Science.gov

Sample records for peri-implant soft tissue

  1. Revisiting peri-implant soft tissue – histopathological study of the peri-implant soft tissue

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Eduarda; Félix, Sérgio; Rodriguez-Archilla, Alberto; Oliveira, Pedro; Martins dos Santos, José

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implant soft tissues are essential for osseointegration. The peri-implant mucosa may lack vascular supply, and histological observation, even without plaque, shows the presence of inflammatory cells. The objectives of this study were to assess the histopathological changes of the epithelium and connective tissue around the implant. Twenty patients of both genders were studied. Twelve weeks after implant placement, fragments of peri-implant gingival sulcus were harvested and processed for light microscopy. Group I (10): without clinical inflammatory signs (control); Group II (10): with clinical inflammatory signs. Histopathological parameters were analyzed and classified in 3 grades: mild, moderate or severe (grade 1, 2 or 3). Control group showed only slight changes, grade 1. In group II we found edema with moderate to severe cellular and nuclear changes. There are more women than men with all grades of inflammation. All patients with moderate edema are male and all patients with severe edema are female. A significant association (p=0.007) exists between these two variables. Significant differences were found when comparing the degree of inflammation with nuclear alterations (p=0.001) and the same results when comparing the degree of edema and nuclear changes (p<0.001). This study demonstrates that clinical examination can be used, with a small margin of error, to monitor and control the state of the peri-implant mucosa. In clinics the predisposition of female patients to greater degree of edema and inflammation should be accounted for. PMID:24551281

  2. Peri-implant soft tissue management: Where are we?

    PubMed

    Bhatavadekar, Neel

    2012-10-01

    Dental implants have evolved dramatically over the last decade, and so have our expectations from them in terms of functional and esthetic criteria. The maintenance and augmentation of the soft tissue has emerged as an area of concern and focus. The triad of anatomical peri-implant characteristics, soft tissue response to the implant material, and clinical skill form the fundamental principles in augmenting soft tissue. However, as clinicians, where are we with regards to the ability to augment and maintain soft tissue around dental implants, about 40 years after the first implants were placed? We now understand that peri-implant soft tissue management begins with extraction management. Our treatment modalities have evolved from socket compression post-extraction, to socket preservation with an aim to enhance the eventual peri-implant soft tissue. This short communication will assess the evolution of our thought regarding peri-implant soft tissue management, augmentation of keratinized mucosa around implants, and also look at some recent techniques including the rotated pedicle connective tissue graft for enhancing inter-implant papilla architecture. With newer research modalities, such as cyto-detachment technology, and cutting-edge bioengineering solutions (possibly a soft-tissue-implant construct) which might be available in the near future for enhancing soft tissue, we are certainly in an exciting era in dentistry.

  3. Peri-implant soft tissue management: Where are we?

    PubMed Central

    Bhatavadekar, Neel

    2012-01-01

    Dental implants have evolved dramatically over the last decade, and so have our expectations from them in terms of functional and esthetic criteria. The maintenance and augmentation of the soft tissue has emerged as an area of concern and focus. The triad of anatomical peri-implant characteristics, soft tissue response to the implant material, and clinical skill form the fundamental principles in augmenting soft tissue. However, as clinicians, where are we with regards to the ability to augment and maintain soft tissue around dental implants, about 40 years after the first implants were placed? We now understand that peri-implant soft tissue management begins with extraction management. Our treatment modalities have evolved from socket compression post-extraction, to socket preservation with an aim to enhance the eventual peri-implant soft tissue. This short communication will assess the evolution of our thought regarding peri-implant soft tissue management, augmentation of keratinized mucosa around implants, and also look at some recent techniques including the rotated pedicle connective tissue graft for enhancing inter-implant papilla architecture. With newer research modalities, such as cyto-detachment technology, and cutting-edge bioengineering solutions (possibly a soft-tissue-implant construct) which might be available in the near future for enhancing soft tissue, we are certainly in an exciting era in dentistry. PMID:23493178

  4. [Research progress in peri-implant soft tissue engineering augmentation method].

    PubMed

    Pei, Tingting; Yu, Hongqiang; Wen, Chaoju; Guo, Tianqi; Zhou, Yanmin; Peng, Huimin

    2016-05-01

    The sufficiency of hard and soft tissue at the implant site is the guarantee of long-term function, health and the appearance of implant denture. Problem of soft tissue recession at the implant site has always been bothering dentists. Traditional methods for augmentation of soft tissue such as gingival transplantation have disadvantages of instability of the increased soft-tissue and more trauma. Lately the methods that base on tissue engineering to increase the soft tissue of peri-implant sites have drawn great attention. This review focuses on the current methods of peri-implant restoration through tissue engineering, seed cells, biological scaffolds and cytokines.

  5. Influence of Peri-Implant Soft Tissue Condition and Plaque Accumulation on Peri-Implantitis: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Poskevicius, Lukas; Juodzbalys, Gintaras; Kubilius, Ricardas; Jimbo, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To systematically examine influence of soft tissue condition and plaque accumulation around dental implants on peri-implantitis development. Material and Methods An electronic literature search was conducted of two databases - MEDLINE (Ovid) and EMBASE from 2011 to 2016. Sequential screenings at the title, abstract, and full-text levels were performed. Clinical human studies in the English language that had reported soft tissue condition or plaque accumulation influence on peri-implantitis development were included. The resulting articles were independently subjected to clear inclusion and exclusion criteria by two reviewers as follows. Results The search resulted in 8 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. These studies reported gingival index, plaque index, pocket depth, bleeding on probing/modified bleeding index for sites with “adequate” (≥ 2 mm) and “inadequate” (< 2 mm) width of keratinized mucosa. Results demonstrated that the amount of keratinized mucosa has little influence on soft-tissue inflammation in the presence of good oral hygiene. However, suboptimal oral hygiene due to difficulty in access for plaque control in the areas of minimal keratinized mucosa may lead to greater tissue damage. Conclusions In cases with insufficient keratinized gingiva in the vicinity of implants, the insufficiency does not necessarily mediate adverse effects on the hygiene management and soft tissue health condition. Nonetheless, the risk of the increase of gingival index, plaque index, pocket depth, bleeding on probing/modified bleeding index is present. Therefore, the presence of an appropriate amount of keratinized gingiva is required. PMID:27833727

  6. Expression of IL-22, IL-22R and IL-23 in the peri-implant soft tissues of patients with peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhenhua; Wang, Hui; Sun, Zheng; Luo, Wei; Wu, Yafei

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the expression of interleukin (IL)-22, IL-22R and IL-23 in the peri-implant soft tissues between the peri-implantitis patient group (PG) and peri-implant healthy control group (HG). The tissues were collected from 12 peri-implantitis patients and eight peri-implant healthy controls. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) were performed to analyse the gene expression of IL-22, IL-22R and IL-23p19 in peri-implant soft tissues in the PG and the HG group. The IHC result showed that number of IL-22, IL-22R, and IL-23p19 positive cells increased in PG than in HG (P<0.05). The result of qPCR demonstrated that the expressions of IL-22 messenger RNA (mRNA) and IL-23p19 mRNA were significantly higher in the PG group compared to the HG group (P<0.05). Gene expression of IL-22R mRNA was higher in the PG group; however, there was no statistically significant difference between these two groups (P>0.05). This study indicates that there is an increased expression level of IL-22 and IL-23 in patients with peri-implantitis, which may induce expression of related pro-inflammatory cytokines and may further have a crucial role in tissue repair and reconstruction in pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A modified impression technique for accurate registration of peri-implant soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Attard, Nikolai; Barzilay, Izchak

    2003-02-01

    Replacement of single missing teeth with an implant-supported restoration is recognized as a highly successful treatment. An impression technique for peri-implant soft-tissue replication in an anterior zone is described. The technique involves use of an interim restoration as an abutment for the final impression. This allows accurate duplication of the soft tissues and fabrication of a final restoration with the correct emergence profile.

  8. Combined soft and hard tissue peri-implant plastic surgery techniques to enhance implant rehabilitation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baltacıoğlu, Esra; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Bağış, Nilsun; Aydın, Güven; Yuva, Pınar; Korkmaz, Yavuz Tolga; Bağış, Bora

    2014-01-01

    This case report presents an implant-aided prosthetic treatment in which peri-implant plastic surgery techniques were applied in combination to satisfactorily attain functional aesthetic expectations. Peri-implant plastic surgery enables the successful reconstruction and restoration of the balance between soft and hard tissues and allows the option of implant-aided fixed prosthetic rehabilitation.

  9. Combined Soft and Hard Tissue Peri-Implant Plastic Surgery Techniques to Enhance Implant Rehabilitation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Baltacıoğlu, Esra; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Bağış, Nilsun; Aydın, Güven; Yuva, Pınar; Korkmaz, Yavuz Tolga; Bağış, Bora

    2014-01-01

    This case report presents an implant-aided prosthetic treatment in which peri-implant plastic surgery techniques were applied in combination to satisfactorily attain functional aesthetic expectations. Peri-implant plastic surgery enables the successful reconstruction and restoration of the balance between soft and hard tissues and allows the option of implant-aided fixed prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:25489351

  10. The influence of initial soft tissue thickness on peri-implant bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Vervaeke, Stijn; Dierens, Melissa; Besseler, Jos; De Bruyn, Hugo

    2014-04-01

    To elucidate the influence of initial soft tissue thickness on peri-implant bone remodeling. The research hypothesis was that implants installed in patients or at sites with thin mucosal tissues would show increased peri-implant bone loss. 79 edentulous patients were consecutively treated with two non-splinted implants supporting an overdenture in the mandible. During recall-visits, peri-implant health was determined by means of probing pocket depth and the modified plaque/bleeding index. Digital peri-apical radiographs were taken from individual implants. Bone level changes were measured from a reference point (lower border of the smooth implant collar) to the marginal bone-to-implant contact level. The linear mixed-effect model analysis was adopted to analyze the influence of clinical parameters and transmucosal abutment height on peri-implant bone loss. 67 patients attended the 1-year and 66 the 2-year recall-visit. Mean bone level changes were 0.89 mm (SD 0.62) and 0.90 mm (SD 0.66), plaque scores 0.82 (SD 0.94) and 0.87 (SD 0.92), bleeding scores 0.46 (SD 0.68) and 0.56 (SD 0.72) and PPD 1.65 mm (SD 0.60) and 1.78 mm (SD 0.59) after 1 year and 2 years respectively. The linear mixed-effect model revealed increasing bone level changes with decreasing abutment heights. Peri-implant bone level changes were significantly higher for implants with abutments of <2 mm (1.17 mm, p < .01; 1.23 mm, p < .01), 2 mm (0.86 mm, p < .01; 1.03 mm, p < .01) or 3 mm (0.38 mm, p = .046; 0.41 mm, p = .044) compared to ≥4 mm-abutments (bone level changes set to zero as reference value) both after 1 year and 2 years and bone level changes were significantly influenced by probing pocket depth (p < .01, p < .01), but not by plaque (p = .31, p = .09) and bleeding scores (p = .30, p = .40). The present study suggests that implants with lower abutments, reflecting the initial gingival thickness, lose more peri-implant

  11. Abutment Material Effect on Peri-implant Soft Tissue Color and Perceived Esthetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aram; Campbell, Stephen D; Viana, Marlos A G; Knoernschild, Kent L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of implant abutment material on peri-implant soft tissue color using intraoral spectrophotometric analysis and to compare the clinical outcomes with patient and clinician perception and satisfaction. Thirty patients and four prosthodontic faculty members participated. Abutments were zirconia, gold-hued titanium, and titanium. Peri-implant mucosa color of a single anterior implant restoration was compared to the patient's control tooth. Spectrophotometric analysis using SpectroShade(TM) Micro data determined the color difference (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, Δb*) between the midfacial peri-implant soft tissue for each abutment material and the marginal gingiva of the control tooth. Color difference values of the abutment groups were compared using ANOVA (α = 0.05). Patient and clinician satisfaction surveys were also conducted using a color-correcting light source. The results of each patient and clinician survey question were compared using chi-square analysis (α = 0.05). Pearson correlation analyses identified the relationship between the total color difference (ΔE) and the patient/clinician perception and satisfaction, as well as between ΔE and tissue thickness. Zirconia abutments displayed significantly smaller spectrophotometric gingival color difference (ΔE) compared to titanium and gold-hued titanium abutments (respectively, 3.98 ± 0.99; 7.22 ± 3.31; 5.65 ± 2.11; p < 0.05). Among ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*, only Δa* (red-green spectrum) showed significant difference between groups. There was no significant correlation between measured soft tissue thickness and ΔE, but thick gingival phenotype, determined by a probe test, demonstrated a smaller ΔE than thin phenotype (4.82 ± 1.49; 6.41 ± 3.27; p = 0.097). There was no statistical difference in patient or clinician satisfaction among abutment materials, and no correlation between ΔE and the patient and clinician satisfaction. Patient satisfaction was

  12. Impact of abutment material on peri-implant soft tissue color. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Sala, Leticia; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Carrillo-de-Albornoz, Ana

    2016-11-22

    The objectives of the present study is to determine the differences in peri-implant soft tissue color with the utilization of titanium, titanium gold-plated, white zirconia, Vita Classical (VC) A4-shaded zirconia, and fluorescent white zirconia abutments and to establish the influence of gingival thickness on the resulting color. Four implants were contralaterally inserted in 19 fresh pig mandibles, and the color of the peri-implant mucosa with the different abutments was spectrophotometrically measured at 1-, 2-, and 3-mm height from the margin. At 1-mm height, titanium significantly differed from all zirconia abutments in lightness (L*), chroma along red axis (a*), and chroma along yellow-blue axis (b*) parameters. At 2 mm, all zirconia abutments differed from titanium in b* but only fluorescent zirconia in a*. At 3 mm, titanium differed from VC A4-shaded and fluorescent zirconia abutments in b*. At soft tissue thicknesses <1 and 1-2 mm, titanium differed from fluorescent zirconia in a* and b* and from VC A4-shaded zirconia in b*; at thickness >2 mm, no differences were found among abutments. All abutments differed from natural teeth in a* and b* at all heights and thicknesses except for fluorescent zirconia at thickness >2 mm. The Euclidean distance (ΔΕ) differed between titanium abutments and gold, VC A4, and fluorescent zirconia at <1- and 1-2-mm thicknesses. The natural gingival color was not reproduced with any abutment at gingival thicknesses <2 mm. The worst color match was with titanium abutments and the best with fluorescent zirconia, followed by VC A4-shaded zirconia. At gingival thicknesses >2 mm, no differences were detected among abutments. This study demonstrates that the type of abutment and the gingival thickness affect the resulting peri-implant gingival color.

  13. Prosthetic resolution of peri-implant mucositis: promoting soft-tissue health through proper restorative design.

    PubMed

    Azar, David E

    2014-01-01

    As the use of dental implants has become more prevalent in restorative dentistry, a need has emerged for developing proper therapeutic approaches and modalities to treat peri-implant disease. While much attention has focused on tissue-centric treatment modalities, this article will examine another causative factor in peri-implant disease: improper restorative design. It will discuss the therapeutic benefits of modifying the morphology of existing restorative components in a case of chronic peri-implant mucositis, as well as review some basic concepts of current implant management.

  14. Changes of the peri-implant soft tissue thickness after grafting with a collagen matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zafiropoulos, Gregory-George; Deli, Giorgio; Hoffmann, Oliver; John, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the treatment outcome of the use of a porcine monolayer collagen matrix (mCM) to increase soft-tissue volume as a part of implant site development. Materials and Methods: Implants were placed in single sites in 27 patients. In the test group, mCM was used for soft-tissue augmentation. No graft was placed in the control group. Soft-tissue thickness (STTh) was measured at the time of surgery (T0) and 6 months postoperatively (T1) at two sites (STTh 1, 1 mm below the gingival margin; STTh 2, 3 mm below the mucogingival margin). Results: Significant increases (P < 0.001) in STTh (STTh 1 = 1.06 mm, 117%; STTh 2 = 0.89 mm, 81%) were observed in the test group. Biopsy results showed angiogenesis and mature connective tissue covered by keratinized epithelium. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it could be concluded that mCM leads to a significant increase of peri-implant soft-tissue thickness, with good histological integration and replacement by soft tissue and may serve as an alternative to connective tissue grafting. PMID:28298828

  15. Development of stable peri-implant soft tissue and mentolabial sulcus depth with an implant-retained soft tissue conformer after osteocutaneous flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dhima, Matilda; Rieck, Kevin L; Arce, Kevin; Salinas, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Excessive soft tissue bulk, movement, chronic inflammation, and hypertrophy in periimplant areas pose challenges for long-term management of peri-implant soft tissues surrounding osteocutaneous flap reconstructions. A case history report is presented on the predictable establishment of stable peri-implant soft tissue and improved mentolabial sulcus depth in a patient treated for high-grade osteosarcoma of the mandible. Following surgical resection, reconstruction with osteocutaneous fibula free flap, and endosseous implant placement, a combined surgical and prosthetic approach was used through a lip switch vestibuloplasty and an implant-retained soft tissue conformer.

  16. Peri-implant soft tissue colour around titanium and zirconia abutments: a prospective randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Cosgarea, Raluca; Gasparik, Cristina; Dudea, Diana; Culic, Bogdan; Dannewitz, Bettina; Sculean, Anton

    2015-05-01

    To objectively determine the difference in colour between the peri-implant soft tissue at titanium and zirconia abutments. Eleven patients, each with two contralaterally inserted osteointegrated dental implants, were included in this study. The implants were restored either with titanium abutments and porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns, or with zirconia abutments and ceramic crowns. Prior and after crown cementation, multi-spectral images of the peri-implant soft tissues and the gingiva of the neighbouring teeth were taken with a colorimeter. The colour parameters L*, a*, b*, c* and the colour differences ΔE were calculated. Descriptive statistics, including non-parametric tests and correlation coefficients, were used for statistical analyses of the data. Compared to the gingiva of the neighbouring teeth, the peri-implant soft tissue around titanium and zirconia (test group), showed distinguishable ΔE both before and after crown cementation. Colour differences around titanium were statistically significant different (P = 0.01) only at 1 mm prior to crown cementation compared to zirconia. Compared to the gingiva of the neighbouring teeth, statistically significant (P < 0.01) differences were found for all colour parameter, either before or after crown cementation for both abutments; more significant differences were registered for titanium abutments. Tissue thickness correlated positively with c*-values for titanium at 1 mm and 2 mm from the gingival margin. Within their limits, the present data indicate that: (i) The peri-implant soft tissue around titanium and zirconia showed colour differences when compared to the soft tissue around natural teeth, and (ii) the peri-implant soft tissue around zirconia demonstrated a better colour match to the soft tissue at natural teeth than titanium. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Long-term stability of peri-implant tissues after bone or soft tissue augmentation. Effect of zirconia or titanium abutments on peri-implant soft tissues. Summary and consensus statements. The 4th EAO Consensus Conference 2015.

    PubMed

    Sicilia, Alberto; Quirynen, Marc; Fontolliet, Alain; Francisco, Helena; Friedman, Anton; Linkevicius, Tomas; Lutz, Rainer; Meijer, Henny J; Rompen, Eric; Rotundo, Roberto; Schwarz, Frank; Simion, Massimo; Teughels, Wim; Wennerberg, Ann; Zuhr, Otto

    2015-09-01

    Several surgical techniques and prosthetic devices have been developed in the last decades, aiming to improve aesthetic, hygienic and functional outcomes that may affect the peri-implant tissues, such as procedures of bone and soft tissue augmentation and the use of custom-made abutments of titanium and zirconium. Three systematic reviews, based on randomized clinical trials and prospective studies covering the above reported topics were analysed, and the detected evidence was exposed to interactive experts' discussion during the group's and general assembly's meetings of the 4th EAO Consensus Conference. The results are reported using the following abbreviations: S-T: short-term evidence, M-T: medium-term evidence; L-T: long-term evidence; LE: limited evidence. Soft tissue augmentation procedures may be indicated for the increase of soft tissue thickness and keratinized tissue, the reduction of interproximal peri-implant bone loss, and the coverage of shallow peri-implant soft tissue recessions (S-T, LE), L-T is lacking. Guided bone regeneration approaches (GBR) showed efficacy when used for ridge reconstruction after the complete healing of the soft tissues (S-T & L-T), and the stability of the augmented bone may play a role in the maintenance of the soft tissue position and dimensions (LE). No significant differences were observed between titanium and zirconia abutments when evaluating probing pocket depth, bleeding on probing, marginal bone levels and mucosal recessions. Zirconia abutments were associated with more biological complications but demonstrated superiority in terms of achieving natural soft tissue colour (S-T). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effects of thread size in the implant neck area on peri-implant hard and soft tissues: an animal study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jay-Yong; Moon, Ik-Sang; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kwang-Ho; Huh, Jong-Ki; Lee, Dong-Won

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this animal study was to examine the effects of thread size in the implant neck area on peri-implant tissues in terms of BIC and hard- and soft-tissue dimensions. Six Beagle dogs received experimental implants in the mandible 3 month after the removal of premolars and first molars (P2, P3, P4, and M1). Two different types of implants were installed in each animal: Anyone microthread(®) as Group 1 and Anyone(®) as Group 2. Resonance frequency test, intraoral radiography, micro-CT, and histomorphometry were used to evaluate peri-implant tissue after implantation periods of 4 and 8 weeks. No remarkable complication was observed during the healing period in either group. Resonance frequency testing revealed no significant difference between groups. In radiographic evaluation, Group 2 showed more bone loss than Group 1. However, this difference was not statistically significant. In the micro-CT analysis, BIC and BIV values and soft-tissue height were not significant in both groups. Histological analysis revealed no significant difference in BIC ratio, bone density, or bone loss between groups. However, soft-tissue height was significantly greater in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P = 0.0004). No difference in peri-implant hard or soft tissues was observed according to thread size in the implant neck area. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Combined surgical resective and regenerative therapy for advanced peri-implantitis with concomitant soft tissue volume augmentation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Frank; John, Gordon; Sahm, Narja; Becker, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    This case report presents a 3-year follow-up of the clinical outcomes of a combined surgical therapy for advanced peri-implantitis with concomitant soft tissue volume augmentation using a collagen matrix. One patient suffering from advanced peri-implantitis and a thin mucosal biotype underwent access flap surgery, implantoplasty at buccally and supracrestally exposed implant parts, and augmentation of the intrabony components using a natural bone mineral and a native collagen membrane after surface decontamination. A collagen matrix was applied to the wound area to increase soft tissue volume and support transmucosal healing. The following clinical parameters were recorded over a period of 3 years: bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), mucosal recession (MR), clinical attachment level (CAL), and width of keratinized mucosa (KM). At 36 months, the combined surgical procedure was associated with a clinically important reduction in mean BOP (100%), PD (4.3 ± 0.5 mm), and CAL (4.4 ± 0.4 mm). Site-level analysis of the buccal aspects pointed to an increase in MR (-1.0 ± 0.4 mm) and a decrease in KM (-1.3 ± 0.5 mm) values at 12 months. However, a regain in mucosal height and KM was noted at 24 months, even reaching respective baseline values after 36 months of healing. The presented combined surgical procedure was effective in controlling an advanced peri-implantitis lesion without compromising the overall esthetic outcome in the long term.

  20. Accelerated Peri-Implant Soft Tissue Conditioning With Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing Technology and Surgical Intervention: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hyoung; Sohn, Dong-Seok

    2015-12-01

    The conventional soft tissue conditioning technique around implant demands time and effort for optimizing soft tissue contour. This article describes an alternative technique for achieving proper emergence profile with a custom-milled titanium abutment, interim restoration, and surgical intervention. With this technique, peri-implant soft tissue is conditioned and healed against a correct designed interim restoration without composite resin addition.

  1. Effects of Thread Depth in the Neck Area on Peri-Implant Hard and Soft Tissues: An Animal Study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shan-Pao; Lee, Dong-Won; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kwang-Ho; Park, Kwang-Bum; Moon, Ik-Sang

    2016-11-01

    Implants with deep thread depth have been developed for the purpose of increasing total implant surface area. However, effects of implant thread depth remain controversial. The aim of this study is to examine effects of thread depth on peri-implant tissues in terms of bone-implant contact (BIC), bone-implant volume (BIV), and hard and soft tissue dimensions using comprehensive analyses, including microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Five beagle dogs received experimental intramandibular implants 3 months after removal of their premolars and first molars (P2, P3, P4, and M1). Two different types of implants were installed in each animal: deep threaded (DT) and shallow threaded (ST). Resonance frequency testing was performed on the day of implantation as well as 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. Intraoral radiography, micro-CT, and histomorphometry were used to evaluate peri-implant tissues 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. There were no significant differences in resonance frequency test results between the two groups. Although radiographic analysis showed no group differences, micro-CT (P = 0.01) and histomorphometry (P = 0.003) revealed the DT group had significantly lower BIC values than the ST group at 4 weeks. However, by 8 weeks, BIC values of the two groups did not differ significantly. No significant differences in BIV or soft tissue height were observed between the two groups at either time point. DT implants showed no benefits over ST implants when inserted in dog mandibles.

  2. Analysis of the peri-implant soft tissues in contact with zirconia abutments: an evidence-based literature review.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Rodrigo Antonio; Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Mazaro, Jose Vitor Quinelli; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate through a literature review, the soft tissue response in contact with zirconia abutments, including case reports comparing prosthetics rehabilitations with zirconia and titanium abutments upto 3 years of follow-up as well as the factors that should be considered on implant's abutment selection. Metallic abutments can provide grayish color when in contact with thin soft tissues which may lead the implant prosthetic treatment to failure. In this context, the abutments of zirconia stand out because there is an excellent linking between esthetics and the health of peri-implant soft tissues. A consult of the published researches was made on the PubMed database from 2000 to September 2012. The including criteria were: literature reviews, clinical studies and case reports in English that focused on the response of the soft tissue in contact with zirconia implant abutments. The studies that were not in English and did not match the tackled issue were excluded. A total of 32 articles were found. According to the search strategy, just 16 articles were selected for this review. Three studies affirmed that zirconia abutments have an excellent soft tissue response; one study showed increased gingival recession with zirconia abutments and nine studies do not stand out any difference on biological behavior between titanium and zirconia abutments. Three studies affirmed that zirconia abutments provide natural gingival appearance, anatomic contour and greater esthetics. The use of zirconia abutments is recommended for anterior regions because of their greater optical properties and esthetic results and more studies should be performed and analyzed longitudinally regarding their biological response. The zirconia abutments have been established to be essential in order to achieve great esthetic results in cases of thin peri-implant soft tissues and in regions where the three-dimensional placement of implants is more superficial.

  3. Spectrophotometric and visual evaluation of peri-implant soft tissue color.

    PubMed

    Benic, Goran I; Scherrer, Daniela; Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Thoma, Daniel S; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2017-02-01

    To spectrophotometrically and visually test whether the peri-implant mucosal color differs from the color of the natural gingiva. Forty single implants in the incisor and premolar region of 40 patients were assessed 3-7 years after implant placement. The differences of the color components lightness, chroma along red-green axis, chroma along yellow-blue axis, and the total color difference ΔE between peri-implant mucosa and natural gingiva were measured with a spectrophotometer. The color difference between peri-implant mucosa and natural gingiva was visually evaluated by clinicians and rated as "clinically visible" or "clinically invisible" from speaking distance. The dimensions of peri-implant mucosa and gingiva at the mid-buccal aspect were evaluated by using cone-beam CT. Spearman analysis was performed to detect correlations between different variables. Two-sided t-test, ANOVA, Mann-Whitney, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were applied to detect differences between the groups. The spectrophotometrically assessed color difference ΔE between peri-implant mucosa and natural gingiva amounted to 7.0 ± 3.9. The peri-implant mucosa presented a significant dark, greenish and bluish discoloration in comparison with gingiva at control teeth. Clinical investigation revealed that in 60% of sites the color difference between peri-implant mucosa and natural gingiva was clinically visible from speaking distance. The threshold value ΔE for the extraoral clinical distinction of mucosal color differences measured 7.5. When comparing the groups with visible and invisible color differences with respect to the three color components, a significant difference was found only for chroma along yellow-blue axis. In the group with visible color difference, mucosa presented a bluish discoloration. Correlation analysis indicated that with an increase in mucosal thickness, a trend for smaller ΔE was found. The spectrophotometrically assessed color of the peri-implant mucosa revealed more

  4. Influence of abutment material on peri-implant soft tissues in anterior areas with thin gingival biotype: a multicentric prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lops, Diego; Stellini, Edoardo; Sbricoli, Luca; Cea, Niccolò; Romeo, Eugenio; Bressan, Eriberto

    2016-10-03

    The aim of the present clinical trial was to analyze, through spectrophotometric digital technology, the influence of the abutment material on the color of the peri-implant soft tissue in patients with thin gingival biotype. Thirty-seven patients received an endosseous dental implant in the anterior maxilla. At time of each definitive prosthesis delivery, an all-ceramic crown has been tried on gold, titanium and zirconia abutment. Peri-implant soft-tissue color has been measured through a spectrophotometer after the insertion of each single abutment. Also facial peri-implant soft-tissue thickness was measured at the level of the implant neck through a caliper. A specific software has been utilized to identify a standardized tissue area and to collect the data before the statistical analysis in Lab* color space. ΔE parameters of the selected abutments were tested for correlation with mucosal thickness. Pearson correlation test was used. Only 15 patients met the study inclusion criteria on peri-implant soft-tissue thickness. Peri-implant soft-tissue color was different from that around natural teeth, no matter which type of restorative material was selected. Measurements regarding all the abutments were above the critical threshold of ΔE 8.74 for intraoral color distinction by the naked eye. The ΔE mean values of gold and zirconium abutments were similar (11.43 and 11.37, respectively) and significantly lower (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, respectively) than the titanium abutment (13.55). In patients with a facial soft-tissue thickness ≤2 mm, the ΔE mean value of gold and zirconia abutments was significantly lower than that of titanium abutments (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, respectively) and much more close to the reference threshold of 8.74. For peri-implant soft tissue of ≤2 mm, gold or zirconia abutments could be selected in anterior areas treatment. Moreover, the thickness of the peri-implant soft tissue seemed to be a crucial factor in the abutment impact

  5. Molecular, cellular and pharmaceutical aspects of autologous grafts for peri-implant hard and soft tissue defects.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiayu; Hao, Yongming; Zhao, Wei; Lv, Chengqi; Zou, Derong

    2016-12-01

    The lack of supporting hard and soft tissues always prevents the rehabilitation with dental implants. Among various hard and soft tissue augmentation procedures, autologous grafts have been considered to be the gold standard. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow, dental tissue and adipose tissue have been described as promising alternatives for bone regeneration in the field of dental implantation. Mucosal cells, gingival fibroblasts and dental progenitor cells (DPS) can enhance peri-implant soft tissue augmentation and regenerate periodontal tissues around dental implants. Obtained from patients, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) are enriched in autologous platelets, which contain a great deal of growth factors and cytokines that are conducive to the regeneration of both hand and soft tissues around dental implants. Pharmaceutical treatments for osteoporosis and diabetes should be locally applied with implant procedures to restrict the resorption of autologous bone grafts and reduction of bone volume. Although autografts hold great potentials for dental implants, new approaches should also be explored with minimally invasion donor sites methods such as tissue engineering combined with autologous three factors and bio-3D printing involving self-assembling cell aggregates.

  6. Extraoral implants in the rehabilitation of craniofacial defects: implant and prosthesis survival rates and peri-implant soft tissue evaluation.

    PubMed

    Curi, Marcos Martins; Oliveira, Marcelo Ferraz; Molina, Giuliano; Cardoso, Camila Lopes; Oliveira, Loretta De Groot; Branemark, Per-Ingvar; Ribeiro, Karina de Cássia Braga

    2012-07-01

    Few reports have evaluated cumulative survival rates of extraoral rehabilitation and peri-implant soft tissue reaction at long-term follow-up. The objective of this study was to evaluate implant and prosthesis survival rates and the soft tissue reactions around the extraoral implants used to support craniofacial prostheses. A retrospective study was performed of patients who received implants for craniofacial rehabilitation from 2003 to 2010. Two outcome variables were considered: implant and prosthetic success. The following predictor variables were recorded: gender, age, implant placement location, number and size of implants, irradiation status in the treated field, date of prosthesis delivery, soft tissue response, and date of last follow-up. A statistical model was used to estimate survival rates and associated confidence intervals. We randomly selected 1 implant per patient for analysis. Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test to compare survival curves. A total of 150 titanium implants were placed in 56 patients. The 2-year overall implant survival rates were 94.1% for auricular implants, 90.9% for nasal implants, 100% for orbital implants, and 100% for complex midfacial implants (P = .585). The implant survival rates were 100% for implants placed in irradiated patients and 94.4% for those placed in nonirradiated patients (P = .324). The 2-year overall prosthesis survival rates were 100% for auricular implants, 90.0% for nasal implants, 92.3% for orbital implants, and 100% for complex midfacial implants (P = .363). The evaluation of the peri-implant soft tissue response showed that 15 patients (26.7%) had a grade 0 soft tissue reaction, 30 (53.5%) had grade 1, 6 (10.7%) had grade 2, and 5 (8.9%) had grade 3. From this study, it was concluded that craniofacial rehabilitation with extraoral implants is a safe, reliable, and predictable method to restore the patient's normal appearance. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral

  7. Peri-implant soft tissue analyses comparing Ti and ZrO2 abutments: an animal study on beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Juan; Caneiro, Leticia; Liñares, Antonio; Batalla, Pilar; Muñoz, Fernando; Ramos, Isabel

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the soft tissue histomorphometric composition around implant abutments comparing two different materials, titanium (Ti) and zirconia (ZrO2 ). Twelve implants were placed at bone level in the mandible of six beagle dogs (one in each side). At the same day of surgery one titanium abutment was screwed to the implant in one side (control group) and a zirconia abutment was screwed in the contralateral side. Nine months after implant/abutments placement, animals were sacrificed for histological analysis. Descriptive analysis was calculated for each variable and Wilcoxon test was applied to evaluate histomorphometric variables. At the end of the study the soft tissue dimension at Ti and ZrO2 were similar in all counterparts: biological width, the length of the barrier epithelium, length of the connective tissue, and the percentage of collagen fibers density. However, the percentage of blood vessels was higher for the Ti in comparison to ZrO2 (5.11% ± 1.70 and 2.23% ± 0.98, respectively [P = 0.016]). Peri-implant soft tissue histomorphology composition was similar in implant abutments made of ZrO2 and titanium after 9 months of healing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Comparison of Gene Expression in Peri-implant Soft Tissue and Oral Mucosal Tissue by Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    Makabe, Yasushi; Sasaki, Hodaka; Mori, Gentaro; Sekine, Hideshi; Yoshinari, Masao; Yajima, Yasutomo

    2015-01-01

    Implant placement entails disruption of the epithelial continuity, which can lead to various complications. Therefore, the area of mucosal penetration is of particular interest clinically. The goal of the present study was to compare gene expression in peri-implant soft tissue (PIST) with that in oral mucosal tissue (OMT) using microarray analysis, and to investigate which genes were specifically expressed in PIST. The bilateral upper first molars were extracted from 4-week-old rats and titanium alloy implants placed only in the left-side extraction sockets. Four weeks after surgery, samples were harvested from the left-side PIST and right-side OMT and total RNA samples isolated. Microarray analysis was used to compare gene expression in PIST and OMT, which was then confirmed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemical staining was also performed to confirm protein level expression. The number of genes expressed with more than a twofold change in PIST compared with OMT was 1,102, of which 750 genes were upregulated and 352 genes were downregulated. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of three selected genes-Ceacam1, Ifitm1, and MUC4-were more significantly expressed in PIST than in OMT(P < .01). Immunohistochemical localization of CEACAM1, IFITM1, and MUC4 was observed in PIST, but no immunoreaction was recognized in OMT. The result of microarray analysis showed that, because of implant placement, 750 genes were upregulated in PIST compared with OMT. CEACAM1, IFITM1, and MUC4 were specifically upregulated in PIST.

  9. Single unit attachments improve peri-implant soft tissue conditions in mandibular overdentures supported by four implants.

    PubMed

    Cordaro, Luca; di Torresanto, Vincenzo Mirisola; Petricevic, Nikola; Jornet, Primitivo Roig; Torsello, Ferruccio

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical performance as well as patients' and clinicians' satisfaction on two different prosthodontic retention systems for implant-overdentures in the mandible. In this retrospective study, patients provided with four intraforaminal implants with at least 12 months of follow-up since overdenture delivery were evaluated. A total of 39 patients were treated either with Locator(®) attachment or with cad-cam milled bar. Clinical parameters such as Peri-implant Probing Depth (PPD), Plaque Index (PI), and Bleeding on Probing (BOP) were evaluated. Patients' and clinicians' perceptions regarding the outcome were assessed on visual analog scales (VAS). The mean follow-up was 13 months in the Locator(®) group and 18 months in the Bar group and no implants were lost. The Locator group showed better results for PPD, PI, and BOP values. Patients' satisfaction was high in both groups, whereas the clinicians found better hygienic conditions and soft tissue health in the Locator group. Although the patients' satisfaction was similar in both groups the Locator(®) system demonstrated better soft tissues scores because hygienic maintenance was more complicated around bars. This may increase the frequency of chronic inflammations around the implants. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Effect of Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF) on Peri-implant Soft Tissue and Crestal Bone in One-Stage Implant Placement: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Boora, Priyanka; Rathee, Manu; Bhoria, Mohaneesh

    2015-04-01

    The viability of Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF) on enhancement of osseous and associated tissue healing has been substantiated well in literature. However, paucity in the applicability of PRF to enhance peri-implant healing in oral region is not well-corroborated. This prospective study evaluated the effect of Platelet PRF on peri-implant tissue response following one-stage implant placement with non-functional immediate provisionalization in maxillary anterior region. A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) was conducted across 20 (15 male, 5 Female) systemically healthy subjects with maintainable oral hygiene. Subjects were broadly divided into two groups i.e. Study group (PRF group) and Control group (Non-PRF group). Twenty standard SLA- AB/AE (alumina oxide blasted/acid etched surface treated) tapered threaded dental implants were randomly placed with and without PRF and immediately provisionalized. The subjects were evaluated clinically and radiographically at baseline (at time of implant placement), one month and three month post-operatively for peri-implant soft tissue and crestal bone responses. At 3 months, all implants remained osseointegrated. The mean marginal bone changes were observed from baseline to 3 months in both groups with lesser changes observed in PRF Group. No significant differences in probing depth and bleeding on probing were noted during follow-up. Within the limitations of this study, PRF could be considered as a healing biomaterial with potential beneficial effect on peri-implant tissue and can be used as a therapeutic adjuvant in clinical scenario of one stage, single tooth implant placement procedure in maxillary anterior region.

  11. The effect of zirconia or titanium as abutment material on soft peri-implant tissues: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Linkevicius, Tomas; Vaitelis, Julius

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this review was to analyze research with regard to the effect of zirconia or titanium as abutment material on soft peri-implant tissues. Clinical studies were selected via electronic and hand searches in English language journals until December 1, 2014. Only randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and prospective controlled clinical trials (CCTs) showing direct comparison between zirconia (Zr) and titanium (Ti) abutments in the same patient were considered. The outcome measures were (1) soft tissue color, (2) soft tissue recession, (3) peri-implant probing, (4) bleeding on probing, (5) esthetic indexes, (6) patient-reported outcome, (7) marginal bone level, and (8) biological complications. Nine relevant studies (11 papers) were identified: 4 RCTs and 5 CCTs. Due to heterogeneity in the study design, statistical methods, and reported results, a meta-analysis of the data was feasible only for soft tissue color. The outcome was found to be significantly superior for Zr abutments. For the other outcome measures, a qualitative analysis of the selected articles was performed. The studies did not show any statistically significant differences between Zr and Ti abutments on soft tissue recession, probing depths, bleeding on probing, marginal bone level, and patient-reported outcome. One study reported significantly higher pink esthetic score (PES) scores at Zr implants with Zr abutments, compared to metal implants and Ti abutments. Overall, the research does not support any obvious advantage of Ti or Zr abutments over each other. However, there is a significant tendency in Zr abutments evoking better color response of peri-implant mucosa and superior esthetic outcome measured by PES score. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Peri-implant soft tissue maintenance in patients with craniofacial implant retained prostheses.

    PubMed

    Allen, P F; Watson, G; Stassen, L; McMillan, A S

    2000-04-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to describe the effectiveness of a hygiene protocol prescribed for patients receiving craniofacial implant retained prostheses. Eleven subjects receiving either orbital or auricular prostheses were instructed by a hygienist in debris removal procedures. Patients were re-examined on at least four occasions over the following 18 months, and tissue health around the implant abutments was evaluated using standard criteria. In most cases, adequate debris removal was demonstrated, particularly when hygiene procedures were reinforced at the second follow-up visit. Barriers to maintenance of tissue health included inadequate space between fixtures and thickness of skin around abutments. Occasionally, prostheses had to be replaced due to inappropriate cleaning methods. The intensive hygiene regimen helped maintain tissue health around implant abutments, although it was demanding in terms of professional time.

  13. Peri-implant tissue response to pathological insults.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, S A

    1999-06-01

    With the increased use of osseointegrated implants and with many implants functioning for long periods of time, the soft tissue barrier around implants has become more important. This paper reviews the soft tissue response around implants under healthy and diseased conditions and presents the etiology of peri-implant tissue breakdown. Diagnostic techniques such as probing pocket depth, radiographic evidence, and microbial sampling have been analyzed and modified from the periodontal field and used during the maintenance phase of the dental implant. The long-term goal of implant maintenance is to prevent or to arrest the progression of disease, and to achieve a maintainable implant site. Recent reports indicate that peri-implant tissues can be treated with either non-surgical or surgical techniques.

  14. Sub-Periosteal Dissection with Denture-Guided Epithelial Regeneration: A Novel Method for Peri-Implant Soft Tissue Management in Reconstructed Mandibles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay V; Jacob, P C; Kuriakose, Moni A

    2016-12-01

    In patients with reconstructed mandibles using free fibula flaps, management of soft tissues around implants supporting dental rehabilitation, is often a clinical problem. The aim of this paper is to describe a new technique, namely "Sub-periosteal dissection and denture-guided epithelial regeneration (SD-DGER)", as a method of peri-implant soft tissue management in these patients. The technique consists of performing a subperiosteal dissection with creation of buccal and lingual flaps. These flaps form the buccal and lingual vestibule. Implants are placed and an interim denture is immediately loaded onto the implants to guide the regenerated epithelium. A keratinized mucosal layer is formed on the bare fibula bone in six months time. This technique was successful in producing fixed keratinized epithelial tissue around implants in patients with mandibles reconstructed using the free fibula flap in patients who did not undergo radiotherapy. The sub-periosteal dissection with denture guided epithelial regeneration is a predictable form of peri-implant soft tissue management in selected patients with reconstructed jaws.

  15. A new submerged split-thickness skin graft technique to rebuild peri-implant keratinized soft tissue in composite flap reconstructed mandible or maxilla.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Ma, Wei; Ma, Wei-guang; Li, De-hua; Liu, Bao-lin

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce our preliminary experience on a submerged split-thickness skin graft (STSG) technique combined with secondary vestibuloplasty to rebuild keratinized peri-implant soft tissue and oral vestibule for patients with large oromandibular defects reconstructed by composite flaps. Five patients were enrolled in this study. Stage 1 was submerged STSG and simultaneous implant placement. Stage 2 was the uncovering of the STSG and vestibuloplasty. The implant-borne fixed denture was inserted after this 2-stage treatment. All patients were followed for at least 12 months (average 18 months). Eighteen implants were placed. The rebuilt peri-implant keratinized soft tissue was healthy clinically. The STSG graft had firm adherence to the underlying periosteum. The vestibule had adequate depth to maintain local hygiene. All implants were osseointegrated and all implant-borne prostheses were functioning well. Submerged STSG technique combined with secondary vestibuloplasty may become a feasible and effective solution to rebuild keratinized soft tissue before dental implant restoration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Pathology of Bone Tissue during Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Schminke, B.; vom Orde, F.; Gruber, R.; Schliephake, H.; Bürgers, R.

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants are one of the most frequently used treatment options for tooth replacement. Approximately 30% of patients with dental implants develop peri-implantitis, which is an oral inflammatory disease that leads to loss of the supporting tissues, predominately the bone. For the development of future therapeutic strategies, it is essential to understand the molecular pathophysiology of human dental peri-implant infections. Here, we describe the gene and protein expression patterns of peri-implantitis bone tissue compared with healthy peri-implant bone tissue. Furthermore, cells from the osteoblastic lineage derived from peri-implantitis samples were immortalized and characterized. We applied microarray, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and Western blot analyses. The levels of typical bone matrix molecules, including SPP1, BGLAP, and COL9A1, in patients with peri-implantitis were reduced, while the inflammation marker interleukin 8 (IL8) was highly expressed. RUNX2, one of the transcription factors of mature osteoblasts, was also decreased in peri-implantitis. Finally, the human telomerase reverse transcriptase immortalized cell line from peri-implantitis exhibited a more fibro-osteoblastic character than did the healthy control. PMID:25406169

  17. The pathology of bone tissue during peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Schminke, B; Vom Orde, F; Gruber, R; Schliephake, H; Bürgers, R; Miosge, N

    2015-02-01

    Dental implants are one of the most frequently used treatment options for tooth replacement. Approximately 30% of patients with dental implants develop peri-implantitis, which is an oral inflammatory disease that leads to loss of the supporting tissues, predominately the bone. For the development of future therapeutic strategies, it is essential to understand the molecular pathophysiology of human dental peri-implant infections. Here, we describe the gene and protein expression patterns of peri-implantitis bone tissue compared with healthy peri-implant bone tissue. Furthermore, cells from the osteoblastic lineage derived from peri-implantitis samples were immortalized and characterized. We applied microarray, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and Western blot analyses. The levels of typical bone matrix molecules, including SPP1, BGLAP, and COL9A1, in patients with peri-implantitis were reduced, while the inflammation marker interleukin 8 (IL8) was highly expressed. RUNX2, one of the transcription factors of mature osteoblasts, was also decreased in peri-implantitis. Finally, the human telomerase reverse transcriptase immortalized cell line from peri-implantitis exhibited a more fibro-osteoblastic character than did the healthy control. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2014.

  18. Accurate transfer of peri-implant soft tissue emergence profile from the provisional crown to the final prosthesis using an emergence profile cast.

    PubMed

    Elian, Nicolas; Tabourian, Gerard; Jalbout, Ziad N; Classi, Anthony; Cho, Sang-Choon; Froum, Stuart; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2007-01-01

    The use of impression copings to make the final impression results in a master cast in which the soft tissue configuration around the implant platform is circular. Therefore, any soft tissue sculpting developed clinically by the provisional restoration is squandered. The purpose of this report was to present a method for the precise transfer of the peri-implant soft-tissue developed by a customized provisional restoration to an emergence profile cast. The emergence profile cast is obtained from an impression of the implant-supported provisional restoration and poured with a soft tissue model material. It is used for the fabrication of the emergence profile of the implant abutment and the cervical section of the crown. The technique described is simple, accurate, predictable, and does not require additional chair time for the customization of the impression coping or the fabrication of a new provisional restoration. This article describes a technique that results in an implant restoration that mimics accurately in its emergence profile that of the carefully crafted and customized provisional restoration. The reproduction of the soft tissue contour from the provisional to the final restoration results in an improved esthetic outcome of the final restoration.

  19. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis: bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Khammissa, R A G; Feller, L; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

    2012-03-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants have a ong-term success rate of over 90%, but may be threatened by peri-implant mucostis and peri-implantitis, bacteria biofilm-induced inflammatory conditions. While peri-implant mucositis is a reversible inflammatory condition confined to the peri-implant soft-tissue unit, peri-implantitis is characterised by progressive inflammatory destruction of the crest of the alveolar bone supporting the implant, by increased peri-implant probing depths, and by bleeding and/or suppuration on probing. Effective treatment of peri-implant mucositis will prevent the development of peri-implantitis. Plaque accumulation on the implant/abutment surface juxtaposed to the junctional epithelium and to the connective tissue zone of the peri-implant soft-tissue unit induces the development of peri-implant mucositis which can subsequently progress to peri-implantitis. The aim of this paper is to review some aspects of bacterial infection of the tissue supporting dental implants, and to explore how to maintain the healthy peri-implant soft-tissue unit.

  20. The Novel Design of Zirconium Oxide-Based Screw-Retained Restorations, Maximizing Exposure of Zirconia to Soft Peri-implant Tissues: Clinical Report After 3 Years of Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Linkevicius, Tomas

    Current use of zirconium oxide (ZrO₂)-based screw-retained restorations does not guarantee maximum contact of soft peri-implant tissues with ZrO₂, because veneering porcelain usually covers the major subgingival part of the restoration. Ceramics preclude direct interaction between zirconia and soft tissue cells, thus reducing biocompatibility and benefit to the patient. The four case reports discussed in this article describe the new design modality of the ZrO₂ screw-retained restorations, in which zirconia is exposed to the tissues and no veneering porcelain is located below the gingival margin. The article also shows the impact of this treatment on soft peri-implant tissues after 3 years of follow-up. Soft tissue recession, vestibular contour, bleeding on probing, and probing depth were evaluated.

  1. A Clinical Study Assessing the Influence of Anodized Titanium and Zirconium Dioxide Abutments and Peri-implant Soft Tissue Thickness on the Optical Outcome of Implant-Supported Lithium Disilicate Single Crowns.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rus, Francisco; Prieto, Marta; Salido, María P; Madrigal, Cristina; Özcan, Mutlu; Pradíes, Guillermo

    To assess the influence of anodized titanium and zirconium dioxide abutments and peri-implant soft tissue thickness on the optical outcome of implant-supported lithium disilicate single crowns. Twenty patients with a missing maxillary single incisor, canine, or first premolar received an endosseous implant after a two-stage surgery protocol. After healing and soft tissue conditioning, peri-implant soft tissues were reproduced in the impression, and the thickness was measured. Customized abutments were made of titanium, gold-anodized titanium, pink-anodized titanium, and zirconium dioxide. The definitive prosthesis was a lithium disilicate crown stratified by feldsphatic porcelain. Customized abutments were screwed (35 Ncm), and the crown was temporarily placed on the abutment with a try-in paste. Color measurements were made using a spectrophotometer. CIELab color scale was employed following the formula: ΔE = (ΔL)² + (Δa) ² + (Δb) ². Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), Bonferroni and Pearson's correlation tests (α = .05). Abutment material type significantly affected the ΔE values at both the peri-implant soft tissue (P = .0001) and coronal level (P = .001). The lowest ΔE values were obtained with zirconia abutments at both soft tissue (6.06 ± 3.2) and coronal level (5.76 ± 2.9) compared with those of other abutments (soft tissue: 8.96 ± 3.1 to 11.56 ± 3.4; coronal: 8.66 ± 6.1 to 10.42 ± 6.3). Mean soft tissue thickness (1.63 ± 0.64 mm) affected the ΔE values at the peri-implant soft tissue level for only titanium and pink-anodized titanium abutments (P = .024 and P = .048, respectively). In all conditions, correlation coefficients between ΔE and the abutment materials were higher for titanium (r = -0.544; P = .024) and the least for zirconia (r = -0.313; P = .238) and gold-anodized titanium (r = -0.393; P = .119) abutments. All abutment types demonstrated noticeable color difference at both the soft tissue

  2. A new cervical implant design compared with standard design in order to increase peri-implant hard and soft tissue behavior: histomorphometric and histological study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Maté-Sánchez de Val, José E; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Fernández Domínguez, Manuel; Orlato Rossetti, Paulo Henrique; Gehrke, Sergio A

    2016-09-05

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a new design of the cervical portion of dental implant with the objective to increase the volume of peri-implant tissues in the crestal area. Forty-eight tapered dental titanium implants with internal conical connection were implanted in healed alveolar sites of six dogs. Twenty-four conventional implants design (C1 implant) formed the control group, and 24 new implant design (V3 implant) formed the test group. The groups were randomized. Histological, histomorphometric, and implant stability quotient were performed. After 12 weeks of healing period, histomorphometric analyses of the specimens were carried out to measure the crestal bone level values and the tissue thickness in the cervical implant portion. The data were compared using statistical tests (α = 5%). The mean of the measurements in the buccal and lingual aspects measured of crestal bone level was 0.31 ± 0.24 mm and 0.30 ± 0.19 mm in the control group, respectively, and 0.71 ± 0.28 and 0.42 ± 0.30 mm in the test group, respectively, whereas the mean of the tissue thickness was 1.63 ± 0.33 mm and 2.04 ± 0.23 mm in the control group, respectively, and 2.11 ± 0.35 mm and 2.51 ± 0.41 mm in the test group. Within the limitations of this study, our findings suggest that more thickness of peri-implant hard and soft tissues may be expected in this new implant design. However, the control group with traditional implant design was found to have more height values of the crestal bone compared with new V3 implants. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Histological and immunohistochemical evaluation of the peri-implant soft tissues around machined and acid-etched titanium healing abutments: a prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Degidi, Marco; Artese, Luciano; Piattelli, Adriano; Scarano, Antonio; Shibli, Jamil A; Piccirilli, Marcello; Perrotti, Vittoria; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2012-06-01

    A close spatial correlation has been described between the roughness of intraoral materials and the rate of bacterial colonisation. The aim of the present study in man was to conduct a comparative immunohistochemical evaluation of the inflammatory infiltrate, microvessel density, the nitric oxide synthases 1 and 3 and the vascular endothelial growth factor expression, the proliferative activity, and the B and T lymphocyte and histiocyte positivity in the peri-implant soft tissues around machined and acid-etched titanium healing caps. Ten patients participated in this study. The patients were enrolled consecutively. All patients received dental implants left to heal in a non-submerged mode. Healing caps were inserted in all implants. Half of the implants were supplied randomly with machined caps of titanium (control), while the other half were provided randomly with acid-etched titanium caps (test). After a 6-month healing period, a gingival biopsy was performed with a circular scalpel around the healing caps of both groups. The inflammatory infiltrate was mostly present in test specimens. Their extension was much larger than that of the control samples. A higher number of T and B lymphocytes were observed in test specimens. Higher values of microvessel density and a higher expression of vascular endothelial growth factor intensity were observed in the test samples. Furthermore, the Ki-67, NOS1 and NOS3 expression was significantly higher in the test specimens. All these results showed that the tissues around test healing caps underwent a higher rate of restorative processes, most probably correlated to the higher inflammation processes observed in these tissues.

  4. The peri-implant hard and soft tissues at different implant systems. A comparative study in the dog.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, I; Berglundh, T; Wennström, J; Lindhe, J

    1996-09-01

    The aim of this study of the present experiment was to study the marginal periimplant tissues at intentionally non-submerged (1-stage implants) and initially submerged and subsequently exposed implants (2-stage implants). 5 beagle dogs, about 1-year-old, were used, 3 months after the extraction of the mandibular premolars, fixtures of the Astra Tech Implants Dental System, the Brånemark System and the Bonefit--ITI system were installed. In each mandibular quadrant, 1 fixture of each implant system was installed in a randomised order. The installation procedure followed the recommendations given in the manuals for each system. Thus, following installation, the bone crest coincided with the fixture margin of the Astra Tech Implants Dental System and the Brånemark System, whereas the border between the plasma sprayed and the machined surface of the Bonefit-ITI implant system was positioned at the level of the bone crest. Following a healing period of 3 months, abutment connection was carried out in the 2-stage systems (the Astra Tech Implants Dental System and the Brånemark system). A 6-month period of plaque control was initiated. The animals were sacrificed and biopsies representing each important region dissected. The tissue samples were prepared for light microscopy and exposed to histometric and morphometric measurements. The mucosal barrier which formed to the titanium surface following 1-stage and 2-stage implant installations comprised an epithelial and a connective tissue component, which for that 3 systems studied, had similar dimensions and composition. The amount of lamellar bone contained in the periimplant region close to the fixture part of the 3-implant systems was almost identical. It is suggested that correctly performed implant installation may ensure proper conditions for both and hard tissue healing, and that the geometry of the titanium implant seems to be of limited importance.

  5. Soft-tissue grafting for peri-implantitis-a treatment option in case of unsuitable skeletal basic morphology of the alveolar bone and lack of keratinized mucosa: a retrospective clinical cohort study.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Michael; Mengel, Rainer; Becher, Sebastian; Brinkmann, Bernhard; Peleska, Barbara; Kluk, Esther

    2015-12-01

    This retrospective study evaluated soft-tissue grafting as a surgical treatment option for peri-implantitis in case of unsuitable basic skeletal morphology of the alveolar bone and lack of keratinized mucosa. Twenty-eight patients (21 females, 7 males, at a mean age 59.4 years) were included with a total of 54 implants. All implants showed peri-implantitis and attached keratinized buccal mucosa of ≤2 mm. A surgical procedure of soft-tissue grafting (STG) was made by inserting an inlay and inlay-onlay transplant. Clinical investigations were made prior to the STG (baseline) and after 9-180 months (Ø 43 months) including the following parameters: soft-tissue biotype, skeletal basic morphology of the alveolar bone, width of the peri-implant keratinized mucosa (KM), mobility of the KM, pocket probing depth (PPD), and bleeding on probing (BOP). Nearly all patients showed a thin soft-tissue biotype. The analysis of the skeletal basic morphology of the alveolar bone revealed a narrow apical base in 18 patients, middle base in 7 patients, and broad base in 3 patients. Width of the KM increased significantly (p < 0.01) from 0.4 ± 0,5 mm to 4.3 ± 1.5 mm after STG and PPD was significantly (p < 0,01) reduced from 6.3 ± 2,3 mm to 4.1 ± 1.9 mm. A significant reduction (p < 0.01) in BOP was recorded. All patients reported a clinical improvement of the inflammatory symptoms at follow-up. The results of this study showed that the STG can be applied successfully as a surgical treatment of peri-implantitis. It remains unclear whether soft-tissue biotype or the skeletal basic morphology of the alveolar bone affects the outcome of this surgical treatment.

  6. A retrospective analysis of peri-implant tissue responses at immediate load/provisionalized microthreaded implants.

    PubMed

    De Kok, Ingeborg J; Chang, Sandra S; Moriarty, John D; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to examine the peri-implant tissue status at immediately provisionalized anterior maxillary implants 12 to 30 months following tooth replacement. This is a retrospective study of 43 microthreaded, TiO2 grit-blasted implants placed in healed ridges and immediate extraction sockets to restore maxillary anterior and premolar teeth in 28 patients. The cortical bone position relative to the implant reference point was evaluated at implant placement and 6 to 30 months following restoration. Radiographs were assessed using 7x magnification. The distance from the reference point to the cortical bone was measured to +/- 0.1 mm. The relationship of the peri-implant mucosa to the incisal edge of the definitive prosthesis was recorded. Four implants in 3 individuals failed during the first 6 weeks following placement and provisional loading. Cortical bone adaptation from the time of implant placement up to 30 months following restoration ranged from 0.0 mm to 1.5 mm (average, 0.33 +/- 0.40 mm mesially and 0.28 +/- 0.37 mm distally). The mean radiographic measurements from the interproximal crestal bone to the contact point were 4.53 +/- -0.91 mm (mesial) and 4.06 +/- 0.98. Maintenance and growth of papilla was observed in this group of immediate provisionalized single-tooth implants. Definitive abutment or abutment screw loosening was not observed. The linear clinical and radiographic measures of peri-implant tissue responses suggest that proper implant placement is followed by supracrestal biological width formation along the abutment and preservation of toothlike tissue contours. This may influence buccal peri-implant tissue dimensions. Generalized maintenance of crestal bone and the increased soft tissue dimension with maintenance of peri-implant papilla were identified as expected outcomes for immediate loading/provisionalization of microthreaded, TiO2 grit-blasted implants. Control of peri-implant tissues can be achieved to provide

  7. Periodontal and peri-implant microbiota in patients with healthy and inflamed periodontal and peri-implant tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Long-Fei; Watt, Rory M; Mattheos, Nikos; Si, Mi-Si; Lai, Hong-Chang; Lang, Niklaus P

    2016-01-01

    To compare the prevalence and levels of six bacterial pathogens within the subgingival/submucosal microbiota at teeth versus implants with various clinical conditions. Twenty-two Chinese were included. Four subgingival/submucosal sites were selected for microbiological sampling within each subject, that is, (1) healthy peri-implant tissues; (2) peri-implantitis [PPD ≥ 5 mm, presence of bleeding on probing (BOP) and confirmed radiographic bone loss]; (3) healthy gingiva; and (4) periodontitis (PPD ≥4 mm). Subgingival/submucosal plaque was sampled using paper points. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) was used to quantify six pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.), Treponema denticola (T.d.), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a.), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F.n.), Prevotella intermedia (P.i.), and Staphylococcus aureus (S.a.). Counts were log10-transformed. The most commonly detected species were S. a. and F. n., while A. a. and. P. i. had the lowest detection frequency. The detection frequencies of diseased tooth or implant sites for each of the six target species were either equal to or higher than the respective frequencies at the corresponding healthy sites. There were no statistically significant differences for any of the species or clinical sites (P > 0.05, Cochran's Q test). No statistically significant differences in the bacterial loads were found among the four clinical sites; with the exception of F. nucleatum. This was more abundant in periodontitis sites (P = 0.023, Friedman's 2-way anova). Both periodontal and peri-implant sites, irrespective of their health status, were revealed to harbor S. aureus cells. The log10-transformed loads of S. aureus were approximately 3.5 within each of the clinical sites (P = 0.232). This was the highest of the six species analyzed. Within the same subjects, putative periodontal pathogens were common to both periodontal and peri-implant sites irrespective of health

  8. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis: clinical and histopathological characteristics and treatment.

    PubMed

    Khammissa, R A G; Feller, L; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

    2012-04-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants are used routinely in dentistry in the confidence of predictable success. However, if the implant surfaces become colonised by pathogenic bacteria, the plaque-induced inflammation around the implants may cause peri-implant tissue destruction. Peri-implant mucositis is a reversible, plaque-induced inflammatory lesion confined to the peri-implant soft tissue unit and clinically is characterised by redness, swelling and bleeding on gentle probing. Peri-implantitis is an extension of peri-implant mucositis to involve the bone supporting the implant: it is characterised by loss of osseointegration of the coronal part of the implant, by increased probing depth and by bleeding and/or suppuration on probing. Established peri-implantitis does not respond predictably to treatment. The best management of plaque-induced peri-implant inflammatory diseases is prevention. Regular personal and professional cleaning of the implant is mandatory to minimise bacterial load. Despite our best efforts, plaque-induced peri-implant inflammatory diseases will occur frequently, and as these diseases respond best to early treatment, early detection of peri-implant mucositis by regular assessment will permit timely treatment. Peri-implant mucositis is readily treated non-surgically. Peri-implantitis is more difficult to treat largely because of the problem of decontamination of the roughened, threaded surfaces of exposed implants. As a rule, surgical treatment will be necessary, and even then success is not assured.

  9. Management of peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Prathapachandran, Jayachandran; Suresh, Neethu

    2012-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a site-specific infectious disease that causes an inflammatory process in soft tissues, and bone loss around an osseointegrated implant in function. The etiology of the implant infection is conditioned by the status of the tissue surrounding the implant, implant design, degree of roughness, external morphology, and excessive mechanical load. The microorganisms most commonly associated with implant failure are spirochetes and mobile forms of Gram-negative anaerobes, unless the origin is the result of simple mechanical overload. Diagnosis is based on changes of color in the gingiva, bleeding and probing depth of peri-implant pockets, suppuration, X-ray, and gradual loss of bone height around the tooth. Treatment will differ depending upon whether it is a case of peri-implant mucositis or peri-implantitis. The management of implant infection should be focused on the control of infection, the detoxification of the implant surface, and regeneration of the alveolar bone. This review article deals with the various treatment options in the management of peri-implantitis. The article also gives a brief description of the etiopathogenesis, clinical features, and diagnosis of peri-implantitis. PMID:23559913

  10. A Murine Model of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Pirih, Flavia Q.; Hiyari, Sarah; Leung, Ho-Yin; Barroso, Ana D. V.; Jorge, Adrian C. A.; Perussolo, Jeniffer; Atti, Elisa; Lin, Yi-Ling; Tetradis, Sotirios; Camargo, Paulo M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental implants are a vastly used treatment option for tooth replacement. Dental implants are however susceptible to inflammatory diseases such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, which are highly prevalent and may lead to implant loss. Unfortunately, the understanding of the pathogenesis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis is fragmented and incomplete. Therefore, the availability of a reproducible animal model to study these inflammatory diseases would facilitate the dissection of their pathogenic mechanisms. The objective of this study is to propose a murine model of experimental peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Materials and Methods Screw-shaped titanium implants were placed in the upper healed edentulous alveolar ridges of C57BL/6J mice eight weeks after tooth extraction. Following four weeks of osseointegration, Porphyromonas gingivalis-lipolysaccharide (LPS) injections were delivered to the peri-implant soft tissues for six weeks. No-injections and vehicle injections were utilized as controls. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were assessed clinically, radiographically (micro-CT) and histologically following LPS-treatment. Results LPS-injections resulted in a significant increase in soft tissue edema around the head of the implants as compared to the control groups. Micro-CT analysis revealed significantly greater bone loss in the LPS-treated implants. Histological analysis of the specimens demonstrated that the LPS-group had increased soft tissue vascularity, which harbored a dense mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, and the bone exhibited noticeable osteoclast activity. Conclusion The induction of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in mice via localized delivery of bacterial LPS has been demonstrated. We anticipate that this model will contribute to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic approaches for these two conditions. PMID:24967609

  11. A Murine Model of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis.

    PubMed

    Pirih, Flavia Q; Hiyari, Sarah; Leung, Ho-Yin; Barroso, Ana D V; Jorge, Adrian C A; Perussolo, Jeniffer; Atti, Elisa; Lin, Yi-Ling; Tetradis, Sotirios; Camargo, Paulo M

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants are a widely used treatment option for tooth replacement. However, they are susceptible to inflammatory diseases such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, which are highly prevalent and may lead to implant loss. Unfortunately, the understanding of the pathogenesis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis is fragmented and incomplete. Therefore, the availability of a reproducible animal model to study these inflammatory diseases would facilitate the dissection of their pathogenic mechanisms. The objective of this study is to propose a murine model of experimental peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Screw-shaped titanium implants were placed in the upper healed edentulous alveolar ridges of C57BL/6J mice 8 weeks after tooth extraction. Following 4 weeks of osseointegration, Porphyromonas gingivalis -lipolysaccharide (LPS) injections were delivered to the peri-implant soft tissues for 6 weeks. No-injections and vehicle injections were utilized as controls. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were assessed clinically, radiographically (microcomputerized tomograph [CT]), and histologically following LPS-treatment. LPS-injections resulted in a significant increase in soft tissue edema around the head of the implants as compared to the control groups. Micro-CT analysis revealed significantly greater bone loss in the LPS-treated implants. Histological analysis of the specimens demonstrated that the LPS-group had increased soft tissue vascularity, which harbored a dense mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, and the bone exhibited noticeable osteoclast activity. The induction of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in mice via localized delivery of bacterial LPS has been demonstrated. We anticipate that this model will contribute to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic approaches for these 2 conditions.

  12. Can degradation products released from dental implants affect peri-implant tissues?

    PubMed

    Noronha Oliveira, M; Schunemann, W V H; Mathew, M T; Henriques, B; Magini, R S; Teughels, W; Souza, J C M

    2017-08-02

    This study aimed to assess the literature available on the effects, on peri-implant tissues, of degradation products released from dental implants as a consequence of therapeutic treatment for peri-implantitis and/or of wear-corrosion of titanium. A literature review of the PubMed medline database was performed up to December 31, 2016. The following search terms were used: "titanium wear and dental implant"; "titanium corrosion and dental implant"; "bio-tribocorrosion"; "peri-implantitis"; "treatment of peri-implantitis"; "titanium particles release and dental implant"; and "titanium ion release and dental implant". The keywords were applied to the database in different combinations without limits of time period or type of work. In addition, the reference lists of relevant articles were searched for further studies. Seventy-nine relevant scientific articles on the topic were retrieved. The results showed that pro-inflammatory cytokines, infiltration of inflammatory response cells and activation of the osteoclasts activity are stimulated in peri-implant tissues in the presence of metal particles and ions. Moreover, degenerative changes were reported in macrophages and neutrophils that phagocytosed titanium microparticles, and mutations occurred in human cells cultured in medium containing titanium-based nanoparticles. Debris released from the degradation of dental implants has cytotoxic and genotoxic potential for peri-implant tissues. Thus, the amount and physicochemical properties of the degradation products determine the magnitude of the detrimental effect on peri-implant tissues. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of peri-implant soft tissue and bone levels around early loaded implant in restoring single missing tooth: A clinico-radiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Isha; Bhushan, Anoop; Baiju, Chandrababu Sudha; Bali, Shweta; Joshi, Vaibhav

    2016-01-01

    Background: One-stage nonsubmerged protocol which can achieve success rates comparable to implants placed in a two-staged submerged procedure also the preconditions for periimplant bone regeneration has lead to more refined concepts of implant loading. Materials and Methods: Twenty sites with single missing tooth were included in this study. Clinical parameters included sulcus bleeding index (sBI), probing pocket depth (PD), and papilla index (PI) and radiographic parameters included crestal bone level were assessed for a period of 9 months. Results: The crestal bone loss showed mean value ranging from baseline 0.25 ± 0.11 to 0.31 ± 0.08 at 3 weeks, to 0.67 ± 0.13 at 3 months, to 0.85 ± 0.09 at 6 months, and to 0.88 ± 0.12 at 9 months. Probing PD, the mean value for probing PD at 3 weeks 1.20 ± 0.83, 3 months 1.60 ± 1.1, at 6 months 1.40 ± 1.14, and at 9 months 1.20 ± 1.0. sBI, mean value for sBI at 3 weeks 0.00 ± 0.00, 3 months 0.3 ± 0.11, at 6 months 0.09 ± 0.25, and at 9 months 0.08 ± 0.24. PI, showed a significant difference among at different points of time with P = 0.000. Conclusion: The dental implants showed <1 mm of crestal bone loss at 9 months follow-up, clinically significant marginal bone loss occurred between the time of implant placement and 3 months. Subsequent to that, bone loss observed around the implant up to 9 months was minimal. The periimplant soft tissue maturity was maintained throughout the study. PMID:27041836

  14. Peri-implant esthetics assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniam, Aarthi S.; Raja, Sunitha V.; Thomas, Libby John

    2013-01-01

    Providing an esthetic restoration in the anterior region of the mouth has been the basis of peri-implant esthetics. To achieve optimal esthetics, in implant supported restorations, various patient and tooth related factors have to be taken into consideration. Peri-implant plastic surgery has been adopted to improve the soft tissue and hard tissue profiles, during and after implant placement. The various factors and the procedures related to enhancement of peri-implant esthetics have been discussed in this review article. PMID:23878557

  15. Effect of connective tissue grafting on peri-implant tissue in single immediate implant sites: a RCT.

    PubMed

    Zuiderveld, Elise G; Meijer, Henny J A; den Hartog, Laurens; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    2017-09-23

    To assess the effect of connective tissue grafting on the mid-buccal mucosal level (MBML) of immediately placed and provisionalized single implants in the maxillofacial esthetic zone. Sixty patients with a failing tooth were provided with an immediately placed and provisionalized implant. During implant placement, patients randomly received either a connective tissue graft from the maxillary tuberosity (n=30, test group) or no graft (n=30, control group). Follow-up visits were at one (T1 ) and twelve months (T12 ) after final crown placement. The primary outcome measure was any change in MBML compared to the pre-operative situation. In addition, gingival biotype, esthetics (using the Pink Esthetic Score-White Esthetic Score), marginal bone level, soft tissue peri-implant parameters and patient satisfaction were assessed. The mean MBML change at T12 was -0.5±1.1mm in the control group and 0.1±0.8mm in the test group (p=0.03). No significant differences regarding other outcome variables were observed, neither was gingival biotype associated with a gain or loss in MBML. This one-year study shows that connective tissue grafting in single, immediately placed and provisionalized implants leads to less recession of the peri-implant soft tissue at the mid-buccal aspect, irrespective of the gingival biotype (www.trialregister.nl: TC3815). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Correlation between different genotypes of human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus and peri-implant tissue status.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, S; Aleksic, Z; Dimitrijevic, B; Lekovic, V; Milinkovic, I; Kenney, B

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of different genotypes of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in peri-implantitis and mucositis sites, and to evaluate the correlation between herpesvirus presence and clinical parameters. A total of 80 dental implants (mean time of loading, 4.16 ± 1.8 years) were evaluated during the course of the study (30 peri-implantitis, 25 mucositis and 25 healthy peri-implant sites). The following clinical parameters were assessed: visible plaque index, bleeding on probing, suppuration and probing depth. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to identify the presence of different HCMV and EBV genotypes in peri-implant tissue plaque samples. HCMV-2 was detected in 53.3% and EBV-1 in 46.6% of the 30 peri-implantitis sites evaluated. By contrast, HCMV-2 was not detected in healthy periodontal sites and EBV-1 was detected in one healthy site. A statistically significant correlation was found between the presence of HCMV-2 and EBV-1 genotypes and clinical parameters of peri-implantitis. The results from the present study confirmed the high prevalence of HCMV-2 and EBV-1 in the peri-implant tissue plaque of peri-implantitis sites and suggests a possible active pathogenic role of the viruses in peri-implantitis. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  17. The role of keratinized tissue and attached gingiva in maintaining periodontal/peri-implant health.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Ignacio Christian

    2004-01-01

    Although the band of keratinized tissue and attached gingiva is determined genetically, it may be affected by the presence of plaque-associated inflammation or by the action of certain mechanical interventions. This article reviews variations in the width of keratinized tissue and attached gingiva and their clinical significance regarding periodontal/peri-implant health.

  18. Peri-implant tissue behavior around non-titanium material: Experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Maté Sánchez de Val, José Eduardo; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Pérez-Albacete Martínez, Carlos; Ramírez-Fernández, Maria Piedad; Granero-Marín, Jose Manuel; Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of using non-titanium abutments for better establishment of peri-implant biological width and to assess the stability of the soft tissue. Forty-eight tapered dental titanium implants with internal connection of 3.5mm in diameter and 10mm length were implanted in post extraction alveoli of 6 dogs. Twenty-four abutments made in a reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) formed the test group, and 24 titanium abutments, the control group. The groups were randomized. Histological, histomorphometric, ISQ and radiological analyses were performed. Greatest differences (control group vs. test group) were found at PM-Lc (Mucosa to lingual bone contact) (2.91±0.03 vs. 3.71±0.18), and to PM Lingual-IS (2.65±0.43 vs. 3.57±0.38). Reinforced PEEK constitutes an effective alternative to conventional titanium abutments, given its high rate of biocompatibility, preservation of bone height and soft tissue stability.

  19. Effect of dental cements on peri-implant microbial community: comparison of the microbial communities inhabiting the peri-implant tissue when using different luting cements.

    PubMed

    Korsch, Michael; Marten, Silke-Mareike; Dötsch, Andreas; Jáuregui, Ruy; Pieper, Dietmar H; Obst, Ursula

    2016-12-01

    Cementing dental restorations on implants poses the risk of undetected excess cement. Such cement remnants may favor the development of inflammation in the peri-implant tissue. The effect of excess cement on the bacterial community is not yet known. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of two different dental cements on the composition of the microbial peri-implant community. In a cohort of 38 patients, samples of the peri-implant tissue were taken with paper points from one implant per patient. In 15 patients, the suprastructure had been cemented with a zinc oxide-eugenol cement (Temp Bond, TB) and in 23 patients with a methacrylate cement (Premier Implant Cement, PIC). The excess cement found as well as suppuration was documented. Subgingival samples of all patients were analyzed for taxonomic composition by means of 16S amplicon sequencing. None of the TB-cemented implants had excess cement or suppuration. In 14 (61%) of the PIC, excess cement was found. Suppuration was detected in 33% of the PIC implants without excess cement and in 100% of the PIC implants with excess cement. The taxonomic analysis of the microbial samples revealed an accumulation of oral pathogens in the PIC patients independent of the presence of excess cement. Significantly fewer oral pathogens occurred in patients with TB compared to patients with PIC. Compared with TB, PIC favors the development of suppuration and the growth of periodontal pathogens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Peri-implant diseases: Consensus Report of the Sixth European Workshop on Periodontology.

    PubMed

    Lindhe, Jan; Meyle, Joerg

    2008-09-01

    Issues related to peri-implant disease were discussed. It was observed that the most common lesions that occur, i.e. peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis are caused by bacteria. While the lesion of peri-implant mucositis resides in the soft tissues, peri-implantitis also affects the supporting bone. Peri-implant mucositis occurs in about 80% of subjects (50% of sites) restored with implants, and peri-implantitis in between 28% and 56% of subjects (12-40% of sites). A number of risk indicators were identified including (i) poor oral hygiene, (ii) a history of periodontitis, (iii) diabetes and (iv) smoking. It was concluded that the treatment of peri-implant disease must include anti-infective measures. With respect to peri-implant mucositis, it appeared that non-surgical mechanical therapy caused the reduction in inflammation (bleeding on probing) but also that the adjunctive use of antimicrobial mouthrinses had a positive effect. It was agreed that the outcome of non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis was unpredictable. The primary objective of surgical treatment in peri-implantitis is to get access to the implant surface for debridement and decontamination in order to achieve resolution of the inflammatory lesion. There was limited evidence that such treatment with the adjunctive use of systemic antibiotics could resolve a number of peri-implantitis lesions. There was no evidence that so-called regenerative procedures had additional beneficial effects on treatment outcome.

  1. Diagnostic Principles of Peri-Implantitis: a Systematic Review and Guidelines for Peri-Implantitis Diagnosis Proposal

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To review and summarize the literature concerning peri-implantitis diagnostic parameters and to propose guidelines for peri-implantitis diagnosis. Material and Methods An electronic literature search was conducted of the MEDLINE (Ovid) and EMBASE databases for articles published between 2011 and 2016. Sequential screening at the title/abstract and full-text levels was performed. Systematic reviews/guidelines of consensus conferences proposing classification or suggesting diagnostic parameters for peri-implantitis in the English language were included. The review was recorded on PROSPERO system with the code CRD42016033287. Results The search resulted in 10 articles that met the inclusion criteria. Four were papers from consensus conferences, two recommended diagnostic guidelines, three proposed classification of peri-implantitis, and one suggested an index for implant success. The following parameters were suggested to be used for peri-implantitis diagnosis: pain, mobility, bleeding on probing, probing depth, suppuration/exudate, and radiographic bone loss. In all of the papers, different definitions of peri-implantitis or implant success, as well as different thresholds for the above mentioned clinical and radiographical parameters, were used. Current evidence rationale for the diagnosis of peri-implantitis and classification based on consecutive evaluation of soft-tissue conditions and the amount of bone loss were suggested. Conclusions Currently there is no single uniform definition of peri-implantitis or the parameters that should be used. Rationale for diagnosis and prognosis of peri-implantitis as well as classification of the disease is proposed. PMID:27833733

  2. Non-surgical treatment of peri-implant pathology.

    PubMed

    De Araújo Nobre, M; Capelas, C; Alves, A; Almeida, T; Carvalho, R; Antunes, E; Oliveira, D; Cardador, A; Maló, P

    2006-05-01

    Peri-implant pathologies consist of an inflammatory process affecting the soft and hard tissues surrounding the implants. Chlorhexidine is considered the gold standard antiseptic, with a large variety of choice in administration. In this study, a protocol for the irrigation of peri-implant pockets with a chlorhexidine gel, using a plastic needle for the delivery of the product into the peri-implant pockets is described. Nine patients with at least one implant presenting peri-implant pathology (inflamed soft tissue associated with bone loss around the implant) were enrolled in this prospective clinical study, and followed-up for 1 year, where clinical parameters such as modified plaque index, modified bleeding index, probing pocket depths, attachment levels were assessed at baseline, 1 month, and 1 year after implementation of the treatment protocol. Treatment success was achieved in eight of the nine patients (and in 11 of the 13 implants) according to the success criteria adopted by the authors of this study. Infection control lies at the heart of peri-implant treatment. The control of three factors such as optimal diagnosis, removal of the aetiological factor of the disease (proper removal of debris and decontamination of the peri-implant sulcus/pocket) and a good patient's oral hygiene self-care represents the key to success, resulting in good treatment outcomes when managing peri-implant pathologies. The protocol used (irrigation of peri-implant pockets with chlorhexidine gel delivered by a plastic needle) is considered to be of utility.

  3. Investigation of peri-implant tissue conditions and peri-implant tissue stability in implants placed with simultaneous augmentation procedure: a 3-year retrospective follow-up analysis of a newly developed bone level implant system.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Jonas; Lerner, Henriette; Sader, Robert A; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2017-09-05

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) has been proven to be a reliable therapy to regenerate missing bone in cases of atrophy of the alveolar crest. The aim of the present retrospective analysis was to assess peri-implant tissue conditions and document peri-implant tissue stability in C-Tech implants when placed simultaneously with a GBR augmentation procedure. A total of 47 implants, which were placed simultaneously with a GBR procedure with a synthetic bone substitute material in 20 patients, were investigated clinically and radiologically at least 3 years after loading. Implant survival, the width and thickness of peri-implant keratinized gingiva, probing depth, bleeding on probing (BOP), the Pink Esthetic Score (PES), peri-implant bone loss, and the presence of peri-implant osteolysis were determined. The follow-up investigation revealed a survival rate of 100% and only low median rates for probing depths (2.7 mm) and BOP (30%). The mean PES was 10.1 from the maximum value of 14. No osseous peri-implant defects were obvious, and the mean bone loss was 0.55 mm. In conclusion, implants placed in combination with a GBR procedure can achieve long-term stable functionally and esthetically satisfying results for replacing missing teeth in cases of atrophy of the alveolar crest.

  4. Improving darkened anterior peri-implant tissue color with zirconia custom implant abutments.

    PubMed

    Watkin, Arnold; Kerstein, Robert B

    2008-05-01

    Tissue discoloration in the cervical third of anterior implant restorations may result from implant abutment material show-through. As an alternative to metal abutments that may compromise the appearance of tissue color in the esthetic zone, zirconia abutments can be used. When zirconia abutments are combined with all-ceramic crowns, the appearance of the peri-implant tissue can be noticeably improved. This article describes two cases where a zirconia abutment replaced an existing metal abutment in a single anterior implant restoration.

  5. AQP1 expression in human gingiva and its correlation with periodontal and peri-implant tissue alterations.

    PubMed

    Buffoli, Barbara; Dalessandri, Michela; Favero, Gaia; Mensi, Magda; Dalessandri, Domenico; Di Rosario, Federico; Stacchi, Claudio; Rezzani, Rita; Salgarello, Stefano; Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio

    2014-06-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of hydrophobic integral membrane proteins that function as transmembrane channels and play an important role in tissue homeostasis. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1), in particular, has been reported to be involved in several biological processes including inflammation, angiogenesis, wound healing and others. Periodontitis and peri-implantitis can be defined as inflammatory processes that affect the tissues surrounding a tooth or an osseointegrated implant, respectively. To date, there are limited data about the involvement of AQPs in these diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible link between the histomorphological alterations and the expression of AQP1 in healthy, pathological and healed periodontal and peri-implant gingival tissues. The results obtained showed that changes in organization of collagen fibers were observed in periodontitis and peri-implantitis, together with an increase in the percentage of area occupied by inflammatory cell infiltration and an increase of AQP1 immunostaining, which was located in the endothelial cells of the vessels within the lamina propria. Moreover, in healed periodontal and peri-implant mucosa a restoration of histomorphological alterations was observed together with a concomitant decrease of AQP1 immunostaining. These data suggested a possible link between the degree of inflammatory state and the presence of AQP1, where the latter could be involved in the chain of inflammatory reactions triggered at periodontal and peri-implant levels.

  6. Clinical, microbiological, and immunological aspects of healthy versus peri-implantitis tissue in full arch reconstruction patients: a prospective cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ata-Ali, Javier; Flichy-Fernández, Antonio Juan; Alegre-Domingo, Teresa; Ata-Ali, Fadi; Palacio, Jose; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Due to the world-wide increase in treatments involving implant placement, the incidence of peri-implant disease is increasing. Late implant failure is the result of the inability to maintain osseointegration, whose most important cause is peri-implantitis. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical, microbiological, and immunological aspects in the peri-implant sulcus fluid (PISF) of patients with healthy dental implants and patients with peri-implantitis. PISF samples were obtained from 24 peri-implantitis sites and 54 healthy peri-implant sites in this prospective cross-sectional study. The clinical parameters recorded were: modified gingival index (mGI), modified plaque index (mPI) and probing pocket depth (PPD). The periodontopathogenic bacteria Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola and Porphyromonas gingivalis were evaluated, together with the total bacterial load (TBL). PISF samples were analyzed for the quantification of Interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α using flow cytometry (FACS). The mGI and PPD scores in the peri-implantitis group were significantly higher than the healthy group (p < 0.001). A total of 61.5% of the patients with peri-implantitis had both arches rehabilitated, compared with 22.7% of patients with healthy peri-implant tissues; there was no implant with peri-implantitis in cases that received mandibular treatment exclusively (p < 0.05). Concentrations of Porphyromonas gingivalis (p < 0.01), association with bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola (p < 0.05), as well as the TBL (p < 0.05) are significantly higher in the peri-implantitis group. IL-1β (p < 0.01), IL-6 (p < 0.01), IL-10 (p < 0.05) and TNF-α (p < 0.01) are significantly higher at the sites with peri-implantitis compared to healthy peri-implant tissue, while IL-8 did not increase significantly. The results of the present study involving a limited patient sample suggest that the peri-implant microbiota and

  7. Advanced peri-implantitis cases with radical surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Shane J J

    2014-02-01

    Peri-implantitis, a clinical term describing the inflammatory process that affects the soft and hard tissues around an osseointegrated implant, may lead to peri-implant pocket formation and loss of supporting bone. However, this imprecise definition has resulted in a wide variation of the reported prevalence; ≥10% of implants and 20% of patients over a 5- to 10-year period after implantation has been reported. The individual reporting of bone loss, bleeding on probing, pocket probing depth and inconsistent recording of results has led to this variation in the prevalence. Thus, a specific definition of peri-implantitis is needed. This paper describes the vast variation existing in the definition of peri-implantitis and suggests a logical way to record the degree and prevalence of the condition. The evaluation of bone loss must be made within the concept of natural physiological bony remodelling according to the initial peri-implant hard and soft tissue damage and actual definitive load of the implant. Therefore, the reason for bone loss must be determined as either a result of the individual osseous remodelling process or a response to infection. The most current Papers and Consensus of Opinion describing peri-implantitis are presented to illustrate the dilemma that periodontologists and implant surgeons are faced with when diagnosing the degree of the disease process and the necessary treatment regime that will be required. The treatment of peri-implantitis should be determined by its severity. A case of advanced peri-implantitis is at risk of extreme implant exposure that results in a loss of soft tissue morphology and keratinized gingival tissue. Loss of bone at the implant surface may lead to loss of bone at any adjacent natural teeth or implants. Thus, if early detection of peri-implantitis has not occurred and the disease process progresses to advanced peri-implantitis, the compromised hard and soft tissues will require extensive, skill

  8. Management of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Figuero, Elena; Graziani, Filippo; Sanz, Ignacio; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano

    2014-10-01

    Peri-implant diseases are defined as inflammatory lesions of the surrounding peri-implant tissues and include peri-implant mucositis (an inflammatory lesion limited to the surrounding mucosa of an implant) and peri-implantitis (an inflammatory lesion of the mucosa that affects the supporting bone with resulting loss of osseointegration). This review aims to describe the different approaches to manage both entities and to provide a critical evaluation of the evidence available on their efficacy. Therapy of peri-implant mucositis and nonsurgical therapy of peri-implantitis usually involve mechanical debridement of the implant surface using curettes, ultrasonic devices, air-abrasive devices or lasers, with or without the adjunctive use of local antibiotics or antiseptics. The efficacy of these therapies has been demonstrated for mucositis: controlled clinical trials show an improvement in clinical parameters, especially in bleeding on probing. For peri-implantitis, the results are limited, especially in terms of probing pocket-depth reduction. Surgical therapy of peri-implantitis is indicated when nonsurgical therapy fails to control the inflammatory changes. Selection of the surgical technique should be based on the characteristics of the peri-implant lesion. In the presence of deep circumferential and intrabony defects, surgical interventions should aim to provide thorough debridement, implant-surface decontamination and defect reconstruction. In the presence of defects without clear bony walls or with a predominant suprabony component, the aim of the surgical intervention should be the thorough debridement and the repositioning of the marginal mucosa to enable the patient to perform effective oral-hygiene practices, although this aim may compromise the esthetic result of the implant-supported restoration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effects of occlusal overload on peri-implant tissue health: a systematic review of animal-model studies.

    PubMed

    Chambrone, Leandro; Chambrone, Luiz A; Lima, Luiz A

    2010-10-01

    This study systematically evaluates the effect of occlusal overload (OV) on peri-implant tissue health in animal studies. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS databases were searched for articles published up to and including January 2010. Studies that reported outcomes of non-splinted titanium dental implants submitted to OV were eligible for inclusion. Probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), radiographic and histologic distances from the implant base to the most coronal point of bone-to-implant contact (RDIB and DIB, respectively), and bone density (BD) were the main outcomes of interest. Two controlled trials were included in this review and both were considered at a high risk of bias. The marked heterogeneity between studies did not allow data to be combined for meta-analyses. Two studies reported no association between OV and peri-implant tissue breakdown in the absence of dental plaque, with PD and CAL varying from 2 to 3 mm at the end of the experiments. In the presence of plaque accumulation, OV played a key role in peri-implant tissue breakdown (PD change: 5.3 mm; DIB: 6.0 mm). Trends suggested that OV may increase BD. Data on OV on stable implants are limited and conflicting. OV may lead to bone loss in the presence of dental plaque and to an increase in BD in areas where plaque control is performed.

  10. Healing of peri-implant tissues after flapless and flapped implant installation.

    PubMed

    Bayounis, Abeer M A; Alzoman, Hamad A; Jansen, John A; Babay, Nadir

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of different flapless procedures for the installation of dental implants on peri-implant bone response. After bilateral extraction of the mandibular second and third premolars and a 3-month healing period, 30 SLActive(®) implants were installed for 3 months in 10 Beagle dogs according to three different surgical approaches, i.e.: (1) flapped (F), (2) tissue punch flapless (P), and (3) direct flapless (DF). At harvesting, 29 implants were analysed. Micro-computed tomography and histomorphometrical evaluation (which also included the mobile implants) showed comparable results in bone volume (F=55 ± 9, P=51 ± 4, DF=54 ± 5) and crestal bone level (F=3420 ± 762, P=5358 ± 1681, DF=3843 ± 433). However, the implants inserted using the punch approach revealed a significantly lower first bone contact (F=3420 ± 762, P=5358 ± 1681, DF=3843 ± 433) and bone-to-implant contact percentage (F=70 ± 12, P=48 ± 23, DF=73 ± 12). Considering the gingival response, the barrier epithelium was also significantly deeper around the implants installed using the punch approach (F=1383 ± 332, P=2278 ± 1154, DF=1107 ± 300). The results indicate that a flapless surgical technique can be used for the installation of oral implants. In addition, using a tissue punch wider than the implant diameter should be avoided, as it can jeopardize the outcome of the implantation procedure. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Decementation Rates and the Peri-Implant Tissue Status of Implant-Supported Fixed Restorations Retained via Zinc Oxide Cement: A Retrospective 10-23-Year Study.

    PubMed

    Woelber, Johan P; Ratka-Krueger, Petra; Vach, Kirstin; Frisch, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    Long-term data on clinical outcomes of restorations attached to implants via zinc oxide (ZnO) cement have been sparse. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate decementation rates and peri-implant tissue status of implant-supported fixed restorations retained by ZnO cement. Between 1989 and 2003, 63 partially edentulous patients received 93 implants. Of these, 27 patients received 36 screwed single crowns (SC) and served as a control (C group). The other 36 patients had their restorations cemented using ZnO cement. They were subdivided into a SC group and a fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) group. After between 10 and 23 years (mean: 13.22 ± 3.21), all decementation events and peri-implant soft tissue status were evaluated using patient records. Decementation was assessed in 57 implants supporting 30 SCs and 16 FDPs. Five cases of decementation (8.77%) were recorded after a mean of 9.27 ± 7.05 years (range: 4.81-21.79). In the control group of vertically screwed SCs, five events of screw loosening (13.89%) were recorded in five patients (18.52%) after a mean of 5.84 ± 5.96 years (range: 0.56-15.05) within a 14.30 year observation period. No cases of peri-implantitis were observed in any group. The mean values of periodontal probing depths and bleeding on probing (BOP+) were 3.74 mm and 31.58%, respectively, for ZnO-cemented restorations, versus 3.76 mm and 25%, respectively, for the C group. No significant correlations regarding technical/biologic complications between the groups were detected. Within the limitations of this study, we conclude that the use of ZnO cement provides sufficient retention of implant-supported fixed restorations over long periods without biologic complications in form of peri-implantitis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Definition, etiology, prevention and treatment of peri-implantitis – a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implant inflammations represent serious diseases after dental implant treatment, which affect both the surrounding hard and soft tissue. Due to prevalence rates up to 56%, peri-implantitis can lead to the loss of the implant without multilateral prevention and therapy concepts. Specific continuous check-ups with evaluation and elimination of risk factors (e.g. smoking, systemic diseases and periodontitis) are effective precautions. In addition to aspects of osseointegration, type and structure of the implant surface are of importance. For the treatment of peri-implant disease various conservative and surgical approaches are available. Mucositis and moderate forms of peri-implantitis can obviously be treated effectively using conservative methods. These include the utilization of different manual ablations, laser-supported systems as well as photodynamic therapy, which may be extended by local or systemic antibiotics. It is possible to regain osseointegration. In cases with advanced peri-implantitis surgical therapies are more effective than conservative approaches. Depending on the configuration of the defects, resective surgery can be carried out for elimination of peri-implant lesions, whereas regenerative therapies may be applicable for defect filling. The cumulative interceptive supportive therapy (CIST) protocol serves as guidance for the treatment of the peri-implantitis. The aim of this review is to provide an overview about current data and to give advices regarding diagnosis, prevention and treatment of peri-implant disease for practitioners. PMID:25185675

  13. Effectiveness of Implant Therapy Analyzed in a Swedish Population: Prevalence of Peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Derks, J; Schaller, D; Håkansson, J; Wennström, J L; Tomasi, C; Berglundh, T

    2016-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease affecting soft and hard tissues surrounding dental implants. As the global number of individuals that undergo restorative therapy through dental implants increases, peri-implantitis is considered as a major and growing problem in dentistry. A randomly selected sample of 588 patients who all had received implant-supported therapy 9 y earlier was clinically and radiographically examined. Prevalence of peri-implantitis was assessed and risk indicators were identified by multilevel regression analysis. Forty-five percent of all patients presented with peri-implantitis (bleeding on probing/suppuration and bone loss >0.5 mm). Moderate/severe peri-implantitis (bleeding on probing/suppuration and bone loss >2 mm) was diagnosed in 14.5%. Patients with periodontitis and with ≥4 implants, as well as implants of certain brands and prosthetic therapy delivered by general practitioners, exhibited higher odds ratios for moderate/severe peri-implantitis. Similarly, higher odds ratios were identified for implants installed in the mandible and with crown restoration margins positioned ≤1.5 mm from the crestal bone at baseline. It is suggested that peri-implantitis is a common condition and that several patient- and implant-related factors influence the risk for moderate/severe peri-implantitis (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01825772). © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  14. Definition, etiology, prevention and treatment of peri-implantitis--a review.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Henningsen, Anders; Jung, Ole; Heiland, Max; Hammächer, Christian; Stein, Jamal M

    2014-09-03

    Peri-implant inflammations represent serious diseases after dental implant treatment, which affect both the surrounding hard and soft tissue. Due to prevalence rates up to 56%, peri-implantitis can lead to the loss of the implant without multilateral prevention and therapy concepts. Specific continuous check-ups with evaluation and elimination of risk factors (e.g. smoking, systemic diseases and periodontitis) are effective precautions. In addition to aspects of osseointegration, type and structure of the implant surface are of importance. For the treatment of peri-implant disease various conservative and surgical approaches are available. Mucositis and moderate forms of peri-implantitis can obviously be treated effectively using conservative methods. These include the utilization of different manual ablations, laser-supported systems as well as photodynamic therapy, which may be extended by local or systemic antibiotics. It is possible to regain osseointegration. In cases with advanced peri-implantitis surgical therapies are more effective than conservative approaches. Depending on the configuration of the defects, resective surgery can be carried out for elimination of peri-implant lesions, whereas regenerative therapies may be applicable for defect filling. The cumulative interceptive supportive therapy (CIST) protocol serves as guidance for the treatment of the peri-implantitis. The aim of this review is to provide an overview about current data and to give advices regarding diagnosis, prevention and treatment of peri-implant disease for practitioners.

  15. Lack of association between overload and peri-implant tissue loss in healthy conditions.

    PubMed

    Afrashtehfar, Kelvin I; Afrashtehfar, Cyrus Dm

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesPubMed, Ovid, EMBASE and LILACS were searched up to December 2011. In addition, the reference lists of the selected review papers were further hand searched. Language was limited to studies published only in English.Study selectionHuman and animal randomised clinical trials (RCT), systematic reviews of RCTs, non-randomised trials, case series that reported on the clinical, radiographic, and/or histological outcomes of dental/oral implants exposed to excessive load were considered eligible for inclusion.Data extraction and synthesisIdentified studies were evaluated by one non-blinded reviewer according to the selection criteria. When doubt arose co-authors assisted until consensus was reached. The data extracted from the clinical studies included study design, patients/implants/prostheses/loading time/follow-up time, type of intervention/methods, outcome, and, specific to animal studies, the animal model, intention to overload (ie yes or no), load mode, type of loading (ie dynamic or static), and microbial control if any. The heterogeneity among studies did not allow data to be combined.ResultsThe search strategy in addition to hand searching retrieved 726 potentially eligible studies after de-duplication. After screening the 41 full-text relevant studies and applying the selection criteria assessment, only three non-randomised split-mouth animal studies and one systematic review of animal experimental data were considered for inclusion. The non-randomised studies could not reveal any relationship between increased leverage on dental implants and marginal loss. The systematic review suggested that supra-occlusal contacts on uninflamed peri-implant bone tissue did not cause catabolism, whereas supra-occlusal contacts combined with inflammation significantly increased the plaque-induced catabolism.ConclusionsThe effect of implant overload on bone/implant loss in clinically well-integrated implants is poorly reported and provides little unbiased evidence to

  16. Composition of Human Peri-implantitis and Periodontitis Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Carcuac, O.; Berglundh, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine differences in cellular characteristics of human peri-implantitis and periodontitis lesions. Two groups of patients were included: 40 patients with generalized severe chronic periodontitis and 40 patients presenting with severe peri-implantitis. Soft tissue biopsies were obtained from diseased sites (probing pocket depth ≥ 7 mm with bleeding on probing) and prepared for histologic and immunohistochemical analysis. In contrast to periodontitis samples, peri-implantitis lesions were more than twice as large and contained significantly larger area proportions, numbers, and densities of CD138-, CD68-, and MPO-positive cells than periodontitis lesions. Peri-implantitis lesions also extended to a position that was apical of the pocket epithelium and not surrounded by noninfiltrated connective tissue. They further presented with significantly larger densities of vascular structures in the connective tissue area lateral to the infiltrated connective tissue than within the infiltrate. This study suggests that peri-implantitis and periodontitis lesions exhibit critical histopathologic differences, which contribute to the understanding of dissimilarities in onset and progression between the 2 diseases. PMID:25261052

  17. Peri-implant complications for posterior endosteal implants

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Mehler, Alex; Clark, Arthur; Neal, Dan; Gonzaga, Luiz; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Objectives (1) To assess whether there is evidence of an association between the number of peri-implant tissue complications and patient characteristics such as gender, diabetes status, smoking status, and bite force; (2) To assess whether there is evidence of an association between the number of peri-implant tissue complications and location of the implant, surgical technique used, bone graft status and sinus lift status. Materials and Methods This randomized controlled clinical trial included a total of 176 implants (Osseospeed, Dentsply) in 67 participants with 88 fixed dental prostheses. Information was obtained from health histories, a baseline exam, surgical notes, and postoperative exams. The data were analyzed using Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney tests, and generalized estimating equations logistic regression with a significance level set at 0.05. Results All 176 implants survived within a recall period of three years but 11 implants demonstrated peri-implant tissue complications. Ten sites showed dehiscence and one case exhibited vertical bone loss. There was a statistically significant association between surgical technique used (1-stage or 2-stage) and the presence of soft tissue complications (p = 0.005), where 2-stage surgery was associated with a higher frequency of peri-implant soft tissue complications. A correlation, although not statistically significant (p=0.077) was noted, between peri-implant tissue complications and bone grafting, suggesting a possible role for this factor as well. Conclusions Participants who did not require any second stage surgery at the implant sites experienced fewer complications. Therefore, additional surgical procedures should be performed judiciously considering their possible effects on peri-implant tissue health. PMID:25263400

  18. Foreign bodies associated with peri-implantitis human biopsies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thomas G; Valderrama, Pilar; Burbano, Maria; Blansett, Jonathan; Levine, Robert; Kessler, Harvey; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory condition that can lead to implant loss. The aim of this descriptive retrospective study is to describe the histopathologic findings in soft tissue biopsies of implants with peri-implantitis. Thirty-six human peri-implantitis biopsies were analyzed using light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The composition of foreign materials found in the tissues was assessed using an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer. At the LM level, the inflammatory lesion of peri-implantitis was in most cases a mixture of subacute and chronic inflammation dominated by plasma cells. At the SEM level, radiopaque foreign bodies were identified in 34 of the 36 biopsies. The predominant foreign bodies found were titanium and dental cement. These foreign materials were surrounded by inflammatory cells. At present, the exact mechanism for introduction of these materials and their role in peri-implantitis is unknown. Further research is warranted to determine their etiology and potential role in pathogenesis.

  19. Resilient liner vs. clip attachment effect on peri-implant tissues of bar-implant-retained mandibular overdenture: a 1-year clinical and radiographical study.

    PubMed

    Elsyad, Moustafa Abdou; Shoukouki, Ali Hamed E L

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare between the effects of resilient liner and clip attachments of bar-implant-retained mandibular overdenture on peri-implant tissues. In a randomized-controlled clinical trial, 30 edentulous male patients (mean age 62.5 years) were equally assigned to two groups. In each patient, two implants were inserted in the canine area of the mandible using a two-stage surgical protocol. After 3 months, the implants were connected with resilient bars. Mandibular overdentures were retained to the bars with either clips (group I) or silicone-resilient liners (group II). Peri-implant tissues were evaluated clinically (with regard to plaque scores, gingival scores and probing depths) and radiographically (with regard to peri-implant vertical and horizontal alveolar bone changes). Evaluations were performed at the time of overdenture insertion (T0), 6 months (T6) and 12 months (T12) after overdenture insertion. After 12 months of using bar-implant-retained mandibular overdenture, the resilient liner attachment had significantly decreased peri-implant plaque score, gingival score, probing depth, vertical and horizontal bone loss when compared with the clip attachment. Within the limitations of this study, and in terms of peri-implant tissue health of bar-implant-retained mandibular overdenture, we recommend resilient liner rather than clip attachment.

  20. Edentulous site enhancement: a regenerative approach to the management of edentulous areas. Part 2: Peri-implant tissues.

    PubMed

    Calesini, Gaetano; Micarelli, Costanza; Coppè, Stefano; Scipioni, Agostino

    2009-02-01

    The appearance and long-term stability of peri-implant bone, mucosa, and gingiva determine the success of implant-supported prostheses from both the esthetic and functional standpoints. Any surgical or prosthetic technique that takes into consideration only some variables, or that only intervenes in a limited phase of treatment, is a potential source of a partially successful and/or unpredictable clinical outcome. This article describes the underlying principles and surgical-prosthetic procedures of a systematic regenerative approach, edentulous site enhancement (ESE). The goal of this approach is to improve the anatomy of edentulous sites. Applied to implant dentistry, this approach enables peri-implant tissue to be managed predictably, optimizing the functional and esthetic result of restorations with regard to treatment time, number of surgical stages, long-term prognosis, and incidence of complications. The principles underlying the ESE approach, which are independent of any specific implant system, are applicable in the majority of clinical situations, regardless of the esthetic requirements.

  1. Peri-implant complications for posterior endosteal implants.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Mehler, Alex; Clark, Arthur; Neal, Dan; Gonzaga, Luiz; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2015-12-01

    (1) To assess whether there is evidence of an association between the number of peri-implant tissue complications and patient characteristics such as gender, diabetes status, smoking status, and bite force; (2) To assess whether there is evidence of an association between the number of peri-implant tissue complications and location of the implant, surgical technique used, bone graft status and sinus lift status. This randomized, controlled clinical trial included a total of 176 implants (OsseoSpeed, DENTSPLY) in 67 participants with 88 fixed dental prostheses. Information was obtained from health histories, a baseline exam, surgical notes, and post-operative exams. The data were analyzed using Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney tests and generalized estimating equations using logistic regression with a significance level set at 0.05. All 176 implants survived within a recall period of 3 years, but 11 implants demonstrated peri-implant tissue complications. Ten sites showed dehiscence and one case exhibited vertical bone loss. There was a statistically significant association between surgical technique used (1-stage or 2-stage) and the presence of soft tissue complications (P = 0.005), where 2-stage surgery was associated with a higher frequency of peri-implant soft tissue complications. A correlation, although not statistically significant (P = 0.077), was noted, between peri-implant tissue complications and bone grafting, suggesting a possible role for this factor as well. Participants who did not require any second-stage surgery at the implant sites experienced fewer complications. Therefore, additional surgical procedures should be performed judiciously considering their possible effects on peri-implant tissue health. The clinical implication of this research study is that secondary surgery should be considered with caution during implant placement and it should be performed only when other options have been exhausted, as it has been shown to have a direct

  2. Cement-associated signs of inflammation: retrospective analysis of the effect of excess cement on peri-implant tissue.

    PubMed

    Korsch, Michael; Robra, Bernt-Peter; Walther, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Excess cement left in the peri-implant sulcus after the placement of prosthetic restorations risks inflammation in the peri-implant tissue. While many current studies deal with the question of how to avoid undetected excess cement, relatively little is known about the clinical consequences of this complication. This study analyzed the clinical findings associated with excess cement. Further, the influence of the sojourn time of undetected excess cement in the peri-implant pocket on clinical findings was investigated. Within the scope of a retrospective clinical follow-up, the suprastructures that were originally cemented with a methacrylate cement were revised in 93 patients (171 implants). The patients were split into two groups according to the time between placement of the prosthetic restoration and revision. Group 1 (G1) had treatment revisions within 2 years of restoration placement (71 patients with 126 implants); in group 2 (G2), treatment revisions were conducted at a later time (22 patients with 45 implants). For the purpose of statistical analysis, both groups were further analyzed based on the presence/absence of excess cement at the time of revision. By definition, the average time to revision in G1 was shorter than in G2 (0.71 years versus 4.07 years). There was no significant difference in the frequency of excess cement at revision between G1 (59.5%) and G2 (62.2%). The clinical findings around the implants in G1 were significantly less severe than in G2 (bleeding on probing: G1 without excess cement--17.6%, G1 with excess cement--80%, G2 without excess cement--94.1%, G2 with excess cement--100%; suppuration: G1 without excess--0%, G1 with excess cement--21.3%, G2 without excess cement--23.3%, G2 with excess cement--89.3%). After removing the excess cement, cleaning and disinfecting the implant abutment and restoration, and using a different cement, significantly fewer signs of inflammation were found at further follow-up in both groups. Within the

  3. The effectiveness of optical coherence tomography for evaluating peri-implant tissue: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sanda, Minoru; Imakita, Chiharu; Sakuyama, Aoi; Kasugai, Shohei; Sumi, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been investigated as a novel diagnostic imaging tool. The utilisation of this equipment has been evaluated through several studies in the field of dentistry. The aim of this preliminary study was to determine through basic experiments the effectiveness of OCT in implant dentistry. Materials and Methods To assess detection ability, we captured OCT images of implants in each of the following situations: (1) implants covered with mucosae of various thicknesses that were harvested from the mandibles of pigs; (2) implants installed in the mandibles of pigs; and (3) implants with abutments and crowns fixed with temporary cement. The OCT images were captured before cementation, after cementation, and after removing the excess submucosal cement. Results If the thickness of the mucosa covering the implant body was less than 1 mm, the images of the implants were clearly detected by OCT. In the implants were installed in pigs' mandibles, it was difficult to capture clear images of the implant and alveolar bone in most of the samples. Remnants of excess cement around the implants were visible in most samples that had a mucosa thickness of less than 3 mm. Conclusion Currently, OCT imaging of implants is limited. Cement remnants at the submucosal area can be detected in some cases, which can be helpful in preventing peri-implant diseases. Still, though there are some restrictions to its application, OCT could have potential as an effective diagnostic instrument in the field of implant dentistry as well. PMID:27672613

  4. Risk indicators related to peri-implant disease: an observational retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the influence of potential risk indicators on the development of peri-implant disease. Methods Overall, 103 patients referred for implant treatment from 2000 to 2012 were randomly enrolled. The study sample consisted of 421 conventional-length (>6 mm) non-turned titanium implants that were evaluated clinically and radiographically according to pre-established clinical and patient-related parameters by a single investigator. A non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test or Kruskal-Wallis rank test and a logistic regression model were used for the statistical analysis of the recorded data at the implant level. Results The diagnosis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis was made for 173 (41.1%) and 19 (4.5%) implants, respectively. Age (≥65 years), patient adherence (professional hygiene recalls <2/year) and the presence of plaque were associated with higher peri-implant probing-depth values and bleeding-on-probing scores. The logistic regression analysis indicated that age (P=0.001), patient adherence (P=0.03), the absence of keratinized tissue (P=0.03), implants placed in pristine bone (P=0.04), and the presence of peri-implant soft-tissue recession (P=0.000) were strongly associated with the event of peri-implantitis. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, patients aged ≥65 years and non-adherent subjects were more prone to develop peri-implant disease. Therefore, early diagnosis and a systematic maintenance-care program are essential for maintaining peri-implant tissue health, especially in older patients. PMID:27588216

  5. Risk indicators related to peri-implant disease: an observational retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Poli, Pier Paolo; Beretta, Mario; Grossi, Giovanni Battista; Maiorana, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the influence of potential risk indicators on the development of peri-implant disease. Overall, 103 patients referred for implant treatment from 2000 to 2012 were randomly enrolled. The study sample consisted of 421 conventional-length (>6 mm) non-turned titanium implants that were evaluated clinically and radiographically according to pre-established clinical and patient-related parameters by a single investigator. A non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test or Kruskal-Wallis rank test and a logistic regression model were used for the statistical analysis of the recorded data at the implant level. The diagnosis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis was made for 173 (41.1%) and 19 (4.5%) implants, respectively. Age (≥65 years), patient adherence (professional hygiene recalls <2/year) and the presence of plaque were associated with higher peri-implant probing-depth values and bleeding-on-probing scores. The logistic regression analysis indicated that age (P=0.001), patient adherence (P=0.03), the absence of keratinized tissue (P=0.03), implants placed in pristine bone (P=0.04), and the presence of peri-implant soft-tissue recession (P=0.000) were strongly associated with the event of peri-implantitis. Within the limitations of this study, patients aged ≥65 years and non-adherent subjects were more prone to develop peri-implant disease. Therefore, early diagnosis and a systematic maintenance-care program are essential for maintaining peri-implant tissue health, especially in older patients.

  6. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Consumption and Gum Health Workshop on Regeneration Periodontal Disease More Prevalent among Ethnic Minorities Dental Implants Periodontal ... factors for developing peri-implant disease include previous periodontal disease diagnosis, poor plaque control, smoking , and diabetes . It ...

  7. The peri-implant esthetics: An unforgettable entity

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Sangeeta

    2011-01-01

    Esthetic demands in today's world of dentistry are scaling new heights, and are driven by the zest to look beautiful. The soft tissue esthetics around implants is the foci of attention, which, if failed to meet, leads to unacceptable esthetic failure. The aim of this article is to give a brief overview of the various vital parameters influencing the esthetics governing the peri-implant area. PMID:21976830

  8. Implant decontamination with phosphoric acid during surgical peri-implantitis treatment: a RCT.

    PubMed

    Hentenaar, Diederik F M; De Waal, Yvonne C M; Strooker, Hans; Meijer, Henny J A; Van Winkelhoff, Arie-Jan; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    2017-12-01

    Peri-implantitis is known as an infectious disease that affects the peri-implant soft and hard tissue. Today, scientific literature provides very little evidence for an effective intervention protocol for treatment of peri-implantitis. The aim of the present randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the microbiological and clinical effectiveness of phosphoric acid as a decontaminating agent of the implant surface during surgical peri-implantitis treatment. Peri-implantitis lesions were treated with resective surgical treatment aimed at peri-implant granulation tissue removal, bone recontouring, and pocket elimination. Fifty-three implant surfaces in 28 patients were mechanically cleaned and treated with either 35% phosphoric etching gel (test group) or sterile saline (control group). Microbiological samples were obtained during surgery; clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and at 3 months after treatment. Data were analyzed using multi-variable linear regression analysis and multilevel statistics. Significant immediate reductions in total anaerobic bacterial counts on the implant surface were found in both groups. Immediate reduction was greater when phosphoric acid was used. The difference in log-transformed mean anaerobic counts between both procedures was not statistical significant (p = 0.108), but there were significantly less culture-positive implants after the decontamination procedure in the phosphoric acid group (p = 0.042). At 3 months post-surgery, 75% of the implants in the control group and 63.3% of the implants in the test group showed disease resolution. However, no significant differences in clinical and microbiological outcomes between both groups were found. The application of 35% phosphoric acid after mechanical debridement is superior to mechanical debridement combined with sterile saline rinsing for decontamination of the implant surface during surgical peri-implantitis treatment. However, phosphoric acid as implant surface

  9. Cross-sectional study on the prevalence and risk indicators of peri-implant diseases.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Ioannis K; Kotsakis, Georgios A; Gerdes, Sebastian; Walter, Michael Horst

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of peri-implant diseases in a university patient sample and to analyse possible risk variables associated with their occurrence. One hundred and eighty-six patients with 597 implants were examined clinically and radiographically. The mean period of function was 5.5 years (range 1 to 16.5 years). A subgroup analysis was performed for implants with a minimum function time of 5 years. Outcome measures were implant failures, prevalence and risk indicators of peri-implant diseases. In order to identify statistically significant risk indicators of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis multi-level logistic regression models were constructed. The prevalence of peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis on patient levels were 12.9% (13.3% for ≥ 5 years) and 64.5% (64.4% for ≥ 5 years), respectively. Multi-level analysis showed that a high plaque score (OR = 1.365; 95% CI: 1.18 to 1.57, P < 0.001) was a risk indicator for periimplant mucositis, while augmentation of the hard or soft tissue at implant sites had a protective effect (OR = 0.878 95% CI: 0.79 to 0.97, P = 0.01). It was also shown that the odds ratio for having peri-implant mucositis increased with the increase of plaque score in a dose-dependent manner. With respect to peri-implantitis, loss of the last tooth due to periodontitis (OR = 1.063; 95% CI: 1.00 to 1.12, P = 0.03) and location of the implants in the maxilla (OR = 1.052, 95% CI: 1.00 to 1.09, P = 0.02) were identified as statistically significant risk indicators. Within the limitations of this study, the history of periodontal disease was the most significant risk indicator for peri-implantitis and the level of oral hygiene was significantly associated with peri-implant mucositis.

  10. Peri-Implant Bone Loss and Peri-Implantitis: A Report of Three Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Daniel; Marlow, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Dental implant supported restorations have been added substantially to the clinical treatment options presented to patients. However, complications with these treatment options also arise due to improper patient selection and inadequate treatment planning combined with poor follow-up care. The complications related to the presence of inflammation include perimucositis, peri-implant bone loss, and peri-implantitis. Prevalence rates of these complications have been reported to be as high as 56%. Treatment options that have been reported include nonsurgical therapy, the use of locally delivered and systemically delivered antibiotics, and surgical protocols aimed at regenerating the lost bone and soft tissue around the implants. The aim of this article is to report on three cases and review some of the treatment options used in their management. PMID:27833766

  11. Dental implants with versus without peri-implant bone defects treated with guided bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background The guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique is highly successful for the treatment of peri-implant bone defects. The aim was to determine whether or not implants associated with GBR due to peri-implant defects show the same survival and success rates as implants placed in native bone without defects. Material and Methods Patients with a minimum of two submerged dental implants: one suffering a dehiscence or fenestration defect during placement and undergoing simultaneous guided bone regeneration (test group), versus the other entirely surrounded by bone (control group) were treated and monitored annually for three years. Complications with the healing procedure, implant survival, implant success and peri-implant marginal bone loss were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests setting an alpha value of 0.05. Results Seventy-two patients and 326 implants were included (142 test, 184 control). One hundred and twenty-five dehiscences (average height 1.92±1.11) and 18 fenestrations (average height 3.34±2.16) were treated. At 3 years post-loading, implant survival rates were 95.7% (test) and 97.3% (control) and implant success rates were 93.6% and 96.2%, respectively. Mean marginal bone loss was 0.54 (SD 0.26 mm) for the test group and 0.43 (SD 0.22 mm) for the control group. No statistically significant differences between both groups were found. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, implants with peri-implant defects treated with guided bone regeneration exhibited similar survival and success rates and peri-implant marginal bone loss to implants without those defects. Large-scale randomized controlled studies with longer follow-ups involving the assessment of esthetic parameters and hard and soft peri-implant tissue stability are needed. Key words:Guided bone regeneration, peri-implant defects, dental implants, marginal bone level, success rate, survival rate. PMID:26330931

  12. [Monocrystalline aluminum dental implants in animals: a study of the peri-implant tissue].

    PubMed

    Gatti, A M; Zaffe, D; Poli, G P

    1990-04-01

    After the extraction of two molars in a dog's jaw, a single crystal alumina screw was implanted. Monthly radiographs were taken and analyzed by means of a video display computer (VDC) to obtain densitometric informations about the interface. After one year implantation, the bone segment containing the prosthesis was fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde, embedded in methacrylate and sectioned by a microtome saw. The results in light microscopy with ordinary and polarized light, in SEM and X-ray microanalysis, show the presence of a thick connective tissue layer interposed between the screw and the bone. The histological findings confirm the results obtained through the VDC analysis of the radiographic images.

  13. Experimental peri-implant mucositis in man.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, N U; Berglundh, T; Marinello, C P; Lindhe, J

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine reactions of gingiva and peri-implant mucosa (PiM) to de novo plaque accumulation in humans. Prior to the start of the study, which included 12 partially edentulous subjects, a 3-week plaque control program was performed. Ethical approval was granted by the local ethics committee. On day 0, 2 soft tissue biopsies were harvested, 1 from a tooth and 1 from an implant site in every subject. After 3 weeks of undisturbed plaque accumulation (day 21), 2 additional biopsies were obtained from the gingiva and PiM in each subject. The tissue samples, each 4x4 mm in size, were snap frozen and prepared for immunohistochemical analysis. The size of the infiltrate (ICT) in the day 0 biopsies, was about 0.03 mm2 in both the gingiva and PiM. At the end of the plaque accumulation period, the size of the lesion had significantly increased in both groups and occupied an area of 0.26 mm2 in the gingiva and 0.14 mm2 in PiM. In the biopsies presenting day 0, the proportions of the various cell populations examined were similar in the gingiva and in PiM. The tissue fractions of almost all types of cells increased during the 3 weeks, but the mean change for each cell type was greater in the gingiva than in PiM. The CD3/CD19 ratio decreased in the gingiva between day 0 and 21, but increased in PiM. The results of the present study indicated that plaque accumulation induced an inflammatory response characterized by increased proportions of T- and B-cells in the ICT of both the gingiva and the PiM. Although not statistically significant, the host response in the gingiva tended to be more pronounced than in the peri-implant mucosa.

  14. Impact of dental implant insertion method on the peri-implant bone tissue--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Stamatović, Novak; Matić, Smiljana; Tatić, Zoran; Petković-Curcin, Aleksandra; Vojvodić, Danilo; Rakić, Mia

    2013-09-01

    The function of dental implants depends on their stability in bone tissue over extended period of time, i.e. on osseointegration. The process through which osseointegration is achieved depends on several factors, surgical insertion method being one of them. The aim of this study was to histopathologically compare the impact of the surgical method of implant insertion on the peri-implant bone tissue. The experiment was performed on 9 dogs. Eight weeks following the extraction of lower premolars implants were inserted using the one-stage method on the right mandibular side and two-stage method on the left side. Three months after implantation the animals were sacrificed. Three distinct regions of bone tissue were histopathologically analyzed, the results were scored and compared. In the specimens of one-stage implants increased amount of collagen fibers was found in 5 specimens where tissue necrosis was also observed. Only moderate osteoblastic activity was found in 3 sections. The analysis of bone-to-implant contact region revealed statistically significantly better results regarding the amount of collagen tissue fibers for the implants inserted in the two-stage method (Wa = 59 < 66.5, alpha = 0.05), but necrosis was found in all specimens, and no osteoblastic activity. Histopathological analysis of bone-implant interface of one-stage implants revealed increased amount of collagen fibers in all specimens, moderate osteoblastic activity and neovascularization in 2 specimens. No inflammation was observed. The analysis of two-stage implants revealed a marked increase of collagen fibers in 5 specimens, inflammation and bone necrosis were found in only one specimen. There were no statistically significant differences between the two methods regarding bone-implant interface region. Histopathological analysis of bone tissue adjacent to the one-stage implant revealed moderate increase of collagen tissue in only 1 specimen, moderate increase of osteoblasts and osteocytes in

  15. Reliability of periodontal diagnostic tools for monitoring peri-implant health and disease.

    PubMed

    Coli, Pierluigi; Christiaens, Véronique; Sennerby, Lars; Bruyn, Hugo De

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence, causes and consequences of crestal bone loss at dental implants are a matter of debate. In recent years, a high prevalence of peri-implant soft-tissue inflammation, associated with peri-implant bone loss, has been reported and the need for treatments similar to those offered for natural teeth affected by periodontitis has been proposed. This suggestion is based on the assumption that periodontal indices, such as probing pocket depth and bleeding on probing, are reliable indicators of the peri-implant tissue conditions and good predictors of future bone loss. However, based on a critical review of the literature in the present paper, it is concluded that periodontal indices are not reliable either for identifying peri-implant disease or for predicting future risk for peri-implant crestal bone loss and implant failure. The long-term experiences with dental implants, presented in the literature, indicate that the presence of bleeding on probing, probing pocket depths much larger than 4 mm and some bone loss seem to reflect, in most instances, normal conditions of well-functioning dental implants, bearing in mind that healing of dental implants is the result of a foreign body reaction with the formation of scar tissue. Therefore, the use of probing pocket depth and bleeding on probing assessments may lead to over-diagnosis and possibly to over-treatment of assumed biofilm-mediated peri-implantitis lesions. It is the opinion of the authors of this review that a treatment should only be initiated when a clinical problem is present based on patient's symptoms (discomfort, pain), the presence of swelling, redness and pus, and significant crestal bone loss over time (as verified with radiographs). The treatment should aim at resolving the infection, which could include removal of the implant.

  16. Peri-implantitis. Part 2: Prevention and maintenance of peri-implant health.

    PubMed

    Alani, A; Bishop, K

    2014-09-01

    The prevention of any disease process should be the cornerstone of any healthcare provision. This ethos is well established in dentistry with plaque associated disease such as periodontitis and caries but is at the current time less developed for peri-implantitis. The current review identities potential modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for per-implantitis development and details strategies for the prevention of the disease. These include poor oral hygiene, previous history of periodontitis, smoking, genetic factors, occlusal overload and foreign body reactions. Local factors include soft tissue and bone quality, implant positioning, restoration design and the implant-abutment interface. An implant maintenance protocol is proposed and a schematic for maintenance visits is also detailed.

  17. [Topical treatment of peri-implantitis with metronidazole dental gel 25%. Clinical analysis and microbiological control].

    PubMed

    Stellini, E; Migliorato, A; Mazzoleni, S; Mottola, A; Lombardi, L; Favero, G A

    2000-01-01

    Aim of this research is to verify the efficacy of metronidazole dental gel 25%, used as a topical antibiotic for the treatment of peri-implantitis. The efficacy of the medicine in the starting phase of the disease (mucositis), as well as during peri-implantitis involving bone-bearing loss has been evaluated. Twenty patients were chosen as a sample for the study. After careful evaluation of the several protocols concerning peri-implantitis treatment, some diagnostic clinical parameters have been recorded for each patient and metronidazole dental gel 25% (Elyzol Cabon) has been administered in two applications at perimplants pocket (one after a week). For each patient 3 microbiological drawings were made for the evaluation of the bacterial population around the implant site. From the microbiological examination a decrease of Gram- and an increase of Gram+ which returned in almost all the patients to normal levels have been observed; moreover, in all the patients a gradual decrease of PMN, resolution index of the inflammatory process was obtained, confirmed also by a remarkable improvement of all the observed diagnostic parameters, except for the peri-implants bone radiotransparency which was unchanged. The research showed that the peri-implant diseases can be positively resolved by using the metronidazole dental gel 25% topical antibiotic. This drug led to a 60-70% decrease of Gram-, and 40-50% increase for Gram+, bringing these back to normal values in almost all the patients. Moreover, a good recovery of the peri-implants soft tissues has been observed.

  18. A diversity of peri-implant mucosal thickness by site.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Kei; Munakata, Motohiro; Kitazume, Takaaki; Tachikawa, Noriko; Kasugai, Shohei; Kuroda, Shinji

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine peri-implant mucosal thickness at different sites of peri-implant crevice around 70 implants placed in 35 patients. The peri-implant mucosal thickness was defined as distance of the peri-implant mucosal margin and the coronal edge of bone/implant contact and measured using the cast models and dental radiography. The overall mean peri-implant mucosal thickness was 3.6 ± 1.4 mm, wherein maxillary anterior implants, maxillary posterior implants and mandibular posterior implants had significantly different dimensions of median thickness of 4.25, 3.75 and 3.0 mm, respectively. Furthermore, the mesial and distal sites of those positioned implants measured unevenness in the thickness especially in the maxillary posterior region with statistical significance. The proposed methodology to evaluate peri-implant mucosal thickness measured with a big variation from overall 3.6 mm with a big variation from 1.6 to 7.0 mm in healthy volunteers. And significant difference was found in the depth among the three regions and, statistically, dispersion of individual peri-implant mucosal thickness resulted in lack of consistency. Although dental implants have been well developed, predictable and prevailing prosthetics, onset of peri-implantitis might be inevitable in some cases. Therefore, establishment of a standardized dimensional diagnosis of peri-implant tissues followed by pathologic ascertainment could be taken into account for the prevention or curing of peri-implantitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Peri-implant infections of oral biofilm etiology.

    PubMed

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Charalampakis, Georgios; Bostanci, Nagihan; Stadlinger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities that grow on various surfaces in nature. The oral micobiota tend to form polymicrobial biofilms, particularly on the hard mineralized surfaces of teeth, which may impact on oral health and disease. They can cause inflammation of the adjacent tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, leading to destructive periodontal disease and tooth loss. The emergence of osseointegrated dental implants as a restorative treatment option for replacing missing teeth has also brought along new artificial surfaces within the oral cavity, on which oral bacteria can form biofilms. As in the case of natural teeth, biofilms on implant surfaces may also trigger infection and cause inflammatory destruction of the peri-implant tissue (i.e. peri-implantitis). While there are strong similarities in the composition of the mixed microbial flora between periodontal and peri-implant infections, there are also a few distinctive differences. The immunological events underlying the pathogenesis of peri-implant infections are qualitatively similar, yet more extensive, compared to periodontal infections, resulting in a faster progression of tissue destruction. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on the microbiology and immunology of peri-implant infections, including findings from the peri-implant crevicular fluid, the inflammatory exudate of the peri-implant tissue. Moreover, it discusses the diagnosis and current approaches for the treatment of oral infections.

  20. Regenerative Medicine for Periodontal and Peri-implant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Larsson, L; Decker, A M; Nibali, L; Pilipchuk, S P; Berglundh, T; Giannobile, W V

    2016-03-01

    The balance between bone resorption and bone formation is vital for maintenance and regeneration of alveolar bone and supporting structures around teeth and dental implants. Tissue regeneration in the oral cavity is regulated by multiple cell types, signaling mechanisms, and matrix interactions. A goal for periodontal tissue engineering/regenerative medicine is to restore oral soft and hard tissues through cell, scaffold, and/or signaling approaches to functional and aesthetic oral tissues. Bony defects in the oral cavity can vary significantly, ranging from smaller intrabony lesions resulting from periodontal or peri-implant diseases to large osseous defects that extend through the jaws as a result of trauma, tumor resection, or congenital defects. The disparity in size and location of these alveolar defects is compounded further by patient-specific and environmental factors that contribute to the challenges in periodontal regeneration, peri-implant tissue regeneration, and alveolar ridge reconstruction. Efforts have been made over the last few decades to produce reliable and predictable methods to stimulate bone regeneration in alveolar bone defects. Tissue engineering/regenerative medicine provide new avenues to enhance tissue regeneration by introducing bioactive models or constructing patient-specific substitutes. This review presents an overview of therapies (e.g., protein, gene, and cell based) and biomaterials (e.g., resorbable, nonresorbable, and 3-dimensionally printed) used for alveolar bone engineering around teeth and implants and for implant site development, with emphasis on most recent findings and future directions.

  1. Regenerative Medicine for Periodontal and Peri-implant Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, L.; Decker, A.M.; Nibali, L.; Pilipchuk, S.P.; Berglundh, T.; Giannobile, W.V.

    2015-01-01

    The balance between bone resorption and bone formation is vital for maintenance and regeneration of alveolar bone and supporting structures around teeth and dental implants. Tissue regeneration in the oral cavity is regulated by multiple cell types, signaling mechanisms, and matrix interactions. A goal for periodontal tissue engineering/regenerative medicine is to restore oral soft and hard tissues through cell, scaffold, and/or signaling approaches to functional and aesthetic oral tissues. Bony defects in the oral cavity can vary significantly, ranging from smaller intrabony lesions resulting from periodontal or peri-implant diseases to large osseous defects that extend through the jaws as a result of trauma, tumor resection, or congenital defects. The disparity in size and location of these alveolar defects is compounded further by patient-specific and environmental factors that contribute to the challenges in periodontal regeneration, peri-implant tissue regeneration, and alveolar ridge reconstruction. Efforts have been made over the last few decades to produce reliable and predictable methods to stimulate bone regeneration in alveolar bone defects. Tissue engineering/regenerative medicine provide new avenues to enhance tissue regeneration by introducing bioactive models or constructing patient-specific substitutes. This review presents an overview of therapies (e.g., protein, gene, and cell based) and biomaterials (e.g., resorbable, nonresorbable, and 3-dimensionally printed) used for alveolar bone engineering around teeth and implants and for implant site development, with emphasis on most recent findings and future directions. PMID:26608580

  2. Estimation of bone loss biomarkers as a diagnostic tool for peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Rakic, Mia; Struillou, Xavier; Petkovic-Curcin, Aleksandra; Matic, Smiljana; Canullo, Luigi; Sanz, Mariano; Vojvodic, Danilo

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study are to estimate the profile of bone loss biomarkers in peri-implant tissues and to identify potential prognostic biomarkers of peri-implantitis. Peri-implant crevicular fluid samples collected from 164 participants (52 patients with peri-implantitis, 54 with mucositis, and 58 with healthy peri-implant tissues) were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to evaluate concentrations of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK), soluble RANK ligand (sRANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), cathepsin-K, and sclerostin. Concentrations of RANK, sRANKL, OPG, and sclerostin were significantly increased in patients with peri-implantitis compared with patients with healthy peri-implant tissues. Comparisons between peri-implantitis and mucositis demonstrated significantly higher values of sclerostin in peri-implantitis samples. Comparisons between mucositis and healthy peri-implant tissues showed significantly increased levels of RANK and cathepsin-K in mucositis. These results are suggestive of a role of sRANKL, OPG, and sclerostin as prognostic biomarkers in peri-implantitis.

  3. Simple method of fabricating an impression coping to reproduce peri-implant gingiva on the master cast.

    PubMed

    Polack, Mariano A

    2002-08-01

    This article describes a simple technique in which a custom impression coping is fabricated with flowable composite and used to reproduce peri-implant soft tissues on the master cast. This procedure is designed to generate an accurate reproduction of the gingival contours surrounding the implant, thus contributing to a final restoration with favorable esthetics.

  4. [Enlargement of keratinized peri-implant mucosa at the time of second stage surgery (re-entry)].

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Regula; Bassetti, Renzo; Mericske-Stern, Regina; Enkling, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    A tightly attached keratinized mucosa around endosseous dental implants is believed to be protective against peri-implant bone loss. Tension caused by buccal frena and mobile non keratinized mucosa is to avoid. This case report documents the optimization of peri-implant mucosal conditions in the upper and lower jaw. At the time of second stage surgery (re-entry) at submucosally osseointegrated dental implants an enlargement of keratinized mucosa and a thickening of soft tissue was obtained administrating a vestibuloplasty combined by a free gingival graft or a vestibuloplasty combined by an apically moved flap.

  5. Peri-implant diseases: a review of treatment interventions.

    PubMed

    Romanos, Georgios E; Javed, Fawad; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The ideal management of peri-implant diseases focuses on infection control, detoxification of implant surfaces, regeneration of lost tissues, and plaque-control regimens via mechanical debridement (with or without raising a surgical flap). However, a variety of other therapeutic modalities also have been proposed for the management of peri-implantitis. These treatment strategies encompass use of antiseptics and/or antibiotics, laser therapy, guided bone regeneration, and photodynamic therapy. The aim of this article was to review indexed literature with reference to the various therapeutic interventions proposed for the management of peri-implant diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Peri-implant collagen fibers around human cone Morse connection implants under polarized light: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Scarano, Antonio; Shibli, Jamil A; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2012-06-01

    Most of the histologic studies found in the literature on the peri-implant soft tissues have been done in animals and usually have been confined to mandibular implants fitted with healing or standard abutments. Few studies have investigated human peri-implant soft tissues. Moreover, the structure and dimensions of the peri-implant soft tissues in immediately loaded implants have not been investigated in depth. Human histologic data are valuable to validate animal models. This histologic and histomorphometric study evaluated the peri-implant soft tissues around three immediately loaded implants in humans. The implants were retrieved using a trephine and treated to obtain thin, ground sections. The sulcular epithelium was composed of approximately four to five layers of parakeratinized epithelial cells and had a length of approximately 1.2 to 1.3 mm. The junctional epithelium was composed of approximately three to four layers of epithelial cells and had a length of approximately 1.0 to 1.5 mm. Connective tissue attachment had a width of between 400 and 800 μm. Peri-implant collagen fibers, in the form of bundles (1- to 5-μm thick), began at the crestal bone and were oriented perpendicular to the abutment surface until 200 μm from the surface, where they became parallel running in several directions. Collagen fibers appeared to form a three-dimensional network around the abutment. No acute or chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate was present. Collagen fibers oriented in a perpendicular manner and in direct contact with the abutment surface were not observed in any of the specimens. This differentiated network of fibers may have clinical relevance as a mechanical protection of the underlying bone. These human histologic data are extremely valuable to validate and confirm those obtained from studies performed on animal models. Moreover, immediate loading of the implants did not compromise soft tissue integration.

  7. The effect of the local use of chlorhexidine in surgical treatment of experimental peri-implantitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Carcuac, Olivier; Abrahamsson, Ingemar; Charalampakis, Georgios; Berglundh, Tord

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of surgical treatment of experimental peri-implantitis at implants with different surface characteristics using different anti-infective procedures. Four implants with different surface characteristics (A: TiOblast, B: OsseoSpeed, C: AT-I, D: TiUnite) were installed in a randomized order in each side of the mandible in 6 labrador dogs 3 months after tooth extraction. Experimental peri-implantitis was induced 3 months later. Surgical treatment of peri-implantitis was performed. The implants were cleaned with gauze soaked in either saline (control) or chlorhexidine (test). Clinical and radiographical examinations were performed and microbiological samples were taken during a 6-month period after surgery. Biopsies were obtained and prepared for histological analysis. Clinical signs of soft tissue inflammation were reduced after surgical therapy in most test and control sites. While the analysis of bone level alterations in radiographs together with histological and microbiological assessments of resolution of peri-implantitis lesions failed to demonstrate statistically significant differences between test and control procedures, the evaluations disclosed significant differences between implant D and implants A, B and C on treatment outcome. It is suggested that (i) the local use of chlorhexidine has minor influence on treatment outcome, (ii) resolution of peri-implantitis following surgical treatment without the adjunctive use of local and systemic antimicrobial agents is possible and (iii) the results are influenced by implant surface characteristics. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Peri-implant bone tissues around retrieved human implants after time periods longer than 5 years: a retrospective histologic and histomorphometric evaluation of 8 cases.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, Giovanna; Piattelli, Adriano; Mangano, Carlo; Shibli, Jamil A; Vantaggiato, Giovanni; Frosecchi, Massimo; Di Chiara, Claudio; Perrotti, Vittoria

    2014-01-01

    Only rarely, it is possible to find in the literature histological reports of human retrieved implants, especially after several years of functional loading. These implants can help us in understanding the reactions of peri-implant bone. The aim of this study was to perform a histologic and histomorphometric analysis of the peri-implant tissues behavior and of the bone-titanium interface in titanium dental implants retrieved from patients after time periods longer than 5 years. The archives of the Implant Retrieval Center of the Dental School of the University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy were searched for human dental implants, retrieved after a loading period of more than 5 years. A total of 8 implants were found: 3 of these had been retrieved after 5 years, 1 after 6 years, one after 10 years, 1 after 14 years, 1 after 18 years, 1 after 22 years. Only the bone to implant contact in the three best threads was evaluated. Compact, mature, lamellar bone, with few and small marrow spaces, was present around the implants. Osteons with Haversian canals were present inside some threads, in close proximity to the interface, at both cortical and trabecular regions. Other osteons had a direction perpendicular to the direction of the long axis of the implants. Numerous reversal lines were present. At higher magnification, no gaps or fibrous, connective tissues were present at the interface. The BIC of the three best threads for all implants varied from 94 to 100 %.In conclusion, within the limitations of the present report histology showed that implants with different surfaces all presented the potential to maintain osseointegration over a long period, with a continuous remodeling at the interface, as indicated by the presence of reversal lines.

  9. Characterization of Cement Particles Found in Peri-implantitis-Affected Human Biopsy Specimens.

    PubMed

    Burbano, Maria; Wilson, Thomas G; Valderrama, Pilar; Blansett, Jonathan; Wadhwani, Chandur P K; Choudhary, Pankaj K; Rodriguez, Lucas C; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a disease characterized by soft tissue inflammation and continued loss of supporting bone, which can result in implant failure. Peri-implantitis is a multifactorial disease, and one of its triggering factors may be the presence of excess cement in the soft tissues surrounding an implant. This descriptive study evaluated the composition of foreign particles from 36 human biopsy specimens with 19 specimens selected for analysis. The biopsy specimens were obtained from soft tissues affected by peri-implantitis around cement-retained implant crowns and compared with the elemental composition of commercial luting cement. Nineteen biopsy specimens were chosen for the comparison, and five test cements (TempBond, Telio, Premier Implant Cement, Intermediate Restorative Material, and Relyx) were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. This enabled the identification of the chemical composition of foreign particles embedded in the tissue specimens and the composition of the five cements. Statistical analysis was conducted using classification trees to pair the particles present in each specimen with the known cements. The particles in each biopsy specimen could be associated with one of the commercial cements with a level of probability ranging between .79 and 1. TempBond particles were found in one biopsy specimen, Telio particles in seven, Premier Implant Cement particles in four, Relyx particles in four, and Intermediate Restorative Material particles in three. Particles found in human soft tissue biopsy specimens around implants affected by peri-implant disease were associated with five commercially available dental cements.

  10. Management of Peri-Implant Hypertrophic Scarring for an Ear Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Alfenas, Elizabeth Rodrigues; Moreno, Amália; Tanner, Paul Benjamin; Netto, Henrique Duque; Fonseca, Maria Fernanda Lopes; Rios, Fernando Gonçalves

    2017-09-19

    The clinical report describes a case of a 14-year-old patient with a traumatic amputation of the left auricle and severe hypertrophic scarring. The management of peri-implant soft tissue was challenging, but successful in the rehabilitation of a patient with auricular prosthesis retained by implants. The prosthesis restored the patient's facial aesthetics and contributed not only to function, but also to psychosocial well-being.

  11. The Management of Retrograde Peri-Implantitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jumshad B; Alam, Md Nazish; Singh, Gurudeep; Chandrasekaran, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Peri-Implantitis is defined as an inflammatory reaction with the loss of the supporting bone in the tissues which surround a functioning implant. The peri-implantitis lesions are often asymptomatic and they are usually detected during the routine recall appointments. Careful probing around the teeth and the implants should be done routinely along with the radiologic evaluation during these check-up appointments. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove even more difficult to identify, resulting in the loss of the implant. This paper presents a report of the extensive and the meticulous management of retrograde peri-implantitis and the implant being finally restored to health and the full functional status. PMID:23285472

  12. Spontaneous progression of ligature induced peri-implantitis at implants with different surface roughness: an experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Berglundh, T; Gotfredsen, K; Zitzmann, N U; Lang, N P; Lindhe, J

    2007-10-01

    Peri-implantitis is associated with the presence of submarginal plaque, soft-tissue inflammation and advanced breakdown of the supporting bone. The progression of peri-implantitis following varying periods of continuing plaque accumulation has been studied in animal models. The aim of the current experiment was to study the progression of peri-implantitis around implants with different surface roughness. In five beagle dogs, three implants with either a sandblasted acid-etched surface (SLA) or a polished surface (P) were installed bilaterally in the edentulous premolar regions. After 3 months on a plaque control regimen, experimental peri-implantitis was induced by ligature placement and plaque accumulation was allowed to progress until about 40% of the height of the supporting bone had been lost. After this 4-month period, ligatures were removed and plaque accumulation was continued for an additional 5 months. Radiographs of all implant sites were obtained before and after 'active' experimental peri-implantitis as well as at the end of the experiment. Biopsies were harvested and the tissue samples were prepared for light microscopy. The sections were used for histometric and morphometric examinations. The radiographic examinations indicated that similar amounts of bone loss occurred at SLA and P sites during the active breakdown period, while the progression of bone loss was larger at SLA than at polished sites following ligature removal. The histological examination revealed that both bone loss and the size of the inflammatory lesion in the connective tissue were larger in SLA than in polished implant sites. The area of plaque was also larger at implants with an SLA surface than at implants with a polished surface. It is suggested that the progression of peri-implantitis, if left untreated, is more pronounced at implants with a moderately rough surface than at implants with a polished surface.

  13. Surgical Non-Regenerative Treatments for Peri-Implantitis: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ramanauskaite, Ausra; Daugela, Povilas; Faria de Almeida, Ricardo; Saulacic, Nikola

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were 1) to systematically review the literature on the surgical non-regenerative treatments of peri-implantitis and 2) to determine a predictable therapeutic option for the clinical management of peri-implantitis lesions. The study search was performed on primary database MEDLINE and EMBASE from 2005 until 2016. Sequential screenings at the title, abstract, and full-text levels were performed. Clinical human studies in the English language that had reported changes in probing depth (PD) and/or bleeding on probing (BOP) and/or radiologic marginal bone level changes after peri-implantitis surgical non-regenerative treatment at 6-month follow-up or longer were included accordingly PRISMA guidelines. The first electronic and hand search resulted in 765 citations. From 16 full-text articles reviewed, 6 were included in this systematic review. Surgical non-regenerative methods were found to be efficient in reducing clinical parameters. BOP and PD values were significantly decreased following implantoplasty and systematic administration of antibacterials, but not after local application of chemical compounds or diode laser. Similarly, significant improvement in clinical and radiographic parameters was found only after implantoplasty compared with resective surgery alone. We found significant heterogeneity in study designs and treatments provided among the pooled studies. All of the studies revealed an unclear or high risk of bias. Surgical non-regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis was found to be effective to reduce the soft tissue inflammation and decrease probing depth. More randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to assess the efficacy of surgical non-regenerative therapy of peri-implantitis.

  14. Surgical Non-Regenerative Treatments for Peri-Implantitis: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ramanauskaite, Ausra; Daugela, Povilas; Faria de Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purposes of the present study were 1) to systematically review the literature on the surgical non-regenerative treatments of peri-implantitis and 2) to determine a predictable therapeutic option for the clinical management of peri-implantitis lesions. Material and Methods The study search was performed on primary database MEDLINE and EMBASE from 2005 until 2016. Sequential screenings at the title, abstract, and full-text levels were performed. Clinical human studies in the English language that had reported changes in probing depth (PD) and/or bleeding on probing (BOP) and/or radiologic marginal bone level changes after peri-implantitis surgical non-regenerative treatment at 6-month follow-up or longer were included accordingly PRISMA guidelines. Results The first electronic and hand search resulted in 765 citations. From 16 full-text articles reviewed, 6 were included in this systematic review. Surgical non-regenerative methods were found to be efficient in reducing clinical parameters. BOP and PD values were significantly decreased following implantoplasty and systematic administration of antibacterials, but not after local application of chemical compounds or diode laser. Similarly, significant improvement in clinical and radiographic parameters was found only after implantoplasty compared with resective surgery alone. We found significant heterogeneity in study designs and treatments provided among the pooled studies. All of the studies revealed an unclear or high risk of bias. Conclusions Surgical non-regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis was found to be effective to reduce the soft tissue inflammation and decrease probing depth. More randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to assess the efficacy of surgical non-regenerative therapy of peri-implantitis. PMID:27833739

  15. The rationale for soft-tissue grafting and vestibuloplasty in association with endosseous implants: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hoelscher, D C; Simons, A M

    1994-01-01

    Significant soft-tissue complications have been reported around endosseous implant permucosal abutments. Peri-implantitis with associated bone loss can have a negative effect on the long-term prognosis of the implant reconstruction. The rationale for soft-tissue grafting and vestibuloplasty techniques is presented in the form of a literature review. The implant sulcular epithelium, permucosal seal, and the peri-implant connective tissues are discussed. The etiology of soft-tissue complications as well as the significance of attached gingiva surrounding implant abutments are presented along with techniques for surgical intervention.

  16. The rationale for soft-tissue grafting and vestibuloplasty in association with endosseous implants: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hoelscher, D C; Simons, A M

    1996-03-01

    Significant soft-tissue complications have been reported around endosseous implant permucosal abutments. Peri-implants with associated bone loss can have a negative effect on the long-term prognosis of the implant reconstruction. The rationale for soft-tissue grafting and vestibuloplasty techniques is presented in the form of a literature review. The implant sulcular epithelium, permucosal seal, and the peri-implant connective tissues are discussed. The etiology of soft-tissue complications as well as the significance of attached gingiva surrounding implant abutments are presented along with techniques for surgical intervention.

  17. Influence of collar design on peri-implant tissue healing around immediate implants: A pilot study in Foxhound dogs.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; López-López, Patricia Jara; Maté Sánchez de Val, José Eduardo; Mareque-Bueno, Javier; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Romanos, Georgios E

    2015-07-01

    The study aims to assess the soft tissue level (STL) and crestal bone level (CBL), of titanium dental implants with different mixed collar abutments configurations. This study included 48 implants with the same dimensions. They were divided into two groups of 24 implants each one: implants with a polished collar of 2 mm plus a roughened area of 0.8 mm (CONTROL) and implants with a polished collar of 0.8 mm plus a micro-threated and roughened area of 2 mm (TEST). The implants were inserted randomly in the post-extraction sockets of P2, P3, P4, and M1 bilaterally in the lower jaw of six foxhound dogs. STL and CBL were evaluated after 8 and 12 weeks by histology and histometry. All implants were clinically and histologically osseointegrated. Healing patterns examined microscopically at 8 and 12 weeks for both groups yielded similar qualitative findings for the STL evaluation, without significant differences between groups (P > 0.05). CBL was significantly higher in the buccal side in comparison with the lingual side for both groups (P < 0.05); the comparison between groups at 8 weeks showed IS-B (distance from the implant shoulder to the top of the bony crest) and IS-C (distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant contact) values significantly higher for control group in comparison with test (P < 0.05). At 12 weeks, CBL showed increased values for both groups that were higher in controls group in comparison with test (P < 0.05). Bony crest resorption could not be avoided both at test and control sites. However, the neck conformation at the test sites reduced the buccal bone resorption. Soft tissue dimensions were similar both at the test and control sites. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Evaluation of peri-implant tissues around nanopore surface implants with or without platelet rich fibrin: A clinico-radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zia Arshad; Jhingran, Rajesh; Bains, Vivek Kumar; Srivastava, Ruchi; Madan, Rohit; Rizvi, Iram

    2017-09-28

    To comparatively evaluate peri-implant tissue changes around nano-pore implant surface with or without platelet rich fibrin (PRF). Material and Methods: For the present study total number of 17 patients was initially enrolled for the study (6 females, 11 males) with 38 sites (19 control and 19 experimental sites) were finally randomly assigned to receive either as Group 1 (Control) i.e. Extraction site received immediate implants without any PRF, and Group 2 (Experimental) i.e. Extraction sites received immediate implants with PRF. Clinical and radiographic parameters were recorded till 9 months after implant-loading phase. Results: Clinically, there was significant (p<0.001) increase in peri-implant probing depth (PIPD) from prosthetic phase to 9 months in both the groups and the increase was more in control group. However, the mean difference of change between the two groups was non-significant. Modified gingiva index (mGI) for Group II is significantly lower than that for Group I in prosthetic phase. Radiographically, in control group and experimental group, there was significant increase (<0.01) in bone loss (BL) in mesial and distal aspect of implant from surgical to prosthetic phase, surgical to 9 months and from prosthetic phase to 9 months. There was greater BL in control group than in experimental group, in both mesial and distal aspect of implant, however the difference in BL was non-significant (<0.01). There was greater BL in the distal aspect than in the mesial aspect in both the groups; however the difference in BL was non-significant. Conclusion: PRF treatment may be a way to prevent bone loss during the surgical-to-prosthetic phase. These result were based on short term low sample randomized clinical study, therefore long term study with more sites with homogenous sampling are recommended. Keywords: Implant, extraction socket, probing pocket depth, platelet rich fibrin . © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. Changes in WNT signaling-related gene expression associated with development and cloning in bovine extra-embryonic and endometrial tissues during the peri-implantation period.

    PubMed

    Biase, Fernando H; Rabel, Chanaka; Guillomot, Michel; Sandra, Olivier; Andropolis, Kalista; Olmstead, Colleen; Oliveira, Rosane; Wallace, Richard; Le Bourhis, Daniel; Richard, Christophe; Campion, Evelyne; Chaulot-Talmon, Aurélie; Giraud-Delville, Corinne; Taghouti, Géraldine; Jammes, Hélène; Hue, Isabelle; Renard, Jean Paul; Lewin, Harris A

    2013-12-01

    We determined if somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is associated with WNT-related gene expression in cattle development, and if the expression of genes in the WNT pathway changes during the peri-implantation period. Extra-embryonic and endometrial tissues were collected at gestation days 18 and 34 (d18, d34). WNT5A, FZD4, FZD5, LRP5, CTNNB1, GNAI2, KDM1A, BCL2L1, and SFRP1 transcripts were localized in extra-embryonic tissue, whereas SFRP1 and DKK1 were localized in the endometrium. There were no differences in the localization of these transcripts in extra-embryonic tissue or endometrium from SCNT or artificial insemination (AI) pregnancies. Expression levels of WNT5A were 11-fold greater in the allantois of SCNT than AI samples. In the trophoblast, expression of WNT5A, FZD5, CTNNB1, and DKK1 increased significantly from d18 to d34, whereas expression of KDM1A and SFRP1 decreased, indicating that implantation is associated with major changes in WNT signaling. SCNT was associated with altered WNT5A expression in trophoblasts, with levels increasing 2.3-fold more in AI than SCNT conceptuses from d18 to d34. In the allantois, expression of WNT5A increased 6.3-fold more in SCNT than AI conceptuses from d18 to d34. Endometrial tissue expression levels of the genes tested did not differ between AI or SCNT pregnancies, although expression of individual genes showed variation across developmental stages. Our results demonstrate that SCNT is associated with altered expression of specific WNT-related genes in extra-embryonic tissue in a time- and tissue-specific manner. The pattern of gene expression in the WNT pathway suggests that noncanonical WNT signal transduction is important for implantation of cattle conceptuses. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Stress distribution in fixed-partial prosthesis and peri-implant bone tissue with different framework materials and vertical misfit levels: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Ataís; Consani, Rafael L X; Mesquita, Marcelo F; dos Santos, Mateus B F

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of superstructure material and vertical misfits on the stresses created in an implant-supported partial prosthesis. A three-dimensional (3-D) finite element model was prepared based on common clinical data. The posterior part of a severely resorbed jaw with two osseointegrated implants at the second premolar and second molar regions was modeled using specific modeling software (SolidWorks 2010). Finite element models were created by importing the solid model into mechanical simulation software (ANSYS Workbench 11). The models were divided into groups according to the prosthesis framework material (type IV gold alloy, silver-palladium alloy, commercially pure titanium, cobalt-chromium alloy, or zirconia) and vertical misfit level (10 µm, 50 µm, and 100 µm) created at one implant-prosthesis interface. The gap of the vertical misfit was set to be closed and the stress values were measured in the framework, porcelain veneer, retention screw, and bone tissue. Stiffer materials led to higher stress concentration in the framework and increased stress values in the retention screw, while in the same circumstances, the porcelain veneer showed lower stress values, and there was no significant difference in stress in the peri-implant bone tissue. A considerable increase in stress concentration was observed in all the structures evaluated within the misfit amplification. The framework material influenced the stress concentration in the prosthetic structures and retention screw, but not that in bone tissue. All the structures were significantly influenced by the increase in the misfit levels.

  1. Histomorphometric Assessment of the Influence of Low-Level Laser Therapy on Peri-Implant Tissue Healing in the Rabbit Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Fernando Vacilotto; Mayer, Luciano; de Oliveira, Marília Gerhardt; Baraldi, Carlos Eduardo; Ponzoni, Deise; Puricelli, Edela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the peri-implant bone healing process in the rabbit mandible. Background data: LLLT has been shown to accelerate tissue repair and osseointegration of implants placed into the rabbit tibia. However, the beneficial effects of LLLT have never been tested in the rabbit mandible, which would more closely mimic the human situation. Materials and methods: Twenty-four male New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into four groups of six animals each. All animals had their left mandibular incisors extracted, followed by immediate insertion of a titanium dental implant in the fresh socket. Three groups received LLLT [aluminum-gallium-arsenide (AlGaAs), λ=830nm, 50 mW, continuous wave (CW)] at three different energy densities per treatment session (E-5, 5 J/cm2; E-10, 10 J/cm2; and E-20, 20 J/cm2). Irradiation was performed every 48 h for 13 days, totaling seven sessions. One group received sham treatment (controls). Histological sections were obtained from each of the 24 mandibles dissected, without first decalcifying the specimens, and were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Picrosirius red for histomorphometric evaluation. Bone-to-implant contact (BIC), bone formation area, and collagen fiber area were assessed by light microscopy. Results: Significant differences were found between group E-20 and all other groups (p<0.05). Histomorphometric evaluation showed significantly higher BIC and significantly more collagen fibers in group E-20. Conclusions: Photobiostimulation with LLLT at an energy density of 20 J/cm2 per session had a significant positive effect on new bone formation around dental implants inserted in the rabbit mandible. PMID:25751666

  2. Concise survey of Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors that promote adhesion and damage to peri-implant tissues.

    PubMed

    Arciola, Carla Renata; Visai, Livia; Testoni, Francesca; Arciola, Susanna; Campoccia, Davide; Speziale, Pietro; Montanaro, Lucio

    2011-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of infection in orthopedic implants and of osteomyelitis consequent to it. Here we focus on the wide array of virulence factors that endow S. aureus with its abilities to colonize peri-prosthesis tissues and to attack and damage them. Following an infective strategy orchestrated by agr locus, Staphylococcus aureus first deploys virulence factors for adhesion to the prosthesis and peri-prosthesis tissues and then launches its attack by delivering destructive factors.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors for peri-implant diseases in Japanese adult dental patients.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yorimasa; Nakayama, Yohei; Tatsumi, Junichi; Kubota, Takehiko; Sato, Shuichi; Nishida, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Onitsuka, Tokuya; Sakagami, Ryuji; Nozaki, Takenori; Murakami, Shinya; Matsubara, Naritoshi; Tanaka, Maki; Yoshino, Toshiaki; Ota, Junya; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Ishihara, Yuichi; Ito, Taichi; Saito, Atsushi; Yamaki, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Etsuko; Hidaka, Toshirou; Sasaki, Daisuke; Yaegashi, Takashi; Yasuda, Tadashi; Shibutani, Toshiaki; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Araki, Hisao; Ikumi, Noriharu; Aoyama, Yukihiko; Kogai, Hideki; Nemoto, Kenji; Deguchi, Shinji; Takiguchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Inokuchi, Keita; Ito, Takatoshi; Kado, Takashi; Furuichi, Yasushi; Kanazashi, Mikimoto; Gomi, Kazuhiro; Takagi, Yukie; Kubokawa, Keita; Yoshinari, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Hirose, Tetsushi; Sase, Toshinaga; Arita, Hirokazu; Kodama, Toshiro; Shin, Kitetsu; Izumi, Yuichi; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2017-03-31

    We investigated the prevalences and risk factors for peri-implant diseases in Japanese adult dental patients attending a follow-up visit at dental hospitals or clinics as part of their maintenance program. This cross-sectional multicenter study enrolled patients with dental implants who attended regular check-ups as part of a periodontal maintenance program during the period from October 2012 through September 2013. Patients with implants with at least 3 years of loading time were included in the study. The condition of peri-implant tissue was examined and classified into the following categories: healthy, peri-implant mucositis, and peri-implantitis. Patients were also evaluated for implant risk factors. A total of 267 patients (110 men, 157 women; mean age: 62.5 ± 10.7 years) were analyzed. The prevalence of patient-based peri-implant mucositis was 33.3% (n = 89), and the prevalence of peri-implantitis was 9.7% (n = 26). Poor oral hygiene and a history of periodontitis were strong risk factors for peri-implant disease. The present prevalences were lower than those previously reported. The quality of periodontal therapy before and after implant installation and patient compliance and motivation, as indicated by plaque control level, appear to be important in maintaining peri-implant tissue health.

  4. Peri-implantitis: associated microbiota and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ata-Ali, Javier; Candel-Marti, María Eugenia; Flichy-Fernández, Antonio Juan; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Balaguer-Martinez, José Francisco; Peñarrocha Diago, María

    2011-11-01

    Peri-implantitis is a late complication of dental implant treatment, induced by microbiological changes. Since the disorder is frequent, a review is indicated of the microorganisms that influence it and of the existing treatment options. To conduct a literature review of the microbiota associated to peri-implantitis and the existing treatment options. A PubMed literature search was made of the studies on the microbiota associated to dental implants in healthy patients and patients with peri-implantitis, as well as of the latest treatment developments, using the following key words: "peri-implantitis AND microbiota", "periimplantitis AND microbiota", "peri-implantitis AND treatment", and "periimplantitis AND treatment". Only clinical studies in humans were considered. The following criteria were applied for including articles in the analysis: a) for the peri-implant microbiota, the search limits were human studies after the year 2000; and b) for the treatment of peri-implantitis, the search limits were randomized and controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in humans, with a minimum follow-up of 4 months, and publication after the year 2000. A total of 18 articles were selected in relation to peri-implant microbiota, and 13 in relation to the treatment of peri-implantitis (8 involving nonsurgical mechanical treatments and 5 surgical procedures). Evaluation of the literature has shown the microbiota associated to peri-implantitis to be more complex than that found under healthy peri-implant conditions - the main flora consisting of anaerobic gramnegative bacteria. No clear criteria have been identified for the diagnosis and treatment of peri-implantitis.

  5. The treatment of peri-implant diseases: a new approach using hybenx® as a decontaminant for implant surface and oral tissues

    PubMed Central

    LOPEZ, M.A.; BASSI, M. ANDREASI; CONFALONE, L.; SILVESTRE, F.; ARCURI, C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the efficacy of HyBeNX® to decontaminate the implant surface, both in the case mucositis and severe peri-implantitis and to allow future bone regeneration. Materials and methods We describe three case reports of peri-implantitis successfully treated with HyBeNX®. In our study, we have used microbiological tests to demonstrate the efficacy of HyBeNX® in decreasing bacterial load. Results The microbiological results of the clinical cases described show that there was a reduction in the total bacterial count after treatment. Conclusions The ability of HyBeNX® to dry the surface and remove biofilm may explain the efficacy of the decontamination and subsequent clinical improvements in all three cases. PMID:28042438

  6. Regenerative Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Failure of Dental Implant Due to Infection; Infection; Inflammation; Peri-implantitis; Bacterial Infections; Bleeding of Subgingival Space; Molecular Sequence Variation; Periodontal Diseases; Mouth Diseases

  7. A Classification Proposal for Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis: A Critical Update

    PubMed Central

    Ata-Ali, Javier; Ata-Ali, Fadi; Bagan, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Definitions of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis vary in the literature, and no clear criteria have been established for the diagnosis and treatment of such disorders. This study proposes a classification for peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis based on the severity of the disease, using a combination of peri-implant clinical and radiological parameters to classify severity into several stages (Stage 0A and 0B = peri-implant mucositis, and Stage I to IV = periimplantitis). Following a review of the literature on the subject and justification of the proposed peri-implant disease classification, the latter aims to facilitate professional communication and data collection for research and community health studies. PMID:26966463

  8. A Classification Proposal for Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis: A Critical Update.

    PubMed

    Ata-Ali, Javier; Ata-Ali, Fadi; Bagan, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Definitions of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis vary in the literature, and no clear criteria have been established for the diagnosis and treatment of such disorders. This study proposes a classification for peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis based on the severity of the disease, using a combination of peri-implant clinical and radiological parameters to classify severity into several stages (Stage 0A and 0B = peri-implant mucositis, and Stage I to IV = periimplantitis). Following a review of the literature on the subject and justification of the proposed peri-implant disease classification, the latter aims to facilitate professional communication and data collection for research and community health studies.

  9. Factors influencing severity of peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Saaby, Martin; Karring, Eva; Schou, Søren; Isidor, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively assess the influence of potential risk factors, primarily smoking and a prior history of periodontitis, on the severity of peri-implantitis in patients referred for treatment of peri-implantitis. Among 98 patients referred for treatment of peri-implantitis, 34 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria: one or several implants with peri-implant marginal bone loss ≥2 mm concomitant with bleeding and/or pus on probing. Information about health status, smoking habits, reason for tooth loss, and performed implant treatment were obtained from the patient charts and interviews. Moreover, a detailed extra- and intraoral examination was performed, including intraoral radiographs of all implants. Risk factors were evaluated by a two-way anova at patient level. Smoking and a prior history of periodontitis were significant risk factors for increased severity of peri-implantitis. Furthermore, the presence of both smoking and a prior history of periodontitis did not further increase the severity of peri-implantitis, as compared to either of these two factors alone. Poor marginal fit of the suprastructure and extensive gingival imitations on implant-supported fixed full prostheses may also be potential risk factors. The study indicated that smoking and a prior history of periodontitis were important risk factors for increased severity of peri-implantitis, while concomitant presence of these two risk factors did not further increase the severity of peri-implantitis, as compared to either of these two risk factors alone. Therefore, early diagnosis and adequate treatment of peri-implantitis are important in patients with a prior history of periodontitis and in smokers to minimize the risk of advanced peri-implantitis in conjunction with focus on known risk factors, including meticulous infection control before implant treatment and a systematic maintenance care program. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The implant surface characteristics and peri-implantitis. An evidence-based update.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, C Davila; Almas, K

    2016-03-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease of the peri-implant mucosa with the loss of supporting bone. Because of the absence of an un-inflamed connective tissue zone between the healthy and diseased sites, peri-implant lesions are thought to progress more rapidly than periodontal lesions, suggesting the importance of early diagnosis and intervention if possible. A number of risk factors have been identified that may lead to the initiation and progression of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, eg., previous periodontal disease, poor plaque control, inability to clean, residual cement, smoking, genetic factors, diabetes, occlusal overload, rheumatoid arthritis, increased time of loading and alcohol consumption. At present there is not much literature available, highlighting the relationship between implant surface characteristics and peri-implant diseases. Implant surface characteristics vary with respect to topography, roughness and clinical composition, including turned, blasted, acid etched, porous sintered, oxidized, plasma sprayed and hydroxyapatite coated surfaces and their combinations. So the aim of this review is to explore the relationship between the characteristics of implant surface, the prevalence and incidence of peri-implantitis. This would help to identify plausible influence of surface characteristics, oral hygiene instructions and maintenance of implants for the long-term uneventful success of implant therapy.

  11. Primary prevention of peri-implantitis: managing peri-implant mucositis.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Søren; Berglundh, Tord; Genco, Robert; Aass, Anne Merete; Demirel, Korkud; Derks, Jan; Figuero, Elena; Giovannoli, Jean Louis; Goldstein, Moshe; Lambert, France; Ortiz-Vigon, Alberto; Polyzois, Ioannis; Salvi, Giovanni E; Schwarz, Frank; Serino, Giovanni; Tomasi, Cristiano; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades, the placement of dental implants has become a routine procedure in the oral rehabilitation of fully and partially edentulous patients. However, the number of patients/implants affected by peri-implant diseases is increasing. As there are--in contrast to periodontitis--at present no established and predictable concepts for the treatment of peri-implantitis, primary prevention is of key importance. The management of peri-implant mucositis is considered as a preventive measure for the onset of peri-implantitis. Therefore, the remit of this working group was to assess the prevalence of peri-implant diseases, as well as risks for peri-implant mucositis and to evaluate measures for the management of peri-implant mucositis. Discussions were informed by four systematic reviews on the current epidemiology of peri-implant diseases, on potential risks contributing to the development of peri-implant mucositis, and on the effect of patient and of professionally administered measures to manage peri-implant mucositis. This consensus report is based on the outcomes of these systematic reviews and on the expert opinion of the participants. Key findings included: (i) meta-analysis estimated a weighted mean prevalence for peri-implant mucositis of 43% (CI: 32-54%) and for peri-implantitis of 22% (CI: 14-30%); (ii) bleeding on probing is considered as key clinical measure to distinguish between peri-implant health and disease; (iii) lack of regular supportive therapy in patients with peri-implant mucositis was associated with increased risk for onset of peri-implantitis; (iv) whereas plaque accumulation has been established as aetiological factor, smoking was identified as modifiable patient-related and excess cement as local risk indicator for the development of peri-implant mucositis; (v) patient-administered mechanical plaque control (with manual or powered toothbrushes) has been shown to be an effective preventive measure; (vi) professional intervention

  12. Implants in free fibula flap supporting dental rehabilitation - Implant and peri-implant related outcomes of a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay V; Ebenezer, Supriya; Kämmerer, Peer W; Jacob, P C; Kuriakose, Moni A; Hedne, Naveen; Wagner, Wilfried; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the difference in success rates of implants when using two or four implant-supported-overdentures following segmental mandibular reconstruction with fibula free flap. This prospective, parallel designed, randomized clinical study was conducted with 1:1 ratio. At baseline, all participants already had segmental reconstruction of mandible with free fibula flap. The participants were randomized into two groups: Group-I received implant-supported-overdentures on two tissue-level implants and Group-II received implant-supported-overdentures on four tissue-level implants. Success rates of the implants were evaluated at 3 months, 6 months and 12 months following implant loading using marginal bone level changes as well as peri-implant indices (Buser et al., 1990). 52 patients were randomized into two treatment groups (26 each), out of which 18 patients (36 implants) of Group-I and 17 patients (68 implants) of Group-II were evaluated. One implant in Group-I was lost due to infective complications and one patient in the same group had superior barrel necrosis. There was a statistically significant increase at both time points (p = 0.03, p = 0.04 at 6 months, 12 months) in the amount of marginal bone loss in Group-I (0.4 mm, 0.5 mm at 6 months, 12 months) as compared to Group-II (0.1 mm, 0.2 mm at 6 months, 12 months). There were no clinically significant changes peri-implant parameters between both groups. Peri-implant soft tissue hyperplasia was seen in both groups, 32% of implants at 3-months, 26% at 6-months and 3% at 12-months follow-up. The results of this study show that patients with 2-implant-supported-overdentures had higher marginal bone loss as compared to patients with 4-implant-supported-overdentures. There were no clinically significant differences in peri-implant soft tissue factors in patients with 2- or 4-implant-supported-overdentures. Hyperplastic peri-implant tissues are common in the early implant

  13. Soft tissue grafting to improve the attached mucosa at dental implants: A review of the literature and proposal of a decision tree.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Mario; Kaufmann, Regula; Salvi, Giovanni E; Sculean, Anton; Bassetti, Renzo

    2015-06-01

    Scientific data and clinical observations appear to indicate that an adequate width of attached mucosa may facilitate oral hygiene procedures thus preventing peri-implant inflammation and tissue breakdown (eg, biologic complications). Consequently, in order to avoid biologic complications and improve long-term prognosis, soft tissue conditions should be carefully evaluated when implant therapy is planned. At present the necessity and time-point for soft tissue grafting (eg, prior to or during implant placement or after healing) is still controversially discussed while clinical recommendations are vague. To provide a review of the literature on the role of attached mucosa to maintain periimplant health, and to propose a decision tree which may help the clinician to select the appropriate surgical technique for increasing the width of attached mucosa. The available data indicate that ideally, soft tissue conditions should be optimized by various grafting procedures either before or during implant placement or as part of stage-two surgery. In cases, where, despite insufficient peri-implant soft tissue condition (ie, lack of attached mucosa or movements caused by buccal frena), implants have been uncovered and/or loaded, or in cases where biologic complications are already present (eg, mucositis, peri-implantitis), the treatment appears to be more difficult and less predictable. Soft tissue grafting may be important to prevent peri-implant tissue breakdown and should be considered when dental implants are placed. The presented decision tree may help the clinician to select the appropriate grafting technique.

  14. Peri-implant conditions around sintered porous-surfaced (SPS) implants. A 36-month prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Malchiodi, Luciano; Ghensi, Paolo; Cucchi, Alessandro; Pieroni, Stefano; Bertossi, Dario

    2015-02-01

    The specific aim of this study was to assess sintered porous-surfaced (SPS) implant system from a biological point of view, through a prospective study of the health status and the evolution of the peri-implant tissues over time and analysis of the changes observed in the various peri-implant parameters. Hundred and fifty-one patients were treated consecutively from 2005 to 2007 using 280 SPS implants, which were restored with a single crown or a partial fixed denture. To accurately monitor the health and biological evolution of peri-implant soft and hard tissues, a number of clinical parameters were adopted, such as the modified Plaque Index (mPI), the modified sulcus Bleeding Index (mBI), Peri-implant Probing Depth (PPD), and Crestal Bone Level (CBL). Clinical and radiographic examinations were scheduled over a 36-month follow-up of functional loading according to a well-established protocol generally applied to determine implant success rates and Peri-implant Bone Loss (PBL). Statistical analysis was used to determine any significant differences or correlations (P = 0.05). A total of 259 SPS implants in 136 patients were followed up for 36 months. According to Buser's success criteria, the overall implant-based success rate was 98.1% and the mean PBL was 0.48 ± 0.29 mm. MBI and mPI mean values showed statistically significant differences between baseline and follow-up analyses (P < 0.001). No statistically significant differences in mean PPD values were found between baseline and control analyses (P = 0.060). This prospective cohort study revealed that the biological behavior of SPS implant system was characterized by high tissue stability during the observation period, both as regards soft and hard tissues. In particular, the crestal bone remodeling pattern was very similar to that reported in other studies, confirming that the bone loss around SPS implants, at least at 36 months, seems to be predictable. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  15. Non-surgical treatment of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Renvert, Stefan; Roos-Jansåker, Ann-Marie; Claffey, Noel

    2008-09-01

    To review the literature on non-surgical treatment of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. A search of PubMed and The Cochrane Library of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL) as well as a hand search of articles were conducted. Publications and articles accepted for publication up to November 2007 were included. Out of 437 studies retrieved a total of 24 studies were selected for the review. Thus the available evidence for non-surgical treatment of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis is scarce. It was observed that mechanical non-surgical therapy could be effective in the treatment of peri-implant mucositis lesions. Furthermore, the adjunctive use of antimicrobial mouth rinses enhanced the outcome of mechanical therapy of such mucositis lesions. In peri-implantitis lesions non-surgical therapy was not found to be effective. Adjunctive chlorhexidine application had only limited effects on clinical and microbiological parameters. However, adjunctive local or systemic antibiotics were shown to reduce bleeding on probing and probing depths. Minor beneficial effects of laser therapy on peri-implantitis have been shown; this approach needs to be further evaluated. There is a need for randomized-controlled studies evaluating treatment models of non-surgical therapy of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis.

  16. Predisposing conditions for retrograde peri-implantitis, and treatment suggestions.

    PubMed

    Quirynen, Marc; Vogels, Roel; Alsaadi, Ghada; Naert, Ignace; Jacobs, Reinhilde; van Steenberghe, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    endodontic pathology. No other predisposing factors could be identified. A curettage of the peri-apical lesions and the use of a bone substitute material prevented further progression of such lesions in the upper jaw (implants maintained their marginal bone and low PTV scores). A treatment in the lower jaw was less successful. Within the limitations of a retrospective study, these results seem to indicate that retrograde peri-implantitis is provoked by remaining scar or granulomatous tissue at the recipient site: endodontic pathology of extracted tooth (scar tissue-impacted tooth) or possible endodontic pathology from a neighboring tooth.

  17. Primary Oral Malignancy Imitating Peri-Implantitis.

    PubMed

    Raiser, Vadim; Abu-El Naaj, Immad; Shlomi, Benjamin; Fliss, Dan M; Kaplan, Ilana

    2016-07-01

    To describe new cases of primary malignancy arising around dental implants. Three patients presented with asymptomatic lesions around longstanding dental implants that resembled peri-implantitis. One case was primary large B-cell lymphoma and the remaining cases were primary squamous cell carcinoma in patients with oral lichen planus. The literature was reviewed for cases mimicking peri-implantitis. Of 42 implant-associated malignancies reported from 2000 through 2014, 85.7% were squamous cell carcinoma (69% primary and 9.4% metastatic). Most patients presented with pre-existing risk factors for oral cancer. Lymphoma was not associated with dental implants. Primary and metastatic malignancies can occur in peri-implant mucosa, often with clinical and radiographic features resembling peri-implantitis. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for changes in peri-implant mucosa in patients with existing risk factors; however, rare cases such as lymphoma might present outside this risk population. Histopathologic analysis should be included in the management of selected peri-implant lesions to avoid delayed diagnosis of malignancy. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Marginal peri-implantitis due to occlusal overload. A case report.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Roberto; Peñarrocha, Miguel; Sanchis, Jose María; García, Oscar

    2004-01-01

    The etiology of marginal peri-implantitis describes an infectious factor and a biomechanical factor resulting from occlusal overload. Clinical and experimental articles oriented to the biomechanical factor are scarce, so as the studies about the histology associated to periimplantitis. We present a case of marginal peri-implantitis on an implant in the mandibular molar zone caused by occlusal overload, which led to an osseous defect on the marginal crest. The treatment was composed of occlusal adjustment, removal of contaminated surgical tissue, and autogenous bone graft, which varies from the common treatment of infectious peri-implantitis. Histologic analysis of peri-implantitis tissue reveals a juxtaepithelial lympho-plasmocytorious infiltrate and a central zone of dense fibro-connective tissue with scanty inflammatory cells, which differs from the chronic inflammatory tissue associated with infectious peri-implantitis. Clinical and radiographic followup control after 12 months evidenced the remission of the symptoms and bone regeneration on the marginal crest. We consider that in the treatment of marginal peri-implantitis, it is necessary to continue the studies on the histological differences between the infectious types and those that are caused by occlusal overload.

  19. Comparative assessment of the interfacial soft and hard tissues investing implants and natural teeth in the macaque mandible.

    PubMed

    Siar, Chong Huat; Toh, Chooi Gait; Romanos, Georgios E; Ng, Kok Han

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a comparative qualitative and quantitative assessment of the interfacial soft and hard tissues investing implants and natural teeth. The test sample consisted of six adult healthy male Macaca fascicularis with three-unit splinted crowns, each crown supported by an Ankylos screw-shaped titanium implant. These implants were placed in the mandibular premolar-second molar region, one side by an immediate-loading (IL) and the other by delayed-loading (DL) protocol. The animals were sacrificed after 3 months of functional loading. Another two monkeys with natural dentition served as controls. Nondecalcified sections were prepared for assessment of optical intensities (OI) under a confocal laser scanning microscope. In both the test (IL and DL) and control, the soft tissue complexes demonstrated a highly fluorescent keratinized layer and diminished cytoplasmic and enhanced membranous fluorescence in the remaining epithelium. Peri-implant mucosa was further characterized by an intense fluorescence at the junctional epithelium-implant interface and in the stromal mononuclear infiltrate. Connective tissue contact and periodontal ligament were weakly fluorescent. In hard tissues, a high fluorescence was observed in peri-implant woven bone and along the implant-bone interface. Mean OI was significantly higher in peri-implant woven bone than around teeth (P < 0.05). In the remaining soft and hard tissue complexes, no significant differences in mean OI between the test and control were observed (P > 0.05). Present findings suggest that peri-implant woven bone is highly mineralized, while the peri-implant and gingival mucosa share structural similarities. Optical intensities of interfacial tissues investing implants and teeth are related to their biological properties.

  20. Prevalences of peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Teh; Huang, Yen-Wen; Zhu, Liang; Weltman, Robin

    2017-07-01

    Due to the inconsistent definitions, reporting methods and study characteristics, prevalences of peri-implant diseases significantly varied in studies. This study aimed to systematically analyze implant-based and subject-based prevalences of peri-implant diseases and assess clinical variables potentially affecting the prevalence. Electronic search of studies was conducted using MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE and Web of Science. Publication screening, data extraction, and quality assessment were performed. Clinical studies having an at least average three-year follow-up period were selected. The numbers of subjects and implants in the studies had to be equal to or more than thirty. Forty seven studies were selected and prevalences of peri-implant diseases were analyzed. Since heterogeneity existed in each outcome (I(2)=94.7, 95.7, 95.3, and 99.3 for implant-based and subject-based peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis, respectively), the random-effects model based on the DerSimonian and Laird method, which incorporate an estimate of heterogeneity in the weighting, was applied to obtain the pooled prevalence. Weighted mean implant-based and subject-based peri-implantitis prevalences were 9.25% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): [7.57, 10.93]) and 19.83% (CI [15.38, 24.27) respectively. Weighted mean implant-based and subject-based peri-implant mucositis prevalences were 29.48% (CI: [22.65, 36.32]) and 46.83% (CI: [38.30, 55.36]) respectively. Functional time and implant to subject ratio were associated with subject-based peri-implantitis prevalence, but not peri-implant mucositis prevalences. Peri-implant diseases were prevalent and prevalence of peri-implantitis increased over time. Prevalences of peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis might not be highly associated since the prevalences were influenced by distinct variables. The results should be carefully interpreted because of data heterogeneity. Peri-implant diseases affect a significant number of dental

  1. Influence of inflammatory reactions vs. occlusal loading on peri-implant marginal bone level.

    PubMed

    van Steenberghe, D; Naert, I; Jacobs, R; Quirynen, M

    1999-06-01

    Plaque accumulation on abutments or implant surfaces induces an inflammatory reaction in the gingiva/alveolar mucosa just as around teeth. The longevity of oral implants can be jeopardized by either peri-implantitis and/or an occlusal overload. In the partially edentulous patient in whom pockets around teeth act as a reservoir for the colonization of the pockets around implants, the risk for inflammatory reactions of the peri-implant soft tissues seems especially more plausible than in the fully edentulous patient. This is especially true for implants with a very rough surface (e.g., plasma-sprayed), because of the positive relationship between surface roughness and supra- as well as subgingival plaque formation. Several medium-term (from 5 to 10 years) clinical studies support this hypothesis, through the observation of ongoing bone loss and subsequent decreasing success/survival percentages. Occlusal overload increases the risk for microfractures at the implant-bone interface in two-stage implants, which can result in significant marginal bone loss and even failure. There is ample evidence that occlusal factors are related to marginal angular defects around two-stage implants.

  2. Bone Cells Dynamics during Peri-Implantitis: a Theoretical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Pedro de Sousa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The present manuscript aims a detailed characterization of the bone cells dynamics during physiological bone remodelling and, subsequently, to address the cellular and molecular mechanisms that play a fundamental role in the immune-inflammatory-induced uncoupled bone remodelling observed in peri-implantitis. Results An intimate relationship between the immune system and bone is acknowledged to be determinant for bone tissue remodelling and integrity. Due to the close interaction of immune and bone cells, the two systems share a number of surface receptors, cytokines, signalling pathways and transcription factors that are involved in mutual regulatory mechanisms. This physiological equilibrium is disturbed in pathological conditions, as verified in peri-implantitis establishment and development. Activation of the innate and adaptive immune response, challenged by the local bacterial infection, induces the synthesis of high levels of a variety of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that disturb the normal functioning of the bone cells, by uncoupling bone resorption and formation, ending up with a net alveolar bone loss and subsequent implant failure. Most data points to an immune-inflammatory induced osteoclast differentiation and function, as the major underlying mechanism to the uncoupled bone resorption to bone formation. Further, the disturbed functioning of osteoblasts, reflected by the possible expression of a fibro-osteoblastic phenotype, may also play a role. Conclusions Alveolar bone loss is a hallmark of peri-implantitis. A great deal of data is still needed on the cellular and humoral crosstalk in the context of an integrated view of the osteoimmunologic interplay occurring in the peri-implantitis environment subjacent to the bone loss outcome. PMID:27833731

  3. Treatment Alternatives to Negotiate Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Machtei, Eli E.

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implant diseases are becoming a major health issue in dentistry. Despite the magnitude of this problem and the potential grave consequences, commonly acceptable treatment protocols are missing. Hence, the present paper reviews the literature treatment of peri-implantitis in order to explore their benefits and limitations. Treatment of peri-implantitis may include surgical and nonsurgical approaches, either individually or combined. Nonsurgical therapy is aimed at removing local irritants from the implants' surface with or without surface decontamination and possibly some additional adjunctive therapies agents or devices. Systemic antibiotics may also be incorporated. Surgical therapy is aimed at removing any residual subgingival deposits and additionally reducing the peri-implant pockets depth. This can be done alone or in conjunction with either osseous respective approach or regenerative approach. Finally, if all fails, explantation might be the best alternative in order to arrest the destruction of the osseous structure around the implant, thus preserving whatever is left in this site for future reconstruction. The available literature is still lacking with large heterogeneity in the clinical response thus suggesting possible underlying predisposing conditions that are not all clear to us. Therefore, at present time treatment of peri-implantitis should be considered possible but not necessarily predictable. PMID:26556414

  4. Microbiological diversity of peri-implantitis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Faveri, Marcelo; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Pérez-Chaparro, Paula Juliana; Feres, Magda

    2015-01-01

    The open-ended microbial diagnostic approaches such as the complete or partial sequencing of the 16S ribosomal gene by Sanger sequencing or by pyrosequencing have provided new insights into the diversity of the oral microbiota. These techniques have recently been used to evaluate the microbiota associated with osseointegrated implants and these results have expanded the knowledge on the diversity of the microbial communities associated with peri-implantitis. Taken together, the results of these studies suggest that the diversity of the microbial community of peri-implantitis and periodontitis might not be as similar as previously thought. Although certain known periodontal pathogens may also be associated with the etiology of peri-implantitis, apparently there were many differences between these two clinical conditions, involving distinct microorganisms. Further investigations on the diversity of peri-implant microbiota would be essential in order to define effective preventive and therapeutic strategies for peri-implantitis. It is also important to standardize laboratory protocols to make the results of the open-ended diagnostic techniques based on PCR amplification more comparable throughout the different research groups.

  5. Post-Surgical Clinical Monitoring of Soft Tissue Wound Healing in Periodontal and Implant Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pippi, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Clinical features of surgical soft tissue wound healing in dentistry have been rarely discussed in the international literature. The aim of the present paper is to highlight both the main clinical findings of surgical wound healing, especially in periodontal and implant dentistry, and the wound healing monitoring procedures which should be followed. Wound inspection after careful food and plaque debridement is the essential part of wound healing monitoring. Periodontal and peri-implant probing should be performed only after tissue healing has been completed and not on a weekly basis in peri-implant tissue monitoring. Telephone follow-up and patient self-assessment scales can also be used the days following surgery to monitor the most common surgical complications such as pain, swelling, bleeding, and bruising. Wound healing monitoring is an important concern in all surgical procedures since it allows to identify signs or/and symptoms possibly related to surgical complications.

  6. Managing an extreme peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Materni, A

    2013-09-01

    Peri-implantitis leads to gradual peri-implant bone loss. Severe and extreme cases lead to complete implant failure and imply lost implants have to be removed. The aim of the present report is to present a case where an extreme peri-implantitis, causing complete peri-implant bone loss, was managed successfully. A patient already rehabilitated with a prosthesis supported by two implants at positions 3.4 and 3.6 presented with severe peri-implantitis affecting both implants. Initial probing depths were 11 and 9 mm respectively. Implant at position 3.4 showed a bone-implant gap ≥3 mm all around it, but was kept firmly in place by the prosthesis, still supported by the other implant. The patient refused to have her prosthesis removed. In an attempt to save it anyway, after debridement, sandblasting and decontamination of both implant surfaces an enzyme-deantigenic collagenic bone substitute was grafted. Controls followed at 1, 3, 5 and 12 months after surgery. Radiographic exams showed radio-opacity at the grafted sites to gradually increase over time. Postoperative probing depth gain, 7 and 6 mm respectively at position 3.4 and 3.6 remained unchanged at all follow-up controls. After 12 months the patient is asymptomatic and the failed implant can be considered restored. The way we managed this extreme peri-implantitis case has allowed to give clinical success even if, to comply to the patient's will, the best clinical, evidence-based treatment, was not performed. The implant that was otherwise lost was successfully recovered. As an hypothesis, a new osseointegration process could have occurred between the implant and the newly formed bone.

  7. Treatment modalities for peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Renvert, Stefan; Polyzois, Ioannis; Persson, G Rutger

    2013-12-01

    To review treatment modalities used for peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. A literature search was performed in PubMed for articles published until May 2013 using peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis and different modalities of treatment as search terms. The search was limited to the English literature. Titles and abstracts were searched in order to find studies eligible for the review. The present review reported that treatment of peri-implant mucositis lesions using mechanical therapy is possible. The additional use of professionally delivered antimicrobials has commonly failed to show additional benefits as compared to mechanical debridement alone. The scientific evidence on the efficacy of non-surgical and surgical therapies in the treatment of peri-implantitis is limited. Complete resolution of peri-implantitis using mechanical, laser, or photodynamic therapy does not seem to result in a predictable outcome. Following surgical interventions around implants diagnosed with peri-implantitis, clinical improvements as judged by reductions of probing depths and bleeding on probing have been reported. Bone or bone substitutes have been used in attempts to regenerate bone loss around implants. When regenerative modalities have been employed, radiographic evidence of defect fill has been reported. Few long term follow up studies on the treatment of peri-implantitis are available. Positive treatment results can be maintained over a period of 3-5 years. Regardless of the treatment performed, adequate plaque control by the patient is fundamental to treatment success. If the patient cannot obtain an adequate level of oral hygiene, the infection around the implants will reoccur.

  8. Animal models for peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Frank; Sculean, Anton; Engebretson, Steven P; Becker, Jürgen; Sager, Martin

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of infectious diseases affecting osseointegrated implants in function has become a demanding issue in implant dentistry. Since the early 1990s, preclinical data from animal studies have provided important insights into the etiology, pathogenesis and therapy of peri-implant diseases. Established lesions in animals have shown many features in common with those found in human biopsy material. The current review focuses on animal studies, employing different models to induce peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Periodontal and peri-implant diseases: identical or fraternal infections?

    PubMed

    Robitaille, N; Reed, D N; Walters, J D; Kumar, P S

    2016-08-01

    Peri-implant diseases (peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis) are bacterially driven infections. Peri-implantitis leads to aggressive bone resorption and eventual loss of the implant. Traditionally, peri-implantitis was regarded as microbially similar to periodontitis, and translocation of periodontal pathogens into the peri-implant crevice was considered as a critical factor in disease causation. However, evidence is emerging to suggest that the peri-implant and periodontal ecosystems differ in many important ways. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence supporting microbial congruence and discordance in these two communities. Current evidence suggests that osseointegrated implants truly create unique microenvironments that force microbial adaptation and selection. Further studies that revisit the "microbial reservoir" hypothesis and identify species that play an etiologic role in peri-implant disease and examine their transmission from teeth are needed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles, tendons, fat, and blood vessels. Soft tissue sarcoma is a cancer of these soft tissues. There ... have certain genetic diseases. Doctors diagnose soft tissue sarcomas with a biopsy. Treatments include surgery to remove ...

  11. Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    MedlinePlus

    Necrotizing fasciitis; Fasciitis - necrotizing; Flesh-eating bacteria; Soft tissue gangrene; Gangrene - soft tissue ... Many different types of bacteria can cause this infection. A very severe and usually deadly form of necrotizing soft tissue infection is due to the ...

  12. Microarray expression in peri-implant tissue next to different titanium implant surfaces predicts clinical outcomes: a split-mouth study.

    PubMed

    Menini, M; Dellepiane, E; Baldi, D; Longobardi, M G; Pera, P; Izzotti, A

    2017-09-01

    This split-mouth study evaluated miRNA expression of tissues around implants with different surface treatments. Each patient of the sample (five men and five women) received two implants (one control and one test) into an edentulous quadrant to support fixed partial dentures. The control implants (Osseotite) had a dual acid-etched (DAE) surface in the apical portion and a machined coronal part, test implants (Full Osseotite, FOSS) were completely DAE. Machined healing abutments were placed on control implants and DAE abutments on test ones. All implants were assigned codes for blinding. Standardized periapical radiographs were taken at baseline, 2 and 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. Plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), and probing depth (PD) were recorded at 3 and 6 weeks, and 2, 3, 6, and 12 months post-implant placement. After 3 months, a mini-invasive sample of soft tissue was collected from seven patients (four women and three men) for miRNA microarray analysis. Control implants showed greater bone resorption (BR) and lower PI: this was not statistically significant. No statistically significant differences in BOP and PD appeared. miRNA modulated by implant surfaces as well as by other clinical conditions has been identified. miRNA microarray analysis revealed that: (i) implant sites with low PI and absence of BOP had a miRNA expression profile similar to those with plaque and absence of BOP; sites with high PI and high BOP had a different profile. (ii) Implant sites with BOP presented similar profiles independently from implant surface. (iii) Implant sites with high PI and normal BR differed from others for miRNA expression profile. (iv) Implant sites with normal BR despite high BOP differed from others. This profile resembled that of FOSS implants. (v) Implant surface affected BR; groups having similar BR clusterized differently according to the implant type. DAE surfaces induced lower BR and more plaque accumulation: This did not affect the

  13. Peri-implant bone loss caused by occlusal overload: repair of the peri-implant defect following correction of the traumatic occlusion. A case report.

    PubMed

    Tawil, Georges

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate the relation between occlusal overload and peri-implant bone loss and the reversal of the situation after removal of the offending forces. The placement of an unstable removable prosthesis on 3 well-integrated implants that had been stable for 9 years caused noticeable bone loss after 6 months. The elimination of the traumatic occlusion reversed the situation, and a remarkable healing of the peri-implant tissue occurred until the pretrauma condition was nearly restored. The condition has been stable for the past 4 years.

  14. The adjunctive use of light-activated disinfection (LAD) with FotoSan is ineffective in the treatment of peri-implantitis: 1-year results from a multicentre pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Marco; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; De Angelis, Nicola; Camurati, Andrea; Campailla, Michele; Felice, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate possible benefits of the adjunctive use of light-activated disinfection (LAD) in the treatment of peri-implantitis. A total of 80 patients with at least one implant affected by peri-implantitis defined as at least 3 mm of bone loss on baseline radiographs in the presence of signs of infection (pus exudation and/or soft tissue swelling and/or soft tissue redness) were non-surgically or surgically treated for peri-implantitis and 50% of them were randomly allocated to receive an additional LAD treatment (FotoSan) according to a parallel group design at four different centres. Only one implant per patient was considered. Outcome measures were implant failures, recurrence of peri-implantitis, complications, peri-implant marginal bone level (RAD) changes, probing pocket depth (PPD) changes and number of re-treatment sessions recorded by blinded assessors. Patients were followed up for 1 year after treatment. Five treated patients did not fit the original inclusion criteria: 4 because they were not affected by the present definition of peri-implantitis and 1 due to being treated with antibiotics. However, they were included according to an intention-to-treat-analysis concept. Nine patients of the LAD group were treated surgically versus 10 control patients. After 1 year, 3 patients dropped out, all from the LAD group. One implant treated with the LAD therapy failed versus none of the control group. Four complications occurred: 3 in 3 patients of the LAD group and 1 in the control group. Recurrence of peri-implantitis defined as 2 mm of peri-implant bone loss or more recorded on standardised periapical radiographs was observed in 6 patients, 3 from each group. In total, 29 implants were re-treated 1 to 4 times in the LAD group versus 33 implants 1 to 4 times in the control group; the difference was not statistically significant. Peri-implant marginal bone levels remained stable up to 1 year with no statistically significant differences between groups (0.13 mm

  15. Microbiome of peri-implant infections: lessons from conventional, molecular and metagenomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Charalampakis, Georgios; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants are now a well-established treatment option in the armament of restorative dentistry. These technologically advanced devices are designed to functionally and esthetically replace missing teeth. Despite the revolutionary advances that implants have incurred, they have also provided the oral cavity with new artificial surfaces prone to the formation of oral biofilms, similarly to the hard tissue surfaces of natural teeth. Biofilm formation on the implant surface can trigger the inflammatory destruction of the peri-implant tissue, in what is known as peri-implantitis. The mixed microbial flora of peri-implant infections resembles that of periodontal infections, with some notable differences. These are likely to expand with the ever increasing application of metagenomics and metatrascriptomics in the analysis of oral ecology. This review presents the wealth of knowledge we have gained from microbiological methods used in the characterization of peri-implant microflora and sheds light over potential new benefits, as well as limitations, of the new sequencing technology in our understanding of peri-implant disease pathogenesis.

  16. Microbiome of peri-implant infections: Lessons from conventional, molecular and metagenomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Charalampakis, Georgios; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants are now a well-established treatment option in the armament of restorative dentistry. These technologically advanced devices are designed to functionally and esthetically replace missing teeth. Despite the revolutionary advances that implants have incurred, they have also provided the oral cavity with new artificial surfaces prone to the formation of oral biofilms, similarly to the hard tissue surfaces of natural teeth. Biofilm formation on the implant surface can trigger the inflammatory destruction of the peri-implant tissue, in what is known as peri-implantitis. The mixed microbial flora of peri-implant infections resembles that of periodontal infections, with some notable differences. These are likely to expand with the ever increasing application of metagenomics and metatrascriptomics in the analysis of oral ecology. This review presents the wealth of knowledge we have gained from microbiological methods used in the characterization of peri-implant microflora and sheds light over potential new benefits, as well as limitations, of the new sequencing technology in our understanding of peri-implant disease pathogenesis. PMID:25654499

  17. An immediate peri-implantitis induction model to study regenerative peri-implantitis treatments.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Rhee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Jeong-Cheol; Shin, Seung-Yun; Lee, Yong-Moo; Seol, Yang-Jo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity of the immediate peri-implantitis model to test regenerative therapies in peri-implantitis defects. In an immediate peri-implantitis model in beagles, the mandibular third premolars were extracted, and dental implants were immediately placed in the distal extraction sockets. Without a healing period, experimental peri-implantitis was induced by ligature placement for 3 months. In the conventional peri-implantitis model, dental implants were placed in the healed mandibular fourth premolar region and were submerged for osseointegration. After 3 months of healing, peri-implantitis induction was performed for another 3 months. After peri-implantitis defects were formed in both models, regenerative therapy was performed in both models. After 3 months in the immediate model and 9 months in the conventional model, similarly shaped horizontal bone defects (wide and craterlike) were observed. However, buccal bone defects were deeply formed in the immediate model compared with the conventional model (6.02 ± 1.20 and 4.34 ± 0.86 mm, respectively; P = 0.009), but the amounts of bone regeneration were not significantly different between the models (P = 0.107). On the lingual side, re-osseointegration was significantly greater in the conventional model than in the immediate model (0.72 ± 0.50 and 1.77 ± 0.87 mm, respectively; P = 0.009), although lingual bone defects were not significantly different between the models (P = 0.248). Although the immediate peri-implantitis model is challenging for regeneration, it may be able to replace the conventional model to study regenerative peri-implantitis treatment due to its short experimental time and similar defect configuration. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Analysis of microbiota associated with peri-implantitis using 16S rRNA gene clone library

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Tatsuro; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Izumi, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Peri-implantitis (PI) is an inflammatory disease which leads to the destruction of soft and hard tissues around osseointegrated implants. The subgingival microbiota appears to be responsible for peri-implant lesions and although the complexity of the microbiota has been reported in PI, the microbiota responsible for PI has not been identified. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the microbiota in subjects who have PI, clinically healthy implants, and periodontitis-affected teeth using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis to clarify the microbial differences. Design Three subjects participated in this study. The conditions around the teeth and implants were evaluated based on clinical and radiographic examinations and diseased implants, clinically healthy implants, and periodontally diseased teeth were selected. Subgingival plaque samples were taken from the deepest pockets using sterile paper points. Prevalence and identity of bacteria was analyzed using a 16S rRNA gene clone library technique. Results A total of 112 different species were identified from 335 clones sequenced. Among the 112 species, 51 (46%) were uncultivated phylotypes, of which 22 were novel phylotypes. The numbers of bacterial species identified at the sites of PI, periodontitis, and periodontally healthy implants were 77, 57, and 12, respectively. Microbiota in PI mainly included Gram-negative species and the composition was more diverse when compared to that of the healthy implant and periodontitis. The phyla Chloroflexi, Tenericutes, and Synergistetes were only detected at PI sites, as were Parvimonas micra, Peptostreptococcus stomatis, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, and Solobacterium moorei. Low levels of periodontopathic bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, were seen in peri-implant lesions. Conclusions The biofilm in PI showed a more complex microbiota when compared to periodontitis and periodontally healthy teeth

  19. Surgery for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tissue Sarcomas Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Targeted Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment of Soft Tissue Sarcomas, by Stage ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  20. Inter-rater agreement in the diagnosis of mucositis and peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Merli, Mauro; Bernardelli, Francesco; Giulianelli, Erica; Toselli, Ivano; Moscatelli, Marco; Pagliaro, Umberto; Nieri, Michele

    2014-09-01

    The objective was to assess the inter-rater agreement in the diagnosis of mucositis and peri-implantitis. Adult patients with ≥ 1 dental implant were eligible. Three operators examined the patients. One examiner allocated the patients to three groups of nine as follows: nine implants with peri-implantitis, nine implants with mucositis, and 9 implants with healthy mucosa. Each examiner recorded on all 27 patients (one implant per patient) recessions, probing depth, bleeding on probing, suppuration, keratinized tissue depth and bone loss, leading to a final diagnosis of mucositis, peri-implantitis or healthy mucosa. Examiners were independent and blinded to each other. Fleiss k-statistic with quadratic weight in the diagnosis of peri-implantitis and mucositis was 0.66 [CI95%: 0.45-0.87]. A complete agreement was obtained only in 14 cases (52%). Fleiss k-statistics in bleeding on probing and bone loss were respectively 0.31 [CI95%: 0.20-0.41] and 0.70 [CI95%: 0.45-0.94]. Intra-class correlation coefficients for recession, probing depth and keratinized tissue depth were respectively 0.69 [CI95%: 0.62-0.75], 0.54 [CI95%: 0.44-0.63] and 0.56 [CI95%: 0.27-0.77]. The inter-rater agreement in the diagnosis of peri-implant disease was qualified as merely good. This could also be due in part to the unclear definition of peri-implantitis and mucositis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Soft tissue enhancement combined with biologically oriented preparation technique (BOPT) to correct volumetric bone defects: a clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Rancitelli, Davide; Poli, Pierpaolo; Cicciù, Marco; Lini, Francesco; Roncucci, Rachele; Cervino, Gabriele; Maiorana, Carlo

    2017-06-12

    The aim of the present case report was to illustrate how to obtain an ideal alveolar ridge contour by means of peri-implant soft tissues management combined with the prosthetic approach of the biologically oriented preparation technique (BOPT). A patient presenting a moderate vertical and horizontal bone loss in the posterior maxilla was treated with sinus floor elevation and contextual implant placement. During the re-entry procedure, the horizontal defect was corrected with an apically repositioned flap combined with a connective tissue graft. To increase the volume of the inter-implant papillae, a pedunculated flap originating from the primary flap was turned within the inter-implant space. BOPT one-time abutments have been employed to maximize the space available for the papilla-like tissues. A focused and combined surgical and prosthetic procedure has permitted to enhance both peri-implant aesthetic and function without the need for further invasive and costly bone regeneration techniques.

  2. Basis of bone metabolism around dental implants during osseointegration and peri-implant bone loss.

    PubMed

    Insua, Angel; Monje, Alberto; Wang, Hom-Lay; Miron, Richard J

    2017-07-01

    Despite the growing number of publications in the field of implant dentistry, there are limited studies to date investigating the biology and metabolism of bone healing around dental implants and their implications in peri-implant marginal bone loss. The aim of this review article is to provide a thorough understanding of the biological events taking place during osseointegration and the subsequent early and late phases of bone remodeling around dental implants. An update on the coupling mechanism occurring during bone resorption-bone remodeling is provided, focused on the relevance of the osteocytes, bone lining cells and immune cells during bone maintenance. An electronic and manual literature search was conducted by three independent reviewers in several databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register databases for articles up to September 2016 with no language restriction. Local bone metabolism is subject to signals from systemic calcium-phosphate homeostasis and bone remodeling. Three areas of interest were reviewed due to recent reported compromises in bone healing including the putative effects of (1) cholesterol, (2) hyperlipidemia, and (3) low vitamin D intake. Moreover, the prominent influence of osteocytes and immune cells is discussed as being key regulators during dental implant osseointegration and maintenance. These cells are of crucial importance in the presence of biofilm accumulation and their associated byproducts that leads to hard and soft tissue breakdown; the so called peri-implantitis. Factors that could negatively impact osteoclastogenesis or osteal macrophage activation should be monitored in future research including implant placement/torque protocols, bone characteristics, as well as meticulous maintenance programs to favor osseointegration and future long-term stability and success of dental implants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res

  3. Bacterial profiles and proteolytic activity in peri-implantitis versus healthy sites.

    PubMed

    Neilands, J; Wickström, C; Kinnby, B; Davies, J R; Hall, J; Friberg, B; Svensäter, G

    2015-10-01

    Peri-implantitis is a biofilm-induced destructive inflammatory process that, over time, results in loss of supporting bone around an osseointegrated dental implant. Biofilms at peri-implantitis sites have been reported to be dominated by Gram-negative anaerobic rods with a proteolytic metabolism such as, Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, Prevotella and Tannerella, as well as anaerobic Gram-positive cocci. In this study, we hypothesized that protease activity is instrumental in driving bone destruction and we therefore compared the microbial composition and level of protease activity in samples of peri-implant biofluid (PIBF) from 25 healthy subjects (H group) and 25 subjects with peri-implantitis (PI group). Microbial composition was investigated using culture techniques and protease activity was determined using a FITC-labelled casein substrate. The microbial composition was highly variable in subjects both in the H and PI groups but one prominent difference was the prevalence of Porphyromonas/Prevotella and anaerobic Gram positive cocci which was significantly higher in the PI than in the H group. A subgroup of subjects with peri-implantitis displayed a high level of protease activity in the PIBF compared to healthy subjects. However, this activity could not be related to the presence of specific bacterial species. We propose that a high level of protease activity may be a predictive factor for disease progression in peri-implantitis. Further longitudinal studies are however required to determine whether assessment of protease activity could serve as a useful method to identify patients at risk for progressive tissue destruction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Soft tissue sealing around dental implants based on histological interpretation.

    PubMed

    Atsuta, Ikiru; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Kondo, Ryosuke; Oshiro, Wakana; Matsuura, Yuri; Furuhashi, Akihiro; Tsukiyama, Yoshihiro; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview on the biology and soft tissue sealing around dental implants and teeth. This is a narrative review performed through scientific articles published between 1977 and 2014, indexed in MEDLINE and PubMed databases. The study selected articles that focused on epithelial sealing around dental implant or teeth with cell biology and histology of soft tissue. Implant therapy has been widely applied in dental rehabilitation for many years, with predictable long-term results. The longevity and functionality of dental implants is dependent on both osseointegration around the implant body and the establishment of a soft tissue barrier that protects the underlying hard tissue structures and the implant itself. The health and stability of the peri-implant mucosa also affects the esthetics of the implant. The healing and maintenance of the epithelial and connective tissues around implants are increasingly recognized as being fundamental to implant success. However, there has been little research into the function or formation of the soft tissue seal around dental implants, and the roles of this unique mucosal interface remain unclear. This narrative review explores the extent of the current knowledge of soft tissue barriers around implants from both a basic and clinical perspective, and aims to consolidate this knowledge and highlight the most pertinent questions relating to this area of research. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comprehensive microbiological findings in peri-implantitis and periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Tatsuro; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Maruyama, Noriko; Ohkuma, Moriya; Izumi, Yuichi

    2013-03-01

    The microbial differences between peri-implantitis and periodontitis in the same subjects were examined using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Subgingival plaque samples were taken from the deepest pockets of peri-implantitis and periodontitis sites in six subjects. The prevalence of bacteria was analysed using a 16S rRNA gene clone library and real-time polymerase chain reaction. A total of 333 different taxa were identified from 799 sequenced clones; 231 (69%) were uncultivated phylotypes, of which 75 were novel. The numbers of bacterial taxa identified at the sites of peri-implantitis and periodontitis were 192 and 148 respectively. The microbial composition of peri-implantitis was more diverse when compared with that of periodontitis. Fusobacterium spp. and Streptococcus spp. were predominant in both peri-implantitis and periodontitis, while bacteria such as Parvimonas micra were only detected in peri-implantitis. The prevalence of periodontopathic bacteria was not high, while quantitative evaluation revealed that, in most cases, prevalence was higher at peri-implantitis sites than at periodontitis sites. The biofilm in peri-implantitis showed a more complex microbial composition when compared with periodontitis. Common periodontopathic bacteria showed low prevalence, and several bacteria were identified as candidate pathogens in peri-implantitis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Risk indicators for peri-implantitis. A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Renvert, Stefan; Quirynen, Marc

    2015-09-01

    To examine the existing evidence in identifying risk indicators in the etiology of peri-implantitis. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE via PubMed database of the US National Library of Medicine, for articles published until October 2014 using Medical Subject Heading search terms + free text terms and in different combinations. The microbiota associated with peri-implantitis is complex, demonstrating differences and similarities to the one seen at periodontitis sites. Plaque accumulation at dental implants triggers the inflammatory response leading to peri-implant mucositis/peri-implantitis. Individuals with a history of periodontal disease and smokers have an increased risk of developing peri-implantitis. There is some evidence to support the role of genetic polymorphism, diabetes, and excess cement as risk indicators for the development of peri-implantitis. There is also evidence to support that individuals on regular maintenance are less likely to develop peri-implantitis and that successful treatment of periodontitis prior to implant placement lowers the risk of peri-implantitis. Plaque accumulation at implants will result in the development of an inflammation at implants. A history of periodontal disease, smoking, excess cement, and lack of supportive therapy should be considered as risk indicators for the development of peri-implantitis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Recommendations on the clinical application of air polishing for the management of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Frank; Becker, Kathrin; Bastendorf, Klaus-Dieter; Cardaropoli, Daniele; Chatfield, Christina; Dunn, Ian; Fletcher, Paul; Einwag, Johannes; Louropoulou, Anna; Mombelli, Andrea; Ower, Philip; Pavlovic, Pedja; Sahrmann, Philipp; Salvi, Giovanni E; Schmage, Petra; Takeuchi, Yasuko; Van Der Weijden, Fridus; Renvert, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Air polishing was introduced as an alternative approach for the supra- and submucosal biofilm management at dental implants. An international expert meeting involving competent clinicians and researchers took place during the EUROPERIO 8 conference in London, UK, on 4 June 2015. Prior to this meeting a comprehensive systematic review dealing with the efficacy of air polishing in the treatment of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis was prepared and served as a basis for the group discussions. This paper summarizes the consensus statements and practical recommendations on the clinical application of air polishing for the management of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis.

  8. The Influence of Smoking on the Peri-Implant Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Tsigarida, A.A.; Dabdoub, S.M.; Nagaraja, H.N.

    2015-01-01

    Smokers are at high risk for 2 bacterially driven oral diseases: peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to use a deep-sequencing approach to identify the effect of smoking on the peri-implant microbiome in states of health and disease. Peri-implant biofilm samples were collected from 80 partially edentulous subjects with peri-implant health, peri-implant mucositis, and peri-implantitis. Bacterial DNA was isolated and 16S ribsomal RNA gene libraries sequenced using 454-pyrosequencing targeting the V1 to V3 and V7 to V9 regions. In total, 790,692 classifiable sequences were compared against the HOMD database for bacterial identification. Community-level comparisons were carried out using UniFrac and nonparametric tests. Microbial signatures of health in smokers exhibited lower diversity compared to nonsmokers, with significant enrichment for disease-associated species. Shifts from health to mucositis were accompanied by loss of several health-associated species, leading to a further decrease in diversity. Peri-implantitis did not differ significantly from mucositis in species richness or evenness. In nonsmokers, by contrast, the shift from health to mucositis resembled primary ecological succession, with acquisition of several species without replacement of pioneer organisms, thereby creating a significant increase in diversity. Again, few differences were detected between peri-implantitis and mucositis. Thus, our data suggest that smoking shapes the peri-implant microbiomes even in states of clinical health, by supporting a pathogen-rich community. In both smokers and nonsmokers, peri-implant mucositis appears to be a pivotal event in disease progression, creating high-at-risk-for-harm communities. However, ecological succession follows distinctly divergent pathways in smokers and nonsmokers, indicating a need for personalized therapeutics for control and prevention of disease in these 2 cohorts. PMID:26124222

  9. Spectrophotometric assessment of peri-implant mucosa after restoration with zirconia abutments veneered with fluorescent ceramic: a controlled, retrospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Happe, Arndt; Schulte-Mattler, Verena; Fickl, Stefan; Naumann, Michael; Zöller, Joachim E; Rothamel, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the optical appearance of the soft tissue labial to dental implants restored with fluorescent ceramic-veneered zircona abutments. It was hypothesized that the tested abutment design leads to an increased brightness in the marginal peri-implant tissue, which does not differ from that of natural teeth. Moreover, a reduction of the color difference that has been reported from other abutment materials was expected. A total of 12 patients with single titanium implants in the maxillary anterior region were recruited. All implants (N = 12) were restored with zirconia abutments veneered with fluorescent ceramic and full-ceramic crowns. Color measurements of the peri-implant mucosa at the test sites were made of the facial aspect of the teeth using a Spectroshade-spectrophotometer. The gingiva of a contralateral or adjacent natural tooth served as a control. Color data (CIE-L*a*b* color coordinates) were obtained in five incremental areas of 1 × 2 mm in both test and control sites. ∆E-values were calculated from the ΔL*, Δa* and Δb* values for each patient. Data acquisition from the test site demonstrated lower mean values of L*, a* and b* than the control site. Statistical significance between the test site and control site was reached in the L* values only in the second of the five incremental areas (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon test). However, discrepancies in a*- and b*-values reached a statistically significant difference in the incremental areas 1, 2 and 4, and in b* in area 5 (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon test). Medians of the ∆E-values in all five increments were found to be higher than the clinical perceptual threshold of 3.7. However, considering the original data, five individual patients did not reach the threshold in increment 1 and 2, two in increment 3 and three in increment 4. None of the patients showed lower ∆E-values than the perceptual threshold of 3.7 in increment 5, which had the largest distance from the gingival

  10. Reconstructive Procedures for Treating Peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Khoshkam, V.; Chan, HL.; Lin, GH.; MacEachern, M.P.; Monje, A.; Suarez, F.; Giannobile, W.V.; Wang, HL.

    2013-01-01

    This review aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of reconstructive procedures for treating peri-implantitis. Searches of electronic databases and cross-referencing were performed for human comparative clinical trials with ≥10 implants for ≥12 months of follow-up, reporting radiographic defect fill and at least one of the following parameters: probing depth reduction, clinical attachment level gain, bleeding on probing reduction, and mucosal recession. The searches retrieved 430 citations. Only 1 randomized controlled trial was identified, which compared reconstructive therapy and open flap debridement. Case series studies were also included to evaluate the overall performance of the reconstructive procedures. Twelve studies were finally included. Meta-analysis revealed that the weighted mean radiographic defect fill was 2.17 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46-2.87 mm), probing depth reduction was 2.97 mm (95% CI: 2.38-3.56 mm), clinical attachment level gain was 1.65 mm (95% CI: 1.17-2.13 mm), and bleeding on probing reduction was 45.8% (95% CI: 38.5%-53.3%). Great variability in reparative outcomes was found, attributed to patient factors, defect morphology, and reconstructive agents used. Currently, there is a lack of evidence for supporting additional benefit of reconstructive procedures to the other treatment modalities for managing peri-implantitis. PMID:24158331

  11. Influence of Abutment Color and Mucosal Thickness on Soft Tissue Color.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Marco; Carrabba, Michele; Vichi, Alessandro; Goracci, Cecilia; Cagidiaco, Maria Crysanti

    Zirconia (ZrO₂) and titanium nitride (TiN) implant abutments were introduced mainly for esthetic purposes, as titanium's gray color can be visible through mucosal tissues. This study was aimed at assessing whether ZrO₂ and TiN abutments could achieve better esthetics in comparison with titanium (Ti) abutments, regarding the appearance of soft tissues. Ninety patients were included in the study. Each patient was provided with an implant (OsseoSpeed, Dentsply Implant System). A two-stage surgical technique was performed. Six months later, surgical reentry was performed. After 1 week, provisional restorations were screwed onto the implants. After 8 weeks, implant-level impressions were taken and soft tissue thickness was recorded, ranking thin (≤ 2 mm) or thick (≥ 2 mm). Patients were randomly allocated to three experimental groups, based on abutment type: (1) Ti, (2) TiN, and (3) ZrO₂. After 15 weeks, the final restorations were delivered. The mucosal area referring to each abutment was measured for color using a clinical spectrophotometer (Easyshade, VITA); color measurements of the contralateral areas referring to natural teeth were performed at the same time. The data were collected using the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) L*a*b* color system, and ΔE was calculated between peri-implant and contralateral soft tissues. A critical threshold of ΔE = 3.7 was selected. The chi-square test was used to identify statistically significant differences in ΔE between thin and thick mucosal tissues and among the abutment types. Three patients were lost at follow-up. No statistically significant differences were noticed as to the abutment type (P = .966). Statistically significant differences in ΔE were recorded between thick and thin peri-implant soft tissues (P < .001). Only 2 out of 64 patients with thick soft tissues showed a ΔE higher than 3.7: 1 in the TiN group and 1 in the ZrO₂ group. All the patients with thin soft tissues reported color

  12. Ligature-Induced Peri-Implantitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pirih, Flavia Q; Hiyari, Sarah; Barroso, Ana DV; Jorge, Adrian CA; Perussolo, Jeniffer; Atti, Elisa; Tetradis, Sotirios; Camargo, Paulo M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peri-implantitis has a prevalence of 11-47%, involves destruction of peri-implant bone, and may lead to implant loss. A detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop a murine model of experimental peri-implantitis. Materials and Methods Machined, smooth surface screw-shaped titanium implants were placed in the healed alveolar bone of the left maxillary molars of C57BL/6J male mice, eight weeks after tooth extraction. Peri-implantitis was induced by securing silk ligatures around the head of the implant fixtures. Implant survival and peri-implant bone levels were analyzed by micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT) scans and histology twelve weeks after ligature placement. Results Implant survival was 60% (6/10) for implants with ligatures and 100% (8/8) for controls. Micro-CT revealed significantly greater bone loss around the implants that received ligatures and that survived as compared to controls. The radiographic findings were confirmed via histology and toluidine blue staining. Conclusions This study describes a murine model of experimental peri-implantitis around screw-shaped titanium implants placed in the edentulous alveolar bone. This model should be a useful tool to dissect pathogenic mechanisms of peri-implantitis and evaluate potential treatment interventions. PMID:25244403

  13. Ligature-induced peri-implantitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Pirih, F Q; Hiyari, S; Barroso, A D V; Jorge, A C A; Perussolo, J; Atti, E; Tetradis, S; Camargo, P M

    2015-08-01

    Peri-implantitis has a prevalence of 11-47%, involves destruction of peri-implant bone and may lead to implant loss. A detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop a murine model of experimental peri-implantitis. Machined, smooth-surface, screw-shaped titanium implants were placed in the healed alveolar bone of the left maxillary molars of C57BL/6J male mice, 8 wk after tooth extraction. Peri-implantitis was induced by securing silk ligatures around the head of the implant fixtures. Implant survival and peri-implant bone levels were analyzed by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scans and histology, 12 wk after ligature placement. Implant survival was 60% (six of 10) for implants with ligatures and 100% (eight of eight) for controls. Micro-CT revealed significantly greater bone loss around the implants that received ligatures and that survived, compared with controls. The radiographic findings were confirmed via histology and toluidine blue staining. This study describes a murine model of experimental peri-implantitis around screw-shaped titanium implants placed in the edentulous alveolar bone. This model should be a useful tool to dissect pathogenic mechanisms of peri-implantitis and evaluate potential treatment interventions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Peri-implantitis: etiology, diagnosis and treatment: an update.

    PubMed

    Elemek, Eser; Almas, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implant mucositis is described as the presence of inflammation in the mucosa around implants without any bone loss. By contrast, in peri-implantitis, besides the inflammation in the peri-implant mucosa, loss of supporting bone is also seen. The probing depth, the presence of bleeding on probing, suppuration and radiographs should be assessed regularly for the diagnosis of peri-implant diseases. Poor oral hygiene, smoking and previous history of periodontitis are known risk factors for the disease. The occlusion and longevity of fixed partial dentures around implants, whether connected to the natural teeth or not, is still an area of investigaton, but studies show that long-term results are acceptable for both. Various treatment modalities are discussed in relation to the management of periimplantitis. The predictable outcome of peri-implantitis management is not yet known.

  15. Peri-implant tissue response and biodegradation performance of a Mg-1.0Ca-0.5Sr alloy in rat tibia.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Ida S; Jacobs, Brittany Y; Allen, Kyle D; Kim, Stanley E; Pozzi, Antonio; Allen, Josephine B; Manuel, Michele V

    2016-05-01

    Biodegradable magnesium (Mg) alloys combine the advantages of traditional metallic implants and biodegradable polymers, having high strength, low density, and a stiffness ideal for bone fracture fixation. A recently developed Mg-Ca-Sr alloy potentially possesses advantageous characteristics over other Mg alloys, such as slower degradation rates and minimal toxicity. In this study, the biocompatibility of this Mg-Ca-Sr alloy was investigated in a rat pin-placement model. Cylindrical pins were inserted in the proximal tibial metaphyses in pre-drilled holes orthogonal to the tibial axis. Implant and bone morphologies were investigated using μCT at 1, 3, and 6 weeks after implant placement. At the same time points, the surrounding tissue was evaluated using H&E, TRAP and Goldner's trichrome staining. Although gas bubbles were observed around the degrading implant at early time points, the bone remained intact with no evidence of microfracture. Principle findings also include new bone formation in the area of the implant, suggesting that the alloy is a promising candidate for biodegradable orthopedic implants.

  16. Microbial analysis of biofilms on cement surfaces: An investigation in cement-associated peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Korsch, Michael; Walther, Winfried; Marten, Silke-Mareike; Obst, Ursula

    2014-09-05

    The cementation of implant-supported restorations always poses the risk of excess cement retained in the peri-implant sulcus despite careful clinical control. Excess cement can become the basis of colonization by oral microorganisms. As a result of the biofilm formation peri-mucositis or peri-implantitis may develop. Complications were observed in the routine prosthetic restoration of implants when a methacrylate-based cement was used. These developed a few weeks after cementation of the suprastructure and caused bleeding on probing as well as suppuration from the peri-implant tissue. In the revision therapy, excess cement in the peri-implant sulcus was found in many cases. This excess cement was sampled from ten patients and investigated for biofilm formation. For this purpose, the cement samples were collected and analyzed for bacterial in situ colonization by 16S rDNA-based methods. In laboratory experiments, the methacrylate-based cement and two other dental cements were then investigated for their proneness to form biofilm. The results of the in situ and in vitro investigations revealed a strong tendency towards bacterial invasion of the methacrylate-based cement by opportunistic species and pathogens.

  17. Clinical association of Spirochaetes and Synergistetes with peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Mir-Mari, Javier; Sahrmann, Philipp; Sanz-Martin, Ignacio; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Jung, Ronald E

    2016-06-01

    The microbial composition of peri-implantitis-associated biofilms may resemble that of periodontitis, with some distinctive differences, as identified by various conventional or molecular detection methods. Yet, the complete microbiome of peri-implantitis awaits further characterization. The present clinical study was undertaken with the aim to investigate the association of Spirochaetes, and the more recently identified phylum Synergistetes, with peri-implantitis. Submucosal biofilms were obtained from single sites of patients with peri-implantitis (n = 43) or individuals with peri-implant health (n = 41). The samples were analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and epifluorescence microscopy, using 16S rRNA-based oligonucleotide probes for Synergistetes cluster A, subclusters A1 and A2, and Treponema groups I-III and IV. Treponema group IV was barely detectable, whereas Treponema groups I-III were detected at low prevalence in health, but their prevalence and numbers were significantly increased in peri-implantitis by 48% and 2.4-log, respectively. Synergistetes cluster A was detected in half of the healthy sites, and its prevalence and numbers were significantly increased in peri-implantitis by 30% and 2.5-log, respectively. No quantitative differences were found between Synergistetes subclusters A1 and A2 numbers, as both increased by 2.8-log. Synergistetes cluster A displayed strong correlations with several clinical peri-implant parameters, but Treponema groups I-III only with probing pocket depth. The present clinical cross-sectional study demonstrates that Spriochaetes of the Treponema groups I-III, but not group IV, and Synergistetes of the cluster A are highly associated with peri-implantitis. Synergistetes cluster A appears to display a stronger association with peri-implantitis than Spirochaetes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Clinical approaches to treat peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Renvert, Stefan; Polyzois, Ioannis N

    2015-06-01

    Therapies proposed for the treatment of peri-implant diseases are primarily based on the evidence available from treating periodontitis. The primary objective is elimination of the biofilm from the implant surface, and nonsurgical therapy is a commonly used treatment. A number of adjunctive therapies have been introduced to overcome accessibility problems or difficulties with decontamination of implant surfaces as a result of specific surface characteristics. It is now accepted that following successful decontamination, clinicians can attempt to regenerate the bone that was lost as a result of infection. The ultimate goal is re-osseointegration, and a number of regenerative techniques have been introduced. By reviewing the existing evidence, it seems that peri-implant mucositis is reversible when appropriately treated. Additionally, a combined therapy (mechanical therapy with local antimicrobials as adjuncts) can serve as an alternative to surgical intervention when treating peri-implantits in cases not suitable for surgery. Surgical therapy is an effective method for treating peri-implantitis, and various degrees of success of the use of regenerative procedures have been reported, regardless of whether or not radiographic evidence of defect fill has been achieved. Finally, no matter which therapy is employed, a prerequisite for the long-term stability of treatment results obtained is the ability of the patient to maintain good oral hygiene. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma associated with breast implants: a unique entity within the spectrum of peri-implant effusions.

    PubMed

    Chai, Siaw Ming; Kavangh, Simon; Ooi, Sin Sin; Sterrett, Gregory F; Cull, Gavin; Plunkett, Myfanwy; Spagnolo, Dominic; Amanuel, Benhur; Joske, David; Leslie, Connull; Barham, Tony; Frost, Felicity

    2014-11-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare and newly described complication associated with breast implants. Patients often present with a peri-implant effusion, which is amenable to fine-needle aspiration. The laboratory handling of peri-implant effusions for cytology and ancillary studies is as crucial as recognizing the characteristic cytology of ALCL. All cases of peri-implant effusions were retrieved from the PathWest database between January 2003 and May 2013, yielding four cases of breast implant-associated ALCL and six benign samples. The cytological features were evaluated and information from ancillary studies collated. Clinical and follow-up histology was available in all cases. All ALCL cases contained highly atypical lymphoid cells including 'hallmark' cells. In contrast, benign peri-implant effusions showed a mixture of inflammatory cells, being either neutrophil-rich (three cases) or lymphocyte-rich (three cases). A CD30 positive, ALK1 negative immunophenotype was demonstrated in all cases on cell block immunohistochemistry. Flow cytometry and T-cell receptor clonality studies confirmed aberrant T-cell immunophenotype in four of four and clonally rearranged T-cell receptor antigens in three of three cases. ALCL was identified in three of four subsequent capsulectomies. Staging confirmed disease limited to the capsular tissue or peri-implant effusion in all cases. None of the six patients with benign peri-implant effusions developed lymphoma during follow-up. Cases of ALCL accounted for 40% of peri-implant effusions received over a 10-year period, indicating the rarity of these samples and the high likelihood of malignancy. Awareness of this entity and its presentation should allow for appropriate triage of these specimens and definitive diagnosis on effusion specimens.

  20. Factors related to peri-implantitis - a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Renvert, Stefan; Aghazadeh, Ahmad; Hallström, Hadar; Persson, Gösta Rutger

    2014-04-01

    Retrospectively, we assessed the likelihood that peri-implantitis was associated with a history of systemic disease, periodontitis, and smoking habits. Data on probing pocket depth (PPD), bleeding on probing (BOP), and radiographic bone levels were obtained from individuals with dental implants. Peri-implantitis was defined as described by Sanz & Chapple 2012. Control individuals had healthy conditions or peri-implant mucositis. Information on past history of periodontitis, systemic diseases, and on smoking habits was obtained. One hundred and seventy-two individuals had peri-implantitis (mean age: 68.2 years, SD ± 8.7), and 98 individuals (mean age: 44.7 years, SD ± 15.9) had implant health/peri-implant mucositis. The mean difference in bone level at implants between groups was 3.5 mm (SE mean ± 0.4, 95% CI: 2.8, 4.3, P < 0.001). A history of cardiovascular disease was found in 27.3% of individuals with peri-implantitis and in 3.0% of individuals in the implant health/peri-implant mucositis group. When adjusting for age, smoking, and gender, odds ratio (OR) of having peri-implantitis and a history of cardiovascular disease was 8.7 (95% CI: 1.9, 40.3 P < 0.006), and odds ratio of having a history of periodontitis was 4.5 (95% CI 2.1, 9.7, P < 0.001). Smoking or gender did not significantly contribute to the outcome. In relation to a diagnosis of peri-implantitis, a high likelihood of comorbidity was expressed by a history of periodontitis and a history of cardiovascular disease. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Differences between buccal and lingual bone quality and quantity of peri-implant regions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Gyoon; Elias, Kathy L.; Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Clements, Matthew; Brantley, William A.; Lee, Damian J.; Han, Jung-Suk

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to examine whether peri-implant bone tissue properties are different between the buccal and lingual regions treated by growth factors. Four dental implant groups were used: titanium (Ti) implants, alumina-blasted zirconia implants (ATZ-N), alumina-blasted zirconia implants with demineralized bone matrix (DBM) (ATZ-D), and alumina-blasted zirconia implants with rhBMP-2 (ATZ-B). These implants were placed in mandibles of six male dogs. Nanoindentation elastic modulus (E) and plastic hardness (H) were measured for the buccal and lingual bone tissues adjacent and away from the implants at 3 and 6 weeks post-implantation. A total of 2281 indentations were conducted for 48 placed implants. The peri-implant buccal region had less bone quantity resulting from lower height and narrower width of bone tissue than the lingual region. Buccal bone tissues had significant greater mean values of E and H than lingual bone tissues at each distance and healing period (p<0.007). Nearly all implant treatment groups displayed lower mean values of the E at the lingual bone tissues than at the buccal bone tissues (p<0.046) although the difference was not significant for the Ti implant group (p=0.758). The DBM and rhBMP-2 treatments stimulated more peri-implant bone remodeling at the lingual region, producing more immature new bone tissues with lower E than at the buccal region. This finding suggests that the growth factor treatments to the zirconia implant system may help balance the quantity and quality differences between the peri-implant bone tissues. PMID:26773652

  2. Treatment of peri-implantitis and the failing implant.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kevin; Shahbazian, Timothy; MacLeod, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Appropriate treatment of implants is becoming increasingly important for the general dentist as the number of implants placed per year continues to increase. Early diagnosis of peri-implantitis is imperative; initiating the correct treatment protocol depends on a proper diagnosis. Several risk factors exist for the development of peri-implantitis, which can guide patient selection and treatment planning. Treatment of peri-implantitis should be tailored to the severity of the lesion (as outlined by the cumulative interceptive supportive treatment protocol), ranging from mechanical debridement to explantation. Several surgical and nonsurgical treatment alternatives exist. There is little consensus on superior treatment methods. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Peri-implant bone reactions to immediately loaded implants. An experimental study in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Romanos, G; Toh, C G; Siar, C H; Swaminathan, D; Ong, A H; Donath, K; Yaacob, H; Nentwig, G H

    2001-04-01

    There are reports which demonstrate that immediately loaded splinted implants can be osseointegrated when they are placed in the anterior part of the lower jaw. The concept of immediate loading has not been well investigated in the posterior mandible. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone reactions around immediately loaded implants placed in the posterior region of the lower jaw in the monkey model. Six adult Macaca fascicularis monkeys were used in this study. A total of 36 implants were placed after extraction of the second premolars, first and second molars, and complete healing of the sockets. Three control (C) group implants were placed in one quadrant of the lower jaw of each monkey. After a delay of 3 months to allow osseointegration to take place, the implants were loaded for 1 month using temporary resin bridges and later for 2 months using metal splinted crowns. In the contralateral region of the lower jaw, 3 test (T) group implants were placed and loaded immediately with the same sequence as carried out for the C implants. Specimens were examined and evaluated histologically after sacrifice. All of the implants were osseointegrated. Compact, cortical bone in contact with the implant surface without any gaps or connective tissue formation was observed. It was concluded that immediately loaded, splinted implants can be osseointegrated with a similar hard and soft tissue peri-implant response as delayed-loaded implants in the posterior mandible.

  4. Avian Soft Tissue Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2016-01-01

    Basic surgical instrumentation for avian soft tissue surgery includes soft tissue retractors, microsurgical instrumentation, surgical loupes, and head-mounted lights. Hemostasis is fundamental during the surgical procedures. The indications, approach, and complications associated with soft tissue surgeries of the integumentary (digit constriction repair, feather cyst excision, cranial wound repair, sternal wound repair, uropygial gland excision), gastrointestinal (ingluviotomy, crop biopsy, crop burn repair, celiotomy, coelomic hernia and pseudohernia repair, proventriculotomy, ventriculotomy, enterotomy, intestinal resection and anastomosis, cloacoplasty, cloacopexy), respiratory (rhinolith removal, sinusotomy, tracheotomy, tracheal resection and anastomosis, tracheostomy, pneumonectomy) and reproductive (ovocentesis, ovariectomy, salpingohysterectomy, cesarean section, orchidectomy, vasectomy, phallectomy) systems are reviewed.

  5. Evaluation of Different Implant Designs in a Ligature-Induced Peri-implantitis Model: A Canine Study.

    PubMed

    Battula, Suneel; Lee, Jin Whan; Wen, Hai Bo; Papanicolaou, Savvas; Collins, Michael; Romanos, Georgios E

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a challenging situation that leads to tissue destruction and eventual implant failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare, clinically and histologically, the influence of ligature-induced peri-implantitis on two implant designs in a canine extraction socket model. Sixty-four implants (4.1 × 13 mm) were placed bilaterally in eight dogs immediately after extraction of the mandibular premolars (P3, P4) and molars (M1, M2). Thirty-two conventional threaded implants (group A) and 32 tantalum-based porous implants (group B) were placed. After 12 weeks of normal healing, experimental peri-implantitis was induced in four dogs via the placement of ligatures subgingivally around the implant necks in the treatment group; the control group remained ligature-free. Two dogs in each group were euthanized after 12 or 26 weeks of plaque accumulation (control group dogs received regular cleanings). Clinical evaluations were conducted during the observation period and histologic sections were obtained for histologic and histomorphometric assessments. All the implants exhibited clinical and histologic osseointegration. The treatment group showed significant loss of peri-implant tissue from the induced peri-implantitis. Pocket probing depths for the treatment groups were significantly greater than those of the control groups. Mean bone-to-implant-contact values were not statistically different for control vs treatment groups or for group A vs group B. In the treatment group, group B implants exhibited mean bone ingrowth of 28.4% to 36.3% and achieved more bone formation along the length of the implant than group A implants in the treatment group. Implant design did not influence the tissue response or histomorphometric findings under induced peri-implantitis in the canine extraction socket.

  6. Peri-implantitis - onset and pattern of progression.

    PubMed

    Derks, Jan; Schaller, Dennis; Håkansson, Jan; Wennström, Jan L; Tomasi, Cristiano; Berglundh, Tord

    2016-04-01

    While information on the prevalence of peri-implantitis is available, data describing onset and progression of the disease are limited. A 9-year follow-up examination of 596 randomly selected implant-carrying individuals identified 62 patients with moderate/severe peri-implantitis. Longitudinal assessments of peri-implant marginal bone levels were used to construct a statistical model with bone loss as the dependent variable. A multilevel growth model estimated the pattern of bone loss for each implant/patient. Onset of peri-implantitis was determined by evaluating the cumulative percentage of implants/patients presenting with estimated bone loss at each year following prosthesis delivery. The analysis showed a non-linear, accelerating pattern of bone loss at the 105 affected implants. The onset of peri-implantitis occurred early, and 52% and 66% of implants presented with bone loss of >0.5 mm at years 2 and 3 respectively. A total of 70% and 81% of subjects presented with ≥1 implants with bone loss of >0.5 mm at years 2 and 3 respectively. It is suggested that peri-implantitis progresses in a non-linear, accelerating pattern and that, for the majority of cases, the onset occurs within 3 years of function. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Soft Tissue Surgical Procedures for Optimizing Anterior Implant Esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Andreas L.; Kotsakis, Georgios A.; McHale, Michelle G.; Lareau, Donald E.; Hinrichs, James E.; Romanos, Georgios E.

    2015-01-01

    Implant dentistry has been established as a predictable treatment with excellent clinical success to replace missing or nonrestorable teeth. A successful esthetic implant reconstruction is predicated on two fundamental components: the reproduction of the natural tooth characteristics on the implant crown and the establishment of soft tissue housing that will simulate a healthy periodontium. In order for an implant to optimally rehabilitate esthetics, the peri-implant soft tissues must be preserved and/or augmented by means of periodontal surgical procedures. Clinicians who practice implant dentistry should strive to achieve an esthetically successful outcome beyond just osseointegration. Knowledge of a variety of available techniques and proper treatment planning enables the clinician to meet the ever-increasing esthetic demands as requested by patients. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the implant surgeon's rationale and techniques beyond that of simply placing a functional restoration in an edentulous site to a level whereby an implant-supported restoration is placed in reconstructed soft tissue, so the site is indiscernible from a natural tooth. PMID:26124837

  8. Soft Tissue Surgical Procedures for Optimizing Anterior Implant Esthetics.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Andreas L; Kotsakis, Georgios A; McHale, Michelle G; Lareau, Donald E; Hinrichs, James E; Romanos, Georgios E

    2015-01-01

    Implant dentistry has been established as a predictable treatment with excellent clinical success to replace missing or nonrestorable teeth. A successful esthetic implant reconstruction is predicated on two fundamental components: the reproduction of the natural tooth characteristics on the implant crown and the establishment of soft tissue housing that will simulate a healthy periodontium. In order for an implant to optimally rehabilitate esthetics, the peri-implant soft tissues must be preserved and/or augmented by means of periodontal surgical procedures. Clinicians who practice implant dentistry should strive to achieve an esthetically successful outcome beyond just osseointegration. Knowledge of a variety of available techniques and proper treatment planning enables the clinician to meet the ever-increasing esthetic demands as requested by patients. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the implant surgeon's rationale and techniques beyond that of simply placing a functional restoration in an edentulous site to a level whereby an implant-supported restoration is placed in reconstructed soft tissue, so the site is indiscernible from a natural tooth.

  9. 10-year survival rate and the incidence of peri-implant disease of 374 titanium dental implants with a SLA surface: a prospective cohort study in 177 fully and partially edentulous patients.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, Frank J J; Ofec, Ronen; Schulten, Engelbert A J M; Ten Bruggenkate, Christiaan M

    2015-10-01

    This prospective cohort study evaluates the 10-year survival and incidence of peri-implant disease at implant and patient level of sandblasted, large grid, and acid-etched titanium dental implants (Straumann, soft tissue level, SLA surface) in fully and partially edentulous patients. Patients who had dental implant surgery in the period between November 1997 and June 2001, with a follow-up of at least 10 years, were investigated for clinical and radiological examination. Among the 506 inserted dental implants in 250 patients, 10-year data regarding the outcome of implants were available for 374 dental implants in 177 patients. In the current study, peri-implantitis was defined as advanced bone loss (≧1.5 mm. postloading) in combination with bleeding on probing. At 10-year follow-up, only one implant was lost (0.3%) 2 months after implant surgery due to insufficient osseointegration. The average bone loss at 10 year postloading was 0.52 mm. Advanced bone loss at 10-year follow-up was present in 35 dental implants (9.8%). Seven percent of the observed dental implants showed bleeding on probing in combination with advanced bone loss and 4.2% when setting the threshold for advanced bone loss at 2.0 mm. Advanced bone loss without bleeding on probing was present in 2.8% of all implants. In this prospective study, the 10-year survival rate at implant and patient level was 99.7% and 99.4%, respectively. Peri-implantitis was present in 7% of the observed dental implants according to the above-mentioned definition of peri-implantitis. This study shows that SLA implants offer predictable long-term results as support in the treatment of fully and partially edentulous patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The effect of microstructured surfaces and laminin-derived peptide coatings on soft tissue interactions with titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sandra; Huck, Olivier; Frisch, Benoît; Vautier, Dominique; Elkaim, René; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Brunel, Gérard; Tenenbaum, Henri

    2009-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the dental implant protection from peri-implant inflammation by improving the soft tissue adhesion on the titanium surface. Porous titanium was used to create, at the level of the transmucosal part of the implants (the "neck"), a microstructured 3-dimensional surface that would tightly seal the interface between the implant and soft tissue. Cell-specific adhesion properties were induced via an adhesion peptide derived from laminin-5 coupled to native or cross-linked PLL/PGA multilayered polyelectrolyte films (MPFs), which are used for biomedical device coatings. Porous titanium exhibited good cell-adhesion properties, but the colonisation of the material was further improved by a coating with laminin-5 functionalised MPFs and especially with (PLL/PGA)(6,5)-PGA-peptide film. Focal contact formation was observed on cross-linked architectures, reflecting cell anchorage on these surfaces. In contrast, when seeded on laminin-5-functionalised native films, epithelial cells formed only very diffuse focal contacts, but adhered via hemidesmosome formation. In vivo experiments confirmed that the porous titanium was colonised by cells of soft tissue. Altogether, the results indicate that the microstructure of the implant neck combined with a specific bioactive coating could constitute efficient routes to improve the integration of soft tissue on titanium dental implants, which could significantly protect implants from peri-implant inflammation and enhance long-term implant stabilisation.

  11. A Regenerative Approach to the Successful Treatment of Peri-implantitis: A Consecutive Series of 170 Implants in 100 Patients with 2- to 10-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Froum, Stuart J; Froum, Scott H; Rosen, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a consecutive case series of 170 treated peri-implantitis-affected implants in 100 patients with follow-up measurements from 2 to 10 years. A total of 51 implants in 38 patients previously reported on were followed for an additional 2.5 years, and 119 additional implants in 62 additional patients were treated with the same protocol and monitored for at least 2 years posttreatment. The treatment consisted of flap reflection, surface decontamination, use of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and guided bone regeneration with mineralized freezedried bone and/or anorganic bovine bone combined with PDGF or EMD and covered with an absorbable membrane and/or subepithelial connective tissue graft. Maintenance and monitoring followed every 2 to 3 months. Two implants were lost 6 months posttreatment, for a 98.8% survival rate. Bleeding on probing was eliminated in 91% of the treated implants. Probing depth reduction averaged 5.10 mm, bone level gain averaged 1.77 mm, and soft tissue marginal gain averaged 0.52 mm. These outcomes were obtained with one surgical procedure on 140 implants, with two procedures on 18 implants, and with three procedures on 10 implants. The results to date with this layered/combined regenerative approach for the treatment of peri-implantitis appear to be encouraging.

  12. Peri-implant medullary cisternae at the interface of bone-smooth surface titanium endosseous implant.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, A; Strocchi, R; Franchi, M; Martini, D; Raspanti, M; Congiu, T; Ruggeri, A

    1999-01-01

    A histological and ultrastructural study was carried out on the spongy bone response to smooth titanium oral implant surfaces. The samples obtained both from monkeys and from patients at various times from the implant insertion revealed that the bone-implant integration developed through different morphological aspects. The implant surface appeared in contact with medullary lacunae, as well as with osteoid tissue or directly with bone matrix. The complementary ultrastructural techniques employed have shown that the medullary lacunae appeared as wide and flattened cisternae delimited by a continuous single layer of flattened cells forming a thin lamina adhering to the implant and an endosteal lamina facing the bone surface. For their position and flattened shape we named them peri-implant medullary cisternae. The presence of blood vessels, reticular cells and myeloid cells in their lumen suggested that these peri-implant medullary cisternae were functional sites of new bone formation.

  13. Prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotypes in the peri-implant sulcus of Koreans assessed using a new primer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA is a virulence factor associated with periodontal diseases, but its role in the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between the condition of peri-implant tissue and the distribution of P. gingivalis fimA genotypes in Koreans using a new primer. Methods A total of 248 plaque samples were taken from the peri-implant sulci of 184 subjects. The control group consisted of sound implants with a peri-implant probing depth (PD) of 5 mm or less with no bleeding on probing (BOP). Test group I consisted of implants with a peri-implant PD of 5 mm or less and BOP, and test group II consisted of implants with a peri-implant PD of more than 5 mm and BOP. DNA was extracted from each sample and analyzed a using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with P. gingivalis-specific primers, followed by an additional PCR assay to differentiate the fimA genotypes in P. gingivalis-positive subjects. Results The Prevalence of P. gingivalis in each group did not significantly differ (P>0.05). The most predominant fimA genotype in all groups was type II. The prevalence of type Ib fimA was significantly greater in test group II than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions The fimA type Ib genotype of P. gingivalis was found to play a critical role in the destruction of peri-implant tissue, suggesting that it may be a distinct risk factor for peri-implantitis. PMID:26937292

  14. Supportive peri-implant therapy following anti-infective surgical peri-implantitis treatment: 5-year survival and success.

    PubMed

    Heitz-Mayfield, Lisa J A; Salvi, Giovanni E; Mombelli, Andrea; Loup, Pierre-Jean; Heitz, Fritz; Kruger, Estie; Lang, Niklaus P

    2016-06-23

    To evaluate clinical outcomes of supportive peri-implant therapy (SPIT) following surgical treatment of peri-implantitis. Twenty-four partially dentate patients with 36 dental implants diagnosed with peri-implantitis were treated by an anti-infective surgical protocol followed by regular supportive therapy. SPIT included removal of supra- and submucosal biofilm at the treated implants using titanium or carbon fibre curettes, or ultrasonic devices. In addition, professional prophylaxis (calculus/biofilm removal) at other implants/teeth and oral hygiene reinforcement was provided. Clinical measurements and radiographs were obtained at 1, 3 and 5 years. A successful treatment outcome was defined as implant survival with the absence of peri-implant probing depths (PD) ≥ 5 mm with concomitant bleeding/suppuration and absence of progression of peri-implant bone loss. Twelve months after treatment, there was 100% survival of the treated implants and 79% of patients (19 of 24) had a successful treatment outcome according to the defined success criteria. At 3 years, 75% of the patients (18 of 24) had a successful treatment outcome, two patients (8%) were lost to follow-up (LTF), while 8% lost an implant, and two patients had recurrence of peri-implantitis. Between 3 and 5 years, an additional two patients were LTF, and an additional two patients each lost one implant. Thus, at 5 years 63% of patients (15 of 24) had a successful treatment outcome. Complete resolution of peri-implantitis, defined as absence of bleeding at all sites, was achieved in 42% of implants (N = 15) at 5 years. Five years following regular supportive therapy, the peri-implant conditions established following peri-implantitis surgery were maintained in the majority of patients and implants. Some patients had recurrence of peri-implantitis and some lost implants over the 5-year period. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Comparison of peri-implant clinical and radiographic inflammatory parameters and whole salivary destructive inflammatory cytokine profile among obese and non-obese men.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Tariq; Al-Sahaly, Faisal; Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Kellesarian, Tammy Varela; Al-Anazi, Mohammed; Al-Khathami, Mohammed; Javed, Fawad; Vohra, Fahim

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present cross-sectional retrospective study was to compare the peri-implant clinical and radiographic inflammatory parameters and whole salivary destructive inflammatory cytokine profile among obese and non-obese men. Thirty-five obese and 37 non-obese men were included. Information regarding age, obesity, systemic health status, and habits was collected using a questionnaire. Clinical examination to evaluate peri-implant parameters and radiographic examination to assess marginal bone loss were conducted. Levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β in collected un-stimulated whole saliva were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data was statistically analyzed using Kruskal Wallis test. The mean scores of peri-implant bleeding on probing (P<0.05) and peri-implant probing depth (P<0.05) were significantly higher among obese compared with non-obese individuals. The mean marginal bone loss was also statistically significantly higher among individuals in the test-group compared with the control-group (P<0.05). Whole salivary IL-1β (P<0.001) and IL-6 (P<0.001) levels were significantly higher among individuals in the test-group compared with the control-group. Clinical and radiographic peri-implant inflammatory parameters were worse, and whole salivary IL-6 and IL-1β were higher in obese than non-obese subjects. Obese patients are at greater risk of peri-implant inflammation than non-obese healthy subjects. It is highly recommended that clinicians should educate obese patients seeking implant treatment regarding the association between obesity and peri-implant inflammation. In addition, obese patients with osseointegrated implants must follow strict oral hygiene regimen to prevent inflammation and maintain optimum peri-implant tissue health.

  16. Prognostic indicators for surgical peri-implantitis treatment.

    PubMed

    de Waal, Yvonne C M; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Meijer, Henny J A; Winkel, Edwin G; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan

    2016-12-01

    Objective of this study was to identify prognostic indicators for the outcome of resective peri-implantitis treatment, by an analysis of the pooled data of two previously conducted randomized controlled trials. Data of 74 patients with peri-implantitis (187 implants) who had received resective surgical treatment were available. Primary outcome variable was failure of peri-implantitis treatment after 12 months. Multilevel univariable and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the effect of various potentially prognostic indicators on the primary outcome. Peri-implantitis treatment was unsuccessful in 106 implants (57%) and 48 patients (67%) after 12 months. In the multiple regression analysis, the variables "order of inclusion" (P = 0.016) and mean bone loss at baseline (P = 0.030) were significant prognostic indicators for treatment failure. To eliminate the effect of "order of inclusion," post hoc analyses were carried out in a subgroup of patients. The univariable post hoc analysis showed a significant association for smoking (P = 0.015), maximum pocket depth at baseline (P = 0.073), mean bone loss at baseline (P = 0.003), and presence of plaque (P = 0.100). In the multiple regression post hoc analysis, only the variables smoking (P = 0.044) and mean bone loss (P = 0.043) remained statistically significant. The outcome of surgical peri-implantitis treatment is influenced by the experience of the surgical team with the surgical procedure. The observed learning effect has consequences for clinical practice and for conducting and interpreting clinical trials on peri-implantitis treatment. Other prognostic indicators are amount of peri-implant bone loss at baseline and smoking, and to a lesser extent, probing pocket depth at baseline and presence of plaque during follow-up. Early diagnosis of peri-implantitis and control of behavioral factors are crucial in achieving peri-implantitis treatment success. © 2015 John Wiley

  17. Nonsurgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis Using the Biofilm Decontamination Approach: A Case Report Study.

    PubMed

    Pini-Prato, Giovanpaolo; Magnani, Cristina; Rotundo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary study is to show the effect of the biofilm decontamination approach on peri-implantitis treatment. Clinical cases showing peri-implantitis were treated using an oral tissue decontaminant material that contains a concentrated aqueous mixture of hydroxybenzenesulfonic and hydroxymethoxybenzenesulfonic acids and sulfuric acid. The material was positioned in the pocket around the implant without anesthesia in nonsurgically treated cases. No instrumentation and no systemic or local antibiotics were used in any of the cases. A questionnaire was used for each patient to record the pain/discomfort felt when the material was administered. All of the treated cases healed well and rapidly. The infections were quickly resolved without complications. The momentary pain on introduction of the material was generally well tolerated and completely disappeared after a few seconds. The biofilm decontamination approach seems to be a very promising technique for the treatment of peri-implantitis. The local application of this material avoids the use of systemic or local antibiotics.

  18. The use of Buccal fat pad free graft in regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis: A new and predictable technique

    PubMed Central

    Kablan, Fares

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Peri-implantitis is a common condition, but no particular treatment protocol has shown to be definitively effective. Fat tissue in the oral cavity is widely available and easily accessed. The aim of the current study is to present a novel technique in the treatment of peri-implant lesions, utilizing a free fat tissue graft from the buccal fat pad (BFP). Patients and Methods: Free fat graft (FFG) was harvested from the BFP in eight patients and used with bone substitutes to regenerate 22 peri-implant lesions. Mechanical debridement of the implants surface and the granulation tissue were made with curettes or with Er: YAG laser. Clinical parameters such as plaque index, bleeding on probing, pocket depth, gingival recession, and the clinical attachment level were recorded as a baseline during the follow-up period. In addition, radiological evaluation was made preoperative during the follow-up period. Results: The donor site of the free fat graft was healed without cosmetic defect in all patients. Twenty-two peri-implant lesions were followed up for 12 months. Bleeding on probing and the pocket depth were significantly improved, and the clinical attachment level was achieved and maintained during the follow-up period due to the fibrous healing of the free fat graft. Satisfactory esthetic and functional outcomes of the treated implants were achieved and maintained. Conclusions: Free buccal fat graft heals by fibrosis. The fibrotic tissue adheres strongly to the implant surface and with stand the recurrence of the peri-implant lesion and provides stable and predictable outcome. PMID:26981467

  19. Hypoelastic Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    In Part I, a novel hypoelastic framework for soft-tissues was presented. One of the hallmarks of this new theory is that the well-known exponential behavior of soft-tissues arises consistently and spontaneously from the integration of a rate based formulation. In Part II, we examine the application of this framework to the problem of biaxial kinematics, which are common in experimental soft-tissue characterization. We confine our attention to an isotropic formulation in order to highlight the distinction between non-linearity and anisotropy. In order to provide a sound foundation for the membrane extension of our earlier hypoelastic framework, the kinematics and kinetics of in-plane biaxial extension are revisited, and some enhancements are provided. Specifically, the conventional stress-to-traction mapping for this boundary value problem is shown to violate the conservation of angular momentum. In response, we provide a corrected mapping. In addition, a novel means for applying loads to in-plane biaxial experiments is proposed. An isotropic, isochoric, hypoelastic, constitutive model is applied to an in-plane biaxial experiment done on glutaraldehyde treated bovine pericardium. The experiment is comprised of eight protocols that radially probe the biaxial plane. Considering its simplicity (two adjustable parameters) the model does a reasonably good job of describing the non-linear normal responses observed in these experimental data, which are more prevalent than are the anisotropic responses exhibited by this tissue. PMID:21394222

  20. The effect of orally administered probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri-containing tablets in peri-implant mucositis: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Flichy-Fernández, A J; Ata-Ali, J; Alegre-Domingo, T; Candel-Martí, E; Ata-Ali, F; Palacio, J R; Peñarrocha-Diago, M

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics create a biofilm and protect the oral tissues against the action of periodontal pathogenic bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the oral probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri Prodentis upon the peri-implant health of edentulous patients with dental implants and peri-implant mucositis, establishing comparisons vs implants without peri-implant disease. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, prospective cross-over study was made. The patients were all edentulous and were divided into two groups, (A) no peri-implant disease, and (B) peri-implant mucositis affecting one or more implants. Patients with peri-implantitis were excluded. The dosage was one tablet every 24 h over 30 d. All patients in both groups initially received the oral probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri Prodentis, followed by placebo. Patients started with probiotic treatment during 30 d, followed by a 6 mo washout period and the administration of placebo for the same period. The following parameters were studied: crevicular fluid volume, modified plaque index, probing depth, modified gingival index, and concentrations of interleukin 1β, interleukin 6 and interleukin 8. A total of 77 implants were evaluated in 34 patients. Group A involved 22 patients with 54 implants without peri-implant alterations, and group B, 12 patients with mucositis affecting one or more implants (23 implants). After treatment with the probiotic, both the patients with mucositis and the patients without peri-implant disease showed improvements in the clinical parameters, with reductions in cytokine levels. In contrast, no such changes were observed with placebo. After treatment with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri in patients with implants presenting mucositis, the clinical parameters improved, and the cytokine levels decreased - in contraposition to the observations in the placebo group. Probiotic administration may be regarded as a good alternative for both the treatment of peri-implant mucositis

  1. Soft tissue elastometer.

    PubMed

    Egorov, V; Tsyuryupa, S; Kanilo, S; Kogit, M; Sarvazyan, A

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a device entitled the 'Tissue Elastometer' (TE) for evaluating the Young's modulus of soft tissues. Soft tissue specimens are compressed between the object plate of an electronic balance and a linearly actuated indenter with a small rounded tip. The hardware of the device was designed such that a deformation model for semi-infinite media is applicable for calculating the Young's modulus of test specimens from their collected force-displacement data. Force-elongation measurements were performed on long strips of cured silicone mixtures to produce calibrated, tissue-mimicking test samples for the TE in a Young's modulus range of 10-400 kPa. When tested with the TE, the Young's moduli of the silicone samples demonstrated accuracy to within 1-10% of their calibrated values. Testing on excised tissue samples (fresh store-bought poultry breast; bovine liver, kidneys, hind shanks; porcine) was also performed, and a repeatability of elasticity measurements was demonstrated in the range of 8-14%. Results indicate that the TE can be effectively used in laboratory and clinical environments to evaluate the elasticity modulus of tissues.

  2. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    PubMed Central

    Andreoni, D.

    2016-01-01

    Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to replace the missing bone, allowing for a prosthetic driven implant placement. Soft tissues deficiency was corrected by means of a combined epithelialized and subepithelial connective tissue graft. The 3-year clinical and radiological follow-up demonstrated symmetric gingival levels of the upper canines, with physiological peri-implant probing depths and bone loss. Thus, the use of autogenous tissues combined with biomaterials might be considered a reliable technique in case of highly aesthetic demanding cases. PMID:27738534

  3. The peri-implantitis: implant surfaces, microstructure, and physicochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mouhyi, Jaafar; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2012-04-01

    There are two ways of looking at secondary failures of osseointegration; one is to reflect on possible causes for the failure, the other focuses on the pathology per se. In the first case, background factors such as mechanical trauma (adverse loading) or inflammations/infections are being discussed as the cause of failure. Then peri-implantitis is a term reserved for implant disturbance due to inflammation/infections only. However, irrespective of the original reason for the failure being adverse loading or inflammation/infection, the end result with bone resorption and inflammation may be very similar. Hence, in the present article, an alternative outlook has been chosen. Trigerring factors for peri-implantitis are generally gathered under four categories: lesions of peri-implant attachment, presence of aggressive bacteria, excessive mechanical stress, and corrosion. If only one of these factors would start a chain reaction leading to lesions, then the other factors may combine to worsen the condition. With other words, peri-implantitis is a general term dependent on a synergy of several factors, irrespective of the precise reason for first triggering off symptoms. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Laser Treatment of Peri-Implantitis: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ashnagar, Sajjad; Nowzari, Hessam; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Yaghoub Zadeh, Behnoush; Chiniforush, Nasim; Choukhachi Zadeh, Nastaran

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a state defined as an inflammatory reaction around osseointegrated implants, leading to progressive loss of supporting bone. Various treatment methods are suggested in the treatment of peri-implantitis and clinicians have to choose a method over a large number of treatment protocols. Lasers have shown promising therapeutic effect in treatment of peri-implantitis. However, some controversies have been found in clinical outcomes after using lasers. Therefore, we aimed to review the current literature over the past ten years for the use of lasers in treatment of peri-implantitis, via the Pubmed electronic database of the US National Library of Medicine. Fifteen human studies were reviewed. Er:YAG (Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet), CO2(Carbon Dioxide Laser) and Diode lasers were used. Despite inconsistencies and disharmonies among studies in terms of study design, positive treatment outcomes were obvious among the majority of them. However, short period of follow-ups and poor control of plaque index, as a critical confounding factor, were the major problems which these studies suffered from. It seems that one session laser therapy is not adequate for achieving optimal clinical outcome. Further studies with longer periods of follow-ups, intense control of plaque index, and various sessions of laser treatments are needed to clearly illustrate the clinical privilege of laser therapy. PMID:25653815

  5. Reptile Soft Tissue Surgery.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Nicola; Mans, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The surgical approach to reptiles can be challenging. Reptiles have unique physiologic, anatomic, and pathologic differences. This may result in frustrating surgical experiences. However, recent investigations provided novel, less invasive, surgical techniques. The purpose of this review was to describe the technical aspects behind soft tissue surgical techniques that have been used in reptiles, so as to provide a general guideline for veterinarians working with reptiles.

  6. Non-surgical periodontal treatment of peri-implant diseases with the adjunctive use of diode laser: preliminary clinical study.

    PubMed

    Lerario, Francesco; Roncati, Marisa; Gariffo, Annalisa; Attorresi, Enrica; Lucchese, Alessandra; Galanakis, Alexandros; Palaia, Gaspare; Romeo, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Peri-implant diseases present in two forms: peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. The prevalence of peri-implant complications is significantly rising. The aim of this study was to compare conventional treatment of inflamed peri-implant tissues with conventional treatment together with diode laser application. Twenty-seven patients (age 36 to 67, 15 women and 12 men, 12 smokers and 15 non-smokers) requiring treatment for mucositis or peri-implantitis were taken into account for this preliminary study. Plaque index (PI), pocket depth (PD), and bleeding on probing (BoP) were recorded at baseline evaluation. Patients in control group (CG) received conventional non-surgical periodontal treatment. Patients in test group received conventional non-surgical periodontal treatment together with diode laser application (810 nm, 30 s, 1 W, 50 Hz, t on = 100 ms, t off = 100 ms, energy density = 24.87 J/cm(2)). Paired t test was used to evaluate the difference in repeated measurements of considered indexes at T 0 and T 1 (1 year) in both groups. A total of 606 sites were taken into account in the test group (TG) and 144 in the CG. PD mean variation in the TG was 2.66 mm ± 1.07, while mean PD variation in the CG was 0.94 ± 1.13 mm. Paired t testing of the variation in PD in CG and TG revealed a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p < 0.0001). A reduction of pathological sites from 89 % (T 0) to 14.35 % (T 1) was achieved in the TG, while reduction obtained in the CG was from 75.69 % (T 0) to 50 % (T 1); BoP scores at time T 1 had fallen below 5 % in the TG and decreased to 59.7 %, in the CG. Within the limitations of this study, diode laser seems to be an additional valuable tool for peri-implant disease treatment.

  7. Can Soft Tissue Sarcomas Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tissue Sarcoma Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Soft Tissue Sarcomas Be Found Early? People who have ... Your Doctor About Soft Tissue Sarcomas? More In Soft Tissue Sarcoma About Soft Tissue Sarcoma Causes, Risk ...

  8. Soft tissue vibrations within one soft tissue compartment.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Katherine A; Nigg, Benno M

    2006-01-01

    The concept of muscle tuning suggests that vibrations of the soft tissue compartments of the leg initiated by impacts are minimized by muscular activity prior to heel-strike of heel-toe running. For the quantification of muscle tuning it has been assumed (1) that the soft tissue compartment acts as one lumped mass and (2) that vibration energy dissipation does occur within one muscle. The purpose of this study was to test these two assumptions. It was hypothesized that (H1) the movement of the soft tissue compartment is not homogeneous, (H2) the vibration frequencies for different muscles within one soft tissue compartment are different and (3) attenuation of vibration movement within one muscle does occur. Soft tissue vibrations were measured using accelerometers on four locations on the quadriceps soft tissue compartment during heel-toe running. There were differences in the peak soft tissue acceleration and time of peak acceleration between accelerometer locations. The dominant frequency was similar throughout the soft tissue compartment, however; there was an attenuation of high-frequency vibration energy between distal and proximal points overlying one muscle. This evidence suggests that accelerometer placement is important when quantifying the acceleration magnitude and timing of peak soft tissue compartment but not when estimating the resonant vibration characteristics of a soft tissue compartment. It also provides initial evidence to support the idea that vibration control through muscle tuning may be achieved through changes in energy dissipating properties within the soft tissue compartment.

  9. Occurrence of cases with peri-implant mucositis or peri-implantitis in a 21-26 years follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Renvert, Stefan; Lindahl, Christel; Persson, G Rutger

    2017-09-29

    to determine the prevalence and development of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis and to assess risk factors over time. The study is a longitudinal case series assessing the occurrence and diagnosis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. 218/294 patients who had received dental implants between 1988-1992 were examined between 2000-2002 (exam II; 9-14 years after the first exam). At exam III (20-26 years after exam I, on average 23.3 years), 86 individuals were re-examined. The diagnosis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis at exam III was 23.8% and 13.7% respectively. Surgical treatment of peri-implantitis after exam II resulted in a bone gain for 2/12 individuals. Individuals with ≥ 3 implants at exam II were at risk for peri-implantitis at exam III (χ2=7.9, p <0.01, LR: 11.6, 95%CI: 1.5, 92.5, p < 0.01). A history of periodontitis (p=0.07), a diagnosis of peri-implant mucositis (p =0.77), or smoking (p=0.86) at exam II, were not predictive of peri-implantitis at exam III. The diagnosis and occurrence of peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis was high. Healthy conditions at implants after 9-14 years were predictive of future implant health. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B gene polymorphisms in Iranian periodontitis and peri-implantitis patients.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi; Baghani, Zahra; Ebadian, Ahmad Reza; Kaghazchi, Zahra; Amid, Reza

    2014-06-01

    Peri-implantitis and periodontitis are inflammatory and infectious diseases of implant and tooth-supporting tissues. Recently, the role of gene polymorphisms of immune response components in the relevant pathogenesis has been investigated. The present study was the first to evaluate the relationship between two known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-β (RANK) gene (rs3018362 and rs35211496) in chronic periodontitis and peri-implantitis patients in an Iranian population. Eighty-one periodontally healthy patients, 38 patients with peri-implantitis, and 74 patients with chronic periodontitis were enrolled in this study. DNA was extracted from blood arm vein samples by using Miller's salting out technique according to the manufacturer's instructions given in the extraction kit. The concentration of DNA samples was measured using a spectrophotometer. The genetic polymorphisms of the RANK gene were evaluated using a competitive allele specific polymerase chain reaction (KBioscience allele specific PCR) technique. Differences in the frequencies of genotypes and alleles in the diseased and healthy groups were analyzed using chi-squared statistical tests (P<0.05). Analysis of rs35211496 revealed statistically significant differences in the expression of the TT, TC, and CC genotypes among the three groups (P=0.00). No statistically significant difference was detected in this respect between the control group and the chronic periodontitis group. The expression of the GG, GA, and AA genotypes and allele frequencies (rs3018362) showed no statistically significant difference among the three groups (P=0.21). The results of this study indicate that the CC genotype of the rs35211496 RANK gene polymorphism was significantly associated with peri-implantitis and may be considered a genetic determinant for peri-implantitis, but this needs to be confirmed by further studies in other populations.

  11. Expression of IL-6, IL-10, IL-17 and IL-33 in the peri-implant crevicular fluid of patients with peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Severino, Viviane Oliveira; Beghini, Marcela; de Araújo, Márcia Fernandes; de Melo, Marcelo Luiz Ribeiro; Miguel, Camila Botelho; Rodrigues, Wellington Francisco; de Lima Pereira, Sanivia Aparecida

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the levels of IL-6, IL-10, IL-17 and IL-33 in the peri-implantar crevicular fluid (PICF) and in parotid gland saliva (PGS) of healthy patients, and peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis patients. The PICF was collected from 40 implants as follows: 10 peri-implant mucositis patients, 20 peri-implantitis patients and 10 healthy patients. The PICF and PGS samples collected from each patient were quantified for IL-6, IL-10, IL-17 and IL-33 by enzymatic immunosorbent assay (ELISA). IL-6, IL-17 and IL-33 levels on PIFC were significantly higher in peri-implantitis group when compared to healthy group. IL-17 and IL-33 levels in PIFC were significantly higher in peri-implant mucositis group than in healthy group. There was no significant difference when comparing IL-6, IL-10, IL-17 and IL-33 levels in PGS among healthy, peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis groups. Therefore, as in patients with peri-implantitis there were significantly higher levels of IL-6, IL-17 and IL-33 in PICF, we believe that these cytokines were intensifying local inflammatory process, and contributing to clinical aspects such as increased marginal bleeding and probing depth found in patients with peri-implantitis. Furthermore, as IL-17 and IL-33 were increased in patients with peri-implant mucositis, hypothesized that these cytokines were also contributing to the inflammatory process observed in this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of peri-implant diseases: a review of the literature and protocol proposal.

    PubMed

    Armas, Joshé; Culshaw, Shauna; Savarrio, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Over 100,000 implants were placed in the UK in 2010. As the numbers of patients with implant-retained prostheses increases, operators are encountering an increasing number of biological implant complications, most commonly peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. The effective management of these complications is crucial to maintain patients' oral health. In particular, in contrast to common periodontal infections, some peri-implant infections may benefit from surgical intervention as a first line approach. This article reviews the literature on the treatment options for peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis and proposes a protocol for their treatment.

  13. Prevalence of Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis in Patients Treated with a Combination of Axial and Tilted Implants Supporting a Complete Fixed Denture

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Nicolò; Taschieri, Silvio; Francetti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the incidence and prevalence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in patients with a fixed full-arch prosthesis supported by two axial and two tilted implants. Materials and Methods. Sixty-nine patients were included in the study. Each patient received a fixed full-arch prosthesis supported by two mesial axial and two distal tilted implants to rehabilitate the upper arch, the lower arch, or both. Three hundred thirty-six implants for 84 restorations were delivered. Patients were scheduled for follow-up visits every 6 months in the first 2 years and yearly after. At each follow-up visit peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were diagnosed if present. Results. The overall follow-up range was from 12 to 130 months (mean 63,2 months). Three patients presented peri-implantitis. The prevalence of peri-implant mucositis ranged between 0 and 7,14% of patients (5,06% of implants) while the prevalence of peri-implantitis varied from 0 to 4,55% of patients (3,81% of implants). Conclusions. The prevalence and incidence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis are lower than most of the studies in literature. Therefore this kind of rehabilitation could be considered a feasible option, on the condition of adopting a systematic hygienic protocol. PMID:26065029

  14. Prevalence of Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis in Patients Treated with a Combination of Axial and Tilted Implants Supporting a Complete Fixed Denture.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Nicolò; Corbella, Stefano; Taschieri, Silvio; Francetti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the incidence and prevalence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in patients with a fixed full-arch prosthesis supported by two axial and two tilted implants. Sixty-nine patients were included in the study. Each patient received a fixed full-arch prosthesis supported by two mesial axial and two distal tilted implants to rehabilitate the upper arch, the lower arch, or both. Three hundred thirty-six implants for 84 restorations were delivered. Patients were scheduled for follow-up visits every 6 months in the first 2 years and yearly after. At each follow-up visit peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were diagnosed if present. The overall follow-up range was from 12 to 130 months (mean 63,2 months). Three patients presented peri-implantitis. The prevalence of peri-implant mucositis ranged between 0 and 7,14% of patients (5,06% of implants) while the prevalence of peri-implantitis varied from 0 to 4,55% of patients (3,81% of implants). The prevalence and incidence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis are lower than most of the studies in literature. Therefore this kind of rehabilitation could be considered a feasible option, on the condition of adopting a systematic hygienic protocol.

  15. Incidence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in edentulous patients with an implant-retained mandibular overdenture during a 10-year follow-up period.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Henny J A; Raghoebar, Gerry M; de Waal, Yvonne C M; Vissink, Arjan

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this sub-analysis of two prospective studies was to assess the incidence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in fully edentulous patients with an implant-retained mandibular overdenture during a 10-year follow-up period. One hundred and fifty edentulous patients with two endosseous implants to support a mandibular overdenture were available from two prospective studies. Clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed at 5 and 10 years of functional loading. Incidence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were calculated at implant level and patient level following the Consensus of the Seventh European Workshop on Periodontology on peri-implant diseases. Incidence of peri-implant mucositis at patient level was 51.9% after 5 years of evaluation and 57.0% after 10 years. Incidence of peri-implantitis at patient level was 16.9% after 5 years of evaluation and 29.7% after 10 years. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis do occur in totally edentulous patients and incidence numbers are high. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. In vitro assessment of the soft tissue/implant interface using porcine gingival explants.

    PubMed

    Abdulmajeed, Aous A; Willberg, Jaana; Syrjänen, Stina; Vallittu, Pekka K; Närhi, Timo O

    2015-01-01

    The biologic seal of peri-implant soft tissue is crucial for long-term prognosis of oral implants. This in vitro study describes a novel tissue culture model using porcine gingival explants to evaluate the soft tissue/implant interface. Two different types of substrates were investigated: (a) plain polymer: BisGMA-TEGDMA (50-50 %) and (b) unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite (FRC). Porcine gingival explants were obtained from a local slaughterhouse. The experimental implants (n = 4) were inserted into the middle of freshly excised porcine gingival explants and cultured at the air/liquid interface up to 14 days. Porcine gingival explants with no implants served as baseline controls. The specimens were fixed and processed for the preparation of undecalcified samples. Histological analysis of the soft tissue/implant interface was carried out using a light-microscope. Microscopic evaluation suggests that the gingival explants established epithelial and connective tissue attachment to both implant types over the incubation period. FRC surfaces seemed to have a favorable tissue response with a sign of an outward epithelial migration. However, tissue degeneration was observed at the end of the experiment. In conclusion, this in vitro model maintains mucosal viability and ability to histologically evaluate soft tissue attachment to biomaterials rendering it a time efficient and cost effective model that may reduce the need for animal experiments.

  17. [Dental implantation and soft tissue augmentation after ridge preservation in a molar site: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zhao, L P; Zhan, Y L; Hu, W J; Wang, H J; Wei, Y P; Zhen, M; Xu, T; Liu, Y S

    2016-12-18

    For ideal implant rehabilitation, an adequate bone volume, optical implant position, and stable and healthy soft tissue are required. The reduction of alveolar bone and changes in its morphology subsequent to tooth extraction will result in insufficient amount of bone and adversely affect the ability to optimally place dental implants in edentulous sites. Preservation of alveolar bone volume through ridge preservation has been demonstrated to reduce the vertical and horizontal contraction of the alveolar bone crest after tooth extraction and reduce the need for additional bone augmentation procedures during implant placement. In this case, a patient presented with a mandible molar of severe periodontal disease, the tooth was removed as atraumatically as possible and the graft material of Bio-Oss was loosely placed in the alveolar socket without condensation and covered with Bio-Gide to reconstruct the defects of the alveolar ridge. Six months later, there were sufficient height and width of the alveolar ridge for the dental implant, avoiding the need of additional bone augmentation and reducing the complexity and unpredictability of the implant surgery. Soft tissue defects, such as gingival and connective tissue, played crucial roles in long-term implant success. Peri-implant plastic surgery facilitated development of healthy peri-implant structure able to withstand occlusal forces and mucogingival stress. Six months after the implant surgery, the keratinized gingiva was absent in the buccal of the implant and the vestibular groove was a little shallow. The free gingival graft technique was used to solve the vestibulum oris groove supersulcus and the absence of keratinized gingiva around the implant. The deepening of vestibular groove and broadening of keratinized gingiva were conducive to the long-term health and stability of the tissue surrounding the implant. Implant installation and prosthetic restoration showed favorable outcome after six months.

  18. Survival by Stage of Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Survival by Stage of Soft Tissue Sarcoma Survival rates are often used by ... Your Doctor About Soft Tissue Sarcomas? More In Soft Tissue Sarcoma About Soft Tissue Sarcoma Causes, Risk ...

  19. The role of biomaterial properties in peri-implant neovascularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raines, Andrew Lawrence

    An understanding of the interactions between orthopaedic and dental implant surfaces with the surrounding host tissue is critical in the design of next generation implants to improve osseointegration and clinical success rates. Critical to the process of osseointegration is the rapid establishment of a patent neovasculature in the peri-implant space to allow for the delivery of oxygen, nutrients, and progenitor cells. The central aim of this thesis is to understand how biomaterials regulate cellular and host tissue response to elicit a pro-angiogenic microenvironment at the implant/tissue interface. To address this question, the studies performed in this thesis aim to (1) determine whether biomaterial surface properties can modulate the production and secretion of pro-angiogenic growth factors by cells, (2) determine the role of integrin and VEGF-A signaling in the angiogenic response of cells to implant surface features, and (3) to determine whether neovascularization in response to an implanted biomaterial can be modulated in vivo. The results demonstrate that biomaterial surface microtopography and surface energy can increase the production of pro-angiogenic growth factors by osteoblasts and that these growth factors stimulate the differentiation of endothelial cells in a paracrine manner and the results suggest that signaling through specific integrin receptors affects the production of angiogenic growth factors by osteoblast-like cells. Further, using a novel in vivo model, the results demonstrate that a combination of a rough surface microtopography and high surface energy can improve bone-to-implant contact and neovascularization. The results of these studies also suggest that VEGF-A produced by osteoblast-like cells has both an autocrine and paracrine effect. VEGF-A silenced cells exhibited reduced production of both pro-angiogenic and osteogenic growth factors in response to surface microtopgraphy and surface energy, and conditioned media from VEGF

  20. An in vivo assessment of the effects of using different implant abutment occluding materials on implant microleakage and the peri-implant microbiome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, Caroline

    Microleakage may be a factor in the progression of peri-implant pathology. Microleakage in implant dentistry refers to the passage of bacteria, fluids, molecules or ions between the abutment-implant interface to and from the surrounding periodontal tissues. This creates a zone of inflammation and reservoir of bacteria at the implant-abutment interface. Bone loss typically occurs within the first year of abutment connection and then stabilizes. It has not yet been definitively proven that the occurrence of microleakage cannot contribute to future bone loss or impede the treatment of peri-implant disease. Therefore, strategies to reduce or eliminate microleakage are sought out. Recent evidence demonstrates that the type of implant abutment channel occluding material can affect the amount of microleakage in an in vitro study environment. Thus, we hypothesize that different abutment screw channel occluding materials will affect the amount of observed microleakage, vis-a-vis the correlation between the microflora found on the abutment screw channel occluding material those found in the peri-implant sulcus. Additional objectives include confirming the presence of microleakage in vivo and assessing any impact that different abutment screw channel occluding materials may have on the peri-implant microbiome. Finally, the present study provides an opportunity to further characterize the peri-implant microbiome. Eight fully edentulous patients restored with at dental implants supporting screw-retained fixed hybrid prostheses were included in the study. At the initial appointment (T1), the prostheses were removed and the implants and prostheses were cleaned. The prostheses were then inserted with polytetrafluoroethylene tape (PTFE, TeflonRTM), cotton, polyvinyl siloxane (PVS), or synthetic foam as the implant abutment channel occluding material and sealed over with composite resin. About six months later (T2), the prostheses were removed and the materials collected. Paper

  1. Effect of platform switching on the peri-implant bone: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Bouazza-Juanes, Kheira; Martínez-González, Amparo; Peiró, Germán; Ródenas, Juan-José; López-Mollá, María-Victoria

    2015-10-01

    There exists a relation between the presence and location of the micro-gap and the loss of peri implant bone. Several authors have shown that the treatments based on the use of platform switching result in less peri-implant bone loss and an increased tissue stability. The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of the platform switching on the distribution of stresses on the peri-implant bone using the finite element method. A realistic 3D full-mandible finite element model representing cortical bone and trabecular bone was used to study the distribution of the stress on the bone induced by an implant of diameter 4.1 mm. Two abutments were modelled. The first one, of diameter 4.1 mm, was used in the reference model to represent a conventional implant. The second one, of diameter 3.2 mm, was used to represent the implant with platform switching. Both models were subjected to axial and oblique masticatory loads. The analyses showed that, although no relevant differences can be found for the trabecular bone, the use of platform switching reduces the maximum stress level in the cortical bone by almost 36% with axial loads and by 40% with oblique loads. The full 3D Finite Element model, that can be used to investigate the influence of other parameters (implant diameter, connexion type, …) on the biomechanical behaviour of the implant, showed that this stress reduction can be a biomechanical reasons to explain why the platform switching seems to reduce or eliminate crestal bone resorption after the prosthetic restoration. Dental implant, platform switching, finite element method.

  2. Effect of platform switching on the peri-implant bone: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Amparo; Peiró, Germán; Ródenas, Juan-José; López-Mollá, María-Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Background There exists a relation between the presence and location of the micro-gap and the loss of peri implant bone. Several authors have shown that the treatments based on the use of platform switching result in less peri-implant bone loss and an increased tissue stability. The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of the platform switching on the distribution of stresses on the peri-implant bone using the finite element method. Material and Methods A realistic 3D full-mandible finite element model representing cortical bone and trabecular bone was used to study the distribution of the stress on the bone induced by an implant of diameter 4.1 mm. Two abutments were modelled. The first one, of diameter 4.1 mm, was used in the reference model to represent a conventional implant. The second one, of diameter 3.2 mm, was used to represent the implant with platform switching. Both models were subjected to axial and oblique masticatory loads. Results The analyses showed that, although no relevant differences can be found for the trabecular bone, the use of platform switching reduces the maximum stress level in the cortical bone by almost 36% with axial loads and by 40% with oblique loads. Conclusions The full 3D Finite Element model, that can be used to investigate the influence of other parameters (implant diameter, connexion type, …) on the biomechanical behaviour of the implant, showed that this stress reduction can be a biomechanical reasons to explain why the platform switching seems to reduce or eliminate crestal bone resorption after the prosthetic restoration. Key words:Dental implant, platform switching, finite element method. PMID:26535094

  3. An innovative therapy for peri-implantitis based on radio frequency electric current: numerical simulation results and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Cosoli, G; Scalise, L; Tricarico, G; Tomasini, E P; Cerri, G

    2016-08-01

    Peri-implantitis is a severe inflammatory pathology that affects soit and hard tissues surrounding dental implants. Nowadays, only prevention is effective to contrast peri-implantitis, but, in recent years, there is the clinical evidence of the efficiency of a therapy based on the application of radio frequency electric current, reporting that 81% of the cases (66 implants, 46 patients) were successfully treated. The aim of this paper is to present the therapy mechanism, exploring the distribution of the electric currents in normal and pathologic tissues. A 3D numerical FEM model of tooth root with a dental implant screwed in the alveolar bone has been realized and the therapy has been simulated in COMSOL Multiphysics® environment. Results show that the electric current is focused in the inflamed zone around the implant, due to the fact that its conductivity is higher than the healthy tissue one. Moreover, by means of a movable return electrode, the electric current and field lines can be guided in the most inflamed area, limiting the interference on healthy tissues and improving the therapy in the area of interest. In conclusion, it can be stated that this innovative therapy would make a personalized therapy for peri-implantitis possible, also through impedance measurements, allowing the clinician to evaluate the tissue inflammation state.

  4. Early implant-associated osteomyelitis results in a peri-implanted bacterial reservoir.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Louise Kruse; Koch, Janne; Aalbaek, Bent; Moodley, Arshnee; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Petersen, Andreas; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2017-01-01

    Implant-associated osteomyelitis (IAO) is a common complication in orthopedic surgery. The aim of this study was to elucidate how deep IAO can go into the peri-implanted bone tissue within a week. The study was performed in a porcine model of IAO. A small steel implant and either 10(4) CFU/kg body weight of Staphylococcus aureus or saline was inserted into the right tibial bone of 12 pigs. The animals were consecutively killed on day 2, 4 and 6 following implantation. Bone tissue around the implant was histologically evaluated. Identification of S. aureus was performed immunohistochemically on tissue section and with scanning electron microscopy and peptide nucleic acid in situ hybridization on implants. The distance of the peri-implanted pathological bone area (PIBA), measured perpendicular to the implant, was significantly larger in infected animals compared to controls (p = 0.0014). The largest differences were seen after 4 and 6 days of inoculation, where PIBA measurements of up to 6 mm were observed. Positive S. aureus bacteria were identified on implants and from 25 μm to 6 mm into PIBA. This is important knowledge for optimizing outcomes of surgical debridement in osteomyelitis.

  5. Microbiological diversity of peri-implantitis biofilm by Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ennyo S C; Feres, Magda; Figueiredo, Luciene C; Shibli, Jamil A; Ramiro, Fernanda S; Faveri, Marcelo

    2014-10-01

    To examine the microbial diversity associated with implants with or without peri-implantitis and to identify differences between the bacterial communities in these clinical conditions. Twenty subjects were assigned to a Control group consisting of subjects with healthy implants and a Test group consisting of subjects with peri-implantitis sites, as well as a healthy implant site (n = 10/group). In the Test group, subgingival biofilm samples were taken from the deepest sites of the diseased implant. In both groups, samples were collected from one site around a healthy implant. DNA was extracted and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced, and the phylotypes were identified by comparison with known 16S rRNA sequences. The phylogenetic identity of 1387 16S rRNA gene clones was determined. Healthy implants demonstrated higher proportions of Actinomyces, Atopobium, Gemella, Kingella and Rothia and lower levels of Campylobacter, Desulfobulbus, Dialister, Eubacterium, Filifactor, Mitsukella, Porphyromonas and Pseudoramibacter (Mann-Whitney U-test; P < 0.05). Fusobacterium nucleatum, Dialister invisus, Streptococcus sp. human oral taxon (HOT) 064, Filifactor alocis and Mitsuokella sp. HOT 131 presented a higher mean proportion, while Veillonella dispar, Actinomyces meyeri, Granulicatella adiacens showed lower mean proportions in the peri-implantitis sites when compared with healthy implants in both the Control and Test groups (Mann-Whitney U-test; P < 0.05). Marked differences were observed in the composition of the subgingival biofilm between healthy and diseased implants. The biofilm associated with peri-implantitis harbored more pathogenic bacterial species from the orange complex and other "unusual" putative pathogens, such as F. alocis, D. invisus and Mitsuokella sp. HOT 131. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Biomechanics of soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Miller, K

    2000-01-01

    Recent developments in Computer-Integrated and Robot-Aided Surgery (in particular, the emergence of automatic surgical tools and robots (as well as advances in Virtual Reality techniques, call for closer examination of the mechanical properties of very soft tissues (such as brain, liver, kidney, etc.). Moreover, internal organs are very susceptible to trauma. In order to protect them properly against car crash and other impact consequences we need to be able to predict the organ deformation. Such prediction can be achieved by proper mathematical modelling followed by a computer simulation. The ultimate goal of our research into the biomechanics of these tissues is development of corresponding, realistic mathematical models. This paper contains experimental results of in vitro, uniaxial, unconfined compression of swine brain tissue obtained by the author in Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, Japan, and discusses liver and kidney in vivo compression experiments conducted in Highway Safety Research Institute and the Medical Centre of The University of Michigan. The stress-strain curves for investigated tissues are concave upward for all compression rates containing no linear portion from which a meaningful elastic modulus might be determined. The tissue response stiffened as the loading speed increased, indicating a strong stress (strain rate dependence. As the step in the direction towards realistic computer simulation of injuries and surgical procedures, this paper presents two mathematical representations of brain, liver and kidney tissue stiffness. Biphasic and single-phase models are discussed. The biphasic model is shown to be inappropriate due to its inability to account for strong stress-strain relationship. Agreement between the proposed single-phase models and experiment is good for compression levels reaching 30% and for loading velocities varying over five orders of magnitude. Presented mathematical models can find applications in computer and robot

  7. Clinical features of peri-implant medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: Is there an association to peri-implantitis?

    PubMed

    Troeltzsch, Matthias; Cagna, David; Stähler, Philip; Probst, Florian; Kaeppler, Gabriele; Troeltzsch, Markus; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Otto, Sven

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the behavior of dental implants in patients diagnosed with MRONJ and to analyze the characteristics of peri-implant MRONJ. It was hypothesized that peri-implant parameters are not associated with peri-implant MRONJ. A retrospective study design was selected to address the research purpose. Patients with confirmed MRONJ and the simultaneous presence of dental implants who presented between 2010 and 2016 served as the study cohort. Predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. Demographic, clinical and radiological data were collected and analyzed statistically with respect to the variable scale (significance level p ≤ 0.05). The study sample was composed of 34 patients (female: 16; male: 18; average age: 70.6 years) with a total of 117 dental implants the majority of whom had received antiresorptive drug therapy within oncologic treatment protocols. Peri-implant MRONJ occurred in 15 patients (44%). Signs of peri-implantitis (present around 46/117 implants; 39%) appeared to be associated with the occurrence of peri-implant MRONJ. Patients receiving antiresorptive drugs in high doses seem to be at risk of developing MRONJ in the vicinity of dental implants. Peri-implantitis may be associated with the etiology of peri-implant MRONJ. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The biological seal of the implant–soft tissue interface evaluated in a tissue-engineered oral mucosal model

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Wen L.; Brook, Ian M.; Palmquist, Anders; van Noort, Richard; Moharamzadeh, Keyvan

    2012-01-01

    For dental implants, it is vital that an initial soft tissue seal is achieved as this helps to stabilize and preserve the peri-implant tissues during the restorative stages following placement. The study of the implant–soft tissue interface is usually undertaken in animal models. We have developed an in vitro three-dimensional tissue-engineered oral mucosal model (3D OMM), which lends itself to the study of the implant–soft tissue interface as it has been shown that cells from the three-dimensional OMM attach onto titanium (Ti) surfaces forming a biological seal (BS). This study compares the quality of the BS achieved using the three-dimensional OMM for four types of Ti surfaces: polished, machined, sandblasted and anodized (TiUnite). The BS was evaluated quantitatively by permeability and cell attachment tests. Tritiated water (HTO) was used as the tracing agent for the permeability test. At the end of the permeability test, the Ti discs were removed from the three-dimensional OMM and an Alamar Blue assay was used for the measurement of residual cells attached to the Ti discs. The penetration of the HTO through the BS for the four types of Ti surfaces was not significantly different, and there was no significant difference in the viability of residual cells that attached to the Ti surfaces. The BS of the tissue-engineered oral mucosa around the four types of Ti surface topographies was not significantly different. PMID:22915635

  9. Altered sensation caused by peri-implantitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Shim, Ji-Suk; Huh, Jung-Bo; Rim, Jae-Suk; Lee, Jeong-Yol; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2013-07-01

    Frequently reported is a case wherein a lesion caused by periodontitis or periapical lesion in a natural tooth enlarged, invaded the inferior alveolar nerve canal, and induced paresthesia. Cases wherein paresthesia occurred because of peri-implantitis have been rarely reported. The patient in this case report had experienced transient paresthesia after implant placement and recovered normal sensation 3 months later. Thirteen years later, this patient visited the authors' hospital with paresthesia in the same region because the peri-implantitis progressed to the apex of the implant. One week after removal of the implant, sense recovery and pain relief started, and 15 days after removal, the paresthesia and pain completely disappeared. For patients who experience transient paresthesia and recovery owing to nerve damage caused by the placement of an implant in the mandibular molar or premolar area, or in patients in whom the implant is close to the inferior alveolar nerve canal or the mental nerve, the spread of inflammation caused by peri-implantitis can induce paresthesia.

  10. Reconstruction of Peri-implant Osseous Defects: A Multicenter Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, K; Jepsen, S; Laine, M L; Anssari Moin, D; Pilloni, A; Zeza, B; Sanz, M; Ortiz-Vigon, A; Roos-Jansåker, A M; Renvert, S

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of data for the effectiveness of reconstructive procedures in the treatment of peri-implantitis. The objective of this study was to compare reconstruction of peri-implant osseous defects with open flap debridement (OFD) plus porous titanium granules (PTGs) compared with OFD alone. Sixty-three patients (36 female, 27 male; mean age 58.4 y [SD 12.3]), contributing one circumferential peri-implant intraosseous defect, were included in a multinational, multicenter randomized trial using a parallel-group design. After OFD and surface decontamination using titanium brushes and hydrogen peroxide, 33 defects received PTGs. The implants were not submerged. All patients received adjunctive perioperative systemic antibiotics. The primary outcome variable (defect fill) was assessed on digitalized radiographs. Clinical measurements of probing depth (PPD), bleeding on probing (BoP), suppuration, and plaque were taken by blinded examiners. After 12 mo, the test group (OFD plus PTG) showed a mean radiographic defect fill (mesial/distal) of 3.6/3.6 mm compared with 1.1/1.0 in the control group (OFD). Differences were statistically significant in favor of the test group (P < 0.0001). The OFD plus PTG group showed a mean reduction in PPD of 2.8 mm compared with 2.6 mm in the OFD group. BoP was reduced from 89.4% to 33.3% and from 85.8% to 40.4% for the test and control groups, respectively. There was no significant difference in complete resolution of peri-implantitis (PPD ≤4 mm and no BoP at six implant sites and no further bone loss), because this finding was accomplished at 30% of implants in the test group and 23% of implants in the control group. Reconstructive surgery using PTGs resulted in significantly enhanced radiographic defect fill compared with OFD. However, limitations in the lack of ability to discern biomaterial from osseous tissue could not be verified to determine new bone formation. Similar improvements according to clinical measures were

  11. Esthetic Outcome of Implant Supported Crowns With and Without Peri-Implant Conditioning Using Provisional Fixed Prosthesis: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Furze, David; Byrne, Ashley; Alam, Sonia; Wittneben, Julia-Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    Achieving an optimal esthetic result using dental implants is challenging. Fixed implant-supported provisional crowns are often used to customize the emergence profile and to individualize the surrounding peri-implant soft tissue. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether the use of a provisional implant-supported crown leads to an esthetic benefit on implants that are placed in the esthetic zone. The null hypothesis is that there is no-difference between the two study groups. Twenty single implants (Bone Level, Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland) were inserted in consecutive patients. After reopening, a randomization process assigned them to either cohort group 1: a provisional phase with soft tissue conditioning using the "dynamic compression technique" or cohort group 2: without a provisional. Implants were finally restored with an all-ceramic crown. Follow-up examinations were performed at 3 and 12 months including implant success and survival, clinical, and radiographic parameters. After 1 year all implants successfully integrated, mean values of combined modPES and WES were 16.7 for group 1 and 10.5 for Group 2. This was statistically significant. Mean bone loss after 1 year was -0.09 and -0.08 for groups 1 and 2, respectively, without being statistically significant. A provisional phase with soft tissue conditioning does improve the final esthetic result. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Parameters to Define Peri-implantitis: A Review And A Proposed Multi-Domain Scale.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guo-Hao; Kapila, Yvonne; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2017-09-05

    Peri-implant diseases have received much attention since dental implants are generally used in contemporary dentistry. Several contributing factors associated with the development of peri-implant diseases have also been investigated. The prevalence of peri-implantitis has been reported but with great heterogeneity due to a lack of a universally accepted classification system to define the extent and severity of peri-implantitis. Several parameters, including radiographic bone loss, probing depth, bleeding on probing, and suppuration, have been introduced in these reports aiming to assist with clinical diagnosis. This article aims to provide an objective evaluation of these parameters based on currently available evidence, provide further recommendations, and propose a multi-domain scale for diagnosis of peri-implantitis. Future investigations and modifications may be needed to develop a comprehensive, evidence-based classification system that addresses the multifactorial etiology of peri-implant diseases.

  13. Bone and Soft Tissue Response in Bone-Level Implants Restored with Platform Switching: A 5-Year Clinical Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Lago, Laura; da Silva, Luis; Gude, Francisco; Rilo, Benito

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate radiographic levels of peri-implant bone crest as well as soft tissue response, papilla height, and buccal mucosa recession, in bone-level implants restored with platform switching after 1-year and 5-year follow-ups. This prospective study called for the placement of 59 implants to obtain a target of 90% power. To compensate for possible dropouts, the sample size was adjusted to 67 implants. To assess marginal bone level changes, periapical radiographs were taken at baseline, 1 year, and 5 years after the definitive restorations. Peri-implant soft tissue modifications were evaluated by performing a photographic sequence at 15 days, 1 year, and 5 years after implant restoration. Parameters measured were: (1) distance from the tip of the papilla to the contact point and (2) apicocoronal crown length. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA rank test) was used to compare quantitative data among the three time points studied. Mean marginal bone level changes were as follows: -0.06 ± 0.32 mm from baseline to 1 year, -0.23 ± 0.38 mm from 1 to 5 years, and -0.28 ± 0.45 mm from baseline to 5 years. In bone-level outcomes, no statistically significant differences were found between baseline and 1 year, while the mean differences between 1 and 5 years and baseline and 5 years showed statistically significant differences. In the soft tissue analysis, the distance from the tip of the papilla to the contact point showed the following values: baseline, 2.08 mm; 1 year, 1.54 mm; 5 years, 1.31 mm. No statistically significant differences were found between baseline and 1 year, whereas statistically significant differences between 1 and 5 years and baseline and 5 years were found. Apicocoronal crown length measurements showed the following values: baseline, 9.44 mm; 1 year, 9.28 mm; 5 years, 9.81 mm. No significant differences were found between times studied. This prospective clinical study of 67 bone-level implants restored

  14. Probing at implants with peri-implantitis and its relation to clinical peri-implant bone loss.

    PubMed

    Serino, Giovanni; Turri, Alberto; Lang, Niklaus P

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the probing depth at implants with signs of peri-implantitis before and following the removal of the prosthetic reconstructions and its relation with the peri-implant bone level as revealed by open access flap surgery. Twenty-nine patients with 89 implants with diagnosis of peri-implantitis were included in the study. The probing pocket depth at implants before (PPD-1) and following (PPD-2) the removal of the prosthetic reconstructions was measured at four sites of the implants. These measurements were also analysed in relation to the amount of peri-implant bone loss measured during peri-implant surgery. The results showed that in only 119 (37%) of the sites, the measurements were similar between PPD-1 and PPD-2; in 124 sites (39%), the difference was ±1 mm, in 47 sites (15%) it was ±2 mm and in the rest of the sites it was ±3 mm. A high linear and statistically significant (P = <0.001) correlation between PPD-2 and the bone loss measured at implants for all and single surfaces was observed (r = 0.67, range 0.64-0.69), while PPD-1 yielded a weak and no statistically significant correlation (r = 0.35, range 0.27-0.42). The analysis of the bone loss at implants showed that 59 implants (66%) had an amount of bone loss that was similar at all the four surfaces, while in 30 implants, the bone loss differed for the various sites. A higher extent of bone loss was often detected at the buccal compared with the other sites. The results of this study yielded differences in the pocket probing measurements at implants with or without the prosthetic reconstruction in place and that the probing pocket depth following the removal of the prosthesis had a high correlation with the amount of bone loss at implants assessed during surgery. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Adipose Tissue Engineering for Soft Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jennifer H.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Lee, Kyongbum; Marra, Kacey G.; Rubin, J. Peter; Yoo, James J.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Current treatment modalities for soft tissue defects caused by various pathologies and trauma include autologous grafting and commercially available fillers. However, these treatment methods present a number of challenges and limitations, such as donor-site morbidity and volume loss over time. As such, improved therapeutic modalities need to be developed. Tissue engineering techniques offer novel solutions to these problems through development of bioactive tissue constructs that can regenerate adipose tissue in both structure and function. Recently, a number of studies have been designed to explore various methods to engineer human adipose tissue. This review will focus on these developments in the area of adipose tissue engineering for soft tissue replacement. The physiology of adipose tissue and current surgical therapies used to replace lost tissue volume, specifically in breast tissue, are introduced, and current biomaterials, cell sources, and tissue culture strategies are discussed. We discuss future areas of study in adipose tissue engineering. PMID:20166810

  16. Soft and Hard Tissue Management in Implant Therapy—Part I: Surgical Concepts

    PubMed Central

    D'Addona, Antonio; Ghassemian, Marjan; Raffaelli, Luca; Manicone, Paolo Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Implant therapy has become a reliable and predictable treatment alternative for the replacement of missing teeth with conventional removable and fixed partial dentures. Recently though, in the pursuit for improved esthetics, the literature has dedicated a considerable amount of its research on the successful maintenance and regeneration of the surrounding gingiva and bone, which are lost following extraction of a tooth. Thoroughly analyzing the anatomic situation and well-planned treatment has become a requirement, because incorrectly planned and positioned implants may jeopardize long-term esthetic and functional prognosis. In addition, many types of biocompatible materials, autogenous hard and soft tissue grafts, and different surgical techniques have been developed, and their viability has been investigated. As a result, implant specialists have gained a greater understanding of the dynamics and anatomical and biological concepts of the periodontium and peri-implant tissues both at the surgical and prosthetic phases of treatment, which contributes to better soft and hard tissue management (SHTM). This may further contribute to achieving a superior final result which is obtained by having a harmonious soft tissue profile, a correctly placed and contoured final restoration, and the reestablishment of masticatory function and phonetics. PMID:22829828

  17. Implant maintenance treatment and peri-implant health.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark-Steven

    2017-03-01

    Data sourcesMedline (PubMed), Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register databases and a manual search of the Journal of Dental Research, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Periodontology and the International Journal of Periodontics and Restorative Dentistry from January 2014 to February 2015.Study selectionProspective, retrospective, randomised or not, case-controlled or case series trials showing the incidence or recurrence of peri-implant disease plus or minus PIMT over more than six months.Data extraction and synthesisThree reviewers independently selected studies and abstracted data with two reviewers assessing study quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). A multivariate binomial regression was used to examine the data.ResultsThirteen studies were included with ten contributing to the meta-analysis. The average quality assessment score (NOS) was 5.3 out of a possible nine, only one paper achieved eight. At patient level mucositis ranged from 18.5-74.2% and peri-implantitis from 8-28%, with significant effects being seen for treatment (z= -14.36, p<0.001). Mucositis was affected by history of periodontitis and mean PIMT at implant and patient levels, respectively. For peri-implantitis there were also significant effects of treatment (z = -16.63, p<0.001). Increased peri-implantitis was observed for patients with a history of periodontal disease. (z=3.76, p<0.001). Implants under PIMT have 0.958 the incident event compared to those with no PIMT.ConclusionsWithin the limitations of the present systematic review it can be concluded that implant therapy must not be limited to placement and restoration of dental implants, but to the implementation of PIMT to potentially prevent biological complications and heighten the long-term success rate. Although it must be tailored to a patients risk profiling, our findings suggest reason to claim a minimum recall PIMT interval of five to six

  18. Haplotypes in BMP4 and FGF Genes Increase the Risk of Peri-Implantitis.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Renata Barboza; Gonçalves, Roberto; Villas-Boas, Ricardo de Mello; Bonato, Leticia Ladeira; Quinelato, Valquiria; Pinheiro, Aristides da Rosa; Machado, Aldir; Nunes, Carlos Henrique Ramirez; Gonçalves, Rackel; Vieira, Alexandre Resende; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Casado, Priscila Ladeira

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success of osseointegrated implants, failures have increased significantly, associated with development of peri-implantitis. Multiple factors influence the peri-implant bone loss, including environmental and genetic causes. BMPs (Bone morphogenetic proteins) are growth factors that induce bone formation. FGF (fibroblast growth factors) and their receptors (FGFRs) play important roles by controlling the levels of cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. BMP/FGF relationship is responsible for promoting bone regeneration and bone loss. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between BMP4, FGF3, FGF10 and FGFR1 genes and peri-implant bone loss. Two hundred and fifteen volunteers, with 754 dental implants, were submitted to oral examination and divided in healthy group (n=129) and peri-implantitis group (n=86). Thirteen polymorphisms in BMP4, FGF3, FGF10 and FGFR1 genes were analyzed individually and in haplotype. The chi-square test correlated genotypes, allelic and haplotype frequencies. Values of p<0.05 were considered significant. Volunteers with peri-implantitis demonstrated high incidence of total edentulism (p<0.0001) and thin peri-implant phenotype (p<0.04). Higher incidence of spontaneous bleeding, plaque and implant mobility was observed in peri-implantitis group (p<0.0001 for all). The TT polymorphic genotype for BMP4 rs2761884 was associated with healthy peri-implant (p=0.01). FGF3 rs4631909 (TT+CT genotype) also showed association with the control group (p=0.04). The frequency of C allele for FGF3 rs4631909 showed a tendency for association with peri-implantitis (p=0.08). FGF10 CCTG (p=0.03), BMP4 GAAA (p=0.05) and GGGA (p=0.02) haplotypes were associated with peri-implantitis (p=0.03). Therefore, it may be concluded that BMP4 and FGF10 haplotypes are associated with peri-implantitis.

  19. Prevalence and Possible Risk Factors of Peri-implantitis: A Concept Review.

    PubMed

    Marcantonio, Claudio; Nicoli, Lelis Gustavo; Marcantonio Junior, Elcio; Zandim-Barcelos, Daniela Leal

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to estimate the prevalence of peri-implantitis, as well as to determine possible risk factors associated with its development in patients treated with oral implants. Although implant therapy has been identified as a successful and predictable treatment for partially and fully edentulous patients, complications and failures can occur. Peri-implantitis is considered a biologic complication that results in bone loss around implants and may lead to implant treatment failure. A great variation has been observed in the literature regarding the prevalence of peri-implantitis according to the diagnostic criteria used to define peri-implantitis. The prevalence ranges from 4.7 to 43% at implant level, and from 8.9 to > 56% at patient level. Many risk factors that may lead to the establishment and progression of peri-implantitis have been suggested. There is strong evidence that presence and history of periodontitis are potential risk factors for peri-implantitis. Cigarette smoking has not yet been conclusively established as a risk factor for peri-implantitis, although extra care should be taken with dental implant in smokers. Other risk factors, such as diabetes, genetic traits, implant surface roughness and presence of keratinized mucosa still require further investigation. Peri-implantitis is not an uncommon complication following implant therapy. A higher prevalence of peri-implantitis has been identified for patients with presence or history of periodontal disease and for smokers. Until now, a true risk factor for peri-implantitis has not been established. Supportive maintenance program is essential for the long-term success of treatments with oral implants. The knowledge of the real impact of peri-implantitis on the outcome of treatments with oral implants as well as the identification of risk factors associated to this inflammatory condition are essential for the development of supportive maintenance programs and the establishment of

  20. Stages of Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... soft tissue sarcomas: Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treatment Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment ... Sarcoma Home Page Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treatment Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment ...

  1. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... soft tissue sarcomas: Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treatment Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment ... Sarcoma Home Page Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treatment Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... soft tissue sarcomas: Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treatment Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment ... Sarcoma Home Page Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treatment Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment ...

  3. Clinical and radiographic outcomes of a combined resective and regenerative approach in the treatment of peri-implantitis: a prospective case series.

    PubMed

    Matarasso, Sergio; Iorio Siciliano, Vincenzo; Aglietta, Marco; Andreuccetti, Gianmaria; Salvi, Giovanni E

    2014-07-01

    To assess the clinical and radiographic outcomes applying a combined resective and regenerative approach in the treatment of peri-implantitis. Subjects with implants diagnosed with peri-implantitis (i.e., pocket probing depth (PPD) ≥5 mm with concomitant bleeding on probing (BoP) and ≥2 mm of marginal bone loss or exposure of ≥1 implant thread) were treated by means of a combined approach including the application of a deproteinized bovine bone mineral and a collagen membrane in the intrabony and implantoplasty in the suprabony component of the peri-implant lesion, respectively. The soft tissues were apically repositioned allowing for a non-submerged healing. Clinical and radiographic parameters were evaluated at baseline and 12 months after treatment. Eleven subjects with 11 implants were treated and completed the 12-month follow-up. No implant was lost yielding a 100% survival rate. At baseline, the mean PPD and mean clinical attachment level (CAL) were 8.1 ± 1.8 mm and 9.7 ± 2.5 mm, respectively. After 1 year, a mean PPD of 4.0 ± 1.3 mm and a mean CAL of 6.7 ± 2.5 mm were assessed. The differences between the baseline and the follow-up examinations were statistically significant (P = 0.001). The mucosal recession increased from 1.7 ± 1.5 at baseline to 3.0 ± 1.8 mm at the 12-month follow-up (P = 0.003). The mean% of sites with BoP+ around the selected implants decreased from 19.7 ± 40.1 at baseline to 6.1 ± 24.0 after 12 months (P = 0.032). The radiographic marginal bone level decreased from 8.0 ± 3.7 mm at baseline to 5.2 ± 2.2 mm at the 12-month follow-up (P = 0.000001). The radiographic fill of the intrabony component of the defect amounted to 93.3 ± 13.0%. Within the limits of this study, a combined regenerative and resective approach for the treatment of peri-implant defects yielded positive outcomes in terms of PPD reduction and radiographic defect fill after 12 months. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A

  4. Soft Tissue Stability around Single Implants Inserted to Replace Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A 3D Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, F. G.; Picciocchi, G.; Park, K. B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the soft tissue stability around single implants inserted to replace maxillary lateral incisors, using an innovative 3D method. Methods. We have used reverse-engineering software for the superimposition of 3D surface models of the dentogingival structures, obtained from intraoral scans of the same patients taken at the delivery of the final crown (S1) and 2 years later (S2). The assessment of soft tissues changes was performed via calculation of the Euclidean surface distances between the 3D models, after the superimposition of S2 on S1; colour maps were used for quantification of changes. Results. Twenty patients (8 males, 12 females) were selected, 10 with a failing/nonrestorable lateral incisor (test group: immediate placement in postextraction socket) and 10 with a missing lateral incisor (control group: conventional placement in healed ridge). Each patient received one immediately loaded implant (Anyridge®, Megagen, Gyeongbuk, South Korea). The superimposition of the 3D surface models taken at different times (S2 over S1) revealed a mean (±SD) reduction of 0.057 mm (±0.025) and 0.037 mm (±0.020) for test and control patients, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.069). Conclusions. The superimposition of the 3D surface models revealed an excellent peri-implant soft tissue stability in both groups of patients, with minimal changes registered along time. PMID:27298621

  5. Soft Tissue Stability around Single Implants Inserted to Replace Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A 3D Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mangano, F G; Luongo, F; Picciocchi, G; Mortellaro, C; Park, K B; Mangano, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the soft tissue stability around single implants inserted to replace maxillary lateral incisors, using an innovative 3D method. Methods. We have used reverse-engineering software for the superimposition of 3D surface models of the dentogingival structures, obtained from intraoral scans of the same patients taken at the delivery of the final crown (S1) and 2 years later (S2). The assessment of soft tissues changes was performed via calculation of the Euclidean surface distances between the 3D models, after the superimposition of S2 on S1; colour maps were used for quantification of changes. Results. Twenty patients (8 males, 12 females) were selected, 10 with a failing/nonrestorable lateral incisor (test group: immediate placement in postextraction socket) and 10 with a missing lateral incisor (control group: conventional placement in healed ridge). Each patient received one immediately loaded implant (Anyridge®, Megagen, Gyeongbuk, South Korea). The superimposition of the 3D surface models taken at different times (S2 over S1) revealed a mean (±SD) reduction of 0.057 mm (±0.025) and 0.037 mm (±0.020) for test and control patients, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.069). Conclusions. The superimposition of the 3D surface models revealed an excellent peri-implant soft tissue stability in both groups of patients, with minimal changes registered along time.

  6. Lasers in minimally invasive periodontal and peri-implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Koji; Aoki, Akira; Coluzzi, Donald; Yukna, Raymond; Wang, Chen-Ying; Pavlic, Verica; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    Laser therapy has the potential to be an effective, minimally invasive procedure in periodontal therapy. The aim of the present review was to survey the relevant literature on the clinical application of lasers as a minimally invasive treatment for periodontitis and peri-implant disease. Currently, there are a large number of published clinical studies and case reports that evaluate the adjunctive use of diode, carbon dioxide, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG), erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) and erbium, chromium-doped: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers or antimicrobial photodynamic therapy for nonsurgical and minimally invasive surgical treatment of periodontal pockets. These procedures are expected not only to control inflammation but also to provide biostimulation effects with photonic energy. Recent meta-analyses did not show statistically significant differences in pocket reduction and clinical attachment gain compared with mechanical debridement alone, although limited positive effects of adjunctive laser therapy were reported. At present, systematic literature approaches suggest that more evidence-based studies need to be performed to support the integration of various laser therapies into the treatment of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. The disparity between previous statistical analyses and individual successful clinical outcomes of laser applications might reveal the necessity of developing optimal laser-treatment modalities of different wavelengths and better-defined indications for each protocol. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Microbiota in experimental periodontitis and peri-implantitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Charalampakis, Georgios; Abrahamsson, Ingemar; Carcuac, Olivier; Dahlén, Gunnar; Berglundh, Tord

    2014-09-01

    To analyze the microbial profile around teeth and implants following ligature removal in experimental periodontitis and peri-implantitis in dogs. Four implants with similar geometry and with two different surface characteristics (implant A: turned/implant B: TiUnite; NobelBiocare AB) were placed pairwise in the right side of the mandible 3 months after tooth extraction in five dogs. Experimental periodontitis and peri-implantitis were initiated 3 months later by ligature placement around implants and mandibular premolars and plaque formation. The ligatures were removed after 10 weeks. Microbial samples were obtained using paper points immediately after ligature removal, at 10 and 25 weeks after ligature removal. The microbiological analysis was performed by "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridization, including a panel of 16 bacterial species. The amount of bone loss that occurred during the period following ligature removal was significantly larger at implants with a modified surface than at implants with a turned surface and at teeth. The microbiological analysis revealed that the total bacterial load increased during the period following ligature removal and established an anaerobic Gram-negative microflora. It is suggested that the large variation in regard to the microbial profiles makes interpretation of a correlation between disease progression and microbial profiles difficult. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Peri-Implant Strain in an In Vitro Model.

    PubMed

    Hussaini, Souheil; Vaidyanathan, Tritala K; Wadkar, Abhinav P; Quran, Firas A Al; Ehrenberg, David; Weiner, Saul

    2015-10-01

    An in vitro experimental model was designed and tested to determine the influence that peri-implant strain may have on the overall crestal bone. Strain gages were attached to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) models containing a screw-type root form implant at sites 1 mm from the resin-implant interface. Three different types of crown superstructures (cemented, 1-screw [UCLA] and 2-screw abutment types) were tested. Loading (1 Hz, 200 N load) was performed using a MTS Mechanical Test System. The strain gage data were stored and organized in a computer for statistical treatment. Strains for all abutment types did not exceed the physiological range for modeling and remodeling of cancellous bone, 200-2500 με (microstrain). For approximately one-quarter of the trials, the strain values were less than 200 με the zone for bone atrophy. The mean microstrain obtained was 517.7 με. In conclusion, the peri-implant strain in this in vitro model did not exceed the physiologic range of bone remodeling under axial occlusal loading.

  9. Soft tissue application of lasers.

    PubMed

    Holt, Timothy L; Mann, Fred A

    2002-05-01

    Despite increasing numbers of veterinarians incorporating lasers into their clinical practices, little information has been published about laser clinical applications in soft tissue surgery. This article reviews soft tissue interaction, describes laser equipment and accessories commonly marketed to veterinarians, and discusses clinical applications of the carbon dioxide laser in a systems-based approach. A table of recommended laser tips and settings based on the authors' experiences using a carbon dioxide laser (AccuVet Novapulse LX-20SP, Bothell, WA) is provided.

  10. Intraindividual variation in core microbiota in peri-implantitis and periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Noriko; Maruyama, Fumito; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Aikawa, Chihiro; Izumi, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    The oral microbiota change dramatically with each part of the oral cavity, even within the same mouth. Nevertheless, the microbiota associated with peri-implantitis and periodontitis have been considered the same. To improve our knowledge of the different communities of complex oral microbiota, we compared the microbial features between peri-implantitis and periodontitis in 20 patients with both diseases. Although the clinical symptoms of peri-implantitis were similar to those of periodontitis, the core microbiota of the diseases differed. Correlation analysis revealed the specific microbial co-occurrence patterns and found some of the species were associated with the clinical parameters in a disease-specific manner. The proportion of Prevotella nigrescens was significantly higher in peri-implantitis than in periodontitis, while the proportions of Peptostreptococcaceae sp. and Desulfomicrobium orale were significantly higher in periodontitis than in peri-implantitis. The severity of the peri-implantitis was also species-associated, including with an uncultured Treponema sp. that correlated to 4 clinical parameters. These results indicate that peri-implantitis and periodontitis are both polymicrobial infections with different causative pathogens. Our study provides a framework for the ecologically different bacterial communities between peri-implantitis and periodontitis, and it will be useful for further studies to understand the complex microbiota and pathogenic mechanisms of oral polymicrobial diseases. PMID:25308100

  11. Microbial Profiles and Detection Techniques in Peri-Implant Diseases: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Padial-Molina, Miguel; López-Martínez, Jesús; O’Valle, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To describe the microbial profiles of peri-implant diseases and the main detection methods. Material and Methods A literature search was performed in MEDLINE via PubMed database to identify studies on microbial composition of peri-implant surfaces in humans published in the last 5 years. Studies had to have clear implant status definition for health, peri-implant mucositis and/or peri-implantitis and specifically study microbial composition of the peri-implant sulcus. Results A total of 194 studies were screened and 47 included. Peri-implant sites are reported to be different microbial ecosystems compared to periodontal sites. However, differences between periodontal and peri-implant health and disease are not consistent across all studies, possibly due to the bias introduced by the microbial detection technique. New methods non species-oriented are being used to find ‘unexpected’ microbiota not previously described in these scenarios. Conclusions Microbial profile of peri-implant diseases usually includes classic periodontopathogens. However, correlation between studies is difficult, particularly because of the use of different detection methods. New metagenomic techniques should be promoted for future studies to avoid detection bias. PMID:27833735

  12. Early radiographic diagnosis of peri-implantitis enhances the outcome of peri-implantitis treatment: a 5-year retrospective study after non-surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hee-Yung; Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Jin-Ah; Kim, Young-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This retrospective study evaluated the relationship between the timing of peri-implantitis diagnosis and marginal bone level after a 5-year follow-up of non-surgical peri-implantitis treatment. Methods Thirty-three patients (69 implants) were given peri-implantitis diagnosis in 2008-2009 in Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. Among them, 31 implants from 16 patients were included in this study. They were treated non-surgically in this hospital, and came for regular maintenance visits for at least 5 years after peri-implantitis treatment. Radiographic marginal bone levels at each interval were measured and statistical analysis was performed. Results Timing of peri-implantitis was one of the significant factors affecting initial bone loss and total bone loss not additional bone after peri-implantitis diagnosis. Patients with cardiovascular disease and diabetic mellitus were positively influenced on both initial bone loss and total bone loss. Patients who needed periodontal treatment after implant placement showed a negative effect on bone loss compared to those who needed periodontal treatment before implant placement during entire periods. Implant location also significantly influenced on amounts of bone loss. Mandibular implants showed less bone loss than maxillary implants. Among surgical factors, combined use of autogenous and xenogenic bone graft materials showed a negative effect on bone loss compared to autogenous bone graft materials. Use of membrane negatively affected on initial bone loss but positively on additional bone loss and total bone loss. Thread exposure showed positive effects on initial bone loss and total bone loss. Conclusions Early peri-implantitis diagnosis led to early non-surgical intervention for peri-implantitis treatment, which resulted in the maintenance of the bone level as well as preservation of the implant. Graphical Abstract PMID:26131368

  13. [Soft tissue rheumatism in erderly].

    PubMed

    Szczepański, Leszek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of soft, peri-articular tissues are a common cause of musculoskeletal pain in elderly patients. Nevertheless, most physicians underestimate the role of soft tissue rheumatism in the pathomechanism of the pain. The impairments of soft tissue can not be diagnosed by X-rays examinations, whereas degenerative lesions of joints are easy diagnosed using this method even despite of their uncertain role in producing the symptoms. The incidence of pain syndromes originated from soft tissues differ regarding to the age of patients. In young subjects the incidence of all of them is generally low. Syndromes provoked by overloading during work: repetitive strain syndrome, canal tunnel syndrome, tennis elbow, golfers elbow, shoulder tendon coin disorders and myofascial pain syndrome are common in middle-aged patients. The morbidity of fibromialgia syndrome is also lower in old people probably as the result of diminished numbers and degenerative changes in nociceptive fibers. The syndromes prevailing in elderly patients include trochanteric syndrome and the pain syndromes provoked by muscle spasm depended on posture abnormalities. In the soft tissue pain syndrome prevention adapted to old age kinesitherapy and avoiding muscle overloading are recommended. Soft tissue pain syndromes are usually treated with non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs. In local pain syndromes better results can be obtained by local treatment. Local injections of glikocorticosteroids are usually very effective and safe.

  14. Assessment of dehydrothermally cross‐linked collagen membrane for guided bone regeneration around peri-implant dehiscence defects: a randomized single-blinded clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the clinical feasibility of using dehydrothermally cross‐linked collagen membrane (DCM) for bone regeneration around peri-implant dehiscence defects, and compare it with non-cross-linked native collagen membrane (NCM). Methods Dehiscence defects were investigated in twenty-eight patients. Defect width and height were measured by periodontal probe immediately following implant placement (baseline) and 16 weeks afterward. Membrane manipulation and maintenance were clinically assessed by means of the visual analogue scale score at baseline. Changes in horizontal thickness at 1 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm below the top of the implant platform and the average bone density were assessed by cone-beam computed tomography at 16 weeks. Degradation of membrane was histologically observed in the soft tissue around the implant prior to re-entry surgery. Results Five defect sites (two sites in the NCM group and three sites in the DCM group) showed soft-tissue dehiscence defects and membrane exposure during the early healing period, but there were no symptoms or signs of severe complications during the experimental postoperative period. Significant clinical and radiological improvements were found in all parameters with both types of collagen membrane. Partially resorbed membrane leaflets were only observed histologically in the DCM group. Conclusions These findings suggest that, compared with NCM, DCM has a similar clinical expediency and possesses more stable maintenance properties. Therefore, it could be used effectively in guided bone regeneration around dehiscence-type defects. PMID:26732806

  15. Quality assessment of reporting of animal studies on pathogenesis and treatment of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. A systematic review using the ARRIVE guidelines.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Frank; Iglhaut, Gerhard; Becker, Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    To address the following focused question: What is the quality of reporting of pre-clinical research for the study and treatment of mucositis/peri-implantitis? Electronic databases of the PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for animal studies reporting on pathogenesis or therapy of either peri-implant mucositits or peri-implantitis and completed by dual manual searches in duplicate between 1992 and May 2011. Quality assessment (i.e. grading of a checklist of 20 items in different categories) of selected full-text articles was performed according to the Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) guidelines. Following screening, 75 publications were eligible for the review. For publications reporting on pathogenesis (n = 7) and therapy (n = 1) of peri-implant mucositis, minimum gradings were assigned to items 5 (Methods/Ethical Statement), 9 (Methods/Housing and husbandry), 11 (Methods/Allocation animals to experimental groups), 14 (Results/Baseline data), and 17 (Results/Adverse events). For publications reporting on pathogenesis (n = 34) and therapy (n = 33) of peri-implantitis, minimum grades were mainly assigned to items 9, 11, 14, and 17. This systematic review has identified missing information in the publications on pre-clinical research for the study and treatment of mucositis/peri-implantitis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Peri-implant bone regeneration with calcium sulfate: a light and transmission electron microscopy case report.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Antonio; Orsini, Giovanna; Pecora, Gabriele; Iezzi, Giovanna; Perrotti, Vittoria; Piattelli, Adriano

    2007-06-01

    Calcium sulfate is a simple, biocompatible material with a very long, safe clinical history in several different fields of medicine. It is a rapidly resorbing material that leaves behind calcium phosphate lattice, which promotes bone regeneration. The aim of this study was a histological and ultrastructural evaluation of the tissues in a peri-implant site regenerated with calcium sulfate. The specimens were processed for observation under light and transmission electron microscopes. In light microscopy, trabecular bone was present. No remnants of calcium sulfate were present. Transmission electron microscopy showed, in the areas of the interface with the implant surface, features of mature bone with many osteocytes. An amorphous layer and/or osteoid seam separated this mature bone from the metal surface. The results confirm the high biocompatibility and rapid resorption of calcium sulfate.

  17. Expression of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in soft tissue over ceramic and metal implant materials before uncovering: a clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nickenig, Hans-Joachim; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Wichmann, Manfred; Eitner, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    To compare the effect of ceramic and metal implant materials on the expression pattern of inflammatory cytokines in peri-implant soft tissue. This split-mouth study included patients who received dental implants. In each patient, four different materials were used for the implant cover screws: the ceramic material titanium niobium oxynitride ([Ti,Nb]ON) with plasma-chemical oxidation treatment, (Ti,Nb)ON, a titanium-tantalum alloy, and tantalum. Biopsy specimens of peri-implant tissue were harvested at reentry, 4 months after the initial surgery. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Six patients received a total of 24 dental implants with the four different types of implant cover screws. Quantitative analysis of TNF-α; and IL-6 expression showed the lowest expression of IL-6 (1.5; interquartile range, 0 to 8.5) and TNF-α (4.8; interquartile range, 3.5 to 7.5) in tissue adjacent to the (Ti,Nb)ON layer. In comparison to the metal surfaces, the expression of both cytokines was significantly lower (P = .01 and P = .03). The lowest levels of cytokine expression were observed in tissue adjacent to the ceramic (Ti,Nb)ON coating with plasma-chemical oxidation. Based on the results of this study, this ceramic layer shows promise as a biocompatible material, and further study is warranted.

  18. Trabectedin in soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Petek, Bradley J; Loggers, Elizabeth T; Pollack, Seth M; Jones, Robin L

    2015-02-12

    Soft tissue sarcomas are a group of rare tumors derived from mesenchymal tissue, accounting for about 1% of adult cancers. There are over 60 different histological subtypes, each with their own unique biological behavior and response to systemic therapy. The outcome for patients with metastatic soft tissue sarcoma is poor with few available systemic treatment options. For decades, the mainstay of management has consisted of doxorubicin with or without ifosfamide. Trabectedin is a synthetic agent derived from the Caribbean tunicate, Ecteinascidia turbinata. This drug has a number of potential mechanisms of action, including binding the DNA minor groove, interfering with DNA repair pathways and the cell cycle, as well as interacting with transcription factors. Several phase II trials have shown that trabectedin has activity in anthracycline and alkylating agent-resistant soft tissue sarcoma and suggest use in the second- and third-line setting. More recently, trabectedin has shown similar progression-free survival to doxorubicin in the first-line setting and significant activity in liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma subtypes. Trabectedin has shown a favorable toxicity profile and has been approved in over 70 countries for the treatment of metastatic soft tissue sarcoma. This manuscript will review the development of trabectedin in soft tissue sarcomas.

  19. Effect of Nd:YAG laser-assisted non-surgical mechanical debridement on clinical and radiographic peri-implant inflammatory parameters in patients with peri-implant disease.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Tariq; Javed, Fawad; Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Vohra, Fahim; Romanos, Georgios E

    2017-03-01

    The efficacy of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser-assisted non-surgical mechanical debridement (MD) in the treatment of periimplant diseases remains uninvestigated. The aim was to assess the efficacy of Nd:YAG laser-assisted non-surgical MD on clinical and radiographic periimplant inflammatory parameters in patients with periimplant disease. Treatment wise, 63 male patients with periimplant diseases were divided into 2 groups: Group-1 (32 patients): treatment of periimplant disease using MD alone (control group); and Group-2 (n=31 patients): treatment of periimplant disease using MD with a single application of Nd:YAG laser. Peri-implant inflammatory parameters (plaque index [PI], bleeding on probing [BOP] and probing depth [PD]) were measured at baseline and at 3 and 6months' follow-up. Periimplant crestal bone loss (CBL) was measured at baseline and at 6months' follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskall-Wallis and Bonferroni Post hoc tests. P-values<0.05 were considered statistically significant. In both groups, mean age of patients and baseline scores of periimplant PI, BOP and PD were comparable. At 3-month follow-up, scores of periimplant PI, BOP and PD were higher among patients in Group-1 compared with Group-2. At 6-month follow-up, scores of periimplant PI, BOP and PD were comparable among patients in groups 1 and 2. There was no statistically significant difference in periimplant CBL in both groups at all time intervals. Nd:YAG laser-assisted non-surgical MD is more effective in reducing periimplant soft tissue inflammatory parameters than MD alone in short-term but not in long-term. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Different configuration of socket shield technique in peri-implant bone preservation: An experimental study in dog mandible.

    PubMed

    Guirado, José Luis Calvo; Troiano, Miguel; López-López, P J; Ramírez-Fernandez, María Piedad; de Val, José Eduardo Maté Sánchez; Marin, Jose Manuel Granero; Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the residual root and peri implant bone dimensions on the clinical success of the socket shield technique. Thirty-six dental implants were installed in 6 dogs. The clinical crowns of teeth P3, P4 and M1 were beheaded. Afterwards, the roots were worn down 2-3mm in apical direction until they were located at crestal level. Posterior implant beds were prepared in the center of the roots passing by 3mm apically forming 6 groups in accordance to the remaining root thickness. Radiography of the crestal bone level was performed on day 0 and after 12 weeks. Histomorphometric analyses of the specimens were carried out to measure the crestal bone level, the bone to implant contact and the buccal and lingual bone thickness at the implant shoulder portion. Correlations between groups were analyzed through nonparametric Friedman test, statistical significance was set as p<0.05. All 36 implants were osseointegrated, but 3 samples showed a clinical inflammatory reaction and some radicular fragments presented a small resorption process. On the buccal and lingual side, the radicular fragment was attached to the buccal bone plate by a physiologic periodontal ligament. In the areas where there was space between the implant and the fragment, newly formed bone was demonstrated directly on the implant surface. Within the limitations of an animal pilot study, root-T belt technique may be beneficial in preserving and protecting the bundle bone and preservation of soft tissues. If the thickness of the buccal bone is 3mm, and the thickness of the remaining root fragment is 2mm, the socket shield technique is more predictable and the bone contours can be maintained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical, Immune, and Microbiome Traits of Gingivitis and Peri-implant Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Schincaglia, G P; Hong, B Y; Rosania, A; Barasz, J; Thompson, A; Sobue, T; Panagakos, F; Burleson, J A; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, A; Diaz, P I

    2017-01-01

    Tissues surrounding dental implants and teeth develop clinical inflammation in response to microbial stimuli. However, the literature suggests that differences exist in the microbial insult and inflammatory responses leading to gingivitis and peri-implant mucositis. In this pilot study, the authors use for the first time a systems biology approach to comprehensively evaluate clinical parameters, selected inflammatory markers, and the microbiome of subject-matched tooth and implant sites during native inflammation and in response to experimental plaque accumulation. Fifteen subjects with 2 posterior implants and corresponding contralateral teeth were examined at enrollment; at day 0, after reinstitution of gingival/mucosal health; at days 7, 14, and 21, during stent-mediated oral hygiene (OH) abstention; and at day 42, after resumption of OH. The subgingival microbiome was evaluated via 16S rRNA gene sequencing and 8 selected inflammatory markers measured in crevicular fluid. Comparison of teeth and implants via general linear models based on orthogonal polynomials showed similar responses in clinical parameters, inflammatory mediators, and proportions of individual microbial taxa during OH abstention. Implants, however, accumulated less plaque and underwent more heterogeneous shifts in microbiome structure. A multilevel, within-group, sparse partial least squares analysis of covariation of microbial, inflammatory, and clinical parameters throughout all study visits found inflammation around teeth and implants positively correlated with IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta and with the proportions of Selenomonas, Prevotella, and 5 species-level phylotypes. Gingivitis, however, showed a stronger positive correlation with lactoferrin and IL-1ra and a stronger negative correlation with Rothia. Peri-implant mucositis, on the contrary, correlated positively with certain microbial taxa not associated with gingivitis by a previous study or the current one. In summary, differences

  2. Augmentation of peri-implant bone improves implant stability: quantification using simulated bone loss.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Andreas J; Müller, Ralph; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2012-02-01

    Low bone quality, such as induced by osteoporosis, is considered a main factor leading to failure of fracture fixations. Peri-implant bone augmentation has been proposed as a means of reducing failure rates in osteoporotic bone by improving implant stability. The beneficial effects of pharmacological augmentation of bone in the immediate vicinity of the implant have been demonstrated. Yet, a quantitative understanding of the role of peri-implant bone in implant stability is lacking. Therefore, the aim of our study was to quantify the effects of bone loss and peri-implant bone augmentation on implant stability using image-based finite element analyses. Using a validated model, we simulated how osteoporotic bone loss would affect implant stability in human humeral heads. We also quantified how augmentation of peri-implant bone can enhance implant stability. Our simulations revealed that a 30% reduction in bone mass led to a 50% decrease in implant stability. We also found that peri-implant bone augmentation increased implant stability and that the efficiency of bone augmentation decreased with increasing peri-implant distance. These findings highlight the strong effect that bone loss has on implant fixation and the potential of peri-implant bone augmentation for improving implant anchorage in low quality bone. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  3. Soft tissue laser in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Gracco, Antonio; Tracey, Stephen; Lombardo, Luca; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Today a lot of minor cosmetic surgery operations on the gingiva can easily be carried out directly by the orthodontist with a small quantity of topical anaesthetic and the use of a soft tissue laser. The Diode laser is the most commonly used laser in dentistry for minor surgery to the soft tissues. This kind of laser offers numerous advantages with respect to traditional or electric scalpels. In this article the authors will analyse several typical uses of the diode laser in daily orthodontic practice. Copyright © 2011 Società Italiana di Ortodonzia SIDO. Published by Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  4. What Happens After Treatment for Soft Tissue Sarcomas?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sarcoma After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Soft Tissue Sarcomas? For some people with soft tissue ... for Soft Tissue Sarcoma Stops Working More In Soft Tissue Sarcoma About Soft Tissue Sarcoma Causes, Risk ...

  5. Microbiologic and Clinical Findings of Implants in Healthy Condition and with Peri-Implantitis.

    PubMed

    Canullo, Luigi; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Covani, Ugo; Rossetti, Paulo Henrique Orlato

    2015-01-01

    To compare implants in healthy conditions and implants with peri-implantitis with regard to their clinical parameters and the microbiologic composition at the peri-implant sulcus, inside the implant connection, and the gingival sulcus of neighboring teeth. A cross-sectional study was performed including consecutive patients with implants in healthy conditions and with peri-implantitis. Clinical parameters for which patients were screened included bleeding on probing, pocket depth, and plaque index at six sites. Samples for microbiologic analysis were obtained from three locations: the peri-implant sulcus, inside the implant connection, and the gingival sulcus of neighboring teeth. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out for total counts of 10 microorganisms: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromona gingivalis, Tanerella forsythia, Tanerella denticola, Prevotela intermedia, Peptostreptococcus micros, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus, Eikenella corrodens, and Candida albicans. The response variables were the percentage of positive sites and total bacterial counts. One hundred twenty-two implants in 57 patients were analyzed in the healthy group and 113 implants in 53 patients in the peri-implantitis group. Differences between the groups were statistically significant for bruxism, probing pocket depth, bleeding on probing, and radiographic bone level. Orange complex species (P intermedia, P micros, F nucleatum) were the most prevalent in the three types of sites for both groups, and prevalence values were higher in the peri-implantitis group. Differences in prevalence between groups were more marked inside the connection than in the peri-implant sulcus. Absolute loads of most microbes and total bacterial counts were higher for the peri-implantitis group in the three locations. Again, differences were bigger inside the connection than at the peri-implant sulcus. Significant interactions were found for prevalence

  6. Treating peri-implantitis using a combined regenerative/resective procedure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Brock; Kang, Taeheon

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this article is to describe a combined regenerative/resective procedure used in the treatment of peri-implantitis. The following case presented with excess-cement-induced peri-implantitis and the resulting combined circumferential and buccal dehiscence defect. Surgical therapy consisted of minimal resection of interproximal peaks of bone and subsequent guided bone regeneration. The 12-month clinical result was resolution of peri-implantitis (no pathologic probing depths, bleeding on probing, suppuration), radiographic evidence of bone fill of the defect, and some recession that was clinically acceptable to the patient.

  7. The Efficacy of Supportive Peri-Implant Therapies in Preventing Peri-Implantitis and Implant Loss: a Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ramanauskaite, Ausra; Tervonen, Tellervo

    2016-01-01

    To study the efficacy of supportive peri-implant therapies in preventing clinical and radiological signs of peri-implantitis and implant loss. Longitudinal human studies, published between January 1, 2006, and February 1, 2016, were included based on an electronic search using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and complemented by a manual search. Articles were included only if 1) they comprised a group of patients involved in/adhering to regular supportive peri-implant therapies (SPTs) and a control group without such therapies or with poor adherence to them, 2) the protocol of the SPTs was clearly described and 3) the outcome was indicated by means of clinical/radiological changes or implant loss. After initially identifying a total of 710 titles and abstracts, 12 full text articles were selected for eligibility assessment. Seven studies, three prospective and four retrospective, fulfilled the inclusion criteria for this review. The frequency of recall visits varied between the studies from a minimum of one visit every three months to an individually tailored regimen. In all the studies a lack of SPTs or poor adherence to them resulted in significantly higher frequencies of sites with mucosal bleeding, deepened peri-implant pockets or alveolar bone loss. In line with the above, a lack of/poor adherence to SPTs was associated with higher implant loss. To prevent peri-implantitis, an individually tailored supportive programme based on patient motivation and re-instruction in oral hygiene measures combined with professional implant cleaning seem to be crucial.

  8. Decontamination of dental implant surface in peri-implantitis treatment: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Vera, Pedro; Solá-Ruiz, María F.; Ferrer-García, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Etiological treatment of peri-implantitis aims to reduce the bacterial load within the peri-implant pocket and decontaminate the implant surface in order to promote osseointegration. The aim of this literature review was to evaluate the efficacy of different methods of implant surface decontamination. A search was conducted using the PubMed (Medline) database, which identified 36 articles including in vivo and in vitro studies, and reviews of different decontamination systems (chemical, mechanical, laser and photodynamic therapies). There is sufficient consensus that, for the treatment of peri-implant infections, the mechanical removal of biofilm from the implant surface should be supplemented by chemical decontamination with surgical access. However, more long-term research is needed to confirm this and to establish treatment protocols responding to different implant characterics. Key words:Peri-implantitis, treatment, decontamination, implant surface, laser. PMID:23986023

  9. The Role of Occlusion in the Dental Implant and Peri-implant Condition: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Carmen V.; Harrel, Steve K.; Rossmann, Jeffrey A.; Kerns, David; Gonzalez, Jorge A.; Kontogiorgos, Elias D.; Al-Hashimi, Ibtisam; Abraham, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Dental implants have become a widely used dental treatment approach. It is important to identify factors that can be detrimental to dental implants and the peri-implant complex. There is controversy regarding whether occlusion plays a role in the implant and peri-implant condition. The present study aims to review the scientific literature regarding this topic. Animal and human studies, and previous reviews on the topic are included and presented. There is a wide heterogeneity among study designs. Several articles demonstrated that occlusion and occlusion overload could detrimentally affect the peri-implant condition, while other articles did not support these results. More studies are needed to help understand the mechanisms by which occlusion might play a role in the peri-implant condition. PMID:27990184

  10. [Expression of cytokines in dentogingival sulcus in patients after dental implantation and during development of peri-implantitis].

    PubMed

    Tsarev, V N; Nikolaeva, E N; Ippolitov, E V; Tsareva, T V

    2012-01-01

    Determination of cytokine content in various areas of dentition in patients with peri-implantitis associated with parodontopathogenic bacteria species of I and II order. 32 patients with complications that developed in 3 months to 14 years after installation of intraosteal dental implants were examined. Content of cytokines in various areas of dentition was determined by using solid phase enzyme immunoassay in patients with developed peri-implantitis associated with parodontopathogenic bacteria species of I and II order. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used for determination of parodontopathogenic bacteria marker DNA. Marker DNA of I order parodontopathogenic bacteria - Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia (Bacteroides forsythus), Porphyromonas gingivalis in peri-implantation tissues during implant rejection was detected with 34.4 - 75% frequency while II order (Prevotella intermedia, Treponema denticola, Parvimonas micros (Peptostreptococcus micros), Fusobacterium nucleatum/periodonticum etc.) - with significantly lower frequency. Total concentration of IL- 1beta, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, TNFalpha, IL- 17A and INFgamma in contents of pathological pocket in the area of implants and the levels of each of them were significantly higher than in the contents of parodontal pockets, areas with stable implants and gingival fluid from areas with healthy teeth. Total interleukin content in the contents of pathological pockets in the area of rejected implants was significantly higher than in other studied areas. In the exudate of parodontal pockets of the preserved teeth it was 2.4 times lower, in the area of stable implants - 4.6 times lower, and in the areas with healthy teeth - 4.8 times lower than with rejected implants (p<0.05). The results of the study conducted allow to make a conclusion regard- ing reasonability of monitoring during dental implantation of parodontopathogenic microorganism strains and local cytokine response of

  11. Bone healing dynamics at buccal peri-implant sites.

    PubMed

    Qahash, Mohammed; Susin, Cristiano; Polimeni, Giuseppe; Hall, Jan; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2008-02-01

    It is common belief that immediate implant placement into extraction sites may act to preserve the alveolar process. The objective of this study was to evaluate healing dynamics at buccal peri-implant sites in relation to the dimensions of the alveolar ridge. Bilateral, critical-size, supraalveolar, peri-implant defects were created in 12 male Hound Labrador mongrel dogs following surgical horizontal cut-down of the alveolar ridge. Each jaw quadrant received three 10-mm titanium implants placed 5 mm into extraction sites of the third and fourth premolar teeth leaving 5 mm in a supraalveolar position. The mucoperiosteal flaps were advanced, adapted, and sutured for primary intention healing. Bone fluorescent markers were administered at weeks 3 and 4 postsurgery, and pre-euthanasia. Incandescent, polarized, and fluorescent light microscopies were used to assess the width of the buccal wall of the alveolar ridge and local bone remodeling over the 8-week healing interval. There was a significant association between the width of the buccal alveolar ridge and extent of bone resorption evaluated by incandescent and fluorescent light microscopy. A non-linear association was observed between the buccal ridge width and resorption of the alveolar ridge. A 2-mm threshold was established to account for this non-linearity. The strength of this association was two times greater in specimens with a buccal ridge width <2 mm compared with a wider ridge (beta=1.62 vs. 0.80) observed by fluorescent light microscopy. Accordingly, mean buccal resorption was significantly greater when the ridge width was <2 mm. Fluorescent light microscopy consistently showed greater buccal resorption compared with incandescent light microscopy (P<0.05). Agreement between the examination techniques was low (concordance correlation coefficient=0.49), especially for higher values of buccal resorption. When implants are placed into extraction sites, proximity to the buccal alveolar crest appears a major

  12. Extent and location of bone loss at dental implants in patients with peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Serino, Giovanni; Turri, Alberto

    2011-01-11

    Peri-implantitis is an infectious disease, which leads to loss of supporting bone around dental implants. To evaluate the extent and location of bone loss, 43 patients with peri-implantitis were examined. The bone loss was clinically measured at the time of dental surgery. Data revealed that 25% of subjects had bone loss associated with all their implants although the majority of the subjects had fewer than 50% of their implants affected by bone loss. A total number of 264 implants were examined and 131 of those had peri-implantitis associated bone loss. The pattern of bone loss at implants varied between and within subjects and location in the jaws. The highest proportion of implants with peri-implantitis was found in the upper jaw and within this group, at implants located in the incisor area of the upper jaw; the lowest was the canine area of the lower jaw. The highest proportion of implants that lost ≥ 2/3 of their bone support was found in the incisor area of the maxilla. We concluded that in the presence of peri-implant inflammation, bone quantity and characteristics may influence the progression of peri-implantitis bone loss at dental implants. We hypothesize that the ability of the bone to withstand occlusal forces will be altered as consequence of the loss of bone at the neck of the implants. To achieve an understanding of the local degradation of bone due to peri-implantitis, we need to analyze the microstructure of the bone as well the cellular biology of the peri-implant inflammation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of Peri-implantitis in Medically Compromised Patients and Smokers: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Turri, Alberto; Rossetti, Paulo Henrique Orlato; Canullo, Luigi; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Dahlin, Christer

    2016-01-01

    To verify whether the diversity of systemic medical conditions and smoking act as biologic associated factors for peri-implantitis. The PICO question was: "In patients with osseointegrated dental implants, does the presence of smoking habits or a compromised medical status influence the occurrence of peri-implantitis compared with the presence of good general health?" Smoking and systemic conditions such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, lung diseases, obesity, cancer, deep depression, and osteoporosis were screened. Selection criteria included at least 10 patients per condition, 1 year of follow-up after implant loading, and strict cutoff levels (probing pocket depth [PPD], bleeding on probing [BOP] and/or pus, marginal bone loss) to define peri-implantitis. From the 1,136 records initially retrieved, 57 were selected after title and abstract analyses. However, only six papers were considered for qualitative evaluation. No randomized controlled clinical trial was found. Smoking was associated with peri-implantitis in only one out of four studies. Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes accentuated only PPD and radiographic marginal bone level prevalence rates in peri-implant patients (one study). Cardiovascular disease was considered a risk (one out of two studies). The chance of peri-implant patients harboring the Epstein-Barr virus was threefold in one report. No associations were found for rheumatoid arthritis. Data from existing studies point to smoking and diabetes as biologic associated factors for peri-implantitis. However, the body of evidence is still immature, and the specific contribution of general health problems to peri-implantitis requires additional robust epidemiologic and clinical investigations.

  14. Peri-Implant Crevicular Fluid Analysis, Enzymes and Biomarkers: a Systemetic Review

    PubMed Central

    Dursun, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To review the current understanding of the biomarkers and enzymes associated with different forms peri-implant diseases and how their level changes influence the pathogenesis of the inflammatory diseases around dental implants. Material and Methods An electronic search in two different databases was performed including MEDLINE (PubMed) and EMBASE between 1996 to 2016. Human studies analyse peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF) biomarker and enzyme levels of implants having peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis published in English language, were evaluated. A systematic review was performed to assess which biomarkers and enzymes in PICF were used to identify the inflammatory conditions around dental implants. Results Fifty-one articles were identified of which 41 were further evaluated and included in the analysis. Due to significant heterogeneity between included studies, a meta-analysis could not be performed. Instead, a systematic descriptive review was performed. Conclusions Biomarkers and enzymes in peri-implant crevicular fluid have shown promising results in differentiating from peri-implant disease condition to health. However, due to inconsistent results and acquiring much evidence from cross-sectional studies, additional evidence supported by randomized-controlled trials is needed to validate the links reported. PMID:27833734

  15. Patient-specific Analysis of Periodontal and Peri-implant Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Dabdoub, S.M.; Tsigarida, A.A.; Kumar, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Periodontally involved teeth have been implicated as ‘microbial reservoirs’ in the etiology of peri-implant diseases. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to use a deep-sequencing approach to identify the degree of congruence between adjacent peri-implant and periodontal microbiomes in states of health and disease. Subgingival and peri-implant biofilm samples were collected from 81 partially edentulous individuals with periodontal and peri-implant health and disease. Bacterial DNA was isolated, and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced by pyrotag sequencing. Chimera-depleted sequences were compared against a locally hosted curated database for bacterial identification. Statistical significance was determined by paired Student’s t tests between tooth-implant pairs. The 1.9 million sequences identified represented 523 species. Sixty percent of individuals shared less than 50% of all species between their periodontal and peri-implant biofilms, and 85% of individuals shared less than 8% of abundant species between tooth and implant. Additionally, the periodontal microbiome demonstrated significantly higher diversity than the implant, and distinct bacterial lineages were associated with health and disease in each ecosystem. Analysis of our data suggests that simple geographic proximity is not a sufficient determinant of colonization of topographically distinct niches, and that the peri-implant and periodontal microbiomes represent microbiologically distinct ecosystems. PMID:24158341

  16. Patient-specific analysis of periodontal and peri-implant microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Dabdoub, S M; Tsigarida, A A; Kumar, P S

    2013-12-01

    Periodontally involved teeth have been implicated as 'microbial reservoirs' in the etiology of peri-implant diseases. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to use a deep-sequencing approach to identify the degree of congruence between adjacent peri-implant and periodontal microbiomes in states of health and disease. Subgingival and peri-implant biofilm samples were collected from 81 partially edentulous individuals with periodontal and peri-implant health and disease. Bacterial DNA was isolated, and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced by pyrotag sequencing. Chimera-depleted sequences were compared against a locally hosted curated database for bacterial identification. Statistical significance was determined by paired Student's t tests between tooth-implant pairs. The 1.9 million sequences identified represented 523 species. Sixty percent of individuals shared less than 50% of all species between their periodontal and peri-implant biofilms, and 85% of individuals shared less than 8% of abundant species between tooth and implant. Additionally, the periodontal microbiome demonstrated significantly higher diversity than the implant, and distinct bacterial lineages were associated with health and disease in each ecosystem. Analysis of our data suggests that simple geographic proximity is not a sufficient determinant of colonization of topographically distinct niches, and that the peri-implant and periodontal microbiomes represent microbiologically distinct ecosystems.

  17. Peri-implant disease: what we know and what we need to know

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Peri-implant disease is a serious problem that plagues today's dentistry, both in terms of therapy and epidemiology. With the expansion of the practice of implantology and an increasing number of implants placed annually, the frequency of peri-implant disease has greatly expanded. Its clinical manifestations, in the absence of a globally established classification, are peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, the counterparts of gingivitis and periodontitis, respectively. However, many doubts remain about its features. Official diagnostic criteria, globally recognized by the dental community, have not yet been introduced. The latest studies using metagenomic methods are casting doubt on the assumption of microbial equivalence between periodontal and peri-implant crevices. Research on most of the features of peri-implant disease remains at an early stage; moreover, there is not a commonly accepted treatment for it. In any case, although the evidence so far collected is limited, we need to be aware of the current state of the science regarding this topic to better understand and ultimately prevent this disease. PMID:27382503

  18. A New Classification for the Relationship between Periodontal, Periapical, and Peri-implant Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi; Amid, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are numerous studies supporting the high success rate of dental implants used for reconstruction of missing teeth. However, complications like mucositis and peri-implantitis are increasingly reported. Placement of dental implants in partially edentulous patients is associated with the risk of peri-implant diseases, especially when an old or a new inflammatory lesion is present adjacent to the implant site. Although no consensus has been reached on the difference in prevalence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis between fully and partially edentulous patients, available data clearly show that the combination of periodontal lesion and peri-implantitis is a possible risk factor for further complications. Several classification systems have been suggested for determination of the severity of disease around dental implants. However, no classification has been proposed for combined biological complications around teeth and implants. This study reviews the possible pathologic communication routes between natural dentition and the implants installed adjacent to them. Furthermore, we introduce a new classification system for the peri-implant disease in association with natural teeth called “PIST”. This system was designed based on the origin of the defects in order to clarify the different pathological situations which can be detected around dental implant. Using this classification system can help improve diagnosis, comparison and subsequent selection of the best treatment option. PMID:23922570

  19. Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Treatment Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  20. Drugs Approved for Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Soft Tissue Sarcoma This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... not listed here. Drugs Approved for Soft Tissue Sarcoma Cosmegen (Dactinomycin) Dactinomycin Doxorubicin Hydrochloride Eribulin Mesylate Gleevec ( ...

  1. [Radiotherapy of adult soft tissue sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Le Péchoux, C; Moureau-Zabotto, L; Llacer, C; Ducassou, A; Sargos, P; Sunyach, M P; Thariat, J

    2016-09-01

    Incidence of soft tissue sarcoma is low and requires multidisciplinary treatment in specialized centers. The objective of this paper is to report the state of the art regarding indications and treatment techniques of main soft tissue sarcoma localisations.

  2. Soft Tissue Response to Titanium Abutments with Different Surface Treatment: Preliminary Histologic Report of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Canullo, Luigi; Dehner, Jan Friedrich; Penarrocha, David; Checchi, Vittorio; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary prospective RCT was to histologically evaluate peri-implant soft tissues around titanium abutments treated using different cleaning methods. Sixteen patients were randomized into three groups: laboratory customized abutments underwent Plasma of Argon treatment (Plasma Group), laboratory customized abutments underwent cleaning by steam (Steam Group), and abutments were used as they came from industry (Control Group). Seven days after the second surgery, soft tissues around abutments were harvested. Samples were histologically analyzed. Soft tissues surrounding Plasma Group abutments predominantly showed diffuse chronic infiltrate, almost no acute infiltrate, with presence of few polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes, and a diffuse presence of collagenization bands. Similarly, in Steam Group, the histological analysis showed a high variability of inflammatory expression factors. Tissues harvested from Control Group showed presence of few neutrophil granulocytes, moderate presence of lymphocytes, and diffuse collagenization bands in some sections, while they showed absence of acute infiltrate in 40% of sections. However, no statistical difference was found among the tested groups for each parameter (p > 0.05). Within the limit of the present study, results showed no statistically significant difference concerning inflammation and healing tendency between test and control groups. PMID:27366741

  3. Exercise and soft tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Hart, L E

    1994-02-01

    Once the almost exclusive domain of the orthopaedic surgeon, sports injuries are now being seen with increasing frequency by other specialists, including rheumatologists. It is therefore important for rheumatologists to be able to diagnose and manage the various musculoskeletal conditions that are associated with physical activity. Soft tissue injuries are a very common cause of morbidity in both competitive and recreational athletes. Most of these conditions are provoked by muscle-tendon overload (or overuse) that is usually the result of excessive training or improper training techniques. However, despite an emerging literature on the natural history of soft tissue overuse syndromes, relatively little is known about the causes, incidence and outcome of many of these injuries. Of the methodologically robust epidemiological studies that have been done, most have focused on habitual distance runners. In this population, it has been reported that the incidence of injury can be as high as 50% or more, and that overtraining and the presence of previous injury are the most significant predictors of future injury. In other popular forms of exercise, such as walking, swimming, cycling, aerobics and racquet sports, injuries are also reported with high frequency but, to date, no prospective studies have examined actual incidences in these populations, and risk factors for injury in these activities remain speculative. Several of the more commonly occurring soft tissue injuries (such as rotator cuff tendinitis, lateral and medial epicondylitis, patellar tendinitis, the iliotibial band friction syndrome, Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis) exemplify the overuse concept and are therefore highlighted in this review. The management of these, and most other, exercise-related soft tissue injuries is directed towards promptly restoring normal function and preventing re-injury.

  4. Clinical and microbiological findings in patients with peri-implantitis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Canullo, Luigi; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Covani, Ugo; Botticelli, Daniele; Serino, Giovanni; Penarrocha, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze clinical and microbiological characters in subjects and implants affected and not affected by peri-implantitis. Additionally, same features were analyzed also intra-individually, comparing healthy and diseased implants within the same subject. A total of 534 patients who received at least 1 implant and coming to routine check-up or spontaneous visits at the University of Valencia were recruited. Clinical parameters including Bleeding on probing (BoP), Probing pocket depth (PPD), and Pi were screened. Samples for microbiological analysis were obtained from three locations: peri-implant sulci (PIS), inner parts of the implant connections (I), and gingival sulci of neighboring teeth (GS). Quantitative real-time PCR was performed for total counts of 10 microorganisms. A total of 534 patients with 1507 dental implants were analyzed. The prevalence of peri-implantitis was found 10.3% for patients and 7.3% for implants. Higher percentage of healthy periodontal subjects were found in the non-peri-implantitis group. The analysis within the 53 patients affected by peri-implantitis revealed that the implants affected by peri-implantitis presented a higher percentage of plaque, BoP, and number of implants presenting <2 mm attached gingiva. Additionally, more cemented crowns and implants inserted in bone-augmented sites were found among the diseased implants. The microbiologic analysis presented no relevant differences between the analysis at the peri-implant sulcus (PIS) and the connections inside the abutments surfaces (PI). The microbial composition at the neighboring teeth (GS) resembled the composition found at the PIS with a high frequency of Pg, Tf, Pi, PM, and Ec. The results of this study seem to indicate that inadequate oral hygiene and the presence of bleeding from the gingiva/mucosa in patients with dental implant were associated with an higher prevalence of peri-implantitis; moreover, in the patients affected by peri-implantitis

  5. Occult peri-implant oroantral fistulae: posterior maxillary peri-implantitis/sinusitis of zygomatic or dental implant origin. Treatment and prevention with bone morphogenetic protein-2/absorbable collagen sponge sinus grafting.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ole T; Adams, Mark; Cottam, Jared R; Ringeman, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Sinus floor grafting with bone morphogenetic protein-2 for transsinus implant placement or as a salvage technique for sinus-involved peri-implantitis has been found to be successful. Transsinus implants for All-on-Four treatment, zygomatic implants including quad zygomatics, and infected transsinus implants underwent peri-implant grafting, which was found to seal off the sinus cavity from the oral cavity in an effort to prevent or treat sinusitis/peri-implantitis.

  6. Management of soft tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Edlich, R F; Rodeheaver, G T; Thacker, J G; Winn, H R; Edgerton, M T

    1977-04-01

    The fate of a surgical wound is held in a delicate balance between the host's resistance to infection and the causal factors of infection. Considerable insight into this relationship between the host and pathogen can be gained from the results of quantitative bacteriologic measurements. Newer rapid slide techniques have been developed which provide the surgeon with this information within 20 minutes. In most soft tissue injuries, the wound bacterial count gives an accurate prediction of subsequent infection. Wounds combining greater than 10(5) bacteria per gram of tissue are destined to develop infection. When the bacterial count is below that level, the wounds will usually heal per primam without infection. This large number of bacteria required to elicit infection reflects the remarkable ability of soft tissues to resist infection. This state of high resistance to infection can be reduced by several factors which include circulatory embarrassment, tissue injury, dead space, and the presence of foreign bodies (dirt, sutures, drains, etc.). When treating soft tissue injuries, the surgeon must employ specific therapeutic modalities that allow the wound to heal per primam without infection. On the basis of experimental studies supported by clinical experience, the following treatment protocol for soft tissue injuries is recommended. Using strict aseptic technique, the wound must be first anesthetized with 1 per cent Xylocaine to permit painless sound cleansing. All wounds should be subjected to high pressure syringe irrigation to remove bacteria, foreign bodies, and blood clots. When necessary, debridement of all devitalized tissue should be performed with a stainless steel scalpel. Many wounds caused by sharp wounding agents contain no foreign bodies and few bacteria and exhibit considerable resistance to infection. In these wounds, primary closure can be initiated after irrigation without the development of infection. Wounds resulting from impact forces have a

  7. Peri-implant evaluation of osseointegrated implants subjected to orthodontic forces: results after three years of functional loading

    PubMed Central

    Marins, Bruna de Rezende; Pramiu, Suy Ellen; Busato, Mauro Carlos Agner; Marchi, Luiz Carlos; Togashi, Adriane Yaeko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The objective of this study was to clinically and radiographically assess the peri-implant conditions of implants used as orthodontic anchorage. Methods: Two groups were studied: 1) a test group in which osseointegrated implants were used as orthodontic anchorage, with the application of 200-cN force; and 2) a control group in which implants were not subjected to orthodontic force, but supported a screw-retained prosthesis. Clinical evaluations were performed three, six and nine months after prosthesis installation and 1- and 3-year follow-up examinations. Intraoral periapical radiographs were obtained 30 days after surgical implant placement, at the time of prosthesis installation, and one, two and three years thereafter. The results were compared by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in clinical probing depth (p = 0.1078) or mesial and distal crestal bone resorption (p = 0.1832) during the study period. After three years of follow-up, the mean probing depth was 2.21 mm for the control group and 2.39 mm for the test group. The implants of the control group showed a mean distance between the bone crest and implant shoulder of 2.39 mm, whereas the implants used as orthodontic anchorage showed a mean distance of 2.58 mm at the distal site. Conclusion: Results suggest that the use of stable intraoral orthodontic anchorage did not compromise the health of peri-implant tissues or the longevity of the implant. PMID:27275618

  8. Histologic and biomechanical evaluation of the effects of implant insertion torque on peri-implant bone healing.

    PubMed

    Consolo, Ugo; Travaglini, Domenico; Todisco, Marzio; Trisi, Paolo; Galli, Silvia

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate histologically and biomechanically the peri-implant bone healing around implants placed with high torque after a follow-up of 8 and 12 weeks. A total of 12 implants were placed in the lower edge of the mandible of 2 sheep. In each sheep, 3 implants were placed with a low torque (<25 N · cm, LT group) as a control, and 3 implants were placed with a high insertion torque (maximum torque, HT group). The sheep were killed after 8 and 12 weeks of healing, and the implants were examined for removal torque, resonance frequency analysis, and histologic analysis.The mean insertion torque in the LT group was 24 N · cm, whereas it was 105.6 N · cm in HT. All the implants osseointegrated and histologic analysis showed similar aspects of the peri-implant bone tissue for both groups and both healing times. Mean removal torque values for LT implants were 159.5 and 131.5 N · cm after 8 and 12 weeks, respectively, whereas those for the HT were 140 and 120 N · cm at 8 and 12 weeks, respectively. Implant stability quotient values were 26.6 and 76 for the LT group and 74 and 76 for the HT group at 8 and 12 weeks, respectively.It could be concluded that high implant insertion torque does not induce adverse reaction in cortical bone and does not lead to implant failure.

  9. Effects of local administration of growth hormone in peri-implant bone: an experimental study with implants in rabbit tibiae.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Isabel F; Blanco, Luis; Clemente, Celia; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the qualitative and quantitative differences that could appear in newly formed peri-implant bone around Screw-Vent implants placed in rabbit tibiae when treated with local administration of growth hormone (GH). Eight New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups: the experimental group, which received 4 IU of GH in the form of lyophilized powder added to the ostectomy site before implant placement, and the control group, which did not receive GH before implant placement. Animals were sacrificed 2 weeks later, and histologic sections were obtained for histomorphometry and observation under light microscopy. The sections in the GH-treated group presented enhanced growth of new trabeculae from the periosteal tissue, and the bone-to-implant contact in the experimental group was significantly greater (P < .05). Local administration of GH stimulated a more dramatic effect than that seen previously with systemic GH administration, prompting growth from both the periosteum and endosteum. Local administration of GH at the time of implant placement could enhance peri-implant bone reaction.

  10. Comparative analysis of proteomic profiles between endometrial caruncular and intercaruncular areas in ewes during the peri-implantation period

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The endometrium of sheep consists of plenty of raised aglandular areas called caruncular (C), and intensely glandular intercaruncular areas (IC). In order to better understand the endometrium involved mechanisms of implantation, we used LC-MS/MS technique to profile the proteome of ovine endometrial C areas and IC areas separately during the peri-implantation period, and then compared the proteomic profiles between these two areas. We successfully detected 1740 and 1813 proteins in C areas and IC areas respectively. By comparing the proteome of these two areas, we found 170 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) (P < 0.05), functional bioinformatics analysis showed these DEPs were mainly involved in growth and remodeling of endometrial tissue, cell adhesion and protein transport, and so on. Our study, for the first time, provided a proteomic reference for elucidating the differences between C and IC areas, as an integrated function unit respectively, during the peri-implantation period. The results could help us to better understand the implantation in the ewes. In addition, we established a relatively detailed protein database of ovine endometrium, which provide a unique reference for further studies. PMID:24093944

  11. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of the effects of implant diameter and photofunctionalization on peri-implant stress.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Tetsuo; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Shibuya, Norio; Tadokoro, Satomi; Nakabayashi, Shinya; Namaki, Shunsuke; Hara, Yaeko; Ogawa, Takahiro; Ishigami, Tomohiko

    2017-01-01

    Previous finite element analyses of peri-implant stress assumed a bone-implant contact (BIC) ratio of 100%, even though the BIC ratio is known to be approximately 50% or less. However, the recent development of ultraviolet treatment of titanium immediately before use, known as photofunctionalization, significantly increased the BIC ratio, to 98.2%. We used a unique finite element analysis model that enabled us to examine the effects of different BIC ratios on peri-implant stress. A three-dimensional model was constructed under conditions of vertical or oblique loading, an implant diameter of 3.3, 3.75, or 5.0 mm, and a BIC ratio of 53.0% or 98.2%. Photofunctionalization and larger implant diameters were associated with reduced stress on surrounding tissues. Under vertical loading, photofunctionalization had a greater effect than increased implant diameter on stress reduction. Under oblique loading, increased implant diameter had a greater effect than photofunctionalization on stress reduction.

  12. Effect of different lateral occlusion schemes on peri-implant strain: A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Lo, Jennifer; Abduo, Jaafar; Palamara, Joseph

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of four different lateral occlusion schemes and different excursions on peri-implant strains of a maxillary canine implant. Four metal crowns with different occlusion schemes were attached to an implant in the maxillary canine region of a resin model. The included schemes were canine-guided (CG) occlusion, group function (GF) occlusion, long centric (LC) occlusion, and implant-protected (IP) occlusion. Each crown was loaded in three sites that correspond to maximal intercuspation (MI), 1 mm excursion, and 2 mm excursion. A load of 140 N was applied on each site and was repeated 10 times. The peri-implant strain was recorded by a rosette strain gauge that was attached on the resin model buccal to the implant. For each loading condition, the maximum shear strain value was calculated. The different schemes and excursive positions had impact on the peri-implant strains. At MI and 1 mm positions, the GF had the least strains, followed by IP, CG, and LC. At 2 mm, the least strains were associated with GF, followed by CG, LC, and IP. However, regardless of the occlusion scheme, as the excursion increases, a linear increase of peri-implant strains was detected. The peri-implant strain is susceptible to occlusal factors. The eccentric location appears to be more influential on peri-implant strains than the occlusion scheme. Therefore, adopting an occlusion scheme that can reduce the occurrence of occlusal contacts laterally may be beneficial in reducing peri-implant strains.

  13. Non-Surgical Therapy for Peri-Implant Diseases: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-López del Amo, Fernando; Yu, Shan-Huey

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this paper was to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of non-surgical therapy for the treatment of peri-implant diseases including both, mucositis and peri-implantitis lesions. Material and Methods An electronic search in two different databases was performed including MEDLINE (PubMed) and EMBASE from 2011 to 2016. Human studies reporting non-surgical treatment of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis with more than 10 implants and at least 6 months follow up published in English language were evaluated. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the different methods of decontamination employed in the included investigations. Risk of bias assessment was elaborated for included investigations. Results Twenty-five articles were identified of which 14 were further evaluated and included in the analysis. Due to significant heterogeneity in between included studies, a meta-analysis could not be performed. Instead, a systematic descriptive review was performed. Included investigations reported the used of different methods for implant decontamination, including self-performed cleaning techniques, and professionally delivered treatment such as laser, photodynamic therapy, supra-/sub-mucosal mechanical debridement, and air-abrasive devices. Follow-up periods ranged from 6 to 60 months. Conclusions Non-surgical treatment for peri-implant mucositis seems to be effective while modest and not-predictable outcomes are expected for peri-implantitis lesions. Limitations include different peri-implant diseases definitions, treatment approaches, as well as different implant designs/surfaces and defect characteristics. PMID:27833738

  14. The Microbiologic Profile Associated with Peri-Implantitis in Humans: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rakic, Mia; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Canullo, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    To qualitatively investigate the microbiologic profile in peri-implantitis by systematically reviewing the published literature on peri-implant infection. Searches of the US National Institutes of Health free digital archives of the biomedical and life sciences journal literature (PubMed) and The Cochrane Library of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL), as well as a hand search of other literature, were conducted to identify articles potentially relevant for the review. Randomized clinical trials, prospective cohort studies, longitudinal studies, case-control studies, and cross-sectional studies in humans reporting microbiologic findings in patients with diagnosed peri-implantitis were considered eligible for this review. Screening, data extraction, and quality assessment were conducted independently and in duplicate. Twenty-one articles were eligible for inclusion in this review. Early studies focused on the identification of target periopathogens, whereas more recent studies used advanced molecular techniques for comprehensive overview of the peri-implantitis-associated microbiome. In summary, the microbiologic profile in peri-implantitis (1) is complex and variable, (2) consists of gram-negative anaerobic periopathogens and opportunistic microorganisms in almost the same ratio, (3) is frequently associated with the Epstein-Barr virus and nonsaccharolytic anaerobic gram-positive rods, (4) is not so strictly associated with Staphylococcus aureus, and (5) is different from that of periodontitis. A meta-analysis could not be performed because of the heterogeneity of the reviewed studies. Although a comparison of the published results was limited because of the inhomogeneity of the studies, it is clear that the microbiologic profile of peri-implantitis consists of aggressive and resistant microorganisms and is distinct from that of periodontitis. It seems that the quantitative characteristics of the microflora cohabitants represent the key determinant of disease

  15. Effect of different lateral occlusion schemes on peri-implant strain: A laboratory study

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jennifer; Palamara, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aims to investigate the effects of four different lateral occlusion schemes and different excursions on peri-implant strains of a maxillary canine implant. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four metal crowns with different occlusion schemes were attached to an implant in the maxillary canine region of a resin model. The included schemes were canine-guided (CG) occlusion, group function (GF) occlusion, long centric (LC) occlusion, and implant-protected (IP) occlusion. Each crown was loaded in three sites that correspond to maximal intercuspation (MI), 1 mm excursion, and 2 mm excursion. A load of 140 N was applied on each site and was repeated 10 times. The peri-implant strain was recorded by a rosette strain gauge that was attached on the resin model buccal to the implant. For each loading condition, the maximum shear strain value was calculated. RESULTS The different schemes and excursive positions had impact on the peri-implant strains. At MI and 1 mm positions, the GF had the least strains, followed by IP, CG, and LC. At 2 mm, the least strains were associated with GF, followed by CG, LC, and IP. However, regardless of the occlusion scheme, as the excursion increases, a linear increase of peri-implant strains was detected. CONCLUSION The peri-implant strain is susceptible to occlusal factors. The eccentric location appears to be more influential on peri-implant strains than the occlusion scheme. Therefore, adopting an occlusion scheme that can reduce the occurrence of occlusal contacts laterally may be beneficial in reducing peri-implant strains. PMID:28243391

  16. The Efficacy of Supportive Peri-Implant Therapies in Preventing Peri-Implantitis and Implant Loss: a Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ramanauskaite, Ausra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To study the efficacy of supportive peri-implant therapies in preventing clinical and radiological signs of peri-implantitis and implant loss. Material and Methods Longitudinal human studies, published between January 1, 2006, and February 1, 2016, were included based on an electronic search using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and complemented by a manual search. Articles were included only if 1) they comprised a group of patients involved in/adhering to regular supportive peri-implant therapies (SPTs) and a control group without such therapies or with poor adherence to them, 2) the protocol of the SPTs was clearly described and 3) the outcome was indicated by means of clinical/radiological changes or implant loss. Results After initially identifying a total of 710 titles and abstracts, 12 full text articles were selected for eligibility assessment. Seven studies, three prospective and four retrospective, fulfilled the inclusion criteria for this review. The frequency of recall visits varied between the studies from a minimum of one visit every three months to an individually tailored regimen. In all the studies a lack of SPTs or poor adherence to them resulted in significantly higher frequencies of sites with mucosal bleeding, deepened peri-implant pockets or alveolar bone loss. In line with the above, a lack of/poor adherence to SPTs was associated with higher implant loss. Conclusions To prevent peri-implantitis, an individually tailored supportive programme based on patient motivation and re-instruction in oral hygiene measures combined with professional implant cleaning seem to be crucial. PMID:27833737

  17. Can peri-implant crevicular fluid assist in the diagnosis of peri-implantitis? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Faot, Fernanda; Nascimento, Gustavo G; Bielemann, Amália M; Campão, Thiago D; Leite, Fábio R M; Quirynen, Marc

    2015-05-01

    A broader understanding of the immune inflammatory profile of peri-implant diseases could be helpful in the development of host-targeted preventive and therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study is to answer two clinical questions: 1) whether patients with peri-implantitis (PP) present higher prevalence of any specific inflammatory cytokine in peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF) compared with healthy patients; and 2) whether local inflammation measured in PICF can be used as a predictor for incipient PP. A systematic review of the literature on the most common cytokines released in PICF in healthy and PP-affected sites was conducted from 1996 up to and including October 2013 using predefined search strategies. Cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal studies were considered. Meta-analyses were done separately for healthy, mucositis (MU), and PP outcomes. Interleukin (IL)-1β was the most studied cytokine (n = 12), followed by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (n = 10). Other cytokines were also linked to PP, such as IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-17. Statistical differences were revealed when IL-1β release was compared between healthy implant sites and PP (P = 0.001) or MU sites (P = 0.002), respectively; when PP and MU were compared, no statistical differences could be detected (P = 0.80). For TNF-α release, significant differences were found between healthy and PP implants (P = 0.02). PICF containing inflammatory mediators, such as IL-1β and TNF-α, can be used as additional criteria for a more robust diagnosis of peri-implant infection. Additionally, once the inflammatory process is installed, no differences were found between peri-implant MU and PP.

  18. A biological model for the regulation of peri-implantational hemostasis and menstruation.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, C J; Schatz, F

    1996-01-01

    To delineate the physiologic mechanisms whereby the human endometrium maintains hemostasis during endovascular trophoblast invasion but permits menstrual hemorrhage. Experimental results are presented that are relevant to developing a comprehensive biological model for studying peri-implantational hemostasis and menstruation. A marked increase in the expression of tissue factor (TF) and type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) and an inhibition of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators (tPA and uPA, respectively), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression accompany progestin-induced decidualization of estrogen-primed endometrial stromal cells both in vivo and in vitro. The presence of these important regulators of hemostasis, fibrinolysis, extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover, and vascular tone in decidualized human stromal cells and decidual cells isolated from gestational endometrium suggests a mechanism to explain the absence of hemorrhage during invasion of the endometrial vasculature by trophoblasts. Conversely, progesterone withdrawal reduces TF and PAI-1 expression and increases tPA, uPA, MMP, and ET-1 expression accounting for the hemorrhage, enhanced fibrinolysis, ECM degradation, and ischemic spiral arterial vascular injury characterizing menstruation. Perivascular decidualized endometrial stromal cells are spatially and temporally positioned to promote endometrial hemostasis during implantation but, paradoxically, promote the hemorrhage of menstruation via their hormone-regulated expression of hemostatic, proteolytic, and vasoactive proteins.

  19. Concomitant Correction of a Soft-Tissue Fenestration with Keratinised Tissue Augmentation By Using A Rotated Double-Pedicle Flap During Second-Stage Implant Surgery- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Aileni Amarender; Kumar, P. Anoop; Sailaja, Sistla; Chakravarthy, Yshs

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue deficiencies and defects around dental implants have been observed frequently. Soft-tissue defects after implant procedures originate from the process of modelling of periimplant mucosa and often cause aesthetic disharmony, food debris accumulation and soft tissue shrinkage. Periimplant mucogingival surgery focuses on creating an optimum band of keratinized tissue resulting in soft tissue architecture similar to the gingiva around natural teeth. A 23-year-old male reported to the Department of Periodontology with a complaint of gum soreness, foul smell and food accumulation at a site where a 3.75 x 11.5mm implant was placed previously. On clinical examination, fenestration of tissue above the cover screw was observed and there appeared to be a keratinized tissue of 1mm surrounding the implant. The case was managed by use of a rotated double-pedicle flap during second-stage implant surgery to correct the soft-tissue fenestration defect and to obtain a keratinized periimplant soft tissue. A periosteal bed was prepared by giving a horizontal incision at the mucogingival junction to a depth of 4 mm. Two split-thickness keratinized pedicles were dissected from the mesial and distal interproximal tissues near the implant. After rotation, both the pedicles were sutured to each other mid-buccally and the pedicles were rigidly immobilized with sutures. At 1 month, there was a 3mm band of stable and firm keratinized tissue over the underlying tissues. The procedure resulted in an aesthetic improvement due to enhanced soft tissue architecture and optimum integration between the peri-implant soft tissue and the final prosthesis. PMID:26816998

  20. Dimensional changes in soft tissues around dental implants following free gingival grafting: an experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bengazi, Franco; Lang, Niklaus P; Caroprese, Marino; Urbizo Velez, Joaquin; Favero, Vittorio; Botticelli, Daniele

    2015-02-01

    To study the buccal dimensional tissue changes at oral implants following free gingival grafting, with or without including the keratin layer, performed at the time of implant installation into alveolar mucosa. The mandibular premolars and first molars were extracted bilaterally in six Beagle dogs. In the right side of the mandible (Test), flaps were first elevated, and the buccal as well as part of the lingual masticatory mucosa was removed. An incision of the periosteum at the buccal aspect was performed to allow the flap to be coronally repositioned. Primary wound closure was obtained. In the left side, the masticatory (keratinized) mucosa was left in situ, and no sutures were applied (Control). After 3 months of healing, absence of keratinized mucosa was confirmed at the test sites. Two recipient sites were prepared at each side of the mandible in the region of the third and fourth premolars. All implants were installed with the shoulder placed flush with the buccal alveolar bony crest, and abutments were connected to allow a non-submerged healing. Two free gingival mucosal grafts were harvested from the buccal region of the maxillary canines. One graft was left intact (gingival mucosal graft), while for the second, the epithelial layer was removed (gingival connective tissue graft). Subsequently, the grafts were fixed around the test implants in position of the third and fourth premolars, respectively. After 3 months, the animals were euthanized and ground sections obtained. Similar bony crest resorption and coronal extension of osseointegration were found at test and control sites. Moreover, similar dimensions of the peri-implant soft tissues were obtained at test and control sites. The increase in the alveolar mucosal thickness by means of a gingival graft affected the peri-implant marginal bone resorption and soft tissue recession around implants. This resulted in outcomes that were similar to those at implants surrounded by masticatory mucosa, indicating

  1. Erythritol-Enriched Air-Polishing Powder for the Surgical Treatment of Peri-Implantitis.

    PubMed

    Taschieri, Silvio; Weinstein, Roberto; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Corbella, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis represents a major complication that can compromise the success and survival of implant-supported rehabilitations. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatment protocols were proposed to improve clinical parameters and to treat implants affected by peri-implantitis. A systematic review of the literature was performed on electronic databases. The use of air-polishing powder in surgical treatment of peri-implantitis was investigated. A total of five articles, of different study designs, were included in the review. A meta-analysis could not be performed. The data from included studies reported a substantial benefit of the use of air-polishing powders for the decontamination of implant surface in surgical protocols. A case report of guided bone regeneration in sites with implants affected by peri-implantitis was presented. Surgical treatment of peri-implantitis, though demanding and not supported by a wide scientific literature, could be considered a viable treatment option if an adequate decontamination of infected surfaces could be obtained.

  2. Erythritol-Enriched Air-Polishing Powder for the Surgical Treatment of Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Taschieri, Silvio; Weinstein, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis represents a major complication that can compromise the success and survival of implant-supported rehabilitations. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatment protocols were proposed to improve clinical parameters and to treat implants affected by peri-implantitis. A systematic review of the literature was performed on electronic databases. The use of air-polishing powder in surgical treatment of peri-implantitis was investigated. A total of five articles, of different study designs, were included in the review. A meta-analysis could not be performed. The data from included studies reported a substantial benefit of the use of air-polishing powders for the decontamination of implant surface in surgical protocols. A case report of guided bone regeneration in sites with implants affected by peri-implantitis was presented. Surgical treatment of peri-implantitis, though demanding and not supported by a wide scientific literature, could be considered a viable treatment option if an adequate decontamination of infected surfaces could be obtained. PMID:26065025

  3. In vitro color changes of soft tissues caused by restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ronald E; Sailer, Irena; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Attin, Thomas; Schmidlin, Patrick

    2007-06-01

    A crucial factor influencing implant esthetics is the color of the peri-implant mucosa. This in vitro study analyzed the effect of titanium and zirconia with and without veneering ceramic on the color of mucosa of three different thicknesses. Ten pig maxillae were used, and the palatal area was chosen as the test region. To simulate different mucosa thicknesses, connective tissue grafts, 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm thick, were harvested from three additional jaws. Defined mucosa thicknesses were created by placing the grafts under a palatal mucosa flap. Four different test specimens (titanium, titanium veneered with feldspathic ceramic, zirconia, and zirconia veneered with feldspathic ceramic) were placed under the mucosa, and the color of the tissue was evaluated with a spectrophotometer for three different soft tissue thicknesses (1.5, 2.0, and 3.0 mm). The color was compared to mucosa without test specimens, and the color difference (DeltaE) was calculated. All restorative materials induced overall color changes (DeltaE), which diminished with increases in soft tissue thickness. Titanium induced the most prominent color change. Zirconia did not induce visible color changes in 2.0-mm-thick and 3.0-mm-thick mucosa, regardless of whether it was veneered. However, with a mucosa thickness of 3.0 mm, no change in color could be distinguished by the human eye on any specimen. Mucosa thickness is a crucial factor in terms of discoloration caused by different restorative materials. In patients with thinner mucosa, zirconia will show the least color change.

  4. Dimensions of the healthy gingiva and peri-implant mucosa.

    PubMed

    Parpaiola, Andrea; Cecchinato, Denis; Toia, Marco; Bressan, Eriberto; Speroni, Stefano; Lindhe, Jan

    2015-06-01

    To determine the dimensions of the soft tissue cuff present at various aspects of teeth and to compare these dimensions to those of the mucosa surrounding single implants. Fifty volunteers were recruited that were ≥25 years of age and exhibited no signs of (i) untreated caries; (ii) loss of periodontal tissue support in the incisor, canine, and premolar regions; (iii) systemic or local disease. Furthermore, among the 50 patients recruited (iV), 27 had one single implant in the maxilla with teeth present mesial and/or distal to the implant. Probing pocket depth (PPD) and transmucosal sounding depth (TS) were assessed by five experienced, carefully calibrated examiners and with the use of a periodontal probe at the proximal (mesial, distal) and flat (facial, buccal and palatal/lingual) surfaces of all teeth/implants. The width of the keratinized mucosa (KM) was also determined. It was demonstrated that (i) PPD and TS were greater at proximal than at flat surfaces at both tooth and implant sites. In addition, both PPD and TS were deeper at implant than at tooth sites. The TS values documented that the cuff of healthy soft tissue that surrounded a tooth varied between 2 mm at flat surfaces and 4 mm at proximal surfaces, while at implant sites, the mucosa at proximal as well as flat surfaces was 1-1.5 mm greater. The probing pocket depth (PPD) and the transmucosal sounding depth (TS) values were greater at proximal than at flat, that is, facial/palatal (lingual) surfaces at tooth sites and frequently also at implant sites. Furthermore, the PPD and the TS dimensions were greater at implant than at adjacent tooth sites. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Soft tissue coverage in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Donald P; Butler, Charles E

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal wall defects requiring soft tissue coverage can be either partial-thickness defects or full-thickness composite defects. Soft tissue flap reconstruction offers significant advantages in defects that cannot be closed primarily. Flap reconstruction is performed in a single-stage procedure obviating chronic wound management. If the defect size exceeds the availability of local soft tissue for coverage, regional pedicled flaps can be delivered into the abdominal wall while maintaining blood supply from their donor site. Microsurgical free tissue transfer increases the capacity to provide soft tissue coverage for abdominal wall defects that are not amenable to either local or regional flap coverage.

  6. Peri-implant bone loss clinical and radiographic evaluation around rough neck and microthread implants: a 5-year study.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; López-López, Patricia J; Pérez-Albacete Martínez, Carlos; Javed, Fawad; Granero-Marín, José Manuel; Maté Sánchez de Val, José Eduardo; Ramírez Fernández, Maria Piedad

    2016-01-07

    To evaluate marginal bone loss over 5 years around microthreaded implants placed in the maxillary anterior/esthetic zone and immediate restored with non-occlusal loading. Seventy-one implants (with microthreads up to the platform-rough surface body and neck, internal connection and platform switching) were placed in healed bone in the maxillary arches of 30 men and 23 women (mean age 37.85 ± 7.09 years, range 27-60). All subjects had at least 3 mm of soft tissue to allow the establishment of adequate biologic width and to reduce bone resorption. Each patient received a provisional restoration immediately after implant placement with slight occlusal contact. Mesial and distal bone height was evaluated using digital radiography on the day following implant placement (baseline) and after 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 years. Primary stability was measured with resonance frequency analysis. No implants failed, resulting in a cumulative survival rate of 100% after 3 years. Marginal bone loss from implant collar to bone crest measured at baseline (peri-implant bone defect at the fresh extraction socket) and after 5 years was 0.90 mm ± 0.26 mm. Mesial and distal site crestal bone loss ranged from 3.42 ± 1.2 mm at baseline to 3.51 ± 1.5 mm after 5 years and from 3.38 ± 0.9 mm at baseline to 3.49 ± 0.9 mm after 5 years, respectively (P = 0.086). The results of this study showed limited implant crestal bone loss 0.90 mm ± 0.26 mm and 100% of implant survival rate at 5-year follow-up of immediate restored implants with rough surface neck and microthreads. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Decontamination of dental implant surface in peri-implantitis treatment: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Mellado-Valero, Ana; Buitrago-Vera, Pedro; Solá-Ruiz, María-Fernanda; Ferrer-García, Juan-Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Etiological treatment of peri-implantitis aims to reduce the bacterial load within the peri-implant pocket and decontaminate the implant surface in order to promote osseointegration. The aim of this literature review was to evaluate the efficacy of different methods of implant surface decontamination. A search was conducted using the PubMed (Medline) database, which identified 36 articles including in vivo and in vitro studies, and reviews of different decontamination systems (chemical, mechanical, laser and photodynamic therapies). There is sufficient consensus that, for the treatment of peri-implant infections, the mechanical removal of biofilm from the implant surface should be supplemented by chemical decontamination with surgical access. However, more long-term research is needed to confirm this and to establish treatment protocols responding to different implant characterics.

  8. Electromagnetic irradiation may be a new approach to therapy for peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhensheng; Chen, Yijia; Chen, Yuxue; Zhao, Qing; Xu, Xiaomei; Chen, Yangxi

    2012-03-01

    Peri-implantitis can lead to bone destruction around a dental implant through inflammation and immune reactions caused by bacteria adhering to the surface of the implant abutment. Electromagnetic irradiation can inhibit bacterial growth, increase bone formation, decrease bone resorption and reduce the inflammatory response. Our hypothesis is that electromagnetic irradiation may be a new treatment approach for peri-implantitis and may simultaneously maintain bone mass around the dental implant. The results would be more significant when combined with other agents, because the effect of some antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs is strengthened by electromagnetic irradiation. This non-invasive therapy is expected to be conducted in a convenient manner, and even by patients at home, thereby facilitating the prevention and treatment of peri-implantitis.

  9. Osteoprotegerin Gene (OPG) Polymorphisms Associated with Peri-Implantitis Susceptibility in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the association between T950C (rs2073617) and G1181C (rs2073618) polymorphisms of the osteoprotegerin gene (OPG) and the susceptibility of peri-implantitis in the Chinese Han population. Material/Methods 110 patients with peri-implantitis and 116 healthy persons from the Chinese Han population were included in this study using a case-control design; rs2073617 and rs2073618 in OPG were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype analysis were performed with Haploview software. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was assessed in the control group based on the genotype distributions of OPG polymorphisms. The genotype, allele, and haplotype distribution differences between the case and control groups were analyzed by chi-square test, and the relative risk of PD was expressed by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results The study results showed that people carrying the CC genotype of rs2073618 were more likely to have peri-implantitis than GG genotype carriers (OR=2.18, 95% CI=1.03–4.62, p=0.04). In addition, patients with the C allele had 1.47 times the risk of suffering from peri-implantitis (OR=1.47, 95% CI=1.01–2.13, p=0.04), but not rs2073617 polymorphism. The G-C haplotype frequency of rs2073618-rs2073617 in OPG was significantly correlated to the increased susceptibility of peri-implantitis (OR=2.27, 95% CI=1.20–4.30). Conclusions OPG rs2073618 polymorphism may be related to the risk of peri-implantitis, but not rs2073617. Moreover, haplotype is also a non-ignorable risk factor. PMID:27828936

  10. Preventing and Treating Peri-Implantitis: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, Falk; Tu, Yu-Kang; Stolpe, Michael

    2015-09-01

    A large number of treatments for peri-implantitis are available, but their cost-effectiveness remains uncertain. This study evaluates the cost-effectiveness of preventing and treating peri-implantitis. A Markov model was constructed that followed each implant over 20 years. Supportive implant therapy (SIT) for managing peri-implant mucositis and preventing development of peri-implantitis was either provided or not. Risk of peri-implantitis was assumed to be affected by SIT and the patient's risk profile. If peri-implantitis occurred, 11 treatment strategies (non-surgical or surgical debridement alone or combined with adjunct therapies) were compared. Treatments and risk profiles determined disease progression. Modeling was performed based on systematically collected data. Primary outcomes were costs and proportion of lost implants, as assessed via Monte Carlo microsimulations. Not providing SIT and performing only non-surgical debridement was both least costly and least effective. The next best (more costly and effective) option was to provide SIT and perform surgical debridement (additional 0.89 euros per 1% fewer implants lost). The most effective option included bone grafts, membranes, and laser treatment (56 euros per 1%). For patients at high risk, the cost-effectiveness of SIT increased, whereas in low-risk groups, a cost-optimized strategy was cost-effective. Although clinical decision-making will be guided mainly by clinical condition, cost-effectiveness analyses might add another perspective. Based on these findings, an unambiguous comparative effectiveness ranking was not established. However, cost-effectiveness was predominantly determined by provision of SIT and initial treatment costs. Transferability of these findings to other healthcare systems needs further confirmation.

  11. Coated vs uncoated implants: bone defect configurations after progressive peri-implantitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Madi, Marwa; Zakaria, Osama; Kasugai, Shohei

    2014-12-01

    In this study, hydroxyapatite coated vs uncoated implants were used to evaluate the type and dimensions of bone defects after progressive peri-implantitis in dogs. Thirty-two dental implants with 4 different surfaces-machined (M), sandblasted acid-etched (SA), 1-μm thin sputter hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated (S), and plasma-sprayed HA-coated (P)-were inserted into the mandibles of 4 beagle dogs after extracting all mandibular premolars. Experimental peri-implantitis was induced after 3 months using ligature to allow for plaque accumulation. After 4 months, ligatures were removed and plaque accumulation continued for 5 months (progression period). The open flap surgery demonstrated 3 patterns of peri-implantitis bone defect: (1) Class I defect: represented as circumferential intra-alveolar bone loss; (2) Class II defect: circumferential intra-alveolar defect with supra-alveolar bone loss exposing the implant surface; and (3) Class III defect: represented as circumferential intra-alveolar defect with supra-alveolar bone loss and buccal dehiscence. Class I was the most frequent (62.5%) defect pattern around implant types M, SA, and S; while implant type-P showed a recurring majority of Class II (62.5%). Comparison among the 4 implant groups revealed a significant defect width (DW) in implant type-P relative to other types (P < 0.01). However, no statistically significant differences were noted for defect depth (DD) (P > 0.05). We concluded that the shape and size of peri-implantitis bone defects were influenced by the type and thickness of the HA coat together with the quantity of the available peri-implant bone. Plasma-sprayed HA-coated implants showed larger peri-implant defects than did thin sputter HA-coated implants.

  12. Peri-implantitis in a specialist clinic of periodontology. Clinical features and risk indicators.

    PubMed

    Carcuac, Olivier; Jansson, Leif

    2010-01-01

    Implant therapy has become a widely recognized treatment alternative for replacing missing teeth. Several long term follow-up studies have shown that the survival rate is high. However, complications may appear and risk indcators associated with early and late failures have been identified. The purpose of the present retrospective clinical study was to describe some clinical features of patients with clinical signs of peri-implantitis and to identify risk indicators of peri-implantitis in a population at a specialist clinic of Periodontology. In total,the material consisted of 377 implants in 111 patients with the diagnosis peri-implantitis. The mean age at the examination was found to be 56.3 years (range 22-83) for females and 64.1 years (range 27-85) for males. The mean number of remaining teeth was found to be 10.5 (S.D. 8.89) and the mean number of implants was 5.85 (S.D. 3.42). For a majority of the subjects, more than 50% of the remaining teeth had a marginal bone loss of more than 1/3 of the root length. Forty-sex percent of the patients visited regularly dental hygienists for supportive treatment. The percentage of implants with peri-implantitis was significantly increased for smokers compared to non-smokers (p = 0.04). In the group of non-smokers, 64% of the implants had the diagnosis peri-implantitis, while the corresponding relative frequency for smokers was 78%. A majority of the individuals had a Plaque index and Bleeding on probing index >50%. The median of the follow-up time after implant placement was 7.4 years and the observation period was not significantly correlated to the degree of bone loss around the implants. Among the subjects with a mean bone loss >6 mm at implants with peri-implantitis, more than 70% had a mean marginal bone loss > 1/3 of the root length of the remaining teeth. A positive and significant correlation was found between the degree of marginal bone loss in remaining teeth and the degree of bone loss around implants with peri-implantitis

  13. Cephalometric soft tissue facial analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergman, R T

    1999-10-01

    My objective is to present a cephalometric-based facial analysis to correlate with an article that was published previously in the American Journal of Orthodontic and Dentofacial Orthopedics. Eighteen facial or soft tissue traits are discussed in this article. All of them are significant in successful orthodontic outcome, and none of them depend on skeletal landmarks for measurement. Orthodontic analysis most commonly relies on skeletal and dental measurement, placing far less emphasis on facial feature measurement, particularly their relationship to each other. Yet, a thorough examination of the face is critical for understanding the changes in facial appearance that result from orthodontic treatment. A cephalometric approach to facial examination can also benefit the diagnosis and treatment plan. Individual facial traits and their balance with one another should be identified before treatment. Relying solely on skeletal analysis, assuming that the face will balance if the skeletal/dental cephalometric values are normalized, may not yield the desired outcome. Good occlusion does not necessarily mean good facial balance. Orthodontic norms for facial traits can permit their measurement. Further, with a knowledge of standard facial traits and the patient's soft tissue features, an individualized norm can be established for each patient to optimize facial attractiveness. Four questions should be asked regarding each facial trait before treatment: (1) What is the quality and quantity of the trait? (2) How will future growth affect the trait? (3) How will orthodontic tooth movement affect the existing trait (positively or negatively)? (4) How will surgical bone movement to correct the bite affect the trait (positively or negatively)?

  14. Peri-implant and systemic effects of high-/low-affinity bisphosphonate-hydroxyapatite composite coatings in a rabbit model with peri-implant high bone turnover

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings composed with bisphosphonates (BPs) which have high mineral-binding affinities have been confirmed to successfully enhance implant stability. However, few previous studies focused on HA coatings composed with low-affinity BPs or on systemic effects of locally released BPs. Methods In this long-term study, we developed two kinds of BP-HA composite coatings using either high-affinity BP (alendronate, ALN) or low-affinity BP (risedronate, RIS). Thirty-six rabbits were divided into three groups according to different coating applications (group I: HA, group II: ALN-HA, and group III: RIS-HA). Implants were inserted into the proximal region of the medullary cavity of the left tibiay. At insertion, 2 × 108 wear particles were injected around implants to induce a peri-implant high bone turnover environment. Both local (left tibias) and systemic (right tibias and lumbar vertebrae) inhibitory effect on bone resorption were compared, including bone-implant integration, bone architecture, bone mineral density (BMD), implant stability, and serum levels of bone turnover markers. Results The results indicated that ALN-HA composite coating, which could induce higher bone-implant contact (BIC) ratio, bone mass augmentation, BMD, and implant stability in the peri-implant region, was more potent on peri-implant bone, while RIS-HA composite coating, which had significant systemic effect, was more potent on non-peri-implant bone, especially lumbar vertebrae. Conclusions It is instructive and meaningful to further clinical studies that we could choose different BP-HA composite coatings according to the patient’s condition. PMID:22686414

  15. In vitro color changes of soft tissues caused by dyed fluorescent zirconia and nondyed, nonfluorescent zirconia in thin mucosa.

    PubMed

    Happe, Arndt; Schulte-Mattler, Verena; Strassert, Christian; Naumann, Michael; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Zoller, Joachim E; Rothamel, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Abutment material selection may have an effect on the color of the peri-implant soft tissue, especially in thin mucosa. The objective of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of titanium, zirconia, and dyed fluorescent zirconia on the color of 1.5-mm-thick mucosa. Ten pig maxillae were used to simulate thin mucosa according to a previously published setup. Three different abutment materials were placed under the mucosa, and the color of the soft tissue was evaluated using a spectrophotometer. The test area without underlying material was used as a control. Whereas titanium induced visible color change values of ΔE7.3, significantly above the threshold level of ΔE3.7 (P < .05, Student t test), the changes after insertion of zirconia ( ΔE3.7) and dyed fluorescent zirconia (3.5) were not statistically different from the visible threshold of ΔE3.7 (P < .05, Student t test). The difference between the two zirconia specimens was not statistically significant, although the dyed zirconia material was darker; the color difference was ΔE10.35 between the two. In contrast to titanium, neither nondyed zirconia nor dyed fluorescent zirconia changed the gingival coloration. Moreover, shading of white zirconia with a fluorescent dye leads to an all-ceramic abutment material that mimics the optical properties of natural teeth.

  16. Nasal Soft-Tissue Triangle Deformities.

    PubMed

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2016-08-01

    The soft-tissue triangle is one of the least areas attended to in rhinoplasty. Any postoperative retraction, notching, or asymmetries of soft triangles can seriously affect the rhinoplasty outcome. A good understanding of the risk factors predisposing to soft triangle deformities is necessary to prevent such problems. The commonest risk factors in our study were the wide vertical domal angle between the lateral and intermediate crura, and the increased length of intermediate crus. Two types of soft triangle grafts were described to prevent and treat soft triangle deformities. The used soft triangle grafts resulted in an excellent long-term aesthetic and functional improvement.

  17. Pathology of soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Thway, K

    2009-11-01

    Sarcomas are a rare, complex group of childhood and adult neoplasms with differentiation towards mesenchymal tissue, which may arise almost anywhere in the body. Although pathologically diverse, they frequently exhibit similar clinical presentations and radiological features. Correct histopathological diagnosis is therefore crucial, but there is overlap between histological patterns of malignant tumours, between benign and malignant lesions, and with non-mesenchymal tumours. Immunohistochemistry and molecular genetic techniques, the latter to detect tumour-specific alterations, add significantly to histological interpretation, but several groups of tumours still lack reliable immunohistochemical markers or reproducible genetic changes. The classification of sarcomas is incomplete and continues to evolve, and although the biology of many remains relatively poorly understood, our increasing insight into molecular events occurring in these tumours is certain to aid future diagnosis and therapy. This paper aims to give a broad overview of several of the main soft tissue sarcomas from a clinicopathological perspective, discussing laboratory diagnosis and the use and limitations of ancillary investigations, including recent developments in molecular diagnosis.

  18. Immediate versus Delayed Treatment in the Anterior Maxilla Using Single Implants with a Laser-Microtextured Collar: 3-Year Results of a Case Series on Hard- and Soft-Tissue Response and Esthetics.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Renzo; Belleggia, Fabrizio; Grande, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    To compare peri-implant marginal bone loss, soft tissue response, and esthetics following single immediate implant treatment (IIT) and delayed implant treatment (DIT) in the esthetic zone of the maxilla in well-selected patients. Adequate bone volume and ideal soft tissue level/contour were considered requirements for implant therapy, with additional prerequisites for IIT of residual alveolar bone wall integrity and a thick gingival biotype. IIT included immediate placement and provisionalization, while DIT included extraction socket preservation followed by implant placement and provisionalization 4 months later. Cortical bone levels and peri-implant mucosal conditions were evaluated at regular intervals. The esthetic outcome was objectively rated after 3 years using the pink esthetic score (PES) and white esthetic score (WES). Twelve patients received an immediate Laser-Lok® implant, and 13 patients received a delayed Laser-Lok® implant. No significant differences were found between the study groups regarding survival rate (100%). The mean bone level from the implant/abutment interface was 0.35 ± 0.18 mm for IIT and 0.42 ± 0.21 mm for DIT after 3 years (p > 0.05). Mesial and distal papillae remained stable over time in DIT. A tendency for regrowth of mesial and distal papillae was found following IIT (p < 0.05). Midfacial soft tissues remained stable over time following DIT and IIT. Within the limitations of this study (e.g., small sample size, short follow-up duration), the results suggest that regarding success rate, hard/soft tissue responses, and esthetics, DIT and IIT with single Laser-Lok® implants in the anterior maxilla are comparable and predictable options for well-selected patients. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. Treatment of peri-implantitis around TiUnite-surface implants using Er:YAG laser microexplosions.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsuhikp; Tanabe, Toshiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Implant therapy can lead to peri-implantitis, and none of the methods used to treat this inflammatory response have been predictably effective. It is nearly impossible to treat infected surfaces such as TiUnite (a titanium oxide layer) that promote osteoinduction, but finding an effective way to do so is essential. Experiments were conducted to determine the optimum irradiation power for stripping away the contaminated titanium oxide layer with Er:YAG laser irradiation, the degree of implant heating as a result of Er:YAG laser irradiation, and whether osseointegration was possible after Er:YAG laser microexplosions were used to strip a layer from the surface of implants placed in beagle dogs. The Er:YAG laser was effective at removing an even layer of titanium oxide, and the use of water spray limited heating of the irradiated implant, thus protecting the surrounding bone tissue from heat damage.

  20. Peri-implantation and late gestation maternal undernutrition differentially affect fetal sheep skeletal muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Paula M; Rowlerson, Anthea; Astaman, Nur Aida; Anthony, Fred Erick W; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Cooper, Cyrus; Hanson, Mark A; Green, Lucy R

    2008-01-01

    Poor prenatal nutrition is associated with a greater risk of adult glucose intolerance and insulin insensitivity in the offspring. Skeletal muscle is the primary tissue for glucose utilization, and insulin resistance in muscle is the earliest identifiable abnormality in the pre-diabetic patient. We investigated the effect of early and late gestation undernutrition on structure and markers of growth and glucose metabolism regulation in the fetal triceps brachii (TB, slow- and fast-twitch myofibres) and soleus (slow-twitch myofibres) muscles. Pregnant sheep were fed 100% nutrient requirements (C, n = 8) or a restricted diet peri-implantation (PI, n = 9; 40%, 1–31 days gestation (dGA) (term ∼147)) or in late gestation (L, n = 6; 50%, 104–127 dGA). At 127 ± 1 dGA we measured myofibre and capillary density in the fetal TB and soleus muscles, and mRNA levels in the TB of insulin receptor (InsR), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R). Total myofibre and capillary densities were lower in the TB, but not the soleus, of PI and L fetuses. The predominant effect in the L group was on slow-twitch myofibres. In TB, InsR, GLUT-4 and IGF-1R mRNA levels were greater in L group fetuses. Our finding of reduced myofibre density is consistent with a redistribution of resources at the expense of specific peripheral tissues by early and late gestation undernutrition which may be mediated by a decrease in capillary density. The increase in key regulatory components of glucose uptake following late gestation undernutrition may constitute a short-term compensation to maintain glucose homeostasis in the face of fewer type I (insulin-sensitive) myofibres. However, together these adaptations may influence the risk of later metabolic disease and thus our findings have implications for future strategies aimed at improving maternal diet. PMID:18339691

  1. Histologic Evaluation of Sinus Grafting Materials After Peri-implantitis-Induced Failure: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Antonio; Cholakis, Anastasia Kelekis; Piattelli, Adriano

    This human case series presents the clinical and histologic results of five cases of peri-implantitis with subsequent sinus graft infections. Complications may follow maxillary sinus augmentation procedures. It is possible to have an inflammatory reaction, movement of the implant inside the sinus, formation of an insufficient quantity of osseous tissue, and the production of an oroantral fistula. Complications following maxillary subantral augmentation procedures are relatively rare; however, the risks and benefits of any surgery must be carefully evaluated at the onset. In this case series, bacterial proliferation from infected implants into the grafted biomaterial in sinus cavities was examined. In five cases, removal of infected implants from augmented sinuses did not result in resolution of the infection, but rather in persistence of the infection in the area of the sinus augmentation procedure. Intraoral examination revealed edema/redness in two cases and edema and sinus tract formation in another case. In all cases, surgical curettage of the affected maxillary sinuses was performed. The inserted biomaterials and the accompanying inflammatory tissue infiltrate were totally removed with curettes. The sample was sent for a histopathologic examination. The maxillary sinuses were filled with an autologous platelet gel. Necrotic bone was found lining the different biomaterial grafts. Macrophages were observed around the grafted particles. No blood vessels were observed. This case series is the first to document the spread of infection from an implant surface to the entirety of the graft in the maxillary antrum. Complete removal of all infected bone graft material is the treatment of choice in such cases.

  2. Systemic antibiotics and the risk of superinfection in peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Verdugo, Fernando; Laksmana, Theresia; Uribarri, Agurne

    2016-04-01

    Peri-implantitis has emerged in the last few years as a complication difficult to resolve. The etiopathogenesis consensus is mainly attributed to bacteria. Following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines, a PubMed/Medline literature search was performed using the US National Library of Medicine database up to 2015 to analyze available scientific data on the rationale and risk of superinfection associated to systemic antimicrobials in human peri-implant disease. A hand search was also conducted on relevant medical and microbiology journals. The methodological index for non-randomized studies (MINORS) was independently assessed for quality on the selected papers. Proposed combined therapies use broad-spectrum antibiotics to halt the disease progression. A major associated risk, particularly when prescribed empirically without microbiological follow-up, is the undetected development of superinfections and overgrowth of opportunistic pathogens difficult to eradicate. Peri-implant superinfections with opportunistic bacteria, yeast and viruses, are plausible risks associated to the use of systemic antibiotics in immunocompetent individuals. Lack of microbiological follow-up and antibiotic susceptibility testing may lead to ongoing microbial challenges that exacerbate the disease progression. The increased proliferation of antimicrobial resistance, modern implant surface topography and indiscriminative empiric antibiotic regimens may promote the escalation of peri-implant disease in years to come. A personalized 3-month supportive therapy may help prevent risks by sustaining a normal ecological balance, decreasing specific pathogen proportions and maintaining ideal plaque control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Air Abrasive Disinfection of Implant Surfaces in a Simulated Model of Peri-Implantitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Periodontics Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the...Abrasive Disinfection of Implant Surfaces in a Simulated Model of Peri-Implantitis David G. Quintero Certificate in Periodontics , Periodontics ...reduction in bacteria may allow the host response to better combat remaining periodontal pathogens and initiate healing. When compared to

  4. [Distal tibia peri-implant fracture with an intramedullary nail: a case report].

    PubMed

    Reyes-Cabrera, J M; González-Alconada, R; García-Mota, M D

    2013-01-01

    Peri-implant fractures of the distal tibia after intramedullary nailing are rare. We present a case of a fracture of the distal tibia at the site of the distal interlocking screw. We found two cases reported in the world literature. There are no cases reported in the Spanish literature.

  5. Osteocyte density in the peri-implant bone of immediately loaded and submerged dental implants.

    PubMed

    Barros, Raquel R M; Degidi, Marco; Novaes, Arthur B; Piattelli, Adriano; Shibli, Jamil A; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2009-03-01

    The role of osteocytes in bone structure and function remains partially unresolved. Their participation in mechanotransduction, i.e., the conversion of a physical stimulus into a cellular response, has been hypothesized. The present study was an evaluation of the osteocyte density in the peri-implant bone of immediately loaded and submerged dental implants. Fourteen male patients were included in the study; all of them were partially edentulous and needed a posterior mandibular restoration. Implants were inserted in these areas; half of the sample was loaded immediately (included in a fixed provisional prosthesis on the same day as implant surgery), whereas the other half was left to heal submerged. Fourteen implants (seven immediately loaded and seven unloaded) were retrieved with a trephine after a healing period of 8 weeks. The specimens were treated to obtain thin ground sections, and histomorphometry was used to evaluate the osteocyte index in the peri-implant bone. A higher and statistically significant number of osteocytes was found in the peri-implant bone around immediately loaded implants (P = 0.0081). A correlation between the percentage of bone-implant contact and osteocyte density was found for immediately loaded implants (P = 0.0480) but not for submerged implants (P = 0.2667). The higher number of osteocytes in the peri-implant bone around immediately loaded implants could be related to the functional adaptation required by the loading stimulus, which also explains the hypothesized involvement of the osteocytes in the maintenance of the bone matrix.

  6. Peri-Implantation Hormonal Milieu: Elucidating Mechanisms of Abnormal Placentation and Fetal Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Mainigi, Monica A.; Olalere, Devvora; Burd, Irina; Sapienza, Carmen; Bartolomei, Marisa; Coutifaris, Christos

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have been associated with several adverse perinatal outcomes involving placentation and fetal growth. It is critical to examine each intervention individually in order to assess its relationship to the described adverse perinatal outcomes. One intervention ubiquitously used in ART is superovulation with gonadotropins. Superovulation results in significant changes in the hormonal milieu, which persist during the peri-implantation and early placentation periods. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that the treatment-induced peri-implantation maternal environment plays a critical role in perinatal outcomes. In this study, using the mouse model, we have isolated the exposure to the peri-implantation period, and we examine the effect of superovulation on placentation and fetal growth. We report that the nonphysiologic peri-implantation maternal hormonal environment resulting from gonadotropin stimulation appears to have a direct effect on fetal growth, trophoblast differentiation, and gene expression. This appears to be mediated, at least in part, through trophoblast expansion and invasion. Although the specific molecular and cellular mechanism(s) leading to these observations remain to be elucidated, identifying this modifiable risk factor will not only allow us to improve perinatal outcomes with ART, but help us understand the pathophysiology contributing to these outcomes. PMID:24352558

  7. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms associated with peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Amarlu, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Saeed; Samiei, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assessthe antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms isolated from subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis lesions. Methods. Thirteen patients requiring peri-implantitis treatment were consecutively selected and their subgingival biofilm was collected by inserting fine sterile paper points into peri-implant pockets for 15 seconds. A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from the subgingival biofilm and cultured. In this study, the standard strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans served as the positive control group and a blank disc impregnated with water served as the negative control; 0.1 mL of the bacterial suspension was cultured on specific culture medium and blank discs (6 mm in diameter) impregnated with 0.2%CHX mouthrinse (Behsa Pharmaceutical Co.) and negative control discs were placed on two sides of the bacterial culture plate. The size of growth inhibition zone was measured by a blinded independent observer in millimetres. Results. According to the results of disc diffusion test, the mean diameter of growth inhibition zone of A. actinomycetemcomitans around discs impregnated with CHX was larger in both standard (positive control) and biofilm samples of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared to the negative control group (blank disc) (P<0.001). Conclusion. Use of0.2% CHX mouthwash had antibacterial effects on A. actinomycetemcomitans species isolated from peri-implantitis sites. PMID:27651884

  8. Biological markers during early pregnancy: trophoblastic signals of the peri-implantation period

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, S.R.; Julian, J.; Munir, M.I.; Soares, M.J.

    1987-10-01

    The peri-implantation period extends from the time the blastocyst is free in the uterus, through the processes of recognition and attachment, to the beginning of trophoblast differentiation and the interactions between the embryo and the uterine endometrium which initiate establishment of the hemochorial placenta. It is during the peri-implantation period that the embryo and hormonally regulated endometrial cells appear to be most sensitive to factors which introduce risk into the intrauterine environment. There are no markers which can be used practically to assess pregnancy risk during the peri-implantation period of either human or laboratory rodents. Experimental studies, using in vitro laboratory models of differentiating trophoblasst cells, have identified peptide hormone markers of pivotal developmental processes. Exposure of trophoblast during the expression of these processes could have severe and far-reaching effects individually and societally. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has been used extensively as a marker to assess risk during the early stages of pregnancy. Extrapolation of experimental data indicates how hCG could be used more effectively in analyses of possible cause and effect relationships. The limitations of hCG as a marker for risk during the human peri-implantation period are discussed. Peptide hormones which could serve to assess risk during this critical period of extraordinary sensitivity to toxic factors are introduced.

  9. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms associated with peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Amarlu, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Saeed; Samiei, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assessthe antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms isolated from subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis lesions. Methods. Thirteen patients requiring peri-implantitis treatment were consecutively selected and their subgingival biofilm was collected by inserting fine sterile paper points into peri-implant pockets for 15 seconds. A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from the subgingival biofilm and cultured. In this study, the standard strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans served as the positive control group and a blank disc impregnated with water served as the negative control; 0.1 mL of the bacterial suspension was cultured on specific culture medium and blank discs (6 mm in diameter) impregnated with 0.2%CHX mouthrinse (Behsa Pharmaceutical Co.) and negative control discs were placed on two sides of the bacterial culture plate. The size of growth inhibition zone was measured by a blinded independent observer in millimetres. Results. According to the results of disc diffusion test, the mean diameter of growth inhibition zone of A. actinomycetemcomitans around discs impregnated with CHX was larger in both standard (positive control) and biofilm samples of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared to the negative control group (blank disc) (P<0.001). Conclusion . Use of0.2% CHX mouthwash had antibacterial effects on A. actinomycetemcomitans species isolated from peri-implantitis sites.

  10. ZINC INFLUENCES THE IN VITRO DEVELOPMENT OF PERI-IMPLANTATION MOUSE EMBRYOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: For humans, it is estimated that over 70% of concepti are lost during early development. In culture, mouse peri-implantation embryos can mimic development from the blastocyst to the egg cylinder stage of development, a period during which implantation occurs in viv...

  11. The importance of histopathological diagnosis in the management of lesions presenting as peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Ilana; Hirshberg, Avraham; Shlomi, Benjamin; Platner, Ori; Kozlovsky, Avital; Ofec, Ronen; Schwartz-Arad, Devorah

    2015-01-01

    This study is a histopathological analysis of lesions clinically diagnosed as peri-implantitis (PI). This retrospective study included microscopic findings in 117 peri-implant biopsies from lesions presenting clinical and radiographic features of peri-implantitis. The study group included 117 biopsies, mean age 55.2 years; 60.9% of biopsies were from failing implants during explantation, the remaining from surviving implants. All cases showed microscopic evidence for inflammation; however, although 41% exhibited only nonspecific inflammation, 29.9% exhibited actinomyces-related inflammation, 18.8% pyogenic granuloma (PG), and 10.3% giant cell granuloma (GCG). Differences in implant failure rates between pathological diagnostic groups were not statistically significant. Lesions with simple inflammation could not be distinguished clinically or radiographically from the potentially destructive lesions. There were no clinical features which could distinguish PI with simple inflammation from potentially destructive lesions mimicking PI, such as GCG, PG, and actinomycosis. However, to control GCG and PG surgical procedures would be recommended, actinomycosis would indicate specific antibiotics, whereas in nonspecific inflammation, these measures may not be indicated. The results of the present study provide evidence for the importance of early microscopic examination of lesions presenting clinically as peri-implantitis, a step toward more accurate diagnosis and improved treatment of PI and lesions mimicking PI. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Sulcus fluid bone marker levels and the outcome of surgical treatment of peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, Johan C; Aass, Anne M; Granfeldt, Finn; Lyngstadaas, Ståle P; Reseland, Janne E

    2014-04-01

    To analyse change in selected bone markers in peri-implant sulcus fluid (PISF) sampled before treatment and after 12 months and test correlation with change in disease progression. Peri-implant sulcus fluid was sampled from 32 patients in a randomized, clinical study comparing peri-implant defect re-construction with or without porous titanium granules. Matrix metalloproteinase 8 levels were measured using the Quantikine Human Total MMP-8 (DMP800) ELISA. Multianalyte profiling of the level of bone markers [interleukin-6, osteprotegerin (OPG), osteocalcin, leptin, osteopontin, parathyroid hormone, tumour necrosis factor-α, adiponectin and insulin] was performed by Luminex using Human Bone Panel IB. Changes in bone marker levels were compared and correlation with clinical findings was tested. No differences in clinical parameter or bone marker levels between test and control group were found. When comparing bone marker levels irrespective of treatment allocation between baseline and 12 months, a significant reduction in total protein, matrix metalloproteinase -8, interleukin-6, OPG, leptin and adiponectin were demonstrated. Positive correlations were found between the reduction in interleukin-6 (r = 0.43), insulin (r = 0.38) and matrix metalloproteinase-8 (r = 0.47) concentration, and probing pocket depth reduction. Peri-implantitis surgical treatment induced some reduction of the studied bone markers. Conclusive evidence for correlation between change in bone marker concentrations with disease resolution was not found. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of non-surgical peri-implantitis treatments.

    PubMed

    Listl, Stefan; Frühauf, Nadine; Dannewitz, Bettina; Weis, Christiane; Tu, Yu-Kang; Chang, Huei-Ju; Faggion, Clovis M

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of various alternatives of non-surgical peri-implantitis treatment. A decision analytical model was constructed and populated with parameter estimates from recent literature for reduction in pocket probing depth (PPD) in response to eight different treatment alternatives. A micro-costing approach combined with an online expert survey was applied to simulate a decision-making scenario taking place in Germany. The treatment alternatives providing the most advantageous cost/outcome combinations were identified according to the net benefit criterion. Uncertainties regarding model input parameters were incorporated via simple and probabilistic sensitivity analysis based on Monte Carlo simulation. In the base case scenario, debridement alone, Air-Flow, debridement combined with PerioChip, and debridement combined with local antibiotics were identified as treatment strategies with comparably better value for money than Er:YAG laser monotherapy, Vector System, debridement combined with CHX, and photodynamic therapy. Sensitivity analysis revealed considerable decision uncertainty corresponding to limited evidence about different treatment alternatives for peri-implantitis treatment. Derivation of robust treatment recommendations for peri-implantitis requires more comprehensive and patient-centred evidence on peri-implantitis treatments. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Effects of non-equilibrium plasma in the treatment of ligature-induced peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qi; Song, Ke; Zhou, Xincai; Xiong, Zilan; Du, Tianfeng; Lu, Xinpei; Cao, Yingguang

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of non-equilibrium plasma in the treatment of ligature-induced peri-implantitis in beagle dogs. Six beagles received 12 implants installed in the position of the fourth mandibular premolars. Ligature-induced peri-implantitis was initiated at 3 months post-implantation. When approximately 40% of the supporting bone was lost, the ligatures were removed. The implants were subjected to the muco-periosteal scaling and chlorhexidine irrigation with or without plasma irrigation. Three months later, clinical, radiographic and microbiological analyses were performed. Block biopsies were prepared for micro-CT and histomorphometric analysis. The primary outcome was the difference in bone healing of peri-implant sites, and the secondary outcomes included changes in clinical parameters (SBI, PD) and bacterial detection. At baseline, no significant differences were observed between the two groups. At 3 months post-treatment, the plasma group showed a significantly higher bone level than the control group (p < 0.05), a significantly decreased detection of bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia) (p < 0.05), and a significant improvement in clinical examination (p < 0.05). Within the limits of this study, non-equilibrium plasma treatment as an adjunct to the conventional therapy is a feasible approach for the treatment of peri-implantitis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. ZINC INFLUENCES THE IN VITRO DEVELOPMENT OF PERI-IMPLANTATION MOUSE EMBRYOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: For humans, it is estimated that over 70% of concepti are lost during early development. In culture, mouse peri-implantation embryos can mimic development from the blastocyst to the egg cylinder stage of development, a period during which implantation occurs in viv...

  16. Olaratumab for soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Teyssonneau, Diego; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-08-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare malignant tumors. Unfortunately, the first-line doxorubicin-based treatment has not been improved since the 1970s. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor alpha (PDGFR-α) and its ligands are co-expressed in many types of cancer, including sarcomas. They are involved in stimulating growth and regulating stromal-derived fibroblasts and angiogenesis. PDGFR-α and its ligand may play an important role in tumorigenesis and be a potential target in the treatment of sarcomas. Olaratumab is a fully human IgG1-type anti-PDGFR-α monoclonal antibody with a high affinity and a low 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). Areas covered: The authors review the role of olaratumab in the treatment of STS by focusing on the recent, randomized Phase II JDGD trial that challenged patients with unresectable or metastatic STS with doxorubicin in the presence or absence of olaratumab. This trial showed a great improvement in overall survival (OS), with an increase in survival from 14.7 months to 26.5 months for patients in the experimental arm and showed acceptable toxicity. Expert opinion: Results seem promising. However, it must be qualified, as the study includes several uncertainties. These uncertainties should be addressed by the ongoing Phase 3 JGDJ confirmatory trial, for which the final efficacy analysis is expected by 2019.

  17. Treatment outcome in patients with peri-implantitis in a periodontal clinic: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lagervall, Maria; Jansson, Leif E

    2013-10-01

    The number of placed implants has grown during the past decade, and the prevalence of peri-implantitis has increased. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the treatment outcome of peri-implantitis and to identify factors influencing the treatment success rate. The study was conducted as a retrospective longitudinal study on a referral population. The material included 382 implants with peri-implantitis in 150 patients. Peri-implantitis was defined as presence of pocket depths ≥5 mm, bleeding at probing and/or suppuration, and the presence of implant radiographic bone loss ≥3 mm or bone loss comprising at least three threads of the implant. Variance analyses, χ(2) analyses, and logistic regression analysis were used for data analyses. The mean age of the participants at baseline was found to be 64 years (range: 22 to 87 years). The mean ± SD follow-up time was 26 ± 20 months, and the mean time between implant installation and baseline was 6.4 years (range: 1 to 20 years). Periodontal flap surgery with osteoplasty was the most common type of therapy (47%), and regenerative surgery procedures with bone substitute materials were chosen in 20% of the cases. The mean success rate at patient level was 69%. The results of the logistic regression analyses showed that the success rate was significantly lower for individuals with the diagnosis of severe periodontitis, severe marginal bone loss around the implants, poor oral hygiene, and low compliance. The effectiveness of the peri-implantitis therapy was impaired by severe periodontitis, severe marginal bone loss around the implants, poor oral hygiene, and low compliance.

  18. Discomfort/pain due to periodontal and peri-implant probing: Implant type and age.

    PubMed

    Stanner, Julia; Klum, Matthias; Parvini, Puria; Zuhr, Otto; Nickles, Katrin; Eickholz, Peter

    2017-07-01

    There is evidence that patients experience more discomfort/pain after peri-implant probing than periodontal probing. However, there are several plausible factors to additionally influence this observation: e.g., implant type, age, smoking. Thus, this study was designed to compare discomfort/pain after periodontal and peri-implant probing in different implant types. Two dentists recruited and examined 80 patients, each of them exhibiting a dental implant with a contralateral natural tooth. Only two types of implants were included. Periodontal and peri-implant probing depths (PPD) and probing attachment level (PAL) were assessed. Whether implant or tooth were measured first was randomly assigned. Immediately after probing patients scored discomfort/pain using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Eighty patients (median; lower/upper quartile: age 57; 47.5/65.5 years; 40 females, 11 smokers) were examined. With the exception of PPD and PAL at the deepest site as well as mean PPD (p < .05) clinical parameters (PAL, bleeding on probing, suppuration) were well balanced between implants and teeth. Peri-implant probing (VAS: 9.0; 5.0/17.0) caused significantly (p = .038) more discomfort/pain than periodontal probing (5.5; 2.0/13.5). This was confirmed by repeated measures analysis of variance adjusting for several factors (p = .011). Peri-implant probing caused significantly more discomfort/pain than periodontal probing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Peri-implantitis and extracellular matrix antibodies: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Piero; Di Carlo, Stefano; Rosella, Daniele; De Angelis, Francesca; Capogreco, Mario; Pompa, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this case–control study was to compare patients with a healthy peri-implant environment and patients affected by peri-implantitis, evaluating the occurrence of antibodies to extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. The authors hypothesized the presence of ECM autoantibodies in serum of peri-implantitis patients. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided into two groups: one with dental implants with a diagnosis of peri-implantitis and one control group with implants classified as being “healthy.” Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed on patients’ sera to detect human antibodies to type I, III, IV, and V collagens, laminin, and fibronectin. Fisher exact test was performed to evaluate statistical association, with a significant P < 0.05. Results: Forty-two patients were enrolled in this study, 27 females (64.28%) and 15 males (35.72%) with a mean age of 53 ± 29.69 years (age range 32–74). The presence of antibodies to CIII was recorded in 6/21 (28.57%) patients of test group, compared to just 2/21 (9.52%) for the control group, showing a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05). Other antibodies tested were found to be not statistically significant or absent. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that further studies, with larger sample and different design, are necessary to address the research purpose, evaluating possible associations between anti-ECM antibodies and peri-implantitis. PMID:28932144

  20. Water jet with adjunct chlorhexidine gel for nonsurgical treatment of peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Levin, Liran; Frankenthal, Shai; Joseph, Livia; Rozitsky, Doron; Levi, Guy; Machtei, Eli E

    2015-02-01

    Peri-implant disease following successful integration of an endosseous implant is the result of an imbalance between bacterial load and host defense, which may affect not only the peri-implant mucosa but also involve the supporting bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adjunctive effect of a dental water jet rinse mixed with chlorhexidine gel to the nonsurgical treatment for peri-implantitis. A prospective randomized interventional cohort study was conducted. Forty consecutive patients presenting with peri-implantitis were recruited and randomly assigned into two treatment groups. Initially all patients received scaling/surface debridement and oral hygiene instruction. Patients in the study group received a water jet device containing chlorhexidine gel (Silonite®) for home use twice daily while the control group performed the recommended oral hygiene measures with no water jet usage. Three months following baseline visit, patients were reevaluated clinically and radiographically. In total, 39 patients completed the study and were available for final examination. Three months following baseline visit the test group exhibited greater mean probing depth reduction (0.75 mm vs 0.27 mm; P = .029) as well as greater reduction in the number of sites presenting with bleeding on probing (2.26 vs 0.45 sites; P = .011). No significant change in bone level was observed at 3 months (mean bone gain was 0.18 mm). Water jet mixed with chlorhexidine gel might supplement the response to nonsurgical treatment for peri-implantitis lesions. Further, larger-cohort studies are warranted.

  1. Bone reconstruction after surgical treatment of experimental peri-implantitis defects at a sandblasted/acid-etched hydroxyapatite-coated implant: an experimental study in the dog.

    PubMed

    Namgoong, Hee; Kim, Myung-duck; Ku, Young; Rhyu, In-Chul; Lee, Yong Moo; Seol, Yang Jo; Gu, Hee Jin; Susin, Cristiano; Wikesjö, Ulf M E; Koo, Ki-Tae

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate bone formation/osseointegration following surgical treatment of experimental peri-implantitis at dental implants with different surface characteristics exposed to ligature-induced breakdown conditions. Ten turned (control), 10 sandblasted/acid-etched (SA), and 10 SA/hydroxyapatite nanocoated (HA) implants were installed into the edentulated posterior mandible in five Beagle dogs and allowed to osseointegrate for 12 weeks. Ligature-induced breakdown defects were then induced over 23 weeks using stainless steel wire ligatures. The ligatures were removed and soft tissues were allowed to heal for 3 weeks. Next, exposed implant surfaces were decontaminated followed by guided bone regeneration using a collagen membrane and submerged wound healing. The animals were euthanized for histometric analysis at 12 weeks post-surgery. The radiographic analysis showed vertical bone loss following ligature-induced breakdown without statistically significant differences among implant technologies. The histometric analysis showed significantly enhanced bone formation (height) at SA and SA/HA compared with turned implants (p = 0.028) following reconstructive surgery. Bone formation area was greater at SA/HA compared with turned implants, however the difference did not reach statistical significance. While ligature-induced defect progression does not appear implant surface dependent in this animal model, bone formation at the decontaminated implant surfaces appears more favourable at SA and SA/HA over turned implants following reconstructive surgery. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Histopathological Verification of Osteoimmunological Mediators in Peri-Implantitis and Correlation to Bone Loss and Implant Functional Period.

    PubMed

    Konermann, Anna; Götz, Werner; Le, Michael; Dirk, Cornelius; Lossdörfer, Stefan; Heinemann, Friedhelm

    2016-02-01

    Peri-implantitis (PI) is characterized by inflammation and bone resorption eventually leading to implant failure, but the characteristic pathologic determinants are undefined to date. This study aims to elucidate the parameters involved in PI pathogenesis, including intraoral implant retention time, extent of bone loss, smoking history, and identification of osteoimmunological markers for inflammation and bone loss. Peri-implant tissues (n = 21) displaying clinically diagnosed PI from patients with vertical bone loss ranging from 0-12 mm and implant function period between 1 and 60 months were evaluated by histochemistry and immunohistochemistry for TRAP, CD3, RANK, RANKL, OPG, and TNF-α. Statistical analyses were performed with the Welch test and correlation coefficients were calculated. Most bone resorption occurred during the first 12 months of implant function and correlated with the extent of inflammation, although histological signs of inflammation strongly varied between samples from minimal appearance of inflammatory cells to extended infiltrates. Implant function period and smoking history did not significantly affect the degree of inflammation. Higher RANK levels emerged in the first 12 months of implant function compared to longer retention times and were negatively correlated to the occurrence of RANKL. Additionally, histological signs of inflammation were about two-fold higher in specimens with bone resorption up from 5 mm compared to under 5 mm. CD3(+) cells were more prevalent in extensive inflammatory infiltrates and samples derived from smokers. Our analyses proved that PI-induced bone loss is differentially influenced by the parameters evaluated in this study, but a distinct interconnection between disease severity and implant retention time can be established.

  3. Expression and role of cubilin in the internalization of nutrients during the peri-implantation development of the rodent embryo.

    PubMed

    Assémat, Emeline; Vinot, Stéphanie; Gofflot, Françoise; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Illien, Françoise; Châtelet, François; Verroust, Pierre; Louvet-Vallée, Sophie; Rinninger, Franz; Kozyraki, Renata

    2005-05-01

    Histiotrophic nutrition is essential during the peri-implantation development in rodents, but little is known about receptors involved in protein and lipid endocytosis derived from the endometrium and the uterine glands. Previous studies suggested that cubilin, a multiligand receptor for vitamin, iron, and protein uptake in the adult, might be important in this process, but the onset of its expression and function is not known. In this study, we analyzed the expression of cubilin in the pre- and early post-implantation rodent embryo and tested its potential function in protein and cholesterol uptake. Using morphological and Western blot analysis, we showed that cubilin first appeared at the eight-cell stage. It was expressed by the maternal-fetal interfaces, trophectoderm and visceral endoderm, but also by the future neuroepithelial cells and the developing neural tube. At all these sites, cubilin was localized at the apical pole of the cells exposed to the maternal environment or to the amniotic and neural tube cavities, and had a very similar distribution to megalin, a member of the LDLR gene family and a coreceptor for cubilin in adult tissues. To analyze cubilin function, we followed endocytosis of apolipoprotein A-I and HDL cholesterol, nutrients normally present in the uterine glands and essential for embryonic growth. We showed that internalization of both ligands was cubilin dependent during the early rodent gestation. In conclusion, the early cubilin expression and its function in protein and cholesterol uptake suggest an important role for cubilin in the development of the peri-implantation embryo.

  4. Does residual cement around implant-supported restorations cause peri-implant disease? A retrospective case analysis.

    PubMed

    Linkevicius, Tomas; Puisys, Algirdas; Vindasiute, Egle; Linkeviciene, Laura; Apse, Peteris

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between patients with a history of periodontitis and development of cement-related peri-implant disease. Seventy-seven patients with 129 implants for this retrospective analysis were selected from completed implant cases that were scheduled for regular maintenance or had experienced mechanical or biological complications between years 2006 and 2011 in private practice. Implants with extracoronal residual cement and implants without cement remnants were analyzed. The selected cases were further divided into two groups--implants in patients with history of periodontitis (1) and implants in periodontitis-free individuals (2). The selection of these groups was made on the basis of treatment history and orthopantomograph. As a control group, a set of 238 screw-retained implant restorations, delivered to 66 patients during the same period of time was examined. The incidence of peri-implant disease among implants in all groups was calculated. Peri-implant disease was evident in 62 of 73 implants with cement remnants (85%). All implants in group 1 developed peri-implantitis--4 early and 35 delayed disease cases. In the periodontally healthy group, 20 of 31 implants were diagnosed with peri-implant mucositis, 3 implants had early peri-implantitis, and 11 implants with cement remnants did not develop biological complications. In the group of implants without cement remnants, peri-implant disease was diagnosed in 17 of 56 cases (30%). In contrast, only two occurrences of peri-implant disease were registered in the control group of screw-retained restorations (1.08%). Implants with cement remnants in patients with history of periodontitis may be more likely to develop peri-implantitis, compared with patients without history of periodontal infection. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Ultraviolet-C irradiation to titanium implants increases peri-implant bone formation without impeding mineralization in a rabbit femur model.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Makoto; Yamada, Masahiro; Ishizaki, Ken; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2015-05-01

    Volume and bone quality of peri-implant supporting bone, in particular, at implant neck region, as well as bone-implant contact ratio, is important for long-term stability of implants. Ultraviolet-C (UVC) irradiation is known to enhance the osseointegration capability of titanium implants. However, the histological determination was performed only on a rat model, but not pre-clinical animal model such as a rabbit model. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of UVC irradiation on titanium implants on the volume and mineral density of peri-implant supporting bone formation in a rabbit femur model. Acid-etched pure titanium screw implants with or without 3 mW/cm2 UVC irradiation for 48 h were placed in rabbit femur diaphyses. Peri-implant bone tissue formation was analyzed at 3 and 8 weeks post-operatively by histology and micro-CT-based bone morphometry after calibration with hydroxyl apatite phantoms. UVC pre-irradiated implants accumulated a higher density of cells and thicker and longer bone tissue attachments that continued into the inner basic lamellae of the surface of existing cortical bone at 3 and 8 weeks than the implants without irradiation. Although the bone mineral density around both implants was equivalent to that of the existing cortical bone, bone volume was greater with UVC pre-irradiation in two-thirds or more of the apical region throughout the observation period. These results indicate that UVC treatment increased the volume of cortical-like bone tissue in the coronal region of titanium implants without deterioration of bone mineral density.

  6. New Soft Tissue Implants Using Organic Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, David N.

    Typical biomaterials are stiff, difficult to manufacture, and not initially developed for medical implants. A new biomaterial is proposed that is similar to human soft tissue. The biomaterial provides mechanical properties similar to soft tissue in its mechanical and physical properties. Characterization is performed for modulus of elasticity, ultimate strength and wear resistance. The material further exhibits excellent biocompatibility with little toxicity and low inflammation. The material can be molded into a variety of anatomic shapes for use as a cartilage replacement, heart valve, and reconstructive implant for trauma victims. The biomaterial may be suitable for several biodevices of the future aimed at soft-tissue replacements.

  7. Soft tissue balancing in total shoulder replacement.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Maike; Hoy, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty is now capable of recreating near anatomic reproduction of native bony shoulder anatomy, but the function and longevity of anatomic shoulder replacement is dependent on a competent soft tissue envelope and adequate motoring of all musculo-tendinous units about the shoulder. Balancing the soft tissues requires understanding of the anatomy and pathology, as well as technical skills. The advent of reverse shoulder biomechanics has brought with it special requirements of understanding of the soft tissue elements still left in the shoulder despite major rotator cuff deficiency.

  8. Raman Spectroscopy of Soft Musculoskeletal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Esmonde-White, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Tendon, ligament, and joint tissues are important in maintaining daily function. They can be affected by disease, age, and injury. Slow tissue turnover, hierarchical structure and function, and nonlinear mechanical properties present challenges to diagnosing and treating soft musculoskeletal tissues. Understanding these tissues in health, disease, and injury is important to improving pharmacologic and surgical repair outcomes. Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in the examination of soft musculoskeletal tissues. This article highlights exciting basic science and clinical/translational Raman studies of cartilage, tendon, and ligament. PMID:25286106

  9. Assessment of periodontal and opportunistic flora in patients with peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Matteo; López-Cerero, Lorena; O'Sullivan, Manuel G; Chereguini, Carlos F; Ballesta, Sofia; Ríos, Vicente; Herrero-Climent, Mariano; Bullón, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    To assess the presence of periodontal and opportunistic organisms in patients with peri-implantitis. Thirty-three partially edentulous subjects (22 women, 11 men), aged 32-90 years, who had one or more implants with peri-implantitis were included. Peri-implantitis was defined as: (i) the presence of bleeding on probing and/or suppuration and (ii) radiographic images showed marginal bone loss >1.8 mm after 1 year in function. Criteria for inclusion were: (i) partially edentulous patients having at least one implant diagnosed with peri-implantitis; (ii) no antibiotic therapy for 6 months prior to clinical examination. Following this definition, a total of 48 implants were diagnosed with peri-implantitis. Subgingival bacterial samples were obtained with sterile paper points from infected implants and selected teeth of each individual. Periodontopathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola) were detected by multiplex PCR targeting 16S rDNA. Samples were placed in reduced transport medium and cultured for opportunistic pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, enteric bacteria, Pseudomonas and yeasts). Twenty-two patients yielded positive results for P. gingivalis, 25 for T. forsythia, eight for P. intermedia and 13 for T. denticola. None of the patients yielded a positive result for A. actinomycetemcomitans. Non-periodontal species were found in five patients (15% of total). P. aeruginosa was found in four (12%) patients, and C. albicans (3%) and S. aureus in one patient (3%) each. In two cases of peri-implantitis, none of the periodontal or opportunistic microorganisms studied were detected in either implant or tooth samples. When results of the periodontopathic bacteria from the implant and tooth samples of the same patient were compared, 18 patients (54%) showed the same results for both samples and 15 (45%) patients different results. The implant surface may be colonized with

  10. Impact of immediate loading on early soft tissue healing at two-piece implants placed in fresh extraction sockets: an experimental study in the beagle dog.

    PubMed

    Mareque, S; Liñares, A; Pérez, J; Muñoz, F; Ramos, I; Blanco, J

    2014-08-01

    To study early soft tissue healing of immediately placed implants with or without immediate loading in the dog. Forty-eight implants were placed in the distal sockets of Pm3 and Pm4 in the lower jaw of 12 beagle dogs immediately after tooth extraction. In the control group, no loading was applied. In the test group, an immediate loading restoration with occlusal contacts was performed. Dogs were sacrificed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks for histological analysis. At the end of the study, there was a 100% implant and prosthesis survival. The biological width dimension was similar in both groups at all the studied healing periods. This dimension tended to decrease from week 2 to 8 in both groups, on both the buccal and lingual side. The barrier epithelium tended to stop at the implant-abutment interface in both groups and also decreased in length from week 2 to 8, on the buccal and the lingual side. Soft tissue recession remained low and occurred mainly in the test group. The characteristics, dimension, and healing pattern of the peri-implant soft tissues were similar around immediate implants with or without immediate loading. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. What Is a Soft Tissue Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... know has just been diagnosed with sarcoma, this short, simple guide can help. Downloadable PDFs Download free PDFs of our soft tissue sarcoma information About and ... Read More Latest Cancer News Read More Stories ...

  12. Soft Tissue Sarcomas and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors' benefits . Research on soft tissue sarcoma and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... report " Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam " and other updates that there ...

  13. Soft tissue sarcoma metastatic to pleura.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Hüseyin; Metintaş, Muzaffer; Ak, Güntülü; Dündar, Emine; Erginel, Sinan

    2008-01-01

    Almost all cancers can cause distant pleural metastases. However, pleural metastases of soft tissue sarcoma that constitute less than 1% of adult solid malignancy are extremely rare. It is very difficult to distinguish them form sarcomatous malignant mesothelioma on histopathological features. We report a 57 year-old man who presented to us with left chest pain and progressive dyspnea and was diagnosed to have a pleural metastases of soft tissue sarcoma by thoracoscopic biopsy.

  14. Radionuclide imaging of soft tissue neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, F.S.; Hudson, T.M.; Enneking, W.F.

    1981-10-01

    Two classes of radiopharmaceuticals may be used for imaging tumors of the musculoskeletal system. The first is comprised of soft tissue or tumor specific agents such as gallium-67, bleomycin, and radionuclide-labeled antibodies, which may be useful for detecting and localizing these tumors. The other class of tracer is comprised of those with avidity for bone. The 99mTc-labeled-phosphate skeletal imaging compounds have been found to localize in a variety of soft tissue lesions, including benign and malignant tumors. In 1972, Enneking began to include bone scans in the preoperative evaluation of soft tissue masses. Later, he and his associates reported that these scans were useful in planning operative treatment of sarcomas by detecting involvement of bone by the tumors. Nearly all malignant soft tissue tumors take up bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals, and bone involvement was indicated in two-thirds of the scans we reviewed. About half of benign soft tissue lesions had normal scans, but the other half showed uptake within the lesion and a few also showed bone involvement. Careful, thorough imaging technique is essential to proper evaluation. Multiple, high-resolution static gamma camera images in different projections are necessary to adequately demonstrate the presence or absence of soft tissue abnormality and to define the precise relationship of the tumor to the adjacent bone.

  15. Injectable Silk Foams for Soft Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bellas, E.; Lo, T.J.; Fournier, E.P.; Brown, J.E.; Abbott, R.D.; Gil, E.S.; Marra, K.G.; Rubin, J.P.; Leisk, G.G.; Kaplan, D.L.

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue fillers are needed for restoration of a defect or augmentation of existing tissues. Autografts and lipotransfer have been under study for soft tissue reconstruction but yield inconsistent results, often with considerable resorption of the grafted tissue. A minimally invasive procedure would reduce scarring and recovery time as well as allow for the implant and/or grafted tissue to be placed closer to existing vasculature. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of an injectable silk foam for soft tissue regeneration. Adipose derived stem cells survive and migrate through the foam over a 10 day period in vitro. The silk foams are also successfully injected into the subcutaneous space in a rat and over a 3 month period integrating with the surrounding native tissue. The injected foams are palpable and soft to the touch through the skin and returning to their original dimensions after pressure was applied and then released. The foams readily absorb lipoaspirate making the foams useful as a scaffold or template for existing soft tissue filler technologies, useful either as a biomaterial alone or in combination with the lipoaspirate. PMID:25323438

  16. Injectable silk foams for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bellas, Evangelia; Lo, Tim J; Fournier, Eric P; Brown, Joseph E; Abbott, Rosalyn D; Gil, Eun S; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter; Leisk, Gary G; Kaplan, David L

    2015-02-18

    Soft tissue fillers are needed for restoration of a defect or augmentation of existing tissues. Autografts and lipotransfer have been under study for soft tissue reconstruction but yield inconsistent results, often with considerable resorption of the grafted tissue. A minimally invasive procedure would reduce scarring and recovery time as well as allow the implant and/or grafted tissue to be placed closer to existing vasculature. Here, the feasibility of an injectable silk foam for soft tissue regeneration is demonstrated. Adipose-derived stem cells survive and migrate through the foam over a 10-d period in vitro. The silk foams are also successfully injected into the subcutaneous space in a rat and over a 3-month period integrating with the surrounding native tissue. The injected foams are palpable and soft to the touch through the skin and returning to their original dimensions after pressure is applied and then released. The foams readily absorb lipoaspirate making the foams useful as a scaffold or template for existing soft tissue filler technologies, useful either as a biomaterial alone or in combination with the lipoaspirate.

  17. Non-surgical treatment of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis at two-piece zirconium implants: A clinical follow-up observation after up to 3 years.

    PubMed

    John, Gordon; Becker, Jürgen; Schmucker, Andrea; Schwarz, Frank

    2017-07-01

    To assess the long-term clinical outcomes following non-surgical therapy of peri-implant diseases at two-piece zirconium implants. A total of 27 patients suffering from either (i) peri-implant mucositis (n = 24 implants), or (ii) peri-implantitis (n = 16 implants) completed a mean follow-up period of 32.8 ± 2.85 months (median: 34 months). The initial treatment procedures included (i) mechanical debridement + local antiseptic therapy using chlorhexidine digluconate (MD + CXH), or (ii) Er:YAG laser monotherapy (ERL). The primary outcome was disease resolution (i.e. absence of bleeding on probing (BOP) at mucositis sites/absence of BOP and probing pocket depths (PD) ≥6 mm at peri-implantitis sites). Resolution of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis was obtained in 7/14 (50.0%; p = .003) and 5/13 (38.5%; p = .001) of the patients investigated. This corresponded to 54.2% (13/24) and 50.0% (8/16) at the implant level respectively. Both MD + CHX and ERL were effective on the long-term, but failed to achieve a complete disease resolution. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Comparison of Subgingival and Peri-implant Microbiome in Chronic Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Qin, Xue Yan; Jiang, Wei Peng; Zheng, Hui; Xu, Xin Li; Chen, Feng

    2015-09-01

    To analyse the microbia composition of 10 healthy dental implants and 10 chronic periodontitis patients. Subgingival plaque and peri-implant biofilm were sampled at the first molar site before and after implant restoration. The analysis was conducted by 454-prosequencing of bacterial V1 to V3 regions of 16S rDNA. Chronic periodontitis subjects showed greater bacterial diversity compared with implant subjects. The relative abundance of sixteen genera and twelve species differed significantly between implant and chronic periodontitis subjects. The genera Catonella, Desulfovibrio, Mogibacterium, Peptostreptococcus and Propionibacterium were present in higher abundance in chronic periodontitis subjects, while implant subjects had higher proportions of Brevundimonas and Pseudomonas species. Our results demonstrate that implant restoration changes the oral microbiota. The analysis suggests that periodontal bacteria can remain for a prolonged period of time at non-dental sites, from where they can colonise the peri-implant.

  19. Serum HCG measured in the peri-implantation period predicts IVF cycle outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Bruce S; Daneshmand, Said T; Restrepo, Humberto; Garner, Forest C

    2012-09-01

    The current study assessed the relationship between serum concentrations of human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) measured in the peri-implantation period and various outcome measures following blastocyst transfer in IVF cycles. The study group included 767 autologous IVF cycles, each with the transfer of two fresh blastocysts in a 6-year study period, ending 31 December 2009. Outcome measures were ectopic pregnancy, biochemical pregnancy loss, ongoing pregnancy, spontaneous abortion and multiple pregnancy. Peri-implantation serum HCG concentration measured 5 days after blastocyst transfer was highly predictive of these outcome measures. These findings suggest embryonic implantation and developmental fate are largely determined by 5 days after blastocyst transfer and that very early serum HCG measurements may be useful markers of IVF outcome.

  20. Influence of anisotropy on peri-implant stress and strain in complete mandible model from CT.

    PubMed

    Liao, Sheng-Hui; Tong, Ruo-Feng; Dong, Jin-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    This paper reveals the influence of elastic anisotropy for the peri-implant stress and strain in personalized mandible. First, from CT data, the individual geometry of the complete range of mandible was well reproduced, also the separation between cortical and cancellous bone. Then, by an ad hoc automatic mesh generator integrated with anisotropic material assignment function, high quality anisotropic finite element model of the complete mandible was created, with two standard threaded implants embedded in posterior zone. The values of principal stress and strain in surrounding bone were evaluated under buccolingual oblique loading, and compared to that of the same FE model with equivalent isotropic material. Results of the analyses demonstrated that the percentage increase of stress and strain in anisotropic case reached up to 70%. It is concluded that anisotropy has significant effects on peri-implant stress and strain and careful consideration should be given to its use in biomechanical FE studies.

  1. Peri-implantitis Treatment with a Regenerative Approach: Clinical Outcomes on Reentry.

    PubMed

    Parma-Benfenati, Stefano; Roncati, Marisa; Galletti, Primo; Tinti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    This case series presents clinical outcomes on reentry using regenerative submerged and nonsubmerged approaches in peri-implant defects; pre- and posttreatment assessments of nine implants in six patients are presented. A mean bone fill value of 91.3% with a 4.88-mm mean bone gain was obtained. Neither approach led to additional bone loss or required additional bone augmentation procedures. Strict methods of implant surface decontamination and detoxification were used on all patients, regardless of implant surface characteristics. The regenerative procedure was effective in the treatment of moderate to advanced peri-implantitis lesions without compromising the previous fixed implant-supported prostheses. These preliminary results are reasonably encouraging in that all cases showed bone gains. Nevertheless, caution must be exercised when determining reosseointegration, because it is not possible to ascertain it in clinical practice.

  2. Soft tissue engineering in craniomaxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Roderick Y; Fasi, Anthony C; Feinberg, Stephen E

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial soft tissue reconstruction may be required following trauma, tumor resection, and to repair congenital deformities. Recent advances in the field of tissue engineering have significantly widened the reconstructive armamentarium of the surgeon. The successful identification and combination of tissue engineering, scaffold, progenitor cells, and physiologic signaling molecules has enabled the surgeon to design, recreate the missing tissue in its near natural form. This has resolved the issues like graft rejection, wound dehiscence, or poor vascularity. Successfully reconstructed tissue through soft tissue engineering protocols would help surgeon to restore the form and function of the lost tissue in its originality. This manuscript intends to provide a glimpse of the basic principle of tissue engineering, contemporary, and future direction of this field as applied to craniofacial surgery. PMID:24987591

  3. The incidence of peri-implantitis for two different implant systems over a period of thirteen years.

    PubMed

    Renvert, Stefan; Lindahl, Christel; Rutger Persson, G

    2012-12-01

    To study the incidence of peri-implantitis over 13 years between two types of dental implants. Peri-implantitis incidence was defined as bone loss ≥ 1.0 mm after 1 year, and with BOP or suppuration. Nineteen subjects with TioBlast AstraTech(™) (AT) and 22 subjects with machine-etched Brånemark Nobel Biocare(®) (NB) implants were studied. The incidences of peri-implantitis between years 1 and 7 and between years 7 and 13 were 26.2% and 7.1% for AT implants, and 30.4% and 11.5% for NB implants (NS). A history of periodontitis was a risk for future incidence of peri-implantitis (Likelihood ratio: 4.1, 95% CI: 2.0, 8.4, p < 0.001). Subjects with a history of systemic disease had a higher incidence of peri-implantitis (p < 0.05). No difference in the incidence of peri-implantitis over a period of 13 years as an effect implant surface and design was found. Bone loss during the first 7 years after implant installation was greater than thereafter. Microbiological information at year 7 did not predict incidence of peri-implantitis at year 13. Subjects with a previous history of periodontitis and with systemic disease were at higher risk for future incidence of peri-implantitis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Clinical outcome of a nonsurgical and surgical treatment protocol in different types of peri-implantitis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Thierbach, René; Eger, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    The replacement of missing teeth with dental implants has been standard practice in dentistry for many years. The success of dental implants depends on many factors, among which the diagnosis, clinical severity, and treatment of peri-implant diseases play a key role. In this prospective case series, the influence of cumulative treatment modalities on peri-implantitis with and without pus formation on clinical outcome was assessed. During 2010, 28 patients were referred for peri-implantitis treatment. They presented two different types of peri-implant diseases: peri-implantitis with (17 implants) or without pus formation (33 implants). After microbiologic diagnosis, all patients were treated at baseline with full-mouth scaling and root planing. Two months later, further full-mouth scaling and root planing and additional antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) was applied. Four months after baseline, patients with pus formation additionally underwent access flap surgery. Active human matrix metalloproteinase-8 (aMMP-8) levels were measured in eluates before and after all treatment modalities and 7 months after baseline. Clinical parameters (probing depth, bleeding on probing) and aMMP-8-levels improved in both groups after treatment and the final examination. In periimplantitis patients without pus formation, all parameters decreased after full-mouth scaling and root planing and the additional aPDT and no surgery was necessary to improve the parameters. In patients with pus formation, the parameters decreased only after access flap surgery. The presence of pus influences the clinical outcome of the treatment of peri-implant diseases. Whereas peri-implantitis cases without pus formation can be successfully managed nonsurgically, peri-implantitis with pus formation can be effectively treated after an additional observation time of 3 months postoperatively only with additional flap surgery.

  5. Different contribution of BRINP3 gene in chronic periodontitis and peri-implantitis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Casado, Priscila L; Aguiar, Diego P; Costa, Lucas C; Fonseca, Marcos A; Vieira, Thays C S; Alvim-Pereira, Claudia C K; Alvim-Pereira, Fabiano; Deeley, Kathleen; Granjeiro, José M; Trevilatto, Paula C; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2015-03-11

    Peri-implantitis is a chronic inflammation, resulting in loss of supporting bone around implants. Chronic periodontitis is a risk indicator for implant failure. Both diseases have a common etiology regarding inflammatory destructive response. BRINP3 gene is associated with aggressive periodontitis. However, is still unclear if chronic periodontitis and peri-implantitis have the same genetic background. The aim of this work was to investigate the association between BRINP3 genetic variation (rs1342913 and rs1935881) and expression and susceptibility to both diseases. Periodontal and peri-implant examinations were performed in 215 subjects, divided into: healthy (without chronic periodontitis and peri-implantitis, n = 93); diseased (with chronic periodontitis and peri-implantitis, n = 52); chronic periodontitis only (n = 36), and peri-implantitis only (n = 34). A replication sample of 92 subjects who lost implants and 185 subjects successfully treated with implants were tested. DNA was extracted from buccal cells. Two genetic markers of BRINP3 (rs1342913 and rs1935881) were genotyped using TaqMan chemistry. Chi-square (p < 0.05) compared genotype and allele frequency between groups. A subset of subjects (n = 31) had gingival biopsies harvested. The BRINP3 mRNA levels were studied by CT method (2(ΔΔCT)). Mann-Whitney test correlated the levels of BRINP3 in each group (p < 0.05). Statistically significant association between BRINP3 rs1342913 and peri-implantitis was found in both studied groups (p = 0.04). The levels of BRINP3 mRNA were significantly higher in diseased subjects compared to healthy individuals (p = 0.01). This study provides evidence that the BRINP3 polymorphic variant rs1342913 and low level of BRINP3 expression are associated with peri-implantitis, independently from the presence of chronic periodontitis.

  6. Validating cone-beam computed tomography for peri-implant bone morphometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Dessel, Jeroen Van; Depypere, Maarten; EzEldeen, Mostafa; Iliescu, Alexandru Andrei; Santos, Emanuela Dos; Lambrichts, Ivo; Liang, Xin; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been recently used to analyse trabecular bone structure around dental implants. To validate the use of CBCT for three-dimensional (3D) peri-implant trabecular bone morphometry by comparing it to two-dimensional (2D) histology, 36 alveolar bone samples (with implants n=27 vs. without implants n=9) from six mongrel dogs, were scanned ex vivo using a high-resolution (80 µm) CBCT. After scanning, all samples were decalcified and then sectioned into thin histological sections (∼6 μm) to obtain high contrast 2D images. By using CTAn imaging software, bone morphometric parameters including trabecular number (Tb.N), thickness (Tb.Th), separation (Tb.Sp) and bone volume fraction (BV/TV) were examined on both CBCT and corresponding histological images. Higher Tb.Th and Tb.Sp, lower BV/TV and Tb.N were found on CBCT images (P<0.001). Both measurements on the peri-implant trabecular bone structure showed moderate to high correlation (r=0.65–0.85). The Bland–Altman plots showed strongest agreement for Tb.Th followed by Tb.Sp, Tb.N and BV/TV, regardless of the presence of implants. The current findings support the assumption that peri-implant trabecular bone structures based on high-resolution CBCT measurements are representative for the underlying histological bone characteristics, indicating a potential clinical diagnostic use of CBCT-based peri-implant bone morphometric characterisation. PMID:26273522

  7. Dental floss as a possible risk for the development of peri-implant disease: an observational study of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, Frank J J; Lang, Niklaus P; Schulten, Engelbert A J M; Ten Bruggenkate, Christiaan M

    2016-05-01

    To report on a possible relationship between the use of dental floss or superfloss and the development of peri-implantitis. Ten patients with progressive peri-implantitis with an intensive oral hygiene protocol, which consisted of extensive professional supra- and submucosal cleaning, and not responding to this therapy were scheduled for examination. Plaque and bleeding indices and probing depth measurements were assessed, and radiographic examination was performed every two years. In all ten cases, remnants of dental floss were found around the neck and coronal part of a dental implant. After careful removal of these floss remnants and implant cleansing, a significant improvement in the peri-implant conditions in nine of ten cases was noted. In one case, peri-implant probing depth decreased substantially. However, bleeding on probing was still present. In vitro testing yielded that the application of various types of dental floss on the exposed rough implant surfaces may easily lead to tearing of floss fibers. This may result in the deposition of floss remnants on rough implant surfaces, which, in turn, may lead to the development of plaque-related peri-implant inflammation and, subsequently, bone loss. In case of exposed rough surfaces of the dental implant, the peri-implant conditions may be jeopardized by the application of dental floss, and hence, the utilization of interproximal brushes or toothpicks may be preferred for daily home care practices. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Peri-implantitis and late implant failures in postmenopausal women: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Gabriella; Arnhart, Christoph; Heuberer, Simone; Huber, Christian D; Watzek, Georg; Gruber, Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Systemic bone loss is a major cause of fractures in postmenopausal women and may also affect the jawbone; however, its consequences on the success of dental implants remain poorly understood. In this cross-sectional study, the relation between self-reported osteoporosis and the success rate of dental implants in an adult female population was evaluated. The primary outcome parameters were the occurrence of peri-implantitis and late implant failures. Women with unknown bone status were excluded from the study. The potential confounders age, recipient site, smoking, periodontal disease and time of loading were recorded. Data from 203 women with a mean age of 63 ± 9 years and 967 dental implants were investigated. The patients were classified according to their medical history into one of three groups: osteoporosis (47 women), osteopenia (16 women) and healthy controls (140 women). Patients with unknown bone status (n=26) were excluded. The multi-level statistical analysis showed no association between peri-implantitis [odds ratio (OR) 2.1; p=0.6] or implant failure [hazards ratio (HR) 2.5; p=0.2] and systemic bone loss. No relation was found between osteoporosis and peri-implantitis in an adult female population. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. [Physical therapy and rheumatism of soft tissues].

    PubMed

    Gross, D

    1982-08-28

    Soft tissue rheumatism (extraarticular rheumatism) is a group of common disorders found separately as independent disorders or as a symptom of systemic joint or spine diseases. The most frequent soft tissue rheumatisms are tendinopathies, rheumatism of muscles with myofascial pains, fibrositis of subcutaneous tissue and, finally, bursitis and inflammations of tendon sheaths. The commonest therapeutic procedures are non-steroidal anatirheumatic drugs, local infiltrations of corticosteroids, and physiotherapy. In the acute stages cold packs are the best physical measure against subjective pain. In subacute and chronic cases the pain in subcutaneous tissues can be lessened by connective tissue massage and underwater jet massage, muscle pain by heat and active exercises, and tendinopathies by ultrasonics and electrotherapy but very seldom by heat. In chronic bursitis and tendovaginitis, iontophoresis with potassium iodine may be helpful. Reflex pains in muscles are due to lesions of the spine and should therefore be treated by spine extension and manipulations. Every pain in soft tissue has one source in the anatomic lesion of the tissue and the second in psychogenic disorders. The latter must be sought when soft tissue pains are found all over the body on the lines of a generalized fibrositis syndrome.

  10. Soft tissue masses for the general orthopedic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, Edward W; Esther, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are a rare, heterogeneous group of malignancies that should be included in the differential diagnosis for any patient presenting with a soft tissue mass. This article reviews strategies for differentiating between benign and malignant soft tissue masses. Epidemiology, appropriate workup, and treatment of soft tissue sarcomas are reviewed.

  11. Peri-implant and periodontal microbiome diversity in aggressive periodontitis patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Vanessa; Nibali, Luigi; Spratt, David; Dopico, Jose; Mardas, Nikos; Petrie, Aviva; Donos, Nikolaos

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the bacterial microbiome in periodontal and peri-implant biofilms deriving from aggressive periodontitis patients (AgP) in conditions of health and disease. Ninety-one plaque samples were collected from 18 patients previously diagnosed and treated for AgP. The samples were taken from (i) 24 residual periodontal pockets (TD) (n = 6 patients), (ii) 24 healthy periodontal sites (TH) (n = 6 patients), (iii) 24 dental sites from the same implant patients (TM) (n = 6 patients), (iv) 5 peri-implantitis sites (II) (n = 2 patients), (v) 6 peri-mucositis sites (IM) (n = 2 patients) and (vi) 8 healthy implant sites (IH) (n = 2 patients). All subjects underwent periodontal clinical and radiographic assessments. Bacterial DNA was extracted, PCR amplified using 16S rRNA gene V5-V7 primers (barcoded amplicons 785F;1175R), purified, pooled at equimolar concentrations and sequenced (MiSeq, Illumina) yielding 250 bp paired-end reads. The 16S rRNA reads were filtered, assembled and analysed. The genera Propionibacterium, Paludibacter, Staphylococcus, Filifactor, Mogibacterium, Bradyrhizobium and Acinetobacter were unique to peri-implant sites (P = 0.05). In TM samples, different proportions and bacterial spp. were found when compared with the same patients' samples at implant sites. Specifically, Actinomyces (P = 0.013) and Corynebacterium (P = 0.030) genera showed to be significantly more abundant in the TM group when compared to the II. The highest phylogenetic diversity was observed in residual periodontal pocket sites (TD). Increased annual tooth loss rate and residual pocketing was related to high proportions of the genera Actinomyces, Porphyromonas, Prevotella, Streptococcus, Actinomycetaceae, TM7-3, Selenomonas, and Dialister, Treponema, Parvimonas and Peptostreptococcus in the TD group. Within the limitations of this pilot study, the periodontal and peri-implant microbiome presents a dissimilar taxonomic composition across different niches

  12. The diagnosis of soft tissue tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Serpell, J. W.; Fish, S. H.; Fisher, C.; Thomas, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    We prospectively analysed methods of diagnosis in 118 patients referred for definitive treatment with documented or presumed soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Of 65 patients with primary STS, 54 were biopsied before referral. Of these, 5 (9%) were biopsied by Tru-cut biopsy, 17 (32%) by incisional biopsy and 32 (59%) by excisional biopsy. The remaining 11 patients with primary STS, referred without biopsy, were all diagnosed by Tru-cut biopsy. An additional eight patients suspected of having STS were referred without biopsy and were found to have malignant tumours other than STS involving soft tissue by Tru-cut biopsy. Nineteen patients were proved to have benign soft tissue tumours; in 13 presumed to have STS, the diagnosis was unknown at referral. In four of these, biopsy was inappropriate. Of nine submitted to Tru-cut biopsy, an unequivocal diagnosis was made in 5 (56%) and incisional biopsy was required in the other four. Therefore, paradoxically, benign soft tissue tumours may be more difficult to diagnose with Tru-cut biopsy than malignant tumours. This study confirms the high degree of accuracy of Tru-cut biopsy in diagnosing malignant soft tissue tumours and highlights the disadvantages of open biopsy techniques. PMID:1416683

  13. Enabling Technologies for Advanced Soft Tissue Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Tools for measuring soft tissue properties. Workshop on Reality- Based Modeling of Tissues for Simulation and Robot -Assisted Surgery , at IEEE/RSJ IROS...protocols, mathematical models and tools, and validation techniques to determine and describe the biomechanical behavior of living tissues. The...surgical simulation systems that allow new doctors to experience their first surgeries without risk to real patients. They can be implemented in

  14. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani Smith, Stephanie; Hwang, Margaret; Rau, Christoph; Fishman, Andrew J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2011-03-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  15. Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Köhle, Olivia; Abt, Dominik; Rothermundt, Christian; Öhlschlegel, Christian; Brugnolaro, Christiane; Schmid, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare mesenchymal tumors. Amongst others, primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) of the kidney and synovial sarcoma of the kidney belong to the group of soft tissue sarcomas. Synovial sarcomas can occur almost anywhere in the body, most frequently, however, in the lower (62%) or upper extremities (21%). Metastases occur in 50-70% of cases, and thus the prognosis is poor. PNETs are rare, highly aggressive neoplastic lesions which mainly occur in the torso or axial skeleton in young adults. The prognosis is poor with a 5-year disease-free survival rate of 45-55%. The primary therapeutic approach is surgical resection. Most randomized studies assessing adjuvant chemotherapy for all types of localized soft tissue sarcomas did not show statistically significantly better overall survival times after chemotherapy, although they did show longer progression-free survival. We report on two cases of primary renal synovial sarcoma and one case of PNET of the kidney. PMID:25918607

  16. Degenerative and regenerative morphological aspects in peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Pais, Emil S; Slavescu, Dragos

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the tissues surrounding two early failed dental implants morphologically and ultrastructurally. In the first case, the implant's surface was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using an environmental scanning electron microscope and the surrounding tissues were analyzed by light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy. In the second case we used only LM. By SEM analysis, very thin connective tissue was seen at the implant's apex; in the middle part, highly vascularized connective tissue and poorly mineralized areas were found, and there were fewer mineralized areas at the implant's base. Histologically and ultrastructurally, we identified a heterogeneous cellular population including fibroblast-like cells and osteoblasts with abundant amorphous extracellular matrix, as well as a number of inflammatory cells, predominantly neutrophils. In a small area around the implant, microorganisms classified as Actinomyces were identified. In this case, degenerative aspects were predominantly caused by infection. In the second case, our observations focused on recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells, their proliferation and differentiation into epithelial cells with keratinocyte phenotype, and formation of de novo capillaries from mesenchymal progenitors of endothelial cells. These regenerative events were accompanied by multiple areas of mineralization, culminating in bone formation around the implant. Correlative microscopic observations are necessary to conduct in future studies, in various clinical conditions and post-operative stages, to better define the cellular events involved in healing and osseointegration; our observations clearly depict significant regenerative aspects despite the degenerative ones.

  17. Soft-tissue amyloidoma with associated plasmacytoma.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Bibhas Saha; Sarkar, Piyabi; Maity, Namrata; Nadeem, Sayed Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue amyloidoma with features similar to plasmacytoma, in absence of systemic amyloidosis, is an extremely rare finding. We hereby report the case of a 77 year old man who presented with a painless, nodular swelling on chest wall, diagnosed as soft tissue amyloidoma with plasma cell infiltration. Congo red staining was done to prove the presence of amyloid which showed characteristic "apple-green" birefringence on polarized microscopy. The plasma cells were monoclonal in origin as demonstrated by serum protein and immunofixation electrophoresis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second such reported case. However close follow up is required, as this patient may develop multiple myeloma in future.

  18. Reconstruction of Small Soft Tissue Nasal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Weathers, William M.; Cheng, David; Thornton, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Nasal defect repair has been one of the more challenging areas of reconstructive surgery due to the lack of uniform nasal skin thickness and complex contours. Currently, algorithms for medium to large nasal soft tissue defects have been well defined by various authors. Small defects, arbitrarily defined as 1 cm or less, still present significant challenges. In this article, the authors examine the options available to repair small soft tissue nasal defects and the appropriate situations in which each method is best suited. PMID:24872751

  19. Successful management of peri-implantitis with a regenerative approach: a consecutive series of 51 treated implants with 3- to 7.5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Froum, Stuart J; Froum, Scott H; Rosen, Paul S

    2012-02-01

    The results of a case series of 51 consecutively treated, peri-implantitis-affected implants in 38 patients with follow-up measurements from 3 to 7.5 years are presented. Each implant displayed bleeding on probing, probing depths ≥ 6 mm, and bone loss ≥ 4 mm prior to surgery. A successful regenerative approach including surface decontamination, use of enamel matrix derivative, a combination of platelet-derived growth factor with anorganic bovine bone or mineralized freeze-dried bone, and coverage with a collagen membrane or a subepithelial connective tissue graft was employed in all cases. Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included patients in which the greatest defect depth was visible on radiographs; group 2 included patients in which the greatest loss of bone was on the facial or oral aspect of the implant. Bone level changes in patients in group 2 were determined by probe sounding under local anesthesia. Probing depth reductions at 3 to 7.5 years of follow-up were 5.4 and 5.1 mm in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Concomitant bone level gain was 3.75 mm in group 1 and 3.0 mm in group 2. No implant in either group lost bone throughout the duration of the study. The results to date with this regenerative approach for the treatment of peri-implantitis appear to be encouraging.

  20. Evaluation of Peri-Implant Bone Response in Implants Retrieved for Fracture After More Than 20 Years of Loading: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Carlo; Piattelli, Adriano; Mortellaro, Carmen; Mangano, Francesco; Perrotti, Vittoria; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of human retrieved dental implants is a useful tool in the evaluation of implant success and failure. More human histological data are needed from samples of long-term implant service. The aim of the present case series was a histological and histomorphometrical evaluation of the peri-implant bone responses in implants retrieved for fracture after more than 20 years loading. The archives of the Implant Retrieval Center of the Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences of the University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy were searched. A total of 5 implants, retrieved after a loading period of more than 20 years, were found: 2 had been retrieved after 20 years, 1 after 22 years, 1 after 25 years, and 1 after 27 years. All these implants were histologically processed. Compact, mature bone in close contact with the implant surface was observed in all specimens, with no gaps or connective tissue at the interface. Bone in different maturation stages was found around some implants. Primarily newly formed bone was observed in proximity of the implant surface, while mature compact bone with many remodeling areas and cement lines were detected in areas distant from the implant. Many primary and secondary osteons were present. Bone to implant contact percentage varied from 37.2% to 76%. In conclusion, histology and histomorphometry showed that even after many years of function, all implants presented more than adequate bone to implant contact and they appeared to be very well integrated in the peri-implant bone.

  1. Peri-implant bone response around a human hydroxyapatite-coated implant retrieved after a 10-year loading period: a case report.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, Giovanna; Malchiodi, Luciano; Quaranta, Alessandro; Ghensi, Paolo; Piattelli, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    This case report presents a histologic and histomorphometric evaluation of the peri-implant tissues of a HA-coated implant retrieved due to peri-implantitis after a 10-year loading period. The implant was retrieved with a trephine and treated to obtain thin ground sections. At low-power magnification mostly compact, mature bone with small marrow spaces could be observed at the interface with the implant. The coating was always present in the areas where bone was detected, the bone was always in close contact with the coating, and there was no detachment between the metal and coating or between the coating and bone. Areas of bone remodeling were demonstrated by the presence of many secondary osteons and reversal lines close to the implant surface. The bone-implant contact percentage was 36.3% ± 1.2%. The percentage of the implant surface covered by the HA coating without bone, where bone may have detached during retrieval, was 32.6% ± 2.8%. This HA-coated implant, continued to demonstrate more than adequate BIC after many years of function and the potential to maintain osseointegration in the long term.

  2. Four-year follow-up of combined surgical therapy of advanced peri-implantitis evaluating two methods of surface decontamination.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Frank; Hegewald, Andrea; John, Gordon; Sahm, Narja; Becker, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the impact of two surface decontamination methods on the long-term outcomes following combined surgical resective/regenerative therapy of advanced peri-implantitis lesions. Seventeen patients (n = 17 combined supra- and intrabony-defects) completed the 48 months follow-up observation following access flap surgery, granulation tissue removal and implantoplasty at bucally and supracrestally exposed implant parts. The remaining unmodified implant surface areas were randomly treated using either (i) an Er:YAG laser (ERL), or (ii) plastic curets + cotton pellets + sterile saline (CPS), and augmented with a natural bone mineral + collagen membrane. At 48 months, CPS-treated sites tended to reveal higher reductions in mean BOP (CPS: 85.2 ± 16.4% versus ERL: 71.6 ± 24.9%) and CAL values (CPS: 1.5 ± 2.0 mm versus ERL: 1.2 ± 2.0 mm) when compared with the ERL group. In both groups, clinical outcomes were not directly influenced by the initial defect configuration. The 4-year clinical outcomes obtained following combined surgical resective/regenerative therapy of advanced peri-implantitis were not influenced by the method of surface decontamination. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Implant Materials Generate Different Peri-implant Inflammatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Slosar, Paul J.; Schneider, Jennifer M.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. An in vitro study examining factors produced by human mesenchymal stem cells on spine implant materials. Objective. The aim of this study was to examine whether the inflammatory microenvironment generated by cells on titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-alloy, TiAlV) surfaces is affected by surface microtexture and whether it differs from that generated on poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK). Summary of Background Data. Histologically, implants fabricated from PEEK have a fibrous connective tissue surface interface whereas Ti-alloy implants demonstrate close approximation with surrounding bone. Ti-alloy surfaces with complex micron/submicron scale roughness promote osteoblastic differentiation and foster a specific cellular environment that favors bone formation whereas PEEK favors fibrous tissue formation. Methods. Human mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on tissue culture polystyrene, PEEK, smooth TiAlV, or macro-/micro-/nano-textured rough TiAlV (mmnTiAlV) disks. Osteoblastic differentiation and secreted inflammatory interleukins were assessed after 7 days. Fold changes in mRNAs for inflammation, necrosis, DNA damage, or apoptosis with respect to tissue culture polystyrene were measured by low-density polymerase chain reaction array. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance, followed by Bonferroni's correction of Student's t-test. Results. Cells on PEEK upregulated mRNAs for chemokine ligand-2, interleukin (IL) 1β, IL6, IL8, and tumor necrosis factor. Cells grown on the mmnTiAlV had an 8-fold reduction in mRNAs for toll-like receptor-4. Cells grown on mmnTiAlV had reduced levels of proinflammatory interleukins. Cells on PEEK had higher mRNAs for factors strongly associated with cell death/apoptosis, whereas cells on mmnTiAlV exhibited reduced cytokine factor levels. All results were significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion. These results suggest that fibrous tissue around PEEK implants may be due to several factors: reduced osteoblastic differentiation of

  4. Prevalence of peri-implant inflammatory disease in patients with a history of periodontal disease who receive supportive periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Zorzano, Luis Antonio; Estefanía-Fresco, Ruth; Telletxea, Olatz; Bravo, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    To describe the status of implants in periodontally compromised patients who regularly receive supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) and to determine the factors associated to peri-implant inflammatory disease in those patients. Clinical and radiographic data of implants in periodontal patients who, after being treated and included in a SPT programme, wore implant prostheses for at least 6 months were recorded. The implants were classified according to the criteria of the 6th European Workshop on Periodontology in health, mucositis and peri-implantitis. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyse the individual and adjusted effects of each study variable on mucositis or peri-implantitis, using SUDAAN to account for clustering (multiple implants within the patient). A total of 786 implants were placed in 239 patients. At patient level, 60.3%, 24.7% and 15.1% were classified as healthy, mucositis and peri-implantitis patients, respectively. At implant level, the respective percentages were 77.4%, 12.8% and 9.8%. For mucositis, at implant level, the adjusted ORs indicate a significant association with plaque index (P = 0.050), type of periodontitis (P = 0.030) and location (P = 0.045). For peri-implantitis, the adjusted ORs indicate a significant association with plaque index (P < 0.001) and location (P = 0.002). The prevalence of peri-implant inflammatory disease in periodontal patients who regularly undergo SPT is clinically significant. The factors associated with peri-implant inflammatory disease were plaque index and implant location, and mucositis was also affected by the type of periodontitis the patient had. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma or Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  6. Soft tissue and epithelial models.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J A; den Braber, E T; Walboomers, X F; de Ruijter, J E

    1999-06-01

    The applicability of a biomaterial for the manufacturing of oral implants is determined by its physicochemical and geometric surface properties. Research, therefore, is concerned with the cellular reactions that occur when an implant material comes into contact with body tissues. For permucosal oral implants, this involves both the reaction of bone and gingival cells. In vitro cell culturing--including the use of various analytical techniques like light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and digital image analysis--is a good tool whereby investigators can obtain more insight into the relevant components of implant-tissue adhesion. In the current overview, the role of cell models in oral implant research is discussed, specifically with reference to responses of epithelial cells and fibroblasts.

  7. Osteocyte density in the peri-implant bone of implants retrieved after different time periods (4 weeks to 27 years).

    PubMed

    Piattelli, Adriano; Artese, Luciano; Penitente, Enrico; Iaculli, Flavia; Degidi, Marco; Mangano, Carlo; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Coelho, Paulo G; Perrotti, Vittoria; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2014-02-01

    Bone tissue is characterized by a constant turnover in response to mechanical stimuli, and osteocytes play an essential role in bone mechanical adaptation. However, little to no information has been published regarding osteocyte density as a function of implantation time in vivo. The aim of this retrospective histological study was to evaluate the osteocyte density of the peri-implant bone in implants retrieved because of different reasons in a time period from 4 weeks to 27 years. A total of 18 samples were included in the present study. Specimens were divided into 3 groups depending on the loading history of the implants: loading between 4 weeks and 7 months (group 1); loading between 1 and 5 years (group 2); loading between 14 and 27 years (group 3). All the samples were histologically evaluated and osteocyte density was obtained using the ratio of the number of osteocytes to the bone-area (mm(2) ). The osteocyte density values significantly increased in the Group 2 (1-5 years) compared with Group 1 (4 weeks-7 months), and significantly decreased in the Group 3 (14-27 years) compared to Group 2. No significant differences were detected between Group 1 and Group 3. The decrease in osteocyte density observed in samples that were in vivo for long periods of time under loading is possibly because of the fact that once the bone structure is well aligned and biomechanically competent, a lower number of osteocytes are necessary to keep the tissue homeostasis under loading.

  8. Prevalence of human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus in subgingival plaque at peri-implantitis, mucositis and healthy sites. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, S; Aleksic, Z; Dimitrijevic, B; Lekovic, V; Camargo, P; Kenney, B

    2011-03-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in peri-implantitis and mucositis sites and the correlation between herpesvirus and clinical parameters. Fifty-six dental implants (mean time of loading, 4.27±1.6 years) were evaluated (20 peri-implantitis, 18 mucositis, 18 healthy peri-implant sites.) The clinical parameters assessed were: visible plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), suppuration (SUP), probing depth (PD). A polymerase chain reaction assay identified HCMV and EBV in subgingival plaque samples. The percent of sites with plaque and BOP was significantly higher around mucositis and peri-implantitis compared with healthy implants (p<0.05). The mean PD around the implants was significantly higher in peri-implantitis, followed by mucositis and healthy implants (p<0.05). HCMV was detected in 13 (65%) and EBV in 9 (45%) of the 20 peri-implantitis sites. HCMV was found in 1 of the 18 (6%) healthy periodontal sites and EBV in 2 (11%). A statistically significant correlation was found between presence of HCMV and EBV subgingivally and clinical parameters of peri-implantitis and healthy sites. These results confirm the high prevalence of HCMV and EBV in subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis sites and suggest the viruses have a possible active pathogenic role in peri-implantitis. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  9. Soft tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zam, Azhar; Stelzle, Florian; Nkenke, Emeka; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Adler, Werner; Douplik, Alexandre

    2009-07-01

    Laser surgery gives the possibility to work remotely which leads to high precision, little trauma and high level sterility. However these advantages are coming with the lack of haptic feedback during the laser ablation of tissue. Therefore additional means are required to control tissue-specific ablation during laser surgery supporting the surgeon regardless of experience and skills. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy provides a straightforward and simple approach for optical tissue differentiation. We measured diffuse reflectance from four various tissue types ex vivo. We applied Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) to differentiate the four tissue types and computed the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Special emphasis was taken on the identification of nerve as the most crucial tissue for maxillofacial surgery. The results show a promise for differentiating soft tissues as guidance for tissue-specific laser surgery by means of the diffuse reflectance.

  10. Equine Model for Soft Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, J.E.; Lo, T.; Quinn, K.P.; Fourligas, N.; Georgakoudi, I.; Leisk, G.G.; Mazan, M.; Thane, K.E.; Taeymans, O.; Hoffman, A.M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kirker-Head, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue regeneration methods currently yield suboptimal clinical outcomes due to loss of tissue volume and a lack of functional tissue regeneration. Grafted tissues and natural biomaterials often degrade or resorb too quickly, while most synthetic materials do not degrade. In previous research we demonstrated that soft tissue regeneration can be supported using silk porous biomaterials for at least 18 months in vivo in a rodent model. In the present study, we scaled the system to a survival study using a large animal model and demonstrated the feasibility of these biomaterials for soft tissue regeneration in adult horses. Both slow and rapidly degrading silk matrices were evaluated in subcutaneous pocket and intramuscular defect depots. We showed that we can effectively employ an equine model over six months to simultaneously evaluate many different implants, reducing the number of animals needed. Furthermore, we were able to tailor matrix degradation by varying the initial format of the implanted silk. Finally, we demonstrate ultrasound imaging of implants to be an effective means for tracking tissue regeneration and implant degradation. PMID:25350377

  11. Supervised autonomous robotic soft tissue surgery.

    PubMed

    Shademan, Azad; Decker, Ryan S; Opfermann, Justin D; Leonard, Simon; Krieger, Axel; Kim, Peter C W

    2016-05-04

    The current paradigm of robot-assisted surgeries (RASs) depends entirely on an individual surgeon's manual capability. Autonomous robotic surgery-removing the surgeon's hands-promises enhanced efficacy, safety, and improved access to optimized surgical techniques. Surgeries involving soft tissue have not been performed autonomously because of technological limitations, including lack of vision systems that can distinguish and track the target tissues in dynamic surgical environments and lack of intelligent algorithms that can execute complex surgical tasks. We demonstrate in vivo supervised autonomous soft tissue surgery in an open surgical setting, enabled by a plenoptic three-dimensional and near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging system and an autonomous suturing algorithm. Inspired by the best human surgical practices, a computer program generates a plan to complete complex surgical tasks on deformable soft tissue, such as suturing and intestinal anastomosis. We compared metrics of anastomosis-including the consistency of suturing informed by the average suture spacing, the pressure at which the anastomosis leaked, the number of mistakes that required removing the needle from the tissue, completion time, and lumen reduction in intestinal anastomoses-between our supervised autonomous system, manual laparoscopic surgery, and clinically used RAS approaches. Despite dynamic scene changes and tissue movement during surgery, we demonstrate that the outcome of supervised autonomous procedures is superior to surgery performed by expert surgeons and RAS techniques in ex vivo porcine tissues and in living pigs. These results demonstrate the potential for autonomous robots to improve the efficacy, consistency, functional outcome, and accessibility of surgical techniques.

  12. Equine model for soft-tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bellas, Evangelia; Rollins, Amanda; Moreau, Jodie E; Lo, Tim; Quinn, Kyle P; Fourligas, Nicholas; Georgakoudi, Irene; Leisk, Gary G; Mazan, Melissa; Thane, Kristen E; Taeymans, Olivier; Hoffman, A M; Kaplan, D L; Kirker-Head, C A

    2015-08-01

    Soft-tissue regeneration methods currently yield suboptimal clinical outcomes due to loss of tissue volume and a lack of functional tissue regeneration. Grafted tissues and natural biomaterials often degrade or resorb too quickly, while most synthetic materials do not degrade. In previous research we demonstrated that soft-tissue regeneration can be supported using silk porous biomaterials for at least 18 months in vivo in a rodent model. In the present study, we scaled the system to a survival study using a large animal model and demonstrated the feasibility of these biomaterials for soft-tissue regeneration in adult horses. Both slow and rapidly degrading silk matrices were evaluated in subcutaneous pocket and intramuscular defect depots. We showed that we can effectively employ an equine model over 6 months to simultaneously evaluate many different implants, reducing the number of animals needed. Furthermore, we were able to tailor matrix degradation by varying the initial format of the implanted silk. Finally, we demonstrate ultrasound imaging of implants to be an effective means for tracking tissue regeneration and implant degradation.

  13. Soft tissues stability of cad-cam and stock abutments in anterior regions: 2-year prospective multicentric cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lops, Diego; Bressan, Eriberto; Parpaiola, Andrea; Sbricoli, Luca; Cecchinato, Denis; Romeo, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    Aim of this study was to verify if the type of implant abutment manufacturing, stock or cad-cam, could influence the maintenance of stable gingival margins around single restorations in anterior areas. After 16 weeks of healing, implants (Osseospeed, Astra Tech Dental Implant) were positioned. Depending on the different fixture inclination and the thickness of buccal peri-implant soft tissue, abutment selection resulted in four groups: Group 1 (patients with zirconia ZirDesign(®) stock abutments), Group 2 (titanium stock TiDesign(®) abutments), Group 3 (zirconia cad-cam abutments), and Group 4 (titanium cad-cam abutments). The following parameters were assessed: buccal gingival margin modification (BGM). The modification of the implant gingival margin was followed at 1 and 2 years of follow-up. A computerized analysis was performed for measurements. Differences between soft tissue margin at baseline and after 2 years measured the gingival margin recession. A general linear model was used to evaluate each group in relation to gingival recession after two years. Tukey's post hoc test was used to compare the mean REC indexes of each group of abutments. Seventy-two healthy patients (39 males and 33 females; mean age of 46 years) scheduled for single gap rehabilitation in anterior areas were enrolled. A 100% of implant survival rate was observed after 24 months of function. One failure occurred due to fracture of a Zirconia cad-cam abutment. Moreover, two abutment screw unscrewing were observed. Both for zirconia and titanium stock abutments (Group 1 and 2), the mean recession of implant buccal soft tissue was of 0.3 mm (SD of 0.3 and 0.4 mm, respectively). Soft tissue mean recession of zirconia and titanium cad-cam abutments (Group 3 and 4) was of 0.1 and -0.3 mm, respectively (SD of 0.3 and 0.4 mm, respectively). REC values of cad-cam titanium abutments (Group 4) were significantly lower than that of Group 1 (-0.57 mm), Group 2 (-0.61 mm), and Group 3 (-0.40 mm

  14. Soft tissue trauma and scar revision.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Steven R; Sjogren, Phayvanh P

    2014-11-01

    Numerous techniques and treatments have been described for scar revision, with most studies focusing on the adult population. A comprehensive review of the literature reveals a paucity of references related specifically to scar revision in children. This review describes the available modalities in pediatric facial scar revision. The authors have integrated current practices in soft tissue trauma and scar revision, including closure techniques and materials, topical therapy, steroid injection, cutaneous laser therapy, and tissue expanders.

  15. Olaratumab for advanced soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Alexander; O'brien, Michael P; Agulnik, Mark

    2017-07-01

    Olaratumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that blocks the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα). Its antagonistic behavior inhibits the receptor's tyrosine kinase activity, thereby, turning off the downstream signaling cascades responsible for soft tissue sarcoma tumorigenesis. In October 2016, olaratumab received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for its use in combination with doxorubicin for treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma. Areas covered: This drug profile takes a comprehensive look at the clinical studies leading to FDA approval of olaratumab as well as its safety and efficacy as a front-line treatment option for sarcoma patients. The literature search was primarily conducted using PubMed. Expert commentary: The combination of olaratumab plus doxorubicin has provided a new front-line therapeutic option for soft tissue sarcoma patients. An open-label phase Ib and randomized phase II trial in patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma demonstrated that the addition of olaratumab to doxorubicin prolonged progression-free survival by 2.5 months and overall survival by 11.8 months when compared to doxorubicin alone. Of importance, this clinically meaningful increase in overall survival did not come at the expense of a significantly greater number of toxicities. A phase III confirmatory trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02451943) will be completed in 2020.

  16. Lasers in soft tissue dental surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pick, Robert M.

    1990-06-01

    In the field of periodontics and oral surgery, the laser is a relatively new, but rapidly emerging, surgical tool. In the new area of soft tissue surgery, i.e., benign lesion and growths, the laser can completely replace the scalpel and offer the periodontist and the oral and maxillofacial surgeon a new and exciting alternative.

  17. Volumizing the face with soft tissue fillers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek

    2011-07-01

    This article discusses the role of injectable soft-tissue fillers in the aging face, and their clinical and chemical behavior. Temporary and permanent fillers are discussed, namely hyaluronic acids, calcium hydroxylapatite, poly-l-lactic acid, liquid silicone, and polymethylmethacrylate. Techniques and outcomes are presented. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling of indentation into inhomogeneous soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubicheva, A. N.; Goryacheva, I. G.; Dosaev, M. Z.; Su, F.-Ch.

    2017-01-01

    A simulation of a contact interaction of the indenter and inhomogeneous soft biological tissues is carried out. The soft tissue is modeled by the incompressible elastic body which contains structural inhomogeneities (spherical or longitudinal inclusions). The elastic moduli of inclusions are higher than the bulk soft tissue modulus. These inclusions may be considered, in particular, as the models of the pathological growths. The indenter has the form of a hollow hemisphere (shell). It is the model of the mechanoreceptor developed in [1] to study the mechanical properties of soft tissues. The hydrostatic pressure can be applied inside the shell. Based on the numerical analysis, the dependences of the contact area size, and contact pressure on penetration of the indenter into the sample for several values of the inclusion size, depth, its location, the ratio of the elastic moduli of inclusion and the surrounding material, but also for various values of hydrostatic pressure inside the shell were obtained. The possibility of an inverse problem solution for determining the mechanical properties of the inclusion, and its size by measuring the contact characteristics is discussed.

  19. Non-linear micromechanics of soft tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Zhao, Xuefeng; Lu, Xiao; Kassab, Ghassan

    2013-01-01

    Microstructure-based constitutive models have been adopted in recent studies of non-linear mechanical properties of biological soft tissues. These models provide more accurate predictions of the overall mechanical responses of tissues than phenomenological approaches. Based on standard approximations in non-linear mechanics, we classified the microstructural models into three categories: (1) uniform-field models with solid-like matrix, (2) uniform-field models with fluid-like matrix, and (3) second-order estimate models. The first two categories assume affine deformation field where the deformation of microstructure is the same as that of the tissue, regardless of material heterogeneities; i.e., they represent the upper bounds of the exact effective strain energy and stress of soft tissues. In addition, the first type is not purely structurally motivated and hence cannot accurately predict the microscopic mechanical behaviors of soft tissues. The third category considers realistic geometrical features, material properties of microstructure and interactions among them and allows for flexible deformation in each constituent. The uniform-field model with fluid-like matrix and the second-order estimate model are microstructure-based, and can be applied to different tissues based on micro-structural features. PMID:24817769

  20. Biomimetic 3D tissue printing for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Ha, Dong-Heon; Jang, Jinah; Han, Hyun Ho; Rhie, Jong-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Engineered adipose tissue constructs that are capable of reconstructing soft tissue with adequate volume would be worthwhile in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Tissue printing offers the possibility of fabricating anatomically relevant tissue constructs by delivering suitable matrix materials and living cells. Here, we devise a biomimetic approach for printing adipose tissue constructs employing decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) matrix bioink encapsulating human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). We designed and printed precisely-defined and flexible dome-shaped structures with engineered porosity using DAT bioink that facilitated high cell viability over 2 weeks and induced expression of standard adipogenic genes without any supplemented adipogenic factors. The printed DAT constructs expressed adipogenic genes more intensely than did non-printed DAT gel. To evaluate the efficacy of our printed tissue constructs for adipose tissue regeneration, we implanted them subcutaneously in mice. The constructs did not induce chronic inflammation or cytotoxicity postimplantation, but supported positive tissue infiltration, constructive tissue remodeling, and adipose tissue formation. This study demonstrates that direct printing of spatially on-demand customized tissue analogs is a promising approach to soft tissue regeneration.

  1. Thermomechanical analysis of soft-tissue thermotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aksan, Alptekin; McGrath, John J

    2003-10-01

    Soft-tissue thermotherapy based on sub-ablative heating of collagenous tissues finds wide-spread application in medicine such as tissue welding, thermokeratoplasty, skin resurfacing, elimination of discogenic pain in the spine and treatment of joint instability. In this paper, heat-induced thermomechanical response characteristics of collagenous tissues are quantified by means of in vitro experimentation with a representative model tissue (New Zealand white rabbit patellar tendon). Three distinct heat-induced thermomechanical response regimes (defined by the rate of deformation and the variation of material properties) are identified. Arrhenius damage integral representation of collagenous tissue thermal history is shown to be adequate in establishing the master response curves for quantification of thermomechanical response for modeling purposes. The trade-off between the improved kinematical stability and compromised mechanical stability of the heated collagenous tissue is shown to be the major challenge hindering the success of subablative thermotherapies.

  2. Comparative volumetric and clinical evaluation of peri-implant sulcular fluid and gingival crevicular fluid

    PubMed Central

    Prabhuji, Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah Venkatesh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Peri-implant sulcular fluid (PISF) has a production mechanism similar to gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). However, limited research has been performed comparing their behavior in response to inflammation. Hence, the aim of the present study was to comparatively evaluate PISF and GCF volume with varying degrees of clinical inflammatory parameters. Methods Screening of patients was conducted. Based on the perimucosal inflammatory status, 39 loaded implant sites were selected from 24 patients, with equal numbers of sites in healthy, peri-implant mucositis, and peri-implantitis subgroups. GCF collection was done from age- and sex-matched dentate patients, selected with gingival inflammatory status corresponding to the implant sites. Assessment of the inflammatory status for dental/implant sites was performed using probing depth (PD), plaque index/modified plaque index (PI/mPI), gingival index/simplified gingival index (GI/sGI), and modified sulcular bleeding index (BI). Sample collection was done using standardized absorbent paper strips with volumetric evaluation performed via an electronic volume quantification device. Results Positive correlation of the PISF and GCF volume was seen with increasing PD and clinical inflammatory parameters. A higher correlation of GCF with PD (0.843) was found when compared to PISF (0.771). PISF expressed a higher covariation with increasing grades of sGI (0.885), BI (0.841), and mPI (0.734), while GCF established a moderately positive correlation with GI (0.694), BI (0.696), and PI (0.729). Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, except for minor fluctuations, GCF and PISF volumes demonstrated a similar nature and volumetric pattern through increasing grades of inflammation, with PISF showing better correlation with the clinical parameters. PMID:24236246

  3. Prevalence of peri-implantitis in patients with implant-supported fixed prostheses.

    PubMed

    Schuldt Filho, Guenther; Dalago, Haline Renata; Oliveira de Souza, João Gustavo; Stanley, Kyle; Jovanovic, Sascha; Bianchini, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate periimplantitis prevalence in patients using implant-supported fixed prostheses that did not have any routine maintenance care. A total of 161 implants (27 patients) were evaluated in patients using implant-supported fixed prostheses. Collected data included information related to patient general health and local factors such as characteristics of implants, time in function, type of loading, positioning, Modified Bleeding Index, bacterial plaque, bleeding on probing (BOP), marginal recession, probing depth (PD), keratinized mucosa, and radiographic bone loss (BL). Factors related to the prostheses were also evaluated. The exclusion criteria were patients that have had any follow-up visit for plaque control of the prosthesis and/or the implants. From a total of 161 implants, 116 (72%) presented without peri-implantitis (PD > 4 mm + BOP + BL > 2 mm) while 45 (28%) had some sign of the disease. Implants placed in the maxilla were 2.98 times more likely to develop the disease (P < .05). Moreover, patients aged ≤ 60 years old were 3.24 times more likely to develop peri-implantitis (P < .05). Another analysis with statistical relevance (P < .05) was that implants with less than 3 mm interimplant distance were three times more likely to have peri-implantitis. There was no statistical relevance considering other analyses. It can be concluded that patients aged ≤ 60 years have a greater chance of presenting periimplantitis, as well as for implants positioned in the maxilla and those placed with an interimplant distance < 3 mm.

  4. Reimplantation of dental implants following ligature-induced peri-implantitis: a pilot study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Levin, Liran; Zigdon, Hadar; Coelho, Paulo G; Suzuki, Marcelo; Machtei, Eli E

    2013-02-01

    This preliminary investigation aimed to evaluate the potential of contaminated implants to reosseointegrate into pristine sites and, in addition, to assess the potential of osseointegration of new implants in peri-implantitis sockets in a canine model. All mandibular premolars were bilaterally extracted from two mongrel dogs. Following 12 weeks of healing, two dental implants were inserted on each hemiarch. Forty-five days following implant placement, a silk ligature secured with cyanoacrylate was placed around the implants' cervical region in order to induce peri-implantitis. After another 45 days from ligature placement, the implants were mechanically removed using counter rotation with a ratchet and were reimplanted without any decontamination (neither rinsing nor chemical or mechanical cleaning) in adjacent pristine zones. In sites where implants were removed, new, wider-diameter implants were placed in the infected sockets. Forty-five days following reimplantation surgery, the dogs were sacrificed; nondecalcified specimens were processed and toluidine blue stained for morphologic and morphometric (bone-to-implant contact [BIC]) assessment under an optical microscope. In dog 1 all the implants (both in the pristine and in the infected sites) survived and osseointegrated while in dog 2, six out of eight implants failed to osseointegrate and exfoliated. Overall, the mean BIC of all implants was 51.08% (SD 20.54). The mean BIC for the infected implants placed into pristine sites was 51.48% ± 26.29% (SD) and the mean BIC for the new implants in peri-implantitis socket was 50.58% ± 14.27% (SD). Within the limitations of this preliminary investigation, especially the small number of animals, osseointegration seems to be achievable both in infected sites and around contaminated implant surfaces. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Altered expectations on dental implant therapy; views of patients referred for treatment of peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Kajsa H; Wennström, Jan L; Berglundh, Tord; Abrahamsson, Ingemar

    2017-04-01

    The aim was to explore patients' reactions on being diagnosed with peri-implantitis, their opinions on dental implant therapy and expectations on treatment of the disease. The study subjects were patients referred to a specialist clinic for treatment of peri-implantitis. The method of grounded theory was used in collecting and analyzing data. Audiotaped, thematized open-ended interviews were conducted. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and consecutively analyzed in hierarchical coding processes that continued until saturation was met (n = 15). In the analysis, a conceptual model was generated that illuminated a process among patients. From having very high initial expectations on dental implant therapy as a permanent solution of oral/dental problems, patients realized that dental implants, such as teeth, require continuous care and that there is no guarantee for that dental implants provides a treatment alternative free from future problems. The core concept of the model "altered expectations on dental implant therapy" was composed of three main categories: "initial expectations on dental implant therapy and living with dental implants", "being referred to periodontist and become diagnosed with peri-implantitis" and "investing again in an expensive therapy with no guarantee for the future". Patients may have unrealistically high expectations on dental implant therapy. The results illuminate the importance of patient-centered communication in dentistry and that treatment decisions should be based not only on professional expertise but also on expectations, abilities, wishes and life circumstances of the individual patient. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Probiotic supplements and debridement of peri-implant mucositis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hallström, Hadar; Lindgren, Susann; Widén, Cecilia; Renvert, Stefan; Twetman, Svante

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of probiotic supplements in adjunct to conventional management of peri-implant mucositis. Forty-nine adult patients with peri-implant mucositis were consecutively recruited after informed consent. After initial mechanical debridement and oral hygiene instructions, the patients received a topical oil application (active or placebo) followed by twice-daily intake of lozenges (active or placebo) for 3 months. The active products contained a mix of two strains of Lactobacillus reuteri. Patients were clinically monitored and sampled at baseline and after 1, 2, 4, 12 and 26 weeks. The clinical end-points were pocket-probing depth (PPD), plaque index (PI) and bleeding on probing (BOP). In addition, the subgingival microbiota was processed with checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization and samples of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) were analyzed for selected cytokines with the aid of multiplex immunoassays. After 4 and 12 weeks, all clinical parameters were improved in both the test and the placebo group. PPD and BOP were significantly reduced compared with baseline (p < 0.05), but no significant differences were displayed between the groups. The clinical improvements persisted 3 months after the intervention. No major alterations of the subgingival microflora were disclosed and the levels of inflammatory mediators in GCF did not differ between the groups. Mechanical debridement and oral hygiene reinforcement resulted in clinical improvement of peri-implant mucositis and a reduction in cytokine levels. Probiotic supplements did not provide added benefit to placebo.

  7. The team approach to managing dental implant complications: strategies for treating peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Paul S

    2013-10-01

    Practitioners who are knowledgeable about the risk factors identified by the Consensus Report of the Sixth European Workshop on Periodontology and who are trained in techniques to eliminate or reduce them may be able to significantly improve long-term implant outcomes. A careful review of the literature suggests that this will include treatment planning, restoring a patient to periodontal heath before initiating care, appropriate implant selection, complete cement removal, and diligent recordkeeping that will track changes and enable early intervention should complications arise. In the case of the biologic complication of peri-implantitis, recent reports suggest that regenerative care may restore implants back to health.

  8. Multiscale mechanical modeling of soft biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2008-10-01

    Soft biological tissues include both native and artificial tissues. In the human body, tissues like the articular cartilage, arterial wall, and heart valve leaflets are examples of structures composed of an underlying network of collagen fibers, cells, proteins and molecules. Artificial tissues are less complex than native tissues and mainly consist of a fiber polymer network with the intent of replacing lost or damaged tissue. Understanding of the mechanical function of these materials is essential for many clinical treatments (e.g. arterial clamping, angioplasty), diseases (e.g. arteriosclerosis) and tissue engineering applications (e.g. engineered blood vessels or heart valves). This thesis presents the derivation and application of a multiscale methodology to describe the macroscopic mechanical function of soft biological tissues incorporating directly their structural architecture. The model, which is based on volume averaging theory, accounts for structural parameters such as the network volume fraction and orientation, the realignment of the fibers in response to strain, the interactions among the fibers and the interactions between the fibers and the interstitial fluid in order to predict the overall tissue behavior. Therefore, instead of using a constitutive equation to relate strain to stress, the tissue microstructure is modeled within a representative volume element (RVE) and the macroscopic response at any point in the tissue is determined by solving a micromechanics problem in the RVE. The model was applied successfully to acellular collagen gels, native blood vessels, and electrospun polyurethane scaffolds and provided accurate predictions for permeability calculations in isotropic and oriented fiber networks. The agreement of model predictions with experimentally determined mechanical properties provided insights into the mechanics of tissues and tissue constructs, while discrepancies revealed limitations of the model framework.

  9. Soft tissue infections and the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Daniels, T; Bohnen, J M

    1996-12-01

    Soft tissue infections are classified as local or spreading. Spreading soft tissue infections are potentially life-threatening conditions, requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment. The information presented is based on a literature review and the authors' clinical experience. Diagnosis of soft tissue infections is aimed at determining the level of infection (skin, fascia, muscle) and whether necrosis is present. The bacteriology of these infections is varied and is of secondary importance. Treatment of skin infections that have no dead tissue is with antibiotics alone. Infections at the fascial or muscle level and those with necrosis at any level require surgical debridement and adjuvant antibiotics. The feet of diabetic patients are prone to plantar forefoot ulcers associated with tissue destruction and infection. The vast majority are caused by mechanical factors. If local immune defenses are adequate, bacterial colonization occurs without infection. Most diabetic foot ulcers will respond to relief of pressure, which may require total contact casting. Antibiotics and debridement are required in infected or deep ulcers, or when the ulcer does not respond to total contact casting.

  10. [Soft tissue defects treated with perforator flaps].

    PubMed

    Weum, Sven; de Weerd, Louis; Klein, Steven; Hage, J Joris

    2008-01-31

    Treatment of soft tissue defects caused by trauma, tumour surgery or pressure sores is a challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Although contour and function may be restored by tissue transposition, traditional methods often cause significant donor site morbidity. This article describes how increased understanding of vascular anatomy has led to the development of new techniques. The article is based on textbooks of plastic surgery, selected articles and own clinical experience. Pedicled and free perforator flaps represent the latest development in surgical treatment of soft tissue defects. The use of perforator flaps can considerably reduce the disadvantages that are associated with other surgical methods. The use of perforator flaps demands microsurgical skills, but has many advantages. Reliable vascular supply and a good aesthetical result can be combined with minimal donor site morbidity. In many cases this technique may even give sensibility to the reconstructed area.

  11. Distinguishing predictive profiles for patient-based risk assessment and diagnostics of plaque induced, surgically and prosthetically triggered peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Canullo, Luigi; Tallarico, Marco; Radovanovic, Sandro; Delibasic, Boris; Covani, Ugo; Rakic, Mia

    2016-10-01

    To investigate whether specific predictive profiles for patient-based risk assessment/diagnostics can be applied in different subtypes of peri-implantitis. This study included patients with at least two implants (one or more presenting signs of peri-implantitis). Anamnestic, clinical, and implant-related parameters were collected and scored into a single database. Dental implant was chosen as the unit of analysis, and a complete screening protocol was established. The implants affected by peri-implantitis were then clustered into three subtypes in relation to the identified triggering factor: purely plaque-induced or prosthetically or surgically triggered peri-implantitis. Statistical analyses were performed to compare the characteristics and risk factors between peri-implantitis and healthy implants, as well as to compare clinical parameters and distribution of risk factors between plaque, prosthetically and surgically triggered peri-implantitis. The predictive profiles for subtypes of peri-implantitis were estimated using data mining tools including regression methods and C4.5 decision trees. A total of 926 patients previously treated with 2812 dental implants were screened for eligibility. Fifty-six patients (6.04%) with 332 implants (4.44%) met the study criteria. Data from 125 peri-implantitis and 207 healthy implants were therefore analyzed and included in the statistical analysis. Within peri-implantitis group, 51 were classified as surgically triggered (40.8%), 38 as prosthetically triggered (30.4%), and 36 as plaque-induced (28.8%) peri-implantitis. For peri-implantitis, 51 were associated with surgical risk factor (40.8%), 38 with prosthetic risk factor (30.4%), 36 with purely plaque-induced risk factor (28.8%). The variables identified as predictors of peri-implantitis were female sex (OR = 1.60), malpositioning (OR = 48.2), overloading (OR = 18.70), and bone reconstruction (OR = 2.35). The predictive model showed 82.35% of accuracy and

  12. Staphylococcus aureus soft tissue infection may increase the risk of subsequent staphylococcal soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Cindy; Gjoni, Shpresa; Zenelaj, Besa; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Hakko, Elif; Uçkay, Ilker

    2017-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of soft tissue infections. It is unknown, however, if a patient who has had such an infection is at greater risk for future soft tissue infections with S. aureus. We conducted an epidemiological survey of adult patients hospitalized in the only public hospital in Geneva for treatment (usually combined surgical and medical) of a soft tissue infection caused by S. aureus. By reviewing nursing and medical records from the emergency department and hospital wards, we assessed whether or not they developed any other soft tissue infections (excluding a recurrence) after or before the index one. Among 1023 index episodes of soft tissue infections, 670 (65%) were caused by S. aureus, of which 47 were caused by methicillin-resistant strains (30 healthcare-associated and 17 community-acquired). The patients' median age was 51 years and 334 (34%) were immune-compromised. The median time span between the patient's first and last consultation (for any reason) in our hospital was 21.4 years (interquartile range, 10-30 years). In addition to their index infection, 124 patients (12%) developed a new nosocomial or community-acquired soft tissue infection. Among the index cases with an S. aureus infection, 92 (14%) had another soft tissue infection, compared to 32 (9%) who had a non-staphylococcal index infection (Pearson-χ(2)-test; p=0.03). Similarly, patients with an index S. aureus infection, compared to those with a non-S. aureus infection, had a higher rate of another soft tissue infection caused by S. aureus (χ(2)-test; p<0.01). In multivariate analysis, an index infection due to S. aureus shows a high association to further S. aureus soft tissue infections (logistic regression; odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.4-4.6). Among adult patients hospitalised for a soft tissue infection, those infected with S. aureus (compared with other pathogens) may be at higher risk of a subsequent soft tissue infection, particularly with S

  13. Hard-Soft Tissue Interface Engineering.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Oliver E; Oyen, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system is comprised of three distinct tissue categories: structural mineralized tissues, actuating muscular soft tissues, and connective tissues. Where connective tissues - ligament, tendon and cartilage - meet with bones, a graded interface in mechanical properties occurs that allows the transmission of load without creating stress concentrations that would cause tissue damage. This interface typically occurs over less than 1 mm and contains a three order of magnitude difference in elastic stiffness, in addition to changes in cell type and growth factor concentrations among others. Like all engineered tissues, the replication of these interfaces requires the production of scaffolds that will provide chemical and mechanical cues, resulting in biologically accurate cellular differentiation. For interface tissues however, the scaffold must provide spatially graded chemical and mechanical cues over sub millimetre length scales. Naturally, this complicates the manufacture of the scaffolds and every stage of their subsequent cell seeding and growth, as each region has different optimal conditions. Given the higher degree of difficulty associated with replicating interface tissues compared to surrounding homogeneous tissues, it is likely that the development of complex musculoskeletal tissue systems will continue to be limited by the engineering of connective tissues interfaces with bone.

  14. Transcriptomic analysis of the myometrium during peri-implantation period and luteolysis--the study on the pig model.

    PubMed

    Franczak, Anita; Wojciechowicz, Bartosz; Kolakowska, Justyna; Zglejc, Kamila; Kotwica, Genowefa

    2014-12-01

    In pigs, implantation begins with the attachment of embryos to the endometrium. As the process is regulated by the expression of numerous genes, endometrial transcriptomic profiles have been extensively studied in early gravid pigs. However, the myometrium, a secretory tissue, should not be neglected, as it can also participate in the regulation of implantation in early pregnant pigs. To clarify this issue, the transcriptomic profile of the porcine myometrium during the peri-implantation period (i.e. on days 15 to 16 of pregnancy) was compared with the profile observed during luteolysis (i.e. on days 15 to 16 of the oestrous cycle) with an Agilent's Porcine (V2) Two-Colour Gene Expression Microarray 4 × 44 (Agilent, USA). Analysis of the microarray data revealed that of 526 unique, accurately annotated genes, the expression of 271 unique genes was upregulated, while the expression of 255 genes was downregulated in pregnant versus cyclic myometrium. The in-depth data analysis revealed differential expression of genes encoding for factors involved in immunomodulation, tissue growth and differentiation, and prostaglandin and steroid biosynthesis and action. Moreover, the comparison of the obtained data on the myometrial transcriptome with our previously published results on the endometrial transcriptome allowed us to determine substantial differences in the regulatory function of both tissues. The new insights into the function of the myometrium of early pregnant pigs obtained here are in agreement with our previous results that suggest that this tissue plays an important role in providing optimal conditions for developing embryos. Therefore, the importance of the myometrium as an active embryo signal-responsive tissue during early pregnancy cannot be underestimated.

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms are differentially expressed in peri-implantation porcine conceptuses.

    PubMed

    Blitek, Agnieszka; Szymanska, Magdalena

    2017-10-01

    increased on Days 11-12 compared to Days 10-11 (P < 0.05). PPARD and PPARG mRNA expression showed strong positive correlations with PTGS2 mRNA expression (P < 0.0001). Additionally, PPARD gene expression correlated with SLC2A1 and IL1B mRNA expression (P < 0.01). Collectively, these results indicate that among all three PPARs expressed in peri-implantation porcine conceptuses, PPARD and PPARG may be involved in conceptus elongation before implantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Classification and Clinical Management of Retrograde Peri-implantitis Associated with Apical Periodontitis: A Proposed Classification System and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sarmast, Nima D; Wang, Howard H; Sajadi, Ali S; Angelov, Nikola; Dorn, Samuel O

    2017-08-16

    Biological complications involving dental implants include peri-implant diseases such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. The latter presents with progressive bone loss from the alveolar crest in a coronal apical direction. However, a separate disease entity termed retrograde peri-implantitis (RPI), which presents with progressive bone loss at the periapex of the implant, also exists and may be of particular interest to endodontists because it typically presents with periapical pathology of both the implant and adjacent tooth or at a site that previously housed an endodontically treated tooth. The reported prevalence of retrograde peri-implantitis is 0.26%, which is much lower than the prevalence of marginal peri-implantitis; however, its incidence increases to 7.8% when teeth adjacent to the implant exhibit an endodontic infection. It is positively correlated with a shorter distance between the implant and the adjacent tooth and a shorter time elapsed from the endodontically treated adjacent tooth to implant placement. This case report describes a patient diagnosed with an RPI lesion (RPI) associated with an adjacent endodontically treated tooth with a persistent periapical radiolucent lesion. The diagnosis, possible etiology, and management of the RPI lesion is thoroughly reported including follow-up visits showing complete resolution after subsequent periodontal and endodontic therapy. Endodontic evaluation of teeth adjacent to the implant site should be performed for primary prevention of RPI. Proper classification of RPI will aid in determining the course of treatment; class 1 and 2 cases require endodontic therapy of the involved teeth for healing to occur. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of pathogenic genes in peri-implantitis from implant clustering failure patients: a whole-exome sequencing pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soohyung; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jihye; Kim, Sanguk; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Han, Dong-Hoo

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a frequently occurring gum disease linked to multi-factorial traits with various environmental and genetic causalities and no known concrete pathogenesis. The varying severity of peri-implantitis among patients with relatively similar environments suggests a genetic aspect which needs to be investigated to understand and regulate the pathogenesis of the disease. Six unrelated individuals with multiple clusterization implant failure due to severe peri-implantitis were chosen for this study. These six individuals had relatively healthy lifestyles, with minimal environmental causalities affecting peri-implantitis. Research was undertaken to investigate pathogenic genes in peri-implantitis albeit with a small number of subjects and incomplete elimination of environmental causalities. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on collected saliva samples via self DNA collection kit. Common variants with minor allele frequencies (MAF) > = 0.05 from all control datasets were eliminated and variants having high and moderate impact and loss of function were used for comparison. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed to reveal functional groups associated with the genetic variants. 2,022 genes were left after filtering against dbSNP, the 1000 Genomes East Asian population, and healthy Korean randomized subsample data (GSK project). 175 (p-value <0.05) out of 927 gene sets were obtained via GSEA (DAVID). The top 10 was chosen (p-value <0.05) from cluster enrichment showing significance of cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and metal ion binding. Network analysis was applied to find relationships between functional clusters. Among the functional groups, ion metal binding was located in the center of all clusters, indicating dysfunction of regulation in metal ion concentration might affect cell morphology or cell adhesion, resulting in implant failure. This result may demonstrate the feasibility of and provide pilot data for a larger research project aimed at

  18. Investigation of Pathogenic Genes in Peri-Implantitis from Implant Clustering Failure Patients: A Whole-Exome Sequencing Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soohyung; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jihye; Kim, Sanguk; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Han, Dong-Hoo

    2014-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a frequently occurring gum disease linked to multi-factorial traits with various environmental and genetic causalities and no known concrete pathogenesis. The varying severity of peri-implantitis among patients with relatively similar environments suggests a genetic aspect which needs to be investigated to understand and regulate the pathogenesis of the disease. Six unrelated individuals with multiple clusterization implant failure due to severe peri-implantitis were chosen for this study. These six individuals had relatively healthy lifestyles, with minimal environmental causalities affecting peri-implantitis. Research was undertaken to investigate pathogenic genes in peri-implantitis albeit with a small number of subjects and incomplete elimination of environmental causalities. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on collected saliva samples via self DNA collection kit. Common variants with minor allele frequencies (MAF) > = 0.05 from all control datasets were eliminated and variants having high and moderate impact and loss of function were used for comparison. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed to reveal functional groups associated with the genetic variants. 2,022 genes were left after filtering against dbSNP, the 1000 Genomes East Asian population, and healthy Korean randomized subsample data (GSK project). 175 (p-value <0.05) out of 927 gene sets were obtained via GSEA (DAVID). The top 10 was chosen (p-value <0.05) from cluster enrichment showing significance of cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and metal ion binding. Network analysis was applied to find relationships between functional clusters. Among the functional groups, ion metal binding was located in the center of all clusters, indicating dysfunction of regulation in metal ion concentration might affect cell morphology or cell adhesion, resulting in implant failure. This result may demonstrate the feasibility of and provide pilot data for a larger research project aimed at

  19. Accuracy of periapical radiography in assessing bone level in implants affected by peri-implantitis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    García-García, Marta; Mir-Mari, Javier; Benic, Goran I; Figueiredo, Rui; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of periapical radiography in measuring peri-implant bone levels. Twenty-five subjects with 46 implants in need of surgical treatment for peri-implantitis were included in this cross-sectional study. Prior to surgery, periapical radiographs were taken, a prediction of type of defect was made and radiographic peri-implant bone levels (RxBL) were determined at the mesial and distal aspects. Intra-operatively, the peri-implant bone level (SurgBL) was assessed mesially, distally, buccally and orally and the type of defect was recorded. A paired t-test was applied to detect differences between inter-proximal RxBL and SurgBL. ANOVA was used to compare SurgBL at different circumferential positions. The mean inter-proximal RxBL was 4.0 ± 2.2 mm and the mean inter-proximal SurgBL was 5.3 ± 2.3 mm. The difference between RxBL and SurgBL was statistically significant (p = 0.014). There were no significant differences in SurgBL at the mesial, distal, buccal and oral aspects (p > 0.05). The intra-operatively measured peri-implant bone levels were more apical than the radiographic bone levels. The intra-operatively assessed peri-implant bone levels (SurgBL) were similar at all the circumferential positions around the implant. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. International Brainstorming Meeting on Etiologic and Risk Factors of Peri-implantitis, Montegrotto (Padua, Italy), August 2014.

    PubMed

    Canullo, Luigi; Schlee, Markus; Wagner, Wilfried; Covani, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    The emerging literature has recently reported an alarming increase in peri-implantitis. This disease is typically described as the result of an imbalance between host response and bacterial load, supported by gram-negative anaerobic microflora. The current literature on the prevention and treatment of peri-implantitis does not allow for the extraction of applicable clinical information. In fact, the lack of efficacy of the current treatment methods may be a result of insufficient understanding of the biology. The aim of this position paper was to try to reevaluate the etiopathogenesis of peri-implantitis, highlighting the principal clinically induced triggering factors of the disease. The consensus conference provided strong evidence to suggest that a different microbiologic flora (slightly different from that collected around teeth affected by periodontitis) could support peri-implantitis. However, the evidence to support a consensus statement regarding clinically triggering factors (surgical, prosthetic, and biomechanical) for peri-implantitis is only of moderate strength (cohort studies or consistent results from long-term, well-populated case series). Expert opinion led the consensus group to support the following: rectifying the number of peri-implant inflammatory situations caused by surgical, restorative, or material complications may lower the number of infections to a more realistic figure and may suggest different and more appropriate treatment plans. At the same time, it can be stated that implant material, shape and surface characteristics, procedures and biomaterials used for bone augmentation, and incorrect prosthetic procedures and biomechanical plans could also be risk factors for the occurrence and progression of periimplantitis.

  1. Collagen-Coated Bovine Bone in Peri-implantitis Defects: A Pilot Study on a Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, Shaun A; Steiner, Rob; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2016-01-01

    As dental implants have become routine therapy, clinicians are more frequently being faced with treating peri-implantitis. To date, no single treatment protocol has been shown to be the preferred means to treat peri-implantitis. The aim of this retrospective case series is to present a novel approach utilizing porcine collagen-coated bovine bone (CBB) to treat peri-implantitis. Eleven patients, with no history of periodontitis, presenting with peri-implantitis around a single restored dental implant, were included in the study. At initial and follow-up examinations, bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), and gingival margin location (GM) were recorded. Following surgical debridement of the peri-implant defect and treatment of the implant surface with a 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate solution, bony defects were grafted with CBB. All patients had 12 months of follow-up. Upon presentation, average PD at the deepest site (DS) was 7.6 ± 1.9 mm. At the time of surgery, excess cement was found around nine implants (81%). All patients healed uneventfully without postoperative complications. At 6 and 12 months, all implants showed favorable results with average DS PD reduction of 3.9 ± 1.5 mm and 4.1 ± 1.6 mm, respectively. All implants showed radiographic signs of bone fill, while GM showed no changes from preoperative measurements at either 6 (0.1 ± 0.5 mm) or 12 (0.0 ± 0.6 mm) months. The use of a porcine collagen-coated bovine bone graft to treat peri-implantitis represents a potentially predictable therapeutic modality. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to substantiate the treatment outcomes.

  2. The Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in the Treatment of Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Libotte, Fabrizio; Sabatini, Silvia; Grassi, Felice Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of addition of the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy to the conventional approach in the treatment of peri-implantitis. Materials and Methods. Forty patients were randomly assigned to test or control groups. Patients were assessed at baseline and at six (T1), twelve (T2), and twenty-four (T3) weeks recording plaque index (PlI), probing pocket depth (PPD), and bleeding on probing (BOP); control group received conventional periodontal therapy, while test group received photodynamic therapy in addition to it. Result. Test group showed a 70% reduction in the plaque index values and a 60% reduction in PD values compared to the baseline. BOP and suppuration were not detectable. Control group showed a significative reduction in plaque index and PD. Discussion. Laser therapy has some advantages in comparison to traditional therapy, with faster and greater healing of the wound. Conclusion. Test group showed after 24 weeks a better value in terms of PPD, BOP, and PlI, with an average pocket depth value of 2 mm, if compared with control group (3 mm). Our results suggest that antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with diode laser and phenothiazine chloride represents a reliable adjunctive treatment to conventional therapy. Photodynamic therapy should, however, be considered a coadjuvant in the treatment of peri-implantitis associated with mechanical (scaling) and surgical (grafts) treatments. PMID:27429618

  3. Therapeutic Interaction of Systemically-Administered Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Peri-Implant Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Ryosuke; Atsuta, Ikiru; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Matsuura, Yuri; Furuhashi, Akihiro; Tsukiyama, Yoshihiro; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of systemically transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on the peri-implant epithelial sealing around dental implants. Materials and Methods MSCs were isolated from bone marrow of donor rats and expanded in culture. After recipient rats received experimental titanium dental implants in the bone sockets after extraction of maxillary right first molars, donor rat MSCs were intravenously transplanted into the recipient rats. Results The injected MSCs were found in the oral mucosa surrounding the dental implants at 24 hours post-transplantation. MSC transplantation accelerated the formation of the peri-implant epithelium (PIE)-mediated mucosa sealing around the implants at an early stage after implantation. Subsequently, enhanced deposition of laminin-332 was found along the PIE-implant interface at 4 weeks after the replacement. We also observed enhanced attachment and proliferation of oral mucous epithelial cells. Conclusion Systemically transplanted MSCs might play a critical role in reinforcing the epithelial sealing around dental implants. PMID:24651408

  4. Does the number of implants have any relation with peri-implant disease?

    PubMed

    Passoni, Bernardo Born; Dalago, Haline Renata; Schuldt Filho, Guenther; Oliveira de Souza, João Gustavo; Benfatti, César Augusto Magalhães; Magini, Ricardo de Souza; Bianchini, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the number of pillar implants of implant-supported fixed prostheses and the prevalence of periimplant disease. Clinical and radiographic data were obtained for the evaluation. The sample consisted of 32 patients with implant-supported fixed prostheses in function for at least one year. A total of 161 implants were evaluated. Two groups were formed according to the number of implants: G1) ≤5 implants and G2) >5 implants. Data collection included modified plaque index (MPi), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), width of keratinized mucosa (KM) and radiographic bone loss (BL). Clinical and radiographic data were grouped for each implant in order to conduct the diagnosis of mucositis or peri-implantitis. Clinical parameters were compared between groups using Student's t test for numeric variables (KM, PD and BL) and Mann-Whitney test for categorical variables (MPi and BOP). KM and BL showed statistically significant differences between both groups (p<0.001). Implants from G1 - 19 (20.43%)--compared with G2 - 26 (38.24%)--showed statistically significant differences regarding the prevalence of peri-implantitis (p=0.0210). It seems that more than 5 implants in total fixed rehabilitations increase bone loss and consequently the prevalence of implants with periimplantitis. Notwithstanding, the number of implants does not have any influence on the prevalence of mucositis.

  5. Does the number of implants have any relation with peri-implant disease?

    PubMed Central

    PASSONI, Bernardo Born; DALAGO, Haline Renata; SCHULDT FILHO, Guenther; OLIVEIRA DE SOUZA, João Gustavo; BENFATTI, César Augusto Magalhães; MAGINI, Ricardo de Souza; BIANCHINI, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the number of pillar implants of implant-supported fixed prostheses and the prevalence of periimplant disease. Material and Methods Clinical and radiographic data were obtained for the evaluation. The sample consisted of 32 patients with implant-supported fixed prostheses in function for at least one year. A total of 161 implants were evaluated. Two groups were formed according to the number of implants: G1) ≤5 implants and G2) >5 implants. Data collection included modified plaque index (MPi), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), width of keratinized mucosa (KM) and radiographic bone loss (BL). Clinical and radiographic data were grouped for each implant in order to conduct the diagnosis of mucositis or peri-implantitis. Results Clinical parameters were compared between groups using Student's t test for numeric variables (KM, PD and BL) and Mann-Whitney test for categorical variables (MPi and BOP). KM and BL showed statistically significant differences between both groups (p<0.001). Implants from G1 – 19 (20.43%) – compared with G2 – 26 (38.24%) – showed statistically significant differences regarding the prevalence of peri-implantitis (p=0.0210). Conclusion It seems that more than 5 implants in total fixed rehabilitations increase bone loss and consequently the prevalence of implants with periimplantitis. Notwithstanding, the number of implants does not have any influence on the prevalence of mucositis. PMID:25466474

  6. Re-stability of dental implants following treatment of peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Hamza Ather; Romanos, Georgios E.

    2013-01-01

    It is hypothesized that active treatment of peri-implantitis (PI) leads to re-stabilization of dental implants. The aim was to assess whether or not dental implants can re-stabilize following treatment of PI. To address the focused question, MEDLINE/PubMed and Google-Scholar databases were explored from 1977 up to and including August 2013. Any disagreements between the authors were resolved via discussion. Articles published only in English were included. Hand searching was also performed. Thirteen experimental studies were included. The treatment regimes adopted in these studies comprised of antibiotic therapy, guided bone regeneration (GBR), laser therapy, use of bone matrix proteins with membrane, conventional flap surgery and mechanical debridement. In four studies, GBR promoted new bone formation; whereas two studies showed photosensitization therapy (in combination with either mechanical debridement or GBR) to regenerate bone around peri-implant defects. Six studies reported that mechanical debridement in conjunction with antibiotic therapy promoted re-stability of dental implants. In one study, recombinant human bone matrix protein-2 with a collagen membrane helped promote re-stabilization of dental implants. New bone formation may occur to some extent around dental implants following treatment for PI; however, a “complete” re-stability may be difficult to achieve without GBR. PMID:24265901

  7. Detoxification of Implant Surfaces Affected by Peri-Implant Disease: An Overview of Surgical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wilson Jr, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Peri-implantitis is one of the major causes of implant failure. The detoxification of the implant surface is necessary to obtain reosseointegration. The aim of this review was to summarize in vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials that have evaluated surgical approaches for detoxification of the implant body surfaces. Materials and Methods. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1966 to 2013. The outcome variables were the ability of the therapeutic method to eliminate the biofilm and endotoxins from the implant surface, the changes in clinical parameters, radiographic bone fill, and histological reosseointegration. Results. From 574 articles found, 76 were analyzed. The findings, advantages, and disadvantages of using mechanical, chemical methods and lasers are discussed. Conclusions. Complete elimination of the biofilms is difficult to achieve. All therapies induce changes of the chemical and physical properties of the implant surface. Partial reosseointegration after detoxification has been reported in animals. Combination protocols for surgical treatment of peri-implantitis in humans have shown some positive clinical and radiographic results, but long-term evaluation to evaluate the validity and reliability of the techniques is needed. PMID:23983691

  8. Antibacterial properties of metal and metalloid ions in chronic periodontitis and peri-implantitis therapy.

    PubMed

    Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal diseases like periodontitis and peri-implantitis have been linked with Gram-negative anaerobes. The incorporation of various chemotherapeutic agents, including metal ions, into several materials and devices has been extensively studied against periodontal bacteria, and materials doped with metal ions have been proposed for the treatment of periodontal and peri-implant diseases. The aim of this review is to discuss the effectiveness of materials doped with metal and metalloid ions already used in the treatment of periodontal diseases, as well as the potential use of alternative materials that are currently available for other applications but have been proved to be cytotoxic to the specific periodontal pathogens. The sources of this review included English articles using Google Scholar™, ScienceDirect, Scopus and PubMed. Search terms included the combinations of the descriptors "disease", "ionic species" and "bacterium". Articles that discuss the biocidal properties of materials doped with metal and metalloid ions against the specific periodontal bacteria were included. The articles were independently extracted by two authors using predefined data fields. The evaluation of resources was based on the quality of the content and the relevance to the topic, which was evaluated by the ionic species and the bacteria used in the study, while the final application was not considered as relevant. The present review summarizes the extensive previous and current research efforts concerning the use of metal ions in periodontal diseases therapy, while it points out the challenges and opportunities lying ahead.

  9. The effect of direct and indirect force transmission on peri-implant bone stress - a contact finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Rand, Annike; Stiesch, Meike; Eisenburger, Michael; Greuling, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    In almost all finite element (FE) studies in dentistry, virtual forces are applied directly to dentures. The purpose of this study was to develop a FE model with non-linear contact simulation using an antagonist as force transmitter and to compare this with a similar model that uses direct force transmission. Furthermore, five contact situations were created in order to examine their influence on the peri-implant bone stresses, which are relevant to the survival rate of implants. It was found that the peri-implant bone stresses were strongly influenced by the kind of force transmission and contact number.

  10. Outcome of surgical treatment of peri-implantitis: results from a 2-year prospective clinical study in humans.

    PubMed

    Serino, Giovanni; Turri, Alberto

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the outcome of a surgical procedure based on pocket elimination and bone re-contouring for the treatment of peri-implantitis. The 31 subjects involved in this study presented clinical signs of peri-implantitis at one or more dental implants (i.e. ≥6 mm pockets, bleeding on probing and/or suppuration and radiographic evidence of ≥2 mm bone loss). The patients were treated with a surgical procedure based on pocket elimination and bone re-contouring and plaque control before and following the surgery. At the time of surgery, the amount of bone loss at implants was recorded. Two years following treatment, 15 (48%) subjects had no signs of peri-implant disease; 24 patients (77%) had no implants with a probing pocket depth of ≥6 mm associated with bleeding and/or suppuration following probing. A total of 36 implants (42%) out of the 86 with initial diagnosis of peri-implantitis presented peri-implant disease despite treatment. The proportion of implants that became healthy following treatment was higher for those with minor initial bone loss (2-4 mm bone loss as assessed during surgery) compared with the implants with a bone loss of ≥5 mm (74% vs. 40%). Among the 18 implants with bone loss of ≥7 mm, seven were extracted. Between the 6-month and the 2-year examination, healthy implants following treatment tended to remain stable, while deepening of pockets was observed for those implants with residual pockets. The results of this study indicated that a surgical procedure based on pocket elimination and bone re-contouring and plaque control before and following surgery was an effective therapy for treatment of peri-implantitis for the majority of subjects and implants. However, complete disease resolution at the site level seems to depend on the initial bone loss at implants. Implants with no signs of peri-implantitis following treatment tended to remain healthy during the 2-year period, while a tendency for disease

  11. Palmar Soft Tissue Infection From Shewanella putrefaciens.

    PubMed

    Ryan, James M; Truelove, Elizabeth; Sabatino, Matthew; Peters, Stephen; Kessler, Michael

    2017-08-25

    Shewanella putrefaciens, a gram-negative bacillus, ubiquitous in marine environments, is an opportunistic agent reported to cause rare human infection, most commonly in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a preexisting soft tissue defect. We present an immunocompetent, 40-year-old woman with a soft tissue infection of the left palm caused by S. putrefaciens. The patient's infection was complicated by the presence of retained foreign bodies, seashell fragments, from a traumatic fall. Following appropriate evaluation and surgical treatment, our patient experienced a successful outcome with no recurrence of infection or deficit in the affected hand. This case report complements the growing literature regarding morbidity attributed to S. putrefaciens infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Recent advances in soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Krauss, M C

    1999-06-01

    Soft tissue augmentation has become increasingly important as more individuals seek aesthetic improvement without major surgical procedures. The choice of an appropriate subcutaneous implant, whether solid or injectable, requires a thorough understanding of the materials available. This review of the literature addresses autologous fat and dermis transplantation, autologous and allogeneic human collagen, bovine collagen, acellular dermal allograft, hyaluronic acid derivatives, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, polymethyl-methacrylate microspheres, and other potential biomaterials. The search for the perfect material to eradicate rhytids, smooth scars, and fill traumatic detects continues. New products appear, sometimes with great fanfare, which fail to fulfill the promise of a better alternative to what we use now. For this reason, an in-depth understanding of implant materials is necessary for any physician performing soft-tissue augmentation procedures.

  13. Liquid injectable silicone for soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Prather, Chad L; Jones, Derek H

    2006-01-01

    Liquid injectable silicone is a unique soft tissue augmenting agent that may be effectively utilized for the correction of specific cutaneous and subcutaneous atrophies. Although historical complications have occurred, resulting likely from the presence of adulterants and impurities, modern purified silicone products approved by the Food and Drug Administration for injection into the human body may be employed with minimal complications when strict protocol is followed. In this article the present authors review the history and controversy regarding silicone as well as describe the appropriate indications, patient selection, instrumentation, treatment protocol, and anticipated complications involved with the use of liquid injectable silicone for soft tissue augmentation. Although its use is controversial, the present authors maintain that liquid injectable silicone is an important and effective augmenting agent for the long-term correction of scars and facial contour defects such as HIV facial lipoatrophy. Furthermore, it is a treatment modality deserving of continued investigation.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ChDC F316, Isolated from a Human Peri-implantitis Lesion in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soon-Nang; Cho, Eugene; Kim, Hwa-Sook; Kim, Dae-Soo; Jung, Jaeeun; Baek, Jeong-Hun; Kyong Lim, Yun; Jo, Eojin; Chang, Young-Hyo; Hwan Shin, Jeong; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Kang, Jihee; Choi, YongUn; Park, Hong-Seog; Kim, Hongik

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative anaerobe and is one of the causative agents of periodontal diseases, including peri-implantitis. Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ChDC F316 (KCOM 1322) was isolated from a human peri-implantitis lesion. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain. PMID:24336379

  15. Fibre-Matrix Interaction in Soft Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zaoyang

    2010-05-21

    Although the mechanical behaviour of soft tissue has been extensively studied, the interaction between the collagen fibres and the ground matrix has not been well understood and is therefore ignored by most constitutive models of soft tissue. In this paper, the human annulus fibrosus is used as an example and the potential fibre-matrix interaction is identified by careful investigation of the experimental results of biaxial and uniaxial testing of the human annulus fibrosus. First, the uniaxial testing result of the HAF along the axial direction is analysed and it is shown that the mechanical behaviour of the ground matrix can be well simulated by the incompressible neo-Hookean model when the collagen fibres are all under contraction. If the collagen fibres are stretched, the response of the ground matrix can still be described by the incompressible neo-Hookean model, but the effective stiffness of the matrix depends on the fibre stretch ratio. This stiffness can be more than 10 times larger than the one obtained with collagen fibres under contraction. This phenomenon can only be explained by the fibre-matrix interaction. Furthermore, we find that the physical interpretation of this interaction includes the inhomogeneity of the soft tissue and the fibre orientation dispersion. The dependence of the tangent stiffness of the matrix on the first invariant of the deformation tensor can also be explained by the fibre orientation dispersion. The significant effect of the fibre-matrix interaction strain energy on mechanical behaviour of the soft tissue is also illustrated by comparing some simulation results.

  16. Modern Soft Tissue Pathology | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    This book comprehensively covers modern soft tissue pathology and includes both tumors and non-neoplastic entities. Soft tissues make up a large bulk of the human body, and they are susceptible to a wide range of diseases. Many soft-tissue tumors are biologically very aggressive, and the chance of them metastasizing to vital organs is quite high. In recent years, the outlook for soft-tissue cancers has brightened dramatically due to the increased accuracy of the pathologist's tools.

  17. Assessment of the effects of laser photobiomodulation on peri-implant bone repair through energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence: A study of dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, R. F.; Araújo, N. C.; Carneiro, V. S. M.; Moreno, L. M.; Guerra, L. A. P.; Santos Neto, A. P.; Gerbi, M. E. M.

    2016-03-01

    Bone neoformation is essential in the osteointegration of implants and has been correlated with the repair capacity of tissues, the blood supply and the function of the cells involved. Laser therapy accelerates the mechanical imbrication of peri-implant tissue by increasing osteoblastic activity and inducing ATP, osteopontin and the expression of sialoproteins. Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess peri-implant bone repair using the tibia of dogs that received dental implants and laser irradiation (AsGaAl 830nm - 40mW, CW, f~0.3mm) through Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF). Methodology: Two groups were established: G1 (Control, n=20; two dental implants were made in the tibia of each animal; 10 animals); G2 (Experimental, n=20, two dental implants were made in the tibia each animal + Laser therapy; 10 animals). G2 was irradiated every 48 hours for two weeks, with a total of seven sessions. The first irradiation was conducted during the surgery, at which time a point in the surgical alveolus was irradiated prior to the placement of the implant and four new spatial positions were created to the North, South, East and West (NSEW) of the implant. The subsequent sessions involved irradiation at these four points and at one infra-implant point (in the direction of the implant apex). Each point received 4J/cm2 and a total dose of 20J/cm2 per session (treatment dose=140J/cm2). The specimens were removed 15 and 30 days after the operation for the EDXRF test. The Mann- Whitney statistical test was used to assess the results. Results: The increase in the calcium concentration in the periimplant region of the irradiated specimens (G2) was statistically significant (p < 0.05), when compared with the control group (G1). Conclusion: The results of the present study show that irradiation with the AsGaAl laser promoted an acceleration in bone repair in the peri-implant region.

  18. Prevalence and risk indicators of peri-implantitis in Korean patients with a history of periodontal disease: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and risk indicators of peri-implantitis in Korean patients with history of periodontal disease. Methods A total of 444 patients with 1,485 implants were selected from patients who had been treated at the Department of Periodontology, Chonbuk National University Dental Hospital between July 2014 and June 2015. A group with a history of peri-implantitis (HP) (370 patients with 1,189 implants) and a group with a current peri-implantitis (CP) (318 patients with 1,004 implants) were created based on the radiographic and clinical assessments of implants. The prevalence of peri-implantitis was calculated at both the patient and implant levels. The influence of risk variables on the occurrence of peri-implantitis was analyzed using generalized estimating equations analysis. Results The prevalence of peri-implantitis in the HP and CP groups ranged from 6.7% to 19.7%. The cumulative peri-implantitis rate in the HP group estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method was higher than that in the CP group over the follow-up period. Among the patient-related risk variables, supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) was the only significant risk indicator for the occurrence of peri-implantitis in both groups. In the analysis of implant-related variables, implants supporting fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) and implants with subjective discomfort were associated with a higher prevalence of peri-implantitis than single implants and implants without subjective discomfort in the HP group. The presence of subjective discomfort was the only significant implant-related variable predictive of peri-implantitis in the CP group. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, the prevalence of peri-implantitis in Korean patients with a history of periodontal disease was similar to that reported in other population samples. Regular SPT was important for preventing peri-implantitis. Single implants were found to be less susceptible to peri-implantitis

  19. Prevalence and risk indicators of peri-implantitis in Korean patients with a history of periodontal disease: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Goh, Mi-Seon; Hong, Eun-Jin; Chang, Moontaek

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and risk indicators of peri-implantitis in Korean patients with history of periodontal disease. A total of 444 patients with 1,485 implants were selected from patients who had been treated at the Department of Periodontology, Chonbuk National University Dental Hospital between July 2014 and June 2015. A group with a history of peri-implantitis (HP) (370 patients with 1,189 implants) and a group with a current peri-implantitis (CP) (318 patients with 1,004 implants) were created based on the radiographic and clinical assessments of implants. The prevalence of peri-implantitis was calculated at both the patient and implant levels. The influence of risk variables on the occurrence of peri-implantitis was analyzed using generalized estimating equations analysis. The prevalence of peri-implantitis in the HP and CP groups ranged from 6.7% to 19.7%. The cumulative peri-implantitis rate in the HP group estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method was higher than that in the CP group over the follow-up period. Among the patient-related risk variables, supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) was the only significant risk indicator for the occurrence of peri-implantitis in both groups. In the analysis of implant-related variables, implants supporting fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) and implants with subjective discomfort were associated with a higher prevalence of peri-implantitis than single implants and implants without subjective discomfort in the HP group. The presence of subjective discomfort was the only significant implant-related variable predictive of peri-implantitis in the CP group. Within the limitations of this study, the prevalence of peri-implantitis in Korean patients with a history of periodontal disease was similar to that reported in other population samples. Regular SPT was important for preventing peri-implantitis. Single implants were found to be less susceptible to peri-implantitis than those supporting FDP

  20. Soft tissue cutting with ultrasonic mechanical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Mark. P.; McGuinness, Garrett; Gavin, Graham P.

    2012-05-01

    The use of ultrasonic vibrations transmitted via small diameter wire waveguides represents a technology that has potential for minimally invasive procedures in surgery. This form of energy delivery results in distal tip mechanical vibrations with amplitudes of vibration of up to 50 μm and at frequencies between 20-50 kHz commonly reported. This energy can then be used by micro-cutting surgical tools and end effectors for a range of applications such as bone cutting, cement removal in joint revision surgery and soft tissue cutting. One particular application which has gained regulatory approval in recent years is in the area of cardiovascular surgery in the removal of calcified atherosclerotic plaques and chronic total occlusions. This paper builds on previous work that was focused on the ultrasonic perforation of soft vascular tissue using ultrasonically activated mechanical waveguides and the applied force required to initiate failure in soft tissue when compared with non-ultrasonic waveguides. An ultrasonic device and experimental rig was developed that can deliver ultrasonic vibrations to the distal tip of 1.0 mm diameter nickel-titanium waveguides. The operation of the ultrasonic device has been characterized at 22.5 kHz with achievable amplitudes of vibration in the range of 16 - 40μm. The experimental rig allows the ultrasonically activated waveguide to be advanced through a tissue sample over a range of feedrates and the waveguide-tissue interaction force can be measured during perforation into the tissue. Preliminary studies into the effects of feedrate on porcine aortic arterial tissue perforation forces are presented as part of this work. A range of amplitudes of vibration at the wire waveguide distal tip were examined. The resulting temperature increase when perforating artery wall when using the energized wire waveguides is also examined. Results show a clear multistage failure of the tissue. The first stage involves a rise in force up to some

  1. Postextraction tissue management: a soft tissue punch technique.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ronald E; Siegenthaler, David W; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical study was to analyze graft-enhanced soft tissue healing during the initial phases after tooth extraction. Twenty patients in need of tooth extraction (incisors, canines, and premolars) and implant replacement were included. In patients with multiple extractions, one tooth was randomly selected for treatment. After administration of antibiotics, the selected tooth was gently removed. The socket was completely filled with deproteinized bovine bone mineral integrated in a 10% collagen matrix to fill out the space of the alveolus and support the soft tissue. A biopsy punch with a diameter corresponding to the socket orifice was chosen to harvest a free gingival graft of 2- to 3-mm thickness from the palate. The punched graft was carefully sutured to the deepithelialized soft tissue margins of the socket. One week after graft insertion, 64.3% of the mean graft area was fully integrated, 35.6% was fibrinoid, and 0.1% showed necrotic parts. Three and 6 weeks postsurgery, the mean integrated graft surface increased to 92.3% and 99.7%, respectively. After 6 weeks, a mean of 0.3% of the surface in four grafts showed incomplete wound closure, and no fibrin or necrosis was present. Colorimetry of the graft and adjacent tissue revealed a mean color match of deltaE = 2.91, lower than the critical threshold of 3.7 for intraoral visibility of different colors. This soft tissue punch technique led to successful biologic and esthetic integration of the transplanted graft into the local host tissues.

  2. Soft tissue management in endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Velvart, Peter; Peters, Christine I

    2005-01-01

    Modern endodontic surgery involves both root-end preparation and proper sealing of all apical portals of exit. Both components are requirements for mechanical and biological success, but the management of soft tissues becomes increasingly important for an esthetically successful treatment. A healthy appearance of soft tissues plays an important role in the esthetic outcome of periradicular surgery. This is true considering maintenance of attachment levels and regarding the amount of possible recession after surgical procedures. Complete, recession-free and predictable healing of gingival tissue is one important goal of endodontic surgical treatment. A critical review of currently used techniques based on clinical and scientific data reveals great potential for improvements. Possible reasons for scar formation and recession specifically in healthy periodontal conditions requiring surgical endodontic intervention are highlighted. Based on anatomical considerations various incision types are evaluated and recommendations made. Clear understanding of wound closure and tissue-healing patterns call for the use of atraumatic procedures, nonirritating suture materials and adequate suturing techniques. This article gives an overview and guidance for integrating current and new successful flap designs and wound closure methods. The methods described have the intention of maintaining the attachment level and avoiding postoperative recession after surgical endodontic therapy.

  3. Collecting and Storing Tissue, Blood, and Bone Marrow Samples From Patients With Rhabdomyosarcoma or Other Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-23

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  4. Impact of crestal and subcrestal implant placement in peri-implant bone: A prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pellicer-Chover, Hilario; Peñarrocha-Diago, María; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Gomar-Vercher, Sonia; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    To assess the influence of the crestal or subcrestal placement of implants upon peri-implant bone loss over 12 months of follow-up. Twenty-six patients with a single hopeless tooth were recruited in the Oral Surgery Unit (Valencia University, Valencia, Spain). The patients were randomized into two treatment groups: group A (implants placed at crestal level) or group B (implants placed at subcrestal level). Control visits were conducted by a trained clinician at the time of implant placement and 12 months after loading. A previously established standard protocol was used to compile general data on all patients (sex and age, implant length and diameter, and brushing frequency). Implant success rate, peri-implant bone loss and the treatment of the exposed implant surface were studied. The level of statistical significance was defined as 5% (α=0.05). Twenty-three patients (8 males and 15 females, mean age 49.8±11.6 years, range 28-75 years) were included in the final data analyses, while three were excluded. All the included subjects were non-smokers with a brushing frequency of up to twice a day in 85.7% of the cases. The 23 implants comprised 10 crestal implants and 13 subcrestal implants. After implant placement, the mean bone position with respect to the implant platform in group A was 0.0 mm versus 2.16±0.88 mm in group B. After 12 months of follow-up, the mean bone positions were -0.06±1.11 mm and 0.95±1.50 mm, respectively - this representing a bone loss of 0.06±1.11 mm in the case of the crestal implants and of 1.22±1.06 mm in the case of the subcrestal implants (p=0.014). Four crestal implants and 5 subcrestal implants presented peri-implant bone levels below the platform, leaving a mean exposed treated surface of 1.13 mm and 0.57 mm, respectively. The implant osseointegration success rate at 12 months was 100% in both groups. Within the limitations of this study, bone loss was found to be greater in the case of the subcrestal implants, though from the

  5. Influence of occlusal loading on peri-implant clinical parameters. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer-Chover, Hilario; Viña-Almunia, José; Romero-Millán, Javier; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Peñarrocha-Diago, María

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relation between occlusal loading and peri-implant clinical parameters (probing depth, bleeding on probing, gingival retraction, width of keratinized mucosa, and crevicular fluid volume) in patients with implant-supported complete fixed prostheses in both arches. Material and Methods: This clinical study took place at the University of Valencia (Spain) dental clinic. It included patients attending the clinic for regular check-ups during at least 12 months after rehabilitation of both arches with implant-supported