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Sample records for periadolescent mice effect

  1. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Interleukin-2 Treatment on the Sensitivity of Periadolescent Female Mice to Interleukin-2 and Dopamine Uptake Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, James S.; Zalcman, Steven S.; Zhu, Youhua; Siegel, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-2, a T-helper 1 (Th1) cell-derived cytokine, which potently modulates dopamine activity and neuronal excitability in mesolimbic structures, is linked with pathological outcomes (e.g., schizophrenia, depression, etc.) that at least partly reflect alterations in central dopaminergic processes. It has been suggested that dopamine neurons undergo pruning during adolescence and abnormalities in pruning predispose individuals to behavioral disorders. Since IL-2 is known as a neurodevelopmental factor affecting associated behavioral processes, the present study tested whether IL-2 can modulate stereotypic behaviors in both the periadolescent and adult periods. This study determined whether IL-2 treatment would produce long-lasting changes in sensitivity to a later challenge with IL-2 or GBR 12909, a highly selective dopamine uptake inhibitor. Four experiments were conducted. Firstly, a decrease in novelty-induced stereotypic behavior was observed in BALB/c periadolescent mice (38 days of age) following IL-2 administration (0.4 µg/2 ml) relative to vehicle control. In the second experiment, an initial dose of IL-2 was given in the periadolescent period, but did not affect rearing responses. A second dose of IL-2 given to the animals 30 days later as adults, resulted in a significant increase in rearing behaviors relative to control animals. In the third experiment, separate groups of experimental and control mice were administered GBR 12909, a highly selective dopamine reuptake inhibitor, 30 days following treatment with either IL-2 or vehicle. It was noted that this experimental group, which initially received IL-2, exhibited stereotypy, as evidenced by increased sniffing behavior. A fourth experiment revealed that IL-2 administered in periadolesecence and adulthood had no effect on other motor responses, indicating that IL-2 selectively modulates selective stereotypic behaviors. The results provide evidence, for the first time, that long-term changes in

  2. Acute and carryover effects in mice of MDMA ("ecstasy") administration during periadolescence.

    PubMed

    Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Bianchi, Mauro; Gerra, Gilberto; Laviola, Giovanni

    2002-07-12

    In spite of the increasing evidence concerning its neurotoxicity, young human individuals are often involved in the recreational use of amphetamine-type stimulants such as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy"). A study aimed to investigate short- and long-term consequences of a repeated and intermittent MDMA administration (0, 5 or 10 mg/kg i.p., 3 days treatment history) was conducted in mice. Mice were injected at different phases in development, namely at early (28 days old), middle (38 days old) or late (52 days old) adolescence. When assessed for nociceptive response, a dose-dependent analgesia was found in middle and late adolescent mice. Carryover consequences of previous MDMA treatment were then investigated at adulthood (80 days old). In a social interaction test, levels of environment exploration and social behaviour resulted markedly increased in drug-free state as a function of drug exposure during development, whereas others behaviours were reduced. MDMA challenge (5-mg/kg dose) produced the expected hyperactivity, as well as a marked increment of hypothalamic serotonin (5-hydroxyhyptamine, 5-HT) levels. Mice treated chronically with MDMA during middle and late adolescence were associated with important reductions of the indoleamine. As a whole, these results indicate a differential long-term vulnerability to behavioural and neurotoxicant effects of MDMA as a function of the developmental stage of exposure.

  3. Prolonged perinatal AZT administration and early maternal separation: effects on social and emotional behaviour of periadolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Venerosi, Aldina; Cirulli, Francesca; Capone, Francesca; Alleva, Enrico

    2003-02-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is an effective treatment in preventing perinatal transmission of HIV-1; however, a continuous re-evaluation of the risk-benefit ratio of human exposure to this drug is suggested by both clinical and animal studies. The objective of this study was to assess the medium and long-term effects of pre-postnatal AZT treatment on mouse social and emotional behaviour and the possible interactions between AZT exposure and disruptions in the mother-infant relationship. Pregnant CD-1 mice were administered per os with AZT (160 mg/kg) from pregnancy day 10, throughout delivery, to lactation day 10. In half of the litters, the offspring was separated from the mother for 3 h from postnatal days 2 (PND2) to PND14. On PND35, a 30-min social interaction test was performed and corticosterone levels were measured at the end of the session. On PND80, long-term effects of AZT on emotionality were assess by means of an elevated plus-maze. Results indicate that, on PND35, previous AZT exposure affected social behaviour of the experimental subjects, reducing aggressive interactions in males, while decreasing investigative behaviours in females. At adulthood, AZT inhibited exploratory behaviour in the plus-maze while increasing the frequency of risk-assessment postures in male mice. As for maternal deprivation, this early manipulation exerted a pro-aggressive effect in adolescent male mice, deprived subjects being overall characterised by higher activity levels and a deficit in habituation, an effect also observed in the plus-maze. A significant interaction between AZT and maternal deprivation was found for affiliative behaviours. As for corticosterone levels, no AZT effect was found, while maternal deprivation tended to reduce elevations of this hormone in response to stressful stimuli. Overall results from this study indicate that both AZT exposure and maternal deprivation induced gender-dependent changes in social and emotional behaviour both during adolescence and at

  4. Neural and behavioural changes in male periadolescent mice after prolonged nicotine-MDMA treatment.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, Philip A; Ishola, Azeez O; Laoye, Babafemi J; Olatunji, Babawale P; Bankole, Oluwamolakun O; Shallie, Philemon D; Ogundele, Olalekan M

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between MDMA and Nicotine affects multiple brain centres and neurotransmitter systems (serotonin, dopamine and glutamate) involved in motor coordination and cognition. In this study, we have elucidated the effect of prolonged (10 days) MDMA, Nicotine and a combined Nicotine-MDMA treatment on motor-cognitive neural functions. In addition, we have shown the correlation between the observed behavioural change and neural structural changes induced by these treatments in BALB/c mice. We observed that MDMA (2 mg/Kg body weight; subcutaneous) induced a decline in motor function, while Nicotine (2 mg/Kg body weight; subcutaneous) improved motor function in male periadolescent mice. In combined treatment, Nicotine reduced the motor function decline observed in MDMA treatment, thus no significant change in motor function for the combined treatment versus the control. Nicotine or MDMA treatment reduced memory function and altered hippocampal structure. Similarly, a combined Nicotine-MDMA treatment reduced memory function when compared with the control. Ultimately, the metabolic and structural changes in these neural systems were seen to vary for the various forms of treatment. It is noteworthy to mention that a combined treatment increased the rate of lipid peroxidation in brain tissue.

  5. Neural and behavioural changes in male periadolescent mice after prolonged nicotine-MDMA treatment.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, Philip A; Ishola, Azeez O; Laoye, Babafemi J; Olatunji, Babawale P; Bankole, Oluwamolakun O; Shallie, Philemon D; Ogundele, Olalekan M

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between MDMA and Nicotine affects multiple brain centres and neurotransmitter systems (serotonin, dopamine and glutamate) involved in motor coordination and cognition. In this study, we have elucidated the effect of prolonged (10 days) MDMA, Nicotine and a combined Nicotine-MDMA treatment on motor-cognitive neural functions. In addition, we have shown the correlation between the observed behavioural change and neural structural changes induced by these treatments in BALB/c mice. We observed that MDMA (2 mg/Kg body weight; subcutaneous) induced a decline in motor function, while Nicotine (2 mg/Kg body weight; subcutaneous) improved motor function in male periadolescent mice. In combined treatment, Nicotine reduced the motor function decline observed in MDMA treatment, thus no significant change in motor function for the combined treatment versus the control. Nicotine or MDMA treatment reduced memory function and altered hippocampal structure. Similarly, a combined Nicotine-MDMA treatment reduced memory function when compared with the control. Ultimately, the metabolic and structural changes in these neural systems were seen to vary for the various forms of treatment. It is noteworthy to mention that a combined treatment increased the rate of lipid peroxidation in brain tissue. PMID:26088184

  6. Exposure to nicotine during periadolescence or early adulthood alters aversive and physiological effects induced by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Jennifer A; Hutchison, Mary Anne; Chen, Scott A; Thorsell, Annika; Heilig, Markus; Riley, Anthony L

    2011-07-01

    The majority of smokers begin their habit during adolescence, which often precedes experimentation with alcohol. Interestingly, very little preclinical work has been done examining how exposure to nicotine during periadolescence impacts the affective properties of alcohol in adulthood. Understanding how periadolescent nicotine exposure influences the aversive effects of alcohol might help to explain why it becomes more acceptable to this preexposed population. Thus, Experiment 1 exposed male Sprague Dawley rats to either saline or nicotine (0.4mg/kg, IP) from postnatal days 34 to 43 (periadolescence) and then examined changes in the aversive effects of alcohol (0, 0.56, 1.0 and 1.8g/kg, IP) in adulthood using the conditioned taste aversion (CTA) design. Changes in blood alcohol concentration (BAC) as well as alcohol-induced hypothermia and locomotor suppression were also assessed. To determine if changes seen were specific to nicotine exposure during periadolescence, the procedures were replicated in adults (Experiment 2). Preexposure to nicotine during periadolescence attenuated the acquisition of the alcohol-induced CTAs (at 1.0g/kg) and the hypothermic effects of alcohol (1.0g/kg). Adult nicotine preexposure produced similar attenuation in alcohol's aversive (at 1.8g/kg) and hypothermic (1.8g/kg) effects. Neither adolescent nor adult nicotine preexposure altered BACs or alcohol-induced locomotor suppression. These results suggest that nicotine may alter the aversive and physiological effects of alcohol, regardless of the age at which exposure occurs, possibly increasing its overall reinforcing value and making it more likely to be consumed.

  7. Effects of periadolescent ethanol exposure on alcohol preference in two BALB substrains.

    PubMed

    Blizard, David A; Vandenbergh, David J; Jefferson, Akilah L; Chatlos, Cynthia D; Vogler, George P; McClearn, Gerald E

    2004-01-01

    Ethanol exposure during adolescence is a rite of passage in many societies, but only a subset of individuals exposed to ethanol becomes dependent on alcohol. To explore individual differences in response to ethanol exposure, we compared the effects of periadolescent ethanol exposure on alcohol drinking in an animal model. Male and female mice of two BALB substrains were exposed to ethanol in one of three forms--choice [water vs. 10% (volume/volume) ethanol], forced (10% ethanol in a single bottle), or gradual (single bottle exposure, starting with 0.5% ethanol and increasing at 2-day intervals to 10% ethanol)--from the 6th through the 12th week of age and administered two-bottle alcohol preference tests (10% ethanol vs. water) for 15 days immediately thereafter. All three forms of ethanol exposure increased alcohol preference in male and female BALB/cByJ mice, relative to findings for ethanol-naive control animals. Only gradual ethanol exposure produced an increase in alcohol preference in BALB/cJ mice. During extended alcohol preference testing (for a total of 39 days) of mice in the gradual ethanol exposure group, the higher alcohol preference of the gradual ethanol-exposed BALB/cByJ male mice persisted, but alcohol preference of control group female mice in this strain--formerly ethanol naive, but at this point having received 10% ethanol in the two-bottle paradigm for 15 days--rose to the level of alcohol preference of female mice in the gradual ethanol exposure group. This finding demonstrated that both adolescent and adult ethanol exposure stimulated alcohol preference in female mice of this strain. Across days of testing in adulthood, alcohol preference of the gradual ethanol-exposed BALB/cJ mice decreased, resulting in a lack of effect of gradual exposure to ethanol on alcohol preference in both male and female mice of this strain during the period of extended testing. These strain differences support a genetic basis for the effects of ethanol exposure on

  8. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L

    2013-10-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT--7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory.

  9. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L.; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT-7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory. PMID:23792034

  10. Sex differences in tolerance to the locomotor depressant effects of lobeline in periadolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Harrod, Steven B.; Van Horn, M. Lee

    2009-01-01

    Lobeline is being tested in clinical trials as a pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine abuse and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Preclinical research demonstrates that lobeline produces locomotor hypoactivity apart from its therapeutic effects; however, the hypothesis that there are sex differences in hypoactivity or in the development of tolerance to its locomotor depressant effects has not been investigated. Periadolescent rats were injected with saline to determine baseline locomotor activity. Animals received saline or lobeline (1.0–10 mg/kg) daily for 7 consecutive days (post natal days 29–35), and were challenged with saline 24 h later to assess baseline activity. Lobeline produced hypoactivity in total horizontal activity and center distance travelled. Tolerance developed to the lobeline-induced hypoactivity and sex differences in lobeline tolerance were observed on both measures. Females acquired tolerance to lobeline 5.6 mg/kg at a slower rate than males. Saline challenge revealed a linear dose-dependent trend of hyperactivity on both measures, which indicates that rats exhibited altered locomotor behavior 24 h after the final lobeline treatment. These findings demonstrate sex differences in the hypoactive response to lobeline prior to puberty and suggest that females may experience more locomotor depressant effects than males. Chronic lobeline may induce hyperactivity following cessation of treatment. PMID:19766134

  11. Effects of different concentrations of sugarcane alcohol on food intake and nutritional status of male and female periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves de Orange, Luciana; Bion, Francisca Martins; Rolim de Lima, Cybelle

    2009-03-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of food and alcohol intake on the nutritional and metabolic status of male and female periadolescent rats submitted to single (15%) and multiple (10%, 20%, 30%) concentrations of hydroalcoholic solutions of sugar-based alcohol associated with a feed mixture. Thirty-six periadolescent Wistar rats were used and randomly arranged into three groups: Group A (control; 0% ethanol; six males and six females), Group B (15% ethanol; six males and six females), and Group C (10%, 20%, and 30% ethanol; six males and six females). Food consumption, body weight, water intake (mL), ethanol intake (g/kg/day), ethanol preference in relation to water and different concentrations, and serum biochemical dosages (glucose, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein fraction, triglycerides, cholesterol/HDL [CT/HDL], albumin) were analyzed. Males from Group C ingested more feed than females, which consumed reducing amounts throughout the weeks studied. Males also had heavier body weight, which increased throughout the experimental period. The animals ingested more water (females ingested more than males) in the first experimental week. Group C had a higher ethanol intake and greater preference for ethanol over water in both genders than Group B, which decreased over the subsequent weeks. Serum glucose was lower in Group A, whereas the CT/HDL ratio was lower in Group C. These findings allow the conclusion that nutritional and metabolic impact resulting from alcohol intake is different between genders and between the different forms in which the drug is offered. It is important to warn the population about the concentrations of alcohol intake, which may influence the growth and development of adolescents, thereby compromising their quality of life.

  12. Periadolescent amphetamine treatment causes transient cognitive disruptions and long-term changes in hippocampal LTP depending on the endogenous expression of pleiotrophin.

    PubMed

    Gramage, Esther; Del Olmo, Nuria; Fole, Alberto; Martín, Yasmina B; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Amphetamine treatment during adolescence causes long-term cognitive deficits in rats. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a cytokine with important roles in the modulation of synaptic plasticity, whose levels of expression are significantly regulated by amphetamine administration. To test the possibility that the long-term consequences of periadolescent amphetamine treatment cross species and, furthermore, to test the hypothesis that PTN could be one of the factors involved in the adult cognitive deficits observed after periadolescent amphetamine administrations, we comparatively studied the long-term consequences of periadolescent amphetamine treatment (3 mg/kg intraperitoneal, daily during 10 days) in normal wild-type (PTN+/+) and in PTN genetically deficient (PTN-/-) mice. Within the first week after cessation of treatment, significant deficits in the passive avoidance and Y-maze tests were only observed in amphetamine-pretreated PTN-/- mice. However, 13 and 26 days after the last administration, we did not find significant differences in Y-maze between amphetamine- and saline-pretreated PTN-/- mice. In addition, we did not find any genotype- or treatment-related anxiogenic- or depressive-like behaviour in adult mice. Furthermore, we observed a significantly enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 hippocampal slices from saline-pretreated PTN-/- mice compared with saline-pretreated PTN+/+ mice. Interestingly, amphetamine pre-treatment during adolescence significantly enhanced LTP in adult PTN+/+ mice but did not cause any effect in PTN-/- mice, suggesting LTP mechanisms saturation in naïve PTN-/- mice. The data demonstrate that periadolescent amphetamine treatment causes transient cognitive deficits and long-term alterations of hippocampal LTP depending on the endogenous expression of PTN.

  13. Long-term exposure to oral methylphenidate or dl-amphetamine mixture in peri-adolescent rhesus monkeys: effects on physiology, behavior, and dopamine system development.

    PubMed

    Soto, Paul L; Wilcox, Kristin M; Zhou, Yun; Kumar, Anil; Ator, Nancy A; Riddle, Mark A; Wong, Dean F; Weed, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    The stimulants methylphenidate and amphetamine are used to treat children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder over important developmental periods, prompting concerns regarding possible long-term health impact. This study assessed the effects of such a regimen in male, peri-adolescent rhesus monkeys on a variety of cognitive/behavioral, physiological, and in vivo neurochemical imaging parameters. Twice daily (0900 and 1200 hours), for a total of 18 months, juvenile male monkeys (8 per group) consumed either an unadulterated orange-flavored solution, a methylphenidate solution, or a dl-amphetamine mixture. Doses were titrated to reach blood/plasma levels comparable to therapeutic levels in children. [¹¹C]MPH and [¹¹C]raclopride dynamic PET scans were performed to image dopamine transporter and D₂-like receptors, respectively. Binding potential (BP(ND)), an index of tracer-specific binding, and amphetamine-induced changes in BP(ND) of [¹¹C]raclopride were estimated by kinetic modeling. There were no consistent differences among groups on the vast majority of measures, including cognitive (psychomotor speed, timing, inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility), general activity, physiological (body weight, head circumference, crown-to-rump length), and neurochemical (ie, developmental changes in dopamine transporter, dopamine D₂ receptor density, and amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release were as expected). Cytogenetic studies indicated that neither drug was a clastogen in rhesus monkeys. Thus, methylphenidate and amphetamine at therapeutic blood/plasma levels during peri-adolescence in non-human primates have little effect on physiological or behavioral/cognitive development.

  14. Daily patterns of ethanol drinking in peri-adolescent and adult alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Bell, Richard L; Rodd, Zachary A; Sable, Helen J K; Schultz, Jonathon A; Hsu, Cathleen C; Lumeng, Lawrence; Murphy, James M; McBride, William J

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol abuse among adolescents continues to be a major health problem for our society. Our laboratory has used the peri-adolescent alcohol-preferring, P, rat as an animal model of adolescent alcohol abuse. Even though peri-adolescent P rats consume more alcohol (g/kg/day) than their adult counterparts, it is uncertain whether their drinking is sufficiently aggregated to result in measurable blood ethanol concentrations (BECs). The objectives of this study were to examine daily alcohol drinking patterns of adolescent and adult, male and female P rats, and to determine whether alcohol drinking episodes were sufficiently aggregated to result in meaningful BECs. Male and female P rats were given 30 days of 24 h free-choice access to alcohol (15%, v/v) and water, with ad lib access to food, starting at the beginning of adolescence (PND 30) or adulthood (PND 90). Water and alcohol drinking patterns were monitored 22 h/day with a "lickometer" set-up. The results indicated that (a) peri-adolescent P rats consumed more water and total fluids than adult P rats, (b) female P rats consumed more water and total fluids than male P rats, (c) there were differences in alcohol, and water, licking patterns between peri-adolescent and adult and female and male P rats, (d) individual licking patterns revealed that alcohol was consumed in bouts often exceeding the amount required to self-administer 1 g/kg of alcohol, and (e) BECs at the end of the dark cycle, on the 30th day of alcohol access, averaged 50 mg%, with alcohol intakes during the last 1 to 2 h averaging 1.2 g/kg. Overall, these findings indicate that alcohol drinking patterns differ across the age and sex of P rats. This suggests that the effectiveness of treatments for reducing excessive alcohol intake may vary depending upon the age and/or sex of the subjects being tested.

  15. The Reinforcing Properties of Ethanol are Quantitatively Enhanced in Adulthood by Peri-Adolescent Ethanol, but not Saccharin, Consumption in Female Alcohol-Preferring (P) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Toalston, Jamie E.; Deehan, Gerald A.; Hauser, Sheketha R.; Engleman, Eric A.; Bell, Richard L.; Murphy, James M.; McBride, William J.; Rodd, Zachary A.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol drinking during adolescence is associated in adulthood with heavier alcohol drinking and an increased rate of alcohol dependence. Past research in our laboratory has indicated that peri-adolescent ethanol consumption can enhance the acquisition and reduce the rate of extinction of ethanol self-administration in adulthood. Caveats of the past research include reinforcer specificity, increased oral consumption during peri-adolescence, and a lack of quantitative assessment of the reinforcing properties of ethanol. The current experiments were designed to determine the effects of peri-adolescent ethanol or saccharin drinking on acquisition and extinction of oral ethanol self-administration and ethanol seeking, and to quantitatively assess the reinforcing properties of ethanol (progressive ratio). Ethanol or saccharin access by alcohol-preferring (P) rats occurred during postnatal day (PND) 30–60. Animals began operant self-administration of ethanol or saccharin after PND 85. After 10 weeks of daily operant self-administration, rats were tested in a progressive ratio paradigm. Two weeks later, self-administration was extinguished in all rats. Peri-adolescent ethanol consumption specifically enhanced the acquisition of ethanol self-administration, reduced the rate of extinction for ethanol self-administration, and quantitatively increased the reinforcing properties of ethanol during adulthood. Peri-adolescent saccharin consumption was without effect. The data indicate that ethanol consumption during peri-adolescence results in neuroadaptations that may specifically enhance the reinforcing properties of ethanol during adulthood. This increase in the reinforcing properties of ethanol could be a part of biological sequelae that are the basis for the effects of adolescent alcohol consumption on the increase in the rate of alcoholism during adulthood. PMID:26074425

  16. The reinforcing properties of ethanol are quantitatively enhanced in adulthood by peri-adolescent ethanol, but not saccharin, consumption in female alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Toalston, Jamie E; Deehan, Gerald A; Hauser, Sheketha R; Engleman, Eric A; Bell, Richard L; Murphy, James M; McBride, William J; Rodd, Zachary A

    2015-08-01

    Alcohol drinking during adolescence is associated in adulthood with heavier alcohol drinking and an increased rate of alcohol dependence. Past research in our laboratory has indicated that peri-adolescent ethanol consumption can enhance the acquisition and reduce the rate of extinction of ethanol self-administration in adulthood. Caveats of the past research include reinforcer specificity, increased oral consumption during peri-adolescence, and a lack of quantitative assessment of the reinforcing properties of ethanol. The current experiments were designed to determine the effects of peri-adolescent ethanol or saccharin drinking on acquisition and extinction of oral ethanol self-administration and ethanol seeking, and to quantitatively assess the reinforcing properties of ethanol (progressive ratio). Ethanol or saccharin access by alcohol-preferring (P) rats occurred during postnatal day (PND) 30-60. Animals began operant self-administration of ethanol or saccharin after PND 85. After 10 weeks of daily operant self-administration, rats were tested in a progressive ratio paradigm. Two weeks later, self-administration was extinguished in all rats. Peri-adolescent ethanol consumption specifically enhanced the acquisition of ethanol self-administration, reduced the rate of extinction for ethanol self-administration, and quantitatively increased the reinforcing properties of ethanol during adulthood. Peri-adolescent saccharin consumption was without effect. The data indicate that ethanol consumption during peri-adolescence results in neuroadaptations that may specifically enhance the reinforcing properties of ethanol during adulthood. This increase in the reinforcing properties of ethanol could be a part of biological sequelae that are the basis for the effects of adolescent alcohol consumption on the increase in the rate of alcoholism during adulthood.

  17. Acute and constitutive increases in central serotonin levels reduce social play behaviour in peri-adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Schiepers, Olga J. G.; Schoffelmeer, Anton N. M.; Cuppen, Edwin; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Serotonin is an important modulator of social behaviour. Individual differences in serotonergic signalling are considered to be a marker of personality that is stable throughout lifetime. While a large body of evidence indicates that central serotonin levels are inversely related to aggression and sexual behaviour in adult rats, the relationship between serotonin and social behaviour during peri-adolescence has hardly been explored. Objective To study the effect of acute and constitutive increases in serotonin neurotransmission on social behaviour in peri-adolescent rats. Materials and methods Social behaviour in peri-adolesent rats (28–35 days old) was studied after genetic ablation of the serotonin transporter, causing constitutively increased extra-neuronal serotonin levels, and after acute treatment with the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine or the serotonin releasing agent 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). A distinction was made between social play behaviour that mainly occurs during peri-adolescence, and non-playful social interactions that are abundant during the entire lifespan of rats. Results In serotonin transporter knockout rats, social play behaviour was markedly reduced, while non-playful aspects of social interaction were unaffected. Acute treatment with fluoxetine or MDMA dose-dependently inhibited social play behaviour. MDMA also suppressed non-playful social interaction but at higher doses than those required to reduce social play. Fluoxetine did not affect non-playful social interaction. Conclusions These data show that both acute and constitutive increases in serotonergic neurotransmission reduce social play behaviour in peri-adolescent rats. Together with our previous findings of reduced aggressive and sexual behaviour in adult serotonin transporter knockout rats, these data support the notion that serotonin modulates social behaviour in a trait-like manner. PMID:17661017

  18. N-acetylcysteine attenuates nicotine-induced kindling in female periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Adriana Mary Nunes Costa; Gomes, Patrícia Xavier L; de Oliveira, Gersilene V; de Araújo, Fernanda Yvelize R; Tomaz, Viviane S; Chaves Filho, Adriano José Maia; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa F; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; de Lucena, David Freitas; Macêdo, Danielle

    2016-06-01

    Kindling is a form of behavioral sensitization that is related to the progression of several neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder. We recently demonstrated that female periadolescent rats are more vulnerable to nicotine (NIC)-induced kindling than their male counterparts. Furthermore, we evidenced that decreases in brain antioxidative defenses may contribute to this gender difference. Here we aimed to determine the preventive effects of the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) against NIC-kindling in female periadolescent rats. To do this female Wistar rats at postnatal day 30 received repeated injections of NIC 2mg/kg, i.p. every weekday for up to 19 days. NAC90, 180 or 270 mg/kg, i.p. was administered 30 min before NIC. The levels of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, lipid peroxidation (LP) and nitrite were determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST). The development of kindling occurred at a median time of 16.5 days with 87.5% of NIC animals presenting stage 5 seizures in the last day of drug administration. NAC270 prevented the occurrence of kindling. NIC-kindled animals presented decreased levels of GSH and increased LP in the PFC, HC and ST, while SOD activity was decreased in the ST. NAC180 or 270 prevented the alterations in GSH induced by NIC, but only NAC270 prevented the alterations in LP. Nitrite levels increased in the ST of NAC270 pretreated NIC-kindled animals. Taken together we demonstrated that NAC presents anti-kindling effects in female animals partially through the restoration of oxidative alterations.

  19. Early Developmental Low-Dose Methylmercury Exposure Alters Learning and Memory in Periadolescent but Not Young Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Albores-Garcia, Damaris; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Loera, Miriam J.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the effects of developmental methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on learning and memory at different ages. The possibility of the amelioration or worsening of the effects has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to assess whether low-dose MeHg exposure in utero and during suckling induces differential disturbances in learning and memory of periadolescent and young adult rats. Four experimental groups of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally exposed to MeHg or vehicle from gestational day 5 to weaning: (1) control (vehicle), (2) 250 μg/kg/day MeHg, (3) 500 μg/kg/day MeHg, and (4) vehicle, and treated on the test day with MK-801 (0.15 mg/kg i.p.), an antagonist of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor. The effects were evaluated in male offspring through the open field test, object recognition test, Morris water maze, and conditioned taste aversion. For each test and stage assessed, different groups of animals were used. MeHg exposure, in a dose-dependent manner, disrupted exploratory behaviour, recognition memory, spatial learning, and acquisition of aversive memories in periadolescent rats, but alterations were not observed in littermates tested in young adulthood. These results suggest that developmental low-dose exposure to MeHg induces age-dependent detrimental effects. The relevance of decreasing exposure to MeHg in humans remains to be determined. PMID:26885512

  20. Exposure to methylphenidate during peri-adolescence affects endocrine functioning and sexual behavior in female Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Guarraci, Fay A; Holifield, Caroline; Morales-Valenzuela, Jessica; Greene, Kasera; Brown, Jeanette; Lopez, Rebecca; Crandall, Christina; Gibbs, Nicole; Vela, Rebekah; Delgado, Melissa Y; Frohardt, Russell J

    2016-03-01

    The present study was designed to test the effects of methylphenidate (MPH) exposure on the maturation of endocrine functioning and sexual behavior. Female rat pups received either MPH (2.0mg/kg, i.p.) or saline twice daily between postnatal days 20-35. This period of exposure represents the time just prior to puberty as well as puberty onset. Approximately five weeks after the last injection of MPH or saline, female subjects were hormone-primed and tested during their first sexual experience. Subjects were given the choice to interact with a sexually active male or a sexually receptive female rat (i.e., the partner-preference test). The partner-preference paradigm allows us to assess multiple aspects of female sexual behavior. MPH exposure during peri-adolescence delayed puberty and, when mated for the first time, affected sexual behavior (e.g., increased time spent with the male stimulus and decreased the likelihood of leaving after mounts) during the test of partner preference. When monitoring estrous cyclicity, female subjects treated with MPH during peri-adolescence frequently experienced irregular estrous cycles. The results of the present study suggest that chronic exposure to a therapeutic dose of MPH around the onset of puberty alters long-term endocrine functioning, but with hormone priming, increases sensitivity to sexual stimuli.

  1. Decreased Bdnf expression and reduced social behavior in periadolescent rats following prenatal stress.

    PubMed

    Berry, Alessandra; Panetta, Pamela; Luoni, Alessia; Bellisario, Veronica; Capoccia, Sara; Riva, Marco Andrea; Cirulli, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    Prenatal stress (PNS) is a risk factor for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. This study was aimed at assessing, in a rodent model, changes in gene expression profiles and behavioral output as a result of PNS, during periadolescence, a critical developmental period for the onset of psychopathology. Social behavior was studied in a standardized social interaction paradigm and the expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (Bdnf), a marker of neuronal plasticity, and of inhibitory and excitatory mechanisms (Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) and K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporters ratio, NKCC1/KCC2) was analyzed. Results indicate that PNS reduced Bdnf transcripts while increasing the NKCC1/KCC2 ratio, primarily in the hippocampus. In the prefrontal cortex, changes in Bdnf were found to be gender-dependent. These effects were accompanied by reduced levels of affiliative and investigative social behaviors. Interestingly, interaction with non-stressed subjects was able to improve sociality in PNS rats suggesting that the social environment could be exploited for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25783782

  2. Methylphenidate improves performance on the radial arm maze in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Dow-Edwards, Diana L; Weedon, Jeremy C; Hellmann, Esther

    2008-01-01

    Methylphenidate (Ritalin; MPD) is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in childhood and adolescence and many clinical studies have documented its efficacy. Due to the limitations of conducting invasive research in humans, animal models can be beneficial for studying drug effects. However, few animal studies have demonstrated the effects of methylphenidate on cognitive processes. The objective of this study was to find a dose of methylphenidate that was effective in improving performance on a spatial working memory cognitive task when administered orally to periadolescent rats. Therefore, we dosed subjects with methylphenidate at 1 or 3 mg/kg/day via gastric intubation from postnatal day 22 to 59 and assessed the effects of the drug on performance on the radial arm maze each day. To enhance performance overall, a second experiment was conducted where the subjects were moderately food restricted (to 90% of the free-feeding weight). Results of Experiment 1 show that during the first week of testing only the 3 mg/kg MPD-treated males showed improved performance (entries prior to repeated entry) when ad lib fed and housed in pairs while the same dose significantly improved performance in both males and females under conditions of food-restriction and individual housing in Experiment 2. MPD also produced a pattern of increased errors and arms entered during the first week, especially in Experiment 2. MPD increased locomotor activity when tested at postnatal day 60 in both experiments. The data suggest that 3 mg/kg oral methylphenidate improves performance on a spatial cognitive task only early in treatment in the rat. While males show improvement under conditions of both high and low motivation, females only show MPD effects when highly motivated. Hypothetically, methylphenidate may improve radial arm maze performance through increased attention and improved spatial working memory and/or alterations in locomotion, reactivity to novelty or anxiety. Regardless, the

  3. Intermittent Voluntary Ethanol Drinking during Periadolescence Impairs Adult Spatial Learning after a Long Abstinence Period in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Ana; Garcia-Burgos, David; Manrique, Tatiana; Gonzalez, Felisa; Gallo, Milagros

    2011-01-01

    Although previous findings point to the long-term impact of ethanol exposure during periadolescence on hippocampal-dependent learning tasks, comparisons considering different onset and exposure periods during this developmental range of ages are still needed. The aim of this experiment was to determine whether intermittent voluntary chronic…

  4. Maternal deprivation and early handling affect density of calcium binding protein-containing neurons in selected brain regions and emotional behavior in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Giachino, C; Canalia, N; Capone, F; Fasolo, A; Alleva, E; Riva, M A; Cirulli, F; Peretto, P

    2007-03-16

    Adverse early life experiences can induce neurochemical changes that may underlie modifications in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responsiveness, emotionality and cognition. Here, we investigated the expression of the calcium binding proteins (CBPs) calretinin, calbindin and parvalbumin, which identify subpopulations of GABAergic neurons and serve important functional roles by buffering intracellular calcium levels, following brief (early handling) and long (maternal deprivation) periods of maternal separation, as compared with non-handled controls. CBP-expressing neurons were analyzed in brain regions related to stress and anxiety. Emotionality was assessed in parallel using the social interaction test. Analyses were carried out at periadolescence, an important phase for the development of brain areas involved in stress responses. Our results indicate that density of CBP-immunoreactive neurons decreases in the paraventricular region of deprived rats but increases in the hippocampus and lateral amygdala of both early-handled and deprived rats when compared with controls. Emotionality is reduced in both early-handled and deprived animals. In conclusion, early handling and deprivation led to neurochemical and behavioral changes linked to stress-sensitive brain regions. These data suggest that the effects of early experiences on CBP containing neurons might contribute to the functional changes of neuronal circuits involved in emotional response.

  5. Narrow band quantitative and multivariate electroencephalogram analysis of peri-adolescent period

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The peri-adolescent period is a crucial developmental moment of transition from childhood to emergent adulthood. The present report analyses the differences in Power Spectrum (PS) of the Electroencephalogram (EEG) between late childhood (24 children between 8 and 13 years old) and young adulthood (24 young adults between 18 and 23 years old). Results The narrow band analysis of the Electroencephalogram was computed in the frequency range of 0–20 Hz. The analysis of mean and variance suggested that six frequency ranges presented a different rate of maturation at these ages, namely: low delta, delta-theta, low alpha, high alpha, low beta and high beta. For most of these bands the maturation seems to occur later in anterior sites than posterior sites. Correlational analysis showed a lower pattern of correlation between different frequencies in children than in young adults, suggesting a certain asynchrony in the maturation of different rhythms. The topographical analysis revealed similar topographies of the different rhythms in children and young adults. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) demonstrated the same internal structure for the Electroencephalogram of both age groups. Principal Component Analysis allowed to separate four subcomponents in the alpha range. All these subcomponents peaked at a lower frequency in children than in young adults. Conclusions The present approaches complement and solve some of the incertitudes when the classical brain broad rhythm analysis is applied. Children have a higher absolute power than young adults for frequency ranges between 0-20 Hz, the correlation of Power Spectrum (PS) with age and the variance age comparison showed that there are six ranges of frequencies that can distinguish the level of EEG maturation in children and adults. The establishment of maturational order of different frequencies and its possible maturational interdependence would require a complete series including all the different ages. PMID

  6. Dopamine and serotonin signaling during two sensitive developmental periods differentially impact adult aggressive and affective behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qinghui; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Mahadevia, Darshini; Huang, Yung-Yu; Balsam, Daniel; Mann, J John; Gingrich, Jay A; Ansorge, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacologic blockade of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) or serotonin transporter (5-HTT) has antidepressant and anxiolytic efficacy in adulthood. Yet, genetically conferred MAOA or 5-HTT hypo-activity is associated with altered aggression and increased anxiety/depression. Here we test the hypothesis that increased monoamine signaling during development causes these paradoxical aggressive and affective phenotypes. We find that pharmacologic MAOA blockade during early postnatal development (P2-P21) but not during peri-adolescence (P22-41) increases anxiety- and depression-like behavior in adult (> P90) mice, mimicking the effect of P2-21 5-HTT inhibition. Moreover, MAOA blockade during peri-adolescence, but not P2-21 or P182-201, increases adult aggressive behavior, and 5-HTT blockade from P22-P41 reduced adult aggression. Blockade of the dopamine transporter, but not the norepinephrine transporter, during P22-41 also increases adult aggressive behavior. Thus, P2-21 is a sensitive period during which 5-HT modulates adult anxiety/depression-like behavior, and P22-41 is a sensitive period during which DA and 5-HT bi-directionally modulate adult aggression. Permanently altered DAergic function as a consequence of increased P22-P41 monoamine signaling might underlie altered aggression. In support of this hypothesis, we find altered aggression correlating positively with locomotor response to amphetamine challenge in adulthood. Proving that altered DA function and aggression are causally linked, we demonstrate that optogenetic activation of VTA DAergic neurons increases aggression. It therefore appears that genetic and pharmacologic factors impacting dopamine and serotonin signaling during sensitive developmental periods can modulate adult monoaminergic function and thereby alter risk for aggressive and emotional dysfunction. PMID:24589889

  7. Reinforcing Properties and Neurochemical Response of Ethanol within the Posterior Ventral Tegmental Area Are Enhanced in Adulthood by Periadolescent Ethanol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Deehan, Gerald A.; Hauser, Sheketha R.; Engleman, Eric A.; Bell, Richard L.; Murphy, James M.; Truitt, William A.; McBride, William J.; Rodd, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol drinking during adolescence is associated with increased alcohol drinking and alcohol dependence in adulthood. Research examining the biologic consequences of adolescent ethanol (EtOH) consumption on the response to EtOH in the neurocircuitry shown to regulate drug reinforcement is limited. The experiments were designed to determine the effects of periadolescent alcohol drinking on the reinforcing properties of EtOH within the posterior ventral tegmental area (pVTA) and the ability of EtOH microinjected into the pVTA to stimulate dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh). EtOH access (24-hour free-choice) by alcohol-preferring rats occurred during postnatal days (PND) 30–60. Animals were tested for their response to EtOH after PND 85. Intracranial self-administration techniques were performed to assess EtOH self-infusion into the pVTA. In the second experiment, rats received microinjections of EtOH into the pVTA, and dialysis samples were collected from the AcbSh. The results indicate that in rats that consumed EtOH during adolescence, the pVTA was more sensitive to the reinforcing effects of EtOH (a lower concentration of EtOH supported self-administration) and the ability of EtOH microinjected into the pVTA to stimulate DA release in the AcbSh was enhanced (sensitivity and magnitude). The data indicate that EtOH consumption during adolescence altered the mesolimbic DA system to be more sensitive and responsive to EtOH. This increase in the response to EtOH within the mesolimbic DA during adulthood could be part of biologic sequelae that are the basis for the deleterious effects of adolescent alcohol consumption on the rate of alcoholism during adulthood. PMID:25150280

  8. High-fructose diet during periadolescent development increases depressive-like behavior and remodels the hypothalamic transcriptome in male rats.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Constance S; Burgado, Jillybeth; Kelly, Sean D; Johnson, Zachary P; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2015-12-01

    Fructose consumption, which promotes insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, has increased by over 25% since the 1970s. In addition to metabolic dysregulation, fructose ingestion stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis leading to elevations in glucocorticoids. Adolescents are the greatest consumers of fructose, and adolescence is a critical period for maturation of the HPA axis. Repeated consumption of high levels of fructose during adolescence has the potential to promote long-term dysregulation of the stress response. Therefore, we determined the extent to which consumption of a diet high in fructose affected behavior, serum corticosterone, and hypothalamic gene expression using a whole-transcriptomics approach. In addition, we examined the potential of a high-fructose diet to interact with exposure to chronic adolescent stress. Male Wistar rats fed the periadolescent high-fructose diet showed increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test in adulthood, irrespective of stress history. Periadolescent fructose-fed rats also exhibited elevated basal corticosterone concentrations relative to their chow-fed peers. These behavioral and hormonal responses to the high-fructose diet did not occur in rats fed fructose during adulthood only. Finally, rats fed the high-fructose diet throughout development underwent marked hypothalamic transcript expression remodeling, with 966 genes (5.6%) significantly altered and a pronounced enrichment of significantly altered transcripts in several pathways relating to regulation of the HPA axis. Collectively, the data presented herein indicate that diet, specifically one high in fructose, has the potential to alter behavior, HPA axis function, and the hypothalamic transcriptome in male rats.

  9. High-fructose diet during periadolescent development increases depressive-like behavior and remodels the hypothalamic transcriptome in male rats.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Constance S; Burgado, Jillybeth; Kelly, Sean D; Johnson, Zachary P; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2015-12-01

    Fructose consumption, which promotes insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, has increased by over 25% since the 1970s. In addition to metabolic dysregulation, fructose ingestion stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis leading to elevations in glucocorticoids. Adolescents are the greatest consumers of fructose, and adolescence is a critical period for maturation of the HPA axis. Repeated consumption of high levels of fructose during adolescence has the potential to promote long-term dysregulation of the stress response. Therefore, we determined the extent to which consumption of a diet high in fructose affected behavior, serum corticosterone, and hypothalamic gene expression using a whole-transcriptomics approach. In addition, we examined the potential of a high-fructose diet to interact with exposure to chronic adolescent stress. Male Wistar rats fed the periadolescent high-fructose diet showed increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test in adulthood, irrespective of stress history. Periadolescent fructose-fed rats also exhibited elevated basal corticosterone concentrations relative to their chow-fed peers. These behavioral and hormonal responses to the high-fructose diet did not occur in rats fed fructose during adulthood only. Finally, rats fed the high-fructose diet throughout development underwent marked hypothalamic transcript expression remodeling, with 966 genes (5.6%) significantly altered and a pronounced enrichment of significantly altered transcripts in several pathways relating to regulation of the HPA axis. Collectively, the data presented herein indicate that diet, specifically one high in fructose, has the potential to alter behavior, HPA axis function, and the hypothalamic transcriptome in male rats. PMID:26356038

  10. Analgesic effect of tianeptine in mice.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, I T; Cinar, M G; Aytemir, M; Tuglular, I

    1999-01-01

    The effects of tianeptine, a novel and unusual tricyclic antidepressant drug, on tail-flick and hot-plate tests, which are two thermal analgesia evaluating methods, have been investigated in mice. Tianeptine (5 and 10 mg/kg), para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) (100 mg/kg) and a combination of pCPA and tianeptine (10 mg/kg) or saline were injected to mice intraperitoneally. pCPA (100 mg/kg) was injected 24 h before tianeptine or saline treatment when it was combined with tinaeptine (10 mg/kg) or tested alone. The tail-flick latencies and hot-plate reaction times of the mice were measured between 15th and 180th minutes following injections. Tianeptine (10 mg/kg) exhibited a significant antinociceptive activity that could be measured by both tests as compared to groups which were treated with saline or pCPA alone between 15th and 180th min of the observation period. The lower dose of tianeptine (5 mg/kg) or pCPA (100 mg/kg) did not produce any significant changes on tail-flick latency or hot-plate reaction time of the mice. However, pretreatment with pCPA completely blocked the antinociceptive effect induced by tianeptine (10 mg/kg) in both tests used in the present study. Furthermore, tianeptine (10 mg/kg) did not cause any significant impairment effects on rotarod performance of the mice. Our results suggested that tianeptine has a prominent thermal antinociceptive activity in mice and that increased serotonergic activity may be responsible for the analgesic effect of tianeptine.

  11. [Effect of scopolamine on depression in mice].

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng-xue; Zhang, Jian-jun

    2011-04-01

    Based on the report of previous clinical study which showed cholinergic receptor antagonist scopolamine had antidepressant activity, this study was to investigate the antidepressant activity of scopolamine and explore its effective dose in mice, and to evaluate the effect of scopolamine on the central nervous system and learning/memory ability at its antidepressant effective dose. Tail suspension test, forced swimming test, step-down passive avoidance test and open field test were used to evaluate its effects on mice. Compared with the vehicle control group, single-dose administration of scopolamine (0.1-0.4 mg x kg(-1), ip) significantly decreased the immobility time (P < 0.01 or P < 0.001) in tail suspension test, and significantly decreased the immobility time (P < 0.001) in forced swimming test, but had no effect on the step-down latency and errors in step-down passive avoidance test. Scopolamine (0.1 and 0.2 mg x kg(-1), ip) had no influence on the locomotor activity in open field test, while at dose of 0.4 mg x kg(-1) significantly increase the locomotor activity. These results showed that scopolamine produced reliable antidepressant effect at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mg x kg(-1), without impairment on learning and memory, as well as excitory or inhibitory effect on central nervous system in mice.

  12. Effects of chronic centrifugation on mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janer, L.; Duke, J.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to excess gravity in vitro alters the developmental sequence in embryonic mouse limbs and palates (Duke, Janer and Campbell, 1984; Duke, 1983). The effects of excess gravity on in vivo mammalian development was investigated using a small animal centrifuge. Four-week old female mice exposed to excess gravities of 1.8-3.5 G for eight weeks weighed significantly less than controls. Mice were mated after five weeks of adaptation to excess G, and sacrificed either at gestational day 12 or 18. There were fewer pregnancies in the centrifuged group (4/36) than in controls (9/31), and crown rump lengths (CRL) of embryos developing in the centrifuge were less than CRLs of 1-G embryos. These results show that although immersed in amniotic fluid, embryos are responsive to Delta-G.

  13. Effect of chrysotile asbestos fibers on germ cells of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rita, P.; Reddy, P.P.

    1986-10-01

    An Indian form of chrysotile asbestos procured from a local asbestos factory (Hyderabad) was tested for its toxic effects on spermatocytes and sperm of mice. Swiss albino male mice were fed orally with chrysotile asbestos suspended in water. The concentration tested was 20 mg/kg/day. Chronic oral administration of chrysotile failed to induce chromosomal aberrations and abnormal sperms in mice.

  14. Teratogenic Effects of Pregabalin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Etemad, Leila; Mohammad, Afshar; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Vahdati Mashhadi, Nasser; Moallem, Seyed Adel

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) have the potential to affect fetal development throughout pregnancy. Considering the broad therapeutic indications of pregabalin (PGB), its potential teratogenic effects and the levels of homocysteine have been studied. Materials and Methods: Timed-pregnant mice received one of three doses of PGB (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/day) or the vehicle control during organogenesis, intraperitoneally. The litters were stained and examined for malformations. Total homocysteine (tHcy) was measured in serum from the pregnant mice on GD18. Results: The rate of fetus malformations increased significantly in all treated groups as compared to the control group. The abnormalities included limb, vertebral column and craniofacial abnormalities. The most common abnormality was limb deformity. The percentage of fetal resorption significantly increased at higher doses. There was no significant difference in tHcy concentrations between the treated and control groups. Conclusion: Pregabalin may have potential teratogenic effects even in lower doses, however with less intensity than other AEDs. Therefore, it is suggested that great caution should be taken when prescribing it in pregnancy and further investigation for possible mechaninsms. PMID:24379963

  15. The effect of some drugs on acute toxoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hamadto, H H; Rashed, S M; Marii, N E; Sobhy, M M; el-Ridi, A M; el-Fakahany, A F

    1989-12-01

    The effect of some chemotherapeutics, on the course of acute toxoplasmosis in experimentally infected mice was studied. Obtained results showed that, praziquantel, levamisole had no effect on acute toxoplasmosis, while trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and clindamycin showed some prophylactic effect on acute toxoplasmosis in mice. PMID:2788673

  16. Neuropharmacological effects of Nigerian honey in mice.

    PubMed

    Akanmu, Moses Atanda; Olowookere, Temitope Adunni; Atunwa, Soliu Abiola; Ibrahim, Basirat Olufunmilola; Lamidi, Oluwafunmilayo Fatima; Adams, Philomena Arekekhuegbe; Ajimuda, Bolanle Olubunmi; Adeyemo, Lilian Edelauvo

    2011-01-01

    Honey is a natural sweet substance that bees produce by transforming flower nectar or other sweet secretions of plants. It has widespread use in traditional medicine in various parts of the world. It has been reported to assist in building the entire central nervous system. The beneficial effects of honey have been attributed to the possible polyphenolic contents and some other constituents. The geographical locations and the sources of plant nectars may contribute to the effects of honey samples. Thus, we evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of six samples of honey (10%, 20% and 40%(V)/v, p.o.) from three geographical locations of Nigeria using the following behavioral models: Novelty-induced behaviors (NIB), learning and memory, pentobarbital-induced hypnosis, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, analgesic and antidepressant models in mice. The results showed that honey significantly (p< 0.05) decreased locomotion and rearing behaviors in NIB and amphetamine-induced locomotor activity when compared to the control group. Exploratory behavior was significantly increased in both holeboard and elevated plus maze but had no significant effect on spatial working memory. Honey sample from Umudike has significant hypnotic and anticonvulsant effects. The antinociceptive models (hot plate and tail flick tests) showed that the honey samples significantly increased the pain reaction time and naloxone blocked these central antinociceptive effects. The force swimming test showed that only the Idanre (ID) honey sample had antidepressant effect. In conclusion, some of these honey samples have central inhibitory property, anxiolytic, antinociceptive, anticonvulsant and antidepressant effects, thus may be used as nutraceutic. It can also be inferred that some of these effects are probably mediated through dopaminergic and opioidergic systems.

  17. Neurodevelopmental effects of lanthanum in mice.

    PubMed

    Briner, W; Rycek, R F; Moellenberndt, A; Dannull, K

    2000-01-01

    Mice were exposed to lanthanum chloride in drinking water at 0, 125, 250, and 500 mg/liter concentration prior to conception, during gestation, and until 30 days postnatally. Developing mice were assessed for the development of swimming and walking behavior and ear and eye opening. At 30 days of age the mice were assessed with a standard neurologic scale. Differences were found in the emergence of swimming and walking behavior and ear and eye opening. Differences were also found for touch response and visual placing responses. The brains of lanthanum-exposed mice were also smaller than controls. These findings indicate that lanthanum is a potential behavioral teratogen. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Effects of simulated heat waves on ApoE-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunling; Zhang, Shuyu; Tian, Ying; Wang, Baojian; Shen, Shuanghe

    2014-02-01

    The effects of simulated heat waves on body weight, body temperature, and biomarkers of cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice were investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a meteorological environment simulation chamber according to data from a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen ApoE-/- mice were divided into control group, heat wave group, and heat wave BH4 group. Mice in the heat wave and BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. Mice in BH4 group were treated with gastric lavage with BH4 2 h prior to heat wave exposure. Results showed that the heat waves did not significantly affect body weight or ET-1 levels. However, mice in the heat wave group had significantly higher rectal temperature and NO level and lower SOD activity compared with mice in the control group (p < 0.01), indicating that heat wave had negative effects on cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice. Gastric lavage with BH4 prior to heat wave exposure significantly reduced heat wave-induced increases in rectal temperature and decreases in SOD activity. Additionally, pretreatment with BH4 further increased NO level in plasma. Collectively, these beneficial effects demonstrate that BH4 may potentially mitigate the risk of coronary heart disease in mice under heat wave exposure. These results may be useful when studying the effects of heat waves on humans. PMID:24477215

  19. Effects of simulated heat waves on ApoE-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunling; Zhang, Shuyu; Tian, Ying; Wang, Baojian; Shen, Shuanghe

    2014-02-01

    The effects of simulated heat waves on body weight, body temperature, and biomarkers of cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice were investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a meteorological environment simulation chamber according to data from a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen ApoE-/- mice were divided into control group, heat wave group, and heat wave BH4 group. Mice in the heat wave and BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. Mice in BH4 group were treated with gastric lavage with BH4 2 h prior to heat wave exposure. Results showed that the heat waves did not significantly affect body weight or ET-1 levels. However, mice in the heat wave group had significantly higher rectal temperature and NO level and lower SOD activity compared with mice in the control group (p < 0.01), indicating that heat wave had negative effects on cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice. Gastric lavage with BH4 prior to heat wave exposure significantly reduced heat wave-induced increases in rectal temperature and decreases in SOD activity. Additionally, pretreatment with BH4 further increased NO level in plasma. Collectively, these beneficial effects demonstrate that BH4 may potentially mitigate the risk of coronary heart disease in mice under heat wave exposure. These results may be useful when studying the effects of heat waves on humans.

  20. Lymphocytes from Chronically Stressed Mice Confer Antidepressant-Like Effects to Naive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brachman, Rebecca A.; Lehmann, Michael L.; Maric, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether cells of the adaptive immune system retain the memory of psychosocial stress and thereby alter mood states and CNS function in the host. Lymphocytes from mice undergoing chronic social defeat stress or from unstressed control mice were isolated and adoptively transferred into naive lymphopenic Rag2−/− mice. Changes in affective behavior, hippocampal cell proliferation, microglial activation states, and blood cytokine levels were examined in reconstituted stress-naive mice. The mice receiving lymphocytes from defeated donors showed less anxiety, more social behavior, and increased hippocampal cell proliferation compared with those receiving no cells or cells from unstressed donors. Mice receiving stressed immune cells had reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the blood relative to the other groups, an effect opposite to the elevated donor pro-inflammatory cytokine profile. Furthermore, mice receiving stressed immune cells had microglia skewed toward an anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective M2-like phenotype, an effect opposite the stressed donors' M1-like pro-inflammatory profile. However, stress had no effect on lymphocyte surface marker profiles in both donor and recipient mice. The data suggest that chronic stress-induced changes in the adaptive immune system, contrary to conferring anxiety and depressive behavior, protect against the deleterious effects of stress. Improvement in affective behavior is potentially mediated by reduced peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokine load, protective microglial activity, and increased hippocampal cell proliferation. The data identify the peripheral adaptive immune system as putatively involved in the mechanisms underlying stress resilience and a potential basis for developing novel rapid-acting antidepressant therapies. PMID:25632130

  1. Effects of oil plastic extract on mice.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatim, A S; Al-Hachim, G M

    2001-03-01

    In the plastics industry, various chemical additives are used to improve certain properties of plastics. Some of these chemicals, that might be toxic, have been proved to leach from the plastic containers and mix with their contents such as food oils, beverages, drugs, etc. Locally manufactured polyvinyl chloride (PVC) jerrycans were bought from the market and cut into small chips of 0.5 cm in the larger dimension. Four grams of chips were extracted with 20 ml cottonseed oil in the autoclave for 1 h at 121 degrees C. The extract was prepared daily and given orally to adult MFI mice in a dose of 10 ml kg(-1) body weight. Pure cottonseed oil was prepared under the same conditions and given in a dose of 10 ml kg(-1) body weight to the control group. Treatment of both groups continued for 1 month. Each group comprised 60 animals, regardless of sex. Effects of the oil plastic extract were observed on blood elements, serum transaminases (aspartate aminotransferase, AST, and alanine aminotransferase, ALT), organ-to-body weight of the liver, kidneys and brain, and the nervous system (effects on the neuromuscular junction and analgesia, using the Rota-Rod(R) treadmill 'RRT', and the hot plate, respectively). All the results were subjected to Student's t-test. The results showed that the extract induced significant effects: an increase in the activities of AST (p< 0.001) and ALT (p< 0.02), an increase in the mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) (p< 0.01), and the monocyte count (p< 0.01). It decreased the white blood cell count (WBC) (p< 0.01), the mean corpuscular volume (MCV) (p< 0.05), and the lymphocyte count (p< 0.05). It also reduced the weight of the liver (P< 0.01), kidneys (P< 0.05), and the endurance time on the RRT (p< 0.001). PMID:11260789

  2. Microwave effects on learning and memory in mice. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luttges, M.W.

    1980-09-30

    The effects of microwave irradiation were assessed on learning memory in mice. Also, preliminary studies were completed to begin an assessment of underlying physiological mechanisms related to the observed microwave effects on behavior. Using a resonant microwave irradiation chamber in which mice were exposed following daily training to 3GHz pulsed microwave at approximately 18m W/sq cm average power levels, small but reliable increases in performance were documented. All treatments were delivered posttrial for a 15 min. period. Sham-treated mice were treated in the same manner as exposed mice except that no radiation was delivered. Repeated replications with different aged animals produced the same effects. The microwave facilitation was observed in both automated active avoidance testing and in single-trial, passive avoidance testing. The modest facilitation effect was observed when the mice were tested at 20 days after original training. Using a different irradiation chamber, the studies were repeated. The new chamber used an impedance matched horn in which the mice were restrained in a constant orientation relative to the microwave fields. In this test configuration the mice received an average power level of 22mW/sq cm. Once again, small but reliable amounts of performance facilitation were observed.

  3. Effect of ammonia on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Casey, C. J.; Furst, A.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC /50/ values were determined for Swiss albino male mice exposed to different concentrations of ammonia in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The LC/50/ for a 30 minute exposure was 21,430 ppm.

  4. Pulmonary effects of inhaled diesel exhaust in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel, Kinal J.; Mainelis, Gediminas; Turpin, Barbara J.; Ridgely, Sherritta; Laumbach, Robert J.; Kipen, Howard M.; Nazarenko, Yevgen; Veleeparambil, Manoj; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary morbidity and mortality resulting from exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) increases with age. The present studies analyzed potential mechanisms underlying increased susceptibility of the elderly to PM using diesel exhaust (DE) as a model. Mice (2 m and 18 m) were exposed to DE (0, 300, and 1000 μg/m3) for 3 h once (single) or 3 h/day for 3 days (repeated). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), serum and lung tissue were collected 0 and 24 h later. Exposure to DE resulted in structural alterations in the lungs of older but not younger mice, including patchy thickening of the alveolar septa and inflammatory cell localization in alveolar spaces. These effects were most pronounced 24 h after a single exposure to the higher dose of DE. Significant increases in BAL nitrogen oxides were also noted in older mice, as well as expression of lipocalin 24p3, an oxidative stress marker in the lung with no effects in younger mice. Following DE inhalation, expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) was upregulated in lungs of both younger and older mice; however, this was attenuated in older animals. Whereas exposure to DE resulted in increases in lung Interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in both older and younger mice, IL-8 increased only in older animals. In younger mice, constitutive expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) decreased after DE exposure, while in older mice, constitutive MnSOD was not detectable and DE had no effect on expression of this antioxidant. Taken together, these results suggest that altered generation of inflammatory mediators and MnSOD may contribute to increased susceptibility of older mice to inhaled DE. PMID:19729031

  5. Pulmonary effects of inhaled diesel exhaust in aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel, Kinal J.; Mainelis, Gediminas; Turpin, Barbara J.; Ridgely, Sherritta; Laumbach, Robert J.; Kipen, Howard M.; Nazarenko, Yevgen; Veleeparambil, Manoj; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2009-12-15

    Pulmonary morbidity and mortality resulting from exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) increases with age. The present studies analyzed potential mechanisms underlying increased susceptibility of the elderly to PM using diesel exhaust (DE) as a model. Mice (2 m and 18 m) were exposed to DE (0, 300, and 1000 mug/m{sup 3}) for 3 h once (single) or 3 h/day for 3 days (repeated). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), serum and lung tissue were collected 0 and 24 h later. Exposure to DE resulted in structural alterations in the lungs of older but not younger mice, including patchy thickening of the alveolar septa and inflammatory cell localization in alveolar spaces. These effects were most pronounced 24 h after a single exposure to the higher dose of DE. Significant increases in BAL nitrogen oxides were also noted in older mice, as well as expression of lipocalin 24p3, an oxidative stress marker in the lung with no effects in younger mice. Following DE inhalation, expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFalpha) was upregulated in lungs of both younger and older mice; however, this was attenuated in older animals. Whereas exposure to DE resulted in increases in lung Interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in both older and younger mice, IL-8 increased only in older animals. In younger mice, constitutive expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) decreased after DE exposure, while in older mice, constitutive MnSOD was not detectable and DE had no effect on expression of this antioxidant. Taken together, these results suggest that altered generation of inflammatory mediators and MnSOD may contribute to increased susceptibility of older mice to inhaled DE.

  6. [Effect of eel oil capsule on mice memory].

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Xu, D; Xu, S; Huang, X

    1998-06-01

    Step-down test, step-through test and water maze in mice were used to observe the effect of eel oil capsule on mice memory. The results indicated that during the administration period (30 days), the eel oil capsule treating groups with dosages of 0.129, 0.387, and 1.161 g/kg obviously improved the learning and memory abilities. Compared with the control test, the eel oil capsule promoted the memory and smart.

  7. Effects of leptin on sympathetic nerve activity in conscious mice

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Donald A; Despas, Fabien; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, has emerged as an important regulator of regional sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) with pathophysiological implications in obesity. Genetically engineered mice are useful to understand the molecular pathways underlying the SNA responses evoked by leptin. However, so far the effect of leptin on direct SNA in mice has been studied under general anesthesia. Here, we examined the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin in conscious mice. Mice were instrumented, under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, with renal or lumbar SNA recordings using a thin (40 gauge) bipolar platinum–iridium wire. The electrodes were exteriorized at the nape of the neck and mice were allowed (5 h) to recover from anesthesia. Interestingly, the reflex increases in renal and lumbar SNA caused by sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced hypotension was higher in the conscious phase versus the anesthetized state, whereas the increase in both renal and lumbar SNA evoked by leptin did not differ between anesthetized or conscious mice. Next, we assessed whether isoflurane anesthesia would yield a better outcome. Again, the SNP-induced increase in renal SNA and baroreceptor-renal SNA reflex were significantly elevated in the conscious states relative to isoflurane-anesthetized phase, but the renal SNA response induced by leptin in the conscious states were qualitatively comparable to those evoked above. Thus, despite improvement in sympathetic reflexes in conscious mice the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin mimic those induced during anesthesia. PMID:26381017

  8. Effects of Hindlimb Unweighting on Arterial Contractile Responses in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Jia; Ren, Xin-Ling; Purdy, Ralph E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine if hindlimb unweighting in mice alters arterial contractile responses. Sixteen male C57B/6 mice and 16 male Chinese Kunming mice were divided into control and 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting groups, respectively. Using isolated arterial rings from different arteries of mouse, effects of 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting on arterial contractile responsiveness were examined in vitro. The results showed that, in arterial rings from both C57B/6 and Chinese Kunming mice, maximum isometric contractile tensions evoked by either KCl or phenylephrine were significantly lower in abdominal aortic, mesenteric arterial and femoral arterial rings from hindlimb unweighting, compared to control mice. However, the maximal contractile responses of common carotid rings to KCl and PE were not significantly different between control and hindlimb unweighting groups. The sensitivity (EC(sub 50)) of all arteries to KCl or PE showed no significant differences between control and hindlimb unweighting mice. These data indicated that 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting results in a reduced capacity of the arterial smooth muscle of the hindquarter to develop tension. In addition, the alterations in arterial contractile responses caused by hindlimb unweighting in mice are similar as those in rats. Our work suggested that hindlimb unweighting mouse model may be used as a model for the study of postflight cardiovascular deconditioning.

  9. Effects of leptin on sympathetic nerve activity in conscious mice.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Donald A; Despas, Fabien; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-09-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, has emerged as an important regulator of regional sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) with pathophysiological implications in obesity. Genetically engineered mice are useful to understand the molecular pathways underlying the SNA responses evoked by leptin. However, so far the effect of leptin on direct SNA in mice has been studied under general anesthesia. Here, we examined the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin in conscious mice. Mice were instrumented, under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, with renal or lumbar SNA recordings using a thin (40 gauge) bipolar platinum-iridium wire. The electrodes were exteriorized at the nape of the neck and mice were allowed (5 h) to recover from anesthesia. Interestingly, the reflex increases in renal and lumbar SNA caused by sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced hypotension was higher in the conscious phase versus the anesthetized state, whereas the increase in both renal and lumbar SNA evoked by leptin did not differ between anesthetized or conscious mice. Next, we assessed whether isoflurane anesthesia would yield a better outcome. Again, the SNP-induced increase in renal SNA and baroreceptor-renal SNA reflex were significantly elevated in the conscious states relative to isoflurane-anesthetized phase, but the renal SNA response induced by leptin in the conscious states were qualitatively comparable to those evoked above. Thus, despite improvement in sympathetic reflexes in conscious mice the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin mimic those induced during anesthesia.

  10. Effects of Hemerocallis on sleep in mice.

    PubMed

    Uezu, E

    1998-04-01

    Freeze-dried flowers of the Akinowasuregusa (Hemerocallis fulva L. var. sempervirona M. Hotta), a Hemerocallis genus of the lily family, were fed to C57BL strain mice. The slow wave sleep and paradoxical sleep of the Hemerocallis-treated group increased during the dark period. The differences between the control group and the Hemerocallis-treated group were significant (P < 0.05). The Hemerocallis feeding did not cause a change in sleep time during the light period. As a result, there was no significant change in the sleep-time percentage over a 24-h period. PMID:9628113

  11. Effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on social development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Zeeba D.; Kennedy, Bruce; Katzman, Aaron; Lahvis, Garet; Kosofsky, Barry E.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) in humans and animals has been shown to impair social development. Molecules that mediate synaptic plasticity and learning in the medial PFC (mPFC), specifically BDNF and its downstream signaling molecule, egr1 have been shown to affect the regulation of social interactions (SI). In this study we determined the effects of PCE on SI and the corresponding ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in developing mice. Furthermore, we studied the PCE-induced changes in constitutive expression of BDNF, egr1 and their transcriptional regulators in the mPFC as a possible molecular mechanism mediating the altered SI. In prenatal cocaine exposed (PCOC) mice we identified increased SI and USV production at P25, and increased SI but not USVs, at P35. By P45 the expression of both social behaviors normalized in PCOC mice. At the molecular level, we found increased BDNF exon IV and egr1 mRNA in the mPFC of PCOC mice at P30 that normalized by P45. This was concurrent with increased egr1 protein in the mPFC of PCOC mice at P30 suggesting a role of egr1 in the enhanced SI observed in juvenile PCOC mice. Additionally, by measuring the association of acH3K9,14, and MeCP2 at the promoters of BDNF exons I and IV, and egr1, our results provide evidence of promoter specific alterations in the mPFC of PCOC juvenile mice with increased association of acH3K9,14 only at the BDNF exon IV promoter. These results identify a potential PCE-induced molecular alteration as the underlying neurobiologic mechanism mediating the altered social development in juvenile mice. PMID:24852757

  12. Carryover effects of dichloroacetic acid on hepatic tumorigenesis in mice.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of drinking water chlorination. Chronic DCA exposure has been shown to increase liver tumors in mice, although carryover effects and interactions with other promotional agents are not known. Here we evaluated effects...

  13. The effects of methaqualone on the temperature regulation of mice.

    PubMed

    Boggan, W O; Meyer, J S

    1977-05-01

    Methaqualone produces dose and time dependent changes in the rectal temperature of mice. More specifically, the drug produces poikilothermia. This effect appears to be produced by methaqualone itself rather than a liver metabolite since SKF525A, a compound known to block drug metabolizing enzymes in the liver, does not abolish the phenomenon. Tolerance to the temperature altering effects of methaqualone is also shown.

  14. Effect of chronic psychosocial stress on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Czech, Barbara; Neumann, Inga D; Müller, Martina; Reber, Stefan O; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation which may progress towards inflammation (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)). NAFLD is regarded as a consequence of a sedentary, food-abundant lifestyle which, in the modern world, often coincides with chronically high levels of perceived psychosocial stress. Here, we aimed to characterize the effect of chronic psychosocial stress on the development of NAFLD/NASH in male mice either fed with standard chow or NASH-inducing high fat diet. Chronic psychosocial stress was induced by chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC), a pre-clinically validated paradigm relevant for human affective and somatic disorders. Single housed (SHC) mice served as controls. Under standard chow conditions CSC mice revealed lower hepatic triglyceride levels but higher hepatic TNFα, MCP-1 and HMOX mRNA expression, while serum transaminase levels did not significantly differ from SHC mice. Under the NASH-inducing high-fat diet CSC and SHC mice showed similar body weight-gain and serum levels of glucose and adiponectin. Moreover, liver histology as well as TNFα, MCP-1 and HMOX expression were similar in CSC and SHC mice fed with HFD. Surprisingly, CSC showed even significantly lower transaminase levels than SHC mice fed with the same NASH-inducing diet. Together, these data indicate that under normal dietary conditions the CSC model induces noticeable hepatic oxidative stress and inflammation without causing manifest hepatocellular injury. In contrast, CSC exhibited a protective effect on hepatocellular injury in a dietary NASH-model. Identification of the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to prevent progression of NAFLD.

  15. Effect of chronic psychosocial stress on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Czech, Barbara; Neumann, Inga D; Müller, Martina; Reber, Stefan O; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation which may progress towards inflammation (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)). NAFLD is regarded as a consequence of a sedentary, food-abundant lifestyle which, in the modern world, often coincides with chronically high levels of perceived psychosocial stress. Here, we aimed to characterize the effect of chronic psychosocial stress on the development of NAFLD/NASH in male mice either fed with standard chow or NASH-inducing high fat diet. Chronic psychosocial stress was induced by chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC), a pre-clinically validated paradigm relevant for human affective and somatic disorders. Single housed (SHC) mice served as controls. Under standard chow conditions CSC mice revealed lower hepatic triglyceride levels but higher hepatic TNFα, MCP-1 and HMOX mRNA expression, while serum transaminase levels did not significantly differ from SHC mice. Under the NASH-inducing high-fat diet CSC and SHC mice showed similar body weight-gain and serum levels of glucose and adiponectin. Moreover, liver histology as well as TNFα, MCP-1 and HMOX expression were similar in CSC and SHC mice fed with HFD. Surprisingly, CSC showed even significantly lower transaminase levels than SHC mice fed with the same NASH-inducing diet. Together, these data indicate that under normal dietary conditions the CSC model induces noticeable hepatic oxidative stress and inflammation without causing manifest hepatocellular injury. In contrast, CSC exhibited a protective effect on hepatocellular injury in a dietary NASH-model. Identification of the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to prevent progression of NAFLD. PMID:23923077

  16. Effects of Lorenzo's Oil on peroxisomes in healthy mice.

    PubMed

    De Craemer, D; Van den Branden, C; Fontaine, M; Vamecq, J

    1998-03-01

    We investigated peroxisomal alterations in mice treated with different doses of Lorenzo's Oil (a therapy for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients) for up to 100 days. Hepatic erucic acid levels were already significantly increased 2.2-fold and 2.6-fold in mice treated with 10% and 20% Lorenzo's Oil for 21 days, respectively. No lipidosis was found in liver, myocardium and kidney of any of the treated mice. While hepatic catalase, lauroyl-CoA oxidase and glycolate oxidase, and renal catalase activities were not induced by either diet, myocardial catalase activity was increased in most groups. This suggests that the mechanism of the effect of Lorenzo's Oil in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patients may not be a direct effect on the peroxisomes.

  17. Effect of Sex Steroids on Babesia microti Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Mizuki; Fujii, Yoshito; Iwamoto, Maya; Ikadai, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Sex-based-differences are known to affect susceptibility to protozoan infections, but their effects on parasitemia and clinical symptoms in Babesia infections remain unclear. We examined the sex-based susceptibility of various mouse strains to Babesia microti Munich strain infection. In all strains, male mice exhibited significantly higher peak parasitemia and more severe anemia than female mice. Testosterone and estradiol-17β treatment caused an increase in parasitemia and aggravation of anemia. Orchidectomized male mice receiving testosterone exhibited smaller splenic macrophage populations three days after infection, smaller B cell populations 10 days after infection, and reduced splenic tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ mRNA expression than mice that did not receive testosterone. Mice receiving estradiol-17β did not exhibit immunosuppressive effects. Thus, a weakened and delayed innate immunity response may lead to acquired immunity failure. The results suggested that testosterone directly affects T or B cells, leading to delayed acquired immunity, dramatically increased parasitemia, and severe anemia. PMID:23249689

  18. Effects of cage density on behavior in young adult mice.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lauren P; Chedester, Alan L; Cole, Marlene N

    2007-08-01

    Optimal housing conditions for mice can be achieved by minimizing environmental variables, such as those that may contribute to anxiety-like behavior. This study evaluated the effects of cage size on juvenile mice through assessment of differences in weaning weight, locomotor skills, and anxiety-like behavior. Eighteen pairs of male and pregnant female Swiss-Webster (Cr:SW) mice were housed in 3 different caging scenarios, providing 429, 505, or 729 cm2 of space. Litters were standardized to 10 pups per litter in each cage. Mice reared in each caging scenario were assessed with the open-field, light-dark exploration, and elevated plus-maze tests. No differences in weaning weight were noted. Mice reared in the 505- and 729-cm2 cages explored a significantly larger area of the open-field arena than did those in the 429-cm2 cages. Those reared in the 505-cm2 cages spent more time in the center of the open field than did those in the 729-cm2 cages, suggesting that anxiety-like behavior may be increased in the animals housed in the larger cages. This study did not establish a consistent link between decreased floor space and increased anxiety-like behavior; neither does there appear to be a consistent effect of available floor area on the development of locomotor skills on mouse pups.

  19. Effect of Enrichment Devices on Aggression in Manipulated Nude Mice.

    PubMed

    Lockworth, Cynthia R; Kim, Sun-Jin; Liu, Jun; Palla, Shana L; Craig, Suzanne L

    2015-11-01

    Agonistic behavior in group-housed male mice is a recurring problem in many animal research facilities. Common management procedures, such as the removal of aggressors, are moderately successful but often fail, owing to recurrence of aggressive behavior among cagemates. Studies have incorporated enrichment devices to attenuate aggression, but such devices have had mixed results. However, these studies did not include research manipulations when assessing the benefits of various enrichment devices. We obtained 100 male athymic nude mice and studied the efficacy of various enrichment devices, including cotton squares, paper rolls, shredded paper, nylon bones, and a mouse house and wheel combination in the reduction of fighting during an ongoing study that involved randomization followed by prostate and intratibial injections. Groups were evaluated according to a numerical grading system for wound assessment. Examination of the data revealed that the enrichment devices had no effect on the presence of wounds, thus none of the devices tested affected fighting in nude mice. However, when mice began experimental use, fight wounds increased significantly at cage change and after randomization, reflecting a disruption of existing social hierarchies. Therefore, in the context of an actual research study that involves common manipulations, the specific enrichment device had less effect on aggression in male nude mice than did the destruction and reconstruction of social structures within each group.

  20. Effect of Enrichment Devices on Aggression in Manipulated Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lockworth, Cynthia R; Kim, Sun-Jin; Liu, Jun; Palla, Shana L; Craig, Suzanne L

    2015-01-01

    Agonistic behavior in group-housed male mice is a recurring problem in many animal research facilities. Common management procedures, such as the removal of aggressors, are moderately successful but often fail, owing to recurrence of aggressive behavior among cagemates. Studies have incorporated enrichment devices to attenuate aggression, but such devices have had mixed results. However, these studies did not include research manipulations when assessing the benefits of various enrichment devices. We obtained 100 male athymic nude mice and studied the efficacy of various enrichment devices, including cotton squares, paper rolls, shredded paper, nylon bones, and a mouse house and wheel combination in the reduction of fighting during an ongoing study that involved randomization followed by prostate and intratibial injections. Groups were evaluated according to a numerical grading system for wound assessment. Examination of the data revealed that the enrichment devices had no effect on the presence of wounds, thus none of the devices tested affected fighting in nude mice. However, when mice began experimental use, fight wounds increased significantly at cage change and after randomization, reflecting a disruption of existing social hierarchies. Therefore, in the context of an actual research study that involves common manipulations, the specific enrichment device had less effect on aggression in male nude mice than did the destruction and reconstruction of social structures within each group. PMID:26632782

  1. Effect of Kiwifruit on Bone Resorption in Ovariectomized Mice.

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Shinichi; Wolber, Frances M; Tadaishi, Miki; Tousen, Yuko; Ishimi, Yoshiko; Kruger, Marlena C

    2015-01-01

    Kiwifruit is a good source of dietary components and has beneficial effects for health. In this study, we investigated the effects of two types of kiwifruit, green kiwifruit (GRK) and gold kiwifruit (GOK), on bone metabolism in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. Seven-week-old female Balb/c-strain mice were divided into four groups: sham-operated (sham) group, OVX group, and OVX mice that were fed a GRK-supplemented diet or GOK-supplemented diet. Freeze-dried GRK and GOK were prepared and added in the diet at a concentration of 3 g/100 g. After 9 wk, the mice were sacrificed, and the serum, uterus, and femurs were obtained. Final body weight did not differ significantly among the four groups. Compared to the sham group, uterine weight was significantly lower and serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTx) levels and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) mRNA expression of the whole femur were significantly higher in the OVX group. Compared to the OVX group, GRK, but not GOK, reduced serum CTx concentrations and RANKL mRNA expression of the whole femur without changes in uterine weight. These results suggest that the GRK inhibited bone resorption, which might be due to a decrease in RANKL mRNA expression in OVX mice.

  2. Effect of Kiwifruit on Bone Resorption in Ovariectomized Mice.

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Shinichi; Wolber, Frances M; Tadaishi, Miki; Tousen, Yuko; Ishimi, Yoshiko; Kruger, Marlena C

    2015-01-01

    Kiwifruit is a good source of dietary components and has beneficial effects for health. In this study, we investigated the effects of two types of kiwifruit, green kiwifruit (GRK) and gold kiwifruit (GOK), on bone metabolism in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. Seven-week-old female Balb/c-strain mice were divided into four groups: sham-operated (sham) group, OVX group, and OVX mice that were fed a GRK-supplemented diet or GOK-supplemented diet. Freeze-dried GRK and GOK were prepared and added in the diet at a concentration of 3 g/100 g. After 9 wk, the mice were sacrificed, and the serum, uterus, and femurs were obtained. Final body weight did not differ significantly among the four groups. Compared to the sham group, uterine weight was significantly lower and serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTx) levels and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) mRNA expression of the whole femur were significantly higher in the OVX group. Compared to the OVX group, GRK, but not GOK, reduced serum CTx concentrations and RANKL mRNA expression of the whole femur without changes in uterine weight. These results suggest that the GRK inhibited bone resorption, which might be due to a decrease in RANKL mRNA expression in OVX mice. PMID:26440641

  3. Effect of Enrichment Devices on Aggression in Manipulated Nude Mice.

    PubMed

    Lockworth, Cynthia R; Kim, Sun-Jin; Liu, Jun; Palla, Shana L; Craig, Suzanne L

    2015-11-01

    Agonistic behavior in group-housed male mice is a recurring problem in many animal research facilities. Common management procedures, such as the removal of aggressors, are moderately successful but often fail, owing to recurrence of aggressive behavior among cagemates. Studies have incorporated enrichment devices to attenuate aggression, but such devices have had mixed results. However, these studies did not include research manipulations when assessing the benefits of various enrichment devices. We obtained 100 male athymic nude mice and studied the efficacy of various enrichment devices, including cotton squares, paper rolls, shredded paper, nylon bones, and a mouse house and wheel combination in the reduction of fighting during an ongoing study that involved randomization followed by prostate and intratibial injections. Groups were evaluated according to a numerical grading system for wound assessment. Examination of the data revealed that the enrichment devices had no effect on the presence of wounds, thus none of the devices tested affected fighting in nude mice. However, when mice began experimental use, fight wounds increased significantly at cage change and after randomization, reflecting a disruption of existing social hierarchies. Therefore, in the context of an actual research study that involves common manipulations, the specific enrichment device had less effect on aggression in male nude mice than did the destruction and reconstruction of social structures within each group. PMID:26632782

  4. Effect of environment on staphylococcal lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J P; Cordaro, J T; Ball, R J

    1967-11-01

    The influence of reduced barometric pressure on the development and healing of staphylococcal skin lesions in mice was investigated by exposing groups of animals to the test environment before, after, or before and after subcutaneous inoculation with 3.5 x 10 colony-forming units of a phage type 80 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. Similarly infected control animals were not exposed to the experimental environment. The results indicate that the lesions which developed in mice exposed to the test environment prior to infectious challenge were larger and healed at a slower rate than those in mice maintained at ground level before infection. Exposure after inoculation produced no demonstrable effect in the size or healing rate of the experimental lesions.

  5. Effects of Lizhong Tang on gastrointestinal motility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Cheol; Ha, Wooram; Park, Jinhyeong; Kim, Junghoon; Jung, Yunjin; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of Lizhong Tang, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, on gastrointestinal motility in mice. METHODS The in vivo effects of Lizhong Tang on GI motility were investigated by measuring the intestinal transit rates (ITRs) and gastric emptying (GE) values in normal mice and in mice with experimentally induced GI motility dysfunction (GMD). RESULTS In normal ICR mice, the ITR and GE values were significantly and dose-dependently increased by Lizhong Tang (ITR values: 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 65.2% ± 1.8%, P < 0.01 with 0.1 g/kg Lizhong Tang and 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 83.8% ± 1.9%, P < 0.01 with 1 g/kg Lizhong Tang; GE values: 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 66.8% ± 2.1%, P < 0.05 with 0.1 g/kg Lizhong Tang and 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 72.5% ± 1.7%, P < 0.01 with 1 g/kg Lizhong Tang). The ITRs of the GMD mice were significantly reduced compared with those of the normal mice, which were significantly and dose-dependently reversed by Lizhong Tang. Additionally, in loperamide- and cisplatin-induced models of GE delay, Lizhong Tang administration reversed the GE deficits. CONCLUSION These results suggest that Lizhong Tang may be a novel candidate for development as a prokinetic treatment for the GI tract. PMID:27678361

  6. Effects of Lizhong Tang on gastrointestinal motility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Cheol; Ha, Wooram; Park, Jinhyeong; Kim, Junghoon; Jung, Yunjin; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of Lizhong Tang, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, on gastrointestinal motility in mice. METHODS The in vivo effects of Lizhong Tang on GI motility were investigated by measuring the intestinal transit rates (ITRs) and gastric emptying (GE) values in normal mice and in mice with experimentally induced GI motility dysfunction (GMD). RESULTS In normal ICR mice, the ITR and GE values were significantly and dose-dependently increased by Lizhong Tang (ITR values: 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 65.2% ± 1.8%, P < 0.01 with 0.1 g/kg Lizhong Tang and 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 83.8% ± 1.9%, P < 0.01 with 1 g/kg Lizhong Tang; GE values: 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 66.8% ± 2.1%, P < 0.05 with 0.1 g/kg Lizhong Tang and 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 72.5% ± 1.7%, P < 0.01 with 1 g/kg Lizhong Tang). The ITRs of the GMD mice were significantly reduced compared with those of the normal mice, which were significantly and dose-dependently reversed by Lizhong Tang. Additionally, in loperamide- and cisplatin-induced models of GE delay, Lizhong Tang administration reversed the GE deficits. CONCLUSION These results suggest that Lizhong Tang may be a novel candidate for development as a prokinetic treatment for the GI tract.

  7. Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Aging on Long-Term and Remote Memory in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a…

  8. The analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of piperine in mice.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, I A; Pivac, N; Alhumayyd, M S; Mahesar, A L; Gilani, A H

    2013-12-01

    Piperine, is the major active principal of black pepper. In traditional medicine, black pepper has been used as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory agent and in the treatment of epilepsy. This study was conducted to evaluate the in vivo analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of piperine in mice. The analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of piperine were studied in mice using acetic acid-induced writhing, tail flick assay, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)- and picrotoxin (PIC)-induced seizures models. The intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of piperine (30, 50 and 70 mg/kg) significantly inhibited (P<0.01) the acetic acid-induced writhing in mice, similar to the effect of indomethacin (20 mg/kg i.p.). In the tail flick assay, piperine (30 and 50 mg/kg, i.p.) and morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a significant increase (P<0.01) in the reaction time of mice. Pre-treatment of animals with naloxone (5 mg/kg i.p.), reversed the analgesic effects of both piperine and morphine in the tail flick assay. Piperine (30, 50 and 70 mg/kg, i.p.) and standard drugs, valproic acid (200 mg/kg, i.p.), carbamazepine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and diazepam (1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly (P<0.01) delayed the onset of PTZ-and PIC-induced seizures in mice. These findings indicate that piperine exhibits analgesic and anticonvulsant effects possibly mediated via opioid and GABA-ergic pathways respectively. Moreover, piperine being the main constituent of black pepper, may be contributing factor in the medicinal uses of black pepper in pain and epilepsy.

  9. Effects of taurine on gut microbiota and metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haining; Guo, Zhengzhao; Shen, Shengrong; Shan, Weiguang

    2016-07-01

    As being a necessary amino acid, taurine plays an important role in the regulation of neuroendocrine functions and nutrition. In this study, effects of taurine on mice gut microbes and metabolism were investigated. BALB/C mice were randomly divided into three experimental groups: The first group was administered saline (CK), the second was administered 165 mg/kg natural taurine (NE) and the third one administered 165 mg/kg synthetic taurine (CS). Gut microbiota composition in mice feces was analyzed by metagenomics technology, and the content of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in mice feces was detected by gas chromatography (GC), while the concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were detected by a LPS ELISA kit and a SOD assay kit, respectively. The results showed that the effect of taurine on gut microbiota could reduce the abundance of Proteobacteria, especially Helicobacter. Moreover, we found that the SCFA content was increased in feces of the NE group while LPS content was decreased in serum of the NE group; the SOD activity in serum and livers of the NE and CS groups were not changed significantly compare to that of the CK group. In conclusion, taurine could regulate the gut micro-ecology, which might be of benefit to health by inhibiting the growth of harmful bacteria, accelerating the production of SCFA and reducing LPS concentration. PMID:27026373

  10. Effects of taurine on gut microbiota and metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haining; Guo, Zhengzhao; Shen, Shengrong; Shan, Weiguang

    2016-07-01

    As being a necessary amino acid, taurine plays an important role in the regulation of neuroendocrine functions and nutrition. In this study, effects of taurine on mice gut microbes and metabolism were investigated. BALB/C mice were randomly divided into three experimental groups: The first group was administered saline (CK), the second was administered 165 mg/kg natural taurine (NE) and the third one administered 165 mg/kg synthetic taurine (CS). Gut microbiota composition in mice feces was analyzed by metagenomics technology, and the content of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in mice feces was detected by gas chromatography (GC), while the concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were detected by a LPS ELISA kit and a SOD assay kit, respectively. The results showed that the effect of taurine on gut microbiota could reduce the abundance of Proteobacteria, especially Helicobacter. Moreover, we found that the SCFA content was increased in feces of the NE group while LPS content was decreased in serum of the NE group; the SOD activity in serum and livers of the NE and CS groups were not changed significantly compare to that of the CK group. In conclusion, taurine could regulate the gut micro-ecology, which might be of benefit to health by inhibiting the growth of harmful bacteria, accelerating the production of SCFA and reducing LPS concentration.

  11. A VACCINE AGAINST METHAMPHETAMINE ATTENUATES ITS BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun Y.; Kosten, Therese A.; Lopez, Angel Y.; Kinsey, Berma M.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vaccines have treatment potential for methamphetamine (MA) addiction. We tested whether a conjugate vaccine against MA (succinyl-methamphetamine–keyhole limpet hemocyanin carrier protein; SMA-KLH) would generate MA antibodies and alter MA-induced behaviors. METHODS Mice were injected with SMA-KLH and received booster administrations 3-and 20-weeks later. Serum antibody titers reached peak levels by 4–6 weeks, remained at a modest level through 18-weeks, peaked again at 22-wks after the second boost, and were still elevated at 35-weeks. At 7 weeks, groups of vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice were administered one of three MA doses (1, 2, or 3 mg/kg) to assess locomotor activity. RESULTS Non-vaccinated mice showed dose-dependent effects of MA with hypolocomotion at the lowest dose and elevated activity levels at the highest dose. Both dose effects were reduced in SMA-KLH groups, particularly low dose-induced hypolocomotion at later times post MA administration. Separate groups of vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice were trained in MA place conditioning at 30-weeks with either 0 (vehicle) or 0.5 mg/kg MA. Although times spent in the MA-paired side did not differ between groups on Test vs. Baseline sessions, SMA-KLH mice conditioned with MA showed reduced conditioned approach behaviors and decreased conditioned activity levels compared to control groups. CONCLUSION These data suggest SMA-KLH attenuates the ability of MA to support place conditioning and reduces or delays its locomotor effects. Overall, results support SMA-KLH as a candidate MA vaccine. PMID:23022610

  12. Contrasting effects of immunosuppression on Theiler's virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lipton, H L; Canto, C D

    1977-03-01

    In the present study, cyclophosphamide and rabbit anti-mouse thymocyte serum were used to immunosuppress SJL/J mice infected with Theiler's mouse encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in order to delineate the potential mechanism(s) of virus-induced cellular injury in this infection. Whereas both immunosuppressive agents produced a significant increase in mortality, this treatment had differing effects on the pathological involvement of gray and white-matter structures in the central nervous system. The central nervous system of immunosuppressed TMEV-infected mice had increased microglial cell proliferation and neuronal necrosis, longer maintenance of high virus levels and spread of virus antigen to involve the neocortex and hippocampal complex. These observations indicate that TMEV causes a cytolotic infection of neurons and possibly other cells in gray matter. In contrast, immunosuppression produced a dramatic reduction in mononuclear inflammatory cells in the leptomeninges and spinal cord white matter of infected mice and prevented demyelination. Further, virus antigen was not detected in the leptomeninges and white matter of immunosuppressed and infected mice. These findings suggest that demyelination of TMEV infection is immune mediated.

  13. Hematologic and immunologic effects of pulsed microwaves in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, H.A.; Phillips, R.D.; Buschbom, R.L.; Busch, R.H.; Morris, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Mice were exposed in the far field in an anechoic chamber to 2,880-MHz pulsed microwaves 3 to 7.5 h daily, 5 days/week for 60 to 360 h. Three experiments were performed at average power densities of 5 mW/cm2 and six at 10 mW/cm2, corresponding to averaged specific absorption rates (SARs) of 2.25 and 4.50 mW/g, respectively. Each experiment consisted of eight mice, with a concurrently sham-exposed group of eight. In two of three studies at 5 mW/cm2, there was a significant increase in bone marrow cellularity in the microwave-exposed groups compared to the sham-exposed groups. Significant differences were occasionally seen in erythrocyte, leukocyte, and platelet values from microwave-exposed groups, but were not consistently observed. In one of six groups exposed at 10 mW/cm2, mean bone marrow cellularity was reduced significantly in the microwave-exposed mice; in another group, the lymphocyte count was increased. In only one exposure (10 mW/cm2 for 360 h) was any significant effect noted on serum proteins: a reduction to 5.1 +/- 0.3 g/dl in the exposed versus 5.6 +/- 0.4 g/dl in the sham-exposed mice. This was due to a decrease in alpha and beta globulins, with no effect on albumin or gamma globulin concentrations. No effect on bone marrow granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming units (CFU) was revealed following exposure of mice to pulsed microwaves at 5 mW/cm2. In one of four exposures at 10 mW/cm2, there was a significant increase in CFU-agar colonies. No significant effects of exposures at 10 mW/cm2 were observed on in vivo and in vitro assays of cell-mediated immune functions. No exposure-related histopathologic lesions were found from examination of several tissues and organs. Results of these series of exposures of mice at SARs of 2.25 and 4.50 mW/g indicated no consistent effects on the hematologic, immunologic, or histopathologic variables examined.

  14. Morphine effects on striatal transcriptome in mice

    PubMed Central

    Korostynski, Michal; Piechota, Marcin; Kaminska, Dorota; Solecki, Wojciech; Przewlocki, Ryszard

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic opiate use produces molecular and cellular adaptations in the nervous system that lead to tolerance, physical dependence, and addiction. Genome-wide comparison of morphine-induced changes in brain transcription of mouse strains with different opioid-related phenotypes provides an opportunity to discover the relationship between gene expression and behavioral response to the drug. Results Here, we analyzed the effects of single and repeated morphine administrations in selected inbred mouse strains (129P3/J, DBA/2J, C57BL/6J, and SWR/J). Using microarray-based gene expression profiling in striatum, we found 618 (false discovery rate < 1%) morphine-responsive transcripts. Through ontologic classification, we linked particular sets of genes to biologic functions, including metabolism, transmission of nerve impulse, and cell-cell signaling. We identified numerous novel morphine-regulated genes (for instance, Olig2 and Camk1g), and a number of transcripts with strain-specific changes in expression (for instance, Hspa1a and Fzd2). Moreover, transcriptional activation of a pattern of co-expressed genes (for instance, Tsc22d3 and Nfkbia) was identified as being mediated via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Further studies revealed that blockade of the GR altered morphine-induced locomotor activity and development of physical dependence. Conclusion Our results indicate that there are differences between strains in the magnitude of transcriptional response to acute morphine treatment and in the degree of tolerance in gene expression observed after chronic morphine treatment. Using whole-genome transcriptional analysis of morphine effects in the striatum, we were able to reveal multiple physiological factors that may influence opioid-related phenotypes and to relate particular gene networks to this complex trait. The results also suggest the possible involvement of GR-regulated genes in mediating behavioral response to morphine. PMID:17598886

  15. Effects of acetaminophen on cadmium metabolism in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, G.R.; Atkins, L.M.; Smith, A.B.; Walker, E.M. Jr.; Fody, E.P.

    1986-02-01

    Acetaminophen (ACM) administration to mice of the (C57BL/6 X DBA/2)F1 strain produced a typical hepatic centrilobular necrosis similar to that observed in rodents and humans. To determine the effects of this drug-induced necrosis on cadmium (Cd) metabolism, mice were given a sublethal dose of CdCl2 . 2.5 H2O containing 109CdCl2 and maintained for a period of time sufficient for Cd-metallothionein (Cd-MT) to be synthesized and distributed. Subsequent administration of ACM ip or po evoked a marked redistribution of Cd from livers to kidneys of mice, and increased the amount of Cd excreted in urine and feces. There were only minimal or no effects on Cd concentrations in other organs assessed. The effect of ACM on Cd redistribution was antagonized by administration of cysteine, a glutathione precursor, and was enhanced by pretreatment with phenobarbital, a potent inducer of the cytochrome P-450 mixed-function oxidase system. Pretreatment of mice with ACM 6 or 24 hr prior to Cd administration caused aberrations of the normal Cd distribution pattern, but no effect was noted when Cd administration was delayed for 48 hr after ACM injection, indicating recovery of the mechanisms of Cd-MT synthesis and sequestration. Sephadex G-75 gel filtration chromatography of serum from ACM-treated mice showed that most of the Cd was associated with high-molecular-weight proteins, and only a minor portion was present as Cd-MT. Cd excreted in urine was predominantly in a low-molecular-weight form, but there was evidence of two minor components of higher molecular weight, neither of which eluted as Cd-MT. Cd excreted in feces was insoluble following homogenization in 0.25 M sucrose solution. Cd in livers and kidneys of ACM-treated mice eluted as Cd-MT. Persons who have a moderately high Cd burden may be at risk of Cd nephrotoxicity if they incur hepatic necrosis subsequent to ACM abuse.

  16. Effect of the Y chromosome on testis weight in mice.

    PubMed

    Satou, Kunio; Suto, Jun-ichi

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the effect of the Y chromosome on testis weight in (B6.Cg-A(y) × Y-consomic mouse strain) F1 male mice. We obtained the following results: (1) Mice with the Mus musculus domesticus-type Y chromosome had significantly heavier testis than those with the M. m. musculus-type Y chromosome. (2) Variations in Usp9y and the number of CAG repeats in Sry were significantly associated with testes weight. The A(y) allele was correlated with a reduced testis weight, and the extent of this reduction was significantly associated with a CAG repeat number polymorphism in Sry. These results suggest that Y chromosome genes not only influence testis weight but also modify the effect of the A(y) allele in mediating this phenomenon.

  17. Effects of phenylalanine on reproductive performance and teratogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R J; Pesarini, J R; Mauro, M O; Fronza, L S; Victorelli, S G; Cantero, W B; Sena, M C; Antoniolli, A C M B

    2014-07-25

    We evaluated the effects of phenylalanine on reproductive performance and teratogenesis in mice, as well as we assessed its protective effect in mice treated with an acute dose of cyclophosphamide. Animals were divided into 6 experimental groups (females N = 15/group, males N = 5/group): G1, the negative control group, phosphate-buffered saline; G2, the positive control group, 35 mg cyclophosphamide/kg body weight (b.w.); G3 and G4 received phenylalanine at doses of 150 and 300 mg/ kg b.w., respectively; G5 and G6 received phenylalanine at doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg b.w. co-administered with cyclophosphamide at a dose of 35 mg/kg b.w., respectively. Pregnant mice received phenylalanine from 8-12 days of pregnancy and cyclophosphamide on the 10th day of treatment or the respective vehicles. In animals treated with cyclophosphamide, offspring fetal weight significantly decreased. The G5 and G6 groups, which received cyclophosphamide co-administered with phenylalanine, showed a smaller reduction in weight. Based on this analysis, the offspring from groups G2, G5, and G6 showed low weight due to pregnancy age. Moreover, at the doses used, phenylalanine did not interfere with embryo-fetal development. However, further studies are necessary to increase the understanding of the effects of phenylalanine on mouse reproductive performance and teratogenesis.

  18. Anxiogenic and proconvulsant effect of gatifloxacin in mice.

    PubMed

    Bharal, Nidhi; Gupta, Sparsh; Khurana, Sonam; Mediratta, Pramod Kumari; Sharma, Krishna Kishore

    2008-02-01

    The present study was performed to assess the neurological and neurobehavioural effects of gatifloxacin after its oral administration in two doses: 25 and 50 mg/kg for 7 days and 14 days in mice. The neurobehavioural parameters used for the short-term study (x 7 days) were pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure, forced swim test, elevated plus-maze, spontaneous alternation behaviour and rota-rod tests. However, only pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure and rota-rod tests were performed in long term (x 14 days) study. The results showed proconvulsant effect of gatifloxacin (50 mg/kg) in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure test after both short- and long-term administration studies. Gatifloxacin in both doses showed an anxiogenic effect. However, in both doses, it did not show any effect on memory and mood as the drug did not show any effect in alternation behaviour and forced swim tests. In the long term study, gatifloxacin in 50 mg/kg, p.o. produced grip impairing effect only after 14 days of administration. These results reveal that gatifloxacin possesses proconvulsant and anxiogenic effects but it does not have an effect on mood and memory. Besides, long term administration of gatifloxacin for 14 days was found to reduce grip strength indicating its movement impairing effect in mice.

  19. 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Enhances Anesthethic Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Xu, Zhipeng; Wu, Anshi; Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Yiying; Yue, Yun; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of general anesthesia by volatile drugs remain largely unknown. Mitochondrial dysfunction and reduction in energy levels have been suggested to be associated with general anesthesia status. 2-Deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG), an analog of glucose, inhibits hexokinase and reduces cellular levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). 3-Nitropropionic acid is another compound which can deplete ATP levels. In contrast, idebenone and L-carnitine could rescue deficits of energy. We therefore sought to determine whether 2-DG and/or 3-nitropropionic acid can enhance the anesthetic effects of isoflurane, and whether idebenone and L-carnitine can reverse the actions of 2-DG. Methods C57BL/6J mice (8 months old) received different concentrations of isoflurane with and without the treatments of 2-DG, 3-nitropropionic acid, idebenone, and L-carnitine. Isoflurane-induced loss of righting reflex (LORR) was determined in the mice. ATP levels in H4 human neuroglioma cells were assessed after these treatments. Finally, 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the effects of isoflurane on brain ATP levels in the mice. Results 2-DG enhanced isoflurane-induced LORR (P = 0.002, N = 15). 3-nitropropionic acid also enhanced the anesthetic effects of isoflurane (P = 0.005, N = 15). Idebenone (Idebenone + saline versus Idebenone + 2-DG: P = 0.165, N = 15), but not L-cartinine (L-carnitine + saline versus L-carnitine + 2-DG: P < 0.0001, N = 15), inhibited the effects of 2-DG on enhancing isoflurane-induced LORR in mice, as evidenced by 2-DG not enhancing isoflurane-induced LORR in mice pretreated with idebenone. Idebenone (Idebenone + saline versus Idebenone + 2-DG: P = 0.177, N = 6), but not L-cartinine (L-carnitine + saline versus L-carnitine + 2-DG: P = 0.029, N = 6), also mitigated the effects of 2-DG on reducing ATP levels in cells, as evidenced by 2-DG not decreasing ATP levels in the cell pretreated with idebenone. Finally, isoflurane decreased ATP levels

  20. Procognitive effect of AC-3933 in aged mice, and synergistic effect of combination with donepezil in scopolamine-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Hatayama, Yuki; Nakamichi, Keiko; Yoshida, Naoyuki

    2014-12-15

    We have previously reported that AC-3933, a newly developed benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, facilitates acetylcholine release in the hippocampus and ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory deficits in rats. To further confirm the procognitive effect of AC-3933, we assessed in this study the beneficial effects of this compound in aged mice using the Y-maze and object recognition tests. In addition, we investigated the synergistic effect of AC-3933 and donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. In aged mice, oral administration of AC-3933 at doses of 0.05-0.1 mg/kg and 0.05 mg/kg significantly improved spatial working memory and episodic memory, respectively. In scopolamine-treated mice, both AC-3933 and donepezil significantly ameliorated memory deficits in the Y-maze test at doses of 0.3-3 mg/kg and 10-15 mg/kg, respectively. The beneficial effect of AC-3933, but not that of donepezil, on scopolamine-induced memory impairment was antagonized by flumazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, indicating that the procognitive action of AC-3933 arises via a mechanism different from that of donepezil. Co-administration of donepezil at the suboptimal dose of 3 mg/kg with AC-3933 at doses of 0.1-1 mg/kg significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairment, suggesting that AC-3933 potentiates the effect of donepezil on memory impairment induced by cholinergic hypofunction. These findings indicate that AC-3933 not only has good potential as a cognitive enhancer by itself, but also is useful as a concomitant drug for the treatment of Alzheimer׳s disease.

  1. Sleep fragmentation has differential effects on obese and lean mice

    PubMed Central

    He, Junyun; Kastin, Abba J.; Wang, Yuping; Pan, Weihong

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF), common in patients with sleep apnea, correlates with the development of obesity. We hypothesized that SF differentially affects neurobehavior in lean wildtype (WT) and obese pan-leptin receptor knockout (POKO) mice fed the same normal diet. First we established an SF paradigm by interrupting sleep every 2 min during the inactive light span. The maneuver was effective in decreasing sleep duration and bout length, and in increasing sleep state transition and waking, without significant rebound sleep in the dark span. Changes of sleep architecture were evident in the light span and consistent across days 1–10 of SF. There was reduced NREM, shortened sleep latency, and increased state transitions. During the light span of the first day of SF, there also was reduction of REM and increased delta power of slow wave sleep. Potential effects of SF on thermal pain threshold, locomotor activity, and anxiety were then tested. POKO mice had a lower circadian amplitude of pain latency than WT mice in the hot plate test, and both groups had lowest tolerance at 4 pm (ZT 10) and longest latency at 4 am (ZT 22). SF increased the pain threshold in WT but not POKO mice when tested at 8 am (ZT 2). Both the POKO mutation and SF resulted in reduced physical activity and increased anxiety, but there was no additive effect of these two factors. Overall, SF and the POKO mutation differentially regulate mouse behavior. The results suggest that obesity can blunt neurobehavioral responses to SF. PMID:25152064

  2. Assessment of anxiolytic effect of nerolidol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Rajesh Kumar; Kaur, Dilpreet; Pahwa, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: The present study was to assess the anxiolytic effect of nerolidol in mice. Materials and Methods: The anxiolytic activity was examined using the elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field test (OFT), and motor coordination by rotarod test. Thirty Swiss albino mice were divided into five groups of six mice each. Group 1 received vehicle control (normal saline); Group 2 received diazepam (1 mg/kg); Groups 3, 4, and 5 received nerolidol 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg, respectively. Results: Nerolidol (12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the time spent and a number of entries in open arm as compared to vehicle control in EPM test. In OFT, the nerolidol showed a significant (P < 0.05) increase in number of rearings and time spent in center and periphery, suggesting exploratory behavior of animals. Furthermore, nerolidol did not alter the fall down latency in rotarod test. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that nerolidol exerts an anxiolytic effect without altering the motor coordination. PMID:27756960

  3. Chemotherapy-induced late transgenerational effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Kujjo, Loro L; Chang, Eun A; Pereira, Ricardo J G; Dhar, Shilpa; Marrero-Rosado, Brenda; Sengupta, Satyaki; Wang, Hongbing; Cibelli, Jose B; Perez, Gloria I

    2011-03-17

    To our knowledge, there is no report on long-term reproductive and developmental side effects in the offspring of mothers treated with a widely used chemotherapeutic drug such as doxorubicin (DXR), and neither is there information on transmission of any detrimental effects to several filial generations. Therefore, the purpose of the present paper was to examine the long-term effects of a single intraperitoneal injection of DXR on the reproductive and behavioral performance of adult female mice and their progeny. C57BL/6 female mice (generation zero; G0) were treated with either a single intraperitoneal injection of DXR (G0-DXR) or saline (G0-CON). Data were collected on multiple reproductive parameters and behavioral analysis for anxiety, despair and depression. In addition, the reproductive capacity and health of the subsequent six generations were evaluated. G0-DXR females developed despair-like behaviors; delivery complications; decreased primordial follicle pool; and early lost of reproductive capacity. Surprisingly, the DXR-induced effects in oocytes were transmitted transgenerationally; the most striking effects being observed in G4 and G6, constituting: increased rates of neonatal death; physical malformations; chromosomal abnormalities (particularly deletions on chromosome 10); and death of mothers due to delivery complications. None of these effects were seen in control females of the same generations. Long-term effects of DXR in female mice and their offspring can be attributed to genetic alterations or cell-killing events in oocytes or, presumably, to toxicosis in non-ovarian tissues. Results from the rodent model emphasize the need for retrospective and long-term prospective studies of survivors of cancer treatment and their offspring.

  4. Effect of MWCNTs on Gastric Emptying in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Qi, W.; Geng, Yx; Pan, Dq; Lu, Y.; Xu, Jz; Wu, Ws

    2011-12-01

    After making model of gastric functional disorder (FD), part of model mice were injected intravenously (i.v.) with oxide multi-walled carbon nanotubes (oMWCNTs) to investigate effect of carbon nanotubes on gastric emptying. The results showed that NO content in stomach, compared with model group, was decreased significantly and close to normal level post-injection with oMWCNTs (500 and 800 μg/mouse). In contrast to FD or normal groups, the content of acetylcholine (Ach) in stomach was increased obviously in injection group with 500 or 800 μg/mouse of oMWCNTs. The kinetic curve of emptying was fitted to calculate gastric motility factor k; the results showed that the k of injection group was much higher than FD and normal. In other words, the gastric motility of FD mice was enhanced via injection with oMWCNTs. In certain dosage, oMWCNTs could improve gastric emptying and motility.

  5. Banana resistant starch and its effects on constipation model mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Huang, Ji Hong; Cheng, Yan Feng; Yang, Gong Ming

    2014-08-01

    Banana resistant starch (BRS) was extracted to investigate the structural properties of BRS, its effects on the gastrointestinal transit, and dejecta of normal and experimentally constipated mice. The mouse constipation model was induced by diphenoxylate administration. The BRS administered mice were divided into three groups and gavaged with 1.0, 2.0, or 4.0 g/kg body weight BRS per day. The small intestinal movement, time of the first black dejecta, dejecta granules, weight and their moisture content, body weight, and food intake of mice were studied. Results showed that the BRS particles were oval and spindly and some light cracks and pits were in the surface. The degree of crystallinity of BRS was 23.13%; the main diffraction peaks were at 2(θ) 15.14, 17.38, 20.08, and 22.51. The degree of polymerization of BRS was 81.16 and the number-average molecular weight was 13147.92 Da, as determined by the reducing terminal method. In animal experiments, BRS at the dose of 4.0 g/kg body weight per day was able to increase the gastrointestinal propulsive rate, and BRS at the doses of 2.0 and 4.0 g/kg body weight per day was found to shorten the start time of defecation by observing the first black dejecta exhaust. However, there were no influences of BRS on the dejecta moisture content, the dejecta granules and their weight, body weight, or daily food intake in mice. BRS was effective in accelerating the movement of the small intestine and in shortening the start time of defecation, but did not impact body weight and food intake. Therefore, BRS had the potential to be useful for improving intestinal motility during constipation.

  6. Effect of acute nutritional deprivation on immune function in mice. II. Response to sublethal radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, E.J.; Barczynski, L.K.

    1984-03-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory indicated that mice starved for 48 or 72 hr were resistant to the intracellular pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes. In the present experiments, we investigated the possibility that rapidly proliferating monocytes were responsible for the early protective effect observed in these mice. Confirming previous studies, the numbers of L. monocytogenes in livers and spleens of starved mice were 2-3 logs lower than those of fed mice 72 hr after inoculation of bacteria. The early protective effect of starvation could be eliminated completely by nonlethal doses of radiation (200-900 rads). Organ bacterial counts in starved-irradiated mice were similar to those of fed mice. Correlative histopathologic studies were carried out on all three groups of mice. Seventy-two hours after challenge with L. monocytogenes, the livers of fed mice had multiple microabscesses with cental necrosis and a poor mononuclear response. In contrast, livers of starved mice had fewer infectious foci, less necrosis, and a more prominent monocyte/macrophage inflammatory response. Similar to fed mice, the livers of starved-irradiated mice had marked necrosis and few monocytes/macrophages. In addition, the number of peripheral blood monocytes in starved mice was increased 72 hr after inoculation compared to fed and starved-irradiated mice. The data from these experiments suggest that a proliferating population of monocytes is responsible for resistance of starved mice against L. monocytogenes.

  7. Inhibition of serotonin but not norepinephrine transport during development produces delayed, persistent perturbations of emotional behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Ansorge, Mark S; Morelli, Emanuela; Gingrich, Jay A

    2008-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) acts as a neurotransmitter, but also modulates brain maturation during early development. The demonstrated influence of genetic variants on brain function, personality traits, and susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders suggests a critical importance of developmental mechanisms. However, little is known about how and when developmentally perturbed 5-HT signaling affects circuitry and resulting behavior. The 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) is a key regulator of extracellular 5-HT levels and we used pharmacologic strategies to manipulate 5-HTT function during development and determine behavioral consequences. Transient exposure to the 5-HTT inhibitors fluoxetine, clomipramine, and citalopram from postnatal day 4 (P4) to P21 produced abnormal emotional behaviors in adult mice. Similar treatment with the norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor, desipramine, did not adversely affect adult behavior, suggesting that 5-HT and norepinephrine (NE) do not share the same effects on brain development. Shifting our period of treatment/testing to P90/P185 failed to mimic the effect of earlier exposure, demonstrating that 5-HT effects on adult behavior are developmentally specific. We have hypothesized that early-life perturbations of 5-HT signaling affect corticolimbic circuits that do not reach maturity until the peri-adolescent period. In support of this idea, we found that abnormal behaviors resulting from postnatal fluoxetine exposure have a post-pubescent onset and persist long after reaching adult age. A better understanding of the underlying 5-HT sensitive circuits and how they are perturbed should lead to new insights into how various genetic polymorphisms confer their risk to carriers. Furthermore, these studies should help determine whether in utero exposure to 5-HTT blocking drugs poses a risk for behavioral abnormalities in later life.

  8. Effects of silver nanoparticles on neonatal testis development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Background Metal nanoparticles (MNPs) play an important role in consumer products. An increasing use of MNPs has raised concerns about potential risks for human health. Therefore, in vivo tests of MNPs are urgently required. Using mice as a model animal, the aim of the present study was designed to investigate the effect of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on spermatogenesis in neonatal mice. Methods AgNPs were synthesized using Bacillus funiculus. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using various analytical techniques such as UV–visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The prepared AgNPs were used to investigate testis development in neonatal mice. Institute of Cancer Research neonatal male mice were used in all experiments and were treated with different doses (0, 1, and 5 mg/kg) of AgNPs five times (interval of 3 days from postnatal day [PND] 8–21) by abdominal subcutaneous injection. Results The results showed that the sperm abnormalities such as quality and quantity were significantly increased by the synthesized AgNPs. The diameter of the convoluted tubules shrank significantly in mice treated with AgNPs on PND28 and PND42. The results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction indicated that the E1f1ay, Gsta4, and Fdx1 genes were up-regulated, and the Amh, Cx43, and Claudin-11 genes were down-regulated in response to AgNPs exposure on PND28; however, these genes recovered at PND60. AgNPs had no effect on the recombination levels of chromosomes in germ cells. Conclusion These results demonstrated the adverse effects of AgNPs on the male reproductive tract, particularly spermatogenesis and the quality of sperm. This study suggests that the development of nanomaterials should be safer and non-toxic to the living organisms and the potential reprotoxicity of AgNPs should be investigated more carefully. PMID:26491295

  9. Protective effect of dextromethorphan against endotoxic shock in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Guorong; Liu, Yuxin; Tzeng, Nian-ssheng; Cui, Gang; Block, Michelle L; Wilson, Belinda; Qin, Liya; Wang, Tongguang; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jie; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2005-01-15

    Dextromethorphan (DM) is a dextrorotatory morphinan and an over-the-counter non-opioid cough suppressant. We have previously shown that DM protects against LPS-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration through inhibition of microglia activation. Here, we investigated protective effects of DM against endotoxin shock induced by lipopolysaccharide/d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN) in mice and the mechanism underlying its protective effect. Mice were given multiple injections of DM (12.5 mg/kg, s.c.) 30 min before and 2, 4 h after an injection of LPS/GalN (20 microg/700 mg/kg). DM administration decreased LPS/GalN-induced mortality and hepatotoxicity, as evidenced by increased survival rate, decreased serum alanine aminotransferase activity and improved pathology. Furthermore, DM was also effective when it was given 30 min after LPS/GalN injection. The protection was likely associated with reduced serum and liver tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) levels. DM also attenuated production of superoxide and intracellular reactive oxygen species in Kupffer cells and neutrophils. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that DM administration suppressed the expression of a variety of inflammation-related genes such as macrophage inflammatory protein-2, CXC chemokine, thrombospondin-1, intercellular adhesion molecular-1 and interleukin-6. DM also decreased the expression of genes related to cell-death pathways, such as the DNA damage protein genes GADD45 and GADD153. In summary, DM is effective in protecting mice against LPS/GalN-induced hepatotoxicity, and the mechanism is likely through a faster TNF-alpha clearance, and decrease of superoxide production and inflammation and cell-death related components. This study not only extends neuroprotective effect of DM, but also suggests that DM may be a novel compound for the therapeutic intervention for sepsis. PMID:15627475

  10. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  11. Photoperiod effects on ethanol hypothermia in behaviorally thermoregulating mice

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, C.S.; Crawshaw, L.I. )

    1989-02-09

    Male mice, maintained on a 12:12 L:D photoperiod (lights on at 7:00, off at 19:00) were injected with 2.6g 7.5% E+OH (in 0.9% NaCl) per kg, or with an equivalent volume of 0.9% NaCl at 24:00, 4:00, 8:00, 12:00, 16:00, and 20:00 hours. Nine mice at each condition were run in tubular temperature gradients (9-40C). Temperature preferences were monitored with an imaging system, and internal temperatures were monitored with implanted telemetry devices. Mean internal temperatures at all 6 times of day for the 40 min period after injection of E+OH (36.0 {plus minus} .1C, range 35.8-36.1C) or NaCl (37.2 {plus minus} .1C, range 37.0-37.4C), an well as mean preferred temperatures for the same 6 times after E+OH (30.6 {plus minus} .2C, range 29.8-31.0C) or NaCl (31.3 {plus minus} .3C, range 30.7-32.1C) showed little difference. This indicates that, in our system, photoperiod exerts but a small effect on the response of behaviorally thermoregulating mice to moderate doses of E+OH.

  12. Potent effects of dioscin against obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Qi, Yan; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Zhao, Yanyan; Sun, Huijun; Yao, Jihong; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of the natural product dioscin against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are unclear. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to further confirm its effects of prevention and then to elucidate the potential mechanisms underlying its activity in mice. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced C57BL/6J mice and ob/ob mice were used as the experimental models. Serum and hepatic biochemical parameters were determined, and the mRNA and protein expression levels were detected. The results indicated that dioscin alleviated body weight and liver lipid accumulation symptoms, increased oxygen consumption and energy expenditure, and improved the levels of serum and hepatic biochemical parameters. Further investigations revealed that dioscin significantly attenuated oxidative damage, suppressed inflammation, inhibited triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis, promoted fatty acid β-oxidation, down-regulated MAPK phosphorylation levels, and induced autophagy to alleviate fatty liver conditions. Dioscin prevents diet induced obesity and NAFLD by increasing energy expenditure. This agent should be developed as a new candidate for obesity and NAFLD prevention. PMID:25609476

  13. Effects of ginsenosides on opioid-induced hyperalgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Tang, Minke; Li, Hui; Huang, Xinjie; Chen, Lei; Zhai, Haifeng

    2014-07-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is characterized by nociceptive sensitization caused by the cessation of chronic opioid use. OIH can limit the clinical use of opioid analgesics and complicate withdrawal from opioid addiction. In this study, we investigated the effects of Re, Rg1, and Rb1 ginsenosides, the bioactive components of ginseng, on OIH. OIH was achieved in mice after subcutaneous administration of morphine for 7 consecutive days three times per day. During withdrawal (days 8 and 9), these mice were administered Re, Rg1, or Rb1 intragastrically two times per day. On the test day (day 10), mice were subjected to the thermal sensitivity test and the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Re (300 mg/kg) inhibited OIH in both the thermal sensitivity test and the acetic acid-induced writhing test. However, the Rg1 and Rb1 ginsenosides failed to prevent OIH in either test. Furthermore, Rg1 showed a tendency to aggravate OIH in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Our data suggested that the ginsenoside Re, but not Rg1 or Rb1, may contribute toward reversal of OIH.

  14. Quinine enhances the behavioral stimulant effect of cocaine in mice.

    PubMed

    Huertas, Adriana; Wessinger, William D; Kucheryavykh, Yuri V; Sanabria, Priscila; Eaton, Misty J; Skatchkov, Serguei N; Rojas, Legier V; Maldonado-Martínez, Gerónimo; Inyushin, Mikhail Y

    2015-02-01

    The Na(+)-dependent dopamine transporter (DAT) is primarily responsible for regulating free dopamine (DA) concentrations in the brain by participating in the majority of DA uptake; however, other DA transporters may also participate, especially if cocaine or other drugs of abuse compromise DAT. Recently, such cocaine-insensitive low-affinity mono- and poly-amine OCT transporters were described in astrocytes which use DA as a substrate. These transporters are from a different transporter family and while insensitive to cocaine, they are specifically blocked by quinine and some steroids. Quinine is inexpensive and is often found in injected street drugs as an "adulterant". The present study was designed to determine the participation of OCTs in cocaine dependent behavioral and physiological changes in mice. Using FVB mice we showed, that daily single injections of quinine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) co-administered with cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) for 10 days significantly enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor behavioral sensitization. Quinine had no significant effect on the time course of behavioral activation. In astrocytes from the ventral tegmental area of mice, transporter currents of quinine-sensitive monoamine transporters were also augmented after two weeks of cocaine administration. The importance of low-affinity high-capacity transporters for DA clearance is discussed, explaining the known ability of systemically administered DAT inhibitors to anomalously increase DA clearance.

  15. Effects of VLA-1 Blockade on Experimental Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Totsuka, Ryuichi; Kondo, Takaaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Hirai, Midori; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    VLA-1 (very late antigen-1) is implicated in recruitment, retention and activation of leukocytes and its blockade has been referred as a potential target of new drug discovery to address unmet medical needs in inflammatory disease area. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an anti-murine CD49a (integrin α subunit of VLA-1) monoclonal antibody (Ha31/8) on various experimental models of inflammatory diseases in mice. Pretreatment with Ha31/8 at an intraperitoneal dose of 250 µg significantly (P<0.01) reduced arthritic symptoms and joint tissue damage in mice with type II collagen-induced arthritis. In addition, Ha31/8 at an intraperitoneal dose of 100 µg significantly (P<0.01) inhibited airway inflammatory cell infiltration induced by repeated exposure to cigarette smoke. In contrast, Ha31/8 failed to inhibit oxazolone-induced chronic dermatitis and OVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness at an intraperitoneal dose of 100 µg. These results show that VLA-1 is involved, at least partly, in the pathogenesis of type II collagen-induced arthritis and cigarette smoke-induced airway inflammatory cell infiltration in mice, indicating the therapeutic potential of VLA-1 blockade against rheumatoid arthritis and chronic occlusive pulmonary disease. PMID:27578034

  16. Effects of HIV-1 on Cognition in Humanized NSG Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Sidra Pervez

    Host species specificity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) creates a challenge to study the pathology, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic agents. The closely related simian immunodeficiency virus and studies of neurocognitive impairments on transgenic animals expressing partial viral genome have significant limitations. The humanized mice model provides a small animal system in which a human immune system can be engrafted and immunopathobiology of HIV-1 infection can be studied. However, features of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) were not evaluated in this model. Open field activity test was selected to characterize behavior of original strain NOD/scid-IL-2Rgammac null (NSG) mice, effects of engraftment of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and functional human immune system (huNSG), and finally, investigate the behavior changes induced by chronic HIV-1 infection. Long-term infected HuNSG mice showed the loss of working memory and increased anxiety in the open field. Additionally, these animals were utilized for evaluation of central nervous system metabolic and structural changes. Detected behavioral abnormalities are correlated with obtained neuroimaging and histological abnormalities published.

  17. Effects of long-term dietary nitrate supplementation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hezel, Michael P.; Liu, Ming; Schiffer, Tomas A.; Larsen, Filip J.; Checa, Antonio; Wheelock, Craig E.; Carlström, Mattias; Lundberg, Jon O.; Weitzberg, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    Background Inorganic nitrate (NO3-) is a precursor of nitric oxide (NO) in the body and a large number of short-term studies with dietary nitrate supplementation in animals and humans show beneficial effects on cardiovascular health, exercise efficiency, host defense and ischemia reperfusion injury. In contrast, there is a long withstanding concern regarding the putative adverse effects of chronic nitrate exposure related to cancer and adverse hormonal effects. To address these concerns we performed in mice, a physiological and biochemical multi-analysis on the effects of long-term dietary nitrate supplementation. Design 7 week-old C57BL/6 mice were put on a low-nitrate chow and at 20 weeks-old were treated with NaNO3 (1 mmol/L) or NaCl (1 mmol/L, control) in the drinking water. The groups were monitored for weight gain, food and water consumption, blood pressure, glucose metabolism, body composition and oxygen consumption until one group was reduced to eight animals due to death or illness. At that point remaining animals were sacrificed and blood and tissues were analyzed with respect to metabolism, cardiovascular function, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Results Animals were supplemented for 17 months before final sacrifice. Body composition, oxygen consumption, blood pressure, glucose tolerance were measured during the experiment, and vascular reactivity and muscle mitochondrial efficiency measured at the end of the experiment with no differences identified between groups. Nitrate supplementation was associated with improved insulin response, decreased plasma IL-10 and a trend towards improved survival. Conclusions Long term dietary nitrate in mice, at levels similar to the upper intake range in the western society, is not detrimental. PMID:26068891

  18. Effect of zinc on prostatic tumorigenicity in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pei; Li, Tie Luo; Guan, Zhi Xin; Franklin, Renty B; Costello, Leslie C

    2003-12-01

    Prostate epithelial cells accumulate the highest zinc levels of any cells in the body. Evidence indicates that zinc plays critical roles in the normal function and pathology of the prostate gland. We have identified two important effects of zinc in the prostate epithelial cells: the inhibition of m-aconitase and the induction of mitochondrial apoptogenesis. However, at the present time, the effects of zinc on prostatic cells in in vivo conditions have not yet been reported. The objectives of this in vivo study were to investigate the effect of zinc on: tumorogenicity in nude mice, zinc accumulation in tumor tissues, and the levels of mitochondrial membrane permeability related proteins, Bax/Bcl-2. A tumorigenicity animal model was established using male nude mice (4-6 weeks old) with inoculation of PC-3 cells (5-10x10(6)/mL) prepared in 10% Matrigel. The mice were treated with zinc by ALZET osmotic pumps (Durect Corporation), with a releasing rate of 0.25 micro l/h for 28 days. Zinc concentrations of the tumor tissues were determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer method. Frozen sections of tumor tissues were prepared for TUNEL assay. The levels of Bax and Bcl-2 in the tumor tissues were determined by Western blot analyses. Our study demonstrated that in vivo treatment of zinc increased zinc accumulation and citrate production in PC-3 cell induced tumor tissues and inhibited tumor growth. The inhibitory effect of zinc appears to result from zinc-induced apoptosis by regulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability-related Bax/Bcl-2 proteins. PMID:15033742

  19. Teratogenic Effects of Sulfur Mustard on Mice Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Sanjarmoosavi, Nasrin; Sanjarmoosavi, Naser; Shahsavan, Marziyeh; Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sulfur Mustard (SM) has been used as a chemical warfare agent, in the World War I and more recently during Iraq-Iran war in early 1980s’. Its biological poisoning effect could be local or systemic and its effect depends on environmental conditions, exposed organs, and the extent and duration of exposure. It is considered as a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic, carcinogenic effects; although a few studies have been performed on its teratogenicity so far. Materials and Methods Mice were administered with SM intraperitoneally with a dose of 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg in different periods of their gestation (gestational age of 11, 13 and 14 weeks). Control mice groups were included. Between 5 and 9 mice were used in each group. Dams underwent cesarean section on day 19 of their gestation. External examination was performed on the animals investigating craniofacial and septal defects and limb malformations such as adactyly and syndactyly. All data were analyzed by Chi-Square test and Fisher's exact test. The P- value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results Craniofacial and septal defects as well as the limb malformations were the most common types of birth defects, displaying an extremely complex biomedical problem. Conclusion This study confirms a significant correlation between SM exposure and its teratogenic effect. We postulated that the malformations could be caused by an uncontrolled migration of neural crest cells, causing developmental disorders. In addition to environmental factors, modifying genes could play an important role in the pathogenesis of the defects. PMID:23493485

  20. Neuropharmacological effects of oleamide in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Akanmu, Moses A; Adeosun, Samuel O; Ilesanmi, Olapade R

    2007-08-22

    Oleamide, a fatty acid amide accumulates selectively in the cerebrospinal fluid of sleep deprived cats and rats. Oleamide has been reported to have effects on a wide range of receptors and neurotransmitter systems especially the centrally acting ones for example, dopamine acetylcholine, serotonin, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), cannabinoid and vanilloid among others. This suggests a wide range of central nervous system effects of the compound. The effects of intraperitoneal administered oleamide on Novelty-induced behaviours, learning and memory and forced swimming-induced depression were studied. The relative effects of the compound on the male and female mice were also noted. Oleamide dose-dependently reduced (p<0.05) novelty induced rearing, grooming and locomotion. The effects on the all NIBs started within the first 10 min of the test and the peak of the effects was observed during the third 10 min period of the test. Effect of oleamide on short-term working memory was significantly (p<0.05) affected only with the dose of 5mg/kg while the other dose of 10mg/kg had no effect. In the forced swimming test, acute triple intraperitoneal administration of oleamide at 10mg/kg induced a significant reduction in the immobility duration in mice signifying an antidepressant effect. Sex differences in the effects of oleamide (10mg/kg, i.p.) were clearly evident in active behaviours in FST. These results confirm the multiplicity of central nervous system receptors and neurotransmitters that oleamide interacts with hence its numerous and diverse neuropharmacological effects. Most importantly, the present study suggests that oleamide has antidepressant-like property.

  1. Study of antiseizure effects of Matricaria recutita extract in mice.

    PubMed

    Heidari, M R; Dadollahi, Z; Mehrabani, M; Mehrabi, H; Pourzadeh-Hosseini, M; Behravan, E; Etemad, L

    2009-08-01

    Matricaria recutita L. is a well-known medicinal plant that is suggested as being carminative, analgesic, and anticonvulsant in traditional medicine. In the present investigation the effect of hydro-methanolic percolated extract of this plant on seizure induced by picrotoxin was studied in male mice. This study was performed on animals pretreated with doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg of extract or 40 mg/kg phenobarbital as the reference drug via intraperitoneal injection. After 20 min each animal received 12 mg/kg picrotoxin for induction of seizure. Latency of onset time of seizure, duration of seizure, death latency, and death rate were determined in experimental and control groups. The results showed that latency of the beginning time of seizure was increased in groups that were pretreated with different doses of extract. The most effective dose was 200 mg/kg (P < 0.05). In addition, this dose delayed the time of death in mice (P < 0.01). The extract had no effect on the death rate. The results indicate that the extract of M. recutita possesses suitable effects on seizure induced by picrotoxin, and more experiments are needed in this field. PMID:19723069

  2. Study of Foeniculum vulgare Effect on Folliculogenesis in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei, Mozafar; Montaseri, Azadeh; Khazaei, Mohammad Rasool; Khanahmadi, Masumeh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Foeniculum vulgare (FVE) is used in traditional medicine for its antiseptic, palliative and anti-inflammatory effects. Traditionally, FVE is utilized for treating female infertility. The present study aims to investigate the effects of FVE extract on folliculogenesis in female albino mice. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, a total of 20 female albino mice were divided into four groups. Groups 1 and 2 (experimental) received FVE alcoholic extract at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight (BW)/day for five days. Group 3 (negative control) received ethanol and group 4 (positive control) was administered normal saline, in the same doses as the experimental groups. Animals in all groups were sacrificed on the sixth day of the study; their ovaries were dissected out and prepared for histological examinations. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained microscopic slides were evaluated and the numbers of ovarian follicles were compared between groups. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA. Results: The total follicle numbers were 26.5 ± 5.24 for group 1 (100 mg/kg FVE), 27.2 ± 4.1 for group 2 (200 mg/kg FVE), 10.1 ± 2.53 for group 3 (ethanol control) and 17.2 ± 3.9 for the saline control group (group 4). The numbers of graffian, antral and multilaminar follicles increased significantly in both experimental groups when compared with the control groups (p<0.05), however there were no significant differences in follicle numbers among the experimental groups. The number of unilaminar primary follicles did not significantly change between all groups. GCMS analysis of FVE extract identified the presence of diosgenin, an estrogenic compound. Conclusion: FVE induced folliculogenesis in female mice ovary and increased the number of growing ovarian follicles. The estrogenic component of FVE, diosgenin, may exert this effect. PMID:25101154

  3. Effect of Ruta graveolens L. on pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Tanise Gonçalves; Augusto, Patrice Martins; Montanari, Tatiana

    2005-01-01

    Ruta graveolens L. is used in many countries, including Brazil, as an abortifacient. To determine its effect on pregnancy, the lyophilized hydroalcoholic extract of its aerial parts was administered orally at a dose of 1000 mg/kg per day to mice between the first and third day of pregnancy (DOP), between the fourth and sixth DOP or between the seventh and ninth DOP. The extract did not cause preimplantation embryonic loss or reabsorptions. Fetal death was found. Estrogenic activity was not exhibited by the extract.

  4. Histomorphometric effects of gemcitabine on Swiss albino mice spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Viveka, S; Udyavar, Ajay; Shetty, Balakrishna; Kuriakose, Santhosh; Sudha, M. J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spermatogenesis is a highly conserved and regulated process and it is sensitive to fluctuations in the physical and chemical environment. Gemcitabine is a novel antimetabolic anticancer drug used frequently in the treatment of many cancers. This study aimed to investigate the histomorphometric effects of gemcitabine on spermatogenesis in Swiss albino mice. Materials and Methods: Gemcitabine in high and low doses (80 and 40 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally to inbred Swiss albino mice. Gross testicular features and seminiferous tubular histomorphometry was studies at the end of 7th, 14th day and at 2 months sperm shape abnormalities were studied. Results: Seminiferous tubular morphology was altered significantly, showing a reduction in height, perimeter and area in a dose dependent manner. Sertoli cell number decreased. Basement membrane thickness was reduced and it appeared to be permanent, with statistically insignificant changes even after 2 months. There was a reduction of intertubular spaces. Sperms have shown banana heading, decapitation and loss of normal hook of head. The effects were partially reversible at the end of 2 months. Conclusion: It was concluded that gemcitabine affects the process of spermatogenesis adversely in a dose and time dependent manner and the effects are partially reversible. PMID:25709994

  5. Effects of marine algal toxins on thermoregulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Ramsdell, John S

    2005-01-01

    Hypothermia is often seen in mice and rats exposed acutely to marine algal toxins, but the mechanism of action of these toxins on thermoregulation is not well understood. Our laboratory has assessed the thermoregulatory mechanisms of two marine algal toxins, maitotoxin and brevetoxin in the mouse. Radiotelemetry was used to measure core temperature in the unrestrained mouse while it was housed in a temperature gradient allowing the exhibition of thermoregulatory behavior. Both maitotoxin (338 ng/kg) and brevetoxin (180 microg/kg) were shown to elicit profound hypothermic responses accompanied by a preference for cooler ambient temperatures in the gradient. This behavioral response would suggest that the toxins alter the central neural control of body temperature, resulting in a regulated reduction in body temperature. Following recovery from the acute hypothermic effects of brevetoxin, mice developed an elevation in their daytime core temperature that persisted for several days after exposure. This fever-like response may represent a delayed toxicological effect of the marine algal toxins that is manifested through the thermoregulatory system. Overall, algal toxins have acute and delayed effects on temperature regulation in the mouse. A better understanding of the mechanisms of action of the toxins on thermoregulation should lead to improved methods for treating victims of ciguatera and other toxin exposures. PMID:16111859

  6. [Effects of trimebutine on colonic propulsion in mice].

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Onoda, Y

    1992-06-01

    Effects of oral administration of trimebutine on colonic propulsion in conscious mice were studied by measuring the time required to evacuate a bead which had been inserted into the colon, and compared with those of metoclopramide and domperidone. In normal animals, trimebutine (10 and 50 mg/kg), metoclopramide (50 mg/kg) and domperidone (50 mg/kg) had no effect on the bead evacuation. Metoclopramide and domperidone at 30 mg/kg showed no effect on the delay of colonic propulsion induced by clonidine, while trimebutine (10 and 30 mg/kg) restored the delay significantly. Trimebutine also showed restoration of the delay induced by loperamide. On the acceleration of the propulsion induced by neostigmine, trimebutine (10 and 30 mg/kg) showed an inhibition. In addition, trimebutine (3-30 mg/kg) dose-dependently suppressed the development of soft feces and/or diarrhea induced by neostigmine. According to the results, it is concluded that trimebutine produces both acceleration and inhibition on the colonic propulsion in mice. PMID:1457960

  7. Temporary amygdala inhibition reduces stress effects in female mice.

    PubMed

    Dalooei, Jila Rezaeian; Sahraei, Hedayat; Meftahi, Gholam Hossein; Khosravi, Maryam; Bahari, Zahra; Hatef, Boshra; Mohammadi, Alireza; Nicaeili, Fateme; Eftekhari, Fateme; Ghamari, Fateme; Hadipour, Mohamadmehdi; Kaka, Gholamreza

    2016-09-01

    The current study investigated the effect of temporary inhibition of amygdala in response to metabolic changes caused by stress in female mice. Unilateral and bilateral amygdala cannulation was carried out, and after a week of recovery, 2% lidocaine hydrochloride was injected into the mice amygdalae five minutes before the induction of stress. A communication box was employed to induce stress for four consecutive days and plasma corticosterone, food and water intake, weight changes, and anorexia were measured as stress-induced metabolic changes. Results demonstrated that stress, increases stress, increased plasma corticosterone concentrations, weight, food, and water intake. Temporary inhibition of the amygdala slightly decreased plasma corticosterone concentrations, but did not fully reduce the effect of stress. The bilateral injection of lidocaine hydrochloride to the amygdala reduced the effect of stress and reduced water intake and weight. Unilateral injection of lidocaine hydrochloride into the left and right amygdala reduced food intake. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the left side and right side of amygdala nuclei play a different role in metabolic responses in stress. PMID:27489731

  8. Temporary amygdala inhibition reduces stress effects in female mice.

    PubMed

    Dalooei, Jila Rezaeian; Sahraei, Hedayat; Meftahi, Gholam Hossein; Khosravi, Maryam; Bahari, Zahra; Hatef, Boshra; Mohammadi, Alireza; Nicaeili, Fateme; Eftekhari, Fateme; Ghamari, Fateme; Hadipour, Mohamadmehdi; Kaka, Gholamreza

    2016-09-01

    The current study investigated the effect of temporary inhibition of amygdala in response to metabolic changes caused by stress in female mice. Unilateral and bilateral amygdala cannulation was carried out, and after a week of recovery, 2% lidocaine hydrochloride was injected into the mice amygdalae five minutes before the induction of stress. A communication box was employed to induce stress for four consecutive days and plasma corticosterone, food and water intake, weight changes, and anorexia were measured as stress-induced metabolic changes. Results demonstrated that stress, increases stress, increased plasma corticosterone concentrations, weight, food, and water intake. Temporary inhibition of the amygdala slightly decreased plasma corticosterone concentrations, but did not fully reduce the effect of stress. The bilateral injection of lidocaine hydrochloride to the amygdala reduced the effect of stress and reduced water intake and weight. Unilateral injection of lidocaine hydrochloride into the left and right amygdala reduced food intake. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the left side and right side of amygdala nuclei play a different role in metabolic responses in stress.

  9. Size effects of latex nanomaterials on lung inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Shimada, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    Effects of nano-sized materials (nanomaterials) on sensitive population have not been well elucidated. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to (latex) nanomaterials on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or allergen in mice, especially in terms of their size-dependency. In protocol 1, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received a single exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (250 {mu}g/animal) with three sizes (25, 50, and 100 nm), LPS (75 {mu}g/animal), or LPS plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 2, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received repeated exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (100 {mu}g/animal), allergen (ovalbumin: OVA; 1 {mu}g/animal), or allergen plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 1, latex nanomaterials with all sizes exacerbated lung inflammation elicited by LPS, showing an overall trend of amplified lung expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, LPS plus nanomaterials, especially with size less than 50 nm, significantly elevated circulatory levels of fibrinogen, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant, and von Willebrand factor as compared with LPS alone. The enhancement tended overall to be greater with the smaller nanomaterials than with the larger ones. In protocol 2, latex nanomaterials with all sizes did not significantly enhance the pathophysiology of allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation and Igs production, although latex nanomaterials with less than 50 nm significantly induced/enhanced neutrophilic lung inflammation. These results suggest that latex nanomaterials differentially affect two types of (innate and adaptive immunity-dominant) lung inflammation.

  10. Effects of sleep deprivation and aging on long-term and remote memory in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a month after training, sleep-deprived and control aged animals performed similarly, primarily due to remote memory decay in the control aged animals. Gene expression analysis supported the finding that SD has similar effects on the hippocampus in young and aged mice. PMID:25776037

  11. Effect of low frequency low energy pulsing electromagnetic fields on mice injected with cyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Cadossi, R.; Zucchini, P.; Emilia, G.; Franceschi, C.; Cossarizza, A.; Santantonio, M.; Mandolini, G.; Torelli, G. )

    1991-03-01

    C3H mice have been used to investigate the effect of a combination of cyclophosphamide (CY) and electromagnetic fields (PEMF). Mice were injected i.p. with a single dose of 200 mg/kg body weight of CY and then exposed to PEMF 24 h per day. In an initial series of experiments immediately after CY injection mice were exposed to PEMF until sacrifice. WBC counts in the peripheral blood demonstrated a quicker decline in WBC at days 1 and 2 in mice exposed to PEMF. Groups of mice were sacrificed at days 1, 4, 6, 8, and 10 after CY injection. In mice exposed to PEMF the spleen weight was less than in controls at days 6, 8, and 10. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that the labeling index of bone marrow smears did not significantly differ between controls and experimental mice exposed to PEMF, whereas the spleen labeling index proved to be higher among control mice versus mice exposed to PEMF at day 6, and higher among mice exposed to PEMF versus controls at day 8. In a second series of experiments mice were exposed to PEMF only over the 24 h following CY injection. We found that the spleens of mice exposed to PEMF weighed less than those of controls at days 6 and 8. The labeling index of bone marrow did evidence a slight decrease among mice exposed to PEMF at days 8 and 10 after CY injection versus control mice. The spleen labeling index proved to be lower in experimental mice exposed to PEMF than in controls at days 4, 6, and 8. Mice were then injected with CY, half were exposed to PEMF, and 24 h later bone marrow was recovered from both groups of animals. The same number of bone marrow cells was injected via the tail vein into recipient mice irradiated to 8.5 Gy.

  12. Fangchinoline inhibited the antinociceptive effect of morphine in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, L H; Zhang, Y H; Ku, B S

    2005-03-01

    Fangchinoline (FAN), a non-specific calcium antagonist, is a major alkaloidal component of the creeper Stephania tetrandra S. Moore (or fenfangji). It has been shown to possess antagonistic activity on morphine-induced antinociception in mice. This study was undertaken to assess the antagonistic mechanism. The results demonstrated that FAN (IP) attenuated morphine (SC)-induced antinociception in a dose-dependent manner with significant effect at doses of 30 and 60mg/kg body wt. (IP) in the tail-flick test but not the tail-pinch tests, carried out in mice. This antagonism was abolished by pretreatment with a serotonin precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP, IP), but not by pretreatment with a noradrenaline precursor, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA, IP) in the tail-flick test. On the other hand, the development of morphine-induced analgesic tolerance was not prevented by FAN. These results suggest that the serotonergic pathway may be involved in the antagonism of morphine-induced antinociception by FAN and, in agreement with other reports, also indicates the possible dissociation of the morphine analgesic effect from its tolerance-development mechanism. PMID:15830839

  13. Effect of Conclevan on endurance capacity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Fukazawa, Yoko; Toda, Takahiro; Ishii, Makoto; Ochiai, Wataru; Usukura, Masatoshi; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the anti-fatigue effect of Conclevan, which is mainly composed of liver hydrolysate, via a forced swimming test using mice. Conclevan was administered to mice for 6 weeks, and a forced swimming test was conducted to measure swimming time. After six weeks, the blood ammonia and glutamine concentrations were measured. In the Conclevan administration group, swimming time increased significantly compared to the swimming control group. In the swimming control group, an increase in blood ammonia and a decrease in blood glutamine were observed, relative to the non-swimming control group. In the Conclevan administration group, the increased blood ammonia and decreased blood glutamine induced by swimming were significantly reduced, compared to the swimming control group. The mRNA expression levels of the hepatic enzymes of the urea cycle (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, argininosuccinate synthetase, and arginase) and glutamine synthesis (glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase) were significantly increased in the Conclevan administration group, compared to the swimming control group. The results of this study demonstrated the anti-fatigue effects of Conclevan. This product may inhibit an increase in the fatigue-inducing ammonia concentration in the blood by increasing the expression of hepatic enzymes, which convert ammonia to urea, leading to increased swimming time. In addition, Conclevan may prolong swimming time by increasing the hepatic synthesis of glutamine, which is an important amino acid for supplying energy in muscles. PMID:22293354

  14. Effects of lead on the male reproductive system in mice.

    PubMed

    Wadi, S A; Ahmad, G

    1999-04-01

    The effect of environmental lead on the male reproductive system has been a major area of concern for several years. Lead toxicity to the male reproductive system of sexually mature male CF-1 mice was investigated by administering two concentrations of lead (0.25% and 0.5%) via drinking water for 6 wk. The low lead dose significantly reduced the number of sperm within the epididymis, while the high dose reduced both the sperm count and percentage of motile sperm and increased the percentage of abnormal sperm within the epididymis. There was no significant effect on testis weight; however, the high-dose treatment significantly decreased the epididymis and seminal vesicle weights as well as overall body weight gain. Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and testosterone (T) levels were not affected by lead administration indicating that in adult male CF-1 mice, lead targets testicular spermatogenesis and sperm within the epididymis to produce reproductive toxicity rather than acting at other sites within the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis.

  15. Immune modulatory effects of the foodborne contaminant citrinin in mice.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Rafiqul; Roh, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Ara; Kim, Jinho; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Eo, Seong-kug; Lim, Chae-Woong; Kim, Bumseok

    2012-10-01

    The mycotoxin citrinin can cause mycotoxic nephropathy, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. To investigate the immune modulatory effects, CTN was orally administered to female BALB/c mice at the dose of 1, 5, or 10 mg/kg body weight for 14 days, and several immunotoxicity tests were performed. The populations of F4/80+ cells and CD19+ cells were significantly decreased in spleen and MLN. In MLN, CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cell populations were increased. CD8+ cells were increased but CD19+ cells were decreased in intra-epithelial, lamina propria and Peyer's patches lymphocytes. In a cell proliferation assay, along with the increased proliferative capacities of ConA-induced splenocytes and MLN cells, IFN-γ production was increased. The expression of TLR 2 was increased in spleen, but TLR 3 expression in MLN was decreased. The level of serum IgM was reduced. Furthermore, apoptosis was induced in spleen, MLN and Peyer's patches and promoted by the change in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 activities. Autophagy gene Atg5 and Beclin-1 were up-regulated in spleen. The expressions of IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α were inhibited in murine macrophage cells pre-exposed with TLR ligands. These results indicate that CTN has multiple immune modulatory effects in mice that may alter normal functions of immune system.

  16. Teratogenic effect of Carbamazepine use during pregnancy in the mice.

    PubMed

    Elshama, Said Said; Osman, Hosam Eldin Hussein; El-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry

    2015-01-01

    Carbamazepine use is the first choice of antiepileptic drugs among epileptic pregnant females. There are many inconclusive studies regard the safety of carbamazepine use during pregnancy. This study aims to investigate the morphological and histopathological teratogenic effects of carbamazepine use during pregnancy. The healthy pregnant females mice divided into equal five groups (each n=20). The first (control) group received distilled water/day. Second, third, fourth and fifth group received 8.75, 22.75, 52.5, 65 mg of carbamazepine/day respectively. Carbamazepine and water were given by gastric gavage throughout gestational period. Fetuses were delivered on the 18th day of gestation by hysterectomy. Fetal measurements and appearance were assessed with investigation the histopathological changes of brain and spinal cord. There was a significant decrease of weight, different organs weight, length, upper and lower limb length of mice in the first day of delivery in fifth group. There was a significant increase of weight, different organs weight, length, upper and lower limb length in the third group. Many congenital anomalies such as spina bifida, meromelia, microphalmia, oligodactyly, anencephaly, neurodegeneration of brain and spinal cord were noticedin fifth group. Teratogenic effect of carbamazepine represented as growth retardation and neurodevelopmental toxicity depending on its overdose degree. PMID:25553681

  17. Teratogenic effect of Lippia citriodora leaves aqueous extract in mice

    PubMed Central

    Oskouei Shirvan, Zahra; Etemad, Leila; Zafari, Reza; Moallem, Seyed Adel; Vahdati-Mashhadian, Naser; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Safety of Lippia citriodora, as a herbal remedy, in pregnancy has not yet been evaluated. This study aimed to identify the effect of L. citriodora aqueous extract on pregnancy outcome in mice. Materials and Methods: Timed-pregnant mice received doses of 0.5 g/kg/day L. citriodora aqueous extract or the vehicle control during organogenesis, intraperitoneally. Maternal body weights were measured throughout the pregnancy. The litters were examined for external malformations and skeletal abnormalities. Fetuses were stained with Alizarin red S and Alcian blue. Results: There were no significant differences in mean maternal weight gain during pregnancy between groups. Also, no significant differences were observed in mean number of implantation, live and resorbed fetuses between control and treated groups. The prevalence of all types of deformity was low and similar to control group (%1.11). Conclusion: The results of this study show that moderate consumption of L. citriodora as an infusion or tea appears to be safe to be used during pregnancy and does not have toxic effects on development of mouse embryo. PMID:27222830

  18. Effect of alcohol on behavioral and autonomic thermoregulation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, C.J.; Stead, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    Male, BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with ethyl alcohol (ethanol) in dosages of 0, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 g/kg and then placed in a temperature gradient that permitted the measurement of preferred ambient temperature (Ta). The 3 g/kg dosage of ethanol resulted in a slight lowering of the preferred Ta during the first 30 min of placement in the gradient. However, there was no overall statistically significant effect of alcohol dosage on preferred Ta. In another experiment, BALB/c mice were treated with the aforementioned ethanol dosages while metabolic rate (MR), evaporative water loss (EWL), and colonic temperature were measured 60 min post-injection at Ta's of 20, 30, and 35 C a dosage of 3 g/kg caused a significant decrease in MR, EWL, and colonic temperature. At a Ta of 30 C this same dosage caused significant reduction in colonic temperature, however; at Ta of 35 C ethanol had no effect on these parameters. In spite of the significant decrease in colonic temperature at a Ta of 30 C, which approximates the normal preferred Ta, the behavioral thermal preference was marginally affected. It is not clear whether or not ethanol injection results in a decrease in the set-point body temperature.

  19. Anxiolytic-like effects of ursolic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Colla, André R S; Rosa, Julia M; Cunha, Mauricio P; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2015-07-01

    Ursolic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that possesses several biological and neuropharmacological effects including antidepressant-like activity. Anxiety disorders represent common and disability psychiatric conditions that are often associated with depressive symptoms. This work investigated the anxiolytic-like effects of ursolic acid administration in different behavioral paradigms that evaluate anxiety in mice: open field test, elevated plus maze test, light/dark box test and marble burying test. To this end, mice were administered with ursolic acid (0.1, 1 and 10mg/kg, p.o.) or diazepam (2mg/kg, p.o.), positive control, and submitted to the behavioral tests. The results show that ursolic acid (10mg/kg) elicited an anxiolytic-like effect observed by the increased total time in the center and decreased number of rearings responses in the open field test and an increased percentage of entries and total time spent in the open arms of elevated plus maze, similarly to diazepam. No significant effects of ursolic acid were shown in the light/dark box and marble burying test. These data indicate that ursolic acid exhibits anxiolytic-like effects in the open field and elevated plus maze test, but not in the light/dark box and marble burying test, showing the relevance of testing several behavioral paradigms in the evaluation of anxiolytic-like actions. Of note, the results extend the understanding on the effects of ursolic acid in the central nervous system and suggest that it may be a novel approach for the management of anxiety-related disorders.

  20. Evaluation of anticonvulsant and nootropic effect of ondansetron in mice.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Agarwal, N B; Mediratta, P K; Sharma, K K

    2012-09-01

    The role of serotonin receptors have been implicated in various types of experimentally induced seizures. Ondansetron is a highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT(3)) receptor antagonist used as antiemetic agent for chemotherapy-, and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The present study was carried out to examine the effect of ondansetron on electroshock, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and cognitive functions in mice. Ondansetron was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg (single dose) to observe its effect on the increasing current electroshock seizure (ICES) test and PTZ-induced seizure test. In addition, a chronic study (21 days) was also performed to assess the effects of ondansetron on electroshock-induced convulsions and cognitive functions. The effect on cognition was assessed by elevated plus maze and passive avoidance paradigms. Phenytoin (25 mg/kg, i.p.) was used as a standard anticonvulsant drug and piracetam (200 mg/kg) was administered as a standard nootropic drug. The results were compared with an acute study, wherein it was found that the administration of ondansetron (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg) significantly raised the seizure-threshold current as compared to control group in the ICES test. Similar results were observed after chronic administration of ondansetron. In PTZ test, ondansetron in all the three tested doses failed to show protective effect against PTZ-induced seizure test. Administration of ondansetron for 21 days significantly decreased the transfer latency (TL) and prolonged the step-down latency (SDL). The results of present study suggest the anticonvulsant and memory-enhancing effect of ondansetron in mice.

  1. Therapeutic effect of mefloquine on Schistosoma mansoni in experimental infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Abou-Shady, Omaima Mohammed; Mohammed, Soheir Sayed; Attia, Samar Sayed; Yusuf, Hebat-Allah Salah; Helmy, Dina Omar

    2016-06-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most prevalent parasitic infections worldwide. Praziquantel is the drug of choice for treatment of schistosomiasis for its high efficacy. The present work was carried out on 160 mice to evaluate the therapeutic effect of mefloquine on experimental schistosomiasis mansoni. Mice were classified into 3 groups; group I (20 infected non-treated mice), group II included 60 infected mice which were further divided into group IIm (20 mice treated with 400 mg/kg mefloquine), group IIp (20 mice treated with 1,000 mg/kg/2 days praziquantel) and group IIpm (20 mice treated with 200 mg/kg mefloquine and 500 mg/kg praziquantel), group III included 80 non-infected mice subdivided into group IIIn (20 non-treated mice), group IIIm (20 mice treated with 400 mg/kg mefloquine), group IIIp (20 mice treated with 1,000 mg/kg/2 days praziquantel), group IIIpm (20 mice treated with 200 mg mefloquine and 500 mg praziquantel). Mefloquine significantly reduced worm burden, tissue egg load, number of liver granulomas and increased the percent of dead ova within granulomas. Combination of mefloquine and praziquantel gave better curative effects than praziquantel or mefloquine given alone. PMID:27413290

  2. Traumatic brain injury in mice and pentadecapeptide BPC 157 effect.

    PubMed

    Tudor, Mario; Jandric, Ivan; Marovic, Anton; Gjurasin, Miroslav; Perovic, Darko; Radic, Bozo; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Kolenc, Danijela; Brcic, Luka; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2010-02-25

    Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, an anti-ulcer peptide, efficient in inflammatory bowel disease trials (PL 14736), no toxicity reported, improved muscle crush injury. After an induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice by a falling weight, BPC 157 regimens (10.0microg, 10.0ng/kgi.p.) demonstrated a marked attenuation of damage with an improved early outcome and a minimal postponed mortality throughout a 24h post-injury period. Ultimately, the traumatic lesions (subarachnoidal and intraventricular haemorrhage, brain laceration, haemorrhagic laceration) were less intense and consecutive brain edema had considerably improved. Given prophylactically (30 min before TBI) the improved conscious/unconscious/death ratio in TBI-mice was after force impulses of 0.068 Ns, 0.093 Ns, 0.113 Ns, 0.130 Ns, 0.145 Ns, and 0.159 Ns. Counteraction (with a reduction of unconsciousness, lower mortality) with both microg- and ng-regimens included the force impulses of 0.068-0.145 Ns. A higher regimen presented effectiveness also against the maximal force impulse (0.159 Ns). Furthermore, BPC 157 application immediately prior to injury was beneficial in mice subjected to force impulses of 0.093 Ns-TBI. For a more severe force impulse (0.130 Ns, 0.145 Ns, or 0159 Ns), the time-relation to improve the conscious/unconscious/death ratio was: 5 min (0.130 Ns-TBI), 20 min (0.145 Ns-TBI) or 30 min (0.159 Ns-TBI). PMID:19931318

  3. Serotonin induces peripheral mechanical antihyperalgesic effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Danielle A; Petrocchi, Júlia Alvarenga; Navarro, Larissa Caldeira; Souza, Tâmara Cristina; Castor, Marina G M; Perez, Andrea C; Duarte, Igor D G; Romero, Thiago R L

    2015-11-15

    The role of serotonin (5-HT) in nociception will vary according to the subtypes of receptors activated. When administered peripherally, it induces pain in humans and in rats by activation of 5-HT1, 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors. In addition, endogenous 5-HT produced in situ, is involved in the nociceptive response induced by formalin in rat's paw inflammation, possibly via 5-HT3 receptors. Moreover, it has been shown that 5-HT released in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by stimulation of the periaqueductal gray causes activation of inhibitory interneurons, resulting in inhibition of spinal neurons. In the present study we evaluated the effect of serotonin and its receptors at peripheral antinociception. The mice paw pressure test was used in animals that had increased sensitivity by an intraplantar injection of PGE2 (2 µg). We used selective antagonists of serotonin receptors (isamoltan 5-HT1B, BRL 15572 5-HT1D, ketanserin 5-HT2A, ondansetron 5-HT3 and SB-269970 5-HT7). Administration of serotonin into the right hind paw (62.5, 125, 250 and 500 ng and 1 µg) produced a dose-dependent peripheral mechanical antihyperalgesic effect of serotonin in mice. Selective antagonists for 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, 5-HT3 receptors at doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 µg, reversed the antihyperalgesic effect induced by 250 ng serotonin. In contrast, selective antagonists for 5-HT1D and 5-HT7 receptors were unable to reverse the antihyperalgesic effect induced by serotonin. These results demonstrated for the first time, the peripheral mechanical antihyperalgesic effect of serotonin, and participation of 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors in this event.

  4. Effect of transgene number of spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in lacl transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    O`Loughlin, K.G.; Hamer, J.D.; Winegar, R.A.; Mirsalis, J.C.; Short, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    Lacl transgenic mice are widely used for the measurement of mutations in specific target issues. The lacl transgene is present in mice as 40 tandem repeats; this sequence is homozygous (contained in both copies of chromosome 5) in C57Bl/6 mice, and is hemizygous in B6C3F1 mice. Previous reports have indicated that tandem repeats can produce chromosome instability, fragile sites, and other effects. To determine whether the presence of the transgene effects micronucleus induction we compared the response of nontransgenic (NTR) to hemizygous (HEMI) transgenic B6C3F1 mice and to hemizygous and homozygous (HOMO) transgenic C57Bl/6 mice. Five mice/group were irradiated with 500 cGy from a {sup 137}Cs source. Bone marrow was harvested 24 hr after treatment and 2000 polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) were analyzed per animal. The presence or absence of the lacl transgene had no effect in unirradiated mice on the percent of micronucleated PCE (MN) or on the ratio of PCE to total red blood cells for either strain: B6C3F1 mice had MN frequencies of 0.26% and 0.20% for NTR and HEMI mice, respectively; C57Bl/6 mice had MN frequencies of 0.34%, 0.32%, and 0.38% for NTR, HEMI, and HOMO mice, respectively. Radiation-induced micronucleus frequencies were significantly higher in HEMI lacl B6C3F1 mice (2.85%) than in NTR litter mates (1.59%); the converse was true in C57Bl/6 mice: NTR were 2.45%, HEMI were 1.25%, HOMO were 1.65%. These data suggest that the lacl transgene does not cause chromosome instability as measured by spontaneous micronucleus levels. However, the response of these transgenic mice to a variety of clastogenic agents needs to be investigated before they are integrated into standard in vivo assays for chromosome damage.

  5. Effects of Valerianae Radix et Rhizoma extract on psychological stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Suk; Ahn, Jeong Deok; Cho, Su-In

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to identify the effects of Valerianae Radix et Rhizoma water extract (VRe) originated from Valeriana fauriei Briquet on reducing psychological stress (PS) on mice. Objective: Mice were put under PS with communication box method: Restraining mice and forcing to see other mice underfoot shock stress. Materials and Methods: Measurements on plasma corticosterone, noradrenaline and lipid peroxidation, and elevated plus-maze (EPM) tests were carried out to determine the effect of VRe administration on physiological and behavioral responses of mice. Results: VRe showed anxiolytic effects in plasma corticosterone, noradrenaline, and EPM transfer latency levels, but it did not show any significant effects on the other indicators. Conclusion: V. fauriei, which has been used as a natural anxiolytic drug, exerts positive effects in the communication box induced PS in mice. PMID:25829779

  6. Protective effects of phyllanthus emblica leaf extract on sodium arsenite-mediated adverse effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Sadia; Ahsan, Nazmul; Kato, Masashi; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Rashid, Abdur; Akhand, Anwarul Azim

    2015-02-01

    Groundwater contamination of arsenic is the major cause of a serious health hazard in Bangladesh. No specific treatment is yet available to manage the large number of individuals exposed to arsenic. In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of Phyllanthus emblica (Indian gooseberry or Amla) leaf extract (PLE) on arsenic-mediated toxicity in experimental mice. Male Swiss albino mice were divided into three different groups (n=6/group). 'Control' mice received arsenic free water together with normal feed. Mice in the remaining two groups designated 'SA' and 'SA+PLE' were exposed to sodium arsenite (SA, 10 µg/g body weight/day) through drinking water in addition to receiving normal feed and PLE-supplemented feed, respectively. The weight gain of SA-exposed mice was decreased compared with the controls; however, this decrease in body weight gain was prevented when the feed was supplemented with PLE. A secondary effect of arsenic was enlargement of the liver, kidney and spleen of SA-group mice. Deposition of arsenic in those organs was demonstrated by ICP-MS. When PLE was supplemented in the feed the enlargement of the organs was minimized; however, the deposition of arsenic was not significantly reduced. These results indicated that PLE may not block arsenic deposition in tissue directly but rather may play a protective role to reduce arsenic-induced toxicity. Therefore, co-administration of PLE in arsenic-exposed animals might have a future therapeutic application for protecting against arsenic-mediated toxicity.

  7. Antidepressant-like effect of lead in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, M; Matteussi, A S; Rodrigues, A L

    1999-12-01

    It has been reported that lead can cause behavioral impairment by inhibiting the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex. MK-801, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, exhibits an antidepressant-like action in the forced swimming test. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether subacute lead exposure in adult male Swiss mice weighing 30-35 g causes an antidepressant-like action in a forced swimming test. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (ip) with 10 mg/kg lead acetate or saline daily for 7 consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the last treatment, the saline and lead-treated mice received an injection of MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg, ip) or saline and were tested in forced swimming and in open-field tests. Immobility time was similarly reduced in the saline-MK-801, Pb-saline and Pb-MK-801 groups compared to the saline-saline group (mean +/- SEM; 197.3 +/- 18.5, 193.5 +/- 15.8, 191.3 +/- 12.3 and 264.0 +/- 14.4 s, respectively; N = 9). These data indicate that lead may exert its effect on the forced swimming test by directly or indirectly inhibiting the NMDA receptor complex. Lead treatment caused no deficit in memory of habituation and did not affect locomotor activity in an open-field (N = 14). However, mice that received MK-801 after lead exhibited a deficit in habituation (22% reduction in rearing responses between session 3 and 1; N = 14) as compared to control (41% reduction in rearing responses; N = 15), further suggesting that lead may have affected the NMDA receptor activity. Forced-swim immobility in a basin in two daily consecutive sessions was also significantly decreased by lead exposure (mean +/- SEM; day 1 = 10.6 +/- 3.2, day 2 = 19.6 +/- 3.6; N = 16) as compared to control (day 1 = 18.4 +/- 3.8, day 2 = 34.0 +/- 3.7; N = 17), whereas the number of crossings was not affected by lead treatment, further indicating a specific antidepressant-like action of lead.

  8. [Radiobiological effects of total mice irradiation with Bragg's peak protons].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Molokanov, A G; Ushakov, I B; Bulynina, T M; Vorozhtsova, S V; Abrosimova, A N; Kryuchkova, D M; Gaevsky, V N

    2013-01-01

    Outbred CD-1 female mice were irradiated in a proton beam (171 MeV, 5 Gy) on the phasotron at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia). Radiation was delivered in two points of the depth dose distribution: at the beam entry and on Bragg's peak. Technical requirements for studying the effects of Bragg's peak protons on organism of experimental animals were specified. It was recognized that protons with high linear energy transfer (mean LET = 1.6 keV/microm) cause a more severe damaging effect to the hemopoietic system and cytogenetic apparatus in bone marrow cells as compared with entry protons and 60Co gamma-quanta. It was shown that recovery of the main hemopoietic organs and immunity as well as elimination of chromosomal aberrations take more time following irradiation with Bragg's peak protons but not protons with the energy of 171 MeV.

  9. Sedative effect of monoterpene alcohols in mice: a preliminary screening.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; Raphael, Ellen; Brocksom, Ursula; Brocksom, Timothy John

    2007-01-01

    Many essential oils and monoterpenes are used therapeutically as relaxing drugs and tranquilizers. In this study, ten structurally related monoterpene alcohols, present in many essential oils, were evaluated in mice to investigate their pharmacological potential in the central nervous system. Isopulegol (1), neoisopulegol (2), (+/-)-isopinocampheol (3), (-)-myrtenol (4), (-)-cis-myrtanol (5), (+)-p-menth-1-en-9-ol (6) and (+/-)-neomenthol (8) exhibited a depressant effect in the pentobarbital-induced sleep test, indicating a sedative property. (-)-Menthol (7), (+)-dihydrocarveol (9), and (+/-)-isoborneol (10) were ineffective in this test. The results show that these psychoactive monoterpenes have the profile of sedative drugs, and this pharmacological effect is influenced by the structural characteristics of the molecules. PMID:17913072

  10. Metformin administration induces hepatotoxic effects in paraoxonase-1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, Anabel; Riera-Borrull, Marta; Fort-Gallifa, Isabel; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Cabré, Noemí; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Joven, Jorge; Camps, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Metformin is the first-line pharmacological treatment of diabetes. In these patients, metformin reduces body weight and decreases the risk of diabetes-related complications such as cardiovascular disease. However, whether metformin elicits beneficial effects on liver histology is a controversial issue and, as yet, there is no consensus. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1), an enzyme synthesized mainly by the liver, degrades lipid peroxides and reduces oxidative stress. PON1 activities are decreased in chronic liver diseases. We evaluated the effects of metformin in the liver of PON1-deficient mice which, untreated, present a mild degree of liver steatosis. Metformin administration aggravated inflammation in animals given a standard mouse chow and in those fed a high-fat diet. Also, it was associated with a higher degree of steatosis in animals fed a standard chow diet. This report is a cautionary note regarding the prescription of metformin for the treatment of diabetes in patients with concomitant liver impairment.

  11. Effect of oral imperatorin on memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Steinthor; Gudbjarnason, Sigmundur

    2013-11-15

    The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the acetylcholinesterase inhibiting mixture of extracts of Angelica archangelica fruit and Geranium sylvaticum on memory. Furthermore the effect of the main compound, the furanocoumarin imperatorin, which has been shown to affect several neurotransmitters, was studied. Passive avoidance was measured by step-down latency and step-through latency of 10 months old mice receiving 0.79 mg/kg of imperatorin daily, pure or as part of the extracts, for 14 days or longer. Step-down latency was significantly higher in both groups receiving imperatorin than in the control group. In contrast, no difference was found between treatment groups regarding step-through latency. The results indicate that the imperatorin is the main active component of the extract mixture. PMID:24140410

  12. Effects of natural enrichment materials on stress, memory and exploratory behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Acklin, Casey J; Gault, Ruth A

    2015-07-01

    Environmental enrichment is an essential component of laboratory animal housing that allows animals to engage in natural behaviors in an otherwise artificial setting. Previous research by the authors suggested that, compared with synthetic enrichment materials, natural materials were associated with lower stress levels in mice. Here, the authors compare the effects of different enrichment materials on stress, memory and exploratory behavior in Swiss Webster mice. Mice that were provided with natural enrichment materials had lower stress levels, better memory and greater exploratory behavior than did mice provided with synthetic enrichment materials or with no enrichment materials. These findings suggest that provision of natural enrichment materials can improve well-being of laboratory mice.

  13. Test of the antiorthostatic suspension model on mice: effects on the inflammatory cell response.

    PubMed

    Fleming, S D; Rosenkrans, C F; Chapes, S K

    1990-04-01

    We tested the antiorthostatic suspension model for use as a 1G model to study the effects of factors that will be encountered during space travel on inflammation. We found no differences in inflammatory cells induced in antiorthostatically suspended mice. However, the superoxide response (used for oxidative killing of bacteria such as S. aureus) was impaired in antiorthostatically oriented mice compared to control mice. Elevated corticosterone levels were found in antiorthostatically suspended mice and indicate that stress may be a factor in the model. If the stress factor of the model correlates with the physiological stress of space flight, antiorthostatic suspension may be an acceptable model for studying inflammatory responses in mice.

  14. Test of the antiorthostatic suspension model on mice - Effects on the inflammatory cell response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkrans, Charles F., Jr.; Chapes, Stephen K.; Fleming, Sherry D.

    1990-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model was tested for use as a 1G model to study the effects of factors that will be encountered during space travel on inflammation. No differences were found in inflammatory cells induced in antiorthostatically suspended mice. However, the superoxide response (used for oxidative killing of bacteria such as S. aureus) was impaired in antiorthostatically oriented mice compared to control mice. Elevated corticosterone levels were found in antiorthostatically suspended mice, indicating that stress may be a factor in the model. If the stress factor of the model correlates with the physiological stress of space flight, antiorthostatic suspension may be an acceptable model for studying inflammatory responses in mice.

  15. Effects of prenatal stress on sexual partner preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Meek, Leslie R; Schulz, Kalynn M; Keith, Courtney A

    2006-09-30

    Three-month old, male Swiss Webster mice were born to either control dams or dams who had been prenatally stressed with light, heat, noise and handling during the last week of gestation. As adults, male offspring were tested on sexual partner preference and sexual behavior (mounting, intromissions and lordosis) with a sexually experienced male stimulus animal and a stimulus estrous female. In comparison to males born to control dams, prenatally stressed males showed a sexual partner preference for the sexually active male as demonstrated by a negative partner preference score, more and longer visits to the male's compartment, fewer and shorter visits to the female's compartment and longer latencies to and lower frequencies of mounts and intromissions of females. In addition, stressed males showed a greater frequency of lordosis and a higher lordosis quotient than did control males. This study is the first to investigate the effects of prenatal stress alone, without hormonal manipulation, on sexual partner preference using both a partner preference paradigm and measures of sexual behavior such as mounting, intromissions and lordosis. These findings support the suggestion that prenatal stress alone is enough to significantly affect sexual partner preference in male mice.

  16. Effects of hypoxic preconditioning on synaptic ultrastructure in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Sun, Zhishan; Sun, Shufeng; Duan, Yunxia; Shi, Jingfei; Qi, Zhifeng; Meng, Ran; Sun, Yongxin; Zeng, Xianwei; Chui, Dehua; Ji, Xunming

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) elicits resistance to more drastic subsequent insults, which potentially provide neuroprotective therapeutic strategy, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we examined the effects of HPC on synaptic ultrastructure in olfactory bulb of mice. Mice underwent up to five cycles of repeated HPC treatments, and hypoxic tolerance was assessed with a standard gasp reflex assay. As expected, HPC induced an increase in tolerance time. To assess synaptic responses, Western blots were used to quantify protein levels of representative markers for glia, neuron, and synapse, and transmission electron microscopy was used to examine synaptic ultrastructure and mitochondrial density. HPC did not significantly alter the protein levels of astroglial marker (GFAP), neuron-specific markers (GAP43, Tuj-1, and OMP), synaptic number markers (synaptophysin and SNAP25) or the percentage of excitatory synapses versus inhibitory synapses. However, HPC significantly affected synaptic curvature and the percentage of synapses with presynaptic mitochondria, which showed concomitant change pattern. These findings demonstrate that HPC is associated with changes in synaptic ultrastructure. PMID:25155519

  17. Effect of Atorvastatin on Memory in Albino Mice

    PubMed Central

    M.C., Das; Rao A.S.R., Srinivasa; Kadali, SLDV Ramana Murty

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim and objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of atorvastatin on learning and memory in albino mice. Materials and Methods: Thirty Swiss albino mice were divided into 5groups (n=6). In group2, group4 and group5 hyperlipidemia was induced by high fat diet (HFD) orally for 28days. Atrorvastatin was given to group3, group4 and group5 orally for 14 d. Learning and memory was evaluated with Hebb Williams’s maze, Elevated plus maze, Y maze and Step through latency. Continuous data were analyzed by one way ANOVA followed by Scheffe multiple range test, discrete data were analyzed by Kruskal - Wallis test. The level of significance was 5% (p ≤ 0.05). Result and Conclusion: HFD treatment had shown significant increase in body weight, significant impairment in learning and memory (p < 0.05). Only atorvastatin treated group had shown better learning and memory in comparison to HFD group. Atorvastatin 10mg/kg and 20 mg/kg had reversed the HFD induced impairment of learning and memory but there was no significant difference between the doses (p > 0.05). PMID:25584244

  18. Effects of prenatal stress on sexual partner preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Meek, Leslie R; Schulz, Kalynn M; Keith, Courtney A

    2006-09-30

    Three-month old, male Swiss Webster mice were born to either control dams or dams who had been prenatally stressed with light, heat, noise and handling during the last week of gestation. As adults, male offspring were tested on sexual partner preference and sexual behavior (mounting, intromissions and lordosis) with a sexually experienced male stimulus animal and a stimulus estrous female. In comparison to males born to control dams, prenatally stressed males showed a sexual partner preference for the sexually active male as demonstrated by a negative partner preference score, more and longer visits to the male's compartment, fewer and shorter visits to the female's compartment and longer latencies to and lower frequencies of mounts and intromissions of females. In addition, stressed males showed a greater frequency of lordosis and a higher lordosis quotient than did control males. This study is the first to investigate the effects of prenatal stress alone, without hormonal manipulation, on sexual partner preference using both a partner preference paradigm and measures of sexual behavior such as mounting, intromissions and lordosis. These findings support the suggestion that prenatal stress alone is enough to significantly affect sexual partner preference in male mice. PMID:16844154

  19. Effect of carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide on ICR mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC(50) values were determined for male ICR mice exposed to different concentration of carbon monoxide for 30 min and of nitrogen dioxide for 10 min in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The data indicate that ICR mice are more resistant to these two toxicants than Swiss albino mice. The carbon monoxide LC(50) for a 30-min exposure was about 8,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to 3,570 ppm for Swiss albino mice. The nitrogen dioxide LC(50) for a 10-min exposure was above 2,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to about 1,000 ppm for Swiss albino mice.

  20. Long-lived crowded-litter mice exhibit lasting effects on insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Landeryou, Taylor; Blandino-Rosano, Manuel; Cady, Gillian; Elghazi, Lynda; Meister, Daniel; See, Lauren; Bartke, Andrzej; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto; Miller, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    The action of nutrients on early postnatal growth can influence mammalian aging and longevity. Recent work has demonstrated that limiting nutrient availability in the first 3 wk of life [by increasing the number of pups in the crowded-litter (CL) model] leads to extension of mean and maximal lifespan in genetically normal mice. In this study, we aimed to characterize the impact of early-life nutrient intervention on glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis in CL mice. In our study, we used mice from litters supplemented to 12 or 15 pups and compared those to control litters limited to eight pups. At weaning and then throughout adult life, CL mice are significantly leaner and consume more oxygen relative to control mice. At 6 mo of age, CL mice had low fasting leptin concentrations, and low-dose leptin injections reduced body weight and food intake more in CL female mice than in controls. At 22 mo, CL female mice also have smaller adipocytes compared with controls. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests show an increase in insulin sensitivity in 6 mo old CL male mice, and females become more insulin sensitive later in life. Furthermore, β-cell mass was significantly reduced in the CL male mice and was associated with reduction in β-cell proliferation rate in these mice. Together, these data show that early-life nutrient intervention has a significant lifelong effect on metabolic characteristics that may contribute to the increased lifespan of CL mice. PMID:24735888

  1. The Effects of Antihypertensive Drugs on Bone Mineral Density in Ovariectomized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kwi Young; Kang, Yoongoo; Kim, Mirinae; Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Kim, Juryun; Jung, Hae-Rin; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2013-01-01

    The effects of several antihypertensive drugs on bone mineral density (BMD) and micro-architectural changes in ovariectomized (OVX) mice were investigated. Eight-week-old female C57/BL6 mice were used for this study. Three days after ovariectomy, mice were treated intraperitoneally with nifedipine (15 mg/kg), telmisartan (5 mg/kg), enalapril (20 mg/kg), propranolol (1 mg/kg) or hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 mg/kg) for 35 consecutive days. Uterine atrophy of all mice was confirmed to evaluate estrogen deficiency state. BMD and micro-architectural analyses were performed on tibial proximal ends by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). When OVX mice with uterine atrophy were compared with mice without atrophy, BMD decreased (P < 0.001). There were significant differences in BMD loss between different antihypertensive drugs (P = 0.005). Enalapril and propranolol increased BMD loss in mice with atrophied uteri compared with control mice. By contrast, thiazide increased BMD in mice with uterine atrophy compared with vehicle-treated mice (P = 0.048). Thiazide (P = 0.032) and telmisartan (P = 0.051) reduced bone loss and bone fraction in mice with uterine atrophy compared with the control. Thiazide affects BMD in OVX mice positively. The reduction in bone loss by thiazide and telmisartan suggest that these drugs may benefit menopausal women with hypertension and osteoporosis. PMID:23960439

  2. 27-hydroxycholesterol mediates negative effects of dietary cholesterol on cognition in mice.

    PubMed

    Heverin, Maura; Maioli, Silvia; Pham, Therese; Mateos, Laura; Camporesi, Elena; Ali, Zeina; Winblad, Bengt; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Björkhem, Ingemar

    2015-02-01

    In spite of the fact that cholesterol does not pass the blood-brain barrier, treatment of mice with dietary cholesterol causes significant effects on a number of genes in the brain and in addition a memory impairment. We have suggested that these effects are mediated by 27-hydroxycholesterol, which is able to pass the blood-brain barrier. To test this hypothesis we utilized Cyp27-/- mice lacking 27-hydroxycholesterol. The negative effect on memory observed after treatment of wildtype mice with dietary cholesterol was not observed in these mice. The cholesterol diet reduced the levels of the "memory protein" Arc (Activity Regulated Cytoskeleton associated protein) in the hippocampus of the wildtype mice but not in the hippocampus of the Cyp27-/- mice. The results are consistent with 27-hydroxycholesterol as the mediator of the negative effects of cholesterol on cognition. PMID:25453744

  3. 27-hydroxycholesterol mediates negative effects of dietary cholesterol on cognition in mice.

    PubMed

    Heverin, Maura; Maioli, Silvia; Pham, Therese; Mateos, Laura; Camporesi, Elena; Ali, Zeina; Winblad, Bengt; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Björkhem, Ingemar

    2015-02-01

    In spite of the fact that cholesterol does not pass the blood-brain barrier, treatment of mice with dietary cholesterol causes significant effects on a number of genes in the brain and in addition a memory impairment. We have suggested that these effects are mediated by 27-hydroxycholesterol, which is able to pass the blood-brain barrier. To test this hypothesis we utilized Cyp27-/- mice lacking 27-hydroxycholesterol. The negative effect on memory observed after treatment of wildtype mice with dietary cholesterol was not observed in these mice. The cholesterol diet reduced the levels of the "memory protein" Arc (Activity Regulated Cytoskeleton associated protein) in the hippocampus of the wildtype mice but not in the hippocampus of the Cyp27-/- mice. The results are consistent with 27-hydroxycholesterol as the mediator of the negative effects of cholesterol on cognition.

  4. Protective effects of asiaticoside on septic lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-na; Zheng, Jia-jia; Zhang, Li; Gong, Xia; Huang, Hai; Wang, Chang-dong; Wang, Bin; Wu, Meng-jiao; Li, Xiao-hui; Sun, Wen-juan; Liu, Ying-ju; Wan, Jing-yuan

    2011-09-01

    Asiaticoside (AS), a major triterpenoid saponin component isolated from Centella asiatica, has been described to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study aimed to determine the protective effects and the underlying mechanisms of AS on septic lung injury induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Mice were pretreated with the AS (45 mg/kg) or AS as well as GW9662 at 1h before CLP, the survival, lung injury, inflammatory mediators and signaling molecules, and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) were determined 24 h after CLP. The results showed that AS significantly decreased CLP-induced the mortality, lung pathological damage, the infiltration of mononuclear, polymorphonuclear (PMN) leucocytes and total proteins. Moreover, AS inhibited CLP-induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein in lung tissues, and the production of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Interestingly, the expression of PPAR-γ protein in lung tissue was up-regulated by AS. Furthermore, GW9662 (the inhibitor of PPAR-γ) significantly reversed these beneficial effects of AS in septic mice. These findings suggest that AS could effectively protect from septic lung injury induced by CLP and the underlying mechanisms might be related to up-regulation of PPAR-γ expression to some extent, which inhibits MAPKs and NF-κB pathway.

  5. The antinociceptive effect of zolpidem and zopiclone in mice.

    PubMed

    Pick, Chaim G; Chernes, Yakov; Rigai, Tova; Rice, Kenner C; Schreiber, Shaul

    2005-07-01

    Zolpidem and zopiclone are two of a newer hypno-sedative class of drugs, the "Z compounds". Their use for the treatment of short-term insomnia has been expanding constantly during the last two decades. The "Z compounds" are considered to cause less significant rebound insomnia or tolerance than the conventional hypnotic benzodiazepines. Their possible antinociceptive effect and interaction with the opioid system has not been studied yet. Our results demonstrate a significant difference between the antinociceptive properties of zopiclone and zolpidem when injected s.c. in the hotplate analgesic assay in mice. Zopiclone induced a weak, dose-dependent antinociceptive effect, antagonized only by the alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine. Zolpidem induced a weak, biphasic dose-dependent antinociceptive effect, antagonized primarily by the non-selective opioid antagonist naloxone and by yohimbine. The weak antinociceptive effect of both drugs, evident only at very high doses (far beyond those used clinically to induce sleep), implies no clinical use for zopiclone or zolpidem in the management of pain. However, the possible interaction of zolpidem with the opioid system should be further investigated (in behavioral models, which do not overlap with the acute-pain antinociception model we used), both for possible side effects in special populations (i.e. elderly) and for possible drug-drug interactions, in order to minimize possible hazards and maximize clinical beneficial effects of its use for sleep. PMID:15913749

  6. Electric shocks are ineffective in treatment of lethal effects of rattlesnake envenomation in mice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E K; Kardong, K V; Mackessy, S P

    1987-01-01

    Electrical shocks, even crudely delivered from 'stun guns' and gasoline engine spark plugs, have been reported to be effective in the treatment of snake bite. We thus applied similar electric shocks to mice artificially injected with reconstituted rattlesnake venom at various LD50 multiples. Those envenomated mice treated with electric shock survived no better than the controls. We thus found no evidence that electric shocks crudely administered had any life saving effect in mice.

  7. Antinociceptive effect of ethanolic extract of Selaginella convoluta in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Selaginella convoluta (Arn.) Spring (Selaginellaceae), commonly known as “jericó”, is a medicinal plant found in northeastern Brazil. S. convoluta is used in folk medicine as an antidepressant, aphrodisiac, diuretic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and it is used to combat amenorrhea, coughing and bleeding. This study was performed to evaluate the antinociceptive effects of ethanolic extract from S. convoluta in mice exposed to chemical and thermal models of nociception. Methods Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the ethanolic extract was performed. The ethanolic extract from Selaginella convoluta (Sc-EtOH) was examined for its intraperitoneal (i.p.) antinociceptive activity at the doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight. Acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin injection and hot plate tests were used to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of Sc-EtOH extract. The rota-rod test was used to evaluate motor coordination. Results A preliminary analysis of Sc-EtOH revealed that it contained phenols, steroids, terpenoids and flavonoids. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, mice treated with Sc-EtOH (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited reduced writhing (58.46, 75.63 and 82.23%, respectively). Secondly, Sc-EtOH treatment (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the paw licking time in mice during the first phase of the formalin test (by 44.90, 33.33 and 34.16%, respectively), as well as during the second phase of the test (by 86.44, 56.20 and 94.95%, respectively). Additionally, Sc-EtOH treatment at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg increased the latency time in the hot plate test after 60 and 90 minutes, respectively. In addition, Sc-EtOH did not impair motor coordination. Conclusion Overall, these results indicate that Sc-EtOH is effective as an analgesic agent in various pain models. The activity of Sc-EtOH is most likely mediated via the inhibition of peripheral mediators and central inhibitory mechanisms. This study supports previous claims of

  8. Unusual Effects of Nicotine as a Psychostimulant on Ambulatory Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Umezu, Toyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of nicotine, alone and in combination with various drugs that act on the CNS, on ambulatory activity, a behavioral index for locomotion, in ICR (CD-1) strain mice. Nicotine at 0.25–2 mg/kg acutely reduced ambulatory activity of ICR mice. The effect of nicotine was similar to that of haloperidol and fluphenazine but distinct from that of bupropion and methylphenidate. ICR mice developed tolerance against the inhibitory effect of nicotine on ambulatory activity when nicotine was repeatedly administered. This effect was also distinct from bupropion and methylphenidate as they produced augmentation of their ambulation-stimulating effects in ICR mice. Nicotine reduced the ambulation-stimulating effects of bupropion and methylphenidate as well as haloperidol and fluphenazine. Taken together, nicotine exhibited unusual effects as a psychostimulant on ambulatory activity in ICR mice. PMID:22530136

  9. Effect of linalool on morphine tolerance and dependence in mice.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Hosseini, Mohammadreza; Razavi, Bibi Marjan

    2012-09-01

    Linalool, a terpene alcohol, has been shown to interact with the opioid system and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Therefore, the effect of linalool on morphine dependence and tolerance was studied. Dependence and tolerance were induced in mice using subcutaneous morphine injections, three times a day (50, 50 and 75 mg/kg /day) for 3 days. To evaluate the effect of agents on the induction of morphine dependence and tolerance, linalool (50, 75 and 100 mg/kg), clonidine (positive control), alpha-2 receptor agonist, (0.1 mg/kg), memantine, NMDA receptor antagonist (positive control), (30 mg/kg) and saline were injected intraperitoneally three times a day for 3 days. To determine the expression of morphine dependence and tolerance, all compounds were injected once intraperitoneally on the day of experiment. The effect of linalool and other agents on dependence were evaluated by counting the number of jumps (induced by naloxone 5 mg/kg). The tolerance was evaluated by the tail-flick test. The results showed that linalool in the induction and expression phase increased the nociception threshold. Linalool (48% and 95.6% at doses 75 and 100 mg/kg, respectively), clonidine and memantine reduced the severity of withdrawal signs in the induction and expression phases. This study indicated that linalool has a significant effect on morphine tolerance and dependence. This effect may be mediated partially through the inhibition of NMDA receptors.

  10. Hypoglycemic effects of brassinosteroid in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Debora; Kizelsztein, Pablo; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Raskin, Ilya

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing globally, and obesity is a major risk factor for metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Previously, we reported that oral administration of homobrassinolide (HB) to healthy rats triggered a selective anabolic response that was associated with lower blood glucose. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of HB administration on glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity, body composition, and gluconeogenic gene expression profiles in liver of C57BL/6J high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Acute oral administration of 50-300 mg/kg HB to obese mice resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in fasting blood glucose within 3 h of treatment. Daily chronic administration of HB (50 mg/kg for 8 wk) ameliorated hyperglycemia and improved oral glucose tolerance associated with obesity without significantly affecting body weight or body composition. These changes were accompanied by lower expression of two key gluconeogenic enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase), and increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase in the liver and muscle tissue. In vitro, HB treatment (1-15 μM) inhibited cyclic AMP-stimulated but not dexamethasone-stimulated upregulation of PEPCK and G-6-Pase mRNA levels in H4IIE rat hepatoma cells. Among a series of brassinosteroid analogs related to HB, only homocastasterone decreased glucose production in cell culture significantly. These results indicate the antidiabetic effects of brassinosteroids and begin to elucidate their putative cellular targets both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22785239

  11. The effect of B vitamin supplementation on wound healing in type 2 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Saeka; Takano, Mayuko; Sugano, Naoyuki; Ohtsu, Mariko; Tsunoda, Kou; Koshi, Ryosuke; Yoshinuma, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effects of B-group vitamin supplements on wound healing in diabetic mice. The mice in the experimental group were treated daily with 1 g/L B6, 1.25 mg/L B12, and 62.5 mg/L folic acid in their drinking water. Full-thickness excision wounds were created with 6-mm skin biopsy punches. Each wound closure was digitally photographed. Beginning on day 3 after wounding, the wound area in the diabetic mice was statistically larger than that of normal mice (p<0.05 vs diabetic mice). The diabetic mice treated with B vitamins displayed accelerated wound closure on day 3 (wound area 42.8 ± 11.3%, p<0.05). On day 9 after wounding, the wound area in the diabetic mice was also statistically larger than that of normal mice (p<0.05 vs diabetic mice). The diabetic mice treated with B vitamins displayed accelerated wound closure on day 3 (wound area 13.2 ± 16.8%, p<0.05). In addition, the high glucose level in the diabetic animals decreased significantly in response to B vitamin treatment. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that B vitamin supplementation may improve wound healing in diabetic mice. PMID:26798199

  12. Evaluation of effects of ozone exposure on influenza infection in mice using several indicators of susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Selgrade, M.K.; Illing, J.W.; Starnes, D.M.; Stead, A.G.; Menache, M.G.; Stevens, M.A.

    1988-07-01

    Mice were exposed to 1 ppm O3, 3 hr/day, for 5 consecutive days. Separate groups of mice were infected with influenza following each of the individual exposures. A twofold increase in the incidence of mortality and a 3-day decrease in mean survival time were observed in mice infected after the second exposure. There were no effects on percentage mortality or mean survival time due to exposure to 1 ppm O3 in mice infected after the first, third, fourth, or fifth exposure. When the exposure concentration was lowered to 0.5 ppm, there were no effects on mortality in mice infected after the second exposure. Five, daily, 3-hr exposures to 1 ppm O3 had no effect on virus titers in the lungs of mice infected after either the second or fifth exposure. In contrast, wet lung weights were significantly enhanced over infected air controls in mice infected after the second O3 exposure at both 1 and 0.5 ppm but not at 0.25 ppm exposure concentrations. This effect on lung wet weight was observed in mice infected with a dose of virus which produced 7-33% mortality in controls as well as in mice infected with a sublethal dose of virus. Histopathologic changes due to sublethal influenza infection, including nonsuppurative pneumonitis and necrosis, squamous metaplasia and hyperplasia of the epithelium lining the bronchi and bronchioles, were more severe in mice infected after the second of five, 1 ppm O3 exposure than in comparable air controls. Sublethal infection caused a loss of lung volume with secondary reduction in diffusing capability and homogenity of ventilation distribution. These latter two effects were also exacerbated in mice infected after the second of five, 1 ppm O3 exposures as compared to air controls. When mice were infected after the fifth, 1 ppm O3 exposure, there was no effect due to ozone on either lung wet weight or histopathology.

  13. Anticonvulsant effect of Berberis integerrima L. root extracts in mice.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Ramezani, Mohammad; Shafaei, Hojjat; Taghiabadi, Elahe

    2013-02-01

    Berberis integerrima is a member of Berberidaceae family. Berberine is one of the main constituents of this plant, having neuroprotective effect on central nervous system diseases. In this study, the anticonvulsant activity of methanolic extract, and hydromethanolic fraction, and chloroform fraction of B integerrima was assessed. The anticonvulsant effect of B integerrima was investigated using both pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) and maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure models. The LD50 value of the methanolic extract was 302.676 mg/kg. In the PTZ test, methanolic extract (140 and 200 mg/kg, i.p., p<0.01), hydromethanolic fraction (200 mg/kg, p<0.01), and chloroform fraction (200 mg/kg, p<0.01) increased the onset time of hind limb tonic extensions (HLTEs). The protective effect against mortality (convulsion survivors/animals tested) was 2/8 in methanolic extract, and 3/8 in hydromethanolic fraction at a dose of 200 mg/kg and in chloroform fraction at a dose of 140 mg/kg. In the MES test, this plant did not display any significant effect in reducing HLTE duration. According to phytochemical screening, methanolic extract contained alkaloids and tannins. The present study, conducted in mice, indicated that B integerrima has anticonvulsant activity in PTZ-induced seizures. It is concluded that B integerrima may be useful in petit mal epilepsy.

  14. Anti-diabetic effects of rice hull smoke extract in alloxan-induced diabetic mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the protective effect of a liquid rice hull smoke extract (RHSE) against diabetes in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Anti-diabetic effects of RHSE were evaluated in both the rat insulinoma-1 cell line (INS-1) and diabetic ICR mice induced by inraperitoneal (ip) injection of alloxan. ...

  15. Harmful effects of cadmium on olfactory system in mice.

    PubMed

    Bondier, Jean-Robert; Michel, Germaine; Propper, Alain; Badot, Pierre-Marie

    2008-10-01

    The inhalation of certain metals can result in olfactory epithelial injury, an altered sense of smell, and direct delivery of the metal from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulbs and other parts of the central nervous system. The purpose of this study was to examine whether mice given an intranasal instillation of cadmium would develop altered olfactory function and to assess whether cadmium may be transported directly from the olfactory epithelium to the central nervous system. To evaluate cadmium's ability to induce anosmia and on the basis of olfactory epithelium sensitivity to metals, the aim of this study was first to study cadmium effects on the olfactory function and secondly to check whether cadmium may be transported from the nasal area to the central nervous system. After an intranasal instillation of a solution containing CdCl2 at 136 mM, we observed in treated mice: (1) a partial destruction of the olfactory epithelium, which is reduced to three or four basal cell layers followed by a progressive regeneration; (2) a loss of odor discrimination with a subsequent recovery; and (3) a cadmium uptake by olfactory bulbs demonstrated using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, but not by other parts of the central nervous system. Cadmium was delivered to the olfactory bulbs, most likely along the olfactory nerve, thereby bypassing the intact blood-brain barrier. We consider that cadmium can penetrate olfactory epithelium and hence be transported to olfactory bulbs. The olfactory route could therefore be a likely way to reach the brain and should be taken into account for occupational risk assessments for this metal.

  16. Effect of low frequency low energy pulsing electromagnetic field (PEMF) on X-ray-irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cadossi, R.; Hentz, V.R.; Kipp, J.; Eiverson, R.; Ceccherelli, G.; Zucchini, P.; Emilia, G.; Torelli, G.; Franceschi, C.; Cossarizza, A.

    1989-02-01

    C3H/Km flora-defined mice were used to investigate the effect of exposure to pulsing electromagnetic field (PEMF) after total body x-ray irradiation. Prolonged exposure to PEMF had no effect on normal nonirradiated mice. When mice irradiated with different doses of x-ray (8.5 Gy, 6.8 Gy, and 6.3 Gy) were exposed to PEMF 24 h a day, we observed a more rapid decline in white blood cells (WBC) in the peripheral blood of mice exposed to PEMF at all the x-ray dosages used. No effect of exposure to PEMF was observed on the survival of the mice irradiated with 6.3 Gy and 8.5 Gy; in mice irradiated with 6.8 Gy, 2 out of 12 survived when exposed to PEMF as compared to 10 out of 12 control mice that were irradiated only. At day 4 after irradiation autoradiographic studies performed on bone marrow and spleen of 8.5-Gy-irradiated mice showed no difference between controls and mice exposed to PEMF, whereas on 6.8-Gy mice the bone marrow labeling index was lower in mice exposed to PEMF. In mice irradiated to 6.3 Gy we observed that the recovery of WBC in the peripheral blood was slowed in mice exposed to PEMF and their body weight was significantly lower than in control mice that were irradiated only. The spleen and bone marrow of the mice irradiated to 6.3 Gy and sacrificed at days 4, 14, 20, and 25 after irradiation were analyzed by autoradiography to evaluate the labeling index. Half of the spleens from mice sacrificed at day 25 after irradiation were used to evaluate the RNA content. Autoradiography showed that in the spleen and bone marrow of control mice, there were more cells labeled with (3H)thymidine at days 4 and 14 and less at days 20 and 25 after irradiation in comparison with mice irradiated and exposed to PEMF.

  17. Paradoxical effects of partial leptin deficiency on bone in growing female mice.

    PubMed

    Philbrick, Kenneth A; Turner, Russell T; Branscum, Adam J; Wong, Carmen P; Iwaniec, Urszula T

    2015-12-01

    Morbidly obese, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice display low bone mass, mild osteoclast-rich osteopetrosis, and increased bone marrow adiposity. While partial leptin deficiency results in increased weight, the skeletal manifestations of partial leptin deficiency are less well defined. We therefore analyzed femora and lumbar vertebrae in growing (7-week-old) female C57BL/6 wildtype (WT) mice, partial leptin-deficient ob/+ mice, and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. The bones were evaluated by dual energy absorptiometry, microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry. As expected, ob/+ mice were heavier, had more white adipose tissue, and lower serum leptin than WT mice, but were lighter and had less white adipose tissue than ob/ob mice. With a few exceptions, cancellous bone architecture, cell (osteoblast, osteoclast, and adipocyte), and dynamic measurements did not differ between WT and ob/+ mice. In contrast, compared to WT and ob/+ mice, ob/ob mice had lower cancellous bone volume fraction, and higher bone marrow adiposity in the femur metaphysis, and higher cancellous bone volume fraction in lumbar vertebra. Paradoxically, ob/+ mice had greater femoral bone volume than either WT or ob/ob mice. There was a positive correlation between body weight and femur volume in all three genotypes. However, the positive effect of weight on bone occurred with lower body weight in leptin-producing mice. The paradoxical differences in bone size among WT, ob/+, and ob/ob mice may be explained if leptin, in addition to stimulating bone growth and cancellous bone turnover, acts to lower the set-point at which increased body weight leads to a commensurate increase in bone size.

  18. Effects of CO2 inhalation exposure on mice vomeronasal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hacquemand, Romain; Buron, Gaelle; Pourié, Gregory; Karrer, Melanie; Jacquot, Laurence; Brand, Gerard

    2010-08-01

    Nasal epitheliums are the first sites of the respiratory tract in contact with the external environment and may therefore be susceptible to damage from exposure to many toxic volatile substances (i.e., volatile organic components, vapors, and gases). In the field of inhalation toxicology, a number of studies have considered the main olfactory epithelium, but few have dealt with the epithelium of the vomeronasal organ (VNO). However, in several species such as in rodents, the VNO (an organ of pheromone detection) plays an important role in social interactions, and alterations of this organ are known to induce adaptative behavioral disturbances. Among volatile toxicants, health effects of inhaled gases have been thoroughly investigated, especially during CO(2) inhalation because of its increasing atmospheric concentration. Therefore, this work was designed to examine the effects of 3% CO(2) inhalation on VNO in two different exposure conditions (5 h/day and 12 h/day) in mice. Behavioral sensitivity tests to urine of congener and histological measurements of VNO were conducted before, during (weeks 1-4), and after (weeks 5-8) CO(2) inhalation exposures. Results showed no significant modifications of behavioral responses to urine, but there were significant changes of both cell number and thickness of the VNO epithelium. Moreover, the findings indicated a selectively dose-dependent effect of CO(2), and further research could use other gases in the same manner for comparison.

  19. Effects of CO2 inhalation exposure on mice vomeronasal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hacquemand, Romain; Buron, Gaelle; Pourié, Gregory; Karrer, Melanie; Jacquot, Laurence; Brand, Gerard

    2010-08-01

    Nasal epitheliums are the first sites of the respiratory tract in contact with the external environment and may therefore be susceptible to damage from exposure to many toxic volatile substances (i.e., volatile organic components, vapors, and gases). In the field of inhalation toxicology, a number of studies have considered the main olfactory epithelium, but few have dealt with the epithelium of the vomeronasal organ (VNO). However, in several species such as in rodents, the VNO (an organ of pheromone detection) plays an important role in social interactions, and alterations of this organ are known to induce adaptative behavioral disturbances. Among volatile toxicants, health effects of inhaled gases have been thoroughly investigated, especially during CO(2) inhalation because of its increasing atmospheric concentration. Therefore, this work was designed to examine the effects of 3% CO(2) inhalation on VNO in two different exposure conditions (5 h/day and 12 h/day) in mice. Behavioral sensitivity tests to urine of congener and histological measurements of VNO were conducted before, during (weeks 1-4), and after (weeks 5-8) CO(2) inhalation exposures. Results showed no significant modifications of behavioral responses to urine, but there were significant changes of both cell number and thickness of the VNO epithelium. Moreover, the findings indicated a selectively dose-dependent effect of CO(2), and further research could use other gases in the same manner for comparison. PMID:19924548

  20. Oxygen effects on mortality of mice infected with Diplococcus pneumoniae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angrick, E. J.; Somerson, N. L.; Weiss, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Mice infected by intraperitoneal injection of Diplococcus pneumoniae were held at 1 atm in either hypoxic (12%), hyperoxic (75%), or a normal (21%) oxygen environment. Mortality rates indicated prolongation of survival in hypoxia and shortened survival in hyperoxia. Exposure of mice to the experimental gas mixtures prior to inoculation did not alter the results.

  1. Effect of cage bedding on temperature regulation and metabolism of group-housed female mice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J

    2004-02-01

    Mice are generally housed in groups in cages lined with an absorbent bedding material at ambient temperature (Ta) of 20 to 24 degrees C, which is comfortable for humans, but cool for mice. Little is known about the effects of bedding on thermoregulation of group-housed mice. To determine whether bedding material affects thermoregulatory stability, core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA) were monitored by use of radiotelemetry in female CD-1 mice housed in groups of four in a standard plastic cage at Ta of 23.5 degrees C. Ten groups were tested using three types of bedding material: a deep layer of heat-treated wood shavings (DWS) that allowed mice to burrow, a thin layer of wood shavings (TWS) just covering the bottom of the cage floor, or a layer of beta chips (BC). Mice could not burrow in the TWS or BC. The Tc and MA were affected by bedding type and time of day. Mice housed with DWS maintained a significantly higher Tc (deltaTc = 1.0 degrees C) during the day, compared with that in mice housed with TWS and BC. During the night, Tc and MA were high in all groups and there was no effect of bedding type on Tc or MA. Effect of bedding on metabolic rate (MR) was estimated by measuring oxygen consumption for six hours in groups of four mice at Ta of 23.5 degrees C. The Tc was significantly reduced in mice housed on the TWS and BC, but MR was unaffected by bedding type. There was a trend for higher MR in mice on BC. Compared with use of other bedding materials, housing mice on DWS and comparable materials provides an environment to burrow, thus reducing heat loss. The effects of bedding material on temperature regulation may affect rodent health and well being. Moreover, bedding will affect variability in toxicologic and pharmacologic studies whenever an endpoint is dependent on body temperature.

  2. Effect of cage bedding on temperature regulation and metabolism of group-housed female mice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J

    2004-02-01

    Mice are generally housed in groups in cages lined with an absorbent bedding material at ambient temperature (Ta) of 20 to 24 degrees C, which is comfortable for humans, but cool for mice. Little is known about the effects of bedding on thermoregulation of group-housed mice. To determine whether bedding material affects thermoregulatory stability, core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA) were monitored by use of radiotelemetry in female CD-1 mice housed in groups of four in a standard plastic cage at Ta of 23.5 degrees C. Ten groups were tested using three types of bedding material: a deep layer of heat-treated wood shavings (DWS) that allowed mice to burrow, a thin layer of wood shavings (TWS) just covering the bottom of the cage floor, or a layer of beta chips (BC). Mice could not burrow in the TWS or BC. The Tc and MA were affected by bedding type and time of day. Mice housed with DWS maintained a significantly higher Tc (deltaTc = 1.0 degrees C) during the day, compared with that in mice housed with TWS and BC. During the night, Tc and MA were high in all groups and there was no effect of bedding type on Tc or MA. Effect of bedding on metabolic rate (MR) was estimated by measuring oxygen consumption for six hours in groups of four mice at Ta of 23.5 degrees C. The Tc was significantly reduced in mice housed on the TWS and BC, but MR was unaffected by bedding type. There was a trend for higher MR in mice on BC. Compared with use of other bedding materials, housing mice on DWS and comparable materials provides an environment to burrow, thus reducing heat loss. The effects of bedding material on temperature regulation may affect rodent health and well being. Moreover, bedding will affect variability in toxicologic and pharmacologic studies whenever an endpoint is dependent on body temperature. PMID:15027620

  3. Immunosuppressive and autoimmune effects of thimerosal in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Havarinasab, S.; Haeggqvist, B.; Bjoern, E.; Pollard, K.M.; Hultman, P. . E-mail: perhu@imk.liu.se

    2005-04-15

    The possible health effects of the organic mercury compound thimerosal (ethylmercurithiosalicylate), which is rapidly metabolized to ethylmercury (EtHg), have recently been much debated and the effect of this compound on the immune system is largely unknown. We therefore studied the effect of thimerosal by treating A.SW (H-2{sup s}) mice, susceptible to induction of autoimmunity by heavy metals, with 10 mg thimerosal/L drinking water (internal dose ca 590 {mu}g Hg/kg body weight/day) for up to 30 days. The lymph node expression of IL-2 and IL-15 mRNA was increased after 2 days, and of IL-4 and IFN-{gamma} mRNA after 6 and 14 days. During the first 14 days treatment, the number of splenocytes, including T and B cells as well as Ig-secreting cells decreased. A strong immunostimulation superseded after 30 days treatment with increase in splenic weight, number of splenocytes including T and B cells and Ig-secreting cells, and Th2- as well as Th-1-dependent serum immunoglobulins. Antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) targeting the 34-kDa nucleolar protein fibrillarin, and systemic immune-complex deposits developed. The H-2{sup s} strains SJL and B10.S also responded to thimerosal treatment with ANoA. The A.TL and B10.TL strain, sharing background genes with the A.SW and B10.S strain, respectively, but with a different H-2 haplotype (t1), did not develop ANoA, linking the susceptibility to H-2. Thimerosal-treated H-2{sup s} mice homozygous for the nu mutation (SJL-nu/nu), or lacking the T-cell co-stimulatory molecule CD28 (B10.S-CD28{sup -/-}), did not develop ANoA, which showed that the autoimmune response is T-cell dependent. Using H-2{sup s} strains with targeted mutations, we found that IFN-{gamma} and IL-6, but not IL-4, is important for induction of ANoA by thimerosal. The maximum added renal concentration of thimerosal (EtHg) and inorganic mercury occurred after 14 days treatment and was 81 {mu}g Hg/g. EtHg made up 59% and inorganic mercury 41% of the renal mercury. In

  4. Immunosuppressive and autoimmune effects of thimerosal in mice.

    PubMed

    Havarinasab, S; Häggqvist, B; Björn, E; Pollard, K M; Hultman, P

    2005-04-15

    The possible health effects of the organic mercury compound thimerosal (ethylmercurithiosalicylate), which is rapidly metabolized to ethylmercury (EtHg), have recently been much debated and the effect of this compound on the immune system is largely unknown. We therefore studied the effect of thimerosal by treating A.SW (H-2s) mice, susceptible to induction of autoimmunity by heavy metals, with 10 mg thimerosal/L drinking water (internal dose ca 590 microg Hg/kg body weight/day) for up to 30 days. The lymph node expression of IL-2 and IL-15 mRNA was increased after 2 days, and of IL-4 and IFN-gamma mRNA after 6 and 14 days. During the first 14 days treatment, the number of splenocytes, including T and B cells as well as Ig-secreting cells decreased. A strong immunostimulation superseded after 30 days treatment with increase in splenic weight, number of splenocytes including T and B cells and Ig-secreting cells, and Th2- as well as Th-1-dependent serum immunoglobulins. Antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) targeting the 34-kDa nucleolar protein fibrillarin, and systemic immune-complex deposits developed. The H-2s strains SJL and B10.S also responded to thimerosal treatment with ANoA. The A.TL and B10.TL strain, sharing background genes with the A.SW and B10.S strain, respectively, but with a different H-2 haplotype (t1), did not develop ANoA, linking the susceptibility to H-2. Thimerosal-treated H-2s mice homozygous for the nu mutation (SJL-nu/nu), or lacking the T-cell co-stimulatory molecule CD28 (B10.S-CD28-/-), did not develop ANoA, which showed that the autoimmune response is T-cell dependent. Using H-2s strains with targeted mutations, we found that IFN-gamma and IL-6, but not IL-4, is important for induction of ANoA by thimerosal. The maximum added renal concentration of thimerosal (EtHg) and inorganic mercury occurred after 14 days treatment and was 81 microg Hg/g. EtHg made up 59% and inorganic mercury 41% of the renal mercury. In conclusion, the organic mercury

  5. Effect of sclerostin removal in vivo on experimental periodontitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xianrui; Han, Xianglong; Shu, Rui; Jiang, Fulin; Xu, Li; Xue, Chaoran; Chen, Tian; Bai, Ding

    2016-01-01

    We explored the effects of sclerostin removal in vivo on experimental periodontitis in mice. A ligature of Porphyromonas gingivalis-saturated collagen silk was applied to the cervical region of the first molar tooth in 10 wild-type (WT) mice and 10 sclerostin-knockout (SOST-KO) mice, and the animals were fed 10% sucrose for 2 months. Another 10 WT mice and 10 SOST-KO mice were similarly treated, but then fed a normal diet for 2 months. The maxillae were then harvested for morphological and molecular examinations. The mice with periodontitis showed significantly more severe alveolar bone loss than control mice, the most significant absorption being observed in WT mice. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated upregulation of RANKL and ERK1/2-MAPK expression and downregulation of OPG expression in mice with periodontitis, especially WT mice. Therefore, removal of sclerostin appears to modestly protect the alveolar bone from resorption in this experimental setting. (J Oral Sci 58, 271-276, 2016). PMID:27349550

  6. Effects of stress during pregnancy on maternal behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Meek, L R; Dittel, P L; Sheehan, M C; Chan, J Y; Kjolhaug, S R

    2001-03-01

    The effects of stress experienced during pregnancy and raising stressed offspring on maternal behavior were investigated in Swiss-Webster mice. Dams were either stressed or not stressed during pregnancy, and raised either prenatally stressed or nonstressed cross-fostered pups. Maternal behaviors such as grooming, nursing, pup retrieval and maternal aggression were assessed during the first 4 days after birth. Nonstressed dams raising stressed pups and stressed dams raising nonstressed pups groomed and nursed their pups significantly less than did control dams (stressed dams raising stressed pups and nonstressed dams raising nonstressed pups). Nonstressed dams raising stressed pups were also the slowest to retrieve both the first and last pup in retrieval tests. Nonstressed dams raising nonstressed pups were significantly less aggressive than other dams. In contrast, stressed dams raising stressed pups exhibited high levels of nursing and grooming, retrieved their pups rapidly and were very aggressive towards an intruder. These results indicate that raising stressed pups, or experiencing stress during a pregnancy can have significant effects on maternal behaviors. Stressed dams raising stressed pups exhibit maternal care comparable to that of nonstressed dams raising nonstressed pups at least for nesting/nurturing behaviors, and show increased levels of aggression and pup retrieval.

  7. Doxycycline potentiates antitumor effect of cyclophosphamide in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Singh, Sandeep; Surve, Sachin V.; Vijayakumar, Maleppillil Vavachan; Bhat, Manoj Kumar . E-mail: manojkbhat@nccs.res.in

    2005-02-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CPA) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug in neoplasias. It is a DNA and protein alkylating agent that has a broad spectrum of activity against variety of neoplasms including breast cancer. The therapeutic effectiveness of CPA is limited by the high-dose hematopoietic, renal, and cardiac toxicity that accompanies the systemic distribution of liver-derived activated drug metabolites. The present study examines the potential of combining well-tolerated antibiotic doxycycline (DOX) with CPA and understanding the mechanism of cell killing. Interestingly, we found that DOX significantly enhances the tumor regression activity of CPA on xenograft mice model bearing MCF-7 cells. DOX also potentiates MCF-7 cell killing by CPA in vitro. In presence of DOX (3 {mu}g/ml), the IC{sub 50} value of CPA decreased significantly from 10 to 2.5 mM. Additional analyses indicate that the tumor suppressor p53 and p53-regulated proapoptotic Bax were upregulated in vivo and in vitro following CPA treatment in combination with DOX, suggesting that upregulation of p53 may contribute to the enhancement of antitumor effect of CPA by DOX. Furthermore, downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 was observed in animals treated with CPA and CPA plus DOX when compared to untreated or DOX-treated groups. Our results raise the possibility that this combination chemotherapeutic regimen may lead to additional improvements in treatment of breast cancer.

  8. Protective effect of berberine on serum glucose levels in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chueh, Wei-Han; Lin, Jin-Yuarn

    2012-03-01

    Among the active components in traditional anti-diabetic herbal plants, berberine which is an isoquinoline alkaloid exhibits promising potential for its potent anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic effects. However, the berberine effect on serum glucose levels in type 1 diabetes (T1D) subjects still remains unknown. This study investigated berberine's effects on serum glucose levels using non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice that spontaneously develop T1D. The NOD mice were randomly divided into four groups, administered water with 50, 150, and 500 mg berberine/kg bw, respectively, through 14 weeks. ICR mice were also selected as a species control group to compare with the NOD mice. Changes in body weight, oral glucose challenge, and serum glucose levels were determined to identify the protective effect of berberine on T1D. After the 14-week oral supplementation, berberine decreased fasting serum glucose levels in NOD mice close to the levels in normal ICR mice in a dose dependent manner. Serum berberine levels showed a significantly (P<0.05) negative and non-linear correlation with fasting glucose levels in berberine-administered NOD mice. Our results suggested that berberine supplemented at appropriate doses for 14 weeks did not cause toxic side effects, but improved hyperglycemia in NOD mice.

  9. [Effects of microwave radiation on the content of five elements in mice bone tissue].

    PubMed

    Ren, D; Yang, W; Zeng, G

    2001-07-01

    Mice were radiated with 2450 MHz, 10 mW/cm2 microwave for 12 days, 1.5 h/day. After microwave radiation, compared with the normal control, the content of calcium and zinc in mice bone were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) copper, iron and manganese decreased, appulsively After Libido, a composed traditional herb medicine, and asshide asafetida were supplied seperatively, the content of calcium and trace element zinc in mice bone increased (P < 0.05). It is concluded that Libido was effective on the resistance of mice to microwave radiation. The toxicity of organotin compounds and the current pollution status. PMID:12561512

  10. Anticonvulsant effect of Satureja hortensis aerial parts extracts in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zolfagharian, Farzaneh; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Regarding the anticonvulsant effects of Satureja hortensis (S. hortensis) in Avicenna’s book: canon of medicine; the present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti- eplileptic effects of S. hortensis aqueous and ethanolic aerial part extracts. Furthermore, the mechanisms of their anticonvulsant activities were also evaluated. Materials and Methods: Seizure was induced by Pentylentetrazol (PTZ) and MES (maximal electroshock) models. Mice were randomly divided into 8 groups; negative control (normal saline, 10ml/Kg), positive control (diazepam, 2 mg/kg), S. hortensis aqueous and ethanolic extracts (200, 400 and 600 mg/kg). In PTZ test, latency to the first minimal clonic seizure (MCS), latency to the first generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTCS), the total duration of seizures and protection against mortality were evaluated. In MES test, the stretching length of extremities and protection against mortality were recorded. Results: Aqueous and ethanolic extracts (400 and 600 mg/kg) significantly increased MCS and GTCS latencies in PTZ model. Three doses of the extracts decreased the total duration of seizure. These extracts did not show any protective effects on seizure induced by MES model. In PTZ model, flumazenil, an antagonist of benzodiazepine (BZD) site in the GABAA-BZD receptor complex and 7- nitroindazole (7- NI), a selective nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) inhibitor, reduced the prolongation of seizure latency. Conclusion: S. hortensis showed anticonvulsant activity in PTZ model and this effect may be mediated, at least partly, through interacting with nitric oxide and GABAA-BZD receptor complex. PMID:27462553

  11. Adverse Effects of Vapocoolant and Topical Anesthesia for Tail Biopsy of Preweanling Mice

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Gillian C; Brice, Angela K; Hankenson, F Claire

    2015-01-01

    Tail biopsy of laboratory mice for genotyping purposes has been studied extensively to develop refinements for this common procedure. Our prior work assessed tail vertebral development in different mouse strains (age, 3 to 42 d) and analyzed behavior and activity in mice (age, 21 to 45 d) biopsied under isoflurane anesthesia. To assess the effects of biopsy on preweanling mice, we here evaluated BALB/cAnNCrl mice (n = 80; age, 18 to 21 d) that received topical vapocoolant (ethyl chloride), topical anesthetic (Cetacaine), or isoflurane anesthesia before undergoing a 5-mm or sham biopsy. Control mice did not receive any anesthetic intervention. Regardless of the anesthetic used, acute observation scores indicative of distress were increased at 10 min after biopsy, and locomotor activity was decreased, in biopsied compared with control mice. Acute observation scores at 10 min after biopsy were higher in mice that received ethyl chloride compared with isoflurane or no anesthesia. Microscopic analysis revealed that inflammatory changes in the distal tail remained elevated until 7 d after biopsy and were higher in tails exposed to ethyl chloride. Our findings indicate that vapocoolant, topical anesthesia, and inhaled isoflurane do not enhance the wellbeing of preweanling mice undergoing tail biopsy. Due to the lack of appreciable benefits and the presence of notable adverse effects, using vapocoolants or Cetacaine for this tail biopsy procedure in laboratory mice is unadvisable and we encourage the removal of these agents from institutional tail biopsy guidelines. PMID:26045455

  12. Adverse effects of vapocoolant and topical anesthesia for tail biopsy of preweanling mice.

    PubMed

    Braden, Gillian C; Brice, Angela K; Hankenson, F Claire

    2015-05-01

    Tail biopsy of laboratory mice for genotyping purposes has been studied extensively to develop refinements for this common procedure. Our prior work assessed tail vertebral development in different mouse strains (age, 3 to 42 d) and analyzed behavior and activity in mice (age, 21 to 45 d) biopsied under isoflurane anesthesia. To assess the effects of biopsy on preweanling mice, we here evaluated BALB/cAnNCrl mice (n = 80; age, 18 to 21 d) that received topical vapocoolant (ethyl chloride), topical anesthetic (Cetacaine), or isoflurane anesthesia before undergoing a 5-mm or sham biopsy. Control mice did not receive any anesthetic intervention. Regardless of the anesthetic used, acute observation scores indicative of distress were increased at 10 min after biopsy, and locomotor activity was decreased, in biopsied compared with control mice. Acute observation scores at 10 min after biopsy were higher in mice that received ethyl chloride compared with isoflurane or no anesthesia. Microscopic analysis revealed that inflammatory changes in the distal tail remained elevated until 7 d after biopsy and were higher in tails exposed to ethyl chloride. Our findings indicate that vapocoolant, topical anesthesia, and inhaled isoflurane do not enhance the wellbeing of preweanling mice undergoing tail biopsy. Due to the lack of appreciable benefits and the presence of notable adverse effects, using vapocoolants or Cetacaine for this tail biopsy procedure in laboratory mice is unadvisable and we encourage the removal of these agents from institutional tail biopsy guidelines.

  13. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid on cholesterol gallstone formation in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo-Min; Park, Jin-A; Kim, Na-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Soon; Zhang, Dan; Yi, Hee; Cho, Hee-Jung; Kim, Ja Kyung; Lee, Dong Ki; Kim, Jin-Suk; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the preventive effect of ω-3 fatty acids against cholesterol gallstone (CG) formation. CG formation was induced in C57BL/6J mice using a lithogenic diet (LD). The mice were divided into four treatment groups: i) LD, ii) LD plus eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), iii) LD plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and iv) LD plus EPA plus DHA. Subsequent to feeding the mice the LD for four weeks, EPA and/or DHA (70 mg/kg/day) were orally administered for eight weeks. The mice in the EPA treatment groups exhibited significantly less gallstone formation than those in the LD group. By contrast, DHA treatment only slightly suppressed gallstone formation. The expression of mucin 2, 5AC, 5B and 6 was significantly decreased in the gallbladders of mice in the EPA groups (70-90%) and the LD plus DHA group (30-50%), compared with that in the mice in the LD group. In addition, the mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase was significantly decreased in the livers of mice in the EPA treatment group compared with that in the livers of mice in the LD group. In conclusion, EPA was found to have a dominant anti-lithogenic effect in C57BL/6J mice. PMID:25333303

  14. Genotype-dependent characteristics of behavior in mice in cognitive tests. The effects of Noopept.

    PubMed

    Bel'nik, A P; Ostrovskaya, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2009-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J, BALB/c, and DBA/2J mice showed differences in their abilities to perform two cognitive tests. C57BL/6J mice had good learning ability and memory trace retention (at 10 days) in a simplified Morris maze, while BALB/c mice had low levels of memory trace retention and DBA/2J mice had low learning ability in this test. I.p. administration of the nootropic agent Noopept (GVS-111, N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg 15 min before the start of the test induced significant improvements in long-term memory in this test in BALB/c mice but no further improvement in C57BL/6J mice, and had no effect in DBA/2J mice. On testing the ability to extrapolate the direction of movement of a stimulus, administration of Noopept increased the proportion of correct responses in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice, but had no effect in DBA/2J mice. PMID:19089630

  15. Benzene inhalation effects upon tetanus antitoxin. Responses and leukemogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, R D; Drew, R T; Bernstein, D M

    1980-01-01

    The effects of inhaled benzene on primary and secondary antibody responses and the incidence of leukemia in mice are reported. Young adult mice were given 5, 12, or 22 exposures to 400 ppM benzene for 6 hrs/day 5 days/week. After the exposure periods, the mice were immunized with absorbed tetanus toxoid (APTT) and/or fluid tetanus toxid (FTT). Exposure to benzene increasingly suppressed primary antibody responses to both antigens. Secondary antibody responses to FTT were nearly normal in animals given 10, 15, or 20 exposures to 400 ppM benzene. Other groups of mice were exposed to either 200 ppM or 50 ppM benzene. Primary antibody responses elicited with FTT and/or APTT were nearly normal in all mice exposed to 50 ppM benzene and in mice exposed to 200 ppM benzene for 5 days. However, 10 and 20 exposures to 200 ppM benzene inhibited antibody production. The effects of chronically inhaled 300 ppM benzene on the time of onset and incidence of leukemia in 400 7-month-old female HRS/J mice were also studied. Two genotypes were used; the (hr/hr) hairless mice are leukemia-prone, whereas the (hr/+) haired mice are more resistant to leukemia. The exposure continued for a period of 6 months. Lymphoid, myeloid, and mixed (lymphoid and myeloid) leukemias were observed. Ninety percent of the (hr/hr) mice exposed to benzene died from leukemia as compared with 91% for the (hr/hr) air control group. Eighty-five percent of the (hr/+) mice exposed to benzene died from leukemia as compared with 81% for the (hr/+) air control group. Exposures to 300 ppM benzene did not alter the time of onset or the incidence of leukemia commonly expected in HRS/J mice.

  16. Post-weaning Environmental Enrichment, But Not Chronic Maternal Isolation, Enhanced Ethanol Intake during Periadolescence and Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Berardo, Luciana R.; Fabio, María C.; Pautassi, Ricardo M.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed ethanol intake in male and female Wistar rats exposed to maternal separation (MS) during infancy (postnatal days 1–21, PD1–21) and environmental enrichment (EE) during adolescence (PD 21–42). Previous work revealed that MS enhances ethanol consumption during adulthood. It is still unknown if a similar effect is found during adolescence. Several studies, in turn, have revealed that EE reverses stress experiences, and reduces ethanol consumption and reinforcement; although others reported greater ethanol intake after EE. The interactive effects between these treatments upon ethanol’s effects and intake have yet to be explored. We assessed chronic ethanol intake and preference (12 two-bottle daily sessions, spread across 30 days, 1st session on PD46) in rats exposed to MS and EE. The main finding was that male – but not female – rats that had been exposed to EE consumed more ethanol than controls given standard housing, an effect that was not affected by MS. Subsequent experiments assessed several factors associated with heightened ethanol consumption in males exposed to MS and EE; namely taste aversive conditioning and hypnotic-sedative consequences of ethanol. We also measured anxiety response in the light-dark box and in the elevated plus maze tests; and exploratory patterns of novel stimuli and behaviors indicative of risk assessment and risk-taking, via a modified version of the concentric square field (CSF) test. Aversive conditioning, hypnosis and sleep time were similar in males exposed or not to EE. EE males, however, exhibited heightened exploration of novel stimuli and greater risk taking behaviors in the CSF test. It is likely that the promoting effect of EE upon ethanol intake was due to these effects upon exploratory and risk-taking behaviors. PMID:27790100

  17. Mechanism of Isoflavone Aglycone's Effect on Cognitive Performance of Senescence-Accelerated Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hong; Jin, Guifang; Ren, Dongdong; Luo, Sijing; Zhou, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of isoflavone aglycone (IA) on the learning and memory performance of senescence-accelerated mice, and explored its neural protective mechanism. Results showed that SAM-P/8 senescence-accelerated mice treated with IA performed significantly better in the Y-maze cognitive test than the no treatment control (P less…

  18. Effects of chronic doxepin and amitriptyline administration in naïve mice and in neuropathic pain mice model.

    PubMed

    Mika, J; Jurga, A M; Starnowska, J; Wasylewski, M; Rojewska, E; Makuch, W; Kwiatkowski, K; Malek, N; Przewlocka, B

    2015-05-21

    Neuropathic pain is a severe clinical problem, often appearing as a co-symptom of many diseases or manifesting as a result of damage to the nervous system. Many drugs and agents are currently used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, such as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). The aims of this paper were to test the effects of two classic TCAs, doxepin and amitriptyline, in naïve animals and in a model of neuropathic pain and to determine the role of cytokine activation in the effects of these drugs. All experiments were carried out with Albino-Swiss mice using behavioral tests (von Frey test and the cold plate test) and biochemical analyses (qRT-PCR and Western blot). In the mice subjected to chronic constriction injury (CCI), doxepin and amitriptyline attenuated the symptoms of neuropathic pain and diminished the CCI-induced increase in the levels of spinal interleukin (IL)-6 and -1β mRNA, but not the protein levels of these cytokines, measured on day 12. Unexpectedly, chronic administration of doxepin or amitriptyline for 12 days produced allodynia and hyperalgesia in naïve mice. The treatment with these drugs did not influence the spinal levels of IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA, however, the protein levels of these pronociceptive factors were increased. The administration of ondansetron (5-HT3 receptor antagonist) significantly weakened the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by both antidepressants in naïve mice; in contrast, yohimbine (α2-adrenergic receptors antagonist) did not influence these effects. Allodynia and hyperalgesia induced in naïve animals by amitriptyline and doxepin may be associated with an increase in the levels of pronociceptive cytokines resulting from 5-HT3-induced hypersensitivity. Our results provide new and important information about the possible side effects of antidepressants. Further investigation of these mechanisms may help to guide decisions about the use of classic TCAs for therapy. PMID:25769941

  19. Effects of capsaicin on testis ghrelin expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ilhan, T; Erdost, H

    2013-01-01

    Capsaicin (CAP), the active substance of red hot peppers, has been reported to stimulate development of the gonad. Ghrelin is an acylated polypeptide hormone that is secreted predominantly by endocrine cells of the stomach. There is evidence that ghrelin is involved in reproductive function. Ghrelin significantly inhibits testosterone secretion in a dose-dependent manner. We investigated the effect of CAP on ghrelin expression in testes of mice and on testosterone levels during pubertal and adult periods. We used a variety of morphometric, immunohistochemical and biochemical methods, and western blot analysis. The animals were divided into two age groups: puberty and adult. Control groups for both age groups were fed with standard diet and experimental groups were fed with a diet containing 0.02% CAP. Testes were collected quickly after sacrifice. After dehydration, the specimens were embedded in paraffin and 5 μm sections were cut, and Crossman's triple staining and immunohistochemical staining for ghrelin were applied. Immunohistochemical staining with ghrelin antibody for both age groups demonstrated immunoreaction especially in Leydig and Sertoli cells, but no reaction was observed in spermatogenic cells. Ghrelin immunoreaction was less intense in the experimental groups. Serum testosterone levels were increased in both experimental groups, especially in adults. More spermatocytes were observed in the experimental group compared to the control group. In both pubertal and adult experimental groups, the seminiferous epithelium was thick. CAP appears to enhance testicular cell proliferation and can affect the release of ghrelin and testosterone directly or indirectly.

  20. Pathological effects of dichlorvos and fenitrothion in mice.

    PubMed

    Somia, El-Maghraby; Madiha, Farghaly

    2012-05-15

    Seeds of faba and soybeans were treated with dichlorvos (12 mg/kg) and fenitrothion (5 mg/kg) insecticides and stored for 30 weeks. The total internal residues of dichlorvos and fenitrothion amounted to about 69%, 73% and 67%, 74% in the applied doses in faba and soybeans, respectively. The pathological potential of dichlorvos and fenitrothion residues was studied by feeding mice for 90 days with the treated seeds. Parallel studies were conducted in two control groups. Liver and kidney were taken for histological examinations. The results of blood biochemistry are supported by the histopathological changes observed in the liver and kidney of treated mice. Dichlorvos and fenitrothion insecticides caused degenerative changes in the liver and kidney of mice. Changes were more intense in mice which were given beans treated with dichlorvos than in mice fed on beans treated with fenitrothion. The livers of both treated groups showed an abnormal size and shape of hepatic cells. The kidneys of treated mice showed tubular vascular degeneration and lumen dilatation in both groups as compared with the control group.

  1. Pathological effects of dichlorvos and fenitrothion in mice.

    PubMed

    Somia, El-Maghraby; Madiha, Farghaly

    2012-05-15

    Seeds of faba and soybeans were treated with dichlorvos (12 mg/kg) and fenitrothion (5 mg/kg) insecticides and stored for 30 weeks. The total internal residues of dichlorvos and fenitrothion amounted to about 69%, 73% and 67%, 74% in the applied doses in faba and soybeans, respectively. The pathological potential of dichlorvos and fenitrothion residues was studied by feeding mice for 90 days with the treated seeds. Parallel studies were conducted in two control groups. Liver and kidney were taken for histological examinations. The results of blood biochemistry are supported by the histopathological changes observed in the liver and kidney of treated mice. Dichlorvos and fenitrothion insecticides caused degenerative changes in the liver and kidney of mice. Changes were more intense in mice which were given beans treated with dichlorvos than in mice fed on beans treated with fenitrothion. The livers of both treated groups showed an abnormal size and shape of hepatic cells. The kidneys of treated mice showed tubular vascular degeneration and lumen dilatation in both groups as compared with the control group. PMID:22464154

  2. Effects of pseudopregnancy on immunoglobulin-secreting cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Sulila, P; Lundkvist, U; Mattsson, R

    1988-07-01

    Pregnant mice characteristically show elevated numbers of immunoglobulin-secreting cells in their enlarged spleen and para-aortic lymph nodes. A comparative study of pseudopregnancy and syngeneic pregnancy in CBA/Ca mice was made to evaluate the role of maternal hormones in the induction of these changes. To induce pseudopregnancy, CBA/Ca female mice were mated with vasectomized males, the duration of pseudopregnancy induced in this way is 8-10 days. Serum progesterone levels were monitored periodically throughout pseudopregnancy using RIA technique. Changes were recorded in weight of the thymus, spleen and para-aortic lymph nodes, levels of serum IgG and IgM (ELISA-technique), and content of splenic IgG- and IgM-secreting cells (protein A plaque assay). Thymus involution was observed in pregnant and pseudopregnant mice. Patterns of change in the weight of the spleen and the para-aortic lymph nodes (PALN) were similar in pregnant and pseudopregnant mice until day 8. Ig-secretion in the spleen increased slightly day 5-8 in both pregnant and pseudopregnant mice, but to a lesser extent in the latter. No differences were observed in serum Ig levels between the two groups until day 8. A marked decrease in serum IgG levels and, to some extent, IgM levels between days 8 and 12 was observed in pregnant animals.

  3. Effectiveness of zinc in modulating perinatal effects of arsenic on the teratological effects in mice offspring.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Wadaa, Mohammad A M; Farooq, Muhammad; Daghestani, Maha H; Sami, Ahmed S

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is considered as a worldwide problem. Studies have shown that arsenic exposure during pregnancy affects embryogenesis and offspring development in rats and mice. Zinc as a micronutrient regulates many physiological functions, including an antioxidative role under various toxic conditions. However, studies on the perinatal protective effect of zinc on offspring need further attention. The present study was designed to evaluate the potential protective role of zinc in mitigating the adverse effects in the offspring of arsenic exposure during pregnancy. The arsenic (40mg/kg body weight) and zinc (4% w/v) doses formed the only drinking fluid source for the experimental groups of dams during the perinatal period of the experiment. The early development of sensory motor coordination reflexes together with morphological development in the male pups was measured during the weaning period. In adolescence, the offspring were tested for their motor behavior. The enzyme γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) and the oxidative stress indices like reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (TBARS) were also estimated in the serum of the young adult male mice. Perinatal arsenic exposure caused depletion in body weight gain, delay in morphological development and retardation in the development of all sensory motor reflexes of the pups. In young adults, significant decrease in motor behavior with significant decrease in GSH level in the serum was observed. On the other hand, γ-GT and TBARS were significantly increased in the serum due to arsenic treatment. However, animals exposed to arsenic in the presence of zinc showed a remarkable ameliorating effect of zinc on all observed teratological and biochemical arsenic toxicity in male offspring. It was observed that zinc has an antioxidative role in the perinatal toxicity of arsenic. It is concluded from the present study that zinc consumed during the perinatal period of pregnancy can ameliorate

  4. Effectiveness of zinc in modulating perinatal effects of arsenic on the teratological effects in mice offspring.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Wadaa, Mohammad A M; Farooq, Muhammad; Daghestani, Maha H; Sami, Ahmed S

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is considered as a worldwide problem. Studies have shown that arsenic exposure during pregnancy affects embryogenesis and offspring development in rats and mice. Zinc as a micronutrient regulates many physiological functions, including an antioxidative role under various toxic conditions. However, studies on the perinatal protective effect of zinc on offspring need further attention. The present study was designed to evaluate the potential protective role of zinc in mitigating the adverse effects in the offspring of arsenic exposure during pregnancy. The arsenic (40mg/kg body weight) and zinc (4% w/v) doses formed the only drinking fluid source for the experimental groups of dams during the perinatal period of the experiment. The early development of sensory motor coordination reflexes together with morphological development in the male pups was measured during the weaning period. In adolescence, the offspring were tested for their motor behavior. The enzyme γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) and the oxidative stress indices like reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxidation (TBARS) were also estimated in the serum of the young adult male mice. Perinatal arsenic exposure caused depletion in body weight gain, delay in morphological development and retardation in the development of all sensory motor reflexes of the pups. In young adults, significant decrease in motor behavior with significant decrease in GSH level in the serum was observed. On the other hand, γ-GT and TBARS were significantly increased in the serum due to arsenic treatment. However, animals exposed to arsenic in the presence of zinc showed a remarkable ameliorating effect of zinc on all observed teratological and biochemical arsenic toxicity in male offspring. It was observed that zinc has an antioxidative role in the perinatal toxicity of arsenic. It is concluded from the present study that zinc consumed during the perinatal period of pregnancy can ameliorate

  5. Protective effect of esculin on streptozotocin-induced diabetic renal damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki Sung; Lee, Woojung; Jung, Yujung; Lee, Ji Hwan; Lee, Seungyong; Eom, Dae-Woon; Jeon, Youngsic; Yoo, Hye Hyun; Jin, Ming Ji; Song, Kyung Il; Kim, Won Jun; Ham, Jungyeob; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Kim, Su-Nam

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigated the presence and mechanism of esculin-mediated renoprotection to assess its therapeutic potential. Esculin was orally administered at 20 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks to streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, and its effects were compared with those of the vehicle in normal and diabetic mice. After oral administration of esculin to mice, the concentrations of esculin and esculetin in blood were 159.5 ± 29.8 and 9.7 ± 4.9 ng/mL at 30 min, respectively. Food and water intake were significantly increased in the diabetic mice compared to normal mice but attenuated in mice receiving esculin. The elevated blood glucose level and hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase expression were significantly reduced in esculin-treated diabetic mice, supporting the antidiabetic effect of esculin. Esculin also increased the uptake of glucose and induced the insulin-evoked phosphorylation of insulin receptor, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase 3β in C2C12 myotubes, indicating a potential for improvement of insulin sensitivity. In addition, esculin lessened the elevated blood creatinine levels in diabetic mice and ameliorated diabetes-induced renal dysfunction by reducing caspase-3 activation in the kidney. Data support the beneficial effect of esculin against diabetes and oxidative stress-related inflammatory processes in the kidney.

  6. Effects of chronic deoxynivalenol exposure on p53 heterozygous and p53 homozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Bondy, G S; Coady, L; Curran, I; Caldwell, D; Armstrong, C; Aziz, S A; Nunnikhoven, A; Gannon, A M; Liston, V; Shenton, J; Mehta, R

    2016-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a secondary metabolite associated with Fusarium species pathogenic to important food crops. A two-year feeding study reported that DON was non-carcinogenic in B6C3F1 mice. The present study was conducted to further characterize the chronic effects of DON by exposing cancer-prone transgenic p53 heterozygous (p53+/-) male mice and p53 homozygous (p53+/+) male mice to 0, 1, 5, or 10 mg DON/kg in diet for 26 weeks. Gross and microscopic organ-specific neoplastic and non-neoplastic changes and expression profiles of key hepatic and renal genes were assessed. Few toxicologic differences between p53+/+ and p53+/- mice were observed, and no tumours were observed due to DON. The results indicated that DON was non-carcinogenic and that reduced expression of the p53 gene did not play a key role in responses to DON toxicity. The lack of inflammatory and proliferative lesions in mice may be attributed to the anorectic effects of DON, which resulted in dose-dependent reductions in body weight in p53+/+ and p53+/- mice. Hepatic and renal gene expression analyses confirmed that chronic exposure to DON was noninflammatory. The effects of 26-week DON exposure on p53+/+ and p53+/-mice were consistent with those previously seen in B6C3F1 mice exposed to DON for two years.

  7. Effects of chronic estrogen treatment on modulating age-related bone loss in female mice.

    PubMed

    Syed, Farhan A; Mödder, Ulrike Il; Roforth, Matthew; Hensen, Ira; Fraser, Daniel G; Peterson, James M; Oursler, Merry Jo; Khosla, Sundeep

    2010-11-01

    While female mice do not have the equivalent of a menopause, they do undergo reproductive senescence. Thus, to dissociate the effects of aging versus estrogen deficiency on age-related bone loss, we sham-operated, ovariectomized, or ovariectomized and estrogen-replaced female C57/BL6 mice at 6 months of age and followed them to age 18 to 22 months. Lumbar spines and femurs were excised for analysis, and bone marrow hematopoietic lineage negative (lin-) cells (enriched for osteoprogenitor cells) were isolated for gene expression studies. Six-month-old intact control mice were euthanized to define baseline parameters. Compared with young mice, aged/sham-operated mice had a 42% reduction in lumbar spine bone volume/total volume (BV/TV), and maintaining constant estrogen levels over life in ovariectomized/estrogen-treated mice did not prevent age-related trabecular bone loss at this site. By contrast, lifelong estrogen treatment of ovariectomized mice completely prevented the age-related reduction in cortical volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and thickness at the tibial diaphysis present in the aged/sham-operated mice. As compared with cells from young mice, lin- cells from aged/sham-operated mice expressed significantly higher mRNA levels for osteoblast differentiation and proliferation marker genes. These data thus demonstrate that, in mice, age-related loss of cortical bone in the appendicular skeleton, but not loss of trabecular bone in the spine, can be prevented by maintaining constant estrogen levels over life. The observed increase in osteoblastic differentiation and proliferation marker gene expression in progenitor bone marrow cells from aged versus young mice may represent a compensatory mechanism in response to ongoing bone loss. PMID:20499336

  8. Effect of Salmonella enteric Serovar Typhimurium in Pregnant Mice: A Biochemical and Histopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Geeta; Verma, Ishita; Sharma, Lalita

    2012-01-01

    Background Food borne infections caused by Salmonella enterica species are increasing globally and pregnancy poses a significant threat in developing countries, where sanitation facilities are inadequate. Thus, the present study was designed to delineate the effect of Salmonella infection during pregnancy. Method Pregnant, BALB/c mice were challenged orally with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on gestational day 10 and were monitored for bacterial load, hepatic injury, histopathological alterations vis-a-vis oxidant and antioxidant levels. Results Pregnant-Salmonella-infected mice had higher bacterial translocation in the liver, spleen as well as liver enzymes mainly aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase compared with Salmonella-infected mice. The levels of lipid peroxidation were significantly higher in all the organs of both pregnant-Salmonella-infected and Salmonella-infected mice compared with control mice. However, the activities of antioxidant enzymes (reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase) were lower in the liver, spleen and placenta of pregnant, pregnant-Salmonella-infected and Salmonella-infected mice compared with control mice, but the decrease was more in pregnant-Salmonella-infected mice indicating depression of antioxidant defense system. Histopathologically, pregnant-Salmonella-infected mice had more architectural damage in the liver, spleen and placenta compared with other groups. Conclusion Pregnancy makes the host more vulnerable to typhoid fever by affecting the physiology of pivotal organs and highlighting the importance of early and prompts diagnosis so as to avoid the further materno-fetal complications.

  9. [Effect of fluoropyrimidine, drugs of tegafur and UFT on transplanted tumor in liver-damaged mice].

    PubMed

    Aoike, A; Hosokawa, T; Koyama, K; Rokutan, K; Nishi, Y; Yoshida, A; Nakamura, K; Kawai, K

    1988-10-01

    1-(2-Tetrahydrofuryl)-5-fluorouracil (FT) and UFT are masked compounds of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and considered to be gradually metabolized and converted to 5-FU in the liver. Therefore, it is important clinically to classify whether or not these anti-cancer drugs are effective in individuals with liver diseases. BALB/c mice were injected 4 ml/kg of 10% CCl4 intraperitoneally twice a week for two months to induce liver damage. On the 49th day after starting of giving CCl4, mouse sarcoma 180 was transplanted to the right thigh of mice and from the next day 5-FU (10, 20, 30 mg/kg/day), FT (50, 100, 200 mg/kg/day), UFT (10, 20, 30 mg/kg/day) or physiological saline solution for control were orally administered daily for 7 days. On the 61st day, all mice were sacrificed and the weight of excised tumor was measured to judge the effect of anti-cancer drugs. Dose-dependent effect of 5-FU was observed in the liver-damaged mice. FT was more effective in liver-damaged mice than control. It was assumed that the suppression of 5-FU decomposition was due to the insufficient liver function. Effect of UFT was similar in liver-damaged mice to control. These data show that the effects of FT and UFT were not reduced in tumor-bearing mice by liver damage.

  10. Teratogenic effects of retinoic acid on neurulation in mice embryos.

    PubMed

    Nobakht, M; Zirak, A; Mehdizadeh, M; Tabatabaeei, P

    2006-02-21

    Retinoic acids (RA) are natural chemicals that exert a hormone-like activity and a variety of biological effects on early development of mouse. In this study, the probable teratogenic effects of RA on CNS have been investigated in pregnant mice (n = 20) divided into four groups: (1) untreated controls, (2) controls which received a single dose of DMSO, (3) a group that received 40 mg/kg, and (4) a group that received 60 mg/kg of all-trans RA in DMSO, respectively on the eighth day of gestation. Embryos whose dams had received 40 and 60 mg/kg doses of RA, showed malformations and decreased size. At 40 mg/kg dosage level, 50% of the embryos had closed neural tubes while at 60 mg/kg dosage level the neural tube failed to close. The neuroblast mantle layers were disorganized in the 40 mg/kg and even more in the 60 mg/kg exposed group compared to the controls. In mitosis, the density of chromatin was increased in the 60 mg/kg dose group. Compared to controls the 40 and 60 mg/kg dose groups of RA treated dams decreases in the luminal longitudinal and internal measures were observed. Also the thickness of ventricular, mantle and marginal layers was smaller. Wide intercellular spaces due to the degenerated cells at high doses of RA as well as an accumulation of intercellular fluid were observed. Therefore, the wedge shape of neuroepithelium was abolished, preventing the elevation of the neural wall.

  11. Effect of microencapsulated ampicillin on cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, I S; Kopydlowski, K M; Burge, J R; Setterstrom, J A

    1997-11-01

    The effects of free ampicillin, microencapsulated ampicillin anhydrate (MEAA) and antibiotic-free microspheres on the cell-mediated immune response in Balb/c mice were measured by lymphoproliferation assay, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and cytokine production. Injection into mice for seven consecutive days with equivalent subcutaneous doses of ampicillin, MEAA or placebo microspheres did not produce any consistent change in lymphocyte proliferation nor did it affect DTH responses or interleukin-2 production. Although the production of interleukin-4 in mice treated with ampicillin or MEAA increased compared with the control mice, this increase was not statistically significant. These results indicate that ampicillin and MEAA have similar effects on cell-mediated immunity in mice. PMID:9421323

  12. Lentiviral Transduction of Neurons in Adult Brain: Evaluation of Inflammatory Response and Cognitive Effects in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kunitsyna, T A; Ivashkina, O I; Roshchina, M A; Toropova, K A; Anokhin, K V

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of hippocampal injection of lentiviral particles p156-CMV-EGFP on behavior, learning, and microglial Iba1(+) cells activation in mice. Testing in the open field and elevated plus-maze revealed higher anxiety levels in lentiviral-injected mice in comparison with animals injected with vehicle. At the same time, lentivirus injection did not change learning and memory of mice in the hippocampal-dependent fear conditioning task. Microglia density in lentivirus-injected mice was significantly higher than in vehicle-injected mice. Thus, hippocampal injection of lentiviral particles with minimum content of transgenes produced evident inflammation process, changed anxiety level of experimental animals, but had no effect on hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. PMID:27383167

  13. Effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue on thermal nociception in mice.

    PubMed

    Bobyntsev, I I; Sever'yanova, L A; Kryukov, A A

    2006-02-01

    Intraperitoneal treatment with an analogue of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in doses of 0.004-450 microg/kg produced an analgesic effect on male mice in the hot plate test. Castration significantly elevated the nociceptive thresholds. In castrated mice the effects of the test peptide were less pronounced and had an algesic nature. Our results indicate that these effects depend on functional activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  14. Effects of chronic methamphetamine exposure on heart function in uninfected and retrovirus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qianli; Montes, Sergio; Larson, Douglas F; Watson, Ronald R

    2002-07-12

    Methamphetamine (MA) increases catecholamine levels, which have detrimental effects on heart function through vasoconstriction, myocardial hypertrophy, and fibrosis. Murine retrovirus infection induces dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The present study investigated the cardiovascular effects of chronic MA treatment on uninfected and retrovirus-infected mice. C57BL/6 mice were studied after 12 weeks treatment. The four study groups were (group I) uninfected, MA placebo; (group II) infected, MA placebo; (group III) uninfected, MA treatment; and (group IV) infected and MA treatment. MA injections were given i.p. once a day for 5 days/week with a increasing dose from 15 mg/kg to 40 mg/kg. Left ventricular mechanics were measured in situ a using Millar conductance catheter system for pressure-volume loop analysis. Cardiac pathology was determined with histological analysis. In the uninfected mice, the load independent contractile parameters, pre-load recruitable stroke work (PRSW) and dP/dt(max) vs. Ved, significantly decreased by 32% and 35% in MA treated mice when compared to the saline injected mice. In retrovirus-infected mice, although there were no significant difference in Ees, PRSW, and dP/dt(max) vs. Ved due to MA treatment, they were increased 45%, 15% and 42% respectively when compared to saline treated mice. No further lowered heart function during murine AIDS may be due to the counteraction of the retroviral DCM and the MA induced myocardial fibrosis and hypertrophy (thickening of the ventricular walls). This is supported by increases in the End-diastolic volume (Ved, 38%) and End-systolic volume (Ves, 84%) in the retrovirus-infected saline injected mice, the decreases of 33% and 17% in the uninfected MA-treated mice, but no significant changes in the retrovirus-infected MA treated mice when compared to uninfected saline injected mice. These data suggest that MA induced myocardial cellular changes compensate for retrovirus induced DCM. PMID:12084392

  15. Effect of peripheral administration of cholecystokinin on food intake in apolipoprotein AIV knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimichi, Go; Lo, Chunmin C; Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Ma, Liyun; Lee, Dana M; Begg, Denovan P; Liu, Min; Sakai, Randall R; Woods, Stephen C; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu; Tso, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Apolipoprotein AIV (apo AIV) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are satiation factors secreted by the small intestine in response to lipid meals. Apo AIV and CCK-8 has an additive effect to suppress food intake relative to apo AIV or CCK-8 alone. In this study, we determined whether CCK-8 (1, 3, or 5 μg/kg ip) reduces food intake in fasted apo AIV knockout (KO) mice as effectively as in fasted wild-type (WT) mice. Food intake was monitored by the DietMax food system. Apo AIV KO mice had significantly reduced 30-min food intake following all doses of CCK-8, whereas WT mice had reduced food intake only at doses of 3 μg/kg and above. Post hoc analysis revealed that the reduction of 10-min and 30-min food intake elicited by each dose of CCK-8 was significantly larger in the apo AIV KO mice than in the WT mice. Peripheral CCK 1 receptor (CCK1R) gene expression (mRNA) in the duodenum and gallbladder of the fasted apo AIV KO mice was comparable to that in WT mice. In contrast, CCK1R mRNA in nodose ganglia of the apo AIV KO mice was upregulated relative to WT animals. Similarly, upregulated CCK1R gene expression was found in the brain stem of apo AIV KO mice by in situ hybridization. Although it is possible that the increased satiating potency of CCK in apo AIV KO mice is mediated by upregulation of CCK 1R in the nodose ganglia and nucleus tractus solitarius, additional experiments are required to confirm such a mechanism.

  16. Biological studies on the effect of estrogen on experimentally induced asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    El-Desouki, Nabila I; Tabl, Ghada A; Elkhodary, Yasmin A A

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the influence of estrogen hormone on the experimentally induced asthma in male mice. The animals were divided into four groups, with 20 mice in each group; group I (control mice) included mice that received no treatment, group II included mice that received intraperitoneal estrogen injection (0.25 mg/kg body weight (bw), twice on day 28 of the experiment), group III (asthmatic mice) included asthmatic mice that received intraperitoneal injection of two doses of ovalbumin (OVA; 2 µg of OVA mixed with 100 µg of aluminum potassium sulfate) on days 1 and 14 of the experiment and then challenged intranasally with a single dose of OVA (50 µg dissolved in 0.05 ml phosphate-buffered saline; PBS) on day 28 of the experiment, and group IV (asthmatic mice treated with estrogen) included asthma model male mice that received the estrogen (0.5 mg/kg bw in 40 ml PBS, twice on the day 28 of the experiment). The immunohistochemical studies observed a marked intensity of CD15 immunoreactivity in the lung tissues of asthma model mice. Physiological results recorded that the total and differential count of leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of asthma model mice recorded a significant increase in the number of leukocytes especially in the number of eosinophil cells. The BALF of asthma model mice showed high levels of interleukins 4 and 5 (IL-4 and IL-5), and there was a significant decrease in both the levels of IL-4 and IL-5 in BALF of asthma model mice treated with estrogen. In conclusion, the obtained results indicated that the asthma is responsible for certain immunohistochemical and physiological alterations induced in lung tissues of mice. The administration of estrogen to asthmatic male mice could improve these changes. For this reason, the present findings support the possible role of estrogen in modulating the inflammatory effects caused by asthma in male mice and may be helpful to cure many asthmatic progressions.

  17. Temperament moderates the influence of periadolescent social experience on behavior and adrenocortical activity in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Caruso, M J; McClintock, M K; Cavigelli, S A

    2014-08-01

    Adolescence is a period of significant behavioral and physiological maturation, particularly related to stress responses. Animal studies that have tested the influence of adolescent social experiences on stress-related behavioral and physiological development have led to complex results. We used a rodent model of neophobia to test the hypothesis that the influence of adolescent social experience on adult behavior and adrenocortical function is modulated by pre-adolescent temperament. Exploratory activity was assessed in 53 male Sprague-Dawley rats to classify temperament and then they were housed in one of the three conditions during postnatal days (PND) 28-46: (1) with familiar kin, (2) with novel social partners, or (3) individually with no social partners. Effects on adult adrenocortical function were evaluated from fecal samples collected while rats were individually-housed and exposed to a 1-hour novel social challenge during PND 110-114. Adolescent-housing with novel or no social partners led to reduced adult glucocorticoid production compared to adolescent-housing with familiar littermates. Additionally, highly-exploratory pre-weanling rats that were housed with novel social partners during adolescence exhibited increased exploratory behavior and a more rapid return to basal glucocorticoid production in adulthood compared to those housed with familiar or no social partners during adolescence and compared to low-exploratory rats exposed to novel social partners. In sum, relatively short-term adolescent social experiences can cause transient changes in temperament and potentially longer-term changes in recovery of glucocorticoid production in response to adult social challenges. Furthermore, early temperament may modulate the influence of adolescent experiences on adult behavioral and adrenocortical function.

  18. Effects of Hot Water Extracts from Polygonum multiflorum on Ovariectomy Induced Osteopenia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yun-Ho; Kang, Kyung-Yun; Kim, Jong-Jin; Lee, Sung-Ju; Son, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Polygonum multiflorum (PM), a traditional Chinese medicine, is used to treat various diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hyperlipidemia. However, the influence of PM on osteoporosis in animals is unclear. The present study investigated the antiosteoporotic effect of PM on bone mass in ovariectomized (OVX) mice and its possible mechanism of action. Twenty-five female C3H/HeN mice were divided into five groups of five mice as follows. Sham-operated control mice received daily oral gavage of an equal volume of water, and OVX mice received daily oral gavage of water or an injection of β-estradiol or PM for 6 weeks. Administration of PM significantly suppressed body weight and organs weight and increased weight and length of bone compared with the OVX group. Treatment with PM reversed osteopenia in OVX mice, thereby improving the bone morphometric parameters. Moreover, histological analysis using hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that PM inhibited OVX-induced bone loss. Serum estradiol and bone alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly decreased in the OVX group, with the levels increasing with PM treatment. In addition, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity was inhibited by PM in OVX mice. These results suggest that PM is effective in preventing bone loss in OVX mice. PMID:27746822

  19. Immunomodulatory effect of ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) on long-term heavy-load exercising mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yali; Cai, Dehua; Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Xinshen

    2012-12-01

    Long-term heavy-load exercise can lead to a decrease in the organism's immune response. In this study, we used 100 Kunming (KM) mice to investigate the immune-regulatory effects of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) on long-term heavy-load exercising mice. Peripheral white blood cells (WBC), the absolute value of neutrophils (NEUT), the phagocytic function of macrophages, serum agglutination valence, and the number of plaque-forming cells (PFC) were evaluated 4 weeks after gavaging long-term heavy-load exercising mice with GLP. After exercise, the WBC count in peripheral blood, absolute neutrophil count, macrophage phagocytic index, serum agglutination valence, and the number of plaque-forming cells were significantly reduced in the mice not fed GLP. Both medium and high doses of GLP drastically increased peripheral WBC, absolute neutrophil count, macrophage phagocytic index, serum agglutination valence, and the number of plaque-forming cells in long-term heavy-load exercising mice. High doses of GLP increased peritoneal macrophage phagocytic rate considerably. With this study, we demonstrate that 4 weeks of heavy-load exercise can lead to exercise-induced immunosuppression in mice. A supplement of GLP fed to these mice improves both non-specific and specific immune responses among these mice. The effect for the high-dose GLP treatment is especially significant.

  20. The effect of interferon treatment in rabies prophylaxis in immunocompetent, immunosuppressed, and immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Marcovistz, R; Germano, P M; Rivière, Y; Tsiang, H; Hovanessian, A G

    1987-02-01

    The development of rabies is modulated by many interacting factors, most of which are dependent on the host immune response. For this reason, we studied the action of interferon (IFN) treatment on street rabies virus infection in mice, immunocompetent or immunosuppressed with cyclophosphamide. In immunocompetent mice, paralysis of hind limbs is the first symptom characteristic of rabies disease before weight loss and general prostration leading to death. Paralysis does not occur in immunosuppressed mice, which develop a shaggy hair and eventually lose weight and die. Administration of interferon (10(5) units, intraperitoneally) 1 h after virus inoculation and every 24 h led to a delay in the onset of first disease signs, but in general did not rescue immunocompetent or immunosuppressed mice from death. In both types of mice, rabies virus production in the brain was reduced by 1 log in response to IFN treatment. In immunocompetent mice treated with IFN, there was a significant increase of antibody synthesis against rabies virus. As expected, antibody synthesis in immunosuppressed mice was almost negligible. However, in mice treated with IFN and cyclophosphamide there was still significant antibody synthesis specific for rabies virus. IFN administered intravenously, subcutaneously, or intraperitoneally crosses the blood-brain barrier to cause enhanced levels of the two double-stranded RNA-dependent enzymes, the protein kinase and 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase in the brain. However in spite of this effect, IFN treatment seems to be unable to prevent the evolution of rabies disease in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed mice. Since the suppressing effect of cyclophosphamide is nonselective on both the cellular and humoral immune responses of mice, we investigated the action of IFN in rabies virus-infected athymic nude mice, which lack T cells. Athymic nude mice infected with street rabies virus become cachectic and die without any apparent symptom of

  1. Effects of statins and cholesterol on memory functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghodke, Ravindra M; Tour, Nagesh; Devi, Kshama

    2012-12-01

    Studies on influence of lipid lowering therapies have generated wide controversial results on the role of cholesterol on memory function. However recent studies revealed that cholesterol lowering treatment substantially reduce the risk of dementia. The objectives of this study were to analyze the effect of statins on memory function and to establish the relationship between increase/decrease in cholesterol synthesis, total cholesterol level and memory function in animals. We examined the relationship between biosynthesis of cholesterol and memory function using two statins (lipophilic simvastatin and hydrophilic pravastatin) and high cholesterol diet in mice for 15 days and 4 months. Memory performance was evaluated with two different behavioral tests and various biochemical parameters such as serum cholesterol, whole brain cholesterol, brain 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) activity and brain acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. We found that statin treatment for 4 months, but not for 15 days, showed significant improvement in memory function whereas high cholesterol diet showed significant impairment of memory. However long-term statin treatment showed significant decrease in serum cholesterol level as well as brain AChE level. Moreover high cholesterol diet showed significant decrease in memory function with an increase in serum cholesterol level as well as brain AChE level. There is no direct correlation between brain cholesterol level, as well as HMG-CoA activity with memory function regulation. However there is definite link between plasma cholesterol level and AChE level. A long-standing plasma cholesterol alteration may be essential to regulate memory function which in turn might be mediated through AChE modulated pathway.

  2. Effect of surfactants on weight gain in mice.

    PubMed

    Kaneene, J B; Ross, R W

    1986-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine if four surfactants can induce increased weight gain in the mouse. Basic-H, Triton X-100, Amway All Purpose Adjuvant and X-77 were put in water and fed to various groups of ICR 21 day old female mice for a period of 43 days. All the mice were clinically normal throughout the study period. Pathological examination of a random sample of the mice revealed no gross pathological changes. Similarly, histopathological examination of the lungs, livers and intestines did not reveal any visible lesions. Basic-H and Amway surfactants induced weight gain, though not significantly, better at 0.1% (V/V) concentration while X-77 and Triton X-100 induced weight gain better at 0.4% (V/V) concentration. Overall results show that none of the surfactants tested induced significant weight gain.

  3. Effect of UV irradiation on lethal infection of mice with Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Denkins, Y M; Kripke, M L

    1993-02-01

    Exposure of mice to UV radiation inhibits the induction and elicitation of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to Candida albicans. To determine whether UV irradiation also affects the pathogenesis of systemic C. albicans infection, C3H mice were exposed to a single dose of 48 kJ/m2 UV-B radiation from FS40 sunlamps 5 days before or 5 days after sensitization with formalin-fixed C. albicans and challenged intravenously (i.v.) with a lethal dose of viable fungi 6 days after sensitization (11 or 1 days after UV irradiation). Exposing unsensitized mice to UV radiation 11 days before lethal challenge had no effect on survival, but the survival time of mice exposed to UV radiation 1 day before challenge was reduced by more than 50%. In the latter group, decreased survival time correlated with persistence of C. albicans in the brain and progressive growth of C. albicans in the kidneys. Sensitization of unirradiated mice with formalin-fixed C. albicans extended their survival time following lethal i.v. challenge with viable C. albicans. Exposing the mice to UV radiation 5 days before sensitization did not abrogate this beneficial effect of sensitization on survival, even though it significantly reduced the DTH response. Thus, immunity to systemic infection did not depend on the ability of the mice to exhibit a DTH response to C. albicans. The beneficial effect of sensitization on survival after lethal infection was abrogated, however, in mice exposed to UV radiation 1 day before lethal challenge with C. albicans. Furthermore, these mice were unable to contain the progressive growth of C. albicans in the kidneys, in contrast to sensitized, unirradiated mice. PMID:8451288

  4. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-11-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes.

  5. Orexin administration to mice that underwent chronic stress produces bimodal effects on emotion-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hye-Seung; Kim, Jae-Gon; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Yoon, Bong-June

    2014-11-01

    Orexin plays diverse roles in regulating behaviors, such as sleep and wake, reward processing, arousal, and stress and anxiety. The orexin system may accomplish these multiple tasks through its complex innervations throughout the brain. The emerging evidence indicates a role of orexin in emotional behaviors; however, most of the previous studies have investigated the function of orexin in naïve animals. Here, we examined a functional role of orexin in mice that had been exposed to repeated stress. Chronic social defeat stress produced differential social interaction behaviors in mice (susceptible versus resilient) and these two groups of mice displayed different levels of prepro-orexin in the hypothalamus. Exogenously added orexin A to the brain induced an antidepressant-like effect in only the susceptible mice but not in the resilient mice. In contrast, orexin A and orexin B infused together produced an anxiogenic effect in only the resilient mice and not in the susceptible mice. Furthermore, we found that the antidepressant-like effect of orexin A is mediated by the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) after exposure to chronic restraint stress. These findings reveal a bimodal effect of the orexin system in regulating emotional behavior that depends on stress susceptibility.

  6. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes. PMID:26632783

  7. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-11-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes. PMID:26632783

  8. Effect of ultraviolet irradiation on mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikai, K.; Danno, K.; Horio, T.; Narumiya, S.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of UV irradiation on the skin was investigated in (WB-W/+) X (C57BL/6J-Wv/+)F1-W/Wv mice, which are genetically deficient in tissue mast cells. Their congenic littermates (+/+) and normal albino mice (ICR or BALB/c) were used as controls. Mice were irradiated with 500 mJ/cm2 of UVB and the increment of ear thickness was measured before and 6, 12, and 24 h after irradiation. Ear swelling in W/Wv mice at 12 and 24 h after irradiation was significantly smaller than that in +/+ and ICR mice. In contrast, the number of sunburn cells formed 24 h after UVB irradiation (200 or 500 mJ/cm2) was similar in W/Wv, +/+ and ICR mice. On the other hand, when mice were treated with 8-methoxy-psoralen (0.5%) plus UVA irradiation (4 J/cm2) (topical PUVA), ears of W/Wv and BALB/c mice, which were both white in color, were thickened similarly 72 h after treatment, but less swelling was observed in +/+ mice, which were black in skin color. The amount of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) in ears, determined by radioimmunoassay specific for PGD2, was elevated 3-fold in +/+ and ICR mice at 3 h after irradiation with 500 mJ/cm2 of UVB in comparison with basal level without irradiation. However, such elevation was not observed in W/Wv mice. These results suggest that mast cells play an important role in UVB-induced inflammation, and PGs from mast cells are responsible at least in part for the development of this reaction. However, neither mast cells nor PGs contribute to the sunburn cell formation and ear swelling response by PUVA treatment.

  9. The Effects of Acute Blood Loss for Diagnostic Bloodwork and Fluid Replacement in Clinically Ill Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marx, James O; Jensen, JanLee A; Seelye, Stacie; Walton, Raquel M; Hankenson, F Claire

    2015-01-01

    Despite the great value of diagnostic bloodwork for identifying disease in animals, the volume of blood required for these analyses limits its use in laboratory mice, particularly when they are clinically ill. We sought to determine the effects of acute blood loss (ABL) following blood collection for diagnostic bloodwork in healthy mice compared with streptozotocin-induced diabetic and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-treated dehydrated mice. ABL caused several mild changes in the control mice, with significant decreases in body weight, temperature, and activity in both experimental groups; increased dehydration and azotemia in the DSS-treated mice; and a significant drop in the blood pressure of the diabetic mice. To determine whether these negative outcomes could be ameliorated, we treated mice with intraperitoneal lactated Ringers solution either immediately after or 30 min before ABL. Notably, preABL administration of fluids helped prevent the worsening of the dehydration and azotemia in the DSS-treated mice and the changes in blood pressure in the diabetic mice. However, fluid administration provided no benefit in control of blood pressure when administered after ABL in the diabetic mice. Furthermore, fluid therapy did not prevent ABL-induced drops in body weight and activity. Although one mouse not receiving fluid therapy became moribund at the 24-h time point, no animals died during the 24-h study. This investigation demonstrates that blood for diagnostic bloodwork can be collected safely from clinically ill mice and that preemptive fluid therapy mitigates some of the negative changes associated with this blood loss. PMID:26141445

  10. Anti-obesity effect of intranasal administration of galanin-like peptide (GALP) in obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Kageyama, Haruaki; Shiba, Kanako; Hirako, Satoshi; Wada, Nobuhiro; Yamanaka, Satoru; Nogi, Yukinori; Takenoya, Fumiko; Nonaka, Naoko; Hirano, Tsutomu; Inoue, Shuji; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Galanin-like peptide (GALP) has an anti-obesity effect in rats and mice. It has been reported that the uptake of GALP by the brain is higher after intranasal administration than with intravenous injection. This study therefore aimed to clarify the effect of intranasal administration of GALP on the feeding behavior of lean and obese mice. Autoradiography revealed the presence of 125I-GALP in the olfactory bulb and the brain microcirculation. The body weights of ob/ob mice gradually increased during vehicle treatment, but remained unchanged in response to repeated intranasal administration of GALP, with both ob/ob and diet-induced obese mice displaying significantly decreased food intake, water intake and locomotor activity when treated with GALP. These results suggest that intranasal administration is an effective route whereby GALP can exert its effect as an anti-obesity drug. PMID:27323911

  11. Anti-obesity effect of intranasal administration of galanin-like peptide (GALP) in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Haruaki; Shiba, Kanako; Hirako, Satoshi; Wada, Nobuhiro; Yamanaka, Satoru; Nogi, Yukinori; Takenoya, Fumiko; Nonaka, Naoko; Hirano, Tsutomu; Inoue, Shuji; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Galanin-like peptide (GALP) has an anti-obesity effect in rats and mice. It has been reported that the uptake of GALP by the brain is higher after intranasal administration than with intravenous injection. This study therefore aimed to clarify the effect of intranasal administration of GALP on the feeding behavior of lean and obese mice. Autoradiography revealed the presence of (125)I-GALP in the olfactory bulb and the brain microcirculation. The body weights of ob/ob mice gradually increased during vehicle treatment, but remained unchanged in response to repeated intranasal administration of GALP, with both ob/ob and diet-induced obese mice displaying significantly decreased food intake, water intake and locomotor activity when treated with GALP. These results suggest that intranasal administration is an effective route whereby GALP can exert its effect as an anti-obesity drug. PMID:27323911

  12. Effect of antidepressant drugs on 6-OHDA-treated mice in the FST.

    PubMed

    Chenu, F; Dailly, E; Bourin, M

    2007-02-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting that dopamine could be indirectly involved in the appearance of behavioural effects of antidepressants. In this study, we induced a partial (over 70%) and non-reversible depletion of dopamine-containing neurons in mice by i.c.v. infusion of 6-OHDA. Then, we compared the antidepressant-like effect of drugs (citalopram, paroxetine, desipramine and imipramine) with or without dopamine depletion in the mice forced swimming test. Our results clearly show that lesion with 6-OHDA does not modify the response of mice to desipramine and imipramine, whereas dopamine depletion abolished the antidepressant-like effect of citalopram and paroxetine. It could then be suggested that antidepressant-like effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (paroxetine and citalopram) in the mice FST requires the activation of dopaminergic pathways to occur.

  13. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and progesterone on spatial learning and memory in young and aged mice.

    PubMed

    Bodensteiner, Karin J; Stone, Ivan J; Ghiraldi, Loraina L

    2008-07-01

    Young (2-4 months) and aged (14-16 months) male Swiss-Webster albino mice (n = 7 per group) were subcutaneously injected with 20 mg/kg/day dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), progesterone (P), DHEAS + P, or vehicle control and trained over a 5-day period in a Morris water maze. The subjects were tested 48 hr after training for memory recall as measured by latencies to locate the hidden platform, and trunk blood was collected immediately thereafter. As expected, latency to platform decreased for all groups over the 6 testing days, with aged mice taking longer to reach platform than did young mice. However, results did not support the hypotheses that DHEAS-treated mice would exhibit shorter latencies and that P-treated mice would show longer latencies to platform in comparison with age-matched controls. These results raise doubts about the effectiveness of commercially available supplements claiming to promote enhanced memory in humans.

  14. [Effects of sex hormone on the dilatation of urinary tubule and acidophil body in NON mice].

    PubMed

    Sahata, H; Suzuki, S; Ago, A; Mifune, H; Sakamoto, H

    1994-10-01

    The influences of sex hormones on the dilatation of the urinary tubules and acidophil bodies were histologically investigated in NON (Non-Obese Non-diabetic) mice. Although the dilatation of the proximal tubules and acidophil bodies in NON mice were observed only in female but not in male, a slight dilatation and a few bodies were also observed in castrated male NON mice. Moreover, in ovariectomized female NON mice the dilatation and bodies were less compared with intact female NON mice. Estradiol administration induced prominent dilatation and numerous acidophil bodies, while the administration of testosterone showed a complete preventive effect. Therefore, it is suggested that the dilatation of the tubules and the acidophil bodies can be profoundly influenced by sex hormones. PMID:7805803

  15. [Morphological observation of effect of bee pollen on intercellura lipofuscin in NIH mice].

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Li, L

    1990-09-01

    By histochemical method we have observed the effect of bee pollen on lipofuscin in NIH mice. The results show that oral administration of bee pollen at 10 g/kg/d markedly reduces lipofuscin in cardiac muscle in aged mice, significantly inhibits the increase of lipofuscin in cardiac muscle, liver, brain and adrenal gland cells induced by orally given peroxidized corn oil or iv alloxan. This action may be related with the anti-ageing effect of bee pollen.

  16. Effects of orally administered bovine lactoperoxidase on dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kouichirou; Horigome, Ayako; Yamauchi, Koji; Takase, Mitsunori; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2008-07-01

    The effect of lactoperoxidase (LPO) on dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis was examined in mice. After 9 d of colitis induction, weight loss, colon shortening, and the histological score were significantly suppressed in mice orally administered LPO (62.5 mg/body/d) as compared to a group administered bovine serum albumin. These results suggest that LPO exhibits anti-inflammatory effects in the gastrointestinal tract.

  17. Effects of a lactobacilli, oligosaccharide and organic germanium intake on the immune responses of mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Saito, Miki; Aso, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    The organic germanium compound, Ge-132, has immune-modulating effects. We evaluated the symbiotic effects of Ge-132 with lactobacilli and oligosaccharide (LB/OS) on the immune responses of mice. The highest fecal IgA levels were observed in the mice receiving a low concentration of Ge-132 with LB/OS for 8 weeks. Our data suggest that LB/OS with a low concentration of Ge-132 stimulated the intestinal immunity.

  18. The life-extending effect of dietary restriction requires Foxo3 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawa, Isao; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Hayashi, Nobutaka; Kim, Sang-Eun; Kawata, Takuya; Park, Seongjoon; Hayashi, Hiroko; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Chiba, Takuya; Mori, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    Forkhead box O (Foxo) transcription factors may be involved in the salutary effect of dietary restriction (DR). This study examined the role of Foxo3 in lifespan extension and cancer suppression in DR mice. Wild-type (WT) and Foxo3-knockout heterozygous (+/–) and homozygous (–/–) mice were subjected to a 30% DR regimen initiated at 12 weeks of age. Control mice were fed ad libitum (AL) throughout the study. In contrast to WT mice, DR did not significantly extend the lifespan of Foxo3+/– or Foxo3–/– mice. However, DR reduced the prevalence of tumors at death in WT, Foxo3+/–, and Foxo3–/– mice. These results indicate the necessity of Foxo3 for lifespan extension but not cancer suppression by DR. The findings in Foxo3+/– mice contrast with those in Foxo1+/– mice reported previously by our laboratory suggest differential regulation of cancer and lifespan by DR via Foxo1 and Foxo3. PMID:25808402

  19. Contrasting effects of a dietary copper deficiency in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Lynch, S M; Klevay, L M

    1994-02-01

    Female rats are protected from the lethal effects of a dietary copper (Cu) deficiency, but female mice fed a Cu-deficient diet develop atrial thromboses and die. To further investigate the effect of sex on Cu status in mice (n = 16), male and female adult Swiss-Webster mice were fed Cu-supplemented (8.4 mg Cu/kg) or Cu-deficient (0.3 mg Cu/kg) diets with deionized water for 43-49 days. Six female mice, but only one male mouse, fed the Cu-deficient diet died during the experiment. Both male and female mice fed the Cu-deficient diet exhibited typical features of deficiency. The severity of anemia and the values observed for several indicators of Cu status (plasma ceruloplasmin [EC 1.16.3.1.] and erythrocyte copper-zinc superoxide dismutase [EC 1.15.1.1.] activities, cardiac Cu) were similar in both male and female Cu-deficient mice. However, cardiac enlargement (0.97 vs 0.73 g/100 g body wt, P < 0.05), cardiac edema (79.9% vs 78.2% cardiac water, P < 0.05) and depletion of renal Cu (10.4 vs 12.5 micrograms/g dry weight, P < 0.05) were more severe in female compared with male, Cu-deficient mice. Furthermore, although hepatic Cu was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in female Cu-deficient compared with Cu-supplemented mice, it was not significantly decreased by deficiency in male mice. These data indicate that the female mice experienced a more extreme form of Cu deficiency than the males.

  20. Preventive effect of Dendrobium candidum Wall. ex Lindl. on activated carbon-induced constipation in mice

    PubMed Central

    WANG, RUI; SUN, PENG; ZHOU, YALIN; ZHAO, XIN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Dendrobium candidum Wall. ex Lindl. (D. candidum) on activated carbon-induced constipation in ICR mice. ICR mice were orally administered D. candidum for 9 days. Body weight, defecation status, gastrointestinal (GI) transit and defecation times, in addition to the levels of motilin (MTL), gastrin (Gas), endothelin (ET), somatostatin (SS), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in serum were used to evaluate the preventive effects of D. candidum on constipation. The laxative drug bisacodyl acted as a positive control. The time to the first defecation of a black stool for the normal, control, bisacodyl-treated (100 mg/kg), 200 and 400 mg/kg D. candidum-treated mice was 84, 202, 126, 161 and 142 min, respectively. Following the consumption of 200 and 400 mg/kg D. candidum or bisacodyl (100 mg/kg), the GI transit was reduced to 57.7, 74.6 and 90.2%, respectively, of the transit in normal mice. The serum levels of MTL, Gas, ET, AChE, SP and VIP were significantly increased and the serum levels of SS were reduced in the mice treated with D. candidum compared with those in the untreated control mice (P<0.05). These results demonstrate that D. candidum has preventive effects on constipation in mice, and a greater functional activity was observed when a higher concentration was administered. PMID:25574235

  1. Long-lasting effects of minocycline on behavior in young but not adult Fragile X mice.

    PubMed

    Dansie, L E; Phommahaxay, K; Okusanya, A G; Uwadia, J; Huang, M; Rotschafer, S E; Razak, K A; Ethell, D W; Ethell, I M

    2013-08-29

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common single-gene inherited form of intellectual disability with behaviors characteristic of autism. People with FXS display childhood seizures, hyperactivity, anxiety, developmental delay, attention deficits, and visual-spatial memory impairment, as well as a propensity for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Several of these aberrant behaviors and FXS-associated synaptic irregularities also occur in "fragile X mental retardation gene" knock-out (Fmr1 KO) mice. We previously reported that minocycline promotes the maturation of dendritic spines - postsynaptic sites for excitatory synapses - in the developing hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice, which may underlie the beneficial effects of minocycline on anxiolytic behavior in young Fmr1 KO mice. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of minocycline treatment in young and adult Fmr1 KO mice, and determined the dependence of behavioral improvements on short-term versus long-term minocycline administration. We found that 4- and 8-week-long treatments significantly reduced locomotor activity in both young and adult Fmr1 KO mice. Some behavioral improvements persisted in young mice post-treatment, but in adults the beneficial effects were lost soon after minocycline treatment was stopped. We also show, for the first time, that minocycline treatment partially attenuates the number and severity of audiogenic seizures in Fmr1 KO mice. This report provides further evidence that minocycline treatment has immediate and long-lasting benefits on FXS-associated behaviors in the Fmr1 KO mouse model.

  2. EFFECT OF MARINE TOXINS ON THERMOREGULATION IN MICE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine algal toxins are extremely toxic and can represent a major health problem to humans and animals. Temperature regulation is one of many processes to be affected by exposure to these toxins. Mice and rats become markedly hypothermic when subjected to acute exposure to the ma...

  3. Effects of Macrophage Depletion on Sleep in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ames, Conner; Boland, Erin; Szentirmai, Éva

    2016-01-01

    The reciprocal interaction between the immune system and sleep regulation has been widely acknowledged but the cellular mechanisms that underpin this interaction are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of macrophages in sleep loss- and cold exposure-induced sleep and body temperature responses. Macrophage apoptosis was induced in mice by systemic injection of clodronate-containing liposomes (CCL). We report that CCL treatment induced an immediate and transient increase in non-rapid-eye movement sleep (NREMS) and fever accompanied by decrease in rapid-eye movement sleep, motor activity and NREMS delta power. Chronically macrophage-depleted mice had attenuated NREMS rebound after sleep deprivation compared to normal mice. Cold-induced increase in wakefulness and decrease in NREMS, rapid-eye movement sleep and body temperature were significantly enhanced in macrophage-depleted mice indicating increased cold sensitivity. These findings provide further evidence for the reciprocal interaction among the immune system, sleep and metabolism, and identify macrophages as one of the key cellular elements in this interplay. PMID:27442442

  4. Barometric pressure fluctuations: effects on the activity of laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Sprott, R L

    1967-09-01

    Fluctuations in naturally occurring levels of barometric pressure appear to be an important determinant of activity in laboratory mice. In three experiments, activity was higher after increases in barometric pressure than it was after decreases. When the barometric pressure remained relatively stable, intermediate levels of activity were observed.

  5. EFFECTS OF MARINE ALGAL TOXINS ON THERMOREGULATION IN MICE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hypothermia is often seen in mice and rats exposed acutely to marine algal toxins, but the mechanism of action of these toxins on thermoregulation is not well understood. Our laboratory has assessed the thermoregulatory mechanisms of two marine algal toxins, maitotoxin and brevet...

  6. Change in radio sensitivity of mice under effect of rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arlashchenko, N. I.; Seraya, V. M.; Rodina, G. P.

    1980-01-01

    Radiosensitivity of animals placed in slowly rotating chambers was investigated and was found to vary under the influence of the functional load on the vestibular analyzer. An increased radioresistance was registered in populations of the most radiosensitive mice. In populations of more radioresistant animals the gravitational load decreases the radioresistance.

  7. Effects of Macrophage Depletion on Sleep in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Conner; Boland, Erin; Szentirmai, Éva

    2016-01-01

    The reciprocal interaction between the immune system and sleep regulation has been widely acknowledged but the cellular mechanisms that underpin this interaction are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of macrophages in sleep loss- and cold exposure-induced sleep and body temperature responses. Macrophage apoptosis was induced in mice by systemic injection of clodronate-containing liposomes (CCL). We report that CCL treatment induced an immediate and transient increase in non-rapid-eye movement sleep (NREMS) and fever accompanied by decrease in rapid-eye movement sleep, motor activity and NREMS delta power. Chronically macrophage-depleted mice had attenuated NREMS rebound after sleep deprivation compared to normal mice. Cold-induced increase in wakefulness and decrease in NREMS, rapid-eye movement sleep and body temperature were significantly enhanced in macrophage-depleted mice indicating increased cold sensitivity. These findings provide further evidence for the reciprocal interaction among the immune system, sleep and metabolism, and identify macrophages as one of the key cellular elements in this interplay. PMID:27442442

  8. Effect of sulfur dioxide on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Machado, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC50 values were determined for male Swiss albino mice exposed to different concentrations of sulfur dioxide in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The LC50 for a 30 minute exposure was about 3000 ppm SO2.

  9. Effect of nitrogen dioxide on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Machado, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC50 values were determined for male Swiss albino mice exposed to different concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The LC50 for a 10 minute exposure was about 1000 ppm NO2.

  10. Effect of carbon monoxide on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC50 values were determined for male Swiss albino mice exposed to different concentrations of carbon monoxide in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. These values are compared to values reported in the literature. The LC50 for a 30 minute exposure was 3570 ppm CO.

  11. [Pharmacodynamic experiment of the antivirus effect of Houttuynia cordata injection on influenza virus in mice].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang-zhou; Shi, Han; Shi, Yu-jing; Liu, Ying; Jin, Ya-hong; Gao, Ying-jie; Guo, Shan-shan; Cui, Xiao-lan

    2010-03-01

    It is to investigate the effect of two kinds of Houttuynia Cordata Injection on preventing and treating H1N1 influenza virus infection in mice. Pneumonia model was set up by intranasal infection of the normal and immunocompromised mice with influenza virus FM1 and PR8. The two injections were administered before and after the administration of virus, separately, and the lung index was observed. The results showed that the two preparations have obvious therapeutic effect on normal mice infected with influenza virus FM1 and PR8. And to FM1, the new injection's effect is better at small dosage. The results also showed that the two preparations have obvious prophylactic effect on immunodepressed mice infected with influenza virus FM1 and PR8. And to PR8, the old injection's effect is better at small dosage. Houttuynia Cordata Injection can improve the mice pneumonia caused by influenza virus H1N1 and decrease the lung index markedly. It has a remarkable preventive and therapeutic effect on H1N1 influenza virus in mice. PMID:21351520

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-2-induced memory improvement and anxiolytic effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Takashi; Jin, Kazushi; Ohnuki, Tomoko; Sasaki-Hamada, Sachie; Nakamura, Minami; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Sugiyama, Azusa; Ikeda, Masaatsu; Tanabe, Mitsuo; Oka, Jun-Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on memory impairment in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice, and anxiety-like behavior in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-treated mice. In the Y-maze test, LPS (10 µg/mouse, i.c.v.) significantly decreased spontaneous alternation, which was prevented by pretreatment with GLP-2 (0.01-0.3 µg/mouse, i.c.v.). The GLP-2 treatment just before the Y-maze test also improved LPS-induced memory impairment. Continuous treatment with GLP-2 (3 µg/mouse, i.c.v.) had no effect on the open-field test in saline-treated or ACTH-treated mice. Chronic ACTH treatment did not cause anxiogenic effects in the elevated plus-maze test. GLP-2 showed weak anxiolytic-like effects in the elevated plus-maze test in ACTH-treated, but not saline-treated mice. Moreover, GLP-2 increased 5-HT, but not 5-HIAA and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 levels in the amygdala of ACTH-treated mice. Pharmacological depletion of 5-HT prevented the anxiolytic effects of GLP-2. These results suggest that GLP-2 protected and improved memory function in LPS-treated mice, and also had anxiolytic effects due to changes in the 5-HT system.

  13. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production. PMID:24577726

  14. Acute pulmonary effects of ultrafine particles in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Oberdörster, G; Finkelstein, J N; Johnston, C; Gelein, R; Cox, C; Baggs, R; Elder, A C

    2000-08-01

    Ambient fine particles consist of ultrafine particles (< 100 nm) and accumulation-mode particles (approximately 100 to 1,000 nm). Our hypothesis that ultrafine particles can have adverse effects in humans is based on results of our earlier studies with particles of both sizes and on the finding that urban ultrafine particles can reach mass concentrations of 40 to 50 micrograms/m3, equivalent to number concentrations of 3 to 4 x 10(5) particles/cm3. The objectives of the exploratory studies reported here were to (1) evaluate pulmonary effects induced in rats and mice by ultrafine particles of known high toxicity (although not occurring in the ambient atmosphere) in order to obtain information on principles of ultrafine particle toxicology; (2) characterize the generation and coagulation behavior of ultrafine particles that are relevant for urban air; (3) study the influence of animals' age and disease status; and (4) evaluate copollutants as modifying factors. We used ultrafine Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene [PTFE]*) fumes (count median diameter [CMD] approximately 18 nm) generated by heating Teflon in a tube furnace to 486 degrees C to evaluate principles of ultrafine particle toxicity that might be helpful in understanding potential effects of ambient ultrafine particles. Teflon fumes at ultrafine particle concentrations of approximately 50 micrograms/m3 are extremely toxic to rats when inhaled for only 15 minutes. We found that neither the ultrafine Teflon particles alone when generated in argon nor the Teflon fume gas-phase constituents when generated in air were toxic after 25 minutes of exposure. Only the combination of both phases when generated in air caused high toxicity, suggesting the existence of either radicals on the particle surface or a carrier mechanism of the ultrafine particles for adsorbed gas-phase compounds. We also found rapid translocation of the ultrafine Teflon particles across the epithelium after their deposition, which appears to be an

  15. Long-term effects of ovariectomy on osteoporosis and obesity in estrogen-receptor-β-deleted mice.

    PubMed

    Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana; Nguyen, Ba Tiep; Wuttke, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    Untreated BERKO mice demonstrate few abnormalities in bone phenotype and recent ovariectomy has few effects on various bone characteristics in these mice. Long-term studies on the bone phenotype of intact and ovariectomized mice are unavailable. Using quantitative computed tomography (qCT), we determined various parameters of the metaphysis of the tibia in sham-ovariectomized (intact) and ovariectomized BERKO and wildtype mice. Body weight and estrogen-regulated fat were also measured. Mice underwent surgery (ovariectomy or sham) at 3 mo of age, and qCT analysis was performed every 2 to 4 mo until mice were 12 mo old. Ovariectomized wildtype mice gained body weight and their fat depot increased in size within 2 mo after ovariectomy. Obesity developed later in ovariectomized BERKO mice, which became significantly heavier than their wildtype counterparts. Ovariectomized wildtype mice lost trabecular density more rapidly than did ovariectomized BERKO mice, which did not show similar loss in trabecular density until at least 7 mo after ovariectomy. At the latest studied time point (9 mo after surgery), cortical area was significantly larger in ovariectomized BERKO mice than ovariectomized wildtype mice. The absence of ERβ in ovariectomized BERKO mice during the first 3 to 5 mo after ovariectomy had protective effects against obesity and trabecular rarification; this protective effect disappeared at later time points.

  16. Differential effects of norUDCA and UDCA in obstructive cholestasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fickert, Peter; Pollheimer, Marion J.; Silbert, Dagmar; Moustafa, Tarek; Halilbasic, Emina; Krones, Elisabeth; Durchschein, Franziska; Thüringer, Andrea; Zollner, Gernot; Denk, Helmut; Trauner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims The quest for effective drugs to treat cholangiopathies led to the development of norUDCA previously shown to have potent choleretic effects and to heal cholangiopathy in Abcb4 knockout (Abcb4−/−) mice. Its mother compound UDCA had detrimental effects in common bile duct ligated (CBDL) mice, presumably related to its choleretic effects. norUDCA choleretic effects may therefore raise safety concerns when used in cholangiopathies with biliary obstruction. We therefore aimed at comparing the effects of UDCA and norUDCA in clear-cut obstructive cholestasis. Methods 0.5% UDCA- or norUDCA-fed wild type and Abcb4−/− mice were subjected to CBDL or selective bile duct ligation (SBDL) and compared to controls with regard to liver injury. Bile flow, bile composition, and biliary manometry were compared in UDCA-fed, norUDCA-fed and control mice. Toxicity of UDCA and norUDCA was compared in vitro. Results Compared to UDCA, liver injury in CBDL mice was significantly lower in almost all norUDCA groups. In SBDL mice, only UDCA induced bile infarcts in the ligated lobes, whereas norUDCA even ameliorated liver injury. In vitro, UDCA induced cellular ATP depletion and was significantly more toxic than norUDCA in HepG2 cells, mouse bile duct epithelial cells, and primary human hepatocytes. Conclusions Compared to norUDCA, UDCA is significantly more toxic in CBDL mice. norUDCA, in contrast to UDCA, significantly ameliorates liver injury in SBDL mice. Our findings uncover profound differences in metabolism and therapeutic mechanisms of both bile acids with important clinical consequences. PMID:23369794

  17. Effects of photoperiod and food restriction on the reproductive physiology of female California mice

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Michael Q.; Knight, Jennifer A.; Trainor, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    Many temperate-zone animals use changes in photoperiod to time breeding. Shorter term cues, like food availability, are integrated with photoperiod to adjust reproductive timing under unexpected conditions. Many mice of the genus Peromyscus breed in the summer. California mice (Peromyscus californicus), however, can breed year round, but tend to begin breeding in the winter. Glial cells may be involved in transduction of environmental signals that regulate gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) activity. We examined the effects of diet and photoperiod on reproduction in female California mice. Mice placed on either short days (8L:16D) or long days (16L:8D) were food restricted (80% of normal intake) or fed ad libitum. Short day-food restricted mice showed significant regression of the reproductive system. GnRH-immunoreactivity was increased in the tuberal hypothalamus of long day-food restricted mice. This may be associated with the sparing effect long days have when mice are food restricted. The number of GFAP-immunoreactive fibers in proximity to GnRH nerve terminals correlated negatively with uterine size in ad libitum but not food restricted mice, suggesting diet may alter glial regulation of the reproductive axis. There was a trend towards food restriction increasing uterine expression of c-fos mRNA, an estrogen dependent gene. Similar to other seasonally breeding rodents, short days render the reproductive system of female California mice more susceptible to effects of food restriction. This may be vestigial, or it may have evolved to mitigate consequences of unexpectedly poor winter food supplies. PMID:22245263

  18. Effects of photoperiod and food restriction on the reproductive physiology of female California mice.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Michael Q; Knight, Jennifer A; Trainor, Brian C

    2012-05-01

    Many temperate-zone animals use changes in photoperiod to time breeding. Shorter term cues, like food availability, are integrated with photoperiod to adjust reproductive timing under unexpected conditions. Many mice of the genus Peromyscus breed in the summer. California mice (Peromyscus californicus), however, can breed year round, but tend to begin breeding in the winter. Glial cells may be involved in transduction of environmental signals that regulate gonadotrophin releasing hormone I (GnRH) activity. We examined the effects of diet and photoperiod on reproduction in female California mice. Mice placed on either short days (8L:16D) or long days (16L:8D) were food restricted (80% of normal intake) or fed ad libitum. Short day-food restricted mice showed significant regression of the reproductive system. GnRH-immunoreactivity was increased in the tuberal hypothalamus of long day-food restricted mice. This may be associated with the sparing effect long days have when mice are food restricted. The number of GFAP-immunoreactive fibers in proximity to GnRH nerve terminals correlated negatively with uterine size in ad libitum but not food restricted mice, suggesting diet may alter glial regulation of the reproductive axis. There was a trend towards food restriction increasing uterine expression of c-fos mRNA, an estrogen dependent gene. Similar to other seasonally breeding rodents, short days render the reproductive system of female California mice more susceptible to effects of food restriction. This may be vestigial, or it may have evolved to mitigate consequences of unexpectedly poor winter food supplies.

  19. Effect of chronic social defeat stress on behaviors and dopamine receptor in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guang-Biao; Zhao, Tong; Gao, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Xu, Yu-Ming; Li, Hao; Lv, Lu-Xian

    2016-04-01

    Victims of bullying often undergo depression, low self-esteem, high anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. The social defeat model has become widely accepted for studying experimental animal behavior changes associated with bullying; however, differences in the effects in susceptible and unsusceptible individuals have not been well studied. The present study investigated the effects of social defeat stress on behavior and the expression of dopamine receptors D1 and D2 in the brains of adult mice. Adult mice were divided into susceptible and unsusceptible groups after 10days of social defeat stress. Behavioral tests were conducted, and protein levels in the brains were assessed by Western blotting. The results indicate that all mice undergo decreased locomotion and increased anxiety behavior. However, decreased social interaction and impaired memory performance were only observed in susceptible mice. A significantly decreased expression of D1 was observed in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala of susceptible mice only. No significant differences in D2 expression were shown between control and defeated mice in any area studied. These data indicate that depression-like behavior and cognition impairment caused by social defeat stress in susceptible mice may be related to changes in the dopamine receptor D1. PMID:26655446

  20. Hypolipidemic effect of young persimmon fruit in C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Shin-ichiro; Gato, Nobuki

    2008-10-01

    We investigated the hypolipidemic effects of young persimmon fruit (YP) on apolipoprotein E-deficient C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice. These mice exhibited higher plasma cholesterols, except for high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and lower plasma HDL cholesterol than C57BL/6.Cr mice that had the same genetic background as the C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice. Male C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice (n=5) were fed a diet supplemented with dry YP, Hachiya-kaki, at a concentration of 5% (w/w) for 10 weeks. YP treatment significantly lowered plasma chylomicron, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterols, and triglyceride, and this response was accompanied by an elevation of fecal bile acid excretion. In the liver, sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 gene expression was significantly higher in mice fed YP, while the mRNA and protein levels of the LDL receptor did not change. These results indicate that acceleration of fecal bile acid excretion is a major mechanism of the hypolipidemic effect induced by YP in C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice. PMID:18838807

  1. Local cryoanalgesia is effective for tail-tip biopsy in mice.

    PubMed

    Matthias, Nadine; Robinson, Mary A; Crook, Robyn; Lockworth, Cynthia R; Goodwin, Bradford S

    2013-03-01

    Tail-tip biopsy for genotyping of genetically modified mice older than 21 d typically is performed by using isoflurane anesthesia. Isoflurane-induced changes in behavior and metabolism can result in unexpected complications and death. We investigated whether cryoanalgesia by using ethylene chloride spray would be an effective local anesthetic for tail-tip biopsies in mice. C57BL/6J mice were allocated randomly into 4 groups (n = 10 each) to receive isoflurane anesthesia with tail biopsy, ethylene chloride spray on the tip of the tail before biopsy, ethylene chloride spray without biopsy, or no treatment. Blood glucose was measured periodically in both groups undergoing tail biopsy, and the tail-pinch assay was performed in all mice that received ethylene chloride spray. Body weight, water, and food intake were measured daily for 2 wk. In both groups undergoing tail biopsy, blood glucose levels at 15 min were significantly higher than those after 2 min. This elevation was greater and more prolonged after 30 min in mice that received isoflurane compared with ethylene chloride spray. Tail-pinch latency at 20 min was greater than that after 2 min in all mice that received ethylene chloride spray. All mice gained weight, and there was no difference in food and water intake among groups. We conclude that ethylene chloride spray is an effective local anesthetic and a valuable alternative to isoflurane. PMID:23562100

  2. Local Cryoanalgesia Is Effective for Tail-Tip Biopsy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matthias, Nadine; Robinson, Mary A; Crook, Robyn; Lockworth, Cynthia R; Goodwin, Bradford S

    2013-01-01

    Tail-tip biopsy for genotyping of genetically modified mice older than 21 d typically is performed by using isoflurane anesthesia. Isoflurane-induced changes in behavior and metabolism can result in unexpected complications and death. We investigated whether cryoanalgesia by using ethylene chloride spray would be an effective local anesthetic for tail-tip biopsies in mice. C57BL/6J mice were allocated randomly into 4 groups (n = 10 each) to receive isoflurane anesthesia with tail biopsy, ethylene chloride spray on the tip of the tail before biopsy, ethylene chloride spray without biopsy, or no treatment. Blood glucose was measured periodically in both groups undergoing tail biopsy, and the tail-pinch assay was performed in all mice that received ethylene chloride spray. Body weight, water, and food intake were measured daily for 2 wk. In both groups undergoing tail biopsy, blood glucose levels at 15 min were significantly higher than those after 2 min. This elevation was greater and more prolonged after 30 min in mice that received isoflurane compared with ethylene chloride spray. Tail-pinch latency at 20 min was greater than that after 2 min in all mice that received ethylene chloride spray. All mice gained weight, and there was no difference in food and water intake among groups. We conclude that ethylene chloride spray is an effective local anesthetic and a valuable alternative to isoflurane. PMID:23562100

  3. Protective Effects of Royal Jelly on Oxymetholone- Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nejati, Vahid; Zahmatkesh, Ensieh; Babaei, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study was carried out to investigate the possible protective effects of royal jelly (RJ) on oxymetholone (OXM)-induced oxidative liver injuries in mice. Methods: In total, 32 adult male NMRI mice were divided into four groups of eight mice each. Mice in groups 1 and 2 were orally administered 5 mg/kg/day OXM for 30 days. At the same time, mice in group 3 received RJ at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day. Saline control and RJ control groups were also included in this study. Results: Administration of 5 mg/kg OXM resulted in a significant decrease in total antioxidant capacity and catalase activity, as well as a significant increase in malondialdehyde (P<0.05). In addition, OXM-administrated mice showed a slight increase in liver enzymes, including alanine amino transferase, aspartate amino transferase, and alkaline phosphatase. Although OXM caused histopathological changes in the liver, RJ could significantly improve all of the above-mentioned parameters at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that RJ has a partially protective effect on OXM-induced liver toxicity in mice. PMID:27178489

  4. Evaluation of bone quality and quantity in osteoporotic mice--the effects of genistein and equol.

    PubMed

    Sehmisch, S; Uffenorde, J; Maehlmeyer, S; Tezval, M; Jarry, H; Stuermer, K M; Stuermer, E K

    2010-05-01

    The technology of gene manipulation is often used in mice. A crucial point for osteoporosis research is the evaluation of biomechanical and morphologic parameters. These parameters, however, are difficult to measure in mice. Nevertheless, this study demonstrates the capability of using techniques for the evaluation of bone quality and quantity after various treatments in osteopenic mice. After ovariectomy, 60 C57BL/6J mice were divided into 4 groups and were fed a soy-free diet (C) supplemented with estradiol, genistein or equol for 3 months. To analyze the osteoprotective effects of the tested supplements, we evaluated the bone biomechanical properties, histomorphometric changes and bone mineral density of the proximal tibiae metaphysis. The biomechanical parameters of genistein (GEN) were shown to be similar to those levels observed with estradiol (E). The biomechanical parameters of both GEN and E were significantly superior to those observed with C. Supplementation with equol (EQO) demonstrated higher mean biomechanical values than those observed with C. The histomorphometric evaluation demonstrated an increased number of nodes in mice treated with GEN and E as compared to the mice treated with EQO and C. Treatment with E and EQO led to improved cortical bone, which was only partly seen with the mice treated with GEN. The analysis of the bone mineral density (BMD) demonstrated that treatment with GEN and E resulted in a significant improvement as compared to the mice treated with C, while the cancellous density was significantly increased in all of the supplementation groups. This study conclusively demonstrated that bone quality and quantity parameters can be measured in mice. Furthermore, biomechanical and morphologic evaluations were shown to be reliable for use in mice. Further studies may combine these techniques with gene manipulation technology to better understand osteoporosis. Treatment with GEN resulted in improved biomechanical results and

  5. Effects of Berberine Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guanghui; Zhang Yaping; Tang Jinliang; Chen Zhengtang; Hu Yide; Wei Hong; Li Dezhi; Hao Ping; Wang Donglin

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced intestinal injury is a significant clinical problem in patients undergoing abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Berberine has been used as an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antimotility agent. The present study investigated the protective effect of berberine against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: The mice were administrated berberine or distilled water. A total of 144 mice underwent 0, 3, 6, 12, or 16 Gy single session whole-abdominal RT and 16 mice underwent 3 Gy/fraction/d for four fractions of fractionated abdominal RT. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-10, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, malonaldehyde, and apoptosis were assayed in the mice after RT. The body weight and food intake of the mice receiving fractionated RT were recorded. Another 72 mice who had undergone 12, 16, or 20 Gy abdominal RT were monitored for mortality every 12 h. Results: The body weight and food intake of the mice administered with distilled water decreased significantly compared with before RT. After the same dose of abdominal RT, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in plasma and malonalhehyde and apoptosis of the intestine were significantly greater in the control group than in the mice administered berberine (p < .05-.01). In contrast, interleukin-10 in the mice with berberine treatment was significantly greater than in the control group (p < .01). A similar result was found in the fractionated RT experiment and at different points after 16 Gy abdominal RT (p < .05-.01). Berberine treatment significantly delayed the point of death after 20 Gy, but not 16 Gy, abdominal RT (p < .01). Conclusion: Treatment with berberine can delay mortality and attenuated intestinal injury in mice undergoing whole abdominal RT. These findings could provide a useful therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  6. Osteoprotegerin is an effective countermeasure for spaceflight-induced bone loss in mice.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Shane A; Morony, Sean E; Ferguson, Virginia L; Simske, Steven J; Stodieck, Louis S; Warmington, Kelly S; Livingston, Eric W; Lacey, David L; Kostenuik, Paul J; Bateman, Ted A

    2015-12-01

    Bone loss associated with microgravity exposure poses a significant barrier to long-duration spaceflight. Osteoprotegerin-Fc (OPG-Fc) is a receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) inhibitor that causes sustained inhibition of bone resorption after a single subcutaneous injection. We tested the ability of OPG-Fc to preserve bone mass during 12 days of spaceflight (SF). 64-day-old female C57BL/6J mice (n=12/group) were injected subcutaneously with OPG-Fc (20mg/kg) or an inert vehicle (VEH), 24h prior to launch. Ground control (GC) mice (VEH or OPG-Fc) were maintained under environmental conditions that mimicked those in the space shuttle middeck. Age-matched baseline (BL) controls were sacrificed at launch. GC/VEH, but not SF/VEH mice, gained tibia BMD and trabecular volume fraction (BV/TV) during the mission (P<0.05 vs. BL). SF/VEH mice had lower BV/TV vs. GC/VEH mice, while SF/OPG-Fc mice had greater BV/TV than SF/VEH or GC/VEH. SF reduced femur elastic and maximum strength in VEH mice, with OPG-Fc increasing elastic strength in SF mice. Serum TRAP5b was elevated in SF/VEH mice vs. GC/VEH mice. Conversely, SF/OPG-Fc mice had lower TRAP5b levels, suggesting that OPG-Fc preserved bone during spaceflight via inhibition of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Decreased bone formation also contributed to the observed osteopenia, based on the reduced femur periosteal bone formation rate and serum osteocalcin level. Overall, these observations suggest that the beneficial effects of OPG-Fc during SF are primarily due to dramatic and sustained suppression of bone resorption. In growing mice, this effect appears to compensate for the SF-related inhibition of bone formation, while preventing any SF-related increase in bone resorption. We have demonstrated that the young mouse is an appropriate new model for SF-induced osteopenia, and that a single pre-flight treatment with OPG-Fc can effectively prevent the deleterious effects of SF on mouse bone.

  7. Osteoprotegerin is an effective countermeasure for spaceflight-induced bone loss in mice.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Shane A; Morony, Sean E; Ferguson, Virginia L; Simske, Steven J; Stodieck, Louis S; Warmington, Kelly S; Livingston, Eric W; Lacey, David L; Kostenuik, Paul J; Bateman, Ted A

    2015-12-01

    Bone loss associated with microgravity exposure poses a significant barrier to long-duration spaceflight. Osteoprotegerin-Fc (OPG-Fc) is a receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) inhibitor that causes sustained inhibition of bone resorption after a single subcutaneous injection. We tested the ability of OPG-Fc to preserve bone mass during 12 days of spaceflight (SF). 64-day-old female C57BL/6J mice (n=12/group) were injected subcutaneously with OPG-Fc (20mg/kg) or an inert vehicle (VEH), 24h prior to launch. Ground control (GC) mice (VEH or OPG-Fc) were maintained under environmental conditions that mimicked those in the space shuttle middeck. Age-matched baseline (BL) controls were sacrificed at launch. GC/VEH, but not SF/VEH mice, gained tibia BMD and trabecular volume fraction (BV/TV) during the mission (P<0.05 vs. BL). SF/VEH mice had lower BV/TV vs. GC/VEH mice, while SF/OPG-Fc mice had greater BV/TV than SF/VEH or GC/VEH. SF reduced femur elastic and maximum strength in VEH mice, with OPG-Fc increasing elastic strength in SF mice. Serum TRAP5b was elevated in SF/VEH mice vs. GC/VEH mice. Conversely, SF/OPG-Fc mice had lower TRAP5b levels, suggesting that OPG-Fc preserved bone during spaceflight via inhibition of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Decreased bone formation also contributed to the observed osteopenia, based on the reduced femur periosteal bone formation rate and serum osteocalcin level. Overall, these observations suggest that the beneficial effects of OPG-Fc during SF are primarily due to dramatic and sustained suppression of bone resorption. In growing mice, this effect appears to compensate for the SF-related inhibition of bone formation, while preventing any SF-related increase in bone resorption. We have demonstrated that the young mouse is an appropriate new model for SF-induced osteopenia, and that a single pre-flight treatment with OPG-Fc can effectively prevent the deleterious effects of SF on mouse bone. PMID

  8. The effect of baclofen on the locomotor activity of control and small-platform-stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Pokk, P; Vassiljev, V; Väli, M

    2000-09-01

    The effect of baclofen on the locomotor activity of control and small-platform-stressed mice was studied. In the small platform technique, mice are forced to stay on small platforms (d= 3.5 cm) surrounded by water for 24 h. Small platform stress increased the locomotor activity of mice in the actometer. Baclofen administered at doses of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg kg(-1)(i.p.) had no effect on the locomotor activity of control mice. In small-platform-stressed mice, the locomotor depressant effect of baclofen was pronounced, being statistically significant at a dose of 1.0 mg kg(-1). These data suggest that small platform stress induces hypersensitivity of mice to the motor depressant effect of baclofen. On the basis of these data it could be proposed that small platform stress induces changes in the function of GABA(B)receptors and that GABA(B)receptors participate in the behavioural changes caused by small platform stress.

  9. [Competitive effect of PSK against the immunosuppressive effect induced in the sera of mice bearing syngeneic tumors].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, K; Morita, I; Oguchi, Y; Fujii, T; Yoshikumi, C; Nomoto, K

    1986-12-01

    PSK is a protein-bound polysaccharide prepared from cultured mycelium of Coriolus versicolor. The appearance of an immunosuppressive effect in sera of tumor-bearing mice and its elimination by oral administration of PSK were investigated using an in vitro assay of blastoid transformation of normal spleen cells in response to PHA. (1) An inhibitory effect appeared in sera of X5563 plasmacytoma-bearing mice, while a facilitating effect was noted in sera of MH134 hepatoma- and MM 102 mammary tumor-bearing mice. (2) The presence of both an inhibitory and a facilitating factor was shown by Sephacryl gel fractionation. (3) Oral administration of PSK resulted in the elimination of the inhibitory effect from sera of X5563-bearing mice. The facilitating effect of sera from MH134-bearing mice was augmented by PSK administration, but that in sera from MM102-bearing mice was not influenced by such treatment. The summarized effects of these factors may be expressed as various types of effects in serum and PSK may be effective in the elimination of a suppressive factor from such sera.

  10. Effects of feeding lactobacillus GG on lethal irradiation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, M.Y.; Chang, T.W.; Gorbach, S.L.

    1987-05-01

    Mice exposed to 1400 rads of total body irradiation experienced 80%-100% mortality in 2 wk. Bacteremia was demonstrated in all dead animals. Feeding Lactobacillus GG strain reduced Pseudomonas bacteremia and prolonged survival time in animals colonized with this organism. In animals not colonized with Pseudomonas, feeding Lactobacillus GG also produced some reduction in early deaths, and there was less Gram-negative bacteremia in these animals compared with controls.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effect of Momordica charantia in sepsis mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Che-Yi; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Wang, Wei-Hsien; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Wild bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L. var. abbreviate Seringe), a common vegetable in Asia, is used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases, including inflammation. Extant literature indicates that wild bitter gourds have components that activate PPARα and PPARγ. This research probed the influence of adding wild bitter gourd to diets on inflammation responses in mice with sepsis induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS. Male BALB/c mice were divided normal, sepsis, positive control, and three experimental groups. The latter ate diets with low (1%), moderate (2%), and high (10%) ratios of wild bitter gourd lyophilized powder. Before mice were sacrificed, with the exception of the normal group, intraperitoneal injection of LPS induced sepsis in each group; positive control group was injected with LPS after PDTC. This experiment revealed starkly lower weights in groups with added wild bitter gourd than those of the remaining groups. Blood lipids (TG, cholesterol, and NEFA) were also lower in comparison to the sepsis group, and blood glucose concentrations recovered and approached normal levels. Blood biochemistry values related to inflammation reactions indicated GOT, GPT, C-RP, and NO concentrations of groups with added wild bitter gourd were all lower than those of the sepsis group. Secretion levels of the spleen pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α tallied significantly lower in comparison to the sepsis group, whereas secretion levels of IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokine increased. Expression level of proteins NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2 were significantly inhibited. Results indicate wild bitter gourd in diets promoted lipid metabolism, reducing fat accumulation, and improving low blood glucose in sepsis. Addition of wild bitter gourd can reduce inflammation biochemical markers or indicators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the body, hence improving the inflammation responses in mice with sepsis. PMID:25153878

  12. Comparison of pulmonary biochemical effects of low-level ozone exposure on mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, M G; Elsayed, N M; Quinn, C L; Postlethwait, E M; Gardner, D E; Graham, J A

    1982-01-01

    The biochemical effects of a 5-d continuous exposure to 0.45 ppm (882 microgram/m3) O3, were studied in the lungs of 2-mo-old male, specific-pathogen-free mice (Swiss Webster) and three strains of rats (Long-Evans, Wistar, and Sprague-Dawley). The results, expressed per lung, indicated a general increase in lung weight, DNA and protein contents, oxygen consumption, sulfhydryl metabolism, and the activities of several NADP+-reducing enzymes for all exposed animals relative to their controls. When the increases in the two species (mice versus three strains of rats) were compared, the mice showed significantly higher increases than the rats in several parameters. The responses among the three strains of rats were variable, but the differences were not significant. These observations suggest that Swiss Webster mice may offer a more sensitive animal model than rats for studying the pulmonary effects of a given low-level O3 exposure.

  13. The Effects of Rm-CSF and Ril-6 Therapy on Immunosuppressed Antiorthostatically Suspended Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstong, Jason W.; Kirby-Dobbels, Kathy; Chapes, Steven K.

    1995-01-01

    Antiorthostatically suspended mice had suppressed macrophage development in both unloaded and loaded bones, indicating a systemic effect. Bone marrow cells from those mice secreted less macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) than did control mice. Because M-CSF and IL-6 are important to bone marrow macrophage maturation, we formulated the hypothesis that suppressed macrophage development occurred as a result of the depressed levels of either M-CSF or IL-6. To test the hypothesis, mice were administered recombinant M-CSF or IL-6 intraperitoneally. We showed that recombinant M-CSF therapy, but not recombinant IL-6 therapy, reversed the suppressive effects of orthostatic suspension on macrophage development. These data suggest that bone marrow cells that produce M-CSF are affected by antiorthostatic suspension and may contribute to the inhibited maturation of bone marrow macrophage progenitors.

  14. Immunomodulatory effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. extract on cyclophosphamide induced toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anamika; Gautam, Manish K; Singh, Rahul K; Kumar, M Vijay; Rao, Ch V; Goel, R K; Anupurba, Shampa

    2010-11-01

    Immunomodulatory effect of ethanolic extract (50%) of M. oleifera leaves (MOE) has been studied in normal and immunosuppressed mice models. Different doses of MOE i.e. 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight of mice were administered orally for 15 days. Cyclophosphamide at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight was administered orally for the next 3 days. On day 16 and 19, hematological parameters like white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell (RBC) count, haemoglobin level (Hb), percent neutrophils and organ weight were recorded. Effect of MOE on phagocytic activity of mice macrophages was determined by carbon clearance test. MOE showed significant dose dependent increase in WBC, percent neutrophils, weight of thymus and spleen along with phagocytic index in normal and immunosuppressed mice. The results indicate that MOE significantly reduced cyclophosphamide induced immunosuppression by stimulating both cellular and humoral immunity. PMID:21117458

  15. Piperine reverses the effects of corticosterone on behavior and hippocampal BDNF expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qing-Qiu; Huang, Zhen; Zhong, Xiao-Ming; Xian, Yan-Fang; Ip, Siu-Po

    2014-07-01

    A mouse model of depression has been recently developed by exogenous corticosterone administration. The present study aimed to examine the antidepressant-like effect and the possible mechanisms of piperine, a major alkaloid of black pepper (Piper nigrum Linn.) and long pepper (Piper longum Linn.), in corticosterone-induced depression in mice. The results showed that 3-weeks corticosterone injections caused depression-like behavior in mice, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose consumption and increase in immobility time in the forced swim test and tail suspension test. Moreover, it was found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein and mRNA levels in the hippocampus were significantly decreased in corticosterone-treated mice. Treating the animals with piperine significantly suppressed behavioral and biochemical changes induced by corticosterone. The results suggest that piperine produces an antidepressant-like effect in corticosterone-treated mice, which is possibly mediated by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the hippocampus.

  16. Neuroprotective effect of fucoidan from Turbinaria decurrens in MPTP intoxicated Parkinsonic mice.

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, Selvaraju; Umayaparvathi, Shanmugam; Saravanan, Ravichandran; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Balasubramanian, Thangavel

    2016-05-01

    Fucoidan is one of the dominant sulfated polysaccharide which was extracted from the brown seaweed Turbinaria decurrens. In the behavioral study mice treated with fucoidan showed better response than the MPTP treated mice. Antioxidants and dopamine level has been increased in the fucoidan treated mice when compared to MPTP induced mice. In Immunohistochemistry, the increase of TH positive cells in the fucoidan treated group is correlated with the TH protein levels in substantia nigra and corpus striatum. The increase is greater than the content of dopamine and DOPAC, which may be explained that the dopaminergic terminals are more sensitive to MPTP toxicity and therefore are more severely damaged than the dopaminergic cell bodies. In immunoblotting TH and DAT was used, both the antibodies expression in MPTP was reduced and reversed in other groups. From the results it was conformed that the fucoidan has a neuroprotective effect without any side effects.

  17. An experimental study of the "faster-is-slower" effect using mice under panic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng; Ma, Jian; Liu, Tianyang; Ran, Tong; Si, Youliang; Li, Tao

    2016-06-01

    A number of crowd accidents in last decades have attracted the interests of scientists in the study of self-organized behavior of crowd under extreme conditions. The faster-is-slower effect is one of the most referenced behaviors in pedestrian dynamics. However, this behavior has not been experimentally verified yet. A series of experiments with mice under panic were conducted in a bi-dimensional space. The mice were trained to be familiar with the way of escape. A varying number of joss sticks were used to produce different levels of stimulus to drive the mice to escape. The evacuation process was video-recorded for further analysis. The experiment found that the escape times significantly increased with the levels of stimulus due to the stronger competition of selfish mice in panic condition. The faster-is-slower effect was experimentally verified. The probability distributions of time intervals showed a power law and the burst sizes exhibited an exponential behavior.

  18. Protective effect of humus extract against Trypanosoma brucei infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Hiroshi; Denso; Okazaki, Fumi; Ishida, Saeko

    2008-11-01

    Humic substances are formed during the decomposition of organic matter in humus, and are found in many natural environments in which organic materials and microorganisms are present. Oral administration of humus extract to mice successfully induced effective protection against experimental challenge by the two subspecies, Trypanosoma brucei brucei and T. brucei gambiense. Mortality was most reduced among mice who received a 3% humus extract for 21 days in drinking water ad libitum. Spleen cells from humus-administered mice exhibited significant non-specific cytotoxic activity against L1210 mouse leukemia target cells. Also, spleen cells produced significantly higher amounts of Interferon-gamma when stimulated in vitro with Concanavalin A than cells from normal controls. These results clearly show that administration to mice of humus extract induced effective resistance against Trypanosoma infection. Enhancement of the innate immune system may be involved in host defense against trypanosomiasis.

  19. Effects of metallothionein on zinc metabolism in lethal-milk mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Grider, A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The lethal-milk mice (C57BL/6J-Im) exhibit various pleiotropic effects, including a congenital otolith defect, production of zinc-deficient milk, and clinical signs of a systemic Zn deficiency by one year of age. The clinical signs include alopecia, dermatitis, and skin lesions. The systemic zinc deficiency may be due to increased levels of metallothionein (MT) in the intestine and/or liver of Im mice. The untreated Im mice contain twice as much intestinal MT as do C57BL/6J-(+/sup im//+ /sup Im/) (B6) controls. This was determined by a sulfhydryl assay, by the /sup 109/Cd-saturation/hemolysate method, and by the /sup 65/Zn-binding assay. Various concentrations of Cd or Zn were added to the drinking water three days before assaying for MT. Compared to B6 mice, the Im mice exhibited more MT in their liver by the /sup 65/Zn-MT binding assay (3-fold) and by the /sup 109/Cd-saturation/hemolysate method (18-fold). The effects of the two zinc treatments did not differ significantly between Im and B6 mice. The retention and excretion of /sup 65/Zn (administered intraperitoneally) were determined over a 14-day period, but the results did not different between the Im and B6 mice. The increased concentrations of MT within the Im mice was not significantly different for the intestine and liver. Based on these data and other studies, the Im mice may exhibit alterations in zinc homeostasis due to some deregulation of MT metabolism, including the inner ear of the fetus, the lactating mammary gland, and the intestine and liver of adults by one year of age.

  20. Effect of Diets Containing Sucrose vs. D-tagatose in Hypercholesterolemic Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Police, S.; Harris, J; Lodder, R; Cassis, L

    2008-01-01

    Effects of functional sweeteners on the development of the metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis are unknown. The objective was to compare the effect of dietary carbohydrate in the form of sucrose (SUCR) to D-tagatose (TAG; an isomer of fructose currently used as a low-calorie sweetener) on body weight, blood cholesterol concentrations, hyperglycemia, and atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLr-/-) mice. LDLr-/- male and female mice were fed either standard murine diet or a diet enriched with TAG or SUCR as carbohydrate sources for 16 weeks. TAG and SUCR diets contained equivalent amounts (g/kg) of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. We measured food intake, body weight, adipocyte diameter, serum cholesterol and lipoprotein concentrations, and aortic atherosclerosis. Macrophage immunostaining and collagen content were examined in aortic root lesions. CONTROL and TAG-fed mice exhibited similar energy intake, body weights and blood glucose and insulin concentrations, but SUCR-fed mice exhibited increased energy intake and became obese and hyperglycemic. Adipocyte diameter increased in female SUCR-fed mice compared to TAG and CONTROL. Male and female SUCR-fed mice had increased serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations compared to TAG and CONTROL. Atherosclerosis was increased in SUCR-fed mice of both genders compared to TAG and CONTROL. Lesions from SUCR-fed mice exhibited pronounced macrophage immunostaining and reductions in collagen content compared to TAG and CONTROL mice. These results demonstrate that in comparison to sucrose, equivalent substitution of TAG as dietary carbohydrate does not result in the same extent of obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis.

  1. Effects of cadmium and monensin on spleen of mice, subjected to subacute cadmium intoxication.

    PubMed

    Gluhcheva, Yordanka; Ivanova, Juliana; Ganeva, Sonja; Mitewa, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of cadmium (Cd) and monensin on spleen function in mice, subjected to subacute Cd-intoxication. Adult male ICR mice were divided into three groups (n = 6 per group) as follows: control group (received distilled water and food ad libitum); Cd-treated (20 mg/kg/b.w./day Cd(II) acetate for the first 2 weeks of the experimental protocol); monensin-treated mice (20 mg/kg/day Cd(II) acetate for the first 2 weeks followed by treatment with 16 mg/kg b.w./day monensin from days 15 to 28. On day 29, mice were sacrificed under light ether anesthesia. Exposure to Cd induced an increase in spleen index (SI). The treatment of cd-intoxicated mice with monensin significantly reduced SI compared to Cd alone. The data from the atomic absorbption analysis of spleen revealed a significant Cd accumulation in Cd-treated mice compared to controls, accompanied by a significant depletion of Fe concentration up to 30%. The treatment of the Cd-administered mice with monensin resulted in a significant decrease of Cd in spleen by 50% compared to Cd alone. Fe recovery occured in spleen of monensin-treated mice. Histopathological analysis of spleen showed that Cd significantly decreased the number of megakaryocytes and disturbed extramedullary hematopoiesis. The number of megakaryocytes increased when monensin was added. The data in this study suggest that monensin was able to reduce the effects of Cd on hematopoesis in mice. PMID:23514074

  2. 2,5-hexanedione-induced immunomodulatory effect in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Upreti, R.K.; Shanker, R.

    1987-06-01

    The immunotoxic potential of 2,5-hexanedione (2,5-Hxdn), the end metabolite of n-hexane/methyl n-butyl ketone, was evaluated in a mouse model involving multiple pathomorphological, hematological, and immunological assays. Young adult male Swiss albino mice were given either single or seven consecutive oral doses of 0.2 x LD/sub 50/ of 2.5-Hxdn. None of the treated mice exhibited any sign of hind limb weakness up to 1 week. On the eighth day, half the animals were sacrificed for initial pathomorphological studies of various organs and the other half were subjected to several immune function tests. The results revealed treatment-related reduction in cellularity of spleen, thymus, and mesentric lymph nodes and pathotoxicological changes. Further, immune function tests such as delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, plaque-forming cell assay, phagocytosis by adherent peritoneal exudate cells, and resistance to endotoxin shock were considerably impaired. These results suggest that 2,5-Hxdn treatment causes profound impairment of immunity in mice even before the onset of peripheral neuropathy.

  3. [Effects of baicalin on HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Hu, Jian-Da; Huang, Yi; Chen, Ying-Yu; Li, Jing; Chen, Bu-Yuan

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of baicalin on HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice in vivo and explore its mechanism. Xenograft tumor model of HL-60 cells in nude mice was established, which was divided randomly into 6 groups: negative control group (injection of 5% NaHCO(3)), 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg baicalin groups, combination group (50 mg/kg baicalin + 2 mg/kg VP16) and positive control group (VP16 4 mg/kg). The nude mice with HL-60 cell xenografts were treated with drugs via intraperitoneal injection daily. After treatment for 14 days average weigh and inhibitory rate of transplanted tumor stripped from 5 nude mice in each group were calculated, and the ultrastructure change of xenografts cells were tested by transmission electron microscopy. Histopathologic examination was used to observed the change of main organs in nude mice. The expression of signaling molecular PI3K/Akt proteins extracted from xenografts was detected by Western blot. The effects of baicalin on overall survival time in nude mice with HL-60 cell xenografts were evaluated. The results showed that baicalin could inhibit the growth of transplanted tumors in dose-dependent manner. There were more necrotic and apoptotic cells in mice of baicalin-treated groups and combination group than that in mice of negative control group. Baicalin could inhibit the proliferation of HL-60 cells in vivo by down-regulating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, where the expressions of p-Akt, mTOR and p-mTOR proteins decreased compared with negative control group, and no significant difference of Akt expression was found between different groups. Compared with negative control group, the median survival time of mice in combination group was more prolongated (P < 0.05). It is concluded that baicalin can inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice, and prolong median survival time of nude mice. The possible mechanisms may be related to inhibition of Akt activity and down

  4. Role of paraoxonase-1 in bone anabolic effects of parathyroid hormone in hyperlipidemic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jinxiu; Cheng, Henry; Atti, Elisa; Shih, Diana M.; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Anabolic effects of PTH were tested in hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing PON1. ► Expression of antioxidant regulatory genes was induced in PON1 overexpression. ► Bone resorptive activity was reduced in PON1 overexpressing hyperlipidemic mice. ► PON1 restored responsiveness to intermittent PTH in bones of hyperlipidemic mice. -- Abstract: Hyperlipidemia blunts anabolic effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cortical bone, and the responsiveness to PTH are restored in part by oral administration of the antioxidant ApoA-I mimetic peptide, D-4F. To evaluate the mechanism of this rescue, hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing the high-density lipoprotein-associated antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg}) were generated, and daily PTH injections were administered to Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} and to littermate Ldlr{sup −/−} mice. Expression of bone regulatory genes was determined by realtime RT-qPCR, and cortical bone parameters of the femoral bones by micro-computed tomographic analyses. PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTH receptor (PTH1R), activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in femoral cortical bone, as well as significantly greater cortical bone mineral content, thickness, and area in femoral diaphyses compared with untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice. In contrast, in control mice (Ldlr{sup −/−}) without PON1 overexpression, PTH treatment did not induce these markers. Calvarial bone of PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice also had significantly greater expression of osteoblastic differentiation marker genes as well as BMP-2-target and Wnt-target genes. Untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTHR1 than untreated Ldlr{sup −/−} mice, whereas sclerostin expression was reduced. In femoral cortical bones, expression levels of transcription factors, Fox

  5. [Specific features of the anticonvulsant effect of memantine in mice intoxicated with a model organic phosphate].

    PubMed

    Iudin, M A; Chepur, S V; Bykov, V N; Kurpiakova, A F; Subbotina, S N; Nikiforov, A S; Ivanov, I M

    2013-01-01

    The effect of memantine administration has been studied on the model of mice poisoning with an anticholinesterase compound. It is established that the memantine action is due to its influence on the cholinesterase activity in the brain, blood plasma, and erythrocytes in addition to its NMDA-blocking action. Memantine promotes oxime-induced erythrocyte enzyme reactivation on the model of mice poisoning with anticholinesterase compound (0.8 LD50).

  6. [Effect of forced swimming on the memory track retention in mice with various behavioral stereotypes].

    PubMed

    Dubrovina, N I; Loskutova, L V; Savost'ianova, D A

    2003-08-01

    The effects of forced swimming on retrieval of the passive avoidance during its extinction were found to depend on aggressive and submissive behavior. In mice without generated behavioral stereotypes, swim stress applied before or after training stabilized retention of the memory trace retrieval. The similar improved influence of forced swimming on memory storage is revealed in submissive, but not aggressive mice. The increase of resistance against extinction under the swim stress can be connected to facilitation of emotional processes.

  7. Berberine enhances antidiabetic effects and attenuates untoward effects of canagliflozin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cai-Ming; Jiang, Xin; Ouyang, Xiao-Xi; Zhang, Ya-Ou; Xie, Wei-Dong

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed at determining whether berberine can enhance the antidiabetic effects and alleviate the adverse effects of canagliflozin in diabetes mellitus. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were introduced, and the combined effects of berberine and canagliflozin on glucose metabolism and kidney functions were investigated. Our results showed that berberine combined with canagliflozin (BC) increased reduction of fasting and postprandial blood glucose, diet, and water intake compared with berberine or canagliflozin alone. Interestingly, BC showed greater decrease in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and lower total urine glucose excretion than canagliflozin alone. In addition, BC showed increased phosphorylated 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) expression and decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) levels in kidneys, compared with berberine or canagliflozin alone. These results indicated that BC was a stronger antidiabetic than berberine or canagliflozin alone with less negative side effects on the kidneys in the diabetic mice. The antidiabetic effect was likely to be mediated by synergically promoting the expression of pAMPK and reducing the expression of TNFα in kidneys. The present study represented the first report that canagliflozin combined with berberine was a promising treatment for diabetes mellitus. The exact underlying mechanisms of action should be investigated in future studies. PMID:27507202

  8. Neurochemical, behavioral and physiological effects of pharmacologically enhanced serotonin levels in serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Meredith A.; Jensen, Catherine L.; French, Helen T.; Stein, Alison R.; Huang, Su-Jan; Tolliver, Teresa J.; Murphy, Dennis L.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale Serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout (−/−) mice have an altered phenotype in adulthood, including high baseline anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, associated with increased baseline extracellular serotonin levels throughout life. Objectives To examine the effects of increases in serotonin following administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP) in SERT wildtype (+/+), heterozygous (+/−) and −/− mice. Results 5-HTP increased serotonin in all five brain areas examined, with ~2–5-fold increases in SERT +/+ and +/− mice, and greater 4.5–11.7-fold increases in SERT −/− mice. Behaviorally, 5-HTP induced exaggerated serotonin syndrome behaviors in SERT −/− mice, with similar effects in male and female mice. Studies suggest promiscuous serotonin uptake by the dopamine transporter (DAT) in SERT −/− mice, and here, the DAT blocker GBR 12909 enhanced 5-HTP-induced behaviors in SERT −/− mice. Physiologically, 5-HTP induced exaggerated temperature effects in SERT-deficient mice. The 5-HT1A antagonist WAY 100635 decreased 5-HTP-induced hypothermia in SERT +/+ and +/− mice, with no effect in SERT −/− mice, whereas the 5-HT7 antagonist SB 269970 decreased this exaggerated response in SERT −/− mice only. WAY 100635 and SB 269970 together completely blocked 5-HTP-induced hypothermia in SERT +/− and −/− mice. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that SERT −/− mice have exaggerated neurochemical, behavioral and physiological responses to further increases in serotonin, and provide the first evidence of intact 5-HT7 receptor function in SERT −/− mice, with interesting interactions between 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors. As roles for 5-HT7 receptors in anxiety and depression were recently established, the current findings have implications for understanding the high anxiety and depressive-like phenotype of SERT-deficient mice. PMID:18712364

  9. Effect of glucose in mice after acute experimental poisoning with arsenic trioxide (As2O3).

    PubMed

    Reichl, F X; Szinicz, L; Kreppel, H; Fichtl, B; Forth, W

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate depletion (glucose and glycogen) was reported to be a major problem in acute arsenic poisoning. In the present paper the effectiveness of glucose substitution was investigated in mice after acute experimental poisoning with As2O3. Four groups of ten mice each received As2O3, 12.9 mg/kg, s.c. After the injection the first group remained without further treatment, the second received saline every 2 h, the third 5% glucose, and the fourth 5% glucose +0.12 IE insulin/kg i.p. Groups 5 and 6, five mice each, received either saline or glucose only. Group 7, five mice, remained without any treatment. Immediately after death the livers were removed for the enzymatic determination of glucose and glycogen. Mice receiving As2O3 only died within 22 h. The mean survival time was 12.4 h. In mice receiving As2O3 and after that saline, glucose, or glucose + insulin, an increase in the survival time to 30.8, 40.7, and 43.6 h, respectively, was observed. All mice which died showed a significant decrease in the liver glucose and glycogen content, compared to control animals. In livers of survivors, the glucose and glycogen content was not different to the control groups. The data support the assumption that carbohydrate depletion is an important factor in arsenic toxicity, and its substitution should be considered in the treatment of arsenic poisoning.

  10. Expression of GAT1 in male reproductive system and its effects on reproduction in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, JinFu; Gui, YaPing; Yuan, Tao; Bian, CuiDong; Guo, LiHe

    2009-12-01

    The present study was carried out to identify GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transport protein I (GAT1) in male reproductive organs and to study the effect of GAT1 overexpression on the male reproductive system in GAT1 transgenic mice (TG). Expression and location of GAT1 in testes, epididymis, and sperm of wild-type (WT) mice were identified by immunohistochemistry and western-blot. Histological changes of testes, epididymis, and sperm of transgenic mice overexpressing GAT1 were detected by immunofluorenscent staining and haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. GAT1 expression was detected in the testes, epididymis, and sperm of non-transgenic mice. Vacuolization and deformity of spermatogenic cells were observed in the transgenic mice, but the epididymis was unremarkable. Immunofluorenscent staining showed that the number of diastrophic and decapitated sperm increased significantly in transgenic mice to 46.9% from 7.3% in nontransgenic mice. These results suggest that abnormal expression of GAT1 could result in spermiogenesis function injury, sperm paramorphia and dysgenesis.

  11. [Effects of cactus, alove veral, momorcica charantia on reducing the blood glucose of diabetic mice].

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Shen, X; Long, Z; Yang, Q

    2001-07-01

    The effects of cactus, alove veral and momorcica charantia on reducing the blood glucose level of mice were observed. The diabetic model with no symptom in mice was established by injection of streptozotocin(STZ) 80 mg/kg BW into abdominal cavity for 11 days. The diabetic mice were randomly divided into 8 groups: STZ diabetic model, diet A, diet B, cactus, alove veral, momordica charantia and glyburide groups. Cactus (60 g/kg BW), alove veral (60 g/kg BW), and momordica charantia (30 g/kg BW) were administrated orally each day to the diabetic mice for another 21 days. Serum glucose of mice fasting for 12 hours and 2 hours after meal was determined with the method of glucose-oxidase at the 21th day of the experiment. The results showed that serum glucose levels of diabetic mice were significantly higher than the normal control group (P < 0.01). After giving diet A, cactus, alove veral and momorcica charantia juice for 21 days, the serum glucose concentration of these diabetic mice were significantly lower than STZ diabetic model group (P < 0.01) but still higher than the normal control group.

  12. Preventive effects of cedrol against alopecia in cyclophosphamide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yan; Lu, Qiu-Li; Lin, Zhe; Zhao, Yuqing

    2016-09-01

    Although numerous hypotheses have been proposed to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), effective pharmaceuticals have yet to be developed. In our study, the back hairs of C57BL/6 mice were factitiously removed. These mice were then treated with cedrol or minoxidil daily. Mice with early-stage anagen VI hair follicles were treated with cyclophosphamide (CYP, 125mg/kg) to induce alopecia. The CYP-damaged hair follicles were observed and quantified by using a digital photomicrograph. The results demonstrated that the minoxidil-treated mice suffered from complete alopecia similar to the model 6days after CYP administration. Simultaneously, the cedrol-treated (200mg/kg) mice manifested mild alopecia with 40% suppression. Histological observation revealed that anagen hair follicles of the cedrol-pretreated mice (82.5%) likely provided from damage compared with the sparse and dystrophic hair follicles of the model mice (37.0%). Therefore, the use of topical cedrol can prevent hair follicle dystrophy and provide local protection against CIA. PMID:27522546

  13. The effects of cosmic Particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: V. Preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. Part I. physiological studies.

    PubMed

    Leon, H A; Suri, K; McTigue, M; Smith, J; Cooper, W; Miquel, J; Ashley, W W; Behnke, A R; Saunders, J F

    1975-04-01

    Tests were carried out on pocket mice to ascertain their tolerance to elevated oxygen pressures alone and to a combination of hyperoxta and heat in excess of that expected during the flight of the mice on Apollo XVII. the mice withstood oxygen partial pressures up to 12 pst at normal room temperature (24 degrees C, 75 degrees F) over a period of 7 days. A few mice previously exposed to increased PO2 died in the course of exposure to an oxygen pressure of 10 pst or 12 psi (517 mm or 620 mm Hg) for 13 d in ambient heat of 32 degrees C (90 degrees F). Supplemental vitamin E and physiological saline loading given prior to exposure had no apparent protective effect. The overall conclusion was that the pocket mice which were to go on Apollo XVII could readily survive the ambient atmosphere to which they would be exposed.

  14. Metallothionein-I/II null mice are more sensitive than wild-type mice to the hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic effects of chronic oral or injected inorganic arsenicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Liu, Y; Goyer, R A; Achanzar, W; Waalkes, M P

    2000-06-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is a low-molecular-weight, sulfhydryl-rich, metal-binding protein that can protect against the toxicity of cadmium, mercury, and copper. However, the role of MT in arsenic (As)-induced toxicity is less certain. To better define the ability of MT to modify As toxicity, MT-I/II knockout (MT-null) mice and the corresponding wild-type mice (WT) were exposed to arsenite [As(III)] or arsenate [As(V)] either through the drinking water for 48 weeks, or through repeated sc injections (5 days/week) for 15 weeks. Chronic As exposure increased tissue MT concentrations (2-5-fold) in the WT but not in MT-null mice. Arsenic by both routes produced damage to the liver (fatty infiltration, inflammation, and focal necrosis) and kidney (tubular cell vacuolization, inflammatory cell infiltration, and interstitial fibrosis) in both MT-null and WT mice. However, in MT-null mice, the pathological lesions were more frequent and severe when compared to WT mice. This was confirmed biochemically, in that, at the higher oral doses of As, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were increased more in MT-null mice (60%) than in WT mice (30%). Chronic As exposures produced 2-10 fold elevation of serum interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels, with greater increases seen by repeated injections than by oral exposure, and again, MT-null mice had higher serum cytokines than WT mice after As exposure. Repeated As injections also decreased hepatic glutathione (GSH) by 35%, but GSH-peroxidase and GSH-reductase were minimally affected. MT-null mice were more sensitive than WT mice to the effect of GSH depletion by As(V). Hepatic caspase-3 activity was increased (2-3-fold) in both WT and MT-null mice, indicative of apoptotic cell death. In summary, chronic inorganic As exposure produced injuries to multiple organs, and MT-null mice are generally more susceptible than WT mice to As-induced toxicity regardless of route of exposure, suggesting that MT could be a

  15. Antidepressant effects of insulin in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice: Modulation of brain serotonin system.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepali; Kurhe, Yeshwant; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh

    2014-04-22

    Diabetes is a persistent metabolic disorder, which often leads to depression as a result of the impaired neurotransmitter function. Insulin is believed to have antidepressant effects in depression associated with diabetes; however, the mechanism underlying the postulated effect is poorly understood. In the present study, it is hypothesized that insulin mediates an antidepressant effect in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes in mice through modulation of the serotonin system in the brain. Therefore, the current study investigated the antidepressant effect of insulin in STZ induced diabetes in mice and insulin mediated modulation in the brain serotonin system. In addition, the possible pathways that lead to altered serotonin levels as a result of insulin administration were examined. Experimentally, Swiss albino mice of either sex were rendered diabetic by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of STZ. After one week, diabetic mice received a single dose of either insulin or saline or escitalopram for 14days. Thereafter, behavioral studies were conducted to test the behavioral despair effects using forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), followed by biochemical estimations of serotonin concentrations and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the whole brain content. The results demonstrated that, STZ treated diabetic mice exhibited an increased duration of immobility in FST and TST as compared to non-diabetic mice, while insulin treatment significantly reversed the effect. Biochemical assays revealed that administration of insulin attenuated STZ treated diabetes induced neurochemical alterations as indicated by elevated serotonin levels and decreased MAO-A and MAO-B activities in the brain. Collectively, the data indicate that insulin exhibits antidepressant effects in depression associated with STZ induced diabetes in mice through the elevation of the brain serotonin levels.

  16. Fasting activated histaminergic neurons and enhanced arousal effect of caffeine in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Qun; Li, Rui; Wu, Xu; Zhu, Fen; Takata, Yohko; Zhang, Ze; Zhang, Meng-Qi; Li, Shan-Qun; Qu, Wei-Min

    2015-06-01

    Caffeine, a popular psychoactive compound, promotes wakefulness via blocking adenosine A2A receptors in the shell of the nucleus accumbens, which projects to the arousal histaminergic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN). The TMN controls several behaviors such as wakefulness and feeding. Fasting has been reported to activate the TMN histaminergic neurons to increase arousal. Therefore, we propose that caffeine may promote greater arousal under fasting rather than normal feeding conditions. In the current study, locomotor activity recording, electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram recording and c-Fos expression were used in wild type (WT) and histamine H1 receptor (H1R) knockout (KO) mice to investigate the arousal effects of caffeine under fasting conditions. Caffeine (15mg/kg) enhanced locomotor activity in fasted mice for 5h, but only did so for 3h in normally fed animals. Pretreatment with the H1R antagonist pyrilamine abolished caffeine-induced stimulation on locomotor activity in fasted mice. EEG recordings confirmed that caffeine-induced wakefulness for 3h in fed WT mice, and for 5h in fasted ones. A stimulatory effect of caffeine was not observed in fasted H1R KO mice. Furthermore, c-Fos expression was increased in the TMN under fasting conditions. These results indicate that caffeine had greater wakefulness-promoting effects in fasted mice through the mediation of H1R.

  17. Antihyperglycemic Effect of Ganoderma Lucidum Polysaccharides on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fenglin; Zhang, Yiming; Zhong, Zhijian

    2011-01-01

    The current study evaluated the glucose-lowering effect of ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (Gl-PS) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The diabetic mice were randomly divided into four groups (8 mice per group): diabetic control group, low-dose Gl-PS treated group (50 mg/kg, Gl-PS), high-dose Gl-PS treated group (150 mg/kg, Gl-PS) and positive drug control treated group (glibenclamide, 4 mg/kg), with normal mice used as the control group. Body weights, fasting blood glucose (FBG), serum insulin and blood lipid levels of mice were measured. After 28 days of treatment with Gl-PS, body weights and serum insulin levels of the Gl-PS treated groups was significantly higher than that of the diabetic control group, whereas FBG levels was significantly lower. Moreover, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels of the Gl-PS treated groups had dropped, whereas the high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels had increased. In addition, according to acute toxicity studies, Gl-PS did not cause behavioral changes and any death of mice. These data suggest that Gl-PS has an antihyperglycemic effect. Furthermore, considering the Gl-PS effects on lipid profile, it may be a potential hypolipidaemic agent, which will be a great advantage in treating diabetic conditions associated with atherosclerosis or hyperlipidemia. PMID:22016649

  18. Inhibitory avoidance learning in CD1 mice: Effects of chronic social defeat stress.

    PubMed

    Monleón, Santiago; Duque, Aranzazu; Vinader-Caerols, Concepción

    2015-06-01

    Chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) is an animal model widely used to determine the neurobiological mechanisms of stress and its associated pathologies. In this study, the effects of CSDS on inhibitory avoidance (IA) were evaluated in post-pubertal and adult male CD1 mice, instead of the C57BL/6J strain used in the CSDS standard protocol. CSDS consisted of daily 5-min (experiments 1 and 2) or 10-min (experiment 3) agonistic encounters on 21 consecutive days. Twenty four hours after the last session of CSDS, all the mice were tested for IA. They were also evaluated in an elevated plus-maze, obtaining complementary measures of locomotor activity and emotionality. In experiments 1 and 2, IA learning was confirmed in both non-stressed and stressed groups, showing stressed post-pubertal mice higher test latencies than controls. In experiment 3, IA was confirmed in the non-stressed but not in the stressed group. In conclusion, a moderate degree of CSDS (5-min encounters) enhances memory in post-pubertal but not in adult mice, while a high degree (10-min encounters) prevents the memory formation of IA in mice. These effects of CSDS on memory are not secondary to motor or emotional effects of stress. Furthermore, CD1 has been shown to be a valid strain for the stressed mice in the CSDS model. PMID:25745884

  19. Polysaccharides from Angelica and Astragalus exert hepatoprotective effects against carbon-tetrachloride-induced intoxication in mice.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xiuying; Fan, Wenbo; Yu, Shuang; Li, Yan; Ma, Xiaolong; Liu, Lu; Ren, Jing; Zhang, Weijie

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of polysaccharide from Angelica and Astragalus (AAP) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced liver damage in mice. A total of 120 Kunming mice were randomly distributed among 6 groups comprising (i) the normal control mice, (ii) the CCl4 treatment group, (iii) the bifendate treatment group, (iv) the AAP treatment group, (v) the Angelica sinensis polysaccharide (ASP) treatment group, and (vi) the Astragalus membranaceus polysaccharide (AMP) treatment group. AAP, ASP and AMP were administered to mice treated with CCl4. The activities of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) in the serum, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the liver tissues were quantified, as well as the liver index. Hepatic histological changes were observed by staining liver sections with hematoxylin and eosin. Our results show that bifendate, AAP, ASP, and AMP significantly decreased the activities of MDA, AST, and ALT, and enhanced the activity of SOD in CCl4-treated mice. Bifendate, AAP, ASP, and AMP consistently ameliorated the liver injuries induced with CCl4. Notably, the hepatoprotective effect of AAP was stronger than that of bifendate, ASP, or AMP. In addition, AAP alleviated liver inflammation and decreased the liver indexes of mice induced with CCl4. These effects were at least partly due to the antioxidant properties of AAP in scavenging free radicals to ameliorate oxidative stress and to inhibit lipid peroxidation.

  20. Cognitive-enhancing effects of hydrolysate of polygalasaponin in SAMP8 mice*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pan; Xu, Shu-ping; Wang, Ke-zhu; Lu, Cong; Zhang, Hong-xia; Pan, Rui-le; Qi, Chang; Yang, Yan-yan; Li, Ying-hui; Liu, Xin-min

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study is to evaluate the cognitive-enhancing effects of hydrolysate of polygalasaponin (HPS) on senescence accelerate mouse P8 (SAMP8) mice, an effective Alzheimer’s disease (AD) model, and to research the relevant mechanisms. Methods: The cognitive-enhancing effects of HPS on SAMP8 mice were assessed using Morris water maze (MWM) and step-through passive avoidance tests. Then N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit expression for both the cortex and hippocampus of mice was observed using Western blotting. Results: HPS (25 and 50 mg/kg) improved the escape rate and decreased the escape latency and time spent in the target quadrant for the SAMP8 mice in the MWM after oral administration of HPS for 10 d. Moreover, it decreased error times in the passive avoidance tests. Western blotting showed that HPS was able to reverse the levels of NMDAR1 and NMDAR2B expression in the cortex or hippocampus of model mice. Conclusions: The present study suggested that HPS can improve cognitive deficits in SAMP8 mice, and this mechanism might be associated with NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-related pathways. PMID:27381727

  1. Effect of three different cultivars of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) on learning and depression in ovariectomized mice

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Julio; Caldas, Maria; Dávila, Sonia; Gasco, Manuel; Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2006-01-01

    Background Lepidium meyenii Walp. (Brassicaceae), known as Maca, is a Peruvian hypocotyl growing exclusively between 4000 and 4500 m altitude in the central Peruvian Andes, particularly in Junin plateau and is used traditionally to enhance fertility. Maca is a cultivated plant and different cultivars are described according to the color of the hypocotyls. Methods The study aimed to elucidate the effect of Yellow, Red and Black Maca on cognitive function and depression in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. In all experiments OVX mice were treated during 21 days and divided in four groups: control group, Yellow Maca, Red Maca and Black Maca. Latent learning was assessed using the water finding task and the antidepressant activity of the three varieties of Maca was evaluated using the forced swimming test. Animals were sacrificed at the end of each treatment and the uterus were excised and weighed. Results Black Maca was the variety that showed the best response in the water finding task, particularly in the trained mice. The three varieties were effective to reduce finding latency in non trained and trained mice (P < 0.05). In the force swimming test, all varieties assessed reduced the time of immobility and increased uterine weight in OVX mice. Conclusion Black Maca appeared to have more beneficial effects on latent learning in OVX mice; meanwhile, all varieties of Maca showed antidepressant activity. PMID:16796734

  2. Reduced wheel running and blunted effects of voluntary exercise in LPA1-null mice: The importance of assessing the amount of running in transgenic mice studies

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Blanco, Eduardo; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    This work was aimed to assess whether voluntary exercise rescued behavioral and hippocampal alterations in mice lacking the lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor (LPA1-null mice), studying the potential relationship between the amount of exercise performed and its effects. Normal and LPA1-null mice underwent 23 days of free wheel running and were tested for open-field behavior and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (cell proliferation, immature neurons, cell survival). Running decreased anxiety-like behavior in both genotypes but increased exploration only in the normal mice. While running affected all neurogenesis-related measures in normal mice (especially in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus), only a moderate increase in cell survival was found in the mutants. Importantly, the LPA1-nulls showed notably reduced running. Analysis suggested that defective running in the LPA1-null mice could contribute to explain the scarce benefit of the voluntary exercise treatment. On the other hand, a literature review revealed that voluntary exercise is frequently used to modulate behavior and the hippocampus in transgenic mice, but half of the studies did not assess the quantity of running, overlooking any potential running impairments. This study adds evidence to the relevance of the quantity of exercise performed, emphasizing the importance of its assessment in transgenic mice research. PMID:24055600

  3. Reduced wheel running and blunted effects of voluntary exercise in LPA1-null mice: the importance of assessing the amount of running in transgenic mice studies.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Blanco, Eduardo; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J

    2013-11-01

    This work was aimed to assess whether voluntary exercise rescued behavioral and hippocampal alterations in mice lacking the lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor (LPA1-null mice), studying the potential relationship between the amount of exercise performed and its effects. Normal and LPA1-null mice underwent 23 days of free wheel running and were tested for open-field behavior and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (cell proliferation, immature neurons, cell survival). Running decreased anxiety-like behavior in both genotypes but increased exploration only in the normal mice. While running affected all neurogenesis-related measures in normal mice (especially in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus), only a moderate increase in cell survival was found in the mutants. Importantly, the LPA1-nulls showed notably reduced running. Analysis suggested that defective running in the LPA1-null mice could contribute to explain the scarce benefit of the voluntary exercise treatment. On the other hand, a literature review revealed that voluntary exercise is frequently used to modulate behavior and the hippocampus in transgenic mice, but half of the studies did not assess the quantity of running, overlooking any potential running impairments. This study adds evidence to the relevance of the quantity of exercise performed, emphasizing the importance of its assessment in transgenic mice research.

  4. Effect of Croatian propolis on diabetic nephropathy and liver toxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the present study, we examined the antioxidant effect of water soluble derivative of propolis (WSDP) and ethanolic (EEP) extract of propolis on renal and liver function in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. In addition, we examined whether different extract of propolis could prevent diabetic nephropathy and liver toxicity by inhibiting lipid peroxidation in vivo. Methods Diabetes was induced in Swiss albino mice with a single intravenous injection of alloxan (75 mg kg-1). Two days after alloxan injection, propolis preparations (50 mg kg-1 per day) were given intraperitoneally for 7 days in diabetic mice. Survival analysis and body weights as well as hematological and biochemical parameters were measured. The renal and liver oxidative stress marker malonaldehyde levels and histopathological changes were monitored in the liver and kidney of treated and control mice. Results Administration of propolis to diabetic mice resulted in a significant increase of body weight, haematological and immunological parameters of blood as well as 100% survival of diabetic mice. Alloxan-injected mice showed a marked increase in oxidative stress in liver and kidney homogenate, as determined by lipid peroxidation. Histopathological observation of the liver sections of alloxan-induced diabetic mice showed several lesions including cellular vacuolization, cytoplasmic eosinophilia and lymphocyte infiltrations, but with individual variability.Treatment of diabetic mice with propolis extracts results in decreased number of vacuolized cells and degree of vacuolization; propolis treatment improve the impairment of fatty acid metabolism in diabetes. Renal histology showed corpuscular, tubular and interstitial changes in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Test components did not improve renal histopathology in diabetic mice. Conclusions Propolis preparations are able to attenuate diabetic hepatorenal damage, probably through its anti-oxidative action and its detoxification

  5. Soy Content of Basal Diets Determines the Effects of Supplemental Selenium in Male Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Quiner, Trevor E.; Nakken, Heather L.; Mason, Brock A.; Lephart, Edwin D.; Hancock, Chad R.; Christensen, Merrill J.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of supplemental Se in rodent models may depend upon composition of the basal diet to which it is added. Wild-type male littermates of Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate mice were fed until 18 wk of age 1 of 2 Se-adequate stock diets high in soy (HS) or low in phytoestrogens (LP) or the same diets supplemented with 3.0 mg Se/kg diet as seleno-methylselenocysteine. Body and abdominal fat pad weights were lower (P < 0.01) in mice fed the HS diet. Supplemental Se reduced fat pad weights in mice receiving the LP diet but increased body and fat pad weights in mice consuming the HS formulation (P-interaction < 0.005). Serum free triiodothyronine concentrations were unaffected by supplemental Se in mice fed the LP diet but were decreased by Se supplementation of mice given the HS feed (P-interaction < 0.02). Free thyroxine concentrations were higher in mice consuming the HS diet regardless of Se intake (P < 0.001). Hepatic mRNA for iodothyronine deiodinase I was lower (P < 0.001) in mice fed the HS diet. Supplementation of Se increased this mRNA (P < 0.001) in both diet groups. Results from this study show a significant interaction between the composition of basal diets and the effects of supplemental Se with respect to body composition. These findings have important implications for future studies in rodent models of the effects of supplemental Se on heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and other conditions related to body weight and composition. PMID:22031663

  6. Effects of Altered Levels of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase and Irradiation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Female Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yani; Leu, David; Chui, Jennifer; Fike, John R.; Huang, Ting-Ting

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Altered levels of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) and cranial irradiation have been shown to affect hippocampal neurogenesis. However, previous studies were only conducted in male mice, and it was not clear if there was a difference between males and females. Therefore, female mice were studied and the results compared with those generated in male mice from an earlier study. Methods and Materials: Female wild-type, EC-SOD-null (KO), and EC-SOD bigenic mice with neuronal-specific expression of EC-SOD (OE) were subjected to a single dose of 5-Gy gamma rays to the head at 8 weeks of age. Progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation, and long-term survival of newborn neurons were determined. Results: Similar to results from male mice, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation both resulted in significant reductions in mature newborn neurons in female mice. EC-SOD deficiency reduced long-term survival of newborn neurons whereas irradiation reduced progenitor cell proliferation. Overexpression of EC-SOD corrected the negative impacts from EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation and normalized the production of newborn neurons in OE mice. Expression of neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 were significantly reduced by irradiation in wild-type mice, but the levels were not changed in KO and OE mice even though both cohorts started out with a lower baseline level. Conclusion: In terms of hippocampal neurogenesis, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation have the same overall effects in males and females at the age the studies were conducted.

  7. Sex-related effects of agmatine on caffeine-induced locomotor activity in Swiss Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun; Kose, Akin; Kayir, Hakan; Ulusoy, Gokhan; Celik, Turgay

    2010-03-25

    In mammalian brain, agmatine is an endogenous amine that is synthesized through the decarboxylation of l-arginine by arginine decarboxylase. It has been proposed as a new neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator. It was shown that agmatine had some beneficial effects in animal models of opioid and alcohol addiction. Locomotor stimulant properties of drugs such as ethanol, caffeine, nicotine and amphetamine have been linked to their addictive properties. The present study investigates the effects of agmatine on caffeine-induced locomotor activity both in male and female mice. Adult Swiss Webster mice were used in the study. Locomotor activity was measured for 30min immediately following caffeine (2.5, 5, 10 and 20mg/kg, i.p.) or saline treatments. Agmatine (5, 10 and 20mg/kg, i.p.) were injected 20min before caffeine (2.5 and 5mg/kg, i.p.) administration. In both sexes, agmatine (5-20mg/kg) were also tested for ability to depress or stimulate locomotor activity in the absence of caffeine. Caffeine (5mg/kg) induced a significant increase in locomotor activity of both male and female mice. There was no significant difference in the locomotor-activating effects of caffeine between male and female mice. Agmatine blocked the caffeine (5mg/kg)-induced locomotor stimulation dose dependently in male but not female mice. Agmatine had not any effect on the lower dose (2.5mg/kg) of caffeine in both sexes. These results suggest that agmatine has sex-related inhibitory effects on caffeine-induced locomotor activity in Swiss Webster mice, and male mice are more sensitive than the females to the effect of agmatine.

  8. NASA Rodent Foodbar: Long Term Effects in Swiss Webster Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, D. L.; Yu, D. S.; Naficy, N. H.; Roghani, P. M.; Dalton, B. P.; Barrett, J. E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Swiss Webster male and female mice (150 of each) were fed NASA Rodent Foodbar for more than 110 days to test the diet's nutritional adequacy for use in future long-term studies aboard the International Space Station. Mice were grouped three to a cage (one cage = one sample) and cages were assigned to either Foodbar or Purina Chow #5001 (control) diet groups. Body weights, food intake, and water intake were obtained throughout the study. There were no significant differences in body weights between male Foodbar fed and Chow fed males (p=0.58), and at 15 weeks into the female mouse study there appear to be no significant body weight differences. Both male and female Foodbar fed groups consumed more food and less water than their Chow controls, both factors thought to be attributable to the high moisture content of the Foodbars (26% versus 10% for Chow). All differences in gross food and water consumption had p-values of less than 0.01. When food and water intake were adjusted for the moisture content in the food, both male and female Foodbar fed animals consumed less food, but still had a lower water intake rate than their controls. (p is less than 0.01). Preliminary analysis on blood samples from male and female halfway point dissections suggests differences in glucose and fat metabolism. In both male and female Foodbar fed animals, blood glucose values were significantly lower (p is less than 0.01) but there were no significant differences in cholesterol levels (p=0.51). In Foodbar fed females, triglycerides were significantly higher (p is less than 0.01). These data suggest that Foodbars allow for normal growth in Swiss Webster mice, but affect some blood chemistry parameters.

  9. Genetic effects of testicular incorporation of 137Cs in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramaiya, L K; Pomerantseva, M D; Chekhovich, A V; Lyaginskaya, A M; Kuznetsov, A S

    1994-08-01

    A comparative estimation of the frequencies of genetic disorders induced in germ cells of male mice by a single or long-term exposure to incorporated 137Cs or to external gamma-radiation has been carried out. The frequencies of dominant lethal mutations induced by a single exposure were similar with both types of radiation. In stem cell spermatogonia the frequency of reciprocal translocations was significantly lower in the case of single 137Cs administration than upon external gamma-radiation. Upon long-term administration the genetic efficiencies of both types of radiation were similar. PMID:7519738

  10. Effects of gamma radiation on fetal development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Tahere; Mozdarani, Hossein; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Kalantar, Seyed Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many cancer patients receive radiotherapy which may lead to serious damages to the ovary storage and the matrix muscle state. Some of these patients may admit to infertility clinics for having pregnancy and on the other hand hormonal administration for superovulation induction is a routine procedure in assisted reproduction technology (ART) clinics. Objective: This study aimed to investigate fertility and fetuses of hormone treated super ovulated female mice who had received whole-body gamma irradiation before mating. Materials and Methods: Female mice were randomly categorized into a control group and 3 experimental groups including: Group I (Irradiation), Group II (Superovulation), and Group III (Superovulation and Irradiation). In hormone treated groups, mice were injected with different doses of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) followed with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). Irradiation was done using a Co-60 gamma ray generator with doses of 2 and 4 Gy. Number of fetuses counted and the fetus’s weight, head circumference, birth height, the number of live healthy fetuses, the number of fetuses with detected anomalies in the body, the sum of resorption and arrested fetuses were all recorded as outcome of treatments. Results: In the group I and group II, increased radiation and hormone dose led to a decrease in the number of survived fetuses (45 in 2 Gy vs. 29 in 4 Gy for irradiated group) as well as from 76 in 10 units into 48 in 15 units. In the group III, a higher dose of hormone in the presence of a 2 Gy irradiation boosted the slink rate; i.e. the number of aborted fetuses reached 21 cases while applying the dose of 15 Iu, whereas 6 cases of abortion were reported applying the hormone with a lower dose. Among different parameters studied, there was a significant difference in parameters of weight and height in the mouse fetuses (p=0.01). Conclusion: The data indicated that use of ovarian stimulating hormones in mice that received pre

  11. [Effect of vitamin C on prostatilen mutagenicity in mice].

    PubMed

    Bolonina, V P; Mikheev, V S

    1993-07-01

    Frequencies of sperm head anomalies (SHA) and chromosome aberrations (CA) in bone marrow cells were studied after injection of drugs, prostatilen and vitamin C into the male mice Mus musculus. It was found that prostatilen (5, 10 and 50 mkg) increased the frequency of both SHA and CA. Vitamin C (14 and 140 mkg) induced no CA but increased SHA frequency at the dose of 140 mkg. The joint action of the drugs led to decrease in SHA frequency for all dose combinations. Antimutagenic action of vitamin C in the CA test was recorded for only 14 mkg dose.

  12. Different effects of 7-nitroindazole in reserpine-induced hypolocomotion in two strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Tadaiesky, Meigy T; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F

    2006-03-27

    There are a number of reasons for believing that nitric oxide participates in motor control in the striatum. Therefore, effects of neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) were studied on the reserpine model of Parkinson's disease in Swiss and C57BL/6 mice using the open-field test. Mice received reserpine (1 mg/kg administered intraperitoneally). A significant hypolocomotion was observed 24 h and 48 h after reserpine injection. The treatment with 7-nitroindazole (25 mg/kg, administered intraperitoneally, 30 min after reserpine) attenuated reserpine-induced hypolocomotion 24 h and 48 h after the treatment in Swiss mice, but not completely in C57BL/6 mice. These results suggest that nitric oxide functions as an intercellular messenger in motor circuits in the brain. Moreover, our data suggests that the comparison of such mouse strains may provide information on genetic basis for strain differences in different sensitivity to these drugs.

  13. Inhibitory effects of pretreatment with radon on acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Teruaki; Kataoka, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Yuichi; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that radon inhalation activates antioxidative functions in the liver and inhibits carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatopathy in mice. In addition, it has been reported that reactive oxygen species contribute to alcohol-induced hepatopathy. In this study, we examined the inhibitory effects of radon inhalation on acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to intraperitoneal injection of 50% alcohol (5 g/kg bodyweight) after inhaling approximately 4000 Bq/m(3) radon for 24 h. Alcohol administration significantly increased the activities of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) in serum, and the levels of triglyceride and lipid peroxide in the liver, suggesting acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy. Radon inhalation activated antioxidative functions in the liver. Furthermore, pretreatment with radon inhibited the depression of hepatic functions and antioxidative functions. These findings suggested that radon inhalation activated antioxidative functions in the liver and inhibited acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice.

  14. Pulmonary Effects of Inhaled Diesel Exhaust in Young and Old Mice: A Pilot Project

    PubMed Central

    Laskin, Debra L.; Mainelis, Gedi; Turpin, Barbara; Patel, Kinal J.; Sunil, Vasanthi R.

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and that elderly individuals are particularly susceptible to these effects. We speculated that increased susceptibility of the elderly to PM is due to altered production of inflammatory mediators and antioxidants in the lung and pilot studies were performed to test this hypothesis. For these studies we used diesel exhaust, a major component of urban PM as a model. Animals (CB6F1 male mice; 2 m and 18 m) were exposed to air or diesel exhaust at 300 or 1000 µg/m3 for 3 h one time (single) or 3 h/day for 3 consecutive days (repeated). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, serum and lung tissue were collected 0 and 24 h later. Following single or repeated diesel exhaust exposure, persistent structural alterations and inflammation were observed in the lungs of older mice. This consisted of patchy thickening of alveolar septa and an increase in the number of neutrophils and macrophages in alveolar spaces. In contrast, no major alterations in lung histology were noted in younger mice. In older, but not younger mice, significant increases in expression of the oxidative stress marker, lipocalin 24p3 were also observed. In both younger and older mice, exposure to diesel exhaust was associated with increased expression of TNFα in the lung. However, this response was attenuated in older mice. Exposure to high dose diesel exhaust resulted in significant increases in IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression in lungs of older animals which persisted for 24 h. Whereas IL-6 was also upregulated in younger mice after diesel exhaust exposure, no major effects were evident on expression of IL-8 mRNA. Expression of the antioxidant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was decreased in lung tissue from younger animals after exposure to DE (single or repeated). In contrast, constitutive expression of MnSOD was not evident in lungs of older mice, and

  15. Jumihaidokuto effectively inhibits colon inflammation and apoptosis in mice with acute colitis.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, Remya; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Afrin, Mst Rejina; Harima, Meilei; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakamura, Masahiko; Suzuki, Kenji; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2015-12-01

    Jumihaidokuto, a Japanese kampo medicine, is prescribed in Japan for its anti-inflammatory activity. Here we have examined its beneficial effects against acute colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in mice. We have used C57BL/6 female mice, divided into two groups and received 3% DSS in drinking water during the experimental period (8days). Treatment group mice received 1g/kg/day dose of Jumihaidokuto orally whereas DSS control group received equal volume of distilled water. Normal control group mice received plain drinking water. Jumihaidokuto treatment attenuated the colitis symptoms along with suppression of various inflammatory marker proteins such as IL-1β, IL-2Rα, IL-4, CTGF and RAGE. It has also down-regulated the oxidative stress and apoptotic signaling in the colons of mice with colitis. The present study has confirmed the beneficial effects of Jumihaidokuto on DSS induced acute colitis in mice and suggests that it can be a potential agent for the treatment of colitis.

  16. Memory-Enhancing Effects of the Crude Extract of Polygala tenuifolia on Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongyang; Liu, Yamin; Wang, Liwei; Liu, Xinmin; Chang, Qi; Guo, Zhi; Liao, Yonghong; Pan, Ruile; Fan, Tai-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Learning and memory disorders arise from distinct age-associated processes, and aging animals are often used as a model of memory impairment. The root of Polygala tenuifolia has been commonly used in some Asian countries as memory enhancer and its memory improvement has been reported in various animal models. However, there is less research to verify its effect on memory functions in aged animals. Herein, the memory-enhancing effects of the crude extract of Polygala tenuifolia (EPT) on normal aged mice were assessed by Morris water maze (MWM) and step-down passive avoidance tests. In MWM tests, the impaired spatial memory of the aged mice was partly reversed by EPT (100 and 200 mg/kg; P < 0.05) as compared with the aged control mice. In step-down tests, the nonspatial memory of the aged mice was improved by EPT (100 and 200 mg/kg; P < 0.05). Additionally, EPT could increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities, inhibit monoamine oxidase (MAO) and acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) activities, and decrease the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the brain tissue of the aged mice. The results showed that EPT improved memory functions of the aged mice probably via its antioxidant properties and via decreasing the activities of MAO and AChE.

  17. Bioaccumulation of metals and reproductive effects in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus)

    SciTech Connect

    La Tier, A.J.; Pastorok, R.A.; Ginn, T.C.; Garcia, P.I.

    1994-12-31

    Reproductive parameters were used to evaluate the potential effects of exposure on female deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) to metals-enriched soils in the Upper Clark Fork River Superfund Complex. Deer mice were collected from floodplain and transitional area habitats in each of four drainages with a wide range of metals concentrations in soil. Whole-body tissue concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc were measured in composite samples of male and female deer mice. Females were necropsied, and the uterus was removed to evaluate reproductive performance based on percentages of females with embryos and with uterine scars (i.e., implantation sites) and the mean numbers of embryos and uterine scars per female. Reproductive activity was evidenced by the presence of embryos or uterine scaring in animals from metals-enriched areas. Despite elevated body burden of metals in mice from study areas, deer mice were prevalent in all areas, and mean litter size (4.4/female) was normal for this region (4--6 pups/female). Reproductive indicators suggested that the rate of reproduction was higher in the study areas than in the reference area. These results indicate that the metals elevations in deer mice do not result in measurable effects on reproduction.

  18. Effect and mechanism of Bushen Huoxue recipe on ovarian reserve in mice with premature ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Song, Kun-Kun; Ma, Wen-Wen; Huang, Cong; Ding, Jia-Hui; Cui, Dan-Dan; Tan, Xiu-Juan; Xiao, Jing; Zhang, Ming-Min

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the effect and mechanism of Bushen Huoxue recipe (BHR) on ovarian reserve in mice with premature ovarian failure (POF). Mice were divided into 3 groups: normal group, model group and BHR group. Intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide was performed to create the POF model. Primordial follicular (PDF) number, ovarian wet weight, ovarian index, and estrous cycle were analyzed to evaluate the effect of BHR on POF. Meanwhile, the mRNA and protein level of Mouse Vasa Homologue (MVH) in the bone marrow, peripheral blood and ovary were detected, to explore the underlying mechanism of the treatment efficacy of BHR on ovarian reserve. By the time of BHR treatment for 28 days, BHR increased the PDF number and shortened the estrous cycle of POF mice. BHR also decreased the mRNA level of MVH in the bone marrow, and increased mRNA and protein level of MVH in the ovary of POF mice. Our results demonstrated a treatment efficacy of BHR on POF mice, and revealed that BHR might repair the dysfunction of germline stem cells in the bone marrow, and thus to improve the ovarian reserve and enhance the ovarian function of POF mice through neo-oogenesis. PMID:27465335

  19. Beneficial versus adverse effects of long-term use of clenbuterol in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Dupont-Versteegden, E E; Katz, M S; McCarter, R J

    1995-12-01

    Long-term administration of the beta 2-adrenergic agonist clenbuterol in mdx mice was used to test the hypothesis that increasing contractile protein content in skeletal muscle will decrease the progression of muscular dystrophy. C57BL/10SNJ (control) and dystrophic (mdx) mice were given clenbuterol (1.0-1.5 mg/kg body weight/day) in the drinking water. Ventilatory function and morphological and functional characteristics of soleus (SOL) and diaphragm (DIA) muscles were evaluated. Clenbuterol administration was associated with increased SOL muscle weight, and SOL muscle weight to body weight ratio in control and mdx mice at both ages. There was a 22% increase in myosin concentration of mdx DIA at 1 year of age, correlating well with increased normalized active tension in mdx DIA at this age. Also, absolute tetanic tension increased in control and mdx SOL with clenbuterol at both ages. Ventilatory function was significantly impaired in mdx mice at both ages and clenbuterol administration did not alleviate this. Clenbuterol treatment was associated with a 30-40% increase in fatigability in DIA and SOL muscles of control and mdx mice at both ages. Furthermore, 1-year-old mdx mice receiving clenbuterol exhibited deformities in hindlimbs and spine. These results suggest that long-term clenbuterol treatment has a positive effect on muscle growth and force generation, but has adverse side effects such as increased muscle fatigability and development of deformities. PMID:7477069

  20. Effect of intraperitoneal radiotelemetry instrumentation on voluntary wheel running and surgical recovery in mice.

    PubMed

    Helwig, Bryan G; Ward, Jermaine A; Blaha, Michael D; Leon, Lisa R

    2012-01-01

    Radiotelemetry transmitters support tracking of physiologic variables in conscious animals, but the size of the transmitter may alter animal health and behavior. We hypothesized that the size of the device adversely affects body weight, food intake, water intake, circadian core temperature, activity, voluntary running patterns, and the health of internal organs and that these negative effects can be minimized with smaller transmitter devices. Male C57BL/6J mice (weight, 20 to 24 g) were implanted with small (1.1 g, 0.52 mL) or large (3.5 g, 1.75 mL) radiotransmitters. Recovery of presurgical body weight, food intake, and water intake occurred within 3 d in mice implanted with small transmitter and 9 d in those with large transmitters. Mice with small transmitters displayed robust circadian core body temperature and activity patterns within 1 d after surgery, whereas activity was depressed in mice with large transmitters throughout experimentation. The most robust effects of the large transmitter included significantly reduced voluntary running, which never recovered to baseline, and inflammation of the diaphragm, large intestine, and duodenum. These results demonstrate that the large transmitter delayed surgical recovery, disrupted normal growth, reduced voluntary running, and induced inflammatory reactions of the internal organs of mice. The choice of radiotelemetry transmitter can significantly affect the health and wellbeing of experimental mice as well as data quality, such that the smallest transmitter device available and appropriate to the situation should be chosen for experimentation. PMID:23312089

  1. Effects of acute and chronic administration of neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate on neuronal excitability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Vlainic, Josipa; Samardzic, Janko; Erhardt, Julija; Krsnik, Zeljka

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) has been associated with important brain functions, including neuronal survival, memory, and behavior, showing therapeutic potential in various neuropsychiatric and cognitive disorders. However, the antagonistic effects of DHEAS on γ-amino-butyric acidA receptors and its facilitatory action on glutamatergic neurotransmission might lead to enhanced brain excitability and seizures and thus limit DHEAS therapeutic applications. The aim of this study was to investigate possible age and sex differences in the neuronal excitability of the mice following acute and chronic DHEAS administration. Methods DHEAS was administered intraperitoneally in male and female adult and old mice either acutely or repeatedly once daily for 4 weeks in a 10 mg/kg dose. To investigate the potential proconvulsant properties of DHEAS, we studied the effects of acute and chronic DHEAS treatment on picrotoxin-, pentylentetrazole-, and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced seizures in mice. The effects of acute and chronic DHEAS administration on the locomotor activity, motor coordination, and body weight of the mice were also studied. We also investigated the effects of DHEAS treatment on [3H]flunitrazepam binding to the mouse brain membranes. Results DHEAS did not modify the locomotor activity, motor coordination, body weight, and brain [3H]flunitrazepam binding of male and female mice. The results failed to demonstrate significant effects of single- and long-term DHEAS treatment on the convulsive susceptibility in both adult and aged mice of both sexes. However, small but significant changes regarding sex differences in the susceptibility to seizures were observed following DHEAS administration to mice. Conclusion Although our findings suggest that DHEAS treatment might be safe for various potential therapeutic applications in adult as well as in old age, they also support subtle interaction of DHEAS with male and female hormonal status

  2. Radioprotective effects of troxerutin against gamma irradiation in V79 cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Ping, Xu; Junqing, Jia; Junfeng, Jia; Enjin, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine radioprotective effects of troxerutin. Cell experiments were carried out to test the cytotoxicity of troxerutin on V79 cells and to observe effects on apoptosis caused by 60CO γ rays. A model of 8 Gy ray-caused damage of mice was established to observe the effect that troxerutin has on the physical symptom of irradiated mice and to calculate the 30-day survival rate. It showed that troxerutin had no obvious cytotoxicity at the level of less than 20 μg/ml; but had a redioprotective effect in dose-dependence on viability of V79 cells at the range of 0.2-5 μg/mL irradiated by 5 Gy ray of 60CO γ ray. After the 8 Gy irradiation, the mice lost some weight, were dried up in fur and feather, low spirit, awkward in movement, shrinking in body and handicapped in sight, while mice with troxerutin were much better. So it was clear that troxerutin could increase the 30-day survival rates of irradiated mice dramatically. These results collectively indicate that troxerutin is an effective radioprotective agent.

  3. Therapeutic effects of stress-programmed lymphocytes transferred to chronically stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Scheinert, Rachel B; Haeri, Mitra H; Lehmann, Michael L; Herkenham, Miles

    2016-10-01

    Our group has recently provided novel insights into a poorly understood component of intercommunication between the brain and the immune system by showing that psychological stress can modify lymphocytes in a manner that may boost resilience to psychological stress. To demonstrate the influence of the adaptive immune system on mood states, we previously showed that cells from lymph nodes of socially defeated mice, but not from unstressed mice, conferred anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects and elevated hippocampal cell proliferation when transferred into naïve lymphopenic Rag2(-/-) mice. In the present study, we asked whether similar transfer could be anxiolytic and antidepressant when done in animals that had been rendered anxious and depressed by chronic psychological stress. First, we demonstrated that lymphopenic Rag2(-/-) mice and their wild-type C57BL/6 mouse counterparts had similar levels of affect normally. Second, we found that following chronic (14days) restraint stress, both groups displayed an anxious and depressive-like phenotype and decreased hippocampal cell proliferation. Third, we showed that behavior in the open field test and light/dark box was normalized in the restraint-stressed Rag2(-/-) mice following adoptive transfer of lymph node cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing donor mice previously exposed to chronic (14days) of social defeat stress. Cells transferred from unstressed donor mice had no effect on behavior. Immunolabeling of GFP+ cells confirmed that tissue engraftment had occurred at 14days after transfer. We found GFP+ lymphocytes in the spleen, lymph nodes, blood, choroid plexus, and meninges of the recipient Rag2(-/-) mice. The findings suggest that the adaptive immune system may play a key role in promoting recovery from chronic stress. The data support using lymphocytes as a novel therapeutic target for anxiety states. PMID:27109071

  4. Protective Effect of Lycium ruthenicum Murr. Against Radiation Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yabin; Chen, Fan; Yao, Xingchen; Zhu, Junbo; Wang, Cai; Zhang, Juanling; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    The protective effect of Lycium ruthenicum Murr. against radiation injury was examined in mice. Kunming mice were randomly divided into a control group, model group, positive drug group and L. ruthenicum high dose (8 g/kg), L. ruthenicum middle dose (4 g/kg), L. ruthenicum low dose (2 g/kg) treatment groups, for which doses were administered the third day, seventh day and 14th day after irradiation. L. ruthenicum extract was administered orally to the mice in the three treatment groups and normal saline was administered orally to the mice in the control group and model group for 14 days. The positive group was treated with amifostine (WR-2721) at 30 min before irradiation. Except for the control group, the groups of mice received a 5 Gy quantity of X-radiation evenly over their whole body at one time. Body weight, hemogram, thymus and spleen index, DNA, caspase-3, caspase-6, and P53 contents were observed at the third day, seventh day, and 14th day after irradiation. L. ruthenicum could significantly increase the total red blood cell count, hemoglobin count and DNA contents (p < 0.05). The spleen index recovered significantly by the third day and 14th day after irradiation (p < 0.05). L. ruthenicum low dose group showed a significant reduction in caspase-3 and caspase-6 of serum in mice at the third day, seventh day, and 14th day after irradiation and L. ruthenicum middle dose group experienced a reduction in caspase-6 of serum in mice by the seventh day after irradiation. L. ruthenicum could decrease the expression of P53. The results showed that L. ruthenicum had protective effects against radiation injury in mice. PMID:26193298

  5. The Rpe65rd12 Allele Exerts a Semidominant Negative Effect on Vision in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Charles B.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Feng, Wei; Getz, Shannon E.; Duncan, Todd; Pardue, Machelle T.; Feng, Yue; Redmond, T. Michael; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Nickerson, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The rd12 mouse was reported as a recessively inherited Rpe65 mutation. We asked if the rd12 mutation resides in Rpe65 and how the mutation manifests itself. Methods. A complementation test was performed by mating Rpe65KO (KO/KO) and rd12 mice together to determine if the rd12 mutation is in the Rpe65 gene. Visual function of wild-type (+/+), KO/+, rd12/+, KO/KO, rd12/rd12, and KO/rd12 mice was measured by optokinetic tracking (OKT) and ERG. Morphology was assessed by retinal cross section. qRT-PCR quantified Rpe65 mRNA levels. Immunoblotting measured the size and level of RPE65 protein. Rpe65 mRNA localization was visualized with RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Fractions of Rpe65 mRNA-bound proteins were separated by linear sucrose gradient fractionation. Results. The KO and rd12 alleles did not complement. The rd12 allele induced a negative semidominant effect on visual function; OKT responses became undetectable 120 days earlier in rd12/rd12 mice compared with KO/KO mice. rd12/+ mice lost approximately 21% visual acuity by P210. rd12/rd12 mice had fewer cone photoreceptor nuclei than KO/KO mice at P60. rd12/rd12 mice expressed 71% +/+ levels of Rpe65 mRNA, but protein was undetectable. Mutant mRNA was appropriately spliced, exported to the cytoplasm, trafficked, and contained no other coding mutation aside from the known nonsense mutation. Mutant mRNA was enriched on ribosome-free messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs), whereas wild-type mRNA was enriched on actively translating polyribosomes. Conclusions. The rd12 lesion is in Rpe65. The rd12 mutant phenotype inherits in a semidominant manner. The effects of the mutant mRNA on visual function may result from inefficient binding to ribosomes for translation. PMID:24644049

  6. Subchronic dispositional and toxicological effects of arsenate administered in drinking water to mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.F.; Thompson, D.J.

    1996-10-11

    Exposure to the drinking water contaminant arsenate is a daily occurrence and there are concerns that this exposure may lead to cancer. Although the acute dispositional effects of arsenate have been studied in detail, there is minimal information on the disposition and toxicological effects of it after continuous exposure. The objective of this study was to examine in mice the effect of a 4-wk treatment with arsenate administered in drinking water. Female B6C3F1 mice were housed in metabolism cages and given water and food ad libitum. Two groups (A,B) of mice were treated with distilled water or water containing 0.025 mg/L (L) or 2.5 mg/L (H) arsenate. Several toxicological effects were observed in animals administered arsenate in drinking water, but no changes in the disposition of this arsenical were detected at the doses used in this study. 86 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Effects of slightly acidic electrolysed drinking water on mice.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Shibata, Yoshiko; Obata, Takahiro; Kawagoe, Masami; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Sato, Masayoshi; Toida, Kazumi; Kushima, Hidemi; Matsuda, Yukihisa

    2011-10-01

    Slightly acidic electrolysed (SAE) water is a sanitizer with strong bactericidal activity due to hypochlorous acid. We assessed the safety of SAE water as drinking water for mice at a 5 ppm total residual chlorine (TRC) concentration to examine the possibility of SAE water as a labour- and energy-saving alternative to sterile water. We provided SAE water or sterile water to mice for 12 weeks, during which time we recorded changes in body weight and weekly water and food intakes. At the end of the experiment, all of the subject animals were sacrificed to assess serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine levels and to examine the main organs histopathologically under a light microscope. In addition, we investigated the bacteria levels of both types of water. We found no difference in functional and morphological health condition indices between the groups. Compared with sterile water, SAE water had a relatively higher ability to suppress bacterial growth. We suggest that SAE water at 5 ppm TRC is a safe and useful alternative to sterile water for use as drinking water in laboratory animal facilities.

  8. Differential effects of dietary sodium intake on blood pressure and atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Wu, Congqing; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Charnigo, Richard J; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The amount of dietary sodium intake regulates the renin angiotensin system (RAS) and blood pressure, both of which play critical roles in atherosclerosis. However, there are conflicting findings regarding the effects of dietary sodium intake on atherosclerosis. This study applied a broad range of dietary sodium concentrations to determine the concomitant effects of dietary sodium intake on the RAS, blood pressure, and atherosclerosis in mice. Eight-week-old male low-density lipoprotein receptor -/- mice were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet containing selected sodium concentrations (Na 0.01%, 0.1%, or 2% w/w) for 12 weeks. Mice in these three groups were all hypercholesterolemic, although mice fed Na 0.01% and Na 0.1% had higher plasma cholesterol concentrations than mice fed Na 2%. Mice fed Na 0.01% had greater abundances of renal renin mRNA than those fed Na 0.1% and 2%. Plasma renin concentrations were higher in mice fed Na 0.01% (14.2 ± 1.7 ng/ml/30 min) than those fed Na 0.1% or 2% (6.2 ± 0.6 and 5.8 ± 1.6 ng/ml per 30 min, respectively). However, systolic blood pressure at 12 weeks was higher in mice fed Na 2% (138 ± 3 mm Hg) than those fed Na 0.01% and 0.1% (129 ± 3 and 128 ± 4 mmHg, respectively). In contrast, mice fed Na 0.01% (0.17 ± 0.02 mm(2)) had larger atherosclerotic lesion areas in aortic roots than those fed Na 2% (0.09 ± 0.01 mm(2)), whereas lesion areas in mice fed Na 0.1% (0.12 ± 0.02 mm(2)) were intermediate between and not significantly different from those in Na 0.01% and Na 2% groups. In conclusion, while high dietary sodium intake led to higher systolic blood pressure, low dietary sodium intake augmented atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice.

  9. Differential effects of human interferon alpha and interferon gamma on xenografted human thyroid tissue in severe combined immunodeficient mice and nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Enomoto, T; Fornasier, V; Resetkova, E; Volpé, R

    1997-03-01

    We have studied the in vivo effects of human interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) administration on human thyroid tissue xenografted into two mouse strains: severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and nude mice. Human lymphocytes survive in SCID mice but are lysed in nude mice. Thyroid tissues from Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or paranodular [normal, (N)] tissue was xenografted into SCID mice (0.8 g/mouse) pretreated with anti-asialo GM-1 antiserum and radiation and also into nude mice. One week after xenografting, SCID and nude mice were divided into three groups. Group A was treated with IFN-alpha intraperitoneally (2,000 units/mouse) three times weekly; group B was treated with IFN-gamma similarly; group C was treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) only (control). Autologous human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were added to mice receiving N xenografts. Blood was taken every 2 weeks for levels of IgG and thyroid antibodies (TAb). After 6 weeks of treatment, mice were sacrificed, and xenograft thyrocyte histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) expression were measured. In addition, thyrocyte cultures were stimulated in vitro with 200 units/ml of either IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma or PBS (control). SCID mice xenografted with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in group A showed a significantly higher TAb production than group C, whereas in group B, TAb production was not statistically increased compared to control (group C). SCID mice xenografted with N did not produce TAb in any group, nor did nude mice xenografted with AITD. Thyrocyte HLA-DR expression was markedly increased in group A and B in SCID mice xenografted with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and N tissue compared to group C. In contrast, only group B (IFN-gamma) showed an increase in thyrocyte HLA-DR in nude mice. In the in vitro studies, only IFN-gamma (not IFN-alpha) stimulated

  10. Effect of repeated administration of dexfenfluramine on feeding and brain Fos in mice.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Neil E; Robertson, Kimberly; Green, D Joy

    2003-02-01

    The present study examines whether repeated administration of dexfenfluramine (DFEN) to mice is associated with progressive attenuation of its anorectic action and induction of Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) in some brain regions, both known effects in rats. ICR:Cd-1 mice were adapted to receiving for 30 min daily a sweetened milk gelatin dessert in addition to ad libitum access to chow. Mice were then injected with either DFEN (5-10 mg/kg) or saline vehicle every other day. These doses of DFEN acutely suppressed intake by approximately 50% and this action was sustained for at least eight injections. The anorectic effect of DFEN was no different between drug-naïve and DFEN-pretreated mice under conditions that produce complete tolerance in rats. In addition, unlike in rats, the acute anorectic effect of m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) was unaffected by prior DFEN treatment. Mice were perfused after the intake test on the final experimental day and their brain processed for Fos-ir. DFEN induced Fos-ir in brain regions analogous to those reported in rats and, also, as in rats, DFEN pretreatments reduced substantially the Fos-ir induced by acute DFEN in regions including central nucleus of amygdala, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, and the paraventricular hypothalamus (magno- and parvocellular divisions; PVN). Thus, while DFEN pretreatments reduce the effects of DFEN in many brain regions in both rats and mice, mice are unlike rats insofar as there is no tolerance to the anorectic action, at least in the nondeprivation protocol used here.

  11. Acute behavioral effects of nicotine in male and female HINT1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K J; Wang, J B; Barbier, E; Chen, X; Damaj, M I

    2012-11-01

    Human genetic association and brain expression studies, and mouse behavioral and molecular studies implicate a role for the histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and anxiety. The high comorbidity between smoking and psychiatric disorders, schizophrenia in particular, is well established. Associations with schizophrenia and HINT1 are also sex specific, with effects more predominant in males; however, it is unknown if sex differences associated with the gene extend to other phenotypes. Thus, in this study, using a battery of behavioral tests, we elucidated the role of HINT1 in acute nicotine-mediated behaviors using male and female HINT1 wild-type (+/+) and knockout (-/-) mice. The results show that male HINT1 -/- mice were less sensitive to acute nicotine-induced antinociception in the tail-flick, but not hot-plate test. At low nicotine doses, male and female HINT1 -/- mice were less sensitive to nicotine-induced hypomotility, although the effect was more pronounced in females. Baseline differences in locomotor activity observed in male HINT1 +/+ and -/- mice were absent in females. Nicotine did not produce an anxiolytic effect in male HINT1 -/- mice, but rather an anxiogenic response. Diazepam also failed to induce an anxiolytic response in these mice, suggesting a general anxiety phenotype not specific to nicotine. Differences in anxiety-like behavior were not observed in female mice. These results further support a role for HINT1 in nicotine-mediated behaviors and suggest that alterations in the gene may have differential effects on phenotype in males and females. PMID:22827509

  12. Protective effects of oat oil on deltamethrin-induced reprotoxicity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Ben Halima, Nihed; Ben Slima, Ahlem; Moalla, Imen; Fetoui, Hamadi; Pichon, Chantal; Gdoura, Radhouane; Abdelkafi, Slim

    2014-09-01

    Oats (Avena sativa L.), which are used in foods, are a potential economically viable source of oil. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of oats oil to alleviate oxidative damage of testis induced by deltamethrin, which is a pyrethroid pesticide that exerts a wide range of effects on non-targeted organisms. The reprotoxicity caused by orally administered deltamethrin (DEL) to mice can be effectively antagonized by the beneficial effects of oats oil (OO) as an antioxidant. Thirty-two male albino mice were divided into four equal groups: a control group, a group of mice given deltamethrin (5 mg per kg b.w.), a group administered deltamethrin after receiving oats oil (6 g per kg b.w.), and a group receiving only OO. Exposure to deltamethrin at a dose of 5 mg per kg b.w. per day caused oxidative stress in testis, proven by a decrease in the epididymal sperm count and motility, an increase in the number of abnormal morphologies in spermatozoa and a significant increase of lipid peroxidation (LP) in the testis when compared to control animals. Co-administration of oats oil to the DEL-treated mice ameliorated the testicular biochemical parameters as well as the histological impairments in testis. We concluded that oats oil ameliorated the toxic effects of deltamethrin in testis explored by reduced LP and improved total sperm density, motility and morphology in mice spermatozoa, suggesting its role as a potential antioxidant.

  13. Effects of dietary quercetin on female fertility in mice: implication of transglutaminase 2

    PubMed Central

    Beazley, Kelly E.; Nurminskaya, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Use of the dietary supplement quercetin is on the rise. Because previous studies imply an inhibitory effect of quercetin on male fertility, we explored the effects of this flavonoid on fertility in female mice. Birth outcomes, and ovarian morphology in 4-week-old offspring, were assessed in mice receiving dietary quercetin (5 mg kg−1 day−1) for 9 months during two breeding periods: from 2 to 6 months (prime reproductive age) and 8 to11 months of age. Quercetin increased birth spacing, leading to a 60% reduction in the number of litters, but enhanced folliculogenesis in ovaries of female offspring. While in young females quercetin caused an almost 70% increase in litter size, in older animals this effect was reversed. Consistent with the inhibitory activity of quercetin on the enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2), genetic ablation of TG2 in mice mirrors the effects of quercetin on birth outcomes and follicular development. Further, TG2-null mice lack responsiveness to quercetin ingestion. Our study shows for the first time that dietary quercetin can cause reduced reproductive potential in female mice and implies that TG2 may regulate ovarian ageing. PMID:25557047

  14. Behavioral effects of different enriched environments in mice treated with the cholinergic agonist PNU-282987.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Gresa, Patricia; Ramos-Campos, Marta; Redolat, Rosa

    2014-03-01

    Environmental enrichment is an experimental model in which rodents are housed in complex environments that favor lower levels of anxiety-like behavior. PNU-282987 (PNU) is a α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist with beneficial effects on learning though its effects on anxiety are unclear. Our main aim was to carry out a study of its effects in NMRI (n=96) mice reared in different environments: environmental enrichment (EE), Marlau™ cages (MC) and standard environment (SE). After a 4-month period, mice received acute treatment of PNU (2.5, 5 and 10mg/kg) and were evaluated in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and hole-board (HB). In the EPM, both EE and MC reared mice showed an increase in percentage of entries into open arms while those from EE group differed from SE in time spent on open arms. Mice treated with 2.5 and 10 mg/kg of PNU devoted less time to rearing into open arms. In the HB task, MC mice displayed higher exploratory activity reflected in more head-dips (HD) during the first minute than EE and SE, whereas EE displayed low exploration levels reflected in total HD (5 min). Further research is needed in order to clarify the behavioral effects of this nicotinic agonist in interaction with different environmental conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: insert SI title.

  15. Prior stress interferes with the anxiolytic effect of exercise in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Hare, Brendan D; D'Onfro, Katherine C; Hammack, Sayamwong E; Falls, William A

    2012-12-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that the beneficial effects of voluntary exercise may be sensitive to stress prior to and during the wheel access period. Here, a variate stress procedure is used with socially isolated mice for 7 days prior to the introduction of running wheels to assess the impact of prior and concurrent stress on the anxiolytic effect of exercise. Following stress exposure, functioning or nonfunctioning running wheels were introduced into stressed and unstressed group-housed control cages. Following 3 weeks of wheel access, the anxiolytic effect of exercise was assessed using acoustic startle, stress-induced hyperthermia, and a challenge with the anxiogenic drug metachlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP). Variate stress was demonstrated to interfere with normal weight gain. Further, exercise was not anxiolytic in stressed mice. Consistent with previous reports unstressed exercising mice demonstrated reduced acoustic startle, attenuated stress induced hyperthermia, and a blunted increase in startle following mCPP administration when compared with unstressed sedentary controls. Stressed exercising mice were indistinguishable from stressed sedentary and unstressed sedentary controls on each anxiety measure. Although running distance varied between individual mice, the distance run did not predict the level of anxiety on any measure. These findings suggest that prior and ongoing stress delays or prevents the anxiolytic effect of exercise without affecting exercise itself.

  16. [Homozygote mice deficient in serotonin 5-HT1B receptor and antidepressant effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Trillat, A C; Malagié, I; Bourin, M; Jacquot, C; Hen, R; Gardier, A M

    1998-01-01

    We use the knockout mice strategy to investigate the contribution of the 5-HT1B receptor in mediating the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Using microdialysis in awake 129/Sv mice, we show that the absence of the 5-HT1B receptor in mutant mice (KO 1B -/-) potentiated the effect of paroxetine on extracellular 5-HT levels in the ventral hippocampus, but not in the frontal cortex compared to wild-type mice (WT). Furthermore, using the forced swimming test, we demonstrate that SSRIs decreased immobility of WT mice, and this effect is absent in KO 1B -/- mice showing therefore that activation of 5-HT1B receptors mediate the antidepressant-like effects of SSRIs. Taken together these findings suggest that 5-HT1B autoreceptors limit the effects of SSRI particularly in the hippocampus while postsynaptic 5-HT1B receptors are required for the antidepressant activity of SSRIs.

  17. Biological effects of targeted inactivation of hepatocyte growth factor-like protein in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, J A; Carrick, T L; Degen, J L; Witte, D; Degen, S J

    1998-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor-like protein (HGFL) is a liver-derived serum glycoprotein involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, and is proposed to have a fundamental role in embryogenesis, fertility, hematopoiesis, macrophage activation, and tissue repair. To assess the in vivo effects of total loss of HGFL, we generated mice with targeted disruption of the gene resulting in loss of the protein. Disruption of the HGFL gene allowed for normal embryogenesis, and followed a Mendelian pattern of genetic transmission. Mice homozygous for the targeted allele (HGFL-/- mice) are fertile, and grow to adulthood without obvious phenotypic abnormalities in unchallenged animals, except for development of lipid-containing cytoplasmic vacuoles in hepatocytes throughout the liver lobules. These histologic changes are not accompanied by discernible changes in synthetic or excretory hepatic functions. Hematopoiesis appears unaltered, and although macrophage activation is delayed in the absence of HGFL, migration to the peritoneal cavity upon challenge with thioglycollate was similar in HGFL-/- and wild-type mice. Challenged with incision to skin, HGFL-/- mice display normal wound healing. These data demonstrate that HGFL is not essential for embryogenesis, fertility, or wound healing. HGFL-deficient mice will provide a valuable means to assess the role of HGFL in hepatic and systemic responses to inflammatory and infectious stimuli in vivo. PMID:9486989

  18. The effect of the amount of blocking cue training on blocking of appetitive conditioning in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, David J; Jones, William S; Austen, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    Conditioning of a target cue is blocked when it occurs in compound with another cue (blocking cue) that has already received conditioning. Although blocking of appetitive conditioning is commonly used in rodents as a test of selective learning, it has been demonstrated rarely in mice. In order to investigate the conditions that result in blocking in mice two studies tested the effect of the extent of prior blocking cue training on blocking of appetitive conditioning. Mice received either 80 or 200 trials of blocking cue training prior to compound conditioning. A control group received only compound training. Experiment 1 assessed the ability of a visual cue to block conditioning to an auditory target cue. Exposure to the context and the unconditioned stimulus, sucrose pellets, was equated across groups. Blocking was evident in mice that received 200, but not 80 training trials with the visual blocking cue. Responding to the blocking cue was similar across groups. Experiment 2 assessed the ability of an auditory cue to block conditioning to a visual target cue. Blocking was evident in mice trained with 80 and 200 auditory blocking cue trials. The results demonstrate that the strength of blocking in mice is dependent on the modality and experience of the blocking cue. Furthermore, prolonged training of the blocking cue after asymptotic levels of conditioned responding have been reached is necessary for blocking to occur under certain conditions suggesting that the strength of conditioned responding is a limited measure of learning.

  19. Increasing the effectiveness of intracerebral injections in adult and neonatal mice: a neurosurgical point of view.

    PubMed

    Mathon, Bertrand; Nassar, Mérie; Simonnet, Jean; Le Duigou, Caroline; Clemenceau, Stéphane; Miles, Richard; Fricker, Desdemona

    2015-12-01

    Intracerebral injections of tracers or viral constructs in rodents are now commonly used in the neurosciences and must be executed perfectly. The purpose of this article is to update existing protocols for intracerebral injections in adult and neonatal mice. Our procedure for stereotaxic injections in adult mice allows the investigator to improve the effectiveness and safety, and save time. Furthermore, for the first time, we describe a two-handed procedure for intracerebral injections in neonatal mice that can be performed by a single operator in a very short time. Our technique using the stereotaxic arm allows a higher precision than freehand techniques previously described. Stereotaxic injections in adult mice can be performed in 20 min and have >90% efficacy in targeting the injection site. Injections in neonatal mice can be performed in 5 min. Efficacy depends on the difficulty of precisely localizing the injection sites, due to the small size of the animal. We describe an innovative, effortless, and reproducible surgical protocol for intracerebral injections in adult and neonatal mice.

  20. Cost and Effectiveness of Commercially Available Nesting Substrates for Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus).

    PubMed

    Martin, Tara L; Balser, Shannon R; Young, Gregory S; Lewis, Stephanie D

    2016-01-01

    Provision of nesting material promotes species-typical behaviors in rodents including deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). The purpose of this study was to determine which commercially available nesting material best promotes complex nest building in the subspecies P. m. bairdii yet remains cost-effective for use as enrichment in a laboratory research setting. An existing breeding colony consisting of cages containing all male mice, all female mice, and breeding pairs was evaluated. Five commercially available substrates-compressed cotton squares, cylindrical compressed cotton, cellulose bedding containing small pieces of evenly dispersed compressed paper, brown crinkled paper, and white crinkled paper-were provided according to the manufacturer's recommendation. Nests were evaluated at 24 h after cage change and scored for complexity. Nest complexity was compared between breeding pairs and single-sex cages and between male and female mice. Cages housing breeding pairs with pups had the highest average complexity score. The dispersed paper substrate was the least expensive substrate tested but had the lowest average nest complexity score. Nesting scores for brown crinkled paper, compressed cotton squares, and compressed cotton cylinders did not differ significantly despite the range in cost. Brown crinkled paper was the second least-expensive substrate tested, and mice used it to build consistently complex nests, making it the most practical substrate for use as enrichment for deer mice in a laboratory setting. PMID:27423147

  1. Effect of DSS-induced colitis on visceral sensitivity to colorectal distension in mice.

    PubMed

    Larsson, M H; Rapp, L; Lindström, E

    2006-02-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis on visceral sensitivity, measured as the visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD) in BALB/c and C57Bl/6 male mice. Inflammation was induced by the addition of 4% DSS to the drinking water for 5 (C57Bl/6) or 6-7 days (BALB/c). Parallel groups were used to monitor histopathological changes and visceral sensitivity. Pseudo-affective visceral pain responses were evoked using an increasing phasic CRD paradigm (10-60 mmHg) in conscious mice on predetermined days (pretreatment controls, 12, 16, 20, 30, 40 and 51). In both mouse strains, significant histopathological changes developed between days 2 and 5 of DSS treatment, and persisted until day 12 (P < 0.05). On day 15, inflammatory scores were reduced by about 50%. Despite evidence of inflammation in DSS-treated mice, no differences could be shown in the VMR to CRD between DSS-treated mice and controls at any time point tested. In addition, no differences were seen before and after DSS treatment in the same group of mice. In conclusion, these data suggest that DSS-induced colonic inflammation does not affect the visceral sensitivity to CRD, neither at short or long term, in BALB/c or C57Bl/6 male mice.

  2. Fat-specific Dicer deficiency accelerates aging and mitigates several effects of dietary restriction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Felipe C. G.; Branquinho, Jéssica L. O.; Brandão, Bruna B.; Guerra, Beatriz A.; Silva, Ismael D.; Frontini, Andrea; Thomou, Thomas; Sartini, Loris; Cinti, Saverio; Kahn, C. Ronald; Festuccia, William T.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mori, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Aging increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, and this can be prevented by dietary restriction (DR). We have previously shown that DR inhibits the downregulation of miRNAs and their processing enzymes - mainly Dicer - that occurs with aging in mouse white adipose tissue (WAT). Here we used fat-specific Dicer knockout mice (AdicerKO) to understand the contributions of adipose tissue Dicer to the metabolic effects of aging and DR. Metabolomic data uncovered a clear distinction between the serum metabolite profiles of Lox control and AdicerKO mice, with a notable elevation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in AdicerKO. These profiles were associated with reduced oxidative metabolism and increased lactate in WAT of AdicerKO mice and were accompanied by structural and functional changes in mitochondria, particularly under DR. AdicerKO mice displayed increased mTORC1 activation in WAT and skeletal muscle, where Dicer expression is not affected. This was accompanied by accelerated age-associated insulin resistance and premature mortality. Moreover, DR-induced insulin sensitivity was abrogated in AdicerKO mice. This was reverted by rapamycin injection, demonstrating that insulin resistance in AdicerKO mice is caused by mTORC1 hyperactivation. Our study evidences a DR-modulated role for WAT Dicer in controlling metabolism and insulin resistance. PMID:27241713

  3. Maneb causes pro-oxidant effects in the hippocampus of Nrf2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kurzatkowski, Daniela M; Trombetta, Louis D

    2013-09-01

    The effects of maneb were investigated in C57BL/6 Nrf2 wildtype and knockout mice. Treated KO mice showed significant weight loss as compared to WT counterparts. ICPAAS analysis demonstrated a significant increase in manganese concentration in the tissues of treated KO mice as compared to WT. Biochemical analysis revealed significant decreases of antioxidants including glutathione, glutathione reductase and heme oxygenase-1. Levels of TBARS were significantly increased in hippocampal tissue in Nrf2 KO mice at the 30 and 60mg doses. qPCR demonstrated that the only gene mediated by the Nrf2 transcription pathway that was significantly modulated by at least 1.5 fold was glutathione peroxidase 4. GPX4 was significantly upregulated in Nrf2 WT mice treated with 30mg/kg maneb and significantly downregulated in Nrf2 KO mice treated with the same dose. Microscopy revealed neuronal pyknosis and eosinophilia of the cytoplasm in the hippocampi of both WT and KO animals treated with 60mg/kg maneb. PMID:23764462

  4. Effects of age on the synergistic interactions between lipopolysaccharide and mechanical ventilation in mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lincoln S; Gharib, Sina A; Frevert, Charles W; Martin, Thomas R

    2010-10-01

    Children have a lower incidence and mortality from acute lung injury (ALI) than adults, and infections are the most common event associated with ALI. To study the effects of age on susceptibility to ALI, we investigated the responses to microbial products combined with mechanical ventilation (MV) in juvenile (21-d-old) and adult (16-wk-old) mice. Juvenile and adult C57BL/6 mice were treated with inhaled Escherichia coli 0111:B4 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and MV using tidal volume = 15 ml/kg. Comparison groups included mice treated with LPS or MV alone and untreated age-matched control mice. In adult animals treated for 3 hours, LPS plus MV caused synergistic increases in neutrophils (P < 0.01) and IgM in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (P = 0.03) and IL-1β in whole lung homogenates (P < 0.01) as compared with either modality alone. Although juvenile and adult mice had similar responses to LPS or MV alone, the synergistic interactions between LPS and MV did not occur in juvenile mice. Computational analysis of gene expression array data suggest that the acquisition of synergy with increasing age results, in part, from the loss of antiapoptotic responses and the acquisition of proinflammatory responses to the combination of LPS and MV. These data suggest that the synergistic inflammatory and injury responses to inhaled LPS combined with MV are acquired with age as a result of coordinated changes in gene expression of inflammatory, apoptotic, and TGF-β pathways.

  5. [Genotype-dependent mice behavior in cognitive tasks. Effect of noopept].

    PubMed

    Bel'nik, A P; Ostrovskaia, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2007-01-01

    The interstrain differences in performance of C57BL/6J, BALB/c and DBA/2J male mice in two cognitive tasks were found. Mice C57BL/6J showed good learning ability and preservation of memory traces tested 10 days after performance in a simplified version of Morris water maze. Mice BALB/c learned the task but, virtually, no long-term memory traces were revealed, whereas DBA/2J demonstrated poor learning. The effect of nootropic drug Noopept (GVS-111, N-phenil-acetyl-L-prolylglycin ethyl ether) was shown to be genotype-dependent. Its administration (0.5 mg/kg i.p., 15 min before learning) improved the long-term memory in Morris test in BALB/c mice but failed to produce any improvement in C57BL/6J. The ability of mice for extrapolation of the direction of stimulus movement differently changed after Noopept injections: the proportion of correct task solutions increased in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice, whereas the performance of DBA/2J did not change. PMID:18592707

  6. Protective effects of radon inhalation on carrageenan-induced inflammatory paw edema in mice.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Takahiro; Teraoka, Junichi; Sakoda, Akihiro; Nishiyama, Yuichi; Yamato, Keiko; Monden, Mayuko; Ishimori, Yuu; Nomura, Takaharu; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2012-04-01

    We assessed whether radon inhalation inhibited carrageenan-induced inflammation in mice. Carrageenan (1% v/v) was injected subcutaneously into paws of mice that had or had not inhaled approximately 2,000 Bq/m(3) of radon for 24 h. Radon inhalation significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities and significantly decreased lipid peroxide levels in mouse paws, indicating that radon inhalation activates antioxidative functions. Carrageenan administration induced paw edema and significantly increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and nitric oxide in serum. However, radon inhalation significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema. Serum TNF-α levels were lower in the radon-treated mice than in sham-treated mice. In addition, SOD and catalase activities in paws were significantly higher in the radon-treated mice than in the sham-treated mice. These findings indicated that radon inhalation had anti-inflammatory effects and inhibited carrageenan-induced inflammatory paw edema.

  7. Nesting material as environmental enrichment has no adverse effects on behavior and physiology of laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Van de Weerd, H A; Van Loo, P L; Van Zutphen, L F; Koolhaas, J M; Baumans, V

    1997-11-01

    Environmental enrichment may improve the quality of life of captive animals by altering the environment of animals so that they are able to perform more of the behavior that is within the range of the animal's species-specific repertoire. When enrichment is introduced into an animal's environment, it is important to evaluate the effect of the enrichment program and to assess whether the animal continues to use the enrichment in the long-term. Groups of mice were housed under either standard or enriched conditions for several weeks. Nesting material which was highly preferred in previous studies was used as enrichment. During the period of differential housing several behavioral parameters (behavioral tests and handling) and physiological parameters (urine and plasma corticosterone, food and water intake, body and adrenal weight) were monitored to determine the impact of environmental enrichment. Observations were made to determine whether or not the mice continued to use the enrichment. The results indicated that throughout the study all mice used the nesting material to build nests and that mice from enriched conditions weighed more than mice housed under standard conditions, although the latter consumed more food. No major differences for behavioral and physiological parameters were found between the groups of mice housed under different conditions. Therefore it is not likely that supply of nesting material will jeopardize the outcome of experiments.

  8. Effect of N-acetylchitohexaose against Candida albicans infection of tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Watanabe, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, M

    1990-01-01

    A water-soluble oligosaccharide, N-acetylchitohexaose (NACOS-6), was able to enhance the protective effect against Candida albicans infection in mice during the early phase of tumor-bearing. A significant decrease in the number of C. albicans cells in the kidneys of NACOS-6-treated tumor-bearing mice was observed 8 days after the fungal infection, or 15 days after the tumor transplantation. The candidacidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from NACOS-6-treated tumor-bearing mice did not differ from that of NACOS-6-untreated tumor-bearing mice. On the other hand, the candidacidal activities of both macrophages and T lymphocytes increased following administration of NACOS-6 in the early phase of tumor-bearing. The culture supernatant of T lymphocytes from NACOS-6-treated tumor-bearing mice also potentiated the candidacidal activity of casein-induced macrophages. An enhancement of natural killer cell activity of splenic lymphocytes obtained from NACOS-6-treated tumor-bearing mice was also observed.

  9. Maneb causes pro-oxidant effects in the hippocampus of Nrf2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kurzatkowski, Daniela M; Trombetta, Louis D

    2013-09-01

    The effects of maneb were investigated in C57BL/6 Nrf2 wildtype and knockout mice. Treated KO mice showed significant weight loss as compared to WT counterparts. ICPAAS analysis demonstrated a significant increase in manganese concentration in the tissues of treated KO mice as compared to WT. Biochemical analysis revealed significant decreases of antioxidants including glutathione, glutathione reductase and heme oxygenase-1. Levels of TBARS were significantly increased in hippocampal tissue in Nrf2 KO mice at the 30 and 60mg doses. qPCR demonstrated that the only gene mediated by the Nrf2 transcription pathway that was significantly modulated by at least 1.5 fold was glutathione peroxidase 4. GPX4 was significantly upregulated in Nrf2 WT mice treated with 30mg/kg maneb and significantly downregulated in Nrf2 KO mice treated with the same dose. Microscopy revealed neuronal pyknosis and eosinophilia of the cytoplasm in the hippocampi of both WT and KO animals treated with 60mg/kg maneb.

  10. Fat-specific Dicer deficiency accelerates aging and mitigates several effects of dietary restriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Reis, Felipe C G; Branquinho, Jéssica L O; Brandão, Bruna B; Guerra, Beatriz A; Silva, Ismael D; Frontini, Andrea; Thomou, Thomas; Sartini, Loris; Cinti, Saverio; Kahn, C Ronald; Festuccia, William T; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Mori, Marcelo A

    2016-06-01

    Aging increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, and this can be prevented by dietary restriction (DR). We have previously shown that DR inhibits the downregulation of miRNAs and their processing enzymes - mainly Dicer - that occurs with aging in mouse white adipose tissue (WAT). Here we used fat-specific Dicer knockout mice (AdicerKO) to understand the contributions of adipose tissue Dicer to the metabolic effects of aging and DR. Metabolomic data uncovered a clear distinction between the serum metabolite profiles of Lox control and AdicerKO mice, with a notable elevation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in AdicerKO. These profiles were associated with reduced oxidative metabolism and increased lactate in WAT of AdicerKO mice and were accompanied by structural and functional changes in mitochondria, particularly under DR. AdicerKO mice displayed increased mTORC1 activation in WAT and skeletal muscle, where Dicer expression is not affected. This was accompanied by accelerated age-associated insulin resistance and premature mortality. Moreover, DR-induced insulin sensitivity was abrogated in AdicerKO mice. This was reverted by rapamycin injection, demonstrating that insulin resistance in AdicerKO mice is caused by mTORC1 hyperactivation. Our study evidences a DR-modulated role for WAT Dicer in controlling metabolism and insulin resistance. PMID:27241713

  11. Effects of Cholinergic Stimulation with Pyridostigmine Bromide on Chronic Chagasic Cardiomyopathic Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Cuba, Marília Beatriz; Ribeiro Machado, Marcus Paulo; Farnesi, Thais Soares; Alves, Angelica Cristina; Martins, Livia Alves; de Oliveira, Lucas Felipe; Capitelli, Caroline Santos; Leite, Camila Ferreira; Vinícius Silva, Marcos; Machado, Juliana Reis; Kappel, Henrique Borges; Sales de Campos, Helioswilton; Paiva, Luciano; da Silva Gomes, Natália Lins; Guimarães Faleiros, Ana Carolina; Britto, Constança Felicia de Paoli de Carvalho; Savino, Wilson; Moreira, Otacílio Cruz; Rodrigues Jr., Virmondes; Montano, Nicola; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Ramirez, Luis Eduardo; Dias da Silva, Valdo Jose

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of an anticholinesterase agent, pyridostigmine bromide (Pyrido), on experimental chronic Chagas heart disease in mice. To this end, male C57BL/6J mice noninfected (control:Con) or chronically infected (5 months) with Trypanosoma cruzi (chagasic:Chg) were treated or not (NT) with Pyrido for one month. At the end of this period, electrocardiogram (ECG); cardiac autonomic function; heart histopathology; serum cytokines; and the presence of blood and tissue parasites by means of immunohistochemistry and PCR were assessed. In NT-Chg mice, significant changes in the electrocardiographic, autonomic, and cardiac histopathological profiles were observed confirming a chronic inflammatory response. Treatment with Pyrido in Chagasic mice caused a significant reduction of myocardial inflammatory infiltration, fibrosis, and hypertrophy, which was accompanied by a decrease in serum levels of IFNγ with no change in IL-10 levels, suggesting a shift of immune response toward an anti-inflammatory profile. Lower nondifferent numbers of parasite DNA copies were observed in both treated and nontreated chagasic mice. In conclusion, our findings confirm the marked neuroimmunomodulatory role played by the parasympathetic autonomic nervous system in the evolution of the inflammatory-immune response to T. cruzi during experimental chronic Chagas heart disease in mice. PMID:25221388

  12. Effect of beryllium chloride on porphyrin metabolism in pregnant mice administered by subcutaneous injection

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Sanae; Sakaguchi, Takehiro; Nakamura, Iwao

    1997-04-11

    The effect of beryllium (Be) compounds on porphyrins was investigated in pregnant mice. The blood protoporphyrin (Proto) and zinc protoporphyrin (Zn Proto) concentrations were increased in pregnancy. Regardless of pregnancy or nonpregnancy, the Proto concentration was decreased after Be injection. Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) and porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) activities in blood were significantly elevated in the pregnant untreated (Con-pregnant) group, compared to the nonpregnant mice untreated (Con-nonpregnant) and nonpregnant mice treated with Be (Be-nonpregnant) groups. The blood ALA-D activity of the pregnant mice treated with Be (Be-pregnant group) tended to decrease, compared to Con-pregnant group. The blood PBG-D activity in the Be-pregnant group was significantly lower compared with that of the Con-pregnant group. The ALA-D and PBG-D activities in the spleen were also significantly elevated in the Con-pregnant group, compared to nonpregnant groups. However, it was noted that these values in the Be-pregnant group were almost the same as that of the Con-nonpregnant group and were significantly lower than that in the Con-pregnant group. The elevation of AL-D and PBG-D activities in the blood and spleen, which play a role in the hematopoietic function of mice, was observed in the Con-pregnant mice compared to the nonpregnant mice. However, the phenomenon was not observed in the Be-pregnant mice, it suggesting that Be suppressed the pregnancy-induced increase in hematopoietic function. 26 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Effect of beryllium chloride on porphyrin metabolism in pregnant mice administered by subcutaneous injection.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, S; Sakaguchi, T; Nakamura, I; Aminaka, M; Tanaka, T; Kudo, Y

    1997-04-11

    The effect of beryllium (Be) compounds on porphyrins was investigated in pregnant mice. The blood protoporphyrin (Proto) and zinc protoporphyrin (Zn Proto) concentrations were increased in pregnancy. Regardless of pregnancy or nonpregnancy, the Proto concentration was decreased after Be injection. Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) and porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) activities in blood were significantly elevated in the pregnant untreated (Con-pregnant) group, compared to the nonpregnant mice untreated (Con-nonpregnant) and nonpregnant mice treated with Be (Be-nonpregnant) groups. The blood ALA-D activity of the pregnant mice treated with Be (Be-pregnant group) tended to decrease, compared to Con-pregnant group. The blood PBG-D activity in the Be-pregnant group was significantly lower compared with that of the Con-pregnant group. The ALA-D and PBG-D activities in the spleen were also significantly elevated in the Con-pregnant group, compared to nonpregnant groups. However, it was noted that these values in the Be-pregnant group were almost the same as that of the Con-nonpregnant group and were significantly lower than that in the Con-pregnant group. The elevation of ALA-D and PBG-D activities in the blood and spleen, which play a role in the hematopoietic function of mice, was observed in the Con-pregnant mice compared to the nonpregnant mice. However, the phenomenon was not observed in the Be-pregnant mice, it suggesting that Be suppressed the pregnancy-induced increase in hematopoietic function.

  14. Effect of 2-aminoadamantane derivatives on behavior of mice in a modified light/dark test.

    PubMed

    Avgustinovich, D F; Fomina, M K; Suslov, E V; Tolstikova, T G; Volcho, K P; Salakhutdinov, N F

    2014-12-01

    The effects of two derivatives of 2-aminoadamantane, enantiomers J447H and J579, on the behavior of male and female C57Bl/6J mice were studied using a modified light/dark test. The substances differed by their effects on the behavior of male mice. J579 reduced the number of rearings. J447H in a dose of 1 mg/kg affected more parameters: it reduced exploratory activity 1 h after administration and stimulated exploratory and motor activity in 2 h. In female mice, J447H significantly reduced the number of peepings into holes in 2 h after administration. The results indicate that further analysis of the effects of J579 and especially J447H is required.

  15. Effect of epithalon on the incidence of chromosome aberrations in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, S V; Togo, E F; Mikheev, V S; Popovich, I G; Khavinson, V Kh; Anisimov, V N

    2002-03-01

    The incidence of chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells of 12-month-old SAMP-1 female mice characterized by accelerated aging was 1.8 times higher than in wild-type SAMR-1 females and 2.2 times higher than in SHR females of the same age. Treatment with Epithalon (Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly) starting from the age of 2 months decreased the incidence of chromosome aberrations in SAMP-1, SAMR-1, and SHR mice by 20%, 30.1%, and 17.9%, respectively, compared to age-matched controls (p<0.05). Treatment with melatonin (given with drinking water in a dose of 20 mg/liter in night hours) had no effect on the incidence of chromosome aberrations in SHR mice. These data indicate antimutagenic effect of Epithalon, which probably underlies the geroprotective effect of this peptide. PMID:12360351

  16. Effect of 2-aminoadamantane derivatives on behavior of mice in a modified light/dark test.

    PubMed

    Avgustinovich, D F; Fomina, M K; Suslov, E V; Tolstikova, T G; Volcho, K P; Salakhutdinov, N F

    2014-12-01

    The effects of two derivatives of 2-aminoadamantane, enantiomers J447H and J579, on the behavior of male and female C57Bl/6J mice were studied using a modified light/dark test. The substances differed by their effects on the behavior of male mice. J579 reduced the number of rearings. J447H in a dose of 1 mg/kg affected more parameters: it reduced exploratory activity 1 h after administration and stimulated exploratory and motor activity in 2 h. In female mice, J447H significantly reduced the number of peepings into holes in 2 h after administration. The results indicate that further analysis of the effects of J579 and especially J447H is required. PMID:25430650

  17. Effects of simulated heat waves on cardiovascular functions in senile mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiakun; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Shuyu; Wang, Chunling; Wang, Baojian; Guo, Pinwen; Dong, Lina

    2014-08-01

    The mechanism of the effects of simulated heat waves on cardiovascular disease in senile mice was investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a TEM1880 meteorological environment simulation chamber, according to a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen senile mice were divided into control, heat wave, and heat wave BH4 groups, respectively. Mice in the heat wave and heat wave BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. The levels of ET-1, NO, HSP60, SOD, TNF, sICAM-1, and HIF-1α in each group of mice were measured after heat wave simulation. Results show that heat waves decreased SOD activity in the myocardial tissue of senile mice, increased NO, HSP60, TNF, sICAM-1, and HIF-1α levels, and slightly decreased ET-1 levels, BH4 can relieve the effects of heat waves on various biological indicators. After a comprehensive analysis of the experiments above, we draw the followings conclusions regarding the influence of heat waves on senile mice: excess HSP60 activated immune cells, and induced endothelial cells and macrophages to secrete large amounts of ICAM-1, TNF-α, and other inflammatory cytokines, it also activated the inflammation response in the body and damaged the coronary endothelial cell structure, which increased the permeability of blood vessel intima and decreased SOD activity in cardiac tissues. The oxidation of lipoproteins in the blood increased, and large amounts of cholesterol were generated. Cholesterol penetrated the intima and deposited on the blood vessel wall, forming atherosclerosis and leading to the occurrence of cardiovascular disease in senile mice. These results maybe are useful for studying the effects of heat waves on elderly humans, which we discussed in the discussion chapter. PMID:25101768

  18. Effects of oxytocin on serotonin 1B agonist-induced autism-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Sarah K; Gray, Andrew C; Woehrle, Nancy S

    2016-11-01

    Social impairments in autism remain poorly understood and without approved pharmacotherapies. Novel animals models are needed to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate novel treatments for the social deficits in autism. Recently, serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1B) agonist challenge in mice was shown to induce autism-like behaviors including perseveration, reduced prepulse inhibition, and delayed alternation deficits. However, the effects of 5-HT1B agonists on autism-related social behaviors in mice remain unknown. Here, we examine the effects of 5-HT1B agonist challenge on sociability and preference for social novelty in mice. We also examine the effects of 5-HT1B agonist treatment on average rearing duration, a putative rodent measure of non-selective attention. Non-selective attention is an associated feature of autism that is also not well understood. We show that 5-HT1B receptor activation reduces sociability, preference for social novelty, and rearing in mice. In addition, we examine the ability of oxytocin, an off-label treatment for the social impairments in autism, to reverse 5-HT1B agonist-induced social and attention deficits in mice. We show that oxytocin restores social novelty preference in mice treated with a 5-HT1B agonist. We also show that oxytocin attenuates 5-HT1B agonist-induced sociability and rearing deficits in mice. Our results suggest that 5-HT1B agonist challenge provides a useful pharmacological mouse model for aspects of autism, and implicate 5-HT1B in autism social and attention deficits. Moreover, our findings suggest that oxytocin may treat the social deficits in autism through a mechanism involving 5-HT1B.

  19. Promoting effects of Chinese pangolin and wild pink medicines on the mammary gland development in immature mice.

    PubMed

    Bayin, Jiragara; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Islam, Mohammad Saiful; Yabuki, Akira; Kanouchi, Hiroaki; Oka, Tatsuzo; Nishinakagawa, Hayao

    2009-10-01

    The effects of the mixture of crude aqueous extracts from Chinese pangolin and wild pink (C+P), traditional Chinese medicine, on the proliferation and differentiation of mammary gland epithelium in intact and ovariectomized immature mice were investigated by light and electron microscopy and BrdU immunohistochemistry. Although there were no significant differences in mammary gland fat pad and parenchyma areas between the intact experimental groups, the numbers of duct branchings and buds were significantly larger in the C+W treated mice than in the control mice. The ratio of BrdU immunopositive cells to total epithelial cells was higher in C+W treated intact mice. Ultrastructurally, epithelial cells of the mammary buds and ducts possessed an oval and lucent nucleus, and ribosomes increased in number or developed to a greater degree in C+W treated intact mice than in the control mice. Conversely, there were no significant differences in any measurements of mammary gland between the experimental groups of ovariectomized mice. BrdU immunoreactive cells were never seen and the ultrastructure of mammary epihelial cells indicated the inactive cell phase in both ovariectomied mice. In comparison between the intact and overiectomized mice, the mammary fat pad area was larger in the ovariectomized mice than in the intact mice, although another four measurements were larger in the intact groups. These observations suggest that administration with C+W could promote the development of mammary glands via ovary in immature mice. PMID:19887738

  20. Effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to lethal whole-body. gamma. irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Onoue, M.; Uchida, K.; Yokokura, T.; Takahashi, T.; Mutai, M.

    1981-11-01

    The effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to 2-kR whole-body ..gamma.. irradiation was studied using germfree, monoassociated, and conventionalized ICR mice. The germfree mice were monoassociated with 1 of 11 bacterial strains, which were isolated from the fresh feces of conventional mice, 2 weeks prior to irradiation. All mice died within 3 weeks after irradiation. Monoassociation with Fusobacterium sp., Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas sp. significantly reduced the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. In contrast, monoassociation with Clostridium sp., Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, or Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly prolonged the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. This suggests that the latter organisms may perform some activity to protect the mice from radiation injury. In this histopathological autopsy examination, the main lesions were hypocellularity in hematopoietic organs and hemorrhage in various organs. Neither karyorrhexis nor desquamation of intestinal mucosal cells was observed in any mice. From these observations, it is suggested that the death of these mice was related to hematopoietic damage. Bacterial invasion into various organs was observed in conventionalized and Pseudomonas-, E. coli-, or S. faecalis-monoassociated mice but not in Clostridium-, B. pseudolongum-, L. acidophilus-, or Fusobacterium-monoassociated mice.

  1. Promoting effects of Chinese pangolin and wild pink medicines on the mammary gland development in immature mice.

    PubMed

    Bayin, Jiragara; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Islam, Mohammad Saiful; Yabuki, Akira; Kanouchi, Hiroaki; Oka, Tatsuzo; Nishinakagawa, Hayao

    2009-10-01

    The effects of the mixture of crude aqueous extracts from Chinese pangolin and wild pink (C+P), traditional Chinese medicine, on the proliferation and differentiation of mammary gland epithelium in intact and ovariectomized immature mice were investigated by light and electron microscopy and BrdU immunohistochemistry. Although there were no significant differences in mammary gland fat pad and parenchyma areas between the intact experimental groups, the numbers of duct branchings and buds were significantly larger in the C+W treated mice than in the control mice. The ratio of BrdU immunopositive cells to total epithelial cells was higher in C+W treated intact mice. Ultrastructurally, epithelial cells of the mammary buds and ducts possessed an oval and lucent nucleus, and ribosomes increased in number or developed to a greater degree in C+W treated intact mice than in the control mice. Conversely, there were no significant differences in any measurements of mammary gland between the experimental groups of ovariectomized mice. BrdU immunoreactive cells were never seen and the ultrastructure of mammary epihelial cells indicated the inactive cell phase in both ovariectomied mice. In comparison between the intact and overiectomized mice, the mammary fat pad area was larger in the ovariectomized mice than in the intact mice, although another four measurements were larger in the intact groups. These observations suggest that administration with C+W could promote the development of mammary glands via ovary in immature mice.

  2. [Effect of social interaction on skin temperature in mice].

    PubMed

    Hishimura, Yutaka; Itoh, Kana

    2009-06-01

    We investigated physiological and behavioral characteristics of socially stressed animals in a resident-intruder paradigm. ICR male mice (resident, n = 14) were exposed individually to a novel male conspecific (intruder, n = 14) in their homecage for 30 min. Along with behavioral analyses, the skin temperatures of both the resident and the intruder were measured simultaneously using a multipoint radiation thermometer. There were no significant differences between the resident and intruder in the amount of locomotion, flight and aggressive behaviors. The mean skin temperature of the residents during the interaction was higher than before the interaction. In addition, the skin temperatures of the intruders were consistently higher than the residents. The results suggest that social stress causes elevation in skin temperature as well as stress-induced hyperthermia in core temperature. Moreover, infrared radiation thermometers may provide an alternative means of measuring physiological parameters of two (or more) subjects simultaneously in the study of animal social behavior. PMID:19637832

  3. Inhalational model of cocaine exposure in mice: neuroteratological effects.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Lidow, Irina A; Lidow, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    We developed a novel inhalation-based mouse model of prenatal cocaine exposure. This model approximates cocaine abuse via smoking, the preferred route of cocaine administration by heavy drug users. The model is also characterized by (i) absence of procedural stress from drug administration, (ii) long-term drug exposure starting weeks before pregnancy and continuing throughout the entire gestation, and (iii) self-administration of cocaine in multi-hour daily sessions reminiscent of drug binges, which allows animals to set up the levels of their own drug consumption. The offspring of female mice inhaling cocaine in our model displayed no gross alterations in their cortical cytoarchitecture. These offspring, however, showed significant impairments in sustained attention and spatial working memory. We hope that the introduction of the present model will lead to a significant increase in our understanding of outcomes of prenatal cocaine exposure. PMID:16414242

  4. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10(-9) (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10(-9)-6.5 × 10(-9)) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population.

  5. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice

    PubMed Central

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10−9 (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10−9–6.5 × 10−9) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population. PMID:26129709

  6. Disentangling prenatal and postnatal maternal genetic effects reveals persistent prenatal effects on offspring growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jason B; Leamy, Larry J; Roseman, Charles C; Cheverud, James M

    2011-11-01

    Mothers are often the most important determinant of traits expressed by their offspring. These "maternal effects" (MEs) are especially crucial in early development, but can also persist into adulthood. They have been shown to play a role in a diversity of evolutionary and ecological processes, especially when genetically based. Although the importance of MEs is becoming widely appreciated, we know little about their underlying genetic basis. We address the dearth of genetic data by providing a simple approach, using combined genotype information from parents and offspring, to identify "maternal genetic effects" (MGEs) contributing to natural variation in complex traits. Combined with experimental cross-fostering, our approach also allows for the separation of pre- and postnatal MGEs, providing rare insights into prenatal effects. Applying this approach to an experimental mouse population, we identified 13 ME loci affecting body weight, most of which (12/13) exhibited prenatal effects, and nearly half (6/13) exhibiting postnatal effects. MGEs contributed more to variation in body weight than the direct effects of the offsprings' own genotypes until mice reached adulthood, but continued to represent a major component of variation through adulthood. Prenatal effects always contributed more variation than postnatal effects, especially for those effects that persisted into adulthood. These results suggest that MGEs may be an important component of genetic architecture that is generally overlooked in studies focused on direct mapping from genotype to phenotype. Our approach can be used in both experimental and natural populations, providing a widely practicable means of expanding our understanding of MGEs.

  7. [Effect of proximate environment on drug susceptibility of mice (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tanase, H; Matsunuma, N; Suzuki, Y

    1979-10-01

    The present study was performed in order to elucidate the effect of proximate environment on drug susceptibility of mice. Three experiments were carried out independently. In the first experiment, mongrel and ddS mice produced under an unsatisfactory control of proximate environment were purchased, and acute toxicity tests of thiamine hydrochloride (B1HCl) and isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INAH) were practiced at two different conditioned rooms. In the second experiment, ddY mice produced under the conventional environment controlled to a certain extent were purchased, and the toxic effect of B1HCl was examined under the similar environment. In the third experiment, the sensitivity to B1HCl of RFVL mice produced under the strict barrier system was tested at the severe air-conditioned room. LD50 and their fLD50 values were calculated by Litchfield-Wilcoxon's method, and the variance analyses were carried out. The severer the environmental control after the purchase of mice turned to the higher the drug sensitivity. This respect was more remarkable in INAH of which the toxic response is appeared slowly compared with B1HCl. Furthermore, seasonal variation was found in LD50 values. However, seasonal effect differed from rearing and experimental conditions. In the third experiment which these proximate environments were controlled severely, seasonal variation was very small. From the results of these experiments, it was defined that the use of animals produced under the satisfactory rearing condition and severe environmental control are necessary for animal experiments.

  8. Behavioral Effects of Chronic Methamphetamine Treatment in HIV-1 gp120 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brook L.; Geyer, Mark A.; Buell, Mahalah; Perry, William; Young, Jared W.; Minassian, Arpi

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) dependence is frequently comorbid with HIV infection. Both factors are independently characterized by inhibitory deficits, which may manifest as increased motor activity, inappropriate perseverative behavior, and elevated exploratory responses to novel stimuli, but the effect of combined METH exposure and HIV is not well understood. In this study, we administered a chronic escalation/binge regimen of METH or vehicle treatment to wildtype (WT) or transgenic (tg) mice expressing the HIV-1 gp120 envelope protein and quantified disinhibition during the 7 days following drug withdrawal. We hypothesized that gp120tg mice administered chronic METH would exhibit more pronounced inhibitory deficits compared to vehicle-treated WT or gp120tg animals. Our results showed that METH treatment alone increased novel object interaction while female METH-treated gp120tg mice exhibited the highest level of exploration (holepoking) compared to other female mice. Transgenic mice exhibited fewer rears relative to WT, slightly less locomotion, and also demonstrated a trend towards more perseverative motor patterns. In summary, both METH treatment and gp120 expression may modify inhibition, but such effects are selective and dependent upon variations in age and sex that could impact dopamine and frontostriatal function. These findings illustrate the need to improve our knowledge about the combined effects of HIV and substance use and facilitate improved treatment methods for comorbid disease and drug dependence. PMID:22960458

  9. Protective effect of boric acid against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ince, Sinan; Keles, Hikmet; Erdogan, Metin; Hazman, Omer; Kucukkurt, Ismail

    2012-07-01

    The protective effect of boric acid against liver damage was evaluated by its attenuation of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Male albino mice were treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with boric acid (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) or silymarin daily for 7 days and received 0.2% CCl(4) in olive oil (10 mL/kg, i.p.) on day 7. Results showed that administration of boric acid significantly reduced the elevation in serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and the level of malondialdehyde in the liver that were induced by CCl(4) in mice. Boric acid treatment significantly increased glutathione content, as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in the liver. Boric acid treatment improved the catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 2E1 and maintained activation of nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cell gene expression, with no effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in the livers of mice. Histopathologically, clear decreases in the severity of CCl(4)-induced lesions were observed, particularly at high boric acid concentrations. Results suggest that boric acid exhibits potent hepatoprotective effects on CCl(4)-induced liver damage in mice, likely the result of both the increase in antioxidant-defense system activity and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  10. Anti-obesity effect of alkaline reduced water in high fat-fed obese mice.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Rosa Mistica Coles; Kang, Tae-Young; Kim, Cheol-Su; Kim, Soo-Ki; Yang, Young-Chul; Sohn, Joon-Hyung; Lee, Kyu-Jae

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not alkaline reduced water (ARW) has a positive effect on obesity is unclear. This study aims to prove the positive effect of ARW in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity (DIO) in C57BL/6 mice model. Toward this, obesity was induced by feeding the C57BL/6 male mice with high-fat diet (w/w 45% fat) for 12 weeks. Thereafter, the animals were administered with either ARW or tap water. Next, the degree of adiposity and DIO-associated parameters were assessed: clinico-pathological parameters, biochemical measurements, histopathological analysis of liver, the expression of cholesterol metabolism-related genes in the liver, and serum levels of adipokine and cytokine. We found that ARW-fed mice significantly ameliorated adiposity: controlled body weight gain, reduced the accumulation of epididymal fats and decreased liver fats as compared to control mice. Accordingly, ARW coordinated the level of adiponectin and leptin. Further, mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)7A1 was upregulated. In summary, our data shows that ARW intake inhibits the progression of HF-DIO in mice. This is the first note on anti-obesity effect of ARW, clinically implying the safer fluid remedy for obesity control.

  11. Antinociceptive Activity and Effect of Methanol Extracts of Three Salvia Spp. on Withdrawal Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Mohammad; Shamerani, Mohammad Mehdi; Hossini, Ebrahim; Gohari, Ahmad Reza; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Nosrati, Anahita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: There are several reports about effects of Salvia spp. on CNS. The present experiment is undertaken to study effect of S. limbata, S. hypoleuca and S. macrosiphon on withdrawal syndrome in mice. Methods: Antinociceptive activities of aerial parts of Salvia spp. is investigated using hot plate method. In addition, the effect of its aerial parts on morphine dependence is investigated in mice. After induction of morphine dependency, different concentrations of plant extract are injected. To assess morphine withdrawal, naloxone (5 mg kg-1, i.p.) are injected into mice on the 5th day. Withdrawal syndrome is assessed by placing each mouse in a glass box 30 cm in height and recording the incidence of escape jumps for 60 minutes. Results: A decrease in incidence of escape jumps is observed in morphine dependence mice. S. limbata and S. hypoleuca extracts produced a statistically significant inhibition of pain induced by hot plate latency at (500, 1000 and 1500 mg kg-1) i.p. A significant increase in pain threshold is observed after 30 and 60 minutes (p < 0.001). The activity was comparable to that of morphine (30 mg kg-1, i.p., p > 0.05). The antinociceptive activity increased up to 60 minutes. Conclusion: S. limbataand S. hypolecuca extracts produced statistically significant inhibition of pain and development of morphine dependence in mice. PMID:24312878

  12. Behavioral effects of chronic methamphetamine treatment in HIV-1 gp120 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Henry, Brook L; Geyer, Mark A; Buell, Mahalah; Perry, William; Young, Jared W; Minassian, Arpi

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) dependence is frequently comorbid with HIV infection. Both factors are independently characterized by inhibitory deficits, which may manifest as increased motor activity, inappropriate perseverative behavior, and elevated exploratory responses to novel stimuli, but the effect of combined METH exposure and HIV is not well understood. In this study, we administered a chronic escalation/binge regimen of METH or vehicle treatment to wildtype (WT) or transgenic (tg) mice expressing the HIV-1 gp120 envelope protein and quantified disinhibition during the 7 days following drug withdrawal. We hypothesized that gp120tg mice administered chronic METH would exhibit more pronounced inhibitory deficits compared to vehicle-treated WT or gp120tg animals. Our results showed that METH treatment alone increased novel object interaction while female METH-treated gp120tg mice exhibited the highest level of exploration (holepoking) compared to other female mice. Transgenic mice exhibited fewer rears relative to WT, slightly less locomotion, and also demonstrated a trend toward more perseverative motor patterns. In summary, both METH treatment and gp120 expression may modify inhibition, but such effects are selective and dependent upon variations in age and sex that could impact dopamine and frontostriatal function. These findings illustrate the need to improve our knowledge about the combined effects of HIV and substance use and facilitate improved treatment methods for comorbid disease and drug dependence.

  13. Diuretics Prevent Thiazolidinedione-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy without Compromising Insulin-Sensitizing Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cherng-Shyang; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Sung, Junne-Ming; Chen, Ju-Yi; Ho, Li-Chun; Pandya, Kumar; Maeda, Nobuyo; Tsai, Yau-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Much concern has arisen regarding critical adverse effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs), including rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, on cardiac tissue. Although TZD-induced cardiac hypertrophy (CH) has been attributed to an increase in plasma volume or a change in cardiac nutrient preference, causative roles have not been established. To test the hypothesis that volume expansion directly mediates rosiglitazone-induced CH, mice were fed a high-fat diet with rosiglitazone, and cardiac and metabolic consequences were examined. Rosiglitazone treatment induced volume expansion and CH in wild-type and PPARγ heterozygous knockout (Pparg+/−) mice, but not in mice defective for ligand binding (PpargP465L/+). Cotreatment with the diuretic furosemide in wild-type mice attenuated rosiglitazone-induced CH, hypertrophic gene reprogramming, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, hypertrophy-related signal activation, and left ventricular dysfunction. Similar changes were observed in mice treated with pioglitazone. The diuretics spironolactone and trichlormethiazide, but not amiloride, attenuated rosiglitazone effects on volume expansion and CH. Interestingly, expression of glucose and lipid metabolism genes in the heart was altered by rosiglitazone, but these changes were not attenuated by furosemide cotreatment. Importantly, rosiglitazone-mediated whole-body metabolic improvements were not affected by furosemide cotreatment. We conclude that releasing plasma volume reduces adverse effects of TZD-induced volume expansion and cardiac events without compromising TZD actions in metabolic switch in the heart and whole-body insulin sensitivity. PMID:24287404

  14. Biological effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone on liver damage in Bmi-1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YUANQING; CHEN, NING; MIAO, DENGSHUN

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) has been demonstrated to function as an antioxidant by scavenging free radicals and subsequently protecting the mitochondria from oxidative stress-induced damage. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether PQQ is able to rescue premature senescence in the liver, induced by the deletion of B cell-specific Moloney MLV insertion site-1 (Bmi-1), by inhibiting oxidative stress. In vivo, the mice were allocated into three groups that underwent the following treatment protocols. WT mice received a normal diet, while BKO mice also received a normal diet. An additional group of BKO mice were fed a PQQ-supplemented diet (BKO + PQQ; 4 mg PQQ/kg in the normal diet). The results indicated that PQQ partially rescued the liver damage induced by the deletion of Bmi-1. PQQ was demonstrated to exhibit these therapeutic effects on liver damage through multiple aspects, including the promotion of proliferation, antiapoptotic effects, the inhibition of senescence, the upregulation of antioxidant ability, the downregulation of cell cycle protein expression, the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and the reduction of DNA damage. The results of these experiments indicated that treatment of BKO mice with a moderate dose of PQQ significantly protected the liver from deleterious effects by inhibiting oxidative stress and participating in DNA damage repair. Therefore, PQQ has great potential as a therapeutic agent against oxidative stress during liver damage. PMID:26622336

  15. Anti-Diabetic Effects of CTB-APSL Fusion Protein in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunlong; Gao, Zhangzhao; Guo, Qingtuo; Wang, Tao; Lu, Conger; Chen, Ying; Sheng, Qing; Chen, Jian; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Wu, Wutong; Lv, Zhengbing; Shu, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether cholera toxin B subunit and active peptide from shark liver (CTB-APSL) fusion protein plays a role in treatment of type 2 diabetic mice, the CTB-APSL gene was cloned and expressed in silkworm (Bombyx mori) baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS), then the fusion protein was orally administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg for five weeks in diabetic mice. The results demonstrated that the oral administration of CTB-APSL fusion protein can effectively reduce the levels of both fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), promote insulin secretion and improve insulin resistance, significantly improve lipid metabolism, reduce triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, as well as effectively improve the inflammatory response of type 2 diabetic mice through the reduction of the levels of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Histopathology shows that the fusion protein can significantly repair damaged pancreatic tissue in type 2 diabetic mice, significantly improve hepatic steatosis and hepatic cell cloudy swelling, reduce the content of lipid droplets in type 2 diabetic mice, effectively inhibit renal interstitial inflammatory cells invasion and improve renal tubular epithelial cell nucleus pyknosis, thus providing an experimental basis for the development of a new type of oral therapy for type 2 diabetes. PMID:24633252

  16. Effect of mineralocorticoid treatment in mice with collecting duct-specific knockout of endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Lynch, I Jeanette; Welch, Amanda K; Gumz, Michelle L; Kohan, Donald E; Cain, Brian D; Wingo, Charles S

    2015-12-15

    Aldosterone increases blood pressure (BP) by stimulating sodium (Na) reabsorption within the distal nephron and collecting duct (CD). Aldosterone also stimulates endothelin-1 (ET-1) production that acts within the CD to inhibit Na reabsorption via a negative feedback mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that this renal aldosterone-endothelin feedback system regulates electrolyte balance and BP by comparing the effect of a high-salt (NaCl) diet and mineralocorticoid stimulation in control and CD-specific ET-1 knockout (CD ET-1 KO) mice. Metabolic balance and radiotelemetric BP were measured before and after treatment with desoxycorticosterone pivalate (DOCP) in mice fed a high-salt diet with saline to drink. CD ET-1 KO mice consumed more high-salt diet and saline and had greater urine output than controls. CD ET-1 KO mice exhibited increased BP and greater fluid retention and body weight than controls on a high-salt diet. DOCP with high-salt feeding further increased BP in CD ET-1 KO mice, and by the end of the study the CD ET-1 KO mice were substantially hypernatremic. Unlike controls, CD ET-1 KO mice failed to respond acutely or escape from DOCP treatment. We conclude that local ET-1 production in the CD is required for the appropriate renal response to Na loading and that lack of local ET-1 results in abnormal fluid and electrolyte handling when challenged with a high-salt diet and with DOCP treatment. Additionally, local ET-1 production is necessary, under these experimental conditions, for renal compensation to and escape from the chronic effects of mineralocorticoids. PMID:26400543

  17. Effect of 8-oxoguanine glycosylase deficiency on aflatoxin B1 tumourigenicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Jeanne E.; Turner, Patricia V.; Massey, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) may initiate cancer by causing oxidatively damaged DNA, specifically by causing 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesions. Base excision repair removes these lesions, with 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (OGG1) being the rate-limiting enzyme. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ogg1 deficiency on AFB1-induced oxidatively damaged DNA and tumourigenesis. Female wild-type, heterozygous and homozygous ogg1 null mice were given a single dose of 50mg/kg AFB1 or 40 µl dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) ip. Neither ogg1 genotype nor AFB1 treatment affected levels of oxidised guanine in lung or liver 2h post-treatment. AFB1-treated ogg1 null mice showed exacerbated weight loss and mortality relative to DMSO-treated ogg1 null mice, but AFB1 treatment did not significantly increase lung or liver tumour incidence compared with controls, regardless of ogg1 genotype. Suspect lung masses from three of the AFB1-treated mice were adenomas, and masses from two of the mice were osteosarcomas. No osteosarcomas were observed in DMSO-treated mice. All liver masses from AFB1-treated mice were adenomas, and one also contained a hepatocellular carcinoma. In DNA from the lung tumours, the K-ras mutation pattern was inconsistent with initiation by AFB1. In conclusion, ogg1 status did not have a significant effect on AFB1-induced oxidatively damaged DNA or tumourigenesis, but deletion of one or both alleles of ogg1 did increase susceptibility to other aspects of AFB1 toxicity. PMID:25583175

  18. Attenuating Effect of Ginkgo biloba Leaves Extract on Liver Fibrosis Induced by Thioacetamide in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Atef M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of Ginkgo biloba leaves extract on experimental liver fibrosis induced by thioacetamide (TAA) in male albino mice. The experimental mice were divided into four groups. The mice of the first group were served as control. The experimental animals of the second group were given 150 mg/kg body weight of TAA by intraperitoneal injection, twice weekly, for 9 weeks. The mice of the third group were exposed to TAA and supplemented with G. biloba leaves extract. The animals of the fourth group were supplemented with G. biloba leaves extract. The levels of plasma alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, alkaline phosphatase, triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were statistically increased while the levels of plasma total protein, albumin, glucose, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly decreased. The levels of liver superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glycogen and total protein were notably declined, whereas the level of total lipid was increased in mice of the second group. Furthermore, microscopic examination of liver sections from mice treated with TAA showed an abnormal morphology characterized by nodular transformations in liver parenchyma which surrounded by fibrous septa. Administration of G. biloba leaves extract reduced extent and development of fibrous septa, liver cells change, and biochemical alterations in mice exposed to TAA. This study showed that G. biloba leaves extract has a potential activity against TAA-induced liver fibrosis and suggested that the chemical constituents of G. biloba are effective in modulation of oxidative stress induced by TAA. PMID:23091357

  19. Behavioral effects of combined environmental enrichment and chronic nicotine administration in male NMRI mice.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Gresa, Patricia; Pérez-Martinez, Asunción; Redolat, Rosa

    2013-04-10

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an experimental paradigm which provides sensory, social, physical and cognitive stimulation for rodents. Experimental evidence indicates that this type of housing induces different neurobiological and behavioral changes. However, few studies have evaluated the consequences of combined exposure to an enriched environment and nicotine administration during a critical period of development such as adolescence. Taking into account previous studies, it can be hypothesized that a chronic treatment with nicotine would modulate the effects of rearing animals in enriched environments. In the current study, our main aim was to evaluate the effects of EE and chronic nicotine administration on physiological parameters (weight, fluid intake and cotinine levels), motor activity, exploratory behavior, anxiety and learning in male NMRI mice. Half of the mice (n=32) were exposed to an enriched environment (EE) and the other half (n=32) were housed in standard environments (SE) with or without oral nicotine administration (100 μg/ml). After 3 weeks, mice were evaluated in a behavioral battery that included an elevated plus-maze, a hole board, an actimeter and an inhibitory avoidance task. Blood cotinine levels were measured in an additional group of 32 mice in order to confirm nicotine intake. Results indicated that mice reared in an enriched environment gained less body weight and displayed higher fluid intake than those maintained in a standard environment. EE reduced motor activity, exploratory behavior and anxiety, whereas it enhanced inhibitory avoidance learning. In relation to the effects of chronic nicotine treatment, the data reflected a lower increase in body weight and a reduced fluid intake in nicotine-treated mice. In the elevated plus-maze, nicotine induced a reduction of total arm entries and rearings. Cotinine levels were higher in mice that received oral nicotine than in the control group. We conclude that the EE paradigm applied in

  20. Effect of Paclitaxel on Antitumor Activity of Cyclophosphamide: Study on Two Transplanted Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kaledin, V I; Nikolin, V P; Popova, N A; Pyshnaya, I A; Bogdanova, L A; Morozkova, T S

    2015-11-01

    Antitumor effect of paclitaxel used as the monotherapy or in combination with cyclophosphamide was studied on CBA/LacSto mice with transplanted LS and RLS tumors characterized by high (LS) and low (RLS) sensitivity to cyclophosphamide. The therapeutic effects of cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel were summed in animals with drug-resistant RLS tumor, while combined use of these drugs in LS tumor highly sensitive to the apoptogenic effect of cyclophosphamide was no more effective than cyclophosphamide alone. PMID:26597686

  1. Effect of Paclitaxel on Antitumor Activity of Cyclophosphamide: Study on Two Transplanted Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kaledin, V I; Nikolin, V P; Popova, N A; Pyshnaya, I A; Bogdanova, L A; Morozkova, T S

    2015-11-01

    Antitumor effect of paclitaxel used as the monotherapy or in combination with cyclophosphamide was studied on CBA/LacSto mice with transplanted LS and RLS tumors characterized by high (LS) and low (RLS) sensitivity to cyclophosphamide. The therapeutic effects of cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel were summed in animals with drug-resistant RLS tumor, while combined use of these drugs in LS tumor highly sensitive to the apoptogenic effect of cyclophosphamide was no more effective than cyclophosphamide alone.

  2. Inhibitory effects of sweet cherry anthocyanins on the obesity development in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Tang, Qiong; Yu, Zhuoping; Gao, Zichun; Hu, Hao; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ting

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, purified sweet cherry anthocyanins (CACN) were evaluated to determine their inhibitory effects on adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and their anti-obesity properties in male C57BL/6 mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD). CACN prevented HFD-induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice. In vivo experiment revealed that 40 and 200 mg/kg of CACN in food reduced the body weight by 5.2% and 11.2%, respectively. CACN supplementation could also reduce the size of adipocytes, leptin secretion, serum glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and liver triglycerides. Furthermore, CACN could effectively reduce the expression levels of IL-6 and TNFα genes, markedly increase the SOD and GPx activity. Our results indicated that CACN slowed down the development of HFD-induced obesity in male C57BL/6 mice. PMID:24224922

  3. Effects of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Overexpression on Anxiety and Memory after Early Life Stress in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Ter Horst, Judith P; Harris, Anjanette P; Seckl, Jonathan R; Krugers, Harmen J; Joëls, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Early-life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for the development of psychopathology, particularly in women. Human studies have shown that certain haplotypes of NR3C2, encoding the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), that result in gain of function, may protect against the consequences of stress exposure, including childhood trauma. Here, we tested the hypothesis that forebrain-specific overexpression of MR in female mice would ameliorate the effects of ELS on anxiety and memory in adulthood. We found that ELS increased anxiety, did not alter spatial discrimination and reduced contextual fear memory in adult female mice. Transgenic overexpression of MR did not alter anxiety but affected spatial memory performance and enhanced contextual fear memory formation. The effects of ELS on anxiety and contextual fear were not affected by transgenic overexpression of MR. Thus, MR overexpression in the forebrain does not represent a major resilience factor to early life adversity in female mice.

  4. Effects of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Overexpression on Anxiety and Memory after Early Life Stress in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Ter Horst, Judith P.; Harris, Anjanette P.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Krugers, Harmen J.; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Early-life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for the development of psychopathology, particularly in women. Human studies have shown that certain haplotypes of NR3C2, encoding the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), that result in gain of function, may protect against the consequences of stress exposure, including childhood trauma. Here, we tested the hypothesis that forebrain-specific overexpression of MR in female mice would ameliorate the effects of ELS on anxiety and memory in adulthood. We found that ELS increased anxiety, did not alter spatial discrimination and reduced contextual fear memory in adult female mice. Transgenic overexpression of MR did not alter anxiety but affected spatial memory performance and enhanced contextual fear memory formation. The effects of ELS on anxiety and contextual fear were not affected by transgenic overexpression of MR. Thus, MR overexpression in the forebrain does not represent a major resilience factor to early life adversity in female mice. PMID:26858618

  5. The effect of cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitor treatment on experimental herpes simplex encephalitis mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Jing-Xia; Lu, Zu-Neng

    2016-08-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis(HSE) is the most common and serious viral encephalitis in humans. There is a lack of effective medication to date for HSE. A better understanding of the mediators of tissue damage is essential for finding new targets for therapeutic intervention. In this project, we explored the effect of cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitor olomoucine treatment on experimental HSE mice. The following results were obtained: (1) olomoucine increased survival in HSE mice; (2) olomoucine inhibited microglial activation and reduced HSV-1-induced cytokines release; (3) olomoucine prevented neural cells apoptosis and attenuated brain tissue pathological changes following HSV-1 infection; (4) olomoucine reduced brain edema and improved neurological function in HSE. Overall, olomoucine can induce a blunted inflammatory response, maintain the blood vessel wall intact, improve neurological function and increase survival in HSE mice.

  6. Peripheral effects induced in BALB/c mice infected with DENV by the intracerebral route.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, E R A; Amorim, J F S; Paes, M V; Azevedo, A S; Gonçalves, A J S; Costa, S M; Mantuano-Barradas, M; Póvoa, T F; de Meis, J; Basílio-de-Oliveira, C A; Nogueira, A C M A; Alves, A M B

    2016-02-01

    The lack of an immunocompetent animal model for dengue mimicking the disease in humans is a limitation for advances in this field. Inoculation by intracerebral route of neuroadapted dengue strains in mice is normally lethal and provides a straightforward readout parameter for vaccine testing. However, systemic effects of infection and the immune response elicited in this model remain poorly described. In the present work, BALB/c mice infected by the intracerebral route with neuroadapted DENV2 exhibited several evidences of systemic involvement. DENV-inoculated mice presented virus infective particles in the brain followed by viremia, especially in late stages of infection. Infection induced cellular and humoral responses, with presence of activated T cells in spleen and blood, lymphocyte infiltration and tissue damages in brain and liver, and an increase in serum levels of some pro-inflammatory cytokines. Data highlighted an interplay between the central nervous system commitment and peripheral effects under this experimental condition. PMID:26748331

  7. Marked resistance of RAR gamma-deficient mice to the toxic effects of retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Look, J; Landwehr, J; Bauer, F; Hoffmann, A S; Bluethmann, H; LeMotte, P

    1995-07-01

    Excessive intake of retinol or of retinoic acid causes a syndrome of characteristic toxic effects known as hypervitaminosis A. To test the role of the nuclear retinoic acid receptor (RAR gamma) in this process we produced mice with a targeted disruption of the RAR gamma gene and examined toxic effects of repeated doses of retinoic acid and two other synthetic retinoids, Ro 15-1570 and Ro 40-6055. Surprisingly, homozygous mutant mice were resistant to fourfold higher doses of retinoic acid than wild-type mice as well as to elevated doses of the synthetic retinoids, indicating that RAR gamma may have a major role in mediating retinoid toxicity, a finding that possibly has practical implications for reducing the toxicity of synthetic retinoids in clinical use.

  8. [Effect of alcohol in combination with stress in the prenatal period on adult mice behaviour].

    PubMed

    Morozova, M V; Popova, N K

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the prenatal alcohol and stress on behaviour of adult CBA/LacJ male mice. Pregnant mice were given ethanol 11% from to 21 days of the gestation and were exposed to restraint stress for two hours daily from 15 to 21 days gestation. At 3 months of age, the offspring were tested for behaviour. Alcohol and stress-exposed animals buried more marbles in the marble-burying test, which models obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD). In addition, the alcohol and stress-exposed males showed increased social activity. No significant effects of the prenatal alcohol and stress exposure on locomotor activity, anxiety, exploring activity of the adult male mice were revealed. Conclusion was made that exposure to the alcohol and stress combination in prenatal period produces predisposition to OCD.

  9. Co-species housing in mice and rats: effects on physiological and behavioral stress responsivity.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Saskia S; Lohavech, Dissaya; van't Klooster, José; Ohl, Frauke

    2010-03-01

    Co-species housing of mice and rats is common practice at most breeding facilities and research laboratories, neglecting the possible effects on the animals. We investigated physiological as well as behavioral stress-reactivity in mice and rats which were either derived from a co-species or species-separated housing condition at the breeding facilities. The animals were kept under the housing condition they were used to or assigned to the opposite one. Co-species housing had a significant impact on acute stress reactivity in mice and rats but only if they were used to this housing condition throughout their lives. Moreover, the stress-effects appeared to be long lasting. Assigning animals, derived from a species-separated housing condition, to co-species housing led to chronic stress in mice and affected experimental behavior of rats. Our findings led to the conclusion that co-species housing in mice and rats should be avoided, supporting the recommendations by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport (VWS). In order to support the interpretation, facilitate the reproducibility and comparability and subsequently the generalizability of experimental results, breeding facilities should at least provide detailed information about their housing conditions. PMID:20079742

  10. Effects of a block in cysteine catabolism on energy balance and fat metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomski, Julie; Zhou, James Q; Roman, Heather B; Liu, Xiaojing; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Locasale, Jason W; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2016-01-01

    To gain further insights into the effects of elevated cysteine levels on energy metabolism and the possible mechanisms underlying these effects, we conducted studies in cysteine dioxygenase (Cdo1)-null mice. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) catalyzes the first step of the major pathway for cysteine catabolism. When CDO is absent, tissue and plasma cysteine levels are elevated, resulting in enhanced flux of cysteine through desulfhydration reactions. When Cdo1-null mice were fed a high-fat diet, they gained more weight than their wild-type controls, regardless of whether the diet was supplemented with taurine. Cdo1-null mice had markedly lower leptin levels, higher feed intakes, and markedly higher abundance of hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) compared to wild-type control mice, and these differences were not affected by the fat or taurine content of the diet. Thus, reported associations of elevated cysteine levels with greater weight gain and with elevated hepatic Scd1 expression are also seen in the Cdo1-null mouse model. Hepatic accumulation of acylcarnitines suggests impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acids in Cdo1-null mice. The strong associations of elevated cysteine levels with excess H2 S production and impairments in energy metabolism suggest that H2 S signaling could be involved.

  11. Effect of polybrominated biphenyls on hepatic excretory function in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Cagen, S Z; Gibson, J E

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) on hepatic excretory function in developing and adult rats and mice. Prenatal or postnatal dietary exposure to PBBs (50 ppm in diet of pregnant or lactating mother or in diet of rat weanlings) resulted in elevated liver weight in developing rats. In 15-day-old rats that had been treated with PBBs increased liver weight correlated to enhanced ouabain transport from plasma into bile. Liver weight was also elevated in 21, 35, and 49-day-old rats exposed to PBBs, but this effect was not associated with stimulation of ouabain transport in these animals. However, adult rats fed 100 ppm PBBs for two weeks had significantly lower plasma concentrations of sulfobromophthalein (BSP) and increased biliary excretion of BSP, when compared to controls. PBBs-fed adult rats also excreted a greater percentage conjugated BSP (BSP-GSH) into bile. Two week dietary treatment of 100, 150, and 200 ppm PBBs resulted in enhanced initial disappearance of indocyanine green (ICG) from plasma of adult mice. However, dietary doses of 100 and 200 ppm PBBs to adult mice was not associated with enhanced capacity for ouabain excretion. In contrast, treatment with PBBs through the mother's diet (50 ppm) resulted in an almost twofold increase in cumulative ouabain excretion in 15-day-old mice. The results suggest that PBBs stimulate hepatic drug elimination in rats and mice, but the magnitude of the effect is dependent on age and transported compound.

  12. Differential effects of relaxin deficiency on vascular aging in arteries of male mice.

    PubMed

    Jelinic, Maria; Tare, Marianne; Conrad, Kirk P; Parry, Laura J

    2015-08-01

    Exogenous treatment with the naturally occurring peptide relaxin increases arterial compliance and reduces vascular stiffness. In contrast, relaxin deficiency reduces the passive compliance of small renal arteries through geometric and compositional vascular remodeling. The role of endogenous relaxin on passive mechanical wall properties in other vascular beds is unknown. Importantly, no studies have investigated the effects of aging in arteries of relaxin-deficient mice. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that mesenteric and femoral arteries stiffen with aging, and this is exacerbated with relaxin deficiency. Male wild-type (Rln (+/+)) and relaxin knockout (Rln (-/-)) mice were aged to 3, 6, 12, 18, and 23 months. Passive mechanical wall properties were assessed by pressure myography. In both genotypes, there was a significant increase in circumferential stiffening in mesenteric arteries with aging, whereas in the femoral artery, aging reduced volume compliance. This was associated with a reduced ability of the artery to lengthen with aging. The predominant phenotype observed in Rln (-/-) mice was reduced volume compliance in young mice in both mesenteric and femoral arteries. In summary, aging induces circumferential stiffening in mesenteric arteries and axial stiffening in femoral arteries. Passive mechanical wall properties of Rln (-/-) mouse arteries predominantly differ at younger ages compared with Rln (+/+) mice, suggesting that a lack of endogenous relaxin only has a minor effect on vascular aging.

  13. Delayed emergence of behavioral and electrophysiological effects following juvenile ketamine exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Nagy, L R; Featherstone, R E; Hahn, C G; Siegel, S J

    2015-09-15

    Frequent ketamine abuse in adulthood correlates with increased risk of psychosis, as well as cognitive deficits, including disruption of higher-order executive function and memory formation. Although the primary abusers of ketamine are adolescents and young adults, few studies have evaluated its effects on juvenile cognition. Therefore, the current study analyzes the effect of adolescent ketamine exposure on cognitive development. Juvenile mice (4 weeks of age) were exposed to chronic ketamine (20 mg kg(-1), i.p. daily) for 14 days. Mice were tested immediately after exposure in the juvenile period (7 weeks of age) and again as adults (12 weeks of age). Measures included electroencephalography (EEG) in response to auditory stimulation, the social choice test, and a 6-arm radial water maze task. Outcome measures include low-frequency EEG responses, event-related potential (ERP) amplitudes, indices of social behavior and indices of spatial working memory. Juvenile exposure to ketamine was associated with electrophysiological abnormalities in adulthood, particularly in induced theta power and the P80 ERP. The social choice test revealed that ketamine-exposed mice failed to exhibit the same age-related decrease in social interaction time as controls. Ketamine-exposed mice outperformed control mice as juveniles on the radial water maze task, but did not show the same age-related improvement as adult controls. These data support the hypothesis that juvenile exposure to ketamine produces long-lasting changes in brain function that are characterized by a failure to progress along normal developmental trajectories.

  14. An interactive survey panel regarding the effects of mice (Microtus spec.) on a young ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaplata, Markus; Maurer, Thomas; Boldt-Burisch, Katja; Schaaf, Wolfgang; Hinz, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Apparent disturbance caused by soil megafauna took place for the very first time in 2014, after nine years of spontaneous vegetative succession of the constructed watershed Chicken Creek catchment (6 ha). This watershed was designed to investigate the initial phase of soil and ecosystem development under natural conditions including the detailed study of hydrologic processes and water-substrate-plant-atmosphere interactions. In autumn 2014, we recorded the primarily common vole (Microtus arvalis Pallas) activities (calamity), which altered the microtopography of the substrate surface: We counted mouse holes and diggings (for storage organs) at the same spatial units (permanent plots, >100 # of 5 m × 5 m) where we monitor the vegetation since the onset of the catchment. We are hence capable of analysing the effect of abundant vegetarian mice and biogenic macropores, e.g. on the occurrence and performance of the more than 150 vascular plant species present by comparing the respective coverage in 2013 (the pre-mice year) versus 2014, with or without accounting for the confounding effect of succession. Additionally elaborated insight on the 3-D architecture of the mice underground corridors and the nesting places (in situ) enables to extrapolate mass and volume of the moved substrate and the number of the nests of mice for the whole catchment. We report these results, anticipating a return service: Here, we ask for your expectation regarding the significance of the mice-made disturbance on the vegetation of the young ecosystem.

  15. Whole-Body Vibration Training Effect on Physical Performance and Obesity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chi-Chang; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chung, Yi-Hsiu; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the beneficial effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on exercise performance, physical fatigue and obesity in mice with obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD). Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into two groups: normal group (n=6), fed standard diet (control), and experimental group (n=18), fed a HFD. After 4-week induction, followed by 6-week WBV of 5 days per week, the 18 obese mice were divided into 3 groups (n=6 per group): HFD with sedentary control (HFD), HFD with WBV at relatively low-intensity (5.6 Hz, 0.13 g) (HFD+VL) or high-intensity (13 Hz, 0.68 g) (HFD+VH). A trend analysis revealed that WBV increased the grip strength in mice. WBV also dose-dependently decreased serum lactate, ammonia and CK levels and increased glucose level after the swimming test. WBV slightly decreased final body weight and dose-dependently decreased weights of epididymal, retroperitoneal and perirenal fat pads and fasting serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, CK, glucose, total cholesterol and triacylglycerol. Therefore, WBV could improve exercise performance and fatigue and prevent fat accumulation and obesity-associated biochemical alterations in obese mice. It may be an effective intervention for health promotion and prevention of HFD-induced obesity. PMID:25317067

  16. Effect of bacosides, alcoholic extract of Bacopa monniera Linn. (brahmi), on experimental amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Kamal; Singh, Manjeet

    2005-07-01

    To investigate the effect of bacosides (alcoholic extract of brahmi) on scopolamine (3 mg kg(-1), ip), sodium nitrite (75 mg kg(-1), ip) and BN52021 (15 mg kg(-1), ip) induced experimental amnesia in mice, using Morris water maze test, all the agents were administered 30 min before the acquisition trials on each day and repeated for 4 consecutive days, and on 5th day during the retrieval trials. Bacosides on anterograde administration (before training) in mice, significantly decreased the escape latency time (ELT) during the acquisition trials for 4 consecutive days and increased the time spent (TS) in target quadrant during the retrieval trials on 5th day, and on retrograde administration (after training) bacosides were found not to affect TS significantly. Bacosides also significantly decreased the ELT and increased the TS in mice treated anterogradely with scopolamine and sodium nitrite. Bacosides did not exhibit any significant effect on TS of mice treated retrogradely with sodium nitrite. On the other hand, bacosides significantly increased the TS of mice treated retrogradely with BN52021. On the basis of the present results it can be concluded that bacosides facilitate anterograde memory and attenuate anterograde experimental amnesia induced by scopolamine and sodium nitrite possibly by improving acetylcholine level and hypoxic conditions, respectively. Beside this bacosides also reversed BN52021 induced retrograde amnesia, probably due to increase in platelet activating factor (PAF) synthesis by enhancing cerebral glutamate level.

  17. Gender differences in metformin effect on aging, life span and spontaneous tumorigenesis in 129/Sv mice

    PubMed Central

    Anisimov, Vladimir N.; Piskunova, Tatiana S.; Popovich, Irina G.; Zabezhinski, Mark A.; Tyndyk, Margarita L.; Egormin, Peter A.; Yurova, Maria N.; Rosenfeld, Svetlana V.; Semenchenko, Anna V.; Kovalenko, Irina G.; Poroshina, Tatiana E.; Berstein, Lev M.

    2010-01-01

    Studies in mammals have led to the suggestion that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia are important factors both in aging and in the development of cancer. It is possible that the life-prolonging effects of calorie restriction are due to decreasing IGF-1 levels. A search of pharmacological modulators of insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway (which mimetic effects of life span extending mutations or calorie restriction) could be a perspective direction in regulation of longevity. Antidiabetic biguanides are most promising among them. The chronic treatment of inbred 129/Sv mice with metformin (100 mg/kg in drinking water) slightly modified the food consumption but failed to influence the dynamics of body weight, decreased by 13.4% the mean life span of male mice and slightly increased the mean life span of female mice (by 4.4%). The treatment with metformin failed influence spontaneous tumor incidence in male 129/Sv mice, decreased by 3.5 times the incidence of malignant neoplasms in female mice while somewhat stimulated formation of benign vascular tumors in the latter. PMID:21164223

  18. The Selective SGLT2 Inhibitor Ipragliflozin Has a Therapeutic Effect on Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Yasushi; Imajo, Kento; Kato, Takayuki; Kessoku, Takaomi; Ogawa, Yuji; Tomeno, Wataru; Kato, Shingo; Mawatari, Hironori; Fujita, Koji; Yoneda, Masato; Saito, Satoru; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims In recent years, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has become a considerable healthcare burden worldwide. Pathogenesis of NASH is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and insulin resistance. However, a specific drug to treat NASH is lacking. We investigated the effect of the selective sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor (SGLT2I) ipragliflozin on NASH in mice. Methods We used the Amylin liver NASH model (AMLN), which is a diet-induced model of NASH that results in obesity and T2DM. AMLN mice were fed an AMLN diet for 20 weeks. SGLT2I mice were fed an AMLN diet for 12 weeks and an AMLN diet with 40 mg ipragliflozin/kg for 8 weeks. Results AMLN mice showed steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in the liver as well as obesity and insulin resistance, features that are recognized in human NASH. Ipragliflozin improved insulin resistance and liver injury. Ipragliflozin decreased serum levels of free fatty acids, hepatic lipid content, the number of apoptotic cells, and areas of fibrosis; it also increased lipid outflow from the liver. Conclusions Ipragliflozin improved the pathogenesis of NASH by reducing insulin resistance and lipotoxicity in NASH-model mice. Our results suggest that ipragliflozin has a therapeutic effect on NASH with T2DM. PMID:26731267

  19. Effect of Fluorosis on Liver Cells of VC Deficient and Wild Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Jiao, Yan; Ma, Yonghui; Stuart, John M.; Li, Xiudian; Zhao, Fusheng; Wang, Lishi; Sun, DianJun

    2014-01-01

    For decades, mouse and other rodents have been used for the study of oxidative or related studies such as the effect of fluoride. It is known that rodents normally synthesize their own vitamin C (VC) due to the presence of a key enzyme in ascorbic acid synthesis, l-gulono-lactone-γ-oxidase (Gulo), while humans do not have the capacity of VC synthesis due to the deletion of most parts of the GULO gene. The spontaneous fracture (sfx) mouse recently emerged as a model for study of VC deficiency. We investigated the effect of fluoride on liver cells from wild type Balb/c and sfx mice. We found that activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT were reduced in both wild type and sfx mice; however, the amount of reduction in the sfx cells is more than that in Balb/c cells. In addition, while both cells increased MDA, the increase in the sfx cells is greater than that in Balb/c cells. Gene networks of Sod, Gpx, and Cat in the liver of humans and mice are also different. Our study suggests that reaction to fluoride in vitamin C deficient mice might be different from that of wild type mice. PMID:24693236

  20. Anxiety-like behaviour in mice exposed to tannery wastewater: The effect of photoelectrooxidation treatment.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues; Vanzella, Cláudia; Bianchetti, Paula; Rodrigues, Marco Antonio Siqueira; Stülp, Simone

    2011-01-01

    The leather industry is a major producer of wastewaters and releases large quantities of many different chemical agents used in hide processing into the environment. Since the central nervous system is sensitive to many different contaminants, our aim was to investigate the neurobehavioral effects of exposure of mice to tannery effluents using animal models of depression and anxiety, namely forced swim and elevated plus-maze. In order to propose a clean technology for the treatment of this effluent, we also investigated the exposure of mice to effluents treated by photoelectrooxidation process (PEO). Adult male Swiss albino mice (CF1 strain) were given free access to water bottles containing an effluent treated by a tannery (non-PEO) or PEO-treated tannery wastewater (0.1 and 1% in drinking water). Exposure to tannery wastewater induced behavioural changes in the mice in elevated plus-maze. Exposure to non-PEO 1% decreased the percentage of time spent in the open arms, indicating anxiety-like behaviour. Exposure to tannery wastewater did not alter immobility time in the forced swim test, suggesting that tannery effluents did not induce depression-like behaviour in the mice. These behavioural data suggest that non-PEO tannery effluent has an anxiogenic effect, whereas PEO-treated tannery effluents do not alter anxiety levels.

  1. Effects of Estrogen Receptor Modulators on Morphine Induced Sensitization in Mice Memory

    PubMed Central

    Anoush, Mahdieh; Jani, Ali; Sahebgharani, Moosa; Jafari, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study, the effects of estradiol valerate and raloxifenea selective estrogen receptor modulator; (SERM) on morphine induced sensitization were examined in mice memory, according to the step-down passive avoidance task. Method: The mice received morphine or estradiol and raloxifene for three days alone or in combination with morphine. After a drug free period of 5 days, the subjects received saline or morphine as pre- training treatments followed by a pre-test saline administration. The memory retrieval was evaluated using step-down passive avoidance test both on the training and test day. Results: The results illustrated that the three- day administration of morphine induced sensitization through the enhancement of memory retrieval (morphine induced sensitization in mice memory). Both the three- day administration of estradiol valerate alone and with morphine (5 mg/kg) restored memory. On the other hand, the three- day administration of raloxifene had no effect on memory retrieval alone, but declined morphine induced sensitization in mice memory. Conclusion: The results of the study indicated that there is an interaction between estrogen receptor modulators and morphine induced sensitization in mice memory. PMID:26877753

  2. Effects of a block in cysteine catabolism on energy balance and fat metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomski, Julie; Zhou, James Q; Roman, Heather B; Liu, Xiaojing; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Locasale, Jason W; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2016-01-01

    To gain further insights into the effects of elevated cysteine levels on energy metabolism and the possible mechanisms underlying these effects, we conducted studies in cysteine dioxygenase (Cdo1)-null mice. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) catalyzes the first step of the major pathway for cysteine catabolism. When CDO is absent, tissue and plasma cysteine levels are elevated, resulting in enhanced flux of cysteine through desulfhydration reactions. When Cdo1-null mice were fed a high-fat diet, they gained more weight than their wild-type controls, regardless of whether the diet was supplemented with taurine. Cdo1-null mice had markedly lower leptin levels, higher feed intakes, and markedly higher abundance of hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) compared to wild-type control mice, and these differences were not affected by the fat or taurine content of the diet. Thus, reported associations of elevated cysteine levels with greater weight gain and with elevated hepatic Scd1 expression are also seen in the Cdo1-null mouse model. Hepatic accumulation of acylcarnitines suggests impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acids in Cdo1-null mice. The strong associations of elevated cysteine levels with excess H2 S production and impairments in energy metabolism suggest that H2 S signaling could be involved. PMID:26995761

  3. Short communication: effect of milk and milk containing Lactobacillus casei on the intestinal microbiota of mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaochen; Yan, Yinzhuo; Kim, Eun Bae; Lee, Bokyung; Marco, Maria L

    2014-01-01

    BALB/c mice were fed milk or Lactobacillus casei BL23 in milk for 14d and fecal samples were collected at d 0, 4, and 7 as well as 1 and 8d after the last administration. According to high-throughput DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes extracted from the fecal microbiota, the bacterial diversity in the fecal samples of all mice increased over time. After 14d of administration, the consumption of milk and milk containing L. casei BL23 resulted in distinct effects on the microbial composition in the intestine. Specifically, the proportions of bacteria in the Lactobacillaceae, Porphyromonadaceae, and Comamonadaceae were significantly higher in mice fed the L. casei BL23-milk culture compared with one or more of the other groups of mice. The relative amounts of Lachnospiraceae were higher and Streptococcaceae were lower in mice fed milk alone. The changes were not found at d 4 and 7 during milk and L. casei feeding and were no longer detected 8d after administration was stopped. This study shows that consumption of milk or probiotic L. casei-containing milk results in non-overlapping, taxa-specific effects on the bacteria in the distal murine intestine.

  4. Short communication: effect of milk and milk containing Lactobacillus casei on the intestinal microbiota of mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaochen; Yan, Yinzhuo; Kim, Eun Bae; Lee, Bokyung; Marco, Maria L

    2014-01-01

    BALB/c mice were fed milk or Lactobacillus casei BL23 in milk for 14d and fecal samples were collected at d 0, 4, and 7 as well as 1 and 8d after the last administration. According to high-throughput DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes extracted from the fecal microbiota, the bacterial diversity in the fecal samples of all mice increased over time. After 14d of administration, the consumption of milk and milk containing L. casei BL23 resulted in distinct effects on the microbial composition in the intestine. Specifically, the proportions of bacteria in the Lactobacillaceae, Porphyromonadaceae, and Comamonadaceae were significantly higher in mice fed the L. casei BL23-milk culture compared with one or more of the other groups of mice. The relative amounts of Lachnospiraceae were higher and Streptococcaceae were lower in mice fed milk alone. The changes were not found at d 4 and 7 during milk and L. casei feeding and were no longer detected 8d after administration was stopped. This study shows that consumption of milk or probiotic L. casei-containing milk results in non-overlapping, taxa-specific effects on the bacteria in the distal murine intestine. PMID:24508432

  5. Effect of Embelin Against Lipopolysaccharide-induced Sickness Behaviour in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Ashique; Dhadde, Shivsharan B; Durg, Sharanbasappa; Veerapur, V P; Badami, S; Thippeswamy, B S; Patil, Jagadevappa S

    2016-05-01

    Sickness behaviour is a coordinated set of adaptive behavioural changes that develop in ill individuals during the course of an infection. It is relevant to understanding depression and some aspects of the suffering that in cancer. Embelin has been reported to possess antiinflammatory, neuroprotective and anxiolytic assets and has been shown to inhibit nuclear factor κB pathway and cytokine production. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of embelin isolated from Embelia ribes Burm in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sickness behaviour in mice. Adult male Swiss albino mice were pre-treated with embelin (10 and 20 mg/kg, p.o.) or dexamethasone (1 mg/kg, i.p.) for 3 days and then challenged with LPS (400 µg/kg, i.p.). At different time intervals of post-LPS challenge, sickness behaviour was evaluated in the animals by battery of behavioural tests (plus maze, open field, light-dark box, forced swim, social behaviour assessment, sucrose preference and food and water intake). Levels of oxidative stress makers (reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidation) in mice brain were also analysed. LPS induced behavioural alterations, anhedonia and anorexia, in mice. Pre-treatment with embelin attenuated behavioural changes induced by LPS. In addition, embelin prevented anhedonia, anorexia and ameliorated brain oxidative stress markers. The experimental outcomes of the present study demonstrated protective effect of embelin in LPS-induced sickness behaviour in mice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro; Seino, Yutaka; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin

  7. The magnitude and duration of the analgesic effect of morphine, butorphanol, and buprenorphine in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Gades, N M; Danneman, P J; Wixson, S K; Tolley, E A

    2000-03-01

    This study was designed to determine the magnitude and duration of the analgesic effect of three commonly used opioids: buprenorphine (0.5 mg/kg for rats; 2.0 mg/kg for mice), butorphanol (2.0 mg/kg for rats; 5.0 mg/kg for mice), and morphine (10 mg/kg for rats and mice). We used two standard tests, the hot plate and tail flick assays, to measure opioid analgesia in 62 male, 200 to 300 g Sprague-Dawley rats and 61 male, 25 to 35 g ICR mice. We obtained five baseline measurements then administered the drugs subcutaneously. Morphine gave the highest analgesic effect and was intermediate in duration (2 to 3 h in rats and mice) of analgesia. Butorphanol provided the lowest level of and shortest (1 to 2 h in rats and mice) analgesia. Buprenorphine had an intermediate analgesic effect and the longest duration (6 to 8 h in rats and 3 to 5 h in mice). In light of our results, we recommend the use of morphine (with frequent redosing) for severe pain, butorphanol for mild pain of short duration, and buprenorphine for mild to moderate pain of increased duration. The dosing intervals suggested by our study are 2 to 3 h for morphine in both rats and mice, 1 to 2 h for butorphanol in both rats and mice; and 6 to 8 h in rats and 3 to 5 h in mice for buprenorphine. PMID:11487232

  8. Trans allele methylation and paramutation-like effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Herry; Lu, Michael; Anggraini, Melly; Sikora, Aimee; Chang, Yanjie; Yoon, Bong June; Soloway, Paul D

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, imprinted genes have parent-of-origin–specific patterns of DNA methylation that cause allele-specific expression. At Rasgrf1 (encoding RAS protein-specific guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 1), a repeated DNA element is needed to establish methylation and expression of the active paternal allele1. At Igf2r (encoding insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor), a sequence called region 2 is needed for methylation of the active maternal allele2,3. Here we show that replacing the Rasgrf1 repeats on the paternal allele with region 2 allows both methylation and expression of the paternal copy of Rasgrf1, indicating that sequences that control methylation can function ectopically. Paternal transmission of the mutated allele also induced methylation and expression in trans of the normally unmethylated and silent wild-type maternal allele. Once activated, the wild-type maternal Rasgrf1 allele maintained its activated state in the next generation independently of the paternal allele. These results recapitulate in mice several features in common with paramutation described in plants4. PMID:12740578

  9. Effect of homeopathic medicines on transplanted tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Es, Sunila; Kuttan, Girija; Kc, Preethi; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2007-01-01

    Ultra low doses used in homeopathic medicines are reported to have healing potential for various diseases but their action remains controversial. In this study we have investigated the antitumour and antimetastatic activity of selected homeopathic medicines against transplanted tumours in mice. It was found that Ruta graveolens 200c and Hydrastis canadensis 200c significantly increased the lifespan of Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma and Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites induced tumour-bearing animals by 49.7%, and 69.4% respectively. Moreover there was 95.6% and 95.8% reduction of solid tumour volume in Ruta 200c and Hydrastis 200c treated animals on the 31st day after tumour inoculation. Hydrastis 1M given orally significantly inhibited the growth of developed solid tumours produced by DLA cells and increased the lifespan of tumour bearing animals. Some 9 out of 15 animals with developed tumors were completely tumour free after treatment with Hydrastis 1M. Significant anti-metastatic activity was also found in B16F-10 melanoma-bearing animals treated with Thuja1M, Hydrastis 1M and Lycopodium1M. This was evident from the inhibition of lung tumour nodule formation, morphological and histopathological analysis of lung and decreased levels of gamma-GT in serum, a cellular marker of proliferation. These findings support that homeopathic preparations of Ruta and Hydrastis have significant antitumour activity. The mechanism of action of these medicines is not known at present. PMID:18159975

  10. Antidepressant-like effect of mitragynine isolated from Mitragyna speciosa Korth in mice model of depression.

    PubMed

    Idayu, N Farah; Hidayat, M Taufik; Moklas, M A M; Sharida, F; Raudzah, A R Nurul; Shamima, A R; Apryani, Evhy

    2011-03-15

    Mitragyna speciosa Korth. leaves have been used for decades as a traditional medicine to treat diarrhea, diabetes and to improve blood circulation by natives of Malaysia, Thailand and other regions of Southeast Asia. Mitragynine is the major active alkaloid in the plant. To date, the role of mitragynine in psychological disorders such as depression is not scientifically evaluated. Hence, the present investigation evaluates the antidepressant effect of mitragynine in the mouse forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), two models predictive of antidepressant activity and the effect of mitragynine towards neuroendocrine system of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis by measuring the corticosterone concentration of mice exposed to FST and TST. An open-field test (OFT) was used to detect any association of immobility in the FST and TST with changes in motor activity of mice treated with mitragynine. In the present study, mitragynine at dose of 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg i.p. injected significantly reduced the immobility time of mice in both FST and TST without any significant effect on locomotor activity in OFT. Moreover, mitragynine significantly reduced the released of corticosterone in mice exposed to FST and TST at dose of 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg. Overall, the present study clearly demonstrated that mitragynine exerts an antidepressant effect in animal behavioral model of depression (FST and TST) and the effect appears to be mediated by an interaction with neuroendocrine HPA axis systems. PMID:20869223

  11. Antidepressant-like effect of mitragynine isolated from Mitragyna speciosa Korth in mice model of depression.

    PubMed

    Idayu, N Farah; Hidayat, M Taufik; Moklas, M A M; Sharida, F; Raudzah, A R Nurul; Shamima, A R; Apryani, Evhy

    2011-03-15

    Mitragyna speciosa Korth. leaves have been used for decades as a traditional medicine to treat diarrhea, diabetes and to improve blood circulation by natives of Malaysia, Thailand and other regions of Southeast Asia. Mitragynine is the major active alkaloid in the plant. To date, the role of mitragynine in psychological disorders such as depression is not scientifically evaluated. Hence, the present investigation evaluates the antidepressant effect of mitragynine in the mouse forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), two models predictive of antidepressant activity and the effect of mitragynine towards neuroendocrine system of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis by measuring the corticosterone concentration of mice exposed to FST and TST. An open-field test (OFT) was used to detect any association of immobility in the FST and TST with changes in motor activity of mice treated with mitragynine. In the present study, mitragynine at dose of 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg i.p. injected significantly reduced the immobility time of mice in both FST and TST without any significant effect on locomotor activity in OFT. Moreover, mitragynine significantly reduced the released of corticosterone in mice exposed to FST and TST at dose of 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg. Overall, the present study clearly demonstrated that mitragynine exerts an antidepressant effect in animal behavioral model of depression (FST and TST) and the effect appears to be mediated by an interaction with neuroendocrine HPA axis systems.

  12. Pleiotropic effects of extended blockade of CSF1R signaling in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Kristin A; Pridans, Clare; Sehgal, Anuj; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bradford, Barry M; Raza, Sobia; Moffat, Lindsey; Gow, Deborah J; Beard, Philippa M; Mabbott, Neil A; Smith, Lee B; Hume, David A

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the role of CSF1R signaling in adult mice using prolonged treatment with anti-CSF1R antibody. Mutation of the CSF1 gene in the op/op mouse produces numerous developmental abnormalities. Mutation of the CSF1R has an even more penetrant phenotype, including perinatal lethality, because of the existence of a second ligand, IL-34. These effects on development provide limited insight into functions of CSF1R signaling in adult homeostasis. The carcass weight and weight of several organs (spleen, kidney, and liver) were reduced in the treated mice, but overall body weight gain was increased. Despite the complete loss of Kupffer cells, there was no effect on liver gene expression. The treatment ablated OCL, increased bone density and trabecular volume, and prevented the decline in bone mass seen in female mice with age. The op/op mouse has a deficiency in pancreatic β cells and in Paneth cells in the gut wall. Only the latter was reproduced by the antibody treatment and was associated with increased goblet cell number but no change in villus architecture. Male op/op mice are infertile as a result of testosterone insufficiency. Anti-CSF1R treatment ablated interstitial macrophages in the testis, but there was no sustained effect on testosterone or LH. The results indicate an ongoing requirement for CSF1R signaling in macrophage and OCL homeostasis but indicate that most effects of CSF1 and CSF1R mutations are due to effects on development.

  13. EFFECT OF SPLENECTOMY ON THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF MICE INOCULATED WITH DIPLOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE

    PubMed Central

    Shinefield, Henry R.; Steinberg, Charles R.; Kaye, Donald

    1966-01-01

    An experimental model is described which demonstrated increased susceptibility of mice to infection with D. pneumoniae following splenectomy. It was necessary to use small numbers of a particular strain of pneumococcus (D. pneumoniae type 6), intravenous infection and a particular strain of mouse (pathogen-free NCS strain). The increase in susceptibility persisted for at least 4 months after splenectomy. With modifications in experimental design such as use of large numbers of organisms, a different strain of pneumococcus, the intraperitoneal route of infection or a different mouse strain no increase or a much less impressive increase in susceptibility was demonstrated. Following intravenous injection of small numbers of D. pneumoniae Type 6 bacteremia tended to persist in all NCS mice. Multiplication of pneumococci subsequently occurred in a higher proportion of mice with splenectomy and at a more rapid rate than in control animals. Mice with splenectomy usually had more D. pneumoniae per ml of blood than per gram of any tissue. This suggested that in these mice multiplication of microorganisms occurs primarily in blood. In control mice higher concentrations of bacteria were present in spleen than in blood, and higher concentrations were found in blood than in other tissues. These results suggested that in normal mice infected intravenously with small numbers of D. pneumoniae Type 6, the spleen protects by removing and killing small but critical numbers of D. pneumoniae which are circulating in the blood. No evidence was found to suggest that the altered susceptibility is mediated by an effect of splenectomy on numbers of circulating leukocytes or on the antibacterial activity of mouse blood. PMID:4380067

  14. Differential effects of enrichment on learning and memory function in NR2B transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y P; Wang, H; Feng, R; Kyin, M; Tsien, J Z

    2001-11-01

    It has been known that environmental enrichment leads to better learning and memory in mice. However, the molecular mechanisms are not known. In this study, we used the 10th-12th of the NR2B transgenic (Tg) lines, in which the NMDA receptor function is enhanced via the NR2B subunit transgene in neurons of the forebrain, to test the hypothesis of the involvement of NMDA receptor function in enrichment-induced better learning and memory. Consistent with our previous results, both larger long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus and superior learning and memory were observed in naive NR2B Tg mice even after the 10th-12th generation of breeding. After enrichment, wild-type mice exhibited overall improvement in their performances in contextual and cued conditioning, fear extinctions, and novel object recognition tasks. Interestingly, the same enrichment procedures could not further increase the performance of NR2B Tg mice in contextual conditioning, cued conditioning, or fear extinction, thereby indicating that enhanced NMDA receptor function can occlude these enrichment effects. However, we found that in the novel object recognition task enriched NR2B Tg mice exhibited much longer recognition memory (up to 1 week), compared to that (up to 3 days) in naive NR2B Tg mice. Furthermore, our biochemical experiments showed that enrichment significantly increased protein levels of GluR1, NR2B, and NR2A subunits of glutamate receptors in both wild-type and NR2B Tg mice. Therefore, our results suggest an interactive nature of molecular pathways involved in both environmental and genetic NMDA receptor manipulations for enhancing learning and memory.

  15. Effects of lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing on human chronic myeloid leukemia cells and leukemia mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinyan; Yang, Wenzhong; Han, Jia; Xiong, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing on human chronic myeloid leukemia cells (K562) and the growth of chronic myeloid leukemia mice as well as to explore the potential mechanisms. Methods: Unbtreated K562 cells (CON), blank lentivirus transfected K562 cells (NC) and K562 cells expressing STAT3 siRNA (STAT3 siRNA) were injected into SCID mice to establish the chronic myeloid leukemia model in mice. The growth, peripheral white blood cell count and spleen index in these mice were determined. Results: In vitro experiment showed, when compared with control group, the interference efficiency of STAT3 expression was as high as 97.5% in K562 cells. Western blot assay revealed that the expression of c-Myc, Bcl-xL and Cyclin D1 reduced by 17.01%, 7.3% and 6.82%, respectively, showing significant difference when compared with control group (P < 0.01). These findings were consistent with those from fluorescence quantitative PCR. In vivo experiment showed the body weight of mice reduced progressively and the peripheral white blood cell count increased gradually in control group, accompanied by dragging hind limbs and progressive enlargement of the spleen. The body weight remained unchanged, peripheral white blood cell count reduced gradually and the spleen did not enlarge in mice treated with STAT3 siRNA expressing cells. Conclusion: Lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing may inhibit the expression of its downstream genes (c-Myc, Bcl-xL and Cyclin D1) related to cell proliferation, apoptosis and cycle to suppress the malignant biological behaviors, and STAT3 silencing also inhibit the leukemogenic potency of K562 cells in mice. PMID:25550912

  16. Neuroprotective effects of quercetin, rutin and okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Linn.) in dexamethasone-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Tongjaroenbuangam, Walaiporn; Ruksee, Nootchanart; Chantiratikul, Piyanete; Pakdeenarong, Noppakun; Kongbuntad, Watee; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2011-10-01

    The administration of dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid receptor agonist, causes neuronal death in the CA3 layer of the hippocampus, which has been associated with learning and memory impairments. This study aimed to examine the ability of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Linn.) extract and its derivatives (quercetin and rutin) to protect neuronal function and improve learning and memory deficits in mice subjected to dexamethasone treatment. Learning and memory functions in mice were examined using the Morris water maze test. The results showed that the mice treated with dexamethasone had prolonged water maze performance latencies and shorter time spent in the target quadrant while mice pretreated with quercetin, rutin or okra extract prior to dexamethasone treatment showed shorter latencies and longer time spent in target quadrant. Morphological changes in pyramidal neurons were observed in the dexamethasone treated group. The number of CA3 hippocampal neurons was significantly lower while pretreated with quercetin, rutin or okra attenuated this change. Prolonged treatment with dexamethasone altered NMDA receptor expression in the hippocampus. Pretreatment with quercetin, rutin or okra extract prevented the reduction in NMDA receptor expression. Dentate gyrus (DG) cell proliferation was examined using the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry technique. The number of BrdU-immunopositive cells was significantly reduced in dexamethasone-treated mice compared to control mice. Pretreatment with okra extract, either quercetin or rutin was found to restore BrdU-immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus. These findings suggest that quercetin, rutin and okra extract treatments reversed cognitive deficits, including impaired dentate gyrus (DG) cell proliferation, and protected against morphological changes in the CA3 region in dexamethasone-treated mice. The precise mechanism of the neuroprotective effect of these plant extracts should be further investigated.

  17. Effect of Fenbendazole on Three Behavioral Tests in Male C57BL/6N Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gadad, Bharathi S; Daher, João P L; Hutchinson, Eric K; Brayton, Cory F; Dawson, Ted M; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Watson, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Pinworms are highly contagious parasites of laboratory rodents that often are treated with fenbendazole. To our knowledge, the effect of fenbendazole at therapeutic dosages on behavioral tests in mice has not been evaluated. Here we studied 6-wk-old male C57BL/6N mice. We compared the behavior of control mice (fed regular diet) with 3 groups of mice treated with dietary fenbendazole. Treatment groups were 4 wk of fenbendazole, 2 wk of fenbendazole followed by 2 wk of regular diet, and 2 wk of regular diet followed by 2 wk of fenbendazole. At the end of dietary treatment all groups were tested by open field for central, peripheral and vertical activity; elevated plus maze for anxiety; and rotarod for motor ability and then evaluated by clinical pathology and selected histopathology. Treated and control groups showed no differences in open field or elevated plus maze testing, histopathology, or clinical pathology. However mice treated for 4 wk with fenbendazole or 2 wk of fenbendazole followed by 2 wk regular diet stayed on the rotarod for shorter periods than did controls, and mice treated with 2 wk of regular diet followed by 2 wk fenbendazole showed a trend toward shorter rotarod times. In light of this study, we suggest that open field and elevated plus maze testing is unlikely to be affected by 4 wk fenbendazole treatment in male C57BL/6 mice; however, behavioral tests of motor ability such as rotarod tests may be affected during and for at least 2 wk after fenbendazole treatment. PMID:21205447

  18. Effect of fenbendazole on three behavioral tests in male C57BL/6N mice.

    PubMed

    Gadad, Bharathi S; Daher, João P L; Hutchinson, Eric K; Brayton, Cory F; Dawson, Ted M; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Watson, Julie

    2010-11-01

    Pinworms are highly contagious parasites of laboratory rodents that often are treated with fenbendazole. To our knowledge, the effect of fenbendazole at therapeutic dosages on behavioral tests in mice has not been evaluated. Here we studied 6-wk-old male C57BL/6N mice. We compared the behavior of control mice (fed regular diet) with 3 groups of mice treated with dietary fenbendazole. Treatment groups were 4 wk of fenbendazole, 2 wk of fenbendazole followed by 2 wk of regular diet, and 2 wk of regular diet followed by 2 wk of fenbendazole. At the end of dietary treatment all groups were tested by open field for central, peripheral and vertical activity; elevated plus maze for anxiety; and rotarod for motor ability and then evaluated by clinical pathology and selected histopathology. Treated and control groups showed no differences in open field or elevated plus maze testing, histopathology, or clinical pathology. However mice treated for 4 wk with fenbendazole or 2 wk of fenbendazole followed by 2 wk regular diet stayed on the rotarod for shorter periods than did controls, and mice treated with 2 wk of regular diet followed by 2 wk fenbendazole showed a trend toward shorter rotarod times. In light of this study, we suggest that open field and elevated plus maze testing is unlikely to be affected by 4 wk fenbendazole treatment in male C57BL/6 mice; however, behavioral tests of motor ability such as rotarod tests may be affected during and for at least 2 wk after fenbendazole treatment.

  19. Liver proteome of mice with different genetic susceptibilities to the effects of fluoride

    PubMed Central

    KHAN, Zohaib Nisar; LEITE, Aline de Lima; CHARONE, Senda; SABINO, Isabela Tomazini; MARTINI, Tatiana; PEREIRA, Heloísa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva; OLIVEIRA, Rodrigo Cardoso; BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A/J and 129P3/J mice strains have been widely studied over the last few years because they respond quite differently to fluoride (F) exposure. 129P3/J mice are remarkably resistant to the development of dental fluorosis, despite excreting less F in urine and having higher circulating F levels. These two strains also present different characteristics regardless of F exposure. Objective In this study, we investigated the differential pattern of protein expression in the liver of these mice to provide insights on why they have different responses to F. Material and Methods Weanling male A/J and 129P3/J mice (n=10 from each strain) were pared and housed in metabolic cages with ad libitum access to low-F food and deionized water for 42 days. Liver proteome profiles were examined using nLC-MS/MS. Protein function was classified by GO biological process (Cluego v2.0.7 + Clupedia v1.0.8) and protein-protein interaction network was constructed (PSICQUIC, Cytoscape). Results Most proteins with fold change were increased in A/J mice. The functional category with the highest percentage of altered genes was oxidation-reduction process (20%). Subnetwork analysis revealed that proteins with fold change interacted with Disks large homolog 4 and Calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1. A/J mice had an increase in proteins related to energy flux and oxidative stress. Conclusion This could be a possible explanation for the high susceptibility of these mice to the effects of F, since the exposure also induces oxidative stress. PMID:27383706

  20. Effects of sleep disruption and high fat intake on glucose metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jacqueline M; Barf, R Paulien; Opp, Mark R

    2016-06-01

    Poor sleep quality or quantity impairs glycemic control and increases risk of disease under chronic conditions. Recovery sleep may offset adverse metabolic outcomes of accumulated sleep debt, but the extent to which this occurs is unclear. We examined whether recovery sleep improves glucose metabolism in mice subjected to prolonged sleep disruption, and whether high fat intake during sleep disruption exacerbates glycemic control. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 18-h sleep fragmentation daily for 9 days, followed by 1 day of recovery. During sleep disruption, one group of mice was fed a high-fat diet (HFD) while another group was fed standard laboratory chow. Insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance were assessed by insulin and glucose tolerance testing at baseline, after 3 and 7 days of sleep disruption, and at the end of the protocol after 24h of undisturbed sleep opportunity (recovery). To characterize changes in sleep architecture that are associated with sleep debt and recovery, we quantified electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings during sleep fragmentation and recovery periods from an additional group of mice. We now report that 9 days of 18-h daily sleep fragmentation significantly reduces rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS). Mice respond with increases in REMS, but not NREMS, during the daily 6-h undisturbed sleep opportunity. However, both REMS and NREMS increase significantly during the 24-h recovery period. Although sleep disruption alone has no effect in this protocol, high fat feeding in combination with sleep disruption impairs glucose tolerance, effects that are reversed by recovery sleep. Insulin sensitivity modestly improves after 3 days of sleep fragmentation and after 24h of recovery, with significantly greater improvements in mice exposed to HFD during sleep disruption. Improvements in both glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity are associated with NREMS rebound, raising the possibility that this

  1. Effects of voluntary wheel running on LPS-induced sickness behavior in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stephen A; Pence, Brandt D; Greene, Ryan M; Johnson, Stephanie J; Dantzer, Robert; Kelley, Keith W; Woods, Jeffrey A

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral stimulation of the innate immune system with LPS causes exaggerated neuroinflammation and prolonged sickness behavior in aged mice. Regular moderate intensity exercise has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects that may protect against inappropriate neuroinflammation and sickness in aged mice. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that voluntary wheel running would attenuate LPS-induced sickness behavior and proinflammatory cytokine gene expression in ~22-month-old C57BL/6J mice. Mice were housed with a running wheel (VWR), locked-wheel (Locked), or no wheel (Standard) for 10 weeks, after which they were intraperitoneally injected with LPS across a range of doses (0.02, 0.08, 0.16, 0.33 mg/kg). VWR mice ran on average 3.5 km/day and lost significantly more body weight and body fat, and increased their forced exercise tolerance compared to Locked and Shoebox mice. VWR had no effect on LPS-induced anorexia, adipsia, weight-loss, or reductions in locomotor activity at any LPS dose when compared to Locked and Shoebox groups. LPS induced sickness behavior in a dose-dependent fashion (0.33>0.02 mg/kg). Twenty-four hours post-injection (0.33 mg/kg LPS or Saline) we found a LPS-induced upregulation of whole brain TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-10 mRNA, and increased IL-1β and IL-6 in the spleen and liver; these effects were not attenuated by VWR. We conclude that VWR does not reduce LPS-induced exaggerated or prolonged sickness behavior in aged animals, or 24h post-injection (0.33 mg/kg LPS or Saline) brain and peripheral proinflammatory cytokine gene expression. The necessity of the sickness response is critical for survival and may outweigh the subtle benefits of exercise training in aged animals.

  2. The protective effects of oral low-dose quercetin on diabetic nephropathy in hypercholesterolemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Isabele B. S.; Porto, Marcella L.; Santos, Maria C. L. F. S.; Campagnaro, Bianca P.; Gava, Agata L.; Meyrelles, Silvana S.; Pereira, Thiago M. C.; Vasquez, Elisardo C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most important causes of chronic renal disease, and the incidence of DN is increasing worldwide. Considering our previous report (Gomes et al., 2014) indicating that chronic treatment with oral low-dose quercetin (10 mg/Kg) demonstrated anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and renoprotective effects in the C57BL/6J model of DN, we investigated whether this flavonoid could also have beneficial effects in concurrent DN and spontaneous atherosclerosis using the apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse (apoE−/−). Methods: Streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes (100 mg/kg/day, 3 days) in male apoE−/− mice (8 week-old). After 6 weeks, the mice were randomly separated into DQ: diabetic apoE−/− mice treated with quercetin (10 mg/kg/day, 4 weeks, n = 8), DV: diabetic ApoE−/− mice treated with vehicle (n = 8) and ND: non-treated non-diabetic mice (n = 8). Results: Quercetin treatment diminished polyuria (~30%; p < 0.05), glycemia (~25%, p < 0.05), normalized the hypertriglyceridemia. Moreover, this bioflavonoid diminished creatininemia (~30%, p < 0.01) and reduced proteinuria but not to normal levels. We also observed protective effects on the renal structural changes, including normalization of the index of glomerulosclerosis and kidney weight/body weight. Conclusions: Our data revealed that quercetin treatment significantly reduced DN in hypercholesterolemic mice by inducing biochemical changes (decrease in glucose and triglycerides serum levels) and reduction of glomerulosclerosis. Thus, this study highlights the relevance of quercetin as an alternative therapeutic option for DN, including in diabetes associated with dyslipidemia. PMID:26388784

  3. Neurotoxicological effects of cinnabar (a Chinese mineral medicine, HgS) in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.-F.; Liu, S.-H.; Lin-Shiau, S.-Y.

    2007-10-15

    Cinnabar, a naturally occurring mercuric sulfide (HgS), has long been used in combination with traditional Chinese medicine as a sedative for more than 2000 years. Up to date, its pharmacological and toxicological effects are still unclear, especially in clinical low-dose and long-term use. In this study, we attempted to elucidate the effects of cinnabar on the time course of changes in locomotor activities, pentobarbital-induced sleeping time, motor equilibrium performance and neurobiochemical activities in mice during 3- to 11-week administration at a clinical dose of 10 mg/kg/day. The results showed that cinnabar was significantly absorbed by gastrointestinal (G-I) tract and transported to brain tissues. The spontaneous locomotor activities of male mice but not female mice were preferentially suppressed. Moreover, frequencies of jump and stereotype-1 episodes were progressively decreased after 3-week oral administration in male and female mice. Pentobarbital-induced sleeping time was prolonged and the retention time on a rotating rod (60 rpm) was reduced after treatment with cinnabar for 6 weeks and then progressively to a greater extent until the 11-week experiment. In addition, the biochemical changes in blood and brain tissues were studied; the inhibition of Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activities, increased production of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO) were found with a greater extent in male mice than those in female mice, which were apparently correlated with their differences in the neurological responses observed. In conclusion, these findings, for the first time, provide evidence of the pharmacological and toxicological basis for understanding the sedative and neurotoxic effects of cinnabar used as a Chinese mineral medicine for more than 2000 years.

  4. Metabolism and aging: effects of cold exposure on metabolic rate, body composition, and longevity in mice.

    PubMed

    Vaanholt, Lobke M; Daan, Serge; Schubert, Kristin A; Visser, G Henk

    2009-01-01

    The proposition that increased energy expenditure shortens life has a long history. The rate-of-living theory (Pearl 1928 ) states that life span and average mass-specific metabolic rate are inversely proportional. Originally based on interspecific allometric comparisons between species of mammals, the theory was later rejected on the basis of comparisons between taxa (e.g., birds have higher metabolic rates than mammals of the same size and yet live longer). It has rarely been experimentally tested within species. Here, we investigated the effects of increased energy expenditure, induced by cold exposure, on longevity in mice. Longevity was measured in groups of 60 male mice maintained at either 22 degrees C (WW) or 10 degrees C (CC) throughout adult life. Forty additional mice were maintained at both of these temperatures to determine metabolic rate (by stable isotope turnover, gas exchange, and food intake) as well as the mass of body and organs of subsets of animals at four different ages. Because energy expenditure might affect longevity by either accumulating damage or by instantaneously affecting mortality rate, we included a third group of mice exposed to 10 degrees C early in life and to 22 degrees C afterward (CW). Exposure to cold increased mean daily energy expenditure by ca. 48% (from 47.8 kJ d(-1) in WW to 70.6 kJ d(-1) in CC mice, with CW intermediate at 59.9 kJ d(-1)). However, we observed no significant differences in median life span among the groups (WW, 832 d; CC, 834 d; CW, 751 d). CC mice had reduced body mass (lifetime mean 30.7 g) compared with WW mice (33.8 g), and hence their lifetime energy potential (LEP) per gram whole-body mass had an even larger excess than per individual. Greenberg ( 1999 ) has pointed out that the size of the energetically costly organs, rather than that of the whole body, may be relevant for the rate-of-living idea. We therefore expressed LEP also in terms of energy expenditure per gram dry lean mass or per gram

  5. Combined Effects of Acamprosate and Escitalopram on Ethanol Consumption in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ada Man-Choi; Qiu, Yanyan; Jia, Yun-Fang; Aguiar, Felipe S.; Hinton, David J.; Karpyak, Victor M.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Background Major depression is one of the most prevalent psychiatry comorbidities of alcohol use disorders (AUD). Since negative emotions can trigger craving and increase the risk of relapse, treatments that target both conditions simultaneously may augment treatment success. Previous studies showed a potential synergist effect of FDA approved medication for AUD acamprosate and the antidepressant escitalopram. In this study, we investigated the effects of combining acamprosate and escitalopram on ethanol consumption in stress-induced depressed mice. Methods Forty singly-housed C57BL/6J male mice were subjected to chronic unpredictable stress. In parallel, 40 group-housed male mice were subjected to normal husbandry. After 3 weeks, depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and ethanol consumption were assessed. For the next 7 days, mice were injected with saline, acamprosate (200 mg/kg; twice/day), escitalopram (5 mg/kg; twice/day), or their combination (n = 9–11/drug group/stress group). Two-bottle choice limited access drinking of 15% ethanol and tap water was performed 3 hours into dark phase for 2 hours immediately after the dark phase daily injection. Ethanol drinking was monitored for another 7 days without drug administration. Results Mice subjected to the chronic unpredictable stress paradigm for 3 weeks showed apparent depression- and anxiety-like behaviors compared to their non-stressed counterparts including longer immobility time in the forced swim test and lower sucrose preference. Stressed mice also displayed higher ethanol consumption and preference in a 2-bottle choice drinking test. During the drug administration period, the escitalopram-only and combined drug groups showed significant reduction in ethanol consumption in non-stressed mice, while only the combined drug group showed significantly reduced consumption in stressed mice. However, such reduction did not persist into the post-drug administration period. Conclusions The combination of

  6. Inhibitory Effects of Medium Molecular Weight Heparinyl Amino Acid Derivatives on Ischemic Paw Edema in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Seiichi; Toda, Takao; Nakamura, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the radical-scavenging effects of heparin (HE), medium molecular weight heparinyl phenylalanine (MHF), and medium molecular weight heparinyl leucine (MHL) using ischemic paw edema in mice. We also examined the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) of mice that were administered these compounds as an index of their side-effects. HE had a preventative effect and significant reduced ischemic paw edema. However, its effect was not dose-dependent and the dose-response curve was bell-shaped. The effective dose of HE also exhibited a prolonged APTT. Pretreatment using MHF and MHL were effective against ischemic paw edema without a prolonged APTT. Remarkably, the action of MHF was not only preventively, but also therapeutically active. These results suggest that MHF and MHL are superior to HE as safe radical scavengers in vivo. PMID:27381605

  7. The Cardioprotective Effect of Vitamin E (Alpha-Tocopherol) Is Strongly Related to Age and Gender in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Lin, Ze-Bang; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Jing-Feng; Chen, Yang-Xin; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xi; Ou, Zhi-Jun; Ou, Jing-Song

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin E (VitE) only prevented cardiovascular diseases in some patients and the mechanisms remain unknown. VitE levels can be affected by aging and gender. We hypothesize that age and gender can influence VitE’s cardioprotective effect. Mice were divided into 4 groups according to age and gender, and each group of mice were divided into a control group and a VitE group. The mice were administered water or VitE for 21 days; Afterward, the cardiac function and myocardial infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were measured after myocardial ischemia reperfusion(MI/R). VitE may significantly improved cardiac function in young male mice and aged female mice by enhancing ERK1/2 activity and reducing JNK activity. Enhanced expression of HSP90 and Bcl-2 were also seen in young male mice. No changes in cardiac function and cardiac proteins were detected in aged male mice and VitE was even liked to exert a reverse effect in cardiac function in young mice by enhancing JNK activity and reducing Bcl-2 expression. Those effects were in accordance with the changes of myocardial infarction size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis in each group of mice. VitE may reduce MI/R injury by inhibiting cardiomyocyte apoptosis in young male mice and aged female mice but not in aged male mice. VitE was possibly harmful for young female mice, shown as increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis after MI/R. Thus, we speculated that the efficacy of VitE in cardiac protection was associated with age and gender. PMID:26331272

  8. Effect of the cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist rimonabant on inflammation in mice with diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied whether cannabinoid receptor (CB1) blockade with rimonabant has an anti-inflammatory effect in obese mice, and whether this effect depends on weight loss and/or diet consumption. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice were treated orally with rimonabant (HFD-R) or vehicle (HFD-V) for 4 we...

  9. Natural Pathogens of Laboratory Mice, Rats, and Rabbits and Their Effects on Research

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory mice, rats, and rabbits may harbor a variety of viral, bacterial, parasitic, and fungal agents. Frequently, these organisms cause no overt signs of disease. However, many of the natural pathogens of these laboratory animals may alter host physiology, rendering the host unsuitable for many experimental uses. While the number and prevalence of these pathogens have declined considerably, many still turn up in laboratory animals and represent unwanted variables in research. Investigators using mice, rats, and rabbits in biomedical experimentation should be aware of the profound effects that many of these agents can have on research. PMID:9564563

  10. Effect of dehydration on erythropoiesis in mice - Relevance to the 'anemia' of space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Mice deprived of water for 24 h showed an increase in hematocrit and loss of body weight comparable to that seen in men during space flight. The increase in hematocrit was entirely due to a decrease in plasma volume and was associated with suppression of erythropoiesis, but with no significant change in the serum titer of a presumptive humoral regulator of erythropoiesis, Erythroid Stimulating Activity (ESA). Mice deprived of water for 24 h may be a useful model for the study of the early hematological effects of space flight. The suppression of erythropoiesis due to a relative erythrocytosis appears to be independent of ESA.

  11. [Change in the estrous cycle of mice under the effect of prostaglandin F2 alpha].

    PubMed

    Persianinov, L S; Massal'skaia, L M

    1976-01-01

    It was shown that specific reception in female mice to prostaglandine F2alpha maturated in the process of ontogenesis since the vaginal reaction and the weight of the reproductive organs in the immature female animals failed to alter under its effect. In the sexually mature mice prostaglandine F2alpha arrested the course of the estral cycle and caused an untimely occurrence of the next estrus for a more prolonged time than normal, irrespective of the phase of the estral cycle during which it was administered.

  12. Antidiabetic effects of ajoene in genetically diabetic KK-A(y) mice.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Atsuhiko; Yamada, Norihiko; Nishikawa, Tomoaki; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Fujino, Tsuchiyoshi

    2005-10-01

    Antidiabetic effects of ajoene, derived from garlic, were investigated in genetically diabetic KK-A(y) mice. Four-week-old male KK-A(y) mice were kept on a laboratory diet containing 0.02 or 0.05% of ajoene for 8 wk. The elevation of water intake was suppressed depending on ajoene intake. The levels of plasma glucose in the 0.05% ajoene-containing diet group was significantly suppressed to 73.8% compared with the control group at the 8th wk. Similarly, the plasma triglyceride level was significantly suppressed. It is suggested that hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia are suppressed by ajoene treatment.

  13. [The protector effect of ribosomal preparations against experimental influenza infection in mice].

    PubMed

    Popa, L M; Repanovici, R; Iliescu, R

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted on the protective effect of some ribosomal preparations, isolated from chorionic-allantoic membranes of chicken embryos, infected or not with parainfluenza (Sendai) or influenza (AoPR8) virus, in mice experimentally inoculated with influenza virus strain AoPR8 adapted to the mouse. Results showed that the tested preparation, containing ribosomes and polysomes isolated from chorio-allantoic membranes of Sendai virus inoculated chicken embryos, ensure the mice complete protection against AoPR8 virus, if administrated before the control infection. PMID:2549704

  14. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  15. [Effect of sodium valproate on aggressive behavior of male mice with various aggression experience].

    PubMed

    Smagin, D A; Bondar', N P; Kudriavtseva, N N

    2010-01-01

    Sector of Social Behavior Neurogenetics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch, Effects of sodium valproate on the aggressive behavior of male mice with 2- and 20-day positive fighting experience have been studied. It is established that valproate administered in a singe dose of 100 mg/kg has no effect on the behavior of male mice with a 2-day experience of aggression. The treatment of mice with 300 mg/kg of valproate significantly decreased the level of aggressive motivation and the percentage of animals demonstrating attacks and threats. In male mice with a 20-day experience of aggression, valproate decreased the time of hostile behavior in a dose-dependent manner. Valproate in a single dose of 300 mg/kg significantly decreased the level of aggressive motivation, but also produced a toxic effect, whereby 73% of aggressive males demonstrated long-term immobility and 45% exhibited movement abnormalities (falls) upon the treatment. It is suggested that changes in the brain neurochemical activity, which are caused by a prolonged experience of aggression, modify the effects of sodium valproate.

  16. THE EFFECTS OF HYPERTHERMIA ON SPERMATOGENESIS, APOPTOSIS, GENE EXPRESSION AND FERTILITY IN ADULT MALE MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of hyperthermia on spermatogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression and fertility in adult male mice
    John C. Rockett1, Faye L. Mapp1, J. Brian Garges1, J. Christopher Luft1, Chisato Mori2 and David J. Dix1.
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Envir...

  17. NICOTINE EFFECTS ON THE ACTIVITY OF MICE EXPOSED PRENATALLY TO THE NICOTINIC AGONIST ANATOXIN-A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considerable research has shown long-lasting effects of early exposure in experimental animals to nicotine. Anatoxin-a is produced by cyanobacteria and has been shown to be a potent nicotinic agonist. This experiment evaluated the motor activity of adult mice, and their respons...

  18. EFFECTS OF PARTICLES FROM TWO GERMAN CITIES ON ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF PARTICLES FROM TWO GERMAN CITIES ON ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN MICE. S. H. Gavett, L. R. Bishop, N. Haykal-Coates, J. Heinrich*, and M. I. Gilmour. Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/NHEERL, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, *GSF, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Chi...

  19. Antihyperglycemic effects of Platycodon grandiflorum (Jacq.) A. DC. extract on streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; He, Jiguo; Ji, Baoping; Li, Ye; Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2007-03-01

    The root of Platycodon grandiflorum (Jacq.) A. DC has been reported to have a wide range of health benefits in oriental food. This study examined the hypoglycemic effects of Platycodon grandiflorum (Jacq.) A. DC aqueous-ethanol extract (PGE) in streptozotocin (STZ) -induced diabetic ICR mice (STZ diabetic mice) for the first time. The effects of PGE on blood glucose, plasma insulin levels and body weight were investigated. A significant decrease in blood glucose levels was observed after single administration of PGE. Furthermore, Glibenclamide and PGE significantly suppressed the rise in blood glucose after 30 min in the acute glucose tolerance test. Treatment with glibenclamide and PGE resulted in a reduction in blood glucose levels from the 2nd week, and this reduction was maintained until the 4th week of treatment. The body weight changed slightly in glibenclamide and PGE treated mice in comparison with the STZ control group. Plasma insulin levels were increased with glibenclamide treatment in STZ diabetic mice, whereas such effect was not observed with PGE. These results indicated that PGE could induce hypoglycemic effects without stimulating insulin secretion. PMID:17226070

  20. Protective effect of Plantago major L. Pectin polysaccharide against systemic Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Hetland, G; Samuelsen, A B; Løvik, M; Paulsen, B S; Aaberge, I S; Groeng, E C; Michaelsen, T E

    2000-10-01

    The antibacterial effect of a soluble pectin polysaccharide, PMII, isolated from the leaves of Plantago major, was examined in inbred NIH/OlaHsd and Fox Chase SCID mice experimentally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B. Serotype 6B is known to give a more protracted infection when injected intraperitoneally into susceptible mice than more virulent serotypes like type 4. PMII was administered i.p. either once 3 days before challenge or once to thrice from 3 to 48 h after challenge. The number of bacteria in blood and the mouse survival rate were recorded. Pre-challenge administration of PMII and also lipopolysaccharide (LPS), included as a control, gave a dose-dependent protective effect against S. pneumoniae type 6B infection. However, injection of PMII after establishment of the infection in NIH/OlaHsd mice had no effect. The data demonstrate that, firstly, the polysaccharide fraction PMII from P. major protects against pneumococcal infection in mice when administered systemically prechallenge, and secondly that the protective effect is owing to stimulation of the innate and not the adaptive immune system. PMID:11013005

  1. Antitumor Effect of Zhihuang Fuzheng Soft Capsules on Tumor-Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yanyan; Pan, Xin; Jin, Yahong; Gao, Yingjie; Cui, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Chinese medicines (CMs) have been shown to have some advantages in preventing and controlling tumors. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of ZFSC by establishing a mouse model of HT-1080, A-549, and HCT-8 tumors. The result showed that tumor volumes of HT-1080 tumor-bearing nude mice in ZFSC low, medium, and high dose groups were lower significantly compared to the model group, and the high dose ZFSC showed the best antitumor effect. Tumor volumes of A-549 tumor-bearing nude mice in ZFSC low, medium, and high dose groups were lower significantly compared to the model group and showed a good dose-response relationship. There was no significant effect on human colon cancer, although inhibition trends disappeared in the bar chart. In order to verify the immunomodulatory effect of ZFSC, ELISA was used to analyze serums IL-2, TNF-α, and IFN in spleens. The results showed that ZFSC could enhance the immune function of tumor-bearing mice. ZFSC reduced IFN-γ and TNF-α content in the serum of HT-1080 tumor-bearing mice and inhibit PD1 and PDL1 and suggested that the antitumor mechanism of ZFSC on human fibrosarcoma could be attributed to inhibition of the PDL1/PD1 pathway. PMID:27493673

  2. Effects of Differing Response-Force Requirements on Food-Maintained Responding in CD-1 Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarcone, Troy J.; Chen, Rong; Fowler, Stephen C.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of force requirements on response effort was examined using outbred (CD-1) mice trained to press a disk with their snout. Lateral peak forces greater than 2 g were defined as threshold responses (i.e., all measured responses). Different force requirements were used to define criterion responses (a subclass of threshold responses) that…

  3. Protective effect of Plantago major L. Pectin polysaccharide against systemic Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Hetland, G; Samuelsen, A B; Løvik, M; Paulsen, B S; Aaberge, I S; Groeng, E C; Michaelsen, T E

    2000-10-01

    The antibacterial effect of a soluble pectin polysaccharide, PMII, isolated from the leaves of Plantago major, was examined in inbred NIH/OlaHsd and Fox Chase SCID mice experimentally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B. Serotype 6B is known to give a more protracted infection when injected intraperitoneally into susceptible mice than more virulent serotypes like type 4. PMII was administered i.p. either once 3 days before challenge or once to thrice from 3 to 48 h after challenge. The number of bacteria in blood and the mouse survival rate were recorded. Pre-challenge administration of PMII and also lipopolysaccharide (LPS), included as a control, gave a dose-dependent protective effect against S. pneumoniae type 6B infection. However, injection of PMII after establishment of the infection in NIH/OlaHsd mice had no effect. The data demonstrate that, firstly, the polysaccharide fraction PMII from P. major protects against pneumococcal infection in mice when administered systemically prechallenge, and secondly that the protective effect is owing to stimulation of the innate and not the adaptive immune system.

  4. Effects of beta-carotene and aspartame on clustogenic activity of cyclophosphamide and dioxidine in mice.

    PubMed

    Belogolovskaya, E G; Oreshchenko, A V; Durnev, A D; Seredenin, S B; Litvinova, E V; Zubtsov, Y N

    2000-11-01

    Antimutagenic effects of combination of aspartame (0.4 and 4 mg/kg) and beta-carotene (0.15-15 mg/kg) were studied by estimation of chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells of C57Bl/6 mice. Single and 5-day treatment with this combination decreased the clastogenic effects of dioxidine and cyclophosphamide and produced a more potent and universal antimutagenic effect than its constituents.

  5. The effect of spatial heterogenity on the aggregation of ticks on white-footed mice

    PubMed Central

    Devevey, G.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Parasites are often aggregated on a minority of the individuals in their host populations. Although host characteristics are commonly presumed to explain parasite aggregation on hosts, spatio-temporal aggregation of parasites during their host-seeking stages may have a dominant effect on the aggregation on hosts. We aimed to quantify, using mixed models, repeatability and autocorrelation analyses, the degree to which the aggregation of blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) on white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) is influenced by spatio-temporal distributions of the host-seeking ticks and by heterogeneity among mice. Host-seeking ticks were spatially aggregated at both the larval and nymphal life-stages. However, this spatial aggregation accounted for little of the variation in larval and nymphal burdens observed on mice (3% and 0%, respectively). Conversely, mouse identity accounted for a substantial proportion of the variance in tick burdens. Mouse identity was a significant explanatory factor as the majority of ticks parasitized a consistent set of mice throughout the activity seasons. Of the characteristics associated with mouse identity investigated, only gender affected larval burdens, and body mass and home range sizes in males were correlated with nymphal burdens. These analyses suggest that aggregation of ticks on a minority of mice does not result from the distribution of host-seeking ticks but from characteristics of the hosts. PMID:22409977

  6. Effects of cinnarizine, a calcium antagonist that produces human parkinsonism, in parkin knock out mice.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Menéndez, J; Casarejos, M J; Solano, R M; Gallego, E; Sánchez, M; Mena, M A; García de Yebenes, J

    2005-08-01

    Cinnarizine, a calcium antagonist that produces parkinsonism in humans, induces behavioural changes such as alopecia, buco-lingual dyskinesia and reduction of motor activity in female parkin knock out (PK-KO) mice but not in wild-type (WT) controls. PK-KO mice have high striatal dopamine levels and increased dopamine metabolism in spite of low reduced tyrosine hydroxylase protein. Cinnarizine, which blocks dopamine receptors and increases dopamine release, further increased dopamine metabolism. PK-KO mice increased GSH levels as a compensatory mechanism against enhanced free radical production related to acceleration of dopamine turnover. Neuronal markers, such as beta-tubulin slightly increased in PK-KO and furthermore with cinnarizine. Astroglial markers were decreased in PK-KO mice, and this effect was potentiated by cinnarizine, suggesting abnormal glia in these animals. Microglia was hyperactivated in PK-KO midbrain, suggesting inflammation in these animals. Proapoptotic proteins were increased by cinnarizine and, to a lesser extent, in PK-KO mice. Our data indicate that mutation of parkin is a risk factor for drug-induced parkinsonism. PMID:15993444

  7. The effect of spatial heterogenity on the aggregation of ticks on white-footed mice.

    PubMed

    Devevey, G; Brisson, D

    2012-06-01

    Parasites are often aggregated on a minority of the individuals in their host populations. Although host characteristics are commonly presumed to explain parasite aggregation on hosts, spatio-temporal aggregation of parasites during their host-seeking stages may have a dominant effect on the aggregation on hosts. We aimed to quantify, using mixed models, repeatability and autocorrelation analyses, the degree to which the aggregation of blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) on white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) is influenced by spatio-temporal distributions of the host-seeking ticks and by heterogeneity among mice. Host-seeking ticks were spatially aggregated at both the larval and nymphal life-stages. However, this spatial aggregation accounted for little of the variation in larval and nymphal burdens observed on mice (3% and 0%, respectively). Conversely, mouse identity accounted for a substantial proportion of the variance in tick burdens. Mouse identity was a significant explanatory factor as the majority of ticks parasitized a consistent set of mice throughout the activity seasons. Of the characteristics associated with mouse identity investigated, only gender affected larval burdens, and body mass and home range sizes in males were correlated with nymphal burdens. These analyses suggest that aggregation of ticks on a minority of mice does not result from the distribution of host-seeking ticks but from characteristics of the hosts. PMID:22409977

  8. Effects of acute alcohol withdrawal on nest building in mice selectively bred for alcohol withdrawal severity.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Gian D; Phillips, Tamara J; Crabbe, John C

    2016-10-15

    Nest building has been used to assess thermoregulatory behavior and positive motivational states in mice. There are known genetic influences on ethanol withdrawal severity as well as individual/thermoregulatory nest building. Withdrawal Seizure-Prone (WSP-1, WSP-2) and Withdrawal Seizure-Resistant (WSR-1, WSR-2) mice were selectively bred for high vs low handling-induced convulsion (HIC) severity, respectively, during withdrawal from chronic ethanol vapor inhalation. They also differ in HIC severity during withdrawal from an acute, 4g/kg ethanol injection. In our initial study, withdrawal from an acute dose of ethanol dose-dependently impaired nest building over the initial 24h of withdrawal in genetically segregating Withdrawal Seizure Control (WSC) mice. In two further studies, acute ethanol withdrawal suppressed nest building for up to two days in WSP-1 females. Deficits in nest building from ethanol were limited to the initial 10h of withdrawal in WSR-1 females and to the initial 24h of withdrawal in WSP-1 and WSR-1 males. Effects of ethanol on nest building for up to two days were found in WSP-2 and WSR-2 mice of both sexes. Nest building deficits in female mice from the first replicate could not be explained by a general decrease in locomotor behavior. These results suggest that nest building is a novel behavioral phenotype for indexing the severity of acute ethanol withdrawal, and that genes contributing to this trait differ from those affecting acute withdrawal HIC severity. PMID:27503811

  9. Preventive and therapeutic effects of sodium bicarbonate on melamine-induced bladder stones in mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shu-Ting; Du, Yun-Xia; Xu, Chang-Fu; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Mo, Li-Ping; Sun, Ying; Gao, Xiao-Li

    2014-10-01

    The actual preventive and therapeutic effects of alkalinizing urine on melamine-induced bladder stones (cystolith) are not completely known. Using an ideal model, two experiments were conducted in Balb/c mice. The mice were fed a normal diet in controls and a melamine diet in the other groups. The first day was set as experiment-day 1. In "Experiment 1", either low-/mid-/high-dose sodium bicarbonate (SB) or sterile water was administered by intragastric perfusion (once daily) to the mice for 14 days. Relative to the model group, the mean pH of the urine in the SB groups was significantly elevated at 3 h after SB administration, with a significant decrease in cystolith incidence on experiment-day 14. In "Experiment 2", on experiment-day 12, the melamine diet was replaced by a normal diet in 4 groups with melamine withdrawal (MW). Meanwhile, either mid-/high-dose SB or sterile water was administered by intragastric perfusion (once) to the mice in the corresponding groups. On experiment-day 12, after an additional 8 h, the cystolith incidence was significantly reduced in the high-SB, MW + mid-SB and MW + high-SB groups than in the model group. In conclusion, low urinary pH is one of the main determinants of the formation of melamine-associated stones, urinary alkalinization can be achieved by a proper dose of oral SB, and SB acts to prevent and treat melamine-induced cystoliths in mice.

  10. Effects of sleep fragmentation on sleep and markers of inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Rita A; Verhulst, Steve; Toth, Linda A

    2014-02-01

    Many people in our society experience curtailment and disruption of sleep due to work responsibilities, care-giving, or life style choice. Delineating the health effect of acute and chronic disruptions in sleep is essential to raising awareness of and creating interventions to manage these prevalent concerns. To provide a platform for studying the health impact and underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with inadequate sleep, we developed and characterized an approach to creating chronic disruption of sleep in laboratory mice. We used this method to evaluate how 3 durations of sleep fragmentation (SF) affect sleep recuperation and blood and lung analyte concentrations in male C57BL/6J mice. Mice housed in environmentally controlled chambers were exposed to automated SF for periods of 6, 12, or 24 h or for 12 h daily during the light (somnolent) phase for 4 sequential days. Sleep time, slow-wave amplitude, or bout lengths were significantly higher when uninterrupted sleep was permitted after each of the 3 SF durations. However, mice did not recover all of the lost slow-wave sleep during the subsequent 12- to 24-h period and maintained a net loss of sleep. Light-phase SF was associated with significant changes in serum and lung levels of some inflammatory substances, but these changes were not consistent or sustained. The data indicate that acute light-phase SF can result in a sustained sleep debt in mice and may disrupt the inflammatory steady-state in serum and lung.

  11. The Protective Effect of Stauntonia Chinensis Polysaccharide on CCl4-induced Acute Liver Injuries in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiaojiao; Xiong, Qingming; Zhang, Jing; Yan, Shirong; Zhu, Lihua; Zhu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of Stauntonia chinensis polysaccharides (SCP) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced acute liver injuries in mice. Methods: Kunming mice were randomly divided into three groups: the control group, the pathological model group, and the SCP group. The SCP group was further divided into three subgroups based on SCP treatment: Low dosage (50 mg/kg), medium dosage (100 mg/kg) and high dosage (200 mg/kg). After being fed for 7 days, mixed-edible-oil solution was intraperitoneally injected into the control group, while the other two groups were injected with 0.15% CCl4 mixed with mixed-edible-oil. Sera were collected from mice 24 h later to determine the activity of serum alanine transaminase (ALT). Mice were then sacrificed to prepare liver homogenate. Levels of liver malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide (NO) were determined. Pathological changes in livers were also analyzed. Results: SCP significantly reduced the ALT activity in the serum and inhibited the decrease of serum GSH, GSH-PX and SOD and rose the levels of MDA and NO (P<0.05-0.01). This lessened the pathological damage to the liver tissues. Conclusion: SCP protects against CCl4-induced acute liver injuries in mice. PMID:24711744

  12. Effect of intestinal colonisation by two Lactobacillus strains on the immune response of gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, R S; Lima, M; Gomes de Oliveira, N L; Miyoshi, A; Nicoli, J R; Neumann, E; Nunes, A C

    2014-12-01

    The effect of intestinal colonisation on the immune system was investigated in germ-free mice monoassociated with Lactobacillus strains isolated from calf faeces. Single doses of Lactobacillus acidophilus L36 or Lactobacillus salivarius L38 were administered to germ-free mice by intragastric gavage. Ten days later, the mice were euthanised. Gene expression levels of interleukin 5 (IL-5), IL-6, IL-10, IL-12b, IL-17a, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were quantified in segments of the small and large intestines by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. All the mice were colonised rapidly after Lactobacillus administration with intestinal counts ranging from 6.53 to 8.26 log cfu/g. L. acidophilus L36 administration increased the expression of cytokines involved with the Th2 (IL-5, IL-6 and TGF-β1) and Th17 (IL-17a, TNF-α and IL-6) inflammatory response, whereas L. salivarius L38 appeared to stimulate a pattern of less diversified cytokines in the intestine. Intragastric gavage of L. acidophilus L36 and L. salivarius L38 induced similar levels of colonisation in the digestive tracts of germ-free mice but stimulated different immune responses in the intestinal mucosa. The different immunomodulation patterns might facilitate the potential use of these lactobacilli as probiotics to treat distinct pathological conditions, for example protection against Citrobacter rodentium infection by stimulating IL-17 production.

  13. Preventive effects of jujube polysaccharides on fructose-induced insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Yang, Xingbin; Ren, Daoyuan; Wang, Dongying; Xuan, Yang

    2014-08-01

    High fructose intake is associated with adverse metabolic syndromes. This study was designed to investigate whether the polysaccharides derived from Zizyphus jujube cv. Shaanbeitanzao (ZSP) could alleviate high fructose-induced insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in mice. ZSP was identified by capillary zone electrophoresis as an acidic heteropolysaccharide with l-arabinose, d-galactose and d-galacturonic acid being the main component monosaccharides. Mice were provided with 20% high-fructose water and ZSP was administered intragastrically at doses of 0, 200 or 400 mg kg(-1) BW for 4 weeks. Fructose-treated mice showed hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia with impaired insulin sensitivity (p < 0.05). Administration of ZSP at a dose of 400 mg kg(-1) BW significantly reduced the serum levels of glucose, insulin, TC, TG, LDL-C, and VLDL-C (p < 0.01). ZSP also markedly improved the HDL-C level, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function (HOMA-β), and decreased the atherogenic index (AI) of the mice exposed to high-fructose water. Histopathological test with H&E and oil red O staining confirmed liver steatosis induced by a high-fructose diet and the hepatoprotective effect of ZSP. These findings indicate that the jujube polysaccharides may ameliorate insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in fructose-treated mice.

  14. Effects of price and pellet type on food waste in mice.

    PubMed

    Minervini, Vanessa; Galuska, Chad M; Rowland, Neil E

    2014-03-01

    When laboratory mice are provided with free access to food, they often fragment their food such that it collects on the cage floor - wasted. An operant analysis of food waste, however, has not yet been conducted. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of response requirement and pellet type on food waste using a behavioral economic paradigm. Sixteen mice responded under a series of escalating fixed ratio schedules. Nose pokes were reinforced with either a grain-based pellet or a fiber-based pellet (diluted with non-digestible cellulose) across conditions. We found that mice spilled a greater percent of the total earned pellets at low response requirements. Additionally, mice spilled more fiber-based pellets relative to grain-based pellets. This difference was most pronounced when the fixed ratio requirement was low and was attenuated as the fixed ratio was increased, and this decrease in food waste across prices was well accounted for by an exponential model. Mice may have been extracting the calorically dense components of the fiber-based pellets only when the schedule of reinforcement was rich. When the schedule of reinforcement was lean, responding for a new pellet likely was a more functional behavior than fragmenting a pellet and discarding portions.

  15. Effect of resveratrol on alcohol-induced mortality and liver lesions in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bujanda, Luis; García-Barcina, María; Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez-de; Bidaurrazaga, Joseba; de Luco, Marian Fernández; Gutiérrez-Stampa, Marian; Larzabal, Mikel; Hijona, Elisabeth; Sarasqueta, Cristina; Echenique-Elizondo, Miguel; Arenas, Juan I

    2006-01-01

    Background Resveratrol is a polyphenol with important antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties. We investigated the effect of resveratrol on alcohol-induced mortality and liver lesions in mice. Methods Mice were randomly distributed into four groups (control, resveratrol-treated control, alcohol and resveratrol-treated alcohol). Chronic alcohol intoxication was induced by progressively administering alcohol in drinking water up to 40% v/v. The mice administered resveratrol received 10 mg/ml in drinking water. The animals had free access to standard diet. Blood levels were determined for transaminases, IL-1 and TNF-α. A histological evaluation was made of liver damage, and survival among the animals was recorded. Results Transaminase concentration was significantly higher in the alcohol group than in the rest of the groups (p < 0.05). IL-1 levels were significantly reduced in the alcohol plus resveratrol group compared with the alcohol group (p < 0.05). TNF-α was not detected in any group. Histologically, the liver lesions were more severe in the alcohol group, though no significant differences between groups were observed. Mortality in the alcohol group was 78% in the seventh week, versus 22% in the alcohol plus resveratrol group (p < 0.001). All mice in the alcohol group died before the ninth week. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that resveratrol reduces mortality and liver damage in mice. PMID:17105669

  16. Effects of repeated cycles of fasting-refeeding on brown adipose tissue composition in mice.

    PubMed

    Desautels, M; Dulos, R A

    1988-08-01

    Mice fasted for 24 h showed reductions in carcass fat and gonadal fat depots and atrophy of brown adipose tissue (BAT) that was characterized by loss of protein and succinate dehydrogenase. These changes were reversed on 24 h of refeeding. Cycling mice experienced 14 cycles of 1 day of fast followed by 2 days of refeeding, whereas control mice were fed ad libitum. Weight loss during each fast remained constant, and the animals lost and regained in excess of twice their initial weights within 6 wk. However, final weight and carcass and gonadal fat weights were similar to those of animals fed ad libitum. Total food intake was similar between cycling mice and those fed ad libitum suggesting an increase in feeding efficiency. There was no development of resistance to food deprivation since the preceding fasting experience of the animal had no effect on weight and carcass fat loss during a 24- or 48-h fast. Norepinephrine-stimulated oxygen consumption that was reduced in cycling mice was probably the result of a reduction of BAT thermogenic capacity. BAT succinate dehydrogenase content and the concentration of uncoupling protein in isolated mitochondria were significantly reduced. These changes in BAT composition were not observed when the refeeding period of each cycle was increased to 6 days. These results suggest that reduced energy expenditure in BAT may play a role in the conservation of energy during intermittent and frequent bouts of food deprivation. PMID:3407768

  17. Effects of Active Mastication on Chronic Stress-Induced Bone Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Kagaku; Furuzawa, Manabu; Fujiwara, Shu; Yamada, Kumiko; Kubo, Kin-ya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic psychologic stress increases corticosterone levels, which decreases bone density. Active mastication or chewing attenuates stress-induced increases in corticosterone. We evaluated whether active mastication attenuates chronic stress-induced bone loss in mice. Male C57BL/6 (B6) mice were randomly divided into control, stress, and stress/chewing groups. Stress was induced by placing mice in a ventilated restraint tube (60 min, 2x/day, 4 weeks). The stress/chewing group was given a wooden stick to chew during the experimental period. Quantitative micro-computed tomography, histologic analysis, and biochemical markers were used to evaluate the bone response. The stress/chewing group exhibited significantly attenuated stress-induced increases in serum corticosterone levels, suppressed bone formation, enhanced bone resorption, and decreased trabecular bone mass in the vertebrae and distal femurs, compared with mice in the stress group. Active mastication during exposure to chronic stress alleviated chronic stress-induced bone density loss in B6 mice. Active mastication during chronic psychologic stress may thus be an effective strategy to prevent and/or treat chronic stress-related osteopenia. PMID:26664256

  18. The effect of multigenerational diet containing genetically modified triticale on immune system in mice.

    PubMed

    Krzyżowska, M; Wincenciak, M; Winnicka, A; Baranowski, A; Jaszczak, K; Zimny, J; Niemiałtowski, M

    2010-01-01

    The safety assessment of genetically modified (GM) food and feed is performed to identify the possible effects upon animal and human health, also the long-term, multigenerational influence upon functioning of different organs and systems, such as the immune system. In this study C57BL/6J mice were fed for five consecutive generations with pellets containing 20% of conventional triticale grain (control) vs. pellets containing 20% of the transgenic triticale grain resistant to BASTA herbicide (experimental). The F5 experimental animals showed enlarged inguinal and axillary lymph nodes, but not spleens, and increased WBC counts in blood (but within the norm for Mus musculus). Immunophenotyped cell suspensions derived from spleens, inguinal and axillaris lymph nodes and PBMCs from blood showed the significant decrease in the percentage of T cells in spleen and lymph nodes and the B cells in lymph nodes and blood of the F5 experimental mice in comparison to the control F5 mice. Immunoblotting analysis of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IL- 6, IFN-gamma levels in serum showed significantly increased IL-2 levels and decreased IL-6 levels in the F5-experimental mice sera. No significant changes in the levels of IgE in sera in both mice groups were observed. The obtained results indicate that multigenerational use of feeds for rodents containing the GM-triticale leads to expansion of the B cell compartment in the secondary lymphoid organs, but it is not caused by malignant processes or the allergic response.

  19. Anxiety-like effects of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in paradoxically sleep-deprived mice.

    PubMed

    Polesel, Daniel Ninello; Fukushiro, Daniela Fukue; Andersen, Monica Levy; Nozoe, Karen Tieme; Mári-Kawamoto, Elisa; Saito, Luís Paulo; Carvalho, Fábio Ramos Souza; Alvarenga, Tathiana Aparecida; Freitas, Denise; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto; Lanaro, Rafael; Costa, José Luiz; Tavares, Marina Franco Maggi

    2014-03-01

    Chlorophenylpiperazines (CPP) are psychotropic drugs used in nightclub parties and are frequently used in a state of sleep deprivation, a condition which can potentiate the effects of psychoactive drugs. This study aimed to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation and sleep rebound (RB) on anxiety-like measures in mCPP-treated mice using the open field test. We first optimized our procedure by performing dose-effect curves and examining different pretreatment times in naïve male Swiss mice. Subsequently, a separate cohort of mice underwent paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) for 24 or 48h. In the last experiment, immediately after the 24h-PSD period, mice received an injection of saline or mCPP, but their general activity was quantified in the open field only after the RB period (24 or 48h). The dose of 5mgmL(-1) of mCPP was the most effective at decreasing rearing behavior, with peak effects 15min after injection. PSD decreased locomotion and rearing behaviors, thereby inhibiting a further impairment induced by mCPP. Plasma concentrations of mCPP were significantly higher in PSD 48h animals compared to the non-PSD control group. Twenty-four hours of RB combined with mCPP administration produced a slight reduction in locomotion. Our results show that mCPP was able to significantly change the behavior of naïve, PSD, and RB mice. When combined with sleep deprivation, there was a higher availability of drug in plasma levels. Taken together, our results suggest that sleep loss can enhance the behavioral effects of the potent psychoactive drug, mCPP, even after a period of rebound sleep.

  20. Effects of Kudoa septempunctata genotype ST3 isolate from Korea on ddY suckling mice

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yeounghwan; Ahn, Meejung; Bang, Hyojin; Kang, Bongjo

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of Kudoa septempunctata genotype ST3 spores on ddY suckling mice. Purified Kudoa septempunctata spores were administered into the stomachs of the mice at 5 × 106 or 5 × 107 spores/mouse, with inactivated Kudoa (5 × 106 spores/mouse) or vehicle as controls. No abnormal clinical symptoms were observed and there were no variations in fluid accumulation ratio and cytokine gene expression in all groups. In addition, intact Kudoa spores and the 18S rDNA gene were only detected (by microscopy and quantitative PCR, respectively) in the groups administered such spores. This study thus confirms that spores from the ST3 strain of Kudoa septempunctata were excreted in the faeces without infecting the gastrointestinal tract in ddY suckling mice. PMID:27067108

  1. Preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. II - Effects on lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, G. A.; Corbett, R. L.; Klein, G.

    1975-01-01

    An electron microscope examination was carried out on the lungs of 11 pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) that breathed oxygen at 10 psi or 12 psi partial pressure over a period of 7 d, at the end of which time they were decompressed to sea-level O2 pressure, either suddenly or in 30, 60, or 90 min. Vesiculation was noted in the endothelium of the alveolar-capillary wall in most of the animals and, occasionally, blebbing. Some mitochrondria were swollen in a few of the animals. Alveolar exudate was, in general, sparse. Compared with the lungs of other rodents, the lungs of pocket mice appeared relatively resistant to the toxic effects of oxygen. This conclusion needs, however, to be tempered by the fact that 5% N2 was used in the tests reported here. Nonetheless, the results suggest that the oxygen pressures anticipated on the flight of Apollo XVII should be well tolerated by the pocket mice.

  2. Protective Effect of Anthocyanin from Lonicera Caerulea var. Edulis on Radiation-Induced Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haitian; Wang, Zhenyu; Ma, Fengming; Yang, Xin; Cheng, Cuilin; Yao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of anthocyanin extracted from Lonicera caerulea var. edulis (ALC), was studied in ICR mice. Different doses of ALC were intragastrically administered to mice once a day, prior to radiation. After two weeks, the mice received a one-time 5 Gy whole body 60Coγ radiation. The spleen index, thymus index, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and glutathione (GSH) content in liver tissue were measured. Compared with the radiation control group, the levels of MDA in all ALC treated groups decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Moreover, the GSH content, activities of SOD and GSH-Px in liver tissue were enhanced significantly (p < 0.05) in all ALC groups. These results demonstrate that ALC may be a potential radioprotector, and a further study of the molecular mechanism is needed for further application. PMID:23109882

  3. Effect of oral administration of Kudoa septempunctata genotype ST3 in adult BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Meejung; Woo, Hochoon; Kang, Bongjo; Jang, Yeounghwan; Shin, Taekyun

    2015-01-01

    Kudoa septempunctata (Myxozoa: Multivalvulida) infects the muscles of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus, Paralichthyidae) in the form of spores. To investigate the effect of K. septempunctata spores in mammals, adult BALB/c mice were fed with spores of K. septempunctata genotype ST3 (1.35 × 10(5) to 1.35 × 10(8) spores/mouse). After ingestion of spores, the mice remained clinically normal during the 24-h observation period. No spores were found in any tissue examined by histopathological screening. Quantitative PCR screening of the K. septempunctata 18S rDNA gene revealed that the K. septempunctata spores were detected only in the stool samples from the spore-fed groups. Collectively, these findings suggest that K. septempunctata spores are excreted in faeces and do not affect the gastrointestinal tract of adult mice. PMID:26630307

  4. Subacute toxicity of dietary T-2 toxin in mice: morphological and hematological effects.

    PubMed

    Hayes, M A; Bellamy, J E; Schiefer, H B

    1980-04-01

    Changes in hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues of young Swiss mice fed a balanced semipurified diet containing T-2 toxin (20 ppm) were examined after one, two, three, four or six weeks. During the first three weeks of exposure of T-2 toxin, lymphoid tissues, bone marrow and splenic red pulp became hypoplastic, resulting in anemia, lymphopenia and eosinopenia. Subsequently, during continued exposure to T-2 toxin, hematopoietic cells regenerated in bone marrow and splenic red pulp and became hyperplastic by six weeks. Granulopoiesis and thrombopoiesis resumed in advance of erythropoiesis. All lymphoid tissues remained atrophic throughout the six week trial. Mice exposed to T-2 toxin also developed perioral dermatitis and hyperkeratosis with ulceration of the mucosa of the esophageal region of the stomach. These results indicated that young mice were susceptible to both the irritant and the hematopoietic-suppressive toxic effects of dietary T-2 toxin. However, supression of hematopoiesis was transient and did not lead to hematopoietic failure.

  5. Effects of traditional Chinese herbal medicine San-Huang-Xie-Xin-Tang on gastrointestinal motility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Min Woo; Ahn, Tae Seok; Hong, Noo Ri; Jeong, Han-Sol; Jung, Myeong Ho; Ha, Ki-Tae; Kim, Byung Joo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of San-Huang-Xie-Xin-Tang (SHXXT), a herbal product used in traditional Chinese medicine, on gastrointestinal (GI) motility in mice. METHODS: The in vivo effects of SHXXT on GI motility were investigated by measuring the intestinal transit rates (ITRs) using Evans blue in normal mice and in mice with experimentally induced GI motility dysfunction (GMD). RESULTS: In normal ICR mice, ITRs were significantly and dose-dependently increased by SHXXT (0.1-1 g/kg). GMD was induced by injecting acetic acid or streptozotocin intraperitoneally. The ITRs of GMD mice were significantly reduced compared to normal mice, and these reductions were significantly and dose-dependently inhibited by SHXXT (0.1-1 g/kg). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that SHXXT is a novel candidate for the development of a prokinetic agent that may prevent or alleviate GMD. PMID:25632184

  6. Pathophysiological effects of human TNF-alpha-producing tumor xenografts in immunosuppressed mice.

    PubMed

    Nagy, T; Jánossy, T; Vizler, C; Bohus, K; Joó, F; Végh, P; Duda, E

    1999-10-01

    Groups of CBA mice immunosuppressed with anti-thymocyte serum (ATS) treatment were xeno-transplanted with either HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells or genetically modified cells expressing the human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) gene (All cells). Both cell lines were highly resistant to the cytotoxic effects of TNF. If 3 x 10(6) tumor cells were inoculated s.c. into female mice, HeLa cells grew progressively into large tumors and killed 74% of the recipients, while TNF-expressing All cells caused fatal tumor growth only in 22% of the mice. 3 x 10(6) or 1.5 x 10(7). All cells produced progressive tumor growth and lethality in all male recipients. In sera of all the A11-cell-transplanted mice, biologically active TNF was detected shortly (4.5 h) after tumor inoculation (6 39 U/ml), decreasing to below detection level in the circulation by day 3. In recipients of 15 million A11 cells, circulating TNF reappeared and reached high levels (12-1000 U/ml) 3 to 7 weeks later, when the animals bore large tumors (14-23 mm). Generally, such mice became cachectic, severely anemic, hypothermic, and soon died. On account of calcium mobilization from bones, their serum Ca levels were high. Electron microscopy revealed severe liver damage, but there were no signs of chronic arthritis. These results suggest that ATS-treated mice xenotransplanted with TNF-gene-transfected A11 human tumor cells provide a new model for studying the pathophysiological and anti-tumor effects of TNF. PMID:10549587

  7. Effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on granulocytopenia in mice induced by irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fushiki, M.; Ono, K.; Sasai, K.; Shibamoto, Y.; Tsutsui, K.; Nishidai, T.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M. )

    1990-02-01

    We report the effect of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) on the recovery from granulocytopenia induced by irradiation. Female 9-week old C3H/He mice were used. The irradiation schedule was as follows: Group 1 and 2 received whole-body irradiation of 1 Gy and 5 Gy, respectively, on day 0; Group 3 and 4 received whole-body irradiation of 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, respectively, for 5 consecutive days; Group 5 received upper hemibody irradiation of 3 Gy for 5 consecutive days. Daily subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (3 x 10(5) Unit/mouse) or 0.3 ml of saline to each group were started from the day after the first irradiation and continued for 18 days. Mice were sampled randomly from each group, and the total number of leukocytes, erythrocytes of peripheral blood, nucleated cells in femur, and spleen weight were counted and measured, respectively, on day 0, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, and 18. The leukocyte counts decreased with an increase in radiation doses. In Group 1 and 2 mice, G-CSF enhanced the leukocyte count more than saline. In Group 3 mice, the recovery of leukocytopenia was facilitated by G-CSF, but in Group 4 mice, G-CSF had no effect on the leukocyte count decrease or on leukocytopenia recovery. In Group 5 mice, G-CSF greatly affected leukocytopenia recovery. Increase in spleen weight paralleled the peripheral leukocyte count. Daily administration of recombinant hG-CSF accelerated the granulocytopenia recovery which was induced by irradiation, and it may be a useful therapeutic agent for treating myelosuppressive cases.

  8. Post-training reward partially restores chronic stress induced effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Dalm, Sergiu; de Kloet, E Ron; Oitzl, Melly S

    2012-01-01

    Reduced responsiveness to positive stimuli is a core symptom of depression, known as anhedonia. In the present study, we assessed the expression of anhedonia in our chronic stress mouse model using a subset of read-out parameters. In line with this, we investigated in how far chronic stress would affect the facilitating effect of post-training self-administration of sugar, as we previously observed in naïve mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were repeatedly and at unpredictable times exposed to rats (no physical contact) over the course of two weeks. Following novelty exploration, (non-) spatial learning and memory processes with and without post-training sugar acting as reinforcer, emotionality, reward sensitivity and corticosterone levels were determined. We found that (1) the effects of chronic stress persisted beyond the period of the actual rat exposure. (2) Post-training self-administration of sugar as reinforcer improved spatial performance in naïve mice, whereas (3) in stressed mice sugar partially "normalized" the impaired performance to the level of controls without sugar. Chronic stress (4) increased behavioral inhibition in response to novelty; (5) induced dynamic changes in the pattern of circadian corticosterone secretion during the first week after rat stress and (6) increased the intake of sucrose and water. (7) Chronic stress and sugar consumed during spatial training facilitated the memory for the location of the sucrose bottle weeks later. Concluding, our chronic stress paradigm induces the expression of anhedonia in mice, at different levels of behavior. The behavioral inhibition appears to be long lasting in stressed mice. Interestingly, sugar consumed in close context with spatial learning partially rescued the stress-induced emotional and cognitive impairments. This suggests that reward can ameliorate part of the negative consequences of chronic stress on memory.

  9. Plasma metabolic signatures reveal the regulatory effect of exercise training in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Xiang, L; Cheang, W S; Lin, S H; Wang, L; Li, Y L; Huang, Y; Cai, Z W

    2015-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is caused by a complex set of interactions between genetic modifications and life styles. This complexity creates challenges for a full understanding of the altered metabolic pathways that contribute to the development of T2DM, which needs a comprehensive metabolic analysis. Exercise training is a common therapeutic approach known to antagonize the metabolic consequences of T2DM. However, the metabolic phenotypes of exercise effected in T2DM have not been clearly characterized. Here, we present the effect of physical activity on biochemical changes in diabetic db/db mice. An untargeted metabolomics study based on liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry was carried out to delineate the plasma metabolic signatures in conjunction with a multivariate statistical analysis. As a result, a total of 24 differential metabolites were identified, covering amino acids, organic acids and lipids. Three biomarkers, including lysine, creatine and uridine, were significantly reversed by exercise training in db/db diabetic mice groups compared to lean db/m+ groups. Of note, pantothenic acid and palmitoylcarnitine, which are involved in fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO), were promoted by exercise training in diabetic mice rather than in lean mice. These findings indicated that diabetic mice might be more susceptible to exercise for energy expenditure. Together, the results might demonstrate that exercise could mitigate insulin resistance in T2DM through improving FAO and that uridine in blood might be an important indicator to reflect insulin sensitivity promoted by exercise training in T2DM mice. PMID:26227879

  10. Protective effect of Acanthopanax gracilistylus-extracted Acankoreanogenin A on mice with fulminant hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-Xin; Li, Ning; Zhang, Zu-Ping; Liu, Hong-Bo; Zhou, Rong-Rong; Zhong, Bai-Yun; Zou, Ming-Xiang; Dai, Xia-Hong; Xiao, Mei-Fang; Liu, Xiang-Qian; Fan, Xue-Gong

    2011-08-01

    The release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in both acute (IL-1β and TNF-α) and chronic [high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1)] phases, is thought to play important roles in the development of fulminant hepatitis (FH). Triterpenoid Acankoreanogenin A (AA) which is extracted from the leaves of the Acanthopanax gracilistylus W.W. Smith (AGS) has shown its inhibiting effect on TNF-α, IL-1β and HMGB1 release in vitro in our preliminary experiments. In present study, we investigated the effect of AA on mice with fulminant hepatitis in vivo. Fulminant hepatitis mice model was established by intraperitoneally injecting galactosamine (GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The levels of serum of TNF-α, IL-1β, ALT, AST and HMGB1 from AA-treated mice were measured at different time points. Our results demonstrated that pre-treatment of mice with AA markedly reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, HMGB1, ALT and AST with the improvement in histological features. And the survival rate from AA-treated fulminant hepatitis mice was increased. Furthermore, delayed administration of AA after peak occurrence of the early pro-inflammatory cytokines still endowed significant protection against GalN/LPS-induced lethality. The post-treatment of AA could significantly attenuate the release of HMGB1, but not the TNF-α and IL-1β. These results indicate that AA inhibits the systemic release of pro-inflammatory cytokine HMGB1, and dose-dependently rescue the mice from lethal GalN/LPS-induced fulminant hepatitis, which suggests this component as a candidate therapy for fulminant hepatitis. PMID:21356341

  11. Effects of bacteria‑mediated reprogramming and antibiotic pretreatment on the course of colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gardlik, Roman; Wagnerova, Alexandra; Celec, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Since the original study by Takahashi and Yamanaka in 2006, there have been significant advances in the field of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, to the best of our knowledge, all of the studies published to date are based on ex vivo gene delivery and subsequent reimplantation of the cells. By contrast, in vivo reprogramming allows the direct administration of DNA encoding the reprogramming factors into the target tissue. In our previous study we demonstrated the beneficial effects of Salmonella‑mediated oral delivery of genes into colonic mucosa as a therapy for colitis. In the present study, the effect of the bacterial vector Salmonella typhimurium SL7207, carrying a plasmid encoding the reprogramming factors Sox2, Oct3/4 and Klf4, on colitis in mice was investigated. Therapeutic intervention, consisting of repeated gavaging following the induction of colitis, did not exhibit beneficial effects. However, preventive oral administration of the therapeutic bacterial strain resulted in improvements in weight loss, colon length and stool consistency. Recently it has been shown that antibiotic pretreatment may alleviate chemically induced colitis in mice. Therefore, in the present study it was investigated whether antibiotic pretreatment of mice was able to enhance colonization of the administered bacterial strain in the colon, and therefore improve therapeutic outcome. C57BL/6 mice were administered streptomycin and metronidazole for four days, prior to multiple oral administrations of therapeutic bacteria every other day. Following three gavages, mice were administered dextran sulfate sodium in their drinking water to induce colitis. Disease activity parameters, including stool consistency, weight loss and colon length, were improved in the group receiving antibiotics and bacterial vectors. These results indicate that antibiotic pretreatment may enhance bacterial gene delivery into the colon. Furthermore, the anticipated in vivo reprogramming of colon

  12. Effect of medroxyprogesterone on development of pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling in mice.

    PubMed

    Nasir, S A; Sharma, A; Khanam, R; Vohora, D

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, the effect of medroxyprogesterone (MPA) is evaluated for its effect on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model of epileptogenesis in mice followed by evaluation on kindling-induced changes in cognitive and motor functions. To explore whether the effects are mediated via progesterone receptors, a selective antagonist of progesterone (mifepristone, MIF) was also taken. Kindling was induced by once every 2 days treatment with PTZ (25 mg/kg, i.p.) for 5 weeks. The seizure severity during induction of kindling and % incidence of animals kindled at the end of 5 weeks were recorded. The motor function was assessed using a grip strength meter, whereas spatial memory was assessed in a cross maze. MPA (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the seizure severity scores and produced a significant decrease in the incidence of animals kindled at the end of 5 weeks (P<0.01). A higher efficacy was observed against male mice as compared with females following MPA. MIF neither reduced nor delayed the development of PTZ-induced kindling in mice. Also, it couldn't reverse the antiepileptogenic effects of MPA. On grip strength test (GST) and spontaneous alternation behavior (SAB), a significant decline in GST and % alternation was observed in kindled mice which was reversed by pre-treatment with MPA. MIF, however, could reverse only the reduced % alternation and not grip strength (GS) in PTZ-kindled animals. The study shows that MPA has antiepileptogenic effects against development of PTZ-induced kindling in mice that may not be mediated via progesterone receptors.

  13. Effects of social stress and clomipramine on emotional memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Duque, Aranzazu; Vinader-Caerols, Concepción; Monleón, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    We have previously observed impairing effects of social defeat stress (CSDS) on inhibitory avoidance (IA) in mice. Given the similarity between changes produced by social stress in animals and symptoms of certain human psychopathologies such as depression and anxiety, the effects of the antidepressant clomipramine on IA impairment produced by CSDS were evaluated in the present study. Male CD1 mice were randomly assigned to the groups: non-stressed+saline, non-stressed+clomipramine, stressed+saline and stressed+clomipramine. Stressed animals were subjected to daily agonistic encounters (10 min) in the home cage of the aggressor over a 20-day period. Just before each encounter, non-stressed and stressed mice were injected i.p. with saline or clomipramine (10 mg/kg) according to their experimental condition. 24 hours after the last CSDS session, all the mice were tested in a step-through IA task. In the IA training phase, animals were punished by a shock to the paw when they entered the dark compartment of the apparatus. In the IA test phase (one week later) the same procedure took place, but without shock. Complementary measures were obtained by evaluating all the animals in an elevated plus maze (locomotor activity and emotionality) and on a hot plate (analgesia). IA learning was confirmed in all groups except the stressed+saline group, which was the only one that exhibited higher anxiety levels. No variations were observed in either locomotor activity or analgesia. In conclusion, CSDS induces anxiety and impairs emotional memory in mice; the negative effects of CSDS on memory appear to be attenuated by clomipramine, and these detrimental effects do not seem to be secondary to the effects of CSDS on locomotor activity, emotionality or pain sensitivity. PMID:27685775

  14. In vivo assessment of effect of fermented milk diet on course of infection in mice with bioluminescent Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Vandenende, Chris; Chu, Byron; Ng, Kwok-Yu; Brooks, Andrew; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2003-11-01

    A novel method for assessing the effect of fermented milk and its components on the course of Salmonella infection in live mice is described. Following a period of feeding with whole fermented milk (group W), a cell-free fraction of fermented milk (group S), or saline (group C, control), mice were challenged by oral gavage with a bioluminescent strain of Salmonella Enteritidis. Colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and subsequent infection could be followed by bioluminescent imaging of live mice with a cooled slow-scan CCD camera. Each group of mice was fed for 7 days with the appropriate product. On the eighth day, all mice were orally infected with 10(6) Salmonella cells. On the sixth day after infection, mice in groups W and C showed evidence of disease. No bioluminescent signal was observed for any of the mice in group S. The physical condition of the mice in groups W and S was normal, but some deterioration in the health of the mice in the control group (group C) occurred. On the eighth day after infection, a weak bioluminescence signal was observed for the mice in group W, but still no signal was observed for any of the mice in group S. Mice in both of these groups appeared normal, but the mice in group C showed strong evidence of infection and marked deterioration in their physical condition accompanied by a bioluminescence signal. This method allows the assessment of the effects of potential nutraceutical agents on the course of infection by foodborne pathogens in live animals in real time.

  15. Activation of delta-opioid receptor contributes to the antinociceptive effect of oxycodone in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pao-Pao; Yeh, Geng-Chang; Yeh, Teng-Kuang; Xi, Jinghua; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee; Tao, Pao-Luh

    2016-09-01

    Oxycodone has been used clinically for over 90 years. While it is known that it exhibits low affinity for the multiple opioid receptors, whether its pharmacological activities are due to oxycodone activation of the opioid receptor type or due to its active metabolite (oxymorphone) that exhibits high affinity for the mu-opioid receptors remains unresolved. Ross and Smith (1997) reported the antinociceptive effects of oxycodone (171nmol, i.c.v.) are induced by putative kappa-opioid receptors in SD rat while others have reported oxycodone activities are due to activation of mu- and/or delta-opioid receptors. In this study, using male mu-opioid receptor knock-out (MOR-KO) mice, we examined whether delta-opioid receptor was involved in oxycodone antinociception. Systemic subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of oxycodone (above 40mg/kg) could induce a small but significant antinociceptive effect in MOR-KO mice by the tail flick test. Delta-opioid receptor antagonist (naltrindole, 10mg/kg or 20mg/kg, i.p.) could block this effect. When oxycodone was injected directly into the brain of MOR-KO mice by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) route, oxycodone at doses of 50nmol or higher could induce similar level of antinociceptive responses to those observed in wild type mice at the same doses by i.c.v. Delta-opioid receptor antagonists (naltrindole at 10nmol or ICI 154,129 at 20μg) completely blocked the supraspinal antinociceptive effect of oxycodone in MOR-KO mice. Such oxycodone antinociceptive responses were probably not due to its active metabolites oxymorphone because (a) the relative low level of oxymorphone was found in the brain after systemically or centrally oxycodone injection using LC/MS/MS analysis; (b) oxymorphone at a dose that mimics the level detected in the mice brain did not show any significant antinocieption effect; (c) oxycodone exhibits equal potency as oxymorphone albeit being a partial agonist in regulating [Ca(2+)]I transients in a clonal cell line

  16. Chemopreventive effect of Curcuma longa Linn on liver pathology in HBx transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsun; Ha, Hye-Lin; Moon, Hyung-Bae; Lee, Yeon-Weol; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Yoo, Hwa-Seung; Yu, Dae-Yeul

    2011-06-01

    Unlike other forms of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), HCC induced by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection shows a poor prognosis after conventional therapies. HBV induces liver cirrhosis and HCC. Many researchers have made efforts to find new substances that suppress the activity of HBV. Curcuma longa Linn (CLL) has been used for traditional medicine and food in Asia, especially in India, and has shown chemopreventive effects in a HBV-related in vitro model. This in vivo study was designed to seek the chemopreventive effects of CLL and its mechanisms. CLL mixture concentrated with dextrose water by boiling was lyophilized. CLL extracts were administrated to HBV X protein (HBx) transgenic mice aged 4 weeks for 2 to 4 weeks and aged 6 months for 3 months. After administration, histological changes in the liver tissue and expression of HBx-related genes were investigated. CLL-treated mice showed less visceral fat, a smaller liver/body weight ratio and delayed liver pathogenesis. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression was also increased in CLL-treated HBx transgenic mice, indicating regeneration of damaged liver tissue. CLL treatment decreased expression of HBx and increased p21 and cyclin D1 in livers of HBx transgenic mice. In addition, p-p53 was increased after CLL treatment. These results suggest that CLL can have beneficial effects on the early and late stages of liver pathogenesis, preventing and delaying liver carcinogenesis. This drug should be considered as a potential chemopreventive agent for HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:21190953

  17. Antidepressant-like effect of flaxseed secoisolariciresinol diglycoside in ovariectomized mice subjected to unpredictable chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xing; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Chong; Sun, Jiao; Li, Jianxin; Zhang, Lu; Shao, Tuo; Ruan, Lina; Chen, Liang; Xu, Ying; Pan, Jianchun

    2013-03-01

    Secoisolariciresinol diglycoside (SDG), a predominant lignan in flaxseed, has antioxidant activity as a dietary supplement. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the antidepressant-like effect and the possible mechanism of flaxseed SDG when the ovariectomized mice were exposed to the unpredictable chronic mild stress procedure. Chronic stress induced the increases in immobility time in mouse model of despair tests, but administration with SDG (80 and 160 mg/kg, p.o.) for 21 days inhibited these behavioral changes caused by stress in both forced swimming and tail suspension tests. These doses that affected the immobile response did not affect locomotor activity. Moreover, the changes in the serum corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were also measured to explore the SDG-associated regulation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenals (HPA) axis. The results indicated that the chronic stress-induced increases in the serum corticosterone and ACTH were reversed by treatment with high doses of SDG. Chronic treatment with SDG also affected the body weight of mice and IL-6, IL1β levels in the frontal cortex. In addition, chronic stress procedure induced a decrease in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the frontal cortex of mice; while treatment with SDG reversed this reduction of BDNF. All these results provide compelling evidence that the behavioral effects of flaxseed SDG in the ovariectomized mice might be related to their modulating effects on the neuroendocrine-immune network and neurotrophin factor expression.

  18. Effects of fetal microwave radiation exposure on offspring behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanchun; Li, Zhihui; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Chenggang

    2015-03-01

    The recent rapid development of electronic communication techniques is resulting in a marked increase in exposure of humans to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This has raised public concerns about the health hazards of long-term environmental EMF exposure for fetuses and children. Some studies have suggested EMF exposure in children could induce nervous system disorders. However, gender-dependent effects of microwave radiation exposure on cognitive dysfunction have not previously been reported. Here we investigated whether in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz microwave throughout gestation (Days 3.5-18) affected behavior, using the open field test (OFT), elevated-plus maze (EPM), tail suspension test (TST), forced swimming test (FST) and Morris water maze (MWM). We found that mice showed less movement in the center of an open field (using the OFT) and in an open arm (using the EPM) after in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz radiation, which suggested that the mice had increased anxiety-related behavior. Mice demonstrated reduced immobility in TST and FST after in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz radiation, which suggested that the mice had decreased depression-related behavior. From the MWM test, we observed that male offspring demonstrated decreased learning and memory, while females were not affected in learning and memory, which suggested that microwaves had gender-dependent effects. In summary, we have provided the first experimental evidence of microwaves inducing gender-dependent effects.

  19. Effects of the essential oil from Citrus aurantium L. in experimental anxiety models in mice.

    PubMed

    Pultrini, Aline de Moraes; Galindo, Luciane Almeida; Costa, Mirtes

    2006-03-01

    Citrus aurantium L. is popularly used to treat anxiety, among other indications suggesting central nervous system action. Previous studies showed anxiolytic effect in the essential oil from peel in mice evaluated on the elevated plus maze [Carvalho-Freitas, M.I.R., Costa, M., 2002. Anxiolytic and sedative effects of extracts and essential oil from Citrus aurantium L. Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin 25, 1629-1633.]. In order to better characterize the activity of the essential oil, it was evaluated in two other experimental models: the light-dark box and the marble-burying test, respectively related to generalized anxiety disorder and to obsessive compulsive disorder. Mice were treated acutely by oral route 30 min (single dose) or once a day for 15 days (repeated doses) before experimental procedures. In light-dark box test, single treatment with essential oil augmented the time spent by mice in the light chamber and the number of transitions between the two compartments. There were no observed alterations in the parameters evaluated in light-dark box after repeated treatment. Otherwise, single and repeated treatments with essential oil were able to suppress marble-burying behavior. At effective doses in the behavioral tests, mice showed no impairment on rotarod procedure after both single and repeated treatments with essential oil, denoting absence of motor deficit. Results observed in marble-burying test, related to obsessive compulsive disorder, appear more consistent than those observed in light-dark box.

  20. The possible protective effect of L-carnitine on tilmicosin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kart, A; Yapar, K; Karapehlivan, M; Citil, M

    2007-04-01

    The protective effect of L-carnitine was investigated against tilmicosin-induced cardiotoxic effects including blood creatine kinase (CK), CK-MB, total sialic acid as well as the alterations in glutathione and malondialdehyde concentrations in mice. Thirty-two Balb/C mice were divided into four groups including group 1 (control), group 2 (L-carnitine, s.c., 500 mg/kg for 5 days), group 3 (tilmicosin, s.c., single dose of 75 mg/kg) and group 4 (L-carnitine plus tilmicosin). Serum CK, CK-MB and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in group 3 compared with those of other groups. Total sialic acid level in group 3 was found to be significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that in groups 1 and 2, as well. Contrary to these results, glutathione level in group 3 was found to be significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that in groups 1 and 2. In group 4, serum CK, CK-MB, MDA and total sialic acid levels were found to be significantly (P < 0.05) lower than those in group 3. These results suggest that tilmicosin is cardiotoxic in mice as evidenced by higher total sialic acid, CK and CK-MB. In addition, tilmicosin caused the decrease in glutathione and increase in MDA levels. However, administration of L-carnitine could ameliorate these adverse toxic effects of tilmicosin in mice.

  1. Effect of hydrogen gas on the survival rate of mice following global cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nagatani, Kimihiro; Wada, Kojiro; Takeuchi, Satoru; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Uozumi, Yoichi; Otani, Naoki; Fujita, Masanori; Tachibana, Shoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) often result in high mortality. Free radicals have been reported to play an important role in global cerebral I/R, and therefore, reduction of these might improve the outcome. Here, we investigated the effect of hydrogen gas (H2) (a strong free radical scavenger) on the survival rate of mice following global cerebral I/R. We further examined the histopathological outcome and also the brain water content (as a possible determinant of mortality). Male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to global cerebral I/R by means of 45-min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO). A total of 160 mice were divided into three groups: sham surgery (sham group), BCCAO without H2 (BCCAO group), and BCCAO treated with 1.3% H2 (BCCAO + H2 group). We observed that H2 treatment significantly (P = 0.0232) improved the 7-day survival rate of mice, from 8.3% (BCCAO group, n = 12) to 50% (BCCAO + H2 group, n = 10). Histopathological analysis revealed that H2 treatment significantly attenuated neuronal injury and autophagy in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 sector and also brain edema, after 24 h of reperfusion. The beneficial effects of H2 treatment on brain injury were associated with significantly lower levels of oxidative stress markers (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde) in the brain tissue. T