu, Wei; Hwan Kim, Dae; Myong Kim, Dong; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2013-07-01

    A vertically integrated latch-up based n-p-n bidirectional diode, which is analogous to an open-base bipolar junction transistor, is demonstrated for bipolar resistance-change memory selector application. A maximum current density of >50 MA/cm2 and a selectivity of >104 are observed at a fast switching speed of within 10 ns. The high selectivity as a consequence of the sudden latch-up process is feasible owing to the positive-feedback process initiated by impact ionization. The optimization of the turn-on voltage is comprehensively investigated by numerical device simulation, which ensures the promising potential of the latch-up based selector device.

  4. Performance of an anaerobic, static bed, fixed film bioreactor for chlorinated solvent treatment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Walker, Charles; Graves, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic, fixed film, bioreactors bioaugmented with a dechlorinating microbial consortium were evaluated as a potential technology for cost effective, sustainable, and reliable treatment of mixed chlorinated ethanes and ethenes in groundwater from a large groundwater recovery system. Bench- and pilot-scale testing at about 3 and 13,500 L, respectively, demonstrated that total chlorinated solvent removal to less than the permitted discharge limit of 100 μg/L. Various planned and unexpected upsets, interruptions, and changes demonstrated the robustness and reliability of the bioreactor system, which handled the operational variations with no observable change in performance. Key operating parameters included an adequately long hydraulic retention time for the surface area, a constant supply of electron donor, pH control with a buffer to minimize pH variance, an oxidation reduction potential of approximately −200 millivolts or lower, and a well-adapted biomass capable of degrading the full suite of chlorinated solvents in the groundwater. Results indicated that the current discharge criteria can be met using a bioreactor technology that is less complex and has less downtime than the sorption based technology currently being used to treat the groundwater.

  5. Performance of an anaerobic, static bed, fixed film bioreactor for chlorinated solvent treatment.

    PubMed

    Lorah, Michelle M; Walker, Charles; Graves, Duane

    2015-09-01

    Anaerobic, fixed film, bioreactors bioaugmented with a dechlorinating microbial consortium were evaluated as a potential technology for cost effective, sustainable, and reliable treatment of mixed chlorinated ethanes and ethenes in groundwater from a large groundwater recovery system. Bench- and pilot-scale testing at about 3 and 13,500 L, respectively, demonstrated that total chlorinated solvent removal to less than the permitted discharge limit of 100 μg/L. Various planned and unexpected upsets, interruptions, and changes demonstrated the robustness and reliability of the bioreactor system, which handled the operational variations with no observable change in performance. Key operating parameters included an adequately long hydraulic retention time for the surface area, a constant supply of electron donor, pH control with a buffer to minimize pH variance, an oxidation reduction potential of approximately -200 millivolts or lower, and a well-adapted biomass capable of degrading the full suite of chlorinated solvents in the groundwater. Results indicated that the current discharge criteria can be met using a bioreactor technology that is less complex and has less downtime than the sorption based technology currently being used to treat the groundwater.

  6. Effects of reactor configuration on the performance of static-bed submerged media anaerobic reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Three different configurations of cylindrical submerged media anaerobic reactors (SMARs) with packing volumes of 85 items were operated at 35 C for 415 days with COD loading rates varying from 1 to 12 g/l/d and three retention times of 0.5, 1, and 2 days. A synthetic waste consisting of a milk solution with a mineral supplement was used for the feed. Tracer studies on clean-bed and dirty-bed SMARs indicate that reactor configuration, biogas mixing, and biomass accumulation all have a significant effect on SMAR hydraulics and cause short-circuiting. Based on the isothermal energy dissipation theory, the higher hydrostatic pressures resulting from higher SMAR heights increases self-induced biogas mixing and improves the contact efficiency between substrate and organisms. Based on TCOD removal rate, the tallest SMAR performed slightly better at COD loading rates above 4/g/l/d. At COD loading rates equal to or below 4 g/l/d, there was little difference in TCOD removal rate between the three SMARs. The acetoclastic methanogenic activity (AMA) test developed in this study is reproducible with 6.5% at a mean of 0.39 l CH{sub 4} (STP)/gm VSS/d. For VSS less than 1 g/l, a higher AMA is associated with lower VSS concentrations. For VSS greater than 1 g/l, AMA varies within a narrow range of 0.1 to 0.2 l CH{sub 4} (STP)/gm VSS/d. Exit gas recycle at a ratio of 3.5-7.0% of exit gas flowrate resulted in a 5-13% increase in the methane content of the exit gas at a COD loading rate of about 10 g/l/d and a detention time of about 2 days. This suggest that, at high loading rates, hydrogen dissolution rate may be the rate-limiting step in anaerobic digestion.

  7. Design and Development of a Miniaturized Double Latching Solenoid Valve for the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James T.

    2008-01-01

    The development of the in-house Miniaturized Double Latching Solenoid Valve, or Microvalve, for the Gas Processing System (GPS) of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite is described. The Microvalve is a double latching solenoid valve that actuates a pintle shaft axially to hermetically seal an orifice. The key requirements and the design innovations implemented to meet them are described.

  8. Comparison of Inter-Observer Variability and Diagnostic Performance of the Fifth Edition of BI-RADS for Breast Ultrasound of Static versus Video Images.

    PubMed

    Youk, Ji Hyun; Jung, Inkyung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Sung Hun; Kim, You Me; Lee, Eun Hye; Jeong, Sun Hye; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to compare the inter-observer variability and diagnostic performance of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon for breast ultrasound of static and video images. Ninety-nine breast masses visible on ultrasound examination from 95 women 19-81 y of age at five institutions were enrolled in this study. They were scheduled to undergo biopsy or surgery or had been stable for at least 2 y of ultrasound follow-up after benign biopsy results or typically benign findings. For each mass, representative long- and short-axis static ultrasound images were acquired; real-time long- and short-axis B-mode video images through the mass area were separately saved as cine clips. Each image was reviewed independently by five radiologists who were asked to classify ultrasound features according to the fifth edition of the BI-RADS lexicon. Inter-observer variability was assessed using kappa (κ) statistics. Diagnostic performance on static and video images was compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. No significant difference was found in κ values between static and video images for all descriptors, although κ values of video images were higher than those of static images for shape, orientation, margin and calcifications. After receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the video images (0.83, range: 0.77-0.87) had higher areas under the curve than the static images (0.80, range: 0.75-0.83; p = 0.08). Inter-observer variability and diagnostic performance of video images was similar to that of static images on breast ultrasonography according to the new edition of BI-RADS.

  9. Relative performance of antisymmetric angle-ply laminated stiffened hypar shell roofs with cutout in terms of static behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Puja B.; Mitra, Anirban; Sahoo, Sarmila

    2016-01-01

    A review of literature reveals that bending analysis of laminated composite stiffened hypar shells with cutout have not received due attention. Being a doubly ruled surface, a skewed hypar shell fulfils aesthetic as well as ease of casting requirements. Further, this shell allows entry of north light making it suitable as civil engineering roofing units. Hypar shell with cutout subjected to uniformly distributed load exhibits improved performances with stiffeners. Hence relative performances of antisymmetric angle-ply laminated composite stiffened hypar shells in terms of displacements and stress resultants are studied in this paper under static loading. A curved quadratic isoparametric eight noded element and three noded beam elements are used to model the shell surface and the stiffeners respectively. Results obtained from the present study are compared with established ones to check the correctness of the present approach. A number of additional problems of antisymmetric angle-ply laminated composite stiffened hypar shells are solved for various fibre orientations, number of layers and boundary conditions. Results are interpreted from practical application standpoints and findings important for a designer to decide on the shell combination among a number of possible options are highlighted.

  10. Apollo 14 mission: Failure to achieve docking probe capture latch engagement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Six docking attempts were required in order to successfully achieve capture latch engagement during the transposition and docking phase following translunar injection. After docking, the probe and drogue were examined by the crew. Probe operation appeared normal and radial marks were noted on the drogue. During all subsequent operations, the probe operated properly.

  11. OFF-ON-OFF Fluorescence Switch with T-Latch Function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A novel molecular system with characteristics of an OFF-ON-OFF fluorescence switch was designed to integrate the function of a T-latch. In detail, a receptor1-fluorophore-receptor2 architecture was adopted to achieve fluorescence switching upon addition of protons. PMID:21932803

  12. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Motor Vehicle Safety Standards § 571.113 Standard No. 113; Hood latch system. S1. Purpose and scope.... Application. This standard applies to passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, trucks, and buses. S3... engine, luggage, storage, or battery compartment. S4. Requirements. S4.1Each hood must be provided with...

  13. Effect of the size of GdBCO-Ag secondary magnet on the static forces performance of linear synchronous motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Shi, Yunhua; He, Dabo; Jing, Hailian; Li, Jing; Deng, Zigang; Wang, Suyu; Wang, Jiasu; Cardwell, David A.

    2014-11-01

    Bulk high temperature superconductor magnets (HTSMs) have a higher flux-generating capability compared to conventional permanent magnets (PMs). These materials potentially can be used in high temperature superconducting (HTS) linear synchronous motors (LSMs) as superconducting secondary magnets, what will result in a reduced volume and weight as well as in higher force density and efficiency of these devices when compared to conventional PMs. The focus of this paper is on the effect of size of the secondary HTSM on the static performance (thrust force and normal force) of a LSM. In order to obtain high-field HTSM as the secondary, single grain bulk GdBCO-Ag superconductors of diameter 20 mm, 30 mm and 40 mm, which have higher Jc and trapped fields than YBCO superconductors, were used in this device for the first time following application by the same optimized magnetization condition. It was found that both thrust and normal forces increase and saturate with the increasing size of the HTSM secondary at the small size range, and then potentially distort when the physical size of the HTSM secondary approaches the pole pitch of the linear three-phase primary windings of the LSM. Furthermore, more experiments of a larger-sized multi-seeded HTSM secondary, confirmed that the relationship between the HTSM secondary size and the pole pitch of the primary is an important factor for achieving higher thrust and normal forces. It is suggested that the multi-pole HTSM secondary will be more beneficial to future HTS LSM designs since the single-pole HTSM secondary size should be equal to or smaller than the stator pole pitch in the paper.

  14. Latching operation in a tunable wavelength filter using Si sampled grating waveguide with ferroelectric liquid crystal cladding.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuhara, Katsumi; Kato, Akifumi; Hayama, Yoshiki

    2014-04-21

    A tunable wavelength filter fabricated with a latching function is proposed. The proposed tunable wavelength filter consists of a silicon sampled grating waveguide and ferro-electric liquid crystal (FLC) cladding. The sampled grating waveguide in a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer achieved narrower stop bands than that with the conventional uniform grating structure. Enhanced wavelength shift was also obtained due to the increased effect in FLC by using a thinner silicon core. Bistable switching operation with the fabricated device, which was latching without state-sustaining power, was successfully demonstrated. Its switching and latching characteristics are also reported. PMID:24787847

  15. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned, Active Mirror Telescope Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The Active Mirror Telescope (AMT) task adopted the Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism (CDLM) design as used on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) project. The three separate mechanisms that comprise the CDLM will be discussed in this paper in addition to a focus on heritage adoption lessons learned and specific examples. These lessons learned will be valuable to any project considering the use of heritage designs.

  16. A light writable microfluidic "flash memory": optically addressed actuator array with latched operation for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhishan; Pal, Rohit; Srivannavit, Onnop; Burns, Mark A; Gulari, Erdogan

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel optically addressed microactuator array (microfluidic "flash memory") with latched operation. Analogous to the address-data bus mediated memory address protocol in electronics, the microactuator array consists of individual phase-change based actuators addressed by localized heating through focused light patterns (address bus), which can be provided by a modified projector or high power laser pointer. A common pressure manifold (data bus) for the entire array is used to generate large deflections of the phase change actuators in the molten phase. The use of phase change material as the working media enables latched operation of the actuator array. After the initial light "writing" during which the phase is temporarily changed to molten, the actuated status is self-maintained by the solid phase of the actuator without power and pressure inputs. The microfluidic flash memory can be re-configured by a new light illumination pattern and common pressure signal. The proposed approach can achieve actuation of arbitrary units in a large-scale array without the need for complex external equipment such as solenoid valves and electrical modules, which leads to significantly simplified system implementation and compact system size. The proposed work therefore provides a flexible, energy-efficient, and low cost multiplexing solution for microfluidic applications based on physical displacements. As an example, the use of the latched microactuator array as "normally closed" or "normally open" microvalves is demonstrated. The phase-change wax is fully encapsulated and thus immune from contamination issues in fluidic environments.

  17. A gate-latch-lock mechanism for hormone signalling by abscisic acid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, Karsten; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Xu, Yong; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Park, Sang-Youl; Weiner, Joshua J; Fujii, Hiroaki; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Kovach, Amanda; Li, Jun; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang; Peterson, Francis C; Jensen, Davin R; Yong, Eu-Leong; Volkman, Brian F; Cutler, Sean R; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous hormone that regulates plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Its action is mediated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of START proteins, but it remains unclear how these receptors bind ABA and, in turn, how hormone binding leads to inhibition of the downstream type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) effectors. Here we report crystal structures of apo and ABA-bound receptors as well as a ternary PYL2-ABA-PP2C complex. The apo receptors contain an open ligand-binding pocket flanked by a gate that closes in response to ABA by way of conformational changes in two highly conserved β-loops that serve as a gate and latch. Moreover, ABA-induced closure of the gate creates a surface that enables the receptor to dock into and competitively inhibit the PP2C active site. A conserved tryptophan in the PP2C inserts directly between the gate and latch, which functions to further lock the receptor in a closed conformation. Together, our results identify a conserved gate-latch-lock mechanism underlying ABA signalling.

  18. Dissociation of Bak α1 helix from the core and latch domains is required for apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Amber E; Fennell, Stephanie C; Bartolo, Ray C; Tan, Iris K L; Dewson, Grant; Kluck, Ruth M

    2015-01-01

    During apoptosis, Bak permeabilizes mitochondria after undergoing major conformational changes, including poorly defined N-terminal changes. Here, we characterize those changes using 11 antibodies that were epitope mapped using peptide arrays and mutagenesis. After Bak activation by Bid, epitopes throughout the α1 helix are exposed indicating complete dissociation of α1 from α2 in the core and from α6-α8 in the latch. Moreover, disulfide tethering of α1 to α2 or α6 blocks cytochrome c release, suggesting that α1 dissociation is required for further conformational changes during apoptosis. Assaying epitope exposure when α1 is tethered shows that Bid triggers α2 movement, followed by α1 dissociation. However, α2 reaches its final position only after α1 dissociates from the latch. Thus, α1 dissociation is a key step in unfolding Bak into three major components, the N terminus, the core (α2-α5) and the latch (α6-α8). PMID:25880232

  19. Performance of pancake coils of parallel co-wound Ag/BSCCO tape conductors in static and ramped magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Lue, J.W.; Lubell, M.S.; Walker, M.S.; Hazelton, D.W.; Haldar, P.; Rice, J.A.; Hoehn, J.G. Jr.; Motowidlo, L.R.

    1994-12-31

    Critical Currents are reported for several Ag/BSCCO single-pancake coils in static magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 5 T and temperatures from 4.2 K to 105 K. The sample coils were co-wound of one to six tape conductors in parallel. Since the closed loops formed in such an arrangement could lead to eddy current heating or instability in changing fields, one of the coils was also tested in helium gas, in fields ramped at rates of up to 1.5 T/s. For these quasi-adiabatic tests, at each temperature the transport current was set just below the critical value for a preset static field of 3.3 or 4.9 T. The field was then rapidly ramped down to zero, held for 20 sec, and then ramped back up to the original value. The maximum observed temperature transient of about 1.7 K occurred at 9 K, for a field change of 4.75 T. The temperature transients became negligible when the sample was immersed in liquid helium. Above 30 K, the transients were below 1 K. These results give confidence that parallel co-wound HTSC coils are stable in a rapidly-ramped magnetic field, without undue eddy current heating.

  20. Static test-stand performance of the YF-102 turbofan engine with several exhaust configurations for the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, J. G.; Homyak, L.; Moore, A. S.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of a YF-102 turbofan engine was measured in an outdoor test stand with a bellmouth inlet and seven exhaust-system configurations. The configurations consisted of three separate-flow systems of various fan and core nozzle sizes and four confluent-flow systems of various nozzle sizes and shapes. A computer program provided good estimates of the engine performance and of thrust at maximum rating for each exhaust configuration. The internal performance of two different-shaped core nozzles for confluent-flow configurations was determined to be satisfactory. Pressure and temperature surveys were made with a traversing probe in the exhaust-nozzle flow for some confluent-flow configurations. The survey data at the mixing plane, plus the measured flow rates, were used to calculate the static-pressure variation along the exhaust nozzle length. The computed pressures compared well with experimental wall static-pressure data. External-flow surveys were made, for some confluent-flow configurations, with a large fixed rake at various locations in the exhaust plume.

  1. An approximate theoretical method for modeling the static thrust performance of non-axisymmetric two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical/numerical method has been developed to predict the static thrust performance of non-axisymmetric, two-dimensional convergent-divergent exhaust nozzles. Thermodynamic nozzle performance effects due to over- and underexpansion are modeled using one-dimensional compressible flow theory. Boundary layer development and skin friction losses are calculated using an approximate integral momentum method based on the classic karman-Polhausen solution. Angularity effects are included with these two models in a computational Nozzle Performance Analysis Code, NPAC. In four different case studies, results from NPAC are compared to experimental data obtained from subscale nozzle testing to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the NPAC method. In several cases, the NPAC prediction matched experimental gross thrust efficiency data to within 0.1 percent at a design NPR, and to within 0.5 percent at off-design conditions.

  2. Flight Avionics Sequencing Telemetry (FAST) DIV Latching Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Engineering (NE) Directorate at Kennedy Space Center provides engineering services to major programs such as: Space Shuttle, Inter national Space Station, and the Launch Services Program (LSP). The Av ionics Division within NE, provides avionics and flight control syste ms engineering support to LSP. The Launch Services Program is respons ible for procuring safe and reliable services for transporting critical, one of a kind, NASA payloads into orbit. As a result, engineers mu st monitor critical flight events during countdown and launch to asse ss anomalous behavior or any unexpected occurrence. The goal of this project is to take a tailored Systems Engineering approach to design, develop, and test Iris telemetry displays. The Flight Avionics Sequen cing Telemetry Delta-IV (FAST-D4) displays will provide NASA with an improved flight event monitoring tool to evaluate launch vehicle heal th and performance during system-level ground testing and flight. Flight events monitored will include data from the Redundant Inertial Fli ght Control Assembly (RIFCA) flight computer and launch vehicle comma nd feedback data. When a flight event occurs, the flight event is ill uminated on the display. This will enable NASA Engineers to monitor c ritical flight events on the day of launch. Completion of this project requires rudimentary knowledge of launch vehicle Guidance, Navigatio n, and Control (GN&C) systems, telemetry, and console operation. Work locations for the project include the engineering office, NASA telem etry laboratory, and Delta launch sites.

  3. Design of High Speed and Low Offset Dynamic Latch Comparator in 0.18 µm CMOS Process

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne; Yin, Chia Chieu; Ali, Mohammad Alauddin Mohammad; Marufuzzaman, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The cross-coupled circuit mechanism based dynamic latch comparator is presented in this research. The comparator is designed using differential input stages with regenerative S-R latch to achieve lower offset, lower power, higher speed and higher resolution. In order to decrease circuit complexity, a comparator should maintain power, speed, resolution and offset-voltage properly. Simulations show that this novel dynamic latch comparator designed in 0.18 µm CMOS technology achieves 3.44 mV resolution with 8 bit precision at a frequency of 50 MHz while dissipating 158.5 µW from 1.8 V supply and 88.05 µA average current. Moreover, the proposed design propagates as fast as 4.2 nS with energy efficiency of 0.7 fJ/conversion-step. Additionally, the core circuit layout only occupies 0.008 mm2. PMID:25299266

  4. Different Electrostatic Potentials Define ETGE and DLG Motifs as Hinge and Latch in Oxidative Stress Response▿

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Kit I.; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Kobayashi, Akira; Shang, Chengwei; Hirotsu, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    Nrf2 is the regulator of the oxidative/electrophilic stress response. Its turnover is maintained by Keap1-mediated proteasomal degradation via a two-site substrate recognition mechanism in which two Nrf2-Keap1 binding sites form a hinge and latch. The E3 ligase adaptor Keap1 recognizes Nrf2 through its conserved ETGE and DLG motifs. In this study, we examined how the ETGE and DLG motifs bind to Keap1 in a very similar fashion but with different binding affinities by comparing the crystal complex of a Keap1-DC domain-DLG peptide with that of a Keap1-DC domain-ETGE peptide. We found that these two motifs interact with the same basic surface of either Keap1-DC domain of the Keap1 homodimer. The DLG motif works to correctly position the lysines within the Nrf2 Neh2 domain for efficient ubiquitination. Together with the results from calorimetric and functional studies, we conclude that different electrostatic potentials primarily define the ETGE and DLG motifs as a hinge and latch that senses the oxidative/electrophilic stress. PMID:17785452

  5. Static thrust-vectoring performance of nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzles with post-exit yaw vanes. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., Aug. 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, Robert J.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A static (wind-off) test was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the 16-ft transonic tunnel to determine the performance and turning effectiveness of post-exit yaw vanes installed on two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles. One nozzle design that was previously tested was used as a baseline, simulating dry power and afterburning power nozzles at both 0 and 20 degree pitch vectoring conditions. Vanes were installed on these four nozzle configurations to study the effects of vane deflection angle, longitudinal and lateral location, size, and camber. All vanes were hinged at the nozzle sidewall exit, and in addition, some were also hinged at the vane quarter chord (double-hinged). The vane concepts tested generally produced yaw thrust vectoring angles much less than the geometric vane angles, for (up to 8 percent) resultant thrust losses. When the nozzles were pitch vectored, yawing effectiveness decreased as the vanes were moved downstream. Thrust penalties and yawing effectiveness both decreased rapidly as the vanes were moved outboard (laterally). Vane length and height changes increased yawing effectiveness and thrust ratio losses, while using vane camber, and double-hinged vanes increased resultant yaw angles by 50 to 100 percent.

  6. The design and development of a miniature bi-stable latching solenoid valve for low thrust resistojets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The design approach and development demonstration are presented for a flightweight, miniature, magnetic latching shutoff valve, suitable for use with the ruggedized H2 and NH3 resistojet and the biowaste resistojet. The design criteria established provided for compatibility with specified ruggedized resistojet propellants as well as the biowaste and other propulsion system propellants.

  7. Performance of on-site pilot static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for treating dairy processing wastewater and chemical oxygen demand balance modeling under different operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin Hwan; Park, Jaeyoung; Ellis, Timothy G

    2015-02-01

    The performance and operational stability of a pilot-scale static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for the treatment of dairy processing wastewater were investigated under a wide range of organic and hydraulic loading rates and temperature conditions. The SGBR achieved average chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), and total suspended solids (TSS)-removal efficiencies higher than 90% even at high loading rates up to 7.3 kg COD/m(3)/day, with an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9 h, and at low temperatures of 11 °C. The average methane yield of 0.26 L CH4/g COD(removed) was possibly affected by a high fraction of particulate COD and operation at low temperatures. The COD mass balance indicated that soluble COD was responsible for most of the methane production. The reactor showed the capacity of the methanogens to maintain their activity and withstand organic and hydraulic shock loads.

  8. Performance of on-site pilot static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for treating dairy processing wastewater and chemical oxygen demand balance modeling under different operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin Hwan; Park, Jaeyoung; Ellis, Timothy G

    2015-02-01

    The performance and operational stability of a pilot-scale static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for the treatment of dairy processing wastewater were investigated under a wide range of organic and hydraulic loading rates and temperature conditions. The SGBR achieved average chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), and total suspended solids (TSS)-removal efficiencies higher than 90% even at high loading rates up to 7.3 kg COD/m(3)/day, with an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9 h, and at low temperatures of 11 °C. The average methane yield of 0.26 L CH4/g COD(removed) was possibly affected by a high fraction of particulate COD and operation at low temperatures. The COD mass balance indicated that soluble COD was responsible for most of the methane production. The reactor showed the capacity of the methanogens to maintain their activity and withstand organic and hydraulic shock loads. PMID:25164570

  9. Static and Wind-on Performance of Polymer-Based Pressure-Sensitive Paints Using Platinum and Ruthenium as the Luminophore

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kin Hing; Kontis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to investigate the static and wind-on performance of two in-house-developed polymer-based pressure-sensitive paints. Platinum tetrakis (pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin and tris-bathophenanthroline ruthenium II are used as the luminophores of these two polymer-based pressure-sensitive paints. The pressure and temperature sensitivity and the photo-degradation rate of these two pressure-sensitive paints have been investigated. In the wind tunnel test, it was observed that the normalised intensity ratio of both polymer-based pressure-sensitive paints being studied decreases with increasing the number of wind tunnel runs. The exact reason that leads to the occurrence of this phenomenon is unclear, but it is deduced that the luminophore is either removed or deactivated by the incoming flow during a wind tunnel test. PMID:27128913

  10. Effects of Baseline Levels of Flexibility and Vertical Jump Ability on Performance Following Different Volumes of Static Stretching and Potentiating Exercises in Elite Gymnasts

    PubMed Central

    Donti, Olyvia; Tsolakis, Charilaos; Bogdanis, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of baseline flexibility and vertical jump ability on straight leg raise range of motion (ROM) and counter-movement jump performance (CMJ) following different volumes of stretching and potentiating exercises. ROM and CMJ were measured after two different warm-up protocols involving static stretching and potentiating exercises. Three groups of elite athletes (10 male, 14 female artistic gymnasts and 10 female rhythmic gymnasts) varying greatly in ROM and CMJ, performed two warm-up routines. One warm-up included short (15 s) static stretching followed by 5 tuck jumps, while the other included long static stretching (30 s) followed by 3x5 tuck jumps. ROM and CMJ were measured before, during and for 12 min after the two warm-up routines. Three-way ANOVA showed large differences between the three groups in baseline ROM and CMJ performance. A type of warm-up x time interaction was found for both ROM (p = 0.031) and CMJ (p = 0.016). However, all athletes, irrespective of group, responded in a similar fashion to the different warm-up protocols for both ROM and CMJ, as indicated from the lack of significant interactions for group (condition x group, time x group or condition x time x group). In the short warm-up protocol, ROM was not affected by stretching, while in the long warm-up protocol ROM increased by 5.9% ± 0.7% (p = 0.001) after stretching. Similarly, CMJ remained unchanged after the short warm-up protocol, but increased by 4.6 ± 0.9% (p = 0.012) 4 min after the long warm- up protocol, despite the increased ROM. It is concluded that the initial levels of flexibility and CMJ performance do not alter the responses of elite gymnasts to warm-up protocols differing in stretching and potentiating exercise volumes. Furthermore, 3 sets of 5 tuck jumps result in a relatively large increase in CMJ performance despite an increase in flexibility in these highly-trained athletes. Key Points The initial levels of flexibility and vertical jump

  11. Dynamic and static filtrate-loss techniques for monitoring filter-cake quality improves drilling-fluid performance

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser, B.G.; Clark, D.E.; Wise, W.V.

    1994-09-01

    This paper describes properties that are desirable in a water-based filter cake and test methods that can be used to measure these properties. One method uses a dynamic filtrate-loss apparatus that stirs the fluid mechanically during filtration. Test results show that the initial dynamic filter-cake formation is very important in controlling all future filtration properties and cake quality. The various factors affecting filter-cake quality and how they can be controlled to give better field performance are discussed.

  12. Screening of nanosatellite microprocessors using californium single-event latch-up test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomioka, Takahiro; Okumura, Yuta; Masui, Hirokazu; Takamiya, Koichi; Cho, Mengu

    2016-09-01

    A single-event latch-up (SEL) test using a 252Cf radioisotope was carried out. The results were compared with those of a proton test and from observation in orbit. A radioisotope can reproduce phenomena observed in orbit that are caused by protons. Considering the inexpensive nature of the 252Cf test, it is more suitable for nanosatellites that require low cost and fast delivery. A SEL occurrence rate of a commercial-off-the-shelf microprocessor was derived from the ground test results. The 252Cf test provided a SEL rate approximately 1×106 times greater than that in orbit. This data can be used to derive the minimum SEL occurrence rate in orbit and help satellite designers to evaluate the risk of SEL and take measures if necessary.

  13. Performance of Compressor of XJ-41-V Turbojet Engine II - Static-Pressure Ratios and Limitation of Maximum Flow at Equivalent Compressor Speed of 8000 rpm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dildine, Dean M.; Arthur, W. Lewis

    1948-01-01

    At the request of the Air Material Command, Army Air Forces, an investigation was conducted by the NACA Cleveland laboratory to determine the performance characteristics of the compressor of the XJ-41-V turbojet engine. This report is the second in a series presenting the compressor performance and analysis of flow conditions in the compressor. The static-pressure variation in the direction of flow through the compressor and the location and the cause of the maximum flow restriction at an equivalent speed of 8000 rpm are presented. After the initial runs were reported, the leading edges of the impeller blades and the diffuser surfaces were found to have been roughened by steel particles from a minor failure of auxiliary equipment. The leading edges of the impeller blades were refinished and all high spots resulting from scratches in the diffuser and the accessible parts of the vaned collector passages were removed. The initial overall performance and that obtained with the refinished blades are presented.

  14. Effects of internal yaw-vectoring devices on the static performance of a pitch-vectoring nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to evaluate the internal performance of a nonaxisymmetric convergent divergent nozzle designed to have simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring capability. This concept utilized divergent flap deflection for thrust vectoring in the pitch plane and flow-turning deflectors installed within the divergent flaps for yaw thrust vectoring. Modifications consisting of reducing the sidewall length and deflecting the sidewall outboard were investigated as means to increase yaw-vectoring performance. This investigation studied the effects of multiaxis (pitch and yaw) thrust vectoring on nozzle internal performance characteristics. All tests were conducted with no external flow, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to approximately 13.0. The results indicate that this nozzle concept can successfully generate multiaxis thrust vectoring. Deflection of the divergent flaps produced resultant pitch vector angles that, although dependent on nozzle pressure ratio, were nearly equal to the geometric pitch vector angle. Losses in resultant thrust due to pitch vectoring were small or negligible. The yaw deflectors produced resultant yaw vector angles up to 21 degrees that were controllable by varying yaw deflector rotation. However, yaw deflector rotation resulted in significant losses in thrust ratios and, in some cases, nozzle discharge coefficient. Either of the sidewall modifications generally reduced these losses and increased maximum resultant yaw vector angle. During multiaxis (simultaneous pitch and yaw) thrust vectoring, little or no cross coupling between the thrust vectoring processes was observed.

  15. Seed orientation and magnetic field strength have more influence on tomato seed performance than relative humidity and duration of exposure to non-uniform static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Poinapen, Danny; Brown, Daniel C W; Beeharry, Girish K

    2013-09-15

    Different factors (e.g., light, humidity, and temperature) including exposure to static magnetic fields (SMFs), referred here as critical factors, can significantly affect horticultural seed performance. However, the link between magnetic field parameters and other interdependent factors affecting seed viability is unclear. The importance of these critical factors affecting tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) var. MST/32 seed performance was assessed after performing several treatments based on a L9 (3(4)) (four factors at three levels) orthogonal array (OA) design. The variable factors in the design were magnetic flux density (R1=332.1±37.8mT; R2=108.7±26.9mT; and R3=50.6±10.5mT), exposure time (1, 2, and 24h), seed orientation (North polarity, South polarity, and control - no magnetic field), and relative humidity (RH) (7.0, 25.5, and 75.5%). After seed moisture content stabilisation at the different chosen RH, seeds were exposed in dark under laboratory conditions to several treatments based on the OA design before performance evaluation. Treatments not employing magnetic field exposure were used as controls. Results indicate that electrolyte leakage rate was reduced by a factor of 1.62 times during seed imbibition when non-uniform SMFs were employed. Higher germination (∼11.0%) was observed in magnetically-exposed seeds than in non-exposed ones, although seedlings emerging from SMF treatments did not show a consistent increase in biomass accumulation. The respective influence of the four critical factors tested on seed performance was ranked (in decreasing order) as seed orientation to external magnetic fields, magnetic field strength, RH, and exposure time. This study suggests a significant effect of non-uniform SMFs on seed performance with respect to RH, and more pronounced effects are observed during seed imbibition rather than during later developmental stages. PMID:23759543

  16. Aerodynamic Performance and Static Stability and Control of Flat-Top Hypersonic Gliders at Mach Numbers from 0.6 to 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syvertson, Clarence A; Gloria, Hermilo R; Sarabia, Michael F

    1958-01-01

    A study is made of aerodynamic performance and static stability and control at hypersonic speeds. In a first part of the study, the effect of interference lift is investigated by tests of asymmetric models having conical fuselages and arrow plan-form wings. The fuselage of the asymmetric model is located entirely beneath the wing and has a semicircular cross section. The fuselage of the symmetric model was centrally located and has a circular cross section. Results are obtained for Mach numbers from 3 to 12 in part by application of the hypersonic similarity rule. These results show a maximum effect of interference on lift-drag ratio occurring at Mach number of 5, the Mach number at which the asymmetric model was designed to exploit favorable lift interference. At this Mach number, the asymmetric model is indicated to have a lift-drag ratio 11 percent higher than the symmetric model and 15 percent higher than the asymmetric model when inverted. These differences decrease to a few percent at a Mach number of 12. In the course of this part of the study, the accuracy to the hypersonic similarity rule applied to wing-body combinations is demonstrated with experimental results. These results indicate that the rule may prove useful for determining the aerodynamic characteristics of slender configurations at Mach numbers higher than those for which test equipment is really available. In a second part of the study, the aerodynamic performance and static stability and control characteristics of a hypersonic glider are investigated in somewhat greater detail. Results for Mach numbers from 3 to 18 for performance and 0.6 to 12 for stability and control are obtained by standard text techniques, by application of the hypersonic stability rule, and/or by use of helium as a test medium. Lift-drag ratios of about 5 for Mach numbers up to 18 are shown to be obtainable. The glider studied is shown to have acceptable longitudinal and directional stability characteristics through the

  17. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems. All data gathered in this investigation are contained in the CD-ROM.

  18. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems.

  19. Static and transient performance of YF-102 engine with up to 14 percent core airbleed for the quiet short-haul research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, J. G.; Homyak, L.; Moore, A. S.

    1980-01-01

    An outdoor static test stand was used to measure the steady-state and transient performance of the YF-102 turbofan engine with core airbleed. The test configuration included a bellmouth inlet and a confluent-flow exhaust system similar in size to the quiet short-haul research aircraft (QSRA) exhaust system. For the steady-state tests, the engine operated satisfactorily with core bleed up to 14 percent of the core inlet flow. For the transient tests the engine accelerated and decelerated satisfactorily with no core bleed and with core bleed up to 11 percent of the core inlet flow (maximum tested). For some of the tests the core-bleed flow rate was scheduled to vary with fan discharge pressure, to simulate the QSRA bleed requirements. No stability, surge, stall, overtemperature, combustor flameout, or other operating problems were encountered in any of the tests. Steady-state and transient engine performance data are presented in graphs, and fuel-control trajectories for typical transient tests are shown.

  20. Static and Dynamic Performance of Complementary Inverters Based on Nanosheet α-MoTe2 p-Channel and MoS2 n-Channel Transistors.

    PubMed

    Pezeshki, Atiye; Hosseini Shokouh, Seyed Hossein; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Shackery, Iman; Kim, Jin Sung; Oh, Il-Kwon; Jun, Seong Chan; Kim, Hyungjun; Im, Seongil

    2016-01-26

    Molybdenum ditelluride (α-MoTe2) is an emerging transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) semiconductor that has been attracting attention due to its favorable optical and electronic properties. Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on few-layer α-MoTe2 nanosheets have previously shown ambipolar behavior with strong p-type and weak n-type conduction. We have employed a direct imprinting technique following mechanical nanosheet exfoliation to fabricate high-performance complementary inverters using α-MoTe2 as the semiconductor for the p-channel FETs and MoS2 as the semiconductor for the n-channel FETs. To avoid ambipolar behavior and produce α-MoTe2 FETs with clean p-channel characteristics, we have employed the high-workfunction metal platinum for the source and drain contacts. As a result, our α-MoTe2 nanosheet p-channel FETs show hole mobilities up to 20 cm(2)/(V s), on/off ratios up to 10(5), and a subthreshold slope of 255 mV/decade. For our complementary inverters composed of few-layer α-MoTe2 p-channel FETs and MoS2 n-channel FETs we have obtained voltage gains as high as 33, noise margins as high as 0.38 VDD, a switching delay of 25 μs, and a static power consumption of a few nanowatts. PMID:26631357

  1. Performance evaluation of an improved optical computed tomography polymer gel dosimeter system for 3D dose verification of static and dynamic phantom deliveries

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O.; Langen, K. M.; Meeks, S. L.; Kupelian, P. A.; Zeidan, O. A.; Maryanski, M. J.

    2008-09-15

    The performance of a next-generation optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUS-5X) is characterized in the context of three-dimensional gel dosimetry. Large-volume (2.2 L), muscle-equivalent, radiation-sensitive polymer gel dosimeters (BANG-3) were used. Improvements in scanner design leading to shorter acquisition times are discussed. The spatial resolution, detectable absorbance range, and reproducibility are assessed. An efficient method for calibrating gel dosimeters using the depth-dose relationship is applied, with photon- and electron-based deliveries yielding equivalent results. A procedure involving a preirradiation scan was used to reduce the edge artifacts in reconstructed images, thereby increasing the useful cross-sectional area of the dosimeter by nearly a factor of 2. Dose distributions derived from optical density measurements using the calibration coefficient show good agreement with the treatment planning system simulations and radiographic film measurements. The feasibility of use for motion (four-dimensional) dosimetry is demonstrated on an example comparing dose distributions from static and dynamic delivery of a single-field photon plan. The capability to visualize three-dimensional dose distributions is also illustrated.

  2. Aerodynamic Performance and Static Stability at Mach Number 3.3 of an Aircraft Configuration Employing Three Triangular Wing Panels and a Body Equal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Carlton S.

    1960-01-01

    An aircraft configuration, previously conceived as a means to achieve favorable aerodynamic stability characteristics., high lift-drag ratio, and low heating rates at high supersonic speeds., was modified in an attempt to increase further the lift-drag ratio without adversely affecting the other desirable characteristics. The original configuration consisted of three identical triangular wing panels symmetrically disposed about an ogive-cylinder body equal in length to the root chord of the panels. This configuration was modified by altering the angular disposition of the wing panels, by reducing the area of the panel forming the vertical fin, and by reshaping the body to produce interference lift. Six-component force and moment tests of the modified configuration at combined angles of attack and sideslip were made at a Mach number of 3.3 and a Reynolds number of 5.46 million. A maximum lift-drag ratio of 6.65 (excluding base drag) was measured at a lift coefficient of 0.100 and an angle of attack of 3.60. The lift-drag ratio remained greater than 3 up to lift coefficient of 0.35. Performance estimates, which predicted a maximum lift-drag ratio for the modified configuration 27 percent greater than that of the original configuration, agreed well with experiment. The modified configuration exhibited favorable static stability characteristics within the test range. Longitudinal and directional centers of pressure were slightly aft of the respective centroids of projected plan-form and side area.

  3. Static Scale Conversion (SSC)

    2007-01-19

    The Static Scale Conversion (SSC) software is a unique enhancement to the AIMVEE system. It enables a SSC to weigh and measure vehicles and cargo dynamically (i.e., as they pass over the large scale. Included in the software is the AIMVEE computer code base. The SSC and AIMVEE computer system electronically continue to retrieve deployment information, identify vehicle automatically and determine total weight, individual axle weights, axle spacing and center-of-balance for any wheeled vehicle inmore » motion. The AIMVEE computer code system can also perform these functions statically for both wheel vehicles and cargo with information. The AIMVEE computer code system incorporates digital images and applies cubing algorithms to determine length, width, height for cubic dimensions of both vehicle and cargo. Once all this information is stored, it electronically links to data collection and dissemination systems to provide “actual” weight and measurement information for planning, deployment, and in-transit visibility.« less

  4. Static Scale Conversion (SSC)

    SciTech Connect

    2007-01-19

    The Static Scale Conversion (SSC) software is a unique enhancement to the AIMVEE system. It enables a SSC to weigh and measure vehicles and cargo dynamically (i.e., as they pass over the large scale. Included in the software is the AIMVEE computer code base. The SSC and AIMVEE computer system electronically continue to retrieve deployment information, identify vehicle automatically and determine total weight, individual axle weights, axle spacing and center-of-balance for any wheeled vehicle in motion. The AIMVEE computer code system can also perform these functions statically for both wheel vehicles and cargo with information. The AIMVEE computer code system incorporates digital images and applies cubing algorithms to determine length, width, height for cubic dimensions of both vehicle and cargo. Once all this information is stored, it electronically links to data collection and dissemination systems to provide “actual” weight and measurement information for planning, deployment, and in-transit visibility.

  5. Polarization encoded all-optical quaternary R-S flip-flop using binary latch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay; Roy, Jitendra Nath; Chakraborty, Ajoy Kumar

    2009-04-01

    The developments of different multi-valued logic (MVL) systems have received considerable interests in recent years all over the world. In electronics, efforts have already been made to incorporate multi-valued system in logic and arithmetic data processing. But, very little efforts have been given in realization of MVL with optics. In this paper we present novel designs of certain all-optical circuits that can be used for realizing multi-valued logic functions. Polarization encoded all-optical quaternary (4-valued) R-S flip-flop is proposed and described. Two key circuits (all-optical encoder/decoder and a binary latch) are designed first. They are used to realize quaternary flip-flop in all-optical domain. Here the different quaternary logical states are represented by different polarized state of light. Terahertz Optical Asymmetric Demultiplexer (TOAD) based interferometric switch can take an important role. Computer simulation result confirming described methods and conclusion are given in this paper.

  6. A modified implementation of tristate inverter based static master-slave flip-flop with improved power-delay-area product.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwar; Tiwari, Satish Chandra; Gupta, Maneesha

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces novel architectures for implementation of fully static master-slave flip-flops for low power, high performance, and high density. Based on the proposed structure, traditional C(2)MOS latch (tristate inverter/clocked inverter) based flip-flop is implemented with fewer transistors. The modified C(2)MOS based flip-flop designs mC(2)MOSff1 and mC(2)MOSff2 are realized using only sixteen transistors each while the number of clocked transistors is also reduced in case of mC(2)MOSff1. Postlayout simulations indicate that mC(2)MOSff1 flip-flop shows 12.4% improvement in PDAP (power-delay-area product) when compared with transmission gate flip-flop (TGFF) at 16X capacitive load which is considered to be the best design alternative among the conventional master-slave flip-flops. To validate the correct behaviour of the proposed design, an eight bit asynchronous counter is designed to layout level. LVS and parasitic extraction were carried out on Calibre, whereas layouts were implemented using IC station (Mentor Graphics). HSPICE simulations were used to characterize the transient response of the flip-flop designs in a 180 nm/1.8 V CMOS technology. Simulations were also performed at 130 nm, 90 nm, and 65 nm to reveal the scalability of both the designs at modern process nodes. PMID:24723808

  7. A modified implementation of tristate inverter based static master-slave flip-flop with improved power-delay-area product.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwar; Tiwari, Satish Chandra; Gupta, Maneesha

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces novel architectures for implementation of fully static master-slave flip-flops for low power, high performance, and high density. Based on the proposed structure, traditional C(2)MOS latch (tristate inverter/clocked inverter) based flip-flop is implemented with fewer transistors. The modified C(2)MOS based flip-flop designs mC(2)MOSff1 and mC(2)MOSff2 are realized using only sixteen transistors each while the number of clocked transistors is also reduced in case of mC(2)MOSff1. Postlayout simulations indicate that mC(2)MOSff1 flip-flop shows 12.4% improvement in PDAP (power-delay-area product) when compared with transmission gate flip-flop (TGFF) at 16X capacitive load which is considered to be the best design alternative among the conventional master-slave flip-flops. To validate the correct behaviour of the proposed design, an eight bit asynchronous counter is designed to layout level. LVS and parasitic extraction were carried out on Calibre, whereas layouts were implemented using IC station (Mentor Graphics). HSPICE simulations were used to characterize the transient response of the flip-flop designs in a 180 nm/1.8 V CMOS technology. Simulations were also performed at 130 nm, 90 nm, and 65 nm to reveal the scalability of both the designs at modern process nodes.

  8. Psychometric Evaluation of 5- and 4-Item Versions of the LATCH Breastfeeding Assessment Tool during the Initial Postpartum Period among a Multiethnic Population

    PubMed Central

    Htun, Tha Pyai; Lim, Peng Im; Ho-Lim, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the internal consistency, structural validity, sensitivity and specificity of the 5- and 4-item versions of the LATCH assessment tool among a multiethnic population in Singapore. Methods The study was a secondary analysis of a subset of data (n = 907) from our previous breastfeeding survey from 2013 to 2014. The internal consistency of the LATCH was examined using Cronbach’s alpha. The structural validity was assessed using an exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and the proposed factors were confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using separate samples. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the LATCH score thresholds for predicting non-exclusive breastfeeding. Results The Cronbach’s alpha values of the 5- and 4-item LATCH assessments were 0.70 and 0.74, respectively. The EFA demonstrated a one-factor structure for the 5- and 4-item LATCH assessments among a randomized split of 334 vaginally delivered women. Two CFA of the 4-item LATCH demonstrated better fit indices of the models compared to the two CFA of the 5-item LATCH among another randomized split of 335 vaginally delivered women and 238 cesarean delivered women. Using cutoffs of 5.5 and 3.5 were recommended when predicting non-exclusive breastfeeding for 5- and 4-item versions of the LATCH assessment among vaginally delivered women (n = 669), with satisfactory sensitivities (94% and 95%), low specificities (0% and 2%), low positive predictive values (25%) and negative predictive values (20% and 47%). A cutoff of 5.5 was recommended to predict non-exclusive breastfeeding for 5- and 4-item versions among cesarean delivered women (n = 238) with satisfactory sensitivities (93% and 98%), low specificities (4% and 9%), low positive predictive values (41%) and negative predictive values (65% and 75%). Therefore, the tool has good sensitivity but poor specificity, positive and negative predictive

  9. Breaking The Enzymatic Latch: Do Anaerobic Conditions Constrain Decomposition In Humid Tropical Forest Soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic conditions have been proposed to impose a "latch" on soil organic matter decomposition by inhibiting the activity of extracellular enzymes that catalyze the transformation of organic polymers into monomers for microbial assimilation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that anaerobiosis inhibits soil hydrolytic enzyme activity in a humid tropical forest ecosystem in Puerto Rico. We sampled surface and sub-surface soil from each of 59 plots (n = 118) stratified across distinct topographical zones (ridges, slopes, and valleys) known to vary in soil oxygen (O2) concentrations, and measured the potential activity of five hydrolytic enzymes that decompose carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) substrates. We measured reduced iron (Fe (II)) concentrations in soil extractions to provide a spatially and temporally integrated index of anaerobic microbial activity, since iron oxides constitute the dominant anaerobic terminal electron acceptor in this ecosystem. Surprisingly, we observed positive relationships between Fe (II) concentrations and the activity of all enzymes that we assayed. Linear mixed effects models that included Fe (II) concentration, topographic position, and their interaction explained between 30 to 70 % of the variance of enzyme activity of β-1,4-glucosidase, β-cellobiohydrolase, β-xylosidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase. Soils from ridges and slopes contained between 10 and 800 μg Fe (II) g-1 soil, and exhibited consistently positive relationships (p < 0.0001) between Fe (II) and enzyme activity. Valley soils did not display significant relationships between enzyme activity and Fe (II), although they displayed variation in soil Fe (II) concentrations similar to ridges and slopes. Overall, valleys exhibited lower enzyme activity and lower Fe (II) concentrations than ridges or slopes, possibly related to decreased root biomass and soil C. Our data provide no indication that anaerobiosis suppresses soil enzyme activity, but

  10. Incorporating Peatland Plant Communities into the Enzymic 'Latch' Hypothesis: Can Vegetation Influence Carbon Storage Mechanisms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, K. J.; Daniels, A. L.; Potvin, L. R.; Kane, E. S.; Kolka, R. K.; Chimner, R. A.; Lilleskov, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    High water table conditions in peatland ecosystems are known to favor plant production over decomposition and carbon is stored. Dominant plant communities change in response to water table but little is know of how these changes affect belowground carbon storage. One hypothesis known as the enzymic 'latch' proposed by Freeman et al. suggests that oxygen limitations due to high water table conditions inhibit microorganisms from synthesizing specific extracellular enzymes essential for carbon and nutrient mineralization, allowing carbon to be stored as decomposition is reduced. Yet, this hypothesis excludes plant community interactions on carbon storage. We hypothesize that the dominant vascular plant communities, sedges and ericaceous shrubs, will have inherently different effects on peatland carbon storage, especially in response to declines in water table. Sedges greatly increase in abundance following water table decline and create extensive carbon oxidation and mineralization hotspots through the production of deep roots with aerenchyma (air channels in roots). Increased oxidation may enhance aerobic microbial activity including increased enzyme activity, leading to peat subsidence and carbon loss. In contrast, ericaceous shrubs utilize enzymatically active ericoid mycorrhizal fungi that suppress free-living heterotrophs, promoting decreased carbon mineralization by mediating changes in rhizosphere microbial communities and enzyme activity regardless of water table declines. Beginning May 2010, bog monoliths were harvested, housed in mesocosm chambers, and manipulated into three vegetation treatments: unmanipulated (+sedge, +Ericaceae), sedge (+sedge, -Ericaceae), and Ericaceae (-sedge, +Ericaceae). Following vegetation manipulations, two distinct water table manipulations targeting water table seasonal profiles were implemented: (low intra-seasonal variability, higher mean water table; high intra-seasonal variability, lower mean water table). In 2012, peat

  11. Magnetized static black Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2008-06-15

    We present a new static solution to the 5D Einstein-Maxwell equations describing a static black hole surrounded by a nonrotating dipole black ring. The configuration is kept in equilibrium by an external magnetic field interacting with the dipole charge of the black ring. The properties of the black Saturn-like configuration are studied and the basic physical quantities are calculated. The solution demonstrates 2-fold continuous nonuniqueness of the 5D magnetized static neutral black objects for fixed total mass and Melvin background.

  12. Static conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewell, R.; Mondt, J.

    Historically, all space power systems that have actually flown in space have relied on static energy conversion technology. Thus, static conversion is being considered for space nuclear power systems as well. There are four potential static conversion technologies which should be considered. These include: the alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC), the thermionic converter, the thermoelectric converter, and the thermophotovoltaic converter (TPV). These four conversion technologies will be described in brief detail along with their current status and development needs. In addition, the systems implications of using each of these conversion technologies with a space nuclear reactor power system will be evaluated and some comparisons made.

  13. Teaching home safety and survival skills to latch-key children: a comparison of two manuals and methods.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, L

    1984-01-01

    I evaluated the influence of two training manuals on latch-key children's acquisition of home safety and survival skills. The widely used, discussion-oriented "Prepared for Today" manual was compared with a behaviorally oriented "Safe at Home" manual. Data were scored by response criteria developed by experts and by parents' and experts' ratings of children's spontaneous answers. With both methods of scoring, three behaviorally trained children demonstrated clear and abrupt increases in skill following training in each of seven trained modules, and these increases largely persisted in real world generalization probes and at 5-month follow-up. Smaller and less stable increases in skill were found in the three discussion-trained children across the seven modules; lower skill levels were also seen in real world generalization probes and at follow-up. Neither group of children demonstrated skill increases in home safety areas that were not explicitly trained. Both training methods produced small decreases in children's self-report of general anxiety and anxiety concerning home safety. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for cost-effective training of latch-key children. PMID:6511698

  14. Latch-up signature analysis technique for plastic dual-in-line package (PDIP) devices using scanning acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahanpour, M.; Morgan, I.; Li, S.; Kaufmann, M.

    1995-12-31

    Cracks in the top surface of plastic package product (PDIP), as shown in a figure, resulting from Latch-Up (LU), DC Vcc Over-Voltage, or Reverse Insertion in the socket are usually similar in appearance. A scanning acoustic microscope can not determine the root cause of this Electrical Over-Stress (EOS) damage since all of the above show similar delamination. Even after device decapsulation, carbonized epoxy around Vcc and Vss bond wires doesn`t always indicate the exact root cause of failure. However, a nondestructive technique has been developed to distinguish (LU) from other EOS failures using a Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM). Finally, to verify the validity of the results, a computer analysis using a 3-Dimensional Finite Element Model (FEM) was used. The calculated stress distribution in the plastic IC package in the sustained LU condition agreed with the observations of delamination using SAM on product subjected to Transient Latch-Up (TLU) simulation on the power supply pin.

  15. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the outside... manner that the static pressure system performance is least affected by airflow variation, or by...

  16. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the outside... manner that the static pressure system performance is least affected by airflow variation, or by...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the outside... manner that the static pressure system performance is least affected by airflow variation, or by...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the outside... manner that the static pressure system performance is least affected by airflow variation, or by...

  19. Static Detection of Disassembly Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Nithya; Debray, Saumya; Fligg, Alan K

    2009-10-13

    Static disassembly is a crucial first step in reverse engineering executable files, and there is a consider- able body of work in reverse-engineering of binaries, as well as areas such as semantics-based security anal- ysis, that assumes that the input executable has been correctly disassembled. However, disassembly errors, e.g., arising from binary obfuscations, can render this assumption invalid. This work describes a machine- learning-based approach, using decision trees, for stat- ically identifying possible errors in a static disassem- bly; such potential errors may then be examined more closely, e.g., using dynamic analyses. Experimental re- sults using a variety of input executables indicate that our approach performs well, correctly identifying most disassembly errors with relatively few false positives.

  20. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  1. Relative performances of artificial neural network and regression mapping tools in evaluation of spinal loads and muscle forces during static lifting.

    PubMed

    Arjmand, N; Ekrami, O; Shirazi-Adl, A; Plamondon, A; Parnianpour, M

    2013-05-31

    Two artificial neural networks (ANNs) are constructed, trained, and tested to map inputs of a complex trunk finite element (FE) model to its outputs for spinal loads and muscle forces. Five input variables (thorax flexion angle, load magnitude, its anterior and lateral positions, load handling technique, i.e., one- or two-handed static lifting) and four model outputs (L4-L5 and L5-S1 disc compression and anterior-posterior shear forces) for spinal loads and 76 model outputs (forces in individual trunk muscles) are considered. Moreover, full quadratic regression equations mapping input-outputs of the model developed here for muscle forces and previously for spine loads are used to compare the relative accuracy of these two mapping tools (ANN and regression equations). Results indicate that the ANNs are more accurate in mapping input-output relationships of the FE model (RMSE= 20.7 N for spinal loads and RMSE= 4.7 N for muscle forces) as compared to regression equations (RMSE= 120.4 N for spinal loads and RMSE=43.2 N for muscle forces). Quadratic regression equations map up to second order variations of outputs with inputs while ANNs capture higher order variations too. Despite satisfactory achievement in estimating overall muscle forces by the ANN, some inadequacies are noted including assigning force to antagonistic muscles with no activity in the optimization algorithm of the FE model or predicting slightly different forces in bilateral pair muscles in symmetric lifting activities. Using these user-friendly tools spine loads and trunk muscle forces during symmetric and asymmetric static lifts can be easily estimated.

  2. Integrating the automatic and the controlled: strategies in semantic priming in an attractor network with latching dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Itamar; Bentin, Shlomo; Shriki, Oren

    2014-01-01

    Semantic priming has long been recognized to reflect, along with automatic semantic mechanisms, the contribution of controlled strategies. However, previous theories of controlled priming were mostly qualitative, lacking common grounds with modern mathematical models of automatic priming based on neural networks. Recently, we introduced a novel attractor network model of automatic semantic priming with latching dynamics. Here, we extend this work to show how the same model can also account for important findings regarding controlled processes. Assuming the rate of semantic transitions in the network can be adapted using simple reinforcement learning, we show how basic findings attributed to controlled processes in priming can be achieved, including their dependency on stimulus onset asynchrony and relatedness proportion and their unique effect on associative, category-exemplar, mediated and backward prime-target relations. We discuss how our mechanism relates to the classic expectancy theory and how it can be further extended in future developments of the model.

  3. I.1. Statics.

    PubMed

    Verkerke, Gijsbertus J; Lee, T Clive

    2010-01-01

    The forces that act on an object determine its dynamic behaviour and defromation. Analysis of all forces and moments is essential. A free-body diagram summarizes all forces and moments that act on an object. To calculate the magnitude of the forces we can use the static equilibrium of forces and moments. PMID:20407182

  4. Why Static Clings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naab, Laurie; Henry, David

    2009-01-01

    Using Wiggins and McTighe's (1998) concept of Big Ideas, the authors planned and designed an electricity investigation to address common student misconceptions about static electricity. With Styrofoam plates and transparent tape, elementary students investigated many properties of electrically charged and uncharged objects in a 5E learning cycle…

  5. Static cylindrical matter shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arık, Metin; Delice, Özgür

    2005-08-01

    Static cylindrical shells composed of massive particles arising from matching of two different Levi-Civita space-times are studied for the shell satisfying either an isotropic or an anisotropic equation of state. We find that these solutions satisfy the energy conditions for certain ranges of the parameters.

  6. A comparative analysis of static and dynamic load balancing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iqbal, M. Ashraf; Bokhari, Shahid H.; Saltz, Joel H.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of uniformly distributing the load of a parallel program over a multiprocessor system was considered. A program was analyzed whose structure permits the computation of the optimal static solution. Then four strategies for load balancing were described and their performance compared. The strategies are: (1) the optimal static assignment algorithm which is guaranteed to yield the best static solution, (2) the static binary dissection method which is very fast but suboptimal, (3) the greedy algorithm, a static fully polynomial time approximation scheme, which estimates the optimal solution to arbitrary accuracy, and (4) the predictive dynamic load balancing heuristic which uses information on the precedence relationships within the program and outperforms any of the static methods. It is also shown that the overhead incurred by the dynamic heuristic is reduced considerably if it is started off with a static assignment provided by either of the three strategies.

  7. Axial static mixer

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  8. Static cylindrically symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjällborg, Mikael

    2007-05-01

    We prove the existence of static solutions to the cylindrically symmetric Einstein Vlasov system, and we show that the matter cylinder has finite extension in two of the three spatial dimensions. The same results are also proved for a quite general class of equations of state for perfect fluids coupled to the Einstein equations, extending the class of equations of state considered by Bicak et al (2004 Class. Quantum Grav.21 1583). We also obtain this result for the Vlasov Poisson system.

  9. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-05-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  10. An analysis of a performance by the violinist D. Oistrakh: the hypothetical role of postural tonic-static and entourage movements.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, V; Katsnelson, A

    1996-02-01

    In an interdisciplinary research project carried out by a violinist and a psychophysiologist which is based on a videotape of a performance by the violinist, David Oistrakh, we draw attention to certain postural attitudes and movements which appear in sequences of his rendition of the Brandenburg Concerto N. 4 by Bach and the Concerto for Violin in D Major by Mozart. These postural attitudes and movements occur with a certain regularity and are particular to each piece of music. For example, in the Brandenburg Concerto, one can observe rhythmic oscillations of the musician's whole body, with a shifting of the weight (alternanza di appoggio) from the left to the right foot. The performer's movements were compared with corresponding points of the musical score. Within this analytical framework, we hypothesize that these movements have not only a mechanical postural role but an expressive aesthetic one.

  11. Thermal Performance of Biological Substance Systems in Vitro Under Static and Dynamic Conditions at the Cryogenic Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, James E.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A unique research program, including a comprehensive study of thermal performance at cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, was performed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The main goal was to develop a new soft vacuum system (from 1 torr to 10 torr) that provides an intermediate level of performance (k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K). Liquid nitrogen boil-off methods were used to test conventional materials, novel materials, and certain combinations. The test articles included combinations of aluminum foil, fiberglass paper, polyester fabric, silica aerogel composite blanket, fumed silica, silica aerogel powder, and syntactic foam. A new LCI system was developed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. This system performs exceptionally well at soft vacuum levels and nearly as good as an MLI at high vacuum levels. Apparent thermal conductivities for the LCI range from 2 mW/m-K at soft vacuum to 0.1 mW/m-K at high vacuum. Several cryostats were designed, constructed, and calibrated by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at KSC NASA as part of this research program. The cryostat test apparatus is a liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimeter system for direct measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity at a fixed vacuum level between 5 x 10(exp -5) and 760 torr. The apparatus is also used for transient measurements of temperature profiles. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems has been a targeted area of research for a number of years. Improved methods of characterization, testing, and evaluation of complex biological substance systems for cryosurgery and cryobiology are the focus of this paper.

  12. Dynamic performance of the mechanism of an automatically deployable ROPS.

    PubMed

    Etherton, J R; Cutlip, R G; Harris, J R; Ronaghi, M; Means, K H; Howard, S

    2002-02-01

    The mechanism for an automatically deployable ROPS (AutoROPS) has been designed and tested. This mechanism is part of an innovative project to provide passive protection against rollover fatality to operators of new tractors used in both low-clearance and unrestricted-clearance tasks. The device is a spring-action, telescoping structure that releases on signal to pyrotechnic squibs that actuate release pins. Upper post motion begins when the release pins clear an internal piston. The structure extends until the piston impacts an elastomeric ring and latches at the top position. In lab tests the two-post structure consistently deployed in less than 0.3 s and latched securely. Static load tests of the telescoping structure and field upset tests of the fully functional AutoROPS have been successfully completed. PMID:12002370

  13. Effects of a dynamic chair on pelvic mobility, fatigue, and work efficiency during work performed while sitting: a comparison of dynamic sitting and static sitting.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Hironori; Mitsuhashi, Toshitaka; Sako, Shunji; Goto, Ryokichi; Nakai, Tomohiro; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] Working while sitting for long periods can cause lumbar pain, fatigue, and reduced work efficiency. How a dynamic chair with a seat that moves three-dimensionally affects pelvic mobility before and after work, work efficiency, and post-work fatigue were examined. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 17 healthy adults (10 males, 7 females, mean age 21.8 ± 2.7 years). Subjects performed a 30-min Kraepelin test under two conditions: sitting in a standard office chair and sitting in a dynamic sitting balance chair. Root mean square (RMS) values of pelvic movement measured by a triaxial accelerometer during 30 minutes of work, finger-floor distance before and after work, lumbar fatigue, and pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement were used as outcome measures. [Results] Pelvic movement RMS values collected every 5 minutes during 30 minutes of work were significantly higher while sitting in the dynamic balance chair. Changes in pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement after work and amount of work performed during 30 minutes were significantly higher and lumbar fatigue was significantly lower for the dynamic balance chair. [Conclusion] Dynamic sitting maintained or increased pelvic flexibility. The dynamic balance chair may effectively help workers work continuously in seated postures with little fatigue. PMID:27390410

  14. Effects of a dynamic chair on pelvic mobility, fatigue, and work efficiency during work performed while sitting: a comparison of dynamic sitting and static sitting

    PubMed Central

    Tanoue, Hironori; Mitsuhashi, Toshitaka; Sako, Shunji; Goto, Ryokichi; Nakai, Tomohiro; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Working while sitting for long periods can cause lumbar pain, fatigue, and reduced work efficiency. How a dynamic chair with a seat that moves three-dimensionally affects pelvic mobility before and after work, work efficiency, and post-work fatigue were examined. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 17 healthy adults (10 males, 7 females, mean age 21.8 ± 2.7 years). Subjects performed a 30-min Kraepelin test under two conditions: sitting in a standard office chair and sitting in a dynamic sitting balance chair. Root mean square (RMS) values of pelvic movement measured by a triaxial accelerometer during 30 minutes of work, finger-floor distance before and after work, lumbar fatigue, and pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement were used as outcome measures. [Results] Pelvic movement RMS values collected every 5 minutes during 30 minutes of work were significantly higher while sitting in the dynamic balance chair. Changes in pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement after work and amount of work performed during 30 minutes were significantly higher and lumbar fatigue was significantly lower for the dynamic balance chair. [Conclusion] Dynamic sitting maintained or increased pelvic flexibility. The dynamic balance chair may effectively help workers work continuously in seated postures with little fatigue. PMID:27390410

  15. Effect of device geometry on static and dynamic performance of AlGaN/GaN-on-Si high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jin-Shan; Huang, Hong-Fan; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Zhao, Sheng-Xun; Zhang, Lin-Qing; Wang, Peng-Fei

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses the effects of several geometric parameters in DC and RF performances of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) grown on high-resistivity silicon substrates. Those parameters include the dependency of gate length (L g), gate cap length (L cap) and gate-to-source distance (L gs). It is shown that decreasing L g and L gs can both improve maximum drain current and transconductance behaviors. The fabricated 50 μm wide GaN-HEMT exhibits the maximum drain current of 1 A mm‑1 at V g = 2 V and maximum extrinsic transconductance G mmax of 240 mS mm‑1. Besides, decreasing L g and L cap also provides the improvement on current gain frequency (fT ) and maximum oscillation cut off frequency (f MAX). The fT of 40 GHz and f MAX of 55 GHz at V ds = 5 V are demonstrated by GaN-HEMT device featuring L g of 200 nm, L cap of 300 nm and L gs of 1.2 μm, which can realize the compact solid-state power amplifier used in S and C band. However, gate-to-source distance has little effect on RF performance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Those results compared in our study are not only very essential for accurate GaN-based HEMT device modeling and fabrication, but are also vital to better understanding of their device physics.

  16. Effects of a dynamic chair on pelvic mobility, fatigue, and work efficiency during work performed while sitting: a comparison of dynamic sitting and static sitting.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Hironori; Mitsuhashi, Toshitaka; Sako, Shunji; Goto, Ryokichi; Nakai, Tomohiro; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] Working while sitting for long periods can cause lumbar pain, fatigue, and reduced work efficiency. How a dynamic chair with a seat that moves three-dimensionally affects pelvic mobility before and after work, work efficiency, and post-work fatigue were examined. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 17 healthy adults (10 males, 7 females, mean age 21.8 ± 2.7 years). Subjects performed a 30-min Kraepelin test under two conditions: sitting in a standard office chair and sitting in a dynamic sitting balance chair. Root mean square (RMS) values of pelvic movement measured by a triaxial accelerometer during 30 minutes of work, finger-floor distance before and after work, lumbar fatigue, and pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement were used as outcome measures. [Results] Pelvic movement RMS values collected every 5 minutes during 30 minutes of work were significantly higher while sitting in the dynamic balance chair. Changes in pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement after work and amount of work performed during 30 minutes were significantly higher and lumbar fatigue was significantly lower for the dynamic balance chair. [Conclusion] Dynamic sitting maintained or increased pelvic flexibility. The dynamic balance chair may effectively help workers work continuously in seated postures with little fatigue.

  17. Effect of device geometry on static and dynamic performance of AlGaN/GaN-on-Si high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jin-Shan; Huang, Hong-Fan; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Zhao, Sheng-Xun; Zhang, Lin-Qing; Wang, Peng-Fei

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses the effects of several geometric parameters in DC and RF performances of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) grown on high-resistivity silicon substrates. Those parameters include the dependency of gate length (L g), gate cap length (L cap) and gate-to-source distance (L gs). It is shown that decreasing L g and L gs can both improve maximum drain current and transconductance behaviors. The fabricated 50 μm wide GaN-HEMT exhibits the maximum drain current of 1 A mm-1 at V g = 2 V and maximum extrinsic transconductance G mmax of 240 mS mm-1. Besides, decreasing L g and L cap also provides the improvement on current gain frequency (fT ) and maximum oscillation cut off frequency (f MAX). The fT of 40 GHz and f MAX of 55 GHz at V ds = 5 V are demonstrated by GaN-HEMT device featuring L g of 200 nm, L cap of 300 nm and L gs of 1.2 μm, which can realize the compact solid-state power amplifier used in S and C band. However, gate-to-source distance has little effect on RF performance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Those results compared in our study are not only very essential for accurate GaN-based HEMT device modeling and fabrication, but are also vital to better understanding of their device physics.

  18. Pheromone Static Routing Strategy for Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mao-Bin; Henry, Y. K. Lau; Ling, Xiang; Jiang, Rui

    2012-12-01

    We adopt the concept of using pheromones to generate a set of static paths that can reach the performance of global dynamic routing strategy [Phys. Rev. E 81 (2010) 016113]. The path generation method consists of two stages. In the first stage, a pheromone is dropped to the nodes by packets forwarded according to the global dynamic routing strategy. In the second stage, pheromone static paths are generated according to the pheromone density. The output paths can greatly improve traffic systems' overall capacity on different network structures, including scale-free networks, small-world networks and random graphs. Because the paths are static, the system needs much less computational resources than the global dynamic routing strategy.

  19. The Performance of Various Rear Facing Child Restraint Systems in a Frontal Crash

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, C. P.; Abdelilah, Y.; Crandall, J. R.; Stevens, S. L.; Saggese, J. M.; Eichelberger, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    Current forward facing (FF) child restraint designs use LATCH and ISOFIX systems to couple the restraint to the vehicle. Rear facing (RF) child restraints, however, have multiple coupling methods that vary by manufacturer and country of origin. Sled tests were performed with the CRABI 12 month dummy in six different RF attachment conditions. The performance of the rear facing child restraints (restraint kinematics, head accelerations, and neck loads) was highly dependent on the coupling method used. The results were also compared to a FF LATCH restraint. PMID:15319132

  20. Static intervortex forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speight, J. M.

    1997-03-01

    A point particle approximation to the classical dynamics of well-separated vortices of the Abelian Higgs model is developed. A static vortex is asymptotically identical to a solution of the linearized field theory (a Klein-Gordon-Proca theory) in the presence of a singular point source at the vortex center. It is shown that this source is a composite scalar monopole and magnetic dipole, and the respective charges are determined numerically for various values of the coupling constant. The interaction potential of two well-separated vortices is computed by calculating the interaction Lagrangian of two such point sources in the linear theory. The potential is used to model type II vortex scattering.

  1. Static electricity: A literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Rita M.

    1991-11-01

    The major concern with static electricity is its discharging in a flammable atmosphere which can explode and cause a fire. Textile materials can have their electrical resistivity decreased by the addition of antistatic finishes, imbedding conductive particles into the fibres or by adding metal fibers to the yarns. The test methods used in the studies of static electricity include measuring the static properties of materials, of clothed persons, and of the ignition energy of flammable gases. Surveys have shown that there is sparse evidence for fires definitively being caused by static electricity. However, the 'worst-case' philosophy has been adopted and a static electricity safety code is described, including correct grounding procedures and the wearing of anti-static clothing and footwear.

  2. Semiconductor ac static power switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J.

    1968-01-01

    Semiconductor ac static power switch has long life and high reliability, contains no moving parts, and operates satisfactorily in severe environments, including high vibration and shock conditions. Due to their resistance to shock and vibration, static switches are used where accidental switching caused by mechanical vibration or shock cannot be tolerated.

  3. NAMING DYNAMIC AND STATIC ACTIONS: NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL EVIDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Tranel, Daniel; Manzel, Kenneth; Asp, Erik; Kemmerer, David

    2008-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in identifying the neural correlates of action naming, but the bulk of previous work on this topic has utilized static stimuli. Recent research comparing the visual processing of dynamic versus static actions suggests that these two types of stimuli engage largely overlapping neural systems, raising the possibility that the higher-order processing requirements for naming dynamic and static actions might not be very different. To explore this issue in greater depth, we developed the Dynamic Action Naming Test (DANT), which consists of 158 video clips 3–5 sec in length, for each of which the participant is asked to produce the most appropriate verb. We administered the DANT to 78 brain-damaged patients drawn from our Patient Registry, and to a demographically matched group of 50 normal participants. Out of the 16 patients who performed defectively on the DANT, nearly all (15/16) had damage in the left hemisphere. Lesion analysis indicated that the frontal operculum was the most frequent area of damage in the 15 patients; also, damage to the posterolateral temporal-occipital sector (in and near MT) was specifically related to defective dynamic action naming. Most of the brain-damaged participants (n = 71) also received our Static Action Naming Test (SANT), and we found that performances on verb items that were common across the DANT and SANT were highly correlated (R = .91). Moreover, patients who failed the DANT almost invariably also failed the SANT. These findings lend further support to the hypothesis that there is considerable commonality in the neural systems underlying the use of verbs to orally name dynamic and static actions, a conclusion that is in turn compatible with the concept of “representational momentum.” Our results also contribute more generally to the rapidly growing field of research on embodied cognition. PMID:18486456

  4. Static and Dynamic Traversable Wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamiak, Jaroslaw P.

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this work is to discuss the effects found in static and dynamic wormholes that occur as a solution of Einstein equations in general relativity. The ground is prepared by presentation of faster than light effects, then the focus is narrowed to Morris-Thorne framework for a static spherically symmetric wormhole. Two types of dynamic worm-holes, evolving and rotating, are considered.

  5. A Transonic Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Performance and of the Static Stability and Control Characteristics of a Model of a Fighter-Type Airplane which Embodies Partial Body Indentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielat, Ralph P.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of a model of a fighter-type airplane embodying partial body indentation. The wing had an aspect ratio of 4, taper ratio of 0.5, 35 deg sweepback of the 0.25-chord line, and a modified NACA 65A006 airfoil section at the root and a modified NACA 65A004 airfoil section at the tip. The fuselage has been indented in the region of the wing in order to obtain a favorable area distribution. The results reported herein consist of the performance and of the static longitudinal and lateral stability and control characteristics of the complete model. The Mach number range extended from 0.60 to 1.13, and the corresponding Reynolds number based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord varied from 1.77 x 10(exp 6) to 2.15 x 10(exp 6). The drag rise for both the cambered leading edge and symmetrical wing sections occurred at a Mach number of 0.95. Certain local modifications to the body which further improved the distribution of cross-sectional area gave additional reductions in drag at a Mach number of 1.00. The basic configuration indicated a mild pitch-up tendency at lift coefficients near 0.70 for the Mach number range from 0.80 to 0.90; however, the pitch-up instability may not be too objectionable on the basis of dynamic-stability considerations. The basic configuration indicated positive directional stability and positive effective dihedral through the angle-of-attack range and Mach number range with the exception of a region of negative effective dihedral at low lifts at Mach numbers of 1.00 and slightly above.

  6. Magnetic bearings for a high-performance optical disk buffer, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The operating instructions for the magnetic bearings of a high-performance optical disk buffer are provided. Among the topics that are discussed are the following: front panel layout, turn-on procedure, shut-down procedure, and latch-up protection. Additionally, comprehensive engineering drawings are presented for the design.

  7. Static Thrust Analysis of the Lifting Airscrew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Hefner, Ralph A

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of a combined theoretical and experimental investigation conducted at the Georgia School of Technology on the static thrust of the lifting air screw of the type used in modern autogiros and helicopters. The theoretical part of this study is based on Glauert's analysis but certain modifications are made that further clarify and simplify the problem. Of these changes the elimination of the solidity as an independent parameter is the most important. The experimental data were obtained from tests on four rotor models of two, four, and five blades and, in general, agree quite well with the theoretical calculations. The theory indicates a method of evaluating scale effects on lifting air screws, and these corrections have been applied to the model results to derive general full-scale static thrust, torque, and figure-of-merit curves for constant-chord, constant-incidence rotors. Convenient charts are included that enable hovering flight performance to be calculated rapidly.

  8. Grayloc seal static tests

    SciTech Connect

    Leisher, W.B.; Biffle, J.H.

    1983-02-01

    A series of evaluation tests was performed on Grayloc seals. Helium service and standard seals, size 292, were used. Measurements were made of axial force and motion, diameter, hoop and axial strain, and helium leak rate. Leak rates were in the 10/sup -6/ atm cc/s range for the helium service seals. Pretest analytical calculations agreed reasonably well with measured makeup forces and deflections.

  9. Static Facial Slings: Approaches to Rehabilitation of the Paralyzed Face.

    PubMed

    Langille, Morgan; Singh, Prabhjyot

    2016-02-01

    Facial paralysis results from a variety of different causes. Patients with facial paralysis have cosmetic and functional defects that significantly affect quality of life. Surgical intervention has the potential to help improve cosmetic and functional outcomes. The 2 main categories of surgical rehabilitation are static and dynamic surgical procedures. Static rehabilitation of the midface is typically performed using autologous tissue grafts, allografts, synthetic grafts, permanent suspension sutures, and a novel technique using percutaneous suture-based slings.

  10. Static heterogeneities in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2004-10-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of water seems to be closely related to static heterogeneities. These static heterogeneities are related to the local structure of water molecules, and when properly characterized, may offer an economical explanation of thermodynamic data. The key feature of liquid water is not so much that the existence of hydrogen bonds, first pointed out by Linus Pauling, but rather the local geometry of the liquid molecules is not spherical or oblong but tetrahedral. In the consideration of static heterogeneities, this local geometry is critical. Recent experiments suggested more than one phase of amorphous solid water, while simulations suggest that one of these phases is metastable with respect to another, so that in fact there are only two stable phases.

  11. Static Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Schardt, Michael; Murr, Patrik J; Rauscher, Markus S; Tremmel, Anton J; Wiesent, Benjamin R; Koch, Alexander W

    2016-04-01

    Fourier transform spectroscopy has established itself as the standard method for spectral analysis of infrared light. Here we present a robust and compact novel static Fourier transform spectrometer design without any moving parts. The design is well suited for measurements in the infrared as it works with extended light sources independent of their size. The design is experimentally evaluated in the mid-infrared wavelength region between 7.2 μm and 16 μm. Due to its large etendue, its low internal light loss, and its static design it enables high speed spectral analysis in the mid-infrared.

  12. Voltage Sensors Monitor Harmful Static

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    A tiny sensor, small enough to be worn on clothing, now monitors voltage changes near sensitive instruments after being created to alert Agency workers to dangerous static buildup near fuel operations and avionics. San Diego s Quasar Federal Systems received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center to develop its remote voltage sensor (RVS), a dime-sized electrometer designed to measure triboelectric changes in the environment. One of the unique qualities of the RVS is that it can detect static at greater distances than previous devices, measuring voltage changes from a few centimeters to a few meters away, due to its much-improved sensitivity.

  13. Utility Static Generation Reliability

    1993-03-05

    PICES (Probabilistic Investigation of Capacity and Energy Shortages) was developed for estimating an electric utility''s expected frequency and duration of capacity deficiencies on a daily on and off-peak basis. In addition to the system loss-of-load probability (LOLP) and loss-of-load expectation (LOLE) indices, PICES calculates the expected frequency and duration of system capacity deficiencies and the probability, expectation, and expected frequency and duration of a range of system reserve margin states. Results are aggregated and printedmore » on a weekly, monthly, or annual basis. The program employs hourly load data and either the two-state (on/off) or a more sophisticated three-state (on/partially on/fully off) generating unit representation. Unit maintenance schedules are determined on a weekly, levelized reserve margin basis. In addition to the 8760-hour annual load record, the user provides the following information for each unit: plant capacity, annual maintenance requirement, two or three-state unit failure and repair rates, and for three-state models, the partial state capacity deficiency. PICES can also supply default failure and repair rate values, based on the Edison Electric Institute''s 1979 Report on Equipment Availability for the Ten-Year Period 1968 Through 1977, for many common plant types. Multi-year analysis can be performed by specifying as input data the annual peak load growth rates and plant addition and retirement schedules for each year in the study.« less

  14. Notes on static cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicák, J.; Zofka, M.

    2002-07-01

    Static cylindrical shells made of various types of matter are studied as sources of the vacuum Levi-Civita metrics. Their internal physical properties are related to the two essential parameters of the metrics outside. The total mass per unit length of the cylinders is always less than ¼. The results are illustrated by a number of figures.

  15. FORTRAN Static Source Code Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwarth, P.

    1982-01-01

    FORTRAN Static Source Code Analyzer program (SAP) automatically gathers and reports statistics on occurrences of statements and structures within FORTRAN program. Provisions are made for weighting each statistic, providing user with overall figure of complexity. Statistics, as well as figures of complexity, are gathered on module-by-module basis. Overall summed statistics are accumulated for complete input source file.

  16. FORTRAN Static Source Code Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwarth, P.

    1984-01-01

    FORTRAN Static Source Code Analyzer program, SAP (DEC VAX version), automatically gathers statistics on occurrences of statements and structures within FORTRAN program and provides reports of those statistics. Provisions made for weighting each statistic and provide an overall figure of complexity.

  17. Compiler-assisted static checkpoint insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Junsheng; Fuchs, W. K.; Abraham, Jacob A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a compiler-assisted approach for static checkpoint insertion. Instead of fixing the checkpoint location before program execution, a compiler enhanced polling mechanism is utilized to maintain both the desired checkpoint intervals and reproducible checkpoint 1ocations. The technique has been implemented in a GNU CC compiler for Sun 3 and Sun 4 (Sparc) processors. Experiments demonstrate that the approach provides for stable checkpoint intervals and reproducible checkpoint placements with performance overhead comparable to a previously presented compiler assisted dynamic scheme (CATCH) utilizing the system clock.

  18. Statistics of Static Stress Earthquake Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan, S.; Ouillon, G.; Woessner, J.; Sornette, D.; Wiemer, S.

    2014-12-01

    seismicity is suppressed if ∆CFS<0. Our results rather suggest a spatially ubiquitous triggering process compatible with dynamic triggering, modulated by the sign and amplitude of the static stress field. We also conclude that static stress-based forecasts should not be performed over time scales much larger than τ, which is of the order of few hundred days.

  19. Space station static and dynamic analyses using parallel methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, V.; Newell, J.; Storaasli, O.; Baddourah, M.; Bostic, S.

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms for high-performance parallel computers are applied to perform static analyses of large-scale Space Station finite-element models (FEMs). Several parallel-vector algorithms under development at NASA Langley are assessed. Sparse matrix solvers were found to be more efficient than banded symmetric or iterative solvers for the static analysis of large-scale applications. In addition, new sparse and 'out-of-core' solvers were found superior to substructure (superelement) techniques which require significant additional cost and time to perform static condensation during global FEM matrix generation as well as the subsequent recovery and expansion. A method to extend the fast parallel static solution techniques to reduce the computation time for dynamic analysis is also described. The resulting static and dynamic algorithms offer design economy for preliminary multidisciplinary design optimization and FEM validation against test modes. The algorithms are being optimized for parallel computers to solve one-million degrees-of-freedom (DOF) FEMs. The high-performance computers at NASA afforded effective software development, testing, efficient and accurate solution with timely system response and graphical interpretation of results rarely found in industry. Based on the author's experience, similar cooperation between industry and government should be encouraged for similar large-scale projects in the future.

  20. Size Scaling of Static Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, O. M.; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-02-01

    Sliding friction across a thin soft lubricant film typically occurs by stick slip, the lubricant fully solidifying at stick, yielding and flowing at slip. The static friction force per unit area preceding slip is known from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to decrease with increasing contact area. That makes the large-size fate of stick slip unclear and unknown; its possible vanishing is important as it would herald smooth sliding with a dramatic drop of kinetic friction at large size. Here we formulate a scaling law of the static friction force, which for a soft lubricant is predicted to decrease as fm+Δf/Aγ for increasing contact area A, with γ>0. Our main finding is that the value of fm, controlling the survival of stick slip at large size, can be evaluated by simulations of comparably small size. MD simulations of soft lubricant sliding are presented, which verify this theory.

  1. Water cooled static pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  2. Static penetration resistance of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgunoglu, H. T.; Mitchell, J. K.

    1973-01-01

    Model test results were used to define the failure mechanism associated with the static penetration resistance of cohesionless and low-cohesion soils. Knowledge of this mechanism has permitted the development of a new analytical method for calculating the ultimate penetration resistance which explicitly accounts for penetrometer base apex angle and roughness, soil friction angle, and the ratio of penetration depth to base width. Curves relating the bearing capacity factors to the soil friction angle are presented for failure in general shear. Strength parameters and penetrometer interaction properties of a fine sand were determined and used as the basis for prediction of the penetration resistance encountered by wedge, cone, and flat-ended penetrometers of different surface roughness using the proposed analytical method. Because of the close agreement between predicted values and values measured in laboratory tests, it appears possible to deduce in-situ soil strength parameters and their variation with depth from the results of static penetration tests.

  3. Alkaline static feed electrolyzer based oxygen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, L. D.; Kovach, A. J.; Fortunato, F. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Grigger, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    In preparation for the future deployment of the Space Station, an R and D program was established to demonstrate integrated operation of an alkaline Water Electrolysis System and a fuel cell as an energy storage device. The program's scope was revised when the Space Station Control Board changed the energy storage baseline for the Space Station. The new scope was aimed at the development of an alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer for use in an Environmental Control/Life Support System as an oxygen generation system. As a result, the program was divided into two phases. The phase 1 effort was directed at the development of the Static Feed Electrolyzer for application in a Regenerative Fuel Cell System. During this phase, the program emphasized incorporation of the Regenerative Fuel Cell System design requirements into the Static Feed Electrolyzer electrochemical module design and the mechanical components design. The mechanical components included a Pressure Control Assembly, a Water Supply Assembly and a Thermal Control Assembly. These designs were completed through manufacturing drawing during Phase 1. The Phase 2 effort was directed at advancing the Alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer database for an oxygen generation system. This development was aimed at extending the Static Feed Electrolyzer database in areas which may be encountered from initial fabrication through transportation, storage, launch and eventual Space Station startup. During this Phase, the Program emphasized three major areas: materials evaluation, electrochemical module scaling and performance repeatability and Static Feed Electrolyzer operational definition and characterization.

  4. Three Inexpensive Static-Electricity Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Gordon R.; Gregg, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes demonstrations to (1) construct an inexpensive static electricity detector; (2) obtain an abundant supply of either negative or positive charge using household items; and (3) create static electricity using a Tesla coil or Van de Graaff generator. (MDH)

  5. Comparative Tests of Pitot-static Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Kenneth G; Spaulding, Ellis R

    1935-01-01

    Comparative tests were made on seven conventional Pitot-static tubes to determine their static, dynamic, and resultant errors. The effect of varying the dynamic opening, static opening, wall thickness, and inner-tube diameter was investigated. Pressure-distribution measurements showing stem and tip effects were also made. A tentative design for a standard Pitot-static tube for use in measuring air velocity is submitted.

  6. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity....

  7. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity....

  8. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity....

  9. In-Flight Pitot-Static Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John V. (Inventor); Cunningham, Kevin (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A GPS-based pitot-static calibration system uses global output-error optimization. High data rate measurements of static and total pressure, ambient air conditions, and GPS-based ground speed measurements are used to compute pitot-static pressure errors over a range of airspeed. System identification methods rapidly compute optimal pressure error models with defined confidence intervals.

  10. Static test of an ultralight airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes all of the work necessary to perform the static test of an ultralight airplane. A steel reaction gantry was designed first, then all of the loading whiffletrees, the hydraulic actuation system, and instrumentation systems were designed. Loads and stress analyses were performed on the airplane and the gantry and whiffletrees. Components tested to date are: tubing samples, cables, and two-by-four whiffletrees. A hydraulic system consisting of a 3000-psi hand pump, 10,000-pound actuator, pressure gage and lines, and a Barksdale valve are described. Load cell calibration and pressure indicator calibration procedures are also described. A description of the strain and deflection measurement system is included. Preliminary data obtained to date are compared to the analytical predictions.

  11. Static balancing of planar articulated robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaglia, Giuseppe; Yin, Zhe

    2015-12-01

    Static balancing for a manipulator's weight is necessary in terms of energy saving and performance improvement. This paper proposes a method to design balancing devices for articulated robots in industry, based on robotic dynamics. Full design details for the balancing system using springs are presented from two aspects: One is the optimization for the position of the balancing system; the other is the design of the spring parameters. As examples, two feasible balancing devices are proposed, based on different robotic structures: The first solution consists of linkages and springs; the other consists of pulleys, cross mechanisms and (hydro-) pneumatic springs. Then the two solutions are compared. Pneumatic, hydro-pneumatic and mechanical springs are discussed and their parameters are decided according to the requirements of torque compensation. Numerical results show that with the proper design using the methodology presented in this paper, an articulated robot can be statically balanced perfectly in all configurations. This paper therefore provides a design method of the balancing system for other similar structures.

  12. Static feed water electrolysis module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Jensen, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    An advanced static feed water electrolysis module (SFWEM) and associated instrumentation for generating breathable O2 was developed. The system also generates a H2 byproduct for use in an air revitalization system for O2 recovery from metabolic CO2. Special attention was given to: (1) eliminating water feed compartment degassing, (2) eliminating need for zero gravity condenser/separators, (3) increasing current density capability, and (4) providing a self contained module so that operation is independent of laboratory instrumentation and complicated startup/shutdown procedures.

  13. Measurement of static pressure on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracey, William

    1958-01-01

    Existing data on the errors involved in the measurement of static pressure by means of static-pressure tubes and fuselage vents are presented. The errors associated with the various design features of static-pressure tubes are discussed for the condition of zero angle of attack and for the case where the tube is inclined to flow. Errors which result from variations in the configuration of static-pressure vents are also presented. Errors due to the position of a static-pressure tube in the flow field of the airplane are given for locations ahead of the fuselage nose, ahead of the wing tip, and ahead of the vertical tail fin. The errors of static-pressure vents on the fuselage of an airplane are also presented. Various methods of calibrating static-pressure installations in flight are briefly discussed.

  14. The relationship between parameters of static and dynamic stability tests

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Solomonidis, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stability is often described to be static (quiet standing) and dynamic (maintaining a stable position while undertake a prescribed movement). Many researchers have used only static tests to evaluate the stability of normal and handicapped subjects. However, it is important to evaluate the stability of subjects while undertaking various tasks (dynamic stability). It is not currently clear whether static balance can predict dynamic balance or not. Therefore, the aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between parameters of static and dynamic stability tests. METHODS: The current clinical trial study was carried out in the Bioengineering Unit of Strathclyde University during 2008 and 2009. The normal subjects with no history of musculoskeletal disorders from staff and students of the Unit were selected in this study. Twenty-five normal subjects were recruited to participate in this research project. They were asked to stand on a force plate in quiet standing and while undertaking various hand tasks. The functional stability of the subjects was measured while transverse and vertical reaching tasks were undertaken. The correlation between various parameters of stability in quiet standing and functional hand tasks was evaluated using Pearson correlation. RESULTS: There was no significant correlation between static and dynamic stability parameters. The Pearson correlation coefficients for all parameters regarding the static and dynamic tests were less than 0.46. CONCLUSIONS: As there was no correlation between stability parameters in quiet standing and while performing various hand tasks, it is not practical to discuss ability of the subjects to control their balance while undertaking various hand tasks based on static balance ability. PMID:22091270

  15. Static behaviour of induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    The standard paradigm to describe seismicity induced by fluid injection is to apply non-linear diffusion dynamics in a poroelastic medium. I show that the spatio-temporal behaviour and rate evolution of induced seismicity can, instead, be expressed by geometric operations on a static stress field produced by volume change at depth. I obtain laws similar in form to the ones derived from poroelasticity while requiring a lower description length. Although fluid flow is known to occur in the ground, it is not pertinent to the geometrical description of the spatio-temporal patterns of induced seismicity. The proposed model is equivalent to the static stress model for tectonic foreshocks generated by the Non-Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory. This study hence verifies the explanatory power of this theory outside of its original scope and provides an alternative physical approach to poroelasticity for the modelling of induced seismicity. The applicability of the proposed geometrical approach is illustrated for the case of the 2006, Basel enhanced geothermal system stimulation experiment. Applicability to more problematic cases where the stress field may be spatially heterogeneous is also discussed.

  16. Static analysis of a piping system with elbows

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.J.

    1994-03-01

    Vibration tests of elbows to failure were performed in Japan in the early 1970s. The piping system included two elbows and an eccentric mass. Tests were run both pressurized and unpressurized. This report documents a static analysis of the piping system in which the elbows are subjected to out of plane bending. The effects of internal pressure and material plasticity are investigated.

  17. Sensitivity of capacitance diaphragm manometers to static magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Provost, T.J.

    1982-07-01

    The sensors of the two capacitance diaphragm manometers investigated in this study appear to have no significant dependence upon exposure to static magnetic fields. Subsequent use of the sensors in the near-field environment of the PDX tokamak showed the sensors could perform unshielded in a magnetic environment, however, it was found necessary to magnetically shield the associated signal-conditioning electronics.

  18. Matching Voice and Face Identity from Static Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavica, Lauren W.; Barenholtz, Elan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that people are unable to correctly choose which unfamiliar voice and static image of a face belong to the same person. Here, we present evidence that people can perform this task with greater than chance accuracy. In Experiment 1, participants saw photographs of two, same-gender models, while simultaneously…

  19. High speed GaAs static RAM technology and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, R. E.; Waldner, M.

    A design and analysis study of potential high-speed GaAs MESFET memory circuits was performed. The results show that a 1-kbit static RAM having a 1-ns access time is feasible using low-power enhancement-mode MESFETs to realize static flip-flop memory cells; power dissipation would be 5 microwatts per cell. To achieve maximum memory speed, the control and drive circuitry incorporates depletion-mode devices throughout; total power dissipation would be about 1 W. Details of the memory design and analysis are presented.

  20. Trend of tunnel magnetoresistance and variation in threshold voltage for keeping data load robustness of metal–oxide–semiconductor/magnetic tunnel junction hybrid latches

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, T.; Ikeda, S.; Hanyu, T.; Ohno, H.; Endoh, T.

    2014-05-07

    The robustness of data load of metal–oxide–semiconductor/magnetic tunnel junction (MOS/MTJ) hybrid latches at power-on is examined by using Monte Carlo simulation with the variations in magnetoresistances for MTJs and in threshold voltages for MOSFETs involved in 90 nm technology node. Three differential pair type spin-transfer-torque-magnetic random access memory cells (4T2MTJ, 6T2MTJ, and 8T2MTJ) are compared for their successful data load at power-on. It is found that the 4T2MTJ cell has the largest pass area in the shmoo plot in TMR ratio (tunnel magnetoresistance ratio) and V{sub dd} in which a whole 256 kb cell array can be powered-on successfully. The minimum TMR ratio for the 4T2MTJ in 0.9 V < V{sub dd} < 1.9 V is 140%, while the 6T2MTJ and the 8T2MTJ cells require TMR ratio larger than 170%.

  1. Low field driven latching-type Bi3Fe5O12/Gd3Ga5O12 magneto-optical display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, A. M.; Khartsev, S. I.; Bonetti, S.

    2006-06-01

    Series of heteroepitaxial all-garnet magneto-optical (MO) Bi3Fe5O12n/Gd3Ga5O12m (BIGn/GGGm, n =1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and m =1 and 2 are the numbers of unit cells) nanostructured multilayers have been sintered by pulsed laser deposition technique. Processing parameters and structure of grown films have been optimized to obtain perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and square hysteresis loop with low coercive and saturation magnetic fields. Regular alternating of lattice mismatched BIG and GGG atomic layers inhibited nucleation of misfit dislocations; thus a long range coherent compressive strain was preserved through the whole thickness of BIGn/GGGm multilayer stack. 2.5μm thick BIG3/GGG2 sample (1200 BIG and 800 GGG unit cells) at λ =678nm shows MO Faraday rotation ΘF=±1.4°, transmittance of 82%, attenuation α =3400dB/cm, squareness of magnetization loop (remnant-to-saturation magnetizations ratio) as high as 92%, and saturation and coercive fields as low as 56 and 25Oe, respectively. MO remanence (latching capability) enables application of nanostructured garnet as a magnetic relief replicator/visualizer and as a material for low power consuming displays.

  2. Distributed static linear Gaussian models using consensus.

    PubMed

    Belanovic, Pavle; Valcarcel Macua, Sergio; Zazo, Santiago

    2012-10-01

    Algorithms for distributed agreement are a powerful means for formulating distributed versions of existing centralized algorithms. We present a toolkit for this task and show how it can be used systematically to design fully distributed algorithms for static linear Gaussian models, including principal component analysis, factor analysis, and probabilistic principal component analysis. These algorithms do not rely on a fusion center, require only low-volume local (1-hop neighborhood) communications, and are thus efficient, scalable, and robust. We show how they are also guaranteed to asymptotically converge to the same solution as the corresponding existing centralized algorithms. Finally, we illustrate the functioning of our algorithms on two examples, and examine the inherent cost-performance trade-off.

  3. A cumulant functional for static and dynamic correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollett, Joshua W.; Hosseini, Hessam; Menzies, Cameron

    2016-08-01

    A functional for the cumulant energy is introduced. The functional is composed of a pair-correction and static and dynamic correlation energy components. The pair-correction and static correlation energies are functionals of the natural orbitals and the occupancy transferred between near-degenerate orbital pairs, rather than the orbital occupancies themselves. The dynamic correlation energy is a functional of the statically correlated on-top two-electron density. The on-top density functional used in this study is the well-known Colle-Salvetti functional. Using the cc-pVTZ basis set, the functional effectively models the bond dissociation of H2, LiH, and N2 with equilibrium bond lengths and dissociation energies comparable to those provided by multireference second-order perturbation theory. The performance of the cumulant functional is less impressive for HF and F2, mainly due to an underestimation of the dynamic correlation energy by the Colle-Salvetti functional.

  4. Static mixer improves desalting efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    An in-line static mixer has increased salt removal from crude oil at a large West Coast refinery, says the mixer supplier, Komax Systems Inc. The mixer was installed at a 150,000 b/d crude distillation unit's desalter. Crude at this refinery is a mixture of local production and imports from Indonesia and Alaska. In the past, the refiner used a typical globe-type mix valve to mix fresh water with crude at the desalters. The crude is heated to 300/sup 0/F., mixed with 5% fresh water, and then fed to the desalters. Chemical and electrostatic treatment is used in the desalters to remove salt and water from the crude.

  5. Ares I Static Tests Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, William; Lindemuth, Kathleen; Mich, John; White, K. Preston; Parker, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Probabilistic engineering design enhances safety and reduces costs by incorporating risk assessment directly into the design process. In this paper, we assess the format of the quantitative metrics for the vehicle which will replace the Space Shuttle, the Ares I rocket. Specifically, we address the metrics for in-flight measurement error in the vector position of the motor nozzle, dictated by limits on guidance, navigation, and control systems. Analyses include the propagation of error from measured to derived parameters, the time-series of dwell points for the duty cycle during static tests, and commanded versus achieved yaw angle during tests. Based on these analyses, we recommend a probabilistic template for specifying the maximum error in angular displacement and radial offset for the nozzle-position vector. Criteria for evaluating individual tests and risky decisions also are developed.

  6. The Influence of Visual Cognitive Style when Learning from Instructional Animations and Static Pictures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffler, Tim N.; Prechtl, Helmut; Nerdel, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    In a 2 x 2 design, we examined the role of visual cognitive style in two multimedia-based learning environments (text plus static pictures/animations). A statistically significant interaction was obtained for deeper comprehension: Highly developed visualizers (HDV) who learned with static pictures performed better than HDV who learned with…

  7. Bonded joint strength - Static versus fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesives are commonly characterized only by their static strength even though they are used in structural joints that are subjected to fatigue loads. This paper reviews the relationship between static and fatigue strength for four different specimen types: single-lap-shear, edge-delamination, double cantilever beam, and cracked-lap-shear. It was found that the ratio of static strength to fatigue strength varied from 2.3 to 4.7, depending on the adhesive and specimen configuration.

  8. Studies on proper simulation during static testing of forward speed effects on fan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peracchio, A. A.; Ganz, U. W.; Gedge, M. R.; Robbins, K.

    1980-01-01

    Significant differences exist in the noise generated by engines in flight and engines operating on the test stand. It was observed that these differences can be reduced by the use of an inflow control structure (ICS) in the static test configuration. The results of the third phase of a three phase program are described. The work performed in the first two phases which dealt with the development of a model for atmospheric turbulence, studies of fan noise generated by rotor turbulence interaction, and the development of an inflow control structure design system are summarized. The final phase of the program covers procedures for performing static testing with an ICS projecting the resulting static test data to actual flight test data. Included is a procedures report which covers the design system and techniques for static testing and projecting the static data to flight.

  9. Seeing liquids from static snapshots.

    PubMed

    Paulun, Vivian C; Kawabe, Takahiro; Nishida, Shin'ya; Fleming, Roland W

    2015-10-01

    Perceiving material properties can be crucial for many tasks-such as determining food edibility, or avoiding getting splashed-yet the visual perception of materials remains poorly understood. Most previous research has focussed on optical characteristics (e.g., gloss, translucency). Here, however, we show that shape also provides powerful visual cues to material properties. When liquids pour, splash or ooze, they organize themselves into characteristic shapes, which are highly diagnostic of the material's properties. Subjects viewed snapshots of simulated liquids of different viscosities, and rated their similarity. Using maximum likelihood difference scaling (Maloney & Yang, 2003), we reconstructed perceptual scales for perceived viscosity as a function of the physical viscosity of the simulated fluids. The resulting psychometric function revealed a distinct sigmoidal shape, distinguishing runny liquids that flow easily from viscous gels that clump up into piles. A parameter-free model based on 20 simple shape statistics predicted the subjects' data surprisingly well. This suggests that when subjects are asked to compare the viscosity of static snapshots of liquids that differ only in terms of viscosity, they rely primarily on relatively simple measures of shape similarity. PMID:25676882

  10. Static Material Strength Determined Using a DAC

    SciTech Connect

    Cynn, H; Evans, W; Klepeis, J P; Lipp, M; Liermann, P; Yang, W

    2009-06-04

    By measuring sample thickness and pressure gradient using x-ray absorption and x-ray diffraction, respectively, the accurate static yield strengths of Ta and Fe were determined at high pressure. This improved method has several advantages over other similar methods to quantitatively determine static material strength.

  11. Comparing Techniques for Certified Static Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cachera, David; Pichardie, David

    2009-01-01

    A certified static analysis is an analysis whose semantic validity has been formally proved correct with a proof assistant. The recent increasing interest in using proof assistants for mechanizing programming language metatheory has given rise to several approaches for certification of static analysis. We propose a panorama of these techniques and compare their respective strengths and weaknesses.

  12. The Neglect of Monotone Comparative Statics Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Carol Horton; Tremblay, Victor J.

    2010-01-01

    Monotone methods enable comparative static analysis without the restrictive assumptions of the implicit-function theorem. Ease of use and flexibility in solving comparative static and game-theory problems have made monotone methods popular in the economics literature and in graduate courses, but they are still absent from undergraduate…

  13. Remote histology learning from static versus dynamic microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Mione, Sylvia; Valcke, Martin; Cornelissen, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Histology is the study of microscopic structures in normal tissue sections. Curriculum redesign in medicine has led to a decrease in the use of optical microscopes during practical classes. Other imaging solutions have been implemented to facilitate remote learning. With advancements in imaging technologies, learning material can now be digitized. Digitized microscopy images can be presented in either a static or dynamic format. This study of remote histology education identifies whether dynamic pictures are superior to static images for the acquisition of histological knowledge. Test results of two cohorts of second-year Bachelor in Medicine students at Ghent University were analyzed in two consecutive academic years: Cohort 1 (n = 190) and Cohort 2 (n = 174). Students in Cohort 1 worked with static images whereas students in Cohort 2 were presented with dynamic images. ANCOVA was applied to study differences in microscopy performance scores between the two cohorts, taking into account any possible initial differences in prior knowledge. The results show that practical histology scores are significantly higher with dynamic images as compared to static images (F (1,361) = 15.14, P < 0.01), regardless of student's gender and performance level. Several reasons for this finding can be explained in accordance with cognitivist learning theory. Since the findings suggest that knowledge construction with dynamic pictures is stronger as compared to static images, dynamic images should be introduced in a remote setting for microscopy education. Further implementation within a larger electronic learning management system needs to be explored in future research. Anat Sci Educ 9: 222-230. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  14. Quorum sensing via static coupling demonstrated by Chua's circuits.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpartap; Parmananda, P

    2013-10-01

    Dynamical quorum sensing, the population based phenomenon, is believed to occur when the elements of a system interact via dynamic coupling. In the present work, we demonstrate an alternate scenario, involving static coupling, that could also lead to quorum sensing behavior. These static and dynamic coupling terms have already been employed by Konishi [Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos Appl. Sci. Eng. 17, 2781 (2007)]. In our context, the coupling is defined as static or dynamic, on the basis of the relative time scales at which the surrounding dynamics and the elements' dynamics evolve. According to this, if the variation in the surrounding dynamics happens on a much larger (fast) time scale than that at which the elements' dynamics are varying (such as seconds and μs), then the coupling is considered to be static, otherwise it is considered to be dynamic. A series of experiments have been performed starting from a system of three Chua's circuits to a system of 20 Chua's circuits to study two types of quorum transitions: the emergence and the extinction of global oscillations (period-1). The numerics involving up to 100 Chua's circuits validate the experimental observations.

  15. Static aeroelastic analysis of a three-dimensional generic wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, John A.; Lee, IN; Miura, Hirokazu

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of research on the static aeroelastic analysis of a generic wing configuration is presented. Results of the study of the asymmetric oblique wing model developed by Rockwell International, in conjunction with the NASA Oblique Wing Research Aircraft Program, are reported. The capability to perform static aeroelastic analyses of an oblique wing at arbitrary skew positions is demonstrated by applying the MSC/NASTRAN static analysis scheme modified by the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix created by the NASA Ames aerodynamic panel codes. The oblique wing is studied at two skew angles, and in particular, the capability to calculate 3-D thickness effects on the aerodynamic properties of the wing is investigated. The ability to model asymmetric wings in both subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers is shown. The aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix computed by the external programs is inserted in MSC/NASTRAN static aeroelasticity analysis run stream to compute the aeroelastic deformation and internal forces. Various aerodynamic coefficients of the oblique wing were computed for two Mach numbers, 0.7 and 1.4, and the angle of attach -5 through 15 deg.

  16. Static and Dynamic Moduli of Malm Carbonate: A Poroelastic Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadegan, Alireza; Guérizec, Romain; Reinsch, Thomas; Blöcher, Guido; Zimmermann, Günter; Milsch, Harald

    2016-08-01

    The static and poroelastic moduli of a porous rock, e.g., the drained bulk modulus, can be derived from stress-strain curves in rock mechanical tests, and the dynamic moduli, e.g., dynamic Poisson's ratio, can be determined by acoustic velocity and bulk density measurements. As static and dynamic elastic moduli are different, a correlation is often required to populate geomechanical models. A novel poroelastic approach is introduced to correlate static and dynamic bulk moduli of outcrop analogues samples, representative of Upper-Malm reservoir rock in the Molasse basin, southwestern Germany. Drained and unjacketed poroelastic experiments were performed at two different temperature levels (30 and 60°C). For correlating the static and dynamic elastic moduli, a drained acoustic velocity ratio is introduced, corresponding to the drained Poisson's ratio in poroelasticity. The strength of poroelastic coupling, i.e., the product of Biot and Skempton coefficients here, was the key parameter. The value of this parameter decreased with increasing effective pressure by about 56 ~% from 0.51 at 3 MPa to 0.22 at 73 MPa. In contrast, the maximum change in P- and S-wave velocities was only 3 % in this pressure range. This correlation approach can be used in characterizing underground reservoirs, and can be employed to relate seismicity and geomechanics (seismo-mechanics).

  17. Quorum sensing via static coupling demonstrated by Chua's circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harpartap; Parmananda, P.

    2013-10-01

    Dynamical quorum sensing, the population based phenomenon, is believed to occur when the elements of a system interact via dynamic coupling. In the present work, we demonstrate an alternate scenario, involving static coupling, that could also lead to quorum sensing behavior. These static and dynamic coupling terms have already been employed by Konishi [Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos Appl. Sci. Eng.IJBEE40218-127410.1142/S0218127407018750 17, 2781 (2007)]. In our context, the coupling is defined as static or dynamic, on the basis of the relative time scales at which the surrounding dynamics and the elements' dynamics evolve. According to this, if the variation in the surrounding dynamics happens on a much larger (fast) time scale than that at which the elements' dynamics are varying (such as seconds and μs), then the coupling is considered to be static, otherwise it is considered to be dynamic. A series of experiments have been performed starting from a system of three Chua's circuits to a system of 20 Chua's circuits to study two types of quorum transitions: the emergence and the extinction of global oscillations (period-1). The numerics involving up to 100 Chua's circuits validate the experimental observations.

  18. Modeling of Long-Range Atmospheric Lasercom Links Between Static and Mobile Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T; Breitfeller, E F; Henderson, J R; Kallman, J S; Morris, J R; Ruggiero, A J

    2003-07-29

    We describe modeling and simulation of long-range terrestrial laser communications links between static and mobile platforms. Atmospheric turbulence modeling, along with pointing, tracking and acquisition models are combined to provide an overall capability to estimate communications link performance.

  19. Interpretational conflicts between the static and non-static forms of the de Sitter metric.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Abhas

    2012-01-01

    The de-Sitter metric is a special form of the non-static Friedmann metric, and appears to be genuinely non-static since it describes the initial exponential expansion of the Big Bang universe. However, the de Sitter metric appears to be perfectly static in the Schwarzschild frame where the vacuum fluid is supposed to be in motion. Here we highlight the conflicts between the static and non-static versions of the de-Sitter metric from a physical perspective. In particular, while the "Principle of Energy Conservation" is honored in one case, the same is badly violated for the other. However, we offer a partial resolution of such conflicts by deriving the static de Sitter metric by solving the relevant field equations. It is seen that, it is the very special vacuum equation of state pressure = -density which results in the static form even when the vacuum fluid is supposed to be in motion. PMID:23213359

  20. Aftershocks halted by static stress shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Shinji; Stein, Ross S.; Beroza, Gregory C.; Marsan, David

    2012-06-01

    Earthquakes impart static and dynamic stress changes to the surrounding crust. Sudden fault slip causes small but permanent--static--stress changes, and passing seismic waves cause large, but brief and oscillatory--dynamic--stress changes. Because both static and dynamic stresses can trigger earthquakes within several rupture dimensions of a mainshock, it has proven difficult to disentangle their contributions to the triggering process. However, only dynamic stress can trigger earthquakes far from the source, and only static stress can create stress shadows, where the stress and thus the seismicity rate in the shadow area drops following an earthquake. Here we calculate the stress imparted by the magnitude 6.1 Joshua Tree and nearby magnitude 7.3 Landers earthquakes that occurred in California in April and June 1992, respectively, and measure seismicity through time. We show that, where the aftershock zone of the first earthquake was subjected to a static stress increase from the second, the seismicity rate jumped. In contrast, where the aftershock zone of the first earthquake fell under the stress shadow of the second and static stress dropped, seismicity shut down. The arrest of seismicity implies that static stress is a requisite element of spatial clustering of large earthquakes and should be a constituent of hazard assessment.

  1. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  2. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure...

  3. Cooperation among Wirelessly Connected Static and Mobile Sensor Nodes for Surveillance Applications

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Edison Pignaton; Heimfarth, Tales; Vinel, Alexey; Wagner, Flávio Rech; Pereira, Carlos Eduardo; Larsson, Tony

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a bio-inspired networking strategy to support the cooperation between static sensors on the ground and mobile sensors in the air to perform surveillance missions in large areas. The goal of the proposal is to provide low overhead in the communication among sensor nodes, while allocating the mobile sensors to perform sensing activities requested by the static ones. Simulations have shown that the strategy is efficient in maintaining low overhead and achieving the desired coordination. PMID:24072028

  4. Quasi-Static Viscoelasticity Loading Measurements of an Aircraft Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Angela J.; Tanner, John A.; Johnson, Arthur R.

    1997-01-01

    Stair-step loading, cyclic loading, and long-term relaxation tests were performed on an aircraft tire to observe the quasi-static viscoelastic response of the tire. The data indicate that the tire continues to respond viscoelastically even after it has been softened by deformation. Load relaxation data from the stair-step test at the 15,000-lb loading was fit to a monotonically decreasing Prony series.

  5. Delaminations in composite plates under transverse static loads - Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; He, Yi-Fei; Springer, George S.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed measuring the damage initiation loads and the locations, shapes, and sizes of delaminations in Fiberite T300/976 graphite/epoxy, Fiberite IM7/977-2 graphite-toughened epoxy, and ICI APC-2 graphite-PEEK plates subjected to transverse static loads. The data were compared to the results of the Finn-Springer model, and good agreements were found between the measured and calculated delamination lengths and widths.

  6. Delaminations in composite plates under transverse static loads - Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Scott R.; He, Yi-Fei; Springer, George S.

    1992-11-01

    Tests were performed measuring the damage initiation loads and the locations, shapes, and sizes of delaminations in Fiberite T300/976 graphite/epoxy, Fiberite IM7/977-2 graphite-toughened epoxy, and ICI APC-2 graphite-PEEK plates subjected to transverse static loads. The data were compared to the results of the Finn-Springer model, and good agreements were found between the measured and calculated delamination lengths and widths.

  7. Static conversion systems. [for space power reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewell, R.; Mondt, J.

    1985-01-01

    Historically, all space power systems that have actually flown in space have relied on static energy conversion technology. Thus, static conversion is being considered for space nuclear power systems as well. There are four potential static conversion technologies which should be considered. These include: the alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC), the thermionic converter, the thermoelectric converter, and the thermophotovoltaic converter (TPV). These four conversion technologies will be described in brief detail along with their current status and development needs. In addition, the systems implications of using each of these conversion technologies with a space nuclear reactor power system will be evaluated and some comparisons made.

  8. Analytic three-loop static potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Roman N.; Smirnov, Alexander V.; Smirnov, Vladimir A.; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    We present analytic results for the three-loop static potential of two heavy quarks. The analytic calculation of the missing ingredients is outlined, and results for the singlet and octet potential are provided.

  9. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided...

  10. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided...

  11. Teaching Comparative Statics with Microsoft Excel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreto, Humberto

    2001-01-01

    Describes a Web site that makes use of the Comparative Statics Wizard add-in feature for Microsoft Excel. Enables students to focus on economic problems involving optimality, rate of change, and equilibrium solutions. (JEH)

  12. Vacuum static non-spherical GR equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbanovski, V. V.; Beloushko, K. E.; Markov, V. N.; Kairov, T. V.; Melehina, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    The vacuum static non-spherical equations are considered. The new solutions, which not contain in class of the Schwarzschild-like metrics and also its generalization are obtain. The perspectives for further investigations are discussed.

  13. Reducing static charges in fluidized bed reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Ballou, E. V.; Wood, P. C.; Spitze, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    Radio frequency glow discharge apparatus ionizes fluidizing gas, making it conductive enough to neutralize static charge on fluidized particles. Particles agglomerate less, and in one case reactant loading capacity was increased six fold.

  14. Static solutions for fourth order gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William

    2010-11-15

    The Lichnerowicz and Israel theorems are extended to higher order theories of gravity. In particular it is shown that Schwarzschild is the unique spherically symmetric, static, asymptotically flat, black-hole solution, provided the spatial curvature is less than the quantum gravity scale outside the horizon. It is then shown that in the presence of matter (satisfying certain positivity requirements), the only static and asymptotically flat solutions of general relativity that are also solutions of higher order gravity are the vacuum solutions.

  15. Development of a static feed water electrolysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Lantz, J. B.; Hallick, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    A one person level oxygen generation subsystem was developed and production of the one person oxygen metabolic requirements, 0.82 kg, per day was demonstrated without the need for condenser/separators or electrolyte pumps. During 650 hours of shakedown, design verification, and endurance testing, cell voltages averaged 1.62 V at 206 mA/sq cm and at average operating temperature as low as 326 K, virtually corresponding to the state of the art performance previously established for single cells. This high efficiency and low waste heat generation prevented maintenance of the 339 K design temperature without supplemental heating. Improved water electrolysis cell frames were designed, new injection molds were fabricated, and a series of frames was molded. A modified three fluid pressure controller was developed and a static feed water electrolysis that requires no electrolyte in the static feed compartment was developed and successfully evaluated.

  16. Matlab Stability and Control Toolbox: Trim and Static Stability Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the technical background of the Trim and Static module of the Matlab Stability and Control Toolbox. This module performs a low-fidelity stability and control assessment of an aircraft model for a set of flight critical conditions. This is attained by determining if the control authority available for trim is sufficient and if the static stability characteristics are adequate. These conditions can be selected from a prescribed set or can be specified to meet particular requirements. The prescribed set of conditions includes horizontal flight, take-off rotation, landing flare, steady roll, steady turn and pull-up/ push-over flight, for which several operating conditions can be specified. A mathematical model was developed allowing for six-dimensional trim, adjustable inertial properties, asymmetric vehicle layouts, arbitrary number of engines, multi-axial thrust vectoring, engine(s)-out conditions, crosswind and gyroscopic effects.

  17. Anisotropic energy transfers in quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K. Sandeep; Kumar, Raghwendra; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2014-10-15

    We perform direct numerical simulations of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and compute various energy transfers including the ring-to-ring and conical energy transfers, and the energy fluxes of the perpendicular and parallel components of the velocity field. We show that the rings with higher polar angles transfer energy to ones with lower polar angles. For large interaction parameters, the dominant energy transfer takes place near the equator (polar angle θ≈(π)/2 ). The energy transfers are local both in wavenumbers and angles. The energy flux of the perpendicular component is predominantly from higher to lower wavenumbers (inverse cascade of energy), while that of the parallel component is from lower to higher wavenumbers (forward cascade of energy). Our results are consistent with earlier results, which indicate quasi two-dimensionalization of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic flows at high interaction parameters.

  18. Static and rotational output variation of a tomotherapy unit

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, Pascal; Mazal, Alejandro

    2009-03-15

    A simple device to check the machine output in rotational mode is described. Integral and instantaneous beam output in absolute dose can be measured and analyzed in a very simple manner. A method to correlate the results with the value obtained during the machine calibration in static beam and the reference value used by the treatment planning system for dose calculation in rotation beam is also described. Using this method and device, the daily output can be performed in rotational conditions which are closer to the treatment conditions. Measurement results using this device show differences in the beam output between static and rotational delivery which have to be considered carefully during the calibration process.

  19. Wide-Grasp Latching Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesmith, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    Fingers capture and clamp without accurate positioning. Fully open position, fingers encompass large envelope. When activated by rack and pinion, fingertips move together, thereby grasping object within envelope.

  20. Helmet latching and attaching ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, E. W.; Viikinsalo, S. J. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A neck ring releasably secured to a pressurized garment carries an open-ended ring normally in the engagement position fitted into an annular groove and adapted to fit into a complementary annular groove formed in a helmet. Camming means formed on the inner surface at the end of the helmet engages the open-ended ring to retract the same and allow for one motion donning even when the garment is pressurized. A projection on the end of the split ring is engageable to physically retract the split ring.

  1. Evaluation of static and dynamic perfusion cardiac computed tomography for quantitation and classification tasks.

    PubMed

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R; La Riviere, Patrick J; Alessio, Adam M

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. Either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including (1) stratifying patients into categories of ischemia and (2) using a quantitative myocardial blood flow (MBF) estimate to evaluate disease severity. In this simulation study, we compare method performance on these classification and quantification tasks for matched radiation dose levels and for different flow states, patient sizes, and injected contrast levels. Under conditions simulated, the dynamic method has low bias in MBF estimates (0 to [Formula: see text]) compared to linearly interpreted static assessment (0.45 to [Formula: see text]), making it more suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, had superior performance ([Formula: see text]) in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients and lower contrast doses [area under the curve [Formula: see text] to 96 versus 0.86]. We also demonstrate that static assessment with a correctly tuned exponential relationship between the apparent CT number and MBF has superior quantification performance to static assessment with a linear relationship and to dynamic assessment. However, tuning the exponential relationship to the patient and scan characteristics will likely prove challenging. This study demonstrates that the selection and optimization of static or dynamic acquisition modes should depend on the specific clinical task.

  2. Visualization study on the static flow field around a straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Tagawa, Kotaro

    2010-03-01

    Visual experiments based on the smoke wire way were carried out on a small model of Straight-blade Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (SB-VAWT) to invest the relationship between the static flow field characteristics and the rotor azimuth angle. The test rotor had 3 blades with NACA0018 aerofoil. The rotor diameter and blade chord were 0.3m and 0.07m, respectively. Visual photos of the static flow path lines in and around the rotor were obtained at every 5 degrees of the azimuth angle. Further, numerical computations of the static flow filed were also carried out for comparison with the same situation as the visual tests and the static torques at different azimuth angles were calculated. According to the results of visual tests and computations, the dependence of the starting performance on the azimuth angle was discussed. The solidity is an important factor affecting the starting performance of the SB-VAWT.

  3. Visualization study on the static flow field around a straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Tagawa, Kotaro

    2009-12-01

    Visual experiments based on the smoke wire way were carried out on a small model of Straight-blade Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (SB-VAWT) to invest the relationship between the static flow field characteristics and the rotor azimuth angle. The test rotor had 3 blades with NACA0018 aerofoil. The rotor diameter and blade chord were 0.3m and 0.07m, respectively. Visual photos of the static flow path lines in and around the rotor were obtained at every 5 degrees of the azimuth angle. Further, numerical computations of the static flow filed were also carried out for comparison with the same situation as the visual tests and the static torques at different azimuth angles were calculated. According to the results of visual tests and computations, the dependence of the starting performance on the azimuth angle was discussed. The solidity is an important factor affecting the starting performance of the SB-VAWT.

  4. Control law development for a close-coupled canard, relaxed static stability fighter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, R. W.; Lapins, M.; Martorella, R. P.; Sturm, M.

    1982-01-01

    The performance benefits to be gained from relaxed static stability (RSS) are illustrated for M = 0.9 and M = 2.0 flight conditions. The longitudinal, directional, and lateral control system structure is developed. The effect of static margin, bandwidth, and canard-wing interaction on canard rate requirements is analyzed. Control and maneuver limiter functions are developed and implemented about all three axes; simulation results strikingly demonstrate the concomitant improvement in energy management and improved resistance to departure and spin.

  5. Acceleration of a Static Observer Near the Event Horizon of a Static Isolated Black Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Noel A.

    1981-01-01

    Compares the magnitude of the proper acceleration of a static observer in a static, isolated, spherically symmetric space-time region with the Newtonian result including the situation in the interior of a perfect-fluid star. This provides a simple physical interpretation of surface gravity and illustrates the global nature of the event horizon.…

  6. A static investigation of several STOVL exhaust system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, B. M., Jr.; Meyer, B. E.; Re, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    A static cold flow scale model test was performed in order to determine the internal performance characteristics of various STOVL exhaust systems. All of the concepts considered included a vectorable cruise nozzle and a separate vectorable vertical thrust ventral nozzle mounted on the tailpipe. The two ventral nozzle configurations tested featured vectorable constant thickness cascade vanes for area control and improved performance during transition and vertical lift flight. The best transition performance was achieved using a butterfly door type ventral nozzle and a pitch vectoring 2DCD or axisymmetric cruise nozzle. The clamshell blocker type of ventral nozzle had reduced transition performance due to the choking of the tailpipe flow upstream of the cruise nozzle.

  7. Cardiovascular response to static contraction in borderline hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seals, D R; Hanson, P G; Washburn, R A; Painter, P L; Ward, A; Nagle, F J

    1985-06-01

    Nine young males with borderline hypertension (BH) (mean age +/- SD, 25 +/- 5 yr) and 13 young male normotensive controls (NT) (24 +/- 3 yr) were studied to determine their cardiovascular responses to small and large muscle static contractions. The subjects performed one-arm handgrip and two-leg extension in a randomly assigned order for 3 min at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction. Mean intra-arterial blood pressure (MABP), heart rate (HR), and tension were measured throughout the contractions. Borderline hypertensive patients had a higher MABP at rest (p less than 0.005) and at the end of both types of static contractions (p less than 0.05). The average increases in MABP from rest to the end of exercise (delta MABP) were slightly greater for the BH patients (6 mmHg), but these differences were not significant (p greater than 0.1). However, a greater percentage of BH patients were hyperreactive to handgrip (delta BP greater than 35 mmHg) and leg extension (delta BP greater than 40 mmHg) when compared to controls. These data indicate that, in general, young men with borderline hypertension demonstrate normal cardiovascular regulation in response to static contraction, but that a portion of this population may be hyperreactive to this type of circulatory stress.

  8. Longitudinal static stability requirements for wing in ground effect vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhigang; Collu, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    The issue of the longitudinal stability of a WIG vehicle has been a very critical design factor since the first experimental WIG vehicle has been built. A series of studies had been performed and focused on the longitudinal stability analysis. However, most studies focused on the longitudinal stability of WIG vehicle in cruise phase, and less is available on the longitudinal static stability requirement of WIG vehicle when hydrodynamics are considered: WIG vehicle usually take off from water. The present work focuses on stability requirement for longitudinal motion from taking off to landing. The model of dynamics for a WIG vehicle was developed taking into account the aerodynamic, hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces, and then was analyzed. Following with the longitudinal static stability analysis, effect of hydrofoil was discussed. Locations of CG, aerodynamic center in pitch, aerodynamic center in height and hydrodynamic center in heave were illustrated for a stabilized WIG vehicle. The present work will further improve the longitudinal static stability theory for WIG vehicle.

  9. A cumulant functional for static and dynamic correlation.

    PubMed

    Hollett, Joshua W; Hosseini, Hessam; Menzies, Cameron

    2016-08-28

    A functional for the cumulant energy is introduced. The functional is composed of a pair-correction and static and dynamic correlation energy components. The pair-correction and static correlation energies are functionals of the natural orbitals and the occupancy transferred between near-degenerate orbital pairs, rather than the orbital occupancies themselves. The dynamic correlation energy is a functional of the statically correlated on-top two-electron density. The on-top density functional used in this study is the well-known Colle-Salvetti functional. Using the cc-pVTZ basis set, the functional effectively models the bond dissociation of H2, LiH, and N2 with equilibrium bond lengths and dissociation energies comparable to those provided by multireference second-order perturbation theory. The performance of the cumulant functional is less impressive for HF and F2, mainly due to an underestimation of the dynamic correlation energy by the Colle-Salvetti functional. PMID:27586903

  10. A Model for Static and Dry Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Christopher

    2005-03-01

    It will be shown that the Muser-Robbins (MR) model, consisting of mobile molecules trapped between two incommensurate crystalline solids, exhibits many of the qualitative features of friction between macroscopic solids, such as the result that the static friction is greater than the kinetic friction, stick-slip motion and a force of static friction which increases as a function of the time that the two solids are in contact and stationary. At zero temperature, the kinetic friction is highly sensitive to the direction of sliding, but this sensitivity decreases markedly as the temperature rises. At low temperatures (with the surfaces stationary for a relatively long time), the model gives a static friction approximately 3 times larger than the kinetic friction for sufficiently slow velocities, but this ratio decreases steadily as the temperature is increased.

  11. Thermal static bending of deployable interlocked booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staugaitis, C. L.; Predmore, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Metal ribbons processed with a heat-forming treatment are enabled to form tubelike structures when deployed from a roll. Deployable booms of this have been utilized for gravity-gradient stabilization on the RAE, ATS, and Nimbus D satellites. An experimental thermal-mechanics test apparatus was developed to measure the thermal static bending and twist of booms up to 3 meters long. The apparatus was calibrated by using the correlation between calculated and observed thermal bending of a seamless tube. Thermal static bending values of 16 interlocked deployable booms were observed to be within a factor of 2.5 of the values calculated from seamless-tube theory. Out-of-Sun-plane thermal bending was caused by complex heat transfer across the interlocked seam. Significant thermal static twisting was not observed.

  12. Acute effect of static stretching on power output during concentric dynamic constant external resistance leg extension.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Taichi; Ishii, Kojiro; Yamanaka, Masanori; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the effect of static stretching on muscular performance during concentric isotonic (dynamic constant external resistance [DCER]) muscle actions under various loads. Concentric DCER leg extension power outputs were assessed in 12 healthy male subjects after 2 types of pretreatment. The pretreatments included (a) static stretching treatment performing 6 types of static stretching on leg extensors (4 sets of 30 seconds each with 20-second rest periods; total duration 20 minutes) and (b) nonstretching treatment by resting for 20 minutes in a sitting position. Loads during assessment of the power output were set to 5, 30, and 60% of the maximum voluntary contractile (MVC) torque with isometric leg extension in each subject. The peak power output following the static stretching treatment was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than that following the nonstretching treatment under each load (5% MVC, 418.0 +/- 82.2 W vs. 466.2 +/- 89.5 W; 30% MVC, 506.4 +/- 82.8 W vs. 536.4 +/- 97.0 W; 60% MVC, 478.6 +/- 77.5 W vs. 523.8 +/- 97.8 W). The present study demonstrated that relatively extensive static stretching significantly reduces power output with concentric DCER muscle actions under various loads. Common power activities are carried out by DCER muscle actions under various loads. Therefore, the result of the present study suggests that relatively extensive static stretching decreases power performance.

  13. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case... except as noted in paragraph (b)(3) of this section. (b) If a static pressure system is necessary for...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case... except as noted in paragraph (b)(3) of this section. (b) If a static pressure system is necessary for...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case... except as noted in paragraph (b)(3) of this section. (b) If a static pressure system is necessary for...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case... except as noted in paragraph (b)(3) of this section. (b) If a static pressure system is necessary for...

  17. 30 CFR 57.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6602 Static electricity dissipation... generates a static electricity hazard— (a) An evaluation of the potential static electricity hazard shall...

  18. 30 CFR 57.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6602 Static electricity dissipation... generates a static electricity hazard— (a) An evaluation of the potential static electricity hazard shall...

  19. 30 CFR 57.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6602 Static electricity dissipation... generates a static electricity hazard— (a) An evaluation of the potential static electricity hazard shall...

  20. 30 CFR 57.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6602 Static electricity dissipation... generates a static electricity hazard— (a) An evaluation of the potential static electricity hazard shall...

  1. 30 CFR 57.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6602 Static electricity dissipation... generates a static electricity hazard— (a) An evaluation of the potential static electricity hazard shall...

  2. A foundational methodology for determining system static complexity using notional lunar oxygen production processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Nicholas James

    This thesis serves to develop a preliminary foundational methodology for evaluating the static complexity of future lunar oxygen production systems when extensive information is not yet available about the various systems under consideration. Evaluating static complexity, as part of a overall system complexity analysis, is an important consideration in ultimately selecting a process to be used in a lunar base. When system complexity is higher, there is generally an overall increase in risk which could impact the safety of astronauts and the economic performance of the mission. To evaluate static complexity in lunar oxygen production, static complexity is simplified and defined into its essential components. First, three essential dimensions of static complexity are investigated, including interconnective complexity, strength of connections, and complexity in variety. Then a set of methods is developed upon which to separately evaluate each dimension. Q-connectivity analysis is proposed as a means to evaluate interconnective complexity and strength of connections. The law of requisite variety originating from cybernetic theory is suggested to interpret complexity in variety. Secondly, a means to aggregate the results of each analysis is proposed to create holistic measurement for static complexity using the Single Multi-Attribute Ranking Technique (SMART). Each method of static complexity analysis and the aggregation technique is demonstrated using notional data for four lunar oxygen production processes.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, C. LEE COOK DIVISION, DOVER CORPORATION, STATIC PAC (TM) SYSTEM, PHASE II REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Static Pac System, Phase II, natural gas reciprocating compressor rod packing manufactured by the C. Lee Cook Division, Dover Corporation. The Static Pac System is designed to seal th...

  4. GPS and Glonass Combined Static Precise Point Positioning (ppp)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, D.; Dwivedi, R.; Dikshit, O.; Singh, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs), satellite navigation is undergoing drastic changes. Presently, more than 70 satellites are already available and nearly 120 more satellites will be available in the coming years after the achievement of complete constellation for all four systems- GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou. The significant improvement in terms of satellite visibility, spatial geometry, dilution of precision and accuracy demands the utilization of combining multi-GNSS for Precise Point Positioning (PPP), especially in constrained environments. Currently, PPP is performed based on the processing of only GPS observations. Static and kinematic PPP solutions based on the processing of only GPS observations is limited by the satellite visibility, which is often insufficient for the mountainous and open pit mines areas. One of the easiest options available to enhance the positioning reliability is to integrate GPS and GLONASS observations. This research investigates the efficacy of combining GPS and GLONASS observations for achieving static PPP solution and its sensitivity to different processing methodology. Two static PPP solutions, namely standalone GPS and combined GPS-GLONASS solutions are compared. The datasets are processed using the open source GNSS processing environment gLAB 2.2.7 as well as magicGNSS software package. The results reveal that the addition of GLONASS observations improves the static positioning accuracy in comparison with the standalone GPS point positioning. Further, results show that there is an improvement in the three dimensional positioning accuracy. It is also shown that the addition of GLONASS constellation improves the total number of visible satellites by more than 60% which leads to the improvement of satellite geometry represented by Position Dilution of Precision (PDOP) by more than 30%.

  5. Transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Antonio; Mordillo-Mateos, Laura; Arias, Pablo; Panyavin, Ivan; Foffani, Guglielmo; Aguilar, Juan

    2011-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate in healthy humans the possibility of a non-invasive modulation of motor cortex excitability by the application of static magnetic fields through the scalp. Static magnetic fields were obtained by using cylindrical NdFeB magnets. We performed four sets of experiments. In Experiment 1, we recorded motor potentials evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex before and after 10 min of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) in conscious subjects. We observed an average reduction of motor cortex excitability of up to 25%, as revealed by TMS, which lasted for several minutes after the end of tSMS, and was dose dependent (intensity of the magnetic field) but not polarity dependent. In Experiment 2, we confirmed the reduction of motor cortex excitability induced by tSMS using a double-blind sham-controlled design. In Experiment 3, we investigated the duration of tSMS that was necessary to modulate motor cortex excitability. We found that 10 min of tSMS (compared to 1 min and 5 min) were necessary to induce significant effects. In Experiment 4, we used transcranial electric stimulation (TES) to establish that the tSMS-induced reduction of motor cortex excitability was not due to corticospinal axon and/or spinal excitability, but specifically involved intracortical networks. These results suggest that tSMS using small static magnets may be a promising tool to modulate cerebral excitability in a non-invasive, painless, and reversible way.

  6. Transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Antonio; Mordillo-Mateos, Laura; Arias, Pablo; Panyavin, Ivan; Foffani, Guglielmo; Aguilar, Juan

    2011-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate in healthy humans the possibility of a non-invasive modulation of motor cortex excitability by the application of static magnetic fields through the scalp. Static magnetic fields were obtained by using cylindrical NdFeB magnets. We performed four sets of experiments. In Experiment 1, we recorded motor potentials evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex before and after 10 min of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) in conscious subjects. We observed an average reduction of motor cortex excitability of up to 25%, as revealed by TMS, which lasted for several minutes after the end of tSMS, and was dose dependent (intensity of the magnetic field) but not polarity dependent. In Experiment 2, we confirmed the reduction of motor cortex excitability induced by tSMS using a double-blind sham-controlled design. In Experiment 3, we investigated the duration of tSMS that was necessary to modulate motor cortex excitability. We found that 10 min of tSMS (compared to 1 min and 5 min) were necessary to induce significant effects. In Experiment 4, we used transcranial electric stimulation (TES) to establish that the tSMS-induced reduction of motor cortex excitability was not due to corticospinal axon and/or spinal excitability, but specifically involved intracortical networks. These results suggest that tSMS using small static magnets may be a promising tool to modulate cerebral excitability in a non-invasive, painless, and reversible way. PMID:21807616

  7. Earthquake triggering by transient and static deformations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Beeler, N.M.; Blanpied, M.L.; Bodin, P.

    1998-01-01

    Observational evidence for both static and transient near-field and far-field triggered seismicity are explained in terms of a frictional instability model, based on a single degree of freedom spring-slider system and rate- and state-dependent frictional constitutive equations. In this study a triggered earthquake is one whose failure time has been advanced by ??t (clock advance) due to a stress perturbation. Triggering stress perturbations considered include square-wave transients and step functions, analogous to seismic waves and coseismic static stress changes, respectively. Perturbations are superimposed on a constant background stressing rate which represents the tectonic stressing rate. The normal stress is assumed to be constant. Approximate, closed-form solutions of the rate-and-state equations are derived for these triggering and background loads, building on the work of Dieterich [1992, 1994]. These solutions can be used to simulate the effects of static and transient stresses as a function of amplitude, onset time t0, and in the case of square waves, duration. The accuracies of the approximate closed-form solutions are also evaluated with respect to the full numerical solution and t0. The approximate solutions underpredict the full solutions, although the difference decreases as t0, approaches the end of the earthquake cycle. The relationship between ??t and t0 differs for transient and static loads: a static stress step imposed late in the cycle causes less clock advance than an equal step imposed earlier, whereas a later applied transient causes greater clock advance than an equal one imposed earlier. For equal ??t, transient amplitudes must be greater than static loads by factors of several tens to hundreds depending on t0. We show that the rate-and-state model requires that the total slip at failure is a constant, regardless of the loading history. Thus a static load applied early in the cycle, or a transient applied at any time, reduces the stress

  8. Interpretational conflicts between the static and non-static forms of the de Sitter metric

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Abhas

    2012-01-01

    The de-Sitter metric is a special form of the non-static Friedmann metric, and appears to be genuinely non-static since it describes the initial exponential expansion of the Big Bang universe. However, the de Sitter metric appears to be perfectly static in the Schwarzschild frame where the vacuum fluid is supposed to be in motion. Here we highlight the conflicts between the static and non-static versions of the de-Sitter metric from a physical perspective. In particular, while the “Principle of Energy Conservation” is honored in one case, the same is badly violated for the other. However, we offer a partial resolution of such conflicts by deriving the static de Sitter metric by solving the relevant field equations. It is seen that, it is the very special vacuum equation of state pressure = –density which results in the static form even when the vacuum fluid is supposed to be in motion. PMID:23213359

  9. Effects of insoles contact on static balance.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ju Yong; Ryu, Young Uk; Yi, Chae Woo

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effect of the degree of the contact area between the insoles and soles on static balance. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male and female adults voluntarily participated. All of the subjects wore three different types of insoles (no orthotic insole, partial contact, full contact) in the present experiment. The subjects were instructed to place both feet parallel to each other and maintain static balance for 30 seconds. Center of pressure parameters (range, total distance, and mean velocity) were analyzed. [Results] The results show that the anteroposterior range and mediolateral (ML) total distance and velocity decreased when orthotic insoles with partial contact or full contact were used in comparison to when a flat insole (no orthotic insole) was used. Also, the ML range and total distance were lower with full contact than in the other two conditions. These results indicate that static balance improves as the degree of contact between the soles and insoles increases. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggests that using insoles with increased sole contact area would improve static balance ability.

  10. Effects of insoles contact on static balance

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ju Yong; Ryu, Young Uk; Yi, Chae Woo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effect of the degree of the contact area between the insoles and soles on static balance. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male and female adults voluntarily participated. All of the subjects wore three different types of insoles (no orthotic insole, partial contact, full contact) in the present experiment. The subjects were instructed to place both feet parallel to each other and maintain static balance for 30 seconds. Center of pressure parameters (range, total distance, and mean velocity) were analyzed. [Results] The results show that the anteroposterior range and mediolateral (ML) total distance and velocity decreased when orthotic insoles with partial contact or full contact were used in comparison to when a flat insole (no orthotic insole) was used. Also, the ML range and total distance were lower with full contact than in the other two conditions. These results indicate that static balance improves as the degree of contact between the soles and insoles increases. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggests that using insoles with increased sole contact area would improve static balance ability. PMID:27190460

  11. Hard thermal loops in static external fields

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, J.; Takahashi, N.; Pereira, S. H.

    2009-04-15

    We examine, in the imaginary-time formalism, the high temperature behavior of n-point thermal loops in static Yang-Mills and gravitational fields. We show that in this regime, any hard thermal loop gives the same leading contribution as the one obtained by evaluating the loop integral at zero external energies and momenta.

  12. Static & Dynamic Response of 3D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE3D is a large deformations 3D finite element code used to obtain the resulting displacements and stresses from multi-body static and dynamic structural thermo-mechanics problems with sliding interfaces. Many nonlinear and temperature dependent constitutive models are available.

  13. A study of static stability of airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzo, Frank

    1924-01-01

    The first section deals with the theoretical side of statical stability of airships in general. The second section deals with preliminary tests of the model and experiments for the determination of effects due to change of tail area, aspect ratio, tail form, and tail thickness.

  14. Onthe static and spherically symmetric gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, Ioan; Maftei, Gheorghe; Mociutchi, Cleopatra

    Starting from a generalization of Einstein 's theory of gravitation, proposed by one of the authors (Cleopatra Mociutchi), the authors study a particular spherical symmetric case. Among other one obtain the compatibility conditions for the existence of the static and spherically symmetruic gravitational filed in the case of extended Einstein equation.

  15. Static Abstractions and the Teaching of Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Robert J.

    The element of static abstractions (SAs)--any pseudoheuristic listing of derived nominals whose purpose is to define good structure in prose writing--is one of the important historical components of the current traditional rhetoric inherited from the nineteenth century. SAs, of which unity, coherence, and emphasis are the best known examples, have…

  16. Static and evolutionary quantum public goods games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Qin, Gan; Hu, Lingzhi; Li, Songjian; Xu, Nanyang; Du, Jiangfeng

    2008-05-01

    We apply the continuous-variable quantization scheme to quantize public goods game and find that new pure strategy Nash equilibria emerge in the static case. Furthermore, in the evolutionary public goods game, entanglement can also contribute to the persistence of cooperation under various population structures without altruism, voluntary participation, and punishment.

  17. Matching a static cylindrically symmetric elastic spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, I.; Carot, J.; Mena, F. C.; Vaz, E. G. L. R.

    2012-07-01

    We consider a static cylindrically symmetric spacetime with elastic matter and study the matching problem of this spacetime with a suitable exterior. For the exterior, we take the Levi-Civita spacetime and its generalization including a cosmological constant, the Linet-Tian spacetime. We show that the matching is only possible with the Linet-Tian solution.

  18. INTRODUCTION AND STATIC ELECTRICITY, VOLUME 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME, PART OF A TWO-VOLUME SET, PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE MATERIAL COVERS UNITS ON (1) STATIC ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRICAL CHARGES, (2) COULOMB'S LAW, (3) DISTRIBUTION OF CHARGE AND FLOW OF CURRENT, (4) DIFFERENCE OF POTENTIAL, (5) BATTERIES AND CIRCUITS, (6) RESISTANCE AND RESISTORS, (7) POTENTIAL DIVIDER AND WHEATSTONE…

  19. Static black hole uniqueness and Penrose inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Ryosuke; Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Ohashi, Seiju

    2010-02-15

    Under certain conditions, we offer a new way to prove the uniqueness of the static black hole in higher dimensional asymptotically flat spacetimes. In the proof, the Penrose inequality plays a key role in higher dimensions as well as four dimensions.

  20. A Progression of Static Equilibrium Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutzner, Mickey; Kutzner, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Although simple architectural structures like bridges, catwalks, cantilevers, and Stonehenge have been integral in human societies for millennia, as have levers and other simple tools, modern students of introductory physics continue to grapple with Newton's conditions for static equilibrium. As formulated in typical introductory physics…

  1. A note on static dyonic diholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Compeán, H.; Manko, V. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this brief note we argue that a dyonic generalization of the Emparan-Teo dihole solution is described by a static diagonal metric and therefore, contrary to the claim made in a recent paper by Cabrera-Munguia et al., does not involve any "non-vanishing global angular momentum" and rotating charges.

  2. Cardiorespiratory deconditioning with static and dynamic leg exercise during bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stremel, R. W.; Convertino, V. A.; Bernauer, E. M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study designed to compare the effects of heavy static and dynamic exercise training during 14 days of bed rest on the cardiorespiratory responses to submaximal and maximal exercise performed by seven healthy men aged 19-22 yr. The parameters measured were submaximal and maximal oxygen uptake, minute ventilation, heart rate, and plasma volume. The results indicate that exercise alone during bed rest reduces but does not eliminate the reduction in maximal oxygen uptake. An additional positive hydrostatic effect is therefore necessary to restore maximal oxygen uptake to ambulatory control levels. The greater protective effect of static exercise on maximal oxygen uptake is probably due to a greater hydrostatic component from the isometric muscular contraction. Neither the static nor the dynamic exercise training regimes are found to minimize the changes in all the variables studied, thereby suggesting a combination of static and dynamic exercises.

  3. Classification of schizophrenia and bipolar patients using static and dynamic resting-state fMRI brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Barnaly; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R; Damaraju, Eswar; Cetin, Mustafa S; Miller, Robyn; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Calhoun, Vince D

    2016-07-01

    Recently, functional network connectivity (FNC, defined as the temporal correlation among spatially distant brain networks) has been used to examine the functional organization of brain networks in various psychiatric illnesses. Dynamic FNC is a recent extension of the conventional FNC analysis that takes into account FNC changes over short periods of time. While such dynamic FNC measures may be more informative about various aspects of connectivity, there has been no detailed head-to-head comparison of the ability of static and dynamic FNC to perform classification in complex mental illnesses. This paper proposes a framework for automatic classification of schizophrenia, bipolar and healthy subjects based on their static and dynamic FNC features. Also, we compare cross-validated classification performance between static and dynamic FNC. Results show that the dynamic FNC significantly outperforms the static FNC in terms of predictive accuracy, indicating that features from dynamic FNC have distinct advantages over static FNC for classification purposes. Moreover, combining static and dynamic FNC features does not significantly improve the classification performance over the dynamic FNC features alone, suggesting that static FNC does not add any significant information when combined with dynamic FNC for classification purposes. A three-way classification methodology based on static and dynamic FNC features discriminates individual subjects into appropriate diagnostic groups with high accuracy. Our proposed classification framework is potentially applicable to additional mental disorders.

  4. A quasi-static polynomial nodal method for nuclear reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    Modern nodal methods are currently available which can accurately and efficiently solve the static and transient neutron diffusion equations. Most of the methods, however, are limited to two energy groups for practical application. The objective of this research is the development of a static and transient, multidimensional nodal method which allows more than two energy groups and uses a non-linear iterative method for efficient solution of the nodal equations. For both the static and transient methods, finite-difference equations which are corrected by the use of discontinuity factors are derived. The discontinuity factors are computed from a polynomial nodal method using a non-linear iteration technique. The polynomial nodal method is based upon a quartic approximation and utilizes a quadratic transverse-leakage approximation. The solution of the time-dependent equations is performed by the use of a quasi-static method in which the node-averaged fluxes are factored into shape and amplitude functions. The application of the quasi-static polynomial method to several benchmark problems demonstrates that the accuracy is consistent with that of other nodal methods. The use of the quasi-static method is shown to substantially reduce the computation time over the traditional fully-implicit time-integration method. Problems involving thermal-hydraulic feedback are accurately, and efficiently, solved by performing several reactivity/thermal-hydraulic updates per shape calculation.

  5. Static hyperspectral imaging polarimeter for full linear Stokes parameters.

    PubMed

    Mu, Tingkui; Zhang, Chunmin; Jia, Chenling; Ren, Wenyi

    2012-07-30

    A compact, static hyperspectral imaging linear polarimeter (HILP) based on a Savart interferometer (SI) is conceptually described. It improves the existing SI by replacing front polarizer with two Wollaston prisms, and can simultaneously acquire four interferograms corresponding to four linearly polarized lights on a single CCD. The spectral dependence of linear Stokes parameters can be recovered with Fourier transformation. Since there is no rotating or moving parts, the system is relatively robust. The interference model of the HILP is proved. The performance of the system is demonstrated through a numerical simulation, and the methods for compensating the imperfection of the polarization elements are described. PMID:23038368

  6. Diagnosing Intermittent and Persistent Faults using Static Bayesian Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megshoel, Ole Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Both intermittent and persistent faults may occur in a wide range of systems. We present in this paper the introduction of intermittent fault handling techniques into ProDiagnose, an algorithm that previously only handled persistent faults. We discuss novel algorithmic techniques as well as how our static Bayesian networks help diagnose, in an integrated manner, a range of intermittent and persistent faults. Through experiments with data from the ADAPT electrical power system test bed, generated as part of the Second International Diagnostic Competition (DXC-10), we show that this novel variant of ProDiagnose diagnoses intermittent faults accurately and quickly, while maintaining strong performance on persistent faults.

  7. Static and dynamic analyses of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Yoshitaka

    Tensegrity structures are a class of truss structures consisting of a continuous set of tension members (cables) and a discrete set of compression members (bars). Since tensegrity structures are light weight and can be compactly stowed and deployed, cylindrical tensegrity modules have been proposed for space structures. From a view point of structural dynamics, tensegrity structures pose a new set of problems, i.e., initial shape finding. Initial configurations of tensegrity structures must be computed by imposing a pre-stressability condition to initial equilibrium equations. There are ample qualitative statements regarding the initial geometry of cylindrical and spherical tensegrity modules. Quantitative initial shape anlyses have only been performed on one-stage and two-stage cylindrical modules. However, analytical expressions for important geometrical parameters such as twist angles and overlap ratios lack the definition of the initial shape of both cylindrical and spherical tensegrity modules. In response to the above needs, a set of static and dynamic characterization procedures for tensegrity modules was first developed. The procedures were subsequently applied to Buckminster Fuller's spherical tensegrity modules. Both the initial shape and the corresponding pre-stress mode were analytically obtained by using the graphs of the tetrahedral, octahedral (cubic), and icosahedral (dodecahedral) groups. For pre-stressed configurations, modal analyses were conducted to classify a large number of infinitesimal mechanism modes. The procedures also applied tocyclic cylindrical tensegrity modules with an arbitrary number of stages. It was found that both the Maxwell number and the number of infinitesimal mechanism modes are independent of the number of stages in the axial direction. A reduced set of equilibrium equations was derived by incorporating cyclic symmetry and the flip, or quasi-flip, symmetry of the cylindrical modules. For multi-stage modules with more than

  8. Comparison of Static and Dynamic Balance in Female Collegiate Soccer, Basketball, and Gymnastics Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Bressel, Eadric; Yonker, Joshua C; Kras, John; Heath, Edward M

    2007-01-01

    Context: How athletes from different sports perform on balance tests is not well understood. When prescribing balance exercises to athletes in different sports, it may be important to recognize performance variations. Objective: To compare static and dynamic balance among collegiate athletes competing or training in soccer, basketball, and gymnastics. Design: A quasi-experimental, between-groups design. Independent variables included limb (dominant and nondominant) and sport played. Setting: A university athletic training facility. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-four female volunteers who competed in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I soccer (n = 11), basketball (n = 11), or gymnastics (n = 12). Intervention(s): To assess static balance, participants performed 3 stance variations (double leg, single leg, and tandem leg) on 2 surfaces (stiff and compliant). For assessment of dynamic balance, participants performed multidirectional maximal single-leg reaches from a unilateral base of support. Main Outcome Measure(s): Errors from the Balance Error Scoring System and normalized leg reach distances from the Star Excursion Balance Test were used to assess static and dynamic balance, respectively. Results: Balance Error Scoring System error scores for the gymnastics group were 55% lower than for the basketball group (P = .01), and Star Excursion Balance Test scores were 7% higher in the soccer group than the basketball group (P = .04). Conclusions: Gymnasts and soccer players did not differ in terms of static and dynamic balance. In contrast, basketball players displayed inferior static balance compared with gymnasts and inferior dynamic balance compared with soccer players. PMID:17597942

  9. Static spherically symmetric wormholes with isotropic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Liempi, Luis; Rodríguez, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we study static spherically symmetric wormhole solutions sustained by matter sources with isotropic pressure. We show that such spherical wormholes do not exist in the framework of zero-tidal-force wormholes. On the other hand, it is shown that for the often used power-law shape function there are no spherically symmetric traversable wormholes sustained by sources with a linear equation of state p = ωρ for the isotropic pressure, independently of the form of the redshift function ϕ (r). We consider a solution obtained by Tolman at 1939 for describing static spheres of isotropic fluids, and show that it also may describe wormhole spacetimes with a power-law redshift function, which leads to a polynomial shape function, generalizing a power-law shape function, and inducing a solid angle deficit.

  10. Shock and Static Compression of Nitrobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozu, Naoshi; Arai, Mitsuru; Tamura, Masamitsu; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Yoshida, Masatake

    2000-08-01

    The Hugoniot and static compression curve (isotherm) were investigated using explosive plane wave generators and diamond anvil cells, respectively. The obtained Hugoniot from the shock experiments is represented by two linear lines: Us=2.52+1.23 up (0.8static high pressure over 7 GPa, nitrobenzene undergoes a reaction that is expected to be polymerization. Considering the Hugoniot and the isotherm, it is plausible that shocked nitrobenzene (<15 GPa) is in the liquid state.

  11. Static shear modulus of electrorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lihong; Tam, Wing Yim; Huang, Xianxiang; Sheng, Ping

    2006-05-01

    We report measurements of the static shear modulus of electrorheological (ER) fluids consisting of water-wetted silica microspheres in silicone oil. A shear-annealing method, using creep-recovery (CR) cycles under an external electric field, is used to enhance ER properties of the fluid. The shear-annealing method enables the silica spheres in the ER fluid to form better aligned and denser column microstructures. A stable state with elastic shear deformation is obtained after a sufficient number of CR cycles, with an optimal combination of stress duration and shear strength. Static shear modulus is obtained by measuring the elastic deformations at different shear stresses for an electric field frequency from 10 to 1000 Hz. A water-bridge model is proposed to explain the enhanced shear modulus.

  12. Linking dynamical heterogeneity to static amorphous order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, Patrick; Dyer, Ethan; Lee, Jaehoon; Yaida, Sho

    2016-07-01

    Glass-forming liquids grow dramatically sluggish upon cooling. This slowdown has long been thought to be accompanied by a growing correlation length. Characteristic dynamical and static length scales, however, have been observed to grow at different rates, which perplexes the relationship between the two and with the slowdown. Here, we show the existence of a direct link between dynamical sluggishness and static point-to-set correlations, holding at the local level as we probe different environments within a liquid. This link, which is stronger and more general than that observed with locally preferred structures, suggests the existence of an intimate relationship between structure and dynamics in a broader range of glass-forming liquids than previously thought.

  13. Static magnetotherapy for the treatment of insomnia.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Yao Y; Tsai, Fong Y

    2008-01-01

    Magnets have been used for centuries to treat a number of physical disorders. The vast majority of research, however, on static magnet therapy for insomnia has been confined to the auricular type of therapy, with publications limited to Chinese journals. Most of these studies have depended on the subjective self-assessment of participants rather than objective scientific measurements. In this study, the authors report the positive preliminary results of insomnia treatment using pillows with embedded magnets, magnetic insoles and TriPhase bracelets. The analysis is based on objective actigraphic and polysomnographic data. A theory of accelerated transition from wakefulness to sleep is proposed to explain the process of insomnia relief through low-strength static magnetic fields. Analysis by functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is used to further investigate the theory. PMID:19174368

  14. Variational approach for static mirror structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, E. A.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Ruban, V. P.

    2015-04-15

    Anisotropic static plasma equilibria where the parallel and perpendicular pressures are only functions of the amplitude of the local magnetic field are shown to be amenable to a variational principle with a free energy density given by the parallel tension. This approach is used to demonstrate that two-dimensional small-amplitude static magnetic holes constructed from a Grad-Shafranov type equation slightly below the (subcritical) mirror instability threshold identify with lump solitons of KPII equation, but turn out to be unstable. Differently, large-amplitude magnetic structures, which are stable as they realize a minimum of the free energy, are computed using a gradient method within two-dimensional numerical simulations where the regularizing effect of finite Larmor radius corrections is retained. Interestingly, these structures transform from stripes to bubbles when the angle of the magnetic field with the coordinate plane is increased.

  15. Motion Generated Static Electricity in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao Feng, Chung

    2004-03-01

    The charge state of a metallic object, neutral when stationary, is observed to become positive when in motion. This phenomenon was discovered while testing a hypothesis which expects atoms to be more positive when moving faster. The same hypothesis has also led to the discovery of the phenomena of static electric charges being produced by thermal changes during vaporization, condensation and heating of water. The phenomena due to thermal changes were reported at the American Physical Society meetings of MAR02 (W30 4: Electricity of Vaporization and Condensation) and MAR03 (J1 206: Static Electricity from Heating and Cooling). The phenomenon of charges generated by motion can be seen in simple experiments, by the difference in the charge state of a metal rotor between motionless and spinning. The hypothesis and the phenomenon will be discussed. Some of the experiments will be demonstrated.

  16. A review of bioeffects of static magnetic field on rodent models.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuguang; Shang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    This review is aimed to summarize the experimental researches in the influences of static magnetic field on laboratory rodent models, reported by laboratory scientists, experimental technicians, clinical surgeons, animal veterinarians, and other researchers. Past studies suggested that static magnetic field-singly applied or used combined with other physical or chemical substances-significantly relieved some pains and ameliorated certain diseases in different organ systems, e.g. hypertension, osteoporosis, neuralgia, diabetes and leukemia etc. But on the other hand, some harmful events have also been observed in a number of investigations, from cellular level to fetal development. So exposure to static magnetic field might have dual effects on experimental rodent in various environments, viz. there are potentially therapeutic benefits, as well as adverse effects from it. The positive effect may relate to moderate intensities, while negative influence seems to be in connection with acute strong static magnetic fields. In addition, different orientations of static magnetic field exert different degrees of impact. Thus, the bioeffects of static magnetic field exposure on mice/rats depend on magnetic field intensities, durations and directions, though the exactly relationship between them is still vague. Further researches need to perform with appropriate methodologies, ingenious designs repeatedly and systemically, not only in animal models, but also in human volunteers and patients.

  17. Acute effect of a ballistic and a static stretching exercise bout on flexibility and maximal strength.

    PubMed

    Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira; Monteiro, Gizele Assis; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Tricoli, Valmor; Cabral, Leonardo Ferreira; Aoki, Marcelo Saldanha

    2009-01-01

    Different stretching techniques have been used during warm-up routines. However, these routines may decrease force production. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effect of a ballistic and a static stretching protocol on lower-limb maximal strength. Fourteen physically active women (169.3 +/- 8.2 cm; 64.9 +/- 5.9 kg; 23.1 +/- 3.6 years) performed three experimental sessions: a control session (estimation of 45 degrees leg press one-repetition maximum [1RM]), a ballistic session (20 minutes of ballistic stretch and 45 degrees leg press 1RM), and a static session (20 minutes of static stretch and 45 degrees leg press 1RM). Maximal strength decreased after static stretching (213.2 +/- 36.1 to 184.6 +/- 28.9 kg), but it was unaffected by ballistic stretching (208.4 +/- 34.8 kg). In addition, static stretching exercises produce a greater acute improvement in flexibility compared with ballistic stretching exercises. Consequently, static stretching may not be recommended before athletic events or physical activities that require high levels of force. On the other hand, ballistic stretching could be more appropriate because it seems less likely to decrease maximal strength.

  18. Three-dimensional comparison of static and dynamic scapular motion tracking techniques.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Kathleen F E; Chopp, Jaclyn N; Grewal, Tej-Jaskirat; Picco, Bryan R; Dickerson, Clark R

    2014-02-01

    The shoulder is complex and comprised of many moving parts. Accurately measuring shoulder rhythm is difficult. To classify shoulder rhythm and identify pathological movement, static measures have been the preferred method. However, dynamic measures are also used and can be less burdensome to obtain. The purpose of this paper was to determine how closely dynamic measures represent static measures using the same acromion marker cluster scapular tracking technique. Five shoulder angles were assessed for 24 participants using dynamic and static tracking techniques during humeral elevation in three planes (frontal, scapular, sagittal). ANOVAs were used to identify where significant differences existed for the factors of plane, elevation angle, and tracking technique (static, dynamic raising, dynamic lowering). All factors were significantly different for all shoulder angles (p<0.001), except for elevation plane in scapulothoracic protraction/retraction (p=0.955). Tracking techniques were influential (p<0.001), but the grouped mean differences fell below a clinically relevant 5° benchmark. There was large variation in mean differences of the techniques across individuals. While population averages are similar, individual static and dynamic shoulder assessments may be different. Caution should be taken when dynamic shoulder assessments are performed on individuals, as they may not reflect those obtained in static scapular motion tracking.

  19. Adjoint Optimization of Multistage Axial Compressor Blades with Static Pressure Constraint at Blade Row Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia; Ji, Lucheng; Li, Weiwei; Yi, Weilin

    2016-06-01

    Adjoint method is an important tool for design refinement of multistage compressors. However, the radial static pressure distribution deviates during the optimization procedure and deteriorates the overall performance, producing final designs that are not well suited for realistic engineering applications. In previous development work on multistage turbomachinery blade optimization using adjoint method and thin shear-layer N-S equations, the entropy production is selected as the objective function with given mass flow rate and total pressure ratio as imposed constraints. The radial static pressure distribution at the interfaces between rows is introduced as a new constraint in the present paper. The approach is applied to the redesign of a five-stage axial compressor, and the results obtained with and without the constraint on the radial static pressure distribution at the interfaces between rows are discussed in detail. The results show that the redesign without the radial static pressure distribution constraint (RSPDC) gives an optimal solution that shows deviations on radial static pressure distribution, especially at rotor exit tip region. On the other hand, the redesign with the RSPDC successfully keeps the radial static pressure distribution at the interfaces between rows and make sure that the optimization results are applicable in a practical engineering design.

  20. Can density cumulant functional theory describe static correlation effects?

    PubMed

    Mullinax, J Wayne; Sokolov, Alexander Yu; Schaefer, Henry F

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate the performance of density cumulant functional theory (DCT) for capturing static correlation effects. In particular, we examine systems with significant multideterminant character of the electronic wave function, such as the beryllium dimer, diatomic carbon, m-benzyne, 2,6-pyridyne, twisted ethylene, as well as the barrier for double-bond migration in cyclobutadiene. We compute molecular properties of these systems using the ODC-12 and DC-12 variants of DCT and compare these results to multireference configuration interaction and multireference coupled-cluster theories, as well as single-reference coupled-cluster theory with single, double (CCSD), and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. For all systems the DCT methods show intermediate performance between that of CCSD and CCSD(T), with significant improvement over the former method. In particular, for the beryllium dimer, m-benzyne, and 2,6-pyridyne, the ODC-12 method along with CCSD(T) correctly predict the global minimum structures, while CCSD predictions fail qualitatively, underestimating the multireference effects. Our results suggest that the DC-12 and ODC-12 methods are capable of describing emerging static correlation effects but should be used cautiously when highly accurate results are required. Conveniently, the appearance of multireference effects in DCT can be diagnosed by analyzing the DCT natural orbital occupations, which are readily available at the end of the energy computation.

  1. 4500 V SPT+ IGBT optimization on static and dynamic losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingyun, Dai; Xiaoli, Tian; Wenliang, Zhang; Shuojin, Lu; Yangjun, Zhu

    2015-09-01

    This paper concerns the need for improving the static and dynamic performance of the high voltage insulated gate bipolar transistor (HV IGBTs). A novel structure with a carrier stored layer on the cathode side, known as an enhanced planar IGBT of the 4500 V voltage class is investigated. With the adoption of a soft punch through (SPT) concept as the vertical structure and an enhanced planar concept as the top structure, signed as SPT+ IGBT, the simulation results indicate the turn-off switching waveform of the 4500 V SPT+ IGBT is soft and also realizes an improved trade-off relationship between on-state voltage drop (Von) and turn-off loss (Eoff) in comparison with the SPT IGBT. Attention is also paid to the influences caused by different carrier stored layer doping dose on static and dynamic performances, to optimize on-state and switching losses of SPT+ IGBT. Project supported by the National Major Science and Technology Special Project of China (No. 2011ZX02504-002).

  2. Can density cumulant functional theory describe static correlation effects?

    PubMed

    Mullinax, J Wayne; Sokolov, Alexander Yu; Schaefer, Henry F

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate the performance of density cumulant functional theory (DCT) for capturing static correlation effects. In particular, we examine systems with significant multideterminant character of the electronic wave function, such as the beryllium dimer, diatomic carbon, m-benzyne, 2,6-pyridyne, twisted ethylene, as well as the barrier for double-bond migration in cyclobutadiene. We compute molecular properties of these systems using the ODC-12 and DC-12 variants of DCT and compare these results to multireference configuration interaction and multireference coupled-cluster theories, as well as single-reference coupled-cluster theory with single, double (CCSD), and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. For all systems the DCT methods show intermediate performance between that of CCSD and CCSD(T), with significant improvement over the former method. In particular, for the beryllium dimer, m-benzyne, and 2,6-pyridyne, the ODC-12 method along with CCSD(T) correctly predict the global minimum structures, while CCSD predictions fail qualitatively, underestimating the multireference effects. Our results suggest that the DC-12 and ODC-12 methods are capable of describing emerging static correlation effects but should be used cautiously when highly accurate results are required. Conveniently, the appearance of multireference effects in DCT can be diagnosed by analyzing the DCT natural orbital occupations, which are readily available at the end of the energy computation. PMID:26575548

  3. Propfan test assessment propfan propulsion system static test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orourke, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    The propfan test assessment (PTA) propulsion system successfully completed over 50 hours of extensive static ground tests, including a 36 hour endurance test. All major systems performed as expected, verifying that the large-scale 2.74 m diameter propfan, engine, gearbox, controls, subsystems, and flight instrumentation will be satisfactory with minor modifications for the upcoming PTA flight tests on the GII aircraft in early 1987. A test envelope was established for static ground operation to maintain propfan blade stresses within limits for propfan rotational speeds up to 105 percent and power levels up to 3880 kW. Transient tests verified stable, predictable response of engine power and propfan speed controls. Installed engine TSFC was better than expected, probably due to the excellent inlet performance coupled with the supercharging effect of the propfan. Near- and far-field noise spectra contained three dominant components, which were dependent on power, tip speed, and direction. The components were propfan blade tones, propfan random noise, and compressor/propfan interaction noise. No significant turbine noise or combustion noise was evident.

  4. Non-self-dual static gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, C. H.; Teh, Rosy

    1980-01-01

    We exhibit exact non-self-dual static solutions to the SU(2) Yang-Mills field equations by solving the equation ∇2V+λV3=0 using cylindrical and spherical coordinates. The resulting gauge fields are complex and have singularities. For the cylindrically symmetric solution, we convert it into a real gauge field coupled to the Higgs field in the limit in which the self-interaction potential of the Higgs field vanishes.

  5. Manipulating Cells with Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, J. M.; Guevorkian, K.

    2005-07-01

    We review our investigations of the use of static magnetic fields, B, for manipulating cells and cellular processes. We describe how B fields modify the cell division pattern of frog embryos and consequently can be used to probe the pattern determinants. We also observe that magnetic fields modify the swimming behavior of Paramecium Caudatum. We describe these modifications and their potential application to investigations of their swimming behavior.

  6. Static ocular counterroll reflex in skew deviation

    PubMed Central

    Chandrakumar, M.; Blakeman, A.; Goltz, H.C.; Sharpe, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The static ocular counterroll (OCR) reflex generates partially compensatory torsional eye movements during head roll. It is mediated by the utricle in the inner ear. Skew deviation is a vertical strabismus thought to be caused by imbalance in the utriculo-ocular pathway. We hypothesized that if skew deviation is indeed caused by damage to this reflex pathway, patients with skew deviation would show abnormal OCR. Methods: Eighteen patients with skew deviation caused by brainstem or cerebellar lesions and 18 normal participants viewed a target at 1 m. Ocular responses to static passive head roll-tilts of approximately 20° were recorded using search coils. Static OCR gain was calculated as the change in torsional eye position divided by the change in head position during sustained head roll. Perception of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) was also measured. Results: Group mean OCR gain was reduced by 45% in patients. At an individual level, OCR gains were asymmetric between eyes and between torsional directions in 90% of patients. In addition, the hypotropic eye incyclotorting gain was lower than the hypertropic eye excyclotorting gain during head roll toward the hypotropic eye in 94% of patients. No consistent pattern of gain asymmetry was found during head roll toward the hypertropic eye. The SVV was tilted toward the hypotropic eye. Conclusion: Static OCR gain is significantly reduced in skew deviation. Interocular and directional gain asymmetries are also prevalent. The asymmetries provide further evidence that disruption of the utriculo-ocular pathway is a mechanism for skew deviation. PMID:21813791

  7. On Static Pressure Fluctuation between Sirocco Fan Blades in a Car Air-Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasuhiko; Kato, Takaaki; Moriguchi, Yuu; Sakai, Masaharu; Ito, Kouji; Mitsuishi, Yasushi; Nagata, Kouji; Kubo, Takashi

    In this study, special attention is directed to static pressure fluctuation in a sirocco fan for a car air-conditioning system, because it is expected that there is a close connection between the fluid noise and the pressure fluctuation. The final purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship between the static pressure fluctuation between fan blades and the sound noise emitted to the outside of the fan, and to develop an air-conditioning system with highly low noise level. For this purpose, first of all, a new micro probe for the measurement of static pressure fluctuation has been developed. This new micro probe is composed of an L-type static pressure tube (the outer diameter is 0.5 mm and the inner diameter is 0.34 mm) and a very small pressure transducer. This probe exhibits a flat frequency response until approximately 2,000 Hz, and it is set between the blades of the fan rotating at 1,500 rpm. The measurements of the static pressure fluctuation between the blades have been performed, and the intensity of sound source was quantified from the second derivative of the phase-averaged static pressure fluctuation signals on the basis of Ribner's formula (Ribner 1962). The experiments have been made in two different modes, i.e., the cooling mode (FACE MODE) and the heating mode (FOOT MODE). It is shown that the static pressure increases rapidly as the blade approaches to the nose of the casing. It is also found that the sound source for FACE MODE shows the larger value than that for FOOT MODE as a whole. In particular, the largest intensity of sound source is observed when the blade approaches to the nose. From these results, it is confirmed that the present new static pressure probe is useful to specify the distributions of sound source in a sirocco fan.

  8. Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Eun Young; Zhang Xin; Yan Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose; Moros, Eduardo; Corry, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

  9. The effects of deuterium on static posture control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layne, Charles S.

    1990-01-01

    A significant operational problem impacting upon the Space Shuttle program involves the astronaut's ability to safely egress from the Orbiter during an emergency situation. Following space flight, astronauts display significant movement problems. One variable which may contribute to increased movement ataxia is deuterium (D2O). Deuterium is present in low levels within the Orbiter's water supply but may accumulate to significant physiological levels during lengthy missions. Deuterium was linked to a number of negative physiological responses, including motion sickness, decreased metabolism, and slowing of neural conduction velocity. The effects of D2O on static postural control in response to a range of dosage levels were investigated. Nine sugjects were divided into three groups of three subjects each. The groups were divided into a low, medium, and a high D2O dosage group. The subjects static posture was assessed with the use of the EquiTest systems, a commercially available postural control evaluation system featuring movable force plates and a visual surround that can be servoed to the subject's sway. In addition to the force plate information, data about the degree of subject sway about the hips and shoulders was obtained. Additionally, surface electromyographic (EMG) data from the selected lower limb muscles were collected along with saliva samples used to determine the amount of deuterium enrichment following D2O ingestion. Two baseline testing sessions were performed using the EquiTest testing protocol prior to ingestion of the D2O. Thirty minutes after dosing, subjects again performed the tests. Two more post-dosing tests were run with an interest interval of one hour. Preliminary data anlaysis indicates that only subjects in the igh dose group displayed any significant static postural problems. Future analyses of the sway and EMG is expected to reveal significant variations in the subject's postural control strategy following D2O dosing. While

  10. Slinky Mechanics: Static Shapes and Unstable States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Douglas; Borum, Andy; Moore, Billy; Plaut, Raymond; Dillard, David

    2014-03-01

    The floppy nature of a tumbling Slinky has captivated children and adults alike for over half a century. Highly flexible, the spring will walk down stairs, turn over in your hands, and-much to the chagrin of children everywhere-become easily entangled. The Slinky is an educational tool for demonstrating standing waves, and a structural inspiration due to its ability to extend to many times beyond its initial length without imparting plastic strain on the material. In this work, we provide a mechanical model that captures the static equilibrium configurations of the Slinky in terms of its geometric and material properties. We present both continuous and discrete models to capture a Slinky's static equilibria and unstable transitions. We compare these with experimental results obtained for the Slinky's static equilibrium shapes. We emphasize the importance of modeling coil contact, and determine the critical criteria for the Slinky to topple over in terms of a tilt angle, and the vertical displacement of one bale of coils. Finally, we provide a general description of highly flexible helical springs by considering the nondimensional potential energy of the spring, which characterizes the ``Slinkiness'' of a spring.

  11. A multimode DLL with trade-off between multiphase and static phase error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandan, Zhang; Wenrui, Zhu; Wei, Li; Zhihong, Huang; Lijiang, Gao; Haigang, Yang

    2014-05-01

    A multimode DLL with trade-off between multiphase and static phase error is presented. By adopting a multimode control circuit to regroup the delay line, a better static phase error performance can be achieved while reducing the number of output phases. The DLL accomplishes three operation modes: mode1 with a four-phase output, mode2 with a two-phase output and a better static phase error performance, and mode3 with only a one-phase output but the best static phase error performance. The proposed DLL has been fabricated in 0.13 μm CMOS technology and measurement results show that the static phase errors of mode1, mode2 and mode3 are -18.2 ps, 11.8 ps and -6:44 ps, respectively, at 200 MHz. The measured RMS and peak-to-peak jitters of mode1, mode2 and mode3 are 2.0 ps, 2.2 ps, 2.1 ps and 10 ps, 9.3 ps, 10 ps respectively.

  12. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of four boron nitride coated ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Six types of uncoated ceramic fibers were static tensile and tensile creep tested at various elevated temperatures. Three types of boron nitride coated fibers were also tested. Room temperature static tensile tests were initially performed on all fibers, at gage lengths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, to determine the magnitude of end effects from the gripping system used. Tests at one elevated temperature, at gage lengths of 8 and 10 inches, were also conducted, to determine end effects at elevated temperatures. Fiber cross sectional shapes and areas were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Creep testing was typically performed for 4 hours, in an air atmosphere.

  13. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... combination of both, that all static parts subject to significant gas or liquid pressure loads for a... significant static loads in addition to pressure loads; (3) Minimum properties representative of both...

  14. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... combination of both, that all static parts subject to significant gas or liquid pressure loads for a... significant static loads in addition to pressure loads; (3) Minimum properties representative of both...

  15. What Sexual Recidivism Rates Are Associated With Static-99R and Static-2002R Scores?

    PubMed

    Hanson, R Karl; Thornton, David; Helmus, Leslie-Maaike; Babchishin, Kelly M

    2016-04-01

    Empirical actuarial risk tools are routinely used to assess the recidivism risk of adult sexual offenders. Compared with other forms of risk assessment, one advantage of actuarial risk tools is that they provide recidivism rate estimates. Previous research, however, suggests that there is considerable variability in the recidivism rates associated with the most commonly used sexual offender risk assessment tools (Static-99/R, Static-2002/R). The current study examined the extent to which the variability in the recidivism rates across 21 Static-99R studies (N = 8,805) corresponded to the normative groups proposed by the STATIC development group (routine, treatment, high risk/high need). We found strong evidence that routine (i.e., complete) samples were, on average, less likely to reoffend with a sexual offense than offenders in the high-risk/high-need samples (i.e., those explicitly preselected on risk-relevant variables external to STATIC scales). The differences between routine/complete and high-risk/high-need samples, however, were only consistently observed for offenders with low or moderate scores; for offenders with high STATIC scores, the 5-year sexual recidivism rates for these two groups were not meaningfully different. There was only limited evidence to support treatment samples as a distinct sample type; consequently, the use of separate normative tables for treatment samples is not recommended. The current results reinforce the value of regularly updating the norms for empirical actuarial risk tools. Options are discussed on how STATIC scores could be used to inform recidivism rates estimates in applied assessments.

  16. Static balance and developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    Geuze, Reint H

    2003-11-01

    The development of static balance is a basic characteristic of normal motor development. Most of the developmental motor tests include a measure of static balance. Children with a developmental coordination disorder (DCD) often fail this item. Twenty-four children at risk for DCD with balance problems (DCD-BP) and 24 matched control children in the age range of 6-12 years participated in a detailed study of balance control. Additional groups of children (6-7 years, N=25; 10-11 years, n=16; with M-ABC scores >15th percentile) were selected randomly to study developmental changes in balance control in the age range of interest. Three experiments were conducted to examine developmental and clinical differences in the control of static balance. In the first, we measured the excursion of the centre of pressure (force-plate) in conditions with and without vision while standing still on one or two legs for 20 s. In the second experiment, EMGs were measured while standing on one leg. In the third experiment, in which only a subgroup of the DCD-BP and matched control children participated, a short unexpected force in the back lightly perturbed normal standing and EMG and force-plate responses were measured during balance recovery. In conditions of one-leg stance, children were not always able to maintain balance. Only epochs of stable postural control (7.5-20 s) were analysed. The results showed improvement of static balance with age, but only subtle differences between the DCD and control groups. Centre of pressure measures differed in the more difficult conditions. DCD-BP children had more difficulty standing on one leg with eyes closed. While standing on the non-preferred leg the EMGs of the DCD-BP children showed slightly more co-activation of the muscles of lower and upper leg. Perturbation of standing resulted in longer duration of recovery in the first trial in this group. Apparently DCD children learn to compensate for the perturbation within a few trials as well as

  17. Disequilibrium melt distributions during static recrystallisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walte, N. P.; Bons, P. D.; Passchier, C. W.; Koehn, D.; Arnold, J.

    2003-04-01

    DISEQUILIBRIUM MELT DISTRIBUTIONS DURING STATIC RECRYSTALLISATION N.P. Walte (1), P.D. Bons (2), C.W. Passchier (1), D. Koehn (1), J. Arnold (1) (1) Institute for Earth Sciences, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz, Germany, (2) Institute for Earth Sciences, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany (walte@mail.uni-mainz.de) The geometry of melt-filled pores in a partially molten rock strongly controls the permeability, rheology and initial segregation of melt. Current theory for monomineralic aggregates, using only the wetting angle and melt fraction as parameters, predicts a perfectly regular melt framework or equally shaped melt inclusions on grain boundary junctions. However, published melt-present high-temperature experiments with rock forming minerals such as quartz or olivine show considerable deviations from this predicted regular equilibrium melt geometry. Disequilibrium features, such as fully wetted grain boundaries, melt lenses, and large melt patches have been described, and were attributed to surface energy anisotropy of the minerals. This study used static analogue experiments with norcamphor plus ethanol liquid, that allow continuous in-situ observation of the evolving distribution of melt during static recrystallisation. The liquid-crystal surface energy of norcamphor is effectively isotropic. For the experiments an approximately 0.1 mm thin sample of norcamphor plus ethanole was placed between two glass plates and observed with a miroscope. Ethanol was used as a melt analogue because it allows to run experiments at room temperature, avoiding any temperature gradients. The wetting angle is approximately 15°, which is well below 60° and within the range reported for quartz and olivine plus melt experiments. The experiments show that all described disequilibrium features can form during fluid-enhanced static recrystallisation, especially where surrounding grains consume small, few-sided grains. These features are unstable and transient: a

  18. Static versus Dynamic Splinting for PIP Joint Pyrocarbon Implant Arthroplasty: A Comparison of Current and Historical Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, Jeanne M.; Lyden, Angela K.; Chung, Kevin C.; Murphy, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Non-randomized mixed current and historical cohort follow-up study. Introduction Dynamic splinting is recommended following proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint pyrocarbon implant arthroplasty; however, static splinting may be more feasible to deliver. Purpose To test the effectiveness of static splinting following arthroplasty in patients with osteoarthritis. Methods Nine consecutive patients received static splinting. These patients were compared to a historical control group (n = 10) who received dynamic splinting. Function and performance variables were measured preoperatively and 3 months following surgery. All patients underwent surgery by the same hand surgeon and the majority of patients were treated by the same certified hand therapist. Results Both static and dynamic groups showed improvement on several function and performance measures. Compared to the dynamic group, the static group showed greater improvements in the Michigan Hand Questionnaire (MHQ) subset of work performance (21.00±14.75versus 3.13±14.13, p<0.05) and Jebsen-Taylor test (−11.58±5.44 versus −2.81±3.23, p<0.03). Conclusions Patients who received static splinting had similar outcomes to those who received the dynamic splinting. Static splinting requires less therapist training and offers greater patient convenience and is a promising protocol that should be evaluated in a larger study. PMID:21652173

  19. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67....67 Static-pressure tests. Static-pressure tests shall be conducted by the applicant on each enclosure... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the...

  20. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67....67 Static-pressure tests. Static-pressure tests shall be conducted by the applicant on each enclosure... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the...

  1. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the influence... foreign matter does not seriously affect its accuracy. (b) Each static pressure port must be designed...

  2. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67....67 Static-pressure tests. Static-pressure tests shall be conducted by the applicant on each enclosure... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the...

  3. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67....67 Static-pressure tests. Static-pressure tests shall be conducted by the applicant on each enclosure... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the...

  4. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the influence... foreign matter does not seriously affect its accuracy. (b) Each static pressure port must be designed...

  5. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67....67 Static-pressure tests. Static-pressure tests shall be conducted by the applicant on each enclosure... pressure to be applied shall be 150 pounds per square inch (gage) or one and one-half times the...

  6. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the influence... foreign matter does not seriously affect its accuracy. (b) Each static pressure port must be designed...

  7. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the influence... foreign matter does not seriously affect its accuracy. (b) Each static pressure port must be designed...

  8. 30 CFR 56.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6602 Static electricity dissipation during loading. When explosive material is loaded pneumatically into a blasthole in a manner that generates a static electricity...

  9. 30 CFR 56.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6602 Static electricity dissipation during loading. When explosive material is loaded pneumatically into a blasthole in a manner that generates a static electricity...

  10. 30 CFR 56.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6602 Static electricity dissipation during loading. When explosive material is loaded pneumatically into a blasthole in a manner that generates a static electricity...

  11. 30 CFR 56.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6602 Static electricity dissipation during loading. When explosive material is loaded pneumatically into a blasthole in a manner that generates a static electricity...

  12. 30 CFR 56.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6602 Static electricity dissipation during loading. When explosive material is loaded pneumatically into a blasthole in a manner that generates a static electricity...

  13. 17 CFR 229.1105 - (Item 1105) Static pool information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false (Item 1105) Static pool....1105 (Item 1105) Static pool information. (a) For amortizing asset pools, unless the registrant determines that such information is not material: (1) Provide static pool information, to the extent...

  14. 17 CFR 229.1105 - (Item 1105) Static pool information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false (Item 1105) Static pool....1105 (Item 1105) Static pool information. (a) For amortizing asset pools, unless the registrant determines that such information is not material: (1) Provide static pool information, to the extent...

  15. 17 CFR 229.1105 - (Item 1105) Static pool information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false (Item 1105) Static pool....1105 (Item 1105) Static pool information. (a) For amortizing asset pools, unless the registrant determines that such information is not material: (1) Provide static pool information, to the extent...

  16. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... engine static parts. (a) Strength. The applicant must establish by test, validated analysis, or a combination of both, that all static parts subject to significant gas or liquid pressure loads for a... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts....

  17. 49 CFR 238.203 - Static end strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Static end strength. 238.203 Section 238.203... Equipment § 238.203 Static end strength. (a)(1) Except as further specified in this paragraph or in paragraph (d), on or after November 8, 1999 all passenger equipment shall resist a minimum static end...

  18. The Static Ladder Problem with Two Sources of Friction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jonathan; Mauney, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The problem of a ladder leaning against a wall in static equilibrium is a classic example encountered in introductory mechanics texts. Most discussions of this problem assume that the static frictional force between the ladder and wall can be ignored. A few authors consider the case where the static friction coefficients between ladder/wall…

  19. 14 CFR 23.177 - Static directional and lateral stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static directional and lateral stability... Flight Stability § 23.177 Static directional and lateral stability. (a) The static directional stability... stability, as shown by the tendency to raise the low wing in a sideslip, must be positive for all...

  20. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.177 Static lateral-directional stability. (a) The static directional stability (as shown by the tendency to recover from a...

  1. 14 CFR 23.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. 23.175 Section 23.175 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight Stability § 23.175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal...

  2. 14 CFR 23.177 - Static directional and lateral stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static directional and lateral stability... Flight Stability § 23.177 Static directional and lateral stability. (a) The static directional stability... stability, as shown by the tendency to raise the low wing in a sideslip, must be positive for all...

  3. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.177 Static lateral-directional stability. (a) The static directional stability (as shown by the tendency to recover from a...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the outside... or other foreign matter, and that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section...

  5. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the influence... located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section...

  6. Static Enforcement of Static Separation-of-Duty Policies in Usage Control Authorization Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Li, Ruixuan; Hu, Jinwei; Xu, Dewu

    Separation-of-Duty (SoD) is a fundamental security principle for prevention of fraud and errors in computer security. It has been studied extensively in traditional access control models. However, the research of SoD policy in the recently proposed usage control (UCON) model has not been well studied. This paper formulates and studies the fundamental problem of static enforcement of static SoD (SSoD) policies in the context of UCONA, a sub-model of UCON only considering authorizations. Firstly, we define a set-based specification of SSoD policies, and the safety checking problem for SSoD in UCONA. Secondly, we study the problem of determining whether an SSoD policy is enforceable. Thirdly, we show that it is intractable (coNP-complete) to direct statically enforce SSoD policies in UCONA, while checking whether a UCONA state satisfies a set of static mutually exclusive attribute (SMEA) constraints is efficient, which provides a justification for using SMEA constraints to enforce SSoD policies. Finally, we introduce a indirect static enforcement for SSoD policies in UCONA. We show how to generate the least restrictive SMEA constraints for enforcing SSoD policies in UCONA, by using the attribute-level SSoD requirement as an intermediate step. The results are fundamental to understanding SSoD policies in UCON.

  7. Recognizing people from dynamic and static faces and bodies: dissecting identity with a fusion approach.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Alice J; Phillips, P Jonathon; Weimer, Samuel; Roark, Dana A; Ayyad, Julianne; Barwick, Robert; Dunlop, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate human accuracy at identifying people from static and dynamic presentations of faces and bodies. Participants matched identity in pairs of videos depicting people in motion (walking or conversing) and in "best" static images extracted from the videos. The type of information presented to observers was varied to include the face and body, the face-only, and the body-only. Identification performance was best when people viewed the face and body in motion. There was an advantage for dynamic over static stimuli, but only for conditions that included the body. Control experiments with multiple-static images indicated that some of the motion advantages we obtained were due to seeing multiple images of the person, rather than to the motion, per se. To computationally assess the contribution of different types of information for identification, we fused the identity judgments from observers in different conditions using a statistical learning algorithm trained to optimize identification accuracy. This fusion achieved perfect performance. The condition weights that resulted suggest that static displays encourage reliance on the face for recognition, whereas dynamic displays seem to direct attention more equitably across the body and face.

  8. Time-of-Day Influences on Static and Dynamic Postural Control

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Phillip A; Tucker, W. Steven; White, Paul A

    2007-01-01

    Context: Assessment of postural control is used extensively in clinical and research applications. Time of day affects aspects of physical performance, but whether it also affects postural control is unknown. Objective: To determine the influence of time of day on static and dynamic postural control. Design: For each static postural control variable, a separate 3-way (day, time, eye) repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed. For the dynamic postural control variable, a 2-way (day, time) repeated-measures ANOVA was performed. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty healthy college-aged subjects. Intervention(s): Static and dynamic postural control of each subject was assessed in a laboratory at 10:00, 15:00, and 20:00 on 2 consecutive days. Main Outcome Measure(s): Unilateral static postural control was assessed with eyes open and closed on a forceplate using center-of-pressure velocity in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral planes as the dependent variables. Dynamic postural control was assessed with the anterior reaching direction of the Star Excursion Balance Test using reach distances normalized to leg length as the dependent variable. Results: For static postural control, velocity scores in both directions were lower at 10:00 than at 15:00 and 20:00 on day 1 (P < .05). For dynamic postural control, normalized reach distance was greater at 10:00 than at 15:00 and 20:00 (P < .05). Conclusions: Time of day had a consistent influence on dynamic postural control that suggests performance of this task may be better in the morning than in the afternoon or evening. The influence of time of day on static postural control was not as consistent and we feel requires further investigation. These findings have implications for researchers and clinicians when implementing and interpreting postural control testing. PMID:17597941

  9. LLNL small-scale static spark machine: static spark sensitivity test

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, M F; Simpson, L R

    1999-08-23

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives and other energetic materials is done in order to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli, such as friction, static spark, and impact. Typically this testing is done to discover potential handling problems that may exist for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior, or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing ''Static Spark Test Apparatus'' at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as well as the method used to evaluate the relative static spark sensitivity of energetic materials. The basic design, originally developed by the Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey, is discussed. The accumulated data for the materials tested to date is not included here, with the exception of specific examples that have yielded interesting or unusual results during the tests.

  10. Static stress triggering explains the empirical aftershock distance decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, Sebastian; Moradpour, Javad; Davidsen, Jörn

    2014-12-01

    The shape of the spatial aftershock decay is sensitive to the triggering mechanism and thus particularly useful for discriminating between static and dynamic stress triggering. For California seismicity, it has been recently recognized that its form is more complicated than typically assumed consisting of three different regimes with transitions at the scale of the rupture length and the thickness of the crust. The intermediate distance range is characterized by a relative small decay exponent of 1.35 previously declared to relate to dynamic stress triggering. We perform comprehensive simulations of a simple clock-advance model, in which the number of aftershocks is just proportional to the Coulomb-stress change, to test whether the empirical result can be explained by static stress triggering. Similarly to the observations, the results show three scaling regimes. For simulations adapted to the depths and focal mechanisms observed in California, we find a remarkable agreement with the observation over the whole distance range for a fault distribution with fractal dimension of 1.8, which is shown to be in good agreement with an independent analysis of California seismicity.

  11. How could static telepathology improve diagnosis in neuropathology?

    PubMed

    Remmelinck, M; Lopes, M B; Nagy, N; Rorive, S; Rombaut, K; Decaestecker, C; Kiss, R; Salmon, I

    2000-01-01

    The present paper reports our experience with, and our opinion of static telepathology as applied to neuropathology by means of the PHAROS acquisition system and conventional telephone data transmission (modem). The classical procedure of expert consultation based on surface mailing of histological slides is routinely performed, especially in highly specialized fields of pathology. Telepathology is an easy means of sharing scientific expertise at international level and could thus improve diagnosis particularly in neuropathology, where certain tumor types are very rare and complex to diagnose. Dynamic telepathology allows the referring pathologist to capture by himself images supporting their diagnosis. Using static telepathology the pathologist could be limited in diagnosis by problems in fields selection. We devoted a whole year to collecting all the technical parameters characterizing the use of digitized neuropathological data files in order to investigate the feasibility of telepathology and the extent to which its use could improve diagnoses. Our results on a series of 38 histological brain examinations illustrate how we successfully established an international connection between two departments of pathology in Belgium and the USA. The referring pathologists gave diagnoses in 35 cases and deferred only 3. Despite a time-consuming procedure for the telepathology session of a few cases, this tool provides easy access to expert diagnosis and real-time discussion, both of which are of considerable interest and offer significant improvements in neuropathology.

  12. Static tests of the propulsion system. [Propfan Test Assessment program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, C. C.; Bartel, H. W.; Turnberg, J. E.; Graber, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced, highly-loaded, high-speed propellers, called propfans, are promising to revolutionize the transport aircraft industry by offering a 15- to 30-percent fuel savings over the most advanced turbofans without sacrificing passenger comfort or violating community noise standards. NASA Lewis Research Center and industry have been working jointly to develop the needed propfan technology. The NASA-funded Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) Program represents a key element of this joint program. In PTA, Lockheed-Georgia, working in concert with Hamilton Standard, Rohr Industries, Gulfstream Aerospace, and Allison, is developing a propfan propulsion system which will be mounted on the left wing of a modified Gulfstream GII aircraft and flight tested to verify the in-flight characteristics of a 9-foot diameter, single-rotation propfan. The propfan, called SR-7L, was designed and fabricated by Hamilton Standard under a separate NASA contract. Prior to flight testing, the PTA propulsion system was static tested at the Rohr Brown Field facility. In this test, propulsion system operational capability was verified and data was obtained on propfan structural response, system acoustic characteristics, and system performance. This paper reports on the results of the static tests.

  13. Static and kinematic positioning using WADGPS from geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cefalo, R.; Gatti, M.

    2003-04-01

    STATIC AND KINEMATIC POSITIONING USING WADGPS CORRECTIONS FROM GEOSTATIONARY SATELLITES Cefalo R. (1), Gatti M (2) (1) Department of Civil Engineering, University of Trieste, P.le Europa 1, 34127 Trieste, Italy, cefalo@dic.univ.trieste.it, (2) Department of Engineering, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara, Italy, mgatti@ing.unife.it ABSTRACT. Starting from February 2000, static and kinematic experiments have been performed at the Department of Civil Engineering of University of Trieste, Italy and the Department of Engineering of University of Ferrara, Italy, using the WADGPS (Wide Area Differential GPS) corrections up linked by Geostationary Satellites belonging to the American WAAS and European EGNOS. Recently, a prototypal service by ESA (European Space Agency) named SISNet (Signal In Space through Internet), has been introduced using Internet to diffuse the messages up linked through AOR-E and IOR Geostationary Satellites. This service will overcome the problems relative to the availability of the corrections in urban areas. This system is currently under tests by the authors in order to verify the latency of the message and the applicability and accuracies obtainable in particular in dynamic applications.

  14. Modeling static and dynamic detection of humans in rural terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flug, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Historically, the focus of detection experiments and modeling at the Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) has been on detecting military vehicles in rural terrains. A gap remains in understanding the detection of human targets in rural terrains and how it might differ from detection of vehicles. There are also improvements that can be made in how to quantify the effect of human movement on detectability. Two experiments were developed to look at probability of detection and time to detect fully exposed human targets in a low to moderate clutter environment in the infrared waveband. The first test uses static images of standing humans while the second test uses videos of humans walking across the scene at various ranges and speeds. Various definitions of target and background areas are explored to calculated contrast and target size. Ultimately, task difficulty parameters (V50s) are calculated to calibrate NVESD sensor performance models, specifically NVThermIP and NV-IPM, for the human detection task. The focus of the analysis in this paper is primarily on the static detection task since the analysis for the dynamic detection experiment is still in the early stages. Results will be presented as well as a plan for future work in this area.

  15. Technology advancement of the static feed water electrolysis process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, F. C.; Schubert, F. H.

    1977-01-01

    Some results are presented of a research and development program to continue the development of a method to generate oxygen for crew metabolic consumption during extended manned space flights. The concept being pursued is that of static feed water electrolysis. Specific major results of the work included: (1) completion of a 30-day electrode test using a Life Systems, Inc.-developed high performance catalyst. During startup the cell voltages were as low as 1.38 V at current densities of 108 mA/sq cm (100 ASF) and temperatures of 355 K (180 F). At the end of 30 days of testing the cell voltages were still only 1.42 V at 108 mA/sq cm, (2) determination that the Static Feed Water Electrolysis Module does not release an aerosol of the cell electrolyte into the product gas streams after a break-in period of 24 hours following a new electrolyte charge, and (3) completion of a detailed design analysis of an electrochemical Oxygen Generation Subsystem at a three-man level (4.19 kg/day (9.24 lb/day) of oxygen).

  16. Cygnus Pressurized Cargo Module (PCM) Flight Inertial Load Static Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, Giovanni; Mancini, Simone; Palmieri, Paolo; Rutigliano, Luigi

    2012-07-01

    Cygnus PCM Flight Inertial Load Static Test campaign has been performed by Thales Alenia Space - Italy (TAS-I) to achieve the Static Qualification of its Primary Structure. A “Proto-flight Approach” has been followed (as per [1] and [2]), thus the first flight unit, the PCM0, has been tested up to qualification level (qualification/acceptance factor equivalent to 1.2 [1]). The PCM0 has been constrained to a dummy Service Module (the second member of Cygnus Spacecraft), representative in terms of interfaces provisions, and flight load conditions have been reproduced with proper forces that have been applied by means of hydraulic jacks at internal PCM secondary structure interfaces. Test load cases have been defined in order to simulate load paths and relevant stress fields associated to the worst flight load conditions by using the FE model analyses. Tests have been monitored by means of gauges and displacement transducers and results have been utilized to correlate the PCM FEM following [3] requirements.

  17. Delaminations in composite plates under transverse static or impact loads

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating the locations, shapes, and sizes of delaminations which occur in a fiber reinforced composite plate subjected to transverse static or dynamic (impact) loads. The plate may be simply supported, clamped, or free along its edges. A failure model of the delamination formation was developed. This model was then coupled with a finite element analysis. The model and the finite element analysis were then implemented by a computer code (IMPACT-ST) which can be used to estimate the load at which damage initiates as well as the locations, shapes, and sizes of the delaminations. Test were also performed measuring the geometries of delaminations in Fiberite T300/976 graphite-epoxy, Fiberite IM7/977-2 graphite-toughened epoxy, and ICI APC-2 graphite-PEEK plates subjected to transverse static and impact loads. The data were compared to results of the model and good agreements were found between the measured and calculated delamination lengths and widths.

  18. Static aeroelastic analysis for generic configuration wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, IN; Miura, Hirokazu; Chargin, Mladen K.

    1991-01-01

    A static aeroelastic analysis capability that calculates flexible air loads for generic configuration wings was developed. It was made possible by integrating a finite element structural analysis code (MSC/NASTRAN) and a panel code of aerodynamic analysis based on linear potential flow theory. The framework already built in MSC/NASTRAN was used, and the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix was computed externally and inserted in the NASTRAN by means of a DMAP program. It was shown that deformation and flexible air loads of an oblique wing configuration including asymmetric wings can be calculated reliably by this code both in subsonic and supersonic speeds.

  19. Cancer progression modeling using static sample data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yijun; Yao, Jin; Nowak, Norma J; Goodison, Steve

    2014-01-01

    As molecular profiling data continues to accumulate, the design of integrative computational analyses that can provide insights into the dynamic aspects of cancer progression becomes feasible. Here, we present a novel computational method for the construction of cancer progression models based on the analysis of static tumor samples. We demonstrate the reliability of the method with simulated data, and describe the application to breast cancer data. Our findings support a linear, branching model for breast cancer progression. An interactive model facilitates the identification of key molecular events in the advance of disease to malignancy.

  20. Engineering mechanics: statics and dynamics. [Textbook

    SciTech Connect

    Sandor, B.I.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this textbook is to provide engineering students with basic learning material about statics and dynamics which are fundamental engineering subjects. The chapters contain information on: an introduction to engineering mechanics; forces on particles, rigid bodies, and structures; kinetics of particles, particle systems, and rigid bodies in motion; kinematics; mechanical vibrations; and friction, work, moments of inertia, and potential energy. Each chapter contains introductory material, the development of the essential equations, worked-out example problems, homework problems, and, finally, summaries of the essential methods and equations, graphically illustrated where appropriate. (LCL)

  1. Static quark potential in three flavor QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Burch, Tom; Orginos, Kostas; Toussaint, Doug; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeTar, Carleton; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M.; Hetrick, James E.; Sugar, Bob

    2000-08-01

    We study the effects of dynamical quarks on the static quark potential at distances shorter than those where string breaking is expected. Quenched calculations and calculations with three flavors of dynamical quarks are done on sets of lattices with the lattice spacings matched within about one percent. The effect of the sea quarks on the shape of the potential is clearly visible. We investigate the consequences of these effects in a very crude model, namely solving Schroedinger's equation in the resulting potential. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Radiation-hard static induction transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanes, M.H.; Bartko, J.; Hwang, J.M.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Leslie, S.G.

    1988-12-01

    The static induction transistor (SIT) has been proposed as a preferred power switching device for applications in military and space environments because of its potential for radiation hardness, high-frequency operation, and the incorporation of on-chip smart power sensor and logic functions. Design, fabrication, and characteristics of a 350 V, 100 A buried gate SIT are described. The potential radiation hardness of this class of devices was evaluated by measurement of SIT characteristics after irradiation with 100 Mrad electrons (2 MeV), and up to 10%16% fission neutrons/cm/sup 2/. High-temperature operation and the possibility of radiation damage self-annealing are discussed.

  3. Mobile and static molecular disorder in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyskens, Pierre L.

    1992-11-01

    The fraction of time during which a molecule of a pure alcohol does not undergo H-bonding, estimated from the vapor pressure, is two orders of magnitude larger than the fraction of molecules that at a given time are not bound by an H-bond to their neighbors, as deduced from IR spectroscopic data. This obviously "anti-ergodic" statement renders questionable all the thermodynamic treatments of H-bonding in liquids, which are based on the usual Boltzmann expression. This expression equates the thermodynamic probability of a system with the static probability of distribution of the various states and, as outlined by Einstein, does not hold for non-ergodic systems. As pointed out by Pais (A. Pais, Subtle is the Lord. The Science and the Life of Albert Einstein, Oxford University Press, 1982), another Boltzmann relation relates the thermodynamic probability of a state to the fraction of time during which the system is found in that state. The latter definition was used by Einstein in his treatment of the ergodic problem. Similarly, the theory of the thermodynamics of mobile order in H-bonded liquids, of Huyskens and Siegel (P.L. Huyskens and G.G. Siegel, Bull. Soc. Chim. Belg., 97 (1988) 821), considers not the static configurations of the liquid, but the fraction of time during which an OH proton follows the oxygen atom of one or another neighboring molecules in its motion through the liquid. This coordination lowers the entropy and this reduction can be evaluated quantitatively. The present paper establishes a distinction between the static disorder, which is due to the possibility of exchange between the positions of the molecules and exists in mixed crystals, and the mobile disorder, which is due to the enlargement of the domain available for the motions of a given molecule, provoked by the mixing of two real gases. The mixing of two liquids allows an exchange in the positions, but also an expansion of the individual domains available for the motions. Thus, the

  4. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups.

  5. Static Versus Dynamic Musculoskeletal Ultrasound for Detection of Plantar Plate Pathology.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, Catherine A; Weil, Lowell; Weil, Lowell Scott; Klein, Erin E; Fleischer, Adam; Argerakis, Nicholas G

    2014-07-15

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) is a common modality used to examine plantar plate pathology. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of static versus dynamic ultrasound has not been previously published. The objective of this study was to prospectively compare the value of using preoperative static and dynamic ultrasound findings to diagnose plantar plate pathology using intraoperative inspection as the standard of reference. Patients attending a single foot and ankle specialty clinic from August 2012 to June 2013 with clinically suspected plantar plate pathology that was unresponsive to conservative care served as the study population. Static and dynamic ultrasound exams were performed by a single experienced rater and compared to intraoperative findings. The overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were determined for static and dynamic ultrasound exams. Thirty-six patients (45 lesser metatarsophalangeal joints) were included in this analysis. Of the 36 patients, 29 were females and 7 were males with average age of 57.9 ± 7.8 years (range, 38-73). There were 38 plantar plate tears (84.4%) noted on intraoperative examination. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the static US exam were 80.0%, 81.6%, 71.4%, 93.9%, and 41.7%, respectively. The same values for the dynamic US exam were 88.9%, 100%, 28.6%, 88.3%, and 100%, respectively. Static and dynamic ultrasound techniques are each highly sensitive methods for assessing plantar plate pathology. However, the sensitivity and accuracy of the exam is best when dynamic assessment of the plantar plate is employed. Caution should be used when relying solely on static images to diagnose subtle injuries in this area of the foot.

  6. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups. PMID:25729210

  7. Static vs dynamic settlement and adhesion of diatoms to ship hull coatings.

    PubMed

    Zargiel, Kelli A; Swain, Geoffrey W

    2014-01-01

    Many experiments utilize static immersion tests to evaluate the performance of ship hull coatings. These provide valuable data; however, they do not accurately represent the conditions both the hull and fouling organisms encounter while a ship is underway. This study investigated the effect of static and dynamic immersion on the adhesion and settlement of diatoms to one antifouling coating (BRA 640), four fouling-release coatings (Intersleek(®) 700, Intersleek(®) 900, Hempasil X3, and Dow Corning 3140) and one standard surface (Intergard(®) 240 Epoxy). Differences in community composition were observed between the static and dynamic treatments. Achnanthes longipes was present on all coatings under static immersion, but was not present under dynamic immersion. This was also found for diatoms in the genera Bacillaria and Gyrosigma. Melosira moniformis was the only diatom present under dynamic conditions, but not static conditions. Several common fouling diatom genera were present on panels regardless of treatment: Amphora, Cocconeis, Entomoneis Cylindrotheca, Licmophora, Navicula, Nitzschia, Plagiotropis, and Synedra. Biofilm adhesion, diatom abundance and diatom diversity were found to be significantly different between static and dynamic treatments; however, the difference was dependent on coating and sampling date. Several coatings (Epoxy, DC 3140 and IS 700) had significantly higher biofilm adhesion on dynamically treated panels on at least one of the four sampling dates, while all coatings had significantly higher diatom abundance on at least one sampling date. Diversity was significantly greater on static panels than dynamic panels for Epoxy, IS 700 and HX3 at least once during the sampling period. The results demonstrate how hydrodynamic stress will significantly influence the microfouling community. Dynamic immersion testing is required to fully understand how antifouling surfaces will respond to biofilm formation when subjected to the stresses experienced

  8. Recovery of static stability following a concussion.

    PubMed

    Powers, Kaley C; Kalmar, Jayne M; Cinelli, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use centre of pressure (COP) measurements to determine if static balance deficits had recovered when concussed athletes were cleared to return to play. Nine concussed varsity football players were matched with nine teammates who served as controls. Static balance in the anterior-posterior (A/P) and medial-lateral (M/L) directions was assessed during quiet stance with eyes open and eyes closed. Results showed that concussed football players displayed greater A/P COP displacements in the acute phase, which recovered by RTP; however, COP velocity remained elevated compared to controls even at RTP, particularly in the A/P direction. This balance control deficit in the A/P direction may suggest vestibular impairment, likely due to poor sensorimotor integration of the lateral vestibulospinal tract. The observed persistence of balance control deficits in concussed football players at RTP are usually undetected by traditional assessments because the current study used higher-order COP analysis. Future RTP balance measures may want to incorporate higher-order measures of balance.

  9. Static and Dynamic Criticality: Are They Different?

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D E; Clouse, C J; Procassini, R; Little, R C

    2003-12-12

    Let us start by stating that this paper does not contain anything new. It only contains material that has been known for decades, but which is periodically forgotten. As such this paper is intended merely to refresh people's memories. We will also mention that this paper is an example of the occasional discrepancy between textbook methodologies and real world applications, in the sense that the conclusions reached here contradict what it says in most textbooks, i.e., most textbooks incorrectly interpret the methods presented here, particularly with respect to the use of importance sampling to maintain population control. This paper is not intended as a general tutorial on criticality calculations. It is intended only to clarify the accuracy of various methods for solving criticality problems, such as a true time dependent dynamic calculation, versus an alpha or K static calculation. In particular, we address the long standing controversy between users of the TART code [1] with the dynamic method, and users of the MCNP code [2] with the alpha static method. In this paper we will prove which methods are accurate and inaccurate.

  10. Moist static energy and the MJO (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, A. H.; Wang, S.; Kim, D.; Maloney, E. D.

    2013-12-01

    A range of evidence suggests that the MJO is a) not a Kelvin wave; b) better simulated in models in which deep convection is sensitive to moisture; c) stronger over ocean than land, indicating a dependence on the total surface heat flux, which in turn suggests that surface turbulent fluxes and radiative cooling both help to modulate the convection associated with the MJO. This evidence leads to the hypothesis that the MJO is a 'moisture mode'. We use this term to mean a mode of variability that, in mathematical models, depends inherently on a prognostic moisture equation, and that is best viewed from the point of view of the budget of moist static energy or moist entropy. I will present recent observational, numerical and theoretical work examining the moist static energy budget of the MJO. Results will be presented from the DYNAMO field campaign observations, cloud resolving simulations with parameterized large-scale dynamics, GCM simulations, and an idealized semi-empirical theoretical model. The essential messages are: 1) cloud-radiative feedbacks are essential to drive the MJO, and 2) horizontal advection is essential to its eastward propagation, especially in the region between the western Indian ocean and westernmost Pacific.

  11. Static compression of porous dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Wada, Koji

    2013-07-01

    To understand the structure evolution of dust aggregates is a key in the planetesimal formation. Dust grains become fluffy by coagulation in protoplanetary disks. However, once they become fluffy, they are not sufficiently compressed by collisional compression to form compact planetesimals (Okuzumi et al. 2012, ApJ, 752, 106). Thus, some other compression mechanisms are required to form planetesimals. We investigate the static compression of highly porous aggregates. First, we derive the compressive strength by numerical N-body simulations (Kataoka et al. 2013, A&A, 554, 4). Then, we apply the strength to protoplanetary disks, supposing that the highly porous aggregates can be quiasi-statically compressed by ram pressure of the disk gas and the self gravity. As a result, we find the pathway of the dust structure evolution from dust grains via fluffy aggregates to compact planetesimals. Moreover, we find that the fluffy aggregates overcome the barriers in planetesimal formation, which are radial drift, fragmentation, and bouncing barriers. (The paper is now available on arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1307.7984 )

  12. Boson-mediated interactions between static sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bolsterli, M.

    1983-01-01

    The techniques are now available for doing accurate computations of static potentials arising from the exchange of virtual mesons. Such computations must take account of the fact that different approximation methods must be used in the regions where R is large and where R is small. In the asymptotic region, the distorted-field approximation provides an appropriate starting-point, but it must be improved before trustworthy results are obtained for all but the largest values of R. In the region of small R, accurate strong-coupling methods are based on the use of states with coherent meson pairs. For small R, it is also important to take account of the possibility of meson emission or near-emission. Current work is aimed at applying the techniques described to the case of static sources interacting via pion field. In particular, it will be interesting to see how sensitive the potential is to the value of the cutoff ..lambda... Other areas of application are the study of the effects of nonlinearity and models of quark-quark and quark-antiquark potentials. 17 references.

  13. On static Poincaré-Einstein metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Gregory J.; Woolgar, Eric

    2015-06-01

    The classification of solutions of the static vacuum Einstein equations, on a given closed manifold or an asymptotically flat one, is a long-standing and much-studied problem. Solutions are characterized by a complete Riemannian n-manifold ( M, g) and a positive function N, called the lapse. We study this problem on Asymptotically Poincaré-Einstein n-manifolds, n ≥ 3, when the conformal boundary-at-infinity is either a round sphere, a flat torus or smooth quotient thereof, or a compact hyperbolic manifold. Such manifolds have well-defined Wang mass, and are time-symmetric slices of static, vacuum, asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetimes. By integrating a mildly generalized form of an identity used by Lindblom, Shen, Wang, and others, we give a mass formula for such manifolds. There are no solutions with positive mass. In consequence, we observe that either the lapse is trivial and ( M, g) is Poincaré-Einstein or the Wang mass is negative, as in the case of time symmetric slices of the AdS soliton. As an application, we use the mass formula to compute the renormalized volume of the warped product ( X, γ) ≃ ( M 3 , g) × N 2 ( S 1 , dt 2).

  14. Mapping of Reservoir Properties and Facies Through Integration of Static and Dynamic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, Dean S.; Reynolds, Albert C.; Zhang, Fengjun; Li, Ruijian; Abacioglu, Yafes; Dong, Yannong

    2002-03-05

    The goal of this project was to develop computationally efficient automatic history matching techniques for generating geologically plausible reservoir models which honor both static and dynamic data. Solution of this problem is necessary for the quantification of uncertainty in future reservoir performance predictions and for the optimization of reservoir management.

  15. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pressure test for fuel tanks. A fuel tank is tested by performing the following procedures in the following order: (a) Fill the tank with air or inert gas to the pressure marked on the tank label under § 183.514... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Static pressure test for...

  16. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pressure test for fuel tanks. A fuel tank is tested by performing the following procedures in the following order: (a) Fill the tank with air or inert gas to the pressure marked on the tank label under § 183.514... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Static pressure test for...

  17. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pressure test for fuel tanks. A fuel tank is tested by performing the following procedures in the following order: (a) Fill the tank with air or inert gas to the pressure marked on the tank label under § 183.514... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static pressure test for...

  18. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... pressure test for fuel tanks. A fuel tank is tested by performing the following procedures in the following order: (a) Fill the tank with air or inert gas to the pressure marked on the tank label under § 183.514... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Static pressure test for...

  19. Relationships of Muscular Endurance Among Specific Muscle Groups for Continuous and Intermittent Static Contractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoshizaki, Thomas B.; Massey, B. H.

    1986-01-01

    The static contraction endurance characteristics of five muscle groups were investigated in 38 normal, health, college-aged men. Four parameters of continuous and intermittent contractions were examined. Results support the hypothesis that endurance is unique to each muscle group and specific to the task performed. (Author/MT)

  20. Mapping of Reservoir Properties and Facies Through Integration of Static and Dynamic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Albert C.; Oliver, Dean S.; Zhang, Fengjun; Dong, Yannong; Skjervheim, Jan Arild; Liu, Ning

    2003-03-10

    The goal of this project was to develop computationally efficient automatic history matching techniques for generating geologically plausible reservoir models which honor both static and dynamic data. Solution of this problem was necessary for the quantification of uncertainty in future reservoir performance predictions and for the optimization of reservoir management.

  1. 12-Month-Old Infants' Perception of Attention Direction in Static Video Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hofsten, Claes; Dahlstrom, Emma; Fredriksson, Ylva

    2005-01-01

    Twelve-month-old infants' ability to perceive gaze direction in static video images was investigated. The images showed a woman who performed attention-directing actions by looking or pointing toward 1 of 4 objects positioned in front of her (2 on each side). When the model just pointed at the objects, she looked straight ahead, and when she just…

  2. Static Balance: A Comparative Study of Primary Age Boys and Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiNucci, James M.

    The ability to attain and maintain a body position or balance is considered important in learning and performing motor skills. Static balance is defined as balance in which the body maintains equilibrium for one position; dynamic balance is described as maintaining equilibrium while the body is in motion or changing from one balanced position to…

  3. Quasi-static vapor pressure measurements on reactive systems in inert atmosphere box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, A. K.

    1968-01-01

    Apparatus makes vapor pressure measurements on air-sensitive systems in an inert atmosphere glove box. Once the apparatus is loaded with the sample and all connections made, all measuring operations may be performed outside the box. The apparatus is a single-tube adaptation of the double-tube quasi-static technique.

  4. A Comparison of Static Picture Prompting and Video Prompting Simulation Strategies Using Group Instructional Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cihak, David; Alberto, Paul A.; Taber-Doughty, Teresa; Gama, Robert I.

    2006-01-01

    Two groups of three students with moderate mental retardation were instructed using group procedures to compare static picture and video prompting simulation strategies. An alternating treatments design was used to compare individual student task acquisition and maintenance performances of purchasing and banking skills. The results indicated that…

  5. Description of a pressure measurement technique for obtaining surface static pressures of a radial turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicicco, L. D.; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1992-07-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid uncooled version of a cooled radial turbine was evaluated in the Small Engine Components Test Facility Turbine rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to rotor surface static pressures. This was the first time surface static pressures had been measured on a radial turbine at NASA Lewis. These pressures were measured by a modified Rotating Data Package (RDP), a standard product manufactured by Scanivalve, Inc. Described here are the RDP, and the modifications that were made, as well as the checkout, installation, and testing procedures. The data presented are compared to analytical results obtained from NASA's MERIDL TSONIC BLAYER (MTSB) code.

  6. Description of a pressure measurement technique for obtaining surface static pressures of a radial turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1992-02-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid uncooled version of a cooled radial turbine was evaluated in the Small Engine Components Test Facility Turbine rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to rotor surface static pressures. This was the first time surface static pressures had been measured on a radial turbine at NASA Lewis. These pressures were measured by a modified Rotating Data Package (RDP), a standard product manufactured by Scanivalve, Inc. Described here are the RDP, and the modifications that were made, as well as the checkout, installation, and testing procedures. The data presented are compared to analytical results obtained from NASA's MERIDL TSONIC BLAYER (MTSB) code.

  7. Description of a Pressure Measurement Technique for Obtaining Surface Static Pressures of a Radial Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid uncooled version of a cooled radial turbine was evaluated in the Small Engine Components Test Facility Turbine rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to rotor surface static pressures. This was the first time surface static pressures had been measured on a radial turbine at NASA Lewis. These pressures were measured by a modified Rotating Data Package (RDP), a standard product manufactured by Scanivalve, Inc. Described here are the RDP, and the modifications that were made, as well as the checkout, installation, and testing procedures. The data presented are compared to analytical results obtained from NASA's MERIDL TSONIC BLAYER (MTSB) code.

  8. Description of a pressure measurement technique for obtaining surface static pressures of a radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicicco, L. D.; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a solid uncooled version of a cooled radial turbine was evaluated in the Small Engine Components Test Facility Turbine rig at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Specifically, an experiment was conducted to rotor surface static pressures. This was the first time surface static pressures had been measured on a radial turbine at NASA Lewis. These pressures were measured by a modified Rotating Data Package (RDP), a standard product manufactured by Scanivalve, Inc. Described here are the RDP, and the modifications that were made, as well as the checkout, installation, and testing procedures. The data presented are compared to analytical results obtained from NASA's MERIDL TSONIC BLAYER (MTSB) code.

  9. Degradation of learned skills. Static practice effectiveness for visual approach and landing skill retention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitterley, T. E.

    1974-01-01

    The effectivess of an improved static retraining method was evaluated for a simulated space vehicle approach and landing under instrument and visual flight conditions. Experienced pilots were trained and then tested after 4 months without flying to compare their performance using the improved method with three methods previously evaluated. Use of the improved static retraining method resulted in no practical or significant skill degradation and was found to be even more effective than methods using a dynamic presentation of visual cues. The results suggested that properly structured open loop methods of flight control task retraining are feasible.

  10. Development of a low risk augmentation system for an energy efficient transport having relaxed static stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sizlo, T. R.; Berg, R. A.; Gilles, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    An augmentation system for a 230 passenger, twin engine aircraft designed with a relaxation of conventional longitudinal static stability was developed. The design criteria are established and candidate augmentation system control laws and hardware architectures are formulated and evaluated with respect to reliability, flying qualities, and flight path tracking performance. The selected systems are shown to satisfy the interpreted regulatory safety and reliability requirements while maintaining the present DC 10 (study baseline) level of maintainability and reliability for the total flight control system. The impact of certification of the relaxed static stability augmentation concept is also estimated with regard to affected federal regulations, system validation plan, and typical development/installation costs.

  11. Static Roll Characteristics of an SST at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirotake, Masashi; Kwak, Dong-Youn; Rinoie, Kenichi; Sunada, Yasuto

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to investigate static roll characteristics of an SST model at high angles of attack. The Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord was 6.2×104. Normal force and rolling moment measurements have been done at different roll angles for the cranked arrow wing SST model. Smoke visualizations and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were also performed. Force measurement results were compared both with flow visualization pictures and with PIV measurement results. It was shown that the vortex breakdown has strong influences on the static roll characteristics of the cranked arrow wing.

  12. Static imaging of the electrical impedance tomography on cylinder physical phantom.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruigang; Fu, Feng; You, Fusheng; Shi, Xuetao; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Static imaging of the electrical impedance tomography can obtain the absolute electrical conductivity distribution at one section of the subject. The test is performed on a cylinder physical phantom in which slim rectangle, hollow cylinder, small rectangle or three cylinders are selected to simulate complex conductivity perturbation objects. The measurement data is obtained by a data acquisition system with 32 compound electrodes. A group of static images of conductivity distribution in the cylinder phantom are reconstructed by the modified Newton-Raphson algorithm with two kinds of regularization methods. The results show correct position, size, conductivity difference, and similar shape of the perturbation objects in the images.

  13. Demonstration of relaxed static stability on a commercial transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rising, J. J.; Davis, W. J.; Willey, C. S.; Cokeley, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Increasing jet aircraft fuel costs from 25 percent to nearly 60 percent of the aircraft direct operating costs have led to a heavy emphasis on the development of transport aircraft with significantly improved aerodynamic performance. The application of the concept of relaxed static stability (RSS) and the utilization of an active control stability augmentation system make it possible to design an aircraft with reduced aerodynamic trim drag due to a farther-aft cg balance. Reduced aerodynamic parasite drag and lower structural weight due to a smaller horizontal tail surface can also be obtained. The application of RSS has been studied under a NASA-sponsored program to determine ways of improving the energy efficiency in current and future transport aircraft. Attention is given to a near-term pitch active control system, an advanced pitch active control system, and an operational overview.

  14. Static and dynamic high pressure experiments on cerium

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Brian J; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Cherne, Frank J; Stevens, Gerald; Tschauner, Oliver

    2011-01-25

    There is a scientific need to obtain dynamic data to develop and validate multi phase equation-of-state (EOS) models for metals. Experiments are needed to examine the relevant pure phases, to locate phase boundaries and the associated transition kinetics, and other material properties such as strength. Cerium is an ideal material for such work because it exhibits a complex multiphase diagram at relatively moderate pressures readily accessible using standard shock wave methods. In the current work, shock wave (dynamic) and diamond anvil cell (static) experiments were performed to examine the high pressure, low temperature region of the phase diagram to obtain EOS data and to search for the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} boundary. Past work examining the shock-melt transition and the low-pressure {gamma}-{alpha} transition will be presented in brief followed by details of recent results obtained from DAC and double-shock experiments.

  15. Development of a high temperature static strain sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulse, Charles O.; Bailey, Richard S.; Grant, Howard P.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this program is to develop an electrical resistance strain gage system which will accurately measure the static strains of superalloy blades and vanes in gas turbine engines running on a test stand. Accurate knowledge of these strains is essential to reaching the goals of the HOST program in the selection and experimental verification of the various theoretical models developed to understand and improve the performance of these engines. The specific objective is to develop a complete system capable of making strain measurements of up to + or - 10 percent of full scale during a 50 hour period at temperatures as high as 1250 K. In addition to survival and stability, attaining a low temperature coefficient of resistance, of the order of 20 ppm/K or less, was a major goal. This requirement arises from the presently unavoidable uncertainties in measurement of the exact temperatures inside gas turbines for use in making corrections for apparent strain due to temperature.

  16. Powder wettability at a static air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Dupas, Julien; Forny, Laurent; Ramaioli, Marco

    2015-06-15

    The reconstitution of a beverage from a dehydrated powder involves several physical mechanisms that determine the practical difficulty to obtain a homogeneous drink in a convenient way and within an acceptable time for the preparation of a beverage. When pouring powder onto static water, the first hurdle to overcome is the air-water interface. We propose a model to predict the percentage of powder crossing the interface in 45 s, namely the duration relevant for this application. We highlight theoretically the determinant role of the contact angle and of the particle size distribution. We validate experimentally the model for single spheres and use it to predict the wettability performance of commercial food powders for different contact angles and particles sizes. A good agreement is obtained when comparing the predictions and the wettability of the tested powders. PMID:25721855

  17. Materials and techniques for spacecraft static charge control 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. E.; Eagles, A. E.

    1979-01-01

    Results of exploratory development on the design, fabrication and testing of transparent conductive coatings, conductive bulk materials and grounding techniques for application to high resistivity spacecraft dielectric materials to obtain control of static charge buildup are presented. Deposition techniques for application of indium oxide, indium/tin oxide and other metal oxide films on Kapton, FEP Teflon, OSR and solar cell coverglasses discussed include RF and Magnetron sputtering and vapor deposition. Development, fabrication and testing of conductive glass tiles for OSR and solar cell coverglass applications is discussed. Several grounding techniques for rapid charge dissipation from the conductively coated polymer and glass dielectrics which were developed and tested in thermal cycled and electron plasma environments are described. The optical and electrical characterization and aging effects of these coatings, bulk materials and grounding techniques are reviewed as they apply to the performance of their design functions in a geosynchronous orbit environment.

  18. Biomagnetic localization from transient quasi-static events

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.; Lewis, P.S. University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA . Signal and Image Processing Inst.)

    1993-01-01

    Sensory stimuli, such as auditory, visual, or somatosensory, evoke neural responses in very localized regions of the brain. A SQUID biomagnetometer can measure the very weak fields that are generated outside of the head by this response. A simple source and head model of current dipoles inside a conducting sphere is typically used to interpret these magnetic field measurements or magnetoencephalogram (MEG). Locating dipole sources using data recorded from an array of biomagnetic sensors is distinguished from conventional array source localization techniques by the quasi-static transient nature of the data. Here, the basic MEG model is reviewed, then a localization example is given to motivate the need for partitioning the data to improve estimator performance. Tune-eigenspectrum analysis is introduced as a means of partitioning and interpreting spatio-temporal biomagnetic data. Examples using both simulated and somatosensory data are presented.

  19. Biomagnetic localization from transient quasi-static events

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.; Lewis, P.S. |

    1993-02-01

    Sensory stimuli, such as auditory, visual, or somatosensory, evoke neural responses in very localized regions of the brain. A SQUID biomagnetometer can measure the very weak fields that are generated outside of the head by this response. A simple source and head model of current dipoles inside a conducting sphere is typically used to interpret these magnetic field measurements or magnetoencephalogram (MEG). Locating dipole sources using data recorded from an array of biomagnetic sensors is distinguished from conventional array source localization techniques by the quasi-static transient nature of the data. Here, the basic MEG model is reviewed, then a localization example is given to motivate the need for partitioning the data to improve estimator performance. Tune-eigenspectrum analysis is introduced as a means of partitioning and interpreting spatio-temporal biomagnetic data. Examples using both simulated and somatosensory data are presented.

  20. Investigation of the static and dynamic fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets induced by random surface fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L.; Bourasseau, E.; Filippini, G.

    2016-07-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the static and dynamic fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets of tin induced by random surface fluctuations. The static regime is analyzed by simulating sheets of different thicknesses, and the dynamic fragmentation is ensured by applying along the longitudinal direction of a sheet an instantaneous expansion velocity per initial unit length (expansion rate) with values ranging from 1 × 109 to 3 × 1010 s-1. The simulations show that the static/dynamic fragmentation becomes possible when the fluctuations of the upper and lower surfaces of the sheets can either overlap or make the local volume density of the system go down below a critical value. These two mechanisms cause locally in the sheet the random nucleation of pores of void, on a timescale that exponentially increases with the sheet thickness. Afterwards, the pores develop following distinct stages of growth, coalescence, and percolation, and later in time aggregates of liquid metal are formed. The simulations also show that the fragmentation of static sheets is characterized by relatively mono-dispersed surface and volume distributions of the pores and aggregates, respectively, whereas in extreme conditions of dynamic fragmentation (expansion rate typically in the range of 1 × 1010 s-1), the distributions are rather poly-dispersed and obey a power law decay with surface (volume). A model derived from the simulations suggests that both dynamic and static regimes of fragmentation are similar for expansion rates below typically 1 × 107 s-1.