Science.gov

Sample records for performance static latches

  1. High performance static latches with complete single event upset immunity

    DOEpatents

    Corbett, W.T.; Weaver, H.T.

    1994-04-26

    An asymmetric response latch providing immunity to single event upset without loss of speed is described. The latch has cross-coupled inverters having a hardened logic state and a soft state, wherein the logic state of the first inverter can only be changed when the voltage on the coupling node of that inverter is low and the logic state of the second inverter can only be changed when the coupling of that inverter is high. One of more of the asymmetric response latches may be configured into a memory cell having complete immunity, which protects information rather than logic states. 5 figures.

  2. High performance static latches with complete single event upset immunity

    DOEpatents

    Corbett, Wayne T.; Weaver, Harry T.

    1994-01-01

    An asymmetric response latch providing immunity to single event upset without loss of speed. The latch has cross-coupled inverters having a hardened logic state and a soft state, wherein the logic state of the first inverter can only be changed when the voltage on the coupling node of that inverter is low and the logic state of the second inverter can only be changed when the coupling of that inverter is high. One of more of the asymmetric response latches may be configured into a memory cell having complete immunity, which protects information rather than logic states.

  3. Static latching arrangement and method

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Larry

    1988-01-01

    A latching assembly for use in latching a cable to and unlatching it from a given object in order to move an object from one location to another is disclosed herein. This assembly includes a weighted sphere mounted to one end of a cable so as to rotate about a specific diameter of the sphere. The assembly also includes a static latch adapted for connection with the object to be moved. This latch includes an internal latching cavity for containing the sphere in a latching condition and a series of surfaces and openings which cooperate with the sphere in order to move the sphere into and out of the latching cavity and thereby connect the cable to and disconnect it from the latch without using any moving parts on the latch itself.

  4. Electromechanical latch

    DOEpatents

    Buerger, Stephen; Marron, Lisa C.; Martinez, Michael A.; Spletzer, Barry Louis

    2016-12-13

    An electromechanical latch is described herein. The electromechanical latch is a dual-actuator latch, wherein a first actuator and a second actuator are driven with precise timing to move a first latch part relative to a second latch part, and vice versa. When the electromechanical latch is in a closed position, the first rotary latch part is positioned to prevent rotation of the second rotary latch part in a first direction. To transition the electromechanical latch from the closed position to an open position, the first actuator drives the first rotary latch part such that the second rotary latch part is able to rotate in the first direction. Thereafter, the second actuator drives the second rotary latch part in the first direction until the electromechanical latch is in the open position.

  5. Latching device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, G. W. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A latching device is suited for use in establishing a substantially motionless connection between a stationary receiver and a movable latching mechanism. The latching mechanism includes a pivotally supported restraining hook continuously urged into a capturing relationship with the receiver, characterized by a spring-biased pawl having a plurality of aligned teeth. The teeth are seated in the surface of the throat of the hook and positionable into restraining engagement with a rigid restraining shoulder projected from the receiver.

  6. Rotary latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Joel M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A rotary latch is disclosed, including a hollow, cylindrical outer member and a concentrically arranged inner rotor. The rotor is rotatable within the outer cylindrical member. The outer cylindrical member includes a pair of aligned openings as a cylinder first end facing a latch pin. The rotor includes a pair of aligned slots at a rotor first end facing the latch pin. Slot extensions are provided in the rotor, the slot extensions extending generally perpendicularly to the slots and generally parallel to the rotor first end. In a first position, the outer cylindrical member openings and the rotor slots are aligned to allow receipt of the latch pin. In a second position, the openings and the slot extensions are aligned thereby engaging the latch pin within a closed area defined by the rotor slot extensions and the outer cylinder openings.

  7. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, J.R.; Harper, W.H.; Perez, R.

    1984-08-17

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing. 2 figs.

  8. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, James R.; Harper, William H.; Perez, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing.

  9. Rotary mechanical latch

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Martinez, Michael A.; Marron, Lisa C.

    2012-11-13

    A rotary mechanical latch for positive latching and unlatching of a rotary device with a latchable rotating assembly having a latching gear that can be driven to latched and unlatched states by a drive mechanism such as an electric motor. A cam arm affixed to the latching gear interfaces with leading and trailing latch cams affixed to a flange within the drive mechanism. The interaction of the cam arm with leading and trailing latch cams prevents rotation of the rotating assembly by external forces such as those due to vibration or tampering.

  10. Radial SI latches vibration test data review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, P. M.; Smith, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamic testing of the Space Telescope Scientific Instrument Radial Latches was performed as specified by the designated test criteria. No structural failures were observed during the test. The alignment stability of the instrument simulator was within required tolerances after testing. Particulates were discovered around the latch bases, after testing, due to wearing at the B and C latch interface surfaces. This report covers criteria derivation, testing, and test results.

  11. Single transistor latch phenomenon in junctionless transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Parihar, Mukta; Ghosh, Dipankar; Kranti, Abhinav

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we report on the single transistor latch phenomenon in junctionless transistors. In the latch condition, the device is unable to turn-off despite a reduction in gate bias. It is shown that impact ionization induced latch condition can occur due to an increase in drain bias, silicon film thickness, gate oxide thickness, and doping concentration. The latch phenomenon is explained in terms of generation-recombination rates, electrostatic potential, electric field distribution and product of current density and electric field (J.E). As latch condition is undesirable for dynamic memory applications, the work highlights the significance of (J.E) as a performance metric to avoid the junctionless transistor being driven into the latch mode.

  12. Load regulating latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleberry, W. T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A load regulating mechanical latch is described that has a pivotally mounted latch element having a hook-shaped end with a strike roller-engaging laterally open hook for engaging a stationary strike roller. The latch element or hook is pivotally mounted in a clevis end of an elongated latch stem that is adapted for axial movement through an opening in a support plate or bracket mounted to a structural member. A coil spring is disposed over and around the extending latch stem and the lower end of the coil spring engages the support bracket. A thrust washer is removably attached to the other end of the latch stem and engages the other end of the coil spring and compresses the coil spring thereby preloading the spring and the latch element carried by the latch stem. The hook-shaped latch element has a limited degree of axial travel for loading caused by structural distortion which may change the relative positions of the latch element hook and the strike roller. Means are also provided to permit limited tilt of the latch element due to loading of the hook.

  13. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

    1994-02-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

  14. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Kobsa, Irvin R.

    1994-01-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

  15. 15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, LATCH CRADLE, SPLIT COLLAR, ETC. - Niantic River Swing Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  16. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  17. Self indexing latch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, John C. (Inventor); Calvert, John A. (Inventor); Nesmith, Malcolm F. (Inventor); Cloyd, Richard A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A self-latching jaw assembly is described which includes a pair of jaws for latching a fitting of an associated structure such as the keel fitting of a space telescope. The jaw assembly automatically locates the fitting received on a positioning pedestal and latches it in its original location on the pedestal without need of precision alignment. The first jaw is actuated and moved to the right whereupon a reciprocating plunger, extended from the nose of the jaw senses the hub of the spool. A jaw position responsive switch is then actuated to terminate the drive motor of the jaw. The astronaut will then actuate the drive motor of the jaw and the jaw will move to the left, whereupon the standoff will engage the face of the jaw in a latching position. In the latching position, the noses of the jaws will be under the flanges of the spool.

  18. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small button'' in the latch mechanism had broken off of the lock plunger'' and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  19. Safety rod latch inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    During an attempt to raise control rods from the 100 K reactor in December, one rod could not be withdrawn. Subsequent investigation revealed that a small ``button`` in the latch mechanism had broken off of the ``lock plunger`` and was wedged in a position that prevented rod withdrawal. Concern that this failure may have resulted from corrosion or some other metallurgical problem resulted in a request that SRL examine six typical latch mechanisms from the 100 L reactor by use of radiography and metallography. During the examination of the L-Area latches, a failed latch mechanism from the 100 K reactor was added to the investigation. Fourteen latches that had a history of problems were removed from K-Area and sent to SRL for inclusion in this study the week after the original seven assemblies were examined, bringing the total of latch assemblies discussed in this report to twenty one. Results of the examination of the K-Area latch that initiated this study is not included in this report.

  20. Hemispherical latching apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, K. H. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for securing payloads in a space vehicle such as the space shuttle is described. The apparatus includes many latching assemblies carried by a platform on the vehicle and a like number of latching elements carried by the payload and adapted to mate with the latching assemblies. The novelty of the invention is believed to reside in the use of complementary hemispherical elements which automatically align and engage with one another. This enables a simple but effective mode of operation and avoids the need for hinged linkages and similar moving parts.

  1. Optical data latch

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G Allen [Corrales, NM

    2010-08-31

    An optical data latch is formed on a substrate from a pair of optical logic gates in a cross-coupled arrangement in which optical waveguides are used to couple an output of each gate to an photodetector input of the other gate. This provides an optical bi-stability which can be used to store a bit of optical information in the latch. Each optical logic gate, which can be an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter) or an optical NOR gate, includes a waveguide photodetector electrically connected in series with a waveguide electroabsorption modulator. The optical data latch can be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or GaAs substrate) from III-V compound semiconductor layers. A number of optical data latches can be cascaded to form a clocked optical data shift register.

  2. Dual-mode latching ferrite devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Jiang, Z.

    1986-05-01

    A primary consideration with microwave ferrite control devices is related to the switching speed. In order to achieve fast switching with the considered devices, an operation in the latching mode is required. A description is given of a new class of ferrite latching devices, taking into account latching quadrupole devices and their modifications. It is pointed out that the advantages of the new devices include fast switching, high electrical performance, and simple construction. According to the utilization of external or internal magnetic return paths, there are two modes of operation in latching ferrite devices. Attention is given to constructions and calculations, the design of a model for each of the two modes of operation, polarization insensitive phase shifters (PIPS) with external magnetic return paths, and PIPS with internal magnetic return paths.

  3. Design, testing and evaluation of latching end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, B.; Vandersluis, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Latching End Effector (LEE) forms part of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) for which Spar Aerospace Ltd, Space Systems Division is the prime contractor. The design, testing and performance evaluation of the Latching End Effector mechanisms is the subject of this paper focusing on: (1) ambient, thermal and vibration testing; (2) snare/rigidize performance testing and interaction during payload acquisition; and (3) latch/umbilical test results and performance.

  4. Manual Override For Electromechanical Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Override mechanism enables user to operate electromechanical latching mechanism manually if primary mechanism fails. Release/Engage Mechanism (REM) moves pin receivers to confine pins on object to be held. Clutch disengages electrically driven latch normally used. Used to latch and unlatch large, heavy objects from fixed support structure.

  5. J-hook latching device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Malcolm B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Described here is a latching device for latching two items together that has a housing and a shaft mounted to one item such that rotation of the shaft by a sprocket causes the shaft to move longitudinally up and down. The shaft has one end extending beyond the housing with an alignment cone attached to this end for engaging a receptor on the other item. A latch mounted to a shaft by a traveling nut provides a pivot point for the latch so that rotation of the shaft causes the pivot point of the latch to translate along the longitudinal axis of the shaft. Camming surfaces and a camming spring are used for rotating the latch so that the latch will engage and disengage a receptor on the other item.

  6. Magnetic latching solenoid

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Richardson, John G.; Albano, Richard K.; Morrison, Jr., John L.

    1995-01-01

    This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized.

  7. Magnetic latching solenoid

    DOEpatents

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.; Albano, R.K.; Morrison, J.L. Jr.

    1995-11-28

    This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized. 2 figs.

  8. Rectifier cabinet static breaker

    DOEpatents

    Costantino, Jr, Roger A.; Gliebe, Ronald J.

    1992-09-01

    A rectifier cabinet static breaker replaces a blocking diode pair with an SCR and the installation of a power transistor in parallel with the latch contactor to commutate the SCR to the off state. The SCR serves as a static breaker with fast turnoff capability providing an alternative way of achieving reactor scram in addition to performing the function of the replaced blocking diodes. The control circuitry for the rectifier cabinet static breaker includes on-line test capability and an LED indicator light to denote successful test completion. Current limit circuitry provides high-speed protection in the event of overload.

  9. Self-Latching Piezocomposite Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William K. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Lynch, Christopher S. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A self-latching piezocomposite actuator includes a plurality of shape memory ceramic fibers. The actuator can be latched by applying an electrical field to the shape memory ceramic fibers. The actuator remains in a latched state/shape after the electrical field is no longer present. A reverse polarity electric field may be applied to reset the actuator to its unlatched state/shape. Applied electric fields may be utilized to provide a plurality of latch states between the latched and unlatched states of the actuator. The self-latching piezocomposite actuator can be used for active/adaptive airfoils having variable camber, trim tabs, active/deformable engine inlets, adaptive or adjustable vortex generators, active optical components such as mirrors that change shapes, and other morphing structures.

  10. Latching micro optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  11. NBTI aware HLS using latches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jangir, Ramrakesh; Yadav, Kalyan Singh

    2011-12-01

    Time dependent performance degradation due to negative bias thermal instability (NBTI) is one of the most important reliability concerns for deep nano scale regime VLSI circuits. Under worst case NBTI can degrade circuit performance in terms of timing by more than 10% over a period of 3 years. Reliability decisions taken early in system design can bring significant benefits in terms of design quality. The proposed approach deals with use of latches and NBTI aware scheduling of DFG to overcome the timing violations caused by NBTI. The experimental results suggest that it incurs a very low area overhead and no performance penalty. We propose an algorithm to schedule the DFG and show results for some of the common filters like EW and AR.

  12. NBTI aware HLS using latches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jangir, Ramrakesh; Yadav, Kalyan Singh

    2012-01-01

    Time dependent performance degradation due to negative bias thermal instability (NBTI) is one of the most important reliability concerns for deep nano scale regime VLSI circuits. Under worst case NBTI can degrade circuit performance in terms of timing by more than 10% over a period of 3 years. Reliability decisions taken early in system design can bring significant benefits in terms of design quality. The proposed approach deals with use of latches and NBTI aware scheduling of DFG to overcome the timing violations caused by NBTI. The experimental results suggest that it incurs a very low area overhead and no performance penalty. We propose an algorithm to schedule the DFG and show results for some of the common filters like EW and AR.

  13. Miniature Latching Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. David; Benson, Glendon M.

    2008-01-01

    A miniature latching valve has been invented to satisfy a need for an electrically controllable on/off pneumatic valve that is lightweight and compact and remains in the most recently commanded open or closed state when power is not supplied. The valve includes a poppet that is moved into or out of contact with a seat to effect closure or opening, respectively, of the flow path. Motion of the poppet is initiated by electrical heating of one of two opposing pairs of nickel/titanium shape-memory alloy (SMA) wires above their transition temperature: heated wires contract to their remembered length, applying tension to pull the poppet toward or away from the seat. A latch consisting mainly of a bistable Belleville washer (a conical spring) made of a hardened stainless steel operates between two stable positions corresponding to the fully closed or fully open state, holding the poppet in one of these positions when power is not applied to either pair of SMA wires. To obtain maximum actuation force and displacement, the SMA wires must be kept in tension. The mounting fixtures at the ends of the wires must support large tensile stresses without creating stress concentrations that would limit the fatigue lives of the wires. An earlier design provided for each wire to be crimped in a conical opening with a conical steel ferrule that was swaged into the opening to produce a large, uniformly distributed holding force. In a subsequent design, the conical ferrule was replaced with a larger crimped cylindrical ferrule depicted in the figure. A major problem in designing the valve was to protect the SMA wires from a bake-out temperature of 300 C. The problem was solved by incorporating the SMA wires into an actuator module that is inserted into a barrel of the valve body and is held in place by miniature clip rings.

  14. Minimal Power Latch for Single-Slope ADCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    positive- true signals and is implemented using AND-OR-INVERT logic. In this implementation, both latches are cleared when the comparator is reset. Two redundant transistors are removed from the reset side of each latch, making for a compact layout. CMOS imagers with column-parallel ADCs have demonstrated high performance for remote sensing applications. With this latch circuit, the power consumption and noise can be further reduced. This innovation can be used in CMOS imagers and very-low-power electronics

  15. An SEU-Tolerant DICE Latch Design With Feedback Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.-B.; Li, Y.-Q.; Chen, L.; Li, L.-X.; Liu, R.; Baeg, S.; Mahatme, N.; Bhuva, B. L.; Wen, S.-J.; Wong, R.; Fung, R.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an SEU-tolerant Dual Interlocked Storage Cell (DICE) latch design with both PMOS and NMOS transistors in the feedback paths. The feedback transistors improve the SEU tolerance by increasing the feedback loop delay during the hold mode. The latch design was implemented in a shift register fashion at a 130-nm bulk CMOS process node. Exposures to heavy-ions exhibited a significantly higher upset LET threshold and lower cross-section compared with the traditional DICE latch design. Performance penalties in terms of write delay, power, and area are non-significant compared to traditional DICE design.

  16. Maternal Gaze Behaviors During Latching-On for Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Keiko; Toyota, Mari; Endo, Keiko; Nakamura, Yasuka; Atogami, Fumi; Yoshizawa, Toyoko

    Studies in various fields have demonstrated that experts use specific gaze strategies to achieve better performance. Therefore, we hypothesized that mothers familiar with breastfeeding would use a specific gaze strategy to achieve better latching-on. A head-mounted eye tracker was used to record pupil positions from 14 breastfeeding mothers with 1-month-old infants. Eye gazes were analyzed during the latching-on and assessment phases. During the latching-on phase, participants tended to fixate on their breast, the infant's lower face, an intermediate region between the infant's face and the breast, and the region of contact between the infant's mouth and the breast. Once the infant latched onto the breast, mothers typically assessed the latch by fixating on their breast or the region of contact between the infant's mouth and the breast. The gaze patterns were generally maintained without being influenced by the subtask properties of each phase. Similar to previous studies, we found that mothers fixated on specific locations that were relevant to the current breastfeeding subtask, suggesting that the gaze behavior contributes to the execution of latching-on. Therefore, it is important to consider that successful latching-on is influenced by maternal physical movements and efficient gazing behaviors.

  17. 49 CFR 236.801 - Shoe, latch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Shoe, latch. 236.801 Section 236.801 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Shoe, latch. The casting by means of which the latch rod and the latch block are held to a lever of...

  18. 49 CFR 236.801 - Shoe, latch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Shoe, latch. 236.801 Section 236.801 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Shoe, latch. The casting by means of which the latch rod and the latch block are held to a lever of...

  19. 49 CFR 236.801 - Shoe, latch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Shoe, latch. 236.801 Section 236.801 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Shoe, latch. The casting by means of which the latch rod and the latch block are held to a lever of...

  20. 49 CFR 236.801 - Shoe, latch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Shoe, latch. 236.801 Section 236.801 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Shoe, latch. The casting by means of which the latch rod and the latch block are held to a lever of...

  1. 49 CFR 236.801 - Shoe, latch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shoe, latch. 236.801 Section 236.801 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Shoe, latch. The casting by means of which the latch rod and the latch block are held to a lever of...

  2. Retaining latch for a water pit gate

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    The present invention relates to retaining devices which are used to latch two elements or parts together and, more particularly, to gate latches for use in locking a gate to a wall bracket in a water pit utilized to store or handle hazardous materials. A retaining latch is provided comprising a latch plate which is rotatably mounted to each end of the top of the gate and a recessed opening, formed in the gate frame, for engaging an edge of the latch plate. The latch plate is circular in profile with one side cut away or flat, such that the latch plate is D-shaped. The remaining circular edge of the latch plate comprises steps of successively reduced thickness. The stepped edge of the latch plate fits inside a recessed opening formed in the gate frame. As the latch plate is rotated, alternate steps of the latch plate are engaged by the recessed opening. When the latch plate is rotated such that the flat portion of the latch plate faces the recessed opening in the gate frame, there is no connection between the opening and the latch plate and the gate is unlatched from the gate frame.

  3. Performance tradeoffs in static and dynamic load balancing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iqbal, M. A.; Saltz, J. H.; Bokhart, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of uniformly distributing the load of a parallel program over a multiprocessor system was considered. A program was analyzed whose structure permits the computation of the optimal static solution. Then four strategies for load balancing were described and their performance compared. The strategies are: (1) the optimal static assignment algorithm which is guaranteed to yield the best static solution, (2) the static binary dissection method which is very fast but sub-optimal, (3) the greedy algorithm, a static fully polynomial time approximation scheme, which estimates the optimal solution to arbitrary accuracy, and (4) the predictive dynamic load balancing heuristic which uses information on the precedence relationships within the program and outperforms any of the static methods. It is also shown that the overhead incurred by the dynamic heuristic is reduced considerably if it is started off with a static assignment provided by either of the other three strategies.

  4. K-Band Latching Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  5. K-band latching switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-05-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  6. Optical set-reset latch

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J.

    2013-01-29

    An optical set-reset (SR) latch is formed from a first electroabsorption modulator (EAM), a second EAM and a waveguide photodetector (PD) which are arranged in an optical and electrical feedback loop which controls the transmission of light through the first EAM to latch the first EAM in a light-transmissive state in response to a Set light input. A second waveguide PD controls the transmission of light through the second EAM and is used to switch the first EAM to a light-absorptive state in response to a Reset light input provided to the second waveguide PD. The optical SR latch, which may be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or a GaAs substrate) as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC), stores a bit of optical information and has an optical output for the logic state of that bit of information.

  7. Retaining latch for a water pit gate

    DOEpatents

    Beale, A.R.

    1997-11-18

    A retaining latch is described for use in a hazardous materials storage or handling facility to adjustably retain a water pit gate in a gate frame. A retaining latch is provided comprising a latch plate which is rotatably mounted to each end of the top of the gate and a recessed opening, formed in the gate frame, for engaging an edge of the latch plate. The latch plate is circular in profile with one side cut away or flat, such that the latch plate is D-shaped. The remaining circular edge of the latch plate comprises steps of successively reduced thickness. The stepped edge of the latch plate fits inside a recessed opening formed in the gate frame. As the latch plate is rotated, alternate steps of the latch plate are engaged by the recessed opening. When the latch plate is rotated such that the flat portion of the latch plate faces the recessed opening in the gate frame, there is no connection between the opening and the latch plate and the gate is unlatched from the gate frame. 4 figs.

  8. Retaining latch for a water pit gate

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, A.R.

    1997-11-18

    A retaining latch is described for use in a hazardous materials storage or handling facility to adjustably retain a water pit gate in a gate frame. A retaining latch is provided comprising a latch plate which is rotatably mounted to each end of the top of the gate and a recessed opening, formed in the gate frame, for engaging an edge of the latch plate. The latch plate is circular in profile with one side cut away or flat, such that the latch plate is D-shaped. The remaining circular edge of the latch plate comprises steps of successively reduced thickness. The stepped edge of the latch plate fits inside a recessed opening formed in the gate frame. As the latch plate is rotated, alternate steps of the latch plate are engaged by the recessed opening. When the latch plate is rotated such that the flat portion of the latch plate faces the recessed opening in the gate frame, there is no connection between the opening and the latch plate and the gate is unlatched from the gate frame. 4 figs.

  9. Retaining latch for a water pit gate

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, Arden R.

    1997-01-01

    A retaining latch for use in a hazardous materials storage or handling facility to adjustably retain a water pit gate in a gate frame. A retaining latch is provided comprising a latch plate which is rotatably mounted to each end of the top of the gate and a recessed opening, formed in the gate frame, for engaging an edge of the latch plate. The latch plate is circular in profile with one side cut away or flat, such that the latch plate is D-shaped. The remaining circular edge of the latch plate comprises steps of successively reduced thickness. The stepped edge of the latch plate fits inside a recessed opening formed in the gate frame. As the latch plate is rotated, alternate steps of the latch plate are engaged by the recessed opening. When the latch plate is rotated such that the flat portion of the latch plate faces the recessed opening in the gate frame, there is no connection between the opening and the latch plate and the gate is unlatched from the gate frame.

  10. Electrical latching of microelectromechanical devices

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Sleefe, Gerard E.

    2004-11-02

    Methods are disclosed for row and column addressing of an array of microelectromechanical (MEM) devices. The methods of the present invention are applicable to MEM micromirrors or memory elements and allow the MEM array to be programmed and maintained latched in a programmed state with a voltage that is generally lower than the voltage required for electrostatically switching the MEM devices.

  11. ROPS performance during field upset and static testing.

    PubMed

    Harris, J R; McKenzie, E A; Etherton, J R; Cantis, D M; Ronaghi, M

    2010-01-01

    Agriculture remains one of the most hazardous occupations in the U.S. By conservative estimates, tractor overturns alone claim 120 lives annually. A rollover protective structure (ROPS) and a seatbelt are a highly effective engineering safety control that can prevent many of these fatalities and reduce the severity of injuries associated with tractor overturn. SAE J2194 is a consensus performance standard established for agricultural ROPS. According to this standard, satisfactory ROPS performance can be demonstrated through static testing, field upset testing, or impact testing. A previous modeling study suggested that static testing may underpredict the strain induced in a ROPS during afield upset. In the current study, field upset testing and laboratory static testing results were compared. Field upset testing included six rear and six side upset tests performed according to SAE J2194 guidelines. Additionally, static testing was performed on a ROPS of the same model. The results support findings from the modeling study. Near the lowest sections of the ROPS, the plastic strain resulting from rear upset testing exceeded the plastic strain from static testing for 18 of 24 data points. Conversely, the ROPS plastic strain from side upset testing was typically less than plastic strain from laboratory static testing. However, data indicate that the side upset test may not be very repeatable. This study suggests that the longitudinal loading energy criterion for static testing might not be a conservative predictor of rear upset ROPS response.

  12. Manned maneuvering unit latching mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The astronaut/Manned Maneuvering Unit interface, which presented a challenging set of requirements for a latching mechanism, is described. A spring loaded cam segment with variable ratio pulley release actuator was developed to meet the requirements. To preclude jamming of the mechanism, special precautions were taken such as spring loaded bearing points and careful selection of materials to resist cold welding. The mechanism successfully passed a number of tests which partially simulated orbital conditions.

  13. Static load test performance of a telescoping structure for an automatically deployable ROPS.

    PubMed

    Etherton, J R; Cutlip, R G; Harris, J R; Ronaghi, M; Means, K H; Gillispie, A

    2002-02-01

    The automatically deployable ROPS was developed as part of an innovative project to provide passive protection against overturn fatality to operators of new tractors used in both low-clearance and unrestricted-clearance tasks. The primary objective of this phase of the research was to build a telescoping structure that would prove that a ROPS can be built that will (1) reliably deploy on signal, (2) rise in a sufficiently short amount of time, (3) firmly latch in its deployed position, and (4) satisfy SAE J2194 testing requirements. The two-post structure had previously been found to meet deployment time criteria, and design analyses indicated that neither the slip-fit joint nor the latch pins would fail at test loading. Four directions of static loading were applied to the structure to satisfy SAE requirements. For the series of static loading tests, the raised structure was found to maintain a protective clearance zone after all loads were applied. The structure is overly stiff and should be redesigned to increase its ability to absorb ground-impact energy. Results of dynamic tests and field upset tests are reported in companion articles. The next phase of development is to optimize the structure so that it will plastically deform and absorb energy that would otherwise be transferred to the tractor chassis.

  14. Actuator system history of safety rod lower latch problems review of latch inspection video tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J.J.

    1992-06-24

    During pre-restart testing the safety rod at position X26-YlO bound after being driven approximately two (2) feet out of the reactor. Subsequently, the rod was manually returned to it's seated position. Inspection of the lower latch showed that the latch locking plunger button (screwed on to the bottom of the plunger shaft and retained by a pin through a hole drilled through the button and the plunger shaft) was missing. The shaft failed through the hole drilled for the retaining pin. The button, with the retaining pin intact, was found lodged between the safety rod upper adapter collar and the top of the safety rod thimble top fitting. Analysis of the safety rod latch and accompanying forest guide tube design provided assurance that this type of failure would not cause binding during the scramming'' of the safety rods. Inspection of all of the K'' safety rod lower latches revealed six other latches with missing plunger buttons, and nine with other non-conformances which required latch replacement. A history search conducted by Reactor Engineering Design, Components Handling Group, is included in this report. The history search shows that latch design modifications, as a part of initial development of the latch system and later to improve the delatching operation, were made from 1950 to 1960. These modifications created a condition where latch damage could occur. Video tapes were made during inspection of the safety rod latches in K area and control rod latches in L area. These tapes were reviewed by Reactor Engineering Design Components Handling engineers. The reviews were used for correlation of latch problems reported by the engineers/mechanics making the inspections. The K area tapes showed inspection of 65 of the 66 safety rod latches. The review of the tapes showed the plunger buttons to be missing from five latches. RED-CH reviewed the L Area video taped inspection of 35 control rod clusters (245 latches). No non-conformances were noted.

  15. Actuator system history of safety rod lower latch problems review of latch inspection video tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J.J.

    1992-06-24

    During pre-restart testing the safety rod at position X26-YlO bound after being driven approximately two (2) feet out of the reactor. Subsequently, the rod was manually returned to it`s seated position. Inspection of the lower latch showed that the latch locking plunger button (screwed on to the bottom of the plunger shaft and retained by a pin through a hole drilled through the button and the plunger shaft) was missing. The shaft failed through the hole drilled for the retaining pin. The button, with the retaining pin intact, was found lodged between the safety rod upper adapter collar and the top of the safety rod thimble top fitting. Analysis of the safety rod latch and accompanying forest guide tube design provided assurance that this type of failure would not cause binding during the ``scramming`` of the safety rods. Inspection of all of the ``K`` safety rod lower latches revealed six other latches with missing plunger buttons, and nine with other non-conformances which required latch replacement. A history search conducted by Reactor Engineering Design, Components Handling Group, is included in this report. The history search shows that latch design modifications, as a part of initial development of the latch system and later to improve the delatching operation, were made from 1950 to 1960. These modifications created a condition where latch damage could occur. Video tapes were made during inspection of the safety rod latches in K area and control rod latches in L area. These tapes were reviewed by Reactor Engineering Design Components Handling engineers. The reviews were used for correlation of latch problems reported by the engineers/mechanics making the inspections. The K area tapes showed inspection of 65 of the 66 safety rod latches. The review of the tapes showed the plunger buttons to be missing from five latches. RED-CH reviewed the L Area video taped inspection of 35 control rod clusters (245 latches). No non-conformances were noted.

  16. Quick-Connect, Self-Alining Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, G. C.; Williams, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    Sturdy latch tolerates 10 degrees of angular mismatch in joining structural elements. Hexagonal passive plate nests in active plate, guided by capture plates and alinement keys and grooves. Center hole in both active and passive plates is 1 meter in diameter. Latch has possible uses a pipe joint, connector for parts of portable structures, and fitting for marine risers on offshore drilling rigs.

  17. Quick-Connect, Self-Alining Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, G. C.; Williams, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    Sturdy latch tolerates 10 degrees of angular mismatch in joining structural elements. Hexagonal passive plate nests in active plate, guided by capture plates and alinement keys and grooves. Center hole in both active and passive plates is 1 meter in diameter. Latch has possible uses a pipe joint, connector for parts of portable structures, and fitting for marine risers on offshore drilling rigs.

  18. Quick release latch for reactor scram

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Melvin L.; Shawver, Bruce M.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, reliable, and fast-acting means for releasing a control element and allowing it to be inserted rapidly into the core region of a nuclear reactor for scram purposes. A latch mechanism grips a coupling head on a nuclear control element to connect the control element to the control drive assembly. The latch mechanism is closed by tensioning a cable or rod with an actuator. The control element is released by de-energizing the actuator, providing fail-safe, rapid release of the control element to effect reactor shutdown. A sensing rod provides indication that the control element is properly positioned in the latch. Two embodiments are illustrated, one involving a collet-type latch mechanism, the other a pliers-type latch mechanism with the actuator located inside the reactor vessel.

  19. Quick release latch for reactor scram

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, M.L.; Shawver, B.M.

    1975-09-16

    A simple, reliable, and fast-acting means for releasing a control element and allowing it to be inserted rapidly into the core region of a nuclear reactor for scram purposes is described. A latch mechanism grips a coupling head on a nuclear control element to connect the control element to the control drive assembly. The latch mechanism is closed by tensioning a cable or rod with an actuator. The control element is released by de-energizing the actuator, providing fail-safe, rapid release of the control element to effect reactor shutdown. A sensing rod provides indication that the control element is properly positioned in the latch. Two embodiments are illustrated, one involving a collet- type latch mechanism, the other a pliers-type latch mechanism with the actuator located inside the reactor vessel. (auth)

  20. Assessing the SEU resistance of CMOS latches using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Blaes, B.; Nixon, R.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of Cosmic Rays on the performance of integrated circuits (IC's) in a space environment is evident in the upset rate of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) launched in Apr. 1983. This satellite experiences a single-event-upset (SEU) per day which must be corrected from the ground. Such experience caused a redesign of the Galileo spacecraft with SEU resistant IC's. The solution to the SEU problem continues to be important as the complexity of spacecraft grows, the feature size of IC's decreases, and as space systems are designed with circuits fabricated at non-radiation hardened foundries. This paper describes an approach for verifying the susceptibility of CMOS latches to heavy-ion induced state changes. The approach utilizes alpha particles to induce the upsets in test circuits. These test circuits are standard cells that have offset voltages which sensitize the circuits to upsets. These results are then used to calculate the upsetability at operating voltages. In this study results are presented for the alpha particle upset of a six-transistor static random access memory (SRAM) cell. Then a methodology is described for the analysis of a standard-cell inverter latch.

  1. Four-Point-Latching Microactuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2008-01-01

    An experimental inchworm-type linear microactuator is depicted. This microactuator is a successor to one described in "MEMS-Based Piezoelectric/Electrostatic Inchworm Actuator" (NPO-30672), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 6 (June 2003), page 68. Both actuators are based on the principle of using a piezoelectric transducer operated in alternation with electrostatically actuated clutches to cause a slider to move in small increments. However, the design of the present actuator incorporates several improvements over that of the previous one. The most readily apparent improvement is in geometry and, consequently, in fabrication: In the previous actuator, the inchworm motion was perpendicular to the broad faces of a flat silicon wafer on which the actuator was fabricated, and fabrication involved complex processes to form complex three-dimensional shapes in and on the wafer. In the present actuator, the inchworm motion is parallel to the broad faces of a wafer on which it is fabricated. The components needed to produce the in-plane motion are nearly planar in character and, consequently, easier to fabricate. Other advantages of the present design are described, including that the previous actuator contained two clutches (denoted 'holders' in the cited prior article), the present actuator contains four clutches. The operational sequence of the previous two-clutch actuator is similar. However, the two-clutch configuration is susceptible to tilt of the slider and a consequent large increase in drag. Hence, the primary operational advantages of the present four-point-latching design over the prior two-point-latching design are less drag and greater control robustness arising from greater stability of the orientation of the slider.

  2. Static Aerodynamic Performance Investigation of a Fluid Shield Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balan, C.; Askew, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    In pursuit of an acoustically acceptable, high performance exhaust system capable of meeting Federal Aviation Regulation 36 Stage 3 noise goals for the High Speed Civil Transport application, General Electric Aircraft Engines conducted a design study to incorporate a fluid shield into a 36-chute suppressor exhaust-nozzle system. After a full scale preliminary mechanical design of the resulting fluid shield exhaust system, scale model aerodynamic performance tests and acoustic tests were conducted to establish both aerodynamic performance and acoustic characteristics. Data are presented as thrust coefficients, discharge coefficients, chute-base pressure drags, and plug static pressure distributions.

  3. Static performance tests of a flight-type STOVL ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barankiewicz, Wendy S.

    1991-01-01

    The design and development of thrust augmenting STOVL ejectors has typically been based on experimental iteration (i.e., trial and error). Static performance tests of a full scale vertical lift ejector were performed at primary flow temperatures up to 1560 R (1100 F). Flow visualization (smoke generators and yarn tufts) were used to view the inlet air flow, especially around the primary nozzle and end plates. Performance calculations are presented for ambient temperatures close to 480 R (20 F) and 535 R (75 F) which simulate seasonal aircraft operating conditions. Resulting thrust augmentation ratios are presented as functions of nozzle pressure ratio and temperature.

  4. Dual-action expanded-latch mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. A.; Tewell, J. R.; Tobey, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Single drive actuator operates novel mechanism that expands, attaches to object, and withdraws to latch object firmly to another part. Packaging is extremely simple and compact, and eliminates need for machined parts or close tolerances.

  5. Effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Brown, Lee E; Oliveira de Souza, Eduardo; Wistocki, David R; Davis, Gregory S; Naimo, Marshall A; Zito, Gina A; Wilson, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    It is previously demonstrated that static stretching was associated with a decrease in running economy and distance run during a 30-minute time trial in trained runners. Recently, the detrimental effects of static stretching on economy were found to be limited to the first few minutes of an endurance bout. However, economy remains to be studied for its direct effects on performance during shorter endurance events. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance, electromyography (EMG), ground contact time (GCT), and flexibility. Ten trained male distance runners aged 24 ± 5 years with an average VO2max of 64.9 ± 6.5 mL·kg-1·min-1 were recruited. Subjects reported to the laboratory on 3 separate days interspersed by 72 hours. On day 1, anthropometrics and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max were determined on a motor-driven treadmill. On days 2 and 3, subjects performed a 5-minute treadmill warm-up and either performed a series of 6 lower-body stretches for three 30-second repetitions or sat still for 10 minutes. Time to complete a 1-mile run under stretching and nonstretching conditions took place in randomized order. For the performance run, subjects were instructed to run as fast as possible at a set incline of 5% until a distance of 1 mile was completed. Flexibility from the sit and reach test, EMG, GCT, and performance, determined by time to complete the 1-mile run, were recorded after each condition. Time to complete the run was significantly less (6:51 ± 0:28 minutes) in the nonstretching condition as compared with the stretching condition (7:04 ± 0:32 minutes). A significant condition-by-time interaction for muscle activation existed, with no change in the nonstretching condition (pre 91.3 ± 11.6 mV to post 92.2 ± 12.9 mV) but increased in the stretching condition (pre 91.0 ± 11.6 mV to post 105.3 ± 12.9 mV). A significant condition-by-time interaction for GCT was also present, with no changes in

  6. Pneumatic preloaded scanning science launch latch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kievit, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple system using a preloaded pneumatic piston latch with a pyrotechnic valve release was developed. The system was the only candidate that met all the imposed requirements utilizing reliable state-of-art components. The development of the latch system from its first use on Mariner '69 Mars Flyby Spacecraft through its most recent use on the Voyager Spacecraft that will fly to Jupiter and Saturn is reviewed.

  7. Fertilization test performance using Arbacia punctulata maintained in static culture

    SciTech Connect

    Serbst, J.R.; Wright, L.; Sheehan, C.V.; Fitzpatrick, K.

    1995-12-31

    The sea urchin fertilization test using the Atlantic urchin, Arbacia punctulata, is widely utilized in evaluating toxicity of receiving waters and effluents as part of the NPDES program. While this species is easily maintained in uncontaminated, flow-through seawater systems, laboratories without access to flowing seawater either obtain new urchins for each test or maintain populations in static cultures. This study was conducted to assess test success and reproducibility of fertilization tests conducted using urchins maintained in separate-sex, static, temperature-controlled aquaria containing filtered natural seawater. Test performance was evaluated by periodically conducting the standard sea urchin fertilization test (EPA 600/4-87-028) using a common reference toxicant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) Thirteen tests were conducted between September 1993 and May 1994 using one population of urchins, and five tests were conducted between June and December 1994 with a second population of urchins. Test success was 100% (control fertilization > 50%) with a control fertilization mean of 96.4% (S.D. = 3.3). There were no differences between mean EC{sub 50} values calculated for each set of tests (p < 0.05). The running mean value for toxicity was 7.1 mg/L (S.D. = 1.26) for 18 tests, with a CV of 17.7%, comparing favorably with values generated using urchins maintained in flowing seawater. The running mean value for toxicity in these tests was 2.4 mg/L (S.D. = 0.9) for 18 tests conducted between November 1987 and July 1989 (ASTM STP 1124). Data from all urchin tests were used to construct a control chart defining normal ranges for SDS toxicity. This study demonstrated that fertile, adult sea urchins can produce consistent toxicity responses with low variability while being maintained in static, temperature regulated culture facilities.

  8. K-band high power latching switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlinar, M. J.; Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1980-12-01

    A 19 GHz waveguide latching switch with a bandwidth of 1400 MHz and an exceptionally low insertion loss of 0.25 dB was demonstrated. The RF and driver ferrites are separate structures and can be optimized individually. This analysis for each structure is separately detailed. Basically, the RF section features a dual turnstile junction. The circulator consists of a dielectric tube which contains two ferrite rods, and a dielectric spacer separating the ferrite parts along the center of symmetry of the waveguide to form two turnstiles. This subassembly is indexed and locked in the center of symmetry of a uniform junction of three waveguides by the metallic transformers installed in the top and bottom walls of the housing. The switching junction and its actuating circuitry met all RF performance objectives and all shock and vibration requirements with no physical damage or performance degradation. It exceeds thermal requirements by operating over a 100 C temperature range (-44 C to +56 C) and has a high power handling capability allowing up to 100 W of CW input power.

  9. Minimal Power Latch for Single-Slope ADCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A latch circuit that uses two interoperating latches. The latch circuit has the beneficial feature that it switches only a single time during a measurement that uses a stair step or ramp function as an input signal in an analog to digital converter. This feature minimizes the amount of power that is consumed in the latch and also minimizes the amount of high frequency noise that is generated by the latch. An application using a plurality of such latch circuits in a parallel decoding ADC for use in an image sensor is given as an example.

  10. Static Memory Deduplication for Performance Optimization in Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Jia, Gangyong; Han, Guangjie; Wang, Hao; Yang, Xuan

    2017-04-27

    In a cloud computing environment, the number of virtual machines (VMs) on a single physical server and the number of applications running on each VM are continuously growing. This has led to an enormous increase in the demand of memory capacity and subsequent increase in the energy consumption in the cloud. Lack of enough memory has become a major bottleneck for scalability and performance of virtualization interfaces in cloud computing. To address this problem, memory deduplication techniques which reduce memory demand through page sharing are being adopted. However, such techniques suffer from overheads in terms of number of online comparisons required for the memory deduplication. In this paper, we propose a static memory deduplication (SMD) technique which can reduce memory capacity requirement and provide performance optimization in cloud computing. The main innovation of SMD is that the process of page detection is performed offline, thus potentially reducing the performance cost, especially in terms of response time. In SMD, page comparisons are restricted to the code segment, which has the highest shared content. Our experimental results show that SMD efficiently reduces memory capacity requirement and improves performance. We demonstrate that, compared to other approaches, the cost in terms of the response time is negligible.

  11. STATIC STRETCHING DOES NOT REDUCE VARIABILITY, JUMP AND SPEED PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Luís Manuel Pinto Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Background Stretching is often part of the warm-up routine prior to athletic participation; however, controversial evidence exists on the effects of stretching on countermovement jump (CMJ) and sprint performance. Additionally, analysis of variability between repeated tasks is useful for monitoring players, to analyze factors that could affect the performance, and to guide clinical decisions for training strategies. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine whether static stretching (SS) prior to CMJ and 20-meter (20-m) sprint would affect performance, and to investigate whether SS affects an athlete's ability to perform these tasks consistently. Methods Twenty-two trained healthy athletes (23.2 ± 5.0 years) attended, randomly, two testing sessions, separated by 48 hours. At session one, all participants underwent 10 minutes of dynamic running warm-up followed by the experimental tasks (three CMJ and three 20-m sprint), whereas five minutes of stretching was added after the warm-up routine at session two. All participants performed the same experimental tasks in both sessions. The stretching protocol consisted of five stretching exercises for each lower limb. Results The paired-samples t-test revealed no significant differences between the stretching protocol condition and no stretching condition for the 20-m sprint (t(21)=.920; p=.368) and CMJ (t(21)=.709; p=.486). There were no significant differences in trial-by-trial variability on 20-m sprint (t(21)=1.934; p=.067) and CMJ scores (t(21)=.793; p=.437) as result of SS. Conclusion The SS protocol did not modify jumping and running ability in trained healthy athletes. The SS prior to training or competition may not cause detrimental effects to athletic performance. Level of evidence Level III, Nonrandomized controlled trial. PMID:27104057

  12. Interpersonal synergies: static prehension tasks performed by two actors.

    PubMed

    Solnik, Stanislaw; Reschechtko, Sasha; Wu, Yen-Hsun; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    We investigated multidigit synergies stabilizing components of the resultant force vector during joint performance of a static prehension task by two persons as compared to similar tasks performed by a single person using both hands. Subjects transferred the instrumented handle from the right hand to the left hand (one-person condition) or passed that handle to another person (two-person condition) while keeping the handle's position and orientation stationary. Only three digits were involved per hand, the thumb, the index finger, and the middle finger; the forces and moments produced by the digits were measured by six-component sensors. We estimated the performance-stabilizing synergies within the uncontrolled manifold framework by quantifying the intertrial variance structure of digit forces and moments. The analysis was performed at three levels: between hands, between virtual finger and virtual thumb (imagined digits producing the same mechanical variables as the corresponding actual digits combined) produced by the two hands (in both interpersonal and intrapersonal conditions), and between the thumb and virtual finger for one hand only. Additionally, we performed correlation and phase synchronization analyses of resultant tangential forces and internal normal forces. Overall, the one-person conditions were characterized by higher amount of intertrial variance that did not affect resultant normal force components, higher internal components of normal forces, and stronger synchronization of the normal forces generated by the hands. Our observations suggest that in two-person tasks, when participants try to achieve a common mechanical outcome, the performance-stabilizing synergies depend on non-visual information exchange, possibly via the haptic and proprioceptive systems. Therefore, synergies quantified in tasks using visual feedback only may not be generalizable to more natural tasks.

  13. STATIC STRETCHING DOES NOT REDUCE VARIABILITY, JUMP AND SPEED PERFORMANCE.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Fábio Carlos Lucas; Rama, Luís Manuel Pinto Lopes

    2016-04-01

    Stretching is often part of the warm-up routine prior to athletic participation; however, controversial evidence exists on the effects of stretching on countermovement jump (CMJ) and sprint performance. Additionally, analysis of variability between repeated tasks is useful for monitoring players, to analyze factors that could affect the performance, and to guide clinical decisions for training strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine whether static stretching (SS) prior to CMJ and 20-meter (20-m) sprint would affect performance, and to investigate whether SS affects an athlete's ability to perform these tasks consistently. Twenty-two trained healthy athletes (23.2 ± 5.0 years) attended, randomly, two testing sessions, separated by 48 hours. At session one, all participants underwent 10 minutes of dynamic running warm-up followed by the experimental tasks (three CMJ and three 20-m sprint), whereas five minutes of stretching was added after the warm-up routine at session two. All participants performed the same experimental tasks in both sessions. The stretching protocol consisted of five stretching exercises for each lower limb. The paired-samples t-test revealed no significant differences between the stretching protocol condition and no stretching condition for the 20-m sprint (t(21)=.920; p=.368) and CMJ (t(21)=.709; p=.486). There were no significant differences in trial-by-trial variability on 20-m sprint (t(21)=1.934; p=.067) and CMJ scores (t(21)=.793; p=.437) as result of SS. The SS protocol did not modify jumping and running ability in trained healthy athletes. The SS prior to training or competition may not cause detrimental effects to athletic performance. Level III, Nonrandomized controlled trial.

  14. Resettable binary latch mechanism for use with paraffin linear motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maus, Daryl; Tibbitts, Scott

    1991-01-01

    A new resettable Binary Latch Mechanism was developed utilizing a paraffin actuator as the motor. This linear actuator alternately latches between extended and retracted positions, maintaining either position with zero power consumption. The design evolution and kinematics of the latch mechanism are presented, as well as the development problems and lessons that were learned.

  15. Tailless aircraft performance improvements with relaxed static stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenas, Irving L.; Klyde, David H.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the tailless aircraft performance improvements gained from relaxed static stability, to quantify this potential in terms of range-payload improvements, and to identify other possible operational and handling benefits or problems. Two configurations were chosen for the study: a modern high aspect ratio, short-chord wing proposed as a high-altitude long endurance (HALE) remotely piloted vehicle; a wider, lower aspect ratio, high volume wing suitable for internal stowage of all fuel and payload required for a manned long-range reconnaissance mission. Flying at best cruise altitude, both unstable configurations were found to have a 14 percent improvement in range and a 7 to 9 percent improvement in maximum endurance compared to the stable configurations. The unstable manned configuration also shows a 15 percent improvement in the 50 ft takeoff obstacle distance and an improved height response to elevator control. However, it is generally more deficient in control power due to its larger adverse aileron yaw and its higher takeoff and landing lift coefficient C(sub L), both due to the downward trimmed (vs. upward trimmed for stable configurations) trailing edge surfaces.

  16. Static Performance of a Wing-Mounted Thrust Reverser Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to study the static aerodynamic performance of a wing-mounted thrust reverser concept applicable to subsonic transport aircraft. This innovative engine powered thrust reverser system is designed to utilize wing-mounted flow deflectors to produce aircraft deceleration forces. Testing was conducted using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0, a supercritical left-hand wing section attached via a pylon, and wing-mounted flow deflectors attached to the wing section. Geometric variations of key design parameters investigated for the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept included flow deflector angle and chord length, deflector edge fences, and the yaw mount angle of the deflector system (normal to the engine centerline or parallel to the wing trailing edge). All tests were conducted with no external flow and high pressure air was used to simulate core and fan engine exhaust flows. Test results indicate that the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept can achieve overall thrust reverser effectiveness levels competitive with (parallel mount), or better than (normal mount) a conventional cascade thrust reverser system. By removing the thrust reverser system from the nacelle, the wing-mounted concept offers the nacelle designer more options for improving nacelle aero dynamics and propulsion-airframe integration, simplifying nacelle structural designs, reducing nacelle weight, and improving engine maintenance access.

  17. Misuse study of latch attachment: a series of frontal sled tests.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rajiv; Ghati, Yoganand

    2007-01-01

    This study was initiated to quantify the effects of the misuse in LATCH lower webbing. In the short period since the implementation of the LATCH system several cases of potential misuses have been reported. A series of sled tests in frontal impact mode were conducted with various misuse conditions (loose attachment of LATCH lower webbing, misrouting of LATCH lower webbing and child seat back inclination) for both forward and rearward facing child safety seats (FFCSS and RFCSS). Results from these tests are compared and discussed with that of the standard test with no misuse and showed that as the slack in the lower LATCH webbing increased, ATD injury measures exceeded the limits. The FFCSS tests in the reclined condition yielded lower injury values for all except the chest G's when compared to the standard upright test. In the misrouting tests the ATD kinematics depended on the routing pivot point, the lower the pivot point the better the ATD kinematics. Similar findings were also observed in the RFCSS tests. The use of top tether with the FFCSS substantially improved the performance of the Hybrid III 3 year old ATD in spite of misuse conditions and the injury values were lower than the corresponding tests with no top tether. The effective reduction was 37% in the HIC values, 6% in the chest G's, 30% in the head excursion, 22 % in the knee excursion and finally 37 % reduction in the Nij values.

  18. Magnetic latch trigger for inherent shutdown assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sowa, Edmund S.

    1976-01-01

    An inherent shutdown assembly for a nuclear reactor is provided. A neutron absorber is held ready to be inserted into the reactor core by a magnetic latch. The latch includes a magnet whose lines of force are linked by a yoke of material whose Curie point is at the critical temperature of the reactor at which the neutron absorber is to be inserted into the reactor core. The yoke is in contact with the core coolant or fissionable material so that when the coolant or the fissionable material increase in temperature above the Curie point the yoke loses its magnetic susceptibility and the magnetic link is broken, thereby causing the absorber to be released into the reactor core.

  19. Quasi-static rotor morphing concepts for rotorcraft performance improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Mihir

    The current research is focused on two separate quasi-static rotor morphing concepts: Variable span and variable camber. Both concepts were analyzed from the perspective of the performance improvements they allow for, as well as their design requirements. The goal of this body of work is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the benefits and implementation challenges of both systems. For the case of the variable span rotor concept, the effects on aircraft performance were evaluated for a UH-60A type aircraft. The parametric analysis included the performance effects of the rotor span and rotor speed variation, both individually as well as in combination. The design space considered the effect of three different gross weights (16000 lbs, 18300 lbs and 24000 lbs), for a window of +/-11% variation of the rotor speed and a range between +17% to --16% of radius variation (about the baseline) for a range of altitudes. The results of the analysis showed that variable span rotors by themselves are capable of reducing the power requirement of the helicopter by up to 20% for high altitude and gross weight conditions. However, when combined with rotor speed variation, it was possible to reduce the overall power required by the aircraft by up to 30%. Complimentary to the performance analysis, an analytical study of actuation concepts for a variable span rotor was also conducted. This study considered the design of two active actuation systems: Hydraulic pistons and threaded rods (jackscrews), and two passive systems which employed the use of an internal spring type restraining device. For all the configurations considered, it was determined that the design requirements could not be satisfied when considering the constraints defined. The performance improvements due to a variable camber system were evaluated for a BO-105 type rotor in hover. The design space considered included three different thrust levels (4800 lbs, 5500 lbs and 6400 lbs) for a range of altitudes and

  20. Door latching recognition apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Eakle, Jr., Robert F.

    2012-05-15

    An acoustic door latch detector is provided in which a sound recognition sensor is integrated into a door or door lock mechanism. The programmable sound recognition sensor can be trained to recognize the acoustic signature of the door and door lock mechanism being properly engaged and secured. The acoustic sensor will signal a first indicator indicating that proper closure was detected or sound an alarm condition if the proper acoustic signature is not detected within a predetermined time interval.

  1. Non-latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A non-latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes a permanent magnet and an electromagnet. The respective sections are arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch has a "normal" position and is selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly. The switch returns to the "normal" position when the overriding electromagnetic assembly is inactive.

  2. Bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.; Deboi, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, assembly and test of a development configuration bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve suitable for the control hydrazine and liquid fluorine to an 800 pound thrust rocket engine is described. The valve features a balanced poppet, utilizing metal bellows, a hard poppet/seat interface and a flexure support system for the internal moving components. This support system eliminates sliding surfaces, thereby rendering the valve free of self generated particles.

  3. Structural latches for modular assembly of spacecraft and space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccown, William; Bennett, Neal

    1988-01-01

    Latching techniques are changing from early approaches due to the advent of berthing technology. Latch selection for a given interface may be conducted by evaluating candidate capabilities which meet functional interface requirements. A judgment criteria system is presented along with an example of its use in choosing the Rollerscrew Structural Latch (RSL) for the NASA Flat Plate Interface Prototype (FPIP). Details are given on Rollerscrew operation, design, and development difficulties. A test plan is also outlined for the RSL and FPIP.

  4. Three-dimensional simulation of rotary latch assembly in seismic response and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.K.

    1998-03-02

    The finite element method has been used to investigate the stress field in mechanical suspension systems. The critical seismic loads are depended on three-dimensional dynamic response of vacuum vessels and interactions of the equipment supporting structures to the vacuum vessels and supporting system. In this study of the optics assembly equipment (15 to 27 Hz), it was shown that the pressure vessel systems which supports the optics assembly systems (6.5 to 13 Hz) have significant influence in the seismic response of the rotary latch assembly. A potentially critical failure location is identified. An axisymmetrical elastic analysis predicts stress at the inner radius of the lower housing can be reduced by 60% with simple design modification. Use of three-dimensional dynamic model and static model to evaluate the combined complex stress permits prediction of the rotary latch assembly operating life and seismic safety.

  5. Static and dynamic performances of refrigerant-lubricated foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchehit, B.; Bou-Saïd, B.; Garcia, M.

    2016-08-01

    Gas bearings are successfully used over a large panel of turbo-machineries. Some of these systems run in controlled environments such as refrigerating gas. We present in this paper a theoretical and numerical model which consider the vapor/liquid lubricant transition, the laminar/turbulent flow transition and both temperature and viscosity 3D variations in the fluid and the solids for both static and dynamic situations. The foil deflection is considered using the Heshmat's approach. This model involves: the resolution of the generalized Reynolds equation for compressible fluids with 3D variable viscosity, the description of the turbulence effects by the phenomenological approach of Elrod, using a 3D eddy viscosity field, the resolution of a non-linear equation of state for the lubricant, able to describe the vapor/liquid transition and a local thermal approach to obtain a 3D estimation of the fluid temperature, thanks to the thin-film energy equation and an actualisation of the film thickness. The thermal effects in solids are also taken into account. Both static and dynamic behaviours of GFBs are analysed.

  6. A Modular, Reusable Latch and Decking System for Securing Payloads During Launch and Planetary Surface Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.; Dorsey, John T.; Jones, Thomas C.; King, Bruce D.; Mikulas, Martin M.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient handling of payloads destined for a planetary surface, such as the moon or Mars, requires robust systems to secure the payloads during transport on the ground, in-space and on the planetary surface. In addition, mechanisms to release the payloads need to be reliable to ensure successful transfer from one vehicle to another. An efficient payload handling strategy must also consider the devices available to support payload handling. Cranes used for overhead lifting are common to all phases of payload handling on Earth. Similarly, both recent and past studies have demonstrated that devices with comparable functionality will be needed to support lunar outpost operations. A first generation test-bed of a new high performance device that provides the capabilities of both a crane and a robotic manipulator, the Lunar Surface Manipulation System (LSMS), has been designed, built and field tested and is available for use in evaluating a system to secure payloads to transportation vehicles. National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton Va 23662 A payload handling approach must address all phases of payload management including: ground transportation, launch, planetary transfer and installation in the final system. In addition, storage may be required during any phase of operations. Each of these phases requires the payload to be lifted and secured to a vehicle, transported, released and lifted in preparation for the next transportation or storage phase. A critical component of a successful payload handling approach is a latch and associated carrier system. The latch and carrier system should minimize requirements on the: payload, carrier support structure and payload handling devices as well as be able to accommodate a wide range of payload sizes. In addition, the latch should; be small and lightweight, support a method to apply preload, be reusable, integrate into a minimal set of hard-points and have manual interfaces to actuate the latch should a problem occur. A

  7. A Modular, Reusable Latch and Decking System for Securing Payloads During Launch and Planetary Surface Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.; Dorsey, John T.; Jones, Thomas C.; King, Bruce D.; Mikulas, Martin M.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient handling of payloads destined for a planetary surface, such as the moon or mars, requires robust systems to secure the payloads during transport on the ground, in space and on the planetary surface. In addition, mechanisms to release the payloads need to be reliable to ensure successful transfer from one vehicle to another. An efficient payload handling strategy must also consider the devices available to support payload handling. Cranes used for overhead lifting are common to all phases of payload handling on Earth. Similarly, both recent and past studies have demonstrated that devices with comparable functionality will be needed to support lunar outpost operations. A first generation test-bed of a new high performance device that provides the capabilities of both a crane and a robotic manipulator, the Lunar Surface Manipulation System (LSMS), has been designed, built and field tested and is available for use in evaluating a system to secure payloads to transportation vehicles. A payload handling approach must address all phases of payload management including: ground transportation, launch, planetary transfer and installation in the final system. In addition, storage may be required during any phase of operations. Each of these phases requires the payload to be lifted and secured to a vehicle, transported, released and lifted in preparation for the next transportation or storage phase. A critical component of a successful payload handling approach is a latch and associated carrier system. The latch and carrier system should minimize requirements on the: payload, carrier support structure and payload handling devices as well as be able to accommodate a wide range of payload sizes. In addition, the latch should; be small and lightweight, support a method to apply preload, be reusable, integrate into a minimal set of hard-points and have manual interfaces to actuate the latch should a problem occur. A latching system which meets these requirements has been

  8. Engineering Evaluation of International Low Impact Docking System Latch Hooks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, J.; Patin, R.; Figert, J.

    2013-01-01

    The international Low Impact Docking System (iLIDS) provides a structural arrangement that allows for visiting vehicles to dock with the International Space Station (ISS) (Fig 1). The iLIDS docking units are mechanically joined together by a series of active and passive latch hooks. In order to preserve docking capability at the existing Russian docking interfaces, the iLIDS latch hooks are required to conform to the existing Russian design. The latch hooks are classified as being fail-safe. Since the latch hooks are fail-safe, the hooks are not fracture critical and a fatigue based service life assessment will satisfy the structural integrity requirements. Constant amplitude fatigue testing to failure on four sets of active/passive iLIDS latch hooks was performed at load magnitudes of 10, 11, and 12 kips. Failure analysis of the hook fatigue failures identified multi-site fatigue initiation that was effectively centered about the hook mid-plane (consistent with the 3D model results). The fatigue crack initiation distribution implies that the fatigue damage accumulation effectively results in a very low aspect ratio surface crack (which can be simulated as thru-thickness crack). Fatigue damage progression resulted in numerous close proximity fatigue crack initiation sites. It was not possible to determine if fatigue crack coalescence occurs during cyclic loading or as result of the fast fracture response. The presence of multiple fatigue crack initiation sites on different planes will result in the formation of ratchet marks as the cracks coalesce. Once the stable fatigue crack becomes unstable and the fast fracture advances across the remaining ligament and the plane stress condition at a free-surface will result in failure along a 45 deg. shear plane (slant fracture) and the resulting inclined edge is called a shear lip. The hook thickness on the plane of fatigue crack initiation is 0.787". The distance between the shear lips on this plane was on the order of 0

  9. Iterative solution of large, sparse linear systems on a static data flow architecture - Performance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, D. A.; Patrick, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of static data flow architectures to the iterative solution of sparse linear systems of equations is investigated. An analytic performance model of a static data flow computation is developed. This model includes both spatial parallelism, concurrent execution in multiple PE's, and pipelining, the streaming of data from array memories through the PE's. The performance model is used to analyze a row partitioned iterative algorithm for solving sparse linear systems of algebraic equations. Based on this analysis, design parameters for the static data flow architecture as a function of matrix sparsity and dimension are proposed.

  10. Gate drive latching circuit for an auxiliary resonant commutation circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Eladio Clemente (Inventor); Kheraluwala, Mustansir Hussainy (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A gate drive latching circuit for an auxiliary resonant commutation circuit for a power switching inverter includes a current monitor circuit providing a current signal to a pair of analog comparators to implement latching of one of a pair of auxiliary switching devices which are used to provide commutation current for commutating switching inverters in the circuit. Each of the pair of comparators feeds a latching circuit which responds to an active one of the comparators for latching the associated gate drive circuit for one of the pair of auxiliary commutating switches. An initial firing signal is applied to each of the commutating switches to gate each into conduction and the resulting current is monitored to determine current direction and therefore the one of the switches which is carrying current. The comparator provides a latching signal to the one of the auxiliary power switches which is actually conducting current and latches that particular power switch into an on state for the duration of current through the device. The latching circuit is so designed that the only time one of the auxiliary switching devices can be latched on is during the duration of an initial firing command signal.

  11. Characterization of an Autonomous Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Memory Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, Caroline S.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Evans, Joe; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    We present the electrical characterization of an autonomous non-volatile ferroelectric memory latch using the principle that when an electric field is applied to a ferroelectriccapacitor,the positive and negative remnant polarization charge states of the capacitor are denoted as either data 0 or data 1. The properties of the ferroelectric material to store an electric polarization in the absence of an electric field make the device non-volatile. Further the memory latch is autonomous as it operates with the ground, power and output node connections, without any externally clocked control line. The unique quality of this latch circuit is that it can be written when powered off. The advantages of this latch over flash memories are: a) It offers unlimited reads/writes b) works on symmetrical read/write cycles. c) The latch is asynchronous. The circuit was initially developed by Radiant Technologies Inc., Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  12. Serratus anterior muscle activation during knee push-up plus exercise performed on static stable, static unstable, and oscillating unstable surfaces in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-hyun; Kwon, Oh-yun; Kim, Su-jung; Park, Kyue-nam; Choung, Sung-dae; Weon, Jong-hyuck

    2014-02-01

    To compare electromyographic (EMG) activity of the serratus anterior (SA) during knee push-up plus exercises according to various surfaces (static stable, static unstable, and oscillating unstable surfaces). Comparative study by repeated measures. Yonsei University laboratory. In total, 15 healthy male subjects participated. The subjects performed knee push-up plus exercises on three different surfaces: static stable, static unstable, and oscillating unstable surfaces. Surface EMG activity of the SA for the peak and average amplitudes were collected from the dominant arm and presented as a percentage of the maximal voluntary contraction. A one-way repeated-measures ANOVA with a Bonferroni post hoc test was performed to compare differences in SA EMG activity according to the surface. The peak and average amplitudes of SA activity were significantly greater during knee push-up plus on the oscillating unstable surface than on the static stable or static unstable surfaces (p < 0.01). Additionally, there was no significant difference between the stable and static unstable surfaces (p > 0.05). Knee push-up plus exercise on an oscillating unstable surface activates the SA more than the same exercise on static stable and static unstable surfaces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel tape spring hinge mechanism for quasi-static deployment of a satellite deployable using shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ju Won; Yoo, Young Ik; Shin, Dong Kil; Lim, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Jung Ju

    2014-02-01

    A tape spring hinge (TSH) is a typical flexible deployment device for a satellite and becomes frequently used due to its simplicity, lightweight, low cost, and high deployment reliability. However, the performance of a TSH is quite limited due to trade-offs among deployed stiffness, deployment torque, and latch-up shock despite its many advantages. In this study, a novel conceptual design that circumvents the trade-offs among functional requirements (FRs) is proposed. The trade-offs are obviated by a newly proposed shape memory alloy damper that converts the deployment behavior of a conventional TSH from unstable dynamic to stable quasi-static. This makes it possible to maximize the deployment stiffness and deployment torque of a conventional TSH, which are larger-the-better FR, without any increase in the latch-up shock. Therefore, in view of conceptual design, it is possible to design a highly improved TSH that has much higher deployed stiffness and deployment torque compared to a conventional TSH while minimizing latch-up shock and deployment unstableness. Detailed design was performed through response surface method and finite element analysis. Finally, a prototype was manufactured and tested in order to verify its performance (four point, deployment torque, and latch-up shock tests). The test results confirm the feasibility of the proposed TSH mechanism.

  14. A novel tape spring hinge mechanism for quasi-static deployment of a satellite deployable using shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ju Won; Yoo, Young Ik; Shin, Dong Kil; Lim, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Jung Ju

    2014-02-01

    A tape spring hinge (TSH) is a typical flexible deployment device for a satellite and becomes frequently used due to its simplicity, lightweight, low cost, and high deployment reliability. However, the performance of a TSH is quite limited due to trade-offs among deployed stiffness, deployment torque, and latch-up shock despite its many advantages. In this study, a novel conceptual design that circumvents the trade-offs among functional requirements (FRs) is proposed. The trade-offs are obviated by a newly proposed shape memory alloy damper that converts the deployment behavior of a conventional TSH from unstable dynamic to stable quasi-static. This makes it possible to maximize the deployment stiffness and deployment torque of a conventional TSH, which are larger-the-better FR, without any increase in the latch-up shock. Therefore, in view of conceptual design, it is possible to design a highly improved TSH that has much higher deployed stiffness and deployment torque compared to a conventional TSH while minimizing latch-up shock and deployment unstableness. Detailed design was performed through response surface method and finite element analysis. Finally, a prototype was manufactured and tested in order to verify its performance (four point, deployment torque, and latch-up shock tests). The test results confirm the feasibility of the proposed TSH mechanism.

  15. Miga Aero Actuator and 2D Machined Mechanical Binary Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummin, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    actuators. SMA actuators typically perform ideally as latch-release devices, wherein a spring-loaded device is released when the SMA actuator actuates in one direction. But many applications require cycling between two latched states open and closed.

  16. A 12 GHz broadband latching circulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Y.; Konishi, H.; Sakamoto, K.

    The two kinds of latching circulators, external return path and internal return path, are defined, noting the advantages (faster switching speed, lower switching energy, less complicated fabrication) offered by the internal configuration. It is noted, however, that this kind of circulator is difficult to make broadband because the return paths do not seem to act as part of the ferrite junction. The development of a 12-GHz broadband, internal return path circulator with impedance matching transformer and in-phase adjustment screws designed using eigenvalue measurement is described. In describing the operating characteristics, it is noted that more than 25 dB isolation over 11 GHz to 13.5 GHz and 0.25 dB insertion loss is obtained.

  17. Performance analysis of static locking in replicated distributed database systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Yinghong; Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    Data replication and transaction deadlocks can severely affect the performance of distributed database systems. Many current evaluation techniques ignore these aspects, because it is difficult to evaluate through analysis and time consuming to evaluate through simulation. A technique is used that combines simulation and analysis to closely illustrate the impact of deadlock and evaluate performance of replicated distributed database with both shared and exclusive locks.

  18. Performance analysis of static locking in replicated distributed database systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Yinghong; Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    Data replications and transaction deadlocks can severely affect the performance of distributed database systems. Many current evaluation techniques ignore these aspects, because it is difficult to evaluate through analysis and time consuming to evaluate through simulation. Here, a technique is discussed that combines simulation and analysis to closely illustrate the impact of deadlock and evaluate performance of replicated distributed databases with both shared and exclusive locks.

  19. Pumping Performance or RBCC Engine under Sea Level Static Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchi, Toshinori; Tomioka, Sadatake; Kanda, Takeshi

    Numerical simulations were conducted to predict the ejector pumping performance of a rocket-ramjet combined-cycle engine under a take-off condition. The numerical simulations revealed that the suction airflow was chocked at the exit of the engine throat when the ejector rocket was driven by cold N2 gas at the chamber pressure of 3MPa. When the ejector-driving gas was changed from cold N2 gas to hot combustion gas, the suction performance decreased remarkably. Mach contours in the engine revealed that the rocket plume constricted when the driving gas was the hot combustion gas. The change of the area of the stream tube area seemed to induce the pressure rise in the duct and decreasing in the pumping performance.

  20. Structure-Function Analysis of the OB and Latch Domains of Chlorella Virus DNA Ligase*

    PubMed Central

    Samai, Poulami; Shuman, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    Chlorella virus DNA ligase (ChVLig) is a minimized eukaryal ATP-dependent DNA sealing enzyme with an intrinsic nick-sensing function. ChVLig consists of three structural domains, nucleotidyltransferase (NTase), OB-fold, and latch, that envelop the nicked DNA as a C-shaped protein clamp. The OB domain engages the DNA minor groove on the face of the duplex behind the nick, and it makes contacts to amino acids in the NTase domain surrounding the ligase active site. The latch module occupies the DNA major groove flanking the nick. Residues at the tip of the latch contact the NTase domain to close the ligase clamp. Here we performed a structure-guided mutational analysis of the OB and latch domains. Alanine scanning defined seven individual amino acids as essential in vivo (Lys-274, Arg-285, Phe-286, and Val-288 in the OB domain; Asn-214, Phe-215, and Tyr-217 in the latch), after which structure-activity relations were clarified by conservative substitutions. Biochemical tests of the composite nick sealing reaction and of each of the three chemical steps of the ligation pathway highlighted the importance of Arg-285 and Phe-286 in the catalysis of the DNA adenylylation and phosphodiester synthesis reactions. Phe-286 interacts with the nick 5′-phosphate nucleotide and the 3′-OH base pair and distorts the DNA helical conformation at the nick. Arg-285 is a key component of the OB-NTase interface, where it forms a salt bridge to the essential Asp-29 side chain, which is imputed to coordinate divalent metal catalysts during the nick sealing steps. PMID:21527793

  1. Pumping Performance of RBCC Engine under Sea Level Static Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchi, Toshinori; Tomioka, Sadatake; Kanda, Takeshi

    Two-stream flow model of ejector including heat and mass transfer was constructed by the comparison of the numerical simulations in the rocket-ramjet combined-cycle engine driven three different rocket gas; cold N2 gas, hot combustion gas and it within excess H2. The analysis of the ejector revealed that the heat and mass transfer from hot rocket plume with supersonic speed to cold airflow induced area change (expansion) of the airflow stream tube and the pressure rise in the constant-area section at the downstream of the rocket base. This pressure rise reduced the pumping performance of the ejector. To absorb the expansion of the airflow, the flowpath was changed from the constant area to the diverging area at the downstream of the rocket base. The numerical simulation in the modified engine demonstrated that the diverging-area section at the downstream of the rocket base improved the pumping performance.

  2. Generating functionals for autonomous latching dynamics in attractor relict networks

    PubMed Central

    Linkerhand, Mathias; Gros, Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Coupling local, slowly adapting variables to an attractor network allows to destabilize all attractors, turning them into attractor ruins. The resulting attractor relict network may show ongoing autonomous latching dynamics. We propose to use two generating functionals for the construction of attractor relict networks, a Hopfield energy functional generating a neural attractor network and a functional based on information-theoretical principles, encoding the information content of the neural firing statistics, which induces latching transition from one transiently stable attractor ruin to the next. We investigate the influence of stress, in terms of conflicting optimization targets, on the resulting dynamics. Objective function stress is absent when the target level for the mean of neural activities is identical for the two generating functionals and the resulting latching dynamics is then found to be regular. Objective function stress is present when the respective target activity levels differ, inducing intermittent bursting latching dynamics. PMID:23784373

  3. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned: Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the lessons learned from heritage adoption designs. A general overview of cover deployment hardware that includes the three mechanisms of latch, hinge, and energy absorbers are also discussed.

  4. Centerline latch tool for contingency orbiter door closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The centerline latch tool was designed and developed as an EVA manual backup device for latching the Space Shuttle Orbiter's payload bay doors for reentry in case of a failure of the existing centerline latches to operate properly. The tool was designed to satisfy a wide variety of structural, mechanical, and EVA requirements. It provides a load path for forces on the payload bay doors during reentry. Since the tool would be used by an EVA crewmember, control, handgrips, operating forces, and procedures must be within the capabilities of a partially restrained, suited crewmember in a zero-gravity environment. The centerline latch tool described was designed, developed, and tested to meet these requirements.

  5. All-optical SOA latch fail-safe alarm system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2004-11-01

    Emergency alarm systems, for example, that switch off critical processes in process plant, are vulnerable to deliberate or accidental sabotage through coupling of electromagnetic pulses (EMP) to wires and/or from sparks due to broken wires. A proposed system significantly reduces vulnerability by using a fast all-optical latch in conjunction with an optical sensor and optical fibers. Sparks cannot be created on breaking an optical beam and electromagnetic field transients have negligible effect on optical signals. The optical latch uses optical semiconductor amplifiers (SOAs) configured to form a flip-flop. The flip-flop latches after the occurrence of an intrusion that may be as short as a few nanoseconds, much faster than most environmental changes occur. Detection of an emergency or any break in connections causes the light to drop, triggering the alarm. Computer simulation shows that the all-optical latch is fast and effective.

  6. Electrically controlled optical latch and switch requires less current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieczonka, W. A.; Roy, M. M.; Yeh, T. H.

    1966-01-01

    Electrically controlled optical latch consists of a sensitive phototransistor and a solid-state light source. This design requires less current to activate an optically activated switch than in prior art.

  7. Static internal performance of single-expansion-ramp nozzles with various combinations of internal geometric parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of five geometric design parameters on the internal performance of single-expansion-ramp nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The geometric variables on the expansion-ramp surface of the upper flap consisted of ramp chordal angle, ramp length, and initial ramp angle. On the lower flap, the geometric variables consisted of flap angle and flap length. Both internal performance and static-pressure distributions on the centerlines of the upper and lower flaps were obtained for all 43 nozzle configurations tested.

  8. Comparative research on “high currents” induced by single event latch-up and transient-induced latch-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui; Han, Jian-Wei; Zheng, Han-Sheng; Yu, Yong-Tao; Shangguang, Shi-Peng; Feng, Guo-Qiang; Ma, Ying-Qi

    2015-04-01

    By using the pulsed laser single event effect facility and electro-static discharge (ESD) test system, the characteristics of the “high current”, relation with external stimulus and relevance to impacted modes of single event latch-up (SEL) and transient-induced latch-up (TLU) are studied, respectively, for a 12-bit complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) analog-to-digital converter. Furthermore, the sameness and difference in physical mechanism between “high current” induced by SEL and that by TLU are disclosed in this paper. The results show that the minority carrier diffusion in the PNPN structure of the CMOS device which initiates the active parasitic NPN and PNP transistors is the common reason for the “high current” induced by SEL and for that by TLU. However, for SEL, the minority carrier diffusion is induced by the ionizing radiation, and an underdamped sinusoidal voltage on the supply node (the ground node) is the cause of the minority carrier diffusion for TLU. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41304148).

  9. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Soli, G. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is described for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 micron was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 MeV sq cm/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV sq cm/mg was determined.

  10. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Soli, G. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is described for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 micron was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 MeV sq cm/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV sq cm/mg was determined.

  11. Performance comparison between static and dynamic cardiac CT on perfusion quantitation and patient classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac CT acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. In this simulation study, we evaluate the relative classification and quantification performance of these modes for assessing myocardial blood flow (MBF). In the dynamic method, a series of low dose cardiac CT acquisitions yields data on contrast bolus dynamics over time; these data are fit with a model to give a quantitative MBF estimate. In the static method, a single CT acquisition is obtained, and the relative CT numbers in the myocardium are used to infer perfusion states. The static method does not directly yield a quantitative estimate of MBF, but these estimates can be roughly approximated by introducing assumed linear relationships between CT number and MBF, consistent with the ways such images are typically visually interpreted. Data obtained by either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including 1) stratifying patients into differing categories of ischemia and 2) using the quantitative MBF estimate directly to evaluate ischemic disease severity. Through simulations, we evaluate the performance on each of these tasks. The dynamic method has very low bias in MBF estimates, making it particularly suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, ROC analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, has superior performance in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients.

  12. Static internal performance characteristics of two thrust reverser concepts for axisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, L. D.; Re, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The statis performance of two axisymmetric nozzle thrust reverser concepts was investigated. A rotating vane thrust reverser represented a concept in which reversing is accomplished upstream of the nozzle throat, and a three door reverser concept provided reversing downstream of the nozzle throat. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to approximately 6.0. The results of this investigation indicate that both the rotating vane and three door reverser concepts were effective static thrust spoilers with the landing approach nozzle geometry and were capable of providing at least a 50 percent reversal of static thrust when fully deployed with the ground roll nozzle geometry.

  13. Static internal performance of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle with thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bare, E. Ann; Reubush, David E.

    1987-01-01

    A parametric investigation of the static internal performance of multifunction two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles has been made in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. All nozzles had a constant throat area and aspect ratio. The effects of upper and lower flap angles, divergent flap length, throat approach angle, sidewall containment, and throat geometry were determined. All nozzles were tested at a thrust vector angle that varied from 5.60 tp 23.00 deg. The nozzle pressure ratio was varied up to 10 for all configurations.

  14. Static and Dynamic Performance Simulation of Direct-Acting Force Motor Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xinghai; Ding, Jianjun; Zheng, Gang; Jiang, Kunpeng; Chen, Dongdong

    2017-07-01

    This work focuses on static and dynamic characteristics of direct-acting force motor valve. First, we analyzed the structure features and operating principle of the Mitsubishi-Hitachi force motor valve (FMV) and the operating principle of its internal permanent-magnet moving-coil force motor magnetic circuit, determined the transfer function of the FMV force motor system, and established a mathematical model for the system. Secondly, we established a static performance analysis model using the AMESIM software and utilized the model in combination with experimental results to analyze the effects of electro-hydraulic servo valve structural parameters on static characteristics. Lastly, we deduced the trajectory equation of the system, established the relationship between dynamic characteristic indexes and structural parameters, and analyzed the effects of different parameter values on the dynamic characteristics of the system. This research can provide a theoretical guidance for designing and manufacturing the FMV body.

  15. Dynamic performance and control of a static var generator using cascade multilevel inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    1996-10-01

    A cascade multilevel inverter is proposed for static VAR shifting, compensation/generation applications. The new cascade M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 single-phase full bridges in which each bridge has its own separate dc source. This inverter can generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage with only one time switching per cycle. It can eliminate the need for transformers in multipulse inverters. A prototype static VAR generator (SVG) system using 11- level cascade inverter (21-level line-to-line voltage waveform) has been built. The output voltage waveform is equivalent to that of a 60- pulse inverter. This paper focuses on dynamic performance of the cascade inverter based SVG system. Control schemes are proposed to achieve a fast response which is impossible for a conventional static VAR compensator (SVC). Analytical, simulated and experimental results show the superiority of the proposed SVG system.

  16. Effects of Static Stretching on Squat Performance in Division I Female Athletes.

    PubMed

    Heisey, Clare F; Kingsley, J Derek

    2016-01-01

    Static stretching was once recognized as a method of preparation for physical activity that would inhibit performance and increase risk of injury. However, a growing body of research suggests that static stretching may not have an inhibitory effect. Regardless, the data have not examined gender differences or the fatigue index (FI) and flexibility effects of static stretching on the back squat over multiple sets. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between a static-stretch condition (SC) and control condition (CC) on flexibility and the FI of Division I female athletes during 4 sets of the back squat. Eighteen subjects (mean ± SD; age 20 ± 1 yrs; height 164.5 ± 14.6 cm; mass 74.1 ± 26.8 kg; waist circumference 73.2 ± 5.4 cm) participated in 3 testing days over the course of 3 weeks. Each subject's 1RM back squat was assessed during the first day of testing and verified during the second. On the third testing day, subjects assigned to the SC held 3 lower-body stretches twice for 30 second intervals and those assigned to the CC rested during the corresponding 7 minutes and 50 second time period. The subjects also performed a fatiguing squat protocol consisting of 4 sets of maximum repetitions on the third day of testing. A significant (p=0.04) interaction was noted for flexibility. No significant interaction (p=0.41) was observed between the FI of the CC (41.8 ± 24.1%) or the SC (27.6 ± 45.2%). These results indicate that static stretching does not have a significant effect on multiple sets of the back squat. Therefore, coaches may allow their athletes to engage in static stretching prior to resistance exercise ad libitum.

  17. Effects of Static Stretching on Squat Performance in Division I Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    HEISEY, CLARE F.; KINGSLEY, J. DEREK

    2016-01-01

    Static stretching was once recognized as a method of preparation for physical activity that would inhibit performance and increase risk of injury. However, a growing body of research suggests that static stretching may not have an inhibitory effect. Regardless, the data have not examined gender differences or the fatigue index (FI) and flexibility effects of static stretching on the back squat over multiple sets. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between a static-stretch condition (SC) and control condition (CC) on flexibility and the FI of Division I female athletes during 4 sets of the back squat. Eighteen subjects (mean ± SD; age 20 ± 1 yrs; height 164.5 ± 14.6 cm; mass 74.1 ± 26.8 kg; waist circumference 73.2 ± 5.4 cm) participated in 3 testing days over the course of 3 weeks. Each subject’s 1RM back squat was assessed during the first day of testing and verified during the second. On the third testing day, subjects assigned to the SC held 3 lower-body stretches twice for 30 second intervals and those assigned to the CC rested during the corresponding 7 minutes and 50 second time period. The subjects also performed a fatiguing squat protocol consisting of 4 sets of maximum repetitions on the third day of testing. A significant (p=0.04) interaction was noted for flexibility. No significant interaction (p=0.41) was observed between the FI of the CC (41.8 ± 24.1%) or the SC (27.6 ± 45.2%). These results indicate that static stretching does not have a significant effect on multiple sets of the back squat. Therefore, coaches may allow their athletes to engage in static stretching prior to resistance exercise ad libitum. PMID:27766127

  18. Sprint and vertical jump performances are not affected by six weeks of static hamstring stretching.

    PubMed

    Bazett-Jones, David M; Gibson, Mark H; McBride, Jeffrey M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether 6 weeks of static hamstring stretching effects range of motion (ROM), sprint, and vertical jump performances in athletes. Twenty-one healthy division III women's track and field athletes participated in the study. Subjects were tested for bilateral knee ROM; 55-m sprint time; and vertical jump height before, at 3 weeks, and after the 6-week flexibility program. Subjects were randomly assigned to treatment and control groups and warmed up with a 10-minute jog on a track before a hamstring stretching protocol. The stretching protocol consisted of four repetitions held for 45 seconds, 4 days per week. Four variables (left and right leg ROM, 55-m sprint time, vertical jump) were analyzed using a repeated-measures analysis of variance design. No significant differences (P < or = 0.05) were found with any of the four variables between the stretching and control groups. Six weeks of a static hamstring stretching protocol did not improve knee ROM or sprint and vertical jump performances in women track and field athletes. The use of static stretching should be restricted to post practice or competition because of the detrimental effects reported throughout the literature. Based on the current investigation, it does not seem that chronic static stretching has a positive or negative impact on athletic performance. Thus, the efficacy of utilizing this practice is questionable and requires further investigation.

  19. Comparison of User Performance with Interactive and Static 3d Visualization - Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, L.; Stachoň, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Interactive 3D visualizations of spatial data are currently available and popular through various applications such as Google Earth, ArcScene, etc. Several scientific studies have focused on user performance with 3D visualization, but static perspective views are used as stimuli in most of the studies. The main objective of this paper is to try to identify potential differences in user performance with static perspective views and interactive visualizations. This research is an exploratory study. An experiment was designed as a between-subject study and a customized testing tool based on open web technologies was used for the experiment. The testing set consists of an initial questionnaire, a training task and four experimental tasks. Selection of the highest point and determination of visibility from the top of a mountain were used as the experimental tasks. Speed and accuracy of each task performance of participants were recorded. The movement and actions in the virtual environment were also recorded within the interactive variant. The results show that participants deal with the tasks faster when using static visualization. The average error rate was also higher in the static variant. The findings from this pilot study will be used for further testing, especially for formulating of hypotheses and designing of subsequent experiments.

  20. K-band high power latching switch. [communication satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlinar, M. J.; Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    A 19 GHz waveguide latching switch with a bandwidth of 1400 MHz and an exceptionally low insertion loss of 0.25 dB was demonstrated. The RF and driver ferrites are separate structures and can be optimized individually. This analysis for each structure is separately detailed. Basically, the RF section features a dual turnstile junction. The circulator consists of a dielectric tube which contains two ferrite rods, and a dielectric spacer separating the ferrite parts along the center of symmetry of the waveguide to form two turnstiles. This subassembly is indexed and locked in the center of symmetry of a uniform junction of three waveguides by the metallic transformers installed in the top and bottom walls of the housing. The switching junction and its actuating circuitry met all RF performance objectives and all shock and vibration requirements with no physical damage or performance degradation. It exceeds thermal requirements by operating over a 100 C temperature range (-44 C to +56 C) and has a high power handling capability allowing up to 100 W of CW input power.

  1. Effect of endurance training on cardiovascular response to static exercise performed with untrained muscles.

    PubMed

    Krzeminski, K; Miskiewicz, Z; Niewiadomski, W; Nazar, K; Kozlowski, S

    1989-10-01

    Eighteen male volunteers (20-23 years) were submitted to 13 weeks of training consisting of 30 min of exercise (at 50%-75% VO2max) on a bicycle ergometer, performed three times a week. Every 4 weeks the heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and systolic time interval (STI) responses to the static handgrip (at 30% MVC) were examined. Before and after 13 weeks of training echocardiograms were recorded in seven subjects at rest and during the handgrip. Significant decreases in HR and BP responses to static exercise were found already after 4 weeks of training. Resting STI and left ventricular dimensions were not affected by training, but during the static exercise the pre-ejection period (PEP) and isovolumic contraction time interval (ICT) at the corresponding HR were significantly shortened after 8 weeks of training. The values of echocardiographic indices of left ventricular function obtained during exercise after training did not differ significantly from those found before training. It is concluded that endurance training of moderate intensity improves cardiac function during static exercise performed with untrained muscles.

  2. Effects of a low alcohol dose on static balance, fine motor activity, and mental performance.

    PubMed

    Mangold, S; Läubli, T; Krueger, H

    1996-01-01

    The effects of a single low alcohol dose (men 0.54 g and women 0.44 g alcohol per kg body weight) were measured by static balance, fine motor activity, and mental performance. In 10 healthy volunteers balance was registered by a temporally and spatially high resolution platform measuring the center of foot pressure and a three-dimensional coordination measurement system. Fine motor activity and mental performance were tested with selected experiments from the NES2 (Neurobehavioral Evaluation System) neuropsychological test battery. Changes of bipedal and monopedal balance could be detected after the alcohol consumption. Neither the fine motor activity nor the mental performance test demonstrated significant effects. Thus, the static balance test proved to be a sensitive, fast, and atraumatic method to identify slight neurotoxic disturbances.

  3. The acute effects of combined static and dynamic stretch protocols on fitness performances in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Khorasani, M; Sotoodeh, V

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of different stretching methods on acceleration, speed, agility, power, and flexibility in different soccer positions. Therefore, 16 soccer players conducted 10 m, 20 m, shuttle run agility, vertical jump, and V-sit flexibility after static (SS), dynamic (DS), combined (static + dynamic) (CS), and no stretching (NS). Relative to the no-stretching condition, there were significant differences in fitness performances after (1) DS vs. SS, (2) DS vs. CS, and (3) CS vs. SS in defenders, midfielders, strikers, and also in all players (P<0.05). In conclusion, it may be desirable for soccer players to perform DS during warm up prior to the performance of activities that require a high power output.

  4. Surface electromyographic assessment of the effect of static stretching of the gastrocnemius on vertical jump performance.

    PubMed

    Wallmann, Harvey W; Mercer, John A; McWhorter, J Wesley

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of static stretching of the gastrocnemius muscle on maximal vertical jump performance using electromyographic activity (EMG) of the gastrocnemius musculature to record muscle activation during vertical jump performance. Fourteen healthy adults (8 men and 6 women) aged 18-34 years, who were familiar with the vertical jumping task and had no lower extremity injuries or any bone or joint disorders within the past year, served as participants for this study. After a brief warm-up, participants performed the following sequence: (a) three baseline maximal vertical jump trials, (b) 15 minutes of quiet sitting and three 30-second bilateral static stretches of the gastrocnemius muscles, and (c) 3 maximal vertical jump trials. Jump height data were collected using the Kistler force plate, while muscle activity was recorded during the jumping and stretching trials using a Noraxon telemetry EMG unit. Vertical jump height data as well as EMG values were averaged for the 3 trials and analyzed using paired t-tests for pre- and poststretching (alpha = 0.05). Vertical jump height was 5.6% lower when poststretch heights were compared with prestretch heights (t = -4.930, p < 0.005). Gastrocnemius EMG was 17.9% greater when the EMG during poststretch jumps was compared with prestretch jumps (t = 2.805, p < 0.02). The results from this study imply that, despite increased gastrocnemius muscle activity, static stretching of the gastrocnemius muscles had a negative effect on maximal jumping performance. The practical importance concerns coaches and athletes, who may want to consider the potential adverse effects of performing static stretching of the gastrocnemius muscles only before a jumping event, as jump height may be negatively affected. Future research is required to identify the mechanisms that affect vertical jump performance.

  5. Noise and static performance characteristics of a STOL aircraft jet flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkonen, D. L.; Mcbride, J. F.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Static noise and performance tests were conducted on a 1/4-scale jet flap model with a multilobe nozzle of array area ratio of 2.7. The model nozzle and flap tested were a two-dimensional section of a distributed blowing system similar to previously investigated augmentor wing systems without the upper shroud and intake door. Noise data were measured with the nozzle alone and also during attached flow conditions with the flap at two turning angles representing takeoff and approach conditions. The noise data are scaled to a 200,000-lb TOGW four-engine airplane and are presented in terms of perceived noise level and one-third octave band sound pressure level. Comparisons are made with the noise levels produced by an augmentor wing airplane fitted with a three-element acoustically lined augmentor flap. The static performance is presented in terms of thrust recovery and effective turning angle.

  6. Static stretching does not impair performance in active middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Handrakis, John P; Southard, Veronica N; Abreu, Jairo M; Aloisa, Mariella; Doyen, Mellissa R; Echevarria, Licet M; Hwang, Hyun; Samuels, Christine; Venegas, Steven A; Douris, Peter C

    2010-03-01

    Recent investigations with young, healthy adult subjects suggest that static stretching before activity decreases performance and should, therefore, be avoided. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of an acute static stretching protocol on balance and jump/hop performance in active middle-aged adults. Ten subjects (6 men and 4 women aged 40-60 yr) from a martial arts school volunteered to take part in this research study. This was a repeated measures design. Subjects who stretched for 10 minutes using a 30-second hold during 1 session sat quietly for 10 minutes during the alternate session. Sessions were randomly assigned. The following dependent variables were compared: Dynamic Stability Index (DSI) for single-leg dynamic balance (smaller DSI = improved balance); distances for broad jump, single hop, triple hop, and crossover hop; elapsed time for a 6-m timed hop. Group means for balance were significantly different between the stretch and no-stretch conditions (3.5 +/- 0.7 vs. 4.3 +/- 1.4 DSI, respectively; p < 0.05). No significant differences were found between the group means of the stretch and no-stretch conditions for the dependent measures of broad jump, single hop, triple hop, crossover hop, and 6-m timed hop performance. Ten minutes of acute static stretching enhances dynamic balance and does not affect jump/hop performance in active middle-aged adults. Static stretching should be included before competition and before exercise in fitness programs of active middle-aged adults.

  7. Differential effects of 30- vs. 60-second static muscle stretching on vertical jump performance.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Matheus D; Wilhelm, Eurico N; Tricoli, Valmor; Pinto, Ronei S; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2014-12-01

    It has been proposed that pre-exercise static stretching may reduce muscle force and power. Recent systematic and meta-analytical reviews have proposed a threshold regarding the effect of short (<45 seconds) and moderate (≥60 seconds) stretching durations on subsequent performance in a multi-joint task (e.g., jump performance), although its effect on power output remains less clear. Furthermore, no single experimental study has explicitly compared the effect of short (e.g., 30 seconds) and moderate (60 seconds) durations of continuous static stretching on multi-joint performance. Therefore, the aim of the present study was determine the effect of acute short- and moderate-duration continuous stretching interventions on vertical jump performance and power output. Sixteen physically active men (21.0 ± 1.9 years; 1.7 ± 0.1 m; 78.4 ± 12.1 kg) volunteered for the study. After familiarization, subjects attended the laboratory for 3 testing sessions. In the nonstretching (NS) condition, subjects performed a countermovement jump (CMJ) test without a preceding stretching bout. In the other 2 conditions, subjects performed 30-second (30SS; 4 minutes) or 60-second (60SS; 8 minutes) static stretching bouts in calf muscles, hamstrings, gluteus maximus, and quadriceps, respectively, followed by the CMJ test. Results were compared by repeated-measures analysis of variance. In comparison with NS, 60SS resulted in a lower CMJ height (-3.4%, p ≤ 0.05) and average (-2.7%, p ≤ 0.05) and peak power output (-2.0%, p ≤ 0.05), but no difference was observed between 30SS and the other conditions (p > 0.05). These data suggest a dose-dependent effect of stretching on muscular performance, which is in accordance with previous studies. The present results suggest a threshold of continuous static stretching in which muscular power output in a multi-joint task may be impaired immediately following moderate-duration (60 seconds; 8 minutes) static stretching while short-duration (30

  8. Dynamic performance of a static or throwing droplet impact onto a solid substrate with different properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Li, Ya-Dong

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic performance of a static or throwing droplet impact onto a solid substrate with different properties is numerically studied in this work. After being released or horizontally thrown out, a two-dimensional droplet can fall freely under gravity. The substrate, which is below the droplet, is either hydrophilic/hydrophobic or inhomogeneous. To conduct numerical simulations, a hybrid method is adopted, in which the flow field is solved by using the lattice Boltzmann method and the interface is captured by solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation directly. Given a fixed distance between the droplet and the substrate (H∗), the effects of Bond number (Bo), Weber number (We), and surface property on the performance of droplet impingement are investigated in detail. With the increase of Bond number, the surface coverage area of a static droplet also increases. A hydrophilic surface or an inhomogeneous surface with small advancing/receding angle difference can lead to the breakup of droplet rim due to the bubble entrapment. Moreover, dependent on the Weber number and the surface property, the leading edge rim of a throwing droplet developing on an inhomogeneous surface may break up before or after it contacts the substrate. As a result, compared to the case of static droplet, the surface coverage area will be reduced due to the diffusion of small droplet segment.

  9. The role of trait anxiety on static balance performance in control and anxiogenic situations.

    PubMed

    Hainaut, Jean-Philippe; Caillet, Grégory; Lestienne, Francis G; Bolmont, Benoît

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies have highlighted interactions between state anxiety, sensory processing involved in motor performance, and personality traits such as trait anxiety. In the present study, we investigated the effects of moderate state anxiety on static balance performance with eyes open and eyes closed in two groups of healthy subjects with contrasting trait anxiety. We found that an anxiogenic condition induces larger and faster body swaying in both groups in the eyes-open test. This suggests that state anxiety could modify the processing of the different sensory inputs involved in balance control whatever the subjects' trait anxiety level. When vision is absent, precision of static balance control in individuals with intermediate level of trait anxiety - characterized by a higher visual dependence - is more disrupted than in low trait anxiety subjects. Moreover, moderate state anxiety seems to disturb the ability to use vestibular and/or somatosensory inputs in individuals with low anxiety, but not in individuals with intermediate trait anxiety. These results on inter-individual differences provide a first insight into the inter-dependence between trait anxiety, state anxiety and static balance control.

  10. Static internal performance including thrust vectoring and reversing of two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of geometric design parameters on two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to 12 in the static test facility. Forward flight (dry and afterburning power settings), vectored-thrust (afterburning power setting), and reverse-thrust (dry power setting) nozzles were investigated. The nozzles had thrust vector angles from 0 deg to 20.26 deg, throat aspect ratios of 3.696 to 7.612, throat radii from sharp to 2.738 cm, expansion ratios from 1.089 to 1.797, and various sidewall lengths. The results indicate that unvectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles have static internal performance comparable to axisymmetric nozzles with similar expansion ratios.

  11. Static internal performance of a single expansion ramp nozzle with multiaxis thrust vectoring capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Schirmer, Alberto W.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at static conditions in order to determine the internal performance characteristics of a multiaxis thrust vectoring single expansion ramp nozzle. Yaw vectoring was achieved by deflecting yaw flaps in the nozzle sidewall into the nozzle exhaust flow. In order to eliminate any physical interference between the variable angle yaw flap deflected into the exhaust flow and the nozzle upper ramp and lower flap which were deflected for pitch vectoring, the downstream corners of both the nozzle ramp and lower flap were cut off to allow for up to 30 deg of yaw vectoring. The effects of nozzle upper ramp and lower flap cutout, yaw flap hinge line location and hinge inclination angle, sidewall containment, geometric pitch vector angle, and geometric yaw vector angle were studied. This investigation was conducted in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at nozzle pressure ratios up to 8.0.

  12. Performance assessment of static lead-lag feedforward controllers for disturbance rejection in PID control loops.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenpeng; Wang, Jiandong

    2016-09-01

    This paper assesses the performance of feedforward controllers for disturbance rejection in univariate feedback plus feedforward control loops. The structures of feedback and feedforward controllers are confined to proportional-integral-derivative and static-lead-lag forms, respectively, and the effects of feedback controllers are not considered. The integral squared error (ISE) and total squared variation (TSV) are used as performance metrics. A performance index is formulated by comparing the current ISE and TSV metrics to their own lower bounds as performance benchmarks. A controller performance assessment (CPA) method is proposed to calculate the performance index from measurements. The proposed CPA method resolves two critical limitations in the existing CPA methods, in order to be consistent with industrial scenarios. Numerical and experimental examples illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  13. 49 CFR 236.341 - Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. 236.341 Section 236.341 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.341 Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. Latch shoes, rocker...

  14. 49 CFR 236.341 - Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. 236.341 Section 236.341 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.341 Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. Latch shoes, rocker...

  15. 49 CFR 236.341 - Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. 236.341 Section 236.341 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.341 Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. Latch shoes, rocker...

  16. 49 CFR 236.341 - Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. 236.341 Section 236.341 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.341 Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. Latch shoes, rocker...

  17. 49 CFR 236.341 - Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. 236.341 Section 236.341 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Rules and Instructions § 236.341 Latch shoes, rocker links, and quadrants. Latch shoes, rocker...

  18. Astronaut James Newman with latch hook for tether device

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-09-19

    STS051-26-002 (12-22 Sept 1993) --- Astronaut James H. Newman, mission specialist, shows off a latch hook for a tether device used during the STS-51 extravehicular activity (EVA) on September 16, 1993. Newman, on Discovery's middeck, appears surrounded by sleep restraints.

  19. New materials technology for latching electro-optic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Patrick J.; Mastrangelo, John C.; Chen, Shaw H.

    1999-04-01

    This paper presents the current status of a new class of liquid crystal material being developed for latching electrooptic applications. This new material has the unique property of being electrooptic and fully latching. That is, in one state, the material has the properties of a conventional liquid crystal, capable of being aligned with either an electric or magnetic field; in its other state, it is an optical quality solid that maintains the molecular alignment set while in the fluid state. Experiments have shown that current materials can be switched on the order of milliseconds, as is the case with conventional nematic liquid crystals. In the solid state, the electric field can be removed with no change to the previously set optical properties because the molecular alignment is frozen in place, which should last for an extended period of time. In addition, the material exhibits broad temperature stability in the solid state, enabling devices to be developed that operate from cryogenic temperatures to 80 degrees C without the use of a temperature controller. This new material is ideally suited for applications where the size and mechanical robustness of an electrooptic device is desired, along with the latching capability of optomechanical devices. This materials technology alone will currently not meet high-speed switch requirements. However, this technology can be integrated with other state-of-the-art high-speed materials to provide a high-speed latching device. Devices currently under investigation using this materials include optical switches, optical attenuators and tunable filters.

  20. LATCH: A Syllabus Design for EFL Instruction in CALL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, David

    1998-01-01

    Looks at an innovative organizational tool for syllabus design of English-as-a-Foreign-Language, computer-assisted language learning writing classes that is borrowed from the interdisciplinary field of information architecture. The tool around which this syllabus design is structured is the Location-Alphabet-Time-Category-Hierarchy (LATCH), to…

  1. Automatic logic synthesis for parallel alternating latches clocking schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, D.; Bellido, M.; Juan, J.; Millan, A.; Ruiz, P.; Ostua, E.; Viejo, J.

    2007-05-01

    This paper proposes a VHDL coding technique that allows for the automatic synthesis of digital circuits using the so called Parallel Alternating Latches Clocking Schemes (PALACS). The proposed method greatly improves the applicability of PALACS and its benefits. This technique is verified through design examples in three different CMOS processes and using logic level simulation, with successful results in all the cases.

  2. Latching dynamics in neural networks with synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Carlos; Chossat, Pascal; Krupa, Martin; Lavigne, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Prediction is the ability of the brain to quickly activate a target concept in response to a related stimulus (prime). Experiments point to the existence of an overlap between the populations of the neurons coding for different stimuli, and other experiments show that prime-target relations arise in the process of long term memory formation. The classical modelling paradigm is that long term memories correspond to stable steady states of a Hopfield network with Hebbian connectivity. Experiments show that short term synaptic depression plays an important role in the processing of memories. This leads naturally to a computational model of priming, called latching dynamics; a stable state (prime) can become unstable and the system may converge to another transiently stable steady state (target). Hopfield network models of latching dynamics have been studied by means of numerical simulation, however the conditions for the existence of this dynamics have not been elucidated. In this work we use a combination of analytic and numerical approaches to confirm that latching dynamics can exist in the context of a symmetric Hebbian learning rule, however lacks robustness and imposes a number of biologically unrealistic restrictions on the model. In particular our work shows that the symmetry of the Hebbian rule is not an obstruction to the existence of latching dynamics, however fine tuning of the parameters of the model is needed.

  3. Identifying performing and under performing graphic symbols for verbs and prepositions in animated and static formats: a research note.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Ralf W; Shane, Howard; Sorce, James; Koul, Rajinder; Bloomfield, Emma

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify graphic symbols for verbs and prepositions that were performing and underperforming in static and animated formats in a recent experiment on the effects of animation on transparency, name agreement, and identification of graphic symbols. Variable-specific criteria were developed in order to define when a symbol is considered to be performing in terms of its transparency, name agreement, and identification accuracy. Additionally, across-variable heuristic criteria were developed that allowed classification of symbols into four categories: (a) performing exceptionally, (b) performing effectively, (c) performing adequately, and (d) performing inadequately. These criteria were applied to 24 symbols for verbs and 8 symbols for prepositions in both animated and static formats. Results indicated that the vast majority of the symbols performed adequately or better while a few did not. Potential reasons as to why some of the symbols may have underperformed are discussed. Where appropriate, implications for modifying existing symbols and future research are drawn. Although the fact that the heuristic criteria were developed post-hoc is discussed as a limitation, the benefits of the proposed categories bode well for future applications.

  4. Static and transient performance prediction for CFB boilers using a Bayesian-Gaussian Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Haiwen; Ni, Weidou

    1997-06-01

    A Bayesian-Gaussian Neural Network (BGNN) is put forward in this paper to predict the static and transient performance of Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boilers. The advantages of this network over Back-Propagation Neural Networks (BPNNs), easier determination of topology, simpler and time saving in training process as well as self-organizing ability, make this network more practical in on-line performance prediction for complicated processes. Simulation shows that this network is comparable to the BPNNs in predicting the performance of CFB boilers. Good and practical on-line performance predictions are essential for operation guide and model predictive control of CFB boilers, which are under research by the authors.

  5. Evaluation of the Performance Characteristics of BVA Resonators under Static and Dynamic Conditions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    AO-AI05 064 FREQUENCY AND TIME SYSTEMS INC BEVERLY MA F/S 9/1. EVALUATION OF THE PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF BVA RESONATORS--ETC(UI AUG 81 D A...HARACTERISTICS OF BVA ESONATORS UNDER STATIC AND YNAMIC CONDITIONS ecuency and Time Systems, Inc. DTIC ELECTE DonaW A. Emmons C APIROVED FOR PUlIC RELEASE... Time Systems, Inc. (FTS) relatinq to a novel quartz frequency control element, the BVA resonator. The pur- pose of the study has been to evaluate the

  6. Static performance of an axisymmetric nozzle with post-exit vanes for multiaxis thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Mason, Mary L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the flow-turning capability and the nozzle internal performance of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle with post-exit vanes installed for multiaxis thrust vectoring. The effects of vane curvature, vane location relative to the nozzle exit, number of vanes, and vane deflection angle were determined. A comparison of the post-exit-vane thrust-vectoring concept with other thrust-vectoring concepts is provided. All tests were conducted with no external flow, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.6 to 6.0.

  7. Determination of the static performance of a Cuyuna cc model UL-430RR engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1983-01-01

    The results of static performance tests were carried out on an ultralight engine. A Cuyuna 430 cc, 2 stroke, 2 cylinder model was used to measure thrust, torque, propeller RPM, fuel flow, cylinder head temperature, and change in pressure through the propeller. Measurement of each of the above parameters was taken at specific values of RPM. The propeller's RPM's ranged from idle at approximately 750 RPM to a maximum value of 2810 RPM. The test results were then manipulated to obtain thrust coefficient, power coefficient, shaft horse power, and shaft specific fuel consumption.

  8. Static and dynamic posterior cingulate cortex nodal topology of default mode network predicts attention task performance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pan; Yang, Yong; Jovicich, Jorge; De Pisapia, Nicola; Wang, Xiang; Zuo, Chun S; Levitt, James Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of the default mode network (DMN) as a complex network of functionally interacting dynamic systems has received great interest for the study of DMN neural mechanisms. In particular, understanding the relationship of intrinsic resting-state DMN brain network with cognitive behaviors is an important issue in healthy cognition and mental disorders. However, it is still unclear how DMN functional connectivity links to cognitive behaviors during resting-state. In this study, we hypothesize that static and dynamic DMN nodal topology is associated with upcoming cognitive task performance. We used graph theory analysis in order to understand better the relationship between the DMN functional connectivity and cognitive behavior during resting-state and task performance. Nodal degree of the DMN was calculated as a metric of network topology. We found that the static and dynamic posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) nodal degree within the DMN was associated with task performance (Reaction Time). Our results show that the core node PCC nodal degree within the DMN was significantly correlated with reaction time, which suggests that the PCC plays a key role in supporting cognitive function.

  9. Effects of nonlinear aerodynamics and static aeroelasticity on mission performance calculations for a fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.; Tatum, Kenneth E.; Foss, Willard E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    During conceptual design studies of advanced aircraft, the usual practice is to use linear theory to calculate the aerodynamic characteristics of candidate rigid (nonflexible) geometric external shapes. Recent developments and improvements in computational methods, especially computational fluid dynamics (CFD), provide significantly improved capability to generate detailed analysis data for the use of all disciplines involved in the evaluation of a proposed aircraft design. A multidisciplinary application of such analysis methods to calculate the effects of nonlinear aerodynamics and static aeroelasticity on the mission performance of a fighter aircraft concept is described. The aircraft configuration selected for study was defined in a previous study using linear aerodynamics and rigid geometry. The results from the previous study are used as a basis of comparison for the data generated herein. Aerodynamic characteristics are calculated using two different nonlinear theories, potential flow and rotational (Euler) flow. The aerodynamic calculations are performed in an iterative procedure with an equivalent plate structural analysis method to obtain lift and drag data for a flexible (nonrigid) aircraft. These static aeroelastic data are then used in calculating the combat and mission performance characteristics of the aircraft.

  10. The 727 airplane target thrust reverser static performance model test for refanned JT8D engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, C. T. P.; Atkey, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a scale model static performance test of target thrust reverser configurations for the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft JT8D-100 series engine are presented. The objective of the test was to select a series of suitable candidate reverser configurations for the subsequent airplane model wind tunnel ingestion and flight controls tests. Test results indicate that adequate reverse thrust performance with compatible engine airflow match is achievable for the selected configurations. Tapering of the lips results in loss of performance and only minimal flow directivity. Door pressure surveys were conducted on a selected number of lip and fence configurations to obtain data to support the design of the thrust reverser system.

  11. Acute effects of dynamic stretching, static stretching, and light aerobic activity on muscular performance in women.

    PubMed

    Curry, Brad S; Chengkalath, Devendra; Crouch, Gordon J; Romance, Michelle; Manns, Patricia J

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three warm-up protocols--static stretching, dynamic stretching, and light aerobic activity--on selected measures of range of motion and power in untrained females and to investigate the sustained effects at 5 and 30 minutes after warm-up. A total of 24 healthy females (ages 23-29 years) attended one familiarization session and three test sessions on nonconsecutive days within 2 weeks. A within-subject design protocol with the testing investigators blinded to the subjects' warm-up was followed. Each session started with 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling followed by pretest baseline measures. Another 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling was completed and followed by one of the three randomly selected warm-up interventions (static stretching, dynamic stretching, or light aerobic activity). The following posttest outcome measures were collected 5 and 30 minutes following the intervention: modified Thomas test, countermovement jump, and isometric time to peak force knee extension measured by dynamometer. Analysis of the data revealed significant time effects on range of motion and countermovement jump changes. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between the warm-up conditions on any of the variables. The variation in responses to warm-up conditions emphasizes the unique nature of individual reactions to different warm-ups; however, there was a tendency for warm-ups with an active component to have beneficial effects. The data suggests dynamic stretching has greater applicability to enhance performance on power outcomes compared to static stretching.

  12. Effect of Eccentricity on the Static and Dynamic Performance of a Turbulent Hybrid Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanandres, Luis A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of journal eccentricity on the static and dynamic performance of a water lubricated, 5-recess hybrid bearing is presented in detail. The hydrostatic bearing has been designed to operate at a high speed and with a large level of external pressurization. The operating conditions determine the flow in the bearing to be highly turbulent and strongly dominated by fluid inertia effects. The analysis covers the spectrum of journal center displacements directed towards the middle of a recess and towards the mid-land portion between two consecutive recesses. Predicted dynamic force coefficients are uniform for small to moderate eccentricities. For large journal center displacements, fluid cavitation and recess position determine large changes in the bearing dynamic performance. The effect of fluid inertia force coefficients on the threshold speed of instability and whirl ratio of a single mass flexible rotor is discussed.

  13. Static performance of a cruciform nozzle with multiaxis thrust-vectoring and reverse-thrust capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Asbury, Scott C.

    1992-01-01

    A multiaxis thrust vectoring nozzle designed to have equal flow turning capability in pitch and yaw was conceived and experimentally tested for internal, static performance. The cruciform-shaped convergent-divergent nozzle turned the flow for thrust vectoring by deflecting the divergent surfaces of the nozzle, called flaps. Methods for eliminating physical interference between pitch and yaw flaps at the larger multiaxis deflection angles was studied. These methods included restricting the pitch flaps from the path of the yaw flaps and shifting the flow path at the throat off the nozzle centerline to permit larger pitch-flap deflections without interfering with the operation of the yaw flaps. Two flap widths were tested at both dry and afterburning settings. Vertical and reverse thrust configurations at dry power were also tested. Comparison with two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles showed lower but still competitive thrust performance and thrust vectoring capability.

  14. Non-Contacting Finger Seals Static Performance Test Results at Ambient and High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2016-01-01

    The non-contacting finger seal is an advanced seal concept with potential to reduce specific fuel consumption in gas turbine engines by 2 to 3 percent with little to no wear of the seal or rotor. Static performance tests and bind-up tests of eight different non-contacting finger seal configurations were conducted in air at pressure differentials up to 689.4 kPa and temperatures up to 922 K. Four of the seals tested were designed to have lift pads concentric to a herringbone-grooved rotor which generates hydrodynamic lift when rotating. The remaining seals were tested with a smooth rotor; one seal had a circumferential taper and one had an axial taper on the lift pad inner diameter to create hydrodynamic lift during rotation. The effects of the aft finger axial thickness and of the forward finger inner diameter on leakage performance were investigated as well and compared to analytical predictions.

  15. Non-Contacting Finger Seals Static Performance Test Results at Ambient and High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2016-01-01

    The non-contacting finger seal is an advanced seal concept with potential to reduce specific fuel consumption in gas turbine engines by 2 to 3 with little to no wear of the seal or rotor. Static performance tests and bind-up tests of eight different non-contacting finger seal configurations were conducted in air at pressure differentials up to 689.4 kPa and temperatures up to 922 K. Four of the seals tested were designed to have lift pads concentric to a herringbone-grooved rotor which generates hydrodynamic lift when rotating. The remaining seals were tested with a smooth rotor; one seal had a circumferential taper and one had an axial taper on the lift pad inner diameter to create hydrodynamic lift during rotation. The effects of the aft finger axial thickness and of the forward finger inner diameter on leakage performance were investigated as well and compared to analytical predictions.

  16. Static performance and noise tests on a thrust reverser for an augmentor wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkonen, D. L.; Marrs, C. C.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    A 1/3 scale model static test program was conducted to measure the noise levels and reverse thrust performance characteristics of wing-mounted thrust reverser that could be used on an advanced augmentor wing airplane. The configuration tested represents only the most fundamental designs where installation and packaging restraints are not considered. The thrust reverser performance is presented in terms of horizontal, vertical, and resultant effectiveness ratios and the reverser noise is compared on the basis of peak perceived noise level (PNL) and one-third octave band data (OASPL). From an analysis of the model force and acoustic data, an assessment is made on the stopping distance versus noise for a 90,900 kg (200,000 lb) airplane using this type of thrust reverser.

  17. Retractable tool bit having latch type catch mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voellmer, George

    1993-01-01

    A retractable tool bit assembly for a tool such as an allen key is presented. The assembly includes one or more spring loaded nestable or telescoping tubular sections together with a catch mechanism for capturing and holding the tool in its retracted position. The catch mechanism consists of a latch mechanism located in a base section and which engages a conically shaped tool head located at the inner end of the tool. The tool head adjoins an eccentric oval type neck portion which extends to a rear lip of the tool head. The latch mechanism releases when the ovular neck portion rotates about the catch members upon actuation of a rotary tool drive motor. When released, all the telescoping sections and the tool extends fully outward to a use position.

  18. Novel latch for adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron logic

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Naoki Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Ortlepp, Thomas

    2014-03-14

    We herein propose the quantum-flux-latch (QFL) as a novel latch for adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic. A QFL is very compact and compatible with AQFP logic gates and can be read out in one clock cycle. Simulation results revealed that the QFL operates at 5 GHz with wide parameter margins of more than ±22%. The calculated energy dissipation was only ∼0.1 aJ/bit, which yields a small energy delay product of 20 aJ·ps. We also designed shift registers using QFLs to demonstrate more complex circuits with QFLs. Finally, we experimentally demonstrated correct operations of the QFL and a 1-bit shift register (a D flip-flop)

  19. Retractable tool bit having latch type catch mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A retractable tool bit assembly for a tool such as an allen key is presented. The assembly includes one or more spring loaded nestable or telescoping tubular sections together with a catch mechanism for capturing and holding the tool in its retracted position. The catch mechanism consists of a latch mechanism located in a base section and which engages a conically shaped tool head located at the inner end of the tool. The tool head adjoins an eccentric oval type neck portion which extends to a rear lip of the tool head. The latch mechanism releases when the ovular neck portion rotates about the catch members upon actuation of a rotary tool drive motor. When released, all the telescoping sections and the tool extends fully outward to a use position.

  20. Failure of latch mechanism for motion control of safety rods

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, W.W.F.; Leader, D.R.

    1992-01-16

    During safety rod tests in K-reactor prior to startup, one safety rod could not be lifted because the ``button`` broke off and became lodged in the mechanism. Examination of the failed latch assembly along with other assemblies from both K-Area and L-Area revealed several missing buttons as well as severely deformed ``jaw hanger extensions.`` We participated in the investigation of the damage by request of the Reactor Restart Section. Based on our study of the latch mechanism, the modifications to the ``safety rod extension,`` and the operating history of the machine, this memorandum describes the causes of the observed damage with experimental evidence and calculations to support the findings. 3 refs.

  1. Failure of latch mechanism for motion control of safety rods

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, W.W.F.; Leader, D.R.

    1992-01-16

    During safety rod tests in K-reactor prior to startup, one safety rod could not be lifted because the button'' broke off and became lodged in the mechanism. Examination of the failed latch assembly along with other assemblies from both K-Area and L-Area revealed several missing buttons as well as severely deformed jaw hanger extensions.'' We participated in the investigation of the damage by request of the Reactor Restart Section. Based on our study of the latch mechanism, the modifications to the safety rod extension,'' and the operating history of the machine, this memorandum describes the causes of the observed damage with experimental evidence and calculations to support the findings. 3 refs.

  2. Intermittent But Not Continuous Static Stretching Improves Subsequent Vertical Jump Performance In Flexibility-Trained Athletes.

    PubMed

    Bogdanis, Gregory C; Donti, Olyvia; Tsolakis, Charilaos; Smilios, Ilias; Bishop, David J

    2017-02-23

    This study examined changes in countermovement jump (CMJ) height after an intermittent or a continuous static stretching protocol of equal total duration. Sixteen male, elite-level gymnasts performed 90 s of intermittent (3 x 30 s with 30 s rest) or continuous stretching (90 s) of the quadriceps muscle. A single-leg stretching and jumping design was used, with the contra-lateral limb serving as a control. The same individuals performed both conditions with alternate legs in a randomized, counterbalanced order. One leg CMJ height was measured for the stretched and the control leg after warm-up, immediately after stretching, and at regular intervals for 10 min after stretching. Range of motion (ROM) of the hip and knee joints was measured before, after, and 10 min post-stretching. Compared to the control leg, intermittent stretching increased CMJ height by 8.1±2.0%, 4 min into recovery (+2.2±2.0 cm, 95%CI: 1.0-3.4 cm, p=0.001), while continuous stretching decreased CMJ height by 17.5±3.3% immediately after (-2.9±1.7 cm, 95%CI: -2.0 to -3.7 cm, p=0.001) and by 12.0±2.7% one min after stretching (-2.2±2.1 cm, 95%CI: -1.2 to -3.2 cm, p=0.001). The increases in hip (2.9 and 3.6, p=0.001. d=2.4) and knee joint ROM (5.1 and 6.1, p=0.001. d=0.85) after the intermittent and continuous stretching protocols were not different. The opposite effects of intermittent vs. continuous stretching on subsequent CMJ performance suggests that stretching mode is an important variable when examining the acute effects of static stretching on performance in flexibility-trained athletes.

  3. Effects of dynamic and static stretching on vertical jump performance and electromyographic activity.

    PubMed

    Hough, Paul A; Ross, Emma Z; Howatson, Glyn

    2009-03-01

    The results of previous research have demonstrated that static stretching (SS) can reduce muscular performance and that dynamic stretching (DS) can enhance muscular performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of SS and DS on vertical jump (VJ) performance and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the m. vastus medialis. Eleven healthy men (age 21 +/- 2 years) took part in 3 conditions (no stretching [NS], SS, and DS), on separate occasions in a randomized, crossover design. During each condition, measurements of VJ height and EMG activity during the VJ were recorded. A repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc analysis indicated that VJ height was significantly less (4.19 +/- 4.47%) after SS than NS (p < 0.05) and significantly greater (9.44 +/- 4.25%) in DS than SS (p < 0.05). There was significantly greater EMG amplitude in the DS compared with the SS (p < 0.05). The results demonstrated that SS has a negative influence on VJ performance, whereas DS has a positive impact. Increased VJ performance after DS may be attributed to postactivation potentiation, whereas the reduction in VJ performance after SS may be attributable to neurological impairment and a possible alteration in the viscoelastic properties of the muscular tendon unit (MTU). This investigation provides some physiological basis for the inclusion of DS and exclusion of SS in preparation for activities requiring jumping performance.

  4. Static stretching can impair explosive performance for at least 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Monoem; Dridi, Amir; Chtara, Moktar; Chaouachi, Anis; Wong, Del P; Behm, David; Chamari, Karim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of static vs. dynamic stretching (DS) on explosive performances and repeated sprint ability (RSA) after a 24-hour delay. Sixteen young male soccer players performed 15 minutes of static stretching (SS), DS, or a no-stretch control condition (CC) 24 hours before performing explosive performances and RSA tests. This was a within-subject repeated measures study with SS, DS, and CC being counterbalanced. Stretching protocols included 2 sets of 7 minutes 30 seconds (2 repetitions of 30 seconds with a 15-second passive recovery) for 5 muscle groups (quadriceps, hamstring, calves, adductors, and hip flexors). Twenty-four hours later (without any kind of stretching in warm-up), the players were tested for the 30-m sprint test (with 10- and 20-m lap times), 5 jump test (5JT), and RSA test. Significant differences were observed between CC, SS, and DS with 5JT (F = 9.99, p < 0.00, effect size [ES] = 0.40), 10-m sprint time (F = 46.52, p < 0.00, ES = 0.76), 20-m sprint time (F = 18.44, p < 0.000, ES = 0.55), and 30-m sprint time (F = 34.25, p < 0.000, ES = 0.70). The significantly better performance (p < 0.05) was observed after DS as compared with that after CC and SS in 5JT, and sprint times for 10, 20, and 30 m. In contrast, significantly worse performance (p < 0.05) was observed after SS as compared with that after CC in 5JT, and sprint times for 10, 20, and 30 m. With RSA, no significant difference was observed between different stretching protocols in the total time (F = 1.55, p > 0.05), average time (F = 1.53, p > 0.05), and fastest time (F = 2.30, p > 0.05), except for the decline index (F = 3.54, p < 0.04, ES = 0.19). Therefore, the SS of the lower limbs and hip muscles had a negative effect on explosive performances up to 24 hours poststretching with no major effects on the RSA. Conversely, the DS of the same muscle groups are highly recommended 24 hours before performing sprint and long-jump performances. In

  5. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Performance of Two Choked-Flow Inlets Under Static Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.; Abbott, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of two choking flow inlets under static conditions. One inlet choked the flow in the cowl throat by an axial translation of the inlet centerbody. The other inlet employed a translating grid of airfoils to choke the flow. Both inlets were sized to fit a 13.97 cm diameter fan with a design weight flow of 2.49 kg/sec. The inlets were operated in both the choked and unchoked modes over a range of weight flows. Measurements were made of inlet pressure recovery, flow distortion, surface static pressure distribution, and fan noise suppression. Choking of the translating centerbody inlet reduced blade passing frequency noise by 29 db while yielding a total pressure recovery of 0.985. Noise reductions were also measured at 1/3-octave band center frequencies of 2500, 5000, and 20,000 cycles. The translating grid inlet gave a total pressure recovery of 0.968 when operating close to the choking weight flow. However, an intermittent high intensity noise source was encountered with this inlet that precluded an accurate measurement of inlet noise suppression.

  6. Dual-latching solenoid-actuated valve assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, Myron J. (Inventor); Yang, Jeff (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A tube-type shutoff valve is electrically positioned to its open or closed position by a concentric electromagnetic solenoid. The valve is dual latching in that the armature of the solenoid maintains the sliding tube of the valve in an open or closed position by means of permanent magnets which are effective when current is not supplied to the solenoid. The valve may also be actuated manually.

  7. Dual-latching solenoid-actuated valve assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudnicki, Myron J.; Yang, Jeff

    1994-08-01

    A tube-type shutoff valve is electrically positioned to its open or closed position by a concentric electromagnetic solenoid. The valve is dual latching in that the armature of the solenoid maintains the sliding tube of the valve in an open or closed position by means of permanent magnets which are effective when current is not supplied to the solenoid. The valve may also be actuated manually.

  8. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned: Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James

    2006-01-01

    Within JPL, there is a technology thrust need to develop a larger Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism (CDLM) for future missions. The approach taken was to adopt and scale the CDLM design as used on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) project. The three separate mechanisms that comprise the CDLM will be discussed in this paper in addition to a focus on heritage adoption lessons learned and specific examples. These lessons learned will be valuable to any project considering the use of heritage designs.

  9. Effects of static and dynamic stretching on sprint and jump performance in boys and girls.

    PubMed

    Paradisis, Giorgos P; Pappas, Panagiotis T; Theodorou, Apostolos S; Zacharogiannis, Elias G; Skordilis, Emmanouil K; Smirniotou, Athanasia S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of static (SS) and dynamic stretching (DS) on explosive power, flexibility, and sprinting ability of adolescent boys and girls and to report possible gender interactions. Forty-seven active adolescent boys and girls were randomly tested after SS and DS of 40 seconds on quadriceps, hamstrings, hip extensors, and plantar flexors; no stretching was performed at the control condition. Pretreatment and posttreatment tests examined the effects of stretching on 20-m sprint run (20 m), countermovement jump (CMJ) height, and sit and reach flexibility test. In terms of performance, SS hindered 20 m and CMJ in boys and girls by 2.5 and 6.3%, respectively. Dynamic stretching had no effect on 20 m in boys and girls but impaired CMJ by 2.2%. In terms of flexibility, both SS and DS improved performance with SS being more beneficial (12.1%) compared with DS (6.5%). No gender interaction was found. It can therefore be concluded that SS significantly negates sprinting performance and explosive power in adolescent boys and girls, whereas DS deteriorates explosive power and has no effect on sprinting performance. This diversity of effects denotes that the mode of stretching used in adolescent boys and girls should be task specific.

  10. Performance comparison of flat static and adjustable angle solar panels for sunny weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Yaw Long; Yong, Yoon Kuang

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays solar panels are commonly used to collect sunlight so that it could convert solar energy into electrical energy. The power generated by the solar panels depends on the amount of sunlight collected on the solar panels. This paper presents a study that was carried out to study how changing the angle of the solar panels will impact the amount of electrical energy collected after conversion and the efficiencies of the solar panels. In this paper, the solar panels were placed at 30°, 35° and 40° angles throughout different days. The energy collected is then compared with energy collected by a flat static solar panel. It turns out that the solar panels with 40° angle performed best among the other angle solar panels.

  11. Static and dynamic electrical performances of STI thin-SOI power LDMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, I.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; Flores, D.; Hidalgo, S.; Rebollo, J.

    2008-09-01

    The benefits of applying the shallow trench isolation (STI) concept to a higher voltage thin-SOI laterally diffused metal oxide semiconductor (LDMOS) (in the range of 80 V) are analysed in this paper by means of 2D technology computer-aided design (TCAD) numerical simulations. The TCAD simulation results allow comparing the electrical performance of the studied STI LDMOS structure with that of a conventional LDMOS in terms of the main static (breakdown voltage (VBR) and specific on-state resistance (RON-sp)) and dynamic (gate-drain capacitance (CGD) and cut-off frequency (fT)) characteristics. Moreover, the impact of the STI length (LSTI) and thickness (TSTI), and the N-drift implantation energy on the electrical characteristics is considered in detail. On the other hand, the STI block helps to move the harmful high electric field further away from the silicon surface, thus minimizing gate-oxide degradation by hot carriers.

  12. Performance, static stability, and control effectiveness of a parametric space shuttle launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchholz, R. E.; Gamble, M.

    1972-01-01

    This test was run as a continuation of a prior investigation of aerodynamic performance and static stability tests for a parametric space shuttle launch vehicle. The purposes of this test were: (1) to obtain a more complete set of data in the transonic flight region, (2) to investigate new H-0 tank noseshapes and tank diameters, (3) to obtain control effectiveness data for the orbiter at 0 degree incidence and with a smaller diameter H-0 tank, and (4) to determine the effects of varying solid rocket motor-to-H0 tank gap size. Experimental data were obtained for angles of attack from -10 to +10 degrees and for angles of sideslip from +10 to -10 degrees at Mach numbers ranging from .6 to 4.96.

  13. Effect of Static and Dynamic Stretching on the Diurnal Variations of Jump Performance in Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Chtourou, Hamdi; Aloui, Asma; Hammouda, Omar; Chaouachi, Anis; Chamari, Karim; Souissi, Nizar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The present study addressed the lack of data on the effect of different types of stretching on diurnal variations in vertical jump height - i.e., squat-jump (SJ) and countermovement-jump (CMJ). We hypothesized that dynamic stretching could affect the diurnal variations of jump height by producing a greater increase in short-term maximal performance in the morning than the evening through increasing core temperature at this time-of-day. Methods Twenty male soccer players (age, 18.6±1.3 yrs; height, 174.6±3.8 cm; body-mass, 71.1±8.6 kg; mean ± SD) completed the SJ and CMJ tests either after static stretching, dynamic stretching or no-stretching protocols at two times of day, 07:00 h and 17:00 h, with a minimum of 48 hours between testing sessions. One minute after warming-up for 5 minutes by light jogging and performing one of the three stretching protocols (i.e., static stretching, dynamic stretching or no-stretching) for 8 minutes, each subject completed the SJ and CMJ tests. Jumping heights were recorded and analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures (3 [stretching]×2 [time-of-day]). Results The SJ and CMJ heights were significantly higher at 17:00 than 07:00 h (p<0.01) after the no-stretching protocol. These daily variations disappeared (i.e., the diurnal gain decreased from 4.2±2.81% (p<0.01) to 1.81±4.39% (not-significant) for SJ and from 3.99±3.43% (p<0.01) to 1.51±3.83% (not-significant) for CMJ) after dynamic stretching due to greater increases in SJ and CMJ heights in the morning than the evening (8.4±6.36% vs. 4.4±2.64%, p<0.05 for SJ and 10.61±5.49% vs. 6.03±3.14%, p<0.05 for CMJ). However, no significant effect of static stretching on the diurnal variations of SJ and CMJ heights was observed. Conclusion Dynamic stretching affects the typical diurnal variations of SJ and CMJ and helps to counteract the lower morning values in vertical jump height. PMID:23940589

  14. Fasting improves static apnea performance in elite divers without enhanced risk of syncope.

    PubMed

    Schagatay, Erika; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    In competitive apnea divers, the nutritional demands may be essentially different from those of, for example, endurance athletes, where energy resources need to be maximised for successful performance. In competitive apnea, the goal is instead to limit metabolism, as the length of the sustainable apneic period will depend to a great extent on minimising oxygen consumption. Many but not all elite divers fast before performing static apnea in competition. This may increase oxygen consumption as mainly lipid stores are metabolised but could also have beneficial effects on apneic duration. Our aim was to determine the effect of over-night fasting on apnea performance. Six female and seven male divers performed a series of three apneas after eating and fasting, respectively. The series consisted of two 2-min apneas spaced by 3 min rest and, after 5 min rest, one maximal effort apnea. Apneas were performed at supine rest and preceded by normal respiration and maximal inspiration. Mean (± SD) time since eating was 13 h (± 2 h 43 min) for the fasting and 1 h 34 min (± 33 min) for the eating condition (P < 0.001). Mean blood glucose was 5.1 (± 0.4) mmol/L after fasting and 5.9 (± 0.7) mmol/L after eating (P<0.01). Lung volumes were similar in both conditions (NS). For the 2-min apneas, nadir SaO2 during fasting was 95 (± 1)% and 92 (± 2)% (P < 0.001) on eating and ETCO2 was lower in the fasting condition (P < 0.01) while heart rate (HR) during apnea was 74 (± 10) bpm for fasting and 80 (± 10) bpm for eating conditions (P < 0.01). Maximal apnea durations were 4 min 41 s (± 43 s) during fasting and 3 min 51 s (± 37 s) after eating (P < 0.001), and time without respiratory contractions was 31 s (25%) longer after fasting (P < 0.01). At maximal apnea termination, SaO2 and ETCO2 were similar in both conditions (NS) and apneic HR was 63 (± 9) bpm for fasting and 70 (± 10) bpm for eating (P < 0.01). The 22% longer apnea duration after fasting with analogous end apnea

  15. Does pre-exercise static stretching inhibit maximal muscular performance? A meta-analytical review.

    PubMed

    Simic, L; Sarabon, N; Markovic, G

    2013-03-01

    We applied a meta-analytical approach to derive a robust estimate of the acute effects of pre-exercise static stretching (SS) on strength, power, and explosive muscular performance. A computerized search of articles published between 1966 and December 2010 was performed using PubMed, SCOPUS, and Web of Science databases. A total of 104 studies yielding 61 data points for strength, 12 data points for power, and 57 data points for explosive performance met our inclusion criteria. The pooled estimate of the acute effects of SS on strength, power, and explosive performance, expressed in standardized units as well as in percentages, were -0.10 [95% confidence interval (CI): -0.15 to -0.04], -0.04 (95% CI: -0.16 to 0.08), and -0.03 (95% CI: -0.07 to 0.01), or -5.4% (95% CI: -6.6% to -4.2%), -1.9% (95% CI: -4.0% to 0.2%), and -2.0% (95% CI: -2.8% to -1.3%). These effects were not related to subject's age, gender, or fitness level; however, they were more pronounced in isometric vs dynamic tests, and were related to the total duration of stretch, with the smallest negative acute effects being observed with stretch duration of ≤ 45 s. We conclude that the usage of SS as the sole activity during warm-up routine should generally be avoided. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Static performance investigation of a skewed-throat multiaxis thrust-vectoring nozzle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    The static performance of a jet exhaust nozzle which achieves multiaxis thrust vectoring by physically skewing the geometric throat has been characterized in the static test facility of the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle has an asymmetric internal geometry defined by four surfaces: a convergent-divergent upper surface with its ridge perpendicular to the nozzle centerline, a convergent-divergent lower surface with its ridge skewed relative to the nozzle centerline, an outwardly deflected sidewall, and a straight sidewall. The primary goal of the concept is to provide efficient yaw thrust vectoring by forcing the sonic plane (nozzle throat) to form at a yaw angle defined by the skewed ridge of the lower surface contour. A secondary goal is to provide multiaxis thrust vectoring by combining the skewed-throat yaw-vectoring concept with upper and lower pitch flap deflections. The geometric parameters varied in this investigation included lower surface ridge skew angle, nozzle expansion ratio (divergence angle), aspect ratio, pitch flap deflection angle, and sidewall deflection angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to a high of 11.5 for some configurations. The results of the investigation indicate that efficient, substantial multiaxis thrust vectoring was achieved by the skewed-throat nozzle concept. However, certain control surface deflections destabilized the internal flow field, which resulted in substantial shifts in the position and orientation of the sonic plane and had an adverse effect on thrust-vectoring and weight flow characteristics. By increasing the expansion ratio, the location of the sonic plane was stabilized. The asymmetric design resulted in interdependent pitch and yaw thrust vectoring as well as nonzero thrust-vector angles with undeflected control surfaces. By skewing the ridges of both the upper and lower surface contours, the interdependency between pitch and yaw thrust vectoring may be eliminated

  17. Static Thrust and Vectoring Performance of a Spherical Convergent Flap Nozzle with a Nonrectangular Divergent Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1998-01-01

    The static internal performance of a multiaxis-thrust-vectoring, spherical convergent flap (SCF) nozzle with a non-rectangular divergent duct was obtained in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Duct cross sections of hexagonal and bowtie shapes were tested. Additional geometric parameters included throat area (power setting), pitch flap deflection angle, and yaw gimbal angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to 12 for dry power configurations and from 2 to 6 for afterburning power configurations. Approximately a 1-percent loss in thrust efficiency from SCF nozzles with a rectangular divergent duct was incurred as a result of internal oblique shocks in the flow field. The internal oblique shocks were the result of cross flow generated by the vee-shaped geometric throat. The hexagonal and bowtie nozzles had mirror-imaged flow fields and therefore similar thrust performance. Thrust vectoring was not hampered by the three-dimensional internal geometry of the nozzles. Flow visualization indicates pitch thrust-vector angles larger than 10' may be achievable with minimal adverse effect on or a possible gain in resultant thrust efficiency as compared with the performance at a pitch thrust-vector angle of 10 deg.

  18. Latching-on and suckling of the healthy term neonate: breastfeeding assessment.

    PubMed

    Cadwell, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Increasing breastfeeding duration and exclusivity is an acknowledged public health priority. Breastfeeding problems, especially with the healthy term neonate latching-on or feeding with a suboptimal latch, are common reasons for early breastfeeding termination when they result in inadequate breastfeeding, poor milk transfer, and sore nipples. This article describes clinical strategies for systematic latch-on and suckling assessment with the goal of improving the skills of clinicians who provide care for breastfeeding women.

  19. Occurrence of fatigue during sets of static squat jumps performed at a variety of loads.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, Michael L; Comfort, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Research has identified that the optimal power load for static squat jumps (with no countermovement) is lower than the loads usually recommended for power training. Lower loads may permit the performance of additional repetitions before the onset of fatigue compared with heavier loads; therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the point of fatigue during squat jumps at various loads (0, 20, 40, 60% 1-repetition maximum [1RM]). Seventeen professional rugby league players performed sets of 6 squat jumps (with no countermovement), using 4 loading conditions (0, 20, 40, and 60% of 1RM back squat). Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05) in force, velocity, power, and displacement between repetitions, for the 0, 20, and 40% loading conditions. The 60% condition showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) in peak force between repetitions; however, velocity (1.12 + 0.10 and 1.18 + 0.11 m·s(-1)), power (3,385 + 343 and 3,617 + 396 W) and displacement (11.13 + 2.31 and 11.85 + 2.16 cm) were significantly (p < 0.02) lower during repetition 6 compared with repetition 2. These findings indicate that when performing squat jumps (with no countermovement) with a load <40% 1RM back squat, up to >6 repetitions can be completed without inducing fatigue and a minimum of 4-6 repetitions should be performed to achieve peak power output. When performing squat jumps (with no countermovement) with a load equal to the 60% 1RM only, 5 repetitions should be performed to minimize fatigue and ensure maintenance of velocity and power.

  20. Unsteady vortex lattice techniques applied to wake formation and performance of the statically thrusting propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The application is considered of vortex lattice techniques to the problem of describing the aerodynamics and performance of statically thrusting propellers. A numerical lifting surface theory to predict the aerodynamic forces and power is performed. The chordwise and spanwise loading is modelled by bound vortices fixed to a twisted flat plate surface. In order to eliminate any apriori assumptions regarding the wake shape, it is assumed the propeller starts from rest. The wake is generated in time and allowed to deform under its own self-induced velocity field as the motion of the propeller progresses. The bound circulation distribution is then determined with time by applying the flow tangency boundary condition at certain selected control points on the blades. The aerodynamics of the infinite wing and finite wing are also considered. The details of wake formation and roll-up are investigated, particularly the localized induction effect. It is concluded that proper wake roll-up and roll-up rates can be established by considering the details of motion at the instant of start.

  1. Disassociation of static and dynamic cerebral autoregulatory performance in healthy volunteers after lipopolysaccharide infusion and in patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R; Ronit, Andreas; Bailey, Damian M; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Møller, Kirsten

    2012-12-01

    Sepsis is frequently complicated by brain dysfunction, which may be associated with disturbances in cerebral autoregulation, rendering the brain susceptible to hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion. The purpose of the present study was to assess static and dynamic cerebral autoregulation 1) in a human experimental model of the systemic inflammatory response during early sepsis and 2) in patients with advanced sepsis. Cerebral autoregulation was tested using transcranial Doppler ultrasound in healthy volunteers (n = 9) before and after LPS infusion and in patients with sepsis (n = 16). Static autoregulation was tested by norepinephrine infusion and dynamic autoregulation by transfer function analysis (TFA) of spontaneous oscillations between mean arterial blood pressure and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity in the low frequency range (0.07-0.20 Hz). Static autoregulatory performance after LPS infusion and in patients with sepsis was similar to values in healthy volunteers at baseline. In contrast, TFA showed decreased gain and an increased phase difference between blood pressure and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity after LPS (both P < 0.01 vs. baseline); patients exhibited similar gain but lower phase difference values (P < 0.01 vs. baseline and LPS), indicating a slower dynamic autoregulatory response. Our findings imply that static and dynamic cerebral autoregulatory performance may disassociate in sepsis; thus static autoregulation was maintained both after LPS and in patients with sepsis, whereas dynamic autoregulation was enhanced after LPS and impaired with a prolonged response time in patients. Hence, acute surges in blood pressure may adversely affect cerebral perfusion in patients with sepsis.

  2. Static Internal Performance of a Two-Dimensional Convergent-Divergent Nozzle with External Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Milton; Taylor, John G.; Frassinelli, Mark C.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. The nozzle design was tested with dry and afterburning throat areas, which represent different power settings and three expansion ratios. For each of these configurations, three trailing-edge geometries were tested. The baseline geometry had a straight trailing edge. Two different shaping techniques were applied to the baseline nozzle design to reduce radar observables: the scarfed design and the sawtooth design. A flat plate extended downstream of the lower divergent flap trailing edge parallel to the model centerline to form a shelf-like expansion surface. This shelf was designed to shield the plume from ground observation (infrared radiation (IR) signature suppression). The shelf represents the part of the aircraft structure that might be present in an installed configuration. These configurations were tested at nozzle pressure ratios from 2.0 to 12.0.

  3. A Note on the Comparative Statics of Pay-for-Performance in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Tisamarie B

    2016-05-01

    Pay-for-performance (P4P) is a widely implemented quality improvement strategy in health care that has generated much enthusiasm, but only limited empirical evidence to support its effectiveness. Researchers have speculated that flawed program designs or weak financial incentives may be to blame, but the reason for P4P's limited success may be more fundamental. When P4P rewards multiple services, it creates a special case of the well-known multitasking problem, where incentives to increase some rewarded activities are blunted by countervailing incentives to focus on other rewarded activities: these incentives may cancel each other out with little net effect on quality. This paper analyzes the comparative statics of a P4P model to show that when P4P rewards multiple services in a setting of multitasking and joint production, the change in both rewarded and unrewarded services is generally ambiguous. This result contrasts with the commonly held intuition that P4P should increase rewarded activities.

  4. A Study of TRMM Static Earth Sensor Performance Using On-Orbit Sensor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natanson, Gregory; Glickman, Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the Barnes static Earth sensor assembly (ESA) using on-orbit data collected from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. It is shown that there exist strong correlations between the large penetration angle residuals and the voltages produced by the Offset Radiation Source (ORS). It is conjectured that at certain times in the TRMM orbit the ORS is operating out of its calibrated range, and consequently corrupts the penetration angle information observed and processed by the ESA. The observed yaw drift between Digital Sun Sensor (DSS) observations is shown to be consistent with predictions by a simple roll-yaw coupling computation. This would explain the large drifts seen on TRMM, where the propagation of the yaw angle between DSS updates does not take into account the possibility of a non-zero roll angle error. Finally, the accuracy of the onboard algorithm used when only three of the four quadrants supply valid penetration angles is assessed. In terms of procedures used to perform this study, the analysis of ESA penetration angle residuals is discovered to be a very useful and insightful tool for assessing, the health and functionality of the ESA.

  5. Brush seal leakage performance with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlile, Julie A.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    The leakage performance of a brush seal with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions was studied. The leakage results are included for air, helium, and carbon dioxide at several bristle/rotor interferences. Also, the effects of packing a lubricant into the bristles and also of reversing the pressure drop across the seal were studied. Results were compared to that of an annular seal at similar operating conditions. In order to generalize the results, they were correlated using corresponding state theory. The brush seal tested had a bore diameter of 3.792 cm (1.4930 in), a fence height of 0.0635 cm (0.025 in), and 1800 bristles/cm circumference (4500 bristles/in circumference). Various bristle/rotor radial interferences were achieved by using a tapered rotor. The brush seal reduced the leakage in comparison to the annular seal, up to 9.5 times. Reversing the pressure drop across the brush seal produced leakage rates approx. the same as that of the annular seal. Addition of a lubricant reduced the leakage by 2.5 times. The air and carbon dioxide data were successfully correlated using corresponding state theory. However, the helium data followed a different curve than the air and carbon dioxide data.

  6. Brush seal leakage performance with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlile, Julie A.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    The leakage performance of a brush seal with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions was studied. The leakage results included for air, helium, and carbon dioxide at several bristle/rotor interferences. Also, the effects of packing a lubricant into the bristles and also of reversing the pressure drop across the seal were studied. Results were compared to that of an annular seal at similar operating conditions. In order to generalize the results, they were correlated using corresponding state theory. The brush seal tested had a bore diameter of 3.792 cm (1.4930 in.), a fence height of 0.0635 cm (0.025 in.), and 1800 bristles/cm circumference (4500 bristles/in. circumference). Various bristle/rotor radial interferences were achieved by using a tapered rotor. The brush seal reduced the leakage in comparison to the annular seal, up to 9.5 times. Reversing the pressure drop across the brush seal produced leakage rates approximately the same as that of the annular seal. Addition of a lubricant reduced the leakage by 2.5 times. The air and carbon dioxide data were successfully correlated using corresponding state theory. However, the helium data followed a different curve than the air and carbon dioxide data.

  7. Acute Effect of Static Stretching on Lower Limb Movement Performance by Using STABL Virtual Reality System.

    PubMed

    Ameer, Mariam A; Muaidi, Qassim I

    2017-07-17

    The effect of acute static stretch (ASS) on the lower limb RT has been recently questioned to decrease the risk of falling and injuries in situations requiring a rapid reaction, as in the cases of balance disturbance. The main purpose of this study was to detect the effect of ASS on the lower limb RT by using virtual reality device. Two Group Control Group design. Research laboratory. The control and experimental groups were formed randomly from sixty female university students. Each participant in the experimental group was tested before and after ASS for the quadriceps, hamstrings and planter flexor muscles, and compared with the control group with warming-up exercise only. The stretching program involved warming-up in the form of circular running inside the lab for 5 minutes followed by stretching of each muscle group thrice, to the limit of discomfort of 45 s, with resting period of 15s between stretches. The measurements included the RT of the dominant lower extremity by using the dynamic stability program, STABL Virtual Reality System (Model No. DIZ 2709, Motek Medical and Force Link Merged Co., Amsterdam). There was statistically significant reduction (F = 162, P= .00) in post-test RT between the two groups, and significant decrease in RT after stretching, in the experimental group (7.5%) (P= .00). ASS of the lower limb muscles tends to decrease the lower limb RT and improve movement performance.

  8. Comparisons between the dynamic and quasi-static performances of a dissipative dielectric elastomer under pure shear mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. E.; He, Z. C.; Li, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Based on the Helmholtz free energy function of the dielectric elastomer (DE) with consideration of the dissipation processes and thermal effects, the dynamic equations derived from the work done by the inertia forces and Euler–Lagrange equation along with the quasi-static equation can be established. Under typical loading patterns, including linear and sinusoidal voltages and a sinusoidal force coupled with a constant voltage, the distinctions between the performances of DE induced by the two different governing equations can be fully discussed. Therefore, the effects of the inertia forces in both plane and thickness directions can also be revealed in detail. Furthermore, the mechanisms of failures are briefly studied. The numerical results have indicated that the deformations calculated from the quasi-static and dynamic models are identical under small amplitudes and frequencies of actuation. However, when the external loading is large enough to cause failures, obvious distinction appears and the DE suffers from rupture sooner using the quasi-static model, especially under linear actuation. In addition, no resonance can be detected via the quasi-static equation and the mean stretch calculated from the dynamic equation coincides with the stretch obtained from the equivalent voltage (static) of the applied sinusoidal voltage in some extents. Under a sinusoidal force with a static voltage, the stretch calculated from the dynamic equation oscillates around the curve induced by the quasi-static model at first and finally coincides with it. When power source is cut off, the current leakage lowers the mean stretch of the oscillation.

  9. Static and Wind Tunnel Aero-Performance Tests of NASA AST Separate Flow Nozzle Noise Reduction Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, Kevin L.; McDonald, Timothy J.; Saiyed, Naseem (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of cold flow model tests to determine the static and wind tunnel performance of several NASA AST separate flow nozzle noise reduction configurations. The tests were conducted by Aero Systems Engineering, Inc., for NASA Glenn Research Center. The tests were performed in the Channels 14 and 6 static thrust stands and the Channel 10 transonic wind tunnel at the FluiDyne Aerodynamics Laboratory in Plymouth, Minnesota. Facility checkout tests were made using standard ASME long-radius metering nozzles. These tests demonstrated facility data accuracy at flow conditions similar to the model tests. Channel 14 static tests reported here consisted of 21 ASME nozzle facility checkout tests and 57 static model performance tests (including 22 at no charge). Fan nozzle pressure ratio varied from 1.4 to 2.0, and fan to core total pressure ratio varied from 1.0 to 1.19. Core to fan total temperature ratio was 1.0. Channel 10 wind tunnel tests consisted of 15 tests at Mach number 0.28 and 31 tests at Mach 0.8. The sting was checked out statically in Channel 6 before the wind tunnel tests. In the Channel 6 facility, 12 ASME nozzle data points were taken and 7 model data points were taken. In the wind tunnel, fan nozzle pressure ratio varied from 1.73 to 2.8, and fan to core total pressure ratio varied from 1.0 to 1.19. Core to fan total temperature ratio was 1.0. Test results include thrust coefficients, thrust vector angle, core and fan nozzle discharge coefficients, total pressure and temperature charging station profiles, and boat-tail static pressure distributions in the wind tunnel.

  10. Characterization and Performance Optimization of a Cementitious Composite for Quasi-Static and Dynamic Loads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    rapid-set, high-strength geopolymer cement under quasi-static and dynamic loads. Four unique tensile experiments were conducted to characterize and...review under responsibility of ICM11 Keywords: Material characterization, fiber reinforced concrete, geopolymer cement 1. Introduction A mission... geopolymer cement under quasi-static and dynamic loads. Four unique tensile experiments were conducted to characterize and optimize material response of the

  11. Rotational MEMS mirror with latching arm for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brière, Jonathan; Beaulieu, Philippe-Olivier; Saidani, Menouer; Nabki, Frederic; Menard, Michaël.

    2015-02-01

    We present an innovative rotational MEMS mirror that can control the direction of propagation of light beams inside of planar waveguides implemented in silicon photonics. Potential applications include but are not limited to optical telecommunications, medical imaging, scan and spectrometry. The mirror has a half-cylinder shape with a radius of 300 μm that provides low and constant optical losses over the full angular displacement range. A circular comb drive structure is anchored such that it allows free or latched rotation experimentally demonstrated over 8.5° (X-Y planar rotational movement) using 290V electrostatic actuation. The entire MEMS structure was implemented using the MEMSCAP SOIMUMPs process. The center of the anchor beam is designed to be the approximate rotation point of the circular comb drive to counter the rotation offset of the mirror displacement. A mechanical characterization of the MEMS mirror is presented. The latching mechanism provides up to 20 different angular locking positions allowing the mirror to counter any resonance or vibration effects and it is actuated with an electrostatic linear comb drive. An innovative gap closing structure was designed to reduce optical propagation losses due to beam divergence in the interstitial space between the mirror and the planar waveguide. The gap closing structure is also electrostatically actuated and includes two side stoppers to prevent stiction.

  12. Static internal performance of convergent single-expansion-ramp nozzles with various combinations of internal geometric parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bare, E. Ann; Capone, Francis J.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of five geometric design parameters on the internal performance of convergent single expansion ramp nozzles. The effects of ramp chordal angle, initial ramp angle, flap angle, flap length, and ramp length were determined. All nozzles tested has a nominally constant throat area and aspect ratio. Static pressure distributions along the centerlines of the ramp and flap were also obtained for each configuration. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied up to 10.0 for all configurations.

  13. Static internal performance of single-expansion-ramp nozzles with thrust-vectoring capability up to 60 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted at static conditions (wind off) in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The effects of geometric thrust-vector angle, sidewall containment, ramp curvature, lower-flap lip angle, and ramp length on the internal performance of nonaxisymmetric single-expansion-ramp nozzles were investigated. Geometric thrust-vector angle was varied from -20 deg. to 60 deg., and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to approximately 10.0.

  14. The Association between Unilateral Heel-Rise Performance with Static and Dynamic Balance in Community Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hashish, Rami; Samarawickrame, Sachithra D.; Wang, Man-Ying; Yu, Sean S-Y; Salem, George J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION As a measure of both strength and muscle endurance of the plantar flexors, the unilateral heel rise (UHR) test has been suggested as a method to evaluate balance capabilities in older adults. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the association between UHR performance with biomechanical measures of balance in seniors. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-two older adults completed two testing sessions. The first visit included UHR performance; the second visit included dynamic and static motion analysis. RESULTS UHR performance was significantly associated with dynamic balance capability as measured by medial-lateral inclination angle during gait. As indicated by an analysis of center of pressure, there were significant associations between UHR performance and measures of static balance. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION Balance is influenced by plantar flexor performance as measured by the UHR test. We therefore suggest incorporating the UHR test in analyses of balance in seniors. PMID:25457285

  15. Evaluation of static physics performance of the jPET-D4 by Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Kobayashi, Ayako; Shibuya, Kengo; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Suga, Mikio; Yamaya, Taiga; Kitamura, Keishi; Maruyama, Koichi; Murayama, Hideo

    2007-01-07

    The jPET-D4 is the first PET scanner to introduce a unique four-layer depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector scheme in order to achieve high sensitivity and uniform high spatial resolution. This paper compares measurement and Monte Carlo simulation results of the static physics performance of this prototype research PET scanner. Measurement results include single and coincidence energy spectra, point and line source sensitivities, axial sensitivity profile (slice profile) and scatter fraction. We use GATE (Geant4 application for tomographic emission) as a Monte Carlo radiation transport model. Experimental results are reproduced well by the simulation model with reasonable assumptions on characteristic responses of the DOI detectors. In a previous study, the jPET-D4 was shown to provide a uniform spatial resolution as good as 3 mm (FHWM). In the present study, we demonstrate that a high sensitivity, 11.3 +/- 0.5%, is provided at the FOV centre. However, about three-fourths of this sensitivity is related to multiple-crystal events, for which some misidentification of the crystal cannot be avoided. Therefore, it is crucial to develop a more efficient way to identify the crystal of interaction and to reduce misidentification in order to make use of these high performance values simultaneously. We expect that effective sensitivity can be improved by replacing the GSO crystals with more absorptive crystals such as BGO and LSO. The results we describe here are essential to take full advantage of the next generation PET systems that have DOI recognition capability.

  16. Remote tong/tool latch and storage bracket for an advanced servo-manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Nicholson, John R.

    1990-01-01

    An arrangement for stowing releasable end effectors for manipulator arms wherein the end effector includes a releasable latch mechanism for connecting the end effector to the manipulator arm, and a storage holder is provided which includes an arrangement for actuating the latch mechanism as the end effector is moved into and out of the holder by the action of the manipulator arm.

  17. Evolution of the IBDM Structural Latch Development into a Generic Simplified Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVriendt, K.; Dittmer, H.; Vrancken, D.; Urmston, P.; Gracia, O.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the evolution in the development of the structural latch for the International Berthing Docking Mechanism (IBDM, see Figure 1). It reports on the lessons learned since completion of the test program on the engineering development unit of the first generation latching system in 2007. The initial latch design has been through a second generation concept in 2008, and now evolved into a third generation of this mechanism. Functional and structural testing on the latest latch hardware has recently been completed with good results. The IBDM latching system will provide the structural connection between two mated space vehicles after berthing or docking. The mechanism guarantees that the interface seals become compressed to form a leak-tight pressure system that creates a passageway for the astronauts.

  18. Soil sampling device with latch assembly having a variable circumferential shape

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, R.D.

    1996-12-24

    The invention relates to an improved sampler which can be operated in any orientation. The design features a positive gripping of the operating rod in a manner to reduce point loads so as to reduce any possibility of jamming of the rod on a retraction stroke until such time as it is positively retained in the fully withdrawn position. In the preferred embodiment, a pair of mating cylindrical latch pieces, held together by a circumferential spring, are used for positive actuation. The inner rod has an angular cut-out which provides the base for the latch when aligned with the latch. A release fixture can be used to free the latch from the cone rod after actuation. The latches are formed in such a manner as they may support themselves within the housing of the sampler until they engage the operating rod. 11 figs.

  19. Soil sampling device with latch assembly having a variable circumferential shape

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to an improved sampler which can be operated in any orientation. The design features a positive gripping of the operating rod in a manner to reduce point loads so as to reduce any possibility of jamming of the rod on a retraction stroke until such time as it is positively retained in the fully withdrawn position. In the preferred embodiment, a pair of mating cylindrical latch pieces, held together by a circumferential spring, are used for positive actuation. The inner rod has an angular cut-out which provides the base for the latch when aligned with the latch. A release fixture can be used to free the latch from the cone rod after actuation. The latches are formed in such a manner as they may support themselves within the housing of the sampler until they engage the operating rod.

  20. Static and dynamic single leg postural control performance during dual-task paradigms.

    PubMed

    Talarico, Maria K; Lynall, Robert C; Mauntel, Timothy C; Weinhold, Paul S; Padua, Darin A; Mihalik, Jason P

    2017-06-01

    Combining dynamic postural control assessments and cognitive tasks may give clinicians a more accurate indication of postural control under sport-like conditions compared to single-task assessments. We examined postural control, cognitive and squatting performance of healthy individuals during static and dynamic postural control assessments in single- and dual-task paradigms. Thirty participants (female = 22, male = 8; age = 20.8 ± 1.6 years, height = 157.9 ± 13.0 cm, mass = 67.8 ± 20.6 kg) completed single-leg stance and single-leg squat assessments on a force plate individually (single-task) and concurrently (dual-task) with two cognitive assessments, a modified Stroop test and the Brooks Spatial Memory Test. Outcomes included centre of pressure speed, 95% confidence ellipse, squat depth and speed and cognitive test measures (percentage of correct answers and reaction time). Postural control performance varied between postural control assessments and testing paradigms. Participants did not squat as deep and squatted slower (P < 0.001) during dual-task paradigms (≤12.69 ± 3.4 cm squat depth, ≤16.20 ± 4.6 cm · s(-1) squat speed) compared to single-task paradigms (14.57 ± 3.6 cm squat depth, 19.65 ± 5.5 cm · s(-1) squat speed). The percentage of correct answers did not change across testing conditions, but Stroop reaction time (725.81 ± 59.2 ms; F2,58 = 7.725, P = 0.001) was slowest during single-leg squats compared to baseline (691.64 ± 80.1 ms; P = 0.038) and single-task paradigms (681.33 ± 51.5 ms; P < 0.001). Dynamic dual-task assessments may be more challenging to the postural control system and may better represent postural control performance during dynamic activities.

  1. Driving and latching of the Starlab pointing mirror doors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaven, Herbert R., Jr.; Avina, Raymond R.

    1990-01-01

    The Starlab Experiment, a major SDIO technology initiative, is an attached payload which will be delivered into Earth orbit aboard NASA's Space Shuttle in 1991. Starlab will generate and aim an 80 cm diameter laser beam into space through a large opening in the structure which houses the pointing mirror. Two doors, each somewhat larger than a desktop, cover the opening when the laser optics system is nonoperational. Latch Mechanism Assemblies hold the doors shut during liftoff and ascent and, again, during Orbiter reentry. Each door is powered by a Door Drive System during the many open/close cycles between various experiments. The design, testing, and resultant failure modes of these mechanisms are examined.

  2. Latch of HST aft shroud photographed by Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-12-04

    S61-E-005 (4 Dec 1993) --- This close-up view of a latch on the minus V3 aft shroud door of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was photographed with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC), and down linked to ground controllers soon afterward. Endeavour's crew captured the HST on December 4, 1993 in order to service the telescope. Over a period of five days, four of the seven crew members will work in alternating pairs outside Endeavour's shirt sleeve environment to service the giant telescope. Electronic still photography is a relatively new technology which provides the means for a handheld camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approaching film quality. The electronic still camera has flown as an experiment on several other shuttle missions.

  3. Latch of HST aft shroud photographed by Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-12-04

    S61-E-010 (4 Dec 1993) --- This close-up view of a latch on the minus V3 aft shroud door of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was photographed with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC), and down linked to ground controllers soon afterward. Endeavour's crew captured the HST on December 4, 1993 in order to service the telescope over a period of five days. Four of the crew members will work in alternating pairs outside Endeavour's shirt sleeve environment to service the giant telescope. Electronic still photography is a relatively new technology which provides the means for a handheld camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approaching film quality. The electronic still camera has flown as an experiment on several other shuttle missions.

  4. Latch of HST aft shroud photographed by Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-12-04

    S61-E-004 (4 Dec 1993) --- This close-up view of a latch on the minus V3 aft shroud door of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was photographed with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC), and down linked to ground controllers soon afterward. Endeavour's crew captured the HST on December 4, 1993 in order to service the telescope. Over a period of five days, four of the seven crew members will work in alternating pairs outside Endeavour's shirt sleeve environment to service the giant telescope. Electronic still photography is a relatively new technology which provides the means for a handheld camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approaching film quality. The electronic still camera has flown as an experiment on several other shuttle missions.

  5. Survey of Mathematics Teachers' Static and Transformational Performance and Perspectives for Teaching Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Robert F.; Rappa, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Surveys were used to examine mathematics teachers (15) on their ability to solve similarity problems and on their likely implementation of lesson objectives for teaching similarity. All correctly solved a similarity problem requiring a traditional static perspective, but 7 out of 15 failed to correctly solve a problem that required a more…

  6. Latching chains in K-nearest-neighbor and modular small-world networks.

    PubMed

    Song, Sanming; Yao, Hongxun; Simonov, Alexander Yurievich

    2015-01-01

    Latching dynamics retrieve pattern sequences successively by neural adaption and pattern correlation. We have previously proposed a modular latching chain model in Song et al. (2014) to better accommodate the structured transitions in the brain. Different cortical areas have different network structures. To explore how structural parameters like rewiring probability, threshold, noise and feedback connections affect the latching dynamics, two different connection schemes, K-nearest-neighbor network and modular network both having modular structure are considered. Latching chains are measured using two proposed measures characterizing length of intra-modular latching chains and sequential inter-modular association transitions. Our main findings include: (1) With decreasing threshold coefficient and rewiring probability, both the K-nearest-neighbor network and the modular network experience quantitatively similar phase change processes. (2) The modular network exhibits selectively enhanced latching in the small-world range of connectivity. (3) The K-nearest-neighbor network is more robust to changes in rewiring probability, while the modular network is more robust to the presence of noise pattern pairs and to changes in the strength of feedback connections. According to our findings, the relationships between latching chains in K-nearest-neighbor and modular networks and different forms of cognition and information processing emerging in the brain are discussed.

  7. Modeling the energy performance of event-driven wireless sensor network by using static sink and mobile sink.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiehui; Salim, Mariam B; Matsumoto, Mitsuji

    2010-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) designed for mission-critical applications suffer from limited sensing capacities, particularly fast energy depletion. Regarding this, mobile sinks can be used to balance the energy consumption in WSNs, but the frequent location updates of the mobile sinks can lead to data collisions and rapid energy consumption for some specific sensors. This paper explores an optimal barrier coverage based sensor deployment for event driven WSNs where a dual-sink model was designed to evaluate the energy performance of not only static sensors, but Static Sink (SS) and Mobile Sinks (MSs) simultaneously, based on parameters such as sensor transmission range r and the velocity of the mobile sink v, etc. Moreover, a MS mobility model was developed to enable SS and MSs to effectively collaborate, while achieving spatiotemporal energy performance efficiency by using the knowledge of the cumulative density function (cdf), Poisson process and M/G/1 queue. The simulation results verified that the improved energy performance of the whole network was demonstrated clearly and our eDSA algorithm is more efficient than the static-sink model, reducing energy consumption approximately in half. Moreover, we demonstrate that our results are robust to realistic sensing models and also validate the correctness of our results through extensive simulations.

  8. Modeling the Energy Performance of Event-Driven Wireless Sensor Network by Using Static Sink and Mobile Sink

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiehui; Salim, Mariam B.; Matsumoto, Mitsuji

    2010-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) designed for mission-critical applications suffer from limited sensing capacities, particularly fast energy depletion. Regarding this, mobile sinks can be used to balance the energy consumption in WSNs, but the frequent location updates of the mobile sinks can lead to data collisions and rapid energy consumption for some specific sensors. This paper explores an optimal barrier coverage based sensor deployment for event driven WSNs where a dual-sink model was designed to evaluate the energy performance of not only static sensors, but Static Sink (SS) and Mobile Sinks (MSs) simultaneously, based on parameters such as sensor transmission range r and the velocity of the mobile sink v, etc. Moreover, a MS mobility model was developed to enable SS and MSs to effectively collaborate, while achieving spatiotemporal energy performance efficiency by using the knowledge of the cumulative density function (cdf), Poisson process and M/G/1 queue. The simulation results verified that the improved energy performance of the whole network was demonstrated clearly and our eDSA algorithm is more efficient than the static-sink model, reducing energy consumption approximately in half. Moreover, we demonstrate that our results are robust to realistic sensing models and also validate the correctness of our results through extensive simulations. PMID:22163503

  9. Review of in vivo static and ELF electric fields studies performed at Gazi Biophysics Department.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Nesrin; Güler, Göknur

    2006-01-01

    In vivo effects of Static Electric and ELF Magnetic and Electric fields have been carried out for more than 20 years in the Bioelectromagnetic Laboratory at the Biophysics Department of the Medical Faculty of Gazi University. In this article, the results of in vivo ELF Electric field studies are presented as a review. Static and 50 Hz ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) Electric (E) fields effects on free radical synthesis, antioxidant enzyme level, and collagen synthesis were analyzed on tissues of guinea pigs, such as brain, liver, lung, kidney, spleen, testis, and plasma. Animals were exposed to static and ELF electric fields with intensities ranging from 0.3 kV/m to 1.9 kV/m in vertical and horizontal directions. Exposure periods were 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days. Electric fields were generated from a specially designed parallel plate capacitor system. The results indicate that the effects of electric fields on the tissues studied depend significantly on the type and magnitude of electric field and exposure period.

  10. Subsonic Maneuvering Effectiveness of High Performance Aircraft Which Employ Quasi-Static Shape Change Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C.; Scott, Michael A.; Weston, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper represents an initial study on the use of quasi-static shape change devices in aircraft maneuvering. The macroscopic effects and requirements for these devices in flight control are the focus of this study. Groups of devices are postulated to replace the conventional leading-edge flap (LEF) and the all-moving wing tip (AMT) on the tailless LMTAS-ICE (Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems - Innovative Control Effectors) configuration. The maximum quasi-static shape changes are 13.8% and 7.7% of the wing section thickness for the LEF and AMT replacement devices, respectively. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) panel code is used to determine the control effectiveness of groups of these devices. A preliminary design of a wings-leveler autopilot is presented. Initial evaluation at 0.6 Mach at 15,000 ft. altitude is made through batch simulation. Results show small disturbance stability is achieved, however, an increase in maximum distortion is needed to statically offset five degrees of sideslip. This only applies to the specific device groups studied, encouraging future research on optimal device placement.

  11. The effects of a combined static-dynamic stretching protocol on athletic performance in elite Gaelic footballers: A randomised controlled crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Loughran, Martin; Glasgow, Philip; Bleakley, Chris; McVeigh, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    To determine the effect of three different static-dynamic stretching protocols on sprint and jump performance in Gaelic footballers. Double-blind, controlled, crossover trial. Sports Institute research environment. Seventeen male elite level Gaelic footballers, aged 18-30 years, completed three stretching protocols. Athletic performance was measured by countermovement jump height and power, and timed 10 m, 20 m, and 40 m sprints. Static stretching reduced sprint speed by 1.1% over 40 m and 1.0% over 20 m. Static stretching also reduced countermovement jump height by 10.6% and jump power by 6.4%. When static stretching was followed by dynamic stretching, sprint speed improved by 1.0% over 20 m and 0.7% over 40 m (p < 0.05). The static - dynamic stretching protocol also improved countermovement jump height by 8.7% (p < 0.01) and power by 6.7% (p < 0.01). Static stretching reduces sprint speed and jump performance. Static stretching should be followed by dynamic stretching during warm-up to nullify any performance deficits caused by static stretching. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Latching mechanism for deployable/re-stowable columns useful in satellite construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahl, E. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A column longeron latch assembly provides the securing mechanism for the deployable, telescoping column of a hoop/column antenna. The column is an open lattice structure with three longerons disposed 120 deg apart as the principle load bearing member. The column is deployed from a pair of eleven nested bays disposed on opposite sides of a center section under the influence of a motor-cable-pulley system. The longeron latch is a four bar linkage mechanism using the over-center principle for automatically locking the longeron sections into position during deployment. The latch is unlocked when the antenna is to be restowed. A spring pack disposed in the end of each longeron serves to absorb stress forces on the deployed column through the cam head piston and abutting latch from an adjacent longeron.

  13. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Definitions. Hood means any exterior movable body panel forward of the windshield that is used to cover an... obstructs a driver's forward view through the windshield must be provided with a second latch position...

  14. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Definitions. Hood means any exterior movable body panel forward of the windshield that is used to cover an... obstructs a driver's forward view through the windshield must be provided with a second latch position...

  15. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Definitions. Hood means any exterior movable body panel forward of the windshield that is used to cover an... obstructs a driver's forward view through the windshield must be provided with a second latch position...

  16. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Definitions. Hood means any exterior movable body panel forward of the windshield that is used to cover an... obstructs a driver's forward view through the windshield must be provided with a second latch position...

  17. 49 CFR 571.113 - Standard No. 113; Hood latch system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Definitions. Hood means any exterior movable body panel forward of the windshield that is used to cover an... obstructs a driver's forward view through the windshield must be provided with a second latch position...

  18. Acute Effects of Static Stretching, Dynamic Exercises, and High Volume Upper Extremity Plyometric Activity on Tennis Serve Performance

    PubMed Central

    Gelen, Ertugrul; Dede, Muhittin; Bingul, Bergun Meric; Bulgan, Cigdem; Aydin, Mensure

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of static stretching; dynamic exercises and high volume upper extremity plyometric activity on tennis serve performance. Twenty-six elite young tennis players (15.1 ± 4.2 years, 167.9 ± 5.8 cm and 61.6 ± 8.1 kg) performed 4 different warm-up (WU) routines in a random order on non-consecutive days. The WU methods consisted of traditional WU (jogging, rally and serve practice) (TRAD); traditional WU and static stretching (TRSS); traditional WU and dynamic exercise (TRDE); and traditional WU and high volume upper extremity plyometric activity (TRPLYP). Following each WU session, subjects were tested on a tennis serve ball speed test. TRAD, TRSS, TRDE and TRPLYO were compared by repeated measurement analyses of variance and post-hoc comparisons. In this study a 1 to 3 percent increase in tennis serve ball speed was recorded in TRDE and TRPLYO when compared to TRAD (p< 0.05). However, no significant change in ball speed performance between TRSS and TRAD. (p> 0.05). ICCs for ball speed showed strong reliability (0.82 to 0.93) for the ball speed measurements.The results of this study indicate that dynamic and high volume upper extremity plyometric WU activities are likely beneficial to serve speed of elite junior tennis players. Key points After the traditional warm up in tennis, static stretching has no effect on serve speed. Tennis players should perform dynamic exercises and/or high volume upper extremity plyometric activities to improve their athletic performance. PMID:24150068

  19. Static performance of nonaxisymmetric nozzles with yaw thrust-vectoring vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.

    1988-01-01

    A static test was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16 ft Transonic Tunnel to evaluate the effects of post exit vane vectoring on nonaxisymmetric nozzles. Three baseline nozzles were tested: an unvectored two dimensional convergent nozzle, an unvectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle, and a pitch vectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. Each nozzle geometry was tested with 3 exit aspect ratios (exit width divided by exit height) of 1.5, 2.5 and 4.0. Two post exit yaw vanes were externally mounted on the nozzle sidewalls at the nozzle exit to generate yaw thrust vectoring. Vane deflection angle (0, -20 and -30 deg), vane planform and vane curvature were varied during the test. Results indicate that the post exit vane concept produced resultant yaw vector angles which were always smaller than the geometric yaw vector angle. Losses in resultant thrust ratio increased with the magnitude of resultant yaw vector angle. The widest post exit vane produced the largest degree of flow turning, but vane curvature had little effect on thrust vectoring. Pitch vectoring was independent of yaw vectoring, indicating that multiaxis thrust vectoring is feasible for the nozzle concepts tested.

  20. Laboratory and field performance of FOS sensors in static and dynamic strain monitoring in concrete bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmokrane, B.; Debaiky, A.; El-Ragaby, A.; Roy, R.; El-Gamal, S.; El-Salakawy, E.

    2006-03-01

    There is a growing need for designing and constructing innovative concrete bridges using FRP reinforcing bars as internal reinforcement to avoid the corrosion problems and high costs of maintenance and repair. For efficient use and to increase the lifetime of these bridges, it is important to develop efficient monitoring systems for such innovative structures. Fabry-Perot and Bragg fibre optic sensors (FOS) that can measure the strains and temperature are promising candidates for life-long health monitoring of these structures. This article reports laboratory and field performance of Fabry-Perot and Bragg FOS sensors as well as electrical strain gauges in static and dynamic strain monitoring in concrete bridge decks. The laboratory tests include tensile testing of glass FRP bars and testing of full-scale concrete bridge deck slabs reinforced with glass and carbon FRP bars under static and cyclic concentrated loads. The field tests include static and dynamic testing of two bridges reinforced with steel and glass FRP bars. The obtained strain results showed satisfactory agreement between the different gauges.

  1. A performance comparison of static VAr compensator based on Goertzel and FFT algorithm and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Kececioglu, O Fatih; Gani, Ahmet; Sekkeli, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the present paper is to introduce a new approach for measuring and calculation of fundamental power components in the case of various distorted waveforms including those containing harmonics. The parameters of active, reactive, apparent power and power factor, are measured and calculated by using Goertzel algorithm instead of fast Fourier transformation which is commonly used. The main advantage of utilizing Goertzel algorithm is to minimize computational load and trigonometric equations. The parameters measured in the new technique are applied to a fixed capacitor-thyristor controlled reactor based static VAr compensation system to achieve accurate power factor correction for the first time. This study is implemented both simulation and experimentally.

  2. Performance weight sensor using graded index optical fiber on static test with UTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamimatul Ula, R.; Hanto, Dwi

    2017-05-01

    Overloading the vehicle on a highway cause the damage to roads, accidents and harm other road users. Required a weight sensor has a high sensitivity, resistant to corrosion and electromagnetic wave interference. Graded index optical fiber is a kind of fiber that has the potential to be used as a deformation sensor. This research aims to optimize the load sensor has been developed previously to detect a load on a ton scale. The weight sensor-based micro bending graded index fiber and LED as a light source capable of detecting a load from 0.7 to 1.93 tons with a standard deviation of 1.18 and 99.45% accuracy level in a static text using UTM. This sensor has been able to be used to detect heavy vehicles such as water truck wheels 6 and fuel trucks. The study will be further developed in order to detect the load to more than 8 tons.

  3. The Acute Effects of Static Stretching on Speed and Agility Performance Depend on Stretch Duration and Conditioning Level.

    PubMed

    Avloniti, Alexandra; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Avloniti, Christina; Protopapa, Maria; Draganidis, Dimitrios; Stampoulis, Theodoros; Leontsini, Diamanda; Mavropalias, George; Gounelas, George; Kambas, Antonios

    2016-10-01

    Avloniti, A, Chatzinikolaou, A, Fatouros, IG, Avloniti, C, Protopapa, M, Draganidis, D, Stampoulis, T, Leontsini, D, Mavropalias, G, Gounelas, G, and Kambas, A. The acute effects of static stretching on speed and agility performance depend on stretch duration and conditioning level. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2767-2773, 2016-Although static stretching (SS) is an integral part of physical preparation before training and competition, its usefulness in regards to power performance improvement has been questioned. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 SS durations on speed and agility performance. According to a cross-over design, 34 trained men (age, 20.5 ± 1.4 years; height, 1.81 ± 0.2 m; weight, 77.2 ± 2.6 kg; body fat, 8.2 ± 2.6%) participated in a control session (no stretch) and 6 experimental conditions (10, 15, 20, 30, 40, and 60 seconds) performed in a randomized order. Performance in speed (10 and 20 m) and agility (T-test) was measured after the control and experimental conditions. Static stretching, consisting of stretches for hip extensors, hip adductors, knee extensors, knee flexors, and ankle sole flexors, was performed after light cardiovascular exercise (8 minutes). A 1-way repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that speed was improved only by SS of short duration (15/20 seconds), whereas agility remained unaffected by all SS trials. When participants' speed and agility level was taken into account, it was revealed that only those of moderate performance demonstrated an improved speed (in 15- and 20-second trials) and agility (in 10- and 15-second trials) performance. These results suggest that short-duration SS protocols induce an acute improvement of speed and agility performance, whereas longer-duration SS protocols have neither positive nor negative effect. Furthermore, it seems that individuals of lower speed and agility performance level are more likely to benefit by a short-duration SS protocol.

  4. Numerical analysis of static performance comparison of friction stir welded versus riveted 2024-T3 aluminum alloy stiffened panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qing; He, Yuting; Zhang, Teng; Wu, Liming

    2014-07-01

    Most researches on the static performance of stiffened panel joined by friction stir welding(FSW) mainly focus on the compression stability rather than shear stability. To evaluate the potential of FSW as a replacement for traditional rivet fastening for stiffened panel assembly in aviation application, finite element method(FEM) is applied to compare compression and shear stability performances of FSW stiffened panels with stability performances of riveted stiffened panels. FEMs of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy FSW and riveted stiffened panels are developed and nonlinear static analysis method is applied to obtain buckling pattern, buckling load and load carrying capability of each panel model. The accuracy of each FEM of FSW stiffened panel is evaluated by stability experiment of FSW stiffened panel specimens with identical geometry and boundary condition and the accuracy of each FEM of riveted stiffened panel is evaluated by semi-empirical calculation formulas. It is found that FEMs without considering weld-induced initial imperfections notably overestimate the static strengths of FSW stiffened panels. FEM results show that, buckling patterns of both FSW and riveted compression stiffened panels represent local buckling of plate between stiffeners. The initial buckling waves of FSW stiffened panel emerge uniformly in each plate between stiffeners while those of riveted panel mainly emerge in the mid-plate. Buckling patterns of both FSW and riveted shear stiffened panels represent local buckling of plate close to the loading corner. FEM results indicate that, shear buckling of FSW stiffened panel is less sensitive to the initial imperfections than compression buckling. Load carrying capability of FSW stiffened panel is less sensitive to the initial imperfections than initial buckling. It can be concluded that buckling loads of FSW panels are a bit lower than those of riveted panels whereas carrying capabilities of FSW panels are almost equivalent to those of riveted

  5. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on jump performance after 15 min of reconditioning shooting phase in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Annino, Giuseppe; Ruscello, Bruno; Lebone, Pietro; Palazzo, Francesco; Lombardo, Mauro; Padua, Elvira; Verdecchia, Luca; Tancredi, Virginia; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of static (SS) and dynamic stretching (DS) on vertical jump performance executed before, immediately after and at the end of the shooting phase (i.e., 15 min later), as to simulate the actual conditions preceding a match, in professional basketball players. Ten elite basketball players (age: 29±6.73 years, height: 194.67±7.75 cm, weight: 91±8.17 kg and BMI 23.8±7.91 kg.m-2) participated to the study. SS and DS protocols were administered during the first training session of the week, 48 hours after the championship match. Stretching protocols consisted in ~7 minutes of general warm-up phase followed by ~8 minutes of SS and DS, performed with a cross-over design., and ~15 minutes of a specific warm-up shooting phase (SP). Vertical jump tests consisted in counter movement jump (CMJ) and CMJ with arm swings (CMJas) and were performed immediately after the end of each stretching phase (preS, postS, postSP). A significant decrease (P=0.05; η2partial=0.29) in jumping tests height occurred in CMJas, when performed after the SS (i.e., PostS). However, no significant differences in jumping performances, occurred after the general warm phase and the specific warm-up shooting phase, between the two stretching protocols. These results would indicate that, overall, stretching routines either dynamic or static, performed before a basketball match are transient and affect only marginally leg muscles performance. Stretching routines, particularly the dynamic ones, may be useful to maintain muscle performance before a competition, provided that this latter begins shortly after.

  6. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite materials have increased in the last four decades in high technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties and low weight. In the automotive industry carbon fiber have become popular exclusively in luxury cars because of its high cost. However, Carbon-glass hybrid composites offer an effective alternative to designers to implement fiber-reinforced composites into several conventional applications without a considerable price increase maintaining most of their mechanical properties. A door latch system is a complex mechanism that is under high loading conditions during car accidents such as side impacts and rollovers. Therefore, the Department of Transportation in The United States developed a series of tests that every door latch system comply in order to be installed in a vehicle. The implementation of fiber-reinforced composite materials in a door latch system was studied by analyzing the material behavior during the FMVSS No. 206 transverse test using computational efforts and experimental testing. Firstly, a computational model of the current forkbolt and detent structure was developed. Several efforts were conducted in order to create an effective and time efficient model. Two simplified models were implemented with two different contact interaction approaches. 9 composite materials were studied in forkbolt and 5 in detent including woven carbon fiber, unidirectional carbon fiber, woven carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites and unidirectional carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites. The computational model results showed that woven fiber-reinforced composite materials were stiffer than the unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite materials. For instance, a forkbolt made of woven carbon fibers was 20% stiffer than a forkbolt made of unidirectional fibers symmetrically stacked in 0° and 90° alternating directions. Furthermore, Hybrid composite materials behaved as expected in forkbolt noticing a decline

  7. Static internal performance of a nonaxisymmetric vaned thrust reverser with flow splay capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, Linda S.; Leavitt, Laurence D.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel on a dual-port, nonaxisymmetric, block-and-turn type thrust reverser model with vane cascades in the reverser ports which turned the flow in the splay direction and aided in turning the flow in the reverse direction. Splaying reverser flow is a method of delaying to lower landing ground roll speeds the reingestion of hot exhaust flow into the inlets. Exhaust flow splay can also help prevent the impingement of hot exhaust gases on the empennage surfaces when the reverser is integrated into an actual airframe. The vane cascades consisted of two sets of perpendicular vanes with a variable number of turning and splay vanes. A skewed vane box was also tested which had only one set of vanes angled to provide both turning and splay. Vane cascades were designed to provide different amounts of flow splay in the top and bottom ports. Inner doors, trim tabs, and an orifice plate all provided means of varying the port area for reverser flow modulation. The outer door position was varied as a means of influencing the flow reverse angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.75 to approximately 6.00.

  8. Short period of oxygenation releases latch on peat decomposition.

    PubMed

    Brouns, Karlijn; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Hefting, Mariet M

    2014-05-15

    Extreme summer droughts are expected to occur more often in the future in NW Europe due to climate change. These droughts might accelerate the rate of peat oxidation in drained peat areas, with impacts on soil subsidence, GHG emission and water quality. This study aimed at providing more insight in the oxidation of deep peat layers that had not previously been exposed to air, the so-called secondary decomposition. We incubated two types of peat (eutrophic and oligotrophic), sampled from permanently anoxic peat layers from nature reserves and agricultural peat meadows. Peat samples were incubated for thirteen weeks under anoxic conditions, but were exposed to air for one to eight weeks. The production of CO2 and CH4 was quantified as a proxy for decomposition; concentrations of soluble nutrients and phenolic compounds were also measured. The results showed that oxygenation led to a steep increase in the rate of decomposition, indicated by higher carbon loss rates during and after oxygenation compared to non-oxygenated samples. Carbon loss rates increased more for eutrophic peat (agricultural area: 352%, nature reserve: 182%) than for oligotrophic peat (83% and 159% respectively). Most peat samples investigated showed higher post-oxygenation CO2 and/or CH4 production compared to the anoxic pre-oxygenation period. This indicates that oxygenation stimulates decomposition, even after anoxic conditions have returned. Contrary to the enzymic latch theory, no effects of oxygenation on the concentrations of soluble or condensed phenolic compounds were detected. Soluble nutrient concentrations did not change due to oxygenation either. Noteworthy is the occurrence of pyrite mineralization and associated acidification in eutrophic peat. Thus, low summer water levels, for example due to climate change, should be avoided in order to limit exceptionally high decomposition rates and associated problems such as increasing subsidence rates, greenhouse gas emission, sulfate release

  9. Mechanical characterization of pharmaceutical solids: a comparison between rheological tests performed under static and dynamic porosity conditions.

    PubMed

    Bonacucina, Giulia; Cespi, Marco; Misici-Falzi, Monica; Palmieri, Giovanni F

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this work was to verify how and to what extent rheological tests, carried out under dynamic (Heckel) and static (creep, stress/strain) porosity conditions, may serve as a valuable complement to the classic Heckel tests in the characterization of viscoelastic and densification properties of solid materials for pharmaceutical use. Six different modified (pregelatinized) starches were compressed in a rotary tablet machine equipped to measure force and punch displacement. Tablets were obtained using flat-faced 6mm diameter punches at different compression pressures. Compression cycles performed at the maximal pressure of 200MPa were used to build the Heckel plots. Ejected tablets at the 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% porosity levels were used for the stress/strain and creep tests. Parameters obtained with both types of tests were consistent with each other. In particular, among the six starches, lower viscosity values corresponded to lower P(Y) values, and lower elastic modulus values corresponded to lower elastic recovery of the tablet. Mechanical properties of materials can be better characterized if viscoelastic tests performed under dynamic porosity conditions (Heckel analysis) are supported by classical viscoelastic tests carried out under conditions of static porosity.

  10. Static and dynamic visuomotor task performance in children with acquired brain injury: predictive control deficits under increased temporal pressure.

    PubMed

    Caeyenberghs, Karen; van Roon, Dominique; van Aken, Katrijn; De Cock, Paul; Linden, Catharine Vander; Swinnen, Stephan P; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M

    2009-01-01

    To compare performance of children with acquired brain injury (ABI) on static versus dynamic visuomotor tasks with that of control children. Twenty-eight children with ABI and 28 normal age- and gender-matched controls (aged 6-16 years). Two visuomotor tasks on a digitizing tablet: (1) a static motor task requiring tracing of a flower figure and (2) a dynamic task consisting of tracking an accelerating dot presented on a monitor. Children with ABI performed worse than the control group only during the dynamic tracking task; the duration within the target was shorter, the distance between the centers of cursor and target was larger, and the number of velocity peaks per centimeter and the number of stops (ie, the number of submovements) were higher than those of the control group. Rather than resulting from movement execution problems, this might be due to less adequate processing of fast incoming sensory information, resulting in a decreased ability to anticipate the movement of the target (predictive control). Deficits in eye-hand coordination require careful attention, even in the postinjury chronic phase.

  11. Performance of static positioning for medium distances based on data from a virtual reference station and ASG-PL Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakula, M.

    The use of a network of reference stations instead of a single reference station allows the modelling of some systematic errors in a region and allows a user to increase the distance between the rover receiver and reference stations. In some countries, GPS reference stations exist and GPS observations are available for users in real-time mode and in post-processing. Observations from several GPS reference stations in a regional network enable modelling spatially-correlated errors and their modelling on an epoch-by-epoch and satellite-by-satellite basis. As a result, observations of a virtual reference station can be created at a rover's approximate position and its observations can be used in the precise baseline positioning of the rover. This paper presents the performance of the static positioning of a rover station, its quality and reliability for two different baselines. Single-baseline and network static solutions are presented and compared. Network solutions are based on data from a virtual reference station (VRS) obtained by the Wasoft/Virtuall software. In both cases, the same strategy of ambiguity resolution was used. These approaches have been tested with the use of 24-hour GPS data from the Polish Active Geodetic Network (ASG-PL). The data from three reference stations with medium-range separation were used in the process of generating VRS data. GPS data of the rover station were divided into 20, 10 and 5-min. sessions with a sampling interval of 5 sec. Practical calculations and analyses of horizontal and vertical accuracy of coordinates clearly show the improvement of static positioning in terms of time observation span and ambiguity reliability.

  12. Predicting Material Performance in the Space Environment from Laboratory Test Data, Static Design Environments, and Space Weather Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Josep I.; Edwards, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Qualifying materials for use in the space environment is typically accomplished with laboratory exposures to simulated UV/EUV, atomic oxygen, and charged particle radiation environments with in-situ or subsequent measurements of material properties of interest to the particular application. Choice of environment exposure levels are derived from static design environments intended to represent either mean or extreme conditions that are anticipated to be encountered during a mission. The real space environment however is quite variable. Predictions of the on orbit performance of a material qualified to laboratory environments can be done using information on 'space weather' variations in the real environment. This presentation will first review the variability of space environments of concern for material degradation and then demonstrate techniques for using test data to predict material performance in a variety of space environments from low Earth orbit to interplanetary space using historical measurements and space weather models.

  13. A Detailed Experimental Study on Single-Pump Raman/EDFA Hybrid Amplifiers: Static, Dynamic, and System Performance Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju Han; Chang, You Min; Han, Young Geun; Chung, Haeyang; Hyuck Kim, Sang; Lee, Sang Bae

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the performance comparison of three different schemes of single-pump dispersion-compensating fiber (DCF)-based Raman/erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) hybrid amplifiers together with a DCF-based Raman-only amplifier in terms of static properties, dynamic properties, and system impact: Raman-only amplifier (Type I), Raman/EDFA hybrid amplifiers recycling residual Raman pump in a cascaded EDF located either after (Type II) or prior to (Type III) a DCF, and a Raman-assisted EDFA (Type IV), the concept of which was proposed by Kurosawa With respect to the overall gain and system impact based on bit error rate (BER) measurements in a transmission system, the hybrid amplifier of Type II was found to have the best performance among the four types while the Raman-only amplifier shows the best tolerance to transient response.

  14. Static internal performance of a thrust vectoring and reversing two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle with an aft flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    The static internal performance of a multifunction nozzle having some of the geometric characteristics of both two-dimensional convergent-divergent and single expansion ramp nozzles has been investigated in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The internal expansion portion of the nozzle consisted of two symmetrical flat surfaces of equal length, and the external expansion portion of the nozzle consisted of a single aft flap. The aft flap could be varied in angle independently of the upper internal expansion surface to which it was attached. The effects of internal expansion ratio, nozzle thrust-vector angle (-30 deg. to 30 deg., aft flap shape, aft flap angle, and sidewall containment were determined for dry and afterburning power settings. In addition, a partial afterburning power setting nozzle, a fully deployed thrust reverser, and four vertical takeoff or landing nozzle, configurations were investigated. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied up to 10 for the dry power nozzles and 7 for the afterburning power nozzles.

  15. Static Stretching Alters Neuromuscular Function and Pacing Strategy, but Not Performance during a 3-Km Running Time-Trial

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Mayara V.; Duarte, Marcos; Pasqua, Leonardo A.; Lima-Silva, Adriano E.; MacIntosh, Brian R.; Bertuzzi, Rômulo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies report that static stretching (SS) impairs running economy. Assuming that pacing strategy relies on rate of energy use, this study aimed to determine whether SS would modify pacing strategy and performance in a 3-km running time-trial. Methods Eleven recreational distance runners performed a) a constant-speed running test without previous SS and a maximal incremental treadmill test; b) an anthropometric assessment and a constant-speed running test with previous SS; c) a 3-km time-trial familiarization on an outdoor 400-m track; d and e) two 3-km time-trials, one with SS (experimental situation) and another without (control situation) previous static stretching. The order of the sessions d and e were randomized in a counterbalanced fashion. Sit-and-reach and drop jump tests were performed before the 3-km running time-trial in the control situation and before and after stretching exercises in the SS. Running economy, stride parameters, and electromyographic activity (EMG) of vastus medialis (VM), biceps femoris (BF) and gastrocnemius medialis (GA) were measured during the constant-speed tests. Results The overall running time did not change with condition (SS 11:35±00:31 s; control 11:28±00:41 s, p = 0.304), but the first 100 m was completed at a significantly lower velocity after SS. Surprisingly, SS did not modify the running economy, but the iEMG for the BF (+22.6%, p = 0.031), stride duration (+2.1%, p = 0.053) and range of motion (+11.1%, p = 0.0001) were significantly modified. Drop jump height decreased following SS (−9.2%, p = 0.001). Conclusion Static stretch impaired neuromuscular function, resulting in a slow start during a 3-km running time-trial, thus demonstrating the fundamental role of the neuromuscular system in the self-selected speed during the initial phase of the race. PMID:24905918

  16. Effect of several geometric parameters on the static internal performance of three nonaxisymmetric nozzle concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Re, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Effects of several geometric parameters on the internal performance of nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent, single-ramp expansion, and wedge nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to approximately 10. In addition, two different thrust-vectoring schemes were investigated with the wedge nozzle. The results indicated that as with conventional round nozzles, peak nonaxisymmetric nozzle, internal performance occurred near the nozzle pressure ratio required for fully expanded exhaust flow. Nozzle sidewall length or area generally had little effect on the internal performance of the nozzles investigated.

  17. The Acute Effects of Static Stretching Compared to Dynamic Stretching with and without an Active Warm up on Anaerobic Performance

    PubMed Central

    KENDALL, BRADLEY J.

    2017-01-01

    The Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) has been used in many studies to determine anaerobic performance. However, there has been poor reporting of warm-up protocols and limited consistency between warm-up methods that have been used. With the WAnT being such a commonly-used test, consistency in warm-up methods is essential in order to compare results across studies. Therefore, this study was designed to compare how static stretching, dynamic stretching, and an active warm-up affect WAnT performance. Ten recreationally active participants (5 males, 5 females) with a mean (SD) age of 23.3 (0.7) volunteered for this study. Subjects were randomized to a specific order of five warm-up protocols, which were performed on individual days followed by a WAnT. Peak power, mean power, power drop, and fatigue index were compared for each trial using a repeated measures ANOVA. For peak power, results revealed that warm-up protocol had a significant effect, F(4,36) = 3.90, p = .01, partial η2 = .302. It was hypothesized that the dynamic stretching would lead to greater peak power than the static stretching protocol. However, results of post hoc analyses failed to detect a significant difference (p =.065). For the other measured variables no significant differences were found. The findings from this study suggest that warm-up protocols may have significantly different impacts on peak power during the WAnT. Additional research should use larger sample sizes and further explore these warm-up protocols. Developing a standardized warm-up protocol for the WAnT may improve consistency between studies. PMID:28479947

  18. The Acute Effects of Static Stretching Compared to Dynamic Stretching with and without an Active Warm up on Anaerobic Performance.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Bradley J

    2017-01-01

    The Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) has been used in many studies to determine anaerobic performance. However, there has been poor reporting of warm-up protocols and limited consistency between warm-up methods that have been used. With the WAnT being such a commonly-used test, consistency in warm-up methods is essential in order to compare results across studies. Therefore, this study was designed to compare how static stretching, dynamic stretching, and an active warm-up affect WAnT performance. Ten recreationally active participants (5 males, 5 females) with a mean (SD) age of 23.3 (0.7) volunteered for this study. Subjects were randomized to a specific order of five warm-up protocols, which were performed on individual days followed by a WAnT. Peak power, mean power, power drop, and fatigue index were compared for each trial using a repeated measures ANOVA. For peak power, results revealed that warm-up protocol had a significant effect, F(4,36) = 3.90, p = .01, partial η(2) = .302. It was hypothesized that the dynamic stretching would lead to greater peak power than the static stretching protocol. However, results of post hoc analyses failed to detect a significant difference (p =.065). For the other measured variables no significant differences were found. The findings from this study suggest that warm-up protocols may have significantly different impacts on peak power during the WAnT. Additional research should use larger sample sizes and further explore these warm-up protocols. Developing a standardized warm-up protocol for the WAnT may improve consistency between studies.

  19. Static and Dynamic Measures of Human Brain Connectivity Predict Complementary Aspects of Human Cognitive Performance.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Nuñez, Aurora I; Fischer-Baum, Simon; Martin, Randi C; Yue, Qiuhai; Ye, Fengdan; Deem, Michael W

    2017-01-01

    In cognitive network neuroscience, the connectivity and community structure of the brain network is related to measures of cognitive performance, like attention and memory. Research in this emerging discipline has largely focused on two measures of connectivity-modularity and flexibility-which, for the most part, have been examined in isolation. The current project investigates the relationship between these two measures of connectivity and how they make separable contribution to predicting individual differences in performance on cognitive tasks. Using resting state fMRI data from 52 young adults, we show that flexibility and modularity are highly negatively correlated. We use a Brodmann parcellation of the fMRI data and a sliding window approach for calculation of the flexibility. We also demonstrate that flexibility and modularity make unique contributions to explain task performance, with a clear result showing that modularity, not flexibility, predicts performance for simple tasks and that flexibility plays a greater role in predicting performance on complex tasks that require cognitive control and executive functioning. The theory and results presented here allow for stronger links between measures of brain network connectivity and cognitive processes.

  20. The acute effects of static stretching on the sprint performance of collegiate men in the 60- and 100-m dash after a dynamic warm-up.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Brandon M; Walsh, Mark S; Horn, Thelma S; Cox, Ronald H

    2010-09-01

    Previous research has shown that static stretching has an inhibitory effect on sprinting performances up to 50 m. The purpose of this study was to see what would happen to these effects at longer distances such as those seen in competition. This study used a within-subjects design to investigate the effects of passive static stretching vs. no stretching on the 60- and 100-m sprint performance of college track athletes after a dynamic warm-up. Eighteen male subjects completed both the static stretching and the no stretching conditions in counterbalanced order across 2 days of testing. On each day, all subjects first completed a generalized dynamic warm-up routine that included a self-paced 800-m run, followed by a series of dynamic movements, sprint, and hurdle drills. At the end of this generalized warm-up, athletes were assigned to either a static stretching or a no-stretching condition. They then immediately performed 2 100-m trials with timing gates set up at 20, 40, 60, and 100 m. Results revealed a significant slowing in performance with static stretching (p < 0.039) in the second 20 (20-40) m of the sprint trials. After the first 40 m, static stretching exhibited no additional inhibition of performance in a 100-m sprint. However, although there was no additional time loss, athletes never gained back the time that was originally lost in the first portion of the trials. Therefore, in strict terms of performance, it seems harmful to include static stretching in the warm-up protocol of collegiate male sprinters in distances up to 100 m.

  1. Evaluation of the performance of two state-transfer Hamiltonians in the presence of static disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, A. K.; Nikolopoulos, G. M.; Lambropoulos, P.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the performance of two quantum-state-transfer Hamiltonians in the presence of diagonal and off-diagonal disorders, and in terms of different measures. The first Hamiltonian pertains to a fully engineered chain, and the second to a chain with modified boundary couplings. The task is to find which Hamiltonian is the most robust to given levels of disorder and irrespective of the input state. In this respect, it is shown that the performances of the two protocols are approximately equivalent.

  2. Static internal performance of single expansion-ramp nozzles with thrust vectoring and reversing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Berrier, B. L.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of geometric design parameters on the internal performance of nonaxisymmetric single expansion-ramp nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to approximately 10. Forward-flight (cruise), vectored-thrust, and reversed-thrust nozzle operating modes were investigated.

  3. Effect of varying internal geometry on the static performance of rectangular thrust-reverser ports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, Richard J.; Mason, Mary L.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to evaluate the effects of several geometric parameters on the internal performance of rectangular thrust-reverser ports for nonaxisymmetric nozzles. Internal geometry was varied with a test apparatus which simulated a forward-flight nozzle with a single, fully deployed reverser port. The test apparatus was designed to simulate thrust reversal (conceptually) either in the convergent section of the nozzle or in the constant-area duct just upstream of the nozzle. The main geometric parameters investigated were port angle, port corner radius, port location, and internal flow blocker angle. For all reverser port geometries, the port opening had an aspect ratio (throat width to throat height) of 6.1 and had a constant passage area from the geometric port throat to the exit. Reverser-port internal performance and thrust-vector angles computed from force-balance measurements are presented.

  4. Fabrication and Assembly of High-Precision Hinge and Latch Joints for Deployable Optical Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, James E.

    1999-01-01

    Descriptions are presented of high-precision hinge and latch joints that have been co-developed, for application to deployable optical instruments, by NASA Langley Research Center and Nyma/ADF. Page-sized versions of engineering drawings are included in two appendices to describe all mechanical components of both joints. Procedures for assembling the mechanical components of both joints are also presented. The information herein is intended to facilitate the fabrication and assembly of the high-precision hinge and latch joints, and enable the incorporation of these joints into the design of deployable optical instrument systems.

  5. Design and Development of a Miniaturized Double Latching Solenoid Valve for the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James T.

    2008-01-01

    The development of the in-house Miniaturized Double Latching Solenoid Valve, or Microvalve, for the Gas Processing System (GPS) of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite is described. The Microvalve is a double latching solenoid valve that actuates a pintle shaft axially to hermetically seal an orifice. The key requirements and the design innovations implemented to meet them are described.

  6. Greater volumes of static and dynamic stretching within a warm-up do not impair star excursion balance performance.

    PubMed

    Belkhiria-Turki, L; Chaouachi, A; Turki, O; Hammami, R; Chtara, M; Amri, M; Drinkwater, E J; Behm, D G

    2014-06-01

    Based on the conflicting static stretching (SS) literature and lack of dynamic stretching (DS) literature regarding the effects of differing volumes of stretching on balance, the present study investigated the effects of 4, 8, and 12 sets of SS and DS following a 5 min aerobic running warm-up on the star excursion balance test (SEBT). The objective was to examine an optimal stretch modality and volume to enhance dynamic balance. A randomized, within-subjects experimental design with repeated measures for stretching (SS and DS) versus no-stretching treatment was used to examine the acute effects of 10 (4 sets), 20 (8 sets), and 30 (12 sets) min, of 15s repetitions per muscle of SS and/or DS following a 5 min aerobic warm-up on the performance of the SEBT. Results indicated that a warm-up employing either SS or DS of any volume generally improves SEBT by a "small" amount with effect sizes ranging from 0.06 to 0.50 (11 of 18 conditions>75% likely to exceed the 1.3-1.9% smallest worthwhile change). Secondly, the difference between static and dynamic warm-up on this observed improvement with warm-up improvement was "trivial" to "moderate" (d=0.04 to 0.57) and generally "unclear" (only two of nine conditions>75% likely to exceed the smallest worthwhile change). Finally, the effect of increasing the volume of warm-up on the observed improvement with a warm-up is "trivial" to "small" (d<0.40) and generally "unclear" (only three of 12 conditions>75% likely to exceed the smallest worthwhile change). In summary, an aerobic running warm-up with stretching that increases core and muscle temperature whether it involves SS or DS may be expected to provide small improvements in the SEBT.

  7. Linear static structural and vibration analysis on high-performance computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baddourah, M. A.; Storaasli, O. O.; Bostic, S. W.

    1993-01-01

    Parallel computers offer the oppurtunity to significantly reduce the computation time necessary to analyze large-scale aerospace structures. This paper presents algorithms developed for and implemented on massively-parallel computers hereafter referred to as Scalable High-Performance Computers (SHPC), for the most computationally intensive tasks involved in structural analysis, namely, generation and assembly of system matrices, solution of systems of equations and calculation of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Results on SHPC are presented for large-scale structural problems (i.e. models for High-Speed Civil Transport). The goal of this research is to develop a new, efficient technique which extends structural analysis to SHPC and makes large-scale structural analyses tractable.

  8. Linear Static Structural and Vibration Analysis on High-Performance Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baddourah, Majdi; Storaasli, Olaf O.; Bostic, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Parallel computers offer the opportunity to significantly reduce the computation time necessary to analyze large-scale aerospace structures. This paper presents algorithms developed for and implemented on a massively-parallel computers hereafter referred to as Scalable High Performance Computers (SHPC) for the most computationally intensive tasks involved in structural analysis, namely, generation and assembly of system matrices, solution of systems of equations and calculation of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Results on SHPC are presented for large-scale structural problems (i.e. Models of high speed civil transport). The goal of this research is to develop new efficient technique which extend structural analysis to SHPC and make large-scale structural analyses tractable.

  9. High-performance, static-coated silicon microfabricated columns for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Shaelah; Lambertus, Gordon; Reece, Jennifer; Sacks, Richard

    2006-04-15

    A procedure is described for the preparation of high-performance etched silicon columns for gas chromatography. Rectangular channels, 150 mum wide by 240 mum deep are fabricated in silicon substrates by gas-phase reactive ion etching. A 0.1-0.2-mum-thick film of dimethyl polysiloxane stationary phase is deposited on the channel walls by filling the channel with a dilute solution in 1:1 n-pentane and dichloromethane and pumping away the solvent. A thermally activated cross-linking agent is used for in situ cross-linking. A 3-m-long microfabricated column generated approximately 12 500 theoretical plates at optimal operating conditions using air as carrier gas. A kinetic model for the efficiency of rectangular cross-section columns is used to evaluate column performance. Results indicate an additional source of gas-phase dispersion beyond longitudinal diffusion and nonequilibrium effects, probably resulting from numerous turns in the gas flow path through the channel. The columns are thermally stable to at least 180 degrees C using air carrier gas. Temperature programming is demonstrated for the boiling point range from n-C5 to n-C12. A 3.0-m-long column heated at 10 degrees C/min obtains a peak capacity of over 100 peaks with a resolution of 1.18 and a separation time of approximately 500 s. With a 0.25-m-long column heated at 30 degrees C/min, a peak capacity of 28 peaks is obtained with a separation time of 150 s. Applications are shown for the analysis of air-phase petroleum hydrocarbons and the high-speed analysis of chemical warfare agent and explosive markers.

  10. Static Performance of a Fixed-Geometry Exhaust Nozzle Incorporating Porous Cavities for Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Hunter, Craig A.

    1999-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance of a fixed-geometry exhaust nozzle incorporating porous cavities for shock-boundary layer interaction control. Testing was conducted at static conditions using a sub-scale nozzle model with one baseline and 27 porous configurations. For the porous configurations, the effects of percent open porosity, hole diameter, and cavity depth were determined. All tests were conducted with no external flow at nozzle pressure ratios from 1.25 to approximately 9.50. Results indicate that baseline nozzle performance was dominated by unstable, shock-induced, boundary-layer separation at over-expanded conditions. Porous configurations were capable of controlling off-design separation in the nozzle by either alleviating separation or encouraging stable separation of the exhaust flow. The ability of the porous nozzle concept to alternately alleviate separation or encourage stable separation of exhaust flow through shock-boundary layer interaction control offers tremendous off-design performance benefits for fixed-geometry nozzle installations. In addition, the ability to encourage separation on one divergent flap while alleviating it on the other makes it possible to generate thrust vectoring using a fixed-geometry nozzle.

  11. Acute effects of antagonist static stretching in the inter-set rest period on repetition performance and muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Humberto; Maia, Marianna de Freitas; Paz, Gabriel Andrade; Costa, Pablo B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of antagonist passive static stretching (AS) during the inter-set rest period on repetition performance and muscle activation. Ten trained men (22.4 ± 0.9 years) participated in this study. Two protocols were adopted: Passive recovery (PR)--three sets to repetition failure were performed for the seated row (SR) with two-minute rest interval between sets without pre-exercise stretching; AS--forty seconds of stretching was applied to pectoralis major prior to each set of SR. Significant increases in the number of repetitions were noted under AS compared with PR (p < 0.05). Significant increases on latissimus dorsi (p = 0.002) and biceps brachii (p = 0.001) muscle activity were noted inter-sets under the AS compared with the PR condition. Therefore, the AS adopted during the inter-set rest period may enhance repetition performance and activation of agonist muscles in an acute manner.

  12. Performance of an anaerobic, static bed, fixed film bioreactor for chlorinated solvent treatment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Walker, Charles; Graves, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic, fixed film, bioreactors bioaugmented with a dechlorinating microbial consortium were evaluated as a potential technology for cost effective, sustainable, and reliable treatment of mixed chlorinated ethanes and ethenes in groundwater from a large groundwater recovery system. Bench- and pilot-scale testing at about 3 and 13,500 L, respectively, demonstrated that total chlorinated solvent removal to less than the permitted discharge limit of 100 μg/L. Various planned and unexpected upsets, interruptions, and changes demonstrated the robustness and reliability of the bioreactor system, which handled the operational variations with no observable change in performance. Key operating parameters included an adequately long hydraulic retention time for the surface area, a constant supply of electron donor, pH control with a buffer to minimize pH variance, an oxidation reduction potential of approximately −200 millivolts or lower, and a well-adapted biomass capable of degrading the full suite of chlorinated solvents in the groundwater. Results indicated that the current discharge criteria can be met using a bioreactor technology that is less complex and has less downtime than the sorption based technology currently being used to treat the groundwater.

  13. Comparison of Inter-Observer Variability and Diagnostic Performance of the Fifth Edition of BI-RADS for Breast Ultrasound of Static versus Video Images.

    PubMed

    Youk, Ji Hyun; Jung, Inkyung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Sung Hun; Kim, You Me; Lee, Eun Hye; Jeong, Sun Hye; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to compare the inter-observer variability and diagnostic performance of the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon for breast ultrasound of static and video images. Ninety-nine breast masses visible on ultrasound examination from 95 women 19-81 y of age at five institutions were enrolled in this study. They were scheduled to undergo biopsy or surgery or had been stable for at least 2 y of ultrasound follow-up after benign biopsy results or typically benign findings. For each mass, representative long- and short-axis static ultrasound images were acquired; real-time long- and short-axis B-mode video images through the mass area were separately saved as cine clips. Each image was reviewed independently by five radiologists who were asked to classify ultrasound features according to the fifth edition of the BI-RADS lexicon. Inter-observer variability was assessed using kappa (κ) statistics. Diagnostic performance on static and video images was compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. No significant difference was found in κ values between static and video images for all descriptors, although κ values of video images were higher than those of static images for shape, orientation, margin and calcifications. After receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the video images (0.83, range: 0.77-0.87) had higher areas under the curve than the static images (0.80, range: 0.75-0.83; p = 0.08). Inter-observer variability and diagnostic performance of video images was similar to that of static images on breast ultrasonography according to the new edition of BI-RADS.

  14. Flip-chip fabrication of integrated micromirror arrays using a novel latching off-chip hinge mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalicek, M. Adrian; Bright, Victor M.

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, modeling, and testing of various arrays of cantilever micromirror devices integrated atop CMOS control electronics. The upper layers of the arrays are prefabricated in the MUMPs process and then flip-chip transferred to CMOS receiving modules using a novel latching off-chip hinge mechanism. This mechanism allows the micromirror arrays to be released, rotated off the edge of the host module and then bonded to the receiving module using a standard probe station. The hinge mechanism supports the arrays by tethers that are severed to free the arrays once bonded. The resulting devices are inherently planarized since the bottom of the first releasable MUMPs layer becomes the surface of the integrated mirror. The working devices are formed by mirror surfaces bonded to address electrodes fabricated above static memory cells on the CMOS module. These arrays demonstrate highly desirable features such as compatible address potentials, less than 2 nm of RMS roughness, approximately 1 micrometers of lateral position accuracy and the unique ability to metallize reflective surfaces without masking. Ultimately, the off-chip hinge mechanism enables very low-cost, simple, reliable, repeatable and accurate assembly of advanced MEMS and integrated microsystems without specialized equipment or complex procedures.

  15. Apollo 14 mission: Failure to achieve docking probe capture latch engagement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Six docking attempts were required in order to successfully achieve capture latch engagement during the transposition and docking phase following translunar injection. After docking, the probe and drogue were examined by the crew. Probe operation appeared normal and radial marks were noted on the drogue. During all subsequent operations, the probe operated properly.

  16. School-Age Child-Care/"Latch-Key" Programs. Implementation Handbook for Indiana Schools. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

    This handbook is designed to provide local school corporations with information about legislation enacted by the Indiana General Assembly in 1991 that requires each corporation to offer latch-key programs, or child-care programs for school-age children, during the 1992-93 school year. The handbook supplies school corporations with: (1) a copy of…

  17. Where Do the Children Play? A Manual for Latch Key Child Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    YMCA of Metropolitan Portland, OR.

    This manual outlines the goals, guidelines, and requirements of Y.M.C.A. Latch Key Child Development Programs, which provide before- and after-school day care services for children who otherwise might be at home with no adult supervision. Included is information on how to begin a program, enrollment procedures, facilities, space utilization, daily…

  18. Changes in hip flexor passive compliance do not account for improvement in vertical jump performance after hip flexor static stretching.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, C Brent; Cottrell, G Trevor

    2015-06-01

    To date, there is limited research investigating stretching of antagonist muscles and its effects on agonist muscle function. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of pre-static stretching (pre-SS) of the hip flexor musculature on passive hip extension range of motion (ROM) and vertical jump height. Fifteen subjects reported to the laboratory on 4 separate days (D1, D2, D3, and D4). D1 was for familiarization, while on D2 to D4, subjects randomly completed 1 of 3 intervention conditions; no stretch (CON), hip flexor stretch (HFS), or hip extensor stretch (HES). Subject's pre- and post-intervention hip extension ROM were measured before performing 3 sets of pre- and post-maximal counter-movement vertical jumps. Vertical jump height was normalized to baseline for data analysis. A repeated-measures ANOVA with post hoc paired sample t-tests revealed a significant increase in vertical jump height in the HFS condition (1.74% ± 0.73; p ≤ 0.05) when compared with CON (-1.34% ± 0.96) or HES (-1.74% ± 0.65) conditions. There was also a significant increase in hip extension ROM after the HFS stretching protocol (6.5 ± 2.75%; p ≤ 0.05) when compared with the CON protocol (-1.73 ± 3.26); however, no significant difference when compared with the HES protocol (1.84 ± 2.79). A correlation analysis showed that the relative hip laxity of each subject had no effect on response to either condition nor did the magnitude of hip ROM change predict improvement in vertical jump. These results suggest that performing SS of the hip flexors may enhance vertical jump performance independent of changes in passive compliance of the hip flexor muscular tendon unit.

  19. Performance Analysis of ToA-Based Positioning Algorithms for Static and Dynamic Targets with Low Ranging Measurements.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, André G; Fernandes, Duarte; Catarino, André P; Monteiro, João L

    2017-08-19

    Indoor Positioning Systems (IPSs) for emergency responders is a challenging field attracting researchers worldwide. When compared with traditional indoor positioning solutions, the IPSs for emergency responders stand out as they have to operate in harsh and unstructured environments. From the various technologies available for the localization process, ultra-wide band (UWB) is a promising technology for such systems due to its robust signaling in harsh environments, through-wall propagation and high-resolution ranging. However, during emergency responders' missions, the availability of UWB signals is generally low (the nodes have to be deployed as the emergency responders enter a building) and can be affected by the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) conditions. In this paper, the performance of four typical distance-based positioning algorithms (Analytical, Least Squares, Taylor Series, and Extended Kalman Filter methods) with only three ranging measurements is assessed based on a COTS UWB transceiver. These algorithms are compared based on accuracy, precision and root mean square error (RMSE). The algorithms were evaluated under two environments with different propagation conditions (an atrium and a lab), for static and mobile devices, and under the human body's influence. A NLOS identification and error mitigation algorithm was also used to improve the ranging measurements. The results show that the Extended Kalman Filter outperforms the other algorithms in almost every scenario, but it is affected by the low measurement rate of the UWB system.

  20. Performance Analysis of ToA-Based Positioning Algorithms for Static and Dynamic Targets with Low Ranging Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Duarte; Monteiro, João L.

    2017-01-01

    Indoor Positioning Systems (IPSs) for emergency responders is a challenging field attracting researchers worldwide. When compared with traditional indoor positioning solutions, the IPSs for emergency responders stand out as they have to operate in harsh and unstructured environments. From the various technologies available for the localization process, ultra-wide band (UWB) is a promising technology for such systems due to its robust signaling in harsh environments, through-wall propagation and high-resolution ranging. However, during emergency responders’ missions, the availability of UWB signals is generally low (the nodes have to be deployed as the emergency responders enter a building) and can be affected by the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) conditions. In this paper, the performance of four typical distance-based positioning algorithms (Analytical, Least Squares, Taylor Series, and Extended Kalman Filter methods) with only three ranging measurements is assessed based on a COTS UWB transceiver. These algorithms are compared based on accuracy, precision and root mean square error (RMSE). The algorithms were evaluated under two environments with different propagation conditions (an atrium and a lab), for static and mobile devices, and under the human body’s influence. A NLOS identification and error mitigation algorithm was also used to improve the ranging measurements. The results show that the Extended Kalman Filter outperforms the other algorithms in almost every scenario, but it is affected by the low measurement rate of the UWB system. PMID:28825624

  1. Performance of Compressor of XJ-41-V Turbojet Engine. 3; Compressor Static-Pressure Rise at Equivalent Compressor Speeds of 5000, 7000, 8000, and 9000 rpm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creagh, John W. R.; Ginsburg, Ambrose

    1947-01-01

    At the request of the Air Materiel Command, Army Air Forces, an investigation is being conducted at the NACA Cleveland laboratory to determine the performance characteristics of the XJ-41-V turbojet-engine compressor. The static-pressure variation in the direction of flow through the compressor was presented in reference 1 for an equivalent speed of 8000 rpm. An analysis of these pressure indicated that the maximum-flow limitation of the compressor was caused by separation, which reduced the effective flow area at the vaned-collector entrance. As a result of this analysis, the flow area at the vaned-collector entrance was increased to obtain larger mass flows. The area increase was obtained by cutting back the entrance edges of the collector vanes, which resulted in an increased vaneless-diffuser radius. Comparative performance of the original and revised compressors at an equivalent speed of 8000 rpm is presented. The static-pressure rise through the compressor, determined from static pressures at the impeller entrance and the vaned-collector exit, is also presented together with the compressor adiabatic efficiency and the mass flow over an equivalent speed range from 5000 to 9000 rpm. These static-pressure data are presented for the purpose of correlating the compressor performance with the turbojet-engine performance.

  2. pH-Responsive Dual Cargo Delivery from Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with a Metal-latched Nanogate

    PubMed Central

    Tarn, Derrick; Xue, Min; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    A nanogate composed of two iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and a metal ion latch was designed, synthesized and assembled on mesoporous silica nanoparticles. This gating mechanism is capable of storing and releasing metal ions and molecules trapped in the pores. Pore openings derivatized with IDA can be latched shut by forming a bis-IDA chelate complex with a metal ion. This system was tested by loading with Hoechst 33342 as the probe cargo molecule, and latching with cobalt, nickel or calcium metal ions. No cargo release was observed in a neutral aqueous environment, but both cargoes were delivered after acid stimulation and/or the addition of a competitively binding ligand. PMID:23391170

  3. Effect of the size of GdBCO-Ag secondary magnet on the static forces performance of linear synchronous motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Shi, Yunhua; He, Dabo; Jing, Hailian; Li, Jing; Deng, Zigang; Wang, Suyu; Wang, Jiasu; Cardwell, David A.

    2014-11-01

    Bulk high temperature superconductor magnets (HTSMs) have a higher flux-generating capability compared to conventional permanent magnets (PMs). These materials potentially can be used in high temperature superconducting (HTS) linear synchronous motors (LSMs) as superconducting secondary magnets, what will result in a reduced volume and weight as well as in higher force density and efficiency of these devices when compared to conventional PMs. The focus of this paper is on the effect of size of the secondary HTSM on the static performance (thrust force and normal force) of a LSM. In order to obtain high-field HTSM as the secondary, single grain bulk GdBCO-Ag superconductors of diameter 20 mm, 30 mm and 40 mm, which have higher Jc and trapped fields than YBCO superconductors, were used in this device for the first time following application by the same optimized magnetization condition. It was found that both thrust and normal forces increase and saturate with the increasing size of the HTSM secondary at the small size range, and then potentially distort when the physical size of the HTSM secondary approaches the pole pitch of the linear three-phase primary windings of the LSM. Furthermore, more experiments of a larger-sized multi-seeded HTSM secondary, confirmed that the relationship between the HTSM secondary size and the pole pitch of the primary is an important factor for achieving higher thrust and normal forces. It is suggested that the multi-pole HTSM secondary will be more beneficial to future HTS LSM designs since the single-pole HTSM secondary size should be equal to or smaller than the stator pole pitch in the paper.

  4. Note: A latched comparator circuit for triggering continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Abdur; Curtis, Daniel B.

    2013-06-01

    Continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy offers several advantages over cavity ring-down spectroscopy with a pulsed laser, such as a higher repetition rate and decreased cost. However, the continuous-wave technique requires a more complicated experimental setup because the laser must be switched off rapidly when the intensity is high in order to observe a ring-down event. This note describes an inexpensive and simple latched comparator circuit that can be used to detect light intensity above a threshold value and send a signal to rapidly steer the beam out of the cavity and initiate a ring-down event. The latch eliminates switching noise by preventing the comparator from switching during the ring-down event.

  5. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned, Active Mirror Telescope Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The Active Mirror Telescope (AMT) task adopted the Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism (CDLM) design as used on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) project. The three separate mechanisms that comprise the CDLM will be discussed in this paper in addition to a focus on heritage adoption lessons learned and specific examples. These lessons learned will be valuable to any project considering the use of heritage designs.

  6. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned, Active Mirror Telescope Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The Active Mirror Telescope (AMT) task adopted the Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism (CDLM) design as used on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) project. The three separate mechanisms that comprise the CDLM will be discussed in this paper in addition to a focus on heritage adoption lessons learned and specific examples. These lessons learned will be valuable to any project considering the use of heritage designs.

  7. A light writable microfluidic "flash memory": optically addressed actuator array with latched operation for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhishan; Pal, Rohit; Srivannavit, Onnop; Burns, Mark A; Gulari, Erdogan

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel optically addressed microactuator array (microfluidic "flash memory") with latched operation. Analogous to the address-data bus mediated memory address protocol in electronics, the microactuator array consists of individual phase-change based actuators addressed by localized heating through focused light patterns (address bus), which can be provided by a modified projector or high power laser pointer. A common pressure manifold (data bus) for the entire array is used to generate large deflections of the phase change actuators in the molten phase. The use of phase change material as the working media enables latched operation of the actuator array. After the initial light "writing" during which the phase is temporarily changed to molten, the actuated status is self-maintained by the solid phase of the actuator without power and pressure inputs. The microfluidic flash memory can be re-configured by a new light illumination pattern and common pressure signal. The proposed approach can achieve actuation of arbitrary units in a large-scale array without the need for complex external equipment such as solenoid valves and electrical modules, which leads to significantly simplified system implementation and compact system size. The proposed work therefore provides a flexible, energy-efficient, and low cost multiplexing solution for microfluidic applications based on physical displacements. As an example, the use of the latched microactuator array as "normally closed" or "normally open" microvalves is demonstrated. The phase-change wax is fully encapsulated and thus immune from contamination issues in fluidic environments.

  8. A gate-latch-lock mechanism for hormone signalling by abscisic acid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, Karsten; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Xu, Yong; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Park, Sang-Youl; Weiner, Joshua J; Fujii, Hiroaki; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Kovach, Amanda; Li, Jun; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang; Peterson, Francis C; Jensen, Davin R; Yong, Eu-Leong; Volkman, Brian F; Cutler, Sean R; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous hormone that regulates plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Its action is mediated by the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of START proteins, but it remains unclear how these receptors bind ABA and, in turn, how hormone binding leads to inhibition of the downstream type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) effectors. Here we report crystal structures of apo and ABA-bound receptors as well as a ternary PYL2-ABA-PP2C complex. The apo receptors contain an open ligand-binding pocket flanked by a gate that closes in response to ABA by way of conformational changes in two highly conserved β-loops that serve as a gate and latch. Moreover, ABA-induced closure of the gate creates a surface that enables the receptor to dock into and competitively inhibit the PP2C active site. A conserved tryptophan in the PP2C inserts directly between the gate and latch, which functions to further lock the receptor in a closed conformation. Together, our results identify a conserved gate-latch-lock mechanism underlying ABA signalling.

  9. An Analytical and Experimental Analysis of Factors Affecting Exhaust System Performance in Sea Level Static Jet Engine Test Facilities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-12-01

    in Appendix C. The pressure readings at the orifice were measured by flange taps. The inlet pressure was measured with a mercury manometer , and the...The pressures were measured on a water manometer when possible and on a mercury manometer when the range of the water manometer was exceeded. The...mnents were obtained from flange taps. The upstream static pressure was measured on’a mercury manometer and the pressure drop across the orifice was

  10. Development of the experimental setup for investigation of latching of superconducting single-photon detector caused by blinding attack on the quantum key distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elezov, M. S.; Ozhegov, R. V.; Goltsman, G. N.; Makarov, V.

    2016-12-01

    Recently bright-light control of the SSPD has been demonstrated. This attack employed a "backdoor" in the detector biasing scheme. Under bright-light illumination, SSPD becomes resistive and remains "latched" in the resistive state even when the light is switched off. While the SSPD is latched, Eve can simulate SSPD single-photon response by sending strong light pulses, thus deceiving Bob. We developed the experimental setup for investigation of a dependence on latching threshold of SSPD on optical pulse length and peak power. By knowing latching threshold it is possible to understand essential requirements for development countermeasures against blinding attack on quantum key distribution system with SSPDs.

  11. Development of the experimental setup for investigation of latching of superconducting single-photon detector caused by blinding attack on the quantum key distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elezov, M. S.; Ozhegov, R. V.; Goltsman, G. N.; Makarov, V.

    2017-01-01

    Recently bright-light control of the SSPD has been demonstrated. This attack employed a "backdoor" in the detector biasing scheme. Under bright-light illumination, SSPD becomes resistive and remains "latched" in the resistive state even when the light is switched off. While the SSPD is latched, Eve can simulate SSPD single-photon response by sending strong light pulses, thus deceiving Bob. We developed the experimental setup for investigation of a dependence on latching threshold of SSPD on optical pulse length and peak power. By knowing latching threshold it is possible to understand essential requirements for development countermeasures against blinding attack on quantum key distribution system with SSPDs.

  12. Design integration and noise studies for jet STOL aircraft. Task 7C: Augmentor wing cruise blowing valveless system. Volume 1: Static testing of augmentor noise and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. M.; Harkonen, D. L.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    Static performance and acoustic tests were conducted on a two-dimensional one-third-scale augmentor flap model that simulated a cruise blowing augmentor system designed for a scale augmentor flap model that simulated a cruise blowing augmentor, which offers a degree of 150-passenger STOL airplane. The cruise blowing augmentor, which offers a degree of simplicity by requiring no fan air diverter valves, was simulated by fitting existing lobe suppressor nozzles with new nozzle fairings. Flow turning performance of the cruise blowing augmentor was measured through a large range of flap deflection angles. The noise suppression characteristics of a multilayer acoustic lining installed in the augmentor were also measured.

  13. Flight Avionics Sequencing Telemetry (FAST) DIV Latching Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Engineering (NE) Directorate at Kennedy Space Center provides engineering services to major programs such as: Space Shuttle, Inter national Space Station, and the Launch Services Program (LSP). The Av ionics Division within NE, provides avionics and flight control syste ms engineering support to LSP. The Launch Services Program is respons ible for procuring safe and reliable services for transporting critical, one of a kind, NASA payloads into orbit. As a result, engineers mu st monitor critical flight events during countdown and launch to asse ss anomalous behavior or any unexpected occurrence. The goal of this project is to take a tailored Systems Engineering approach to design, develop, and test Iris telemetry displays. The Flight Avionics Sequen cing Telemetry Delta-IV (FAST-D4) displays will provide NASA with an improved flight event monitoring tool to evaluate launch vehicle heal th and performance during system-level ground testing and flight. Flight events monitored will include data from the Redundant Inertial Fli ght Control Assembly (RIFCA) flight computer and launch vehicle comma nd feedback data. When a flight event occurs, the flight event is ill uminated on the display. This will enable NASA Engineers to monitor c ritical flight events on the day of launch. Completion of this project requires rudimentary knowledge of launch vehicle Guidance, Navigatio n, and Control (GN&C) systems, telemetry, and console operation. Work locations for the project include the engineering office, NASA telem etry laboratory, and Delta launch sites.

  14. Performance of pancake coils of parallel co-wound Ag/BSCCO tape conductors in static and ramped magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Lue, J.W.; Lubell, M.S.; Walker, M.S.; Hazelton, D.W.; Haldar, P.; Rice, J.A.; Hoehn, J.G. Jr.; Motowidlo, L.R.

    1994-12-31

    Critical Currents are reported for several Ag/BSCCO single-pancake coils in static magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 5 T and temperatures from 4.2 K to 105 K. The sample coils were co-wound of one to six tape conductors in parallel. Since the closed loops formed in such an arrangement could lead to eddy current heating or instability in changing fields, one of the coils was also tested in helium gas, in fields ramped at rates of up to 1.5 T/s. For these quasi-adiabatic tests, at each temperature the transport current was set just below the critical value for a preset static field of 3.3 or 4.9 T. The field was then rapidly ramped down to zero, held for 20 sec, and then ramped back up to the original value. The maximum observed temperature transient of about 1.7 K occurred at 9 K, for a field change of 4.75 T. The temperature transients became negligible when the sample was immersed in liquid helium. Above 30 K, the transients were below 1 K. These results give confidence that parallel co-wound HTSC coils are stable in a rapidly-ramped magnetic field, without undue eddy current heating.

  15. A new latch-free LIGBT on SOI with very high current density and low drive voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, J.; Vestling, L.; Eklund, K.-H.

    2016-01-01

    A new latch-free LIGBT on SOI is presented. The new device combines advantages from both LDMOS as well as LIGBT technologies; high breakdown voltage, high drive current density, low control voltages, at the same time eliminating latch-up problems. The new LIGBT has the unique property of independent scaling of the input control device, i.e. LDMOS, and the output part of the device, i.e. the p-n-p part. This allows for additional freedom in designing and optimizing the device properties. Breakdown voltage of over 200 V, on-state current density over 3 A/mm, specific on-resistance below 190 mΩ mm2, and latch-free operation is demonstrated.

  16. Design of High Speed and Low Offset Dynamic Latch Comparator in 0.18 µm CMOS Process

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne; Yin, Chia Chieu; Ali, Mohammad Alauddin Mohammad; Marufuzzaman, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The cross-coupled circuit mechanism based dynamic latch comparator is presented in this research. The comparator is designed using differential input stages with regenerative S-R latch to achieve lower offset, lower power, higher speed and higher resolution. In order to decrease circuit complexity, a comparator should maintain power, speed, resolution and offset-voltage properly. Simulations show that this novel dynamic latch comparator designed in 0.18 µm CMOS technology achieves 3.44 mV resolution with 8 bit precision at a frequency of 50 MHz while dissipating 158.5 µW from 1.8 V supply and 88.05 µA average current. Moreover, the proposed design propagates as fast as 4.2 nS with energy efficiency of 0.7 fJ/conversion-step. Additionally, the core circuit layout only occupies 0.008 mm2. PMID:25299266

  17. Effects of torque spring, CCL and latch mechanism on dynamic response of planar solar arrays with multiple clearance joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zilu; Wang, Cong; Huang, Wenhu

    2017-03-01

    This paper numerically investigates the effects of torque spring, close cable loop (CCL) configuration and latch mechanism on the overall dynamic characteristics of a deployable solar arrays system considering joint clearance; and presents significant guidance for the key parameters design of these three mechanisms. A typical mechanism composed of a main-body with a yoke and two panels is used as a demonstration case to study the dynamic response of the deployable solar array system in the deployment process and post-latch phase. The normal contact force model and tangential friction model in clearance joint are established using nonlinear contact force model and modified Coulomb friction model, respectively. The numerical simulation results reveal that the joint clearances influence the dynamic characteristics of the deployable space solar arrays in different operation phases. Besides, parametric studies indicate some rules to design preload and stiffness coefficient of torque spring, equivalent stiffness coefficient of CCL mechanism and stiffness and damping coefficient of latch mechanism.

  18. Method and Apparatus for Reducing the Vulnerability of Latches to Single Event Upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L., Jr. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A delay circuit includes a first network having an input and an output node, a second network having an input and an output, the input of the second network being coupled to the output node of the first network. The first network and the second network are configured such that: a glitch at the input to the first network having a length of approximately one-half of a standard glitch time or less does not cause tile voltage at the output of the second network to cross a threshold, a glitch at the input to the first network having a length of between approximately one-half and two standard glitch times causes the voltage at the output of the second network to cross the threshold for less than the length of the glitch, and a glitch at the input to the first network having a length of greater than approximately two standard glitch times causes the voltage at the output of the second network to cross the threshold for approximately the time of the glitch. A method reduces the vulnerability of a latch to single event upsets. The latch includes a gate having an input and an output and a feedback path from the output to the input of the gate. The method includes inserting a delay into the feedback path and providing a delay in the gate.

  19. Method and Apparatus for Reducing the Vulnerability of Latches to Single Event Upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L., Jr. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A delay circuit includes a first network having an input and an output node, a second network having an input and an output, the input of the second network being coupled to the output node of the first network. The first network and the second network are configured such that: a glitch at the input to the first network having a length of approximately one-half of a standard glitch time or less does not cause the voltage at the output of the second network to cross a threshold, a glitch at the input to the first network having a length of between approximately one-half and two standard glitch times causes the voltage at the output of the second network to cross the threshold for less than the length of the glitch, and a glitch at the input to the first network having a length of greater than approximately two standard glitch times causes the voltage at the output of the second network to cross the threshold for approximately the time of the glitch. The method reduces the vulnerability of a latch to single event upsets. The latch includes a gate having an input and an output and a feedback path from the output to the input of the gate. The method includes inserting a delay into the feedback path and providing a delay in the gate.

  20. Different electrostatic potentials define ETGE and DLG motifs as hinge and latch in oxidative stress response.

    PubMed

    Tong, Kit I; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Kobayashi, Akira; Shang, Chengwei; Hirotsu, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2007-11-01

    Nrf2 is the regulator of the oxidative/electrophilic stress response. Its turnover is maintained by Keap1-mediated proteasomal degradation via a two-site substrate recognition mechanism in which two Nrf2-Keap1 binding sites form a hinge and latch. The E3 ligase adaptor Keap1 recognizes Nrf2 through its conserved ETGE and DLG motifs. In this study, we examined how the ETGE and DLG motifs bind to Keap1 in a very similar fashion but with different binding affinities by comparing the crystal complex of a Keap1-DC domain-DLG peptide with that of a Keap1-DC domain-ETGE peptide. We found that these two motifs interact with the same basic surface of either Keap1-DC domain of the Keap1 homodimer. The DLG motif works to correctly position the lysines within the Nrf2 Neh2 domain for efficient ubiquitination. Together with the results from calorimetric and functional studies, we conclude that different electrostatic potentials primarily define the ETGE and DLG motifs as a hinge and latch that senses the oxidative/electrophilic stress.

  1. Soft set and pull latch and setting tool for a well measuring instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R. A.

    1985-09-03

    A soft set and pull latch for setting and pulling a measuring instrument in a well conduit. The latch includes a body with a seal, a fishing shoulder and a no-go shoulder. A measuring instrument support is attached to the body by a shock absorber. Locking dogs are radially and longitudinally movable in the body. A dog expander sleeve includes a recess for allowing the dogs to retract and includes a shoulder for locking the dogs outwardly. A locking spring urges the dogs downwardly onto the sleeve shoulder but allows the dogs to move upwardly into alignment with the sleeve recess. A releasing spring acts on the expander sleeve for urging the sleeve upwardly for moving the sleeve shoulder under the dogs but allows the dogs to retract into the sleeve recess on downward movement of the sleeve relative to the body. The body may include pressure equalizing ports and a pressure prong releasably positioned in the body and initially blocking the port.

  2. An approximate theoretical method for modeling the static thrust performance of non-axisymmetric two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical/numerical method has been developed to predict the static thrust performance of non-axisymmetric, two-dimensional convergent-divergent exhaust nozzles. Thermodynamic nozzle performance effects due to over- and underexpansion are modeled using one-dimensional compressible flow theory. Boundary layer development and skin friction losses are calculated using an approximate integral momentum method based on the classic karman-Polhausen solution. Angularity effects are included with these two models in a computational Nozzle Performance Analysis Code, NPAC. In four different case studies, results from NPAC are compared to experimental data obtained from subscale nozzle testing to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the NPAC method. In several cases, the NPAC prediction matched experimental gross thrust efficiency data to within 0.1 percent at a design NPR, and to within 0.5 percent at off-design conditions.

  3. Comparing performance of many-core CPUs and GPUs for static and motion compensated reconstruction of C-arm CT data.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Hannes G; Keck, Benjamin; Rohkohl, Christopher; Hornegger, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Interventional reconstruction of 3-D volumetric data from C-arm CT projections is a computationally demanding task. Hardware optimization is not an option but mandatory for interventional image processing and, in particular, for image reconstruction due to the high demands on performance. Several groups have published fast analytical 3-D reconstruction on highly parallel hardware such as GPUs to mitigate this issue. The authors show that the performance of modern CPU-based systems is in the same order as current GPUs for static 3-D reconstruction and outperforms them for a recent motion compensated (3-D+time) image reconstruction algorithm. This work investigates two algorithms: Static 3-D reconstruction as well as a recent motion compensated algorithm. The evaluation was performed using a standardized reconstruction benchmark, RABBITCT, to get comparable results and two additional clinical data sets. The authors demonstrate for a parametric B-spline motion estimation scheme that the derivative computation, which requires many write operations to memory, performs poorly on the GPU and can highly benefit from modern CPU architectures with large caches. Moreover, on a 32-core Intel Xeon server system, the authors achieve linear scaling with the number of cores used and reconstruction times almost in the same range as current GPUs. Algorithmic innovations in the field of motion compensated image reconstruction may lead to a shift back to CPUs in the future. For analytical 3-D reconstruction, the authors show that the gap between GPUs and CPUs became smaller. It can be performed in less than 20 s (on-the-fly) using a 32-core server.

  4. Acute Effects of Static Stretching of Hamstring on Performance and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk During Stop-Jump and Cutting Tasks in Female Athletes.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Mianfang; Zhang, Qiang; Wu, Xie

    2017-05-01

    Ruan, M, Zhang, Q, and Wu, X. Acute effects of static stretching of hamstring on performance and anterior cruciate ligament injury risk during stop-jump and cutting tasks in female athletes. J Strength Cond Res 31(5): 1241-1250, 2017-There is limited research investigating antagonist stretch. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of static stretching of hamstrings (SSH) on performance and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk during stop-jump and 180° cutting tasks. Twelve female college athletes (age 20.8 ± 0.7 years; height 1.61 ± 0.05 m; mass 54.25 ± 4.22 kg) participated in this study. Subjects performed stop-jump and 180° cutting tasks under 2 conditions: after warm-up with 4 × 30 seconds SSH or after warm-up without SSH. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data as well as electromyography of biceps femoris, rectus femoris, vastus medialis, and gastrocnemius medialis were collected during testing. Static stretching of hamstrings significantly enhanced jump height by 5.1% (p = 0.009) but did not change the takeoff speed of cutting. No significant changes in peak knee adduction moment or peak anterior tibia shear force were observed with SSH regardless of the task. The peak lateral tibia shear force during cutting was significantly (p = 0.036) reduced with SSH. The co-contraction of hamstring and quadriceps during the preactivation (stop-jump: p = 0.04; cutting: p = 0.05) and downward phases (stop-jump: p = 0.04; cutting: p = 0.05) was significantly reduced after SSH regardless of the task. The results suggest that SSH enhanced the performance of stop-jump because of decreased co-contraction of hamstring and quadriceps but did not change the performance of cutting. In addition, SSH did not increase ACL injury risk during stop-jump and cutting tasks and even reduced medial-lateral knee loading during cutting.

  5. Acute Effects of Static Stretching of Hamstring on Performance and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk During Stop-Jump and Cutting Tasks in Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Mianfang; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ruan, M, Zhang, Q, and Wu, X. Acute effects of static stretching of hamstring on performance and anterior cruciate ligament injury risk during stop-jump and cutting tasks in female athletes. J Strength Cond Res 31(5): 1241–1250, 2017—There is limited research investigating antagonist stretch. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of static stretching of hamstrings (SSH) on performance and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk during stop-jump and 180° cutting tasks. Twelve female college athletes (age 20.8 ± 0.7 years; height 1.61 ± 0.05 m; mass 54.25 ± 4.22 kg) participated in this study. Subjects performed stop-jump and 180° cutting tasks under 2 conditions: after warm-up with 4 × 30 seconds SSH or after warm-up without SSH. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data as well as electromyography of biceps femoris, rectus femoris, vastus medialis, and gastrocnemius medialis were collected during testing. Static stretching of hamstrings significantly enhanced jump height by 5.1% (p = 0.009) but did not change the takeoff speed of cutting. No significant changes in peak knee adduction moment or peak anterior tibia shear force were observed with SSH regardless of the task. The peak lateral tibia shear force during cutting was significantly (p = 0.036) reduced with SSH. The co-contraction of hamstring and quadriceps during the preactivation (stop-jump: p = 0.04; cutting: p = 0.05) and downward phases (stop-jump: p = 0.04; cutting: p = 0.05) was significantly reduced after SSH regardless of the task. The results suggest that SSH enhanced the performance of stop-jump because of decreased co-contraction of hamstring and quadriceps but did not change the performance of cutting. In addition, SSH did not increase ACL injury risk during stop-jump and cutting tasks and even reduced medial-lateral knee loading during cutting. PMID:28118311

  6. Understanding drivers of peatland extracellular enzyme activity in the PEATcosm experiment: mixed evidence for enzymic latch hypothesis

    Treesearch

    Karl J. Romanowicz; Evan S. Kane; Lynette R. Potvin; Aleta L. Daniels; Randy Kolka; Erik A. Lilleskov

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Our objective was to assess the impacts of water table position and plant functional groups on peatland extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) framed within the context of the enzymic latch hypothesis. Methods. We utilized a full factorial experiment with 2 water table (WT) treatments (high and low) and 3 plant functional...

  7. The design and development of a miniature bi-stable latching solenoid valve for low thrust resistojets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The design approach and development demonstration are presented for a flightweight, miniature, magnetic latching shutoff valve, suitable for use with the ruggedized H2 and NH3 resistojet and the biowaste resistojet. The design criteria established provided for compatibility with specified ruggedized resistojet propellants as well as the biowaste and other propulsion system propellants.

  8. Effects of a nine-week core strengthening exercise program on vertical jump performances and static balance in volleyball players with trunk instability.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Geovinson, S G; Singh Sandhu, J

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the effects of core strengthening exercise program on trunk instability in response to vertical jump performances and static balance variables in volleyball players. As a core stabilization program aids in developing a stable spine over the pelvis and improves trunk stability this concept should be incorporated in sports tasks involving jump and reach in those with an unstable spine. Forty state level volleyball players with trunk instability were randomly divided into two groups, control ([C] m=10; f=10) and experimental ([E] m=10; f=10). Modified double straight leg lowering test was used to check the degree of trunk instability. Counter movement jump, squat jump, spike jump and block jumps were used to measure jumping abilities and a wobble board test was used to test balance. Pre- and postreadings were noted before and after the nine-week training protocol and statistical data analysis was done using SPSS 16. After nine weeks of core stabilization training, trunk stability (P<0.001), block difference (BD) in block jump (P<0.01) were enhanced significantly comparing to (C) group using independent T test. Effect size Cohen's d score demonstrated better improvement of spike jump (d=0.25) and block jump (d=0.52) in (E) group. Other jumps and static balance were improved but non-significant when compared between groups. Nine-week strategic core strengthening exercise program increases trunk stability and in turn improves block difference (vertical jump parameter).

  9. Static thrust-vectoring performance of nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzles with post-exit yaw vanes. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., Aug. 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, Robert J.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A static (wind-off) test was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the 16-ft transonic tunnel to determine the performance and turning effectiveness of post-exit yaw vanes installed on two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles. One nozzle design that was previously tested was used as a baseline, simulating dry power and afterburning power nozzles at both 0 and 20 degree pitch vectoring conditions. Vanes were installed on these four nozzle configurations to study the effects of vane deflection angle, longitudinal and lateral location, size, and camber. All vanes were hinged at the nozzle sidewall exit, and in addition, some were also hinged at the vane quarter chord (double-hinged). The vane concepts tested generally produced yaw thrust vectoring angles much less than the geometric vane angles, for (up to 8 percent) resultant thrust losses. When the nozzles were pitch vectored, yawing effectiveness decreased as the vanes were moved downstream. Thrust penalties and yawing effectiveness both decreased rapidly as the vanes were moved outboard (laterally). Vane length and height changes increased yawing effectiveness and thrust ratio losses, while using vane camber, and double-hinged vanes increased resultant yaw angles by 50 to 100 percent.

  10. Screening of nanosatellite microprocessors using californium single-event latch-up test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomioka, Takahiro; Okumura, Yuta; Masui, Hirokazu; Takamiya, Koichi; Cho, Mengu

    2016-09-01

    A single-event latch-up (SEL) test using a 252Cf radioisotope was carried out. The results were compared with those of a proton test and from observation in orbit. A radioisotope can reproduce phenomena observed in orbit that are caused by protons. Considering the inexpensive nature of the 252Cf test, it is more suitable for nanosatellites that require low cost and fast delivery. A SEL occurrence rate of a commercial-off-the-shelf microprocessor was derived from the ground test results. The 252Cf test provided a SEL rate approximately 1×106 times greater than that in orbit. This data can be used to derive the minimum SEL occurrence rate in orbit and help satellite designers to evaluate the risk of SEL and take measures if necessary.

  11. Spreading Activation in an Attractor Network with Latching Dynamics: Automatic Semantic Priming Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Itamar; Bentin, Shlomo; Shriki, Oren

    2012-01-01

    Localist models of spreading activation (SA) and models assuming distributed-representations offer very different takes on semantic priming, a widely investigated paradigm in word recognition and semantic memory research. In the present study we implemented SA in an attractor neural network model with distributed representations and created a unified framework for the two approaches. Our models assumes a synaptic depression mechanism leading to autonomous transitions between encoded memory patterns (latching dynamics), which account for the major characteristics of automatic semantic priming in humans. Using computer simulations we demonstrated how findings that challenged attractor-based networks in the past, such as mediated and asymmetric priming, are a natural consequence of our present model’s dynamics. Puzzling results regarding backward priming were also given a straightforward explanation. In addition, the current model addresses some of the differences between semantic and associative relatedness and explains how these differences interact with stimulus onset asynchrony in priming experiments. PMID:23094718

  12. Performance of on-site pilot static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for treating dairy processing wastewater and chemical oxygen demand balance modeling under different operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin Hwan; Park, Jaeyoung; Ellis, Timothy G

    2015-02-01

    The performance and operational stability of a pilot-scale static granular bed reactor (SGBR) for the treatment of dairy processing wastewater were investigated under a wide range of organic and hydraulic loading rates and temperature conditions. The SGBR achieved average chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), and total suspended solids (TSS)-removal efficiencies higher than 90% even at high loading rates up to 7.3 kg COD/m(3)/day, with an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9 h, and at low temperatures of 11 °C. The average methane yield of 0.26 L CH4/g COD(removed) was possibly affected by a high fraction of particulate COD and operation at low temperatures. The COD mass balance indicated that soluble COD was responsible for most of the methane production. The reactor showed the capacity of the methanogens to maintain their activity and withstand organic and hydraulic shock loads.

  13. Static and Wind-on Performance of Polymer-Based Pressure-Sensitive Paints Using Platinum and Ruthenium as the Luminophore

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kin Hing; Kontis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to investigate the static and wind-on performance of two in-house-developed polymer-based pressure-sensitive paints. Platinum tetrakis (pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin and tris-bathophenanthroline ruthenium II are used as the luminophores of these two polymer-based pressure-sensitive paints. The pressure and temperature sensitivity and the photo-degradation rate of these two pressure-sensitive paints have been investigated. In the wind tunnel test, it was observed that the normalised intensity ratio of both polymer-based pressure-sensitive paints being studied decreases with increasing the number of wind tunnel runs. The exact reason that leads to the occurrence of this phenomenon is unclear, but it is deduced that the luminophore is either removed or deactivated by the incoming flow during a wind tunnel test. PMID:27128913

  14. Static and Wind-on Performance of Polymer-Based Pressure-Sensitive Paints Using Platinum and Ruthenium as the Luminophore.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kin Hing; Kontis, Konstantinos

    2016-04-26

    An experimental study has been conducted to investigate the static and wind-on performance of two in-house-developed polymer-based pressure-sensitive paints. Platinum tetrakis (pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin and tris-bathophenanthroline ruthenium II are used as the luminophores of these two polymer-based pressure-sensitive paints. The pressure and temperature sensitivity and the photo-degradation rate of these two pressure-sensitive paints have been investigated. In the wind tunnel test, it was observed that the normalised intensity ratio of both polymer-based pressure-sensitive paints being studied decreases with increasing the number of wind tunnel runs. The exact reason that leads to the occurrence of this phenomenon is unclear, but it is deduced that the luminophore is either removed or deactivated by the incoming flow during a wind tunnel test.

  15. Effects of baseline levels of flexibility and vertical jump ability on performance following different volumes of static stretching and potentiating exercises in elite gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Donti, Olyvia; Tsolakis, Charilaos; Bogdanis, Gregory C

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of baseline flexibility and vertical jump ability on straight leg raise range of motion (ROM) and counter-movement jump performance (CMJ) following different volumes of stretching and potentiating exercises. ROM and CMJ were measured after two different warm-up protocols involving static stretching and potentiating exercises. Three groups of elite athletes (10 male, 14 female artistic gymnasts and 10 female rhythmic gymnasts) varying greatly in ROM and CMJ, performed two warm-up routines. One warm-up included short (15 s) static stretching followed by 5 tuck jumps, while the other included long static stretching (30 s) followed by 3x5 tuck jumps. ROM and CMJ were measured before, during and for 12 min after the two warm-up routines. Three-way ANOVA showed large differences between the three groups in baseline ROM and CMJ performance. A type of warm-up x time interaction was found for both ROM (p = 0.031) and CMJ (p = 0.016). However, all athletes, irrespective of group, responded in a similar fashion to the different warm-up protocols for both ROM and CMJ, as indicated from the lack of significant interactions for group (condition x group, time x group or condition x time x group). In the short warm-up protocol, ROM was not affected by stretching, while in the long warm-up protocol ROM increased by 5.9% ± 0.7% (p = 0.001) after stretching. Similarly, CMJ remained unchanged after the short warm-up protocol, but increased by 4.6 ± 0.9% (p = 0.012) 4 min after the long warm- up protocol, despite the increased ROM. It is concluded that the initial levels of flexibility and CMJ performance do not alter the responses of elite gymnasts to warm-up protocols differing in stretching and potentiating exercise volumes. Furthermore, 3 sets of 5 tuck jumps result in a relatively large increase in CMJ performance despite an increase in flexibility in these highly-trained athletes. Key PointsThe initial levels of flexibility and vertical jump

  16. Effects of Baseline Levels of Flexibility and Vertical Jump Ability on Performance Following Different Volumes of Static Stretching and Potentiating Exercises in Elite Gymnasts

    PubMed Central

    Donti, Olyvia; Tsolakis, Charilaos; Bogdanis, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of baseline flexibility and vertical jump ability on straight leg raise range of motion (ROM) and counter-movement jump performance (CMJ) following different volumes of stretching and potentiating exercises. ROM and CMJ were measured after two different warm-up protocols involving static stretching and potentiating exercises. Three groups of elite athletes (10 male, 14 female artistic gymnasts and 10 female rhythmic gymnasts) varying greatly in ROM and CMJ, performed two warm-up routines. One warm-up included short (15 s) static stretching followed by 5 tuck jumps, while the other included long static stretching (30 s) followed by 3x5 tuck jumps. ROM and CMJ were measured before, during and for 12 min after the two warm-up routines. Three-way ANOVA showed large differences between the three groups in baseline ROM and CMJ performance. A type of warm-up x time interaction was found for both ROM (p = 0.031) and CMJ (p = 0.016). However, all athletes, irrespective of group, responded in a similar fashion to the different warm-up protocols for both ROM and CMJ, as indicated from the lack of significant interactions for group (condition x group, time x group or condition x time x group). In the short warm-up protocol, ROM was not affected by stretching, while in the long warm-up protocol ROM increased by 5.9% ± 0.7% (p = 0.001) after stretching. Similarly, CMJ remained unchanged after the short warm-up protocol, but increased by 4.6 ± 0.9% (p = 0.012) 4 min after the long warm- up protocol, despite the increased ROM. It is concluded that the initial levels of flexibility and CMJ performance do not alter the responses of elite gymnasts to warm-up protocols differing in stretching and potentiating exercise volumes. Furthermore, 3 sets of 5 tuck jumps result in a relatively large increase in CMJ performance despite an increase in flexibility in these highly-trained athletes. Key Points The initial levels of flexibility and vertical jump

  17. Comparison of the static and dynamic balance performance in young, middle-aged, and elderly healthy people.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Mei-Yun; Chen, Chia-Ling; Pei, Yu-Cheng; Leong, Chau-Peng; Lau, Yiu-Chung

    2009-01-01

    Body sway increases with age. The purpose of this study was to obtain baseline data and the characteristics of balance performance in different age groups for balance strategy management. Healthy individuals (n = 107) were divided into young, middle-aged, and elderly groups, and assessed by computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) on a Smart Balance Master. The 6 subtests in the sensory organization tests (SOT) for the CDP were as follows: subtest 1, eyes open, fixed support platform; subtest 2, eyes closed, fixed platform; subtest 3, eyes open, fixed platform; subtest 4, eyes open, swaying platform; subtest 5, eyes closed, swaying platform; subtest 6, swaying visual surround, swaying platform. Motor balance control tests included the limit of stability (LOS) test at 75% of LOS in 8 directions and the left/right and forward/backward rhythmic weight shift (RWS) test. In the SOT, the elderly group demonstrated significantly lower average stability and maximal stability scores in subtests 4-6. This group also demonstrated a relatively lower average percentage of ankle strategy in subtests 4-6. In the motor control tests, the elderly group demonstrated a significantly higher overall reactive time and lower overall directional control in the LOS test, lower on-axis velocity during the forward/backward and left/right motor control test and a lower average percentage of forward/backward directional control in the RWS test. The elderly had a higher degree of postural imbalance and used hip strategy to a greater extent to maintain their balance, especially when standing on a swaying support surface in the absence of visual surround or with conflicted visual surround. The elderly required a longer reaction time and demonstrated lower directional control in balance performance.

  18. A Low-Cost and High-Performance Sulfonated Polyimide Proton-Conductive Membrane for Vanadium Redox Flow/Static Batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinchao; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liu, Suqin; He, Zhen; Zhou, Zhi; Li, Aikui

    2017-09-15

    A novel side-chain-type fluorinated sulfonated polyimide (s-FSPI) membrane is synthesized for vanadium redox batteries (VRBs) by high-temperature polycondensation and grafting reactions. The s-FSPI membrane has a vanadium ion permeability that is over an order of magnitude lower and has a proton selectivity that is 6.8 times higher compared to those of the Nafion 115 membrane. The s-FSPI membrane possesses superior chemical stability compared to most of the linear sulfonated aromatic polymer membranes reported for VRBs. Also, the vanadium redox flow/static batteries (VRFB/VRSB) assembled with the s-FSPI membranes exhibit stable battery performance over 100- and 300-time charge-discharge cycling tests, respectively, with significantly higher battery efficiencies and lower self-discharge rates than those with the Nafion 115 membranes. The excellent physicochemical properties and VRB performance of the s-FSPI membrane could be attributed to the specifically designed molecular structure with the hydrophobic trifluoromethyl groups and flexible sulfoalkyl pendants being introduced on the main chains of the membrane. Moreover, the cost of the s-FSPI membrane is only one-fourth that of the commercial Nafion 115 membrane. This work opens up new possibilities for fabricating high-performance proton-conductive membranes at low costs for VRBs.

  19. Effects of internal yaw-vectoring devices on the static performance of a pitch-vectoring nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to evaluate the internal performance of a nonaxisymmetric convergent divergent nozzle designed to have simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring capability. This concept utilized divergent flap deflection for thrust vectoring in the pitch plane and flow-turning deflectors installed within the divergent flaps for yaw thrust vectoring. Modifications consisting of reducing the sidewall length and deflecting the sidewall outboard were investigated as means to increase yaw-vectoring performance. This investigation studied the effects of multiaxis (pitch and yaw) thrust vectoring on nozzle internal performance characteristics. All tests were conducted with no external flow, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to approximately 13.0. The results indicate that this nozzle concept can successfully generate multiaxis thrust vectoring. Deflection of the divergent flaps produced resultant pitch vector angles that, although dependent on nozzle pressure ratio, were nearly equal to the geometric pitch vector angle. Losses in resultant thrust due to pitch vectoring were small or negligible. The yaw deflectors produced resultant yaw vector angles up to 21 degrees that were controllable by varying yaw deflector rotation. However, yaw deflector rotation resulted in significant losses in thrust ratios and, in some cases, nozzle discharge coefficient. Either of the sidewall modifications generally reduced these losses and increased maximum resultant yaw vector angle. During multiaxis (simultaneous pitch and yaw) thrust vectoring, little or no cross coupling between the thrust vectoring processes was observed.

  20. Performance of Compressor of XJ-41-V Turbojet Engine II - Static-Pressure Ratios and Limitation of Maximum Flow at Equivalent Compressor Speed of 8000 rpm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dildine, Dean M.; Arthur, W. Lewis

    1948-01-01

    At the request of the Air Material Command, Army Air Forces, an investigation was conducted by the NACA Cleveland laboratory to determine the performance characteristics of the compressor of the XJ-41-V turbojet engine. This report is the second in a series presenting the compressor performance and analysis of flow conditions in the compressor. The static-pressure variation in the direction of flow through the compressor and the location and the cause of the maximum flow restriction at an equivalent speed of 8000 rpm are presented. After the initial runs were reported, the leading edges of the impeller blades and the diffuser surfaces were found to have been roughened by steel particles from a minor failure of auxiliary equipment. The leading edges of the impeller blades were refinished and all high spots resulting from scratches in the diffuser and the accessible parts of the vaned collector passages were removed. The initial overall performance and that obtained with the refinished blades are presented.

  1. Seed orientation and magnetic field strength have more influence on tomato seed performance than relative humidity and duration of exposure to non-uniform static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Poinapen, Danny; Brown, Daniel C W; Beeharry, Girish K

    2013-09-15

    Different factors (e.g., light, humidity, and temperature) including exposure to static magnetic fields (SMFs), referred here as critical factors, can significantly affect horticultural seed performance. However, the link between magnetic field parameters and other interdependent factors affecting seed viability is unclear. The importance of these critical factors affecting tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) var. MST/32 seed performance was assessed after performing several treatments based on a L9 (3(4)) (four factors at three levels) orthogonal array (OA) design. The variable factors in the design were magnetic flux density (R1=332.1±37.8mT; R2=108.7±26.9mT; and R3=50.6±10.5mT), exposure time (1, 2, and 24h), seed orientation (North polarity, South polarity, and control - no magnetic field), and relative humidity (RH) (7.0, 25.5, and 75.5%). After seed moisture content stabilisation at the different chosen RH, seeds were exposed in dark under laboratory conditions to several treatments based on the OA design before performance evaluation. Treatments not employing magnetic field exposure were used as controls. Results indicate that electrolyte leakage rate was reduced by a factor of 1.62 times during seed imbibition when non-uniform SMFs were employed. Higher germination (∼11.0%) was observed in magnetically-exposed seeds than in non-exposed ones, although seedlings emerging from SMF treatments did not show a consistent increase in biomass accumulation. The respective influence of the four critical factors tested on seed performance was ranked (in decreasing order) as seed orientation to external magnetic fields, magnetic field strength, RH, and exposure time. This study suggests a significant effect of non-uniform SMFs on seed performance with respect to RH, and more pronounced effects are observed during seed imbibition rather than during later developmental stages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrodynamic and static performance evaluation of the moving-actuator type biventricular assist device, AnyHeart.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jinhan; Lee, Jung Joo; Choi, Jaesoon; Kim, Jongwon; Min, Byoung Goo

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the hydrodynamic characteristics and efficiency of the moving-actuator type implantable biventricular assist device (BVAD), AnyHeart. A blood analog made of 52% glycerin and 48% water was used to simulate the density and viscosity of blood. The maximum pump flow was 9 L/min with 28.8 watts of power input, and the maximum electrical-to-hydraulic power conversion efficiency was approximately 11% at a pump flow of 3.5 L/min. The pump was able to generate 4 L/min output against 100 mm Hg afterload with less than 9 watts of power input. In addition to the overall system efficiency, the inner subpart power conversion efficiency was also evaluated. The system was subdivided according to system mechanism into three major parts: motor part, actuator part, and blood sac part. In normal working conditions (4 L/min, 100 mm Hg) with the AnyHeart, the total system efficiency was 8%, with subpart efficiencies of 50%, 85%, and 19% for motor part, actuator part, and blood sac part, respectively. The pump performance assessed in the in vitro Donovan-type mock circulation loop test was acceptable as a BVAD in terms of flow and pressure.

  3. Aerodynamic Performance and Static Stability and Control of Flat-Top Hypersonic Gliders at Mach Numbers from 0.6 to 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syvertson, Clarence A; Gloria, Hermilo R; Sarabia, Michael F

    1958-01-01

    A study is made of aerodynamic performance and static stability and control at hypersonic speeds. In a first part of the study, the effect of interference lift is investigated by tests of asymmetric models having conical fuselages and arrow plan-form wings. The fuselage of the asymmetric model is located entirely beneath the wing and has a semicircular cross section. The fuselage of the symmetric model was centrally located and has a circular cross section. Results are obtained for Mach numbers from 3 to 12 in part by application of the hypersonic similarity rule. These results show a maximum effect of interference on lift-drag ratio occurring at Mach number of 5, the Mach number at which the asymmetric model was designed to exploit favorable lift interference. At this Mach number, the asymmetric model is indicated to have a lift-drag ratio 11 percent higher than the symmetric model and 15 percent higher than the asymmetric model when inverted. These differences decrease to a few percent at a Mach number of 12. In the course of this part of the study, the accuracy to the hypersonic similarity rule applied to wing-body combinations is demonstrated with experimental results. These results indicate that the rule may prove useful for determining the aerodynamic characteristics of slender configurations at Mach numbers higher than those for which test equipment is really available. In a second part of the study, the aerodynamic performance and static stability and control characteristics of a hypersonic glider are investigated in somewhat greater detail. Results for Mach numbers from 3 to 18 for performance and 0.6 to 12 for stability and control are obtained by standard text techniques, by application of the hypersonic stability rule, and/or by use of helium as a test medium. Lift-drag ratios of about 5 for Mach numbers up to 18 are shown to be obtainable. The glider studied is shown to have acceptable longitudinal and directional stability characteristics through the

  4. Static and transient performance of YF-102 engine with up to 14 percent core airbleed for the quiet short-haul research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, J. G.; Homyak, L.; Moore, A. S.

    1980-01-01

    An outdoor static test stand was used to measure the steady-state and transient performance of the YF-102 turbofan engine with core airbleed. The test configuration included a bellmouth inlet and a confluent-flow exhaust system similar in size to the quiet short-haul research aircraft (QSRA) exhaust system. For the steady-state tests, the engine operated satisfactorily with core bleed up to 14 percent of the core inlet flow. For the transient tests the engine accelerated and decelerated satisfactorily with no core bleed and with core bleed up to 11 percent of the core inlet flow (maximum tested). For some of the tests the core-bleed flow rate was scheduled to vary with fan discharge pressure, to simulate the QSRA bleed requirements. No stability, surge, stall, overtemperature, combustor flameout, or other operating problems were encountered in any of the tests. Steady-state and transient engine performance data are presented in graphs, and fuel-control trajectories for typical transient tests are shown.

  5. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems.

  6. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems. All data gathered in this investigation are contained in the CD-ROM.

  7. Novel aerospace mechanisms: A passive tether damping device for tethered satellite, and a pin/latch structural interface system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Presented here is a collection of development tasks that have been accomplished over the past year at the Marshall Space Flight Center's Structures and Dynamics Laboratory. Dissemination of task findings are reported for the following reasons: the task involves new or evolving technology (as in the case of a tethered satellite), and the tasks depict a technique that could have application to extravehicular activity (EVA) or robotic assembly of space structures (the pin/latch system).

  8. Novel aerospace mechanisms: A passive tether damping device for tethered satellite, and a pin/latch structural interface system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Presented here is a collection of development tasks that have been accomplished over the past year at the Marshall Space Flight Center's Structures and Dynamics Laboratory. Dissemination of task findings are reported for the following reasons: the task involves new or evolving technology (as in the case of a tethered satellite), and the tasks depict a technique that could have application to extravehicular activity (EVA) or robotic assembly of space structures (the pin/latch system).

  9. A 10 Gs/s latched comparator with dynamic offset cancellation in 28nm FD-SOI process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, Zbigniew

    2016-12-01

    This papers presents a high-speed, latched comparator implemented in industrial 28 nm FD-SOI technology. A novel approach to counter the mismatch is proposed. The solution employs trimming the threshold voltage by means of modulating of back-gate polarization of FD-SOI transistors. The comparator is a first step towards the design of a complete 4-bit FLASH analog-to-digital converter, with a sampling frequency of 10 GHz.

  10. Polarization encoded all-optical quaternary R-S flip-flop using binary latch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay; Roy, Jitendra Nath; Chakraborty, Ajoy Kumar

    2009-04-01

    The developments of different multi-valued logic (MVL) systems have received considerable interests in recent years all over the world. In electronics, efforts have already been made to incorporate multi-valued system in logic and arithmetic data processing. But, very little efforts have been given in realization of MVL with optics. In this paper we present novel designs of certain all-optical circuits that can be used for realizing multi-valued logic functions. Polarization encoded all-optical quaternary (4-valued) R-S flip-flop is proposed and described. Two key circuits (all-optical encoder/decoder and a binary latch) are designed first. They are used to realize quaternary flip-flop in all-optical domain. Here the different quaternary logical states are represented by different polarized state of light. Terahertz Optical Asymmetric Demultiplexer (TOAD) based interferometric switch can take an important role. Computer simulation result confirming described methods and conclusion are given in this paper.

  11. Aerodynamic Performance and Static Stability at Mach Number 3.3 of an Aircraft Configuration Employing Three Triangular Wing Panels and a Body Equal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Carlton S.

    1960-01-01

    An aircraft configuration, previously conceived as a means to achieve favorable aerodynamic stability characteristics., high lift-drag ratio, and low heating rates at high supersonic speeds., was modified in an attempt to increase further the lift-drag ratio without adversely affecting the other desirable characteristics. The original configuration consisted of three identical triangular wing panels symmetrically disposed about an ogive-cylinder body equal in length to the root chord of the panels. This configuration was modified by altering the angular disposition of the wing panels, by reducing the area of the panel forming the vertical fin, and by reshaping the body to produce interference lift. Six-component force and moment tests of the modified configuration at combined angles of attack and sideslip were made at a Mach number of 3.3 and a Reynolds number of 5.46 million. A maximum lift-drag ratio of 6.65 (excluding base drag) was measured at a lift coefficient of 0.100 and an angle of attack of 3.60. The lift-drag ratio remained greater than 3 up to lift coefficient of 0.35. Performance estimates, which predicted a maximum lift-drag ratio for the modified configuration 27 percent greater than that of the original configuration, agreed well with experiment. The modified configuration exhibited favorable static stability characteristics within the test range. Longitudinal and directional centers of pressure were slightly aft of the respective centroids of projected plan-form and side area.

  12. Performance evaluation of an improved optical computed tomography polymer gel dosimeter system for 3D dose verification of static and dynamic phantom deliveries

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O.; Langen, K. M.; Meeks, S. L.; Kupelian, P. A.; Zeidan, O. A.; Maryanski, M. J.

    2008-09-15

    The performance of a next-generation optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUS-5X) is characterized in the context of three-dimensional gel dosimetry. Large-volume (2.2 L), muscle-equivalent, radiation-sensitive polymer gel dosimeters (BANG-3) were used. Improvements in scanner design leading to shorter acquisition times are discussed. The spatial resolution, detectable absorbance range, and reproducibility are assessed. An efficient method for calibrating gel dosimeters using the depth-dose relationship is applied, with photon- and electron-based deliveries yielding equivalent results. A procedure involving a preirradiation scan was used to reduce the edge artifacts in reconstructed images, thereby increasing the useful cross-sectional area of the dosimeter by nearly a factor of 2. Dose distributions derived from optical density measurements using the calibration coefficient show good agreement with the treatment planning system simulations and radiographic film measurements. The feasibility of use for motion (four-dimensional) dosimetry is demonstrated on an example comparing dose distributions from static and dynamic delivery of a single-field photon plan. The capability to visualize three-dimensional dose distributions is also illustrated.

  13. Numerical analysis of the static performance of an annular aerostatic gas thrust bearing applied in the cryogenic turbo-expander of the EAST subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Tianwei; Fu, Bao; Chen, Shuangtao; Zhang, Qiyong; Hou, Yu

    2017-02-01

    The EAST superconducting tokamak, an advanced steady-state plasma physics experimental device, has been built at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All the toroidal field magnets and poloidal field magnets, made of NbTi/Cu cable-in-conduit conductor, are cooled with forced flow supercritical helium at 3.8 K. The cryogenic system of EAST consists of a 2 kW/4 K helium refrigerator and a helium distribution system for the cooling of coils, structures, thermal shields, bus-lines, etc. The high-speed turbo-expander is an important refrigerating component of the EAST cryogenic system. In the turbo-expander, the axial supporting technology is critical for the smooth operation of the rotor bearing system. In this paper, hydrostatic thrust bearings are designed based on the axial load of the turbo-expander. Thereafter, a computational fluid dynamics-based numerical model of the aerostatic thrust bearing is set up to evaluate the bearing performance. Tilting effect on the pressure distribution and bearing load is analyzed for the thrust bearing. Bearing load and stiffness are compared with different static supply pressures. The net force from the thrust bearings can be calculated for different combinations of bearing clearance and supply pressure.

  14. Performance evaluation of an improved optical computed tomography polymer gel dosimeter system for 3D dose verification of static and dynamic phantom deliveries.

    PubMed

    Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O; Langen, K M; Meeks, S L; Kupelian, P A; Zeidan, O A; Maryanski, M J

    2008-09-01

    The performance of a next-generation optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUS-5X) is characterized in the context of three-dimensional gel dosimetry. Large-volume (2.2 L), muscle-equivalent, radiation-sensitive polymer gel dosimeters (BANG-3) were used. Improvements in scanner design leading to shorter acquisition times are discussed. The spatial resolution, detectable absorbance range, and reproducibility are assessed. An efficient method for calibrating gel dosimeters using the depth-dose relationship is applied, with photon- and electron-based deliveries yielding equivalent results. A procedure involving a preirradiation scan was used to reduce the edge artifacts in reconstructed images, thereby increasing the useful cross-sectional area of the dosimeter by nearly a factor of 2. Dose distributions derived from optical density measurements using the calibration coefficient show good agreement with the treatment planning system simulations and radiographic film measurements. The feasibility of use for motion (four-dimensional) dosimetry is demonstrated on an example comparing dose distributions from static and dynamic delivery of a single-field photon plan. The capability to visualize three-dimensional dose distributions is also illustrated.

  15. Numerical analysis of the static performance of an annular aerostatic gas thrust bearing applied in the cryogenic turbo-expander of the EAST subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianwei, LAI; Bao, FU; Shuangtao, CHEN; Qiyong, ZHANG; Yu, HOU

    2017-02-01

    The EAST superconducting tokamak, an advanced steady-state plasma physics experimental device, has been built at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All the toroidal field magnets and poloidal field magnets, made of NbTi/Cu cable-in-conduit conductor, are cooled with forced flow supercritical helium at 3.8 K. The cryogenic system of EAST consists of a 2 kW/4 K helium refrigerator and a helium distribution system for the cooling of coils, structures, thermal shields, bus-lines, etc. The high-speed turbo-expander is an important refrigerating component of the EAST cryogenic system. In the turbo-expander, the axial supporting technology is critical for the smooth operation of the rotor bearing system. In this paper, hydrostatic thrust bearings are designed based on the axial load of the turbo-expander. Thereafter, a computational fluid dynamics-based numerical model of the aerostatic thrust bearing is set up to evaluate the bearing performance. Tilting effect on the pressure distribution and bearing load is analyzed for the thrust bearing. Bearing load and stiffness are compared with different static supply pressures. The net force from the thrust bearings can be calculated for different combinations of bearing clearance and supply pressure.

  16. Performance of a static-anode/flat-panel x-ray fluoroscopy system in a diagnostic strength magnetic field: a truly hybrid x-ray/MR imaging system.

    PubMed

    Fahrig, R; Wen, Z; Ganguly, A; DeCrescenzo, G; Rowlands, J A; Stevens, G M; Saunders, R F; Pelc, N J

    2005-06-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are increasing in variety and frequency, facilitated by advances in imaging technology. Our hybrid imaging system (GE Apollo flat panel, custom Brand x-ray static anode x-ray tube, GE Lunar high-frequency power supply and 0.5 T Signa SP) provides both x-ray and MR imaging capability to guide complex procedures without requiring motion of the patient between two distant gantries. The performance of the x-ray tube in this closely integrated system was evaluated by modeling and measuring both the response of the filament to an externally applied field and the behavior of the electron beam for field strengths and geometries of interest. The performance of the detector was assessed by measuring the slanted-edge modulation transfer function (MTF) and when placed at zero field and at 0.5 T. Measured resonant frequencies of filaments can be approximated using a modified vibrating beam model, and were at frequencies well below the 25 kHz frequency of our generator for our filament geometry. The amplitude of vibration was not sufficient to cause shorting of the filament during operation within the magnetic field. A simple model of electrons in uniform electric and magnetic fields can be used to estimate the deflection of the electron beam on the anode for the fields of interest between 0.2 and 0.5 T. The MTF measured at the detector and the DQE showed no significant difference inside and outside of the magnetic field. With the proper modifications, an x-ray system can be fully integrated with a MR system, with minimal loss of image quality. Any x-ray tube can be assessed for compatibility when placed at a particular location within the field using the models. We have also concluded that a-Si electronics are robust against magnetic fields. Detailed knowledge of the x-ray system installation is required to provide estimates of system operation.

  17. Performance of 11C-Pittsburgh Compound B PET Binding Potential Images in the Detection of Amyloid Deposits on Equivocal Static Images.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Chisa; Ishii, Kazunari; Kimura, Yuichi; Hyodo, Tomoko; Hosono, Makoto; Sakaguchi, Kenta; Usami, Kimio; Shimamoto, Kenji; Yamazoe, Yuzuru; Murakami, Takamichi

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to clarify whether binding potential (BP) images using (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PiB) and dynamic PET can reliably detect cortical amyloid deposits for patients whose (11)C-PiB PET static images are ambiguous and whether visual ratings are affected by white matter retention. Static and BP images were constructed for 85 consecutive patients with cognitive impairment after (11)C-PiB dynamic PET. Cortical uptake was visually assessed as positive, negative, or equivocal for both types of images. Quantitatively, the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) from the static image, the nondisplaceable BP from the dynamic image for mean gray matter uptake, and the ratio of gray matter uptake to white matter retention were compared among (11)C-PiB-positive, (11)C-PiB-equivocal, and (11)C-PiB-negative groups. Forty-three scans were visually assessed as (11)C-PiB-positive in both the static and the BP images. Ten scans were (11)C-PiB-equivocal in the static images. In 8 of them, the BP images were (11)C-PiB-positive, whereas the other 2 were (11)C-PiB-equivocal. Thirty-two scans were assessed as (11)C-PiB-negative in the static images. In the BP images, 4 were (11)C-PiB-positive and 2 were (11)C-PiB-equivocal. The mean gray matter uptake of (11)C-PiB in SUVR and nondisplaceable BP, respectively, showed statistically significant differences among the (11)C-PiB-positive, (11)C-PiB-equivocal, and (11)C-PiB-negative groups. The ratio of gray matter uptake to white matter retention was lower in the BP images than static images from the (11)C-PiB-negative and (11)C-PiB-equivocal groups, whereas it was higher in the (11)C-PiB-positive group. (11)C-PiB PET BP images can clarify visual interpretation of clinical static (11)C-PiB-equivocal images by reducing the interference of nonspecific white matter retention. We conclude that (11)C-PiB-equivocal PET findings on static images reflect cortical amyloid deposits, which can be verified using BP images

  18. Psychometric Evaluation of 5- and 4-Item Versions of the LATCH Breastfeeding Assessment Tool during the Initial Postpartum Period among a Multiethnic Population

    PubMed Central

    Htun, Tha Pyai; Lim, Peng Im; Ho-Lim, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the internal consistency, structural validity, sensitivity and specificity of the 5- and 4-item versions of the LATCH assessment tool among a multiethnic population in Singapore. Methods The study was a secondary analysis of a subset of data (n = 907) from our previous breastfeeding survey from 2013 to 2014. The internal consistency of the LATCH was examined using Cronbach’s alpha. The structural validity was assessed using an exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and the proposed factors were confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using separate samples. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the LATCH score thresholds for predicting non-exclusive breastfeeding. Results The Cronbach’s alpha values of the 5- and 4-item LATCH assessments were 0.70 and 0.74, respectively. The EFA demonstrated a one-factor structure for the 5- and 4-item LATCH assessments among a randomized split of 334 vaginally delivered women. Two CFA of the 4-item LATCH demonstrated better fit indices of the models compared to the two CFA of the 5-item LATCH among another randomized split of 335 vaginally delivered women and 238 cesarean delivered women. Using cutoffs of 5.5 and 3.5 were recommended when predicting non-exclusive breastfeeding for 5- and 4-item versions of the LATCH assessment among vaginally delivered women (n = 669), with satisfactory sensitivities (94% and 95%), low specificities (0% and 2%), low positive predictive values (25%) and negative predictive values (20% and 47%). A cutoff of 5.5 was recommended to predict non-exclusive breastfeeding for 5- and 4-item versions among cesarean delivered women (n = 238) with satisfactory sensitivities (93% and 98%), low specificities (4% and 9%), low positive predictive values (41%) and negative predictive values (65% and 75%). Therefore, the tool has good sensitivity but poor specificity, positive and negative predictive

  19. Effects of non-latching blast valves on the source term and consequences of the design-basis accidents in the Device Assembly Facility (DAF)

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.H.

    1993-08-01

    The analysis of the Design-Basis Accidents (DBA) involving high explosives (HE) and Plutonium (Pu) in the assembly cell of the Device Assembly Facility (DAF), which was completed earlier, assumed latching blast valves in the ventilation system of the assembly cell. Latching valves effectively sealed a release path through the ventilation duct system. However, the blast valves in the assembly cell, as constructed are actually non-latching valves, and would reopen when the gas pressure drops to 0.5 psi above one atmosphere. Because the reopening of the blast valves provides an additional release path to the environment, and affects the material transport from the assembly cell to other DAF buildings, the DOE/NV DAF management has decided to support an additional analysis of the DAF`s DBA to account for the effects of non-latching valves. Three cases were considered in the DAF`s DBA, depending on the amount of HE and Pu involved, as follows: Case 1 -- 423 {number_sign}HE, 16 kg Pu; Case 2 -- 150 {number_sign}HE 10 kg Pu; Case 3 -- 55 {number_sign}HE 5 kg Pu. The results of the analysis with non-latching valves are summarized.

  20. A Modified Implementation of Tristate Inverter Based Static Master-Slave Flip-Flop with Improved Power-Delay-Area Product

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Satish Chandra; Gupta, Maneesha

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces novel architectures for implementation of fully static master-slave flip-flops for low power, high performance, and high density. Based on the proposed structure, traditional C2MOS latch (tristate inverter/clocked inverter) based flip-flop is implemented with fewer transistors. The modified C2MOS based flip-flop designs mC2MOSff1 and mC2MOSff2 are realized using only sixteen transistors each while the number of clocked transistors is also reduced in case of mC2MOSff1. Postlayout simulations indicate that mC2MOSff1 flip-flop shows 12.4% improvement in PDAP (power-delay-area product) when compared with transmission gate flip-flop (TGFF) at 16X capacitive load which is considered to be the best design alternative among the conventional master-slave flip-flops. To validate the correct behaviour of the proposed design, an eight bit asynchronous counter is designed to layout level. LVS and parasitic extraction were carried out on Calibre, whereas layouts were implemented using IC station (Mentor Graphics). HSPICE simulations were used to characterize the transient response of the flip-flop designs in a 180 nm/1.8 V CMOS technology. Simulations were also performed at 130 nm, 90 nm, and 65 nm to reveal the scalability of both the designs at modern process nodes. PMID:24723808

  1. A modified implementation of tristate inverter based static master-slave flip-flop with improved power-delay-area product.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwar; Tiwari, Satish Chandra; Gupta, Maneesha

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces novel architectures for implementation of fully static master-slave flip-flops for low power, high performance, and high density. Based on the proposed structure, traditional C(2)MOS latch (tristate inverter/clocked inverter) based flip-flop is implemented with fewer transistors. The modified C(2)MOS based flip-flop designs mC(2)MOSff1 and mC(2)MOSff2 are realized using only sixteen transistors each while the number of clocked transistors is also reduced in case of mC(2)MOSff1. Postlayout simulations indicate that mC(2)MOSff1 flip-flop shows 12.4% improvement in PDAP (power-delay-area product) when compared with transmission gate flip-flop (TGFF) at 16X capacitive load which is considered to be the best design alternative among the conventional master-slave flip-flops. To validate the correct behaviour of the proposed design, an eight bit asynchronous counter is designed to layout level. LVS and parasitic extraction were carried out on Calibre, whereas layouts were implemented using IC station (Mentor Graphics). HSPICE simulations were used to characterize the transient response of the flip-flop designs in a 180 nm/1.8 V CMOS technology. Simulations were also performed at 130 nm, 90 nm, and 65 nm to reveal the scalability of both the designs at modern process nodes.

  2. Incorporating Peatland Plant Communities into the Enzymic 'Latch' Hypothesis: Can Vegetation Influence Carbon Storage Mechanisms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, K. J.; Daniels, A. L.; Potvin, L. R.; Kane, E. S.; Kolka, R. K.; Chimner, R. A.; Lilleskov, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    High water table conditions in peatland ecosystems are known to favor plant production over decomposition and carbon is stored. Dominant plant communities change in response to water table but little is know of how these changes affect belowground carbon storage. One hypothesis known as the enzymic 'latch' proposed by Freeman et al. suggests that oxygen limitations due to high water table conditions inhibit microorganisms from synthesizing specific extracellular enzymes essential for carbon and nutrient mineralization, allowing carbon to be stored as decomposition is reduced. Yet, this hypothesis excludes plant community interactions on carbon storage. We hypothesize that the dominant vascular plant communities, sedges and ericaceous shrubs, will have inherently different effects on peatland carbon storage, especially in response to declines in water table. Sedges greatly increase in abundance following water table decline and create extensive carbon oxidation and mineralization hotspots through the production of deep roots with aerenchyma (air channels in roots). Increased oxidation may enhance aerobic microbial activity including increased enzyme activity, leading to peat subsidence and carbon loss. In contrast, ericaceous shrubs utilize enzymatically active ericoid mycorrhizal fungi that suppress free-living heterotrophs, promoting decreased carbon mineralization by mediating changes in rhizosphere microbial communities and enzyme activity regardless of water table declines. Beginning May 2010, bog monoliths were harvested, housed in mesocosm chambers, and manipulated into three vegetation treatments: unmanipulated (+sedge, +Ericaceae), sedge (+sedge, -Ericaceae), and Ericaceae (-sedge, +Ericaceae). Following vegetation manipulations, two distinct water table manipulations targeting water table seasonal profiles were implemented: (low intra-seasonal variability, higher mean water table; high intra-seasonal variability, lower mean water table). In 2012, peat

  3. Breaking The Enzymatic Latch: Do Anaerobic Conditions Constrain Decomposition In Humid Tropical Forest Soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic conditions have been proposed to impose a "latch" on soil organic matter decomposition by inhibiting the activity of extracellular enzymes that catalyze the transformation of organic polymers into monomers for microbial assimilation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that anaerobiosis inhibits soil hydrolytic enzyme activity in a humid tropical forest ecosystem in Puerto Rico. We sampled surface and sub-surface soil from each of 59 plots (n = 118) stratified across distinct topographical zones (ridges, slopes, and valleys) known to vary in soil oxygen (O2) concentrations, and measured the potential activity of five hydrolytic enzymes that decompose carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) substrates. We measured reduced iron (Fe (II)) concentrations in soil extractions to provide a spatially and temporally integrated index of anaerobic microbial activity, since iron oxides constitute the dominant anaerobic terminal electron acceptor in this ecosystem. Surprisingly, we observed positive relationships between Fe (II) concentrations and the activity of all enzymes that we assayed. Linear mixed effects models that included Fe (II) concentration, topographic position, and their interaction explained between 30 to 70 % of the variance of enzyme activity of β-1,4-glucosidase, β-cellobiohydrolase, β-xylosidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase. Soils from ridges and slopes contained between 10 and 800 μg Fe (II) g-1 soil, and exhibited consistently positive relationships (p < 0.0001) between Fe (II) and enzyme activity. Valley soils did not display significant relationships between enzyme activity and Fe (II), although they displayed variation in soil Fe (II) concentrations similar to ridges and slopes. Overall, valleys exhibited lower enzyme activity and lower Fe (II) concentrations than ridges or slopes, possibly related to decreased root biomass and soil C. Our data provide no indication that anaerobiosis suppresses soil enzyme activity, but

  4. Static Analysis of Mobile Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air...and then use static analysis to verify them. In the end we pursued this idea successfully for several differnet properties and developed novel...difficult to develop with enough precision. In [3], we establish a connection between compositional analyses and modular lattices, which require

  5. Teaching home safety and survival skills to latch-key children: a comparison of two manuals and methods.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, L

    1984-01-01

    I evaluated the influence of two training manuals on latch-key children's acquisition of home safety and survival skills. The widely used, discussion-oriented "Prepared for Today" manual was compared with a behaviorally oriented "Safe at Home" manual. Data were scored by response criteria developed by experts and by parents' and experts' ratings of children's spontaneous answers. With both methods of scoring, three behaviorally trained children demonstrated clear and abrupt increases in skill following training in each of seven trained modules, and these increases largely persisted in real world generalization probes and at 5-month follow-up. Smaller and less stable increases in skill were found in the three discussion-trained children across the seven modules; lower skill levels were also seen in real world generalization probes and at follow-up. Neither group of children demonstrated skill increases in home safety areas that were not explicitly trained. Both training methods produced small decreases in children's self-report of general anxiety and anxiety concerning home safety. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for cost-effective training of latch-key children. PMID:6511698

  6. 40 CFR 53.64 - Test procedure: Static fractionator test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test procedure: Static fractionator... Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM 2.5 § 53.64 Test procedure: Static... when reevaluating the curve as specified in the loading test. (2) Static chamber method....

  7. 40 CFR 53.64 - Test procedure: Static fractionator test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test procedure: Static fractionator... Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.64 Test procedure: Static... when reevaluating the curve as specified in the loading test. (2) Static chamber method....

  8. 40 CFR 53.64 - Test procedure: Static fractionator test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test procedure: Static fractionator... Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.64 Test procedure: Static... when reevaluating the curve as specified in the loading test. (2) Static chamber method....

  9. 40 CFR 53.64 - Test procedure: Static fractionator test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test procedure: Static fractionator... Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM 2.5 § 53.64 Test procedure: Static... when reevaluating the curve as specified in the loading test. (2) Static chamber method....

  10. The relationship between positioning, the breastfeeding dynamic, the latching process and pain in breastfeeding mothers with sore nipples.

    PubMed

    Blair, Anna; Cadwell, Karin; Turner-Maffei, Cindy; Brimdyr, Kajsa

    2003-07-01

    In recognition of the irrefutable disadvantages of not breastfeeding to the mother, baby, society and the environment, increasing the duration of breastfeeding has become a focus of national and international health objectives. However, many mothers experience such painful sore nipples that they stop breastfeeding before they intended. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between various aspects of optimal breastfeeding (e.g. the positioning of the baby at the mother's breast, the positioning of the baby's head and mouth, the breastfeeding dynamic and the latching process) using a guided assessment and documentation tool and the breastfeeding mother's level of reported pain on a five-point verbal descriptor scale. Ninety-five healthy postpartum breastfeeding mothers who sequentially reported sore nipples within ten days of giving birth to healthy, term babies in a hospital in Latvia participated in the study. Each mother's midwife observed, assessed and documented a breastfeed using a guidance assessment form, the Lactation Assessment Tool (LAT). Each mother scored her own pain during breastfeeding. Four attribute categories were scored and examined as related to the pain levels of the mother: the baby's face position (chin and nose and head position, cheekline, lip flange and angle of mouth opening); the baby's body position (height at the breast, body rotation and body in relation to mother's body); the breastfeeding dynamic (change in breastfeeding pattern (suck vs swallow) and movement of mother's breast) and the latching process of the baby (root, gape, seal and suck). No significant difference was found between the mother's level of reported pain and the assessed head position, body position or breastfeeding dynamic attributes of the baby. However, more optimal latching process behaviour of the baby (rooting, gaping, sealing, and sucking behaviour) are slightly related to lower levels of reported pain (r(88) = -0.09, p > 0.05). This should

  11. Latching/Rush-Through as a Turn-Holding Device and Its Functions in Retrospectively Oriented Pre-Emptive Turn Continuation: Findings from Mandarin Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This article offers an interactional account of turn continuations in Chinese conversation, which are characterized as (a) being effected by latching/rush-through, (b) being clauses with predicates, either main or adverbial, and (c) taking a retrospective orientation in the kind of interactional work they do. Close examination reveals that while,…

  12. Temperature and Electrolyte Optimization of the α-Hemolysin Latch Sensing Zone for Detection of Base Modification in Double-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert P.; Fleming, Aaron M.; Jin, Qian; Burrows, Cynthia J.; White, Henry S.

    2014-01-01

    The latch region of the wild-type protein pore α-hemolysin (α-HL) constitutes a sensing zone for individual abasic sites (and furan analogs) in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The presence of an abasic site or furan within a DNA duplex, electrophoretically captured in the α-HL vestibule and positioned at the latch region, can be detected based on the current blockage prior to duplex unzipping. We investigated variations in blockage current as a function of temperature (12–35°C) and KCl concentration (0.15–1.0 M) to understand the origin of the current signature and to optimize conditions for identifying the base modification. In 1 M KCl solution, substitution of a furan for a cytosine base in the latch region results in an ∼8 kJ mol−1 decrease in the activation energy for ion transport through the protein pore. This corresponds to a readily measured ∼2 pA increase in current at room temperature. Optimal resolution for detecting the presence of a furan in the latch region is achieved at lower KCl concentrations, where the noise in the measured blockage current is significantly lower. The noise associated with the blockage current also depends on the stability of the duplex (as measured from the melting temperature), where a greater noise in the measured blockage current is observed for less stable duplexes. PMID:25140427

  13. Latching/Rush-Through as a Turn-Holding Device and Its Functions in Retrospectively Oriented Pre-Emptive Turn Continuation: Findings from Mandarin Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This article offers an interactional account of turn continuations in Chinese conversation, which are characterized as (a) being effected by latching/rush-through, (b) being clauses with predicates, either main or adverbial, and (c) taking a retrospective orientation in the kind of interactional work they do. Close examination reveals that while,…

  14. Temperature and electrolyte optimization of the α-hemolysin latch sensing zone for detection of base modification in double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert P; Fleming, Aaron M; Jin, Qian; Burrows, Cynthia J; White, Henry S

    2014-08-19

    The latch region of the wild-type protein pore α-hemolysin (α-HL) constitutes a sensing zone for individual abasic sites (and furan analogs) in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The presence of an abasic site or furan within a DNA duplex, electrophoretically captured in the α-HL vestibule and positioned at the latch region, can be detected based on the current blockage prior to duplex unzipping. We investigated variations in blockage current as a function of temperature (12-35°C) and KCl concentration (0.15-1.0 M) to understand the origin of the current signature and to optimize conditions for identifying the base modification. In 1 M KCl solution, substitution of a furan for a cytosine base in the latch region results in an ∼ 8 kJ mol(-1) decrease in the activation energy for ion transport through the protein pore. This corresponds to a readily measured ∼ 2 pA increase in current at room temperature. Optimal resolution for detecting the presence of a furan in the latch region is achieved at lower KCl concentrations, where the noise in the measured blockage current is significantly lower. The noise associated with the blockage current also depends on the stability of the duplex (as measured from the melting temperature), where a greater noise in the measured blockage current is observed for less stable duplexes.

  15. Integrating the automatic and the controlled: strategies in semantic priming in an attractor network with latching dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Itamar; Bentin, Shlomo; Shriki, Oren

    2014-01-01

    Semantic priming has long been recognized to reflect, along with automatic semantic mechanisms, the contribution of controlled strategies. However, previous theories of controlled priming were mostly qualitative, lacking common grounds with modern mathematical models of automatic priming based on neural networks. Recently, we introduced a novel attractor network model of automatic semantic priming with latching dynamics. Here, we extend this work to show how the same model can also account for important findings regarding controlled processes. Assuming the rate of semantic transitions in the network can be adapted using simple reinforcement learning, we show how basic findings attributed to controlled processes in priming can be achieved, including their dependency on stimulus onset asynchrony and relatedness proportion and their unique effect on associative, category-exemplar, mediated and backward prime-target relations. We discuss how our mechanism relates to the classic expectancy theory and how it can be further extended in future developments of the model.

  16. Investigation of all-optical latching operation of a monolithically integrated SOA-MZI with a feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yusuke; Shimizu, Satoshi; Kato, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Kohroh; Uenohara, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-10

    We have investigated an all-optical set/reset and latching operation using a monolithically integrated InP-based semiconductor optical amplifier type Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a feedback loop. In simulation, operation conditions when both set and reset are possible was estimated for input light pulse with a FWHM of 31 and 12.5 ps, and the tolerance of the CW probe light and feedback loop loss becomes large with increasing the input light pulse power. In addition, the loop length could be longer than the distance of the light propagating in one bit pulse because of the longer carrier recovery time than one bit time duration. Moreover, we successfully achieved set/reset operation with 34- and 18-ps wide set/reset pulses.

  17. Static Detection of Disassembly Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Nithya; Debray, Saumya; Fligg, Alan K

    2009-10-13

    Static disassembly is a crucial first step in reverse engineering executable files, and there is a consider- able body of work in reverse-engineering of binaries, as well as areas such as semantics-based security anal- ysis, that assumes that the input executable has been correctly disassembled. However, disassembly errors, e.g., arising from binary obfuscations, can render this assumption invalid. This work describes a machine- learning-based approach, using decision trees, for stat- ically identifying possible errors in a static disassem- bly; such potential errors may then be examined more closely, e.g., using dynamic analyses. Experimental re- sults using a variety of input executables indicate that our approach performs well, correctly identifying most disassembly errors with relatively few false positives.

  18. Effect of mother–infant pair's latch-on position on child's health: A lesson for nursing care

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Harshdeep; Magon, Pushpendra; Raina, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effective breastfeeding is a function of the proper positioning of mother and baby and attachment of child to the mother's breast. Positioning of the baby's body is important for good attachment and successful breastfeeding. The study was planned to assess mother–infant pair latch on position and its impact on health status of the child. Materials and Methods: It was community-based cross-sectional study conducted among 1267 children between age group of 0–24 months in the urban and rural field practice areas of the Department of Community Medicine, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana. A self-designed semi-structured questionnaire along with the WHO criteria for assessment of correct latch on position was used in this study. Results: Out of 1267 mothers, only 29.9% mothers initiated breastfeeding within 1 h of delivery. Mothers who had high parity had better positioning scores as compared to mothers with low parity. About 83.7% mothers who had parity >2 had excellent scores as compared to those mothers having one child or two children. About 56.8% and 62.7% children who suffered from diarrhea and acute respiratory infection (ARI), respectively, had mothers with poor positioning and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: It was concluded that mothers who had higher parity had better positioning and attachment scores and also mothers with excellent positioning scores, their children suffered less from diarrhea and ARI. Each mother should be observed for mother's and infant's positioning and attachment at the onset of breastfeeding and if needed given counseling on correct positioning and attachment. PMID:27843833

  19. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  20. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  1. Why Static Clings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naab, Laurie; Henry, David

    2009-01-01

    Using Wiggins and McTighe's (1998) concept of Big Ideas, the authors planned and designed an electricity investigation to address common student misconceptions about static electricity. With Styrofoam plates and transparent tape, elementary students investigated many properties of electrically charged and uncharged objects in a 5E learning cycle…

  2. Static Analysis Numerical Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    and Honeywell Aerospace Advanced Technology to combine model-based development of complex avionics control software with static analysis of the...numerical algorithms, software verification, formal methods 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...18 3.3.4. Tool Software Integration Architecture

  3. Static cylindrical matter shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arık, Metin; Delice, Özgür

    2005-08-01

    Static cylindrical shells composed of massive particles arising from matching of two different Levi-Civita space-times are studied for the shell satisfying either an isotropic or an anisotropic equation of state. We find that these solutions satisfy the energy conditions for certain ranges of the parameters.

  4. Why Static Clings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naab, Laurie; Henry, David

    2009-01-01

    Using Wiggins and McTighe's (1998) concept of Big Ideas, the authors planned and designed an electricity investigation to address common student misconceptions about static electricity. With Styrofoam plates and transparent tape, elementary students investigated many properties of electrically charged and uncharged objects in a 5E learning cycle…

  5. CAI Applications in Statics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Clayton C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a statics course developed at Texas A&M University in the engineering curriculum which utilizes computer-assisted instruction. Discusses the organization and management of the team that developed the course, the selection of the hardware and software used, and the implementation model and lesson prototype developed for the course.…

  6. Preliminary results on performance of new ultra-fast static positioning module - POZGEO-2 in areas outside the ASG-EUPOS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paziewski, Jacek; Krukowska, Marta; Wielgosz, Paweł

    2014-06-01

    The presented preliminary research concerns the accuracy and reliability of new ultra-fast static positioning module - POZGEO-2 - in case of processing GPS data collected outside the ASG-EUPOS network. Such a case requires extrapolation of the network-derived atmospheric corrections which limits correction accuracy and, therefore, has adverse effect on the carrier phase ambiguity resolution. The presented processing tests are based on processing 5-minute long observing sessions and show that precise positioning can be supported up to 35 km from the ASG-EUPOS borders. This means that precise positioning with POZGEO-2 module can be assured for the most of the border areas of Poland. W pracy prezentowane są badania dotyczące dokładności i wiarygodności pozycji wyznaczanej z wykorzystaniem nowego modułu ultra-szybkiego pozycjonowania - POZGEO-2 opracowanego dla systemu ASG-EUPOS. Przedstawione testy obliczeniowe dotyczą szczególnego przypadku wyznaczania pozycji, gdy użytkownik znajduje się poza granicami sieci stacji referencyjnych. W takich warunkach wymagana jest ekstrapolacja sieciowych poprawek atmosferycznych. Wpływa to negatywnie na dokładność tych poprawek i może doprowadzić do sytuacji, w której wyznaczenie nieoznaczoności będzie niemożliwe. Prezentowane badania oparte są na pięciominutowych sesjach obserwacyjnych i pokazują, że poprawki mogą być ekstrapolowane dla obszarów położonych do około 35 km od granic sieci ASG-EUPOS. Oznacza to, że w praktyce precyzyjne pozycjonowanie ultra-szybkie z użyciem modułu POZGEO-2 może być zapewnione dla niemal całego obszaru Polski

  7. A comparative analysis of static and dynamic load balancing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iqbal, M. Ashraf; Bokhari, Shahid H.; Saltz, Joel H.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of uniformly distributing the load of a parallel program over a multiprocessor system was considered. A program was analyzed whose structure permits the computation of the optimal static solution. Then four strategies for load balancing were described and their performance compared. The strategies are: (1) the optimal static assignment algorithm which is guaranteed to yield the best static solution, (2) the static binary dissection method which is very fast but suboptimal, (3) the greedy algorithm, a static fully polynomial time approximation scheme, which estimates the optimal solution to arbitrary accuracy, and (4) the predictive dynamic load balancing heuristic which uses information on the precedence relationships within the program and outperforms any of the static methods. It is also shown that the overhead incurred by the dynamic heuristic is reduced considerably if it is started off with a static assignment provided by either of the three strategies.

  8. A comparative analysis of static and dynamic load balancing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iqbal, M. Ashraf; Bokhari, Shahid H.; Saltz, Joel H.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of uniformly distributing the load of a parallel program over a multiprocessor system was considered. A program was analyzed whose structure permits the computation of the optimal static solution. Then four strategies for load balancing were described and their performance compared. The strategies are: (1) the optimal static assignment algorithm which is guaranteed to yield the best static solution, (2) the static binary dissection method which is very fast but suboptimal, (3) the greedy algorithm, a static fully polynomial time approximation scheme, which estimates the optimal solution to arbitrary accuracy, and (4) the predictive dynamic load balancing heuristic which uses information on the precedence relationships within the program and outperforms any of the static methods. It is also shown that the overhead incurred by the dynamic heuristic is reduced considerably if it is started off with a static assignment provided by either of the three strategies.

  9. Static cylindrically symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjällborg, Mikael

    2007-05-01

    We prove the existence of static solutions to the cylindrically symmetric Einstein Vlasov system, and we show that the matter cylinder has finite extension in two of the three spatial dimensions. The same results are also proved for a quite general class of equations of state for perfect fluids coupled to the Einstein equations, extending the class of equations of state considered by Bicak et al (2004 Class. Quantum Grav.21 1583). We also obtain this result for the Vlasov Poisson system.

  10. Axial static mixer

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  11. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-05-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  12. Control of a biomimetic brain machine interface with local field potentials: performance and stability of a static decoder over 200 days.

    PubMed

    Flint, Robert D; Wright, Zachary A; Slutzky, Marc W

    2012-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) have the potential to restore lost function to individuals with severe motor impairments. An important design specification for BMIs to be clinically useful is the ability to achieve high performance over a period of months to years without requiring frequent recalibration. Here, we report the first successful implementation of a biomimetic BMI based on local field potentials (LFPs). A BMI decoder was built from a single recording session of a random-pursuit reaching task for each of two monkeys, and used to control cursor position in real time (online) over a span of 210 days. Performance using this BMI was similar to prior reports using BMIs based on single-unit spikes for 2D cursor control. During this ongoing study, target acquisition rates remained constant (in 1 monkey) or improved slightly (1 monkey) over a 7 month span, and performance metrics of cursor movement (path length and time-to-target) also remained constant or showed mild improvement as the monkeys gained practice. Based on these results, we expect that a stable, high-performance BMI based on LFP signals could serve as a viable alternative to single-unit based BMIs.

  13. Static Properties of Skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Gregory S.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * CHIRAL FIELD THEORY * The Skyrme Lagrangian * Topological Solitons * Symmetries and Currents * THE SKYRMION * The Hedgehog * The Shape Function * The Rotating Soliton * QUANTIZATION * Quantization and Wave Functions * Matrix Elements * STATIC PROPERTIES * Masses * Sizes and Magnetic Moments * Electric and Magnetic Transition Elements * Axial Coupling and the Goldberger-Treiman Relation * More Results and Predictions * DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS * APPENDIX A: NOTATION * APPENDIX B: PAULI MATRIX ALGEBRA * APPENDIX C: THE ADJOINT REPRESENTATION OF SU(2) * APPENDIX D: A FEW USEFUL FACTS * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  14. SEU response of design- and resistor-hardened D-latches in the SA3300 microprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Corbett, W.T.; Axness, C.L.; Wunsch, T.F.; Hughes, K.L.; Treece, R.K.; Hass, K.J.; Hash, G.L.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    The effectiveness of hardening the SA3300 against SEU using design and design-plus-resistor approaches is presented. The full performance and SEU tolerance requirements are met using R{sub fb} {le} 160 k{Omega}. Lumped-parameter circuit simulations are used to analyze results. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  15. An analysis of a performance by the violinist D. Oistrakh: the hypothetical role of postural tonic-static and entourage movements.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, V; Katsnelson, A

    1996-02-01

    In an interdisciplinary research project carried out by a violinist and a psychophysiologist which is based on a videotape of a performance by the violinist, David Oistrakh, we draw attention to certain postural attitudes and movements which appear in sequences of his rendition of the Brandenburg Concerto N. 4 by Bach and the Concerto for Violin in D Major by Mozart. These postural attitudes and movements occur with a certain regularity and are particular to each piece of music. For example, in the Brandenburg Concerto, one can observe rhythmic oscillations of the musician's whole body, with a shifting of the weight (alternanza di appoggio) from the left to the right foot. The performer's movements were compared with corresponding points of the musical score. Within this analytical framework, we hypothesize that these movements have not only a mechanical postural role but an expressive aesthetic one.

  16. Thermal Performance of Biological Substance Systems in Vitro Under Static and Dynamic Conditions at the Cryogenic Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, James E.; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A unique research program, including a comprehensive study of thermal performance at cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, was performed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The main goal was to develop a new soft vacuum system (from 1 torr to 10 torr) that provides an intermediate level of performance (k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K). Liquid nitrogen boil-off methods were used to test conventional materials, novel materials, and certain combinations. The test articles included combinations of aluminum foil, fiberglass paper, polyester fabric, silica aerogel composite blanket, fumed silica, silica aerogel powder, and syntactic foam. A new LCI system was developed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. This system performs exceptionally well at soft vacuum levels and nearly as good as an MLI at high vacuum levels. Apparent thermal conductivities for the LCI range from 2 mW/m-K at soft vacuum to 0.1 mW/m-K at high vacuum. Several cryostats were designed, constructed, and calibrated by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at KSC NASA as part of this research program. The cryostat test apparatus is a liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimeter system for direct measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity at a fixed vacuum level between 5 x 10(exp -5) and 760 torr. The apparatus is also used for transient measurements of temperature profiles. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems has been a targeted area of research for a number of years. Improved methods of characterization, testing, and evaluation of complex biological substance systems for cryosurgery and cryobiology are the focus of this paper.

  17. Dynamic and static moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. H.; Johnston, David H.

    1981-01-01

    Static and dynamic bulk moduli (Ks and Kd) are measured as continuous functions of pressure from zero to 2-3 kilobars for two sandstones, a tuff, limestone, granite, and oil shale. Results for the sandstones and granite are in good agreement with previously reported data with Ks/Kd varying from about 0.5 at atmospheric pressure to close to unity at pressures 2 kilobars and above. For rocks behaving elastically under static loading, the Ks/Kd ratio is inversely related to the microcrack density. For the limestone, time dependent deformation associated with pore collapse results in Ks/Kd ratios approaching 0.1 at high pressure. Upon unloading, while initially high ( ˜ 1.0) at high pressures, Ks/Kd becomes lower than values obtained during loading at low pressures ( < 1 kilobar) due to opening of microcracks generated during pore collapse. For the oil shale, in which few microcracks exist, Ks/Kd remains relatively constant with pressure at a value of about 0.7.

  18. Improvement of propeller static thrust estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusse, J.; Kettleborough, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of improving the performance estimation of propellers operating in the heavily loaded static thrust condition was studied. The Goldstein theory was assessed as it applies to propellers operating in the static thrust. A review of theoretical considerations is presented along with a summary of the attempts made to obtain a numerical solution. The chordwise pressure distribution was determined during operation at a tip speed of 500 ft/sec. Chordwise integration of the pressures leads to the spanwise load distribution and further integration would give the axial thrust.

  19. Static correction using near surface model

    SciTech Connect

    Deying, Z. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a new static correction using inverse modeling of first break is recommended. It is based on the least square of the difference between the real reflection first break time and corresponding modeled ray-tracing travel time. The initial model derives from priori informations or traditional interpretation results. The preconditioned fastest descent means in inversion achieves simultaneous inversions of overlying-bed velocity and refractor depth. This method has been successfully used to yield theoretical seismic data and to perform static correction of the seismic data in A district.

  20. Effects of a dynamic chair on pelvic mobility, fatigue, and work efficiency during work performed while sitting: a comparison of dynamic sitting and static sitting.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Hironori; Mitsuhashi, Toshitaka; Sako, Shunji; Goto, Ryokichi; Nakai, Tomohiro; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] Working while sitting for long periods can cause lumbar pain, fatigue, and reduced work efficiency. How a dynamic chair with a seat that moves three-dimensionally affects pelvic mobility before and after work, work efficiency, and post-work fatigue were examined. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 17 healthy adults (10 males, 7 females, mean age 21.8 ± 2.7 years). Subjects performed a 30-min Kraepelin test under two conditions: sitting in a standard office chair and sitting in a dynamic sitting balance chair. Root mean square (RMS) values of pelvic movement measured by a triaxial accelerometer during 30 minutes of work, finger-floor distance before and after work, lumbar fatigue, and pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement were used as outcome measures. [Results] Pelvic movement RMS values collected every 5 minutes during 30 minutes of work were significantly higher while sitting in the dynamic balance chair. Changes in pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement after work and amount of work performed during 30 minutes were significantly higher and lumbar fatigue was significantly lower for the dynamic balance chair. [Conclusion] Dynamic sitting maintained or increased pelvic flexibility. The dynamic balance chair may effectively help workers work continuously in seated postures with little fatigue.

  1. Effects of a dynamic chair on pelvic mobility, fatigue, and work efficiency during work performed while sitting: a comparison of dynamic sitting and static sitting

    PubMed Central

    Tanoue, Hironori; Mitsuhashi, Toshitaka; Sako, Shunji; Goto, Ryokichi; Nakai, Tomohiro; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Working while sitting for long periods can cause lumbar pain, fatigue, and reduced work efficiency. How a dynamic chair with a seat that moves three-dimensionally affects pelvic mobility before and after work, work efficiency, and post-work fatigue were examined. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 17 healthy adults (10 males, 7 females, mean age 21.8 ± 2.7 years). Subjects performed a 30-min Kraepelin test under two conditions: sitting in a standard office chair and sitting in a dynamic sitting balance chair. Root mean square (RMS) values of pelvic movement measured by a triaxial accelerometer during 30 minutes of work, finger-floor distance before and after work, lumbar fatigue, and pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement were used as outcome measures. [Results] Pelvic movement RMS values collected every 5 minutes during 30 minutes of work were significantly higher while sitting in the dynamic balance chair. Changes in pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement after work and amount of work performed during 30 minutes were significantly higher and lumbar fatigue was significantly lower for the dynamic balance chair. [Conclusion] Dynamic sitting maintained or increased pelvic flexibility. The dynamic balance chair may effectively help workers work continuously in seated postures with little fatigue. PMID:27390410

  2. Effect of device geometry on static and dynamic performance of AlGaN/GaN-on-Si high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jin-Shan; Huang, Hong-Fan; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Zhao, Sheng-Xun; Zhang, Lin-Qing; Wang, Peng-Fei

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses the effects of several geometric parameters in DC and RF performances of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) grown on high-resistivity silicon substrates. Those parameters include the dependency of gate length (L g), gate cap length (L cap) and gate-to-source distance (L gs). It is shown that decreasing L g and L gs can both improve maximum drain current and transconductance behaviors. The fabricated 50 μm wide GaN-HEMT exhibits the maximum drain current of 1 A mm-1 at V g = 2 V and maximum extrinsic transconductance G mmax of 240 mS mm-1. Besides, decreasing L g and L cap also provides the improvement on current gain frequency (fT ) and maximum oscillation cut off frequency (f MAX). The fT of 40 GHz and f MAX of 55 GHz at V ds = 5 V are demonstrated by GaN-HEMT device featuring L g of 200 nm, L cap of 300 nm and L gs of 1.2 μm, which can realize the compact solid-state power amplifier used in S and C band. However, gate-to-source distance has little effect on RF performance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Those results compared in our study are not only very essential for accurate GaN-based HEMT device modeling and fabrication, but are also vital to better understanding of their device physics.

  3. Pheromone Static Routing Strategy for Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mao-Bin; Henry, Y. K. Lau; Ling, Xiang; Jiang, Rui

    2012-12-01

    We adopt the concept of using pheromones to generate a set of static paths that can reach the performance of global dynamic routing strategy [Phys. Rev. E 81 (2010) 016113]. The path generation method consists of two stages. In the first stage, a pheromone is dropped to the nodes by packets forwarded according to the global dynamic routing strategy. In the second stage, pheromone static paths are generated according to the pheromone density. The output paths can greatly improve traffic systems' overall capacity on different network structures, including scale-free networks, small-world networks and random graphs. Because the paths are static, the system needs much less computational resources than the global dynamic routing strategy.

  4. Dynamic performance of the mechanism of an automatically deployable ROPS.

    PubMed

    Etherton, J R; Cutlip, R G; Harris, J R; Ronaghi, M; Means, K H; Howard, S

    2002-02-01

    The mechanism for an automatically deployable ROPS (AutoROPS) has been designed and tested. This mechanism is part of an innovative project to provide passive protection against rollover fatality to operators of new tractors used in both low-clearance and unrestricted-clearance tasks. The device is a spring-action, telescoping structure that releases on signal to pyrotechnic squibs that actuate release pins. Upper post motion begins when the release pins clear an internal piston. The structure extends until the piston impacts an elastomeric ring and latches at the top position. In lab tests the two-post structure consistently deployed in less than 0.3 s and latched securely. Static load tests of the telescoping structure and field upset tests of the fully functional AutoROPS have been successfully completed.

  5. Hypersonic static aerodynamics for Mars science laboratory entry capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Tang, Wei; Gui, Yewei; Du, Yanxia; Xiao, Guangming; Liu, Lei

    2014-10-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule has been designed as a lifting entry for sufficient deceleration and precise landing performance. This paper presents the static aerodynamics analysis of the MSL capsule in the hypersonic entry process for exploration mission to Mars. Hypersonic static coefficients were derived from fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics solutions with a specified effective specific heat ratio on a typical trajectory state. Aerodynamic performance analysis ascertains the trim characteristics and static stability of the capsule with respect to the center of gravity (CG) location. Analysis results obtained show that CG location determines the trim characteristics and the static stability, and certain CG radial and axial shift alters the lifting entry performance, so that proper aerodynamic configuration and inner equipment layout is needed for CG adjustment to satisfy the static aerodynamics requirements.

  6. Thermal effects in static friction: thermolubricity.

    PubMed

    Franchini, A; Bortolani, V; Santoro, G; Brigazzi, M

    2008-10-01

    We present a molecular dynamics analysis of the static friction between two thick slabs. The upper block is formed by N2 molecules and the lower block by Pb atoms. We study the effects of the temperature as well as the effects produced by the structure of the surface of the lower block on the static friction. To put in evidence the temperature effects we will compare the results obtained with the lower block formed by still atoms with those obtained when the atoms are allowed to vibrate (e.g., with phonons). To investigate the importance of the geometry of the surface of the lower block we apply the external force in different directions, with respect to a chosen crystallographic direction of the substrate. We show that the interaction between the lattice dynamics of the two blocks is responsible for the strong dependence of the static friction on the temperature. The lattice dynamics interaction between the two blocks strongly reduces the static friction, with respect to the case of the rigid substrate. This is due to the large momentum transfer between atoms and the N2 molecules which disorders the molecules of the interface layer. A further disorder is introduced by the temperature. We perform calculations at T = 20K which is a temperature below the melting, which for our slab is at 50K . We found that because of the disorder the static friction becomes independent of the direction of the external applied force. The very low value of the static friction seems to indicate that we are in a regime of thermolubricity similar to that observed in dynamical friction.

  7. Static Aeroelastic Effects on High Performance Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    mounted under a variable sweep wing. The final topic * Aeroelastics Considerations in Wind Tunnel Model Design concentrates on the complexity of modular...calculations for a typical missile and systems pod carried on the inboard and outboard under-wing pylons of a current variable -geometry combat aircraft...often necessary to test a multitude of wing geometries. The variables can include L.E. and T.E. sweep, thickness, camber, twist and different combinations

  8. Latching overcurrent circuit breaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. L.

    1970-01-01

    Circuit breaker consists of a preset current amplitude sensor, and a lamp-photo-resistor combination in a feedback arrangement which energizes a power switching relay. The ac input power is removed from the load at predetermined current amplitudes.

  9. Online temporally consistent indoor depth video enhancement via static structure.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Lu; Ngan, King Ngi; Lim, Chern-Loon; Li, Songnan

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to online enhance the quality of a depth video based on the intermediary of a so-called static structure of the captured scene. The static and dynamic regions of the input depth frame are robustly separated by a layer assignment procedure, in which the dynamic part stays in the front while the static part fits and helps to update this structure by a novel online variational generative model with added spatial refinement. The dynamic content is enhanced spatially while the static region is otherwise substituted by the updated static structure so as to favor the long-range spatiotemporal enhancement. The proposed method both performs long-range temporal consistency on the static region and keeps necessary depth variations in the dynamic content. Thus, it can produce flicker-free and spatially optimized depth videos with reduced motion blur and depth distortion. Our experimental results reveal that the proposed method is effective in both static and dynamic indoor scenes and is compatible with depth videos captured by Kinect and time-of-flight camera. We also demonstrate that excellent performance can be achieved by the proposed method in comparison with the existing spatiotemporal approaches. In addition, our enhanced depth videos and static structures can act as effective cues to improve various applications, including depth-aided background subtraction and novel view synthesis, showing satisfactory results with few visual artifacts.

  10. Crystal structure analysis reveals a spring-loaded latch as molecular mechanism for GDF-5–type I receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kotzsch, Alexander; Nickel, Joachim; Seher, Axel; Sebald, Walter; Müller, Thomas D

    2009-01-01

    Dysregulation of growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF-5) signalling, a member of the TGF-β superfamily, is strongly linked to skeletal malformation. GDF-5-mediated signal transduction involves both BMP type I receptors, BMPR-IA and BMPR-IB. However, mutations in either GDF-5 or BMPR-IB lead to similar phenotypes, indicating that in chondrogenesis GDF-5 signalling seems to be exclusively mediated through BMPR-IB. Here, we present structural insights into the GDF-5:BMPR-IB complex revealing how binding specificity for BMPR-IB is generated on a molecular level. In BMPR-IB, a loop within the ligand-binding epitope functions similar to a latch allowing high-affinity binding of GDF-5. In BMPR-IA, this latch is in a closed conformation leading to steric repulsion. The new structural data now provide also a molecular basis of how phenotypically relevant missense mutations in GDF-5 might impair receptor binding and activation. PMID:19229295

  11. Static inelastic analysis of RC shear walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qin; Qian, Jiaru

    2002-06-01

    A macro-model of a reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall is developed for static inelastic analysis. The model is composed of RC column elements and RC membrane elements. The column elements are used to model the boundary zone and the membrane elements are used to model the wall panel. Various types of constitutive relationships of concrete could be adopted for the two kinds of elements. To perform analysis, the wall is divided into layers along its height. Two adjacent layers are connected with a rigid beam. There are only three unknown displacement components for each layer. A method called single degree of freedom compensation is adopted to solve the peak value of the capacity curve. The post-peak stage analysis is performed using a forced iteration approach. The macro-model developed in the study and the complete process analysis methodology are verified by the experimental and static inelastic analytical results of four RC shear wall specimens.

  12. Einstein static universe from GUP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atazadeh, K.; Darabi, F.

    2017-06-01

    We consider the existence and stability of the Einstein static universe under the Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) effects. We show that this solution in the presence of perfect fluid with a minimal length is cyclically stable around a center equilibrium point. By taking linear homogeneous perturbations, we find that the scale factor of Einstein static universe for closed deformed isotropic and homogeneous FLRW universe depends on the GUP coupling parameter α. Thus, in the model by GUP effects, our universe can stay at the Einstein static state past-eternally, which means that the big bang singularity might be resolved successfully by an emergent scenario.

  13. The statics of cervical traction.

    PubMed

    Pio, A; Rendina, M; Benazzo, F; Castelli, C; Paparella, F

    1994-08-01

    The statics of a sliding body was used to study the distribution of forces during the application of cervical traction in supine patients. This theoretical analysis was completed using a dynamometer to determine the static friction between bed surface and patient head. Therefore, we measured the head weight in 12 inpatients and the minimum force that causes impending motion of the head on the bed surface. The static friction coefficient was calculated from the ratio of the two quantities. The forces acting on the cervical spine were determined by inserting the former data into a specifically designed algorithm that forecasted a progressively increasing traction angle. The coefficient of static friction was 0.62, whereas the maximum available force acting on the cervical spine was obtained with a 35 degrees traction inclination. In contrast, the forces dissipated by the plane progressively decreased with larger angles.

  14. Static and Dynamic Traversable Wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamiak, Jaroslaw P.

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this work is to discuss the effects found in static and dynamic wormholes that occur as a solution of Einstein equations in general relativity. The ground is prepared by presentation of faster than light effects, then the focus is narrowed to Morris-Thorne framework for a static spherically symmetric wormhole. Two types of dynamic worm-holes, evolving and rotating, are considered.

  15. Static Thrust Analysis of the Lifting Airscrew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Hefner, Ralph A

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of a combined theoretical and experimental investigation conducted at the Georgia School of Technology on the static thrust of the lifting air screw of the type used in modern autogiros and helicopters. The theoretical part of this study is based on Glauert's analysis but certain modifications are made that further clarify and simplify the problem. Of these changes the elimination of the solidity as an independent parameter is the most important. The experimental data were obtained from tests on four rotor models of two, four, and five blades and, in general, agree quite well with the theoretical calculations. The theory indicates a method of evaluating scale effects on lifting air screws, and these corrections have been applied to the model results to derive general full-scale static thrust, torque, and figure-of-merit curves for constant-chord, constant-incidence rotors. Convenient charts are included that enable hovering flight performance to be calculated rapidly.

  16. Optimum structural design with static aeroelastic constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Keith B; Grandhi, Ramana V.; Eastep, F. E.

    1989-01-01

    The static aeroelastic performance characteristics, divergence velocity, control effectiveness and lift effectiveness are considered in obtaining an optimum weight structure. A typical swept wing structure is used with upper and lower skins, spar and rib thicknesses, and spar cap and vertical post cross-sectional areas as the design parameters. Incompressible aerodynamic strip theory is used to derive the constraint formulations, and aerodynamic load matrices. A Sequential Unconstrained Minimization Technique (SUMT) algorithm is used to optimize the wing structure to meet the desired performance constraints.

  17. Grayloc seal static tests

    SciTech Connect

    Leisher, W.B.; Biffle, J.H.

    1983-02-01

    A series of evaluation tests was performed on Grayloc seals. Helium service and standard seals, size 292, were used. Measurements were made of axial force and motion, diameter, hoop and axial strain, and helium leak rate. Leak rates were in the 10/sup -6/ atm cc/s range for the helium service seals. Pretest analytical calculations agreed reasonably well with measured makeup forces and deflections.

  18. Static Characteristics of Conical Hydrostatic Journal Bearing Under Micropolar Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, N. K.; Gautam, S. S.; Verma, S.

    2014-10-01

    A theoretical analysis for static characteristics of a conical hydrostatic journal bearing for a multirecess constant flow valve compensated under micropolar lubrication has been carried out in this work. The numerical solution of the modified Reynolds equation for the conical bearing has been done using Finite Element Method (FEM) using necessary boundary conditions. The various static characteristics have been presented to analyze the performance of bearing at zero speed.

  19. Static Facial Slings: Approaches to Rehabilitation of the Paralyzed Face.

    PubMed

    Langille, Morgan; Singh, Prabhjyot

    2016-02-01

    Facial paralysis results from a variety of different causes. Patients with facial paralysis have cosmetic and functional defects that significantly affect quality of life. Surgical intervention has the potential to help improve cosmetic and functional outcomes. The 2 main categories of surgical rehabilitation are static and dynamic surgical procedures. Static rehabilitation of the midface is typically performed using autologous tissue grafts, allografts, synthetic grafts, permanent suspension sutures, and a novel technique using percutaneous suture-based slings.

  20. Static power dissipation in adder circuits: the UDSM domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayouette, Steve; Al-Khalili, Dhamin

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents adder circuits of various architectures aimed at reducing static power dissipation. Circuit topologies for basic building blocks were evaluated for fabrication technologies of 65nm down to 32nm, and simulation results are presented. This work has lead to the development of various low power adder circuits and provides comparative analysis leading to the recommendation that a variable size block carry select adder is the best performer, taking into consideration both static and dynamic power dissipation.

  1. Static heterogeneities in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2004-10-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of water seems to be closely related to static heterogeneities. These static heterogeneities are related to the local structure of water molecules, and when properly characterized, may offer an economical explanation of thermodynamic data. The key feature of liquid water is not so much that the existence of hydrogen bonds, first pointed out by Linus Pauling, but rather the local geometry of the liquid molecules is not spherical or oblong but tetrahedral. In the consideration of static heterogeneities, this local geometry is critical. Recent experiments suggested more than one phase of amorphous solid water, while simulations suggest that one of these phases is metastable with respect to another, so that in fact there are only two stable phases.

  2. Static and dynamic balance deficiencies in chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Tsigkanos, Christos; Gaskell, Lynne; Smirniotou, Athanasia; Tsigkanos, Georgios

    2016-11-21

    According to previously conducted studies, people with Low Back Pain (LBP) present with static balance deficiencies. The aim of the present study was to compare static, as well as dynamic balance ability between Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP) and healthy subjects. The CLBP group comprised 17 subjects and the control group of 16 subjects, matched for age, BMI and gender. The protocol applied compared the balance ability when performing the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) and the static 1-leg stance position. The innovation introduced in the protocol was that the participants performed not only the static 1-leg stance, but also the dynamic SEBT on a force plate which recorded the target sway (TS), i.e. the Center of Pressure (CoP) excursion. The CLBP group had significantly reduced performance in SEBT, coupled with greater static and dynamic TS values. Age and especially BMI also bear a significant effect on SEBT execution. The inclusion of SEBT and TS derived scores in a stepwise logistic regression equation lead to the correct classification of 85% of the subjects. Dynamic and static balance ability provide supplementary information for the identification of the presence of CLBP, with dynamic balance being more instrumental.

  3. Magnetic bearings for a high-performance optical disk buffer, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The operating instructions for the magnetic bearings of a high-performance optical disk buffer are provided. Among the topics that are discussed are the following: front panel layout, turn-on procedure, shut-down procedure, and latch-up protection. Additionally, comprehensive engineering drawings are presented for the design.

  4. Voltage Sensors Monitor Harmful Static

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    A tiny sensor, small enough to be worn on clothing, now monitors voltage changes near sensitive instruments after being created to alert Agency workers to dangerous static buildup near fuel operations and avionics. San Diego s Quasar Federal Systems received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center to develop its remote voltage sensor (RVS), a dime-sized electrometer designed to measure triboelectric changes in the environment. One of the unique qualities of the RVS is that it can detect static at greater distances than previous devices, measuring voltage changes from a few centimeters to a few meters away, due to its much-improved sensitivity.

  5. Static-fluid black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Inyong; Kim, Hyeong-Chan

    2017-04-01

    We investigate black holes formed by static perfect fluid with p =-ρ /3 . These represent the black holes in S3 and H3 spatial geometries. There are three classes of black-hole solutions, two S3 types and one H3 type. The interesting solution is the S3 type one, which possesses two singularities. One is at the north pole behind the horizon, and the other is naked at the south pole. The observers, however, are free from falling to the naked singularity. There are also nonstatic cosmological solutions in S3 and H3 and a singular static solution in H3.

  6. Measurement and analysis of static pressure field in a torque converter pump

    SciTech Connect

    By, R.R.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, the static pressure field and performance parameters of a torque converter pump are measured, analyzed, and interpreted under three turbine/pump speed ratio conditions (0, 0.6, and 0.8). A potential flow code is used to predict the static pressure distribution. Results show that: (1) centrifugal force has a dominant effect on the static pressure rise in the pump; (2) the static pressure field is generally poor at the core section; and (3) the potential flow code can fairly well predict the static pressure distribution at the blade mid-span, but not at the core and shell sections.

  7. 49 CFR Appendix H to Part 229 - Static Noise Test Protocols-In-Cab Static

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Static Noise Test Protocols-In-Cab Static H... Appendix H to Part 229—Static Noise Test Protocols—In-Cab Static This appendix prescribes the procedures for the in-cab static measurements of locomotives. I. Measurement Instrumentation The...

  8. 49 CFR Appendix H to Part 229 - Static Noise Test Protocols-In-Cab Static

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Static Noise Test Protocols-In-Cab Static H... Appendix H to Part 229—Static Noise Test Protocols—In-Cab Static This appendix prescribes the procedures for the in-cab static measurements of locomotives. I. Measurement Instrumentation The...

  9. [Static microperimetry with the laser scanning ophthalmoscope].

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, F J; Timberlake, G T; Jalkh, A E; Schepens, C L

    1990-01-01

    We have used the scanning laser opthalmoscope (SLO) with a personal computer to develop static microperimetry techniques. They allow to see in real-time on a television monitor the precise retinal localization of the stimulus and fixation. The testing is performed under strict conditions. The size of stimuli can vary between 6 and 30 minarc on a side. 255 different intensity levels are possible with the instrument. We have selected 12 of them, representing a logarithmic scale. Stimulus duration can vary between 50 and 500 ms. Examples of macular pathology including subretinal neovascularization, drusen and macular edema are given.

  10. Compiler-assisted static checkpoint insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Junsheng; Fuchs, W. K.; Abraham, Jacob A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a compiler-assisted approach for static checkpoint insertion. Instead of fixing the checkpoint location before program execution, a compiler enhanced polling mechanism is utilized to maintain both the desired checkpoint intervals and reproducible checkpoint 1ocations. The technique has been implemented in a GNU CC compiler for Sun 3 and Sun 4 (Sparc) processors. Experiments demonstrate that the approach provides for stable checkpoint intervals and reproducible checkpoint placements with performance overhead comparable to a previously presented compiler assisted dynamic scheme (CATCH) utilizing the system clock.

  11. Statistics of Static Stress Earthquake Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan, S.; Ouillon, G.; Woessner, J.; Sornette, D.; Wiemer, S.

    2014-12-01

    seismicity is suppressed if ∆CFS<0. Our results rather suggest a spatially ubiquitous triggering process compatible with dynamic triggering, modulated by the sign and amplitude of the static stress field. We also conclude that static stress-based forecasts should not be performed over time scales much larger than τ, which is of the order of few hundred days.

  12. Space station static and dynamic analyses using parallel methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, V.; Newell, J.; Storaasli, O.; Baddourah, M.; Bostic, S.

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms for high-performance parallel computers are applied to perform static analyses of large-scale Space Station finite-element models (FEMs). Several parallel-vector algorithms under development at NASA Langley are assessed. Sparse matrix solvers were found to be more efficient than banded symmetric or iterative solvers for the static analysis of large-scale applications. In addition, new sparse and 'out-of-core' solvers were found superior to substructure (superelement) techniques which require significant additional cost and time to perform static condensation during global FEM matrix generation as well as the subsequent recovery and expansion. A method to extend the fast parallel static solution techniques to reduce the computation time for dynamic analysis is also described. The resulting static and dynamic algorithms offer design economy for preliminary multidisciplinary design optimization and FEM validation against test modes. The algorithms are being optimized for parallel computers to solve one-million degrees-of-freedom (DOF) FEMs. The high-performance computers at NASA afforded effective software development, testing, efficient and accurate solution with timely system response and graphical interpretation of results rarely found in industry. Based on the author's experience, similar cooperation between industry and government should be encouraged for similar large-scale projects in the future.

  13. Space station static and dynamic analyses using parallel methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, V.; Newell, J.; Storaasli, O.; Baddourah, M.; Bostic, S.

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms for high-performance parallel computers are applied to perform static analyses of large-scale Space Station finite-element models (FEMs). Several parallel-vector algorithms under development at NASA Langley are assessed. Sparse matrix solvers were found to be more efficient than banded symmetric or iterative solvers for the static analysis of large-scale applications. In addition, new sparse and 'out-of-core' solvers were found superior to substructure (superelement) techniques which require significant additional cost and time to perform static condensation during global FEM matrix generation as well as the subsequent recovery and expansion. A method to extend the fast parallel static solution techniques to reduce the computation time for dynamic analysis is also described. The resulting static and dynamic algorithms offer design economy for preliminary multidisciplinary design optimization and FEM validation against test modes. The algorithms are being optimized for parallel computers to solve one-million degrees-of-freedom (DOF) FEMs. The high-performance computers at NASA afforded effective software development, testing, efficient and accurate solution with timely system response and graphical interpretation of results rarely found in industry. Based on the author's experience, similar cooperation between industry and government should be encouraged for similar large-scale projects in the future.

  14. Alkaline static feed electrolyzer based oxygen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, L. D.; Kovach, A. J.; Fortunato, F. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Grigger, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    In preparation for the future deployment of the Space Station, an R and D program was established to demonstrate integrated operation of an alkaline Water Electrolysis System and a fuel cell as an energy storage device. The program's scope was revised when the Space Station Control Board changed the energy storage baseline for the Space Station. The new scope was aimed at the development of an alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer for use in an Environmental Control/Life Support System as an oxygen generation system. As a result, the program was divided into two phases. The phase 1 effort was directed at the development of the Static Feed Electrolyzer for application in a Regenerative Fuel Cell System. During this phase, the program emphasized incorporation of the Regenerative Fuel Cell System design requirements into the Static Feed Electrolyzer electrochemical module design and the mechanical components design. The mechanical components included a Pressure Control Assembly, a Water Supply Assembly and a Thermal Control Assembly. These designs were completed through manufacturing drawing during Phase 1. The Phase 2 effort was directed at advancing the Alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer database for an oxygen generation system. This development was aimed at extending the Static Feed Electrolyzer database in areas which may be encountered from initial fabrication through transportation, storage, launch and eventual Space Station startup. During this Phase, the Program emphasized three major areas: materials evaluation, electrochemical module scaling and performance repeatability and Static Feed Electrolyzer operational definition and characterization.

  15. Static penetration resistance of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgunoglu, H. T.; Mitchell, J. K.

    1973-01-01

    Model test results were used to define the failure mechanism associated with the static penetration resistance of cohesionless and low-cohesion soils. Knowledge of this mechanism has permitted the development of a new analytical method for calculating the ultimate penetration resistance which explicitly accounts for penetrometer base apex angle and roughness, soil friction angle, and the ratio of penetration depth to base width. Curves relating the bearing capacity factors to the soil friction angle are presented for failure in general shear. Strength parameters and penetrometer interaction properties of a fine sand were determined and used as the basis for prediction of the penetration resistance encountered by wedge, cone, and flat-ended penetrometers of different surface roughness using the proposed analytical method. Because of the close agreement between predicted values and values measured in laboratory tests, it appears possible to deduce in-situ soil strength parameters and their variation with depth from the results of static penetration tests.

  16. Water cooled static pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  17. Nanomechanics Model for Static Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghoon

    2002-09-01

    This study presented a computational technique to model and simulate atomistic behavior of materials under static loads, Interatomic potential energy was used to maintain equilibrium among atoms under static loads and constraints, In addition, the atomistic model was coupled with the finite element analysis model so that more flexible loads and constraints could be applied to the atomistic model A multi-scale technique was also presented for some single wall nanotubes of both zigzag and armchair and then their effective stiffness were estimated Those designed nanotubes are woven into fabric composites, which can be used in various military applications including body armored, vehicles, and infantry transportation vehicles because advanced nano- composites could be much lighter and stronger than current ones, Some example problems were presented to illustrate the developed technique for the nano-composites and SWNTs, The proposed technique for nanomechanics can be used for design and analysis of materials at the atomic or molecular level,

  18. Three Inexpensive Static-Electricity Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Gordon R.; Gregg, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes demonstrations to (1) construct an inexpensive static electricity detector; (2) obtain an abundant supply of either negative or positive charge using household items; and (3) create static electricity using a Tesla coil or Van de Graaff generator. (MDH)

  19. Three Inexpensive Static-Electricity Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Gordon R.; Gregg, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes demonstrations to (1) construct an inexpensive static electricity detector; (2) obtain an abundant supply of either negative or positive charge using household items; and (3) create static electricity using a Tesla coil or Van de Graaff generator. (MDH)

  20. Comparative Tests of Pitot-static Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Kenneth G; Spaulding, Ellis R

    1935-01-01

    Comparative tests were made on seven conventional Pitot-static tubes to determine their static, dynamic, and resultant errors. The effect of varying the dynamic opening, static opening, wall thickness, and inner-tube diameter was investigated. Pressure-distribution measurements showing stem and tip effects were also made. A tentative design for a standard Pitot-static tube for use in measuring air velocity is submitted.

  1. In-Flight Pitot-Static Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John V. (Inventor); Cunningham, Kevin (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A GPS-based pitot-static calibration system uses global output-error optimization. High data rate measurements of static and total pressure, ambient air conditions, and GPS-based ground speed measurements are used to compute pitot-static pressure errors over a range of airspeed. System identification methods rapidly compute optimal pressure error models with defined confidence intervals.

  2. 14 CFR 31.61 - Static discharge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static discharge. 31.61 Section 31.61... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.61 Static discharge. Unless shown not to be... gas as a lifting means to ensure that the effects of static discharges will not create a hazard....

  3. 14 CFR 31.61 - Static discharge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static discharge. 31.61 Section 31.61... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.61 Static discharge. Unless shown not to be... gas as a lifting means to ensure that the effects of static discharges will not create a hazard....

  4. 14 CFR 31.61 - Static discharge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static discharge. 31.61 Section 31.61... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.61 Static discharge. Unless shown not to be... gas as a lifting means to ensure that the effects of static discharges will not create a hazard....

  5. 14 CFR 31.61 - Static discharge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static discharge. 31.61 Section 31.61... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.61 Static discharge. Unless shown not to be... gas as a lifting means to ensure that the effects of static discharges will not create a hazard....

  6. 14 CFR 31.61 - Static discharge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static discharge. 31.61 Section 31.61... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.61 Static discharge. Unless shown not to be... gas as a lifting means to ensure that the effects of static discharges will not create a hazard....

  7. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  8. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  9. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  10. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  11. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  12. Trend of tunnel magnetoresistance and variation in threshold voltage for keeping data load robustness of metal–oxide–semiconductor/magnetic tunnel junction hybrid latches

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, T.; Ikeda, S.; Hanyu, T.; Ohno, H.; Endoh, T.

    2014-05-07

    The robustness of data load of metal–oxide–semiconductor/magnetic tunnel junction (MOS/MTJ) hybrid latches at power-on is examined by using Monte Carlo simulation with the variations in magnetoresistances for MTJs and in threshold voltages for MOSFETs involved in 90 nm technology node. Three differential pair type spin-transfer-torque-magnetic random access memory cells (4T2MTJ, 6T2MTJ, and 8T2MTJ) are compared for their successful data load at power-on. It is found that the 4T2MTJ cell has the largest pass area in the shmoo plot in TMR ratio (tunnel magnetoresistance ratio) and V{sub dd} in which a whole 256 kb cell array can be powered-on successfully. The minimum TMR ratio for the 4T2MTJ in 0.9 V < V{sub dd} < 1.9 V is 140%, while the 6T2MTJ and the 8T2MTJ cells require TMR ratio larger than 170%.

  13. Assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40 is regulated by latch-like properties of N and C terminal tails.

    PubMed

    Silva, Leslie P; Vanzile, Michael; Bavari, Sina; Aman, J M Javad; Schriemer, David C

    2012-01-01

    The matrix protein VP40 coordinates numerous functions in the viral life cycle of the Ebola virus. These range from the regulation of viral transcription to morphogenesis, packaging and budding of mature virions. Similar to the matrix proteins of other nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA viruses, VP40 proceeds through intermediate states of assembly (e.g. octamers) but it remains unclear how these intermediates are coordinated with the various stages of the life cycle. In this study, we investigate the molecular basis of synchronization as governed by VP40. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry was used to follow induced structural and conformational changes in VP40. Together with computational modeling, we demonstrate that both extreme N and C terminal tail regions stabilize the monomeric state through a direct association. The tails appear to function as a latch, released upon a specific molecular trigger such as RNA ligation. We propose that triggered release of the tails permits the coordination of late-stage events in the viral life cycle, at the inner membrane of the host cell. Specifically, N-tail release exposes the L-domain motifs PTAP/PPEY to the transport and budding complexes, whereas triggered C-tail release could improve association with the site of budding.

  14. Static balancing of planar articulated robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaglia, Giuseppe; Yin, Zhe

    2015-12-01

    Static balancing for a manipulator's weight is necessary in terms of energy saving and performance improvement. This paper proposes a method to design balancing devices for articulated robots in industry, based on robotic dynamics. Full design details for the balancing system using springs are presented from two aspects: One is the optimization for the position of the balancing system; the other is the design of the spring parameters. As examples, two feasible balancing devices are proposed, based on different robotic structures: The first solution consists of linkages and springs; the other consists of pulleys, cross mechanisms and (hydro-) pneumatic springs. Then the two solutions are compared. Pneumatic, hydro-pneumatic and mechanical springs are discussed and their parameters are decided according to the requirements of torque compensation. Numerical results show that with the proper design using the methodology presented in this paper, an articulated robot can be statically balanced perfectly in all configurations. This paper therefore provides a design method of the balancing system for other similar structures.

  15. Static feed water electrolysis module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Jensen, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    An advanced static feed water electrolysis module (SFWEM) and associated instrumentation for generating breathable O2 was developed. The system also generates a H2 byproduct for use in an air revitalization system for O2 recovery from metabolic CO2. Special attention was given to: (1) eliminating water feed compartment degassing, (2) eliminating need for zero gravity condenser/separators, (3) increasing current density capability, and (4) providing a self contained module so that operation is independent of laboratory instrumentation and complicated startup/shutdown procedures.

  16. Measurement of static pressure on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracey, William

    1958-01-01

    Existing data on the errors involved in the measurement of static pressure by means of static-pressure tubes and fuselage vents are presented. The errors associated with the various design features of static-pressure tubes are discussed for the condition of zero angle of attack and for the case where the tube is inclined to flow. Errors which result from variations in the configuration of static-pressure vents are also presented. Errors due to the position of a static-pressure tube in the flow field of the airplane are given for locations ahead of the fuselage nose, ahead of the wing tip, and ahead of the vertical tail fin. The errors of static-pressure vents on the fuselage of an airplane are also presented. Various methods of calibrating static-pressure installations in flight are briefly discussed.

  17. Static and Dynamic Handgrip Strength Endurance: Test-Retest Reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Gerodimos, Vassilis; Karatrantou, Konstantina; Psychou, Dimitra; Vasilopoulou, Theodora; Zafeiridis, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the reliability of static and dynamic handgrip strength endurance using different protocols and indicators for the assessment of strength endurance. Forty young, healthy men and women (age, 18-22 years) performed 2 handgrip strength endurance protocols: a static protocol (sustained submaximal contraction at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction) and a dynamic one (8, 10, and 12 maximal repetitions). The participants executed each protocol twice to assess the test-retest reproducibility. Total work and total time were used as indicators of strength endurance in the static protocol; the strength recorded at each maximal repetition, the percentage change, and fatigue index were used as indicators of strength endurance in the dynamic protocol. The static protocol showed high reliability irrespective of sex and hand for total time and work. The 12-repetition dynamic protocol exhibited moderate-high reliability for repeated maximal repetitions and percentage change; the 8- and 10-repetition protocols demonstrated lower reliability irrespective of sex and hand. The fatigue index was not a reliable indicator for the assessment of dynamic handgrip endurance. Static handgrip endurance can be measured reliably using the total time and total work as indicators of strength endurance. For the evaluation of dynamic handgrip endurance, the 12-repetition protocol is recommended, using the repeated maximal repetitions and percentage change as indicators of strength endurance. Practitioners should consider the static (50% maximal voluntary contraction) and dynamic (12 repeated maximal repetitions) protocols as reliable for the assessment of handgrip strength endurance. The evaluation of static endurance in conjunction with dynamic endurance would provide more complete information about hand function. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Static magnetic fields: animal studies.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Various experimental studies carried out over the last 30-40 years have examined the effects of the chronic or acute exposure of laboratory animals to static magnetic fields. Many of the earlier studies have been adequately reviewed elsewhere; few adverse effects were identified. This review focuses on studies carried out more recently, mostly those using vertebrates, particularly mammals. Four main areas of investigation have been covered, viz., nervous system and behavioural studies, cardiovascular system responses, reproduction and development, and genotoxicity and cancer. Work on the role of the natural geomagnetic field in animal orientation and migration has been omitted. Generally, the acute responses found during exposure to static fields above about 4 T are consistent with those found in volunteer studies, namely the induction of flow potentials around the heart and the development of aversive/avoidance behaviour resulting from body movement in such fields. No consistently demonstrable effects of exposure to fields of approximately 1T and above have been seen on other behavioural or cardiovascular endpoints. In addition, no adverse effects of such fields on reproduction and development or on the growth and development of tumours have been firmly established. Overall, however, far too few animal studies have been carried out to reach any firm conclusions.

  19. Electrowetting -- from statics to dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longquan; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2014-08-01

    More than one century ago, Lippmann found that capillary forces can be effectively controlled by external electrostatic forces. As a simple example, by applying a voltage between a conducting liquid droplet and the surface it is sitting on we are able to adjust the wetting angle of the drop. Since Lippmann's findings, electrocapillary phenomena - or electrowetting - have developed into a series of tools for manipulating microdroplets on solid surfaces, or small amounts of liquids in capillaries for microfluidic applications. In this article, we briefly review some recent progress of fundamental understanding of electrowetting and address some still unsolved issues. Specifically, we focus on static and dynamic electrowetting. In static electrowetting, we discuss some basic phenomena found in DC and AC electrowetting, and some theories about the origin of contact angle saturation. In dynamic electrowetting, we introduce some studies about this rather recent area. At last, we address some other capillary phenomena governed by electrostatics and we give an outlook that might stimulate further investigations on electrowetting.

  20. Matching Voice and Face Identity from Static Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavica, Lauren W.; Barenholtz, Elan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that people are unable to correctly choose which unfamiliar voice and static image of a face belong to the same person. Here, we present evidence that people can perform this task with greater than chance accuracy. In Experiment 1, participants saw photographs of two, same-gender models, while simultaneously…

  1. Static analysis of a piping system with elbows

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.J.

    1994-03-01

    Vibration tests of elbows to failure were performed in Japan in the early 1970s. The piping system included two elbows and an eccentric mass. Tests were run both pressurized and unpressurized. This report documents a static analysis of the piping system in which the elbows are subjected to out of plane bending. The effects of internal pressure and material plasticity are investigated.

  2. Mass properties measurement system: Dynamics and statics measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents and interprets experimental data obtained from the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS). Statics measurements yield the center-of-gravity of an unknown mass and dynamics measurements yield its inertia matrix. Observations of the MPMS performance has lead us to specific design criteria and an understanding of MPMS limitations.

  3. Matching Voice and Face Identity from Static Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavica, Lauren W.; Barenholtz, Elan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that people are unable to correctly choose which unfamiliar voice and static image of a face belong to the same person. Here, we present evidence that people can perform this task with greater than chance accuracy. In Experiment 1, participants saw photographs of two, same-gender models, while simultaneously…

  4. Static and transient behavior of the flow positioned injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Qizhi; Lu, Zhenglin

    1991-06-01

    The flow positioned injector can ensure invariant injecting speed and gives high combustion performance for variable thrust liquid propellant rocket engines. Static and dynamic mathematical models of the injector are developed, and basic design rules to ensure invariant injection pressure drop are deduced from the static model. In practical situations, the effect of the flow-coefficient variation on the injecting speed must be compensated by a special structure design. Based on the dynamic model, transient response of the injector is analyzed via a digital simulation method. The results show that the injector can maintain almost constant injecting speed during transient process if it has an adequate dynamic resistant coefficient.

  5. Optimal configuration of static polarization imagers for target detection.

    PubMed

    Goudail, François; Boffety, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    We determine the set of analysis states of a static Stokes imager that maximizes target detection performance for the least favorable target-background polarimetric configuration. By using a minimax approach, we demonstrate that the optimal choice consists of four analysis states forming a regular tetrahedron in the Poincaré sphere. We also show that the value of the contrast in the best of the four Stokes channels is, in the worst case, equal to one third of that provided by a fully adaptive polarimetric imager. Static Stokes imagers thus constitute an attractive solution in applications where limited loss of discrimination ability can be tolerated.

  6. Static standing and dynamic walking of a practical biped robot

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yuan F.; Rao, M.

    1987-01-01

    The study of static standing and dynamic walking of a practical biped robot is presented in this research report. A systematic method for describing the kinematic behavior of a biped robot is first developed. The development is based on the well-known Denavit-Hartenburg convention. As a result, the method is basically the same as the one used for robot manipulators, except for some considerations given to the unique functions and structure of a biped robot. The static standing of a biped robot is then studied. It is argued that static standing capability is very important if a biped robot is to be employed in an industrial environment. In order to measure the performance of the biped in static standing in terms of its stability, two parameters, stable margin and stable index, are introduced. Based on these parameters, optimal stability of the biped robot with one-foot and two-foot standing cases are discussed. For dynamic walking, a mathematical treatment is first described. Conclusion is reached that by proper positioning of the landing, stable dynamic walking can be realized. A practical biped robot is introduced in the final part of the report. Experimental results of static standing and dynamic walking of the biped robot are presented, to verify the theoretical results. 28 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The Predictive Validity of the Static-99, Static-99R, and Static-2002/R: Which One to Use?

    PubMed

    Reeves, Sophie G; Ogloff, James R P; Simmons, Melanie

    2017-06-01

    The use of Static tools (Static-99, Static-99R, Static-2002, and Static-2002R) in risk decision making involving sexual offenders is widespread internationally. This study compared the predictive accuracy and incremental validity of four Static risk measures in a sample of 621 Australian sexual offenders. Results indicated that approximately 45% of the sample recidivated (with 18.8% committing sexual offenses). All of the Static measures investigated yielded moderate predictive validity for sexual recidivism, which was comparable with other Australian and overseas studies. Area under the curve (AUC) values for the four measures across the 5-, 10-, and 15-year intervals ranged from .67 to .69. All of the Static measures discriminated quite well between low-risk and high-risk sexual offenders but less well for the moderate risk categories. When pitted together, none of the tools accounted for additional variance in sexual recidivism, above and beyond what the other measures accounted for. The overall results provide support for the use of Static measures as a component of risk assessment and decision making with Australian sexual offending populations. The limitations of this study and recommendations for further research are also discussed.

  8. Effects of Static Stretching and Playing Soccer on Knee Laxity.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Christian; Gokeler, Alli; Donath, Lars; Hoppe, Matthias W; Freiwald, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated exercise-induced effects of static stretching and playing soccer on anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the knee joint. Randomized controlled trial. University biomechanics laboratory. Thirty-one athletes were randomly assigned into a stretching (26.9 ± 6.2 years, 1.77 ± 0.09 m, 67.9 ± 10.7 kg) and a control group (27.9 ± 7.4 years, 1.75 ± 0.08 m, 72.0 ± 14.9 kg). Thirty-one amateur soccer players in an additional soccer group (25.1 ± 5.6 years, 1.74 ± 0.10 m, 71.8 ± 14.8 kg). All participants had no history of knee injury requiring surgery and any previous knee ligament or cartilage injury. The stretching group performed 4 different static stretching exercises with a duration of 2 × 20 seconds interspersed with breaks of 10 seconds. The soccer group completed a 90-minute soccer-specific training program. The control group did not perform any physical activity for approximately 30 minutes. Anterior tibial translation was measured with the KT-1000 knee arthrometer at forces of 67 N, 89 N, and maximal manual force (Max) before and after the intervention. There was a significant increase in ATT after static stretching and playing soccer at all applied forces. Maximal manual testing revealed a mean increase of ATT after static stretching of 2.1 ± 1.6 mm (P < 0.0005) and after playing soccer of 1.0 ± 1.5 mm (P = 0.001). The ATT increase after static stretching at 67 and 89 N is significantly higher than in controls. At maximum manual testing, significant differences were evident between all groups. Static stretching and playing soccer increase ATT and may consequently influence mechanical factors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The ATT increase after static stretching was greater than after playing soccer. The observed increase in ATT after static stretching and playing soccer may be associated with changes in kinesthetic perception and sensorimotor control, activation of muscles, joint stability, overall performance, and higher

  9. Ares I Static Tests Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, William; Lindemuth, Kathleen; Mich, John; White, K. Preston; Parker, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Probabilistic engineering design enhances safety and reduces costs by incorporating risk assessment directly into the design process. In this paper, we assess the format of the quantitative metrics for the vehicle which will replace the Space Shuttle, the Ares I rocket. Specifically, we address the metrics for in-flight measurement error in the vector position of the motor nozzle, dictated by limits on guidance, navigation, and control systems. Analyses include the propagation of error from measured to derived parameters, the time-series of dwell points for the duty cycle during static tests, and commanded versus achieved yaw angle during tests. Based on these analyses, we recommend a probabilistic template for specifying the maximum error in angular displacement and radial offset for the nozzle-position vector. Criteria for evaluating individual tests and risky decisions also are developed.

  10. Static Response of Neutron Matter.

    PubMed

    Buraczynski, Mateusz; Gezerlis, Alexandros

    2016-04-15

    We generalize the problem of strongly interacting neutron matter by adding a periodic external modulation. This allows us to study from first principles a neutron system that is extended and inhomogeneous, with connections to the physics of both neutron-star crusts and neutron-rich nuclei. We carry out fully nonperturbative microscopic quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the energy of neutron matter at different densities, as well as different strengths and periodicities of the external potential. In order to remove systematic errors, we examine finite-size effects and the impact of the wave function ansatz. We also make contact with energy-density functional theories of nuclei and disentangle isovector gradient contributions from bulk properties. Finally, we calculate the static density-density linear response function of neutron matter and compare it with the response of other physical systems.

  11. Free Breathing Static Dehumidification Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    1?336 FREE NNERTHIN STATIC DMIDIFICATIOU SYS*kNS(U) RJR In__ FORME PRCKRGING EVJRTIN ROENCY WIIT-RTTERMO WD ON S A M~Y Jfh 97 DST -7-R-1 LOL lSSFFI...0 . LiW- M -. ’*5 iq - a . L O 37 Figure 12. Field Layout at SM-ALC/ DST , McClellan AFB CA .tr 4j w, I , D 4.- 4, 4J 4) :3 4j CCD ko LL o. 0.U UU -4 4...USAeLE11 I Wash DC 20330 HQ Ar’SC/LG’ I O)C-ALC/ DST Tinker Ar’B OK 73145 U0-ALC/ OST 1 Hill AFB UT 84406 SA-ALC/ DST i I. Kelly AeBN TIX 78241 SM-ALC

  12. Staphylococcus aureus SdrE captures complement factor H's C-terminus via a novel 'close, dock, lock and latch' mechanism for complement evasion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Wu, Minhao; Hang, Tianrong; Wang, Chengliang; Yang, Ye; Pan, Weimin; Zang, Jianye; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Xuan

    2017-05-04

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a soluble complement regulatory protein essential for the down-regulation of the alternative pathway on interaction with specific markers on the host cell surface. It recognizes the complement component 3b (C3b) and 3d (C3d) fragments in addition to self cell markers (i.e. glycosaminoglycans, sialic acid) to distinguish host cells that deserve protection from pathogens that should be eliminated. The Staphylococcus aureus surface protein serine-aspartate repeat protein E (SdrE) was previously reported to bind human CFH as an immune-evasion tactic. However, the molecular mechanism underlying SdrE-CFH-mediated immune evasion remains unknown. In the present study, we identified a novel region at CFH's C-terminus (CFH(1206-1226)), which binds SdrE N2 and N3 domains (SdrEN2N3) with high affinity, and determined the crystal structures of apo-SdrEN2N3 and the SdrEN2N3-CFH(1206-1226) complex. Comparison of the structure of the CFH-SdrE complex with other CFH structures reveals that CFH's C-terminal tail flips from the main body to insert into the ligand-binding groove of SdrE. In addition, SdrEN2N3 adopts a 'close' state in the absence of CFH, which undergoes a large conformational change on CFH binding, suggesting a novel 'close, dock, lock and latch' (CDLL) mechanism for SdrE to recognize its ligand. Our findings imply that SdrE functions as a 'clamp' to capture CFH's C-terminal tail via a unique CDLL mechanism and sequesters CFH on the surface of S. aureus for complement evasion. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. The Influence of Visual Cognitive Style when Learning from Instructional Animations and Static Pictures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffler, Tim N.; Prechtl, Helmut; Nerdel, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    In a 2 x 2 design, we examined the role of visual cognitive style in two multimedia-based learning environments (text plus static pictures/animations). A statistically significant interaction was obtained for deeper comprehension: Highly developed visualizers (HDV) who learned with static pictures performed better than HDV who learned with…

  14. The Influence of Visual Cognitive Style when Learning from Instructional Animations and Static Pictures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffler, Tim N.; Prechtl, Helmut; Nerdel, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    In a 2 x 2 design, we examined the role of visual cognitive style in two multimedia-based learning environments (text plus static pictures/animations). A statistically significant interaction was obtained for deeper comprehension: Highly developed visualizers (HDV) who learned with static pictures performed better than HDV who learned with…

  15. Invariant solutions for the static vacuum equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leandro, Benedito; Pina, Romildo

    2017-07-01

    We consider the static vacuum Einstein space-time when the spatial factor (or, base) is conformal to a pseudo-Euclidean space, which is invariant under the action of a translation group. We characterize all such solitons. Moreover, we give examples of static vacuum Einstein solutions for Einstein's field equation. Applications provide an explicit example of a complete static vacuum Einstein space-time.

  16. Negative effect of static stretching restored when combined with a sport specific warm-up component.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kristie-Lee; Sheppard, Jeremy M; Lee, Hamilton; Plummer, Norma

    2009-11-01

    There is substantial evidence that static stretching may inhibit performance in strength and power activities. However, most of this research has involved stretching routines dissimilar to those practiced by athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the decline in performance normally associated with static stretching pervades when the static stretching is conducted prior to a sport specific warm-up. Thirteen netball players completed two experimental warm-up conditions. Day 1 warm-up involved a submaximal run followed by 15 min of static stretching and a netball specific skill warm-up. Day 2 followed the same design; however, the static stretching was replaced with a 15 min dynamic warm-up routine to allow for a direct comparison between the static stretching and dynamic warm-up effects. Participants performed a countermovement vertical jump and 20m sprint after the first warm-up intervention (static or dynamic) and also after the netball specific skill warm-up. The static stretching condition resulted in significantly worse performance than the dynamic warm-up in vertical jump height (-4.2%, 0.40 ES) and 20m sprint time (1.4%, 0.34 ES) (p<0.05). However, no significant differences in either performance variable were evident when the skill-based warm-up was preceded by static stretching or a dynamic warm-up routine. This suggests that the practice of a subsequent high-intensity skill based warm-up restored the differences between the two warm-up interventions. Hence, if static stretching is to be included in the warm-up period, it is recommended that a period of high-intensity sport-specific skills based activity is included prior to the on-court/field performance.

  17. CLASSIFICATION OF SCHIZOPHRENIA AND BIPOLAR PATIENTS USING STATIC AND DYNAMIC RESTING-STATE FMRI BRAIN CONNECTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Barnaly; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Damaraju, Eswar; Cetin, Mustafa S.; Miller, Robyn; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, functional network connectivity (FNC, defined as the temporal correlation among spatially distant brain networks) has been used to examine the functional organization of brain networks in various psychiatric illnesses. Dynamic FNC is a recent extension of the conventional FNC analysis that takes into account FNC changes over short periods of time. While such dynamic FNC measures may be more informative about various aspects of connectivity, there has been no detailed head-to-head comparison of the ability of static and dynamic FNC to perform classification in complex mental illnesses. This paper proposes a framework for automatic classification of schizophrenia, bipolar and healthy subjects based on their static and dynamic FNC features. Also, we compare cross-validated classification performance between static and dynamic FNC. Results show that the dynamic FNC significantly outperforms the static FNC in terms of predictive accuracy, indicating that features from dynamic FNC have distinct advantages over static FNC for classification purposes. Moreover, combining static and dynamic FNC features does not significantly improve the classification performance over the dynamic FNC features alone, suggesting that static FNC does not add any significant information when combined with dynamic FNC for classification purposes. A three-way classification methodology based on static and dynamic FNC features discriminates individual subjects into appropriate diagnostic groups with high accuracy. Our proposed classification framework is potentially applicable to additional mental disorders. PMID:27118088

  18. Static and non-static black holes with the Liouville mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalets, T. M.; Nurmagambetov, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new class of static and non-static quasi-spherical black hole solutions in four-dimensional Minkowski and Anti-de Sitter spaces and briefly discuss its employing in the Gauge/Gravity duality.

  19. Influence of static habitat attributes on local and regional Rocky intertidal community structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konar, B.; Iken, K.; Coletti, H.; Monson, Daniel H.; Weitzman, Ben P.

    2016-01-01

    Rocky intertidal communities are structured by local environmental drivers, which can be dynamic, fluctuating on various temporal scales, or static and not greatly varying across years. We examined the role of six static drivers (distance to freshwater, tidewater glacial presence, wave exposure, fetch, beach slope, and substrate composition) on intertidal community structure across the northern Gulf of Alaska. We hypothesized that community structure is less similar at the local scale compared with the regional scale, coinciding with static drivers being less similar on smaller than larger scales. We also hypothesized that static attributes mainly drive local biological community structure. For this, we surveyed five to six sites in each of the six regions in the mid and low intertidal strata. Across regions, static attributes were not consistently different and only small clusters of sites had similar attributes. Additionally, intertidal communities were less similar on the site compared with the region level. These results suggest that these biological communities are not strongly influenced by the local static attributes measured in this study. An alternative explanation is that static attributes among our regions are not different enough to influence the biological communities. This lack of evidence for a strong static driver may be a result of our site selection, which targeted rocky sheltered communities. This suggests that this habitat may be ideal to examine the influence of dynamic drivers. We recommend that future analyses of dynamic attributes may best be performed after analyses have demonstrated that sites do not differ in static attributes.

  20. Comparison between static stretching and the Pilates method on the flexibility of older women.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Laís Campos de; Oliveira, Raphael Gonçalves de; Pires-Oliveira, Deise Aparecida de Almeida

    2016-10-01

    Flexibility decreases with advancing age and some forms of exercise, such as static stretching and Pilates, can contribute to the improvement of this physical ability. To compare the effects of static stretching and Pilates on the flexibility of healthy older women, over the age of 60 years. Thirty-two volunteers were randomized into two groups (Static stretching or Pilates) to perform exercises for 60 min, twice a week, for three months. Evaluations to analyze the movements of the trunk (flexion and extension), hip flexion and plantar and dorsiflexion of the ankle were performed before and after the intervention, using a fleximeter. The static stretching exercises improved the trunk flexion and hip flexion movements, while the Pilates improved all evaluated movements. However, over time, the groups presented differences only for the trunk extension movement. For some body segments, Pilates may be more effective for improving flexibility in older women compared to static stretching. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Studies on proper simulation during static testing of forward speed effects on fan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peracchio, A. A.; Ganz, U. W.; Gedge, M. R.; Robbins, K.

    1980-01-01

    Significant differences exist in the noise generated by engines in flight and engines operating on the test stand. It was observed that these differences can be reduced by the use of an inflow control structure (ICS) in the static test configuration. The results of the third phase of a three phase program are described. The work performed in the first two phases which dealt with the development of a model for atmospheric turbulence, studies of fan noise generated by rotor turbulence interaction, and the development of an inflow control structure design system are summarized. The final phase of the program covers procedures for performing static testing with an ICS projecting the resulting static test data to actual flight test data. Included is a procedures report which covers the design system and techniques for static testing and projecting the static data to flight.

  2. The Neglect of Monotone Comparative Statics Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Carol Horton; Tremblay, Victor J.

    2010-01-01

    Monotone methods enable comparative static analysis without the restrictive assumptions of the implicit-function theorem. Ease of use and flexibility in solving comparative static and game-theory problems have made monotone methods popular in the economics literature and in graduate courses, but they are still absent from undergraduate…

  3. The Neglect of Monotone Comparative Statics Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Carol Horton; Tremblay, Victor J.

    2010-01-01

    Monotone methods enable comparative static analysis without the restrictive assumptions of the implicit-function theorem. Ease of use and flexibility in solving comparative static and game-theory problems have made monotone methods popular in the economics literature and in graduate courses, but they are still absent from undergraduate…

  4. Comparing Techniques for Certified Static Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cachera, David; Pichardie, David

    2009-01-01

    A certified static analysis is an analysis whose semantic validity has been formally proved correct with a proof assistant. The recent increasing interest in using proof assistants for mechanizing programming language metatheory has given rise to several approaches for certification of static analysis. We propose a panorama of these techniques and compare their respective strengths and weaknesses.

  5. Uranium Transformations in Static Microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Shelly D; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Criddle, Craig; Marsh, Terence; O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Ravel, Bruce; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Kemner, Kenneth M

    2009-01-01

    Elucidation of complex biogeochemical processes and their effects on speciation of U in the subsurface is critical for developing remediation strategies with an understanding of stability. We have developed static microcosms that are similar to bioreduction process studies in situ under laminar flow conditions or in sediment pores. Uranium L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis with depth in the microcosms indicated that transformation of U{sup VI} to U{sup IV} occurred by at least two distinct processes. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis indicated that initial U{sup VI} species associated with C- and P-containing ligands were transformed to U{sup IV} in the form of uraninite and U associated with Fe-bound ligands. Microbial community analysis identified putative Fe{sup III} and sulfate reducers at two different depths in the microcosms. The slow reduction of U{sup VI} to U{sup IV} may contribute the stability of U{sup IV} within microcosms at 11 months after a decrease in bioreducing conditions due to limited electron donors.

  6. Uranium transformations in static microcosms.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, S. D.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Criddle, C.; Marsh, T. L.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Ravel, B.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P. M.; Kemner, K. M.; Stanford Univ.; Michigan State Univ.; ORNL; BNL; EXAFS Analysis

    2010-01-01

    Elucidation of complex biogeochemical processes and their effects on speciation of U in the subsurface is critical for developing remediation strategies with an understanding of stability. We have developed static microcosms that are similar to bioreduction process studies in situ under laminar flow conditions or in sediment pores. Uranium L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis with depth in the microcosms indicated that transformation of U{sup VI} to U{sup IV} occurred by at least two distinct processes. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis indicated that initial U{sup VI} species associated with C- and P-containing ligands were transformed to U{sup IV} in the form of uraninite and U associated with Fe-bound ligands. Microbial community analysis identified putative Fe{sup III} and sulfate reducers at two different depths in the microcosms. The slow reduction of U{sup VI} to U{sup IV} may contribute the stability of U{sup IV} within microcosms at 11 months after a decrease in bioreducing conditions due to limited electron donors.

  7. Statical longitudinal stability of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1921-01-01

    This report, which is a continuation of the "Preliminary report on free flight testing" (report no. NACA-TR-70), presents a detailed theoretical analysis of statical stability with free and locked controls and also the results of many free flight test on several types of airplanes. In developing the theory of stability with locked controls an expression for pitching moment is derived in simple terms by considering the total moment as the sum of the moments due to wings and tail surface. This expression, when differentiated with respect to angle of incidence, enables an analysis to be made of the factors contributing to the pitching moment. The effects of slipstream and down wash are also considered and it is concluded that the C. G. Location has but slight effect or stability, and that stability is much improved by increasing the efficiency of the tail surfaces, which may be done by using an "inverted" tail plane. The results of free flight tests with locked controls are discussed at length and it is shown that the agreement between the experimental results and theory is very satisfactory. The theory of stability with free controls is not amendable to the simple mathematical treatment used in the case of locked controls, but a clear statement of the conditions enables several conclusions to be drawn, one of which is that the fixed tail surfaces should be much larger than the movable surfaces.

  8. Static pressure seal of earmolds.

    PubMed

    Macrae, J

    1990-01-01

    Four experiments were carried out to investigate the effect on the static pressure seal of earmolds made from currently used impression and earmold materials; the occasional practice of making more than one earmold from an impression; the earmoldmaker buildup of impressions; and the multistage buildup of impressions by the impression taker. Experiment 1 showed that the chance of sealing the ear with earmolds made by the ordinary two-stage technique with only general buildup of the impression was approximately 10 percent and that none of the impression or earmold materials significantly improved the chance of obtaining a seal. Experiment 2 showed that the chance of obtaining a seal with multiple earmolds made from the one impression was zero, or very close to zero. Experiment 3 revealed that the chance of obtaining a seal increased to 55 percent when the earmold was made from an impression which was specially built up by the earmoldmaker. Experiment 4 showed that the chance of sealing the ear with earmolds made from multistage impressions was significantly greater (87.5 percent) than sealing the ear with those made from impressions specially built up by the earmoldmaker.

  9. Static experiments above 5 Mbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia

    2013-06-01

    The impact of high-pressure studies on fundamental physics and chemistry, and especially on the Earth and planetary sciences, has been enormous. While experiments in diamond anvil cells (DACs) at pressures of ~250 - 400 GPa are proven to be very difficult but possible, at higher static pressures any matter has not been investigated so until very recently [Ref. 1]. We have developed a method of synthesis of balls and semi-balls (of 10 to 50 μm in diameter) made of nanodiamond (with individual nano-particles of linear dimensions below 100 nm) and used them as second-stage or indentor-type anvils in conventional DACs. In experiments on rhenium, osmium, and gold we were able to generate pressures above 650 GPa [Ref. 1] and demonstrated crucial necessity of the ultra-high pressure measurements for accurate determination of the equation of state (EOS) of materials at extreme conditions. In collaboration with Leonid Dubrovinsky, Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth; Vitali Prakapenka, University of Chicago; Artem Abukumov, University of Antwerp; and Michael Hanfland; ESRF, Grenoble.

  10. Remote histology learning from static versus dynamic microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Mione, Sylvia; Valcke, Martin; Cornelissen, Maria

    2016-05-06

    Histology is the study of microscopic structures in normal tissue sections. Curriculum redesign in medicine has led to a decrease in the use of optical microscopes during practical classes. Other imaging solutions have been implemented to facilitate remote learning. With advancements in imaging technologies, learning material can now be digitized. Digitized microscopy images can be presented in either a static or dynamic format. This study of remote histology education identifies whether dynamic pictures are superior to static images for the acquisition of histological knowledge. Test results of two cohorts of second-year Bachelor in Medicine students at Ghent University were analyzed in two consecutive academic years: Cohort 1 (n = 190) and Cohort 2 (n = 174). Students in Cohort 1 worked with static images whereas students in Cohort 2 were presented with dynamic images. ANCOVA was applied to study differences in microscopy performance scores between the two cohorts, taking into account any possible initial differences in prior knowledge. The results show that practical histology scores are significantly higher with dynamic images as compared to static images (F (1,361) = 15.14, P < 0.01), regardless of student's gender and performance level. Several reasons for this finding can be explained in accordance with cognitivist learning theory. Since the findings suggest that knowledge construction with dynamic pictures is stronger as compared to static images, dynamic images should be introduced in a remote setting for microscopy education. Further implementation within a larger electronic learning management system needs to be explored in future research. Anat Sci Educ 9: 222-230. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  11. Quorum sensing via static coupling demonstrated by Chua's circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harpartap; Parmananda, P.

    2013-10-01

    Dynamical quorum sensing, the population based phenomenon, is believed to occur when the elements of a system interact via dynamic coupling. In the present work, we demonstrate an alternate scenario, involving static coupling, that could also lead to quorum sensing behavior. These static and dynamic coupling terms have already been employed by Konishi [Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos Appl. Sci. Eng.IJBEE40218-127410.1142/S0218127407018750 17, 2781 (2007)]. In our context, the coupling is defined as static or dynamic, on the basis of the relative time scales at which the surrounding dynamics and the elements' dynamics evolve. According to this, if the variation in the surrounding dynamics happens on a much larger (fast) time scale than that at which the elements' dynamics are varying (such as seconds and μs), then the coupling is considered to be static, otherwise it is considered to be dynamic. A series of experiments have been performed starting from a system of three Chua's circuits to a system of 20 Chua's circuits to study two types of quorum transitions: the emergence and the extinction of global oscillations (period-1). The numerics involving up to 100 Chua's circuits validate the experimental observations.

  12. [Research on static Fourier interferometer in target identification].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Huang, Zheng

    2009-08-01

    A new method was proposed for target identification with static Fourier interferometer. Considering the complex structure of mechanical scanning interferometer and the poor stability of identification, a remote detection technique for target identification based on the static spectrum analysis is proposed. Using the static scanning technique to replace mechanical scanning of optical path and applying spectrum analysis method to analyze the interference fringes, the target identification in the bad environment in the wide range field of view was realized. By the simulation computation, the present work obtained the spectro-radiometric function with temperature, wavelength and the air transmittance as the parameters, and got the characteristic of data from difference background radiation. The spectrum D-value function shows the energy of the spectrum in different situation. Performing experiments with the AViiVA-M2 CCD camera, Static Fourier Interferometer, and 1 m x 1 m iron-sheet as the target separately at different time in one day, with different probing range, and under different background condition, the limited distance in each situation was obtained by the system. According to the result of experiment and spectrum data analysis, the target identification method with difference spectrum is feasible, and the average probability of detection is 92.8%.

  13. Static and Dynamic Moduli of Malm Carbonate: A Poroelastic Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadegan, Alireza; Guérizec, Romain; Reinsch, Thomas; Blöcher, Guido; Zimmermann, Günter; Milsch, Harald

    2016-08-01

    The static and poroelastic moduli of a porous rock, e.g., the drained bulk modulus, can be derived from stress-strain curves in rock mechanical tests, and the dynamic moduli, e.g., dynamic Poisson's ratio, can be determined by acoustic velocity and bulk density measurements. As static and dynamic elastic moduli are different, a correlation is often required to populate geomechanical models. A novel poroelastic approach is introduced to correlate static and dynamic bulk moduli of outcrop analogues samples, representative of Upper-Malm reservoir rock in the Molasse basin, southwestern Germany. Drained and unjacketed poroelastic experiments were performed at two different temperature levels (30 and 60°C). For correlating the static and dynamic elastic moduli, a drained acoustic velocity ratio is introduced, corresponding to the drained Poisson's ratio in poroelasticity. The strength of poroelastic coupling, i.e., the product of Biot and Skempton coefficients here, was the key parameter. The value of this parameter decreased with increasing effective pressure by about 56 ~% from 0.51 at 3 MPa to 0.22 at 73 MPa. In contrast, the maximum change in P- and S-wave velocities was only 3 % in this pressure range. This correlation approach can be used in characterizing underground reservoirs, and can be employed to relate seismicity and geomechanics (seismo-mechanics).

  14. Quorum sensing via static coupling demonstrated by Chua's circuits.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpartap; Parmananda, P

    2013-10-01

    Dynamical quorum sensing, the population based phenomenon, is believed to occur when the elements of a system interact via dynamic coupling. In the present work, we demonstrate an alternate scenario, involving static coupling, that could also lead to quorum sensing behavior. These static and dynamic coupling terms have already been employed by Konishi [Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos Appl. Sci. Eng. 17, 2781 (2007)]. In our context, the coupling is defined as static or dynamic, on the basis of the relative time scales at which the surrounding dynamics and the elements' dynamics evolve. According to this, if the variation in the surrounding dynamics happens on a much larger (fast) time scale than that at which the elements' dynamics are varying (such as seconds and μs), then the coupling is considered to be static, otherwise it is considered to be dynamic. A series of experiments have been performed starting from a system of three Chua's circuits to a system of 20 Chua's circuits to study two types of quorum transitions: the emergence and the extinction of global oscillations (period-1). The numerics involving up to 100 Chua's circuits validate the experimental observations.

  15. Static aeroelastic analysis of a three-dimensional generic wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, John A.; Lee, IN; Miura, Hirokazu

    1990-01-01

    A continuation of research on the static aeroelastic analysis of a generic wing configuration is presented. Results of the study of the asymmetric oblique wing model developed by Rockwell International, in conjunction with the NASA Oblique Wing Research Aircraft Program, are reported. The capability to perform static aeroelastic analyses of an oblique wing at arbitrary skew positions is demonstrated by applying the MSC/NASTRAN static analysis scheme modified by the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix created by the NASA Ames aerodynamic panel codes. The oblique wing is studied at two skew angles, and in particular, the capability to calculate 3-D thickness effects on the aerodynamic properties of the wing is investigated. The ability to model asymmetric wings in both subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers is shown. The aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix computed by the external programs is inserted in MSC/NASTRAN static aeroelasticity analysis run stream to compute the aeroelastic deformation and internal forces. Various aerodynamic coefficients of the oblique wing were computed for two Mach numbers, 0.7 and 1.4, and the angle of attach -5 through 15 deg.

  16. Interpretational conflicts between the static and non-static forms of the de Sitter metric.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Abhas

    2012-01-01

    The de-Sitter metric is a special form of the non-static Friedmann metric, and appears to be genuinely non-static since it describes the initial exponential expansion of the Big Bang universe. However, the de Sitter metric appears to be perfectly static in the Schwarzschild frame where the vacuum fluid is supposed to be in motion. Here we highlight the conflicts between the static and non-static versions of the de-Sitter metric from a physical perspective. In particular, while the "Principle of Energy Conservation" is honored in one case, the same is badly violated for the other. However, we offer a partial resolution of such conflicts by deriving the static de Sitter metric by solving the relevant field equations. It is seen that, it is the very special vacuum equation of state pressure = -density which results in the static form even when the vacuum fluid is supposed to be in motion.

  17. Modeling of Long-Range Atmospheric Lasercom Links Between Static and Mobile Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T; Breitfeller, E F; Henderson, J R; Kallman, J S; Morris, J R; Ruggiero, A J

    2003-07-29

    We describe modeling and simulation of long-range terrestrial laser communications links between static and mobile platforms. Atmospheric turbulence modeling, along with pointing, tracking and acquisition models are combined to provide an overall capability to estimate communications link performance.

  18. Helmet latching and attaching ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, E. W.; Viikinsalo, S. J. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A neck ring releasably secured to a pressurized garment carries an open-ended ring normally in the engagement position fitted into an annular groove and adapted to fit into a complementary annular groove formed in a helmet. Camming means formed on the inner surface at the end of the helmet engages the open-ended ring to retract the same and allow for one motion donning even when the garment is pressurized. A projection on the end of the split ring is engageable to physically retract the split ring.

  19. Miniaturized double latching solenoid valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A valve includes a generally elongate pintle; a spacer having a rounded surface that bears against the pintle; a bulbous tip fixed to the spacer; and a hollow, generally cylindrical collar fixed to the pintle, the collar enclosing the spacer and the tip and including an opening through which a portion of the tip extends, the opening in the collar and interior of the collar being of a size such that the tip floats therein.

  20. Berthing latches on the FSS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-21

    S103-E-5170 (21 December 1999) --- This closeup electronic still camera's view shows the lower portion of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) as the giant observatory is berthed in Discovery's cargo bay. The gold-shielded apparatus at the bottom of the frame is the flight support system (FSS), a turntable device similar to a "Lazy Susan" because of its ability to rotate and tilt to assist the upcoming servicing tasks. The image was recorded at 19:49:22 GMT, Dec. 21, 1999 but was not able to be downlinked by the astronauts until late on the following day.

  1. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  2. Creep and fatigue development in the low back in static flexion.

    PubMed

    Shin, Gwanseob; D'Souza, Clive; Liu, Yu-Hsun

    2009-08-01

    In vivo measurements of low back flexion posture and muscle activity before, during, and after static flexion. To identify the occurrence of creep and muscle fatigue development in the low back during static upper body deep flexion that resembled an above ground work posture. Static lumbar flexion has been related to the development of low back disorders, and its injury mechanism has been focused on the changes in passive spinal tissues. Potential influences of muscle fatigue of extensor muscles have not been explored. A total of 20 asymptomatic subjects performed submaximal isometric trunk extension exertions and an isokinetic trunk flexion before and immediately after 5-minute static flexion while the trunk sagittal flexion angle and the myoelectric activities (electromyography [EMG]) of back extensor muscles were recorded simultaneously. Changes in the flexion-relaxation onset angle, maximum flexion angle, muscle activity level, and the median power frequency of EMG associated with the static flexion were evaluated. Flexion-relaxation onset angle in isokinetic flexion and EMG amplitude of isometric extension were significantly greater after static flexion, indicating creep of spinal tissues in static flexion. Median power frequency of lumbar erector spinae EMG during isometric extension was significantly lower after static flexion, suggesting the development of muscle fatigue. Consistent but low level of EMG was observed together with sporadic muscle spasms during the static flexion period. Fatigue of low back extensor muscles may occur in static flexion due to prolonged passive stretching of the muscles. Low back extensor muscles are required to generate more active forces in weight holding or lifting after static flexion to compensate for the reduced contribution of creep deformed passive tissues in maintaining spinal stability and the posture. The degraded force generating capacity of the fatigued muscles can be a significant risk factor for low back pain.

  3. Cooperation among wirelessly connected static and mobile sensor nodes for surveillance applications.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Edison Pignaton; Heimfarth, Tales; Vinel, Alexey; Wagner, Flávio Rech; Pereira, Carlos Eduardo; Larsson, Tony

    2013-09-25

    This paper presents a bio-inspired networking strategy to support the cooperation between static sensors on the ground and mobile sensors in the air to perform surveillance missions in large areas. The goal of the proposal is to provide low overhead in the communication among sensor nodes, while allocating the mobile sensors to perform sensing activities requested by the static ones. Simulations have shown that the strategy is efficient in maintaining low overhead and achieving the desired coordination.

  4. Cooperation among Wirelessly Connected Static and Mobile Sensor Nodes for Surveillance Applications

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Edison Pignaton; Heimfarth, Tales; Vinel, Alexey; Wagner, Flávio Rech; Pereira, Carlos Eduardo; Larsson, Tony

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a bio-inspired networking strategy to support the cooperation between static sensors on the ground and mobile sensors in the air to perform surveillance missions in large areas. The goal of the proposal is to provide low overhead in the communication among sensor nodes, while allocating the mobile sensors to perform sensing activities requested by the static ones. Simulations have shown that the strategy is efficient in maintaining low overhead and achieving the desired coordination. PMID:24072028

  5. Evolution of Coextruded Structures in Static Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollogoub, C.; Guinault, A.; Pedros, M.

    2007-04-01

    Coextrusion allows to combine two thermoplastics in different ways, creating structures with different cross-sectional geometries (side-by-side structure or concentric ring structure). We use static mixers after the feedblock, in order to homogenise these initial structures and obtain different blend morphologies. The control of these morphologies is of prime importance in order to predict the final properties of the polymer blends. The aim of this paper is to study the evolution of some initial coextruded structures in different static mixers. Different static mixers, with adjustable number of mixing elements, are tested. The experimental observations are confronted with numerical simulation results.

  6. Static conversion systems. [for space power reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewell, R.; Mondt, J.

    1985-01-01

    Historically, all space power systems that have actually flown in space have relied on static energy conversion technology. Thus, static conversion is being considered for space nuclear power systems as well. There are four potential static conversion technologies which should be considered. These include: the alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC), the thermionic converter, the thermoelectric converter, and the thermophotovoltaic converter (TPV). These four conversion technologies will be described in brief detail along with their current status and development needs. In addition, the systems implications of using each of these conversion technologies with a space nuclear reactor power system will be evaluated and some comparisons made.

  7. Static conversion systems. [for space power reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewell, R.; Mondt, J.

    1985-01-01

    Historically, all space power systems that have actually flown in space have relied on static energy conversion technology. Thus, static conversion is being considered for space nuclear power systems as well. There are four potential static conversion technologies which should be considered. These include: the alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC), the thermionic converter, the thermoelectric converter, and the thermophotovoltaic converter (TPV). These four conversion technologies will be described in brief detail along with their current status and development needs. In addition, the systems implications of using each of these conversion technologies with a space nuclear reactor power system will be evaluated and some comparisons made.

  8. Delaminations in composite plates under transverse static loads - Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; He, Yi-Fei; Springer, George S.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed measuring the damage initiation loads and the locations, shapes, and sizes of delaminations in Fiberite T300/976 graphite/epoxy, Fiberite IM7/977-2 graphite-toughened epoxy, and ICI APC-2 graphite-PEEK plates subjected to transverse static loads. The data were compared to the results of the Finn-Springer model, and good agreements were found between the measured and calculated delamination lengths and widths.

  9. Quasi-Static Viscoelasticity Loading Measurements of an Aircraft Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Angela J.; Tanner, John A.; Johnson, Arthur R.

    1997-01-01

    Stair-step loading, cyclic loading, and long-term relaxation tests were performed on an aircraft tire to observe the quasi-static viscoelastic response of the tire. The data indicate that the tire continues to respond viscoelastically even after it has been softened by deformation. Load relaxation data from the stair-step test at the 15,000-lb loading was fit to a monotonically decreasing Prony series.

  10. Large scale static and dynamic friction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtar, K.; Barton, N.

    1984-12-31

    A series of nineteen shear tests were performed on fractures 1 m/sup 2/ in area, generated in blocks of sandstone, granite, tuff, hydrostone and concrete. The tests were conducted under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. A vertical stress assisted fracturing technique was developed to create the fractures through the large test blocks. Prior to testing, the fractured surface of each block was characterized using the Barton JRC-JCS concept. the results of characterization were used to generate the peak strength envelope for each fractured surface. Attempts were made to model the stress path based on the classical transformation equations which assumes a theoretical plane, elastic isotropic properties, and therefore no slip. However, this approach gave rise to a stress path passing above the strength envelope which is clearly unacceptable. The results of the experimental investigations indicated that actual stress path is affected by the dilatancy due to fracture roughness, as well as by the side friction imposed by the boundary conditions. By introducing the corrections due to the dilation and boundary conditions into the stress transformation equation, the fully corrected stress paths for predicting the strength of fractured blocks were obtained.

  11. New CPV Systems With Static Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripanagnostopoulos, Y.; Chemisana, D.; Rosell, J. I.; Souliotis, M.

    2010-10-01

    New designs of low concentrating photovoltaics have been studied, where static reflectors and moving absorbers that track the concentrated solar rays, aim to cost effective solar devices. These systems are based on the concept that strip absorbers can use the beam radiation and convert it to electricity, while the diffuse radiation is absorbed by flat absorbers and converted into heat. The work on these designs follow the research on the linear Fresnel lenses, which are combined with PV or PV/T absorbers and can be used not only for the conversion of solar radiation into electricity and heat but also to control the illumination and the temperature of interior building spaces. Design aspects and optical results give a figure of the optical performance of these new CPV collectors, which are based on the converged solar radiation distribution profiles for East-West orientation of parabolic trough reflectors. The concentration ratio depends on the geometry of the parabola axis and the higher values correspond to the axis towards the summer solstice. The results show that the new CPV designs can be effectively applied in buildings adapting energy demand in electricity and heat.

  12. Virtual Breast Quasi-static Elastography (VBQE).

    PubMed

    Rosen, David; Wang, Yu; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-03-01

    Viscoelasticity Imaging (VEI) has been proposed to measure relaxation time constants for characterization of in vivo breast lesions. In this technique, an external compression force on the tissue being imaged is maintained for a fixed period of time to induce strain creep. A sequence of ultrasound echo signals is then utilized to generate time-resolved strain measurements. Relaxation time constants can be obtained by fitting local time-resolved strain measurements to a viscoelastic tissue model (e.g., a modified Kevin-Voigt model). In this study, our primary objective is to quantitatively evaluate the contrast transfer efficiency (CTE) of VEI, which contains useful information regarding image interpretations. Using an open-source simulator for virtual breast quasi-static elastography (VBQE), we conducted a case study of contrast transfer efficiency of VEI. In multiple three-dimensional (3D) numerical breast phantoms containing various degrees of heterogeneity, finite element (FE) simulations in conjunction with quasi-linear viscoelastic constitutive tissue models were performed to mimic data acquisition of VEI under freehand scanning. Our results suggested that there were losses in CTE, and the losses could be as high as -18 dB. FE results also qualitatively corroborated clinical observations, for example, artifacts around tissue interfaces.

  13. Reducing static charges in fluidized bed reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Ballou, E. V.; Wood, P. C.; Spitze, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    Radio frequency glow discharge apparatus ionizes fluidizing gas, making it conductive enough to neutralize static charge on fluidized particles. Particles agglomerate less, and in one case reactant loading capacity was increased six fold.

  14. Static solutions for fourth order gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William

    2010-11-15

    The Lichnerowicz and Israel theorems are extended to higher order theories of gravity. In particular it is shown that Schwarzschild is the unique spherically symmetric, static, asymptotically flat, black-hole solution, provided the spatial curvature is less than the quantum gravity scale outside the horizon. It is then shown that in the presence of matter (satisfying certain positivity requirements), the only static and asymptotically flat solutions of general relativity that are also solutions of higher order gravity are the vacuum solutions.

  15. Static dc voltage stabilizer-converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osadchiy, V. I.

    1974-01-01

    The advantages are outlined of a static dc voltage converter combining the functions of the feed voltage stabilizer simultaneously. A comparison is made between the circuits for the known static stabilizer converter and that developed by the author. A characteristic feature of the improved system is the increased stabilization coefficient, low output impedance and the possibility of smooth regulation of the output voltage. A practical diagram is presented for the improved high voltage stabilizer converter and its parameters.

  16. Effects of Dynamic and Static Stretching Within General and Activity Specific Warm-Up Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Michael; Button, Duane C.; Chaouachi, Anis; Behm, David G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of static and dynamic stretching protocols within general and activity specific warm-ups. Nine male and ten female subjects were tested under four warm-up conditions including a 1) general aerobic warm-up with static stretching, 2) general aerobic warm-up with dynamic stretching, 3) general and specific warm-up with static stretching and 4) general and specific warm-up with dynamic stretching. Following all conditions, subjects were tested for movement time (kicking movement of leg over 0.5 m distance), countermovement jump height, sit and reach flexibility and 6 repetitions of 20 metre sprints. Results indicated that when a sport specific warm-up was included, there was an 0.94% improvement (p = 0.0013) in 20 meter sprint time with both the dynamic and static stretch groups. No such difference in sprint performance between dynamic and static stretch groups existed in the absence of the sport specific warm-up. The static stretch condition increased sit and reach range of motion (ROM) by 2.8% more (p = 0.0083) than the dynamic condition. These results would support the use of static stretching within an activity specific warm-up to ensure maximal ROM along with an enhancement in sprint performance. Key pointsActivity specific warm-up may improve sprint performance.Static stretching was more effective than dynamic stretching for increasing static range of motion.There was no effect of the warm-up protocols on countermovement jump height or movement time. PMID:24149201

  17. Effects of dynamic and static stretching within general and activity specific warm-up protocols.

    PubMed

    Samson, Michael; Button, Duane C; Chaouachi, Anis; Behm, David G

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of static and dynamic stretching protocols within general and activity specific warm-ups. Nine male and ten female subjects were tested under four warm-up conditions including a 1) general aerobic warm-up with static stretching, 2) general aerobic warm-up with dynamic stretching, 3) general and specific warm-up with static stretching and 4) general and specific warm-up with dynamic stretching. Following all conditions, subjects were tested for movement time (kicking movement of leg over 0.5 m distance), countermovement jump height, sit and reach flexibility and 6 repetitions of 20 metre sprints. Results indicated that when a sport specific warm-up was included, there was an 0.94% improvement (p = 0.0013) in 20 meter sprint time with both the dynamic and static stretch groups. No such difference in sprint performance between dynamic and static stretch groups existed in the absence of the sport specific warm-up. The static stretch condition increased sit and reach range of motion (ROM) by 2.8% more (p = 0.0083) than the dynamic condition. These results would support the use of static stretching within an activity specific warm-up to ensure maximal ROM along with an enhancement in sprint performance. Key pointsActivity specific warm-up may improve sprint performance.Static stretching was more effective than dynamic stretching for increasing static range of motion.There was no effect of the warm-up protocols on countermovement jump height or movement time.

  18. Static and Dynamic Errors in Particle Tracking Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    Savin, Thierry; Doyle, Patrick S.

    2005-01-01

    Particle tracking techniques are often used to assess the local mechanical properties of cells and biological fluids. The extracted trajectories are exploited to compute the mean-squared displacement that characterizes the dynamics of the probe particles. Limited spatial resolution and statistical uncertainty are the limiting factors that alter the accuracy of the mean-squared displacement estimation. We precisely quantified the effect of localization errors in the determination of the mean-squared displacement by separating the sources of these errors into two separate contributions. A “static error” arises in the position measurements of immobilized particles. A “dynamic error” comes from the particle motion during the finite exposure time that is required for visualization. We calculated the propagation of these errors on the mean-squared displacement. We examined the impact of our error analysis on theoretical model fluids used in biorheology. These theoretical predictions were verified for purely viscous fluids using simulations and a multiple-particle tracking technique performed with video microscopy. We showed that the static contribution can be confidently corrected in dynamics studies by using static experiments performed at a similar noise-to-signal ratio. This groundwork allowed us to achieve higher resolution in the mean-squared displacement, and thus to increase the accuracy of microrheology studies. PMID:15533928

  19. Applicability of Virtual Reference Stations for Static and Kinematic Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Jakub; Rzepecka, Zofia

    2013-04-01

    There is a possibility to generate artificial observations for a particular position by using a known Virtual Reference Station technique. It is done by transferring the observations from a physical reference station and interpolating the biases, usually using a network of reference stations. Theoretically, the measurements can replace the physical reference receiver and both, simplify and improve the processing of static and kinematic measurements. Here, the VRS is used as a control station for static and kinematic post-processing taking advantage of the network of reference stations by interpolating ionospheric and tropospheric biases to location of measurement. However previous computational experiments showed that the generated virtual observations are strongly correlated with the observations gathered at the nearest physical reference station. The previous studies were performed at close vicinity of the physical reference station. For further investigations of these correlations, and the issue of how do they influence processing results, a field experiment was designed and performed, in which the real measurements were taken at various distances from the physical reference station. Basing on these measurements, the correlations between the reference station and VRS stations were studied. The unknown physical stations were determined and used as a comparison for VRS measurements. Also, the applicability of VRS observations for static and kinematic processing was validated. To assure independence of calculations and results, besides commercial software (GNSS Solutions and LGO) chosen Precise Point Positioning services were used. The VRS data were obtained from the POZGEO-D service of the ASG-EUPOS network.

  20. Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Del P.; Chaouachi, Anis; Lau, Patrick W.C.; Behm, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. Key points The duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. PMID:24149890

  1. Anisotropic energy transfers in quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K. Sandeep; Kumar, Raghwendra; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2014-10-15

    We perform direct numerical simulations of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and compute various energy transfers including the ring-to-ring and conical energy transfers, and the energy fluxes of the perpendicular and parallel components of the velocity field. We show that the rings with higher polar angles transfer energy to ones with lower polar angles. For large interaction parameters, the dominant energy transfer takes place near the equator (polar angle θ≈(π)/2 ). The energy transfers are local both in wavenumbers and angles. The energy flux of the perpendicular component is predominantly from higher to lower wavenumbers (inverse cascade of energy), while that of the parallel component is from lower to higher wavenumbers (forward cascade of energy). Our results are consistent with earlier results, which indicate quasi two-dimensionalization of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic flows at high interaction parameters.

  2. Design, Static Analysis And Fabrication Of Composite Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiselvan, G.; Gobinath, R.; Yuvaraja, S.; Raja, T.

    2017-05-01

    The Bonded joints will be having one of the important issues in the composite technology is the repairing of aging in aircraft applications. In these applications and also for joining various composite material parts together, the composite materials fastened together either using adhesives or mechanical fasteners. In this paper, we have carried out design, static analysis of 3-D models and fabrication of the composite joints (bonded, riveted and hybrid). The 3-D model of the composite structure will be fabricated by using the materials such as epoxy resin, glass fibre material and aluminium rivet for preparing the joints. The static analysis was carried out with different joint by using ANSYS software. After fabrication, parametric study was also conducted to compare the performance of the hybrid joint with varying adherent width, adhesive thickness and overlap length. Different joint and its materials tensile test result have compared.

  3. Matlab Stability and Control Toolbox: Trim and Static Stability Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the technical background of the Trim and Static module of the Matlab Stability and Control Toolbox. This module performs a low-fidelity stability and control assessment of an aircraft model for a set of flight critical conditions. This is attained by determining if the control authority available for trim is sufficient and if the static stability characteristics are adequate. These conditions can be selected from a prescribed set or can be specified to meet particular requirements. The prescribed set of conditions includes horizontal flight, take-off rotation, landing flare, steady roll, steady turn and pull-up/ push-over flight, for which several operating conditions can be specified. A mathematical model was developed allowing for six-dimensional trim, adjustable inertial properties, asymmetric vehicle layouts, arbitrary number of engines, multi-axial thrust vectoring, engine(s)-out conditions, crosswind and gyroscopic effects.

  4. Matter under Extreme Conditions: Advances Based on Static Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemley, Russell

    2008-04-01

    Current technological advances make it possible to perform experiments on materials at static or sustained conditions to multimegabar pressures (several hundred GPa) and several thousand degree (˜1 eV) temperatures. Densities of condensed matter can now be increased over an order of magnitude, causing novel transformations and new physical and chemical phenomena to occur. Growth in this area has been made possible by advances in diamond-anvil cell methods coupled with a wide range of probes, including x-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, inelastic scattering, radiography, and infrared spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. Examples include investigations of dense hydrogen; transformations in molecular materials; novel ceramics; new types of superconductors, electronic, and magnetic materials; and liquids and amorphous materials. Particularly exciting are new developments in time resolved methods and coupling of static and dynamic compression techniques made possible by the creation of new large-scale facilities and novel technologies.

  5. Development of a static feed water electrolysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Lantz, J. B.; Hallick, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    A one person level oxygen generation subsystem was developed and production of the one person oxygen metabolic requirements, 0.82 kg, per day was demonstrated without the need for condenser/separators or electrolyte pumps. During 650 hours of shakedown, design verification, and endurance testing, cell voltages averaged 1.62 V at 206 mA/sq cm and at average operating temperature as low as 326 K, virtually corresponding to the state of the art performance previously established for single cells. This high efficiency and low waste heat generation prevented maintenance of the 339 K design temperature without supplemental heating. Improved water electrolysis cell frames were designed, new injection molds were fabricated, and a series of frames was molded. A modified three fluid pressure controller was developed and a static feed water electrolysis that requires no electrolyte in the static feed compartment was developed and successfully evaluated.

  6. Muscle pain induced by static contraction in rats is modulated by peripheral inflammatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Santos, Diogo Francisco da Silva Dos; Melo Aquino, Bruna de; Jorge, Carolina Ocanha; Azambuja, Graciana de; Schiavuzzo, Jalile Garcia; Krimon, Suzy; Neves, Juliana Dos Santos; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Oliveira-Fusaro, Maria Claudia Gonçalves

    2017-09-01

    Muscle pain is an important health issue and frequently related to static force exertion. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether peripheral inflammatory mechanisms are involved with static contraction-induced muscle pain in rats. To this end, we developed a model of muscle pain induced by static contraction performed by applying electrical pulses through electrodes inserted into muscle. We also evaluated the involvement of neutrophil migration, bradykinin, sympathetic amines and prostanoids. A single session of sustained static contraction of gastrocnemius muscle induced acute mechanical muscle hyperalgesia without affecting locomotor activity and with no evidence of structural damage in muscle tissue. Static contraction increased levels of creatine kinase but not lactate dehydrogenase, and induced neutrophil migration. Dexamethasone (glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory agent), DALBK (bradykinin B1 antagonist), Atenolol (β1 adrenoceptor antagonist), ICI 118,551 (β2 adrenoceptor antagonist), indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor), and fucoidan (non-specific selectin inhibitor) all reduced static contraction-induced muscle hyperalgesia; however, the bradykinin B2 antagonist, bradyzide, did not have an effect on static contraction-induced muscle hyperalgesia. Furthermore, an increased hyperalgesic response was observed when the selective bradykinin B1 agonist des-Arg(9)-bradykinin was injected into the previously stimulated muscle. Together, these findings demonstrate that static contraction induced mechanical muscle hyperalgesia in gastrocnemius muscle of rats is modulated through peripheral inflammatory mechanisms that are dependent on neutrophil migration, bradykinin, sympathetic amines and prostanoids. Considering the clinical relevance of muscle pain, we propose the present model of static contraction-induced mechanical muscle hyperalgesia as a useful tool for the study of mechanisms underlying static contraction-induced muscle pain. Copyright © 2017 IBRO

  7. Some observations on loss of static strength due to fatigue cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illg, Walter; Hardrath, Herbert F

    1955-01-01

    Static tensile tests were performed on simple notched specimens containing fatigue cracks. Four types of aluminum alloys were investigated: 2024-T3(formerly 24S-T3) and 7075-T6(formerly 75S-T6) in sheet form, and 2024-T4(formerly 24S-T4) and 7075-T6(formerly 75S-T6) in extruded form. The cracked specimens were tested statically under four conditions: unmodified and with reduced eccentricity of loading by three methods. Results of static tests on C-46 wings containing fatigue cracks are also reported.

  8. Evaluation of static and dynamic perfusion cardiac computed tomography for quantitation and classification tasks.

    PubMed

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R; La Riviere, Patrick J; Alessio, Adam M

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. Either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including (1) stratifying patients into categories of ischemia and (2) using a quantitative myocardial blood flow (MBF) estimate to evaluate disease severity. In this simulation study, we compare method performance on these classification and quantification tasks for matched radiation dose levels and for different flow states, patient sizes, and injected contrast levels. Under conditions simulated, the dynamic method has low bias in MBF estimates (0 to [Formula: see text]) compared to linearly interpreted static assessment (0.45 to [Formula: see text]), making it more suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, had superior performance ([Formula: see text]) in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients and lower contrast doses [area under the curve [Formula: see text] to 96 versus 0.86]. We also demonstrate that static assessment with a correctly tuned exponential relationship between the apparent CT number and MBF has superior quantification performance to static assessment with a linear relationship and to dynamic assessment. However, tuning the exponential relationship to the patient and scan characteristics will likely prove challenging. This study demonstrates that the selection and optimization of static or dynamic acquisition modes should depend on the specific clinical task.

  9. Static second-order polarizabilities of aminobenzophenones and nitrobenzophenones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Craig E.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    1991-01-01

    Static-field theoretical studies on molecular second-order polarizabilities (beta) of benzophenone derivatives were performed. Calculations were based on the use of shaped electric fields and semiempirical Hamiltonians. Either an electron-donating (amine) or an electron-withdrawing (nitro) substituent was incorporated into a phenyl ring of benzophenone; the phenyl rings of benzophenone were oriented either coplanar or perpendicular to the carbonyl. The change in charge transfer with respect to the electrophilic character of the carbonyl group was monitored to determine its effect on the molecular second-order polarizability. Calculations were performed for all constitutional isomers of the two benzophenone derivatives.

  10. Visualization study on the static flow field around a straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Tagawa, Kotaro

    2010-03-01

    Visual experiments based on the smoke wire way were carried out on a small model of Straight-blade Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (SB-VAWT) to invest the relationship between the static flow field characteristics and the rotor azimuth angle. The test rotor had 3 blades with NACA0018 aerofoil. The rotor diameter and blade chord were 0.3m and 0.07m, respectively. Visual photos of the static flow path lines in and around the rotor were obtained at every 5 degrees of the azimuth angle. Further, numerical computations of the static flow filed were also carried out for comparison with the same situation as the visual tests and the static torques at different azimuth angles were calculated. According to the results of visual tests and computations, the dependence of the starting performance on the azimuth angle was discussed. The solidity is an important factor affecting the starting performance of the SB-VAWT.

  11. Visualization study on the static flow field around a straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Tagawa, Kotaro

    2009-12-01

    Visual experiments based on the smoke wire way were carried out on a small model of Straight-blade Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (SB-VAWT) to invest the relationship between the static flow field characteristics and the rotor azimuth angle. The test rotor had 3 blades with NACA0018 aerofoil. The rotor diameter and blade chord were 0.3m and 0.07m, respectively. Visual photos of the static flow path lines in and around the rotor were obtained at every 5 degrees of the azimuth angle. Further, numerical computations of the static flow filed were also carried out for comparison with the same situation as the visual tests and the static torques at different azimuth angles were calculated. According to the results of visual tests and computations, the dependence of the starting performance on the azimuth angle was discussed. The solidity is an important factor affecting the starting performance of the SB-VAWT.

  12. Finite element modeling of ROPS in static testing and rear overturns.

    PubMed

    Harris, J R; Mucino, V H; Etherton, J R; Snyder, K A; Means, K H

    2000-08-01

    Even with the technological advances of the last several decades, agricultural production remains one of the most hazardous occupations in the United States. Death due to tractor rollover is a prime contributor to this hazard. Standards for rollover protective structures (ROPS) performance and certification have been developed by groups such as the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE) to combat these problems. The current ROPS certification standard, SAE J2194, requires either a dynamic or static testing sequence or both. Although some ROPS manufacturers perform both the dynamic and static phases of SAE J2194 testing, it is possible for a ROPS to be certified for field operation using static testing alone. This research compared ROPS deformation response from a simulated SAE J2194 static loading sequence to ROPS deformation response as a result of a simulated rearward tractor rollover. Finite element analysis techniques for plastic deformation were used to simulate both the static and dynamic rear rollover scenarios. Stress results from the rear rollover model were compared to results from simulated static testing per SAE J2194. Maximum stress values from simulated rear rollovers exceeded maximum stress values recorded during simulated static testing for half of the elements comprising the uprights. In the worst case, the static model underpredicts dynamic model results by approximately 7%. In the best case, the static model overpredicts dynamic model results by approximately 32%. These results suggest the need for additional experimental work to characterize ROPS stress levels during staged overturns and during testing according to the SAE standard.

  13. Static column and its industrial application in China

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, M.; Wang, F.; Liu, W.; Xu, E.; Xu, Q.

    1999-07-01

    The column, as an advanced fine coal cleaning equipment, has been developed for more than 20 years. The Microcel, Jameson cell and other types of columns have been used in the coal industry. Since 1990, the cyclonic micro-bubble flotation column has been developed. The test of 1.5 M packed column is underway in the Shitai coal preparation plant. Chinese fine coal is quite difficult to separate. Its native ash content is high and the floatability is difficult. There is not compressed air available in the small coal mine. The high cost for waste-water treatment limited the usage of wash water. It is necessary to study the column under Chinese conditions. Laboratory tests have been done for five coals. Conventional flotation tests were also done in a one-liter flotation cell in order to compare with the results of static column. Compared with a conventional flotation cell, lower ash content and higher combustion recovery are obtained from the static column. In addition, the static column can produce super-low-ash clean coal and treat very fine and high ash content slurry, which is difficult for conventional flotation cell to separate. Test results also show that the construction of the bubble generator and the aeration rate are important for the performance of the static column. An one-meter diameter by six-meter high FXZ-1 static column has been used in four coal preparation plants for more than one year. The results are satisfactory. An additional three columns with the diameter of 1 M and 1.25 M in another 3 coal mines have been fabricated and will be put into use soon. The three-meter column has been designed for MaTou coal preparation plant and is in the course of fabrication now. The static column does not need any high-pressure air and usually does not use wash-water. The power consumption is very low and manual operation is easy. The investment and operating cost is low. In addition, the separation results are quite satisfactory. It has been recommended to be

  14. Making DidFail Succeed: Enhancing the CERT Static Taint Analyzer for Android App Sets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    success rate from 18% to 68% on our test set of real-world apps . Analytical features were added for more types of components and shared static fields... rate of Phase 1 analysis and investigated the performance of FlowDroid. We found in many cases that vertical scaling is not a viable solution to...Making DidFail Succeed: Enhancing the CERT Static Taint Analyzer for Android App Sets Jonathan Burket Lori Flynn William Klieber Jonathan Lim Wei

  15. Validating Network Security Policies via Static Analysis of Router ACL Configuration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    ordering were not always effective. They developed a system based on adding new filters that could be applied in all cases. The paper uses the concept...first begin with the development of a tool that can automatically perform static analysis of a network based on packet filters, since packet filter use...was developed , and the algorithm is based on static analysis of router configuration files. Packet filters are seen as the easiest way to control

  16. Acceleration of a Static Observer Near the Event Horizon of a Static Isolated Black Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Noel A.

    1981-01-01

    Compares the magnitude of the proper acceleration of a static observer in a static, isolated, spherically symmetric space-time region with the Newtonian result including the situation in the interior of a perfect-fluid star. This provides a simple physical interpretation of surface gravity and illustrates the global nature of the event horizon.…

  17. Acceleration of a Static Observer Near the Event Horizon of a Static Isolated Black Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Noel A.

    1981-01-01

    Compares the magnitude of the proper acceleration of a static observer in a static, isolated, spherically symmetric space-time region with the Newtonian result including the situation in the interior of a perfect-fluid star. This provides a simple physical interpretation of surface gravity and illustrates the global nature of the event horizon.…

  18. 14 CFR 25.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal... Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal stability must be shown as follows: (a... need not be less than 1.3 V SR 1. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the...

  19. 14 CFR 25.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal... Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal stability must be shown as follows: (a... need not be less than 1.3 V SR 1. (b) Cruise. Static longitudinal stability must be shown in the...

  20. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.177 Static lateral... is set forth as follows: § 25.177 Static lateral-directional stability. (a) The static...