Science.gov

Sample records for periadolescent mice effect

  1. Neural and behavioural changes in male periadolescent mice after prolonged nicotine-MDMA treatment.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, Philip A; Ishola, Azeez O; Laoye, Babafemi J; Olatunji, Babawale P; Bankole, Oluwamolakun O; Shallie, Philemon D; Ogundele, Olalekan M

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between MDMA and Nicotine affects multiple brain centres and neurotransmitter systems (serotonin, dopamine and glutamate) involved in motor coordination and cognition. In this study, we have elucidated the effect of prolonged (10 days) MDMA, Nicotine and a combined Nicotine-MDMA treatment on motor-cognitive neural functions. In addition, we have shown the correlation between the observed behavioural change and neural structural changes induced by these treatments in BALB/c mice. We observed that MDMA (2 mg/Kg body weight; subcutaneous) induced a decline in motor function, while Nicotine (2 mg/Kg body weight; subcutaneous) improved motor function in male periadolescent mice. In combined treatment, Nicotine reduced the motor function decline observed in MDMA treatment, thus no significant change in motor function for the combined treatment versus the control. Nicotine or MDMA treatment reduced memory function and altered hippocampal structure. Similarly, a combined Nicotine-MDMA treatment reduced memory function when compared with the control. Ultimately, the metabolic and structural changes in these neural systems were seen to vary for the various forms of treatment. It is noteworthy to mention that a combined treatment increased the rate of lipid peroxidation in brain tissue.

  2. Exposure to nicotine during periadolescence or early adulthood alters aversive and physiological effects induced by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Jennifer A; Hutchison, Mary Anne; Chen, Scott A; Thorsell, Annika; Heilig, Markus; Riley, Anthony L

    2011-07-01

    The majority of smokers begin their habit during adolescence, which often precedes experimentation with alcohol. Interestingly, very little preclinical work has been done examining how exposure to nicotine during periadolescence impacts the affective properties of alcohol in adulthood. Understanding how periadolescent nicotine exposure influences the aversive effects of alcohol might help to explain why it becomes more acceptable to this preexposed population. Thus, Experiment 1 exposed male Sprague Dawley rats to either saline or nicotine (0.4mg/kg, IP) from postnatal days 34 to 43 (periadolescence) and then examined changes in the aversive effects of alcohol (0, 0.56, 1.0 and 1.8g/kg, IP) in adulthood using the conditioned taste aversion (CTA) design. Changes in blood alcohol concentration (BAC) as well as alcohol-induced hypothermia and locomotor suppression were also assessed. To determine if changes seen were specific to nicotine exposure during periadolescence, the procedures were replicated in adults (Experiment 2). Preexposure to nicotine during periadolescence attenuated the acquisition of the alcohol-induced CTAs (at 1.0g/kg) and the hypothermic effects of alcohol (1.0g/kg). Adult nicotine preexposure produced similar attenuation in alcohol's aversive (at 1.8g/kg) and hypothermic (1.8g/kg) effects. Neither adolescent nor adult nicotine preexposure altered BACs or alcohol-induced locomotor suppression. These results suggest that nicotine may alter the aversive and physiological effects of alcohol, regardless of the age at which exposure occurs, possibly increasing its overall reinforcing value and making it more likely to be consumed.

  3. Effects of periadolescent ethanol exposure on alcohol preference in two BALB substrains.

    PubMed

    Blizard, David A; Vandenbergh, David J; Jefferson, Akilah L; Chatlos, Cynthia D; Vogler, George P; McClearn, Gerald E

    2004-01-01

    Ethanol exposure during adolescence is a rite of passage in many societies, but only a subset of individuals exposed to ethanol becomes dependent on alcohol. To explore individual differences in response to ethanol exposure, we compared the effects of periadolescent ethanol exposure on alcohol drinking in an animal model. Male and female mice of two BALB substrains were exposed to ethanol in one of three forms--choice [water vs. 10% (volume/volume) ethanol], forced (10% ethanol in a single bottle), or gradual (single bottle exposure, starting with 0.5% ethanol and increasing at 2-day intervals to 10% ethanol)--from the 6th through the 12th week of age and administered two-bottle alcohol preference tests (10% ethanol vs. water) for 15 days immediately thereafter. All three forms of ethanol exposure increased alcohol preference in male and female BALB/cByJ mice, relative to findings for ethanol-naive control animals. Only gradual ethanol exposure produced an increase in alcohol preference in BALB/cJ mice. During extended alcohol preference testing (for a total of 39 days) of mice in the gradual ethanol exposure group, the higher alcohol preference of the gradual ethanol-exposed BALB/cByJ male mice persisted, but alcohol preference of control group female mice in this strain--formerly ethanol naive, but at this point having received 10% ethanol in the two-bottle paradigm for 15 days--rose to the level of alcohol preference of female mice in the gradual ethanol exposure group. This finding demonstrated that both adolescent and adult ethanol exposure stimulated alcohol preference in female mice of this strain. Across days of testing in adulthood, alcohol preference of the gradual ethanol-exposed BALB/cJ mice decreased, resulting in a lack of effect of gradual exposure to ethanol on alcohol preference in both male and female mice of this strain during the period of extended testing. These strain differences support a genetic basis for the effects of ethanol exposure on

  4. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L.; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT-7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory. PMID:23792034

  5. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L

    2013-10-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT--7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory.

  6. Effects of different concentrations of sugarcane alcohol on food intake and nutritional status of male and female periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves de Orange, Luciana; Bion, Francisca Martins; Rolim de Lima, Cybelle

    2009-03-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of food and alcohol intake on the nutritional and metabolic status of male and female periadolescent rats submitted to single (15%) and multiple (10%, 20%, 30%) concentrations of hydroalcoholic solutions of sugar-based alcohol associated with a feed mixture. Thirty-six periadolescent Wistar rats were used and randomly arranged into three groups: Group A (control; 0% ethanol; six males and six females), Group B (15% ethanol; six males and six females), and Group C (10%, 20%, and 30% ethanol; six males and six females). Food consumption, body weight, water intake (mL), ethanol intake (g/kg/day), ethanol preference in relation to water and different concentrations, and serum biochemical dosages (glucose, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein fraction, triglycerides, cholesterol/HDL [CT/HDL], albumin) were analyzed. Males from Group C ingested more feed than females, which consumed reducing amounts throughout the weeks studied. Males also had heavier body weight, which increased throughout the experimental period. The animals ingested more water (females ingested more than males) in the first experimental week. Group C had a higher ethanol intake and greater preference for ethanol over water in both genders than Group B, which decreased over the subsequent weeks. Serum glucose was lower in Group A, whereas the CT/HDL ratio was lower in Group C. These findings allow the conclusion that nutritional and metabolic impact resulting from alcohol intake is different between genders and between the different forms in which the drug is offered. It is important to warn the population about the concentrations of alcohol intake, which may influence the growth and development of adolescents, thereby compromising their quality of life.

  7. Long-term exposure to oral methylphenidate or dl-amphetamine mixture in peri-adolescent rhesus monkeys: effects on physiology, behavior, and dopamine system development.

    PubMed

    Soto, Paul L; Wilcox, Kristin M; Zhou, Yun; Kumar, Anil; Ator, Nancy A; Riddle, Mark A; Wong, Dean F; Weed, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    The stimulants methylphenidate and amphetamine are used to treat children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder over important developmental periods, prompting concerns regarding possible long-term health impact. This study assessed the effects of such a regimen in male, peri-adolescent rhesus monkeys on a variety of cognitive/behavioral, physiological, and in vivo neurochemical imaging parameters. Twice daily (0900 and 1200 hours), for a total of 18 months, juvenile male monkeys (8 per group) consumed either an unadulterated orange-flavored solution, a methylphenidate solution, or a dl-amphetamine mixture. Doses were titrated to reach blood/plasma levels comparable to therapeutic levels in children. [¹¹C]MPH and [¹¹C]raclopride dynamic PET scans were performed to image dopamine transporter and D₂-like receptors, respectively. Binding potential (BP(ND)), an index of tracer-specific binding, and amphetamine-induced changes in BP(ND) of [¹¹C]raclopride were estimated by kinetic modeling. There were no consistent differences among groups on the vast majority of measures, including cognitive (psychomotor speed, timing, inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility), general activity, physiological (body weight, head circumference, crown-to-rump length), and neurochemical (ie, developmental changes in dopamine transporter, dopamine D₂ receptor density, and amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release were as expected). Cytogenetic studies indicated that neither drug was a clastogen in rhesus monkeys. Thus, methylphenidate and amphetamine at therapeutic blood/plasma levels during peri-adolescence in non-human primates have little effect on physiological or behavioral/cognitive development.

  8. Sex-dependent effects of periadolescent exposure to the cannabinoid agonist CP-55,940 on morphine self-administration behaviour and the endogenous opioid system.

    PubMed

    Biscaia, Miguel; Fernández, Beatriz; Higuera-Matas, Alejandro; Miguéns, Miguel; Viveros, Maria-Paz; García-Lecumberri, Carmen; Ambrosio, Emilio

    2008-04-01

    Early cannabinoid consumption may predispose individuals to the misuse of addictive drugs later in life. However, there is a lack of experimental evidence as to whether cannabinoid exposure during adolescence might differently affect opiate reinforcing efficacy and the opioid system in adults of both sexes. Our aim was to examine whether periadolescent chronic exposure to the cannabinoid agonist CP-55,940 could exert sex-dependent effects on morphine reinforcing and the opioid system in adulthood. Morphine reinforcing was studied under a progressive ratio (PR) reinforcement schedule in adult male and female rats that previously acquired morphine self-administration under a fixed ratio 1 (FR1) schedule. Binding levels and functionality of mu-opioid receptors were also evaluated. Periadolescent cannabinoid exposure altered morphine self-administration and the opioid system in adult rats in a sex-dependent manner. CP-55,940-exposed males exhibited higher self-administration rates under a FR1, but not under a PR schedule. In females, CP-55,940 did not modify morphine self-administration under either schedule. Moreover, CP-55,940 also increased mu-opioid receptor levels in the subcallosal streak of pre-treated animals and decreased mu-opioid receptor functionality in the nucleus accumbens shell but again, only in males. Our data indicate that adult male rats exposed to the cannabinoid in adolescence self-administer more morphine than females, but only when the demands required by the schedule of reinforcement are low, which might be related to the decrease in mu-opioid receptor functionality in the NAcc-shell observed in these animals.

  9. The reinforcing properties of ethanol are quantitatively enhanced in adulthood by peri-adolescent ethanol, but not saccharin, consumption in female alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Toalston, Jamie E; Deehan, Gerald A; Hauser, Sheketha R; Engleman, Eric A; Bell, Richard L; Murphy, James M; McBride, William J; Rodd, Zachary A

    2015-08-01

    Alcohol drinking during adolescence is associated in adulthood with heavier alcohol drinking and an increased rate of alcohol dependence. Past research in our laboratory has indicated that peri-adolescent ethanol consumption can enhance the acquisition and reduce the rate of extinction of ethanol self-administration in adulthood. Caveats of the past research include reinforcer specificity, increased oral consumption during peri-adolescence, and a lack of quantitative assessment of the reinforcing properties of ethanol. The current experiments were designed to determine the effects of peri-adolescent ethanol or saccharin drinking on acquisition and extinction of oral ethanol self-administration and ethanol seeking, and to quantitatively assess the reinforcing properties of ethanol (progressive ratio). Ethanol or saccharin access by alcohol-preferring (P) rats occurred during postnatal day (PND) 30-60. Animals began operant self-administration of ethanol or saccharin after PND 85. After 10 weeks of daily operant self-administration, rats were tested in a progressive ratio paradigm. Two weeks later, self-administration was extinguished in all rats. Peri-adolescent ethanol consumption specifically enhanced the acquisition of ethanol self-administration, reduced the rate of extinction for ethanol self-administration, and quantitatively increased the reinforcing properties of ethanol during adulthood. Peri-adolescent saccharin consumption was without effect. The data indicate that ethanol consumption during peri-adolescence results in neuroadaptations that may specifically enhance the reinforcing properties of ethanol during adulthood. This increase in the reinforcing properties of ethanol could be a part of biological sequelae that are the basis for the effects of adolescent alcohol consumption on the increase in the rate of alcoholism during adulthood.

  10. Peculiar response of adolescent mice to acute and chronic stress and to amphetamine: evidence of sex differences.

    PubMed

    Laviola, Giovanni; Adriani, Walter; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Terranova, Maria Livia

    2002-03-10

    physiologically elevated during adolescence. In experiment II, we investigated age-related differences in the response to both acute and chronic stress conditions. Periadolescent and adult mice were housed either in a standard (three animals per cage) or in a crowding condition (nine animals per cage). The latter has been indeed reported to potentiate the subsequent reaction to acute stress in adult rodents. At the end of this period and following 24 h individual housing, mice were injected with either saline (SAL) or a standard amphetamine (AMPH) dose (2 mg/kg), and faced with a mild acute psychological stress, namely removal of sawdust from the home cage. Important sex differences emerged in animals of the two ages. Periadolescent females showed a reduced CORT response to acute stress. Within the adult male group, the chronic crowding condition produced a prominent potentiation of CORT response to the acute stress challenge. Conversely, this profile was not evidenced in periadolescents. These results indicate a strong role for gender and social variables in the response of periadolescent subjects to the various aspects of stress. As for AMPH effects, in the absence of significant changes in adult subjects, the drug produced a marked CORT release in periadolescent mice. A better understanding of neuroendocrine-related AMPH effects as a function of social and environmental risk factors during adolescence, might deepen our knowledge on the neurobiological bases of genetically determined neuropsichiatric disorders and possibly improve the therapeutical efficacy of psychostimulant drugs.

  11. Periadolescent nicotine exposure causes heterologous sensitization to cocaine reinforcement.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Brian A; Davis, Barbara J; Williams, Helen L; Soderstrom, Ken

    2005-02-21

    There is increasing concern that abuse of tobacco during periadolescence increases the potential for later abuse of other drugs. To test this hypothesis, Sprague-Dawley rats received once-daily injections of either water or 0.4 mg/kg nicotine from postnatal day 35 through 44. Beginning on postnatal day 80, animals were tested in a 12-day cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Prior nicotine treatment enhanced the dose-response to cocaine. CPP training with 3.0 mg/kg i.p. cocaine increased time in drug-paired chambers by 50% in control rats and 94% in nicotine-exposed animals. Thus, periadolescent nicotine exposure produced long-term sensitization to an indirect-acting dopamine agonist.

  12. Sex and age specific effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol during the periadolescent period in the rat: The unique susceptibility of the prepubescent animal.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lindsay; Black, Rita; Michaelides, Michael; Hurd, Yasmin L; Dow-Edwards, Diana

    Adolescents who use marijuana are more likely to exhibit anxiety, depression, and other mood disorders, including psychotic-like symptoms. Additionally, the age at onset of use and the stress history of the individual can affect responses to cannabis. To examine the effect of early life experience on adolescent Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure, we exposed adolescent (postnatal day (P) 29-38) male and female rats, either shipped from a supplier or born in our vivarium, to once daily injections of 3mg/kg THC. Our findings suggest that males are more sensitive to the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of THC, as measured by the elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swim test (FST), respectively, than females. Exposure to the FST increased plasma corticosterone levels, regardless of drug treatment or origin and females had higher levels than males overall. Shipping increased THC responses in females (acoustic startle habituation) and in males (latency to immobility in FST). No significant effects of THC or shipping on pre-pulse inhibition were observed. Due to differences in timing of puberty in males and females during the P29-38 period of THC treatment, we also dosed female rats between P21-30 (pre-puberty) and male rats between P39-48 (puberty). Pre-pubertal animals showed reductions in anxiety on the EPM, an effect that was not seen in animals treated during puberty. These results suggest that both sexes are more susceptible to changes in emotional behavior when THC exposure occurs just prior to the onset of puberty. Within the animals dosed from P29-38, THC increased cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) mRNA expression and tended to decrease CP55,940 stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding in the central amygdala only of females. Therefore, early stress enhances THC responses in males (in FST) and females (ASR habituation), THC alters CB1R expression and function in females only and prepubescent rats are generally more responsive to THC than pubertal rats. In summary

  13. N-acetylcysteine attenuates nicotine-induced kindling in female periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Adriana Mary Nunes Costa; Gomes, Patrícia Xavier L; de Oliveira, Gersilene V; de Araújo, Fernanda Yvelize R; Tomaz, Viviane S; Chaves Filho, Adriano José Maia; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa F; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; de Lucena, David Freitas; Macêdo, Danielle

    2016-06-03

    Kindling is a form of behavioral sensitization that is related to the progression of several neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder. We recently demonstrated that female periadolescent rats are more vulnerable to nicotine (NIC)-induced kindling than their male counterparts. Furthermore, we evidenced that decreases in brain antioxidative defenses may contribute to this gender difference. Here we aimed to determine the preventive effects of the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) against NIC-kindling in female periadolescent rats. To do this female Wistar rats at postnatal day 30 received repeated injections of NIC 2mg/kg, i.p. every weekday for up to 19 days. NAC90, 180 or 270 mg/kg, i.p. was administered 30 min before NIC. The levels of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, lipid peroxidation (LP) and nitrite were determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST). The development of kindling occurred at a median time of 16.5 days with 87.5% of NIC animals presenting stage 5 seizures in the last day of drug administration. NAC270 prevented the occurrence of kindling. NIC-kindled animals presented decreased levels of GSH and increased LP in the PFC, HC and ST, while SOD activity was decreased in the ST. NAC180 or 270 prevented the alterations in GSH induced by NIC, but only NAC270 prevented the alterations in LP. Nitrite levels increased in the ST of NAC270 pretreated NIC-kindled animals. Taken together we demonstrated that NAC presents anti-kindling effects in female animals partially through the restoration of oxidative alterations.

  14. Early Developmental Low-Dose Methylmercury Exposure Alters Learning and Memory in Periadolescent but Not Young Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Albores-Garcia, Damaris; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Loera, Miriam J.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the effects of developmental methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on learning and memory at different ages. The possibility of the amelioration or worsening of the effects has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to assess whether low-dose MeHg exposure in utero and during suckling induces differential disturbances in learning and memory of periadolescent and young adult rats. Four experimental groups of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally exposed to MeHg or vehicle from gestational day 5 to weaning: (1) control (vehicle), (2) 250 μg/kg/day MeHg, (3) 500 μg/kg/day MeHg, and (4) vehicle, and treated on the test day with MK-801 (0.15 mg/kg i.p.), an antagonist of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor. The effects were evaluated in male offspring through the open field test, object recognition test, Morris water maze, and conditioned taste aversion. For each test and stage assessed, different groups of animals were used. MeHg exposure, in a dose-dependent manner, disrupted exploratory behaviour, recognition memory, spatial learning, and acquisition of aversive memories in periadolescent rats, but alterations were not observed in littermates tested in young adulthood. These results suggest that developmental low-dose exposure to MeHg induces age-dependent detrimental effects. The relevance of decreasing exposure to MeHg in humans remains to be determined. PMID:26885512

  15. Early Developmental Low-Dose Methylmercury Exposure Alters Learning and Memory in Periadolescent but Not Young Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Albores-Garcia, Damaris; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Hernandez, Alberto J; Loera, Miriam J; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the effects of developmental methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on learning and memory at different ages. The possibility of the amelioration or worsening of the effects has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to assess whether low-dose MeHg exposure in utero and during suckling induces differential disturbances in learning and memory of periadolescent and young adult rats. Four experimental groups of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally exposed to MeHg or vehicle from gestational day 5 to weaning: (1) control (vehicle), (2) 250 μg/kg/day MeHg, (3) 500 μg/kg/day MeHg, and (4) vehicle, and treated on the test day with MK-801 (0.15 mg/kg i.p.), an antagonist of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor. The effects were evaluated in male offspring through the open field test, object recognition test, Morris water maze, and conditioned taste aversion. For each test and stage assessed, different groups of animals were used. MeHg exposure, in a dose-dependent manner, disrupted exploratory behaviour, recognition memory, spatial learning, and acquisition of aversive memories in periadolescent rats, but alterations were not observed in littermates tested in young adulthood. These results suggest that developmental low-dose exposure to MeHg induces age-dependent detrimental effects. The relevance of decreasing exposure to MeHg in humans remains to be determined.

  16. Exposure to methylphenidate during peri-adolescence affects endocrine functioning and sexual behavior in female Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Guarraci, Fay A; Holifield, Caroline; Morales-Valenzuela, Jessica; Greene, Kasera; Brown, Jeanette; Lopez, Rebecca; Crandall, Christina; Gibbs, Nicole; Vela, Rebekah; Delgado, Melissa Y; Frohardt, Russell J

    2016-03-01

    The present study was designed to test the effects of methylphenidate (MPH) exposure on the maturation of endocrine functioning and sexual behavior. Female rat pups received either MPH (2.0mg/kg, i.p.) or saline twice daily between postnatal days 20-35. This period of exposure represents the time just prior to puberty as well as puberty onset. Approximately five weeks after the last injection of MPH or saline, female subjects were hormone-primed and tested during their first sexual experience. Subjects were given the choice to interact with a sexually active male or a sexually receptive female rat (i.e., the partner-preference test). The partner-preference paradigm allows us to assess multiple aspects of female sexual behavior. MPH exposure during peri-adolescence delayed puberty and, when mated for the first time, affected sexual behavior (e.g., increased time spent with the male stimulus and decreased the likelihood of leaving after mounts) during the test of partner preference. When monitoring estrous cyclicity, female subjects treated with MPH during peri-adolescence frequently experienced irregular estrous cycles. The results of the present study suggest that chronic exposure to a therapeutic dose of MPH around the onset of puberty alters long-term endocrine functioning, but with hormone priming, increases sensitivity to sexual stimuli.

  17. Intermittent binge alcohol exposure during the periadolescent period induces spatial working memory deficits in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Schulteis, Gery; Archer, Clay; Tapert, Susan F; Frank, Lawrence R

    2008-09-01

    Human and animal studies suggest adolescence is a period of heightened sensitivity to adverse cognitive sequelae of alcohol exposure. The present study assessed the effects of intermittent binge ethanol intoxication during the periadolescent period of Wistar rats on subsequent performance in a Morris water maze spatial navigation task. On postnatal days 32-56, rats were exposed to ethanol or air 3 days/week via vapor inhalation chambers. Acquisition of spatial navigation was assessed beginning 5 days after the final day of exposure, with 3 days of training in the Morris Water maze (four trials per day spaced at 90-s intertrial intervals [ITIs]). Rats were placed into the water maze at one of four positions along the perimeter, with a different release position to begin each trial. A probe trial assessed retention of platform location on the day after the final set of training trials. Four days after this probe trial, rats entered a working memory phase in which the platform was in a new location each day and a variable ITI of 1, 2, or 4 h was inserted between Trials 1 and 2; Trials 3 and 4 followed at 90-s intervals after Trial 2 on each day. The "savings" in latency to find the platform and distance traveled before finding it from Trial 1 to Trial 2 on each day served as an index of working memory. Ethanol-exposed rats showed similar acquisition of spatial navigation as control rats during training, as well as similar retention of platform location during the probe trial. However, rats exposed to average blood alcohol level (BAL) >200 mg% showed accelerated forgetting, with decreased retention of platform location at the 2-h ITI (P < .05), compared to control rats. Therefore, a 4-week history of intermittent ethanol exposure at BAL in excess of 200 mg% during periadolescence led to a working memory deficit in young adult rats, demonstrated by accelerated forgetting of novel information. These behavioral data are consistent with findings from adolescent human

  18. Intermittent Voluntary Ethanol Drinking during Periadolescence Impairs Adult Spatial Learning after a Long Abstinence Period in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Ana; Garcia-Burgos, David; Manrique, Tatiana; Gonzalez, Felisa; Gallo, Milagros

    2011-01-01

    Although previous findings point to the long-term impact of ethanol exposure during periadolescence on hippocampal-dependent learning tasks, comparisons considering different onset and exposure periods during this developmental range of ages are still needed. The aim of this experiment was to determine whether intermittent voluntary chronic…

  19. Periadolescent ethanol vapor exposure produces reductions in hippocampal volume that are correlated with deficits in prepulse inhibition of the startle

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Cindy L.; Oguz, Ipek; Budin, Francois; Wills, Derek N.; Crews, Fulton T.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epidemiological studies suggest that excessive alcohol consumption is prevalent among adolescents and may have lasting neurobehavioral consequences. The use of animal models allows for the separation of the effects of adolescent ethanol exposure from genetic background and other environmental insults. In the present study the effects of moderate ethanol vapor exposure, during adolescence, on structural diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and behavioral measures were evaluated in adulthood. METHODS A total of 53 Wistar rats were received at postnatal day (PD) 21, and were randomly assigned to ethanol vapor (14 hrs on/10 hrs off/day) or air exposure for 35 days from PD 23-PD 58 (average blood ethanol concentration (BEC): 169 mg%). Animals were received in two groups that were subsequently sacrificed at two time points following withdrawal from ethanol vapor: (1) at 72 days of age, 2 weeks following withdrawal or (2) at day 128, 10 weeks following withdrawal. In the second group, behavior in the light/dark box and prepulse inhibition of the startle (PPI) were also evaluated. Fifteen animals in each group were scanned, post mortem, for structural DTI. RESULTS There were no significant differences in body weight between ethanol and control animals. Volumetric data, demonstrated that total brain, hippocampal, corpus callosum but not ventricular volume was significantly larger in the 128 day sacrificed animals as compared to the 72 day animals. The hippocampus was smaller and the ventricles larger at 128 days as compared to 72 days, in the ethanol exposed animals, leading to a significant group × time effect. Ethanol exposed animals sacrificed at 128 days also had diminished PPI and more rears in the light box that were significantly correlated with hippocampal size. CONCLUSIONS These studies demonstrate that DTI volumetric measures of hippocampus are significantly impacted by age and periadolescent ethanol exposure and withdrawal in Wistar rats. PMID:23578102

  20. Periadolescent exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 impairs the functional maturation of local GABAergic circuits in the adult prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Thomases, Daniel R; Cass, Daryn K; Tseng, Kuei Y

    2013-01-02

    A developmental disruption of prefrontal cortical inhibitory circuits is thought to contribute to the adolescent onset of cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. However, the developmental mechanisms underlying such a disruption remain elusive. The goal of this study is to examine how repeated exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine maleate (MK-801) during periadolescence [from postnatal day 35 (P35) to P40] impacts the normative development of local prefrontal network response in rats. In vivo electrophysiological analyses revealed that MK-801 administration during periadolescence elicits an enduring disinhibited prefrontal local field potential (LFP) response to ventral hippocampal stimulation at 20 Hz (beta) and 40 Hz (gamma) in adulthood (P65-P85). Such a disinhibition was not observed when MK-801 was given during adulthood, indicating that the periadolescent transition is indeed a sensitive period for the functional maturation of prefrontal inhibitory control. Accordingly, the pattern of prefrontal LFP disinhibition induced by periadolescent MK-801 treatment resembles that observed in the normal P30-P40 prefrontal cortex (PFC). Additional pharmacological manipulations revealed that these developmentally immature prefrontal responses can be mimicked by single microinfusion of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist picrotoxin into the normal adult PFC. Importantly, acute administration of the GABA(A)-positive allosteric modulator Indiplon into the PFC reversed the prefrontal disinhibitory state induced by periadolescent MK-801 to normal levels. Together, these results indicate a critical role of NMDA receptors in regulating the periadolescent maturation of GABAergic networks in the PFC and that pharmacologically induced augmentation of local GABA(A)-receptor-mediated transmission is sufficient to overcome the disinhibitory prefrontal state associated with the periadolescent MK-801 exposure.

  1. Periadolescent ethanol vapor exposure persistently reduces measures of hippocampal neurogenesis that are associated with behavioral outcomes in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, C L; Liu, W; Wills, D N; Crews, F T

    2013-08-06

    Excessive alcohol consumption is prevalent among adolescents and may result in lasting neurobehavioral consequences. The use of animal models to study adolescent alcohol exposure has the advantage of allowing for the control necessary in order to evaluate the effects of ethanol on the brain and separate such effects from genetic background and other environmental insults. In the present study the effects of moderate ethanol vapor exposure, during adolescence, on measures of neurogenesis and behavioral measures were evaluated at two different times following ethanol withdrawal, in adulthood. The two groups of Wistar rats were both exposed to intermittent ethanol vapor (14 h on/10h off/day) for 35-36 days from PD 23 to PD 58 (average blood ethanol concentration: 163 mg%). In the first group, after rats were withdrawn from vapor they were subsequently assessed for locomotor activity, conflict behavior in the open field, and behaviors in the forced swim test (FST) and then sacrificed at 72 days of age. The second group of rats were withdrawn from vapor and injected for 5 days with Bromo-deoxy-Uridine (BrdU). Over the next 8 weeks they were also assessed for locomotor activity, conflict behavior in the open field, and behaviors in the FST and then sacrificed at 113/114 days of age. All rats were perfused for histochemical analyses. Ethanol vapor-exposed rats displayed hypoactivity in tests of locomotion and less anxiety-like and/or more "disinhibitory" behavior in the open field conflict. Quantitative analyses of immunoreactivity revealed a significant reduction in measures of neurogenesis, progenitor proliferation, as indexed by doublecortin (DCX), Ki67, and increased markers of cell death as indexed by cleaved caspase-3, and Fluoro-Jade at 72 days, and decreases in DCX, and increases in cleaved caspase-3 at 114 days in the ethanol vapor-exposed rats. Progenitor survival, as assessed by BrdU+, was reduced in the vapor-exposed animals that were sacrificed at 114 days

  2. Maternal deprivation and early handling affect density of calcium binding protein-containing neurons in selected brain regions and emotional behavior in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Giachino, C; Canalia, N; Capone, F; Fasolo, A; Alleva, E; Riva, M A; Cirulli, F; Peretto, P

    2007-03-16

    Adverse early life experiences can induce neurochemical changes that may underlie modifications in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responsiveness, emotionality and cognition. Here, we investigated the expression of the calcium binding proteins (CBPs) calretinin, calbindin and parvalbumin, which identify subpopulations of GABAergic neurons and serve important functional roles by buffering intracellular calcium levels, following brief (early handling) and long (maternal deprivation) periods of maternal separation, as compared with non-handled controls. CBP-expressing neurons were analyzed in brain regions related to stress and anxiety. Emotionality was assessed in parallel using the social interaction test. Analyses were carried out at periadolescence, an important phase for the development of brain areas involved in stress responses. Our results indicate that density of CBP-immunoreactive neurons decreases in the paraventricular region of deprived rats but increases in the hippocampus and lateral amygdala of both early-handled and deprived rats when compared with controls. Emotionality is reduced in both early-handled and deprived animals. In conclusion, early handling and deprivation led to neurochemical and behavioral changes linked to stress-sensitive brain regions. These data suggest that the effects of early experiences on CBP containing neurons might contribute to the functional changes of neuronal circuits involved in emotional response.

  3. Narrow band quantitative and multivariate electroencephalogram analysis of peri-adolescent period

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The peri-adolescent period is a crucial developmental moment of transition from childhood to emergent adulthood. The present report analyses the differences in Power Spectrum (PS) of the Electroencephalogram (EEG) between late childhood (24 children between 8 and 13 years old) and young adulthood (24 young adults between 18 and 23 years old). Results The narrow band analysis of the Electroencephalogram was computed in the frequency range of 0–20 Hz. The analysis of mean and variance suggested that six frequency ranges presented a different rate of maturation at these ages, namely: low delta, delta-theta, low alpha, high alpha, low beta and high beta. For most of these bands the maturation seems to occur later in anterior sites than posterior sites. Correlational analysis showed a lower pattern of correlation between different frequencies in children than in young adults, suggesting a certain asynchrony in the maturation of different rhythms. The topographical analysis revealed similar topographies of the different rhythms in children and young adults. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) demonstrated the same internal structure for the Electroencephalogram of both age groups. Principal Component Analysis allowed to separate four subcomponents in the alpha range. All these subcomponents peaked at a lower frequency in children than in young adults. Conclusions The present approaches complement and solve some of the incertitudes when the classical brain broad rhythm analysis is applied. Children have a higher absolute power than young adults for frequency ranges between 0-20 Hz, the correlation of Power Spectrum (PS) with age and the variance age comparison showed that there are six ranges of frequencies that can distinguish the level of EEG maturation in children and adults. The establishment of maturational order of different frequencies and its possible maturational interdependence would require a complete series including all the different ages. PMID

  4. High-fructose diet during periadolescent development increases depressive-like behavior and remodels the hypothalamic transcriptome in male rats.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Constance S; Burgado, Jillybeth; Kelly, Sean D; Johnson, Zachary P; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2015-12-01

    Fructose consumption, which promotes insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, has increased by over 25% since the 1970s. In addition to metabolic dysregulation, fructose ingestion stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis leading to elevations in glucocorticoids. Adolescents are the greatest consumers of fructose, and adolescence is a critical period for maturation of the HPA axis. Repeated consumption of high levels of fructose during adolescence has the potential to promote long-term dysregulation of the stress response. Therefore, we determined the extent to which consumption of a diet high in fructose affected behavior, serum corticosterone, and hypothalamic gene expression using a whole-transcriptomics approach. In addition, we examined the potential of a high-fructose diet to interact with exposure to chronic adolescent stress. Male Wistar rats fed the periadolescent high-fructose diet showed increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test in adulthood, irrespective of stress history. Periadolescent fructose-fed rats also exhibited elevated basal corticosterone concentrations relative to their chow-fed peers. These behavioral and hormonal responses to the high-fructose diet did not occur in rats fed fructose during adulthood only. Finally, rats fed the high-fructose diet throughout development underwent marked hypothalamic transcript expression remodeling, with 966 genes (5.6%) significantly altered and a pronounced enrichment of significantly altered transcripts in several pathways relating to regulation of the HPA axis. Collectively, the data presented herein indicate that diet, specifically one high in fructose, has the potential to alter behavior, HPA axis function, and the hypothalamic transcriptome in male rats.

  5. Pleiotropic effects in Eya3 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Söker, Torben; Dalke, Claudia; Puk, Oliver; Floss, Thomas; Becker, Lore; Bolle, Ines; Favor, Jack; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kallnik, Magdalena; Kling, Eva; Moerth, Corinna; Schrewe, Anja; Stigloher, Christian; Topp, Stefanie; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Naton, Beatrix; Beckers, Johannes; Fuchs, Helmut; Ivandic, Boris; Klopstock, Thomas; Schulz, Holger; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Bally-Cuif, Laure; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Graw, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    Background In Drosophila, mutations in the gene eyes absent (eya) lead to severe defects in eye development. The functions of its mammalian orthologs Eya1-4 are only partially understood and no mouse model exists for Eya3. Therefore, we characterized the phenotype of a new Eya3 knockout mouse mutant. Results Expression analysis of Eya3 by in-situ hybridizations and β-Gal-staining of Eya3 mutant mice revealed abundant expression of the gene throughout development, e.g. in brain, eyes, heart, somites and limbs suggesting pleiotropic effects of the mutated gene. A similar complex expression pattern was observed also in zebrafish embryos. The phenotype of young adult Eya3 mouse mutants was systematically analyzed within the German Mouse Clinic. There was no obvious defect in the eyes, ears and kidneys of Eya3 mutant mice. Homozygous mutants displayed decreased bone mineral content and shorter body length. In the lung, the tidal volume at rest was decreased, and electrocardiography showed increased JT- and PQ intervals as well as decreased QRS amplitude. Behavioral analysis of the mutants demonstrated a mild increase in exploratory behavior, but decreased locomotor activity and reduced muscle strength. Analysis of differential gene expression revealed 110 regulated genes in heart and brain. Using real-time PCR, we confirmed Nup155 being down regulated in both organs. Conclusion The loss of Eya3 in the mouse has no apparent effect on eye development. The wide-spread expression of Eya3 in mouse and zebrafish embryos is in contrast to the restricted expression pattern in Xenopus embryos. The loss of Eya3 in mice leads to a broad spectrum of minor physiological changes. Among them, the mutant mice move less than the wild-type mice and, together with the effects on respiratory, muscle and heart function, the mutation might lead to more severe effects when the mice become older. Therefore, future investigations of Eya3 function should focus on aging mice. PMID:19102749

  6. [Effect of scopolamine on depression in mice].

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng-xue; Zhang, Jian-jun

    2011-04-01

    Based on the report of previous clinical study which showed cholinergic receptor antagonist scopolamine had antidepressant activity, this study was to investigate the antidepressant activity of scopolamine and explore its effective dose in mice, and to evaluate the effect of scopolamine on the central nervous system and learning/memory ability at its antidepressant effective dose. Tail suspension test, forced swimming test, step-down passive avoidance test and open field test were used to evaluate its effects on mice. Compared with the vehicle control group, single-dose administration of scopolamine (0.1-0.4 mg x kg(-1), ip) significantly decreased the immobility time (P < 0.01 or P < 0.001) in tail suspension test, and significantly decreased the immobility time (P < 0.001) in forced swimming test, but had no effect on the step-down latency and errors in step-down passive avoidance test. Scopolamine (0.1 and 0.2 mg x kg(-1), ip) had no influence on the locomotor activity in open field test, while at dose of 0.4 mg x kg(-1) significantly increase the locomotor activity. These results showed that scopolamine produced reliable antidepressant effect at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mg x kg(-1), without impairment on learning and memory, as well as excitory or inhibitory effect on central nervous system in mice.

  7. Ms. No.: NSC-12-1582: Periadolescent ethanol vapor exposure persistently reduces measures of hippocampal neurogenesis that are associated with behavioral outcomes in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Cindy L.; Liu, Wen; Wills, Derek N.; Crews, Fulton T.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is prevalent among adolescents and may result in lasting neurobehavioral consequences. The use of animal models to study adolescent alcohol exposure has the advantage of allowing for the control necessary in order to evaluate the effects of ethanol on the brain and separate such effects from genetic background and other environmental insults. In the present study the effects of moderate ethanol vapor exposure, during adolescence, on measures of neurogenesis and behavioral measures were evaluated at two different times following ethanol withdrawal, in adulthood. The two groups of Wistar rats were both exposed to intermittent ethanol vapor (14 hrs on/10 hrs off/day) for 35–36 days from PD 23-PD 58 (average blood ethanol concentration (BEC): 163 mg%). In the first group, after rats were withdrawal from vapor they were subsequently assessed for locomotor activity, conflict behavior in the open field, and behaviors in the forced swim test and then sacrificed at 72 days of age. The second group of rats were withdrawn from vapor and injected for 5 days with Bromo-deoxy-Uridine (BrdU). Over the next 8 weeks they were also assessed for locomotor activity, conflict behavior in the open field, and behaviors in the forced swim test and then sacrificed at 113/114 days of age. All rats were perfused for histochemical analyses. Ethanol vapor exposed rats displayed hypoactivity in tests of locomotion and less anxiety-like and/or more “disinhibitory” behavior in the open field conflict. Quantitative analyses of immunoreactivity revealed a significant reduction in measures of neurogenesis, progenitor proliferation, as indexed by doublecortin (DCX), Ki67, and increased markers of cell death as indexed by cleaved caspase-3, and Fluoro-Jade at 72 days, and decreases in doublecortin (DCX), and increases in cleaved caspase-3 at 114 days in the ethanol vapor exposed rats. Progenitor survival, as assessed by BrdU+, was reduced in the vapor exposed

  8. Antifatigue effect of Gracilaria eucheumoides in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jin-Ting; Wang, Mei-Yan; Zheng, Lu-Bin

    2013-12-01

    Gracilaria eucheumoides Linn (Gracilariaceae; G. eucheumoides) is abundant in dietary fiber, which aids the clearance of excess cholesterol from the blood and maintains stable blood glucose levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antifatigue effect of G. eucheumoides in mice and the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying this effect. Mice were randomly divided into four groups and three of the groups were administered different doses of G. eucheumoides extract. A loaded swimming test demonstrated that the swimming times of the low-, medium- and high-dose groups were longer than those of the control group. Examinations revealed that the liver and muscle glycogen, lactate dehydrogenase and blood glucose concentration levels of the treatment groups were higher than those of the control group (P<0.05). However, this was not the case for lactic acid concentration (P>0.05). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the gene expression levels of glucose transport protein 4 and AMP-activated protein kinase in the medium-dose group exhibited the largest increases, compared with the other treatment groups, and were 3.0- and 1.8-fold higher than those in the control group, respectively. The results of the present study indicated that G. eucheumoides exerts an antifatigue effect on mice.

  9. Antifatigue effect of Gracilaria eucheumoides in mice

    PubMed Central

    SHAO, JIN-TING; WANG, MEI-YAN; ZHENG, LU-BIN

    2013-01-01

    Gracilaria eucheumoides Linn (Gracilariaceae; G. eucheumoides) is abundant in dietary fiber, which aids the clearance of excess cholesterol from the blood and maintains stable blood glucose levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antifatigue effect of G. eucheumoides in mice and the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying this effect. Mice were randomly divided into four groups and three of the groups were administered different doses of G. eucheumoides extract. A loaded swimming test demonstrated that the swimming times of the low-, medium- and high-dose groups were longer than those of the control group. Examinations revealed that the liver and muscle glycogen, lactate dehydrogenase and blood glucose concentration levels of the treatment groups were higher than those of the control group (P<0.05). However, this was not the case for lactic acid concentration (P>0.05). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the gene expression levels of glucose transport protein 4 and AMP-activated protein kinase in the medium-dose group exhibited the largest increases, compared with the other treatment groups, and were 3.0- and 1.8-fold higher than those in the control group, respectively. The results of the present study indicated that G. eucheumoides exerts an antifatigue effect on mice. PMID:24255683

  10. Effects of chronic centrifugation on mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janer, L.; Duke, J.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to excess gravity in vitro alters the developmental sequence in embryonic mouse limbs and palates (Duke, Janer and Campbell, 1984; Duke, 1983). The effects of excess gravity on in vivo mammalian development was investigated using a small animal centrifuge. Four-week old female mice exposed to excess gravities of 1.8-3.5 G for eight weeks weighed significantly less than controls. Mice were mated after five weeks of adaptation to excess G, and sacrificed either at gestational day 12 or 18. There were fewer pregnancies in the centrifuged group (4/36) than in controls (9/31), and crown rump lengths (CRL) of embryos developing in the centrifuge were less than CRLs of 1-G embryos. These results show that although immersed in amniotic fluid, embryos are responsive to Delta-G.

  11. Antiamnesic effects of Desmodium gangeticum in mice.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Hanumanthachar; Parle, Milind

    2006-09-01

    Dementia is a mental disorder characterized by loss of intellectual ability sufficiently severe enough to interfere with one's occupational or social activities. Desmodium gangeticum commonly known as Salparni, is widely used in ayurveda for the treatment of neurological disorders. The present work was designed to assess the potential of aqueous extract of D. gangeticum (DG) as a nootropic agent in mice. DG (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered for 7 successive days to both young and older mice. Exteroceptive behavioral models such as elevated plus maze and passive avoidance paradigm were employed to evaluate learning and memory. Scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) induced amnesia and ageing induced amnesia were the interoceptive behavioral models. To delineate the mechanism by which DG exerts nootropic activity, the effect of DG on whole brain AChE activity was also assessed. Piracetam (200 mg/kg, i.p.) was used as a standard nootropic agent. Pretreatment with DG (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) for seven successive days significantly improved learning and memory in mice and reversed the amnesia induced by both, scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) and natural ageing. DG also decreased whole brain acetyl cholinesterase activity. Hence, D. gangeticum appears to be a promising candidate for improving memory and it would be worthwhile to explore the potential of this plant in the management of dementia and Alzheimer disease.

  12. Anxiolytic effect of noscapine in mice.

    PubMed

    Khodarahmi, Parvin; Rostami, Parvin; Rashidi, Armin; Khodarahmi, Iman

    2006-01-01

    The anxiety-related effects of noscapine were investigated using male Balb-c mice. Since noscapine-induced locomotion may alter the animals' activity level in the dark-light model, the anxiety-related effects of noscapine were studied at doses with no effect on locomotion (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.8, 1, 1.5 and 2 mg/kg). The parameter measured in dark-light model was the time spent in lit compartment. Intraperitoneal administration of noscapine (0.1-0.5 mg/kg) did not produce a significant effect on the time spent in the light, whereas higher doses (0.8, 1, 1.5 and 2 mg/kg) increased it significantly, implying an anxiolytic effect.

  13. Teratogenic effects of noise in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, M.; Takigawa, H.

    1989-07-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the hazardous effects of noise on embryonic development. The experiment was composed of two parts; one was the observation of the effect due to noise alone, and the other was the observation of the combined effect of noise and known teratogens. ICR mice were exposed to a wide octave-band noise at 100 dB(C) for 6 hours a day in three ways: the first group was exposed to a continuous noise only on day 7 of pregnancy (group "N"), the second was exposed to an intermittent noise (15 min ON/15 min OFF) only on day 7 of pregnancy (group "IN"), and the third was exposed daily to a continuous noise during days 7-12 of pregnancy (group "RN"). Cadmium sulfate or trypan blue was applied as a teratogen, and was administered intraperitoneously on day 7 of pregnancy. On day 18 of pregnancy, mice were sacrificed and the developmental status and external malformations of their fetuses were examined. Each type of noise exposure did not significantly induce embryolethality and fetal growth retardation. However, teratogenicity was observed in groups "N" and "IN". Combined effects of teratogen and noise did not show clear-cut interactions.

  14. Effect of chrysotile asbestos fibers on germ cells of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rita, P.; Reddy, P.P.

    1986-10-01

    An Indian form of chrysotile asbestos procured from a local asbestos factory (Hyderabad) was tested for its toxic effects on spermatocytes and sperm of mice. Swiss albino male mice were fed orally with chrysotile asbestos suspended in water. The concentration tested was 20 mg/kg/day. Chronic oral administration of chrysotile failed to induce chromosomal aberrations and abnormal sperms in mice.

  15. Dopamine-dependent periadolescent maturation of corticostriatal functional connectivity in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Gregorio L.; Taravini, Irene R.E.; Murer, M. Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Altered corticostriatal information processing associated with early dopamine systems dysfunction may contribute to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Mice with neonatal dopamine-depleting lesions exhibit hyperactivity that wanes after puberty and is reduced by psychostimulants, reminiscent of some aspects of ADHD. To assess whether the maturation of corticostriatal functional connectivity is altered by early dopamine depletion, we examined pre- and post-adolescent urethane-anesthetized mice with or without dopamine-depleting lesions. Specifically, we assessed (1) synchronization between striatal neuron discharges and oscillations in frontal cortex field potentials and (2) striatal neuron responses to frontal cortex stimulation. In adult control mice striatal neurons were less spontaneously active, less responsive to cortical stimulation and more temporally tuned to cortical rhythms than in infants. Striatal neurons from hyperlocomotor mice required more current to respond to cortical input and were less phase-locked to ongoing oscillations, resulting in fewer neurons responding to refined cortical commands. By adulthood some electrophysiological deficits waned together with hyperlocomotion, but striatal spontaneous activity remained substantially elevated. Moreover, dopamine-depleted animals showing normal locomotor scores exhibited normal corticostriatal synchronization, suggesting that the lesion allows, but is not sufficient, for the emergence of corticostriatal changes and hyperactivity. Although amphetamine normalized corticostriatal tuning in hyperlocomotor mice, it reduced horizontal activity in dopamine-depleted animals irrespective of their locomotor phenotype, suggesting that amphetamine modified locomotion through a parallel mechanism, rather than that modified by dopamine depletion. In summary, functional maturation of striatal activity continues after infancy, and early dopamine depletion delays the maturation of core functional

  16. Dopamine-dependent periadolescent maturation of corticostriatal functional connectivity in mouse.

    PubMed

    Galiñanes, Gregorio L; Taravini, Irene R E; Murer, M Gustavo

    2009-02-25

    Altered corticostriatal information processing associated with early dopamine systems dysfunction may contribute to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Mice with neonatal dopamine-depleting lesions exhibit hyperactivity that wanes after puberty and is reduced by psychostimulants, reminiscent of some aspects of ADHD. To assess whether the maturation of corticostriatal functional connectivity is altered by early dopamine depletion, we examined preadolescent and postadolescent urethane-anesthetized mice with or without dopamine-depleting lesions. Specifically, we assessed (1) synchronization between striatal neuron discharges and oscillations in frontal cortex field potentials and (2) striatal neuron responses to frontal cortex stimulation. In adult control mice striatal neurons were less spontaneously active, less responsive to cortical stimulation, and more temporally tuned to cortical rhythms than in infants. Striatal neurons from hyperlocomotor mice required more current to respond to cortical input and were less phase locked to ongoing oscillations, resulting in fewer neurons responding to refined cortical commands. By adulthood some electrophysiological deficits waned together with hyperlocomotion, but striatal spontaneous activity remained substantially elevated. Moreover, dopamine-depleted animals showing normal locomotor scores exhibited normal corticostriatal synchronization, suggesting that the lesion allows, but is not sufficient, for the emergence of corticostriatal changes and hyperactivity. Although amphetamine normalized corticostriatal tuning in hyperlocomotor mice, it reduced horizontal activity in dopamine-depleted animals regardless of their locomotor phenotype, suggesting that amphetamine modified locomotion through a parallel mechanism, rather than that modified by dopamine depletion. In summary, functional maturation of striatal activity continues after infancy, and early dopamine depletion delays the maturation of core functional

  17. Intrastrain variations in anxiolytic effect of nitrazepam in mice.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P Venugopal; Devi, Kshama

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the individual differences in the baseline anxiety and anxiolytic effect of nitrazepam in Balb/c mice. Initially mice were sorted according into low, intermediate and high anxiety groups (LA, IA and HA) based on the number of entries to and time spent in open arms in elevated plus maze. Later, anxiolytic effect of nitrazepam (2 mg/kg, p.o) in LA, IA and HA mice was evaluated using hole board and light/dark tests. In Hole board test, LA mice made more number of head dippings and spent more time during head dippings, while HA mice made less number of head dippings and spent less time during head dipping when compared to that of IA mice. In light/dark test LA mice made more reentries to and spent more time in bright compartment, while HA mice made few reentries to and spent less time in bright compartment. Results suggest that mice of a single strain differ in their baseline anxiety and anxiolytic effect of nitrazepam.

  18. Effects of simulated heat waves on ApoE-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunling; Zhang, Shuyu; Tian, Ying; Wang, Baojian; Shen, Shuanghe

    2014-01-28

    The effects of simulated heat waves on body weight, body temperature, and biomarkers of cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice were investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a meteorological environment simulation chamber according to data from a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen ApoE-/- mice were divided into control group, heat wave group, and heat wave BH4 group. Mice in the heat wave and BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. Mice in BH4 group were treated with gastric lavage with BH4 2 h prior to heat wave exposure. Results showed that the heat waves did not significantly affect body weight or ET-1 levels. However, mice in the heat wave group had significantly higher rectal temperature and NO level and lower SOD activity compared with mice in the control group (p < 0.01), indicating that heat wave had negative effects on cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice. Gastric lavage with BH4 prior to heat wave exposure significantly reduced heat wave-induced increases in rectal temperature and decreases in SOD activity. Additionally, pretreatment with BH4 further increased NO level in plasma. Collectively, these beneficial effects demonstrate that BH4 may potentially mitigate the risk of coronary heart disease in mice under heat wave exposure. These results may be useful when studying the effects of heat waves on humans.

  19. Effect of ammonia on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Casey, C. J.; Furst, A.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC /50/ values were determined for Swiss albino male mice exposed to different concentrations of ammonia in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The LC/50/ for a 30 minute exposure was 21,430 ppm.

  20. Phagocytic activity in stressed mice: effects of alprazolam.

    PubMed

    Freire-Garabal, M; Núñez, M J; Fernández-Rial, J C; Couceiro, J; García-Vallejo, L; Rey-Méndez, M

    1993-06-01

    Mice exposed to a chronic auditory stressor and daily injected with alprazolam (1 mg/kg/day, s.c.) showed a reduction in stress-induced suppression of the in vitro and in vivo activity of phagocytosis, measured using the zymosan particle uptake method and the carbon clearance test, respectively. Pretreatment with Ro-15-1788 (10 mg/kg, s.c.), a central nervous system benzodiazepine antagonist, resulted in suppression of the effects of alprazolam in stressed mice.

  1. Effects of Hindlimb Unweighting on Arterial Contractile Responses in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Jia; Ren, Xin-Ling; Purdy, Ralph E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine if hindlimb unweighting in mice alters arterial contractile responses. Sixteen male C57B/6 mice and 16 male Chinese Kunming mice were divided into control and 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting groups, respectively. Using isolated arterial rings from different arteries of mouse, effects of 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting on arterial contractile responsiveness were examined in vitro. The results showed that, in arterial rings from both C57B/6 and Chinese Kunming mice, maximum isometric contractile tensions evoked by either KCl or phenylephrine were significantly lower in abdominal aortic, mesenteric arterial and femoral arterial rings from hindlimb unweighting, compared to control mice. However, the maximal contractile responses of common carotid rings to KCl and PE were not significantly different between control and hindlimb unweighting groups. The sensitivity (EC(sub 50)) of all arteries to KCl or PE showed no significant differences between control and hindlimb unweighting mice. These data indicated that 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting results in a reduced capacity of the arterial smooth muscle of the hindquarter to develop tension. In addition, the alterations in arterial contractile responses caused by hindlimb unweighting in mice are similar as those in rats. Our work suggested that hindlimb unweighting mouse model may be used as a model for the study of postflight cardiovascular deconditioning.

  2. Anti-inflammatory effect of resveratrol in old mice liver.

    PubMed

    Tung, Bui Thanh; Rodríguez-Bies, Elisabeth; Talero, Elena; Gamero-Estévez, Enrique; Motilva, Virginia; Navas, Plácido; López-Lluch, Guillermo

    2015-04-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of aging. Caloric restriction and resveratrol (RSV) have shown important effects on prevention of oxidative stress and inflammation. Here, we investigate the progression of proinflammatory markers in liver during aging and the effect of RSV on inflammation markers in the liver of old male C57BL/6J mice. Young (2 months), mature (12 months) and old (18 months) mice were fed during 6 months with RSV. Levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17 and TNF-α were evaluated by ELISA in mice liver. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α and also their respective mRNA increased in the liver from old mice. However, RSV decreased these levels in the case of IL-1β and TNF-α but only in old mice showing no effect on young and mature animals. This reduction was also found at the mRNA level. Levels of mRNA of the components of NALP-3 inflammasome, ASC, CASP-1, NALP-1 and NALP-3, also showed an age-dependent increase that was reversed by RSV. Furthermore, cyclooxygenase 2 levels, a marker of proinflammatory innate immune activity, were also upregulated in aged liver and reversed again by RSV. In conclusion, our study confirms that aging is accompanied by an increase in the proinflammatory pattern in the liver and that RSV reduces this pattern in old mice liver.

  3. Therapeutic Effects of Bupleurum Polysaccharides in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Liu, Zhenzhen; Xu, Yanyan; Zhou, Chunjiao; Lu, Xiaoxiao; Su, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yunyi; Chen, Daofeng

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is related to low-grade chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Bupleurum Polysaccharides (BPs), isolated from Bupleurum smithii var. parvifolium has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. However, little is known about its therapeutic effects on diabetes. In this experiment, the effects of BPs on alleviation of diabetes and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Diabetic mice model was established via successive intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin (100 mg/kg body weight) for two days. Mice with blood glucose levels higher than 16.8mmol/L were selected for experiments. The diabetic mice were orally administered with BPs (30 and 60 mg/kg) once a day for 35 days. BPs not only significantly decreased levels of blood glucose, but also increased those of serum insulin and liver glycogen in diabetic mice compared to model mice. Additionally, BPs adminstration improved the insulin expression and suppressed the apoptosis in pancreas of the diabetic mice. Histopathological observations further demonstrated that BPs protected the pancreas and liver from oxidative and inflammatory damages. These results suggest that BPs protect pancreatic β cells and liver hepatocytes and ameliorate diabetes, which is associated with its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26176625

  4. Effect of some anthelmintics on Hymenolepis nana in albino mice.

    PubMed

    el-Ridi, A M; el-Gamal, R L; Farghaly, A M; Nada, S M

    1989-12-01

    Mebendazole and emetine (orally and parenterally) were used to treat mice infected with H. nana. Yomesan, in a single oral dose, was also used as a standardized well-known cesticidal drug. Emetine had a marked effect on cysticercoids leading to highly significant reduction in their number. Also, it caused complete removal of adult worms in infected mice. Mebendazole had no effect on the cysticercoid stage, but it caused significant reduction in the number of adult worms. Yomesan, showed a marked lethal effect on both the cysticercoids and adult worms leading to highly significant reduction in their number.

  5. Effects of capsaicin on VGSCs in TRPV1-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuehong; Cao, Xuesong; Xie, Hong; Yang, Rong; Lei, Gang; Li, Fen; Li, Ai; Liu, Changjin; Liu, Lieju

    2007-08-13

    Two different mechanisms by which capsaicin blocks voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) were found by using knockout mice for the transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1(-/-)). Similar with cultured rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons, the amplitude of tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium current was reduced 85% by 1 muM capsaicin in capsaicin sensitive neurons, while only 6% was blocked in capsaicin insensitive neurons of TRPV1(+/+) mice. The selective effect of low concentration capsaicin on VGSCs was reversed in TRPV1(-/-) mice, which suggested that this effect was dependent on TRPV1 receptor. The blockage effect of high concentration capsaicin on VGSCs in TRPV1(-/-) mice was the same as that in capsaicin insensitive neurons of rats and TRPV1(+/+) mice. It is noted that non-selective effect of capsaicin on VGSCs shares many similarities with local anesthetics. That is, firstly, both blockages are concentration-dependent and revisable. Secondly, being accompanied with the reduction of amplitude, voltage-dependent inactivation curve shifts to hyperpolarizing direction without a shift of activation curve. Thirdly, use-dependent blocks are induced at high stimulus frequency.

  6. Effect of Amphotericin B Nanodisks on Leishmania major Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cole, PA; Bishop, JV; Beckstead, JA; Titus, R; Ryan, RO

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of a novel formulation of the polyene antibiotic, amphotericin B (AMB), as therapy for cutaneous leishmaniasis in different mouse strains. Methods (AMB), was formulated into water-soluble transport particles, termed nanodisks (ND). Balb/c and CH3 mice infected with Leishmania major on Day 0 were administered vehicle alone, empty ND or AMB-ND on Day 1 and day 7, via the tail vein. Mice were sacrificed 25 or 50 days post inoculation and tissue histology evaluated. Balb/c mice treated with vehicle or empty ND showed signs of severe infection while CH3 mice had less inflammation and fewer parasites. AMB-ND treatment (2 mg/kg) had a marked therapeutic effect on L. major infected Balb/c mice and a discernable therapeutic benefit on CH3 mice. Conclusions AMB-ND is efficacious in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. It may be inferred that AMB-ND may be useful for prophylactic and/or treatment of early stage Leishmania spp. infection. PMID:25584195

  7. Carryover effects of dichloroacetic acid on hepatic tumorigenesis in mice.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of drinking water chlorination. Chronic DCA exposure has been shown to increase liver tumors in mice, although carryover effects and interactions with other promotional agents are not known. Here we evaluated effects...

  8. ESERINE AND AMPHETAMINE: INTERACTIVE EFFECTS ON SLEEPING TIME IN MICE.

    PubMed

    BARNES, C D; MEYERS, F H

    1964-06-05

    The sleeping time of mice given pentobarbital was found to be significantly shortened by the injection of eserine or amphetamine. When both eserine and amphetamine were given with pentobarbital the sleeping time, though much shortened, was significantly longer than with the addition of amphetamine alone. Though possessing an analeptic effect of its own, eserine appears to antagonize the analeptic effect of amphetamine.

  9. [Effect of zuoguiwan on early embryonic development of mice].

    PubMed

    Feng, Q J; Feng, M L; Wang, Y L

    1996-11-01

    Effects of Zuoguiwan (ZGW, a prescription for reinforcing Kidney Yin) on early embryonic development were observed by using embryonic developmental retardation model of mice formed by alcohol. Drug was given in three ways: add ZGW into cultural medium directly (group A), add the serum of mice received ZGW (group B) and cultured the embryo taken from ZGW treated mice (group C). The result was compared with that treated with Bazhen decoction (BZD, a prescription for supplementing Qi and blood). Results showed that the in vitro developmental rate of embryo from 2-cell stage to blastula stage in group B and C, which approached to normal control group, was higher than that in untreated model obviously. While in BZW group, it was higher than in normal control group only in certain stage. However, adding ZGW directly into culture medium didn't reveal marked effect on early embryonic development.

  10. Effect of Enrichment Devices on Aggression in Manipulated Nude Mice.

    PubMed

    Lockworth, Cynthia R; Kim, Sun-Jin; Liu, Jun; Palla, Shana L; Craig, Suzanne L

    2015-11-01

    Agonistic behavior in group-housed male mice is a recurring problem in many animal research facilities. Common management procedures, such as the removal of aggressors, are moderately successful but often fail, owing to recurrence of aggressive behavior among cagemates. Studies have incorporated enrichment devices to attenuate aggression, but such devices have had mixed results. However, these studies did not include research manipulations when assessing the benefits of various enrichment devices. We obtained 100 male athymic nude mice and studied the efficacy of various enrichment devices, including cotton squares, paper rolls, shredded paper, nylon bones, and a mouse house and wheel combination in the reduction of fighting during an ongoing study that involved randomization followed by prostate and intratibial injections. Groups were evaluated according to a numerical grading system for wound assessment. Examination of the data revealed that the enrichment devices had no effect on the presence of wounds, thus none of the devices tested affected fighting in nude mice. However, when mice began experimental use, fight wounds increased significantly at cage change and after randomization, reflecting a disruption of existing social hierarchies. Therefore, in the context of an actual research study that involves common manipulations, the specific enrichment device had less effect on aggression in male nude mice than did the destruction and reconstruction of social structures within each group.

  11. Effects of Lizhong Tang on gastrointestinal motility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Cheol; Ha, Wooram; Park, Jinhyeong; Kim, Junghoon; Jung, Yunjin; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of Lizhong Tang, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, on gastrointestinal motility in mice. METHODS The in vivo effects of Lizhong Tang on GI motility were investigated by measuring the intestinal transit rates (ITRs) and gastric emptying (GE) values in normal mice and in mice with experimentally induced GI motility dysfunction (GMD). RESULTS In normal ICR mice, the ITR and GE values were significantly and dose-dependently increased by Lizhong Tang (ITR values: 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 65.2% ± 1.8%, P < 0.01 with 0.1 g/kg Lizhong Tang and 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 83.8% ± 1.9%, P < 0.01 with 1 g/kg Lizhong Tang; GE values: 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 66.8% ± 2.1%, P < 0.05 with 0.1 g/kg Lizhong Tang and 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 72.5% ± 1.7%, P < 0.01 with 1 g/kg Lizhong Tang). The ITRs of the GMD mice were significantly reduced compared with those of the normal mice, which were significantly and dose-dependently reversed by Lizhong Tang. Additionally, in loperamide- and cisplatin-induced models of GE delay, Lizhong Tang administration reversed the GE deficits. CONCLUSION These results suggest that Lizhong Tang may be a novel candidate for development as a prokinetic treatment for the GI tract. PMID:27678361

  12. The analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of piperine in mice.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, I A; Pivac, N; Alhumayyd, M S; Mahesar, A L; Gilani, A H

    2013-12-01

    Piperine, is the major active principal of black pepper. In traditional medicine, black pepper has been used as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory agent and in the treatment of epilepsy. This study was conducted to evaluate the in vivo analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of piperine in mice. The analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of piperine were studied in mice using acetic acid-induced writhing, tail flick assay, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)- and picrotoxin (PIC)-induced seizures models. The intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of piperine (30, 50 and 70 mg/kg) significantly inhibited (P<0.01) the acetic acid-induced writhing in mice, similar to the effect of indomethacin (20 mg/kg i.p.). In the tail flick assay, piperine (30 and 50 mg/kg, i.p.) and morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a significant increase (P<0.01) in the reaction time of mice. Pre-treatment of animals with naloxone (5 mg/kg i.p.), reversed the analgesic effects of both piperine and morphine in the tail flick assay. Piperine (30, 50 and 70 mg/kg, i.p.) and standard drugs, valproic acid (200 mg/kg, i.p.), carbamazepine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and diazepam (1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly (P<0.01) delayed the onset of PTZ-and PIC-induced seizures in mice. These findings indicate that piperine exhibits analgesic and anticonvulsant effects possibly mediated via opioid and GABA-ergic pathways respectively. Moreover, piperine being the main constituent of black pepper, may be contributing factor in the medicinal uses of black pepper in pain and epilepsy.

  13. Protective effects of two Lactobacillus plantarum strains in hyperlipidemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Xin; Liu, Kai; Gao, Da-Wei; Hao, Ji-Kui

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) CAI6 and L. plantarum SC4 on hyperlipidemic mice. METHODS: Male Kunming mice were fed a high-cholesterol diet for 28 d to construct hyperlipidemic models. Hyperlipidemic mice and normal mice were assigned to 3 groups which were separately treated with L. plantarum CAI6, L. plantarum SC4, and physiological saline through oral gavage for 28 d. Total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were measured by commercially available enzyme kits. FACS Calibur flow cytometry was used to examine hepatic and renal nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression. The morphology of livers was checked by hematoxylin and eosin staining and optical microscope observation. RESULTS: Compared with normal mice, hyperlipidemic mice possessed significantly higher TC (3.50 ± 0.43 vs 2.89 ± 0.36, P < 0.01), TG (1.76 ± 0.07 vs 1.10 ± 0.16, P < 0.01), and LDL-C (1.72 ± 0.20 vs 0.82 ± 0.10, P< 0.01) levels, resulting in an increase of atherogenic index (AI) (2.34 ± 1.60 vs 0.93 ± 0.55, P < 0.05) and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio (1.43 ± 0.12 vs 0.51 ± 0.16, P < 0.05). After treatment with L. plantarum CAI6/L. plantarum SC4, TG (1.43 ± 0.27/1.54 ± 0.10 vs 1.76 ± 0.07, P < 0.01/P < 0.05) and LDL-C (1.42 ± 0.07/1.47 ± 0.12 vs 1.72 ± 0.20, P < 0.01/P < 0.01) in hyperlipidemic mice significantly decreased. In addition, TC, HDL-C, AI, and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio were all positively changed. Meanwhile, the treatment markedly alleviated hepatic steatosis and significantly stimulated Nrf2 expression (73.79 ± 0.80/72.96 ± 1.22 vs 54.94 ± 1.84, P < 0.01/P < 0.01) in hepatocytes of hyperlipidemic mice. CONCLUSION: L. plantarum CAI6 and L. plantarum SC4 may protect against cardiovascular disease by lipid metabolism regulation and Nrf2-induced antioxidative defense in hyperlipidemic mice. PMID:23716997

  14. Neuro-pharmacological effects of Crinum zeylanicum in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yahaya Tijani, Adeniyi; Adeola Salawu, Oluwakanyinsola; Jaiyeoba, Good-luck; Akponso Anuka, Joseph; Marte Hussaini, Isah

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of present study was to evaluate some effects of Crinum zeylanicum (C. zeylanicum) on central nervous system. Materials and Methods: C. zeylanicum methanolic bulb extract (250-1000 mg/kg orally), 2 mg chlorpromazine and 4 mg diazepam /kg body weight intraperitoneally respectively were tested in mice using Irwin test, pentobarbitone-induced sleep test, spontaneous motor activity, apomorphine-induced stereotype behaviour, and rota-rod performance. Results: The C. zeylanicum bulb extract significantly and dose-dependently decreased apomorphine-induced hyperactivity in mice (p<0.001). The Irwin test revealed dose-dependent central depressant effect of the extract, shortened (p<0.05-0.01) the onset of sleep and prolonged the duration of sleep. The extract produced significant (p<0.05-0.001) and dose- dependent reduction in spontaneous motor activity and apomorphine-induced stereotype behaviours in mice. The extract had no effect on performance of mice on rotarod. Conclusion: The results suggest that the extract may possess sedative principles with potential neuroleptic properties. PMID:25050246

  15. Therapeutic Effect of Dendrobium candidum on Lupus Nephritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Sun, Peng; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Context: Dendrobium candidum (D. candimum) widely is a functional drug. The curative effect of D. candidum on lupus nephritis has been studied in vivo. Materials and Method: The DBA/2 and B6D2F1 mice were used for this in vivo experiment. The 50% effective dose (ED50) was used to check the effective concentration for this study. Then the SCr, BUN, TC, TG, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α, and IFN-γ levels were determined by kits. The output of urine protein was determined by means of Coomassie Brilliant Blue, and the auto-antibody dsDNA was determined with titer plate technology and indirect immunofluorescence. The NF-κB, IκB-α, TGF ‘β1, Fas, and FasL expressions were measured by RT-PCR and western blot assay. The component analysis of D. candidum was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. Results: Based on the ED50 result at 329 mg/kg, 200 and 400 mg/kg doses were chosen for this study. SCr, BUN, TC and TG levels of 400 mg/kg D. candidum mice were lower than control mice, TP and ALB levels were higher than control mice. The control and 400 mg/kg treated mice tested positive for dsDNA at the end of sixth and tenth week after the experiment began. The glomerular number of 400 mg/kg treated mice was more than control group. Treatment with 400 mg/kg D. candidum reduced IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γcytokine levels as compared to control mice. D. candidum decreased NF-κb, TGF ‘β1, Fas, FasL and increased IκB-α expressions in kidney tissue. There were 11 compounds in dry D. candidum, these compounds might make the curative effects of lupus nephritis. Conclusion: D. candidum showed a potential curative effect on lupus nephritis. It could be used as a health medicine on lupus nephritis. SUMMARY D. candidum reduced the SCr, BUN, TC, TG serum levels and raised the TP, ALB levels compared to control group.The glomerular number of D. candidum treated mice was more than control group.D. candidum treated mice showed lower IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ cytokine levels than

  16. Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Aging on Long-Term and Remote Memory in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a…

  17. Effect of escitalopram on cardiomyopathy-induced anxiety in mice.

    PubMed

    Anwar, M J; Pillai, K K; Samad, A; Vohora, D

    2013-06-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of escitalopram on anxiety following doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiomyopathy, a rodent model for heart failure (HF), in mice. The study was carried out in Swiss albino mice. DOX was used at a dose of 10 mg/kg intravenously. Escitalopram was administered at the doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg orally for 7 days pre- and 7 days post-DOX. Anxiety was measured on day 8 and on day 14 using elevated plus maze and Vogel's conflict test. On day 14, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was estimated. The mice were then killed and their hearts were dissected out for the estimation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and for the transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. Our results showed that the DOX administration induced cardiomyopathy in mice. This was evidenced by the increased levels of serum LDH and tissue MDA and was also confirmed by TEM. Escitalopram (20 mg/kg) not only reversed the anxiety-like effects induced by DOX but also DOX-induced increase in LDH and MDA as well as the morphological alterations induced by DOX in TEM studies. Escitalopram, thus, appears to be a good candidate for alleviating anxiety in patients with HF.

  18. Effects of taurine on gut microbiota and metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haining; Guo, Zhengzhao; Shen, Shengrong; Shan, Weiguang

    2016-07-01

    As being a necessary amino acid, taurine plays an important role in the regulation of neuroendocrine functions and nutrition. In this study, effects of taurine on mice gut microbes and metabolism were investigated. BALB/C mice were randomly divided into three experimental groups: The first group was administered saline (CK), the second was administered 165 mg/kg natural taurine (NE) and the third one administered 165 mg/kg synthetic taurine (CS). Gut microbiota composition in mice feces was analyzed by metagenomics technology, and the content of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in mice feces was detected by gas chromatography (GC), while the concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were detected by a LPS ELISA kit and a SOD assay kit, respectively. The results showed that the effect of taurine on gut microbiota could reduce the abundance of Proteobacteria, especially Helicobacter. Moreover, we found that the SCFA content was increased in feces of the NE group while LPS content was decreased in serum of the NE group; the SOD activity in serum and livers of the NE and CS groups were not changed significantly compare to that of the CK group. In conclusion, taurine could regulate the gut micro-ecology, which might be of benefit to health by inhibiting the growth of harmful bacteria, accelerating the production of SCFA and reducing LPS concentration.

  19. Hepatoprotective effect of kaempferol against alcoholic liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Sun, Jianguo; Jiang, Zhihui; Xie, Wenyan; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2015-01-01

    Kaempferol is a biologically active component present in various plants. The hepatoprotective effect of kaempferol in drug-induced liver injury has been proven, while its effect against alcoholic liver injury (ALI) remains unclear. Hence, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of kaempferol against ALI in mice. The experimental ALI mice model was developed and the mice were treated with different doses of kaempferol for 4 weeks. The liver functions were observed by monitoring the following parameters: Aspartate aminotransferase (AST/GOT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT/GPT) levels in serum; histopathological studies of liver tissue; oxidative stress by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH); the lipid peroxidation status by malondialdehyde (MDA) and lipid accumulation by triglyceride (TG) level in serum; and the expression levels and activities of a key microsomal enzyme cytochrome 2E1 (CYP2E1), by both in vitro and in vivo methods. The ALI mice (untreated) showed clear symptoms of liver injury, such as significantly increased levels of oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and excessive CYP2E1 expression and activity. The mice treated with different kaempferol dosages exhibited a significant decrease in the oxidative stress as well as lipid peroxidation, and increased anti-oxidative defense activity. The kaempferol treatment has significantly reduced the expression level and activity of hepatic CYP2E1, thus indicating that kaempferol could down regulate CYP2E1. These findings show the hepatoprotective properties of kaempferol against alcohol-induced liver injury by attenuating the activity and expression of CYP2E1 and by enhancing the protective role of anti-oxidative defense system.

  20. Biphasic effects of losartan potassium on immobility in mice.

    PubMed

    Vijayapandi, Pandi; Nagappa, Anantha Naik

    2005-08-01

    The effects of losartan potassium, an angiotensin AT(1) receptor blocker on immobility in forced swim test have been studied. Effect of losartan potassium, nortriptyline HCl, fluoxetine HCl and reserpine per se and in combination on forced swimming-induced immobility in mice have also been studied. In mice, losartan potassium elicits biphasic responses i.e. positive responses at lower doses (0.1, 1.0 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) in the forced swim test, a test of potential antidepressant activity and vice versa at higher dose (20 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.). In chronic studies, enhancement in immobility was observed for losartan potassium (3 and 30 mg/kg, p.o., 21 days). In acute combination studies, losartan potassium (1 and 5 mg/kg) significantly reversed the reserpine-induced immobility, but vice versa at 100 mg/kg. Losartan potassium (0.1 and 5 mg/kg) potentiate antidepressant activity of nortriptyline (30 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice, but vice versa at 100 mg/kg. Likewise, Losartan potassium (100 mg/kg), significantly reversed antidepressant activity of fluoxetine HCl, but at 0.1 and 5 mg/kg, failed to modify fluoxetine HCl induced immobility. The obtained biphasic effect of losartan potassium on immobility in mice might be due to inhibitory effect on AT(1) receptor at lower dose and pronounced effect on AT(2) receptor at higher dose (large concentrations of losartan potassium can displace Angiotensin II (Ang II) from its AT(1) receptor to AT(2) receptor.

  1. Effect of roxithromycin on acute toxoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, H R; Pechere, J C

    1987-01-01

    Roxithromycin effectively treated acute peritoneal murine toxoplasmosis. After five doses, starting 24 h after challenge, the 100 and 50% survival doses were 540 and 336 mg/kg per day, respectively. After 14 doses, starting 3 h after challenge, the 50% survival dose was 360 mg/kg per day. Toxoplasma gondii was recovered from the brain in 59 and 28% of surviving mice treated with 5 and 14 doses, respectively. PMID:3662475

  2. Effects of phenylalanine on reproductive performance and teratogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R J; Pesarini, J R; Mauro, M O; Fronza, L S; Victorelli, S G; Cantero, W B; Sena, M C; Antoniolli, A C M B

    2014-07-25

    We evaluated the effects of phenylalanine on reproductive performance and teratogenesis in mice, as well as we assessed its protective effect in mice treated with an acute dose of cyclophosphamide. Animals were divided into 6 experimental groups (females N = 15/group, males N = 5/group): G1, the negative control group, phosphate-buffered saline; G2, the positive control group, 35 mg cyclophosphamide/kg body weight (b.w.); G3 and G4 received phenylalanine at doses of 150 and 300 mg/ kg b.w., respectively; G5 and G6 received phenylalanine at doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg b.w. co-administered with cyclophosphamide at a dose of 35 mg/kg b.w., respectively. Pregnant mice received phenylalanine from 8-12 days of pregnancy and cyclophosphamide on the 10th day of treatment or the respective vehicles. In animals treated with cyclophosphamide, offspring fetal weight significantly decreased. The G5 and G6 groups, which received cyclophosphamide co-administered with phenylalanine, showed a smaller reduction in weight. Based on this analysis, the offspring from groups G2, G5, and G6 showed low weight due to pregnancy age. Moreover, at the doses used, phenylalanine did not interfere with embryo-fetal development. However, further studies are necessary to increase the understanding of the effects of phenylalanine on mouse reproductive performance and teratogenesis.

  3. Effects of maternal restraint stress and sodium arsenate in mice.

    PubMed

    Rasco, J F; Hood, R D

    1994-01-01

    Either maternal restraint stress or sodium arsenate treatment during pregnancy can cause adverse effects on the mouse conceptus. The current study assessed the effects of both factors administered concurrently. Five treatment groups were used initially: (1) vehicle (H2O) control [C], (2) feed/water deprived [FWD], (3) sodium arsenate [SA], (4) restraint only [R], and (5) sodium arsenate plus restraint [SA+R]. A sixth group, arsenate plus feed/water deprived [SA+FWD], was added later, along with (7) a concurrent arsenate-only control [SAC]. Mated female CD-1 mice in Groups 3, 5, 6, and 7 were injected ip with sodium arsenate (20 mg/kg) on gestation day (GD) 9 (plug = day 1). Group 5 mice were restrained for 12 h beginning immediately after dosing. Groups 4 and 5 were restrained in the supine position from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on GD 9; FWD mice were deprived during that time. All females were killed on GD 18 and subjected to teratologic examination. Significantly increased exencephaly and decreased fetal weight were seen in SA+R Group fetuses. The incidence of supernumerary ribs was significantly higher in the SA+R Group than in the SA Group but did not differ from the R Group. These results add to the evidence that maternal stress combined with a chemical teratogen may have a greater effect on the conceptus than would exposure to either agent alone.

  4. Effect of Pain Management on Immunization Efficacy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kolstad, April M; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Kim, Caroline J; Hale, Laura P

    2012-01-01

    Immunization with complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund adjuvant (IFA) is commonly viewed as painful, yet rodents may not receive analgesics due to concerns that these drugs affect the desired immune responses. Here we tested the hypothesis that pain associated with immunization with CFA or IFA in mice can be relieved without compromising the effectiveness of the immune response. After subcutaneous immunization in the leg with antigen in CFA or IFA, mice were assessed for signs of pain by using behavioral tests, including unrestricted locomotion in an open field, forced running on an automated treadmill, and voluntary wheel running. Effects of the analgesics acetaminophen, meloxicam, and buprenorphine on behavioral and antibody responses were assessed after primary and secondary immunization with the model antigen ovalbumin and after repeated immunization with a limiting dose of recombinant protective antigen from Bacillus anthracis. Open field activity and the distance traveled during forced gait analysis and voluntary wheel running both decreased after immunization. Treatment with each of the analgesics normalized some but not all of these behaviors but did not decrease the mean or maximal antibody titer after primary or repeated immunization with a moderate dose of ovalbumin or after repeated immunization with a limiting dose of protective antigen. In summary, after immunization with CFA or IFA, mice showed behavioral responses suggestive of pain. Acetaminophen, meloxicam, and buprenorphine attenuated these effects without decreasing antibody responses. Therefore, the use of these analgesics for managing rodent pain associated with CFA- or IFA-containing vaccines can be encouraged. PMID:23043810

  5. Procognitive effect of AC-3933 in aged mice, and synergistic effect of combination with donepezil in scopolamine-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Hatayama, Yuki; Nakamichi, Keiko; Yoshida, Naoyuki

    2014-12-15

    We have previously reported that AC-3933, a newly developed benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, facilitates acetylcholine release in the hippocampus and ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory deficits in rats. To further confirm the procognitive effect of AC-3933, we assessed in this study the beneficial effects of this compound in aged mice using the Y-maze and object recognition tests. In addition, we investigated the synergistic effect of AC-3933 and donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. In aged mice, oral administration of AC-3933 at doses of 0.05-0.1 mg/kg and 0.05 mg/kg significantly improved spatial working memory and episodic memory, respectively. In scopolamine-treated mice, both AC-3933 and donepezil significantly ameliorated memory deficits in the Y-maze test at doses of 0.3-3 mg/kg and 10-15 mg/kg, respectively. The beneficial effect of AC-3933, but not that of donepezil, on scopolamine-induced memory impairment was antagonized by flumazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, indicating that the procognitive action of AC-3933 arises via a mechanism different from that of donepezil. Co-administration of donepezil at the suboptimal dose of 3 mg/kg with AC-3933 at doses of 0.1-1 mg/kg significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairment, suggesting that AC-3933 potentiates the effect of donepezil on memory impairment induced by cholinergic hypofunction. These findings indicate that AC-3933 not only has good potential as a cognitive enhancer by itself, but also is useful as a concomitant drug for the treatment of Alzheimer׳s disease.

  6. Chemotherapy-Induced Late Transgenerational Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kujjo, Loro L.; Chang, Eun A.; Pereira, Ricardo J. G.; Dhar, Shilpa; Marrero-Rosado, Brenda; Sengupta, Satyaki; Wang, Hongbing; Cibelli, Jose B.; Perez, Gloria I.

    2011-01-01

    To our knowledge, there is no report on long-term reproductive and developmental side effects in the offspring of mothers treated with a widely used chemotherapeutic drug such as doxorubicin (DXR), and neither is there information on transmission of any detrimental effects to several filial generations. Therefore, the purpose of the present paper was to examine the long-term effects of a single intraperitoneal injection of DXR on the reproductive and behavioral performance of adult female mice and their progeny. C57BL/6 female mice (generation zero; G0) were treated with either a single intraperitoneal injection of DXR (G0-DXR) or saline (G0-CON). Data were collected on multiple reproductive parameters and behavioral analysis for anxiety, despair and depression. In addition, the reproductive capacity and health of the subsequent six generations were evaluated. G0-DXR females developed despair-like behaviors; delivery complications; decreased primordial follicle pool; and early lost of reproductive capacity. Surprisingly, the DXR-induced effects in oocytes were transmitted transgenerationally; the most striking effects being observed in G4 and G6, constituting: increased rates of neonatal death; physical malformations; chromosomal abnormalities (particularly deletions on chromosome 10); and death of mothers due to delivery complications. None of these effects were seen in control females of the same generations. Long-term effects of DXR in female mice and their offspring can be attributed to genetic alterations or cell-killing events in oocytes or, presumably, to toxicosis in non-ovarian tissues. Results from the rodent model emphasize the need for retrospective and long-term prospective studies of survivors of cancer treatment and their offspring. PMID:21437292

  7. Memory-dependent effects on palatability in mice.

    PubMed

    Austen, Joseph M; Strickland, Jasmin A; Sanderson, David J

    2016-12-01

    While palatability depends on the properties of particular foods, it is also determined by prior experience, suggesting that memory affects the hedonic value of a substance. Here, we report two procedures that affect palatability in mice: negative contrast and flavour habituation. A microstructure analysis of licking behaviour was employed, with the lick cluster size (the number of licks made in quick succession before a pause) used as a measure of palatability. It was first confirmed that lick cluster size increased monotonically as a function of sucrose concentration, whereas consumption followed an inverted U-shaped function. In a successive negative contrast procedure it was found that when shifted from a high sucrose concentration (32%) to a low sucrose concentration (4%), mice made smaller lick clusters than a group that only received the low concentration. Mice exposed to flavours (cherry or grape Kool Aid) mixed with sucrose (16%) made larger lick clusters for familiar flavours compared to novel flavours. This habituation effect was evident after short (5min) and long (24h) test intervals. Both successive negative contrast and flavour habituation failed to affect levels of consumption. Collectively, the results show that prior experience can have effects on lick cluster size that are equivalent to increasing or decreasing the sweetness of a solution. Thus, palatability is not a fixed property of a substance but is dependent on expectation or familiarity that occurs as a result of memory.

  8. Assessment of anxiolytic effect of nerolidol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Rajesh Kumar; Kaur, Dilpreet; Pahwa, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: The present study was to assess the anxiolytic effect of nerolidol in mice. Materials and Methods: The anxiolytic activity was examined using the elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field test (OFT), and motor coordination by rotarod test. Thirty Swiss albino mice were divided into five groups of six mice each. Group 1 received vehicle control (normal saline); Group 2 received diazepam (1 mg/kg); Groups 3, 4, and 5 received nerolidol 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg, respectively. Results: Nerolidol (12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the time spent and a number of entries in open arm as compared to vehicle control in EPM test. In OFT, the nerolidol showed a significant (P < 0.05) increase in number of rearings and time spent in center and periphery, suggesting exploratory behavior of animals. Furthermore, nerolidol did not alter the fall down latency in rotarod test. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that nerolidol exerts an anxiolytic effect without altering the motor coordination. PMID:27756960

  9. Effects of cyclosporin on collagen induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Takagishi, K; Kaibara, N; Hotokebuchi, T; Arita, C; Morinaga, M; Arai, K

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin on collagen induced arthritis in mice. Cyclosporin, when given prophylactically, was capable of suppressing the development of collagen induced arthritis and the immunological response to native type II collagen in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment with cyclosporin, started on the same day as the booster injection with type II collagen, also resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and of immunity to collagen. These findings suggest that the time of a booster injection, three weeks after the initial immunisation, might be still within the induction phase of arthritis since reinoculation is required to produce a high incidence of arthritis in mice. In addition, therapeutic treatment with cyclosporin did not affect the clinical course of the disease or the immune response to collagen. PMID:3754714

  10. Photosensitizing effect of protoporphyrin IX in pigmented melanoma of mice.

    PubMed

    Juzenas, Petras; Juzeniene, Asta; Stakland, Silje; Iani, Vladimir; Moan, Johan

    2002-09-27

    No fluorescence of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) was measured using a fiber optic probe in pigmented B16F10 melanoma in mice after topical application of 5-aminolevulinic acid methylester (ALA-Me). However, chemical extraction of tissues excised from mice after intratumoral administration of ALA-Me or its parent compound ALA revealed that this tumor had the capability to produce PpIX. Small amounts of endogenous porphyrins, mainly PpIX, were found in the melanoma not treated with these drugs. Topical application of ALA-Me followed by exposure with laser light (633nm) delayed the growth of the tumors slightly. Light alone also had a significant effect on the tumor growth.

  11. Banana Resistant Starch and Its Effects on Constipation Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Huang, Ji Hong; Cheng, Yan Feng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Banana resistant starch (BRS) was extracted to investigate the structural properties of BRS, its effects on the gastrointestinal transit, and dejecta of normal and experimentally constipated mice. The mouse constipation model was induced by diphenoxylate administration. The BRS administered mice were divided into three groups and gavaged with 1.0, 2.0, or 4.0 g/kg body weight BRS per day. The small intestinal movement, time of the first black dejecta, dejecta granules, weight and their moisture content, body weight, and food intake of mice were studied. Results showed that the BRS particles were oval and spindly and some light cracks and pits were in the surface. The degree of crystallinity of BRS was 23.13%; the main diffraction peaks were at 2θ 15.14, 17.38, 20.08, and 22.51. The degree of polymerization of BRS was 81.16 and the number-average molecular weight was 13147.92 Da, as determined by the reducing terminal method. In animal experiments, BRS at the dose of 4.0 g/kg body weight per day was able to increase the gastrointestinal propulsive rate, and BRS at the doses of 2.0 and 4.0 g/kg body weight per day was found to shorten the start time of defecation by observing the first black dejecta exhaust. However, there were no influences of BRS on the dejecta moisture content, the dejecta granules and their weight, body weight, or daily food intake in mice. BRS was effective in accelerating the movement of the small intestine and in shortening the start time of defecation, but did not impact body weight and food intake. Therefore, BRS had the potential to be useful for improving intestinal motility during constipation. PMID:25046686

  12. Banana resistant starch and its effects on constipation model mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Huang, Ji Hong; Cheng, Yan Feng; Yang, Gong Ming

    2014-08-01

    Banana resistant starch (BRS) was extracted to investigate the structural properties of BRS, its effects on the gastrointestinal transit, and dejecta of normal and experimentally constipated mice. The mouse constipation model was induced by diphenoxylate administration. The BRS administered mice were divided into three groups and gavaged with 1.0, 2.0, or 4.0 g/kg body weight BRS per day. The small intestinal movement, time of the first black dejecta, dejecta granules, weight and their moisture content, body weight, and food intake of mice were studied. Results showed that the BRS particles were oval and spindly and some light cracks and pits were in the surface. The degree of crystallinity of BRS was 23.13%; the main diffraction peaks were at 2(θ) 15.14, 17.38, 20.08, and 22.51. The degree of polymerization of BRS was 81.16 and the number-average molecular weight was 13147.92 Da, as determined by the reducing terminal method. In animal experiments, BRS at the dose of 4.0 g/kg body weight per day was able to increase the gastrointestinal propulsive rate, and BRS at the doses of 2.0 and 4.0 g/kg body weight per day was found to shorten the start time of defecation by observing the first black dejecta exhaust. However, there were no influences of BRS on the dejecta moisture content, the dejecta granules and their weight, body weight, or daily food intake in mice. BRS was effective in accelerating the movement of the small intestine and in shortening the start time of defecation, but did not impact body weight and food intake. Therefore, BRS had the potential to be useful for improving intestinal motility during constipation.

  13. Effect of acute nutritional deprivation on immune function in mice. II. Response to sublethal radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, E.J.; Barczynski, L.K.

    1984-03-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory indicated that mice starved for 48 or 72 hr were resistant to the intracellular pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes. In the present experiments, we investigated the possibility that rapidly proliferating monocytes were responsible for the early protective effect observed in these mice. Confirming previous studies, the numbers of L. monocytogenes in livers and spleens of starved mice were 2-3 logs lower than those of fed mice 72 hr after inoculation of bacteria. The early protective effect of starvation could be eliminated completely by nonlethal doses of radiation (200-900 rads). Organ bacterial counts in starved-irradiated mice were similar to those of fed mice. Correlative histopathologic studies were carried out on all three groups of mice. Seventy-two hours after challenge with L. monocytogenes, the livers of fed mice had multiple microabscesses with cental necrosis and a poor mononuclear response. In contrast, livers of starved mice had fewer infectious foci, less necrosis, and a more prominent monocyte/macrophage inflammatory response. Similar to fed mice, the livers of starved-irradiated mice had marked necrosis and few monocytes/macrophages. In addition, the number of peripheral blood monocytes in starved mice was increased 72 hr after inoculation compared to fed and starved-irradiated mice. The data from these experiments suggest that a proliferating population of monocytes is responsible for resistance of starved mice against L. monocytogenes.

  14. Effects of silver nanoparticles on neonatal testis development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Background Metal nanoparticles (MNPs) play an important role in consumer products. An increasing use of MNPs has raised concerns about potential risks for human health. Therefore, in vivo tests of MNPs are urgently required. Using mice as a model animal, the aim of the present study was designed to investigate the effect of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on spermatogenesis in neonatal mice. Methods AgNPs were synthesized using Bacillus funiculus. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using various analytical techniques such as UV–visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The prepared AgNPs were used to investigate testis development in neonatal mice. Institute of Cancer Research neonatal male mice were used in all experiments and were treated with different doses (0, 1, and 5 mg/kg) of AgNPs five times (interval of 3 days from postnatal day [PND] 8–21) by abdominal subcutaneous injection. Results The results showed that the sperm abnormalities such as quality and quantity were significantly increased by the synthesized AgNPs. The diameter of the convoluted tubules shrank significantly in mice treated with AgNPs on PND28 and PND42. The results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction indicated that the E1f1ay, Gsta4, and Fdx1 genes were up-regulated, and the Amh, Cx43, and Claudin-11 genes were down-regulated in response to AgNPs exposure on PND28; however, these genes recovered at PND60. AgNPs had no effect on the recombination levels of chromosomes in germ cells. Conclusion These results demonstrated the adverse effects of AgNPs on the male reproductive tract, particularly spermatogenesis and the quality of sperm. This study suggests that the development of nanomaterials should be safer and non-toxic to the living organisms and the potential reprotoxicity of AgNPs should be investigated more carefully. PMID:26491295

  15. Heavy-ion radiation induced bystander effect in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shujian; Sun, Yeqing; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Changna

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, Low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic, metabolomics and proteomics play significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male mice head were exposed to 2000mGy dose of 12C heavy-ion radiation and the distant organ liver was detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. MSAP was used to monitor the level of polymorphic DNA methylation changes. The results show that heavy-ion irradiate mouse head can induce liver DNA methylation changes significantly. The percent of DNA methylation changes are time-dependent and highest at 6h after radiation. We also prove that the hypo-methylation changes on 1h and 6h after irradiation. But the expression level of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a is not changed. UPLC/Synapt HDMS G2 was employed to detect the proteomics of bystander liver 1h after irradiation. 64 proteins are found significantly different between treatment and control group. GO process show that six of 64 which were unique in irradiation group are associated with apoptosis and DNA damage response. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo.

  16. Periadolescent rats (P41-50) exhibit increased susceptibility to D-methamphetamine-induced long-term spatial and sequential learning deficits compared to juvenile (P21-30 or P31-40) or adult rats (P51-60).

    PubMed

    Vorhees, Charles V; Reed, Tracy M; Morford, LaRonda L; Fukumura, Masao; Wood, Sandra L; Brown, Carrie A; Skelton, Matthew R; McCrea, Anne E; Rock, Stephanie L; Williams, Michael T

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that P11-20 treatment with d-methamphetamine (MA) induces impaired spatial navigation in the Morris water maze (MWM), whereas P1-10 treatment does not. Little is known about the long-term behavioral consequences of MA during juvenile, adolescent, and early adult brain development. In dose-response experiments, we tested successive 10-day intervals of exposure to MA in rats (P21-30, P31-40, P41-50, and P51-60; four doses per day). MA dosing prior to P21 produces little or no toxicity; however, we observed an increased toxicity with advancing age. Across-age comparisons revealed no MWM acquisition or Cincinnati water maze (CWM) effects after MA treatment on P21-30 (2.5-10 mg/kg/dose), P31-40 (1.25-7.5 mg/kg/dose), or P51-60 (1.25-5.0 mg/kg/dose); however, significantly impaired MWM acquisition was observed after P41-50 MA treatment at the highest dose (6.25 mg/kg/dose). Learning in the CWM was also impaired in this group. No effects were seen at 1.25, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg/dose following P41-50 MA treatment. MWM reversal learning trials after P41-50 treatment showed a trend towards longer latency in all MA dose groups, but no effect on double-reversal trials. Reversal and double-reversal also showed no effects at the other exposure ages. No differences in straight channel swimming or cued learning in the MWM were seen after MA treatment at any exposure age. P41-50 is the periadolescent stage of brain development in rodents. The effects observed at this age may suggest a previously unrecognized period of susceptibility for MA-induced cognitive deficits.

  17. Photoperiod effects on ethanol hypothermia in behaviorally thermoregulating mice

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, C.S.; Crawshaw, L.I. )

    1989-02-09

    Male mice, maintained on a 12:12 L:D photoperiod (lights on at 7:00, off at 19:00) were injected with 2.6g 7.5% E+OH (in 0.9% NaCl) per kg, or with an equivalent volume of 0.9% NaCl at 24:00, 4:00, 8:00, 12:00, 16:00, and 20:00 hours. Nine mice at each condition were run in tubular temperature gradients (9-40C). Temperature preferences were monitored with an imaging system, and internal temperatures were monitored with implanted telemetry devices. Mean internal temperatures at all 6 times of day for the 40 min period after injection of E+OH (36.0 {plus minus} .1C, range 35.8-36.1C) or NaCl (37.2 {plus minus} .1C, range 37.0-37.4C), an well as mean preferred temperatures for the same 6 times after E+OH (30.6 {plus minus} .2C, range 29.8-31.0C) or NaCl (31.3 {plus minus} .3C, range 30.7-32.1C) showed little difference. This indicates that, in our system, photoperiod exerts but a small effect on the response of behaviorally thermoregulating mice to moderate doses of E+OH.

  18. Effects of HIV-1 on Cognition in Humanized NSG Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Sidra Pervez

    Host species specificity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) creates a challenge to study the pathology, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic agents. The closely related simian immunodeficiency virus and studies of neurocognitive impairments on transgenic animals expressing partial viral genome have significant limitations. The humanized mice model provides a small animal system in which a human immune system can be engrafted and immunopathobiology of HIV-1 infection can be studied. However, features of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) were not evaluated in this model. Open field activity test was selected to characterize behavior of original strain NOD/scid-IL-2Rgammac null (NSG) mice, effects of engraftment of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and functional human immune system (huNSG), and finally, investigate the behavior changes induced by chronic HIV-1 infection. Long-term infected HuNSG mice showed the loss of working memory and increased anxiety in the open field. Additionally, these animals were utilized for evaluation of central nervous system metabolic and structural changes. Detected behavioral abnormalities are correlated with obtained neuroimaging and histological abnormalities published.

  19. Potent effects of dioscin against obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Qi, Yan; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Zhao, Yanyan; Sun, Huijun; Yao, Jihong; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of the natural product dioscin against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are unclear. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to further confirm its effects of prevention and then to elucidate the potential mechanisms underlying its activity in mice. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced C57BL/6J mice and ob/ob mice were used as the experimental models. Serum and hepatic biochemical parameters were determined, and the mRNA and protein expression levels were detected. The results indicated that dioscin alleviated body weight and liver lipid accumulation symptoms, increased oxygen consumption and energy expenditure, and improved the levels of serum and hepatic biochemical parameters. Further investigations revealed that dioscin significantly attenuated oxidative damage, suppressed inflammation, inhibited triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis, promoted fatty acid β-oxidation, down-regulated MAPK phosphorylation levels, and induced autophagy to alleviate fatty liver conditions. Dioscin prevents diet induced obesity and NAFLD by increasing energy expenditure. This agent should be developed as a new candidate for obesity and NAFLD prevention. PMID:25609476

  20. Bioelectromagnetic field effects on cancer cells and mice tumors.

    PubMed

    Berg, Hermann; Günther, Bernd; Hilger, Ingrid; Radeva, Maria; Traitcheva, Nelly; Wollweber, Leo

    2010-12-01

    We present possibilities and trends of ELF bioelectromagnetic effects in the mT amplitude range on cancer cells and on mice bearing tumors. In contrast to invasive electrochemotherapy and electrogenetherapy, using mostly needle electrodes and single high-amplitude electropulses for treatment, extremely low-frequency (ELF) pulsating electromagnetic fields (PEMF) and sinusoidal electromagnetic fields (SEMF) induce tumor cell apoptosis, inhibit angiogenesis, impede proliferation of neoplastic cells, and cause necrosis non invasively, whereas human lymphocytes are negligibly affected. Our successful results in killing cancer cells-analyzed by trypan blue staining or by flow cytometry-and of the inhibition of MX-1 tumors in mice by 15-20 mT, 50 Hz treatment in a solenoid coil also in the presence of bleomycin are presented in comparison to similar experimental results from the literature. In conclusion, the synergistic combinations of PEMF or SEMF with hyperthermia (41.5°C) and/or cancerostatic agents presented in the tables for cells and mice offer a basis for further development of an adjuvant treatment for patients suffering from malignant tumors and metastases pending the near-term development of suitable solenoids of 45-60 cm in diameter, producing >20 mT in their cores.

  1. Bleomycin: female-specific dominant lethal effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Sudman, P D; Rutledge, J C; Bishop, J B; Generoso, W M

    1992-12-01

    Limited comparative data in mice indicate that chemical mutagens that induce dominant lethal mutations in males are not necessarily effective in females, but those which are effective in females are generally equally or more effective in males. Recently, however, a few chemicals have been identified that are female-specific with respect to induction of dominant lethal mutations. The antitumor antibiotic adriamycin is among them. Another antitumor antibiotic, bleomycin was examined for its ability to induce dominant lethal mutations in the reproductive cells of male and female mice. No dominant lethal or cytotoxic effects were observed in males treated with bleomycin, even at a maximum tolerated dose. In females, on the other hand, a dose nearly 1/4 of that used in males induced not only a high level of dominant lethal mutations but also killed oocytes in certain stages of follicular development. The effectiveness of bleomycin in inducing dominant lethal mutations in mouse oocytes makes it a valuable tool for investigating whether gonadal transport, inherent differences in the configuration of chromatin in the germ cells of the two sexes or other factors are responsible for the differential susceptibility to bleomycin, which implies potential gender-specific genetic risk in cancer chemotherapy.

  2. Teratogenic Effects of Sulfur Mustard on Mice Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Sanjarmoosavi, Nasrin; Sanjarmoosavi, Naser; Shahsavan, Marziyeh; Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sulfur Mustard (SM) has been used as a chemical warfare agent, in the World War I and more recently during Iraq-Iran war in early 1980s’. Its biological poisoning effect could be local or systemic and its effect depends on environmental conditions, exposed organs, and the extent and duration of exposure. It is considered as a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic, carcinogenic effects; although a few studies have been performed on its teratogenicity so far. Materials and Methods Mice were administered with SM intraperitoneally with a dose of 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg in different periods of their gestation (gestational age of 11, 13 and 14 weeks). Control mice groups were included. Between 5 and 9 mice were used in each group. Dams underwent cesarean section on day 19 of their gestation. External examination was performed on the animals investigating craniofacial and septal defects and limb malformations such as adactyly and syndactyly. All data were analyzed by Chi-Square test and Fisher's exact test. The P- value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results Craniofacial and septal defects as well as the limb malformations were the most common types of birth defects, displaying an extremely complex biomedical problem. Conclusion This study confirms a significant correlation between SM exposure and its teratogenic effect. We postulated that the malformations could be caused by an uncontrolled migration of neural crest cells, causing developmental disorders. In addition to environmental factors, modifying genes could play an important role in the pathogenesis of the defects. PMID:23493485

  3. Effect of phenylhydrazine pretreatment on splenectomized Rauscher leukemia virus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bergson, A; Lobue, J; Gordon, A S; Fredickson, T N

    1978-01-01

    The protective effect of phenylhydrazine pretreatment seen in Rauscher leukemia virus-infected intact mice is not observed when splenectomized mice are used. Such mice succumb to infection even earlier than viral potency controls. Since phenylhydrazine is known to increase both splenic erythropoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell numbers, the results suggest that these two events may be involved in phenylhydrazine prophylaxis.

  4. Antinociceptive effect of Elaeagnus angustifolia fruit seeds in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, M; Hosseinzadeh, H; Daneshmand, N

    2001-03-01

    The antinociceptive effect of different Elaeagnus angustifolia fruit seed extractives was studied in mice using hot-plate and writhing tests. Following intraperitoneal injection, the decoction (EaDE), the ethanol extract (EaEE), the aqueous and n-butanol fractions (EaAF, and EaBF, respectively) of a polyphenolic fraction, and two flavonoid-enriched fractions of EaBF (EaBCF1 and EaBCF2) showed significant antinociceptive activity in both tests, markedly and dose-dependently increasing the pain threshold.

  5. Effect of New Antiviral Agent Camphecin on Behavior of Mice.

    PubMed

    Babina, A V; Lavrinenko, V A; Yarovaya, O I; Salakhutdinov, N F

    2017-01-01

    We studied the effect of camphecin (1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-ylidene-aminoethanol) on mouse behavior in the open-field test. Camphecin possesses antiviral activity and inhibits viral replication, but its influence on the nervous system is poorly studied. Single camphecin injection produced no significant changes in behavioral patterns. Chronic camphecin administration (5 times over 2 weeks) to mice of different strains had no significant influence on open field behavior (motor, exploratory activity, anxiety, emotional state and vegetative functions). The findings are discussed in the context of neutral influence of camphecin on animal behavior.

  6. Effect of cobra venom factor on experimental infection of mice against Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Kijima, M; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, T; Nakamura, M

    1992-10-01

    The effect of cobra venom factor (CoVF) treatment was examined to clarify the mechanism of resistance of mice to Clostridium chauvoei infection. In CoVF-treated mice inoculated with spores of C. chauvoei, no death occurred and the organisms in the infected muscle progressively decreased, similar to that of non-treated control mice. These results indicated that C3 did not play a significant role in the resistance of mice against C. chauvoei infection.

  7. Antiarthritic effect of lonicerin on Candida albicans arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jue-Hee; Han, Yongmoon

    2011-05-01

    Fungal arthritis is a potentially serious disease resulting in rapid destruction of the joint. Among the various Candida species, Candida albicans is the most commonly associated with fungal arthritis. In the present study, we examined the effect of lonicerin, a flavonoid isolated from Lonicerae Flos, on an arthritis caused by C. albicans cell wall (CACW) in mice. To examine the effect, an emulsified mixture of CACW and complete Freund's adjuvant (CACW/CFA) was injected into BALB/c mice via hind footpad route on days -3, -2, and -1. On Day 0, mice with the swollen footpad received lonicerin at 1 or 2 mg/dose/time intraperitoneally 3 times every other day. The footpad-swelling was measured for 20 days. Results showed that the lonicerin treatment reduced the edema at all dose levels, and, furthermore, there was app. 54% edema reduction in animals given the 2 mg-dose at the peak (day 10) of septic arthritis (p < 0.05). Since the peak, the edema was reduced in similar rates. This antiarthritic activity appeared to be mediated by lonicerin's ability to suppress T cell proliferation, nitric oxide production from macrophages, and shift of cellular immunity from Th1- toward Th2-type responses, all of which are beneficial to treat arthritis. In addition, the flavonoid had anticandidal activity (p < 0.01). These data suggest that lonicerin alone, which has both anti-arthritic and antifungal activities, can result in a combination therapy for the treatment of fungal arthritis due to C. albicans infection.

  8. Size effects of latex nanomaterials on lung inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Shimada, Akinori

    2009-01-01

    Effects of nano-sized materials (nanomaterials) on sensitive population have not been well elucidated. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to (latex) nanomaterials on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or allergen in mice, especially in terms of their size-dependency. In protocol 1, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received a single exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (250 {mu}g/animal) with three sizes (25, 50, and 100 nm), LPS (75 {mu}g/animal), or LPS plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 2, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received repeated exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (100 {mu}g/animal), allergen (ovalbumin: OVA; 1 {mu}g/animal), or allergen plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 1, latex nanomaterials with all sizes exacerbated lung inflammation elicited by LPS, showing an overall trend of amplified lung expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, LPS plus nanomaterials, especially with size less than 50 nm, significantly elevated circulatory levels of fibrinogen, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant, and von Willebrand factor as compared with LPS alone. The enhancement tended overall to be greater with the smaller nanomaterials than with the larger ones. In protocol 2, latex nanomaterials with all sizes did not significantly enhance the pathophysiology of allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation and Igs production, although latex nanomaterials with less than 50 nm significantly induced/enhanced neutrophilic lung inflammation. These results suggest that latex nanomaterials differentially affect two types of (innate and adaptive immunity-dominant) lung inflammation.

  9. Effects of sleep deprivation and aging on long-term and remote memory in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a month after training, sleep-deprived and control aged animals performed similarly, primarily due to remote memory decay in the control aged animals. Gene expression analysis supported the finding that SD has similar effects on the hippocampus in young and aged mice. PMID:25776037

  10. Evaluation of anticonvulsant and nootropic effect of ondansetron in mice.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Agarwal, N B; Mediratta, P K; Sharma, K K

    2012-09-01

    The role of serotonin receptors have been implicated in various types of experimentally induced seizures. Ondansetron is a highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT(3)) receptor antagonist used as antiemetic agent for chemotherapy-, and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The present study was carried out to examine the effect of ondansetron on electroshock, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and cognitive functions in mice. Ondansetron was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg (single dose) to observe its effect on the increasing current electroshock seizure (ICES) test and PTZ-induced seizure test. In addition, a chronic study (21 days) was also performed to assess the effects of ondansetron on electroshock-induced convulsions and cognitive functions. The effect on cognition was assessed by elevated plus maze and passive avoidance paradigms. Phenytoin (25 mg/kg, i.p.) was used as a standard anticonvulsant drug and piracetam (200 mg/kg) was administered as a standard nootropic drug. The results were compared with an acute study, wherein it was found that the administration of ondansetron (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg) significantly raised the seizure-threshold current as compared to control group in the ICES test. Similar results were observed after chronic administration of ondansetron. In PTZ test, ondansetron in all the three tested doses failed to show protective effect against PTZ-induced seizure test. Administration of ondansetron for 21 days significantly decreased the transfer latency (TL) and prolonged the step-down latency (SDL). The results of present study suggest the anticonvulsant and memory-enhancing effect of ondansetron in mice.

  11. Teratogenic effect of Lippia citriodora leaves aqueous extract in mice

    PubMed Central

    Oskouei Shirvan, Zahra; Etemad, Leila; Zafari, Reza; Moallem, Seyed Adel; Vahdati-Mashhadian, Naser; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Safety of Lippia citriodora, as a herbal remedy, in pregnancy has not yet been evaluated. This study aimed to identify the effect of L. citriodora aqueous extract on pregnancy outcome in mice. Materials and Methods: Timed-pregnant mice received doses of 0.5 g/kg/day L. citriodora aqueous extract or the vehicle control during organogenesis, intraperitoneally. Maternal body weights were measured throughout the pregnancy. The litters were examined for external malformations and skeletal abnormalities. Fetuses were stained with Alizarin red S and Alcian blue. Results: There were no significant differences in mean maternal weight gain during pregnancy between groups. Also, no significant differences were observed in mean number of implantation, live and resorbed fetuses between control and treated groups. The prevalence of all types of deformity was low and similar to control group (%1.11). Conclusion: The results of this study show that moderate consumption of L. citriodora as an infusion or tea appears to be safe to be used during pregnancy and does not have toxic effects on development of mouse embryo. PMID:27222830

  12. Antidepressant-like effects of auraptenol in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaosu; Zhou, Yong; Wu, Xiaomei; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Cai-Yi; Du, Chenchen; Shen, Lihua; Chen, Xiang; Shi, Jiansheng; Liu, Chunfeng; Ke, Kaifu

    2014-03-24

    Depression is a major psychiatric disorder affecting nearly 21% of the world population and imposes a substantial health burden on society. Current available antidepressants are not adequate to meet the clinical needs. Here we report that auraptenol, an active component of the traditional Chinese medicine, angelicae dahuricae radix, had antidepressant-like effects in mice models of depression. In mouse forced swimming test and tail suspension test, two validated models of depression, auraptenol dose-dependently decreased the immobility duration within the dose range of 0.05-0.4 mg/kg. In addition, the antidepressant-like effects of auraptenol was significantly averted by a selective serotonin 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 (1 mg/kg). These doses that affected the immobile response did not affect locomotor activity. In summary, this study for the first time identified an active component from the herbal medicine angelicae dahuricae radix that possesses robust antidepressant-like efficacy in mice. These data support further exploration for the possibility of developing auraptenol as a novel antidepressant agent in the treatment of major depression disorders.

  13. Teratogenic effect of Carbamazepine use during pregnancy in the mice.

    PubMed

    Elshama, Said Said; Osman, Hosam Eldin Hussein; El-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry

    2015-01-01

    Carbamazepine use is the first choice of antiepileptic drugs among epileptic pregnant females. There are many inconclusive studies regard the safety of carbamazepine use during pregnancy. This study aims to investigate the morphological and histopathological teratogenic effects of carbamazepine use during pregnancy. The healthy pregnant females mice divided into equal five groups (each n=20). The first (control) group received distilled water/day. Second, third, fourth and fifth group received 8.75, 22.75, 52.5, 65 mg of carbamazepine/day respectively. Carbamazepine and water were given by gastric gavage throughout gestational period. Fetuses were delivered on the 18th day of gestation by hysterectomy. Fetal measurements and appearance were assessed with investigation the histopathological changes of brain and spinal cord. There was a significant decrease of weight, different organs weight, length, upper and lower limb length of mice in the first day of delivery in fifth group. There was a significant increase of weight, different organs weight, length, upper and lower limb length in the third group. Many congenital anomalies such as spina bifida, meromelia, microphalmia, oligodactyly, anencephaly, neurodegeneration of brain and spinal cord were noticedin fifth group. Teratogenic effect of carbamazepine represented as growth retardation and neurodevelopmental toxicity depending on its overdose degree.

  14. Evaluation of the radioprotective effect of Liv 52 in mice.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh C; Ganapathi, Narsipura G; Venkatesh, Ponemone; Rao, Nageshwar; Baliga, Manjeshwar S

    2006-08-01

    Liv 52 is a mixture of botanicals that is used clinically to treat various hepatic disorders. In this study, the radioprotective activity of Liv 52 was evaluated in mice given whole-body exposure to different doses of gamma-radiation. In addition, a series of studies was conducted to explore the mechanism of radioprotection. Radioprotection was evaluated by the ability of Liv 52 to reduce both the frequency of bone marrow micronucleated erythrocytes and the lethality produced by (60)Co gamma-radiation. Mice were treated by oral gavage once daily for seven consecutive days with 500 mg/kg body weight Liv 52 or carboxymethylcellulose vehicle prior to radiation. Micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MPCEs), micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes (MNCEs), and the PCE/NCE ratio were measured at 0.25-14 days after exposure to whole-body radiation doses of 0, 0.5, 1.5, 3.0, or 4.5 Gy; animal survival was monitored after doses of 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12 Gy. Pretreatment of mice with Liv 52 significantly reduced the frequency of radiation-induced MPCEs and MNCEs. Irradiation reduced the PCE/NCE ratio in a dose-related manner for up to 7 days following irradiation; Liv 52 pretreatment significantly mitigated against these reductions. Liv 52 treatment also reduced the symptoms of radiation sickness and increased mouse survival 10 and 30 days after irradiation. Liv 52 pretreatment elevated the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), increased the activities of glutathione transferase, GSH peroxidase, GSH reductase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase, and lowered lipid peroxidation (LPx) and the activities of alanine amino transferase and aspartate aminotransferase 30 min after exposure to 7 Gy of gamma-radiation. Liv 52 pretreatment also reduced radiation-induced LPx and increased GSH concentration 31 days following the exposure. The results of this study indicate that pretreatment with Liv 52 reduces the genotoxic and lethal effects of gamma-irradiation in mice and

  15. Effect of low frequency low energy pulsing electromagnetic fields on mice injected with cyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Cadossi, R.; Zucchini, P.; Emilia, G.; Franceschi, C.; Cossarizza, A.; Santantonio, M.; Mandolini, G.; Torelli, G. )

    1991-03-01

    C3H mice have been used to investigate the effect of a combination of cyclophosphamide (CY) and electromagnetic fields (PEMF). Mice were injected i.p. with a single dose of 200 mg/kg body weight of CY and then exposed to PEMF 24 h per day. In an initial series of experiments immediately after CY injection mice were exposed to PEMF until sacrifice. WBC counts in the peripheral blood demonstrated a quicker decline in WBC at days 1 and 2 in mice exposed to PEMF. Groups of mice were sacrificed at days 1, 4, 6, 8, and 10 after CY injection. In mice exposed to PEMF the spleen weight was less than in controls at days 6, 8, and 10. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that the labeling index of bone marrow smears did not significantly differ between controls and experimental mice exposed to PEMF, whereas the spleen labeling index proved to be higher among control mice versus mice exposed to PEMF at day 6, and higher among mice exposed to PEMF versus controls at day 8. In a second series of experiments mice were exposed to PEMF only over the 24 h following CY injection. We found that the spleens of mice exposed to PEMF weighed less than those of controls at days 6 and 8. The labeling index of bone marrow did evidence a slight decrease among mice exposed to PEMF at days 8 and 10 after CY injection versus control mice. The spleen labeling index proved to be lower in experimental mice exposed to PEMF than in controls at days 4, 6, and 8. Mice were then injected with CY, half were exposed to PEMF, and 24 h later bone marrow was recovered from both groups of animals. The same number of bone marrow cells was injected via the tail vein into recipient mice irradiated to 8.5 Gy.

  16. Traumatic brain injury in mice and pentadecapeptide BPC 157 effect.

    PubMed

    Tudor, Mario; Jandric, Ivan; Marovic, Anton; Gjurasin, Miroslav; Perovic, Darko; Radic, Bozo; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Kolenc, Danijela; Brcic, Luka; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2010-02-25

    Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, an anti-ulcer peptide, efficient in inflammatory bowel disease trials (PL 14736), no toxicity reported, improved muscle crush injury. After an induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice by a falling weight, BPC 157 regimens (10.0microg, 10.0ng/kgi.p.) demonstrated a marked attenuation of damage with an improved early outcome and a minimal postponed mortality throughout a 24h post-injury period. Ultimately, the traumatic lesions (subarachnoidal and intraventricular haemorrhage, brain laceration, haemorrhagic laceration) were less intense and consecutive brain edema had considerably improved. Given prophylactically (30 min before TBI) the improved conscious/unconscious/death ratio in TBI-mice was after force impulses of 0.068 Ns, 0.093 Ns, 0.113 Ns, 0.130 Ns, 0.145 Ns, and 0.159 Ns. Counteraction (with a reduction of unconsciousness, lower mortality) with both microg- and ng-regimens included the force impulses of 0.068-0.145 Ns. A higher regimen presented effectiveness also against the maximal force impulse (0.159 Ns). Furthermore, BPC 157 application immediately prior to injury was beneficial in mice subjected to force impulses of 0.093 Ns-TBI. For a more severe force impulse (0.130 Ns, 0.145 Ns, or 0159 Ns), the time-relation to improve the conscious/unconscious/death ratio was: 5 min (0.130 Ns-TBI), 20 min (0.145 Ns-TBI) or 30 min (0.159 Ns-TBI).

  17. Serotonin induces peripheral mechanical antihyperalgesic effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Danielle A; Petrocchi, Júlia Alvarenga; Navarro, Larissa Caldeira; Souza, Tâmara Cristina; Castor, Marina G M; Perez, Andrea C; Duarte, Igor D G; Romero, Thiago R L

    2015-11-15

    The role of serotonin (5-HT) in nociception will vary according to the subtypes of receptors activated. When administered peripherally, it induces pain in humans and in rats by activation of 5-HT1, 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors. In addition, endogenous 5-HT produced in situ, is involved in the nociceptive response induced by formalin in rat's paw inflammation, possibly via 5-HT3 receptors. Moreover, it has been shown that 5-HT released in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by stimulation of the periaqueductal gray causes activation of inhibitory interneurons, resulting in inhibition of spinal neurons. In the present study we evaluated the effect of serotonin and its receptors at peripheral antinociception. The mice paw pressure test was used in animals that had increased sensitivity by an intraplantar injection of PGE2 (2 µg). We used selective antagonists of serotonin receptors (isamoltan 5-HT1B, BRL 15572 5-HT1D, ketanserin 5-HT2A, ondansetron 5-HT3 and SB-269970 5-HT7). Administration of serotonin into the right hind paw (62.5, 125, 250 and 500 ng and 1 µg) produced a dose-dependent peripheral mechanical antihyperalgesic effect of serotonin in mice. Selective antagonists for 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, 5-HT3 receptors at doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 µg, reversed the antihyperalgesic effect induced by 250 ng serotonin. In contrast, selective antagonists for 5-HT1D and 5-HT7 receptors were unable to reverse the antihyperalgesic effect induced by serotonin. These results demonstrated for the first time, the peripheral mechanical antihyperalgesic effect of serotonin, and participation of 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors in this event.

  18. Metformin administration induces hepatotoxic effects in paraoxonase-1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, Anabel; Riera-Borrull, Marta; Fort-Gallifa, Isabel; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Cabré, Noemí; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Joven, Jorge; Camps, Jordi

    2016-04-05

    Metformin is the first-line pharmacological treatment of diabetes. In these patients, metformin reduces body weight and decreases the risk of diabetes-related complications such as cardiovascular disease. However, whether metformin elicits beneficial effects on liver histology is a controversial issue and, as yet, there is no consensus. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1), an enzyme synthesized mainly by the liver, degrades lipid peroxides and reduces oxidative stress. PON1 activities are decreased in chronic liver diseases. We evaluated the effects of metformin in the liver of PON1-deficient mice which, untreated, present a mild degree of liver steatosis. Metformin administration aggravated inflammation in animals given a standard mouse chow and in those fed a high-fat diet. Also, it was associated with a higher degree of steatosis in animals fed a standard chow diet. This report is a cautionary note regarding the prescription of metformin for the treatment of diabetes in patients with concomitant liver impairment.

  19. Hypoglycemic effect of guava juice in mice and human subjects.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J T; Yang, R S

    1983-01-01

    Guava is a plentiful fruit in Taiwan and it was taken from the plants of Psidium guajava Linn. (Myrtaceae). According to the folklore in Chinese Medicine, gauva was useful in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. In the present study, acute i.p. treatment with 1 g/kg guava juice produced a marked hypoglycemic action in normal and alloxan-treated diabetic mice. Although effective duration of guava is more transient and it is less potent than chlorpropamide and metformin, blood glucose lowering effect of guava also can be obtained by oral administration in maturity-onset diabetic and healthy volunteers. Thus, it is suggested that guava may be employed to improve and/or prevent the disease of diabetes mellitus.

  20. Protective effects of phyllanthus emblica leaf extract on sodium arsenite-mediated adverse effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Sadia; Ahsan, Nazmul; Kato, Masashi; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Rashid, Abdur; Akhand, Anwarul Azim

    2015-02-01

    Groundwater contamination of arsenic is the major cause of a serious health hazard in Bangladesh. No specific treatment is yet available to manage the large number of individuals exposed to arsenic. In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of Phyllanthus emblica (Indian gooseberry or Amla) leaf extract (PLE) on arsenic-mediated toxicity in experimental mice. Male Swiss albino mice were divided into three different groups (n=6/group). 'Control' mice received arsenic free water together with normal feed. Mice in the remaining two groups designated 'SA' and 'SA+PLE' were exposed to sodium arsenite (SA, 10 µg/g body weight/day) through drinking water in addition to receiving normal feed and PLE-supplemented feed, respectively. The weight gain of SA-exposed mice was decreased compared with the controls; however, this decrease in body weight gain was prevented when the feed was supplemented with PLE. A secondary effect of arsenic was enlargement of the liver, kidney and spleen of SA-group mice. Deposition of arsenic in those organs was demonstrated by ICP-MS. When PLE was supplemented in the feed the enlargement of the organs was minimized; however, the deposition of arsenic was not significantly reduced. These results indicated that PLE may not block arsenic deposition in tissue directly but rather may play a protective role to reduce arsenic-induced toxicity. Therefore, co-administration of PLE in arsenic-exposed animals might have a future therapeutic application for protecting against arsenic-mediated toxicity.

  1. [Effects of formaldehyde on germ cells of male mice].

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingde; Xie, Ying; Yi, Yizhen; Wang, Wei

    2003-11-01

    General toxicity and genetic materials damage of formaldehyde on germ cells in different stages was studied. In order to discover the toxicity mechanism of formaldehyde on germ cells and the biomarkers of effect after the presence of damage in germ cells and the estimation index, the relationships between the damage of germ cells and the MDA, SDH activity and Cu and Zn. in testicle tissue were investigated. Male mice exposed to formaldehyde by i.p. for 5 days. Formaldehyde doses were: 0.20 mg/kg, 2.00 mg/kg, 20.00 mg/kg. Mice were killed at the 6th day and the 14th day. HE staining was used to study the pathological changes happened in testicle tissue. In order to study the changes in sperm, the sperms and the abnormality of the sperm's heads were observed. In order to study the damage of the genetic material in the germ cells, the frequencies of sister chromosome exchanges and the frequencies of MN cells were studied. MDA was measured by MDA diagnosis box. Copper and zinc were determined by FAAS. US was used to determine the SDH activity in serum and testicle tissue. The results showed that: The main pathological changes in testicle tissue of formaldehyde groups were degeneration; The sperm quantity was decreased and the sperm heads deformation ratio was increased in all formaldehyde groups; There were a significant increase of MN ratio in early spermatogenic cells and SCE ratio in medial and high dose groups; The MDA in testicle tissue significant increased in high dose group. The SDH activity in testicle tissue was declined in all formaldehyde groups; There were a significant decline of copper and zinc in testicle tissue in high dose group. It is suggested that: Formaldehyde could induce genetic materials in spermatogone, primary spermatocyte and caused degeneration and necrosis in secondary spermatocyte, spermatogenic cell, sperm; The damage of LPO, decline of copper and zinc and SDH activity in mice's testicle tissue could be caused by formaldehyde; The effect

  2. Anti-aging effect of Blakeslea trispora powder on adult mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weilian; Dai, Dehui; Li, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Blakeslea trispora powder that contains 1.9 % lycopene was tested for its anti-aging effect on adult mice. 48 adult mice were administered with the powder at 0, 267, 534, 1,068 mg lycopene kg(-1) body daily for 30 days. The body weight, hematology, clinical chemical and antioxidant activities in major organs of adult mice were measured. The powder had no effect on the body weight, hematology, clinical chemical parameters of adult mice but improved the antioxidant activities in major organs of adult mice. Increased activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase and a decreased amount of malondialdehyde in liver, brain, kidney and skin of adult mice when a high-dose of the B. trispora powder was administered, suggests that it has the ability to enhance the antioxidation system and improve the anti-aging abilities of adult mice.

  3. Effect of Atorvastatin on Memory in Albino Mice

    PubMed Central

    M.C., Das; Rao A.S.R., Srinivasa; Kadali, SLDV Ramana Murty

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim and objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of atorvastatin on learning and memory in albino mice. Materials and Methods: Thirty Swiss albino mice were divided into 5groups (n=6). In group2, group4 and group5 hyperlipidemia was induced by high fat diet (HFD) orally for 28days. Atrorvastatin was given to group3, group4 and group5 orally for 14 d. Learning and memory was evaluated with Hebb Williams’s maze, Elevated plus maze, Y maze and Step through latency. Continuous data were analyzed by one way ANOVA followed by Scheffe multiple range test, discrete data were analyzed by Kruskal - Wallis test. The level of significance was 5% (p ≤ 0.05). Result and Conclusion: HFD treatment had shown significant increase in body weight, significant impairment in learning and memory (p < 0.05). Only atorvastatin treated group had shown better learning and memory in comparison to HFD group. Atorvastatin 10mg/kg and 20 mg/kg had reversed the HFD induced impairment of learning and memory but there was no significant difference between the doses (p > 0.05). PMID:25584244

  4. Protective Effects of Fluoxetine on Decompression Sickness in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Barre, Sandrine; Pascual, Aurelie; Castagna, Olivier; Abraini, Jacques H.; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Vallee, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS) that can result in central nervous system disorders or even death. Bubbles alter the vascular endothelium and activate blood cells and inflammatory pathways, leading to a systemic pathophysiological process that promotes ischemic damage. Fluoxetine, a well-known antidepressant, is recognized as having anti-inflammatory properties at the systemic level, as well as in the setting of cerebral ischemia. We report a beneficial clinical effect associated with fluoxetine in experimental DCS. 91 mice were subjected to a simulated dive at 90 msw for 45 min before rapid decompression. The experimental group received 50 mg/kg of fluoxetine 18 hours before hyperbaric exposure (n = 46) while controls were not treated (n = 45). Clinical assessment took place over a period of 30 min after surfacing. At the end, blood samples were collected for blood cells counts and cytokine IL-6 detection. There were significantly fewer manifestations of DCS in the fluoxetine group than in the controls (43.5% versus 75.5%, respectively; p = 0.004). Survivors showed a better and significant neurological recovery with fluoxetine. Platelets and red cells were significantly decreased after decompression in controls but not in the treated mice. Fluoxetine reduced circulating IL-6, a relevant marker of systemic inflammation in DCS. We concluded that fluoxetine decreased the incidence of DCS and improved motor recovery, by limiting inflammation processes. PMID:23145072

  5. Effect of antiflagellar serum in the protection of mice against Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Tanaka, S

    1984-02-01

    Specific antiflagellar serum of Clostridium chauvoei showed a powerful protective effect which prevented bacterial growth in the liver, but not in infected muscle, against intramuscular challenge with calcium chloride-activated spores in normal mice. No protective effect was observed in mice with polymorphonuclear leucocytes depleted by cyclophosphamide treatment. The antiflagellar serum had approximately the same protective effect in mice with macrophages blocked selectively by carrageenan as it did in normal mice. We suggest that the antiflagellar serum exerted its effect by opsonic function and that opsonized C. chauvoei was eliminated mainly by polymorphonuclear leucocytes rather than by macrophages.

  6. Effect of carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide on ICR mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC(50) values were determined for male ICR mice exposed to different concentration of carbon monoxide for 30 min and of nitrogen dioxide for 10 min in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The data indicate that ICR mice are more resistant to these two toxicants than Swiss albino mice. The carbon monoxide LC(50) for a 30-min exposure was about 8,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to 3,570 ppm for Swiss albino mice. The nitrogen dioxide LC(50) for a 10-min exposure was above 2,000 ppm for ICR mice compared to about 1,000 ppm for Swiss albino mice.

  7. Test of the antiorthostatic suspension model on mice - Effects on the inflammatory cell response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkrans, Charles F., Jr.; Chapes, Stephen K.; Fleming, Sherry D.

    1990-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model was tested for use as a 1G model to study the effects of factors that will be encountered during space travel on inflammation. No differences were found in inflammatory cells induced in antiorthostatically suspended mice. However, the superoxide response (used for oxidative killing of bacteria such as S. aureus) was impaired in antiorthostatically oriented mice compared to control mice. Elevated corticosterone levels were found in antiorthostatically suspended mice, indicating that stress may be a factor in the model. If the stress factor of the model correlates with the physiological stress of space flight, antiorthostatic suspension may be an acceptable model for studying inflammatory responses in mice.

  8. Effects of natural enrichment materials on stress, memory and exploratory behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Acklin, Casey J; Gault, Ruth A

    2015-07-01

    Environmental enrichment is an essential component of laboratory animal housing that allows animals to engage in natural behaviors in an otherwise artificial setting. Previous research by the authors suggested that, compared with synthetic enrichment materials, natural materials were associated with lower stress levels in mice. Here, the authors compare the effects of different enrichment materials on stress, memory and exploratory behavior in Swiss Webster mice. Mice that were provided with natural enrichment materials had lower stress levels, better memory and greater exploratory behavior than did mice provided with synthetic enrichment materials or with no enrichment materials. These findings suggest that provision of natural enrichment materials can improve well-being of laboratory mice.

  9. The effects of antihypertensive drugs on bone mineral density in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kwi Young; Kang, Yoongoo; Kim, Mirinae; Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Kim, Juryun; Jung, Hae-Rin; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Ju, Ji Hyeon; Hong, Yeon Sik

    2013-08-01

    The effects of several antihypertensive drugs on bone mineral density (BMD) and micro-architectural changes in ovariectomized (OVX) mice were investigated. Eight-week-old female C57/BL6 mice were used for this study. Three days after ovariectomy, mice were treated intraperitoneally with nifedipine (15 mg/kg), telmisartan (5 mg/kg), enalapril (20 mg/kg), propranolol (1 mg/kg) or hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 mg/kg) for 35 consecutive days. Uterine atrophy of all mice was confirmed to evaluate estrogen deficiency state. BMD and micro-architectural analyses were performed on tibial proximal ends by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). When OVX mice with uterine atrophy were compared with mice without atrophy, BMD decreased (P < 0.001). There were significant differences in BMD loss between different antihypertensive drugs (P = 0.005). Enalapril and propranolol increased BMD loss in mice with atrophied uteri compared with control mice. By contrast, thiazide increased BMD in mice with uterine atrophy compared with vehicle-treated mice (P = 0.048). Thiazide (P = 0.032) and telmisartan (P = 0.051) reduced bone loss and bone fraction in mice with uterine atrophy compared with the control. Thiazide affects BMD in OVX mice positively. The reduction in bone loss by thiazide and telmisartan suggest that these drugs may benefit menopausal women with hypertension and osteoporosis.

  10. Antidepressant-Like Effect of Isorhynchophylline in Mice.

    PubMed

    Xian, Yan-Fang; Fan, Ding; Ip, Siu-Po; Mao, Qing-Qiu; Lin, Zhi-Xiu

    2017-02-01

    Isorhynchophylline (IRN), an oxindole alkaloid, has been identified as the main active ingredient responsible for the biological activities of Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq) Miq ex Havil. (Rubiaceae). Previous studies in our laboratory have revealed that IRN possesses potent neuroprotective effects in different models of Alzheimer's disease. However, the antidepressant-like effects of IRN are remained unclear. The present study aims to evaluate the antidepressant-like effects of IRN. The antidepressant-like effects of IRN was determined by using animal models of depression including forced swimming and tail suspension tests. The acting mechanism was explored by determining the effect of IRN on the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and the activities of monoamine oxidases. Intragastric administration of IRN at 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg for 7 days caused a significant reduction of immobility time in both forced swimming and tail suspension tests, while IRN did not stimulate locomotor activity in the open-field test. In addition, IRN treatment antagonized reserpine-induced ptosis and significantly enhanced the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters including norepinephrine (NE) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and the activity of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of mice. These results suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of IRN are mediated, at least in part, by the inhibition of monoamine oxidases.

  11. Effects of early-onset voluntary exercise on adult physical activity and associated phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Wendy; Meek, Thomas H; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Vu, Kim T; Garland, Theodore

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of early-life exercise on adult physical activity (wheel running, home-cage activity), body mass, food consumption, and circulating leptin levels in males from four replicate lines of mice selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running (High Runner or HR) and their four non-selected control (C) lines. Half of the mice were given wheel access shortly after weaning for three consecutive weeks. Wheel access was then removed for 52 days, followed by two weeks of adult wheel access for all mice. A blood sample taken prior to adult wheel testing was analyzed for circulating leptin concentration. Early-life wheel access significantly increased adult voluntary exercise on wheels during the first week of the second period of wheel access, for both HR and C mice, and HR ran more than C mice. During this same time period, activity in the home cages was not affected by early-age wheel access, and did not differ statistically between HR and C mice. Throughout the study, all mice with early wheel access had lower body masses than their sedentary counterparts, and HR mice had lower body masses than C mice. With wheel access, HR mice also ate significantly more than C mice. Early-life wheel access increased plasma leptin levels (adjusted statistically for fat-pad mass as a covariate) in C mice, but decreased them in HR mice. At sacrifice, early-life exercise had no statistically significant effects on visceral fat pad, heart (ventricle), liver or spleen masses (all adjusted statistically for variation in body mass). Results support the hypothesis that early-age exercise in mice can have at least transitory positive effects on adult levels of voluntary exercise, in addition to reducing body mass, and may be relevant for the public policy debates concerning the importance of physical education for children.

  12. Electric shocks are ineffective in treatment of lethal effects of rattlesnake envenomation in mice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E K; Kardong, K V; Mackessy, S P

    1987-01-01

    Electrical shocks, even crudely delivered from 'stun guns' and gasoline engine spark plugs, have been reported to be effective in the treatment of snake bite. We thus applied similar electric shocks to mice artificially injected with reconstituted rattlesnake venom at various LD50 multiples. Those envenomated mice treated with electric shock survived no better than the controls. We thus found no evidence that electric shocks crudely administered had any life saving effect in mice.

  13. Antinociceptive effect of ethanolic extract of Selaginella convoluta in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Selaginella convoluta (Arn.) Spring (Selaginellaceae), commonly known as “jericó”, is a medicinal plant found in northeastern Brazil. S. convoluta is used in folk medicine as an antidepressant, aphrodisiac, diuretic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and it is used to combat amenorrhea, coughing and bleeding. This study was performed to evaluate the antinociceptive effects of ethanolic extract from S. convoluta in mice exposed to chemical and thermal models of nociception. Methods Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the ethanolic extract was performed. The ethanolic extract from Selaginella convoluta (Sc-EtOH) was examined for its intraperitoneal (i.p.) antinociceptive activity at the doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight. Acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin injection and hot plate tests were used to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of Sc-EtOH extract. The rota-rod test was used to evaluate motor coordination. Results A preliminary analysis of Sc-EtOH revealed that it contained phenols, steroids, terpenoids and flavonoids. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, mice treated with Sc-EtOH (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited reduced writhing (58.46, 75.63 and 82.23%, respectively). Secondly, Sc-EtOH treatment (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the paw licking time in mice during the first phase of the formalin test (by 44.90, 33.33 and 34.16%, respectively), as well as during the second phase of the test (by 86.44, 56.20 and 94.95%, respectively). Additionally, Sc-EtOH treatment at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg increased the latency time in the hot plate test after 60 and 90 minutes, respectively. In addition, Sc-EtOH did not impair motor coordination. Conclusion Overall, these results indicate that Sc-EtOH is effective as an analgesic agent in various pain models. The activity of Sc-EtOH is most likely mediated via the inhibition of peripheral mediators and central inhibitory mechanisms. This study supports previous claims of

  14. Antinociceptive and behavioral effects of ribavirin in mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E

    2006-02-01

    The antinociceptive effect of ribavirin, an antiviral drug, was studied after systemic injection using several pain tests in mice. In the hot-plate test of thermal pain, capsaicin-induced chemogenic pain, formalin test and abdominal stretching assay induced by the i.p. injection of 0.6% acetic acid, ribavirin produced a dose-related reduction in nociceptive responses. The visceral antinociceptive effect of ribavirin was unaffected by co-treatment with yohimbine, atropine or theophylline, but partially reversed by naloxone. Antinociception by ribavirin was augmented by treatment with prazosin, doxazosin, propranolol, guanethidine, glibenclamide, baclofen, indomethacin or cysteamine. Further, the ribavirin induced antinociception was enhanced by D2 receptor antagonists haloperidol, sulpiride, clozapine or domperidone and by the dopamine D2 receptor agonist bromocryptine. Ribavirin did not exhibit depression-like effect, nor it influenced the effect of amitriptyline in the forced swimming test. It did not impair cognitive performance in the Morris water Maze test. The present data demonstrate that ribavirin administered via systemic route possesses visceral and thermal anti-nociceptive properties. The ribavirin analgesic effect was partially reversed by naloxone, an opioid antagonist.

  15. Adaptive evolution and effective population size in wild house mice.

    PubMed

    Phifer-Rixey, Megan; Bonhomme, François; Boursot, Pierre; Churchill, Gary A; Piálek, Jaroslav; Tucker, Priscilla K; Nachman, Michael W

    2012-10-01

    Estimates of the proportion of amino acid substitutions that have been fixed by selection (α) vary widely among taxa, ranging from zero in humans to over 50% in Drosophila. This wide range may reflect differences in the efficacy of selection due to differences in the effective population size (N(e)). However, most comparisons have been made among distantly related organisms that differ not only in N(e) but also in many other aspects of their biology. Here, we estimate α in three closely related lineages of house mice that have a similar ecology but differ widely in N(e): Mus musculus musculus (N(e) ∼ 25,000-120,000), M. m. domesticus (N(e) ∼ 58,000-200,000), and M. m. castaneus (N(e) ∼ 200,000-733,000). Mice were genotyped using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism array, and the proportions of replacement and silent mutations within subspecies were compared with those fixed between each subspecies and an outgroup, Mus spretus. There was significant evidence of positive selection in M. m. castaneus, the lineage with the largest N(e), with α estimated to be approximately 40%. In contrast, estimates of α for M. m. domesticus (α = 13%) and for M. m. musculus (α = 12 %) were much smaller. Interestingly, the higher estimate of α for M. m. castaneus appears to reflect not only more adaptive fixations but also more effective purifying selection. These results support the hypothesis that differences in N(e) contribute to differences among species in the efficacy of selection.

  16. Immunomodulatory effect of diethylcarbamazine in mice infected with Nocardia brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, M; Castro-Corona, M A; Segoviano-Ramírez, J C; Brattig, N W; Medina-De la Garza, C E

    2014-11-01

    We tested whether diethylcarbamazine (DEC) or ivermectin (IVM), both antiparasitic drugs with reported immunomodulatory properties, were able to affect the immune system to potentiate host defense mechanisms and protect against actinomycetoma in a mouse model. Male BALB/c mice of 10-12 weeks of age were injected with either Nocardia brasiliensis or saline solution. Recorded were the effects of a treatment by DEC (6 mg/kg per os daily for one week) or IVM (200 μg/kg subcutaneously on days 1 and 3) on (i) the development of mycetoma lesion, (ii) the expression of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by phagocytes, (iii) the proliferation index of lymphocytes and (iv) antibody production of IgG and IgM. After an initial lesion in all mice, DEC inhibited a full development and progression of actinomycetoma resulting in a reduced lesion size (p < 0.001). IVM had no inhibitory effect on the development of mycetoma. Furthermore, DEC treatment was associated with a significant enhancement of ROI expression (p < 0.05) by polymorphonuclear neutrophils at day 3 after infection. Lymphocyte proliferation in response to N. brasiliensis antigens and concanavalin A in DEC-treated group was higher than in non-treated group at day 21 and 28 postinfection (p < 0.01). Significant changes in antibody response were not observed. By all parameters tested, DEC was superior to IVM regarding immunostimulatory potency. In conclusion, DEC expressed an in vivo influence on the immune status during the infection by N. brasiliensis leading to retrogression of the mycetoma and increasing cellular immune responses. Our findings may indicate a potential use of DEC as a putative adjuvant in infectious disease or vaccination.

  17. Thymoquinone produced antianxiety-like effects in mice through modulation of GABA and NO levels.

    PubMed

    Gilhotra, Neeraj; Dhingra, Dinesh

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of GABAergic and nitriergic modulation in the antianxiety effect of thymoquinone, a major constituent of Nigella sativa, in mice under unstressed and stressed conditions. Thymoquinone (10 and 20 mg/kg), methylene blue (1 mg/kg) and diazepam (2 mg/kg) were administered followed by behavioral testing using an elevated plus maze, the light/dark test and the social interaction test in both unstressed and stressed mice (mice subjected to 6 h immobilization). The effects of the above-mentioned drugs on plasma nitrite, a stable metabolite of nitric oxide (NO) and brain GABA content were also studied. Diazepam (2 mg/kg) produced significant anxiolytic-like effects only in unstressed mice. However, diazepam significantly increased the GABA content in both unstressed and stressed mice as compared with their respective control groups. Thymoquinone (10 and 20 mg/kg) produced significant antianxiety effects in unstressed mice without altering nitrite levels, but only the higher dose (20 mg/kg) of thymoquinone increased the GABA content in unstressed mice. In stressed mice, thymoquinone (20 mg/kg) showed anxiolytic effects, with a significant decrease in plasma nitrite and reversal of the decreased brain GABA content. Pre-treatment with methylene blue enhanced the antianxiety effect of thymoquinone in both unstressed and stressed mice. Therefore, the present study suggests an involvement of NO-cGMP and GABAergic pathways in the anxiolytic-like activity of thymoquinone.

  18. Fuzi polysaccharide-1 produces antidepressant-like effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hua-Cheng; Qu, Hong-Da; Sun, Li-Rong; Li, Shu-Ji; Cao, Xiong; Fang, Ying-Ying; Jie, Wei; Bean, Jonathan C; Wu, Wei-Kang; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2010-06-01

    Current antidepressants are clinically effective only after several weeks of administration. We show that Fuzi polysaccharide-1 (FPS), a new water-soluble polysaccharide isolated from Fuzi, which has been used to treat mood disorders in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries, increases the number of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus in adult mice, and most of these cells subsequently differentiate into new neurons. We also found that FPS administration reduces immobility in the forced swim test, and latency in the novelty suppressed-feeding test. Moreover, a 14-d regimen with FPS reverses avoidance behaviour and inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis induced by chronic defeat stress. In contrast, imipramine, a well known antidepressant, reverses this avoidance behaviour only after 4 wk of continuous administration. Finally, acute treatment with FPS had no effect on brain monoamine levels in frontal cortex but significantly increases BDNF in the hippocampus, while the antidepressant effect and enhancement of cell proliferation induced by FPS administration were totally blocked by K252a, an inhibitor of trkB in a chronic social defeat depression model, suggesting that the neurogenic and antidepressant effects of FPS may involve BDNF signalling. In conclusion, our findings suggest that FPS could be developed as a putative antidepressant with a rapid onset of action.

  19. Neuroprotective effect of picroside II in brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yida; Fang, Wei; Wu, Liang; Yao, Xueya; Wu, Suzhen; Wang, Jie; Xu, Zhen; Tian, Fubo; He, Zhenzhou; Dong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Various types of brain injury which led to the damage of brain tissue structure and neurological dysfunction continues to be the major causes of disability and mortality. Picroside II (PII) possesses a wide range of pharmacological effects and has been proved to ameliorate ischemia and reperfusion injury of kidney and brain. However, critical questions remain about other brain injuries. We investigated the protective effect of PII in four well-characterized murine models of brain injury. Models showed a subsequent regional inflammatory response and oxidative stress in common, which might be improved by the administration of PII (20 mg/kg). Meanwhile, a series of morphological and histological analyses for reinforcement was performed. In traumatic, ischemic and infectious induced injuries, it was observed that the survival rate, apoptosis related proteins, Caspase-3, and the expression of acute inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) were significantly alleviated after PII injection, but PII treatment alone showed no effect on them as well. The western blot results indicated that TLR4 and NF-κB were clearly downregulated with PII administration. In conclusion, our results suggested that PII with a recommended concentration of 20 mg/kg could provide neuroprotective effects against multi-cerebral injuries in mice by suppressing the over-reactive inflammatory responses and oxidative stress and attenuating the damage of brain tissue for further neurological recovery.

  20. Neuroprotective effect of picroside II in brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yida; Fang, Wei; Wu, Liang; Yao, Xueya; Wu, Suzhen; Wang, Jie; Xu, Zhen; Tian, Fubo; He, Zhenzhou; Dong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Various types of brain injury which led to the damage of brain tissue structure and neurological dysfunction continues to be the major causes of disability and mortality. Picroside II (PII) possesses a wide range of pharmacological effects and has been proved to ameliorate ischemia and reperfusion injury of kidney and brain. However, critical questions remain about other brain injuries. We investigated the protective effect of PII in four well-characterized murine models of brain injury. Models showed a subsequent regional inflammatory response and oxidative stress in common, which might be improved by the administration of PII (20 mg/kg). Meanwhile, a series of morphological and histological analyses for reinforcement was performed. In traumatic, ischemic and infectious induced injuries, it was observed that the survival rate, apoptosis related proteins, Caspase-3, and the expression of acute inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) were significantly alleviated after PII injection, but PII treatment alone showed no effect on them as well. The western blot results indicated that TLR4 and NF-κB were clearly downregulated with PII administration. In conclusion, our results suggested that PII with a recommended concentration of 20 mg/kg could provide neuroprotective effects against multi-cerebral injuries in mice by suppressing the over-reactive inflammatory responses and oxidative stress and attenuating the damage of brain tissue for further neurological recovery. PMID:28078024

  1. The effect of B vitamin supplementation on wound healing in type 2 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Saeka; Takano, Mayuko; Sugano, Naoyuki; Ohtsu, Mariko; Tsunoda, Kou; Koshi, Ryosuke; Yoshinuma, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effects of B-group vitamin supplements on wound healing in diabetic mice. The mice in the experimental group were treated daily with 1 g/L B6, 1.25 mg/L B12, and 62.5 mg/L folic acid in their drinking water. Full-thickness excision wounds were created with 6-mm skin biopsy punches. Each wound closure was digitally photographed. Beginning on day 3 after wounding, the wound area in the diabetic mice was statistically larger than that of normal mice (p<0.05 vs diabetic mice). The diabetic mice treated with B vitamins displayed accelerated wound closure on day 3 (wound area 42.8 ± 11.3%, p<0.05). On day 9 after wounding, the wound area in the diabetic mice was also statistically larger than that of normal mice (p<0.05 vs diabetic mice). The diabetic mice treated with B vitamins displayed accelerated wound closure on day 3 (wound area 13.2 ± 16.8%, p<0.05). In addition, the high glucose level in the diabetic animals decreased significantly in response to B vitamin treatment. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that B vitamin supplementation may improve wound healing in diabetic mice. PMID:26798199

  2. Assessment of Routine Procedure Effect on Breathing Parameters in Mice by Using Whole-Body Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Raşid, Orhan; Chirita, Daniel; Iancu, Adina D; Stavaru, Crina; Radu, Dorel L

    2012-01-01

    We used whole-body plethysmography to investigate the effect of restraint, ear marking, tail vein and retroorbital blood sampling, and tail clipping on respiration in Balb/c × TCR-HA+/– F1 hybrid mice (F1h). Baseline values of breathing parameters were determined. During the experiment, mice experienced a procedure and then plethysmographic recordings were obtained immediately and at 4, 24, and 48 h afterward. Baseline breathing parameters showed significant differences between sexes. Restraint affected minute volume differently than did handling in male mice and to a lesser extent in female mice. Ear marking significantly changed minute volume compared with handling but not restraint in male mice and in the opposite manner in female mice. Tail vein blood sampling changed minute volume in a significant manner compared with restraint but not compared with handling in both sexes. Retroorbital blood sampling significantly changed minute volume compared with values for both handling and restraint in male mice but only compared with handling in female mice. Tail clipping modified minute volume significantly compared with handling in male mice and compared with restraint in both sexes. Analysis of data showed that routine procedures affect minute volume in mice depending on invasiveness of maneuver and in a sex-biased manner for as long as 24 h after the procedure. Our experiment shows that procedures performed on laboratory mice can change respiratory parameters and can be investigated by plethysmography. PMID:23043813

  3. Post-weaning Environmental Enrichment, But Not Chronic Maternal Isolation, Enhanced Ethanol Intake during Periadolescence and Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Berardo, Luciana R.; Fabio, María C.; Pautassi, Ricardo M.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed ethanol intake in male and female Wistar rats exposed to maternal separation (MS) during infancy (postnatal days 1–21, PD1–21) and environmental enrichment (EE) during adolescence (PD 21–42). Previous work revealed that MS enhances ethanol consumption during adulthood. It is still unknown if a similar effect is found during adolescence. Several studies, in turn, have revealed that EE reverses stress experiences, and reduces ethanol consumption and reinforcement; although others reported greater ethanol intake after EE. The interactive effects between these treatments upon ethanol’s effects and intake have yet to be explored. We assessed chronic ethanol intake and preference (12 two-bottle daily sessions, spread across 30 days, 1st session on PD46) in rats exposed to MS and EE. The main finding was that male – but not female – rats that had been exposed to EE consumed more ethanol than controls given standard housing, an effect that was not affected by MS. Subsequent experiments assessed several factors associated with heightened ethanol consumption in males exposed to MS and EE; namely taste aversive conditioning and hypnotic-sedative consequences of ethanol. We also measured anxiety response in the light-dark box and in the elevated plus maze tests; and exploratory patterns of novel stimuli and behaviors indicative of risk assessment and risk-taking, via a modified version of the concentric square field (CSF) test. Aversive conditioning, hypnosis and sleep time were similar in males exposed or not to EE. EE males, however, exhibited heightened exploration of novel stimuli and greater risk taking behaviors in the CSF test. It is likely that the promoting effect of EE upon ethanol intake was due to these effects upon exploratory and risk-taking behaviors. PMID:27790100

  4. Post-weaning Environmental Enrichment, But Not Chronic Maternal Isolation, Enhanced Ethanol Intake during Periadolescence and Early Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Berardo, Luciana R; Fabio, María C; Pautassi, Ricardo M

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed ethanol intake in male and female Wistar rats exposed to maternal separation (MS) during infancy (postnatal days 1-21, PD1-21) and environmental enrichment (EE) during adolescence (PD 21-42). Previous work revealed that MS enhances ethanol consumption during adulthood. It is still unknown if a similar effect is found during adolescence. Several studies, in turn, have revealed that EE reverses stress experiences, and reduces ethanol consumption and reinforcement; although others reported greater ethanol intake after EE. The interactive effects between these treatments upon ethanol's effects and intake have yet to be explored. We assessed chronic ethanol intake and preference (12 two-bottle daily sessions, spread across 30 days, 1st session on PD46) in rats exposed to MS and EE. The main finding was that male - but not female - rats that had been exposed to EE consumed more ethanol than controls given standard housing, an effect that was not affected by MS. Subsequent experiments assessed several factors associated with heightened ethanol consumption in males exposed to MS and EE; namely taste aversive conditioning and hypnotic-sedative consequences of ethanol. We also measured anxiety response in the light-dark box and in the elevated plus maze tests; and exploratory patterns of novel stimuli and behaviors indicative of risk assessment and risk-taking, via a modified version of the concentric square field (CSF) test. Aversive conditioning, hypnosis and sleep time were similar in males exposed or not to EE. EE males, however, exhibited heightened exploration of novel stimuli and greater risk taking behaviors in the CSF test. It is likely that the promoting effect of EE upon ethanol intake was due to these effects upon exploratory and risk-taking behaviors.

  5. Effects of combined phytochemicals on skin tumorigenesis in SENCAR mice

    PubMed Central

    KOWALCZYK, MAGDALENA C.; JUNCO, JACOB J.; KOWALCZYK, PIOTR; TOLSTYKH, OLGA; HANAUSEK, MARGARET; SLAGA, THOMAS J.; WALASZEK, ZBIGNIEW

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of the combined action of phytochemicals on the early stages of skin tumorigenesis, i.e. initiation and promotion. We tested calcium D-glucarate (CG) given in the diet, while resveratrol (RES) and ursolic acid (UA) were applied topically. The 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-initiated, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted multistage skin carcinogenesis model in SENCAR mice was used. Mice received one topical dose of DMBA, then after one month, two weekly doses of TPA for 14 weeks until sacrifice. RES or UA were applied 20 min prior to DMBA or TPA treatment and 2% dietary CG was given from 2 weeks prior to 2 weeks after the DMBA dose or continually beginning 2 weeks prior to the first dose of TPA. UA applied alone and in combination with CG during the promotion stage was the only inhibitor of tumor multiplicity and tumor incidence. A number of combinations reduced epidermal proliferation, but only UA and the combination UA+CG applied during promotion significantly reduced epidermal hyperplasia. DMBA/TPA application resulted in significant increases in c-jun and p50, which were reversed by a number of different treatments. DMBA/TPA treatment also strongly increased mRNA levels of inflammation markers COX-2 and IL-6. All anti-promotion treatments caused a marked decrease in COX-2 and IL-6 expression compared to the DMBA/TPA control. These results show that UA is a potent inhibitor of skin tumor promotion and inflammatory signaling and it may be useful in the prevention of skin cancer and other epithelial cancers in humans. PMID:23835587

  6. Effects of combined phytochemicals on skin tumorigenesis in SENCAR mice.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Magdalena C; Junco, Jacob J; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Tolstykh, Olga; Hanausek, Margaret; Slaga, Thomas J; Walaszek, Zbigniew

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of the combined action of phytochemicals on the early stages of skin tumorigenesis, i.e. initiation and promotion. We tested calcium D-glucarate (CG) given in the diet, while resveratrol (RES) and ursolic acid (UA) were applied topically. The 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-initiated, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted multistage skin carcinogenesis model in SENCAR mice was used. Mice received one topical dose of DMBA, then after one month, two weekly doses of TPA for 14 weeks until sacrifice. RES or UA were applied 20 min prior to DMBA or TPA treatment and 2% dietary CG was given from 2 weeks prior to 2 weeks after the DMBA dose or continually beginning 2 weeks prior to the first dose of TPA. UA applied alone and in combination with CG during the promotion stage was the only inhibitor of tumor multiplicity and tumor incidence. A number of combinations reduced epidermal proliferation, but only UA and the combination UA+CG applied during promotion significantly reduced epidermal hyperplasia. DMBA/TPA application resulted in significant increases in c-jun and p50, which were reversed by a number of different treatments. DMBA/TPA treatment also strongly increased mRNA levels of inflammation markers COX-2 and IL-6. All anti-promotion treatments caused a marked decrease in COX-2 and IL-6 expression compared to the DMBA/TPA control. These results show that UA is a potent inhibitor of skin tumor promotion and inflammatory signaling and it may be useful in the prevention of skin cancer and other epithelial cancers in humans.

  7. Anti-diabetic effects of rice hull smoke extract in alloxan-induced diabetic mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the protective effect of a liquid rice hull smoke extract (RHSE) against diabetes in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Anti-diabetic effects of RHSE were evaluated in both the rat insulinoma-1 cell line (INS-1) and diabetic ICR mice induced by inraperitoneal (ip) injection of alloxan. ...

  8. Chronic nicotine alters cannabinoid-mediated locomotor activity and receptor density in periadolescent but not adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Werling, Linda L.; Reed, Stephanie Collins; Wade, Dean; Izenwasser, Sari

    2009-01-01

    A significant number of youths use cigarettes, and more than half of the youths who smoke daily also use illicit drugs. The focus of these studies is on how exposure to nicotine affects subsequent responses to both nicotine and cannabinoids in adolescents compared with adults. We have shown previously that chronic treatment with nicotine produces sensitization to its locomotor-activating effects in female and adult rats but not male adolescent rats. To better understand the effects of nicotine on adolescent and adult rats, rats were injected with nicotine or saline for 7 days and, on day 8, either challenged with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) or the cannabinoid agonist CP 55,940 and tested for locomotor activity, or the brains were removed for quantitative autoradiography studies of the cannabinoid1 receptor. A separate group of rats was treated with nicotine plus the cannabinoid antagonist AM 251 and then challenged with CP 55,940. In adolescent male rats, nicotine administration led to sensitization to the locomotor-decreasing effects of both Δ9-THC and CP 55,940, but in adult male rats, the response to either drug was unchanged compared to controls. The effect of nicotine on CP 55,940-mediated locomotor activity was blocked by co-administration of AM 251 with the nicotine. Further, cannabinoid receptor density was increased in the prelimbic prefrontal cortex, ventral tegmental area, and select regions of the hippocampus in adolescent male rats pretreated with nicotine compared to vehicle-treated controls. There were no significant changes in cannabinoid receptor binding, however, in any of the brain regions examined in adult males pretreated with nicotine. The prelimbic prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus have been shown previously to be involved in stimulant reinforcement; thus it is possible that these changes contribute to the unique behavioral effects of chronic nicotine and subsequent drug administration in adolescents compared with adults. PMID

  9. Protective effects of baicalin against bromocriptine induced abortion in mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ai-Tuan; Zhong, Xiu-Hui; Liu, Zhan-Min; Shi, Wan-Yu; Du, Jian; Zhai, Xiang-He; Zhang, Tie; Meng, Li-Gen

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese herbal medicine Huang Qin (Radix Scutellariae) had been used for restless fetus for hundreds of years in China, however, little attention had been given to the components of the herb, specifically its ability to exert abortion-preventing effects at the maternal fatal interface. The present study was carried out to investigate the protective effects of baicalin and the possible mechanisms on pregnancies. Baicalin (at 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg BW respectively) was gavaged to bromocriptine-treated mice from gestation day (GD) 1 through GD 7. Abortion rates were calculated and the changes of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and progesterone were assayed on different gestation days. Results showed that the embryonic death rates were significantly decreased in groups supplemented with 20 or 50 mg/kg BW of baicalin, accompanied with reduced IFN-gamma and enhanced progesterone contents. Moreover, the highest levels of IFN-gamma appeared on GD 5 both in the control and in baicalin treated groups. It is concluded that baicalin can exert an anti-abortive effect by cutting down the production of IFN-gamma and elevating the levels of progesterone in a dose dependent manner and IFN-gamma is involved in an inflammatory reaction which is beneficial for a successful implantation.

  10. Anxiolytic effect of saponins from Panax quinquefolium in mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiu-Yan; Yang, Jing-Yu; Wang, Jin-Hui; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2007-05-22

    The anxiolytic effect of the saponins from Aniliaeea Panax quinquefolium L. (PQS) was studied in male mice by using a number of experimental paradigms of anxiety and compared with that of the known anxiolytic compound diazepam. Use of the elevated plus-maze test revealed that PQS (50 mg/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (2.5 mg/kg, p.o.) increased the percentage of time and entries spent in open arms. In the light/dark test, PQS (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (2.5 mg/kg, p.o.) prolonged the time spent in the light area. In the hole-board test, PQS (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (2.5 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly increased both head-dip counts and head-dip duration. Both PQS (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (2.5 mg/kg, p.o.) decreased the total fighting time in the isolation-induced aggressive test. Since PQS, in contrast to diazepam, had no effect on locomotion in these tests, its side-effect profile might be considered superior to the benzodiazepines. Thus, the present findings suggest that PQS might be a potential candidate for use as an anxiolytic drug.

  11. Effect of low frequency low energy pulsing electromagnetic field (PEMF) on X-ray-irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cadossi, R.; Hentz, V.R.; Kipp, J.; Eiverson, R.; Ceccherelli, G.; Zucchini, P.; Emilia, G.; Torelli, G.; Franceschi, C.; Cossarizza, A.

    1989-02-01

    C3H/Km flora-defined mice were used to investigate the effect of exposure to pulsing electromagnetic field (PEMF) after total body x-ray irradiation. Prolonged exposure to PEMF had no effect on normal nonirradiated mice. When mice irradiated with different doses of x-ray (8.5 Gy, 6.8 Gy, and 6.3 Gy) were exposed to PEMF 24 h a day, we observed a more rapid decline in white blood cells (WBC) in the peripheral blood of mice exposed to PEMF at all the x-ray dosages used. No effect of exposure to PEMF was observed on the survival of the mice irradiated with 6.3 Gy and 8.5 Gy; in mice irradiated with 6.8 Gy, 2 out of 12 survived when exposed to PEMF as compared to 10 out of 12 control mice that were irradiated only. At day 4 after irradiation autoradiographic studies performed on bone marrow and spleen of 8.5-Gy-irradiated mice showed no difference between controls and mice exposed to PEMF, whereas on 6.8-Gy mice the bone marrow labeling index was lower in mice exposed to PEMF. In mice irradiated to 6.3 Gy we observed that the recovery of WBC in the peripheral blood was slowed in mice exposed to PEMF and their body weight was significantly lower than in control mice that were irradiated only. The spleen and bone marrow of the mice irradiated to 6.3 Gy and sacrificed at days 4, 14, 20, and 25 after irradiation were analyzed by autoradiography to evaluate the labeling index. Half of the spleens from mice sacrificed at day 25 after irradiation were used to evaluate the RNA content. Autoradiography showed that in the spleen and bone marrow of control mice, there were more cells labeled with (3H)thymidine at days 4 and 14 and less at days 20 and 25 after irradiation in comparison with mice irradiated and exposed to PEMF.

  12. Oxygen effects on mortality of mice infected with Diplococcus pneumoniae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angrick, E. J.; Somerson, N. L.; Weiss, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Mice infected by intraperitoneal injection of Diplococcus pneumoniae were held at 1 atm in either hypoxic (12%), hyperoxic (75%), or a normal (21%) oxygen environment. Mortality rates indicated prolongation of survival in hypoxia and shortened survival in hyperoxia. Exposure of mice to the experimental gas mixtures prior to inoculation did not alter the results.

  13. Paradoxical Effects of Partial Leptin Deficiency on Bone in Growing Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Philbrick, Kenneth A.; Turner, Russell T.; Branscum, Adam J.; Wong, Carmen P.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2015-01-01

    Morbidly obese, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice display low bone mass, mild osteoclast-rich osteopetrosis, and increased bone marrow adiposity. While partial leptin deficiency results in increased weight, the skeletal manifestations of partial leptin deficiency are less well defined. We therefore analyzed femora and lumbar vertebrae in growing (7-week-old) female C57BL/6 wildtype (WT) mice, partial leptin-deficient ob/+ mice, and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. The bones were evaluated by dual energy absorptiometry, microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry. As expected, ob/+ mice were heavier, had more white adipose tissue, and lower serum leptin than WT mice, but were lighter and had less white adipose tissue than ob/ob mice. With a few exceptions, cancellous bone architecture, cell (osteoblast, osteoclast, and adipocyte), and dynamic measurements did not differ between WT and ob/+ mice. In contrast, compared to WT and ob/+ mice, ob/ob mice had lower cancellous bone volume fraction and higher bone marrow adiposity in the femur metaphysis, and higher cancellous bone volume fraction in lumbar vertebra. Paradoxically, ob/+ mice had greater femoral bone volume than either WT or ob/ob mice. There was a positive correlation between body weight and femur volume in all three genotypes. However, the positive effect of weight on bone occurred with lower body weight in leptin-producing mice. The paradoxical differences in bone size among WT, ob/+, and ob/ob mice may be explained if leptin, in addition to stimulating bone growth and cancellous bone turnover, acts to lower the set-point at which increased body weight leads to a commensurate increase in bone size. PMID:26370912

  14. Immunosuppressive and autoimmune effects of thimerosal in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Havarinasab, S.; Haeggqvist, B.; Bjoern, E.; Pollard, K.M.; Hultman, P. . E-mail: perhu@imk.liu.se

    2005-04-15

    The possible health effects of the organic mercury compound thimerosal (ethylmercurithiosalicylate), which is rapidly metabolized to ethylmercury (EtHg), have recently been much debated and the effect of this compound on the immune system is largely unknown. We therefore studied the effect of thimerosal by treating A.SW (H-2{sup s}) mice, susceptible to induction of autoimmunity by heavy metals, with 10 mg thimerosal/L drinking water (internal dose ca 590 {mu}g Hg/kg body weight/day) for up to 30 days. The lymph node expression of IL-2 and IL-15 mRNA was increased after 2 days, and of IL-4 and IFN-{gamma} mRNA after 6 and 14 days. During the first 14 days treatment, the number of splenocytes, including T and B cells as well as Ig-secreting cells decreased. A strong immunostimulation superseded after 30 days treatment with increase in splenic weight, number of splenocytes including T and B cells and Ig-secreting cells, and Th2- as well as Th-1-dependent serum immunoglobulins. Antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) targeting the 34-kDa nucleolar protein fibrillarin, and systemic immune-complex deposits developed. The H-2{sup s} strains SJL and B10.S also responded to thimerosal treatment with ANoA. The A.TL and B10.TL strain, sharing background genes with the A.SW and B10.S strain, respectively, but with a different H-2 haplotype (t1), did not develop ANoA, linking the susceptibility to H-2. Thimerosal-treated H-2{sup s} mice homozygous for the nu mutation (SJL-nu/nu), or lacking the T-cell co-stimulatory molecule CD28 (B10.S-CD28{sup -/-}), did not develop ANoA, which showed that the autoimmune response is T-cell dependent. Using H-2{sup s} strains with targeted mutations, we found that IFN-{gamma} and IL-6, but not IL-4, is important for induction of ANoA by thimerosal. The maximum added renal concentration of thimerosal (EtHg) and inorganic mercury occurred after 14 days treatment and was 81 {mu}g Hg/g. EtHg made up 59% and inorganic mercury 41% of the renal mercury. In

  15. Anti-Hyperglycemic Effect of a Kudzu (Pueraria lobata) Vine Extract in Ovariectomized Mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Teruyoshi; Yokota, Yukihiro; Tang, Hanjun; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Kawamura, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Postmenopausal diabetes is exacerbated by estrogen deficiency. Ovariectomized (OVX) animal models can be used to develop strategies for preventing or treating postmenopausal symptoms. We previously found that a diet containing kudzu (Pueraria lobata) vine ethanol extract (PVEE) suppressed weight gain in OVX mice. Therefore, this study further elucidated how PVEE affected OVX mice. Ten-week-old OVX or sham-operated mice were fed diets containing either no PVEE (control) or 20 mg•kg(-1)•d(-1) PVEE for 8 wk, 5 mg•kg(-1)•d(-1) PVEE for 24 wk, or 20 mg•kg(-1)•d(-1) puerarin (daidzein-8-C-glucoside), a major isoflavone present in PVEE, for 10 wk. The effects of puerarin on glucose tolerance were also tested in OVX mice. The experimental diets were not associated with any abnormalities in any mice tested in the present study. Weight gain and serum glucose levels were increased in OVX mice and these effects were significantly attenuated in OVX mice that consumed PVEE (5 or 20 mg•kg(-1)•d(-1)) or puerarin. Puerarin-treated OVX mice also showed reduced serum glucose levels following administration of 1,000 mg•kg(-1) glucose. These results suggested that puerarin contributed to PVEE-mediated improvements in glucose metabolism in OVX mice. Although further studies are needed to clarify the molecular mechanism underlying these observations, PVEE and puerarin could provide effective approaches to the amelioration of postmenopausal diabetes.

  16. Doxycycline potentiates antitumor effect of cyclophosphamide in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Singh, Sandeep; Surve, Sachin V.; Vijayakumar, Maleppillil Vavachan; Bhat, Manoj Kumar . E-mail: manojkbhat@nccs.res.in

    2005-02-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CPA) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug in neoplasias. It is a DNA and protein alkylating agent that has a broad spectrum of activity against variety of neoplasms including breast cancer. The therapeutic effectiveness of CPA is limited by the high-dose hematopoietic, renal, and cardiac toxicity that accompanies the systemic distribution of liver-derived activated drug metabolites. The present study examines the potential of combining well-tolerated antibiotic doxycycline (DOX) with CPA and understanding the mechanism of cell killing. Interestingly, we found that DOX significantly enhances the tumor regression activity of CPA on xenograft mice model bearing MCF-7 cells. DOX also potentiates MCF-7 cell killing by CPA in vitro. In presence of DOX (3 {mu}g/ml), the IC{sub 50} value of CPA decreased significantly from 10 to 2.5 mM. Additional analyses indicate that the tumor suppressor p53 and p53-regulated proapoptotic Bax were upregulated in vivo and in vitro following CPA treatment in combination with DOX, suggesting that upregulation of p53 may contribute to the enhancement of antitumor effect of CPA by DOX. Furthermore, downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 was observed in animals treated with CPA and CPA plus DOX when compared to untreated or DOX-treated groups. Our results raise the possibility that this combination chemotherapeutic regimen may lead to additional improvements in treatment of breast cancer.

  17. Embryotoxic effects of prenatal T-2 toxin exposure in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Blakley, B R; Hancock, D S; Rousseaux, C G

    1987-01-01

    Pregnant CD-1 mice were administered T-2 toxin by gastric intubation on day 11 of gestation at dosages of 0, 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg. The T-lymphocyte dependent antibody response against sheep red blood cells which was evaluated in the offspring at six weeks of age was not affected by T-2 toxin exposure. Individual birth and weaning weights were not influenced by T-2 toxin, but the litter size was reduced in the high dose group, without affecting the number of implantation sites per dam. The number of female offspring produced by dams exposed to 1.5 mg/kg T-2 toxin was less compared to other treatment groups, suggesting that the female fetus was more susceptible to embryolethal effects of prenatal T-2 toxin exposure. These results suggest that prenatal T-2 toxin exposure is unlikely to be a significant health problem with respect to primary humoral immunity. At the dosages given, T-2 toxin produced substantial embryotoxicity without alteration in antibody production. The embryolethal effects are a primary limiting factor which may preclude the expression of any immunoteratological manifestations associated with humoral immunity under natural field conditions. PMID:3651897

  18. Neurobehavioral effect of essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus in mice.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M M; Costa, C A R A; Freire, A O; Santos, J G; Costa, M

    2009-03-01

    Tea obtained from leaves of Cymbopogon citratus (DC) Stapf is used for its anxiolytic, hypnotic and anticonvulsant properties in Brazilian folk medicine. Essential oil (EO) from fresh leaves was obtained by hydrodistillation and orally administered to Swiss male mice 30 min before experimental procedures. EO at 0.5 or 1.0 g/kg was evaluated for sedative/hypnotic activity through pentobarbital sleeping time, anxiolytic activity by elevated plus maze and light/dark box procedures and anticonvulsant activity through seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole and maximal electroshock. EO was effective in increasing the sleeping time, the percentage of entries and time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze as well as the time spent in the light compartment of light/dark box. In addition, EO delayed clonic seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole and blocked tonic extensions induced by maximal electroshock, indicating the elevation of the seizure threshold and/or blockage of seizures spread. These effects were observed in the absence of motor impairment evaluated on the rotarod and open field test. Our results are in accord with the ethnopharmacological use of Cymbopogon citratus, and after complementary toxicological studies it can support investigations assessing their use as anxiolytic, sedative or anticonvulsive agent.

  19. Effect of electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve on insulinemia and glycemia in Acomys cahirinus mice.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, E; Jeanrenaud, B

    1988-08-01

    To investigate the parasympathetic regulation of the endocrine pancreas in spiny mice (Acomys cahirinus), unilateral electrical stimulations of the left cervical vagus nerve were performed in these animals and their controls, the albino mice. Plasma insulin and glucose levels were measured before and after the stimulation. The stimulation parameters were: 2-2.5 V, 14 Hz, 1 msec for the albino mice and 3 V, 14 Hz, 1 msec or 15-20 V, 20 Hz, 1 msec for the spiny mice. Already 2 min after the start of the stimulation, the acomys as well as the albino mice showed a significant increase in plasma insulin levels which was accompanied by a weak but significant increase in glycemia. However, the total insulin output in the acomys mice was half than that of the albino mice. Carbachol administration had no effect on insulin secretion in the acomys mice, while it increased that of the controls. Atropine pretreatment failed to abolish the insulin release elicited by electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve in the acomys mice, while it abolished it in the albino ones. It is proposed that the vagus-nerve mediated insulin release that is present in the acomys mice is exerted, not via muscarinic receptors as in controls, but possibly via other neurotransmitter(s).

  20. Antinociceptive effect of a novel tosylpyrazole compound in mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sara M; Gewehr, Camila; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Cechinel, Cleber A; Wentz, Alexandre; Lourega, Rogério V; Sehnem, Ronan C; Zanatta, Nilo; Martins, Marcos A P; Rubin, Maribel A; Bonacorso, Helio G; Ferreira, Juliano

    2009-02-01

    Pain is the most common complaint in the medical field and the identification of compounds that can effectively treat painful states without induction of side-effects remains a major challenge in biomedical research. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antinociceptive effect of a novel compound, 3-(4-fluorophenyl)-5-trifluoromethyl-1H-1-tosylpyrazole (compound A) in several models of pain in mice and compare with those produced by the known trifluoromethyl-containing pyrazole compound celecoxib. Compound A or celecoxib were administrated by oral (78-780 micromol/kg), intrathecal (9-22.5 nmol/site) or intracerebroventricular (9-22.5 nmol/site) routes. Oral administration of either compound A or celecoxib abolished the mechanical allodynia, but not the oedema caused by intraplantar injection of carrageenan. Similarly, compound A reduced the overt nociception, but not the oedema, produced by bradykinin or capsaicin. However, compound A (500 micromol/kg, orally) did not alter nociception nor oedema caused by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E(2 )or glutamate, whereas celecoxib reduced only the nociception induced by the former. Moreover, oral and intrathecal administration of compound A or celecoxib also reduced the nociception induced by acetic acid. However, only celecoxib reduced the acetic acid-induced nociception when it was injected by the intracerebroventricular route. Finally, neither compound A nor celecoxib was able to produce antinociceptive effect in the tail-flick test or to alter the motor performance and the body temperature. Besides, compound A or celecoxib did not induce gastric lesion. Thus, compound A seems to be an interesting prototype for the development of novel analgesic drugs.

  1. Anticonvulsant effect of Satureja hortensis aerial parts extracts in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zolfagharian, Farzaneh; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Regarding the anticonvulsant effects of Satureja hortensis (S. hortensis) in Avicenna’s book: canon of medicine; the present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti- eplileptic effects of S. hortensis aqueous and ethanolic aerial part extracts. Furthermore, the mechanisms of their anticonvulsant activities were also evaluated. Materials and Methods: Seizure was induced by Pentylentetrazol (PTZ) and MES (maximal electroshock) models. Mice were randomly divided into 8 groups; negative control (normal saline, 10ml/Kg), positive control (diazepam, 2 mg/kg), S. hortensis aqueous and ethanolic extracts (200, 400 and 600 mg/kg). In PTZ test, latency to the first minimal clonic seizure (MCS), latency to the first generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTCS), the total duration of seizures and protection against mortality were evaluated. In MES test, the stretching length of extremities and protection against mortality were recorded. Results: Aqueous and ethanolic extracts (400 and 600 mg/kg) significantly increased MCS and GTCS latencies in PTZ model. Three doses of the extracts decreased the total duration of seizure. These extracts did not show any protective effects on seizure induced by MES model. In PTZ model, flumazenil, an antagonist of benzodiazepine (BZD) site in the GABAA-BZD receptor complex and 7- nitroindazole (7- NI), a selective nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) inhibitor, reduced the prolongation of seizure latency. Conclusion: S. hortensis showed anticonvulsant activity in PTZ model and this effect may be mediated, at least partly, through interacting with nitric oxide and GABAA-BZD receptor complex. PMID:27462553

  2. An anti-immobility effect of exogenous corticosterone in mice.

    PubMed

    Stone, Eric A; Lin, Yan

    2008-02-02

    Although traditionally considered to be etiological factors in depression, corticosteroids have been shown to exert an acute antidepressant action under some conditions. To investigate the mechanism of this effect, the present experiment sought to develop an animal model of it in mice using the repeated forced swim procedure. Corticosterone or desmethylimipramine was administered in the drinking water before, during or after repeated daily forced swims or a tail suspension test. Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor involvement were assessed by coadministration of RU486 or spironolactone. Plasma corticosterone and fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and piriform cortex were also measured in the treated animals. Corticosterone, given either before/during or after repeated swim, was found to produce a rapid reduction of immobility that was greater than that produced by desmethylimipramine given by the same route and dose and for the same duration. There was a nonsignificant tendency toward this effect in the tail suspension test. RU486 failed to block the effect but results with spironolactone were ambiguous. Plasma corticosterone was elevated in an inverted U-shaped fashion by the hormone treatment. Fos expression in response to the last swim was blunted in the paraventricular hypothalamus but enhanced in the piriform cortex. It is concluded that short-term treatment with corticosterone has a marked antidepressant effect in the mouse repeated forced swim test and merits further consideration as a short-term therapeutic agent in low doses. The hormone may act by suppression of neural activity in central stress circuits leading to a disinhibition of regions involved in active behavioral coping.

  3. Protective effect of berberine on serum glucose levels in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chueh, Wei-Han; Lin, Jin-Yuarn

    2012-03-01

    Among the active components in traditional anti-diabetic herbal plants, berberine which is an isoquinoline alkaloid exhibits promising potential for its potent anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic effects. However, the berberine effect on serum glucose levels in type 1 diabetes (T1D) subjects still remains unknown. This study investigated berberine's effects on serum glucose levels using non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice that spontaneously develop T1D. The NOD mice were randomly divided into four groups, administered water with 50, 150, and 500 mg berberine/kg bw, respectively, through 14 weeks. ICR mice were also selected as a species control group to compare with the NOD mice. Changes in body weight, oral glucose challenge, and serum glucose levels were determined to identify the protective effect of berberine on T1D. After the 14-week oral supplementation, berberine decreased fasting serum glucose levels in NOD mice close to the levels in normal ICR mice in a dose dependent manner. Serum berberine levels showed a significantly (P<0.05) negative and non-linear correlation with fasting glucose levels in berberine-administered NOD mice. Our results suggested that berberine supplemented at appropriate doses for 14 weeks did not cause toxic side effects, but improved hyperglycemia in NOD mice.

  4. Genotype-dependent characteristics of behavior in mice in cognitive tests. The effects of Noopept.

    PubMed

    Bel'nik, A P; Ostrovskaya, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2009-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J, BALB/c, and DBA/2J mice showed differences in their abilities to perform two cognitive tests. C57BL/6J mice had good learning ability and memory trace retention (at 10 days) in a simplified Morris maze, while BALB/c mice had low levels of memory trace retention and DBA/2J mice had low learning ability in this test. I.p. administration of the nootropic agent Noopept (GVS-111, N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg 15 min before the start of the test induced significant improvements in long-term memory in this test in BALB/c mice but no further improvement in C57BL/6J mice, and had no effect in DBA/2J mice. On testing the ability to extrapolate the direction of movement of a stimulus, administration of Noopept increased the proportion of correct responses in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice, but had no effect in DBA/2J mice.

  5. Benzene inhalation effects upon tetanus antitoxin. Responses and leukemogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, R D; Drew, R T; Bernstein, D M

    1980-01-01

    The effects of inhaled benzene on primary and secondary antibody responses and the incidence of leukemia in mice are reported. Young adult mice were given 5, 12, or 22 exposures to 400 ppM benzene for 6 hrs/day 5 days/week. After the exposure periods, the mice were immunized with absorbed tetanus toxoid (APTT) and/or fluid tetanus toxid (FTT). Exposure to benzene increasingly suppressed primary antibody responses to both antigens. Secondary antibody responses to FTT were nearly normal in animals given 10, 15, or 20 exposures to 400 ppM benzene. Other groups of mice were exposed to either 200 ppM or 50 ppM benzene. Primary antibody responses elicited with FTT and/or APTT were nearly normal in all mice exposed to 50 ppM benzene and in mice exposed to 200 ppM benzene for 5 days. However, 10 and 20 exposures to 200 ppM benzene inhibited antibody production. The effects of chronically inhaled 300 ppM benzene on the time of onset and incidence of leukemia in 400 7-month-old female HRS/J mice were also studied. Two genotypes were used; the (hr/hr) hairless mice are leukemia-prone, whereas the (hr/+) haired mice are more resistant to leukemia. The exposure continued for a period of 6 months. Lymphoid, myeloid, and mixed (lymphoid and myeloid) leukemias were observed. Ninety percent of the (hr/hr) mice exposed to benzene died from leukemia as compared with 91% for the (hr/hr) air control group. Eighty-five percent of the (hr/+) mice exposed to benzene died from leukemia as compared with 81% for the (hr/+) air control group. Exposures to 300 ppM benzene did not alter the time of onset or the incidence of leukemia commonly expected in HRS/J mice.

  6. Effects of experimental asthma on inflammation and lung mechanics in sickle cell mice.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Feroah, Thom R; Nandedkar, Sandhya D; Holzhauer, Sandra L; Hutchins, William; Schulte, Marie L; Strunk, Robert C; Debaun, Michael R; Hillery, Cheryl A

    2012-03-01

    Experimental asthma increases eosinophil and collagen deposition in the lungs of sickle cell disease (SCD) mice to a greater extent than in control mice. However, the effects of asthma on inflammation and airway physiology remain unclear. To determine effects of asthma on pulmonary inflammation and airway mechanics in SCD mice, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was used to generate chimeric SCD and hemoglobin A mice. Experimental asthma was induced by sensitizing mice with ovalbumin (OVA). Airway mechanics were assessed using forced oscillation techniques. Mouse lungs were examined histologically and physiologically. Cytokine, chemokine, and growth factors in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined by multiplex. IgE was quantified by ELISA. LDH was quantified using a colorimetric enzymatic assay. At baseline (nonsensitized), chimeric SCD mice developed hemolytic anemia with sickled red blood cells, mild leukocytosis, and increased vascular endothelial growth factor and IL-13 compared with chimeric hemoglobin A mice. Experimental asthma increased perialveolar eosinophils, plasma IgE, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 in chimeric hemoglobin A and SCD mice. IFN-γ levels were reduced in both groups. IL-5 was preferentially increased in chimeric SCD mice but not in hemoglobin A mice. Positive end-expiratory pressures and methacholine studies revealed that chimeric SCD mice had greater resistance in large and small airways compared with hemoglobin A mice at baseline and after OVA sensitization. SCD alone induces a baseline lung pathology that increases large and small airway resistance and primes the lungs to increased inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness after OVA sensitization.

  7. Anti-implantation effect of a carbamate fungicide mancozeb in albino mice.

    PubMed

    Bindali, Bharati B; Kaliwal, Basappa B

    2002-04-01

    Mancozeb, an organocarbamate fungicide, was administered to examine the effect on implantation at doses of 18, 24, 30 and 36 mg/kg body weight/d to normal virgin swiss albino mice for 8 days to pregnant mice. The vaginal smear and body weight of the mice were recorded daily and mice were sacrificed on 9th day of pregnancy. There was a complete inhibition of implantation in 36 mg mancozeb treated mice with 100% pre-implantation loss. There was a partial inhibition of implantation in 24 and 30 mg mancozeb treated mice with 53.44 and 90.16% pre-implantation loss respectively. However, implantation was not affected in 18 mg mancozeb treated mice with 4.92% pre-implantation loss when compared to oil treated controls. To study the temporal effect, the effective dose of 36 mg/kg body weight/d mancozeb was administered orally for 3 and 5 days and on day 3 only. There was a complete inhibition of implantation in 5 days treated mice with 100% pre-implantation loss and partial inhibition of implantation of 3 days treated mice with 75% pre-implantation loss. However, implantation was not affected in mice treated on day 3 only with 1.63% pre-implantation loss when compared to control mice. There was a significant decrease in the diestrus phase with the result there was a concomitant increase in the estrus phase and there was a significant decrease in the uterus weight with 24, 30 and 36 mg and for 3 and 5 days with 36 mg mancozeb treatment. Inhibition of implantation by mancozeb may be due to hormonal imbalance or its toxic effects.

  8. Teratogenic effect of diphenylhydantoin and/or fluphenazine in mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hamid, H A; Abdel-Rahman, M S; Abdel-Rahman, S A

    1996-01-01

    Diphenylhydantoin and fluphenazine are two drugs that act on the central nervous system. Many patients are taking these two drugs together and sometimes during pregnancy. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the safety or the teratogenic effect of these two drugs alone or in combination. Pregnant mice were administered diphenylhydantoin at 50 mg kg-1 body wt. and/or fluphenazine at 1 mg kg-1 body wt. by gavage. The control group was administered the vehicle of diphenylhydantoin (water containing 0.6% alcohol). All pregnant animals were treated from day 6 to day 15 of gestation. The females were sacrificed on day 18. A significant reduction of fetal weight and length was found in all treatment groups when compared to the control. As regards to skeletal anomalies, it was found that the incidence of incomplete ossification of sternebrae and skull bones was significantly increased in the combination group when compared to the control group. Examination of visceral anomalies showed that dilated cerebral ventricles were observed in the fluphenazine-treated group, with the incidence of these malformations increasing significantly when diphenylhydantoin was administered in combination with fluphenazine. In summary, the administration of diphenylhydantoin and fluphenazine in combination was shown to be more teratogenic than each drug alone.

  9. The antinociceptive effect of salvinorin A in mice.

    PubMed

    John, Trentini F; French, Larry G; Erlichman, Joseph S

    2006-09-18

    Salvia divinorum is a hallucinogenic plant used by the Mazatec Indians of Mexico for traditional spiritual ceremonies. The active constituent, salvinorin A, induces profound hallucinations, however the biological mechanism for this action is not known. Affinity-binding studies suggest that the biologic activity of salvinorin A involves the kappa-opioid receptor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of salvinorin A in mice. Salvinorin A and opioid receptor antagonists were administered intrathecally and the tail-flick latencies were used as a measure of antinociception. Salvinorin A increased tail-flick latencies in a dose-dependent manner (13.9-23.1 nmol) compared to control trials. Pretreatment with the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine attenuated the salvinorin A induced increase in tail-flick latency. In contrast, neither the mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine nor delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole significantly affected the antinociceptive response of salvinorin A administration. These data support previous reports that salvinorin A represents a unique non-alkaloidal agonist for the kappa-opioid receptor.

  10. Biologic effects of fenbendazole in rats and mice: a review.

    PubMed

    Villar, David; Cray, Carolyn; Zaias, Julia; Altman, Norman H

    2007-11-01

    This review summarizes findings from toxicologic, carcinogenic, immunologic, and metabolic studies on fenbendazole (FBZ). Currently, FBZ is used to treat or prevent pinworm outbreaks in laboratory rodents. Because antiparasitic treatments usually are not part of experimental designs, interactions from the medication on the outcomes of ongoing experiments are a concern. At therapeutic levels, FBZ does not alter the total content of cytochromes P450 but does induce certain hepatic cytochrome P450 isoforms, namely 1A1, 1A2, and 2B1. Although expressed constitutively at low or undetectable levels, these isoforms particularly are known for bioactivating a number of procarcinogens. Lifetime studies in rats have shown that FBZ is not a carcinogen but that it may behave as a tumor promoter when given after certain initiators. Unlike in other animal species, FBZ treatment-associated myelosuppression has not been reported to occur in rodents. The few currently available immunologic studies in mice, including an autoimmune model, have not shown effects on selected immune responses. However, data from other animal species suggest that the ability of B and T lymphocytes to proliferate in the secondary immune response may be suppressed during treatment with FBZ.

  11. Effects of chronic doxepin and amitriptyline administration in naïve mice and in neuropathic pain mice model.

    PubMed

    Mika, J; Jurga, A M; Starnowska, J; Wasylewski, M; Rojewska, E; Makuch, W; Kwiatkowski, K; Malek, N; Przewlocka, B

    2015-05-21

    Neuropathic pain is a severe clinical problem, often appearing as a co-symptom of many diseases or manifesting as a result of damage to the nervous system. Many drugs and agents are currently used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, such as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). The aims of this paper were to test the effects of two classic TCAs, doxepin and amitriptyline, in naïve animals and in a model of neuropathic pain and to determine the role of cytokine activation in the effects of these drugs. All experiments were carried out with Albino-Swiss mice using behavioral tests (von Frey test and the cold plate test) and biochemical analyses (qRT-PCR and Western blot). In the mice subjected to chronic constriction injury (CCI), doxepin and amitriptyline attenuated the symptoms of neuropathic pain and diminished the CCI-induced increase in the levels of spinal interleukin (IL)-6 and -1β mRNA, but not the protein levels of these cytokines, measured on day 12. Unexpectedly, chronic administration of doxepin or amitriptyline for 12 days produced allodynia and hyperalgesia in naïve mice. The treatment with these drugs did not influence the spinal levels of IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA, however, the protein levels of these pronociceptive factors were increased. The administration of ondansetron (5-HT3 receptor antagonist) significantly weakened the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by both antidepressants in naïve mice; in contrast, yohimbine (α2-adrenergic receptors antagonist) did not influence these effects. Allodynia and hyperalgesia induced in naïve animals by amitriptyline and doxepin may be associated with an increase in the levels of pronociceptive cytokines resulting from 5-HT3-induced hypersensitivity. Our results provide new and important information about the possible side effects of antidepressants. Further investigation of these mechanisms may help to guide decisions about the use of classic TCAs for therapy.

  12. Effects of dietary fat on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study assessed the effects of dietary fat on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice. Three-week old male C57BL/6 mice were fed the AIN-93G standard diet or a 45% fat diet (kcal %) for seven weeks before they were subcutaneously injected with 2.5 x 105 viable cells into th...

  13. Mechanism of Isoflavone Aglycone's Effect on Cognitive Performance of Senescence-Accelerated Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hong; Jin, Guifang; Ren, Dongdong; Luo, Sijing; Zhou, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of isoflavone aglycone (IA) on the learning and memory performance of senescence-accelerated mice, and explored its neural protective mechanism. Results showed that SAM-P/8 senescence-accelerated mice treated with IA performed significantly better in the Y-maze cognitive test than the no treatment control (P less…

  14. Effects of human opiorphin on food intake and water intake in mice following central administration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Tian, Xiao-Zhu; Bai, Lu; Liu, Ze-Qi; Xiao, Xing-Peng; Liu, Pu; Li, Xiang-Kai

    2017-02-22

    Human opiorphin plays an important pharmacological functions in rats or mice. The present study was performed to investigate effects and underlying mechanism of central injected opiorphin on food intake and water intake in mice. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered opiorphin (5-20μg/kg) dose-dependently suppressed food intake in fasted mice, but had no influence on food intake in freely feeding mice. The cumulative food intake was significantly decreased at 60min after injection of 10 and 20μg/kg opiorphin and the food intake was significantly reduced during the 20-60min period after treatment. Non-selected opiate receptor antagonist naloxone could fully block the inhibitory effect induced by opiorphin on cumulative food intake at 60min in fasted mice, suggesting that the anorexic effect of opiorphin was related to the opioid system. Moreover, the anorexic effect induced by opiorphin in fasted mice was also significantly inhibited by pretreatment with captopril or valsartan, which suggested that endogenous angiotensin may be involved in the response to opiorphin. Interestingly, the effect of opiorphin on water intake was increased in both fasted and freely feeding mice, which was completely blocked by captopril and valsartan. Furthermore, naloxone did not modify the effect of opiorphin on water intake. All together, the food and water intake effects of opiorphin may be due to the protection of the endogenous angiotensin and opioid peptides from degradation by NEP or APN.

  15. Effects of gasoline engine emissions on preexisting allergic airway responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Day, Kimberly C; Reed, Matthew D; McDonald, Jacob D; Seilkop, Steven K; Barrett, Edward G

    2008-10-01

    Gasoline-powered vehicle emissions contribute significantly to ambient air pollution. We hypothesized that exposure to gasoline engine emissions (GEE) may exacerbate preexisting allergic airway responses. Male BALB/c mice were sensitized by injection with ovalbumin (OVA) and then received a 10-min aerosolized OVA challenge. Parallel groups were sham-sensitized with saline. Mice were exposed 6 h/day to air (control, C) or GEE containing particulate matter (PM) at low (L), medium (M), or high (H) concentrations, or to the H level with PM removed by filtration (high-filtered, HF). Immediately after GEE exposure mice received another 10-min aerosol OVA challenge (pre-OVA protocol). In a second (post-OVA) protocol, mice were similarly sensitized but only challenged to OVA before air or GEE exposure. Measurements of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and blood collection were performed approximately 24 h after the last exposure. In both protocols, M, H, and HF GEE exposure significantly decreased BAL neutrophils from nonsensitized mice but had no significant effect on BAL cells from OVA-sensitized mice. In the pre-OVA protocol, GEE exposure increased OVA-specific IgG(1) but had no effect on BAL interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-13, or interferon (IFN)-gamma in OVA-sensitized mice. Nonsensitized GEE-exposed mice had increased OVA-specific IgG(2a), IgE, and IL-2, but decreased total IgE. In the post-OVA protocol, GEE exposure reduced BAL IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-gamma in nonsensitized mice but had no effect on sensitized mice. These results suggest acute exposure to the gas-vapor phase of GEE suppressed inflammatory cells and cytokines from nonsensitized mice but did not substantially exacerbate allergic responses.

  16. Rewarding and aversive effects of ethanol in High Drinking in the Dark selectively bred mice

    PubMed Central

    Barkley-Levenson, Amanda M.; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Smitasin, Phoebe J.; Crabbe, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Both rewarding and aversive effects contribute to alcohol consumption. Animals genetically predisposed to be high drinkers show reduced sensitivity to the aversive effects of alcohol, and in some instances, increased sensitivity to alcohol’s rewarding effects. The present studies tested the High Drinking in the Dark (HDID) selected lines, a genetic model of drinking to intoxication, to determine whether intake in these mice was genetically related to sensitivity to alcohol aversion or reward. Male HDID mice from the first and second replicate lines (HDID-1 and HDID-2, respectively) and mice from the heterogeneous progenitor control population (HS/Npt, or HS) were conditioned for a taste aversion to a salt solution using 2 doses of alcohol, and lithium chloride (LiCl) and saline controls. In separate experiments, male and female HDID-1, HDID-2, and HS mice were conditioned for place preference using alcohol. HDID mice were found to have an attenuated sensitivity to alcohol at a moderate (2 g/kg) dose compared to HS mice, but did not differ on conditioned taste aversion to a high (4 g/kg) dose or LiCl or saline injections. HDID and HS mice showed comparable development of alcohol-induced conditioned place preference. These results indicate that high blood alcohol levels after drinking in the HDID mice is genetically related to attenuated aversion to alcohol, while sensitivity to alcohol reward is not altered in these mice. Thus, HDID mice may find a moderate dose of alcohol to be less aversive than control mice and consequently may drink more because of this reduced aversive sensitivity. PMID:23910826

  17. Effects of chronic deoxynivalenol exposure on p53 heterozygous and p53 homozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Bondy, G S; Coady, L; Curran, I; Caldwell, D; Armstrong, C; Aziz, S A; Nunnikhoven, A; Gannon, A M; Liston, V; Shenton, J; Mehta, R

    2016-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a secondary metabolite associated with Fusarium species pathogenic to important food crops. A two-year feeding study reported that DON was non-carcinogenic in B6C3F1 mice. The present study was conducted to further characterize the chronic effects of DON by exposing cancer-prone transgenic p53 heterozygous (p53+/-) male mice and p53 homozygous (p53+/+) male mice to 0, 1, 5, or 10 mg DON/kg in diet for 26 weeks. Gross and microscopic organ-specific neoplastic and non-neoplastic changes and expression profiles of key hepatic and renal genes were assessed. Few toxicologic differences between p53+/+ and p53+/- mice were observed, and no tumours were observed due to DON. The results indicated that DON was non-carcinogenic and that reduced expression of the p53 gene did not play a key role in responses to DON toxicity. The lack of inflammatory and proliferative lesions in mice may be attributed to the anorectic effects of DON, which resulted in dose-dependent reductions in body weight in p53+/+ and p53+/- mice. Hepatic and renal gene expression analyses confirmed that chronic exposure to DON was noninflammatory. The effects of 26-week DON exposure on p53+/+ and p53+/-mice were consistent with those previously seen in B6C3F1 mice exposed to DON for two years.

  18. Temporal effects of mancozeb on testes, accessory reproductive organs and biochemical constituents in albino mice.

    PubMed

    Ksheerasagar, Raghavendra L; Kaliwal, Basappa B

    2003-12-01

    Mancozeb, a fungicide of ethylenebisdithiocarbamate group was orally administered at 800 mg/kg body weight to male Swiss albino mice for 5, 10, 20 and 30 days. Daily body weight of the mice were recorded. The mice were sacrificed by cervical dislocation after 24 h of terminal exposure of mancozeb. Testes weight decreased significantly in 20 and 30 days mancozeb treated mice. However, there was a significant decrease in the number of spermatogonia, diameter of spermatocytes and spermatids in 20 days and number of spermatids in 10 days mancozeb treated mice. Histologic studies of the testis of the mice treated with mancozeb for long duration revealed spermatogenesis inhibition reflected by significant decrease in the number of spermatogenic cells and sperms, when compared with that of controls. In the mice treated with mancozeb for 20 and 30 days showed significant decrease in the weight of the prostate gland. However weight of Cowper's glands decreased significantly in 30 days mancozeb treated mice. There was significant decrease in the kidney, spleen and liver weight, where as thyroid weight increased significantly in mice treated with mancozeb for 30 days. However, thymus weight increased significantly only in the mice treated with mancozeb for 10, 20 and 30 days. In mice treated with mancozeb for 20 days caused significant decrease in the level of protein and a significant increase in the level of total lipids in the testis. However, there was significant decrease in the level of glycogen in the kidney. In mice treated with mancozeb for 30 days caused significant decrease in the levels of protein and glycogen and significant increase in the level of total lipids in the testis and liver and a significant decrease in the protein, glycogen and total lipids in the kidney. These observed effects of mancozeb on testis and biochemical constituents may be due to hormonal imbalance in any of the stages in the hypothalamo-hypophysial-testicular axis.

  19. Kinetics of Bartonella birtlesii Infection in Experimentally Infected Mice and Pathogenic Effect on Reproductive Functions

    PubMed Central

    Boulouis, Henri J.; Barrat, Francine; Bermond, Delphine; Bernex, Florence; Thibault, Danièle; Heller, Rémy; Fontaine, Jean-Jacques; Piémont, Yves; Chomel, Bruno B.

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of infection and the pathogenic effects on the reproductive function of laboratory mice infected with Bartonella birtlesii recovered from an Apodemus species are described. B. birtlesii infection, as determined by bacteremia, occurred in BALB/c mice inoculated intravenously. Inoculation with a low-dose inoculum (1.5 × 103 CFU) induced bacteremia in only 75% of the mice compared to all of the mice inoculated with higher doses (≥1.5 × 104). Mice became bacteremic for at least 5 weeks (range, 5 to 8 weeks) with a peak ranging from 2 × 103 to 105 CFU/ml of blood. The bacteremia level was significantly higher in virgin females than in males but the duration of bacteremia was similar. In mice infected before pregnancy (n = 20), fetal loss was evaluated by enumerating resorption and fetal death on day 18 of gestation. The fetal death and resorption percentage of infected mice was 36.3% versus 14.5% for controls (P < 0.0001). Fetal suffering was evaluated by weighing viable fetuses. The weight of viable fetuses was significantly lower for infected mice than for uninfected mice (P < 0.0002). Transplacental transmission of Bartonella was demonstrated since 76% of the fetal resorptions tested was culture positive for B. birtlesii. The histopathological analysis of the placentas of infected mice showed vascular lesions in the maternal placenta, which could explain the reproductive disorders observed. BALB/c mice appeared to be a useful model for studying Bartonella infection. This study provides the first evidence of reproductive disorders in mice experimentally infected with a Bartonella strain originating from a wild rodent. PMID:11500400

  20. Effects of pretreatment with SKF-525A on triphenyltin metabolism and toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohhira, S; Matsui, H; Watanabe, K

    2000-11-20

    The effects of cytochrome P-450 inhibition by alpha-phenyl-alpha-propylbenzeneacetic acid 2-[diethylamino]-ethyl ester hydrochloride (SKF-525A), which inhibits the activity of a number of cytochrome P-450s, on triphenyltin metabolism and toxicity in mice were studied. At 24 h after triphenyltin administration, the triphenyltin levels in the tissues of SKF-525A-pretreated mice were about three times of those in the tissues of SKF-525A-untreated mice and the ratio of metabolites to parent triphenyltin in the tissues of SKF-525A-pretreated mice was lower than those in the tissues of SKF-525A-untreated mice. These data indicate that the pretreatment of SKF-525A decelerated the triphenyltin metabolism and increased triphenyltin accumulation in the tissues of mice. Although triphenyltin did not affect plasma glucose levels of in the SKF-525A-untreated mice, the triphenyltin produced marked hyperglycemia in SKF-525A-pretreated mice. These results suggest that the inhibition of cytochrome P-450 system enzymes by SKF-525A affects the metabolism and toxicity of triphenyltin and has a key role in inducing the hyperglycemic action of triphenyltin, i.e. by increasing triphenyltin accumulation in the mice.

  1. The antidepressant-like effect of human opiorphin via opioid-dependent pathways in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing-Zhen; Lu, Song-Song; Tian, Xiao-Zhu; Yang, Ai-Min; Ge, Wan-Wen; Chen, Qiang

    2011-02-04

    In the present study, we investigated the antidepressive activity of opiorphin with central administration in the forced swim test in mice. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of opiorphin (1-6 μg/mouse) dose-dependently decreased the immobility time, which was reversed by nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, δ-selective naltrindole and μ-selective β-FNA. The data suggested that central administration of opiorphin produced an antidepressant-like effect by activating both μ and δ opioid receptors indirectly. In order to eliminate the possibility of a false-positive result in the forced swim test, locomotor activity was checked in both non-habituated and habituated mice. Opiorphin had no influence on non-habituated mice, though had weak effect on habituated mice. In addition, mice treated with opiorphin did not display any convulsive behaviors.

  2. Effect of peripheral administration of cholecystokinin on food intake in apolipoprotein AIV knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimichi, Go; Lo, Chunmin C; Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Ma, Liyun; Lee, Dana M; Begg, Denovan P; Liu, Min; Sakai, Randall R; Woods, Stephen C; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu; Tso, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Apolipoprotein AIV (apo AIV) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are satiation factors secreted by the small intestine in response to lipid meals. Apo AIV and CCK-8 has an additive effect to suppress food intake relative to apo AIV or CCK-8 alone. In this study, we determined whether CCK-8 (1, 3, or 5 μg/kg ip) reduces food intake in fasted apo AIV knockout (KO) mice as effectively as in fasted wild-type (WT) mice. Food intake was monitored by the DietMax food system. Apo AIV KO mice had significantly reduced 30-min food intake following all doses of CCK-8, whereas WT mice had reduced food intake only at doses of 3 μg/kg and above. Post hoc analysis revealed that the reduction of 10-min and 30-min food intake elicited by each dose of CCK-8 was significantly larger in the apo AIV KO mice than in the WT mice. Peripheral CCK 1 receptor (CCK1R) gene expression (mRNA) in the duodenum and gallbladder of the fasted apo AIV KO mice was comparable to that in WT mice. In contrast, CCK1R mRNA in nodose ganglia of the apo AIV KO mice was upregulated relative to WT animals. Similarly, upregulated CCK1R gene expression was found in the brain stem of apo AIV KO mice by in situ hybridization. Although it is possible that the increased satiating potency of CCK in apo AIV KO mice is mediated by upregulation of CCK 1R in the nodose ganglia and nucleus tractus solitarius, additional experiments are required to confirm such a mechanism.

  3. Enhanced antinociceptive effects of morphine in histamine H2 receptor gene knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mobarakeh, Jalal Izadi; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Sakurada, Shinobu; Kuramasu, Atsuo; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2006-09-01

    We have previously shown that antinociceptive effects of morphine are enhanced in histamine H1 receptor gene knockout mice. In the present study, involvement of supraspinal histamine H2 receptor in antinociception by morphine was examined using histamine H2 receptor gene knockout (H2KO) mice and histamine H2 receptor antagonists. Antinociception was evaluated by assays for thermal (hot-plate, tail-flick and paw-withdrawal tests), mechanical (tail-pressure test) and chemical (formalin and capsaicin tests) stimuli. Thresholds for pain perception in H2KO mice were higher than wild-type mice. Antinociceptive effects of intracerebroventricularly administered morphine were enhanced in the H2KO mice compared to wild-type mice. Intracerebroventricular co-administration of morphine and cimetidine produced significant antinociceptive effects in the wild-type mice when compared to morphine or cimetidine alone. Furthermore, zolantidine, a selective and hydrophobic H2 receptor antagonist, enhanced the effects of morphine in all nociceptive assays examined. These results suggest that histamine exerts inhibitory effects on morphine-induced antinociception through H2 receptors at the supraspinal level. Our present and previous studies suggest that H1 and H2 receptors cooperatively function to modulate pain perception in the central nervous system.

  4. Long-term effects of neonatal methamphetamine exposure on cognitive function in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Jessica A; Park, Byung S; Raber, Jacob

    2011-05-16

    Exposure to methamphetamine during brain development impairs cognition in children and adult rodents. In mice, these impairments are greater in females than males. Adult female, but not male, mice show impairments in novel location recognition following methamphetamine exposure during brain development. In contrast to adulthood, little is known about the potential effects of methamphetamine exposure on cognition in adolescent mice. As adolescence is an important time of development and is relatively understudied, the aim of the current study was to examine potential long-term effects of neonatal methamphetamine exposure on behavior and cognition during adolescence. Male and female mice were exposed to methamphetamine (5 mg/kg) or saline once a day from postnatal days 11 to 20, the period of rodent hippocampal development. Behavioral and cognitive function was assessed during adolescence beginning on postnatal day 30. During the injection period, methamphetamine-exposed mice gained less weight on average compared to saline-exposed mice. In both male and female mice, methamphetamine exposure significantly impaired novel object recognition and there was a trend toward impaired novel location recognition. Anxiety-like behavior, sensorimotor gating, and contextual and cued fear conditioning were not affected by methamphetamine exposure. Thus, neonatal methamphetamine exposure affects cognition in adolescence and unlike in adulthood equally affects male and female mice.

  5. Effects of Hot Water Extracts from Polygonum multiflorum on Ovariectomy Induced Osteopenia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yun-Ho; Kang, Kyung-Yun; Kim, Jong-Jin; Lee, Sung-Ju; Son, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Polygonum multiflorum (PM), a traditional Chinese medicine, is used to treat various diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hyperlipidemia. However, the influence of PM on osteoporosis in animals is unclear. The present study investigated the antiosteoporotic effect of PM on bone mass in ovariectomized (OVX) mice and its possible mechanism of action. Twenty-five female C3H/HeN mice were divided into five groups of five mice as follows. Sham-operated control mice received daily oral gavage of an equal volume of water, and OVX mice received daily oral gavage of water or an injection of β-estradiol or PM for 6 weeks. Administration of PM significantly suppressed body weight and organs weight and increased weight and length of bone compared with the OVX group. Treatment with PM reversed osteopenia in OVX mice, thereby improving the bone morphometric parameters. Moreover, histological analysis using hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that PM inhibited OVX-induced bone loss. Serum estradiol and bone alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly decreased in the OVX group, with the levels increasing with PM treatment. In addition, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity was inhibited by PM in OVX mice. These results suggest that PM is effective in preventing bone loss in OVX mice. PMID:27746822

  6. Stressor exposure has prolonged effects on colonic microbial community structure in Citrobacter rodentium-challenged mice

    PubMed Central

    Galley, Jeffrey D.; Mackos, Amy R.; Varaljay, Vanessa A.; Bailey, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    Stressor exposure significantly affects the colonic mucosa-associated microbiota, and exacerbates Citrobacter rodentium-induced inflammation, effects that can be attenuated with probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri. This study assessed the structure of the colonic mucosa-associated microbiota in mice exposed to a social stressor (called social disruption), as well as non-stressed control mice, during challenge with the colonic pathogen C. rodentium. Mice were exposed to the social stressor or home cage control conditions for six consecutive days and all mice were challenged with C. rodentium immediately following the first exposure to the stressor. In addition, mice received probiotic L. reuteri, or vehicle as a control, via oral gavage following each stressor exposure. The stressor-exposed mice had significant differences in microbial community composition compared to non-stressed control mice. This difference was first evident following the six-cycle exposure to the stressor, on Day 6 post-C. rodentium challenge, and persisted for up to 19 days after stressor termination. Mice exposed to the stressor had different microbial community composition regardless of whether they were treated with L. reuteri or treated with vehicle as a control. These data indicate that stressor exposure affects the colonic microbiota during challenge with C. rodentium, and that these effects are long-lasting and not attenuated by probiotic L. reuteri. PMID:28344333

  7. Effects of dimethoate in male mice reproductive parameters.

    PubMed

    Jallouli, Manel; Dhouib, Ines El Bini; Dhouib, Hanène; Gharbi, Najoua; El Fazaa, Saloua

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the ability of dimethoate (DMT) to induce reprotoxicity in male mice. The dose (20 mg/kg/day) was given orally for 30 days. A significant decrease in sperm count, motility and viability and a significant increase of morphologically abnormal spermatozoa percent in DMT treated mice was observed. Testicular Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities were inhibited. Also, a significant increase in lipid peroxidation level and a significant decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes were observed in testis of DMT mice. In addition, gene expression of glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4) was quantified in RNA samples extracted from the testis by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Compared with control, mRNA expression of GPx4 was slightly decreased after DMT-exposure.

  8. Long-lasting, selective, anxiogenic effects of feline predator stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Adamec, Robert; Walling, Sue; Burton, Paul

    2004-12-15

    Lasting increases in anxiety-like behavior (ALB) are produced by brief exposure of rats to a cat [Adamec RE, Shallow T, Lasting effects on rodent anxiety of a single exposure to a cat, Physiol. Behav., 54 (1993) 101-109.]. Mice also respond defensively to natural predator stimuli. Moreover, chronic exposure of mice to rat odor has immediate anxiogenic effects in plus maze and lasting (7 days) and effects on acoustic startle. The present study examined the lasting (7 days) after effects on ALB of a brief unprotected exposure of male CFW mice to a cat. Lasting effects on ALB of exposure to the cat exposure room were also assessed. Effects on behavior were studied in the hole board and elevated plus-maze (EPM). An ethological analysis of behavior revealed that risk assessment in the EPM was increased the most in predator-stressed mice. Mice exposed to the cat exposure room showed increased risk assessment falling between controls and cat exposed mice. Behavior in the hole board was unaffected, as were most other behaviors in the plus maze. Factor analysis revealed independence of risk assessment from other measures of ALB, activity and exploration, consistent with findings in rats. Aspects of the stress experience were highly predictive of later response to the cat. Cat biting and pawing, mouse fleeing and mouse weight measured at the time of cat exposure together accounted for 71% of the variance of risk assessment in cat exposed mice. The significance of these findings for vulnerability to cat predator stress of mice and for the use of predator stress in mice as a model of aspects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are discussed.

  9. Orexin administration to mice that underwent chronic stress produces bimodal effects on emotion-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hye-Seung; Kim, Jae-Gon; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Yoon, Bong-June

    2014-11-01

    Orexin plays diverse roles in regulating behaviors, such as sleep and wake, reward processing, arousal, and stress and anxiety. The orexin system may accomplish these multiple tasks through its complex innervations throughout the brain. The emerging evidence indicates a role of orexin in emotional behaviors; however, most of the previous studies have investigated the function of orexin in naïve animals. Here, we examined a functional role of orexin in mice that had been exposed to repeated stress. Chronic social defeat stress produced differential social interaction behaviors in mice (susceptible versus resilient) and these two groups of mice displayed different levels of prepro-orexin in the hypothalamus. Exogenously added orexin A to the brain induced an antidepressant-like effect in only the susceptible mice but not in the resilient mice. In contrast, orexin A and orexin B infused together produced an anxiogenic effect in only the resilient mice and not in the susceptible mice. Furthermore, we found that the antidepressant-like effect of orexin A is mediated by the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) after exposure to chronic restraint stress. These findings reveal a bimodal effect of the orexin system in regulating emotional behavior that depends on stress susceptibility.

  10. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes. PMID:26632783

  11. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-11-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes.

  12. Effect of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol on the morphine-induced hyperactivity of mice.

    PubMed

    Ulkü, E; Ayhan, I H; Tulunay, F C; Uran, B; Kaymakçalan, S

    1980-01-01

    The effect of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the locomotor activity-stimulating action of morphine has been investigated in mice. THC (10 mg/kg) has been found to potentiate morphine-induced hyperactivity. On the other hand, the stimulating action of morphine on motor activity strongly diminished in mice rendered tolerant by the implantation of a morphine pellet. The pretreatment of morphine-tolerant mice with the same dose of THC did not change the effect of morphine on the motor activity. These results suggest that tolerance also developed to the potentiating action of THC on morphine-induced hyperactivity during the development of tolerance to this action of morphine.

  13. Effects of dietary arginine supplementation on antibody production and antioxidant enzyme activity in burned mice.

    PubMed

    Shang, Huey-Fang; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2003-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of arginine (Arg) supplementation on specific antibody production and antioxidant enzyme activities in burned mice vaccinated with detoxified Pseudomonas exotoxin A linked with the outer membrane proteins I and F, named PEIF. Also, the survival rate of burned mice complicated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated. Experiment 1: Thirty BALB/c mice were assigned to two groups. One group was fed a control diet with casein as the protein source, while the other group was supplemented with 2% Arg in addition to casein. The two groups were isonitrogenous. The mice were immunized twice with PEIF, and the production of specific antibodies against PEIF was measured every week. After 8 weeks, all mice received a 30% body surface area burn injury. Mice were sacrificed 24h after the burn. The antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxides in the tissues as well as the specific antibody production were analyzed. Experiment 2: Twenty-eight mice were divided into two groups and vaccinated as described in experiment 1. After the burn the mice were infected with P. aeruginosa, and the survival rate was observed for 8 days. The results demonstrated that antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxides in tissues were significantly lower in the Arg group than in the control group after the burn. The production of specific antibodies against P. aeruginosa significantly increased in the Arg group at 4 and 7 weeks after immunization, and 24h after the burn. The survival rates of vaccinated burned mice after bacterial infection did not significantly differ between the two groups. These results suggest that vaccinating mice with Arg supplementation may enhance humoral immunity and attenuate the oxidative stress induced by burn injury. However, Arg supplementation did not improve survival in vaccinated mice complicated with P. aeruginosa infection.

  14. Effect of ultraviolet irradiation on mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikai, K.; Danno, K.; Horio, T.; Narumiya, S.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of UV irradiation on the skin was investigated in (WB-W/+) X (C57BL/6J-Wv/+)F1-W/Wv mice, which are genetically deficient in tissue mast cells. Their congenic littermates (+/+) and normal albino mice (ICR or BALB/c) were used as controls. Mice were irradiated with 500 mJ/cm2 of UVB and the increment of ear thickness was measured before and 6, 12, and 24 h after irradiation. Ear swelling in W/Wv mice at 12 and 24 h after irradiation was significantly smaller than that in +/+ and ICR mice. In contrast, the number of sunburn cells formed 24 h after UVB irradiation (200 or 500 mJ/cm2) was similar in W/Wv, +/+ and ICR mice. On the other hand, when mice were treated with 8-methoxy-psoralen (0.5%) plus UVA irradiation (4 J/cm2) (topical PUVA), ears of W/Wv and BALB/c mice, which were both white in color, were thickened similarly 72 h after treatment, but less swelling was observed in +/+ mice, which were black in skin color. The amount of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) in ears, determined by radioimmunoassay specific for PGD2, was elevated 3-fold in +/+ and ICR mice at 3 h after irradiation with 500 mJ/cm2 of UVB in comparison with basal level without irradiation. However, such elevation was not observed in W/Wv mice. These results suggest that mast cells play an important role in UVB-induced inflammation, and PGs from mast cells are responsible at least in part for the development of this reaction. However, neither mast cells nor PGs contribute to the sunburn cell formation and ear swelling response by PUVA treatment.

  15. Anti-obesity effect of intranasal administration of galanin-like peptide (GALP) in obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Kageyama, Haruaki; Shiba, Kanako; Hirako, Satoshi; Wada, Nobuhiro; Yamanaka, Satoru; Nogi, Yukinori; Takenoya, Fumiko; Nonaka, Naoko; Hirano, Tsutomu; Inoue, Shuji; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Galanin-like peptide (GALP) has an anti-obesity effect in rats and mice. It has been reported that the uptake of GALP by the brain is higher after intranasal administration than with intravenous injection. This study therefore aimed to clarify the effect of intranasal administration of GALP on the feeding behavior of lean and obese mice. Autoradiography revealed the presence of 125I-GALP in the olfactory bulb and the brain microcirculation. The body weights of ob/ob mice gradually increased during vehicle treatment, but remained unchanged in response to repeated intranasal administration of GALP, with both ob/ob and diet-induced obese mice displaying significantly decreased food intake, water intake and locomotor activity when treated with GALP. These results suggest that intranasal administration is an effective route whereby GALP can exert its effect as an anti-obesity drug. PMID:27323911

  16. Effect of antidepressant drugs on 6-OHDA-treated mice in the FST.

    PubMed

    Chenu, F; Dailly, E; Bourin, M

    2007-02-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting that dopamine could be indirectly involved in the appearance of behavioural effects of antidepressants. In this study, we induced a partial (over 70%) and non-reversible depletion of dopamine-containing neurons in mice by i.c.v. infusion of 6-OHDA. Then, we compared the antidepressant-like effect of drugs (citalopram, paroxetine, desipramine and imipramine) with or without dopamine depletion in the mice forced swimming test. Our results clearly show that lesion with 6-OHDA does not modify the response of mice to desipramine and imipramine, whereas dopamine depletion abolished the antidepressant-like effect of citalopram and paroxetine. It could then be suggested that antidepressant-like effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (paroxetine and citalopram) in the mice FST requires the activation of dopaminergic pathways to occur.

  17. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on the pathogenesis of Candida albicans in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Denkins, Y.M.

    1991-01-01

    This dissertation addresses questions concerning the effects of UV radiation on the pathogenesis of opportunistic fungal pathogens such as Candida albicans. UV radiation decreased the survival of Candida-infected mice; however, no correlation was found between suppression of the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response and the course of lethal infection. This suggested that DTH was not protective against lethal disease with this organism. UV radiation also changed the persistence of the organism in the internal organs. UV-irradiated, infected animals had increased numbers of Candida in their kidneys compared to non-irradiated mice. Sensitization prior to UV irradiation aided clearance of the organism from the kidneys of UV-irradiated mice. These data show that UV radiation suppresses cell-mediated immunity to Candida albicans in mice and increases mortality of Candida-infected mice. Moreover, the data suggest that an increase in environmental UV radiation could increase the severity of pathogenic infections.

  18. Anxiolytic effect of music depends on ovarian steroid in female mice.

    PubMed

    Chikahisa, Sachiko; Sano, Atsuko; Kitaoka, Kazuyoshi; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi; Sei, Hiroyoshi

    2007-04-16

    Music is known to be able to elicit emotional changes, including anxiolytic effects. The gonadal steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone have also been reported to play important roles in the modulation of anxiety. In the present study, we examined whether the effect of music on anxiety is related to ovarian steroid in female mice. Behavioral paradigms measuring anxiety were tested in gonadally intact (SHAM) and ovariectomized (OVX) female mice chronically treated with either placebo (OVX/Placebo), 17beta-estradiol (OVX/E), or progesterone (OVX/P). In the elevated plus maze, light-dark transition, and marble burying tests, SHAM and OVX/P mice exposed to music showed less anxiety than those exposed to white noise or silence while OVX/placebo mice did not show these effects at all. OVX/E mice showed the anxiolytic effect of music only in the marble burying test. Furthermore, pretreatment with progesterone's metabolite inhibitor completely prevented the anxiolytic effect of music in behavioral tests, while pretreatment with a progesterone receptor blocker did not prevent the anxiolytic effect of music. These results suggest that exposure to music reduces anxiety levels, and ovarian steroids, mainly progesterone, may be involved in the anxiolytic effect of music observed in female mice.

  19. Effects of 2-chlorodibenzofuran on fetal development in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Usami, Makoto; Sakemi, Kazue; Tabata, Hirobumi; Kawashima, Kunio; Takanaka, Akira

    1993-11-01

    2-Chlorodibenzofuran (2-MCDF), a monochlorinated derivative of dibenzofuran, has been detected as a contaminant in chlorinated tap water in Japan. Shiraishi et al. (1985) analyzed polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in Tsukuba tap water and detected 0.04-1.4 ng/L of 2-MCDF. This means that unintended human exposure to 2-MCDF has occurred, and therefore safety evaluation of 2-MCDF is needed. Toxicological information on 2-MCDF is limited and available only on mutagenicity and metabolic fate. In the Ames test, 2-MCDF showed weak mutagenic activity on Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 98 above 0.4 {mu}mol/plate, but not on strain TA 100 even at 10 {mu}mol/plate, and this activity was diminished by the addition of S9 mix. After intravenous or oral administration to rats, 2-MCDF is rapidly metabolized and excreted in bile and urine. Major metabolites in the rate bile fluid were 2- and/or 7-hydroxylated forms of 2-MCDF. For developmental toxicity, we previously examined the embryotoxicity of 2-MCDF by using post-implantation rat embryo culture. When day 9 embryos were continuously exposed throughout 48 hr culture period either in the presence or in the absence of a metabolic activation system, 2-MCDF at 1 mM was embryotoxic and caused morphological abnormalities of the embryos. However, dosing of up to 1000 mg/kg/day of 2-MCDF to pregnant rats during days 9 to 11 of gestation, corresponding to the culture period, had no effects on the embryo-fetal growth. It was tentatively concluded from these results that 2-MCDF had weak-inactive teratogenicity in rats. In the present study, we further examined fetal effects of 2-MCDF by a teratogenicity test in which the dosing period covers the major organogenic period. We used mice, since they have been used for the evaluation of teratogenicity of polychlorinated congeners of 2-MCDF, because of their higher susceptibility than that of rats. 16 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Effects of ethylenediamine on morphine analgesia and tolerance-dependence in mice.

    PubMed

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L

    1985-01-01

    Ethylenediamine, a GABA receptor agonist induced a small hyperalgesic state in mice, but increased morphine analgesia. The interaction with this morphine effect was not dose-dependent. Ethylenediamine significantly antagonized tolerance development at relatively low doses (5-10 mg/kg). The GABA mimetic agent increased the frequency of abstinence signs in the naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal in mice. The effect of ethylenediamine on morphine withdrawal was suppressed by the irreversible GABA transaminase inhibitor, gamma-vinyl GABA.

  1. Effects of a lactobacilli, oligosaccharide and organic germanium intake on the immune responses of mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Saito, Miki; Aso, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    The organic germanium compound, Ge-132, has immune-modulating effects. We evaluated the symbiotic effects of Ge-132 with lactobacilli and oligosaccharide (LB/OS) on the immune responses of mice. The highest fecal IgA levels were observed in the mice receiving a low concentration of Ge-132 with LB/OS for 8 weeks. Our data suggest that LB/OS with a low concentration of Ge-132 stimulated the intestinal immunity.

  2. EFFECT OF MARINE TOXINS ON THERMOREGULATION IN MICE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine algal toxins are extremely toxic and can represent a major health problem to humans and animals. Temperature regulation is one of many processes to be affected by exposure to these toxins. Mice and rats become markedly hypothermic when subjected to acute exposure to the ma...

  3. Change in radio sensitivity of mice under effect of rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arlashchenko, N. I.; Seraya, V. M.; Rodina, G. P.

    1980-01-01

    Radiosensitivity of animals placed in slowly rotating chambers was investigated and was found to vary under the influence of the functional load on the vestibular analyzer. An increased radioresistance was registered in populations of the most radiosensitive mice. In populations of more radioresistant animals the gravitational load decreases the radioresistance.

  4. EFFECTS OF MARINE ALGAL TOXINS ON THERMOREGULATION IN MICE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hypothermia is often seen in mice and rats exposed acutely to marine algal toxins, but the mechanism of action of these toxins on thermoregulation is not well understood. Our laboratory has assessed the thermoregulatory mechanisms of two marine algal toxins, maitotoxin and brevet...

  5. Effects of Macrophage Depletion on Sleep in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Conner; Boland, Erin; Szentirmai, Éva

    2016-01-01

    The reciprocal interaction between the immune system and sleep regulation has been widely acknowledged but the cellular mechanisms that underpin this interaction are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of macrophages in sleep loss- and cold exposure-induced sleep and body temperature responses. Macrophage apoptosis was induced in mice by systemic injection of clodronate-containing liposomes (CCL). We report that CCL treatment induced an immediate and transient increase in non-rapid-eye movement sleep (NREMS) and fever accompanied by decrease in rapid-eye movement sleep, motor activity and NREMS delta power. Chronically macrophage-depleted mice had attenuated NREMS rebound after sleep deprivation compared to normal mice. Cold-induced increase in wakefulness and decrease in NREMS, rapid-eye movement sleep and body temperature were significantly enhanced in macrophage-depleted mice indicating increased cold sensitivity. These findings provide further evidence for the reciprocal interaction among the immune system, sleep and metabolism, and identify macrophages as one of the key cellular elements in this interplay. PMID:27442442

  6. Effect of nitrogen dioxide on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Machado, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC50 values were determined for male Swiss albino mice exposed to different concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The LC50 for a 10 minute exposure was about 1000 ppm NO2.

  7. Effect of sulfur dioxide on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Machado, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC50 values were determined for male Swiss albino mice exposed to different concentrations of sulfur dioxide in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The LC50 for a 30 minute exposure was about 3000 ppm SO2.

  8. Effect of carbon monoxide on Swiss albino mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC50 values were determined for male Swiss albino mice exposed to different concentrations of carbon monoxide in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. These values are compared to values reported in the literature. The LC50 for a 30 minute exposure was 3570 ppm CO.

  9. Laxative effects of Salecan on normal and two models of experimental constipated mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Constipation is one of the most common gastrointestinal complaints with a highly prevalent and often chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder affecting health-related quality of life. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of Salecan on fecal output and small intestinal transit in normal and two models of drug-induced constipation mice. Methods ICR mice were administrated intragastrically (i.g.) by gavage with 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight (BW) of Salecan while the control mice were received saline. The constipated mice were induced by two types of drugs, loperamide (5 mg/kg BW, i.g.) and clonidine (200 μg/kg BW, i.g.), after Salecan treatment while the control mice were received saline. Number, weight and water content of feces were subsequently measured. Small intestinal transit was monitored by phenol red marker meal. Results Salecan (300 mg/kg BW) significantly increased the number and weight of feces in normal mice. In two models of drug-induced constipation, Salecan dose-dependently restored the fecal number and fecal weight. The water content of feces was markedly affected by loperamide, but not by clonidine. Treatment with Salecan significantly raised the fecal water content in loperamide-induced constipation mice. Moreover, Salecan markedly stimulated the small intestinal transit in both loperamide- and clonidine-induced constipation model mice. Conclusions These results suggest that Salecan has a potential to be used as a hydrophilic laxative for constipation. PMID:23514598

  10. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene-deficient mice. II. Effects on hemostasis, thrombosis, and thrombolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Carmeliet, P; Stassen, J M; Schoonjans, L; Ream, B; van den Oord, J J; De Mol, M; Mulligan, R C; Collen, D

    1993-01-01

    The effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene inactivation on hemostasis, thrombosis and thrombolysis were studied in homozygous PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1-/-) mice, generated by homologous recombination in D3 embryonic stem cells. Diluted (10-fold) whole blood clots from PAI-1-/- and from PAI-1 wild type (PAI-1+/+) mice underwent limited but significantly different (P < 0.001) spontaneous lysis within 3 h (6 +/- 1 vs 3 +/- 1%, respectively). A 25-microliters 125I-fibrin-labeled normal murine plasma clot, injected into a jugular vein, was lysed for 47 +/- 5, 66 +/- 3, and 87 +/- 7% within 8 h in PAI-1+/+, heterozygous PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1+/-), and PAI-1-/- mice, respectively (P = 0.002 for PAI-1+/+ vs PAI-1-/- mice). Corresponding values after pretreatment with 0.5 mg/kg endotoxin in PAI-1+/+ and PAI-1-/- mice, were 35 +/- 5 and 91 +/- 3% within 4 h, respectively (P < 0.001). 11 out of 26 PAI-1+/+ but only 1 out of 25 PAI-1-/- mice developed venous thrombosis (P = 0.004) within 6 d after injection of 10 or 50 micrograms endotoxin in the footpad. Spontaneous bleeding or delayed rebleeding could not be documented in PAI-1-/- mice after partial amputation of the tail or of the caecum. Thus, disruption of the PAI-1 gene in mice appears to induce a mild hyperfibrinolytic state and a greater resistance to venous thrombosis but not to impair hemostasis. Images PMID:8254029

  11. Enriched environment effects on behavior, memory and BDNF in low and high exploratory mice.

    PubMed

    Kazlauckas, Vanessa; Pagnussat, Natalia; Mioranzza, Sabrina; Kalinine, Eduardo; Nunes, Fernanda; Pettenuzzo, Leticia; Souza, Diogo O; Portela, Luis V; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Lara, Diogo R

    2011-03-28

    Environmental enrichment (EE) has been largely used to investigate behavioral modifications and neuroplasticity in the adult brain both in normal and pathological conditions. The interaction between individual behavioral traits with EE responsiveness has not been investigated within the same strain. By using two extremes of CF1 mice that differ by their exploratory behavior in the Open Field (OF) task (Kazlauckas V, 2005), denominated as Low (LE) and High (HE) Exploratory Mice, the present study evaluated if EE during adulthood could modify the putative differences between LE and HE mice on exploratory behavior, memory performance and hippocampal BDNF levels. To this end, we investigated the effect of adult LE and HE mice after 2 months of enriched or standard housing conditions on the open field, on novel object recognition, on the inhibitory avoidance task and on hippocampal BDNF immunocontent. LE showed low exploratory behavior, less retention in the inhibitory avoidance and lower hippocampal BDNF levels. EE enhanced exploratory behavior, memory performance and hippocampal BDNF levels both in LE and HE mice. Importantly, the general profile of LE mice submitted to EE was similar to HE mice housed in standard conditions. These results show that internalized behavior of LE mice can be significantly modified by exposure to an enriched environment even during adulthood. These observations may contribute to investigate biological mechanisms and therapeutical interventions for individuals with internalized psychiatric disorders.

  12. Effects of Moringa oleifera aqueous leaf extract in alloxan induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tuorkey, Muobarak J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a lack of knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms of the antidiabetic activity of Moringa oleifera. This study investigates the antidiabetic effect of M. oleifera and its impact on the immune tolerance. Methods Alloxan-induced diabetes model for mice was used. A dose of 100 mg/kg of Moringa extract was orally administered to diabetic treated mice. Glucose and insulin levels were evaluated to calculate insulin resistance. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC), creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were measured. The relative percentage of CD44, CD69, and IFN-γ was investigated by flow cytometry. Results In diabetic mice, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was increased 4.5-fold than in the control group, and HOMA-IR was decreased 1.3-fold in the Moringa treatment group. The level of TAC was declined 1.94-fold in diabetic mice, and increased 1.67-fold in diabetic treated group. In diabetic mice, creatinine and BUN levels were significantly reduced 1.42- and 1.2-fold, respectively, in Moringa treatment mice. The relative percentage of CD44 was not changed in diabetic mice, but the relative percentage of CD69 was found to be increased. INF-γ was decreased 2.4-fold in diabetic mice and elevated in treated groups. Conclusion Moringa may ameliorate insulin resistance, increase TAC, and improve immune tolerance. PMID:28203392

  13. Distinct Neurobehavioural Effects of Cannabidiol in Transmembrane Domain Neuregulin 1 Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Long, Leonora E.; Chesworth, Rose; Huang, Xu-Feng; Wong, Alexander; Spiro, Adena; McGregor, Iain S.; Arnold, Jonathon C.; Karl, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The cannabis constituent cannabidiol (CBD) possesses anxiolytic and antipsychotic properties. We have previously shown that transmembrane domain neuregulin 1 mutant (Nrg1 TM HET) mice display altered neurobehavioural responses to the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Here we investigated whether Nrg1 TM HET mice respond differently to CBD and whether CBD reverses schizophrenia-related phenotypes expressed by these mice. Adult male Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like littermates (WT) received vehicle or CBD (1, 50 or 100 mg/kg i.p.) for 21 days. During treatment and 48 h after withdrawal we measured behaviour, whole blood CBD concentrations and autoradiographic receptor binding. Nrg1 HET mice displayed locomotor hyperactivity, PPI deficits and reduced 5-HT2A receptor binding density in the substantia nigra, but these phenotypes were not reversed by CBD. However, long-term CBD (50 and 100 mg/kg) selectively enhanced social interaction in Nrg1 TM HET mice. Furthermore, acute CBD (100 mg/kg) selectively increased PPI in Nrg1 TM HET mice, although tolerance to this effect was manifest upon repeated CBD administration. Long-term CBD (50 mg/kg) also selectively increased GABAA receptor binding in the granular retrosplenial cortex in Nrg1 TM HET mice and reduced 5-HT2A binding in the substantia nigra in WT mice. Nrg1 appears necessary for CBD-induced anxiolysis since only WT mice developed decreased anxiety-related behaviour with repeated CBD treatment. Altered pharmacokinetics in mutant mice could not explain our findings since no genotype differences existed in CBD blood concentrations. Here we demonstrate that Nrg1 modulates acute and long-term neurobehavioural effects of CBD, which does not reverse the schizophrenia-relevant phenotypes. PMID:22509273

  14. Effect of nematode Trichinella infection on glucose tolerance and status of macrophage in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hideyuki; Ikeda, Takahide; Kajita, Kazuo; Mori, Ichiro; Hanamoto, Takayuki; Fujioka, Kei; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Usui, Taro; Takahashi, Noriko; Kitada, Yoshihiko; Taguchi, Koichiro; Uno, Yoshihiro; Morita, Hiroyuki; Wu, Zhiliang; Nagano, Isao; Takahashi, Yuzo; Kudo, Takuya; Furuya, Kazuki; Yamada, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Trichinella infection on glucose tolerance and (pro- or anti-inflammatory) macrophage status in adipose tissue. Ob/ob mice and high fat-fed mice (obesity model) and C57/BL mice (control mice) were orally infected with (infected group) or without (uninfected group) 400 Trichinella per mouse. Four weeks later, the mice were subjected to investigation, which showed that fasting plasma glucose levels decreased in the infected group of C57/BL and ob/ob mice. Glucose tolerance, evaluated with intraperitoneal GTT, improved in the infected group of ob/ob mice and high fat-fed mice compared with the uninfected groups. Additional assay included anti-inflammatory macrophage (M2) markers and pro-inflammatory macrophage (M1) markers, with the aim to explore the effect of Trichinella infection on adipose tissue inflammation, since our previous study identified anti-inflammatory substances in secreted proteins by Trichinella. The result showed that mRNA levels of M2 markers, such as CD206, arginase and IL-10, increased, whereas M1 markers, such as CD11c, iNOS and IL-6, decreased in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) isolated from epididymal fat in ob/ob mice. Residential macrophages obtained from the peritoneal lavage exhibited lower M1 markers and higher M2 markers levels in the infected group than in the uninfected group. Trichinella infection increases the ratio of M2/M1 systemically, which results in an improvement in pro-inflammatory state in adipose tissue and amelioration of glucose tolerance in obese mice.

  15. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production.

  16. The effects of Taraxacum officinale extracts (TOE) supplementation on physical fatigue in mice.

    PubMed

    Jinchun, Zhang; Jie, Chen

    2011-01-01

    The study is to investigate the effect of Taraxacum officinale extracts (TOE) supplementation on physical fatigue based on the forced swimming capacity in mice. Forty Kunming male mice were randomly divided into 4 groups, i.e., normal control (NC) and three doses of TOE treated group (High-dose, Middle-dose and Low-dose). Three TOE treated groups were treated by oral TOE with 10, 30 and 100mg/kg b.w respectively for a period of 42 days. The normal control group was given a corresponding volume of sterile distilled water. After 6 weeks, the forced swimming capacity and blood biochemical parameters in mice were measured, and the result showed that TOE had an anti- physical fatigue effect. It enhanced the maximum swimming capacity of mice, effectively delayed the lowering of glucose in the blood, and prevented the increase in lactate and triglyceride concentrations.

  17. Effects of Chronic Caffeine on Adenosine, Dopamine and Acetylcholine Systems in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, D.; Nikodijević, O.; Jacobson, K. A.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic ingestion of caffeine by male NIH Swiss strain mice leads in about 3 days to a significant increase in A1-adenosine, nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and a significant decrease of β1-adrenoceptors in cerebral cortical membranes. Plasma levels of caffeine in the chronically treated mice range from 0.70 to 5.7 μg/ml. The changes in receptors reverse after withdrawal of caffeine within 7 days. An increase in nitrendipine binding sites, associated with L-type calcium channels, also occurs within 4 days and has reversed in 7 days after withdrawal. There is no change in the levels of striatal nicotinic receptors or D2-dopamine receptors, nor of [3H]cocaine binding to dopamine uptake sites. Levels of opioid receptors are either increased (δ) or unaltered (μ, κ). σ-Receptors are unaltered. Stimulations of striatal adenylate cyclase by forskolin, dopamine and NECA are not significantly affected after chronic caffeine ingestion. The adenosine agonist, NECA, reverses the amphetamine-elicited increases in locomotor activity and partly reverses the cocaine-elicited increases. The NECA dose-response curve is multiphasic (depression, stimulation and then depression) versus amphetamine in control mice, but only depressant versus amphetamine in chronic caffeine mice, while being multiphasic versus cocaine in both control and chronic caffeine mice. NECA reverses the stimulation of locomotor activity elicited by the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine, and is more effective in the chronic caffeine mice. The behavioral depressant effects of the muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine, are not markedly altered after chronic caffeine ingestion. The behavioral depressant effects of nicotine are abolished after chronic caffeine ingestion, while the behavioral depressant effects of the nicotinic antagonist, mecamylamine, are not markedly altered after chronic caffeine ingestion. In combination with caffeine, nicotine has depressant effects in control mice, while having biphasic

  18. Antidepressant-like effects of CCKB antagonists in mice: antagonism by naltrindole.

    PubMed Central

    Derrien, M.; Durieux, C.; Roques, B. P.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of selective CCKB agonists, BC 264 and BC 197 were investigated in the conditioned suppression of motility test in mice, an animal model used to select antidepressant drugs. The results showed that both CCKB agonists at doses of 3 and 30 micrograms kg-1, accentuated the suppression of motility in shocked mice and did not modify the behaviour of non-shocked mice. The effects of BC 264 were suppressed by L-365,260. 2. L-365,260 alone, at doses of 0.2 and 2 mg kg-1 decreased motor inhibition in shocked mice and had no effect in non-shocked mice. 3. The effects of L-365,260 observed in shocked mice were suppressed by naltrindole, a selective antagonist for delta-opioid receptors, suggesting the occurrence of physiological adverse interactions between CCK and opioid systems. 4. Together, these results suggest that CCKB antagonists could block centrally located CCKB receptors to produce antidepressant-like effects which could indirectly involve delta-opioid receptor stimulation. PMID:8019773

  19. Effects of photoperiod and food restriction on the reproductive physiology of female California mice

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Michael Q.; Knight, Jennifer A.; Trainor, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    Many temperate-zone animals use changes in photoperiod to time breeding. Shorter term cues, like food availability, are integrated with photoperiod to adjust reproductive timing under unexpected conditions. Many mice of the genus Peromyscus breed in the summer. California mice (Peromyscus californicus), however, can breed year round, but tend to begin breeding in the winter. Glial cells may be involved in transduction of environmental signals that regulate gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) activity. We examined the effects of diet and photoperiod on reproduction in female California mice. Mice placed on either short days (8L:16D) or long days (16L:8D) were food restricted (80% of normal intake) or fed ad libitum. Short day-food restricted mice showed significant regression of the reproductive system. GnRH-immunoreactivity was increased in the tuberal hypothalamus of long day-food restricted mice. This may be associated with the sparing effect long days have when mice are food restricted. The number of GFAP-immunoreactive fibers in proximity to GnRH nerve terminals correlated negatively with uterine size in ad libitum but not food restricted mice, suggesting diet may alter glial regulation of the reproductive axis. There was a trend towards food restriction increasing uterine expression of c-fos mRNA, an estrogen dependent gene. Similar to other seasonally breeding rodents, short days render the reproductive system of female California mice more susceptible to effects of food restriction. This may be vestigial, or it may have evolved to mitigate consequences of unexpectedly poor winter food supplies. PMID:22245263

  20. The isozyme-specific effects of cyclooxygenase-deficiency on bone in mice.

    PubMed

    Myers, L K; Bhattacharya, S D; Herring, P A; Xing, Z; Goorha, S; Smith, R A; Bhattacharya, S K; Carbone, L; Faccio, Roberta; Kang, A H; Ballou, L R

    2006-11-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) plays a critical role in skeletal physiology and bone loss. PGE(2) production is regulated in vivo by at least two cyclooxygenase (COX) isozymes, COX-1 and COX-2. The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of the selective deletion of COX-1 or COX-2 on bone mineral density (BMD), bone microarchitecture and bone strength in wild type (WT), COX-1(-/-) and COX-2(-/-) mice. Using a LUNAR PIXImus, BMD was measured in 18 (WT), 18 COX-1(-/-) and 16 COX-2(-/-) mice. COX-1(-/-) mice exhibited significantly higher BMD (0.0506 g/cm(2) +/- 0.0014 g/cm(2)) than either WT (0.0493 g/cm(2) +/- 0.0019, P < or = 0.05) or COX-2(-/-) (0.0473 g/cm(2) +/- 0.0034, P < or = 0.01) mice. COX-2(-/-) mice had significantly lower BMD than WT (P < or = 0.01) or COX-1(-/-) (P < or = 0.01). Flexure stress of the femurs, determined by breaking the bones with three-point bending, correlated with bone density. Although plasma levels of both Ca(2+) and PTH were comparable in wild type and COX-1(-/-) mice, both were elevated in COX-2(-/-) mice consistent with primary hyperparathyroidism. These studies suggest that COX enzymes are important regulators of BMD and bone strength in mice. The beneficial effect of absence of the COX-1 enzyme on skeletal parameters may be secondary to decreases in PGE(2). On the other hand, primary hyperparathyroidism and lower bone magnesium content may account for the lower BMD and impairments in bone strength of COX-2(-/-) mice. Further elucidation of the effects of the COX pathway on bone remodeling may provide important information on potential therapeutic targets for preventing and/or treating osteoporosis.

  1. Antidiabetic effect of glycyrrhizin in genetically diabetic KK-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Takii, H; Kometani, T; Nishimura, T; Nakae, T; Okada, S; Fushiki, T

    2001-05-01

    We, previously demonstrated that one shot administration of glycyrrhizin (Grz) reduced the postprandial blood glucose rise, using Std ddY mice. Subsequently, we evaluated the effects of long-term Grz treatment (2.7, 4.1 g/kg diet) on diabetic symptoms using genetically non-insulin dependent diabetic model mice (KK-Ay). Male KK-Ay mice were divided into 3 groups: the control group, 0.27% Grz diet (2.7 g of Grz/kg diet) group and 0.41% Grz diet (4.1 g of Grz/kg diet) group. The elevation of blood glucose concentration was almost entirely suppressed in mice fed the 0.41% Grz diet 7 weeks after the beginning of test feeding, although it was not suppressed in mice fed the control diet or the 0.27% Grz diet. Water intake in the control and 0.27% Grz diet groups increased gradually, whereas, this was not true in the 0.41% Grz diet group. Grz treatment significantly lowered blood insulin level. Throughout the experiment, Grz did not affect the food intake or body weight among the three groups. The mice fed the 0.41% Grz diet also improved their tolerance to oral glucose loading 9 weeks after the beginning of test feeding. This study shows that Grz has an antidiabetic effect in noninsulin-dependent diabetes model mice.

  2. Metabolic effects of transgenic melanocyte-stimulating hormone overexpression in lean and obese mice.

    PubMed

    Savontaus, Eriika; Breen, Tracy L; Kim, Andrea; Yang, Lucy M; Chua, Streamson C; Wardlaw, Sharon L

    2004-08-01

    The proopiomelanocortin-derived peptide, alpha-MSH, inhibits feeding via melanocortin receptors in the hypothalamus and genetic defects inactivating the melanocortin system have been shown to lead to obesity in experimental animals and humans. To determine whether long-term melanocortinergic activation has significant effects on body weight and composition and insulin sensitivity, transgenic mice overexpressing N-terminal proopiomelanocortin, including alpha- and gamma(3)-MSH, under the control of the cytomegalovirus-promoter were generated. The transgene was expressed in multiple tissues including the hypothalamus, in which both alpha-MSH and gamma(3)-MSH levels were increased approximately 2-fold, compared with wild-type controls. Transgene homozygous mice were also crossed with obese leptin receptor-deficient db(3J) and obese yellow A(y) mice. MSH overexpression led to uniform, dose- dependent darkening of coat color. MSH overexpression reduced weight gain and adiposity and improved glucose tolerance in lean male mice. In female transgenic mice, there was no significant effect on body weight, but there was a significant decrease in insulin levels. Obesity was attenuated in obese db(3J)/db(3J) male and female mice, but there was no improvement in glucose metabolism. In contrast, the MSH transgene improved glucose tolerance in male A(y) mice. These results support the hypothesis that long-term melanocortinergic activation could serve as a potential strategy for anti-obesity and/or antidiabetic therapy.

  3. Hypolipidemic effect of young persimmon fruit in C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Shin-ichiro; Gato, Nobuki

    2008-10-01

    We investigated the hypolipidemic effects of young persimmon fruit (YP) on apolipoprotein E-deficient C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice. These mice exhibited higher plasma cholesterols, except for high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and lower plasma HDL cholesterol than C57BL/6.Cr mice that had the same genetic background as the C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice. Male C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice (n=5) were fed a diet supplemented with dry YP, Hachiya-kaki, at a concentration of 5% (w/w) for 10 weeks. YP treatment significantly lowered plasma chylomicron, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterols, and triglyceride, and this response was accompanied by an elevation of fecal bile acid excretion. In the liver, sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 gene expression was significantly higher in mice fed YP, while the mRNA and protein levels of the LDL receptor did not change. These results indicate that acceleration of fecal bile acid excretion is a major mechanism of the hypolipidemic effect induced by YP in C57BL/6.KOR-ApoEshl mice.

  4. Protective Effects of Royal Jelly on Oxymetholone- Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nejati, Vahid; Zahmatkesh, Ensieh; Babaei, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study was carried out to investigate the possible protective effects of royal jelly (RJ) on oxymetholone (OXM)-induced oxidative liver injuries in mice. Methods: In total, 32 adult male NMRI mice were divided into four groups of eight mice each. Mice in groups 1 and 2 were orally administered 5 mg/kg/day OXM for 30 days. At the same time, mice in group 3 received RJ at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day. Saline control and RJ control groups were also included in this study. Results: Administration of 5 mg/kg OXM resulted in a significant decrease in total antioxidant capacity and catalase activity, as well as a significant increase in malondialdehyde (P<0.05). In addition, OXM-administrated mice showed a slight increase in liver enzymes, including alanine amino transferase, aspartate amino transferase, and alkaline phosphatase. Although OXM caused histopathological changes in the liver, RJ could significantly improve all of the above-mentioned parameters at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that RJ has a partially protective effect on OXM-induced liver toxicity in mice. PMID:27178489

  5. Antiatherosclerotic and antioxidative effects of captopril in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hayek, T; Attias, J; Smith, J; Breslow, J L; Keidar, S

    1998-04-01

    The effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, captopril, on the development of atherosclerosis was determined in the apolipoprotein (apo) E-deficient mice. These mice develop severe hypercholesterolemia and extensive atherosclerotic lesions on chow diet, similar to those found in humans. Furthermore, in these mice, accelerated atherosclerosis is associated with increased plasma lipid peroxidation, a phenomenon that may play a crucial role in the buildup of the atherosclerotic lesions. Mice received either placebo or 50 mg/kg/day of captopril. After 12 weeks of treatment, captopril reduced the aortic-lesion area by 70% compared with that of the placebo-treated group. Captopril also increased the resistance of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to CuSO4-induced oxidative stress, as shown by a significant reduction in the LDL content of malondialdehyde (MDA) by 30%, as well as by the prolongation of the lag time required for LDL oxidation from 55 min in the placebo-treated mice to 70 min in the captopril-treated mice, and reduction of the maximum LDL oxidation at 150 min by 35%. In vitro studies demonstrated that preincubation of LDL with captopril, inhibited the onset of CuSO4-induced LDL peroxidation up to 120 min, and reduced the LDL content of MDA by 90%. We conclude that captopril attenuates atherosclerosis in the apo E-deficient mice, and this phenomenon may be related to its inhibitory effect on the plasma LDL oxidation.

  6. Effects of morphine on pentobarbital-induced responses in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Y; Ho, I K; Jang, C G; Tanaka, S; Ma, T; Loh, H H; Ko, K H

    2001-03-15

    Effects of morphine on the potentiation of pentobarbital-induced responses were investigated using mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. The duration of loss of righting reflex, hypothermia, and loss of motor coordination induced by pentobarbital were measured after pretreatment with either morphine or saline. Morphine pretreatment failed to show potentiation of both pentobarbital-induced loss of righting reflex and hypothermia in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice, while it significantly potentiated these responses in the wild-type controls. For motor incoordination test, morphine potentiated pentobarbital-induced motor incoordination in the wild-type mice. However, morphine may have opposite effects in the mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. These results demonstrate that synergism between morphine and pentobarbital is not detected in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice and that potentiation of pentobarbital-induced loss of righting reflex and hypothermia by morphine is mediated through mu-opioid receptor. It was interesting to note that pentobarbital-induced decrease in body temperature was less severe in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice than in wild-type mice.

  7. The context preexposure facilitation effect in mice: a dose-response analysis of pretraining scopolamine administration.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin L; Kennard, John A; Sherer, Daniel J; Comalli, David M; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S

    2011-11-20

    The context preexposure facilitation effect (CPFE) is an elaboration of contextual fear conditioning and refers to enhanced contextual conditioning resulting from preexposure to the context prior to a separate, brief context-shock episode. A version of the CPFE developed by Rudy and colleagues in rats has demonstrated greater sensitivity to pre-training hippocampal insult relative to standard contextual fear conditioning preparations. Our aim was to adapt the Rudy CPFE procedures to mice. In Experiment 1 we compared performance of young adult male C57BL6/J mice on two versions of the CPFE. One version - not previously used in mice - adapted methods established by Rudy and colleagues, and the other CPFE task replicated procedures previously established in this mouse strain by Gould and colleagues. In Experiment 2 we compared the effects of pre-training intraperitoneal administration of moderate levels of scopolamine or methylscopolamine on contextual conditioning between mice trained using the Rudy CPFE method and a separate group trained using standard contextual fear procedures. Scopolamine is a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist that impairs hippocampal function. Robust freezing to the conditioning context was observed in mice trained using the Rudy CPFE method (Experiment 1), and greater scopolamine-induced impairments in contextual freezing were observed using this CPFE method relative to mice trained using standard contextual fear procedures (Experiment 2). These findings support use of the Rudy CPFE task as a behavioral assay for hippocampal function in mice.

  8. Effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid connecting phospholipids on the lipid peroxidation of the brain in mice.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Seiichi; Ishihara, Kenji; Kitagawa, Tomoko; Wada, Shun; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2008-12-01

    The effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) with two lipid types on lipid peroxidation of the brain was investigated in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Each group of female Balb/c mice was fed a diet containing DHA-connecting phospholipids (DHA-PL) or DHA-connecting triacylglycerols (DHA-TG) for 5 wk. Safflower oil was fed as the control. The lipid peroxide level of the brain was significantly lower in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet when compared to those fed the DHA-TG and safflower oil diets, while the alpha-tocopherol level was significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the DHA-TG and safflower oil diets. The DHA level of phosphatidylethanolamine in the brain was significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the safflower oil diet. The dimethylacetal levels were significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the safflower oil and DHA-TG diets. These results suggest that the dietary DHA-connecting phospholipids have an antioxidant activity on the brain lipids in mice, and the effect may be related to the brain plasmalogen.

  9. Effects of Berberine Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guanghui; Zhang Yaping; Tang Jinliang; Chen Zhengtang; Hu Yide; Wei Hong; Li Dezhi; Hao Ping; Wang Donglin

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced intestinal injury is a significant clinical problem in patients undergoing abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Berberine has been used as an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antimotility agent. The present study investigated the protective effect of berberine against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: The mice were administrated berberine or distilled water. A total of 144 mice underwent 0, 3, 6, 12, or 16 Gy single session whole-abdominal RT and 16 mice underwent 3 Gy/fraction/d for four fractions of fractionated abdominal RT. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-10, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, malonaldehyde, and apoptosis were assayed in the mice after RT. The body weight and food intake of the mice receiving fractionated RT were recorded. Another 72 mice who had undergone 12, 16, or 20 Gy abdominal RT were monitored for mortality every 12 h. Results: The body weight and food intake of the mice administered with distilled water decreased significantly compared with before RT. After the same dose of abdominal RT, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in plasma and malonalhehyde and apoptosis of the intestine were significantly greater in the control group than in the mice administered berberine (p < .05-.01). In contrast, interleukin-10 in the mice with berberine treatment was significantly greater than in the control group (p < .01). A similar result was found in the fractionated RT experiment and at different points after 16 Gy abdominal RT (p < .05-.01). Berberine treatment significantly delayed the point of death after 20 Gy, but not 16 Gy, abdominal RT (p < .01). Conclusion: Treatment with berberine can delay mortality and attenuated intestinal injury in mice undergoing whole abdominal RT. These findings could provide a useful therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  10. The inhibiting effect of the Coptis chinensis polysaccharide on the type II diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lijuan; Liu, Min; Chang, XiangYun; Sun, Kan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of Coptis chinensis polysaccharide (CCP) on hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic C57BL/6J mice. CCP was prepared by extraction from Coptis chinensis and oral given to the mice. C57BL/6J mice in each of the 5 groups (eight mice per group) were given either the normal diet (ND) (D12450B, 10% kcal% fat; Research diet, New Brunswick, NJ, USA), HFD (D12451, 45% kcal% fat; Research diet, New Brunswick, NJ, USA), or HFD with CCP of differing hardness (500, 1000, and 2000ppm) for 20 weeks. Mice given an HFD with CCP showed lowered fasting plasma glucose levels compared to HFD-fed mice. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests showed that CCP improves impaired glucose tolerance in HFD-fed mice. Histopathological evaluation of the pancreas showed that CCP recovers the size of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, and increases the secretion of insulin and glucagon in HFD-fed mice. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results revealed that the expression of hepatic genes involved in glucogenesis, glycogenolysis and glucose oxidation were suppressed, while those in glucose uptake, β-oxidation, and glucose oxidation in muscle were increased in mice fed HFD with CCP. CCP increased AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 pre- and mature adipocytes and improved impaired AMPK phosphorylation in the muscles and livers of HFD-induced diabetic mice. CCP stimulated phosphoinositol-3-kinase and AMPK pathway-mediated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Taken together, these results suggest that CCP has potential as an anti-diabetic agent, given its ability to suppress hyperglycemia and improve glucose intolerance by increasing glucose uptake.

  11. Therapeutic effects of stem cells and substrate reduction in juvenile Sandhoff mice.

    PubMed

    Arthur, J R; Lee, J P; Snyder, E Y; Seyfried, T N

    2012-06-01

    Sandhoff Disease (SD) involves the CNS accumulation of ganglioside GM2 and asialo-GM2 (GA2) due to inherited defects in the β-subunit gene of β-hexosaminidase A and B (Hexb gene). Substrate reduction therapy, utilizing imino sugar N-butyldeoxygalactonojirimycin (NB-DGJ), reduces ganglioside biosynthesis and levels of stored GM2 in SD mice. Intracranial transplantation of Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) can provide enzymatic cross correction, to help reduce ganglioside storage and extend life. Here we tested the effect of NSCs and NB-DGJ, alone and together, on brain β-hexosaminidase activity, GM2, and GA2 content in juvenile SD mice. The SD mice received either cerebral NSC transplantation at post-natal day 0 (p-0), intraperitoneal injection of NB-DGJ (500 mg/kg/day) from p-9 to p-15, or received dual treatments. The brains were analyzed at p-15. β-galactosidase staining confirmed engraftment of lacZ-expressing NSCs in the cerebral cortex. Compared to untreated and sham-treated SD controls, NSC treatment alone provided a slight increase in Hex activity and significantly decreased GA2 content. However, NSCs had no effect on GM2 content when analyzed at p-15. NB-DGJ alone had no effect on Hex activity, but significantly reduced GM2 and GA2 content. Hex activity was slightly elevated in the NSC + drug-treated mice. GM2 and GA2 content in the dual treated mice were similar to that of the NB-DGJ treated mice. These data indicate that NB-DGJ alone was more effective in targeting storage in juvenile SD mice than were NSCs alone. No additive or synergistic effect between NSC and drug was found in these juvenile SD mice.

  12. Anti-inflammatory effect of Momordica charantia in sepsis mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Che-Yi; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Wang, Wei-Hsien; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2014-08-21

    Wild bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L. var. abbreviate Seringe), a common vegetable in Asia, is used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases, including inflammation. Extant literature indicates that wild bitter gourds have components that activate PPARα and PPARγ. This research probed the influence of adding wild bitter gourd to diets on inflammation responses in mice with sepsis induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS. Male BALB/c mice were divided normal, sepsis, positive control, and three experimental groups. The latter ate diets with low (1%), moderate (2%), and high (10%) ratios of wild bitter gourd lyophilized powder. Before mice were sacrificed, with the exception of the normal group, intraperitoneal injection of LPS induced sepsis in each group; positive control group was injected with LPS after PDTC. This experiment revealed starkly lower weights in groups with added wild bitter gourd than those of the remaining groups. Blood lipids (TG, cholesterol, and NEFA) were also lower in comparison to the sepsis group, and blood glucose concentrations recovered and approached normal levels. Blood biochemistry values related to inflammation reactions indicated GOT, GPT, C-RP, and NO concentrations of groups with added wild bitter gourd were all lower than those of the sepsis group. Secretion levels of the spleen pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α tallied significantly lower in comparison to the sepsis group, whereas secretion levels of IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokine increased. Expression level of proteins NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2 were significantly inhibited. Results indicate wild bitter gourd in diets promoted lipid metabolism, reducing fat accumulation, and improving low blood glucose in sepsis. Addition of wild bitter gourd can reduce inflammation biochemical markers or indicators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the body, hence improving the inflammation responses in mice with sepsis.

  13. 2,5-hexanedione-induced immunomodulatory effect in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Upreti, R.K.; Shanker, R.

    1987-06-01

    The immunotoxic potential of 2,5-hexanedione (2,5-Hxdn), the end metabolite of n-hexane/methyl n-butyl ketone, was evaluated in a mouse model involving multiple pathomorphological, hematological, and immunological assays. Young adult male Swiss albino mice were given either single or seven consecutive oral doses of 0.2 x LD/sub 50/ of 2.5-Hxdn. None of the treated mice exhibited any sign of hind limb weakness up to 1 week. On the eighth day, half the animals were sacrificed for initial pathomorphological studies of various organs and the other half were subjected to several immune function tests. The results revealed treatment-related reduction in cellularity of spleen, thymus, and mesentric lymph nodes and pathotoxicological changes. Further, immune function tests such as delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, plaque-forming cell assay, phagocytosis by adherent peritoneal exudate cells, and resistance to endotoxin shock were considerably impaired. These results suggest that 2,5-Hxdn treatment causes profound impairment of immunity in mice even before the onset of peripheral neuropathy.

  14. Protective effect of taraxasterol against rheumatoid arthritis by the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Hua; Ping, Li-Feng; Sun, Feng-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Sun, Zhi-Juan

    2016-12-01

    Taraxasterol is an effective component of dandelion that has anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro. The present study was performed to explore whether taraxasterol exhibits a protective effect against rheumatoid arthritis through the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice. Eight-week-old CCR9-deficient mice were injected with a collagen II monoclonal antibody cocktail to create a rheumatoid arthritis model. In the experimental group, arthritic model mice were treated with 10 mg/kg taraxasterol once per day for 5 days. Treatment with taraxasterol significantly increased the pain thresholds and reduced the clinical arthritic scores of the mice in the experimental group compared with those of the model group. Furthermore, treatment with taraxasterol significantly suppressed tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and nuclear factor-κB protein expression levels compared with those in the rheumatoid arthritis model mice. Taraxasterol treatment also significantly reduced nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels compared with those in the rheumatoid arthritis model group. These observations indicate that the protective effect of taraxasterol against rheumatoid arthritis is mediated via the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice.

  15. Protective effect of taraxasterol against rheumatoid arthritis by the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Hua; Ping, Li-Feng; Sun, Feng-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Sun, Zhi-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Taraxasterol is an effective component of dandelion that has anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro. The present study was performed to explore whether taraxasterol exhibits a protective effect against rheumatoid arthritis through the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice. Eight-week-old CCR9-deficient mice were injected with a collagen II monoclonal antibody cocktail to create a rheumatoid arthritis model. In the experimental group, arthritic model mice were treated with 10 mg/kg taraxasterol once per day for 5 days. Treatment with taraxasterol significantly increased the pain thresholds and reduced the clinical arthritic scores of the mice in the experimental group compared with those of the model group. Furthermore, treatment with taraxasterol significantly suppressed tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and nuclear factor-κB protein expression levels compared with those in the rheumatoid arthritis model mice. Taraxasterol treatment also significantly reduced nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels compared with those in the rheumatoid arthritis model group. These observations indicate that the protective effect of taraxasterol against rheumatoid arthritis is mediated via the modulation of inflammatory responses in mice. PMID:28101182

  16. An experimental study of the "faster-is-slower" effect using mice under panic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng; Ma, Jian; Liu, Tianyang; Ran, Tong; Si, Youliang; Li, Tao

    2016-06-01

    A number of crowd accidents in last decades have attracted the interests of scientists in the study of self-organized behavior of crowd under extreme conditions. The faster-is-slower effect is one of the most referenced behaviors in pedestrian dynamics. However, this behavior has not been experimentally verified yet. A series of experiments with mice under panic were conducted in a bi-dimensional space. The mice were trained to be familiar with the way of escape. A varying number of joss sticks were used to produce different levels of stimulus to drive the mice to escape. The evacuation process was video-recorded for further analysis. The experiment found that the escape times significantly increased with the levels of stimulus due to the stronger competition of selfish mice in panic condition. The faster-is-slower effect was experimentally verified. The probability distributions of time intervals showed a power law and the burst sizes exhibited an exponential behavior.

  17. Piperine reverses the effects of corticosterone on behavior and hippocampal BDNF expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qing-Qiu; Huang, Zhen; Zhong, Xiao-Ming; Xian, Yan-Fang; Ip, Siu-Po

    2014-07-01

    A mouse model of depression has been recently developed by exogenous corticosterone administration. The present study aimed to examine the antidepressant-like effect and the possible mechanisms of piperine, a major alkaloid of black pepper (Piper nigrum Linn.) and long pepper (Piper longum Linn.), in corticosterone-induced depression in mice. The results showed that 3-weeks corticosterone injections caused depression-like behavior in mice, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose consumption and increase in immobility time in the forced swim test and tail suspension test. Moreover, it was found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein and mRNA levels in the hippocampus were significantly decreased in corticosterone-treated mice. Treating the animals with piperine significantly suppressed behavioral and biochemical changes induced by corticosterone. The results suggest that piperine produces an antidepressant-like effect in corticosterone-treated mice, which is possibly mediated by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the hippocampus.

  18. The Effects of Rm-CSF and Ril-6 Therapy on Immunosuppressed Antiorthostatically Suspended Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstong, Jason W.; Kirby-Dobbels, Kathy; Chapes, Steven K.

    1995-01-01

    Antiorthostatically suspended mice had suppressed macrophage development in both unloaded and loaded bones, indicating a systemic effect. Bone marrow cells from those mice secreted less macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) than did control mice. Because M-CSF and IL-6 are important to bone marrow macrophage maturation, we formulated the hypothesis that suppressed macrophage development occurred as a result of the depressed levels of either M-CSF or IL-6. To test the hypothesis, mice were administered recombinant M-CSF or IL-6 intraperitoneally. We showed that recombinant M-CSF therapy, but not recombinant IL-6 therapy, reversed the suppressive effects of orthostatic suspension on macrophage development. These data suggest that bone marrow cells that produce M-CSF are affected by antiorthostatic suspension and may contribute to the inhibited maturation of bone marrow macrophage progenitors.

  19. Effect of diets containing sucrose vs. D-tagatose in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    PubMed

    Police, Sara B; Harris, J Clay; Lodder, Robert A; Cassis, Lisa A

    2009-02-01

    Effects of functional sweeteners on the development of the metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis are unknown. The objective was to compare the effect of dietary carbohydrate in the form of sucrose (SUCR) to D-tagatose (TAG; an isomer of fructose currently used as a low-calorie sweetener) on body weight, blood cholesterol concentrations, hyperglycemia, and atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLr(-/-)) mice. LDLr(-/-) male and female mice were fed either standard murine diet or a diet enriched with TAG or SUCR as carbohydrate sources for 16 weeks. TAG and SUCR diets contained equivalent amounts (g/kg) of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. We measured food intake, body weight, adipocyte diameter, serum cholesterol and lipoprotein concentrations, and aortic atherosclerosis. Macrophage immunostaining and collagen content were examined in aortic root lesions. CONTROL and TAG-fed mice exhibited similar energy intake, body weights and blood glucose and insulin concentrations, but SUCR-fed mice exhibited increased energy intake and became obese and hyperglycemic. Adipocyte diameter increased in female SUCR-fed mice compared to TAG and CONTROL. Male and female SUCR-fed mice had increased serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations compared to TAG and CONTROL. Atherosclerosis was increased in SUCR-fed mice of both genders compared to TAG and CONTROL. Lesions from SUCR-fed mice exhibited pronounced macrophage immunostaining and reductions in collagen content compared to TAG and CONTROL mice. These results demonstrate that in comparison to sucrose, equivalent substitution of TAG as dietary carbohydrate does not result in the same extent of obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis.

  20. Effect of Diets Containing Sucrose vs. D-tagatose in Hypercholesterolemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Police, Sara B.; Harris, J. Clay; Lodder, Robert A.; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Effects of functional sweeteners on the development of the metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis are unknown. The objective was to compare the effect of dietary carbohydrate in the form of sucrose (SUCR) to D-tagatose (TAG; an isomer of fructose currently used as a low-calorie sweetener) on body weight, blood cholesterol concentrations, hyperglycemia, and atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLr−/−) mice. LDLr−/− male and female mice were fed either standard murine diet or a diet enriched with TAG or SUCR as carbohydrate sources for 16 weeks. TAG and SUCR diets contained equivalent amounts (g/kg) of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. We measured food intake, body weight, adipocyte diameter, serum cholesterol and lipoprotein concentrations, and aortic atherosclerosis. Macrophage immunostaining and collagen content were examined in aortic root lesions. CONTROL and TAG-fed mice exhibited similar energy intake, body weights and blood glucose and insulin concentrations, but SUCR-fed mice exhibited increased energy intake and became obese and hyperglycemic. Adipocyte diameter increased in female SUCR-fed mice compared to TAG and CONTROL. Male and female SUCR-fed mice had increased serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations compared to TAG and CONTROL. Atherosclerosis was increased in SUCR-fed mice of both genders compared to TAG and CONTROL. Lesions from SUCR-fed mice exhibited pronounced macrophage immunostaining and reductions in collagen content compared to TAG and CONTROL mice. These results demonstrate that in comparison to sucrose, equivalent substitution of TAG as dietary carbohydrate does not result in the same extent of obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis. PMID:19008872

  1. Effect of Diets Containing Sucrose vs. D-tagatose in Hypercholesterolemic Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Police, S.; Harris, J; Lodder, R; Cassis, L

    2008-01-01

    Effects of functional sweeteners on the development of the metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis are unknown. The objective was to compare the effect of dietary carbohydrate in the form of sucrose (SUCR) to D-tagatose (TAG; an isomer of fructose currently used as a low-calorie sweetener) on body weight, blood cholesterol concentrations, hyperglycemia, and atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLr-/-) mice. LDLr-/- male and female mice were fed either standard murine diet or a diet enriched with TAG or SUCR as carbohydrate sources for 16 weeks. TAG and SUCR diets contained equivalent amounts (g/kg) of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. We measured food intake, body weight, adipocyte diameter, serum cholesterol and lipoprotein concentrations, and aortic atherosclerosis. Macrophage immunostaining and collagen content were examined in aortic root lesions. CONTROL and TAG-fed mice exhibited similar energy intake, body weights and blood glucose and insulin concentrations, but SUCR-fed mice exhibited increased energy intake and became obese and hyperglycemic. Adipocyte diameter increased in female SUCR-fed mice compared to TAG and CONTROL. Male and female SUCR-fed mice had increased serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations compared to TAG and CONTROL. Atherosclerosis was increased in SUCR-fed mice of both genders compared to TAG and CONTROL. Lesions from SUCR-fed mice exhibited pronounced macrophage immunostaining and reductions in collagen content compared to TAG and CONTROL mice. These results demonstrate that in comparison to sucrose, equivalent substitution of TAG as dietary carbohydrate does not result in the same extent of obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis.

  2. Effects of metallothionein on zinc metabolism in lethal-milk mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Grider, A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The lethal-milk mice (C57BL/6J-Im) exhibit various pleiotropic effects, including a congenital otolith defect, production of zinc-deficient milk, and clinical signs of a systemic Zn deficiency by one year of age. The clinical signs include alopecia, dermatitis, and skin lesions. The systemic zinc deficiency may be due to increased levels of metallothionein (MT) in the intestine and/or liver of Im mice. The untreated Im mice contain twice as much intestinal MT as do C57BL/6J-(+/sup im//+ /sup Im/) (B6) controls. This was determined by a sulfhydryl assay, by the /sup 109/Cd-saturation/hemolysate method, and by the /sup 65/Zn-binding assay. Various concentrations of Cd or Zn were added to the drinking water three days before assaying for MT. Compared to B6 mice, the Im mice exhibited more MT in their liver by the /sup 65/Zn-MT binding assay (3-fold) and by the /sup 109/Cd-saturation/hemolysate method (18-fold). The effects of the two zinc treatments did not differ significantly between Im and B6 mice. The retention and excretion of /sup 65/Zn (administered intraperitoneally) were determined over a 14-day period, but the results did not different between the Im and B6 mice. The increased concentrations of MT within the Im mice was not significantly different for the intestine and liver. Based on these data and other studies, the Im mice may exhibit alterations in zinc homeostasis due to some deregulation of MT metabolism, including the inner ear of the fetus, the lactating mammary gland, and the intestine and liver of adults by one year of age.

  3. Role of paraoxonase-1 in bone anabolic effects of parathyroid hormone in hyperlipidemic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jinxiu; Cheng, Henry; Atti, Elisa; Shih, Diana M.; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Anabolic effects of PTH were tested in hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing PON1. ► Expression of antioxidant regulatory genes was induced in PON1 overexpression. ► Bone resorptive activity was reduced in PON1 overexpressing hyperlipidemic mice. ► PON1 restored responsiveness to intermittent PTH in bones of hyperlipidemic mice. -- Abstract: Hyperlipidemia blunts anabolic effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cortical bone, and the responsiveness to PTH are restored in part by oral administration of the antioxidant ApoA-I mimetic peptide, D-4F. To evaluate the mechanism of this rescue, hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing the high-density lipoprotein-associated antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg}) were generated, and daily PTH injections were administered to Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} and to littermate Ldlr{sup −/−} mice. Expression of bone regulatory genes was determined by realtime RT-qPCR, and cortical bone parameters of the femoral bones by micro-computed tomographic analyses. PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTH receptor (PTH1R), activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in femoral cortical bone, as well as significantly greater cortical bone mineral content, thickness, and area in femoral diaphyses compared with untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice. In contrast, in control mice (Ldlr{sup −/−}) without PON1 overexpression, PTH treatment did not induce these markers. Calvarial bone of PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice also had significantly greater expression of osteoblastic differentiation marker genes as well as BMP-2-target and Wnt-target genes. Untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTHR1 than untreated Ldlr{sup −/−} mice, whereas sclerostin expression was reduced. In femoral cortical bones, expression levels of transcription factors, Fox

  4. [Effects of baicalin on HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Hu, Jian-Da; Huang, Yi; Chen, Ying-Yu; Li, Jing; Chen, Bu-Yuan

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of baicalin on HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice in vivo and explore its mechanism. Xenograft tumor model of HL-60 cells in nude mice was established, which was divided randomly into 6 groups: negative control group (injection of 5% NaHCO(3)), 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg baicalin groups, combination group (50 mg/kg baicalin + 2 mg/kg VP16) and positive control group (VP16 4 mg/kg). The nude mice with HL-60 cell xenografts were treated with drugs via intraperitoneal injection daily. After treatment for 14 days average weigh and inhibitory rate of transplanted tumor stripped from 5 nude mice in each group were calculated, and the ultrastructure change of xenografts cells were tested by transmission electron microscopy. Histopathologic examination was used to observed the change of main organs in nude mice. The expression of signaling molecular PI3K/Akt proteins extracted from xenografts was detected by Western blot. The effects of baicalin on overall survival time in nude mice with HL-60 cell xenografts were evaluated. The results showed that baicalin could inhibit the growth of transplanted tumors in dose-dependent manner. There were more necrotic and apoptotic cells in mice of baicalin-treated groups and combination group than that in mice of negative control group. Baicalin could inhibit the proliferation of HL-60 cells in vivo by down-regulating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, where the expressions of p-Akt, mTOR and p-mTOR proteins decreased compared with negative control group, and no significant difference of Akt expression was found between different groups. Compared with negative control group, the median survival time of mice in combination group was more prolongated (P < 0.05). It is concluded that baicalin can inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of HL-60 cell xenografts in nude mice, and prolong median survival time of nude mice. The possible mechanisms may be related to inhibition of Akt activity and down

  5. Berberine enhances antidiabetic effects and attenuates untoward effects of canagliflozin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cai-Ming; Jiang, Xin; Ouyang, Xiao-Xi; Zhang, Ya-Ou; Xie, Wei-Dong

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed at determining whether berberine can enhance the antidiabetic effects and alleviate the adverse effects of canagliflozin in diabetes mellitus. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were introduced, and the combined effects of berberine and canagliflozin on glucose metabolism and kidney functions were investigated. Our results showed that berberine combined with canagliflozin (BC) increased reduction of fasting and postprandial blood glucose, diet, and water intake compared with berberine or canagliflozin alone. Interestingly, BC showed greater decrease in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and lower total urine glucose excretion than canagliflozin alone. In addition, BC showed increased phosphorylated 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) expression and decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) levels in kidneys, compared with berberine or canagliflozin alone. These results indicated that BC was a stronger antidiabetic than berberine or canagliflozin alone with less negative side effects on the kidneys in the diabetic mice. The antidiabetic effect was likely to be mediated by synergically promoting the expression of pAMPK and reducing the expression of TNFα in kidneys. The present study represented the first report that canagliflozin combined with berberine was a promising treatment for diabetes mellitus. The exact underlying mechanisms of action should be investigated in future studies.

  6. Effect of Drugs on the Lethality in Mice of the Venoms and Neurotoxins from Sundry Snakes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-10

    maximal when the drugs were administered immediately after the irjection of venom or toxin. Nifedipine. piracetam , reserpine, and vesamicol analog 72...California, Santa Barbara, CA, U.S.A. Chloroquine, chlorpromazine, 5 dexamethasone, diltiazem, piracetam , primaquine, and quinacrine were dissolved in...nifedipine had no overt effect on 20 mice observed for 24 hr. , , I I I I I i ii i l I ! ! ! !0 Piracerwn Piracetam failed to protect mice from the

  7. The effects of cosmic Particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: V. Preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. Part I. physiological studies.

    PubMed

    Leon, H A; Suri, K; McTigue, M; Smith, J; Cooper, W; Miquel, J; Ashley, W W; Behnke, A R; Saunders, J F

    1975-04-01

    Tests were carried out on pocket mice to ascertain their tolerance to elevated oxygen pressures alone and to a combination of hyperoxta and heat in excess of that expected during the flight of the mice on Apollo XVII. the mice withstood oxygen partial pressures up to 12 pst at normal room temperature (24 degrees C, 75 degrees F) over a period of 7 days. A few mice previously exposed to increased PO2 died in the course of exposure to an oxygen pressure of 10 pst or 12 psi (517 mm or 620 mm Hg) for 13 d in ambient heat of 32 degrees C (90 degrees F). Supplemental vitamin E and physiological saline loading given prior to exposure had no apparent protective effect. The overall conclusion was that the pocket mice which were to go on Apollo XVII could readily survive the ambient atmosphere to which they would be exposed.

  8. Expression of GAT1 in male reproductive system and its effects on reproduction in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, JinFu; Gui, YaPing; Yuan, Tao; Bian, CuiDong; Guo, LiHe

    2009-12-01

    The present study was carried out to identify GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transport protein I (GAT1) in male reproductive organs and to study the effect of GAT1 overexpression on the male reproductive system in GAT1 transgenic mice (TG). Expression and location of GAT1 in testes, epididymis, and sperm of wild-type (WT) mice were identified by immunohistochemistry and western-blot. Histological changes of testes, epididymis, and sperm of transgenic mice overexpressing GAT1 were detected by immunofluorenscent staining and haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. GAT1 expression was detected in the testes, epididymis, and sperm of non-transgenic mice. Vacuolization and deformity of spermatogenic cells were observed in the transgenic mice, but the epididymis was unremarkable. Immunofluorenscent staining showed that the number of diastrophic and decapitated sperm increased significantly in transgenic mice to 46.9% from 7.3% in nontransgenic mice. These results suggest that abnormal expression of GAT1 could result in spermiogenesis function injury, sperm paramorphia and dysgenesis.

  9. Beneficial effects of a polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor on lupus in MRL-lpr/lpr mice.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, T J; Messner, R P

    1989-01-01

    Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an experimental drug that inactivates ornithine decarboxylase and thus reduces the production of polyamines has a beneficial effect on the mean survival time and the clinical and laboratory manifestations of murine lupus in female MRL-lpr/lpr mice. DFMO-treated mice showed a 29% increase in the mean survival time compared with age- and sex-matched control mice of the same strain. Lymphadenopathy was evident in untreated mice at 14 weeks of age, but was delayed until 19 weeks of age in DFMO-treated mice. In addition, the sera of DFMO-treated mice contained a significantly lower concentration of anti-DNA antibodies compared with untreated mice. These results open the possibility of development of a new class of therapeutic agents based on polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors for the treatment of human autoimmune disease. Possible mechanisms for the action of DFMO include its inhibitory action on cell proliferation as well as its ability to prevent DNA from assuming an immunogenic left-handed Z-DNA conformation. PMID:12412756

  10. Colchicine protects mice from the lethal effect of an agonistic anti-Fas antibody

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guoping; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether colchicine, which has been reported to protect against various hepatotoxic insults, influences the susceptibility of mice to the agonistic anti-Fas antibody, Jo2. All mice that were pretreated with colchicine (2 mg/kg) survived the lethal challenge of intraperitoneal administration of 10 μg of Jo2, whereas all control mice pretreated with γ-lumicolchicine succumbed to the challenge. Twelve micrograms of Jo2 killed less than half of colchicine-pretreated mice and its lethal effects were delayed relative to control mice, which all died within 8 hours. Other microtubule-disrupting agents such as Taxol, vinblastine, and nocodazole also improved the survival of mice treated with the lethal dose of Jo2. Histologic examination showed that colchicine protected against Jo2-induced fulminant liver injury, and TUNEL assay demonstrated that colchicine protected against massive apoptosis of hepatocytes. Hepatocytes isolated from colchicine-pretreated mice exhibited decreased susceptibility to Jo2-induced apoptosis. In addition, colchicine pretreatment reduced surface expression of Fas and decreased Jo2- and TNF-α–induced apoptosis of cultured hepatocytes in the presence of actinomycin D, but did not affect the susceptibility of cultured sinusoidal endothelial cells to Jo2-induced apoptosis. Remarkably, Fas and TNF receptor-1 mRNA and intracellular protein levels increased after colchicine treatment, indicating that colchicine protects against death ligand–induced apoptosis in the liver by decreasing death-receptor targeting to the cell surface. PMID:10675359

  11. Preventive effects of cedrol against alopecia in cyclophosphamide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yan; Lu, Qiu-Li; Lin, Zhe; Zhao, Yuqing

    2016-09-01

    Although numerous hypotheses have been proposed to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), effective pharmaceuticals have yet to be developed. In our study, the back hairs of C57BL/6 mice were factitiously removed. These mice were then treated with cedrol or minoxidil daily. Mice with early-stage anagen VI hair follicles were treated with cyclophosphamide (CYP, 125mg/kg) to induce alopecia. The CYP-damaged hair follicles were observed and quantified by using a digital photomicrograph. The results demonstrated that the minoxidil-treated mice suffered from complete alopecia similar to the model 6days after CYP administration. Simultaneously, the cedrol-treated (200mg/kg) mice manifested mild alopecia with 40% suppression. Histological observation revealed that anagen hair follicles of the cedrol-pretreated mice (82.5%) likely provided from damage compared with the sparse and dystrophic hair follicles of the model mice (37.0%). Therefore, the use of topical cedrol can prevent hair follicle dystrophy and provide local protection against CIA.

  12. Polysaccharides from Angelica and Astragalus exert hepatoprotective effects against carbon-tetrachloride-induced intoxication in mice.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xiuying; Fan, Wenbo; Yu, Shuang; Li, Yan; Ma, Xiaolong; Liu, Lu; Ren, Jing; Zhang, Weijie

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of polysaccharide from Angelica and Astragalus (AAP) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced liver damage in mice. A total of 120 Kunming mice were randomly distributed among 6 groups comprising (i) the normal control mice, (ii) the CCl4 treatment group, (iii) the bifendate treatment group, (iv) the AAP treatment group, (v) the Angelica sinensis polysaccharide (ASP) treatment group, and (vi) the Astragalus membranaceus polysaccharide (AMP) treatment group. AAP, ASP and AMP were administered to mice treated with CCl4. The activities of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) in the serum, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the liver tissues were quantified, as well as the liver index. Hepatic histological changes were observed by staining liver sections with hematoxylin and eosin. Our results show that bifendate, AAP, ASP, and AMP significantly decreased the activities of MDA, AST, and ALT, and enhanced the activity of SOD in CCl4-treated mice. Bifendate, AAP, ASP, and AMP consistently ameliorated the liver injuries induced with CCl4. Notably, the hepatoprotective effect of AAP was stronger than that of bifendate, ASP, or AMP. In addition, AAP alleviated liver inflammation and decreased the liver indexes of mice induced with CCl4. These effects were at least partly due to the antioxidant properties of AAP in scavenging free radicals to ameliorate oxidative stress and to inhibit lipid peroxidation.

  13. Effects of α-zearalanol on spermatogenesis and sex hormone levels of male mice

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Cunxiang; Zhao, Wei; Jia, Qiang; Yang, Zhifeng; Sai, Linlin; Zhang, Fang; Du, Zhongjun; Yu, Gongchang; Xie, Lin; Zhang, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the mechanisms of α-zearalanol (Zeranol)-induced male reproductive toxicity, the effects of Zeranol on spermatogenesis and sex hormone levels of male mice were studied. Methods: Forty healthy sexually mature male Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups. The mice were mock-treated or treated with Zeranol 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg via oral gavage for 35 days. The epididymal sperms were counted and their morphology and motility were analyzed. The testicles were examined by light and electron microscopy. The levels of serum/testicular testosterone (T), serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and serum luteinizing hormone (LH) were determined by radioimmunoassay. Results: Zeranol decreased the epididymal sperm count and sperm motility in a dose depend manner. While there were not significant differences in the sperm malformation rates between the Zeranol treated groups and the control group. Furthermore, Zeranol could decrease the weight and the organ coefficient of the seminal vesicles and the testicles and lead to significant pathological changes of the testicles. Zeranol could also decrease the levels of serum T, FSH, LH as well as the levels of testicular T of male mice. Conclusions: Zeranol induced reproductive toxicity in adult male mice. It could damage spermatogenesis via its direct effects on the testicles and interfere with sex hormone levels of male mice through its effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. PMID:26884912

  14. Antihyperglycemic Effect of Ganoderma Lucidum Polysaccharides on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fenglin; Zhang, Yiming; Zhong, Zhijian

    2011-01-01

    The current study evaluated the glucose-lowering effect of ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (Gl-PS) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The diabetic mice were randomly divided into four groups (8 mice per group): diabetic control group, low-dose Gl-PS treated group (50 mg/kg, Gl-PS), high-dose Gl-PS treated group (150 mg/kg, Gl-PS) and positive drug control treated group (glibenclamide, 4 mg/kg), with normal mice used as the control group. Body weights, fasting blood glucose (FBG), serum insulin and blood lipid levels of mice were measured. After 28 days of treatment with Gl-PS, body weights and serum insulin levels of the Gl-PS treated groups was significantly higher than that of the diabetic control group, whereas FBG levels was significantly lower. Moreover, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels of the Gl-PS treated groups had dropped, whereas the high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels had increased. In addition, according to acute toxicity studies, Gl-PS did not cause behavioral changes and any death of mice. These data suggest that Gl-PS has an antihyperglycemic effect. Furthermore, considering the Gl-PS effects on lipid profile, it may be a potential hypolipidaemic agent, which will be a great advantage in treating diabetic conditions associated with atherosclerosis or hyperlipidemia. PMID:22016649

  15. Effects of psychoactive drugs in the Vogel conflict test in mice.

    PubMed

    Umezu, T

    1999-06-01

    This study examined effects of various psychoactive drugs on the Vogel conflict test, where drinking behavior is punished by electric shocks, in ICR mice to clarify the pharmacological features of this method in mice. A benzodiazepine anxiolytic diazepam and a barbiturate pentobarbital produced significant anticonflict effects, which mean that these drugs increased the number of electric shocks mice received during 40-min test session. On the other hand, yohimbine (alpha2-receptor antagonist), caffeine (adenosine-receptor antagonist), scopolamine (muscarinic cholinergic antagonist), cyclazocine (sigma-receptor antagonist), cimetidine (H2-receptor antagonist), baclofen (GABA(B)-receptor agonist), MK-801 (NMDA-receptor antagonist), buspirone (5-HT1A-receptor agonist), chlorpromazine (dopamine-receptor antagonist) and haloperidol (dopamine-receptor and sigma-receptor antagonist) all did not produce anticonflict effects in this test using ICR mice. The results suggest that the Vogel conflict test is applicable to ICR mice and that this test in mice is appropriate as a screening method for drugs that have apparent anti-anxiety actions.

  16. Effect of three different cultivars of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) on learning and depression in ovariectomized mice

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Julio; Caldas, Maria; Dávila, Sonia; Gasco, Manuel; Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2006-01-01

    Background Lepidium meyenii Walp. (Brassicaceae), known as Maca, is a Peruvian hypocotyl growing exclusively between 4000 and 4500 m altitude in the central Peruvian Andes, particularly in Junin plateau and is used traditionally to enhance fertility. Maca is a cultivated plant and different cultivars are described according to the color of the hypocotyls. Methods The study aimed to elucidate the effect of Yellow, Red and Black Maca on cognitive function and depression in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. In all experiments OVX mice were treated during 21 days and divided in four groups: control group, Yellow Maca, Red Maca and Black Maca. Latent learning was assessed using the water finding task and the antidepressant activity of the three varieties of Maca was evaluated using the forced swimming test. Animals were sacrificed at the end of each treatment and the uterus were excised and weighed. Results Black Maca was the variety that showed the best response in the water finding task, particularly in the trained mice. The three varieties were effective to reduce finding latency in non trained and trained mice (P < 0.05). In the force swimming test, all varieties assessed reduced the time of immobility and increased uterine weight in OVX mice. Conclusion Black Maca appeared to have more beneficial effects on latent learning in OVX mice; meanwhile, all varieties of Maca showed antidepressant activity. PMID:16796734

  17. Cognitive-enhancing effects of hydrolysate of polygalasaponin in SAMP8 mice*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pan; Xu, Shu-ping; Wang, Ke-zhu; Lu, Cong; Zhang, Hong-xia; Pan, Rui-le; Qi, Chang; Yang, Yan-yan; Li, Ying-hui; Liu, Xin-min

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study is to evaluate the cognitive-enhancing effects of hydrolysate of polygalasaponin (HPS) on senescence accelerate mouse P8 (SAMP8) mice, an effective Alzheimer’s disease (AD) model, and to research the relevant mechanisms. Methods: The cognitive-enhancing effects of HPS on SAMP8 mice were assessed using Morris water maze (MWM) and step-through passive avoidance tests. Then N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit expression for both the cortex and hippocampus of mice was observed using Western blotting. Results: HPS (25 and 50 mg/kg) improved the escape rate and decreased the escape latency and time spent in the target quadrant for the SAMP8 mice in the MWM after oral administration of HPS for 10 d. Moreover, it decreased error times in the passive avoidance tests. Western blotting showed that HPS was able to reverse the levels of NMDAR1 and NMDAR2B expression in the cortex or hippocampus of model mice. Conclusions: The present study suggested that HPS can improve cognitive deficits in SAMP8 mice, and this mechanism might be associated with NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-related pathways. PMID:27381727

  18. Fasting activated histaminergic neurons and enhanced arousal effect of caffeine in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Qun; Li, Rui; Wu, Xu; Zhu, Fen; Takata, Yohko; Zhang, Ze; Zhang, Meng-Qi; Li, Shan-Qun; Qu, Wei-Min

    2015-06-01

    Caffeine, a popular psychoactive compound, promotes wakefulness via blocking adenosine A2A receptors in the shell of the nucleus accumbens, which projects to the arousal histaminergic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN). The TMN controls several behaviors such as wakefulness and feeding. Fasting has been reported to activate the TMN histaminergic neurons to increase arousal. Therefore, we propose that caffeine may promote greater arousal under fasting rather than normal feeding conditions. In the current study, locomotor activity recording, electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram recording and c-Fos expression were used in wild type (WT) and histamine H1 receptor (H1R) knockout (KO) mice to investigate the arousal effects of caffeine under fasting conditions. Caffeine (15mg/kg) enhanced locomotor activity in fasted mice for 5h, but only did so for 3h in normally fed animals. Pretreatment with the H1R antagonist pyrilamine abolished caffeine-induced stimulation on locomotor activity in fasted mice. EEG recordings confirmed that caffeine-induced wakefulness for 3h in fed WT mice, and for 5h in fasted ones. A stimulatory effect of caffeine was not observed in fasted H1R KO mice. Furthermore, c-Fos expression was increased in the TMN under fasting conditions. These results indicate that caffeine had greater wakefulness-promoting effects in fasted mice through the mediation of H1R.

  19. Effects of chitosan on xenograft models of melanoma in C57BL/6 mice and hepatoma formation in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ming-Yang; Wu, Ming-Fang; Shang, Hung-Sheng; Chang, Jin-Biou; Shih, Yung-Luen; Chen, Yung-Liang; Hung, Hsiao-Fang; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Yeh, Chun; Wood, W Gibson; Hung, Fang-Ming; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2013-11-01

    According to the World Health Organization, Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a comprehensive term referring to traditional medical treatments and various forms of indigenous medicines, also known as indigenous or folk medicine. Cancer patients often use CAM in the form of nutritional supplements, psychological techniques and natural medical approaches in the place of or in parallel to conventional medicine. The present study aimed to determine if Chitosan can inhibit lung metastasis and hepatoma formation, by studying xenograft of B16F10 melanoma cells in C57BL/6 mice and of Smmu 7721 cells in SCID mice, respectively. For the lung metastasis model, after a five-week treatment, the survival rates of B6 mice were 15% for the control group and 35%, 20%, 45% and 40% for the 320,000 kDa, 173,000 kDa, 86,000 kDa and 8,000 kDa molecular-weight treatment groups, respectively. Chitosan treatment dramatically increased lifespan and inhibited tumor metastasis especially in treatment groups of the low-molecular weight compound. For the hepatoma growth model, the size of the liver tumor mass was approximately >14 mm in the control group. In comparison to the control group, the tumor mass grew slowly with Chitosan treatment, especially at the low-molecular weight treatment group. Chitosan slowed-down the rate of tumor growth but did not inhibit tumor formation. Data presented herein demonstrate that Chitosan has anticancer effects and thus further study of the substance is warranted to examine for mechanisms of action and optimal dosage.

  20. Reduced wheel running and blunted effects of voluntary exercise in LPA1-null mice: The importance of assessing the amount of running in transgenic mice studies

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Blanco, Eduardo; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    This work was aimed to assess whether voluntary exercise rescued behavioral and hippocampal alterations in mice lacking the lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor (LPA1-null mice), studying the potential relationship between the amount of exercise performed and its effects. Normal and LPA1-null mice underwent 23 days of free wheel running and were tested for open-field behavior and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (cell proliferation, immature neurons, cell survival). Running decreased anxiety-like behavior in both genotypes but increased exploration only in the normal mice. While running affected all neurogenesis-related measures in normal mice (especially in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus), only a moderate increase in cell survival was found in the mutants. Importantly, the LPA1-nulls showed notably reduced running. Analysis suggested that defective running in the LPA1-null mice could contribute to explain the scarce benefit of the voluntary exercise treatment. On the other hand, a literature review revealed that voluntary exercise is frequently used to modulate behavior and the hippocampus in transgenic mice, but half of the studies did not assess the quantity of running, overlooking any potential running impairments. This study adds evidence to the relevance of the quantity of exercise performed, emphasizing the importance of its assessment in transgenic mice research. PMID:24055600

  1. Toxoplasma gondii: the effects of infection at different stages of pregnancy on the offspring of mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Min; Gao, Xiao-Jie; Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Congenital toxoplasmosis can cause fetal damage in humans and domestic animals. This study was focused on the effects of Toxoplasma gondii (Prugniaud strain) infection at different stages of pregnancy on the offspring of mice. Results showed that newborn mice from all infected groups were significantly lower in weight than those from the control group but significant difference was not found among these groups at day 60 after birth. The survival rate of the offspring from the group of mice infected at the earlier stage of pregnancy was significantly lower than those of infected and control groups. The positive offspring (with cysts found in their brain tissues) born from the mice infected at the earlier and intermediate stages of pregnancy showed a shorter latency and greater number of errors in the step-through passive avoidance test than those born from the mice infected at the late stage of pregnancy, the control group and the negative offspring from the infected groups. The number of cysts in the brain tissue was significantly higher in the offspring born from the groups of mice infected at the earlier and intermediate stages of pregnancy than those from the group of mice infected at the late stage of pregnancy. In addition, our results indicated that a high congenital transmission rate (90%) occurred in this NIH mouse model. In conclusion, the earlier and intermediate maternal infection of T. gondii can result in severe congenital toxoplasmosis, exhibiting conditions such as stillbirth or non-viability, and learning or memory capability damage in this mouse model. These results not only provide useful data for better understanding the effects of T. gondii infection on the offspring of mice infected at different stages of pregnancy but also for better consideration of the effect of this infection on other mammalian hosts including humans.

  2. Coplanar Polychlorinated Biphenyls Impair Glucose Homeostasis in Lean C57BL/6 Mice and Mitigate Beneficial Effects of Weight Loss on Glucose Homeostasis in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nicki A.; Karounos, Michael; English, Victoria; Fang, Jun; Wei, Yinan; Stromberg, Arnold; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J.; Swanson, Hollie I.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous studies demonstrated that coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) promote proinflammatory gene expression in adipocytes. PCBs are highly lipophilic and accumulate in adipose tissue, a site of insulin resistance in persons with type 2 diabetes. Objectives: We investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of coplanar PCBs on adipose expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and on glucose and insulin homeostasis in lean and obese mice. Methods: We quantified glucose and insulin tolerance, as well as TNF-α levels, in liver, muscle, and adipose tissue of male C57BL/6 mice administered vehicle, PCB-77, or PCB-126 and fed a low fat (LF) diet. Another group of mice administered vehicle or PCB-77 were fed a high fat (HF) diet for 12 weeks; the diet was then switched from HF to LF for 4 weeks to induce weight loss. We quantified glucose and insulin tolerance and adipose TNF-α expression in these mice. In addition, we used in vitro and in vivo studies to quantify aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent effects of PCB-77 on parameters of glucose homeostasis. Results: Treatment with coplanar PCBs resulted in sustained impairment of glucose and insulin tolerance in mice fed the LF diet. In PCB-77–treated mice, TNF-α expression was increased in adipose tissue but not in liver or muscle. PCB-77 levels were strikingly higher in adipose tissue than in liver or serum. Antagonism of AhR abolished both in vitro and in vivo effects of PCB-77. In obese mice, PCB-77 had no effect on glucose homeostasis, but glucose homeostasis was impaired after weight loss. Conclusions: Coplanar PCBs impaired glucose homeostasis in lean mice and in obese mice following weight loss. Adipose-specific elevations in TNF-α expression by PCBs may contribute to impaired glucose homeostasis. PMID:23099484

  3. Age-dependent effects of UCP2 deficiency on experimental acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sarah; Kaiser, Hannah; Krüger, Burkhard; Fitzner, Brit; Lange, Falko; Bock, Cristin N; Nizze, Horst; Ibrahim, Saleh M; Fuellen, Georg; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Jaster, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP) for many years but experimental evidence is still limited. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2)-deficient mice are an accepted model of age-related oxidative stress. Here, we have analysed how UCP2 deficiency affects the severity of experimental AP in young and older mice (3 and 12 months old, respectively) triggered by up to 7 injections of the secretagogue cerulein (50 μg/kg body weight) at hourly intervals. Disease severity was assessed at time points from 3 hours to 7 days based on pancreatic histopathology, serum levels of alpha-amylase, intrapancreatic trypsin activation and levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in lung and pancreatic tissue. Furthermore, in vitro studies with pancreatic acini were performed. At an age of 3 months, UCP2-/- mice and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice were virtually indistinguishable with respect to disease severity. In contrast, 12 months old UCP2-/- mice developed a more severe pancreatic damage than WT mice at late time points after the induction of AP (24 h and 7 days, respectively), suggesting retarded regeneration. Furthermore, a higher peak level of alpha-amylase activity and gradually increased MPO levels in pancreatic and lung tissue were observed in UCP2-/- mice. Interestingly, intrapancreatic trypsin activities (in vivo studies) and intraacinar trypsin and elastase activation in response to cerulein treatment (in vitro studies) were not enhanced but even diminished in the knockout strain. Finally, UCP2-/- mice displayed a diminished ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione in serum but no increased ROS levels in pancreatic acini. Together, our data indicate an aggravating effect of UCP2 deficiency on the severity of experimental AP in older but not in young mice. We suggest that increased severity of AP in 12 months old UCP2-/- is caused by an imbalanced inflammatory response but is unrelated to acinar cell functions.

  4. [Protective effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on hematopoietic organs of irradiated mice].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling-Zhen; Yin, Song-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jia-Yu; Wei, Bo-Xiong; Zhan, Yu; Yu, Wei; Wu, Jin-Ming; Qu, Jia; Guo, Zi-Kuan

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the protective effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on hematopoietic organs of irradiated mice. Human bone marrow MSC were isolated, ex vivo expanded, and identified by cell biological tests. Female BALB/c mice were irradiated with (60)Co γ-ray at a single dose of 6 Gy, and received different doses of human MSC and MSC lysates or saline via tail veins. The survival of mice was record daily, and the femurs and spleens were harvested on day 9 and 16 for pathologic examination. The histological changes were observed and the cellularity was scored. The results showed that the estimated survival time of MSC- and MSC lysate-treated mice was comparable to that of controls. The hematopoiesis in the bone marrow of mice that received high-dose (5×10(6)) of MSC or MSC lysates was partially restored on day 9 and the capacity of hemopoietic tissue and cellularity scorings were significantly elevated as compared with that of controls (P < 0.05). Proliferative nudes were also obviously observed in the spleens of mice that received high-dose of MSC or MSC lysates on d 9 after irradiation. The histological structures of the spleen and bone marrow of the mice that received high-doses (5×10(6)) of MSC or MSC lysates were restored to normal, the cell proliferation displayed extraordinarily active. Further, the cellularity scores of the bone marrow were not significantly different between the high-dose MSC and MSC lysate-treated mice. It is concluded that the bone marrow MSC can promote the hematopoietic recovery of the irradiated mice, which probably is associated with the bioactive materials inherently existed in bone marrow cells.

  5. Effects of Altered Levels of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase and Irradiation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Female Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yani; Leu, David; Chui, Jennifer; Fike, John R.; Huang, Ting-Ting

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Altered levels of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) and cranial irradiation have been shown to affect hippocampal neurogenesis. However, previous studies were only conducted in male mice, and it was not clear if there was a difference between males and females. Therefore, female mice were studied and the results compared with those generated in male mice from an earlier study. Methods and Materials: Female wild-type, EC-SOD-null (KO), and EC-SOD bigenic mice with neuronal-specific expression of EC-SOD (OE) were subjected to a single dose of 5-Gy gamma rays to the head at 8 weeks of age. Progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation, and long-term survival of newborn neurons were determined. Results: Similar to results from male mice, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation both resulted in significant reductions in mature newborn neurons in female mice. EC-SOD deficiency reduced long-term survival of newborn neurons whereas irradiation reduced progenitor cell proliferation. Overexpression of EC-SOD corrected the negative impacts from EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation and normalized the production of newborn neurons in OE mice. Expression of neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 were significantly reduced by irradiation in wild-type mice, but the levels were not changed in KO and OE mice even though both cohorts started out with a lower baseline level. Conclusion: In terms of hippocampal neurogenesis, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation have the same overall effects in males and females at the age the studies were conducted.

  6. Sex-related effects of agmatine on caffeine-induced locomotor activity in Swiss Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun; Kose, Akin; Kayir, Hakan; Ulusoy, Gokhan; Celik, Turgay

    2010-03-25

    In mammalian brain, agmatine is an endogenous amine that is synthesized through the decarboxylation of l-arginine by arginine decarboxylase. It has been proposed as a new neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator. It was shown that agmatine had some beneficial effects in animal models of opioid and alcohol addiction. Locomotor stimulant properties of drugs such as ethanol, caffeine, nicotine and amphetamine have been linked to their addictive properties. The present study investigates the effects of agmatine on caffeine-induced locomotor activity both in male and female mice. Adult Swiss Webster mice were used in the study. Locomotor activity was measured for 30min immediately following caffeine (2.5, 5, 10 and 20mg/kg, i.p.) or saline treatments. Agmatine (5, 10 and 20mg/kg, i.p.) were injected 20min before caffeine (2.5 and 5mg/kg, i.p.) administration. In both sexes, agmatine (5-20mg/kg) were also tested for ability to depress or stimulate locomotor activity in the absence of caffeine. Caffeine (5mg/kg) induced a significant increase in locomotor activity of both male and female mice. There was no significant difference in the locomotor-activating effects of caffeine between male and female mice. Agmatine blocked the caffeine (5mg/kg)-induced locomotor stimulation dose dependently in male but not female mice. Agmatine had not any effect on the lower dose (2.5mg/kg) of caffeine in both sexes. These results suggest that agmatine has sex-related inhibitory effects on caffeine-induced locomotor activity in Swiss Webster mice, and male mice are more sensitive than the females to the effect of agmatine.

  7. NASA Rodent Foodbar: Long Term Effects in Swiss Webster Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, D. L.; Yu, D. S.; Naficy, N. H.; Roghani, P. M.; Dalton, B. P.; Barrett, J. E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Swiss Webster male and female mice (150 of each) were fed NASA Rodent Foodbar for more than 110 days to test the diet's nutritional adequacy for use in future long-term studies aboard the International Space Station. Mice were grouped three to a cage (one cage = one sample) and cages were assigned to either Foodbar or Purina Chow #5001 (control) diet groups. Body weights, food intake, and water intake were obtained throughout the study. There were no significant differences in body weights between male Foodbar fed and Chow fed males (p=0.58), and at 15 weeks into the female mouse study there appear to be no significant body weight differences. Both male and female Foodbar fed groups consumed more food and less water than their Chow controls, both factors thought to be attributable to the high moisture content of the Foodbars (26% versus 10% for Chow). All differences in gross food and water consumption had p-values of less than 0.01. When food and water intake were adjusted for the moisture content in the food, both male and female Foodbar fed animals consumed less food, but still had a lower water intake rate than their controls. (p is less than 0.01). Preliminary analysis on blood samples from male and female halfway point dissections suggests differences in glucose and fat metabolism. In both male and female Foodbar fed animals, blood glucose values were significantly lower (p is less than 0.01) but there were no significant differences in cholesterol levels (p=0.51). In Foodbar fed females, triglycerides were significantly higher (p is less than 0.01). These data suggest that Foodbars allow for normal growth in Swiss Webster mice, but affect some blood chemistry parameters.

  8. The effect of 3-acetylpyridine on inferior olivary neuron degeneration in Lurcher mutant and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Caddy, K W; Vozeh, F

    1997-07-09

    Lurcher mutant and wild-type mice were given intraperitoneal injections of 3-acetylpyridine to look at the toxic effects of this drug on the inferior olivary neurons. Intraperitoneal administration of 3-acetylpyridine is characterized by the different sensitivity of inferior olivary neurons in Lurcher mutant and wild-type mice. Lurcher mutants suffered a destruction of these neurons while wild-type mice were unaffected. The results show that there is a different effect of 3-acetylpyridine between genetic mutations and wild-type mice on the same inbred strain of mice. The different affinity of 3-acetylpyridine for the inferior olivary neurons of this mutant is briefly discussed.

  9. Effects of gamma radiation on fetal development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Tahere; Mozdarani, Hossein; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Kalantar, Seyed Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many cancer patients receive radiotherapy which may lead to serious damages to the ovary storage and the matrix muscle state. Some of these patients may admit to infertility clinics for having pregnancy and on the other hand hormonal administration for superovulation induction is a routine procedure in assisted reproduction technology (ART) clinics. Objective: This study aimed to investigate fertility and fetuses of hormone treated super ovulated female mice who had received whole-body gamma irradiation before mating. Materials and Methods: Female mice were randomly categorized into a control group and 3 experimental groups including: Group I (Irradiation), Group II (Superovulation), and Group III (Superovulation and Irradiation). In hormone treated groups, mice were injected with different doses of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) followed with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). Irradiation was done using a Co-60 gamma ray generator with doses of 2 and 4 Gy. Number of fetuses counted and the fetus’s weight, head circumference, birth height, the number of live healthy fetuses, the number of fetuses with detected anomalies in the body, the sum of resorption and arrested fetuses were all recorded as outcome of treatments. Results: In the group I and group II, increased radiation and hormone dose led to a decrease in the number of survived fetuses (45 in 2 Gy vs. 29 in 4 Gy for irradiated group) as well as from 76 in 10 units into 48 in 15 units. In the group III, a higher dose of hormone in the presence of a 2 Gy irradiation boosted the slink rate; i.e. the number of aborted fetuses reached 21 cases while applying the dose of 15 Iu, whereas 6 cases of abortion were reported applying the hormone with a lower dose. Among different parameters studied, there was a significant difference in parameters of weight and height in the mouse fetuses (p=0.01). Conclusion: The data indicated that use of ovarian stimulating hormones in mice that received pre

  10. Novel effect of berberine on thermoregulation in mice model induced by hot and cold environmental stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing-Fei; Wang, Yu-Gang; Hu, Jun; Lei, Fan; Kheir, Michael M; Wang, Xin-Pei; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Yuan, Zhi-Yi; Lu, Xi; Xing, Dong-Ming; Du, Feng; Du, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of berberine (BBR) on thermoregulation in mice exposed to hot (40°C) and cold (4°C) environmental conditions. Four groups of mice were assembled with three different dosages of BBR (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 mg/kg) and normal saline (control). In room temperature, our largest dosage of BBR (0.8 mg/kg) can reduce rectal temperatures (Tc) of normal mice. In hot conditions, BBR can antagonize the increasing core body temperature and inhibit the expression of HSP70 and TNFα in mice; conversely, in cold conditions, BBR can antagonize the decreasing core body temperature and enhance the expression of TRPM8. This study demonstrates the dual ability of BBR in maintaining thermal balance, which is of great relevance to the regulation of HSP70, TNFα and TRPM8.

  11. Bioaccumulation of metals and reproductive effects in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus)

    SciTech Connect

    La Tier, A.J.; Pastorok, R.A.; Ginn, T.C.; Garcia, P.I.

    1994-12-31

    Reproductive parameters were used to evaluate the potential effects of exposure on female deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) to metals-enriched soils in the Upper Clark Fork River Superfund Complex. Deer mice were collected from floodplain and transitional area habitats in each of four drainages with a wide range of metals concentrations in soil. Whole-body tissue concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc were measured in composite samples of male and female deer mice. Females were necropsied, and the uterus was removed to evaluate reproductive performance based on percentages of females with embryos and with uterine scars (i.e., implantation sites) and the mean numbers of embryos and uterine scars per female. Reproductive activity was evidenced by the presence of embryos or uterine scaring in animals from metals-enriched areas. Despite elevated body burden of metals in mice from study areas, deer mice were prevalent in all areas, and mean litter size (4.4/female) was normal for this region (4--6 pups/female). Reproductive indicators suggested that the rate of reproduction was higher in the study areas than in the reference area. These results indicate that the metals elevations in deer mice do not result in measurable effects on reproduction.

  12. Jumihaidokuto effectively inhibits colon inflammation and apoptosis in mice with acute colitis.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, Remya; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Afrin, Mst Rejina; Harima, Meilei; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakamura, Masahiko; Suzuki, Kenji; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2015-12-01

    Jumihaidokuto, a Japanese kampo medicine, is prescribed in Japan for its anti-inflammatory activity. Here we have examined its beneficial effects against acute colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in mice. We have used C57BL/6 female mice, divided into two groups and received 3% DSS in drinking water during the experimental period (8days). Treatment group mice received 1g/kg/day dose of Jumihaidokuto orally whereas DSS control group received equal volume of distilled water. Normal control group mice received plain drinking water. Jumihaidokuto treatment attenuated the colitis symptoms along with suppression of various inflammatory marker proteins such as IL-1β, IL-2Rα, IL-4, CTGF and RAGE. It has also down-regulated the oxidative stress and apoptotic signaling in the colons of mice with colitis. The present study has confirmed the beneficial effects of Jumihaidokuto on DSS induced acute colitis in mice and suggests that it can be a potential agent for the treatment of colitis.

  13. Effect of LA on the Growth and Development of the Main Organs in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    He, Xiuyuan; Lin, Feng; Li, Yongtao; Chen, Yuxia; Li, Jing; Guo, Linlin; Han, Xuelei; Song, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Effects of lead acetate (LA) on the growth and development of major organs in female mice were studied. Female mice were divided randomly into four treatment groups and one control group. In treatment groups, mice were injected with different concentrations of LA solution every 2 days; whereas control-group mice received equal volumes of sterile normal saline. Body weight (BW) and symptoms were recorded every 2 days. After LA exposure, mice were executed by cervical dislocation and main organs (heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney) collected for evaluation of morphologic and histologic changes. LA could greatly affect increases in BW, and BW decreased with increasing dose and time of exposure to LA. Compared with the control group, organ coefficients in treatment groups were of the order kidney and spleen > liver and lung > heart and demonstrated obvious dose-time effects. LA exposure could damage the heart, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney. Damage to the kidney and spleen was the most severe, followed by that to the liver, heart, and lung. Damage was aggravated with increasing doses and exposure time to LA in an obvious dose-time relationship; when LA dose was ≥20 mg/kg, the growth and development of mice were obviously inhibited. These results suggest that long-term exposure to low-dose LA can result in universal pathologic damage to mouse organs and that severity is dependent on the dose and duration of LA exposure.

  14. Effects of slightly acidic electrolysed drinking water on mice.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Shibata, Yoshiko; Obata, Takahiro; Kawagoe, Masami; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Sato, Masayoshi; Toida, Kazumi; Kushima, Hidemi; Matsuda, Yukihisa

    2011-10-01

    Slightly acidic electrolysed (SAE) water is a sanitizer with strong bactericidal activity due to hypochlorous acid. We assessed the safety of SAE water as drinking water for mice at a 5 ppm total residual chlorine (TRC) concentration to examine the possibility of SAE water as a labour- and energy-saving alternative to sterile water. We provided SAE water or sterile water to mice for 12 weeks, during which time we recorded changes in body weight and weekly water and food intakes. At the end of the experiment, all of the subject animals were sacrificed to assess serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine levels and to examine the main organs histopathologically under a light microscope. In addition, we investigated the bacteria levels of both types of water. We found no difference in functional and morphological health condition indices between the groups. Compared with sterile water, SAE water had a relatively higher ability to suppress bacterial growth. We suggest that SAE water at 5 ppm TRC is a safe and useful alternative to sterile water for use as drinking water in laboratory animal facilities.

  15. Tissue distribution and effects of fasting and obesity on the ghrelin axis in mice.

    PubMed

    Morash, Michael G; Gagnon, Jeffrey; Nelson, Stephanie; Anini, Younes

    2010-08-09

    Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid peptide hormone derived from the 117 amino acid proghrelin, following cleavage by proprotein convertase 1 (PC1). In this study, we comprehensively assessed the tissue distribution and the effect of fasting and obesity on preproghrelin, Exon-4D, PC1 and GOAT expression and proghrelin-derived peptide (PGDP) secretion. The stomach was the major source of preproghrelin expression and PDGPs, followed by the small intestine. The remaining peripheral tissues (including the brain and pancreas) contained negligible expression levels. We detected obestatin in all stomach proghrelin cells, however, 22% of proghrelin cells in the small intestine did not express obestatin. There were strain differences in ghrelin secretion in response to fasting between CD1 and C57BL/6 mice. After a 24 hour-fast, CD1 mice had increased plasma levels of total ghrelin and obestatin with no change in preproghrelin mRNA or PGDP tissues levels. C57BL/6 mice showed a different response to a 24 hour-fast having increased proghrelin mRNA expression, stomach acylated ghrelin peptide and no change in plasma obestatin in C57BL/6 mice. In obese mice (ob/ob and diet-induced obesity (DIO)) there was a significant increase in preproghrelin mRNA levels while tissue and plasma PGDP levels were significantly reduced. Fasting did not affect PGDP in obese mice. Obese models displayed differences in GOAT expression, which was elevated in DIO mice, but reduced in ob/ob mice. We did not find co-localization of the leptin receptor in ghrelin expressing stomach cells, ruling out a direct effect of leptin on stomach ghrelin synthesis and secretion.

  16. Effect of xid on autoimmune C3H-gld/gld mice.

    PubMed

    Seldin, M F; Reeves, J P; Scribner, C L; Roths, J B; Davidson, W F; Morse, H C; Steinberg, A D

    1987-06-01

    The xid gene was introduced into C3H-gld/gld mice to determine its effects on the development of autoimmune disease. C3H-gld/gld.xid mice were compared with C3H-gld/gld mice for the development of lymphadenopathy, surface phenotype of lymph node (LN) cells, c-myb oncogene RNA production, serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels, and autoantibody production. In addition, C3H-gld/gld and C3H-lpr/lpr mice were examined for serum Ig and autoantibody levels. The results showed that the xid gene had no effect on either the development of the severe lymphadenopathy characteristic of C3H-gld/gld mice or the phenotype of the Ly-2-, L3T4-, Ly-5(B220)+ T-cell subset that is expanded in the LN and spleens of these mice. Similarly, xid did not affect the high levels of c-myb oncogene RNA expression by C3H-gld/gld LN and spleen cells. By contrast, the xid gene caused a significant reduction in serum IgM but not IgA levels and almost completely ablated the generation of both IgM and IgG anti-ssDNA antibodies and anti-dsDNA antibodies. These data suggest that the xid gene can dramatically decrease the B-cell manifestations of autoimmunity in gld homozygotes without affecting their abnormal T-cell expansion. Comparisons of age-matched C3H-gld/gld and C3H-lpr/lpr mice showed that they had similarly elevated serum IgM and IgA levels and anti-ssDNA and anti-dsDNA antibody levels providing further evidence that gld and lpr produce parallel defects in C3H mice.

  17. Effect of infrared radiation A on photoaged hairless mice harboring eumelanin and pheomelanin in the epidermis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Shizuka; Funasaka, Yoko; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Kawana, Seiji; Saeki, Hidehisa

    2015-04-01

    Infrared radiation A (IRA) is absorbed by melanin and generates heat. Therefore, the effect of IRA could be well analyzed using skin, which contains melanin in the epidermis. Hairless mice harboring epidermal melanocytes that produce eumelanin, pheomelanin, or non-melanin were generated by backcrossing K14-stem cell factor mice, recessive yellow mice, and then albino hairless mice. High-dose IRA was irradiated over 18 weeks after the establishment of photoaged mice by irradiation with ultraviolet B (UVB) three times a week for 14 weeks. Tumor formation was assessed every week. The formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer and apoptotic cells by the irradiation of IRA and UVB was evaluated. Repetitive irradiation of IRA did not promote tumor formation in all types of mice. Pre-irradiation of IRA to UVB, but not post-irradiation, accelerated the elimination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and enhanced apoptosis; these effects were most obvious in eumelanin-producing mice. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed downregulation of FLICE (cellular caspase 8)-like inhibitory protein and B-cell lymphoma-extra large and upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein by UVB, but further enhancement of these molecules by pre-irradiation of IRA was not observed. These results indicate that IRA does not confer the promotion of UVB-induced carcinogenesis in photoaged mice harboring epidermal melanocytes and that photochemical reaction between IRA and melanin might be involved in the induction of apoptosis and the elimination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by UVB. The enhancement of apoptosis by pre-irradiation of IRA to UVB might be induced by mechanisms other than the modification of the mRNA expression of FLICE (cellular caspase 8)-like inhibitory protein, B-cell lymphoma-extra large, and Bcl-2-associated X.

  18. Sex-dependent behavioral effects of Mthfr deficiency and neonatal GABA potentiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Levav-Rabkin, Tamar; Blumkin, Elinor; Galron, Dalia; Golan, Hava M

    2011-01-20

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (Mthfr) gene and/or abnormal homocysteine-folate metabolism are associated with increased risk for birth defects and neuropsychiatric diseases. In addition, disturbances of the GABAergic system in the brain as well as Mthfr polymorphism are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In the present study we performed behavioral phenotyping of male and female Mthfr mice (wild type and their heterozygous littermates). The present study addresses two main questions: (1) genetic susceptibility, as examined by effects of Mthfr deficiency on behavior (Experiment 1) and (2) possible gene-drug interactions as expressed by behavioral phenotyping of Mthfr-deficient mice neonatally exposed to the GABA potentiating drug GVG (Experiment 2). Newborn development was slightly influenced by Mthfr genotype per se (Experiment 1); however the gene-drug interaction similarly affected reflex development in both male and female offspring (Experiment 2). Hyperactivity was demonstrated in Mthfr heterozygous male mice (Experiment 1) and due to GVG treatment in both Wt and Mthfr+/- male and female mice (Experiment 2). The gene-environment interaction did not affect anxiety-related behavior of male mice (Experiment 2). In female mice, gene-treatment interactions abolished the reduced anxiety observed due to GVG treatment and Mthfr genotype (Experiment 2). Finally, recognition memory of adult mice was impaired due to genotype, treatment and the gene-treatment combination in a sex-independent manner (Experiment 2). Overall, Mthfr deficiency and/or GABA potentiation differentially affect a spectrum of behaviors in male and female mice. This study is the first to describe behavioral phenotypes due to Mthfr genotype, GVG treatment and the interaction between these two factors. The behavioral outcomes suggest that Mthfr deficiency modulates the effects of GABA potentiating drugs. These findings suggest that future treatment

  19. Protective Effect of Lycium ruthenicum Murr. Against Radiation Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yabin; Chen, Fan; Yao, Xingchen; Zhu, Junbo; Wang, Cai; Zhang, Juanling; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    The protective effect of Lycium ruthenicum Murr. against radiation injury was examined in mice. Kunming mice were randomly divided into a control group, model group, positive drug group and L. ruthenicum high dose (8 g/kg), L. ruthenicum middle dose (4 g/kg), L. ruthenicum low dose (2 g/kg) treatment groups, for which doses were administered the third day, seventh day and 14th day after irradiation. L. ruthenicum extract was administered orally to the mice in the three treatment groups and normal saline was administered orally to the mice in the control group and model group for 14 days. The positive group was treated with amifostine (WR-2721) at 30 min before irradiation. Except for the control group, the groups of mice received a 5 Gy quantity of X-radiation evenly over their whole body at one time. Body weight, hemogram, thymus and spleen index, DNA, caspase-3, caspase-6, and P53 contents were observed at the third day, seventh day, and 14th day after irradiation. L. ruthenicum could significantly increase the total red blood cell count, hemoglobin count and DNA contents (p < 0.05). The spleen index recovered significantly by the third day and 14th day after irradiation (p < 0.05). L. ruthenicum low dose group showed a significant reduction in caspase-3 and caspase-6 of serum in mice at the third day, seventh day, and 14th day after irradiation and L. ruthenicum middle dose group experienced a reduction in caspase-6 of serum in mice by the seventh day after irradiation. L. ruthenicum could decrease the expression of P53. The results showed that L. ruthenicum had protective effects against radiation injury in mice. PMID:26193298

  20. The Rpe65rd12 Allele Exerts a Semidominant Negative Effect on Vision in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Charles B.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Feng, Wei; Getz, Shannon E.; Duncan, Todd; Pardue, Machelle T.; Feng, Yue; Redmond, T. Michael; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Nickerson, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The rd12 mouse was reported as a recessively inherited Rpe65 mutation. We asked if the rd12 mutation resides in Rpe65 and how the mutation manifests itself. Methods. A complementation test was performed by mating Rpe65KO (KO/KO) and rd12 mice together to determine if the rd12 mutation is in the Rpe65 gene. Visual function of wild-type (+/+), KO/+, rd12/+, KO/KO, rd12/rd12, and KO/rd12 mice was measured by optokinetic tracking (OKT) and ERG. Morphology was assessed by retinal cross section. qRT-PCR quantified Rpe65 mRNA levels. Immunoblotting measured the size and level of RPE65 protein. Rpe65 mRNA localization was visualized with RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Fractions of Rpe65 mRNA-bound proteins were separated by linear sucrose gradient fractionation. Results. The KO and rd12 alleles did not complement. The rd12 allele induced a negative semidominant effect on visual function; OKT responses became undetectable 120 days earlier in rd12/rd12 mice compared with KO/KO mice. rd12/+ mice lost approximately 21% visual acuity by P210. rd12/rd12 mice had fewer cone photoreceptor nuclei than KO/KO mice at P60. rd12/rd12 mice expressed 71% +/+ levels of Rpe65 mRNA, but protein was undetectable. Mutant mRNA was appropriately spliced, exported to the cytoplasm, trafficked, and contained no other coding mutation aside from the known nonsense mutation. Mutant mRNA was enriched on ribosome-free messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs), whereas wild-type mRNA was enriched on actively translating polyribosomes. Conclusions. The rd12 lesion is in Rpe65. The rd12 mutant phenotype inherits in a semidominant manner. The effects of the mutant mRNA on visual function may result from inefficient binding to ribosomes for translation. PMID:24644049

  1. The effects of in utero bisphenol A exposure on the ovaries in multiple generations of mice

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Amelia; Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Cudiamat, Jonathan; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Changqing; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A is used in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Previous studies show that in utero BPA exposure inhibits germ cell nest breakdown in the F1 generation of mice, but its effects on germ cell nest breakdown and on the ovary in the F2–F3 generations were unknown. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that BPA has transgenerational effects on the ovary. Mice were exposed to BPA in utero (BPA 0.5, 20, or 50 µg/kg/day), and ovaries were collected at postnatal days (PND) 4 and 21 from the F1–F3 generations and subjected to histological evaluation and gene expression analyses. In utero BPA exposure did not have transgenerational effects on germ cell nest breakdown and gene expression on PND 4, but it caused transgenerational changes in expression in multiple genes on PND 21. Collectively, these data indicate that in utero BPA exposure has some transgenerational effects in mice. PMID:26746108

  2. Effect of jinkoh-eremol and agarospirol from agarwood on the central nervous system in mice.

    PubMed

    Okugawa, H; Ueda, R; Matsumoto, K; Kawanishi, K; Kato, A

    1996-02-01

    Agarwood (Jinkoh in Japanese), one of the Oriental medicines, is used as a sedative. The benzene extract of this medicine showed a prolonged effect on the hexobarbital-induced sleeping time, and hypothermic effects in terms of rectal temperature, a suppressive effect on acetic acid-writhing, and a reduction of the spontaneous motility in mice. By repeated fractionation, oral administration in mice, and pharmacological screening, the active principles, jinkoh-eremol and agarospirol, were obtained from the benzene extract. They also gave positive effects on the central nervous system by peritoneal and intracerebroventricular administration. They decreased both methamphetamine- and apomorphine-induced spontaneous motility. The level of homovanillic acid in the brain was increased by them, while the levels of monoamines and other metabolites were unchanged. Similar results were seen in chlorpromazine-administered mice. Therefore, jinkoh-eremol and agarospirol can be considered to be neuroleptic.

  3. Effect of procaine hydrochloride on cyanide intoxication and its effect on neuronal calcium in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Liu, Z; Zhuang, X

    1998-05-01

    Cyanide intoxication in mice can be antagonized by the local anesthetic, procaine HCI, either alone or in combination with sodium nitrite and/or sodium thiosulfate. Antitoxic potency, derived from LD50 values, was compared in groups of mice pretreated with sodium nitrite (43.9 mg/kg i.p.), sodium thiosulfate (1 g/kg i.p.), and procaine HCI (37.0 mg/kg i.p.) either alone or in various combinations. The results of present study indicated that procaine HCI provides a significant protection against the lethal effects of potassium cyanide. Dose-response studies revealed procaine hydrochloride pretreated 3 min before KCN, at doses of 18.48-73.9 mg/kg, produced significant elevation of KCN LD50, moreover it has a good dose-effect relationship, but its antidotal effect was weaker than sodium nitrite or sodium thiosulfate when they were administered alone. The protective effect of sodium nitrite and sodium thiosulfate was enhanced with procaine HCI. When procaine was administered in combination both with sodium nitrite and sodium thiosulfate, its protective effects were further enhanced. Its antitoxic potency is 6.22. The effects of procaine on antagonizing the cyanide-induced whole-brain total calcium increase were also studied. KCN (7 mg/kg i.p.) significantly increased whole-brain total calcium level from 28.37 +/- 0.75 to 48.05 +/- 1.06 mg/g dry wt within 30 min, which can be prevented by procaine pretreated 15 min before KCN. One of the possible mechanism of procaine on antagonizing cyanide toxicity seems, at least, related to its effect on inhibiting the cyanide-induced neuronal calcium increase and maintaining the homeostasis of neuronal calcium.

  4. Differential effects of dietary sodium intake on blood pressure and atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Wu, Congqing; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Charnigo, Richard J; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The amount of dietary sodium intake regulates the renin angiotensin system (RAS) and blood pressure, both of which play critical roles in atherosclerosis. However, there are conflicting findings regarding the effects of dietary sodium intake on atherosclerosis. This study applied a broad range of dietary sodium concentrations to determine the concomitant effects of dietary sodium intake on the RAS, blood pressure, and atherosclerosis in mice. Eight-week-old male low-density lipoprotein receptor -/- mice were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet containing selected sodium concentrations (Na 0.01%, 0.1%, or 2% w/w) for 12 weeks. Mice in these three groups were all hypercholesterolemic, although mice fed Na 0.01% and Na 0.1% had higher plasma cholesterol concentrations than mice fed Na 2%. Mice fed Na 0.01% had greater abundances of renal renin mRNA than those fed Na 0.1% and 2%. Plasma renin concentrations were higher in mice fed Na 0.01% (14.2 ± 1.7 ng/ml/30 min) than those fed Na 0.1% or 2% (6.2 ± 0.6 and 5.8 ± 1.6 ng/ml per 30 min, respectively). However, systolic blood pressure at 12 weeks was higher in mice fed Na 2% (138 ± 3 mm Hg) than those fed Na 0.01% and 0.1% (129 ± 3 and 128 ± 4 mmHg, respectively). In contrast, mice fed Na 0.01% (0.17 ± 0.02 mm(2)) had larger atherosclerotic lesion areas in aortic roots than those fed Na 2% (0.09 ± 0.01 mm(2)), whereas lesion areas in mice fed Na 0.1% (0.12 ± 0.02 mm(2)) were intermediate between and not significantly different from those in Na 0.01% and Na 2% groups. In conclusion, while high dietary sodium intake led to higher systolic blood pressure, low dietary sodium intake augmented atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice.

  5. Effect of IL-17 in the development of colon cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lijuan; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Lili; Hu, Jie; Chen, Haixia; Wang, Lei; Yin, Xiaolin; Li, Quanhai; Qi, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine therapy is commonly used for tumor immunotherapy. Although early studies focused directly on the tumor, current investigations are more attentive of the tumor microenvironment. Various immune cells and related cytokines in the tumor microenvironment play an important role in the occurrence and development of tumor. Interleukin (IL)-17 is the characteristic cytokine produced by Th17 cells. IL-17 has been associated with various immune responses. The results of previous studies showed that IL-17 can significantly reduce the size of transplanted tumors in tumor-bearing mice, albeit it has no effect on the survival time of mice. By investigating the effect of IL-17 in the number and distribution of lymphocyte infiltration in tumor tissues, the expression of cytokines and transcription factors associated with the subsets of CD4+T cells in tumor tissues, the distribution of subsets of spleen lymphocyte in tumor-bearing mice, a preliminary investigation of the possible antitumor mechanism of IL-17 was performed. In conclusion, the antitumor effect of IL-17 gene transfection in the colon cancer of mice may be associated with the mechanisms whereby IL-17 gene transfection can change the distribution of different subsets of spleen lymphocytes in mice. IL-17 gene transfection can increase the number of lymphocyte infiltration in tumor tissues. IL-17 gene transfection can promote the high expression of interferon-γ in tumor tissue, while reducing the expression of IL-10 and IL-13 factors, thus exerting an antitumor effect. PMID:28101230

  6. The antibiotic minocycline prevents methamphetamine-induced rewarding effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yuko; Kunitachi, Shinsui; Iyo, Masaomi; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2012-04-01

    Repeated use of methamphetamine (METH) causes dependence in humans, and to date, there are no effective medication treatments for METH addiction. We previously reported that the antibiotic minocycline attenuated behavioral abnormalities (hyperactivity and behavioral sensitization) and dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice and monkeys, after the administration of METH. In this study, we examined the effect of minocycline on METH-induced rewarding effects in mice using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Minocycline (40 mg/kg, IP) significantly attenuated METH (1.0 mg/kg, SC)-induced place preference in mice. In vivo microdialysis experiments using free-moving mice, showed that minocycline (40 mg/kg, IP) significantly attenuated the increased extracellular dopamine (DA) levels within the nucleus accumbens, typically seen after the administration of METH (1.0 mg/kg, SC). These findings suggest that minocycline may block METH-induced rewarding effects by down regulating extracellular DA levels in the nucleus accumbens of mice. This would make minocycline a potential therapeutic drug for the treatment of METH induced disorders.

  7. Effects of baclofen on dopamine-dependent behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Balsara, J J; Muley, M P; Vaidya, A S; Chandorkar, A G

    1981-01-01

    Baclofen, the parachlorophenyl analog of GABA, was found to induce catalepsy and to inhibit the traction response in mice. However, baclofen pretreatment, instead of antagonizing methamphetamine stereotypy and apomorphine-induced cage climbing behavior, was found to potentiate these behaviors, thereby ruling out the possibility of its possessing postsynaptic dopamine (DA) receptor blocking activity. The possible mechanism involved in the induction of catalepsy and in the inhibition of the traction response by baclofen is discussed on the basis that baclofen, by inhibiting the firing of the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic DA neurons, reduces the release of DA and thereby produces a functional lack of DA at postsynaptic DA receptor sites with resultant induction of catalepsy and inhibition of the traction response. Further, the hyper-responsiveness to methamphetamine and apomorphine is explained on the basis that, as the postsynaptic DA receptors are acutely deprived of their transmitter, following baclofen pretreatment, they become supersensitive to the DA agonists.

  8. Protective effect of topically applied olive oil against photocarcinogenesis following UVB exposure of mice.

    PubMed

    Budiyanto, A; Ahmed, N U; Wu, A; Bito, T; Nikaido, O; Osawa, T; Ueda, M; Ichihashi, M

    2000-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been shown to play a role in ultraviolet light (UV)-induced skin carcinogenesis. Vitamin E and green tea polyphenols reduce experimental skin cancers in mice mainly because of their antioxidant properties. Since olive oil has also been reported to be a potent antioxidant, we examined its effect on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis in hairless mice. Extra-virgin olive oil was applied topically before or after repeated exposure of mice to UVB. The onset of UVB-induced skin tumors was delayed in mice painted with olive oil compared with UVB control mice. However, with increasing numbers of UVB exposures, differences in the mean number of tumors between UVB control mice and mice pretreated with olive oil before UVB exposure (pre-UVB group) were lost. In contrast, mice that received olive oil after UVB exposure (post-UVB group) showed significantly lower numbers of tumors per mouse than those in the UVB control group throughout the experimental period. The mean number of tumors per mouse in the UVB control, pre-UVB and post-UVB groups was 7.33, 6.69 and 2.64, respectively, in the first experiment, and 8.53, 9.53 and 3.36 in the second experiment. Camellia oil was also applied, using the same experimental protocol, but did not have a suppressive effect. Immunohistochemical analysis of DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), (6-4) photoproducts and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in samples taken 30 min after a single exposure of UVB showed no significant difference between UVB-irradiated control mice and the pre-UVB group. In the post-UVB group, there were lower levels of 8-OHdG in epidermal nuclei, but the formation of CPD and (6-4) photoproducts did not differ. Exposure of olive oil to UVB before application abrogated the protective effect on 8-OHdG formation. These results indicate that olive oil topically applied after UVB exposure can effectively reduce UVB-induced murine skin tumors, possibly via its

  9. Evaluation of immunological effects of hochu-ekki-to (TJ-41) prophylactic administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Shigefumi; Hong, Tie; Kaneko, Akiyo; Yoshino, Gen; Sato, Noriyuki; Kikuchi, Kokichi; Aikawa, Yoshihiro; Yasuno, Fumiko; Inoue, Kazumi; Cyong, Jong-Chol

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the immunological effects of a Kampo (Chinese) prescription Hochuekki-to (TJ-41) for 32 weeks and 1 week prophylactically in mice, The splenic natural killer cells (NK) of C57BL/6N mice prophylactically treated with TJ-41 for 32 weeks showed little enhanced cytotoxicity against NK-sensitive YAC-1 targets, but mice treated for 1 week showed significantly enhanced cytotoxicity. TJ-41 administration for 32 weeks increased the splenic NK cell population and CD4/CD8 significantly, but TJ-41 for 1 week was not affected. Further, there were no adverse effects of TJ-41 administration for 32 weeks. Whether or not that duration of administration can have the same beneficial effects on humans await further studies.

  10. Anticlastogenic effects of galangin against mitomycin C-induced micronuclei in reticulocytes of mice.

    PubMed

    Heo, M Y; Jae, L H; Jung, S S; Au, W W

    1996-05-17

    We investigated the suppressive effect of galangin on the induction of micronucleated reticulocytes (MNRETs) by mitomycin C (MMC) in mouse peripheral blood. When galangin was given to mice 24 h before the intraperitoneal injection of MMC (1 mg/kg), a more marked decrease in the frequency of MNRETs was observed than in mice with simultaneous and post-treatment of galangin. On the other hand, when galangin was given to mice for 7 consecutive days before MMC injection, galangin showed potent anticlastogenic effects, even at the lowest dose level of 0.1 mg/kg. Results from our in vivo studies indicate that galangin is capable of suppressing the clastogenic activity of the direct acting MMC. Together with our earlier observations, it appears that galangin is capable of protecting cells from the toxic effects of a variety of hazardous chemicals. Therefore, galangin may be an useful chemopreventive compound.

  11. Effects of Nrf2 silencing on oxidative stress-associated intestinal carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Yuh; Kijima, Aki; Ishii, Yuji; Takasu, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Takuma; Umemura, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    To assess the risk of colorectal cancer in humans with inactivation of NRF2, Nrf2-proficient (Nrf2(+/+) ) and -deficient (Nrf2(-/-) ) mice were exposed to potassium bromate (KBrO3 ) at concentrations of 750 or 1500 ppm for 52 weeks. Neoplastic proliferative lesions were observed in the small intestine and exhibited accumulations of β-catenin and cyclin D1. The lesions had characteristics similar to those in experimental models of human hereditary colorectal cancer. An additional 13-week study was performed to examine the role of Nrf2 in the effects of oxidative stress. Significant increase in combined incidences of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions in Nrf2(-/-) mice administered high-dose KBrO3 . In the short-term study, although 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in the epithelial DNA of Nrf2(-/-) mice at the high dose were significantly lower than those of the corresponding Nrf2(+/+) mice, the difference was very small. mRNA levels of Nrf2-regulated genes were increased in Nrf2(+/+) mice. Overexpression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and increased numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells in the jejunal crypts were observed in Nrf2(-/-) mice administered high-dose KBrO3 . Overall, these data suggested that individuals having single-nucleotide polymorphisms in NRF2 may have a risk of colorectal cancer to some extent.

  12. Ameliorative effects of ginger extract on paraben-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Asnani, Veena M; Verma, Ramtej J

    2009-01-01

    We have evaluated the ameliorative effect of ginger extract on paraben (p-hydroxybenzoic acid)-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver of mice. Adult female albino mice were orally administered with 2.25 or 4.50 mg of paraben in 0.2 mL olive/animal/day (67.5 and 135 mg/kg of body weight) for 30 days. The results revealed significantly higher (p < or = 0.05) lipid peroxidation in the liver of paraben-treated mice than that of controls. As compared with the controls, the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants: glutathione and ascorbic acid, as well as the enzymatic antioxidants: superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase were significantly (p < or = 0.05) lowered in the liver of paraben-treated mice. Oral administration of aqueous extract of Zinziber officinale (3 mg/animal/day) along with paraben for 30 days (Groups 6 and 7) caused significant (p < or = 0.05) amelioration in paraben-induced lipid peroxidation and increased significantly (p < or = 0.05) the activities of enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase) and contents of non-enzymatic (glutathione and ascorbic acid) antioxidants in the liver of mice, as compared with those given paraben alone (Groups 4, 5). Thus, oral administration of aqueous extract of Zinziber officinale along with paraben significantly (p < or = 0.05) ameliorates paraben-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver of mice.

  13. Intestinal epithelial cell surface glycosylation in mice. I. Effect of high-protein diet.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Jaswal, V M; Meenu Mahmood, A

    1992-01-01

    The effects of variation in dietary protein content have been investigated on brush border glycosylation and enzyme activities in mice small intestine. The comparison of different parameters was made between the mice fed 30% (high protein, HP) and 18% protein (pair-fed, PF, and ad libitum-fed) for 21 days. The activities of brush border sucrase, lactase, p-nitrophenyl (PNP)-beta-D-glucosidase and PNP-beta-D-galactosidase were reduced in the HP diet-fed mice compared to PF and ad libitum-fed controls. Alkaline phosphatase and leucine amino-peptidase activities were significantly enhanced while gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity was unaltered under these conditions. Total hexoses and sialic acid content in the brush borders were reduced significantly in the test group compared to the controls while hexosamine and fucose contents remained essentially similar in different groups. The results on the binding of wheat germ agglutinin and Ulex europaeus agglutininI to microvillus membranes corroborated the chemical analysis data on sialic acid and fucose contents of the membranes. Peanut agglutinin binding was enhanced in mice from the HP group. Incorporation of (14C)-mannose into membranes was significantly less in HP diet-fed mice. These results indicate that the feeding of HP diet to mice brings about marked alterations in small intestinal epithelial cell surface glycosylation and enzyme functions.

  14. Fat-specific Dicer deficiency accelerates aging and mitigates several effects of dietary restriction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Felipe C. G.; Branquinho, Jéssica L. O.; Brandão, Bruna B.; Guerra, Beatriz A.; Silva, Ismael D.; Frontini, Andrea; Thomou, Thomas; Sartini, Loris; Cinti, Saverio; Kahn, C. Ronald; Festuccia, William T.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mori, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Aging increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, and this can be prevented by dietary restriction (DR). We have previously shown that DR inhibits the downregulation of miRNAs and their processing enzymes - mainly Dicer - that occurs with aging in mouse white adipose tissue (WAT). Here we used fat-specific Dicer knockout mice (AdicerKO) to understand the contributions of adipose tissue Dicer to the metabolic effects of aging and DR. Metabolomic data uncovered a clear distinction between the serum metabolite profiles of Lox control and AdicerKO mice, with a notable elevation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in AdicerKO. These profiles were associated with reduced oxidative metabolism and increased lactate in WAT of AdicerKO mice and were accompanied by structural and functional changes in mitochondria, particularly under DR. AdicerKO mice displayed increased mTORC1 activation in WAT and skeletal muscle, where Dicer expression is not affected. This was accompanied by accelerated age-associated insulin resistance and premature mortality. Moreover, DR-induced insulin sensitivity was abrogated in AdicerKO mice. This was reverted by rapamycin injection, demonstrating that insulin resistance in AdicerKO mice is caused by mTORC1 hyperactivation. Our study evidences a DR-modulated role for WAT Dicer in controlling metabolism and insulin resistance. PMID:27241713

  15. [Genotype-dependent mice behavior in cognitive tasks. Effect of noopept].

    PubMed

    Bel'nik, A P; Ostrovskaia, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2007-01-01

    The interstrain differences in performance of C57BL/6J, BALB/c and DBA/2J male mice in two cognitive tasks were found. Mice C57BL/6J showed good learning ability and preservation of memory traces tested 10 days after performance in a simplified version of Morris water maze. Mice BALB/c learned the task but, virtually, no long-term memory traces were revealed, whereas DBA/2J demonstrated poor learning. The effect of nootropic drug Noopept (GVS-111, N-phenil-acetyl-L-prolylglycin ethyl ether) was shown to be genotype-dependent. Its administration (0.5 mg/kg i.p., 15 min before learning) improved the long-term memory in Morris test in BALB/c mice but failed to produce any improvement in C57BL/6J. The ability of mice for extrapolation of the direction of stimulus movement differently changed after Noopept injections: the proportion of correct task solutions increased in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice, whereas the performance of DBA/2J did not change.

  16. Biological effects of targeted inactivation of hepatocyte growth factor-like protein in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, J A; Carrick, T L; Degen, J L; Witte, D; Degen, S J

    1998-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor-like protein (HGFL) is a liver-derived serum glycoprotein involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, and is proposed to have a fundamental role in embryogenesis, fertility, hematopoiesis, macrophage activation, and tissue repair. To assess the in vivo effects of total loss of HGFL, we generated mice with targeted disruption of the gene resulting in loss of the protein. Disruption of the HGFL gene allowed for normal embryogenesis, and followed a Mendelian pattern of genetic transmission. Mice homozygous for the targeted allele (HGFL-/- mice) are fertile, and grow to adulthood without obvious phenotypic abnormalities in unchallenged animals, except for development of lipid-containing cytoplasmic vacuoles in hepatocytes throughout the liver lobules. These histologic changes are not accompanied by discernible changes in synthetic or excretory hepatic functions. Hematopoiesis appears unaltered, and although macrophage activation is delayed in the absence of HGFL, migration to the peritoneal cavity upon challenge with thioglycollate was similar in HGFL-/- and wild-type mice. Challenged with incision to skin, HGFL-/- mice display normal wound healing. These data demonstrate that HGFL is not essential for embryogenesis, fertility, or wound healing. HGFL-deficient mice will provide a valuable means to assess the role of HGFL in hepatic and systemic responses to inflammatory and infectious stimuli in vivo. PMID:9486989

  17. Effects of Cholinergic Stimulation with Pyridostigmine Bromide on Chronic Chagasic Cardiomyopathic Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Cuba, Marília Beatriz; Ribeiro Machado, Marcus Paulo; Farnesi, Thais Soares; Alves, Angelica Cristina; Martins, Livia Alves; de Oliveira, Lucas Felipe; Capitelli, Caroline Santos; Leite, Camila Ferreira; Vinícius Silva, Marcos; Machado, Juliana Reis; Kappel, Henrique Borges; Sales de Campos, Helioswilton; Paiva, Luciano; da Silva Gomes, Natália Lins; Guimarães Faleiros, Ana Carolina; Britto, Constança Felicia de Paoli de Carvalho; Savino, Wilson; Moreira, Otacílio Cruz; Rodrigues Jr., Virmondes; Montano, Nicola; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Ramirez, Luis Eduardo; Dias da Silva, Valdo Jose

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of an anticholinesterase agent, pyridostigmine bromide (Pyrido), on experimental chronic Chagas heart disease in mice. To this end, male C57BL/6J mice noninfected (control:Con) or chronically infected (5 months) with Trypanosoma cruzi (chagasic:Chg) were treated or not (NT) with Pyrido for one month. At the end of this period, electrocardiogram (ECG); cardiac autonomic function; heart histopathology; serum cytokines; and the presence of blood and tissue parasites by means of immunohistochemistry and PCR were assessed. In NT-Chg mice, significant changes in the electrocardiographic, autonomic, and cardiac histopathological profiles were observed confirming a chronic inflammatory response. Treatment with Pyrido in Chagasic mice caused a significant reduction of myocardial inflammatory infiltration, fibrosis, and hypertrophy, which was accompanied by a decrease in serum levels of IFNγ with no change in IL-10 levels, suggesting a shift of immune response toward an anti-inflammatory profile. Lower nondifferent numbers of parasite DNA copies were observed in both treated and nontreated chagasic mice. In conclusion, our findings confirm the marked neuroimmunomodulatory role played by the parasympathetic autonomic nervous system in the evolution of the inflammatory-immune response to T. cruzi during experimental chronic Chagas heart disease in mice. PMID:25221388

  18. Effects of soft-diet feeding on BDNF expression in hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsu; Hirayama, Akihiko; Hosoe, Nobuo; Furube, Masaru; Hirano, Shusuke

    2008-11-01

    Our previous study showed that mice fed a soft diet after weaning had reduced synaptic connections in the hippocampal formation and impaired spatial learning ability after 3 months of age. We hypothesized that soft-diet feeding during development reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein in the hippocampus, resulting in lower synaptic densities in this region. Male pups of C57BL/6 mice were fed either a solid (hard-diet group) or powdered diet (soft-diet group), starting at weaning. Expression of BDNF protein in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex was evaluated quantitatively with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at 1, 3 and 6 months of age. Reduction in BDNF protein levels due to soft diet was detected markedly in the hippocampus of 3- and 6-month-old mice. On the other hand, a soft diet showed no significant effect on BDNF content in the cerebral cortex throughout the ages investigated. Immunohistochemistry of hippocampal formation in 3-month-old mice revealed that intensities of BDNF immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer and CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers appeared diminished in mice fed the soft diet compared with mice fed the hard diet. These results indicate that insufficient mastication activity during development reduces BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus and influences synaptic plasticity in this region.

  19. Cost and Effectiveness of Commercially Available Nesting Substrates for Deer Mice (Peromyscus maniculatus)

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Tara L; Balser, Shannon R; Young, Gregory S; Lewis, Stephanie D

    2016-01-01

    Provision of nesting material promotes species-typical behaviors in rodents including deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). The purpose of this study was to determine which commercially available nesting material best promotes complex nest building in the subspecies P. m. bairdii yet remains cost-effective for use as enrichment in a laboratory research setting. An existing breeding colony consisting of cages containing all male mice, all female mice, and breeding pairs was evaluated. Five commercially available substrates—compressed cotton squares, cylindrical compressed cotton, cellulose bedding containing small pieces of evenly dispersed compressed paper, brown crinkled paper, and white crinkled paper—were provided according to the manufacturer's recommendation. Nests were evaluated at 24 h after cage change and scored for complexity. Nest complexity was compared between breeding pairs and single-sex cages and between male and female mice. Cages housing breeding pairs with pups had the highest average complexity score. The dispersed paper substrate was the least expensive substrate tested but had the lowest average nest complexity score. Nesting scores for brown crinkled paper, compressed cotton squares, and compressed cotton cylinders did not differ significantly despite the range in cost. Brown crinkled paper was the second least-expensive substrate tested, and mice used it to build consistently complex nests, making it the most practical substrate for use as enrichment for deer mice in a laboratory setting. PMID:27423147

  20. Effect of Streptozotocin on Plasma Insulin Levels of Rats and Mice: A Meta-analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Koksal, Burcu

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the studies focusing on diabetic organisms, Streprozotocine (STZ) is a frequently used agent to induce diabetes in rats and mice. However the current studies do not represent practical importance of their statistical findings. For showing practical importance of the differences in plasma insulin levels of diabetic rats and mice induced by STZ, there should be a statistical synthesis regarding statistical findings of the studies. AIM: The purpose of this study is to make a meta-analysis of the studies on the effect of STZ on plasma insulin levels in diabetic rats and mice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study 39 effect sizes (37 studies) about levels of plasma insulin were analyzed by calculating individual effect sizes (d) and mean effect size. RESULTS: The effect sizes were between -13.7 and +65.3 and the mean effect size value (+9.33) represented a large effect indicating that STZ was an effective agent to significantly decrease plasma insulin levels of diabetic rats and mice. CONCLUSION: It can be said that the differences in plasma insulin levels between STZ-applied and no application groups has a practical importance in making animal model of diabetes. PMID:27275254

  1. Protective effects of sunscreening agents on photocarcinogenesis, photoaging, and DNA damage in XPA gene knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Horiki, S; Miyauchi-Hashimoto, H; Tanaka, K; Nikaido, O; Horio, T

    2000-10-01

    We investigated the protective effects of commercial sunscreening agents against UVB-induced photoresponses in group A xeroderma pigmentosum (XPA) model mice. XPA gene-deficient mice are defective in nucleotide excision repair and show a high incidence of skin tumors and severe acute inflammation in response to UVB irradiation, in a similar manner to XP patients. SPF 10 and SPF 60 sunscreens protected partially and almost completely, respectively, ear swelling responses produced by UVB up to 200 mJ/cm2 in (-/-) mice. XPA (-/-) mice were irradiated three times a week to a cumulative dose of 2.6 J/cm2 UVB for a period of 24 weeks with or without SPF 10 or SPF 60 sunscreen. UV-induced skin tumors had developed in all unprotected (-/-) mice (13.3 tumors per mouse) at the completion of UVB irradiation. The SPF 60 sunscreen afforded stronger protection against photocarcinogenesis (1.0 tumors per mouse) than the SPF 10 sunscreen (4.4 tumors per mouse). Regarding photoaging, SPF 60 sunscreen also protected against mast cell infiltration (79% inhibition), elastic fiber accumulation, and dermal cyst proliferation in XPA (-/-) mice compared with unprotected (-/-) mice. In (-/-) mice, the SPF 60 sunscreen provided stronger protection against cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation shown immunohistologically following irradiation with 200 mJ/cm2 UVB than the SPF 10 sunscreen. The XPA model mouse is a useful animal for the evaluation of the photoprotective ability of sunscreens because photoresponses, even chronic changes, can be easily and quickly induced experimentally.

  2. Beneficial effects of IL-37 after spinal cord injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Coll-Miró, Marina; Francos-Quijorna, Isaac; Santos-Nogueira, Eva; Torres-Espin, Abel; Bufler, Philip; Dinarello, Charles A.; López-Vales, Rubèn

    2016-01-01

    IL-37, a member of the IL-1 family, broadly reduces innate inflammation as well as acquired immunity. Whether the antiinflammatory properties of IL-37 extend to the central nervous system remains unknown, however. In the present study, we subjected mice transgenic for human IL-37 (hIL-37tg) and wild-type (WT) mice to spinal cord contusion injury and then treated them with recombinant human IL-37 (rIL-37). In the hIL-37tg mice, the expression of IL-37 was barely detectable in the uninjured cords, but was strongly induced at 24 h and 72 h after the spinal cord injury (SCI). Compared with WT mice, hIL-37tg mice exhibited increased myelin and neuronal sparing and protection against locomotor deficits, including 2.5-fold greater speed in a forced treadmill challenge. Reduced levels of cytokines (e.g., an 80% reduction in IL-6) were observed in the injured cords of hIL-37tg mice, along with lower numbers of blood-borne neutrophils, macrophages, and activated microglia. We treated WT mice with a single intraspinal injection of either full-length or processed rIL-37 after the injury and found that the IL-37–treated mice had significantly enhanced locomotor skills in an open field using the Basso Mouse Scale, as well as supported faster speed on a mechanical treadmill. Treatment with both forms of rIL-37 led to similar beneficial effects on locomotor recovery after SCI. This study presents novel data indicating that IL-37 suppresses inflammation in a clinically relevant model of SCI, and suggests that rIL-37 may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of acute SCI. PMID:26787859

  3. Therapeutic Effect of Activated Carbon-Induced Constipation Mice with Lactobacillus fermentum Suo on Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Suo, Huayi; Zhao, Xin; Qian, Yu; Li, Guijie; Liu, Zhenhu; Xie, Jie; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus fermentum Suo (LF-Suo) on activated carbon-induced constipation in ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) mice. ICR mice were orally administered with lactic acid bacteria for 9 days. Body weight, diet intake, drinking amount, defecation status, gastrointestinal transit and defecation time, and the serum levels of MTL (motilin), Gas (gastrin), ET (endothelin), SS (somatostatin), AChE (acetylcholinesterase), SP (substance P), VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) were used to evaluate the preventive effects of LF-Suo on constipation. Bisacodyl, a laxative drug, was used as a positive control. The normal, control, 100 mg/kg bisacodyl treatment, LB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus)-, LF-Suo (L)- and LF-Suo (H)-treated mice showed the time to the first black stool defecation at 90, 218, 117, 180, 155 and 137 min, respectively. By the oral administration of LB-, LF-Suo (L), LF-Suo (H) or bisacodyl (100 mg/kg), the gastrointestinal transit was reduced to 55.2%, 72.3%, 85.5% and 94.6%, respectively, of the transit in normal mice, respectively. In contrast to the control mice, the serum levels of MTL, Gas, ET, AChE, SP and VIP were significantly increased and the serum levels of SS were reduced in the mice treated with LF-Suo (p < 0.05). By the RT-PCR (reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction) and western blot assays, LF-Suo increased the c-Kit, SCF (stem cell factor), GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor) and decreased TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1), NOS (nitric oxide synthase) expressions of small intestine tissue in mice. These results demonstrate that lactic acid bacteria has preventive effects on mouse constipation and LF-Suo demonstrated the best functional activity. PMID:25464378

  4. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice

    PubMed Central

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10−9 (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10−9–6.5 × 10−9) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population. PMID:26129709

  5. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10(-9) (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10(-9)-6.5 × 10(-9)) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population.

  6. Excess TSH causes abnormal skeletal development in young mice with hypothyroidism via suppressive effects on the growth plate.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2013-09-01

    Hypothyroidism in the young leads to irreversible growth failure. hyt/hyt Mice have a nonfunctional TSH receptor (TSHR) and are severely hypothyroid, but growth retardation was not observed in adult mice. We found that epiphysial cartilage as well as cultured chondrocytes expressed functional TSHR at levels comparable to that seen in the thyroid, and that addition of TSH to cultured chondrocytes suppressed expression of chondrocyte differentiation marker genes such as Sox-9 and type IIa collagen. Next, we compared the long bone phenotypes of two distinct mouse models of hypothyroidism: thyroidectomized (THYx) mice and hyt/hyt mice. Although both THYx and hyt/hyt mice were severely hypothyroid and had similar serum Ca(2+) and growth hormone levels, the tibia was shorter and the proliferating and hypertrophic zones in the growth plate was significantly narrower in THYx mice than in hyt/hyt mice. Supplementation of hyt/hyt mice thyroid hormone resulted in a wider growth plate compared with that of wild-type mice. Expressions of chondrocyte differentiation marker genes Sox-9 and type IIa collagen in growth plate from THYx mice were 52 and 60% lower than those of hyt/hyt mice, respectively. High serum TSH causes abnormal skeletal development in young mice with hypothyroidism via suppressive effects on the growth plate.

  7. Promoting effects of Chinese pangolin and wild pink medicines on the mammary gland development in immature mice.

    PubMed

    Bayin, Jiragara; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Islam, Mohammad Saiful; Yabuki, Akira; Kanouchi, Hiroaki; Oka, Tatsuzo; Nishinakagawa, Hayao

    2009-10-01

    The effects of the mixture of crude aqueous extracts from Chinese pangolin and wild pink (C+P), traditional Chinese medicine, on the proliferation and differentiation of mammary gland epithelium in intact and ovariectomized immature mice were investigated by light and electron microscopy and BrdU immunohistochemistry. Although there were no significant differences in mammary gland fat pad and parenchyma areas between the intact experimental groups, the numbers of duct branchings and buds were significantly larger in the C+W treated mice than in the control mice. The ratio of BrdU immunopositive cells to total epithelial cells was higher in C+W treated intact mice. Ultrastructurally, epithelial cells of the mammary buds and ducts possessed an oval and lucent nucleus, and ribosomes increased in number or developed to a greater degree in C+W treated intact mice than in the control mice. Conversely, there were no significant differences in any measurements of mammary gland between the experimental groups of ovariectomized mice. BrdU immunoreactive cells were never seen and the ultrastructure of mammary epihelial cells indicated the inactive cell phase in both ovariectomied mice. In comparison between the intact and overiectomized mice, the mammary fat pad area was larger in the ovariectomized mice than in the intact mice, although another four measurements were larger in the intact groups. These observations suggest that administration with C+W could promote the development of mammary glands via ovary in immature mice.

  8. Effects of tylosin on serum cytokine levels in healthy and lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Er, Ayse; Yazar, Enver; Uney, Kamil; Elmas, Muammer; Altan, Feray; Cetin, Gul

    2010-03-01

    The effects of different doses of tylosin on serum cytokine concentrations were investigated in healthy and lipopolysaccharide-treated mice. The mice were divided into seven groups. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected into the positive control group. The other six groups received three different tylosin doses concurrently without or with LPS: 10 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg + LPS, 100 mg/kg + LPS and 500 mg/kg + LPS. After treatment, serum samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours. Serum tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta) and IL10 levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Tylosin doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg induced no cytokine production in the healthy mice. Tylosin at 500 mg/kg had no effect on TNFalpha or IL1beta production, but it induced IL10 production in healthy mice. All doses of tylosin reduced the elevated TNFalpha and IL1beta in LPS-treated mice but increased their IL10 levels. In conclusion, these data suggest that tylosin has an immunomodulatory effect at the dose recommended for use against infection.

  9. Anti-Diabetic Effects of CTB-APSL Fusion Protein in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunlong; Gao, Zhangzhao; Guo, Qingtuo; Wang, Tao; Lu, Conger; Chen, Ying; Sheng, Qing; Chen, Jian; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Wu, Wutong; Lv, Zhengbing; Shu, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether cholera toxin B subunit and active peptide from shark liver (CTB-APSL) fusion protein plays a role in treatment of type 2 diabetic mice, the CTB-APSL gene was cloned and expressed in silkworm (Bombyx mori) baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS), then the fusion protein was orally administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg for five weeks in diabetic mice. The results demonstrated that the oral administration of CTB-APSL fusion protein can effectively reduce the levels of both fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), promote insulin secretion and improve insulin resistance, significantly improve lipid metabolism, reduce triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, as well as effectively improve the inflammatory response of type 2 diabetic mice through the reduction of the levels of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Histopathology shows that the fusion protein can significantly repair damaged pancreatic tissue in type 2 diabetic mice, significantly improve hepatic steatosis and hepatic cell cloudy swelling, reduce the content of lipid droplets in type 2 diabetic mice, effectively inhibit renal interstitial inflammatory cells invasion and improve renal tubular epithelial cell nucleus pyknosis, thus providing an experimental basis for the development of a new type of oral therapy for type 2 diabetes. PMID:24633252

  10. Diuretics prevent thiazolidinedione-induced cardiac hypertrophy without compromising insulin-sensitizing effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cherng-Shyang; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Sung, Junne-Ming; Chen, Ju-Yi; Ho, Li-Chun; Pandya, Kumar; Maeda, Nobuyo; Tsai, Yau-Sheng

    2014-02-01

    Much concern has arisen regarding critical adverse effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs), including rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, on cardiac tissue. Although TZD-induced cardiac hypertrophy (CH) has been attributed to an increase in plasma volume or a change in cardiac nutrient preference, causative roles have not been established. To test the hypothesis that volume expansion directly mediates rosiglitazone-induced CH, mice were fed a high-fat diet with rosiglitazone, and cardiac and metabolic consequences were examined. Rosiglitazone treatment induced volume expansion and CH in wild-type and PPARγ heterozygous knockout (Pparg(+/-)) mice, but not in mice defective for ligand binding (Pparg(P465L/+)). Cotreatment with the diuretic furosemide in wild-type mice attenuated rosiglitazone-induced CH, hypertrophic gene reprogramming, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, hypertrophy-related signal activation, and left ventricular dysfunction. Similar changes were observed in mice treated with pioglitazone. The diuretics spironolactone and trichlormethiazide, but not amiloride, attenuated rosiglitazone effects on volume expansion and CH. Interestingly, expression of glucose and lipid metabolism genes in the heart was altered by rosiglitazone, but these changes were not attenuated by furosemide cotreatment. Importantly, rosiglitazone-mediated whole-body metabolic improvements were not affected by furosemide cotreatment. We conclude that releasing plasma volume reduces adverse effects of TZD-induced volume expansion and cardiac events without compromising TZD actions in metabolic switch in the heart and whole-body insulin sensitivity.

  11. Anxiolytic effect of music exposure on BDNFMet/Met transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Jing; Yu, Hui; Yang, Jian-Min; Gao, Jing; Jiang, Hong; Feng, Min; Zhao, Yu-Xia; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2010-08-06

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been reported to play important roles in the modulation of anxiety, mood stabilizers, and pathophysiology of affective disorders. Recently, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the BDNF gene (Val66Met) has been found to be associated with depression and anxiety disorders. The humanized BDNF(Met/Met) knock-in transgenic mice exhibited increased anxiety-related behaviors that were unresponsive to serotonin reuptake inhibitors, fluoxetine. Music is known to be able to elicit emotional changes, including anxiolytic effects. In this study, we found that music treatment could significantly decrease anxiety state in BDNF(Met/Met) mice, but not in BDNF(+/)(-), mice compared with white noise exposure in open field and elevated plus maze test. Moreover, in contrast to white noise exposure, BDNF expression levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala and hippocampus were significantly increased in music-exposed adult BDNF(Met/Met) mice. However, music treatment could not upregulate BDNF levels in the PFC, amygdala, and hippocampus in BDNF(+/)(-) mice, which suggests the essential role of BDNF in the anxiolytic effect of music. Together, our results imply that music may provide an effective therapeutic intervention for anxiety disorders in humans with this genetic BDNF(Met) variant.

  12. Protective effect of resveratrol against neuronal damage following transient global cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Hyung; Lee, Seong-Ryong

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) is a natural polyphenol which is rich in grape seeds and skin. Several studies have revealed that resveratrol possesses neuroprotective effects. In the case of global brain ischemia, there are few reports regarding the protective effect of resveratrol. Therefore, the influence of resveratrol on neuronal damage after transient global brain ischemia remains to be clarified. In the current study, C57BL/6 black mice were subjected to 20 min of transient global brain ischemia and followed by 72 h of reperfusion. Resveratrol (20 or 40 mg/kg, once daily, dissolved in 0.5% carboxymethylcellulose) was administered orally for 7 days before ischemia and daily until the mice were euthanized. The effect of lower or higher dose of resveratrol on neuronal damage, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and in situ DNA fragmentation (TUNEL) assay in the hippocampus after global ischemia was examined. Neuronal damages were remarkable in CA1 and CA2 pyramidal cell layers after global ischemia. In resveratrol-treated mice (40 mg/kg), neuronal damage was significantly reduced compared with vehicle-treated mice. Mice treated with resveratrol showed reduced MMP-9 activity. Resveratrol also inhibited TUNEL staining. These data suggest that resveratrol, a natural polyphenol, reduces hippocampal neuronal cell damage following transient global ischemia by reducing MMP-9 activity.

  13. Hypoglycemic effect of DL-aminocarnitine in streptozotocin diabetic mice: inhibition of gluconeogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, D.L.; Griffith, O.W.

    1986-05-01

    DL-Aminocarnitine and palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine are potent, non-covalent inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyl transferase. In both diabetic and non-diabetic fasted mice, DL-aminocarnitine (0.3 mmol/kg) and palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine (0.1 mmol/kg) decrease the blood concentration of ketone bodies to levels observed in fed control mice. Both carnitine palmitoyltransferase inhibitors also normalize plasma glucose levels in diabetic mice. The hypoglycemic effect is maximal at 8 hours, the continues for at least 12 hours. In the present studies the authors have used (/sup 14/C)alanine, a pyruvate precursor, to prove the effect of aminocarnitine on gluconeogenesis. Diabetic mice given L-(U-/sup 14/C)alanine (1 mmol/kg) by intraperitoneal injection convert 10-15% of the administered dose to (/sup 14/C)glucose after 10 min; less than 0.1% of the radioactivity is recovered in glycogen. If 0.3 mmol/kg aminocarnitine is given subcutaneously 1 hr prior to giving (/sup 14/C)analine, the radioactivity recovered in plasma glucose is reduced by approximately 40%. The authors conclude that the hypoglycemic effect of DL-aminocarnitine in diabetic mice is due, at least in part, to inhibition of gluconeogenesis. The possibility that aminocarnitine also stimulates glucose utilization in diabetic animals is not excluded.

  14. Anti-obesity effect of alkaline reduced water in high fat-fed obese mice.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Rosa Mistica Coles; Kang, Tae-Young; Kim, Cheol-Su; Kim, Soo-Ki; Yang, Young-Chul; Sohn, Joon-Hyung; Lee, Kyu-Jae

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not alkaline reduced water (ARW) has a positive effect on obesity is unclear. This study aims to prove the positive effect of ARW in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity (DIO) in C57BL/6 mice model. Toward this, obesity was induced by feeding the C57BL/6 male mice with high-fat diet (w/w 45% fat) for 12 weeks. Thereafter, the animals were administered with either ARW or tap water. Next, the degree of adiposity and DIO-associated parameters were assessed: clinico-pathological parameters, biochemical measurements, histopathological analysis of liver, the expression of cholesterol metabolism-related genes in the liver, and serum levels of adipokine and cytokine. We found that ARW-fed mice significantly ameliorated adiposity: controlled body weight gain, reduced the accumulation of epididymal fats and decreased liver fats as compared to control mice. Accordingly, ARW coordinated the level of adiponectin and leptin. Further, mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)7A1 was upregulated. In summary, our data shows that ARW intake inhibits the progression of HF-DIO in mice. This is the first note on anti-obesity effect of ARW, clinically implying the safer fluid remedy for obesity control.

  15. [Effect of proximate environment on drug susceptibility of mice (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tanase, H; Matsunuma, N; Suzuki, Y

    1979-10-01

    The present study was performed in order to elucidate the effect of proximate environment on drug susceptibility of mice. Three experiments were carried out independently. In the first experiment, mongrel and ddS mice produced under an unsatisfactory control of proximate environment were purchased, and acute toxicity tests of thiamine hydrochloride (B1HCl) and isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INAH) were practiced at two different conditioned rooms. In the second experiment, ddY mice produced under the conventional environment controlled to a certain extent were purchased, and the toxic effect of B1HCl was examined under the similar environment. In the third experiment, the sensitivity to B1HCl of RFVL mice produced under the strict barrier system was tested at the severe air-conditioned room. LD50 and their fLD50 values were calculated by Litchfield-Wilcoxon's method, and the variance analyses were carried out. The severer the environmental control after the purchase of mice turned to the higher the drug sensitivity. This respect was more remarkable in INAH of which the toxic response is appeared slowly compared with B1HCl. Furthermore, seasonal variation was found in LD50 values. However, seasonal effect differed from rearing and experimental conditions. In the third experiment which these proximate environments were controlled severely, seasonal variation was very small. From the results of these experiments, it was defined that the use of animals produced under the satisfactory rearing condition and severe environmental control are necessary for animal experiments.

  16. Protective effect of boric acid against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ince, Sinan; Keles, Hikmet; Erdogan, Metin; Hazman, Omer; Kucukkurt, Ismail

    2012-07-01

    The protective effect of boric acid against liver damage was evaluated by its attenuation of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Male albino mice were treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with boric acid (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) or silymarin daily for 7 days and received 0.2% CCl(4) in olive oil (10 mL/kg, i.p.) on day 7. Results showed that administration of boric acid significantly reduced the elevation in serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and the level of malondialdehyde in the liver that were induced by CCl(4) in mice. Boric acid treatment significantly increased glutathione content, as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in the liver. Boric acid treatment improved the catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 2E1 and maintained activation of nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cell gene expression, with no effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in the livers of mice. Histopathologically, clear decreases in the severity of CCl(4)-induced lesions were observed, particularly at high boric acid concentrations. Results suggest that boric acid exhibits potent hepatoprotective effects on CCl(4)-induced liver damage in mice, likely the result of both the increase in antioxidant-defense system activity and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  17. Behavioral Effects of Chronic Methamphetamine Treatment in HIV-1 gp120 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brook L.; Geyer, Mark A.; Buell, Mahalah; Perry, William; Young, Jared W.; Minassian, Arpi

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) dependence is frequently comorbid with HIV infection. Both factors are independently characterized by inhibitory deficits, which may manifest as increased motor activity, inappropriate perseverative behavior, and elevated exploratory responses to novel stimuli, but the effect of combined METH exposure and HIV is not well understood. In this study, we administered a chronic escalation/binge regimen of METH or vehicle treatment to wildtype (WT) or transgenic (tg) mice expressing the HIV-1 gp120 envelope protein and quantified disinhibition during the 7 days following drug withdrawal. We hypothesized that gp120tg mice administered chronic METH would exhibit more pronounced inhibitory deficits compared to vehicle-treated WT or gp120tg animals. Our results showed that METH treatment alone increased novel object interaction while female METH-treated gp120tg mice exhibited the highest level of exploration (holepoking) compared to other female mice. Transgenic mice exhibited fewer rears relative to WT, slightly less locomotion, and also demonstrated a trend towards more perseverative motor patterns. In summary, both METH treatment and gp120 expression may modify inhibition, but such effects are selective and dependent upon variations in age and sex that could impact dopamine and frontostriatal function. These findings illustrate the need to improve our knowledge about the combined effects of HIV and substance use and facilitate improved treatment methods for comorbid disease and drug dependence. PMID:22960458

  18. Behavioral effects of chronic methamphetamine treatment in HIV-1 gp120 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Henry, Brook L; Geyer, Mark A; Buell, Mahalah; Perry, William; Young, Jared W; Minassian, Arpi

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) dependence is frequently comorbid with HIV infection. Both factors are independently characterized by inhibitory deficits, which may manifest as increased motor activity, inappropriate perseverative behavior, and elevated exploratory responses to novel stimuli, but the effect of combined METH exposure and HIV is not well understood. In this study, we administered a chronic escalation/binge regimen of METH or vehicle treatment to wildtype (WT) or transgenic (tg) mice expressing the HIV-1 gp120 envelope protein and quantified disinhibition during the 7 days following drug withdrawal. We hypothesized that gp120tg mice administered chronic METH would exhibit more pronounced inhibitory deficits compared to vehicle-treated WT or gp120tg animals. Our results showed that METH treatment alone increased novel object interaction while female METH-treated gp120tg mice exhibited the highest level of exploration (holepoking) compared to other female mice. Transgenic mice exhibited fewer rears relative to WT, slightly less locomotion, and also demonstrated a trend toward more perseverative motor patterns. In summary, both METH treatment and gp120 expression may modify inhibition, but such effects are selective and dependent upon variations in age and sex that could impact dopamine and frontostriatal function. These findings illustrate the need to improve our knowledge about the combined effects of HIV and substance use and facilitate improved treatment methods for comorbid disease and drug dependence.

  19. Anti-diabetic effects of CTB-APSL fusion protein in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunlong; Gao, Zhangzhao; Guo, Qingtuo; Wang, Tao; Lu, Conger; Chen, Ying; Sheng, Qing; Chen, Jian; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Wu, Wutong; Lv, Zhengbing; Shu, Jianhong

    2014-03-13

    To determine whether cholera toxin B subunit and active peptide from shark liver (CTB-APSL) fusion protein plays a role in treatment of type 2 diabetic mice, the CTB-APSL gene was cloned and expressed in silkworm (Bombyx mori) baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS), then the fusion protein was orally administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg for five weeks in diabetic mice. The results demonstrated that the oral administration of CTB-APSL fusion protein can effectively reduce the levels of both fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), promote insulin secretion and improve insulin resistance, significantly improve lipid metabolism, reduce triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, as well as effectively improve the inflammatory response of type 2 diabetic mice through the reduction of the levels of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Histopathology shows that the fusion protein can significantly repair damaged pancreatic tissue in type 2 diabetic mice, significantly improve hepatic steatosis and hepatic cell cloudy swelling, reduce the content of lipid droplets in type 2 diabetic mice, effectively inhibit renal interstitial inflammatory cells invasion and improve renal tubular epithelial cell nucleus pyknosis, thus providing an experimental basis for the development of a new type of oral therapy for type 2 diabetes.

  20. Effects of drugs on schedule-controlled running of mice in a circular runway.

    PubMed

    Lehr, E; Morse, W H; Dews, P B

    1985-01-01

    Partially food deprived mice ran in a 1-m circular runway. Every 30 circuits, diluted evaporated milk was delivered. Under control conditions mice averaged 0.18 circuits/s for 1 h. The rate was reduced to 0.11 circuits/s 1 h after gavage of Tylose (cellulose derivative) vehicle. Amphetamine, chlordiazepoxide and pentobarbital increased the rate of responding over some dose range, but chlorpromazine, clozapine, imipramine and morphine caused only decreases in responding at effective dose levels. The results are generally similar to reports of effects of the drugs on responses of much briefer duration occurring at similar rates.

  1. Antidiabetic effects of bitter gourd extracts in insulin-resistant db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Klomann, Sandra D; Mueller, Andreas S; Pallauf, Josef; Krawinkel, Michael B

    2010-12-01

    Bitter gourd (BG, Momordica charantia) exerts proven blood glucose- and body weight-lowering effects. To develop an effective and safe application, it is necessary to identify the bioactive compounds and biochemical mechanisms responsible for these effects in type 2 diabetes. A total of forty-five 4-week-old male db/db mice were assigned to five groups of nine each. The mice were given sterile tap water as a control, a whole fruit powder, the lipid fraction, the saponin fraction or the hydrophilic residue of BG at a daily oral dosage of 150 mg/kg body weight for 5 weeks, respectively. Weight gain was significantly decreased in all the BG-treated groups (P ≤ 0.05). Glycated Hb levels were the highest in the control mice compared with all the four BG-treated mice (P = 0.02). The lipid fraction had the strongest effect, and it tended (P = 0.075) to reduce glycated Hb levels from 9.3 % (control mice) to 8.0 % (lipid fraction-treated mice). The lipid and saponin fractions reduced lipid peroxidation of adipose tissue significantly (P ≤ 0.01). Additionally, the saponin fraction and the lipid fraction reduced protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B) activity in skeletal muscle cytosol by 25 % (P = 0.05) and 23 % (P = 0.07), respectively. PTP 1B is the physiological antagonist of the insulin signalling pathway. Inhibition of PTP 1B increases insulin sensitivity. This is the first study to demonstrate that BG is involved in PTP 1B regulation, and thus explains one possible biochemical mechanism underlying the antidiabetic effects of BG in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  2. Additive Effects of Nicotine and High-Fat Diet on Hepatic Steatosis in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Theodore C.; Sinha-Hikim, Indrani; Parveen, Meher; Najjar, Sonia M.; Liu, Yanjun; Mangubat, Michael; Shin, Chang-Sung; Lyzlov, Alexei; Ivey, Rasheed; Shaheen, Magda; French, Samuel W.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease and may contribute to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. We hypothesize that in the presence of nicotine, high-fat diet (HFD) causes more severe hepatic steatosis in obese mice. Adult C57BL6 male mice were fed a normal chow diet or HFD and received twice daily injections of nicotine (0.75 mg/kg body weight, ip) or saline for 10 wk. Light microscopic image analysis revealed significantly higher lipid accumulation in livers from mice on HFD plus nicotine (190 ± 19 μm2), compared with mice on HFD alone (28 ± 1.2 μm2). A significant reduction in the percent volume of endoplasmic reticulum (67.8%) and glycogen (49.2%) was also noted in hepatocytes from mice on HFD plus nicotine, compared with mice on HFD alone. The additive effects of nicotine on the severity of HFD-induced hepatic steatosis was associated with significantly greater oxidative stress, increased hepatic triglyceride levels, higher incidence of hepatocellular apoptosis, inactivation (dephosphorylation) of AMP-activated protein kinase, and activation of its downstream target acetyl-coenzyme A-carboxylase. Treatment with acipimox, an inhibitor of lipolysis, significantly reduced nicotine plus HFD-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. We conclude that: 1) greater oxidative stress coupled with inactivation of AMP-activated protein kinase mediate the additive effects of nicotine and HFD on hepatic steatosis in obese mice and 2) increased lipolysis is an important contributor to hepatic steatosis. We surmise that nicotine exposure is likely to exacerbate the metabolic abnormalities induced by high-fat intake in obese patients. PMID:23093702

  3. Attenuating Effect of Ginkgo biloba Leaves Extract on Liver Fibrosis Induced by Thioacetamide in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Atef M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of Ginkgo biloba leaves extract on experimental liver fibrosis induced by thioacetamide (TAA) in male albino mice. The experimental mice were divided into four groups. The mice of the first group were served as control. The experimental animals of the second group were given 150 mg/kg body weight of TAA by intraperitoneal injection, twice weekly, for 9 weeks. The mice of the third group were exposed to TAA and supplemented with G. biloba leaves extract. The animals of the fourth group were supplemented with G. biloba leaves extract. The levels of plasma alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, alkaline phosphatase, triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were statistically increased while the levels of plasma total protein, albumin, glucose, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly decreased. The levels of liver superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glycogen and total protein were notably declined, whereas the level of total lipid was increased in mice of the second group. Furthermore, microscopic examination of liver sections from mice treated with TAA showed an abnormal morphology characterized by nodular transformations in liver parenchyma which surrounded by fibrous septa. Administration of G. biloba leaves extract reduced extent and development of fibrous septa, liver cells change, and biochemical alterations in mice exposed to TAA. This study showed that G. biloba leaves extract has a potential activity against TAA-induced liver fibrosis and suggested that the chemical constituents of G. biloba are effective in modulation of oxidative stress induced by TAA. PMID:23091357

  4. Effect of mineralocorticoid treatment in mice with collecting duct-specific knockout of endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Lynch, I Jeanette; Welch, Amanda K; Gumz, Michelle L; Kohan, Donald E; Cain, Brian D; Wingo, Charles S

    2015-12-15

    Aldosterone increases blood pressure (BP) by stimulating sodium (Na) reabsorption within the distal nephron and collecting duct (CD). Aldosterone also stimulates endothelin-1 (ET-1) production that acts within the CD to inhibit Na reabsorption via a negative feedback mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that this renal aldosterone-endothelin feedback system regulates electrolyte balance and BP by comparing the effect of a high-salt (NaCl) diet and mineralocorticoid stimulation in control and CD-specific ET-1 knockout (CD ET-1 KO) mice. Metabolic balance and radiotelemetric BP were measured before and after treatment with desoxycorticosterone pivalate (DOCP) in mice fed a high-salt diet with saline to drink. CD ET-1 KO mice consumed more high-salt diet and saline and had greater urine output than controls. CD ET-1 KO mice exhibited increased BP and greater fluid retention and body weight than controls on a high-salt diet. DOCP with high-salt feeding further increased BP in CD ET-1 KO mice, and by the end of the study the CD ET-1 KO mice were substantially hypernatremic. Unlike controls, CD ET-1 KO mice failed to respond acutely or escape from DOCP treatment. We conclude that local ET-1 production in the CD is required for the appropriate renal response to Na loading and that lack of local ET-1 results in abnormal fluid and electrolyte handling when challenged with a high-salt diet and with DOCP treatment. Additionally, local ET-1 production is necessary, under these experimental conditions, for renal compensation to and escape from the chronic effects of mineralocorticoids.

  5. Modafinil more effectively induces wakefulness in orexin-null mice than in wild-type littermates.

    PubMed

    Willie, J T; Renthal, W; Chemelli, R M; Miller, M S; Scammell, T E; Yanagisawa, M; Sinton, C M

    2005-01-01

    Narcolepsy-cataplexy, a disorder of excessive sleepiness and abnormalities of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, results from deficiency of the hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin) neuropeptides. Modafinil, an atypical wakefulness-promoting agent with an unknown mechanism of action, is used to treat hypersomnolence in these patients. Fos protein immunohistochemistry has previously demonstrated that orexin neurons are activated after modafinil administration, and it has been hypothesized that the wakefulness-promoting properties of modafinil might therefore be mediated by the neuropeptide. Here we tested this hypothesis by immunohistochemical, electroencephalographic, and behavioral methods using modafinil at doses of 0, 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg i.p. in orexin-/- mice and their wild-type littermates. We found that modafinil produced similar patterns of neuronal activation, as indicated by Fos immunohistochemistry, in both genotypes. Surprisingly, modafinil more effectively increased wakefulness time in orexin-/- mice than in the wild-type mice. This may reflect compensatory facilitation of components of central arousal in the absence of orexin in the null mice. In contrast, the compound did not suppress direct transitions from wakefulness to REM sleep, a sign of narcolepsy-cataplexy in mice. Spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram in awake orexin-/- mice under baseline conditions revealed reduced power in the theta; band frequencies (8-9 Hz), an index of alertness or attention during wakefulness in the rodent. Modafinil administration only partly compensated for this attention deficit in the orexin null mice. We conclude that the presence of orexin is not required for the wakefulness-prolonging action of modafinil, but orexin may mediate some of the alerting effects of the compound.

  6. Enhanced Brain Disposition and Effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in P-Glycoprotein and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, Adena S.; Wong, Alexander; Boucher, Aurélie A.; Arnold, Jonathon C.

    2012-01-01

    The ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp, Abcb1) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp, Abcg2) regulate the CNS disposition of many drugs. The main psychoactive constituent of cannabis Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has affinity for P-gp and Bcrp, however it is unknown whether these transporters modulate the brain accumulation of THC and its functional effects on the CNS. Here we aim to show that mice devoid of Abcb1 and Abcg2 retain higher brain THC levels and are more sensitive to cannabinoid-induced hypothermia than wild-type (WT) mice. Abcb1a/b (−/−), Abcg2 (−/−) and wild-type (WT) mice were injected with THC before brain and blood were collected and THC concentrations determined. Another cohort of mice was examined for THC-induced hypothermia by measuring rectal body temperature. Brain THC concentrations were higher in both Abcb1a/b (−/−) and Abcg2 (−/−) mice than WT mice. ABC transporter knockout mice exhibited delayed elimination of THC from the brain with the effect being more prominent in Abcg2 (−/−) mice. ABC transporter knockout mice were more sensitive to THC-induced hypothermia compared to WT mice. These results show P-gp and Bcrp prolong the brain disposition and hypothermic effects of THC and offer a novel mechanism for both genetic vulnerability to the psychoactive effects of cannabis and drug interactions between CNS therapies and cannabis. PMID:22536451

  7. Comparative effects of dimethoate and deltamethrin on reproductive system in male mice.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, F Ben; Slima, A Ben; Dammak, I; Keskes-Ammar, L; Mallek, Z

    2010-06-01

    The effects of dimethoate (5, 15 and 28 mg kg(-1) day(-1)), deltamethrin (5 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) and their mixture (5 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) on male reproduction in mice were studied. The insecticides were given orally by gavage to male mice for 21 days. At the end of the treatment period, body, testes and epididymides weights and sperm parameters were determined. Alone mixture treatment has significantly decreased body weights. Dimethoate at 28 mg kg(-1) day(-1), deltamethrin at 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) and their mixture at 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) were associated with a significantly decreased sperm count, motility and viability and significantly increased percent morphologically abnormal spermatozoa compared with the controls. This study demonstrated the adverse effects of dimethoate at high dose, deltamethrin and their combining at 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) on reproductive system and sperm parameters in male mice.

  8. Effects of interleukin-37 on cardiac function after myocardial infarction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Daoying; Wang, Aiqin; Jiang, Fengqin; Hu, Junhong; Zhang, Xiuzhou

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interleukin-37 (IL-37) is a new discovered member of the interleukin family and plays anti-inflammatory effect in some inflammatory disease. A recent study found that IL-37 elevated significantly in peripheral blood of patients with acute myocardial infarction. We aimed to explore the effect IL-37 on cardiac function after mice myocardial infarction (MI) and its mechanism. Methods: Acute MI mouse model was established and divided into three groups: sham group, MI group and IL-37 treatment group. MPO expression was detected by immunohistochemistry; NF-κB signaling pathway was tested by Western blot; and cardiac function was measured by echocardiography. Results: Compared with MI mice, IL-37 treatment showed an obvious decrease of MPO expression, suppression of p-p65 expression, and improved cardiac function by decreasing left ventricular shortening fraction (LVFS). Conclusion: IL-37 may improve MI mice cardiac function via inhibition of inflammatory NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26191225

  9. A metabonomic analysis on health effects of drinking water on male mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Zong-Yao; Cheng, Shu-Pei

    2011-06-15

    Health effects of drinking water on the male mice (Mus musculus) were investigated by metabonomics after exposure to the Taihu drinking water for 90 days. Metabonomics data combined with the results of conventional serum biochemistry tests and hepatic histopathology showed that the drinking water induced adverse health effects on the male mice. It was found that the serum levels of pyruvate, glutamine, arginine, lysine, N-acetyl glycoproteins, choline and citrate were significantly decreased in the treatment group. These results indicated that Taihu drinking water may induce damages on mice liver via perturbations of energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism and apoptosis. These observations yielded novel insights regarding the environmental health risk of Taihu drinking water.

  10. Effects of ganglion blocking agents on nicotine extensor convulsions and lethality in mice

    PubMed Central

    Aceto, M. D.; Bentley, H. C.; Dembinski, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. The ganglion blocking agents, chlorisondamine, pentamethonium, mecamylamine, decamethonium and hexamethonium all block nicotine extensor convulsions when administered intraventricularly in mice. Tetraethylammonium was inactive. 2. For the intraventricular route, there is a relationship between ganglionic blocking potency and blocking of nicotine extensor convulsions. Indirect evidence suggests that the site(s) of action of nicotine extensor convulsions and lethality is central in origin and associated with brain areas near the ventricles. 3. When ganglion blocking agents are given orally, subcutaneously or intravenously varying degrees of protection can be observed probably depending on factors such as whether or not the drugs cross the blood-brain barrier, absorption, etc., and the effectiveness in protecting mice from nicotine is not related to ganglionic blocking potency. 4. Atropine and morphine given intraventricularly or subcutaneously did not protect mice from the LD95 of nicotine. Chlorpromazine gave very erratic results and phenobarbitone was effective subcutaneously and to a lesser extent intraventricularly. PMID:4390479

  11. [Effects of green tea on growth inhibition and immune regulation of Lewis lung cancer in mice].

    PubMed

    Zhu, M; Gong, Y; Ge, G

    1997-11-01

    C57/BL6J mice were inoculated with Lewis lung cancer cells as an experimental model to study the effects of green tea on cancer prevention, inhibition of tumor growth and immune regulation in mice with tumor. Results showed that weight of thymus in C57/BL6J mice and its index declined, proportion of positive CD4 subgroup of T lymphocyte and ratio of CD4+, to CD8+ reduced, baseline chemilumi-nescence decreased in peripheral white blood cells, yeast zymosan stimulated chemiluminescence increased, and number of immunoglobulin M formation cells decreased. It indicated that green tea had obvious inhibition in Lewis lung cancer and protective effects, to various extent, on adverse changes of above indices.

  12. Neuroprotective effect of lycopene against MPTP induced experimental Parkinson's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Prema, Asokan; Janakiraman, Udaiyappan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin

    2015-07-10

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder that mainly affects the movement of the aged populations. Lycopene is a carotenoid with unique pharmacological properties and its efficacy on experimental Hunginton's disease and brain ischemia has shown intense neuroprotective effects. The present study was aimed to explore the neuroprotective effect of lycopene against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced PD mice. Administration of lycopene (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day orally) protected MPTP induced depletion of striatal dopamine (DA) and its metabolites in a dose dependent manner. It also attenuated MPTP-induced oxidative stress and motor abnormalities seen in PD mice. Our western blot studies showed that treatment with lycopene reversed MPTP induced apoptosis may be due to its antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties. As to conclude, lycopene reverses neurochemical deficts, oxidative stress, apoptosis and physiological abnormalities in PD mice and offer promise strategy in the treatment of this neurodegenerative disease.

  13. Effects of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Overexpression on Anxiety and Memory after Early Life Stress in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Ter Horst, Judith P.; Harris, Anjanette P.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Krugers, Harmen J.; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Early-life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for the development of psychopathology, particularly in women. Human studies have shown that certain haplotypes of NR3C2, encoding the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), that result in gain of function, may protect against the consequences of stress exposure, including childhood trauma. Here, we tested the hypothesis that forebrain-specific overexpression of MR in female mice would ameliorate the effects of ELS on anxiety and memory in adulthood. We found that ELS increased anxiety, did not alter spatial discrimination and reduced contextual fear memory in adult female mice. Transgenic overexpression of MR did not alter anxiety but affected spatial memory performance and enhanced contextual fear memory formation. The effects of ELS on anxiety and contextual fear were not affected by transgenic overexpression of MR. Thus, MR overexpression in the forebrain does not represent a major resilience factor to early life adversity in female mice. PMID:26858618

  14. Effect of 2450 MHz microwave radiation on hematopoiesis of preganant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, M.J.; MacNichols, G.L.; McRee, D.I.

    1984-11-01

    In this study, the influence of 2450 MHz CW microwave radiation on hematopoiesis in pregnant mice was examined. Dams (mice CD-1 strain) were irradiated during Days 1-6 or 6-15 of pregnancy. The animals were irradiated for a total of 8 hr per day at an average power density of 30 mW/cm/sup 2/. Peripheral blood and bone marrow samples were obtained on Day 18 of pregnancy. The total leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts of peripheral blood samples were not affected by either exposure regimen. In addition, no effects were noted in either the erythroid or myeloid mitotic indices of bone marrow samples. Exposure of pregnant mice to microwave radiation under the conditions of these experiments had no effects on the investigated aspects of hematopoiesis.

  15. The effect of androgen on the retention of extinction memory after conditioned taste aversion in mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ema; Eda-Fujiwara, Hiroko; Satoh, Ryohei; Saito, Rika; Miyamoto, Takenori

    2013-05-01

    Conditioned taste aversion (CTA) induced by the application of a novel taste such as sodium saccharin (Sac) as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and a malaise-inducing agent as the unconditioned stimulus (US), results in acquisition of CTA memory to Sac. In contrast, CTA is extinguished by repeated presentations of the CS without the US, resulting in acquisition of the extinction memory. We examined the effects of androgenic hormones on acquisition and retention of extinction memory in mice. We gonadectomized sexually immature mice and continuously administered androgens to these animals. After sexual maturation, the mice underwent a conditioning period followed by an extinction period. Retrieval tests revealed that the androgen-treated group showed significantly greater retention of extinction memory than the non-treated group 5 weeks later, whereas such significant difference was not observed in acquisition of extinction memory. These results demonstrate the enhancing effect of androgens on retention of extinction memory.

  16. Effects of a block in cysteine catabolism on energy balance and fat metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomski, Julie; Zhou, James Q; Roman, Heather B; Liu, Xiaojing; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Locasale, Jason W; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2016-01-01

    To gain further insights into the effects of elevated cysteine levels on energy metabolism and the possible mechanisms underlying these effects, we conducted studies in cysteine dioxygenase (Cdo1)-null mice. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) catalyzes the first step of the major pathway for cysteine catabolism. When CDO is absent, tissue and plasma cysteine levels are elevated, resulting in enhanced flux of cysteine through desulfhydration reactions. When Cdo1-null mice were fed a high-fat diet, they gained more weight than their wild-type controls, regardless of whether the diet was supplemented with taurine. Cdo1-null mice had markedly lower leptin levels, higher feed intakes, and markedly higher abundance of hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) compared to wild-type control mice, and these differences were not affected by the fat or taurine content of the diet. Thus, reported associations of elevated cysteine levels with greater weight gain and with elevated hepatic Scd1 expression are also seen in the Cdo1-null mouse model. Hepatic accumulation of acylcarnitines suggests impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acids in Cdo1-null mice. The strong associations of elevated cysteine levels with excess H2 S production and impairments in energy metabolism suggest that H2 S signaling could be involved.

  17. Hippocampal cytotoxic lesion effects on species-typical behaviours in mice.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Robert M J; Croucher, Adam; Rawlins, J Nicholas P

    2002-05-14

    The behavioural effects of hippocampal lesions have been extensively documented in rats. However, paradigms developed for rats cannot be assumed to transfer straightforwardly to mice; the behaviour of the two species differs in many respects. Mice are currently the species of choice for targeted genetic manipulations. A number of these programs aim to modulate hippocampal function. The present studies were therefore designed to provide a behavioural profile of selective, cytotoxic hippocampal lesions in tasks appropriate for mice. The lesions abolished food hoarding from a source outside the home base, and reduced the tendency to displace food pellets from a tube inside the home cage (burrowing). Lesioned mice showed reductions of directed exploration (rearing and head dipping), but not locomotor activity, in a holeboard and open field, and explored the edges of their home cages less when the lids were removed. Nest construction was also impaired. These effects were not due to gross motor impairments, as formal tests revealed no deficiencies in co-ordination or strength. There were suggestions of changes in emotionality, although a more consistent finding was that lesioned mice were often slower to initiate behaviour in novel surroundings, which may be congruent with the other deficits we observed. These results may aid interpretation of the many genetic manipulations that target the hippocampus, and of neurodegenerative conditions that induce hippocampal pathology.

  18. Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum Strain K21 on High-Fat Diet-Fed Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Chen; Weng, Wei-Lien; Lai, Wen-Lin; Tsai, Hui-Ping; Liu, Wei-Hsien; Lee, Meng-Hwan; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated beneficial effects of specific probiotics on alleviating obesity-related disorders. Here we aimed to identify probiotics with potential antiobesity activity among 88 lactic acid bacterial strains via in vitro screening assays, and a Lactobacillus plantarum strain K21 was found to harbor abilities required for hydrolyzing bile salt, reducing cholesterol, and inhibiting the accumulation of lipid in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Furthermore, effects of K21 on diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were examined. Male C57Bl/6J mice received a normal diet, high-fat diet (HFD), or HFD with K21 administration (10(9) CFU in 0.2 mL PBS/day) for eight weeks. Supplementation of K21, but not placebo, appeared to alleviate body weight gain and epididymal fat mass accumulation, reduce plasma leptin levels, decrease cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and mitigate liver damage in DIO mice. Moreover, the hepatic expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) related to adipogenesis was significantly downregulated in DIO mice by K21 intervention. We also found that K21 supplementation strengthens intestinal permeability and modulates the amount of Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., and Clostridium perfringens in the cecal contents of DIO mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that dietary intake of K21 protects against the onset of HFD-induced obesity through multiple mechanisms of action.

  19. Effects of (-)-Sesamin on Chronic Stress-Induced Anxiety Disorders in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting Ting; Shin, Keon Sung; Park, Hyun Jin; Yi, Bo Ram; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Myung Koo

    2016-12-19

    This study investigated the effects of (-)-sesamin on chronic electric footshock (EF) stress-induced anxiety disorders in mice. Mice were treated with (-)-sesamin (25 and 50 mg/kg) orally once a day for 21 days prior to exposure to EF stress (0.6 mA, 1 s every 5 s, 3 min). Mice treated with (-)-sesamin (25 and 50 mg/kg) exhibited less severe decreases in the number of open arm entries and time spent on open arms in the elevated plus-maze test and the distance traveled in the open field test following exposure to chronic EF stress. Similarly, mice treated with (-)-sesamin exhibited significantly less severe decreases in brain levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin following exposure to chronic EF stress. Increases in serum levels of corticosterone and expression of c-Fos were also less pronounced in mice treated with (-)-sesamin (25 and 50 mg/kg). These results suggest that (-)-sesamin may protect against the effects of chronic EF stress-induced anxiety disorders by modulating dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin levels, c-Fos expression, and corticosterone levels.

  20. [Effects of cadmium on the ovarian parenchyma in Swiss albino mice].

    PubMed

    Lubo-Palma, Adonías; Nava-Leal, Carmen; Villasmil, Víctor; Quevedo, Ana Luisa; Montiel, Maria; Simoes, David; Faría, Clarisa

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of cadmium on the ovarian parenchyma. An experimental study was designed with 25 Swiss albino mice (healthy females) living 50 days under controlled laboratory conditions. For the experimental group, 21 mice were selected at random and divided into 3 groups (B, C, and D) of 7 animals each; thereafter they were exposed, respectively, to 50, 100 and 150 ppm of cadmium chloride dissolved in water offered ad libitum. They were compared with the control group A (6 remaining mice). Beginning on week three, physical and behavioral changes were observed: darkening of the eyes, yellowish discoloration of hair, flaccid and hypotonic muscles, irritability, aggressiveness and indifference. Ovaric histological findings were compared among the groups through optic microscopy and they were the following in cadmium exposed mice: 1) in the epithelium, proliferation, finger-like projections, hyperplasia, degeneration and necrosis; 2) in the ovary cortex, increased numbers of atresic follicles, decreased number of follicles in different stages of maturation, disorganization, edema and decreased number of yellow bodies; 3) in the interfollicular zone, areas of disorganization, edema and necrosis, mainly in the samples belonging to group D; 4) in the ovaric medulla, congestion, hyperemia and large sanguineous vasodilatation tending to haemorrhage. Since these effects increased with increasing concentrations of cadmium chloride, we may conclude that cadmium chloride is a highly toxic agent on the ovaric parenchyma of Swiss albino mice.

  1. Immunosuppressive and antiparasitic effects of cyclosporin A on Hymenolepis nana infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, K; Nakamura, F; Abe, M; Okamoto, K

    1998-04-01

    The effect of cyclosporin A, which is known to act both as immunosuppressant and as an antiparasitic drug in many host-parasite systems, was examined in a mouse-Hymenolepis nana system. When BDF1 mice were injected s.c. with cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) every 48 h from 11 days p.i. with eggs, expulsion of the adult worms from the intestines of mice was prevented completely until at least 30 days p.i. Worm burden, dry weight and the number of gravid proglottids were not significantly reduced. By contrast, in untreated mice most of the worms were eliminated by 19 days p.i. The drug also completely abolished acquired resistance to a challenge infection with eggs when mice were injected s.c. with cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) around the time of challenge infection (Days -2, -1, 0, 1 and 2 relative to challenge). Such immunosuppressive effects of cyclosporin A on worm expulsion and protective immunity to reinfection were similar to those of another immunosuppressant, cyclophosphamide. As for the antiparasitic action of cyclosporin A against H. nana, a smaller number of cysticercoids developed from eggs in mice given cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) for 5 days beginning 1 day before infection, than in untreated controls.

  2. Effect of Fluorosis on Liver Cells of VC Deficient and Wild Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Jiao, Yan; Ma, Yonghui; Stuart, John M.; Li, Xiudian; Zhao, Fusheng; Wang, Lishi; Sun, DianJun

    2014-01-01

    For decades, mouse and other rodents have been used for the study of oxidative or related studies such as the effect of fluoride. It is known that rodents normally synthesize their own vitamin C (VC) due to the presence of a key enzyme in ascorbic acid synthesis, l-gulono-lactone-γ-oxidase (Gulo), while humans do not have the capacity of VC synthesis due to the deletion of most parts of the GULO gene. The spontaneous fracture (sfx) mouse recently emerged as a model for study of VC deficiency. We investigated the effect of fluoride on liver cells from wild type Balb/c and sfx mice. We found that activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT were reduced in both wild type and sfx mice; however, the amount of reduction in the sfx cells is more than that in Balb/c cells. In addition, while both cells increased MDA, the increase in the sfx cells is greater than that in Balb/c cells. Gene networks of Sod, Gpx, and Cat in the liver of humans and mice are also different. Our study suggests that reaction to fluoride in vitamin C deficient mice might be different from that of wild type mice. PMID:24693236

  3. An interactive survey panel regarding the effects of mice (Microtus spec.) on a young ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaplata, Markus; Maurer, Thomas; Boldt-Burisch, Katja; Schaaf, Wolfgang; Hinz, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Apparent disturbance caused by soil megafauna took place for the very first time in 2014, after nine years of spontaneous vegetative succession of the constructed watershed Chicken Creek catchment (6 ha). This watershed was designed to investigate the initial phase of soil and ecosystem development under natural conditions including the detailed study of hydrologic processes and water-substrate-plant-atmosphere interactions. In autumn 2014, we recorded the primarily common vole (Microtus arvalis Pallas) activities (calamity), which altered the microtopography of the substrate surface: We counted mouse holes and diggings (for storage organs) at the same spatial units (permanent plots, >100 # of 5 m × 5 m) where we monitor the vegetation since the onset of the catchment. We are hence capable of analysing the effect of abundant vegetarian mice and biogenic macropores, e.g. on the occurrence and performance of the more than 150 vascular plant species present by comparing the respective coverage in 2013 (the pre-mice year) versus 2014, with or without accounting for the confounding effect of succession. Additionally elaborated insight on the 3-D architecture of the mice underground corridors and the nesting places (in situ) enables to extrapolate mass and volume of the moved substrate and the number of the nests of mice for the whole catchment. We report these results, anticipating a return service: Here, we ask for your expectation regarding the significance of the mice-made disturbance on the vegetation of the young ecosystem.

  4. Effect of cypermethrin on memory, movement activity and coordination in mice after transient incomplete cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nieradko-Iwanicka, Barbara; Borzecki, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Cypermethrin is a synthetic pyrethroid widely used as an insecticide. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible effect of 0.1 LD50 of cypermethrin on memory, movement activity and co-ordination in mice exposed to transient incomplete cerebral ischemia. Transient occlusion of both carotid arteries (BCCA) in adult female mice was performed under ketamine + xylazine anesthesia. Intraperitoneal LD50 for cypermethrin was calculated to be 169.9 mg/kg. Memory retention was evaluated in a step-through passive avoidance task (PA), working spatial memory in a Y-maze, spontaneous movement activity in an automated device fitted with two photocells and a counter in two subsequent 30-min periods, and movement co-ordination on a rod spinning at the rate of 10 rotations/min. Neither memory nor movement co-ordination were significantly affected by transient incomplete cerebral ischemia or cypermethrin. BCCA itself did not impair movement activity in the examined mice. Cypermethrin decreased exploratory motor activity in the mice, and the effect was exacerbated by BCCA. These results show that transient incomplete cerebral ischemia combined with exposure to subtoxic doses of cypermethrin do not impair memory, but do affect behavior, producing transient reduction of spontaneous horizontal movement in mice.

  5. Protective effect of galangin in Concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qingqiong; Zhu, Liping; Ding, Jieying; Zhuang, Xing; Xu, Lili; Chen, Fuxiang

    2015-01-01

    Galangin is an active pharmacological ingredient from propolis and Alpinia officinarum Hance, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. The present study aims to reveal the effect of galangin on Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis (CIH), a well-established animal model of immune-mediated liver injury, and to clarify the related mechanism. C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with galangin followed by ConA challenge. Results indicated that galangin inhibited ConA-induced liver damage. Mice pretreated with galangin showed more reduction of liver damage when compared with control mice pretreated with vehicle solution. In galangin-pretreated mice with induced CIH, increases in serum levels of several inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, and interleukin-12 were dramatically attenuated, and chemokines and adhesion molecules like interferon inducible protein-10, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expressions in liver were decreased. Moreover, CIH mice pretreated with galangin showed less leukocyte infiltration and T-cell activation in the liver. Further, the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effects of galangin may be attributed to its modulation of crucial inflammatory signaling pathways, including nuclear factor kappa B and interferon-gamma/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. Collectively, these findings suggest the preventive and therapeutic potential of galangin in immune-mediated liver injury in vivo.

  6. Effects of a block in cysteine catabolism on energy balance and fat metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Niewiadomski, Julie; Zhou, James Q.; Roman, Heather B.; Liu, Xiaojing; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.; Locasale, Jason W.; Stipanuk, Martha H.

    2016-01-01

    To gain further insights into the effect of elevated cysteine levels on energy metabolism and the possible mechanisms by which cysteine may have these effects, we conducted studies in cysteine dioxygenase (Cdo1)–null mice. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) catalyzes the first step of the major pathway for cysteine catabolism. When CDO is absent, tissue and plasma cysteine levels are elevated, resulting in enhanced flux of cysteine through desulfhydration reactions. When Cdo1-null mice were fed a high-fat diet, they gained more weight than their wild-type controls, regardless of whether the diet was supplemented with taurine. Cdo1-null mice had markedly lower leptin levels, higher feed intakes, and markedly higher abundance of hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) compared to wild-type control mice, and these differences were not affected by the fat or taurine content of the diet. Thus, reported associations of elevated cysteine levels with greater weight gain and with elevated hepatic Scd1 expression holds in the Cdo1-null mouse model. Hepatic accumulation of acylcarnitines suggested impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acids in Cdo1-null mice. The strong associations of elevated cysteine levels with excess H2S production and impairments in energy metabolism suggest that H2S signaling could be involved. PMID:26995761

  7. Antidepressant effect of recombinant NT4-NAP/AAV on social isolated mice through intranasal route.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Liu, You-Ping; Lei, Gang; Liu, Peng; Chu, Zheng; Gao, Cheng-Ge; Dang, Yong-Hui

    2017-02-07

    The purpose of the present study was to observe the depression-like behavior induced by social isolation; detect the antidepressant effect of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing NAP on social isolation mice by intranasal delivery. After construction of NT4-NAP/AAV, expression of NAP was confirmed in vitro. 3-week-old C57/BL mice were bred individually in cages as social isolation-rearing. Six weeks later, the first subset of mice underwent behavioral tests and western blot; the second was for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NT4-NAP/AAV was delivered quaque die by nasal administration for consecutive 10 days before behavioral test. Several depression-like behaviors were observed in social isolation mice, including decreased relative sucrose preference, longer immobility time in forced swimming test, lower plasma corticosterone and decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor in hippocampus. Thus, social isolation procedure appears to be an animal model of depression with good face and construct validity. What's more, the antidepressant effect in social isolation-rearing mice was observed after intranasal administration of NT4-NAP/AAV, suggesting that this might be a promising therapeutic strategy for depressive disorder.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of sildenafil against oxidative stress and memory dysfunction in mice exposed to noise stress.

    PubMed

    Sikandaner, Hu Erxidan; Park, So Young; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Shi Nae; Yang, Dong Won

    2017-02-15

    Noise exposure has been well characterized as an environmental stressor, and is known to have auditory and non-auditory effects. Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors affect memory and hippocampus plasticity through various signaling cascades which are regulated by cGMP. In this study, we investigated the effects of sildenafil on memory deficiency, neuroprotection and oxidative stress in mice caused by chronic noise exposure. Mice were exposed to noise for 4h every day up to 14days at 110dB SPL of noise level. Sildenafil (15mg/kg) was orally administered 30min before noise exposure for 14days. Behavioral assessments were performed using novel object recognition (NOR) test and radial arm maze (RAM) test. Higher levels of memory dysfunction and oxidative stress were observed in noise alone-induced mice compared to control group. Interestingly, sildenafil administration increased memory performance, decreased oxidative stress, and increased neuroprotection in the hippocampus region of noise alone-induced mice likely through affecting memory related pathways such as cGMP/PKG/CREB and p25/CDK5, and induction of free radical scavengers such as SOD1, SOD2, SOD3, Prdx5, and catalase in the brain of stressed mice.

  9. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro; Seino, Yutaka; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin

  10. Antidepressant-like effect of mitragynine isolated from Mitragyna speciosa Korth in mice model of depression.

    PubMed

    Idayu, N Farah; Hidayat, M Taufik; Moklas, M A M; Sharida, F; Raudzah, A R Nurul; Shamima, A R; Apryani, Evhy

    2011-03-15

    Mitragyna speciosa Korth. leaves have been used for decades as a traditional medicine to treat diarrhea, diabetes and to improve blood circulation by natives of Malaysia, Thailand and other regions of Southeast Asia. Mitragynine is the major active alkaloid in the plant. To date, the role of mitragynine in psychological disorders such as depression is not scientifically evaluated. Hence, the present investigation evaluates the antidepressant effect of mitragynine in the mouse forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), two models predictive of antidepressant activity and the effect of mitragynine towards neuroendocrine system of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis by measuring the corticosterone concentration of mice exposed to FST and TST. An open-field test (OFT) was used to detect any association of immobility in the FST and TST with changes in motor activity of mice treated with mitragynine. In the present study, mitragynine at dose of 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg i.p. injected significantly reduced the immobility time of mice in both FST and TST without any significant effect on locomotor activity in OFT. Moreover, mitragynine significantly reduced the released of corticosterone in mice exposed to FST and TST at dose of 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg. Overall, the present study clearly demonstrated that mitragynine exerts an antidepressant effect in animal behavioral model of depression (FST and TST) and the effect appears to be mediated by an interaction with neuroendocrine HPA axis systems.

  11. Pleiotropic effects of extended blockade of CSF1R signaling in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Kristin A; Pridans, Clare; Sehgal, Anuj; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bradford, Barry M; Raza, Sobia; Moffat, Lindsey; Gow, Deborah J; Beard, Philippa M; Mabbott, Neil A; Smith, Lee B; Hume, David A

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the role of CSF1R signaling in adult mice using prolonged treatment with anti-CSF1R antibody. Mutation of the CSF1 gene in the op/op mouse produces numerous developmental abnormalities. Mutation of the CSF1R has an even more penetrant phenotype, including perinatal lethality, because of the existence of a second ligand, IL-34. These effects on development provide limited insight into functions of CSF1R signaling in adult homeostasis. The carcass weight and weight of several organs (spleen, kidney, and liver) were reduced in the treated mice, but overall body weight gain was increased. Despite the complete loss of Kupffer cells, there was no effect on liver gene expression. The treatment ablated OCL, increased bone density and trabecular volume, and prevented the decline in bone mass seen in female mice with age. The op/op mouse has a deficiency in pancreatic β cells and in Paneth cells in the gut wall. Only the latter was reproduced by the antibody treatment and was associated with increased goblet cell number but no change in villus architecture. Male op/op mice are infertile as a result of testosterone insufficiency. Anti-CSF1R treatment ablated interstitial macrophages in the testis, but there was no sustained effect on testosterone or LH. The results indicate an ongoing requirement for CSF1R signaling in macrophage and OCL homeostasis but indicate that most effects of CSF1 and CSF1R mutations are due to effects on development.

  12. Neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of Apigenin and Luteolin in MPTP induced parkinsonism in mice.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sachin P; Jain, Pankaj D; Sancheti, Jayant S; Ghumatkar, Priya J; Tambe, Rufi; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, we aim to investigate the neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of naturally occurring polyphenols like apigenin and luteolin and also to explore the underlying mechanisms with respect to Parkinson's disease (PD). MPTP (25 mg/kg) along with Probenecid (250 mg/kg) was administrated for five consecutive days to induce parkinsonism in mice. Apigenin (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg), luteolin (10 and 20 mg/kg) and Bromocriptine (10 mg/kg) were administrated orally for 26 days including 5 days of pretreatment. Behavioural analysis and biochemical estimation of oxidative stress biomarkers were conducted. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were evaluated in substantia nigra (SN) region of the brain by immunostaining. TNF-α was estimated using ELISA technique. Our results demonstrate that apigenin and luteolin treatment improved the locomotor and muscular activities in MPTP treated mice. TH-positive cells decreased up to 7% in MPTP treated mice compared to normal mice (P < 0.001) and were found to be protected from degeneration in apigenin (69%) and luteolin (63%) treated mice (P < 0.001). Levels of GFAP were found to be decreased in the SN of the brain due to apigenin and luteolin treatment as compared to MPTP mice. BDNF levels were elevated significantly in apigenin and luteolin treatment groups when compared to MPTP treatment mice. In conclusion, apigenin and luteolin protected the dopaminergic neurons probably by reducing oxidative damage, neuroinflammation and microglial activation along with enhanced neurotrophic potential. The above results propose both these flavonoids as promising molecules in the therapeutics of PD.

  13. Metabolomic profiles of arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase knockout mice: effect of sex and arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Madelyn C; Douillet, Christelle; Su, Mingming; Zhou, Kejun; Wu, Tao; Chen, Wenlian; Galanko, Joseph A; Drobná, Zuzana; Saunders, R Jesse; Martin, Elizabeth; Fry, Rebecca C; Jia, Wei; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) is the key enzyme in the pathway for methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs). Altered As3mt expression and AS3MT polymorphism have been linked to changes in iAs metabolism and in susceptibility to iAs toxicity in laboratory models and in humans. As3mt-knockout mice have been used to study the association between iAs metabolism and adverse effects of iAs exposure. However, little is known about systemic changes in metabolism of these mice and how these changes lead to their increased susceptibility to iAs toxicity. Here, we compared plasma and urinary metabolomes of male and female wild-type (WT) and As3mt-KO (KO) C57BL/6 mice and examined metabolomic shifts associated with iAs exposure in drinking water. Surprisingly, exposure to 1 ppm As elicited only small changes in the metabolite profiles of either WT or KO mice. In contrast, comparisons of KO mice with WT mice revealed significant differences in plasma and urinary metabolites associated with lipid (phosphatidylcholines, cytidine, acyl-carnitine), amino acid (hippuric acid, acetylglycine, urea), and carbohydrate (L-sorbose, galactonic acid, gluconic acid) metabolism. Notably, most of these differences were sex specific. Sex-specific differences were also found between WT and KO mice in plasma triglyceride and lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Some of the differentially changed metabolites (phosphatidylcholines, carnosine, and sarcosine) are substrates or products of reactions catalyzed by other methyltransferases. These results suggest that As3mt KO alters major metabolic pathways in a sex-specific manner, independent of iAs treatment, and that As3mt may be involved in other cellular processes beyond iAs methylation.

  14. EFFECT OF SPLENECTOMY ON THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF MICE INOCULATED WITH DIPLOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE

    PubMed Central

    Shinefield, Henry R.; Steinberg, Charles R.; Kaye, Donald

    1966-01-01

    An experimental model is described which demonstrated increased susceptibility of mice to infection with D. pneumoniae following splenectomy. It was necessary to use small numbers of a particular strain of pneumococcus (D. pneumoniae type 6), intravenous infection and a particular strain of mouse (pathogen-free NCS strain). The increase in susceptibility persisted for at least 4 months after splenectomy. With modifications in experimental design such as use of large numbers of organisms, a different strain of pneumococcus, the intraperitoneal route of infection or a different mouse strain no increase or a much less impressive increase in susceptibility was demonstrated. Following intravenous injection of small numbers of D. pneumoniae Type 6 bacteremia tended to persist in all NCS mice. Multiplication of pneumococci subsequently occurred in a higher proportion of mice with splenectomy and at a more rapid rate than in control animals. Mice with splenectomy usually had more D. pneumoniae per ml of blood than per gram of any tissue. This suggested that in these mice multiplication of microorganisms occurs primarily in blood. In control mice higher concentrations of bacteria were present in spleen than in blood, and higher concentrations were found in blood than in other tissues. These results suggested that in normal mice infected intravenously with small numbers of D. pneumoniae Type 6, the spleen protects by removing and killing small but critical numbers of D. pneumoniae which are circulating in the blood. No evidence was found to suggest that the altered susceptibility is mediated by an effect of splenectomy on numbers of circulating leukocytes or on the antibacterial activity of mouse blood. PMID:4380067

  15. Neuroprotective effects of quercetin, rutin and okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Linn.) in dexamethasone-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Tongjaroenbuangam, Walaiporn; Ruksee, Nootchanart; Chantiratikul, Piyanete; Pakdeenarong, Noppakun; Kongbuntad, Watee; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2011-10-01

    The administration of dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid receptor agonist, causes neuronal death in the CA3 layer of the hippocampus, which has been associated with learning and memory impairments. This study aimed to examine the ability of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Linn.) extract and its derivatives (quercetin and rutin) to protect neuronal function and improve learning and memory deficits in mice subjected to dexamethasone treatment. Learning and memory functions in mice were examined using the Morris water maze test. The results showed that the mice treated with dexamethasone had prolonged water maze performance latencies and shorter time spent in the target quadrant while mice pretreated with quercetin, rutin or okra extract prior to dexamethasone treatment showed shorter latencies and longer time spent in target quadrant. Morphological changes in pyramidal neurons were observed in the dexamethasone treated group. The number of CA3 hippocampal neurons was significantly lower while pretreated with quercetin, rutin or okra attenuated this change. Prolonged treatment with dexamethasone altered NMDA receptor expression in the hippocampus. Pretreatment with quercetin, rutin or okra extract prevented the reduction in NMDA receptor expression. Dentate gyrus (DG) cell proliferation was examined using the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry technique. The number of BrdU-immunopositive cells was significantly reduced in dexamethasone-treated mice compared to control mice. Pretreatment with okra extract, either quercetin or rutin was found to restore BrdU-immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus. These findings suggest that quercetin, rutin and okra extract treatments reversed cognitive deficits, including impaired dentate gyrus (DG) cell proliferation, and protected against morphological changes in the CA3 region in dexamethasone-treated mice. The precise mechanism of the neuroprotective effect of these plant extracts should be further investigated.

  16. Effect of Fenbendazole on Three Behavioral Tests in Male C57BL/6N Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gadad, Bharathi S; Daher, João P L; Hutchinson, Eric K; Brayton, Cory F; Dawson, Ted M; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Watson, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Pinworms are highly contagious parasites of laboratory rodents that often are treated with fenbendazole. To our knowledge, the effect of fenbendazole at therapeutic dosages on behavioral tests in mice has not been evaluated. Here we studied 6-wk-old male C57BL/6N mice. We compared the behavior of control mice (fed regular diet) with 3 groups of mice treated with dietary fenbendazole. Treatment groups were 4 wk of fenbendazole, 2 wk of fenbendazole followed by 2 wk of regular diet, and 2 wk of regular diet followed by 2 wk of fenbendazole. At the end of dietary treatment all groups were tested by open field for central, peripheral and vertical activity; elevated plus maze for anxiety; and rotarod for motor ability and then evaluated by clinical pathology and selected histopathology. Treated and control groups showed no differences in open field or elevated plus maze testing, histopathology, or clinical pathology. However mice treated for 4 wk with fenbendazole or 2 wk of fenbendazole followed by 2 wk regular diet stayed on the rotarod for shorter periods than did controls, and mice treated with 2 wk of regular diet followed by 2 wk fenbendazole showed a trend toward shorter rotarod times. In light of this study, we suggest that open field and elevated plus maze testing is unlikely to be affected by 4 wk fenbendazole treatment in male C57BL/6 mice; however, behavioral tests of motor ability such as rotarod tests may be affected during and for at least 2 wk after fenbendazole treatment. PMID:21205447

  17. Toxicogenomic analysis reveals profibrogenic effects of trichloroethylene in autoimmune-mediated cholangitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kopec, Anna K; Sullivan, Bradley P; Kassel, Karen M; Joshi, Nikita; Luyendyk, James P

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to environmental chemicals increases the risk of developing autoimmune liver disease. However, the identity of specific chemical perpetrators and the mechanisms whereby environmental chemicals modify liver disease is unclear. Previous studies link exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) with the development of autoimmune liver disease and exacerbation of autoimmunity in lupus-prone MRL mice. In this study, we utilized NOD.c3c4 mice, which spontaneously develop autoimmune cholangitis bearing resemblance to some features of primary biliary cirrhosis. Nine-week-old female NOD.c3c4 mice were given TCE (0.5 mg/ml) or its vehicle (1% Cremophor-EL) in drinking water for 4 weeks. TCE had little effect on clinical chemistry, biliary cyst formation, or hepatic CD3+ T-cell accumulation. Hepatic microarray profiling revealed a dramatic suppression of early growth response 1 (EGR1) mRNA in livers of TCE-treated mice, which was verified by qPCR and immunohistochemical staining. Consistent with a reported link between reduced EGR1 expression and liver fibrosis, TCE increased hepatic type I collagen (COL1A1) mRNA and protein levels in livers of NOD.c3c4 mice. In contrast, TCE did not increase COL1A1 expression in NOD.ShiLtJ mice, which do not develop autoimmune cholangitis. These results suggest that in the context of concurrent autoimmune liver disease with a genetic basis, modification of hepatic gene expression by TCE may increase profibrogenic signaling in the liver. Moreover, these studies suggest that NOD.c3c4 mice may be a novel model to study gene-environment interactions critical for the development of autoimmune liver disease.

  18. Toxicogenomic Analysis Reveals Profibrogenic Effects of Trichloroethylene in Autoimmune-Mediated Cholangitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kassel, Karen M.; Joshi, Nikita; Luyendyk, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to environmental chemicals increases the risk of developing autoimmune liver disease. However, the identity of specific chemical perpetrators and the mechanisms whereby environmental chemicals modify liver disease is unclear. Previous studies link exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) with the development of autoimmune liver disease and exacerbation of autoimmunity in lupus-prone MRL mice. In this study, we utilized NOD.c3c4 mice, which spontaneously develop autoimmune cholangitis bearing resemblance to some features of primary biliary cirrhosis. Nine-week-old female NOD.c3c4 mice were given TCE (0.5 mg/ml) or its vehicle (1% Cremophor-EL) in drinking water for 4 weeks. TCE had little effect on clinical chemistry, biliary cyst formation, or hepatic CD3+ T-cell accumulation. Hepatic microarray profiling revealed a dramatic suppression of early growth response 1 (EGR1) mRNA in livers of TCE-treated mice, which was verified by qPCR and immunohistochemical staining. Consistent with a reported link between reduced EGR1 expression and liver fibrosis, TCE increased hepatic type I collagen (COL1A1) mRNA and protein levels in livers of NOD.c3c4 mice. In contrast, TCE did not increase COL1A1 expression in NOD.ShiLtJ mice, which do not develop autoimmune cholangitis. These results suggest that in the context of concurrent autoimmune liver disease with a genetic basis, modification of hepatic gene expression by TCE may increase profibrogenic signaling in the liver. Moreover, these studies suggest that NOD.c3c4 mice may be a novel model to study gene-environment interactions critical for the development of autoimmune liver disease. PMID:25055964

  19. Effect of age on testicular germ cell apoptosis and sperm aneuploidy in MF-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, M H; Schmid, T E

    2003-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation rate in the male germ-line increases with age. The reason for this is unknown, but presumably involves an age-related degeneration in the efficacy of cellular processes. To investigate the possibility that rates of apoptosis and genetic damage (represented by aneuploidy) might vary with age in mice, the testes and sperm of 2- and 12-month-old male MF-1 mice were examined by a modified TUNEL technique and 3-colour sperm-FISH assay, respectively. Sperm were labeled with probes to chromosomes 8, X and Y and 20,000 sperm scored from each of 5 animals per group. A significant increase in gonosomal disomy was found in the aged mice, especially X-X-8. This suggests that advanced paternal age is associated primarily with meiosis II rather than meiosis I disjunction errors. Neither diploidy nor autosomal disomy was affected in the older group. The rate of germ cell apoptosis (apoptotic cells per seminiferous tubule cross-section per animal per group) was higher in the old mice than controls, but not significantly. Considerable inter-animal variability was observed in the older group. The finding of an increase in levels of sperm aneuploidy is novel for 1-year-old mice and confirms the genotoxic effect of ageing in mice. Since apoptosis is assumed to eliminate cells with unrepaired damage, it may be that the apoptotic response in older mice is compromised, resulting in the higher levels of aneuploidy in sperm. However, given the inter-animal variability in testicular germ cell apoptosis, this awaits confirmation.

  20. Effect of 'antidiabetis' herbal preparation on serum glucose and fructosamine in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Petlevski, R; Hadzija, M; Slijepcevic, M; Juretic, D

    2001-05-01

    The antihyperglycemic effect of the Antidiabetis herbal preparation ((Myrtilli folium (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), Taraxaci radix (Taraxacum officinale Web.), Cichorii radix (Cichorium intybus L.), Juniperi fructus (Juniperus communis L.), Centaurii herba (Centaurium umbellatum Gilib.), Phaseoli pericarpium (Phaseolus vulgaris), Millefollii herba (Achillea millefolium L.), Morii folium (Morus nigra L.), Valeriane radix (Valleriana officinalis L.), Urticae herba et radix (Urtica dioica L.)), patent No. P-9801091 Zagreb, Croatia was investigated. Two extracts were prepared: ethanol extract (extract 1), and ethanol extract from which ethanol was evaporated on a rotatory evaporator at a temperature of 45 degrees C (extract 2). Extract 1 and extract 2 were administered (in experiment 1) to alloxan-induced non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice in the same dose of 20 mg/kg. Blood glucose was determined before, and 10, 30, 60 and 120 min after the preparation administration. Extract 1 and extract 2 decreased the level of blood glucose by 10 and 20%, respectively, of the initial value (at 0 min, mean = 22.6 +/- 8.3 mmol/l). Serum levels of glucose and fructosamine were determined in NOD mice, NOD mice administered extract 2 in a dose of 20 mg/kg of extract 2, and NOD mice administered acarbose in a dose of 25 mg/100 g chow, in order to verify the hypoglycemic action of extract 2 (in experiment 2). Extract 2 and acarbose were admixed to the chow. The duration of treatment was 7 days. Significantly lower glucose (P < 0.05) and fructosamine (P < 0.001) levels were recorded in extract 2 treated NOD mice as compared with NOD mice. Study results showed extract 2 to significantly decrease the level of glucose and fructosamine in alloxan induced NOD mice. Our future studies will be focused on the search of active principles of the extracts.

  1. Effect of fenbendazole on three behavioral tests in male C57BL/6N mice.

    PubMed

    Gadad, Bharathi S; Daher, João P L; Hutchinson, Eric K; Brayton, Cory F; Dawson, Ted M; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Watson, Julie

    2010-11-01

    Pinworms are highly contagious parasites of laboratory rodents that often are treated with fenbendazole. To our knowledge, the effect of fenbendazole at therapeutic dosages on behavioral tests in mice has not been evaluated. Here we studied 6-wk-old male C57BL/6N mice. We compared the behavior of control mice (fed regular diet) with 3 groups of mice treated with dietary fenbendazole. Treatment groups were 4 wk of fenbendazole, 2 wk of fenbendazole followed by 2 wk of regular diet, and 2 wk of regular diet followed by 2 wk of fenbendazole. At the end of dietary treatment all groups were tested by open field for central, peripheral and vertical activity; elevated plus maze for anxiety; and rotarod for motor ability and then evaluated by clinical pathology and selected histopathology. Treated and control groups showed no differences in open field or elevated plus maze testing, histopathology, or clinical pathology. However mice treated for 4 wk with fenbendazole or 2 wk of fenbendazole followed by 2 wk regular diet stayed on the rotarod for shorter periods than did controls, and mice treated with 2 wk of regular diet followed by 2 wk fenbendazole showed a trend toward shorter rotarod times. In light of this study, we suggest that open field and elevated plus maze testing is unlikely to be affected by 4 wk fenbendazole treatment in male C57BL/6 mice; however, behavioral tests of motor ability such as rotarod tests may be affected during and for at least 2 wk after fenbendazole treatment.

  2. Liver proteome of mice with different genetic susceptibilities to the effects of fluoride

    PubMed Central

    KHAN, Zohaib Nisar; LEITE, Aline de Lima; CHARONE, Senda; SABINO, Isabela Tomazini; MARTINI, Tatiana; PEREIRA, Heloísa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva; OLIVEIRA, Rodrigo Cardoso; BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A/J and 129P3/J mice strains have been widely studied over the last few years because they respond quite differently to fluoride (F) exposure. 129P3/J mice are remarkably resistant to the development of dental fluorosis, despite excreting less F in urine and having higher circulating F levels. These two strains also present different characteristics regardless of F exposure. Objective In this study, we investigated the differential pattern of protein expression in the liver of these mice to provide insights on why they have different responses to F. Material and Methods Weanling male A/J and 129P3/J mice (n=10 from each strain) were pared and housed in metabolic cages with ad libitum access to low-F food and deionized water for 42 days. Liver proteome profiles were examined using nLC-MS/MS. Protein function was classified by GO biological process (Cluego v2.0.7 + Clupedia v1.0.8) and protein-protein interaction network was constructed (PSICQUIC, Cytoscape). Results Most proteins with fold change were increased in A/J mice. The functional category with the highest percentage of altered genes was oxidation-reduction process (20%). Subnetwork analysis revealed that proteins with fold change interacted with Disks large homolog 4 and Calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1. A/J mice had an increase in proteins related to energy flux and oxidative stress. Conclusion This could be a possible explanation for the high susceptibility of these mice to the effects of F, since the exposure also induces oxidative stress. PMID:27383706

  3. Metabolic effects of a mitochondrial-targeted coenzyme Q analog in high fat fed obese mice.

    PubMed

    Fink, Brian D; Guo, Deng Fu; Kulkarni, Chaitanya A; Rahmouni, Kamal; Kerns, Robert J; Sivitz, William I

    2017-04-01

    We recently reported that mitoquinone (mitoQ, 500 μmol/L) added to drinking water of C57BL/6J mice attenuated weight gain, decreased food intake, increased hypothalamic orexigenic gene expression, and mitigated oxidative stress when administered from the onset of high-fat (HF) feeding. Here, we examined the effects of mitoQ on pre-existing obesity in C57BL/6J mice first made obese by 107 days of HF feeding. In contrast to our preventative study, we found that already obese mice did not tolerate mitoQ at 500 μmol/L. Within 4 days of administration, obese mice markedly decreased food and water intake and lost substantial weight necessitating a dose reduction to 250 μmol/L. Food and water intake then improved. Over the next 4 weeks, body mass of the mitoQ-treated mice increased faster than vehicle-treated controls but did not catch up. Over the subsequent 10 weeks, weights of the mitoQ-treated group remained significantly less than vehicle control, but percent fat and food intake did not differ. Although the mitoQ-treated groups continued to drink less, there was no difference in percent body fluid and no laboratory evidence of dehydration at study end. At the time of killing, hypothalamic NPY gene expression was reduced in the mitoQ-treated mice . Liver fat was markedly increased by HF feeding but did not differ between mitoQ and vehicle groups and, in contrast to our previous preventative study, there was no improvement in plasma alanine amino transferase or liver hydroperoxides. In summary, administration of mitoQ to already obese mice attenuated weight gain, but showed limited overall benefit.

  4. Glial dysfunction in parkin null mice: effects of aging.

    PubMed

    Solano, Rosa M; Casarejos, Maria J; Menéndez-Cuervo, Jamie; Rodriguez-Navarro, Jose A; García de Yébenes, Justo; Mena, Maria A

    2008-01-16

    Parkin mutations in humans produce parkinsonism whose pathogenesis is related to impaired protein degradation, increased free radicals, and abnormal neurotransmitter release. The role of glia in parkin deficiency is little known. We cultured midbrain glia from wild-type (WT) and parkin knock-out (PK-KO) mice. After 18-20 d in vitro, PK-KO glial cultures had less astrocytes, more microglia, reduced proliferation, and increased proapoptotic protein expression. PK-KO glia had greater levels of intracellular glutathione (GSH), increased mRNA expression of the GSH-synthesizing enzyme gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, and greater glutathione S-transferase and lower glutathione peroxidase activities than WT. The reverse happened in glia cultured in serum-free defined medium (EF12) or in old cultures. PK-KO glia was more susceptible than WT to transference to EF12 or neurotoxins (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, blockers of GSH synthesis or catalase, inhibitors of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinases), aging of the culture, or combination of these insults. PK-KO glia was less susceptible than WT to Fe2+ plus H2O2 and less responsive to protection by deferoxamine. Old WT glia increased the expression of heat shock protein 70, but PK-KO did not. Glia conditioned medium (GCM) from PK-KO was less neuroprotective and had lower levels of GSH than WT. GCM from WT increased the levels of dopamine markers in midbrain neuronal cultures transferred to EF12 more efficiently than GCM from PK-KO, and the difference was corrected by supplementation with GSH. PK-KO-GCM was a less powerful suppressor of apoptosis and microglia in neuronal cultures. Our data prove that abnormal glial function is critical in parkin mutations, and its role increases with aging.

  5. The protective effects of oral low-dose quercetin on diabetic nephropathy in hypercholesterolemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Isabele B. S.; Porto, Marcella L.; Santos, Maria C. L. F. S.; Campagnaro, Bianca P.; Gava, Agata L.; Meyrelles, Silvana S.; Pereira, Thiago M. C.; Vasquez, Elisardo C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most important causes of chronic renal disease, and the incidence of DN is increasing worldwide. Considering our previous report (Gomes et al., 2014) indicating that chronic treatment with oral low-dose quercetin (10 mg/Kg) demonstrated anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and renoprotective effects in the C57BL/6J model of DN, we investigated whether this flavonoid could also have beneficial effects in concurrent DN and spontaneous atherosclerosis using the apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse (apoE−/−). Methods: Streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes (100 mg/kg/day, 3 days) in male apoE−/− mice (8 week-old). After 6 weeks, the mice were randomly separated into DQ: diabetic apoE−/− mice treated with quercetin (10 mg/kg/day, 4 weeks, n = 8), DV: diabetic ApoE−/− mice treated with vehicle (n = 8) and ND: non-treated non-diabetic mice (n = 8). Results: Quercetin treatment diminished polyuria (~30%; p < 0.05), glycemia (~25%, p < 0.05), normalized the hypertriglyceridemia. Moreover, this bioflavonoid diminished creatininemia (~30%, p < 0.01) and reduced proteinuria but not to normal levels. We also observed protective effects on the renal structural changes, including normalization of the index of glomerulosclerosis and kidney weight/body weight. Conclusions: Our data revealed that quercetin treatment significantly reduced DN in hypercholesterolemic mice by inducing biochemical changes (decrease in glucose and triglycerides serum levels) and reduction of glomerulosclerosis. Thus, this study highlights the relevance of quercetin as an alternative therapeutic option for DN, including in diabetes associated with dyslipidemia. PMID:26388784

  6. Prophylactic effects of alkaloids from Ba lotus seeds on L-NNA-induced hypertension in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Zhu, Kai; Wang, Cun; Liu, Wei-Wei; Peng, De-Guang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-11-01

    Alkaloids from Ba lotus seeds (ABLS) are a kind of important functional compounds in lotus seeds. The present study was designed to determine its hypertension prophylactic effects in the L-NNA-induced mouse hypertension model. The mice were treated with ABLS, the serum and tissues levels of NO, MDA, ET-1, VEGF, and CGRP were determined using the experimental kits, the mRNA levels of various genes in the heart muscle and blood vessel tissues were further determined by RT-PCR assay. ABLS could reduce the systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean blood pressure (MBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), compared to that of the model control group. After ABLS treatment, the NO (nitric oxide) contents in serum, heart, liver, kidney and stomach of the mice were higher than that of the control mice, but the MDA (malonaldehyde) contents were lower than that of the control mice. The serum levels of ET-1 (endothelin-1), VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) were decreased after ABLS treatment, but CGRP (calcium gene related peptide) level was increased. The ABLS treated mice had higher mRNA expressions of HO-1, nNOS, and eNOS and lower expressions of ADM, RAMP2, IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS than the control mice. Higher concentration of ABLS had greater prophylactic effects, which were close to that of the hypertension drug captopril. These results indicated the hypertension prophylactic effects of ABLS could be further explored as novel medicine or functional food in the future.

  7. Impairing effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor Captopril on bone of normal mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Xia, Chao; Song, Yan; Zhao, Xi; Wong, Man-Sau; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-15

    There are contradicting results about the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) on bones. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of ACEI, Captopril, on bone metabolism and histology as well as the action of Captopril on skeletal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and bradykinin receptor pathway in normal male mice. The urine, serum, tibias and femurs from normal control mice and Captopril-treated (10mg/kg) mice were collected for biochemical, histological and molecular analyses after drug administration for eight weeks. The mice after the treatment with Captopril had a significant decrease of serum testosterone level. The histological measurements showed the loss of trabecular bone mass and trabecular bone number, and the breakage of trabecular bone network as well as the changes of chondrocyte zone at epiphyseal plate in Captopril-treated mice. The defect of Captopril on trabecular bone was reflected by the quantitative bio-parameters from micro-CT. The expression of renin receptor and bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) was significantly up-regulated in tibia of mice upon to the Captopril treatment, which decreased the ratio of OPG/RANKL and the expression of osteoblastic factor RUNX2. Furthermore, Captopril treatment resulted in the increase of pAkt/Akt and pNFκB expression in tibia. The present study revealed the impairing effects of Captopril on bone via interfering with the circulating sex hormone level and B2R pathway, which suggests that the bone metabolism of patients need to be carefully monitored when being prescribed for ACEIs.

  8. Effects of sleep disruption and high fat intake on glucose metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jacqueline M; Barf, R Paulien; Opp, Mark R

    2016-06-01

    Poor sleep quality or quantity impairs glycemic control and increases risk of disease under chronic conditions. Recovery sleep may offset adverse metabolic outcomes of accumulated sleep debt, but the extent to which this occurs is unclear. We examined whether recovery sleep improves glucose metabolism in mice subjected to prolonged sleep disruption, and whether high fat intake during sleep disruption exacerbates glycemic control. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 18-h sleep fragmentation daily for 9 days, followed by 1 day of recovery. During sleep disruption, one group of mice was fed a high-fat diet (HFD) while another group was fed standard laboratory chow. Insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance were assessed by insulin and glucose tolerance testing at baseline, after 3 and 7 days of sleep disruption, and at the end of the protocol after 24h of undisturbed sleep opportunity (recovery). To characterize changes in sleep architecture that are associated with sleep debt and recovery, we quantified electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings during sleep fragmentation and recovery periods from an additional group of mice. We now report that 9 days of 18-h daily sleep fragmentation significantly reduces rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS). Mice respond with increases in REMS, but not NREMS, during the daily 6-h undisturbed sleep opportunity. However, both REMS and NREMS increase significantly during the 24-h recovery period. Although sleep disruption alone has no effect in this protocol, high fat feeding in combination with sleep disruption impairs glucose tolerance, effects that are reversed by recovery sleep. Insulin sensitivity modestly improves after 3 days of sleep fragmentation and after 24h of recovery, with significantly greater improvements in mice exposed to HFD during sleep disruption. Improvements in both glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity are associated with NREMS rebound, raising the possibility that this

  9. Neurotoxicological effects of cinnabar (a Chinese mineral medicine, HgS) in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.-F.; Liu, S.-H.; Lin-Shiau, S.-Y.

    2007-10-15

    Cinnabar, a naturally occurring mercuric sulfide (HgS), has long been used in combination with traditional Chinese medicine as a sedative for more than 2000 years. Up to date, its pharmacological and toxicological effects are still unclear, especially in clinical low-dose and long-term use. In this study, we attempted to elucidate the effects of cinnabar on the time course of changes in locomotor activities, pentobarbital-induced sleeping time, motor equilibrium performance and neurobiochemical activities in mice during 3- to 11-week administration at a clinical dose of 10 mg/kg/day. The results showed that cinnabar was significantly absorbed by gastrointestinal (G-I) tract and transported to brain tissues. The spontaneous locomotor activities of male mice but not female mice were preferentially suppressed. Moreover, frequencies of jump and stereotype-1 episodes were progressively decreased after 3-week oral administration in male and female mice. Pentobarbital-induced sleeping time was prolonged and the retention time on a rotating rod (60 rpm) was reduced after treatment with cinnabar for 6 weeks and then progressively to a greater extent until the 11-week experiment. In addition, the biochemical changes in blood and brain tissues were studied; the inhibition of Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activities, increased production of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO) were found with a greater extent in male mice than those in female mice, which were apparently correlated with their differences in the neurological responses observed. In conclusion, these findings, for the first time, provide evidence of the pharmacological and toxicological basis for understanding the sedative and neurotoxic effects of cinnabar used as a Chinese mineral medicine for more than 2000 years.

  10. Effects of avertin versus xylazine-ketamine anesthesia on cardiac function in normal mice.

    PubMed

    Hart, C Y; Burnett, J C; Redfield, M M

    2001-11-01

    Anesthetic regimens commonly administered during studies that assess cardiac structure and function in mice are xylazine-ketamine (XK) and avertin (AV). While it is known that XK anesthesia produces more bradycardia in the mouse, the effects of XK and AV on cardiac function have not been compared. We anesthetized normal adult male Swiss Webster mice with XK or AV. Transthoracic echocardiography and closed-chest cardiac catheterization were performed to assess heart rate (HR), left ventricular (LV) dimensions at end diastole and end systole (LVDd and LVDs, respectively), fractional shortening (FS), LV end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), the time constant of isovolumic relaxation (tau), and the first derivatives of LV pressure rise and fall (dP/dt(max) and dP/dt(min), respectively). During echocardiography, HR was lower in XK than AV mice (250 +/- 14 beats/min in XK vs. 453 +/- 24 beats/min in AV, P < 0.05). Preload was increased in XK mice (LVDd: 4.1 +/- 0.08 mm in XK vs. 3.8 +/- 0.09 mm in AV, P < 0.05). FS, a load-dependent index of systolic function, was increased in XK mice (45 +/- 1.2% in XK vs. 40 +/- 0.8% in AV, P < 0.05). At LV catheterization, the difference in HR with AV (453 +/- 24 beats/min) and XK (342 +/- 30 beats/min, P < 0.05) anesthesia was more variable, and no significant differences in systolic or diastolic function were seen in the group as a whole. However, in XK mice with HR <300 beats/min, LVEDP was increased (28 +/- 5 vs. 6.2 +/- 2 mmHg in mice with HR >300 beats/min, P < 0.05), whereas systolic (LV dP/dt(max): 4,402 +/- 798 vs. 8,250 +/- 415 mmHg/s in mice with HR >300 beats/min, P < 0.05) and diastolic (tau: 23 +/- 2 vs. 14 +/- 1 ms in mice with HR >300 beats/min, P < 0.05) function were impaired. Compared with AV, XK produces profound bradycardia with effects on loading conditions and ventricular function. The disparate findings at echocardiography and LV catheterization underscore the importance of comprehensive assessment of LV function in

  11. Combined Effects of Acamprosate and Escitalopram on Ethanol Consumption in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ada Man-Choi; Qiu, Yanyan; Jia, Yun-Fang; Aguiar, Felipe S.; Hinton, David J.; Karpyak, Victor M.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Background Major depression is one of the most prevalent psychiatry comorbidities of alcohol use disorders (AUD). Since negative emotions can trigger craving and increase the risk of relapse, treatments that target both conditions simultaneously may augment treatment success. Previous studies showed a potential synergist effect of FDA approved medication for AUD acamprosate and the antidepressant escitalopram. In this study, we investigated the effects of combining acamprosate and escitalopram on ethanol consumption in stress-induced depressed mice. Methods Forty singly-housed C57BL/6J male mice were subjected to chronic unpredictable stress. In parallel, 40 group-housed male mice were subjected to normal husbandry. After 3 weeks, depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and ethanol consumption were assessed. For the next 7 days, mice were injected with saline, acamprosate (200 mg/kg; twice/day), escitalopram (5 mg/kg; twice/day), or their combination (n = 9–11/drug group/stress group). Two-bottle choice limited access drinking of 15% ethanol and tap water was performed 3 hours into dark phase for 2 hours immediately after the dark phase daily injection. Ethanol drinking was monitored for another 7 days without drug administration. Results Mice subjected to the chronic unpredictable stress paradigm for 3 weeks showed apparent depression- and anxiety-like behaviors compared to their non-stressed counterparts including longer immobility time in the forced swim test and lower sucrose preference. Stressed mice also displayed higher ethanol consumption and preference in a 2-bottle choice drinking test. During the drug administration period, the escitalopram-only and combined drug groups showed significant reduction in ethanol consumption in non-stressed mice, while only the combined drug group showed significantly reduced consumption in stressed mice. However, such reduction did not persist into the post-drug administration period. Conclusions The combination of

  12. Metabolism and aging: effects of cold exposure on metabolic rate, body composition, and longevity in mice.

    PubMed

    Vaanholt, Lobke M; Daan, Serge; Schubert, Kristin A; Visser, G Henk

    2009-01-01

    The proposition that increased energy expenditure shortens life has a long history. The rate-of-living theory (Pearl 1928 ) states that life span and average mass-specific metabolic rate are inversely proportional. Originally based on interspecific allometric comparisons between species of mammals, the theory was later rejected on the basis of comparisons between taxa (e.g., birds have higher metabolic rates than mammals of the same size and yet live longer). It has rarely been experimentally tested within species. Here, we investigated the effects of increased energy expenditure, induced by cold exposure, on longevity in mice. Longevity was measured in groups of 60 male mice maintained at either 22 degrees C (WW) or 10 degrees C (CC) throughout adult life. Forty additional mice were maintained at both of these temperatures to determine metabolic rate (by stable isotope turnover, gas exchange, and food intake) as well as the mass of body and organs of subsets of animals at four different ages. Because energy expenditure might affect longevity by either accumulating damage or by instantaneously affecting mortality rate, we included a third group of mice exposed to 10 degrees C early in life and to 22 degrees C afterward (CW). Exposure to cold increased mean daily energy expenditure by ca. 48% (from 47.8 kJ d(-1) in WW to 70.6 kJ d(-1) in CC mice, with CW intermediate at 59.9 kJ d(-1)). However, we observed no significant differences in median life span among the groups (WW, 832 d; CC, 834 d; CW, 751 d). CC mice had reduced body mass (lifetime mean 30.7 g) compared with WW mice (33.8 g), and hence their lifetime energy potential (LEP) per gram whole-body mass had an even larger excess than per individual. Greenberg ( 1999 ) has pointed out that the size of the energetically costly organs, rather than that of the whole body, may be relevant for the rate-of-living idea. We therefore expressed LEP also in terms of energy expenditure per gram dry lean mass or per gram

  13. In Vivo Antioxidant and Hypolipidemic Effects of Fermented Mung Bean on Hypercholesterolemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Boon Kee; Ho, Wan Yong; Mohd Yusof, Hamidah; Ali, Norlaily Mohd; Jaganath, Indu Bala; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Koh, Soo Peng

    2015-01-01

    Legumes have previously been reported with hypolipidemic effect caused by the presence of flavonoid. This study was carried out to evaluate the antioxidant and hypolipidemic effects of fermented mung bean on hypercholesterolemic mice. Blood from all mice was collected and subjected to serum lipid and liver profiles biochemical analysis and quantitative RT-PCR for atherosclerosis related gene expressions. Besides, livers were collected for antioxidant assays and histopathology evaluation. Fermented mung bean was found to reduce the level of serum lipid and liver enzyme profiles of hypercholesterolemic mice. Furthermore, liver antioxidant and nitric oxide levels were also significantly restored by fermented mung bean in a dosage dependent manner. The gene expression study indicated that Apoe and Bcl2a1a were upregulated while Npy and Vwf expressions were downregulated after the treatment. The effects of fermented mung bean were greater than nonfermented mung bean. These results indicated that fermented mung bean possessed antioxidants that lead to its hypolipidemic effect on hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:26074993

  14. EFFECTS OF PARTICLES FROM TWO GERMAN CITIES ON ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF PARTICLES FROM TWO GERMAN CITIES ON ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN MICE. S. H. Gavett, L. R. Bishop, N. Haykal-Coates, J. Heinrich*, and M. I. Gilmour. Experimental Toxicology Division, ORD/NHEERL, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, *GSF, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Chi...

  15. THE EFFECTS OF HYPERTHERMIA ON SPERMATOGENESIS, APOPTOSIS, GENE EXPRESSION AND FERTILITY IN ADULT MALE MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of hyperthermia on spermatogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression and fertility in adult male mice
    John C. Rockett1, Faye L. Mapp1, J. Brian Garges1, J. Christopher Luft1, Chisato Mori2 and David J. Dix1.
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Envir...

  16. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  17. NICOTINE EFFECTS ON THE ACTIVITY OF MICE EXPOSED PRENATALLY TO THE NICOTINIC AGONIST ANATOXIN-A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considerable research has shown long-lasting effects of early exposure in experimental animals to nicotine. Anatoxin-a is produced by cyanobacteria and has been shown to be a potent nicotinic agonist. This experiment evaluated the motor activity of adult mice, and their respons...

  18. [Effect of sodium valproate on aggressive behavior of male mice with various aggression experience].

    PubMed

    Smagin, D A; Bondar', N P; Kudriavtseva, N N

    2010-01-01

    Sector of Social Behavior Neurogenetics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch, Effects of sodium valproate on the aggressive behavior of male mice with 2- and 20-day positive fighting experience have been studied. It is established that valproate administered in a singe dose of 100 mg/kg has no effect on the behavior of male mice with a 2-day experience of aggression. The treatment of mice with 300 mg/kg of valproate significantly decreased the level of aggressive motivation and the percentage of animals demonstrating attacks and threats. In male mice with a 20-day experience of aggression, valproate decreased the time of hostile behavior in a dose-dependent manner. Valproate in a single dose of 300 mg/kg significantly decreased the level of aggressive motivation, but also produced a toxic effect, whereby 73% of aggressive males demonstrated long-term immobility and 45% exhibited movement abnormalities (falls) upon the treatment. It is suggested that changes in the brain neurochemical activity, which are caused by a prolonged experience of aggression, modify the effects of sodium valproate.

  19. Neoechinulin A induced memory improvements and antidepressant-like effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki-Hamada, Sachie; Hoshi, Maho; Niwa, Yuki; Ueda, Yudai; Kokaji, Aya; Kamisuki, Shinji; Kuramochi, Kouji; Sugawara, Fumio; Oka, Jun-Ichiro

    2016-11-03

    Neoechinulin A is an isoprenyl indole alkaloid that exhibits scavenging, neurotrophic factor-like, and anti-apoptotic activities. However, the effectiveness of neoechinulin A in animal models of disease has not yet been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effects of neoechinulin A on memory impairment in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice and its antidepressant-like effects in mice. In the Y-maze test, the intracerebroventicular (i.c.v.) administration of LPS (10μg/mouse) significantly decreased spontaneous alternation behavior, which was prevented by the prior administration of neoechinulin A (300ng/mouse, i.c.v.). None of the treatments altered the locomotor activity of mice. Moreover, the administration of neoechinulin A decreased the immobility time in the forced-swim test or tail suspension test, which was prevented by the prior administration of WAY100635 (an antagonist of 5-HT1A receptors) and parachlorophenylalanine (an inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase). These results suggest that neoechinulin A improves memory functions in LPS-treated mice, and also exerts antidepressant-like effects through changes in the 5-HT system.

  20. [Evaluation of the carcinogenic effect of ceramic fibers in experiments on rats and mice].

    PubMed

    Krajnow, A; Lao, I; Stetkiewicz, J

    1997-01-01

    The carcinogenic effect of Kaowoll raw and thermally used ceramic fibres was assessed in experiments on rats and mice. The fibers were applied intraperitoneally in doses by 25 and 5 mg, and the animals were observed over their life-span. It was found that Kaowoll fibers were carcinogenic and that high temperature did not change these properties.

  1. Antitumor Effect of Zhihuang Fuzheng Soft Capsules on Tumor-Bearing Mice.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanyan; Pan, Xin; Jin, Yahong; Gao, Yingjie; Cui, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Chinese medicines (CMs) have been shown to have some advantages in preventing and controlling tumors. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of ZFSC by establishing a mouse model of HT-1080, A-549, and HCT-8 tumors. The result showed that tumor volumes of HT-1080 tumor-bearing nude mice in ZFSC low, medium, and high dose groups were lower significantly compared to the model group, and the high dose ZFSC showed the best antitumor effect. Tumor volumes of A-549 tumor-bearing nude mice in ZFSC low, medium, and high dose groups were lower significantly compared to the model group and showed a good dose-response relationship. There was no significant effect on human colon cancer, although inhibition trends disappeared in the bar chart. In order to verify the immunomodulatory effect of ZFSC, ELISA was used to analyze serums IL-2, TNF-α, and IFN in spleens. The results showed that ZFSC could enhance the immune function of tumor-bearing mice. ZFSC reduced IFN-γ and TNF-α content in the serum of HT-1080 tumor-bearing mice and inhibit PD1 and PDL1 and suggested that the antitumor mechanism of ZFSC on human fibrosarcoma could be attributed to inhibition of the PDL1/PD1 pathway.

  2. Effects of Differing Response-Force Requirements on Food-Maintained Responding in CD-1 Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarcone, Troy J.; Chen, Rong; Fowler, Stephen C.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of force requirements on response effort was examined using outbred (CD-1) mice trained to press a disk with their snout. Lateral peak forces greater than 2 g were defined as threshold responses (i.e., all measured responses). Different force requirements were used to define criterion responses (a subclass of threshold responses) that…

  3. Natural Pathogens of Laboratory Mice, Rats, and Rabbits and Their Effects on Research

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory mice, rats, and rabbits may harbor a variety of viral, bacterial, parasitic, and fungal agents. Frequently, these organisms cause no overt signs of disease. However, many of the natural pathogens of these laboratory animals may alter host physiology, rendering the host unsuitable for many experimental uses. While the number and prevalence of these pathogens have declined considerably, many still turn up in laboratory animals and represent unwanted variables in research. Investigators using mice, rats, and rabbits in biomedical experimentation should be aware of the profound effects that many of these agents can have on research. PMID:9564563

  4. [The protector effect of ribosomal preparations against experimental influenza infection in mice].

    PubMed

    Popa, L M; Repanovici, R; Iliescu, R

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted on the protective effect of some ribosomal preparations, isolated from chorionic-allantoic membranes of chicken embryos, infected or not with parainfluenza (Sendai) or influenza (AoPR8) virus, in mice experimentally inoculated with influenza virus strain AoPR8 adapted to the mouse. Results showed that the tested preparation, containing ribosomes and polysomes isolated from chorio-allantoic membranes of Sendai virus inoculated chicken embryos, ensure the mice complete protection against AoPR8 virus, if administrated before the control infection.

  5. [Anti-injure effect of extract from orange (EOP) peel on germ cells of male mice].

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Jiao, Q; Liu, T

    1998-02-01

    In present study, the anti-injure effect of EOP, on incidence of sperm abnormality and meiotic micronuclei of early spermatids in mice induced by cyclophosphamide was investigated. The results indicated that EOP itself was not a mutagen, but significantly inhibited increase of the rate of micronuclei and the sperm abnormality by CP. The rates of sperm abnormality and meiotic micronuclei of early spermatide of EOP before CP using group were lower obviously than those of CP could before EOP using group (P < 0.01). The results suggested that the CP could permeate blood-testis barrier into germ cells of male mice and induced mutation on genetic material.

  6. Effect of dehydration on erythropoiesis in mice - Relevance to the 'anemia' of space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Mice deprived of water for 24 h showed an increase in hematocrit and loss of body weight comparable to that seen in men during space flight. The increase in hematocrit was entirely due to a decrease in plasma volume and was associated with suppression of erythropoiesis, but with no significant change in the serum titer of a presumptive humoral regulator of erythropoiesis, Erythroid Stimulating Activity (ESA). Mice deprived of water for 24 h may be a useful model for the study of the early hematological effects of space flight. The suppression of erythropoiesis due to a relative erythrocytosis appears to be independent of ESA.

  7. Effect of the cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist rimonabant on inflammation in mice with diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied whether cannabinoid receptor (CB1) blockade with rimonabant has an anti-inflammatory effect in obese mice, and whether this effect depends on weight loss and/or diet consumption. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice were treated orally with rimonabant (HFD-R) or vehicle (HFD-V) for 4 we...

  8. Interventional effects of squid ink polysaccharides on cyclophosphamide-associated testicular damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Le, X Y; Luo, P; Gu, Y P; Tao, Y X; Liu, H Z

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) is a commonly used antitumour and immunosuppressive drug, but it is inevitable that the chemotherapeutic agent may cause long-term or permanent reproductive damage on young male patients through inducing oxidative stress in the testes. Squid ink polysaccharides (SIP), a newly found marine glycosaminoglycon have been proved to have antioxidant capabilities and chemotherapy-protective activities on model animals in our recent investigations. This study was conducted to assess whether or not SIP could protect male mice against gonadotoxicity during CP exposure. Sexually mature male Kunming mice were allocated to one of four groups. CP was abdominally administered at dose of 15 mg/kg body weight to two groups of mice for ten weeks, once a week, one group of mice received SIP at dose of 80 mg/kg body weight by gavage for ten weeks, once a day. The other two groups comprised a vehicle treated group and an SIP treated group. Toxicity of CP and protective activity of SIP on the testes were assessed by: sperm parameters, organ index, testicular antioxidant ability, activities of marker enzymes, sex hormone content, and histopathological features. Data showed CP-induced, serious negative changes on murine sperm parameters, organ index, testicular antioxidant ability, activities of marker enzymes, sexual hormone contents, and histopathological features which were all significantly impaired by SIP. This study found that SIP were demonstrated to offer protective effects against CP-induced toxicity on testes in mice (Tab. 2, Fig. 3, Ref. 29).

  9. Effects of repeated cycles of fasting-refeeding on brown adipose tissue composition in mice.

    PubMed

    Desautels, M; Dulos, R A

    1988-08-01

    Mice fasted for 24 h showed reductions in carcass fat and gonadal fat depots and atrophy of brown adipose tissue (BAT) that was characterized by loss of protein and succinate dehydrogenase. These changes were reversed on 24 h of refeeding. Cycling mice experienced 14 cycles of 1 day of fast followed by 2 days of refeeding, whereas control mice were fed ad libitum. Weight loss during each fast remained constant, and the animals lost and regained in excess of twice their initial weights within 6 wk. However, final weight and carcass and gonadal fat weights were similar to those of animals fed ad libitum. Total food intake was similar between cycling mice and those fed ad libitum suggesting an increase in feeding efficiency. There was no development of resistance to food deprivation since the preceding fasting experience of the animal had no effect on weight and carcass fat loss during a 24- or 48-h fast. Norepinephrine-stimulated oxygen consumption that was reduced in cycling mice was probably the result of a reduction of BAT thermogenic capacity. BAT succinate dehydrogenase content and the concentration of uncoupling protein in isolated mitochondria were significantly reduced. These changes in BAT composition were not observed when the refeeding period of each cycle was increased to 6 days. These results suggest that reduced energy expenditure in BAT may play a role in the conservation of energy during intermittent and frequent bouts of food deprivation.

  10. The effect of spatial heterogenity on the aggregation of ticks on white-footed mice

    PubMed Central

    Devevey, G.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Parasites are often aggregated on a minority of the individuals in their host populations. Although host characteristics are commonly presumed to explain parasite aggregation on hosts, spatio-temporal aggregation of parasites during their host-seeking stages may have a dominant effect on the aggregation on hosts. We aimed to quantify, using mixed models, repeatability and autocorrelation analyses, the degree to which the aggregation of blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) on white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) is influenced by spatio-temporal distributions of the host-seeking ticks and by heterogeneity among mice. Host-seeking ticks were spatially aggregated at both the larval and nymphal life-stages. However, this spatial aggregation accounted for little of the variation in larval and nymphal burdens observed on mice (3% and 0%, respectively). Conversely, mouse identity accounted for a substantial proportion of the variance in tick burdens. Mouse identity was a significant explanatory factor as the majority of ticks parasitized a consistent set of mice throughout the activity seasons. Of the characteristics associated with mouse identity investigated, only gender affected larval burdens, and body mass and home range sizes in males were correlated with nymphal burdens. These analyses suggest that aggregation of ticks on a minority of mice does not result from the distribution of host-seeking ticks but from characteristics of the hosts. PMID:22409977

  11. Effects of Agaricus blazei Murill extract on immune responses in normal BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lin, Jing-Pin; Hsia, Te-Chun; Fan, Ming-Jen; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Shen, Jiann-Jong; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-01-01

    Agaricus blazei Murill (ABM) has shown particularly strong results in treating and preventing cancer and has also traditionally been used as a food source in Brazil. However, the exact immune responses regarding the phagocytosis of macrophage and, the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in normal mice after exposure to ABM extract was unclear. The goal of this study was to investigate whether or not ABM extract can promote immune responses in normal BALB/c mice. BALB/c mice were treated with different doses of ABM extract for different time periods. The results indicated that ABM extract significantly promoted the proliferation of splenocytes both in vitro and in vivo. ABM extract promoted the levels of interleukein-6 (IL-6) and, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) but reduced the levels of IL-4 in vitro and in vivo. The percentage of macrophages with phagocytosis after ABM extract treatment increased and these effects were of dose-dependent manners, both in vitro and in vivo. YAC-1 target cells were killed by NK cells from the mice after treatment with ABM extract at 3 and 6 mg/kg/day for up to 14 days at target cell ratios of 25:1 and 50:1. Taken together, these results show that ABM extract promoted immunomodulations in normal BALB/c mice in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Ursolic acid derivative ameliorates streptozotocin-induced diabestic bone deleterious effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Su-Guo; Zhang, Cheng-Jie; Xu, Xiu-E; Sun, Ji-Hua; Zhang, Li; Yu, Peng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to investigate bone deteriorations of diabetic mice in response to the treatment of ursolic acid derivative (UAD). Methods: The biomarkers in serum and urine were measured, tibias were taken for the measurement on gene and protein expression and histomorphology analysis, and femurs were taken for the measurement on bone Ca and three-dimensional architecture of trabecular bone. Results: UAD showed a greater increase in bone Ca, BMD and significantly increased FGF-23 and OCN, reduced PTH and CTX in diabetic mice. UAD reversed STZ-induced trabecular deleterious effects and stimulated bone remodeling. The treatment of STZ group with UAD significantly elevated the ratio of OPG/RANKL. Moreover, insulin and IGF-1 showed a negative correlation with both FBG and Hb1Ac in STZ group. We attributed down-regulating the level of Hb1Ac in diabetic mice to that ursolic acid derivative could primely control blood sugar levels. After analyzing of two adipocyte markers, PPARγ and aP2, increased expression in the tibias of diabetic mice, and UAD could improve STZ-induced adipocyte dysfunction. Conclusions: These results demonstrated that UAD could ameliorate STZ-induced bone deterioration through improving adipocyte dysfunction and enhancing new bone formation and inhibiting absorptive function of osteoclast in the bone of diabetic mice. PMID:26097549

  13. alpha-Glucosidase-albumin conjugates: effect of chronic administration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.M.; Murray, L.; Bhardwaj, D.; Poznansky, M.J.

    1985-07-01

    Enzyme albumin conjugates have been proposed as a means of increasing the efficacy of enzyme use in vivo and decreasing immune response to the enzyme. Particulate drug carriers, however, have a pronounced tendency to localize in the mononuclear phagocyte (reticuloendothelial) system. The authors have examined in mice the effect on phagocytic index, tissue distribution and organ size of continued administration of conjugates of alpha-glucosidase with either homologous or heterologous albumin. Mice received 10 X 2-mg injections of bovine serum albumin (BSA) or mouse serum albumin (MSA), either free, polymerized or conjugated with alpha-glucosidase. Experiments involving BSA had to be terminated before the end of the experiment because of anaphylaxis, but these reactions were less severe to the polymerized albumin than to free albumin. Free BSA, BSA polymer and BSA-enzyme conjugates all caused a decrease in phagocytic index after six injections. Mice receiving MSA showed no evidence of anaphylaxis, but mice receiving six or more injections of free MSA, MSA polymer or MSA-enzyme conjugate had significantly decreased phagocytic indices as compared to controls. Phagocytic indices had returned to normal by 7 days after the final injection. Tissue distribution of /sup 125/I-labeled albumin preparations was determined in either naive or chronically injected mice.

  14. Effects of cinnarizine, a calcium antagonist that produces human parkinsonism, in parkin knock out mice.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Menéndez, J; Casarejos, M J; Solano, R M; Gallego, E; Sánchez, M; Mena, M A; García de Yebenes, J

    2005-08-01

    Cinnarizine, a calcium antagonist that produces parkinsonism in humans, induces behavioural changes such as alopecia, buco-lingual dyskinesia and reduction of motor activity in female parkin knock out (PK-KO) mice but not in wild-type (WT) controls. PK-KO mice have high striatal dopamine levels and increased dopamine metabolism in spite of low reduced tyrosine hydroxylase protein. Cinnarizine, which blocks dopamine receptors and increases dopamine release, further increased dopamine metabolism. PK-KO mice increased GSH levels as a compensatory mechanism against enhanced free radical production related to acceleration of dopamine turnover. Neuronal markers, such as beta-tubulin slightly increased in PK-KO and furthermore with cinnarizine. Astroglial markers were decreased in PK-KO mice, and this effect was potentiated by cinnarizine, suggesting abnormal glia in these animals. Microglia was hyperactivated in PK-KO midbrain, suggesting inflammation in these animals. Proapoptotic proteins were increased by cinnarizine and, to a lesser extent, in PK-KO mice. Our data indicate that mutation of parkin is a risk factor for drug-induced parkinsonism.

  15. The effect of brief neonatal cryoanesthesia on physical development and adult cognitive function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Janus, Christopher; Golde, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Deep hypothermia (cryoanesthesia) is often used as general anesthesia during surgery in neonatal rodents. Neonatal cryoanesthesia has been used recently to generate somatic brain transgenic (SBT) mouse models via intracerebral ventricular injection of rAAV vectors into both non-transgenic mice and numerous transgenic mouse models. Since, the evaluation of cognition is one of the main experimental endpoints in many of these studies, we examined the consequences of brief neonatal cryoanesthesia on the physical development and mnemonic function of adult mice. Two groups of 129FVBF1 pups from reciprocal breeding crosses underwent cryoanesthesia for 6 (Cryo6) or 12 (Cryo12) min, respectively, within the first hours (< 12hr) of postnatal life. A group of pups separated from the nest and kept in ambient temperature of 33 °C for 6 min served as a control. Our results revealed that lowering the temperature of pups to ~8 °C (Cryo6) or ~5 °C (Cryo12) did not affect their body weight at pre-weaning stage and in the adulthood. The evaluation of cognitive function in adult mice revealed strong and comparable to controls spatial reference, and context and tone fear memories of neonatally cryoanesthetized mice. Also, the experimental and control groups had comparable brain weight at the end of the study. Our results demonstrate that neonatal cryoanesthesia, lasting up to 12 min, has no adverse effects on the body weight of mice during development, and on their cognition in the adulthood. PMID:24239696

  16. Effect of intestinal colonisation by two Lactobacillus strains on the immune response of gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, R S; Lima, M; Gomes de Oliveira, N L; Miyoshi, A; Nicoli, J R; Neumann, E; Nunes, A C

    2014-12-01

    The effect of intestinal colonisation on the immune system was investigated in germ-free mice monoassociated with Lactobacillus strains isolated from calf faeces. Single doses of Lactobacillus acidophilus L36 or Lactobacillus salivarius L38 were administered to germ-free mice by intragastric gavage. Ten days later, the mice were euthanised. Gene expression levels of interleukin 5 (IL-5), IL-6, IL-10, IL-12b, IL-17a, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were quantified in segments of the small and large intestines by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. All the mice were colonised rapidly after Lactobacillus administration with intestinal counts ranging from 6.53 to 8.26 log cfu/g. L. acidophilus L36 administration increased the expression of cytokines involved with the Th2 (IL-5, IL-6 and TGF-β1) and Th17 (IL-17a, TNF-α and IL-6) inflammatory response, whereas L. salivarius L38 appeared to stimulate a pattern of less diversified cytokines in the intestine. Intragastric gavage of L. acidophilus L36 and L. salivarius L38 induced similar levels of colonisation in the digestive tracts of germ-free mice but stimulated different immune responses in the intestinal mucosa. The different immunomodulation patterns might facilitate the potential use of these lactobacilli as probiotics to treat distinct pathological conditions, for example protection against Citrobacter rodentium infection by stimulating IL-17 production.

  17. Effect of Leptin Replacement on PCSK9 in ob/ob Mice and Female Lipodystrophic Patients.

    PubMed

    Levenson, Amy E; Haas, Mary E; Miao, Ji; Brown, Rebecca J; de Ferranti, Sarah D; Muniyappa, Ranganath; Biddinger, Sudha B

    2016-04-01

    Leptin treatment has beneficial effects on plasma lipids in patients with lipodystrophy, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) decreases low-density lipoprotein (LDL) clearance, promotes hypercholesterolemia, and has recently emerged as a novel therapeutic target. To determine the effect of leptin on PCSK9, we treated male and female ob/ob mice with leptin for 4 days via sc osmotic pumps (∼24 μg/d). Leptin reduced body weight and food intake in all mice, but the effects of leptin on plasma PCSK9 and lipids differed markedly between the sexes. In male mice, leptin suppressed PCSK9 but had no effect on plasma triglycerides or cholesterol. In female mice, leptin suppressed plasma triglycerides and cholesterol but had no effect on plasma PCSK9. In parallel, we treated female lipodystrophic patients (8 females, ages 5-23 y) with sc metreleptin injections (∼4.4 mg/d) for 4-6 months. In this case, leptin reduced plasma PCSK9 by 26% (298 ± 109 vs 221 ± 102 ng/mL; n = 8; P = .008), and the change in PCSK9 was correlated with a decrease in LDL cholesterol (r(2) = 0.564, P = .03). In summary, in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, the effects of leptin on PCSK9 and plasma lipids appeared to be independent of one another and strongly modified by sex. On the other hand, in lipodystrophic females, leptin treatment reduced plasma PCSK9 in parallel with LDL cholesterol.

  18. An endocrinology laboratory exercise demonstrating the effect of confinement stress on the immune system of mice.

    PubMed

    Brehe, Jacqueline; Way, Amy L

    2008-06-01

    This article describes a simple laboratory exercise for examining the effect of stress on the immune system in mice. Mice are subjected to confinement stress for 1 h, after which a sample of blood is collected via the caudal vein. Blood samples are smeared onto microscope slides, air dried, and stained with Wright's Giemsa stain. When differential white blood cell counts are performed, there are noticeable differences between the neutrophil and lymphocyte counts of stressed versus control mice. The protocol is simple enough for students to perform, and the entire experiment can be completed within 3 h. Examples of ways in which the basic protocol can be modified to accommodate a shorter laboratory class are provided. This hands-on laboratory experiment provides students with experience using the scientific method to investigate the interaction between the endocrine and immune systems in response to stress.

  19. Protective Effect of Hericium erinaceus on Alcohol Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lijun; Xie, Yuxi; Wu, Guikai; Cheng, Aibin; Liu, Xiaogang; Zheng, Rongjuan; Huo, Hong; Zhang, Junwei

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Hericium erinaceus (HEM) on liver injury induced by acute alcohol administration in mice. Mice received ethanol (5 g/kg BW) by gavage every 12 hrs for a total of 3 doses. HEM (200 mg/kg BW) was gavage before ethanol administration. Subsequent serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level, aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) level, Maleic dialdehyde (MDA) level, hepatic total antioxidant status (TAOS), and activated nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) were determined by ELISA and immunohistochemistry, respectively. HEM administration markedly (P < 0.05) decreased serum ALT, AST, and MDA levels. The hepatic histopathological observations showed that HEM had a relatively significant role in mice model, which had alcoholic liver damage. In conclusion, we observed that HEM (200 mg/kg BW) supplementation could restrain the hepatic damage caused by acute alcohol exposure. PMID:25960751

  20. Preflight studies on tolerance of pocket mice to oxygen and heat. II - Effects on lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, G. A.; Corbett, R. L.; Klein, G.

    1975-01-01

    An electron microscope examination was carried out on the lungs of 11 pocket mice (Perognathus longimembris) that breathed oxygen at 10 psi or 12 psi partial pressure over a period of 7 d, at the end of which time they were decompressed to sea-level O2 pressure, either suddenly or in 30, 60, or 90 min. Vesiculation was noted in the endothelium of the alveolar-capillary wall in most of the animals and, occasionally, blebbing. Some mitochrondria were swollen in a few of the animals. Alveolar exudate was, in general, sparse. Compared with the lungs of other rodents, the lungs of pocket mice appeared relatively resistant to the toxic effects of oxygen. This conclusion needs, however, to be tempered by the fact that 5% N2 was used in the tests reported here. Nonetheless, the results suggest that the oxygen pressures anticipated on the flight of Apollo XVII should be well tolerated by the pocket mice.

  1. Effects of Kudoa septempunctata genotype ST3 isolate from Korea on ddY suckling mice

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yeounghwan; Ahn, Meejung; Bang, Hyojin; Kang, Bongjo

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of Kudoa septempunctata genotype ST3 spores on ddY suckling mice. Purified Kudoa septempunctata spores were administered into the stomachs of the mice at 5 × 106 or 5 × 107 spores/mouse, with inactivated Kudoa (5 × 106 spores/mouse) or vehicle as controls. No abnormal clinical symptoms were observed and there were no variations in fluid accumulation ratio and cytokine gene expression in all groups. In addition, intact Kudoa spores and the 18S rDNA gene were only detected (by microscopy and quantitative PCR, respectively) in the groups administered such spores. This study thus confirms that spores from the ST3 strain of Kudoa septempunctata were excreted in the faeces without infecting the gastrointestinal tract in ddY suckling mice. PMID:27067108

  2. Effects of adrenalectomy on energy balance in obese (ob/ob) mice fed high carbohydrate or high fat diets.

    PubMed

    Grogan, C K; Kim, H K; Romsos, D R

    1987-06-01

    We reported previously that adrenalectomy reduced the energy density of body weight gain (an indicator of proportional gain in lean and fat tissue) and the efficiency of energy retention in obese (ob/ob) mice to values approximating those in lean mice, but that adrenalectomy had much less influence on these parameters in ob/ob mice fed a purified high fat diet. To determine if fat was the exclusive factor in the purified high fat diet that negated effects of adrenalectomy, ob/ob mice were fed a purified high carbohydrate (glucose) diet identical in composition to the high fat diet, except for the fat/carbohydrate ratio. Responses of adrenalectomized ob/ob mice fed the purified high glucose diet from 4 to 7 wk of age mimicked those of mice fed the purified high fat diet, not those of mice fed the high carbohydrate nonpurified diet. Plasma glucose responses to a glucose load in adrenalectomized ob/ob mice paralleled the diet-dependent changes in energy balance. These results demonstrate that diet composition interacts with adrenal secretions to influence energy and glucose metabolism in ob/ob mice; consumption of either a purified high glucose or high fat diet negates the beneficial effects of adrenalectomy on energy and glucose metabolism observed when adrenalectomized ob/ob mice consume a nonpurified diet.

  3. Passive Immunization against Cachectin/Tumor Necrosis Factor Protects Mice from Lethal Effect of Endotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, B.; Milsark, I. W.; Cerami, A. C.

    1985-08-01

    A highly specific polyclonal rabbit antiserum directed against murine cachectin/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was prepared. When BALB/c mice were passively immunized with the antiserum or with purified immune globulin, they were protected against the lethal effect of the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide produced by Escherichia coli. The prophylactic effect was dose-dependent and was most effective when the antiserum was administered prior to the injection of the endotoxin. Antiserum to cachectin/TNF did not mitigate the febrile response of endotoxin-treated animals, and very high doses of endotoxin could overcome the protective effect. The median lethal dose of endotoxin in mice pretreated with 50 microliters of the specific antiserum was approximately 2.5 times greater the median lethal dose for controls given nonimmune serum. The data suggest that cachectin/TNF is one of the principal mediators of the lethal effect of endotoxin.

  4. Post-training reward partially restores chronic stress induced effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Dalm, Sergiu; de Kloet, E Ron; Oitzl, Melly S

    2012-01-01

    Reduced responsiveness to positive stimuli is a core symptom of depression, known as anhedonia. In the present study, we assessed the expression of anhedonia in our chronic stress mouse model using a subset of read-out parameters. In line with this, we investigated in how far chronic stress would affect the facilitating effect of post-training self-administration of sugar, as we previously observed in naïve mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were repeatedly and at unpredictable times exposed to rats (no physical contact) over the course of two weeks. Following novelty exploration, (non-) spatial learning and memory processes with and without post-training sugar acting as reinforcer, emotionality, reward sensitivity and corticosterone levels were determined. We found that (1) the effects of chronic stress persisted beyond the period of the actual rat exposure. (2) Post-training self-administration of sugar as reinforcer improved spatial performance in naïve mice, whereas (3) in stressed mice sugar partially "normalized" the impaired performance to the level of controls without sugar. Chronic stress (4) increased behavioral inhibition in response to novelty; (5) induced dynamic changes in the pattern of circadian corticosterone secretion during the first week after rat stress and (6) increased the intake of sucrose and water. (7) Chronic stress and sugar consumed during spatial training facilitated the memory for the location of the sucrose bottle weeks later. Concluding, our chronic stress paradigm induces the expression of anhedonia in mice, at different levels of behavior. The behavioral inhibition appears to be long lasting in stressed mice. Interestingly, sugar consumed in close context with spatial learning partially rescued the stress-induced emotional and cognitive impairments. This suggests that reward can ameliorate part of the negative consequences of chronic stress on memory.

  5. Neurodevelopmental effects of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in APOE transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Reverte, Ingrid; Domingo, José L; Colomina, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to low doses of neurotoxic pollutants during early brain development is a public health concern. Perinatal exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) has been associated with neurodevelopmental effects in infants and long-term behavioral alterations in rodents. Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) is extensively used in the industry, with its potential risk to humans still under examination. In a previous study, we found that a single postnatal administration of BDE-209 impaired spatial learning in mice at 12 months of age, but a similar alteration was present in young mice carrying a specific genotype of apolipoprotein E (apoE). On the basis of our results, the main goal of the current investigation was to assess whether the same exposure to BDE-209 would affect the neurodevelopment of apoE transgenic mice. We used a functional observational battery (FOB) to evaluate the physical and neuromotor maturation of transgenic mice carrying different apoE polymorphisms (ε2, ε3, and ε4). On postnatal day 10, BDE-209 was administered orally at 0, 10 and 30 mg/kg and neurodevelopmental screening was carried out until postnatal day 36. We observed a subtle delay in eye opening in mice carrying the apoE4 genotype. Exposure to the high dose of BDE-209 retarded the eye opening of apoE2 mice, but no other developmental features were affected. The results indicate few effects of BDE-209 during development, while the vulnerability conferred by the apoE genotype may vary depending on age. Identifying relevant early gene-environment interactions is fundamental for a better understanding of adult health and disease.

  6. Post-Training Reward Partially Restores Chronic Stress Induced Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dalm, Sergiu; de Kloet, E. Ron; Oitzl, Melly S.

    2012-01-01

    Reduced responsiveness to positive stimuli is a core symptom of depression, known as anhedonia. In the present study, we assessed the expression of anhedonia in our chronic stress mouse model using a subset of read-out parameters. In line with this, we investigated in how far chronic stress would affect the facilitating effect of post-training self-administration of sugar, as we previously observed in naïve mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were repeatedly and at unpredictable times exposed to rats (no physical contact) over the course of two weeks. Following novelty exploration, (non-) spatial learning and memory processes with and without post-training sugar acting as reinforcer, emotionality, reward sensitivity and corticosterone levels were determined. We found that (1) the effects of chronic stress persisted beyond the period of the actual rat exposure. (2) Post-training self-administration of sugar as reinforcer improved spatial performance in naïve mice, whereas (3) in stressed mice sugar partially “normalized” the impaired performance to the level of controls without sugar. Chronic stress (4) increased behavioral inhibition in response to novelty; (5) induced dynamic changes in the pattern of circadian corticosterone secretion during the first week after rat stress and (6) increased the intake of sucrose and water. (7) Chronic stress and sugar consumed during spatial training facilitated the memory for the location of the sucrose bottle weeks later. Concluding, our chronic stress paradigm induces the expression of anhedonia in mice, at different levels of behavior. The behavioral inhibition appears to be long lasting in stressed mice. Interestingly, sugar consumed in close context with spatial learning partially rescued the stress-induced emotional and cognitive impairments. This suggests that reward can ameliorate part of the negative consequences of chronic stress on memory. PMID:22745700

  7. Antidepressant-like effects of oxytocin in mice are dependent on the presence of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Loyens, Ellen; De Bundel, Dimitri; Demaegdt, Heidi; Chai, Siew Yeen; Vanderheyden, Patrick; Michotte, Yvette; Gard, Paul; Smolders, Ilse

    2013-06-01

    Oxytocin is a neuromodulator with antidepressant-like effects. In vitro, oxytocin is rapidly cleaved by insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP). Oxytocin metabolites are known to exert strong central activities that are different from the effects of the parent molecule. Our goal is to investigate in vivo whether IRAP deletion modifies the antidepressant-like effects of oxytocin. Male and female C57Bl/6 mice, IRAP wild-type (IRAP(+/+)) and knock-out (IRAP(-/-)) mice were injected subcutaneously with saline, oxytocin or oxytocin combined with angiotensin IV. One hour after injection, immobility was timed during a 5 min forced swim that was preceded by an open field to study locomotor behaviour. Oxytocin induced antidepressant-like effects in male (0.25 mg/kg oxytocin) and female (0.15 mg/kg oxytocin) C57Bl/6 mice subjected to the forced swim test. Oxytocin did not influence locomotor behaviour in mice, as shown with the open field. These findings were reproduced in transgenic male (aged 3-6 months) and female (aged 12-18 months) IRAP(+/+) mice. However, the major findings of our study were that the antidepressant-like effect was reversed in angiotensin IV treated IRAP(+/+) mice and was completely absent in age- and gender-matched IRAP(-/-) mice. The lack of an antidepressant-like effect of oxytocin in young male and middle-aged female IRAP(-/-) mice attributes an important role to IRAP in mediating this effect.

  8. Protective effect of sugar cane extract against dextran sulfate sodium-induced colonic inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Li, Yansen; Mizu, Masami; Furuta, Toma; Li, ChunMei

    2017-02-01

    Sugar cane extract (SCE) exhibits various biological effects and has been reported to enhance animal growth performance. However, the effect of SCE on inflammation in animals is still obscure. To study the effects and underlying mechanism of SCE on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colonic inflammation, forty female ICR mice (26.63±0.19g, 6-week-old) were assigned into four groups: a control group (Cont), a DSS-challenged group (DSS), a SCE-supplemented group (SCE), and a DSS+SCE group (DSS+SCE). Mice in Cont group and DSS group were fed basic diet and other mice received 1% SCE supplemented in basic diet from 6-week to 8-week-old. Mice in DSS and DSS+SCE groups were also given a 4% DSS solution from 7-week to 8-week-old via drinking water to induce colonic inflammation. After 2 weeks, mice were sacrificed and samples were collected. The results showed that dietary SCE alleviated DSS induced growth suppression, splenic damage, colonic histological changes, colonic inflammation, oxidative stress, and colonic dysfunction of tight junctions. Meanwhile, the DSS exposure activated nuclear transcription factor kappa B p65 and inhibited nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), while SCE markedly attenuated the DSS-promoted effect on the p65 nuclear accumulation and the DSS-inhibited effect on the Nrf2 nuclear accumulation. In conclusion, SCE conferred a protective role in the DSS-induced inflammation and the mechanism might be associated with the activated signals of the nuclear factor kappa B p65 and Nrf2.

  9. Hepatoprotective effects of Gentianella turkestanerum extracts on acute liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianghua; Zhu, Dandan; Ju, Bowei; Jiang, Xiangying; Hu, Junping

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the contents of secoiridoid compounds (i.e. sweroside, swertiamarin and gentiopicrin) from Gentianella turkestanerum extracts, and the potential effects of G. turkestanerum extracts against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced liver injury in mice. Methods: The contents of swertiamarin, gentiopicroside and sweroside from different G. turkestanerum extracts were determined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). CCl4 was used to induce acute liver injury in mice. The serum aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total protein (TP), total bilirubin (TB), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione transferase (GSH) and catalase (CAT) were measured. HE staining was performed to investigate the pathological changes of liver. Results: Iridoid glycoside showed the highest content in the product extracted by butanol (designated as GBA), but lower in the products extracted by ethyl acetate and water designated as GEA and GW, respectively. All G. turkestanerum extracts showed protective effects against CCl4 induced acute liver injury in mice, among which GBA showed the maximal protective effects. G. turkestanerum extracts induced significant decrease in the serum ALT, AST, ALP and TB compared with those in the mice with acute lung injury (P < 0.01). Obvious increase was noticed in serum TP (P < 0.01). Moreover, such effects presented in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with the control group, the MDA was significantly elevated in the model group (P < 0.01), while significant decrease was observed in the levels of SOD, GSH and CAT in model group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Whereas, such phenomenon was completely reversed by G. turkestanerum extracts in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: G. turkestanerum showed protective effects against CCl4 induced acute liver injury in mice. PMID:28337284

  10. Effects of bacteria‑mediated reprogramming and antibiotic pretreatment on the course of colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gardlik, Roman; Wagnerova, Alexandra; Celec, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Since the original study by Takahashi and Yamanaka in 2006, there have been significant advances in the field of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, to the best of our knowledge, all of the studies published to date are based on ex vivo gene delivery and subsequent reimplantation of the cells. By contrast, in vivo reprogramming allows the direct administration of DNA encoding the reprogramming factors into the target tissue. In our previous study we demonstrated the beneficial effects of Salmonella‑mediated oral delivery of genes into colonic mucosa as a therapy for colitis. In the present study, the effect of the bacterial vector Salmonella typhimurium SL7207, carrying a plasmid encoding the reprogramming factors Sox2, Oct3/4 and Klf4, on colitis in mice was investigated. Therapeutic intervention, consisting of repeated gavaging following the induction of colitis, did not exhibit beneficial effects. However, preventive oral administration of the therapeutic bacterial strain resulted in improvements in weight loss, colon length and stool consistency. Recently it has been shown that antibiotic pretreatment may alleviate chemically induced colitis in mice. Therefore, in the present study it was investigated whether antibiotic pretreatment of mice was able to enhance colonization of the administered bacterial strain in the colon, and therefore improve therapeutic outcome. C57BL/6 mice were administered streptomycin and metronidazole for four days, prior to multiple oral administrations of therapeutic bacteria every other day. Following three gavages, mice were administered dextran sulfate sodium in their drinking water to induce colitis. Disease activity parameters, including stool consistency, weight loss and colon length, were improved in the group receiving antibiotics and bacterial vectors. These results indicate that antibiotic pretreatment may enhance bacterial gene delivery into the colon. Furthermore, the anticipated in vivo reprogramming of colon

  11. Effects of social stress and clomipramine on emotional memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Duque, Aranzazu; Vinader-Caerols, Concepción; Monleón, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    We have previously observed impairing effects of social defeat stress (CSDS) on inhibitory avoidance (IA) in mice. Given the similarity between changes produced by social stress in animals and symptoms of certain human psychopathologies such as depression and anxiety, the effects of the antidepressant clomipramine on IA impairment produced by CSDS were evaluated in the present study. Male CD1 mice were randomly assigned to the groups: non-stressed+saline, non-stressed+clomipramine, stressed+saline and stressed+clomipramine. Stressed animals were subjected to daily agonistic encounters (10 min) in the home cage of the aggressor over a 20-day period. Just before each encounter, non-stressed and stressed mice were injected i.p. with saline or clomipramine (10 mg/kg) according to their experimental condition. 24 hours after the last CSDS session, all the mice were tested in a step-through IA task. In the IA training phase, animals were punished by a shock to the paw when they entered the dark compartment of the apparatus. In the IA test phase (one week later) the same procedure took place, but without shock. Complementary measures were obtained by evaluating all the animals in an elevated plus maze (locomotor activity and emotionality) and on a hot plate (analgesia). IA learning was confirmed in all groups except the stressed+saline group, which was the only one that exhibited higher anxiety levels. No variations were observed in either locomotor activity or analgesia. In conclusion, CSDS induces anxiety and impairs emotional memory in mice; the negative effects of CSDS on memory appear to be attenuated by clomipramine, and these detrimental effects do not seem to be secondary to the effects of CSDS on locomotor activity, emotionality or pain sensitivity.

  12. [Effect of acetylcholinesterase reactivator dosage on its effectiveness in the treatment of tabun poisoning in mice].

    PubMed

    Kassa, J

    2004-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of selected reactivators of acetylcholinesterase (obidoxime, oxime HI-6, trimedoxime) against acute tabun poisoning in dependence on their dose was examined in experiments on male mice. A comparison of the values of the medium lethal dose (LD50) of tabun in the intoxication influenced by an antidote therapy consisting of atropin and some of the oximes tested revealed that in all three oximes under study their dose markedly influenced their effect. The highest efficacy was always achieved when oximes were administered in the maximal therapeutic dose (20% of LD50). It follows from the comparison of the efficacy of equieffective doses of the oximes tested that in all doses the acute lethal effects of tabun are most effectively eliminated by trimedoxime, and on the other hand, obidoxime seems to be least effective, though in the smallest dose tested (2% of LD50) the differences between the therapeutic efficacy of the individual oximes are not statistically significant. Oxime HI-6 is significantly more effective than obidoxime (in a dose corresponding to 20% of LD50), but it is less effective than trimedoxime (in a dose corresponding to 5% LD50). The achieved results have shown that oxime HI-6, so effective against soman, another nerve agent, is not the most advantageous reactivator of acetylcholinesterase for the therapy of acute tabun poisonings, though its efficacy is partly eliminated by its possible higher dosing in human medicine due to its lower toxicity for mammals. The most suitable reactivator of acetylcholinesterase for the elimination of acute lethal toxic effects of tabun seems to be trimedoxime. Obidoxime, which is the most widely used reactivator of acetylcholinesterase in the therapy of poisonings by nerve agents at present, is, like in the case of soman poisonings, a relatively least suitable oxime ensuring the survival in lethal tabun poisonings.

  13. Protective effect of naringin against ankylosing spondylitis via ossification, inflammation and oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kang; Wu, Lianguo; Shi, Xiaolin; Wu, Fengqing

    2016-01-01

    Naringin is an abundant flavanone in pomelo, grapefruit as well as lime and its variants, has been shown to exhibit certain antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and hypoglycemic effects. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the protective effects of naringin against ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to elucidate the potential underlying mechanism. Firstly, a mouse model of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) was established. Next, osteocalcin (OC), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and triglyceride (TG) activity values, inflammatory factor and oxidative stress were evaluated in the AS mice. Then, the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein expression levels in the AS mice were investigated using western blot analysis. The results showed that naringin increased OC, ALP and TG activity values in the AS mouse model. Furthermore, inflammatory factor and oxidative stress levels in the AS mice were restrained by treatment with naringin. Furthermore, JAK2 and STAT3 protein expression levels were reduced by treatment with naringin. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the protective effects of naringin against AS are exerted via the induction of ossification, suppression of inflammation and oxidative stress and the downregulation of JAK2/STAT3 in mice. PMID:27446336

  14. Effects of fetal microwave radiation exposure on offspring behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanchun; Li, Zhihui; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Chenggang

    2015-03-01

    The recent rapid development of electronic communication techniques is resulting in a marked increase in exposure of humans to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This has raised public concerns about the health hazards of long-term environmental EMF exposure for fetuses and children. Some studies have suggested EMF exposure in children could induce nervous system disorders. However, gender-dependent effects of microwave radiation exposure on cognitive dysfunction have not previously been reported. Here we investigated whether in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz microwave throughout gestation (Days 3.5-18) affected behavior, using the open field test (OFT), elevated-plus maze (EPM), tail suspension test (TST), forced swimming test (FST) and Morris water maze (MWM). We found that mice showed less movement in the center of an open field (using the OFT) and in an open arm (using the EPM) after in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz radiation, which suggested that the mice had increased anxiety-related behavior. Mice demonstrated reduced immobility in TST and FST after in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz radiation, which suggested that the mice had decreased depression-related behavior. From the MWM test, we observed that male offspring demonstrated decreased learning and memory, while females were not affected in learning and memory, which suggested that microwaves had gender-dependent effects. In summary, we have provided the first experimental evidence of microwaves inducing gender-dependent effects.

  15. Treatment effects of Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) on streptozotocin-induced memory deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Xiaozhuan; Liu, Yumei; Shen, Guomin; Zhu, Xiaoying; Li, Sanqiang

    2017-03-08

    Increasing evidence has shown that diabetes-associated cognitive impairment is correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction and resultant synaptic injury as well as brain insulin resistance. Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1), a regulator of energy metabolism, has been shown to exhibit impressive neuroprotective effects. In this study, we evaluated the effects of CT-1 on brain pathological features in intracerebroventrical-streptozotocin (ICV-STZ)-treated mouse model, and explored its potential mechanisms. STZ was injected twice (3mg/kg, ICV) on alternate days (day 1 and day 3) in mice. Daily treatment with CT-1 (1μg/day, ICV) starting from the first dose of STZ for 14days showed that CT-1 significantly improved learning and memory deficits, alleviated mitochondrial dysfunction, and increased synaptic density in the CA1 region of the hippocampus in ICV-STZ-treated mice. Moreover, CT-1 significantly enhanced insulin signaling pathway in the hippocampus of ICV-STZ-treated mice when compared with the control. However, all the protective effects including biochemistry, pathological changes and cognitive function could be blocked by an ICV injection of Compound C, a specific AMPK inhibitor. Taken together, these results suggested that CT-1 improves pathological changes and cognitive impairments via AMPK activation in ICV-STZ mice.

  16. Effect of recombinant platelet-derived growth factor (Regranex) on wound closure in genetically diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Rodney K; Liu, Perry H; Pietramaggiori, Giorgio; Ibrahim, Shahrul I; Hechtman, Herbert B; Orgill, Dennis P

    2006-01-01

    Burns, especially those involving large surface areas, represent a complex wound healing problem. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is released by activated platelets to recruit inflammatory cells toward the wound bed. It has effects on promoting angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation. However, the effectiveness of topical PDGF on wound closure is variable, ranging from little improvement observed in pig models to dramatic improvement reported in a diabetic mouse model. Here, we sought to determine the effectiveness of commercially sold PDGF-BB (Regranex) on wound closure in genetically diabetic mice. C57BL/KsJ db+/db+ mice and its host strain bearing dorsal 1.5-cm wounds were divided into groups (n = 8 in each group) receiving topical application of either Regranex (10 microg/wound) or vehicle for 5 consecutive days after wounding. The rate of wound closure was analyzed using computerized planimetry. The amount of granulation tissue was determined histologically. Our data indicate that diabetic mice exhibit a significant delay in wound closure when compared with their host strain. Topical application of Regranex did not improve the time to wound closure but did significantly increase the amount of granulation tissue. Our current study using commercially available Regranex failed to reproduce the previously reported finding that PDGF improved wound closure in healing impaired genetically diabetic mice.

  17. Effects of fetal microwave radiation exposure on offspring behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanchun; Li, Zhihui; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Chenggang

    2015-01-01

    The recent rapid development of electronic communication techniques is resulting in a marked increase in exposure of humans to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This has raised public concerns about the health hazards of long-term environmental EMF exposure for fetuses and children. Some studies have suggested EMF exposure in children could induce nervous system disorders. However, gender-dependent effects of microwave radiation exposure on cognitive dysfunction have not previously been reported. Here we investigated whether in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz microwave throughout gestation (Days 3.5–18) affected behavior, using the open field test (OFT), elevated-plus maze (EPM), tail suspension test (TST), forced swimming test (FST) and Morris water maze (MWM). We found that mice showed less movement in the center of an open field (using the OFT) and in an open arm (using the EPM) after in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz radiation, which suggested that the mice had increased anxiety-related behavior. Mice demonstrated reduced immobility in TST and FST after in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz radiation, which suggested that the mice had decreased depression-related behavior. From the MWM test, we observed that male offspring demonstrated decreased learning and memory, while females were not affected in learning and memory, which suggested that microwaves had gender-dependent effects. In summary, we have provided the first experimental evidence of microwaves inducing gender-dependent effects. PMID:25359903

  18. Effect of ghrelin on glucose regulation in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvement of glucose metabolism after bariatric surgery appears to be from the composite effect of the alterations in multiple circulating gut hormone concentrations. However, their individual effect on glucose metabolism during different conditions is not clear. The objective of this study was to...

  19. Antagonism by d,1-propranolol of imipramine effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Souto, M; Francès, H; Lecrubier, Y; Puech, A J; Simon, P

    1979-11-23

    Three agents with known or suspected antidepressant activity, imipramine, salbutamol and dexamphetamine, were active in animal tests predictive of an antidepressant effect in man: antagonism of the hypothermia induced by reserpine, by oxotremorine or by a high dose of apomorphine, and the potentiation of the yohimbine-induced toxicity. These effects were antagonized by d,1-propranolol, suggesting that the stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors could be a common mechanism underlying their effects. These results agree with the noradrenergic hypothesis of the pathophysiology of affective disorders.

  20. Effects of Cannabis sativa extract on haloperidol-induced catalepsy and oxidative stress in the mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; El-Sayed El-Shamarka, Marawa; Salem, Neveen A; El-Din M Gaafar, Alaa

    2012-01-01

    Haloperidol is a classic antipsychotic drug known for its propensity to cause extrapyramidal symptoms due to blockade of dopamine D2 receptors in the striatum. Interest in medicinal uses of cannabis is growing. Cannabis sativa has been suggested as a possible adjunctive in treatment of Parkinson's disease. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated administration of an extract of Cannabis sativa on catalepsy and brain oxidative stress induced by haloperidol administration in mice. Cannabis extract was given by subcutaneous route at 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg (expressed as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) once daily for 18 days and the effect on haloperidol (1 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced catalepsy was examined at selected time intervals using the bar test. Mice were euthanized 18 days after starting cannabis injection when biochemical assays were carried out. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (the concentrations of nitrite/nitrate) were determined in brain and liver. In saline-treated mice, no catalepsy was observed at doses of cannabis up to 20 mg/kg. Mice treated with haloperidol at the dose of 1 mg/kg, exhibited significant cataleptic response. Mice treated with cannabis and haloperidol showed significant decrease in catalepsy duration, compared with the haloperidol only treated group. This decrease in catalepsy duration was evident on days 1-12 after starting cannabis injection. Later the effect of cannabis was not apparent. The administration of only cannabis (10 or 20 mg/kg) decreased brain MDA by 17.5 and 21.8 %, respectively. The level of nitric oxide decreased by 18 % after cannabis at 20 mg/kg. Glucose in brain decreased by 20.1 % after 20 mg/kg of cannabis extract. The administration of only haloperidol increased MDA (22.2 %), decreased GSH (25.7 %) and increased brain nitric oxide by 44.1 %. The administration of cannabis (10 or 20 mg/kg) to haloperidol-treated mice resulted in a significant decrease in brain MDA and nitric

  1. Effects of oolong tea on metabolism of plasma fat in mice under restraint stress.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hiroshi; Fukami, Harukazu; Koda, Hirofumi; Tsuruoka, Nobuo; Sugiura, Namino; Shibata, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Takaharu

    2002-09-01

    We investigated the effects of oolong tea on the basic metabolism of plasma lipids in mice under restraint stress. When a lipid emulsion (Intralipid 20%; a lipid emulsion containing 20% soybean oil) was injected intravenously into mice, the restraint stress prolonged the half-life (T 1/2) of elimination for plasma triglyceride (TG) from 28.7 to 55.5 min. The elimination rate per minute was 48.2% in stressed mice with the rate in starved control mice as 100%. Therefore, TG metabolism was disrupted by the stress, and the use of TG as an energy source decreased. We found that the metabolism of lipids significantly response to the restrained stress in the present study. Plasma TG was 515.9 +/- 29.9mg/dl 35min after Intralipid administration in control stressed mice, 478.7 +/- 26.7 mg/dl in the stressed group given caffeine 100 mg/kg of body weight, and 418.3 +/- 18.4 mg/dl in the stressed group given 1,000 mg/kg oolong tea, an improvement by 7.2% and 18.9%, respectively, with the value for the untreated control group. The intake of oolong tea alleviated the stress-induced decrease in the rate of blood lipid metabolism; this effect may have arisen from some non-specific stress-relieving property of the tea or from acceleration of lipid metabolism by properties of polyphenols, etc. in tea. Oolong tea had anti-stress effects on plasma TG metabolism, and the effects did not depend on caffeine.

  2. Effect of strawberry (Fragaria x ananasa) as antidepresant activity on mice induced by stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazar, Siti; Fitri, Lulu L.

    2015-09-01

    Depression is a physiological disorder on the brain and may induce the reduction levels of monoamine neurotransmitters, serotonin and the increased levels of stress hormone, corticosterone. The use of antidepressant drugs causing side effect, therefore natural agents are used as alternative therapy. The objectives of this study are to determine the effect of strawberries in the murine experiments in increasing serotonin level as well as decreasing in the immobility time of mice on Forced Swimming Task (FST). Forty-eight male outbreed of 4 weeks old mice strain Swiss Webster with average body weight of 18-22 grams were divided into six groups of eight mice, as follows: (1) non-stressed, (2) Chronic Mild Stressed (CMS), (3) strawberry extract (with dose of 464.1 mg/kg) and CMS, (4) strawberry extract (with dose of 928.2 mg/kg) and CMS, (5) fisetin (with a dose of 10 mg/kg) and CMS, and (6) amitriptyline (an antidepressant, with a dose of 3.25 mg/kg) and CMS as a comparison group. Chronic Mild Stress (CMS) method were used as induction of stress consisted of seven different stressors and assigned randomly for 35 days. Provision of treatment was made during the 14 days preparations on day 22 to day 35. At the end of treatments, all mice were assigned on FST test for immobility time measurements. Next, all mice were decapitated and the brains were isolated. Serotonin levels were measured using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with UV-visible light detector. The results showed that the immobility time of group mice which were given by the strawberries (928.2 mg/kg) and fisetin had shorter duration than the positive control group. Furthermore, the level of serotonin in the test group increased compared to CMS group. Corticosterone levels of treatment mice were increased significantly compared to non-stressed mice. Therefore, it can be concluded that strawberries are able to improve depressive symptoms by decreasing immobility time and increasing levels of

  3. Effect of spaceflight hardware on the skeletal properties of ground control mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Ted; Lloyd, Shane; Dunlap, Alex; Ferguson, Virginia; Simske, Steven; Stodieck, Louis; Livingston, Eric

    Introduction: Spaceflight experiments using mouse or rat models require habitats that are specifically designed for the microgravity environment. During spaceflight, rodents are housed in a specially designed stainless steel meshed cage with gravity-independent food and water delivery systems and constant airflow to push floating urine and feces towards a waste filter. Differences in the housing environment alone, not even considering the spaceflight environment itself, may lead to physiological changes in the animals contained within. It is important to characterize these cage differences so that results from spaceflight experiments can be more reliably compared to studies from other laboratories. Methods: For this study, we examined the effect of NASA's Animal Enclosure Module (AEM) spaceflight hardware on the skeletal properties of 8-week-old female C57BL/6J mice. This 13-day experiment, conducted on the ground, modeled the flight experiment profile of the CBTM-01 payload on STS-108, with standard vivarium-housed mice being compared to AEM-housed mice (n = 12/group). Functional differences were compared via mechanical testing, micro-hardness indentation, microcomputed tomography, and mineral/matrix composition. Cellular changes were examined by serum chemistry, histology, quantitative histomorphometry, and RT-PCR. A Student's t-test was utilized, with the level of Type I error set at 95 Results: There was no change in elastic, maximum, or fracture force mechanical properties at the femur mid-diaphysis, however, structural stiffness was -17.5 Conclusions: Housing mice in the AEM spaceflight hardware had minimal effects on femur cortical bone properties. However, trabecular bone at the proximal tibia in AEM mice experi-enced large increases in microarchitecture and mineral composition. Increases in bone density were accompanied by reductions in bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts, representing a general decline in bone turnover at this site

  4. Interactions between estrogen effects and hunger effects in ovariectomized female mice. I. Measures of arousal

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, Deborah N.; Dwyer, EvaRose; Johnson, Carolyn; Wittkowski, Knut M.; Pfaff, Donald W.

    2007-01-01

    Measures of arousal were used to study effects of estradiol and food restriction, and their potential interactions, in ovariectomized female C57Bl/6 mice. It was hypothesized based on a proposed theoretical equation (Pfaff, 2006) that each treatment would increase arousal-related behaviors and that their combination would further increase arousal behavior. Following baseline testing, animals (n = 28) were divided into 3 groups that, in different experimental phases, received either estradiol (in subcutaneous capsules), restricted diet (a liquid diet providing 60% of daily caloric requirements) or a combination of those two. An automated arousal behavior monitoring system was used to measure home cage voluntary motor activity and sensory responsiveness, these being components of a new operational definition of ‘generalized arousal’. Key findings: (1) During the light, all treatments reduced voluntary activity. (2) In the dark, estrogens increased, while estrogens in combination with restricted diet decreased, horizontal activity. (3) In the dark, restricted diet alone had little effect on voluntary activity, but reduced it when combined with estrogen treatment. (4) All treatments reduced responses to the olfactory stimulus. The dependence of results on time of day was unexpected. Further, different patterns of results for the three treatments suggest that estrogens and food restriction did not have equivalent or additive effects on arousal. While contrary to the main prediction, these findings are discussed in terms of the animals’ adaptive preparations for reproduction (Schneider, 2006). PMID:17868674

  5. Effect of Olea oleaster and Juniperus procera leaves extracts on thioacetamide induced hepatic cirrhosis in male albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Atef M.; Alrobai, Ali A.; Almalki, Daklallah A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Olea oleaster and Juniperus procera leaves extracts and their combination on thioacetamide (TAA)-induced hepatic cirrhosis were investigated in male albino mice. One hundred sixty mice were used in this study and were randomly distributed into eight groups of 20 each. Mice of group 1 served as controls. Mice of group 2 were treated with TAA. Mice of group 3 were exposed to TAA and supplemented with O. oleaster leaves extracts. Mice of group 4 were treated with TAA and supplemented with J. procera leaves extracts. Mice of group 5 were subjected to TAA and supplemented with O. oleaster and J. procera leaves extracts. Mice of groups 6, 7 and 8 were supplemented with O. oleaster, J. procera, and O. oleaster and J. procera leaves extracts respectively. Administration of TAA for six and twelve weeks resulted in a decline in body weight gain and increased the levels of serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin. Histopathological evaluations of hepatic sections from mice treated with TAA showed severe alterations including increase of fibrogenesis processes with structural damage. Treatment of mice with these extracts showed a pronounced attenuation in TAA induced hepatic cirrhosis associated with physiological and histopathological alterations. Finally, this study suggests that the supplementation of these extracts may act as antioxidant agents and could be an excellent adjuvant support in the therapy of hepatic cirrhosis. PMID:27081362

  6. Agonistic behavior in males and females: effects of an estrogen receptor beta agonist in gonadectomized and gonadally intact mice

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Amy E. Clipperton; Cragg, Cheryl L.; Wood, Alexis J.; Pfaff, Donald W.; Choleris, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Summary Affiliative and agonistic social interactions are mediated by gonadal hormones. Research with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) or beta (ERβ) knockout (KO) mice show that long-term inactivation of ERα decreases, while inactivation of ERβ increases, male aggression. Opposite effects were found in female αERKO and βERKO mice. The role of acute activation of ERα or ERβ in the agonistic responses of adult non-KO mice is unknown. We report here the effects of the ERβ selective agonist WAY-200070 on agonistic and social behavior in gonadally intact and gonadectomized (gonadex) male and female CD-1 mice towards a gonadex, same-sex intruder. All 15 min resident-intruder tests were videotaped for comprehensive behavioral analysis. Separate analyses assessed: 1) effects of WAY-200070 on each sex and gonadal condition; 2) differences between sexes, and between gonadally intact and gonadex mice, in untreated animals. Results show that in gonadally intact male and female mice WAY-200070 increased agonistic behaviors such as pushing down and aggressive grooming, while leaving attacks unaffected. In untreated mice, males attacked more than females, and gonadex animals showed less agonistic behavior than same-sex, gonadally intact mice. Overall, our detailed behavioral analysis suggested that in gonadally intact male and female mice, ERβ mediates patterns of agonistic behavior that are not directly involved in attacks. This suggests that specific aspects of aggressive behavior are acutely mediated by ERβ in adult mice. Our results also showed that, in resident-intruder tests, female mice spend as much time in intrasexual agonistic interactions as males, but use agonistic behaviors that involve extremely low levels of direct attacks. This non-attack aggression in females is increased by acute activation of ERβ. Thus, acute activation of ERβ similarly mediates agonistic behavior in adult male and female CD-1 mice. PMID:20129736

  7. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and antitumour effects of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin in mice.

    PubMed

    Anupama, S; Laha, Preeti; Sharma, Mamta; Pathak, Kamal; Bane, Sanjay; Ingle, Arvind D; Gota, Vikram; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Yu, Lu-Gang; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2017-04-03

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) is a lectin isolated from the fungus Sclerotium rolfsii and has exquisite binding specificity towards the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF-Ag; Galβ1-3GalNAcα-O-Ser/Thr) and its derivatives. Previous studies have shown that SRL inhibits the proliferation of human colon, breast and ovarian cancer cells in vitro and suppresses tumour growth in mice when introduced intratumourally. The present study assessed the effect of SRL on tumour growth when introduced intraperitoneally in BALB/c nude mice and investigated the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of SRL in Swiss albino mice. When 9 doses of SRL (30 mg/kg body weight/mice) was administered to BALB/c nude mice bearing human colon cancer HT-29 xenografts, a substantial reduction in tumour size was observed. A 35.8% reduction in tumour size was noted in the treated animals after 17 days. SRL treatment also inhibited angiogenesis, and the tumours from the treated animals were observed to carry fewer blood vessels and express less angiogenesis marker protein CD31, than that from the control animals. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution analysis revealed that SRL was detected in the serum after 1 h and its level peaked after 24 h. SRL was not detected in any of the organs apart from the kidney where a trace amount was detected after 24 h of SRL injection. No significant changes were observed in any of the biochemical parameters tested including SGOT, SGPT, LDH, CREAT and BUN in the SRL-treated mice compared to these levels in the controls. This suggests that SRL has good potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for cancer treatment and warrant further investigations in vivo and subsequent clinical trials.

  8. Effect of bcl-2 overexpression in mice on ovotoxicity caused by 4-vinylcyclohexene

    SciTech Connect

    Flaws, Jodi A.; Marion, Samuel L.; Miller, Kimberly P.; Christian, Patricia J.; Babus, Janice K.; Hoyer, Patricia B. . E-mail: hoyer@u.arizona.edu

    2006-08-15

    The occupational chemical 4-vinylcyclohexene (VCH) destroys small preantral ovarian follicles in mice following repeated daily dosing. The cell survival gene bcl-2 is thought to protect against follicular death during embryogenesis because primordial follicle numbers in newborn bcl-2 overexpressing (OE) mice are greater than in wild-type (WT) controls. Thus, this study was designed to determine if overexpression of bcl-2 protects against VCH-induced follicle loss during embryonic development. Pregnant bcl-2 OE or WT mice were dosed (p.o.) daily with VCH (500 mg/kg) or sesame oil (vehicle control) on days 8-18 of pregnancy. Ovaries were collected from moms and female pups on pup postnatal day (PND) 8. Nonpregnant OE and WT females were also treated with VCH (500 mg/kg p.o.) or vehicle and evaluated in the same manner. As previously reported, ovaries from PND8 OE female pups contained 50% more primordial follicles than WT pups (P < 0.05). Unlike WT pups, relative to vehicle controls, in utero exposure to VCH resulted in a reduction in primordial (25% of control), primary (38% of control), and secondary (33% of control) follicles in ovaries of OE pups (P < 0.05). VCH had no significant effect on follicle numbers in OE or WT moms. Conversely, in nonpregnant adults, VCH did not affect WT mice but caused loss of primordial (55% of control), primary (51% of control), and secondary (69% of control) follicles in OE mice (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that bcl-2 overexpression does not protect against, but instead increases susceptibility to VCH-induced follicle loss in transplacentally exposed or in nonpregnant mice.

  9. Look Different: Effect of Radiation Hormesis on the Survival Rate of Immunosuppressed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, M.; Taeb, S.; Okhovat, M.A.; Atefi, M.; Negahdari, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hormesis is defined as the bio-positive response of something which is bio-negative in high doses. In the present study, the effect of radiation hormesis was evaluated on the survival rate of immunosuppressed BALB/c mice by Cyclosporine A. Material and Methods: We used 75 consanguine, male, BALB/c mice in this experiment. The first group received Technetium-99m and the second group was placed on a sample radioactive soil of Ramsar region (800Bq) for 20 days. The third group was exposed to X-rays and the fourth group was placed on the radioactive soil and then injected Technetium-99m. The last group was the sham irradiated control group. Finally, 30mg Cyclosporine A as the immunosuppressive agent was orally administered to all mice 48 hours after receiving X-rays and Technetium-99m. The mean survival rate of mice in each group was estimated during time. Results: A log rank test was run to determine if there were differences in the survival distribution for different groups and related treatments. According to the results, the survival rate of all pre-irradiated groups was more than the sham irradiated control group (p < .05). The highest survival time was related to the mice which were placed on the radioactive soil of Ramsar region for 20 days and then injected Technetium-99m. Conclusion: This study confirmed the presence of hormetic models and the enhancement of survival rate in immunosuppressed BALB/c mice as a consequence of low-dose irradiation. It is also revealed the positive synergetic radioadaptive response on survival rate of immunosuppressed animals. PMID:27853721

  10. The Abortificient Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Lawsonia Inermis on BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Esteki, Ramin; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the traditional beliefs of certain cultures, Lawsonia inermis has been reported to cause the abortion or termination of an undesirable pregnancy. The present study was undertaken with the goal of studying the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on abortion in pregnant BALB/c mice in 2013 in Shahrekord, Iran. Methods This research study used an experimental methodology and was conducted in 2013 in Shahrekord, Iran. Forty female BALB/c mice (30–40 gm, 8–12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 4 groups. One male mouse was included for each two female mice (1:2) and they were maintained in a protective cage habitat. Pregnancy of the mice was confirmed by means of a vaginal smear. The doses of 1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg of the hydroalcoholic extract of Lawsonia inermis were injected intraperitoneally into pregnant mice beginning on the first day and continuing through the seventh day of pregnancy. The control group did not receive any treatment, but was left completely unadministered. On the eighteenth day of pregnancy, the uterine tubes of mice were removed. The subsequent embryonic absorption is considered to be an abortion. The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 22 using Fisher’s exact test and the Kruskal-Wallis H tests. Results Abortions were observed more often in the experimental groups (p< 0.01). The mean of the serum estrogen level was significantly higher in the case control groups (p< 0.01) and the mean of progesterone level was also significantly lower in the experimental groups (p< 0.01). Conclusion The use of Lawsonia inermis during pregnancy may cause abortion and therefore it should be considered as contraindication or use with caution. PMID:27504174

  11. Lactobacillus fermentum Suo Attenuates HCl/Ethanol Induced Gastric Injury in Mice through Its Antioxidant Effects

    PubMed Central

    Suo, Huayi; Zhao, Xin; Qian, Yu; Sun, Peng; Zhu, Kai; Li, Jian; Sun, Baozhong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus fermentum Suo (LF-Suo) on HCl/ethanol induced gastric injury in ICR (Institute for Cancer Research) mice and explain the mechanism of these effects through the molecular biology activities of LF-Suo. The studied mice were divided into four groups: healthy, injured, LF-Suo-L and LF-Suo-H group. After the LF-Suo intragastric administration, the gastric injury area was reduced compared to the injured group. The serum MOT (motilin), SP (substance P), ET (endothelin) levels of LF-Suo treated mice were lower, and SS (somatostatin), VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) levels were higher than the injured group mice. The cytokine IL-6 (interleukin 6), IL-12 (interleukin 12), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) and IFN-γ (interferon-γ) serum levels were decreased after the LF-Suo treatment. The gastric tissues SOD (superoxide dismutase), GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase), NO (nitric oxide) and activities of LF-Suo treated mice were increased and MDA (malondialdehyde) activity was decreased compared to the injured group mice. By the RT-PCR assay, LF-Suo raised the occludin, EGF (epidermal growth factor), EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), Fit-1 (fms-like tyrosine kinase-1), IκB-α (inhibitor kappaB-α), nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase), eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT (catalase) mRNA or protein expressions and reduced the COX-2, NF-κB (nuclear factor kappaB), and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) expressions in gastric tissues compared to the gastric injured group mice. A high concentration (1.0 × 109 CFU/kg b.w.) of LF-Suo treatment showed stronger anti-gastric injury effects compared to a low concentration of (0.5 × 109 CFU/kg b.w.) of LF-Suo treatment. LF-Suo also showed strong survival in pH 3.0 man-made gastric juice and hydrophobic properties. These results indicate that LF-Suo has potential use

  12. Effects of oral administration of titanium dioxide fine-sized particles on plasma glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ning; Hu, Hailong; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Wang, Changlin; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is an authorized additive used as a food colorant, is composed of nano-sized particles (NP) and fine-sized particles (FP). Previous study reported that oral administration of TiO2 NPs triggers an increase in plasma glucose of mice. However, no previous studies have focused on toxic effects of TiO2 FPs on plasma glucose homeostasis following oral administration. In the current study, mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs greater than 100 nm in size (64 mg/kg body weight per day), and effects on plasma glucose levels examined. Our results showed that titanium levels was not changed in mouse blood, livers and pancreases after mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs. Biochemical analyzes showed that plasma glucose and ROS levels were not affected by TiO2 FPs. Histopathological results showed that TiO2 FPs did not induce pathology changes in organs, especially plasma glucose homeostasis regulation organs, such as pancreas and liver. Western blotting showed that oral administration of TiO2 FPs did not induce insulin resistance (IR) in mouse liver. These results showed that, TiO2 FPs cannot be absorbed via oral administration and affect plasma glucose levels in mice.

  13. Effect of Colla corii asini (E'jiao) on D-galactose induced aging mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongliang; Liu, Maoxuan; Cao, Jichao; Cheng, Yanna; Zhuo, Chen; Xu, Hongyan; Tian, Shousheng; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Fengshan

    2012-01-01

    Colla corii asini (E'jiao), donkey-hide gelatin prepared by stewing and concentrating from Equus asinus L. donkey hide, is a traditional Chinese medicine preparation widely used in clinical hematic antanemic therapy in China. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential anti-aging effect of Colla corii asini and explore related mechanisms in D-galactose (gal) induced aging model mice. The mice were artificially induced aging by subcutaneously injection with D-gal at the dose of 100 mg/kg·d for 8 weeks. Colla corii asini was simultaneously treated to them once daily by intragastric gavage. Appetite, mental condition, body weight, and organ index were observed. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), as well as levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in serum, brain, and liver were determined by according assay kits. Western blotting analysis was used to detect p16 and p21 expression. Results indicated that Colla corii asini could improve appetite, mental condition, body weight, and organ condition of model mice, improve SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px activities, reduce MDA levels, and modulate age-related genes expression in D-gal induced mice. Therefore, Colla corii asini may have effect to suppress the aging process through enhancing antioxidant activity, scavenging free radicals, and modulating aging-related gene expression.

  14. Effect of dihydrotestosterone on gastrointestinal tract of male Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Karri, Sritulasi; Acosta-Martinez, Veronica; Coimbatore, Gopalakrishnan

    2010-05-01

    The cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still unknown. While research contributions identifying brain as locus of the disease is growing, evidence of severely impaired gastrointestinal (GI) functions with ageing too is accumulating, there is an equal dearth of information on GI tract in AD condition. The aim of this study was to assess the molecular, histological, morphological and microflora alterations of GI tract in male Alzheimer's transgenic mice. The present study also investigates the effect of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment (1 mg/kg) on AD mice. Histoarchitecture data revealed a significant decrease in the villi number, muscular layer thickness, villi length, width, crypt length, enterocyte length and nuclei length. A shift in colon feces microbial community composition was observed by fatty acid methyl ester analysis. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression levels in intestine significantly increased in AD mice revealing its toxicity. DHT treatment attenuated the effect caused by AD on GI morphometrics, APP expression and colon micro flora population. These results for the first time reveal the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of GI tract in male Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

  15. Preventive Effects of Salacia reticulata on Obesity and Metabolic Disorders in TSOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Akase, Tomoko; Shimada, Tsutomu; Harasawa, Yukiko; Akase, Tomohide; Ikeya, Yukinobu; Nagai, Eiichi; Iizuka, Seiichi; Nakagami, Gojiro; Iizaka, Shinji; Sanada, Hiromi; Aburada, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    The extracts of Salacia reticulata (Salacia extract), a plant that has been used for the treatment of early diabetes, rheumatism and gonorrhea in Ayurveda, have been shown to have an anti-obesity effect and suppress hyperglycemia. In this study, the effects of Salacia extract on various symptoms of metabolic disorder were investigated and compared using these TSOD mice and non-obese TSNO mice. Body weight, food intake, plasma biochemistry, visceral and subcutaneous fat (X-ray and CT), glucose tolerance, blood pressure and pain tolerance were measured, and histopathological examination of the liver was carried out. A significant dose-dependent decline in the gain in body weight, accumulation of visceral and subcutaneous fat and an improvement of abnormal glucose tolerance, hypertension and peripheral neuropathy were noticed in TSOD mice. In addition, hepatocellular swelling, fatty degeneration of hepatocytes, inflammatory cell infiltration and single-cell necrosis were observed on histopathological examination of the liver in TSOD mice. Salacia extract markedly improved these symptoms upon treatment. Based on the above results, it is concluded that Salacia extract has remarkable potential to prevent obesity and associated metabolic disorders including the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:19505975

  16. Protective effects of berberine on doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jie; Tong, Nannan; Chen, Youran; Luo, Yonghuang

    2012-01-01

    Doxorubicin, a very potent and often used anti-cancer drug, is largely limited due to the dose-related toxic effects. The present study investigated whether berberine, a natural product alkaloid, can reduce the liver injury induced by doxorubicin. Mice of either gender were randomly divided into four groups: the control group, doxorubicin group, berberine group, and berberine+doxorubicin group. In the tests, body weight, general condition and mortality of the mice were observed, and serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate transaminase levels were determined to evaluate liver function. Furthermore, the liver was excised for determination of the weight changes, as well as histopathological analysis in the tissues. Mortality rate and significant decline in body weight, and increased plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate transaminase activities were observed in doxorubicin-treated mice. These changes were significantly prevented by pretreatment with berberine. Histopathological studies showed that doxorubicin caused structural injuries, such as vascular congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, hepatocellular degeneration and necrosis, fibrosis in the liver. These histopathological changes were largely attenuated by berberine pretreatment. These findings indicate that berberine has the hepatoprotective effect on doxorubicin-induced liver injury in mice.

  17. Comparative effectiveness and molecular pharmacological mechanisms of antiallergic agents on experimental conjunctivitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, S; Merayo-Lloves, J; Zhao, T; Foster, C S

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of antiallergic agents in the treatment of experimental murine ragweed conjunctivitis. SWR/J mice were divided into eight groups: 1; normal controls (unmanipulated); 2, untreated; 3, lodoxamide; 4, cromolyn; 5, livocarbastine; 6, nedocromil; 7, buffer solution (BS); and 8, tetrandine (TDR). Groups 2-8 were exposed to ragweed pollen through topical application to conjunctival and nasal mucosa, followed by conjunctival challenge with the allergen. Allergic conjunctivitis was evaluated by scoring of the clinical signs and histopathology. mRNA gene expression of interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in conjunctiva was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction techniques. Exposed mice developed allergic conjunctivitis clinically and histologically that was modulated by topical lodoxamide, cromolyn, livocarbastine, or nedocromil eye drops or TDR intraperitoneally injected. Histopathologic analysis demonstrated that the drugs and TDR significantly reduced conjunctival eosinophil infiltration and the number of intact and degranulating mast cells. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha mRNA gene expression in conjunctiva of treated mice was inhibited compared with untreated and BS-treated controls. No IL-6 mRNA expression was observed even on the conjunctiva of the untreated mice. The antiallergic drugs and TDR exerted a similar action on the murine model of allergic conjunctivitis and demonstrated pharmacologic effectiveness on the conjunctival mRNA expression of cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha.

  18. Antispermatogenic and antifertility effects of fruits of Piper nigrum L. in mice.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Raghav Kumar; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2009-09-01

    Effect of oral administration (25 and 100 mg/kg body wt/day, for 20 and 90 days) of fruit powder of Piper nigrum L. on the male reproductive organs of mice, Parkes strain, was investigated. Various reproductive end points such as organs weight, histopathology, sperm parameters, sialic acid and fructose contents, and fertility indices were assessed. Histologically, testes in treated mice, except in those treated with 100 mg of dose for 90 days, showed non-uniform degenerative changes in the seminiferous tubules, as both affected and normal tubules were observed in the same section. In mice treated with 100 mg dose for 90 days, degenerative changes were observed in all the tubules. Affected seminiferous tubules showed intraepithelial vacuolation, loosening of germinal epithelium, occurrence of giant cells, and mixing of spermatids of different stages of spermatogenesis; in severe cases, the tubules were lined by mainly a layer of Sertoli cells. Percentage of affected tubules in testes of Piper-treated mice was dose-and duration-related. Further, Piper nigrum treatment for 20 days did not cause appreciable alterations in histological appearance of the epididymis, while the treatment for 90 days caused detectable alterations in the duct. The treatment also had adverse effects on sperm parameters, levels of sialic acid and fructose, and on litter size. Fifty six days after cessation of treatment, the alterations induced in the reproductive organs recovered to control levels, though the litter size in females impregnated by Piper-treated males remained significantly decreased compared to controls.

  19. Effect of extract of Hibiscus on the ultrastructure of the testis in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Yomna Ibrahim

    2012-07-01

    Hibiscus sabdariffa extract is a popular beverage in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. Although, Hibiscus tea is known for its medicinal effects for thousands of years, scientific evidence of its systemic safety is very limited. The current study aimed to assess the potential adverse effects of H. sabdariffa extract on sperm morphology and testicular ultrastructure of albino mice. Thirty adult male albino mice were divided into three equal groups and were given: (a) distilled water, (b) cold Hibiscus aqueous extract, and (c) boiled Hibiscus aqueous extract. Hibiscus extract was administered orally daily for 4 weeks in a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight/mouse. Twenty-four hours after the last treatment, mice were decapitated and the testes and epididymides were excised and processed for transmission electron microscopy to assess ultrastructural and sperm abnormalities. The results clearly demonstrate that aqueous extracts from dried calyx of H. sabdariffa, either cold or boiled, alter normal sperm morphology and testicular ultrastructure and adversely influence the male reproductive fertility in albino mice. The current data suggest that Hibiscus extract should be consumed with caution, and reasonable estimates of the human risk associated with its consumption should be provided.

  20. Enhancement of radiation effect by Aphanamixis polystachya in mice transplanted with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Venkatesha, Venkatasubbaiah Ashoka Kumar

    2005-01-01

    The effect of radiation on tumor tissue can be optimized by adding radiosensitizing agents, in order to achieve a greater degree of tumor damage than expected from the use of either treatment alone. The ethanolic extract of Aphanamixis polystachya (APE) was tested in Swiss albino mice transplanted with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) and exposed to various doses of gamma-radiation. EAC mice received 0, 10, 25, 50, 75, 100, 150 or 200 mg/kg body wt APE before exposure to 6 Gy gamma-radiation followed by once daily administration for another 8 consecutive days post-irradiation. The optimum radiosensitizing dose was found to be 50 mg/kg APE that was further tested in EAC mice exposed to 0, 1, 2, 4, 6 or 8 Gy hemi body gamma-radiation. The best effect of APE and radiation was observed for 6 Gy gamma-radiation. The splitting of 50 mg into two equal fractions of 25 mg and administering the split dose with a gap of 8 h on 1, 3, 5, 7 or 9 d of tumor inoculation resulted in an increased survival even when the drug was administered at late stages (day 5) of tumor development. The APE treatment before irradiation elevated lipid peroxidation followed by a reduction in the glutathione contents. Treatment of tumor bearing mice with APE before irradiation further reduced the activities of various antioxidant enzymes like glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-s-transferase, superoxide dismutase and catalase at different post last drug administration (PLDA) times.

  1. Effect of alprazolam on anxiety and cardiomyopathy induced by doxorubicin in mice.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Md Jamir; Pillai, Krishna K; Khanam, Razia; Akhtar, Mohammad; Vohora, Divya

    2012-06-01

    Anxiety following heart failure (HF) and/or myocardial infarction (MI) can impede recovery and constitute a major risk factor for further cardiac events. The present study was aimed to evaluate anxiety following doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiomyopathy, a rodent model for HF, in mice. Furthermore, the study investigated the effect of alprazolam on anxiety and cardiomyopathy in this model. The study was carried out in Swiss albino mice. DOX was used at a dose of 10 mg/kg i.v. Alprazolam was administered at doses of 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg po for 7 days' pre- and 7 days' post-DOX. Anxiety was measured on day 8 and on day 14 using elevated plus maze and Vogel's conflict test. On 14th day, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was estimated. The mice were then killed and hearts were dissected out for estimation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies. Our results showed that DOX administration induced cardiomyopathy in mice. This was evidenced by an increased serum LDH and tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) and was confirmed by TEM studies. Alprazolam treatment for 14 days dose dependently reversed DOX-induced increase in LDH and MDA as well as the morphological alterations induced by DOX in TEM studies. Furthermore, alprazolam also reversed the anxiety-like effects induced by DOX in both the tests for anxiety. Thus, alprazolam appears to be a good candidate for alleviating anxiety in patients following MI or HF.

  2. Hypoglycemic Effect of Jicama (Pachyrhizus erosus) Extract on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Joo; Han, Ji-Sook

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the inhibitory effect of jicama extract on α-glucosidase activity, α-amylase activity, and postprandial hyperglycemia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Jicama extract showed prominent inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase and α-amylase. The IC50 values of jicama extract against α-glucosidase and α-amylase were 0.083±0.004 and 0.091±0.017 mg/mL, respectively. The increase in postprandial blood glucose levels was more significantly suppressed in the jicama extract-administered group than in the control group of both STZ-induced diabetic and normal mice. Blood glucose levels of the control group increased to 383.75±11.54 and 402.50±15.32 mg/dL at 30 and 60 min after a meal and decreased to 349.67±11.62 mg/dL at 120 min. However, postprandial blood glucose levels were significantly decreased, when diabetic mice were fed with jicama extract (342.00±15.73, 367.00±13.00, and 329.67±12.43 mg/dL at 30, 60, and 120 min, respectively). Furthermore, the area under the curve was significantly decreased with jicama extract administration in diabetic mice (P<0.05). Therefore, these results indicate that jicama extract may help decrease postprandial blood glucose level by inhibiting α-glucosidase.

  3. Capparis spinosa L. aqueous extract evokes antidiabetic effect in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Eddouks, Mohamed; Lemhadri, Ahmed; Hebi, Morad; EL Hidani, Ahmed; Zeggwagh, Naoufel Ali; EL Bouhali, Bachir; Hajji, Lhoussaine; Burcelin, Remy

    2017-01-01

    Objective: As the aqueous extract of Capparis spinosa (CS) possess antidiabetic effect, he present study aims to reveal the possible mechanism of action of CS in diabetic mice. Materials and Methods: Both single and repeated oral administrations of aqueous extract of CS were performed in multi-low dose streptozotocin-induced (MLDS) diabetic mice. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp was used in association with the endogenous glucose production (perfusion rate of 3-3H glucose) to evaluate the effect of CS aqueous extract on insulin sensitivity. Results: Our study showed that aqueous extract of CS possess a potent hypoglycaemic activity in MLDS diabetic mice. Furthermore, the analysis perfusion of 3-3H glucose demonstrated the parallel decrease of basal endogenous glucose production (EGP) with the hypoglycaemic activity. EGP was lower in CS-Treated group when compared to the control group (p<0.001). The euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique demonstrated that CS treatment improves insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues. Conclusion: We conclude that the antihyperglycemic effet CS is probably due to the inhibition of basal endogenous glucose production and the improvement of insulin sensitivity in MLDS diabetic mice. PMID:28348974

  4. Effects of slanted ergonomic mice on task performance and subjective responses.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kihyo

    2014-05-01

    The biomechanical benefits (e.g., muscular activity) of slanted ergonomic mice have been comprehensively identified; however, their effects on task performance and subjective responses have not been fully investigated. The present study examined the effects of two slanted mice (slant angle = 30° and 50°) in comparison with a conventional mouse (slant angle = 0°) in terms of task performance (task completion time and error rate) and subjective responses (perceived discomfort score and overall satisfaction score). Experimental results showed that all of the task and subjective measures worsened as the slant angle of the target mice increases. For example, the task completion time (unit: ms) and overall satisfaction score (unit: point) of the 30° slanted mouse (time = 0.71, satisfaction = -0.09) and 50° slanted mouse (time = 0.73, satisfaction = -0.79) significantly deteriorated than the conventional mouse (time = 0.65, satisfaction = 1.21). The slanted mice seem to compromise biomechanical benefits with task performance and subjective responses.

  5. Contrasting effects of diazepam and repeated restraint stress on latent inhibition in mice.

    PubMed

    Mongeau, Raymond; Marcello, Stefania; Andersen, Jacob Sparre; Pani, Luca

    2007-11-02

    The effects on latent inhibition (LI; a delay in conditioning when a CS has been pre-exposed without consequences) of repeated restraint stress and the anxiolytic drug diazepam were examined in C57BL/6 mice to know whether previous aversive events or anxiolysis are factors determining the expression of LI. The LI model was optimized for this strain particularly sensitive to stress (using both the CER and the conditioned freezing procedures) and characterized with typical (haloperidol) and atypical (clozapine and olanzapine) antipsychotic drugs administered either during the conditioning or the pre-exposure phases. An acute challenge with amphetamine, a dopamine releaser, was done to verify the enhancement of hyperactivity in C57BL/6 mice after the restraint stress sensitization. At all doses tested, diazepam decreased latent inhibition when administered during the pre-exposure phase (similarly to atypical antipsychotic drugs). Repeated restraint stress enhanced LI by blocking the CS-induced freezing in pre-exposed mice. In contrast, pre-treatment with diazepam before pre-exposure allowed the expression of CS-induced freezing in stressed mice pre-exposed to the tone. It is suggested that stress and anxiolytic drugs can have opposite effects on attention or perseveration processes during learning of conflicting contingency responses.

  6. Effects of shikonin isolated from zicao on lupus nephritis in NZB/W F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin Chang; Feng, Jian; Huang, Feng; Fan, Yong Sheng; Wang, Yan Yan; Cao, Ling Yong; Wen, Cheng Pin

    2009-09-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the potential protective effects of Shikonin extracted from Zicao on lupus nephritis (LN) using NZB/W F1 mice. Oral administration of Shikonin (24, 40 mg/kg body weight/d) or vehicle was applied to sixty female NZB/W F1 mice of 28-week-old with LN. Treatment with Shikonin for 14 weeks suppressed proteinuria dose-dependently with the mean proteinuria of 274.0 mg/dl and 160.3 mg/dl for low-dose and high-dose Shikonin groups, respectively, compared to 499.2 mg/dl for the vehicle. Also, Shikonin was observed to reduce circulating adhesion molecules significantly and down-regulate intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA expression in kidney. However, anti-double stranded (ds)DNA antibody in mice with low or high Shikonin dose administration both exhibited no significant elevation, differing from vehicle group. Kidney histological examination showed that renal glomerular lesions were alleviated after Shikonin application. These results suggest that Shikonin has therapeutic effects on LN in NZB/W F1 mice, to which inhibition of anti-dsDNA may be potential contribution, and its part mechanism is related to suppression of mRNA expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in the kidney.

  7. Increased human AP endonuclease 1 level confers protection against the paternal age effect in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Jamila R.; Reddick, Traci L.; Perez, Marissa; Centonze, Victoria E.; Mitra, Sankar; Izumi, Tadahide; McMahan, C. Alex; Walter, Christi A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased paternal age is associated with a greater risk of producing children with genetic disorders originating from de novo germline mutations. Mice mimic the human condition by displaying an age-associated increase in spontaneous mutant frequency in spermatogenic cells. The observed increase in mutant frequency appears to be associated with a decrease in the DNA repair protein, AP endonuclease1 (APEX1) and Apex1 heterozygous mice display an accelerated paternal age effect as young adults. In this study, we directly tested if APEX1 over-expression in cell lines and transgenic mice could prevent increases in mutagenesis. Cell lines with ectopic expression of APEX1 had increased APEX1 activity and lower spontaneous and induced mutations in the lacI reporter gene relative to the control. Spermatogenic cells obtained from mice transgenic for human APEX1 displayed increased APEX1 activity, were protected from the age-dependent increase in spontaneous germline mutagenesis, and exhibited increased apoptosis in the spermatogonial cell population. These results directly indicate that increases in APEX1 level confer protection against the murine paternal age effect, thus highlighting the role of APEX1 in preserving reproductive health with increasing age and in protection against genotoxin-induced mutagenesis in somatic cells. PMID:26201249

  8. Sex-Dependent Effects of HO-1 Deletion from Adipocytes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosick, Peter A.; Weeks, Mary Frances; Hankins, Michael W.; Moore, Kyle H.; Stec, David E.

    2017-01-01

    Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been demonstrated to decrease body weight and improve insulin sensitivity in several models of obesity in rodents. To further study the role of HO-1 in adipose tissue, we created an adipose-specific HO-1 knockout mouse model. Male and female mice were fed either a control or a high-fat diet for 30 weeks. Body weights were measured weekly and body composition, fasting blood glucose and insulin levels were determined every six weeks. Adipocyte-specific knockout of HO-1 had no significant effect on body weight in mice fed a high-fat diet but increased body weight in female mice fed a normal-fat diet. Although body weights were not different in females fed a high fat diet, loss of HO-1 in adipocytes resulted in significant alterations in body composition. Adipose-specific HO-1 knockout resulted in increased fasting hyperglycemia and insulinemia in female but not male mice on both diets. Adipose-specific knockout of HO-1 resulted in a significant loss of HO activity and a decrease in the protein levels of adiponectin in adipose tissue. These results demonstrate that loss of HO-1 in adipocytes has greater effects on body fat and fasting hyperglycemia in a sex-dependent fashion and that expression of HO-1 in adipose tissue may have a greater protective role in females as compared to males. PMID:28287466

  9. Sex differences and hormonal effects on gut microbiota composition in mice

    PubMed Central

    Org, Elin; Mehrabian, Margarete; Parks, Brian W.; Shipkova, Petia; Liu, Xiaoqin; Drake, Thomas A.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously reported quantitation of gut microbiota in a panel of 89 different inbred strains of mice, and we now examine the question of sex differences in microbiota composition. When the total population of 689 mice was examined together, several taxa exhibited significant differences in abundance between sexes but a larger number of differences were observed at the single strain level, suggesting that sex differences can be obscured by host genetics and environmental factors. We also examined a subset of mice on chow and high fat diets and observed sex-by-diet interactions. We further investigated the sex differences using gonadectomized and hormone treated mice from 3 different inbred strains. Principal coordinate analysis with unweighted UniFrac distances revealed very clear effects of gonadectomy and hormone replacement on microbiota composition in all 3 strains. Moreover, bile acid analyses showed gender-specific differences as well as effects of gonodectomy, providing one possible mechanism mediating sex differences in microbiota composition. PMID:27355107

  10. Thyroxine modifies the effects of growth hormone in Ames dwarf mice

    PubMed Central

    Do, Andrew; Menon, Vinal; Zhi, Xu; Gesing, Adam; Wiesenborn, Denise S.; Spong, Adam; Sun, Liou; Bartke, Andrzej; Masternak, Michal M.

    2015-01-01

    Ames dwarf (df/df) mice lack growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone and prolactin. Treatment of juvenile df/df mice with GH alone stimulates somatic growth, reduces insulin sensitivity and shortens lifespan. Early‐life treatment with thyroxine (T4) alone produces modest growth stimulation but does not affect longevity. In this study, we examined the effects of treatment of juvenile Ames dwarf mice with a combination of GH + T4 and compared them to the effects of GH alone. Treatment of female and male dwarfs with GH + T4 between the ages of 2 and 8 weeks rescued somatic growth yet did not reduce lifespan to match normal controls, thus contrasting with the previously reported effects of GH alone. While the male dwarf GH + T4 treatment group had no significant effect on lifespan, the female dwarfs undergoing treatment showed a decrease in maximal longevity. Expression of genes related to GH and insulin signaling in the skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue (WAT) of female dwarfs was differentially affected by treatment with GH + T4 vs. GH alone. Differences in the effects of GH + T4 vs. GH alone on insulin target tissues may contribute to the differential effects of these treatments on longevity. PMID:25935838

  11. Beneficial effect of melatonin treatment on inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress on pancreas of a senescence accelerated mice model.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Sara; Kireev, Roman; García, Cruz; Forman, Katherine; Escames, Germaine; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2011-01-01

    This study has investigated the effect of aging on parameters of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in pancreas obtained from two types of male mice models: senescence-accelerated prone (SAMP8) and resistant mice (SAMR1). Animals of 2 (young) and 10 months of age (old) were used (n = 64). The influence of the administration of melatonin in the drinking water for one month at two different dosages (1 and 10mg/(kg day) on old SAMP8 mice on these parameters was also studied. SAMP8 mice showed with age a significant increase in the relative expression of pancreatic genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Furthermore the protein expression of several NFκB subunits was also enhanced. On the contrary aged SAMR1 mice did not show significant increases in these parameters. Melatonin administration to SAMP8 mice was able to reduce these age related alterations at the two used dosages.

  12. Effect on the immune system of mice exposed chronically to 50 Hz amplitude-modulated 2.45 GHz microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Elekes, E.; Thuroczy, G.; Szabo, L.D.

    1996-12-01

    The effect of continuous (CW; 2.45 GHz carrier frequency) or amplitude-modulated (AM; 50 Hz square wave) microwave radiation on the immune response was tested. CW exposures (6 days, 3 h/day) induced elevations of the number of antibody-producing cells in the spleen of male Balb/c mice (+37%). AM microwave exposure induced elevation of the spleen index (+15%) and antibody-producing cell number (+55%) in the spleen of male mice. No changes were observed in female mice. It is concluded that both types of exposure conditions induced moderate elevation of antibody production only in male mice.

  13. Effects of velvet antler polypeptide on sexual behavior and testosterone synthesis in aging male mice

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Zhi-Jun; Tang, Hong-Feng; Tuo, Ying; Xing, Wei-Jie; Ji, Su-Yun; Gao, Yong; Deng, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-four-month-old male C57BL/6 mice with low serum testosterone levels were used as a late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) animal model for examining the effects of velvet antler polypeptide (VAP) on sexual function and testosterone synthesis. These mice received VAP for 5 consecutive weeks by daily gavage at doses of 100, 200, or 300 mg kg−1 body weight per day (n = 10 mice per dose). Control animals (n = 10) received the same weight-based volume of vehicle. Sexual behavior and testosterone levels in serum and interstitial tissue of testis were measured after the last administration of VAP. Furthermore, to investigate the mechanisms of how VAP affects sexual behavior and testosterone synthesis in vivo, the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) in Leydig cells was also measured by immunofluorescence staining and quantitative real-time PCR. As a result, VAP produced a significant improvement in the sexual function of these aging male mice. Serum testosterone level and intratesticular testosterone (ITT) concentration also increased in the VAP-treated groups. The expression of StAR, P450scc, and 3β-HSD was also found to be enhanced in the VAP-treated groups compared with the control group. Our results suggested that VAP was effective in improving sexual function in aging male mice. The effect of velvet antler on sexual function was due to the increased expression of several rate-limiting enzymes of testosterone synthesis (StAR, P450scc, and 3β-HSD) and the following promotion of testosterone synthesis in vivo. PMID:26608944

  14. Effects of Combination of Thiazolidinediones with Melatonin in Dexamethasone-induced Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghaisas, M. M.; Ahire, Y. S.; Dandawate, P. R.; Gandhi, S. P.; Mule, M.

    2011-01-01

    In type 2 Diabetes, oxidative stress plays an important role in development and aggregation of insulin resistance. In the present study, long term administration of the dexamethasone led to the development of insulin resistance in mice. The effect of thiazolidinediones pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, with melatonin on dexamethasone-induced insulin resistance was evaluated in mice. Insulin resistant mice were treated with combination of pioglitazone (10 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day, p.o.) with melatonin 10 mg/kg/day p.o. from day 7 to day 22. In the biochemical parameters, the serum glucose, triglyceride levels were significantly lowered (P<0.05) in the combination groups as compared to dexamethasone treated group as well as with individual groups of pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, and melatonin. There was also, significant increased (P<0.05) in the body weight gain in combination treated groups as compared to dexamethasone as well as individual groups. The combination groups proved to be effective in normalizing the levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase and lipid peroxidation in liver homogenates may be due to antioxidant effects of melatonin and decreased hyperglycemia induced insulin resistance by thiazolidinediones. The glucose uptake in the isolated hemidiaphragm of mice was significantly increased in combination treated groups (PM and RM) than dexamethasone alone treated mice as well as individual (pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, melatonin) treated groups probably via increased in expression of GLUT-4 by melatonin and thiazolidinediones as well as increased in insulin sensitivity by thiazolidinediones. Hence, it can be concluded that combination of pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, thiazolidinediones, with melatonin may reduces the insulin resistance via decreased in oxidative stress and control on hyperglycemia. PMID:23112392

  15. Contribution of dopamine neurotransmission in proconvulsant effect of Toxoplasma gondii infection in male mice.

    PubMed

    Babaie, Jalal; Sayyah, Mohammad; Fard-Esfahani, Pezhman; Golkar, Majid; Gharagozli, Kourosh

    2017-03-07

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders worldwide with no distinguishable cause in 60% of patients. One-third of world's population is infected with Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). This intracellular parasite has high tendency to excitable cells including neurons. We assessed seizure susceptibility and involvement of dopaminergic system in male mice with acute and chronic T. gondii infection. Mice were infected by intraperitoneal injection of T. gondii cysts. Acute and chronic stages of infection were determined by quantification of SAG1/BAG1 transcripts and level of repetitive REP-529 sequence in the brain of mice by real-time PCR. Threshold of clonic seizures was measured by tail vein infusion of pentylenetetrazole. The infected mice were pretreated with D1 and D2 dopamine receptor antagonists, and seizure threshold was measured. Moreover, seizure threshold was determined after treatment of toxoplasmosis by sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. SAG1 level reached the maximum at week 2 after infection and then declined. The maximum level of BAG1 was observed at the week 3 and preserved till the week 8. REP-529 was detected at first week after infection, reached maximum at the week 3 and kept at this level till the eighth week. Threshold of seizures significantly decreased in both acute and chronic phases of infection. D1 and D2 receptors antagonists inhibited proconvulsant effect of toxoplasmosis. Chemotherapy inhibited parasite growth and multiplication, and returned seizure susceptibility to the level of non-infected mice. Dopaminergic neurotransmission participates in proconvulsant effect of T. gondii. The effect of parasite is eliminated by antibiotic therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effects of Combination of Thiazolidinediones with Melatonin in Dexamethasone-induced Insulin Resistance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghaisas, M M; Ahire, Y S; Dandawate, P R; Gandhi, S P; Mule, M

    2011-11-01

    In type 2 Diabetes, oxidative stress plays an important role in development and aggregation of insulin resistance. In the present study, long term administration of the dexamethasone led to the development of insulin resistance in mice. The effect of thiazolidinediones pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, with melatonin on dexamethasone-induced insulin resistance was evaluated in mice. Insulin resistant mice were treated with combination of pioglitazone (10 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day, p.o.) with melatonin 10 mg/kg/day p.o. from day 7 to day 22. In the biochemical parameters, the serum glucose, triglyceride levels were significantly lowered (P<0.05) in the combination groups as compared to dexamethasone treated group as well as with individual groups of pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, and melatonin. There was also, significant increased (P<0.05) in the body weight gain in combination treated groups as compared to dexamethasone as well as individual groups. The combination groups proved to be effective in normalizing the levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase and lipid peroxidation in liver homogenates may be due to antioxidant effects of melatonin and decreased hyperglycemia induced insulin resistance by thiazolidinediones. The glucose uptake in the isolated hemidiaphragm of mice was significantly increased in combination treated groups (PM and RM) than dexamethasone alone treated mice as well as individual (pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, melatonin) treated groups probably via increased in expression of GLUT-4 by melatonin and thiazolidinediones as well as increased in insulin sensitivity by thiazolidinediones. Hence, it can be concluded that combination of pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, thiazolidinediones, with melatonin may reduces the insulin resistance via decreased in oxidative stress and control on hyperglycemia.

  17. Effects of velvet antler polypeptide on sexual behavior and testosterone synthesis in aging male mice.

    PubMed

    Zang, Zhi-Jun; Tang, Hong-Feng; Tuo, Ying; Xing, Wei-Jie; Ji, Su-Yun; Gao, Yong; Deng, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-four-month-old male C57BL/6 mice with low serum testosterone levels were used as a late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) animal model for examining the effects of velvet antler polypeptide (VAP) on sexual function and testosterone synthesis. These mice received VAP for 5 consecutive weeks by daily gavage at doses of 100, 200, or 300 mg kg-1 body weight per day (n = 10 mice per dose). Control animals (n = 10) received the same weight-based volume of vehicle. Sexual behavior and testosterone levels in serum and interstitial tissue of testis were measured after the last administration of VAP. Furthermore, to investigate the mechanisms of how VAP affects sexual behavior and testosterone synthesis in vivo, the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) in Leydig cells was also measured by immunofluorescence staining and quantitative real-time PCR. As a result, VAP produced a significant improvement in the sexual function of these aging male mice. Serum testosterone level and intratesticular testosterone (ITT) concentration also increased in the VAP-treated groups. The expression of StAR, P450scc, and 3β-HSD was also found to be enhanced in the VAP-treated groups compared with the control group. Our results suggested that VAP was effective in improving sexual function in aging male mice. The effect of velvet antler on sexual function was due to the increased expression of several rate-limiting enzymes of testosterone synthesis (StAR, P450scc, and 3β-HSD) and the following promotion of testosterone synthesis in vivo.

  18. Preventive Effect of Lactobacillus fermentum Zhao on Activated Carbon-Induced Constipation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Qian, Yu; Suo, Huayi; Du, Muying; Li, Guijie; Liu, Zhenhu; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus fermentum Zhao (LF-Zhao) on activated carbon-induced constipation in ICR mice. ICR mice were administered lactic acid bacteria by gavage for 9 d. Body weight, diet intake, drinking amount, stool status, gastrointestinal transit distance and stool time, in addition to motilin (MTL), gastrin (Gas), endothelin (ET), somatostatin (SS), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) levels in serum were monitored to evaluate the preventive effects of LF-Zhao on constipation. Bisacodyl, a laxative drug, was used as a positive control. Times to the first black stool for normal (untreated), control (no lactic acid bacteria treatment but activated carbon treated), bisacodyl-treated and L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (LB), LF-Zhao (L) (low concentration of 1×10(8) CFU/mL)- and LF-Zhao (H) (high concentration of 1×10(9) CFU/mL)-treated mice induced by activated carbon were 90, 218, 117, 180, 169 and 156 min, respectively. Following the consumption of LB, LF-Zhao (L) and LF-Zhao (H) or the oral administration of bisacodyl, the gastrointestinal transit distances were reduced by 55.2%, 61.3%, 70.6% and 94.6%, respectively. The serum levels of MTL, Gas, ET, AChE, SP and VIP were significantly increased and the serum levels of SS were reduced in the mice treated with LF-Zhao compared with those in the control mice (p<0.05). These results demonstrated that lactic acid bacteria demonstrate preventive effects on mouse constipation and that LF-Zhao alleviated constipation symptoms better than LB.

  19. Characterization of Soy Biodiesel Exhaust and Toxicological Effects in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although biofuel use across the world is increasing, very little is known about possible health effects resulting from biofuel exhaust (BE) from this relatively new source of transportation fuel. The U.S. EPA has instigated an in vivo screening approach in rodents to examine whet...

  20. Betaine supplementation is less effective than methionine restriction in correcting phenotypes of CBS deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sapna; Wang, Liqun; Kruger, Warren D

    2016-01-01

    Cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) deficiency is a recessive inborn error of metabolism characterized by elevated serum total homocysteine (tHcy). Betaine supplementation, which can lower tHcy by stimulating homocysteine remethylation to methionine, is often given to CBS deficient patients in combination with other treatments such as methionine restriction and supplemental B-vitamins. However, the effectiveness of betaine supplementation by itself in the treatment of CBS deficiency has not been well explored. Here, we have examined the effect of a betaine supplemented diet on the Tg-I278T Cbs (-/-) mouse model of CBS deficiency and compared its effectiveness to our previously published data using a methionine restricted diet. Tg-I278T Cbs (-/-) mice on betaine, from the time of weaning until for 240 days of age, had a 40 % decrease in mean tHcy level and a 137 % increase in serum methionine levels. Betaine-treated Tg-I278T Cbs (-/-) mice also exhibited increased levels of betaine-dependent homocysteine methyl transferase (BHMT), increased levels of the lipogenic enzyme stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD-1), and increased lipid droplet accumulation in the liver. Betaine supplementation largely reversed the hair loss phenotype in Tg-I278T Cbs (-/-) animals, but was far less effective than methionine restriction in reversing the weight-loss, fat-loss, and osteoporosis phenotypes. Surprisingly, betaine supplementation had several negative effects in control Tg-I278T Cbs (+/-) mice including decreased weight gain, lean mass, and bone mineral density. Our findings indicate that while betaine supplementation does have some beneficial effects, it is not as effective as methionine restriction for reversing the phenotypes associated with severe CBS deficiency in mice.

  1. The beneficial effects of exercise on cartilage are lost in mice with reduced levels of ECSOD in tissues.

    PubMed

    Pate, Kathryn M; Sherk, Vanessa D; Carpenter, R Dana; Weaver, Michael; Crapo, Silvia; Gally, Fabienne; Chatham, Lillian S; Goldstrohm, David A; Crapo, James D; Kohrt, Wendy M; Bowler, Russell P; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Regan, Elizabeth A

    2015-03-15

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased mechanical damage to joint cartilage. We have previously found that extracellular superoxide dismutase (ECSOD) is decreased in OA joint fluid and cartilage, suggesting oxidant damage may play a role in OA. We explored the effect of forced running as a surrogate for mechanical damage in a transgenic mouse with reduced ECSOD tissue binding. Transgenic mice heterozygous (Het) for the human ECSOD R213G polymorphism and 129-SvEv (wild-type, WT) mice were exposed to forced running on a treadmill for 45 min/day, 5 days/wk, over 8 wk. At the end of the running protocol, knee joint tissue was obtained for histology, immunohistochemistry, and protein analysis. Sedentary Het and WT mice were maintained for comparison. Whole tibias were studied for bone morphometry, finite element analysis, and mechanical testing. Forced running improved joint histology in WT mice. However, when ECSOD levels were reduced, this beneficial effect with running was lost. Het ECSOD runner mice had significantly worse histology scores compared with WT runner mice. Runner mice for both strains had increased bone strength in response to the running protocol, while Het mice showed evidence of a less robust bone structure in both runners and untrained mice. Reduced levels of ECSOD in cartilage produced joint damage when joints were stressed by forced running. The bone tissues responded to increased loading with hypertrophy, regardless of mouse strain. We conclude that ECSOD plays an important role in protecting cartilage from damage caused by mechanical loading.

  2. Neonatal thymulin gene therapy in nude mice: Effects on the morphology of the pituitary corticotrope population.

    PubMed

    Martines, Eliana; Reggiani, Paula C; Schwerdt, José I; Goya, Rodolfo G; Cónsole, Gloria

    2011-04-01

    The integrity of the thymus during early life is necessary for a proper maturation of the neuroendocrine system, including the adrenal axis. The thymic metallopeptide thymulin seems to be a central physiologic mediator of thymus-pituitary communication. Furthermore, neonatal thymulin gene therapy has been shown to prevent the typical alterations of gonadotrophic cell number and morphology and serum gonadotropin levels in nude female mice. In the present study we assessed the impact of athymia and the effect of neonatal thymulin gene therapy on the corticotropic cell population in nude mice. The effect of thymulin administration to adult nudes on their hypothalamic content of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and the adrenal content of corticosterone was also determined. We used an adenoviral vector expressing a synthetic gene for the thymic peptide thymulin (metFTS) termed RAd-FTS. On postnatal day 1 or 2, heterozygous (nu/+) and homozygous (nu/nu) pups of both sexes received a single bilateral i.m. injection of RAd-FTS or RAd-GFP, a control vector. On postnatal day 71, mice were bled and sacrificed, and their pituitaries were immediately dissected, fixed and immunostained for corticotropin. Morphometry was performed by means of an image-analysis system. The following parameters were calculated: volume density (VD: Σ cell area/reference area), cell density (CD: number of cells/reference area), and cell surface (CS: expressed in μm²). Serum thymulin levels were measured by a bioassay, and CRH as well as corticosterone were determined by IRMA and RIA, respectively. Neonatal thymulin gene therapy in the athymic mice restored their serum thymulin levels and increased corticotrope CD, VD and CS in both control and athymic mice. Athymic mice showed only a marginal reduction in corticotrope CD, VD and CS. In these mutants hypothalamic CRH content was slightly increased, whereas adrenal corticosterone tended to be lower. Thymulin administration to adult mice tended

  3. Effects of taurine on tolerance to and dependence on morphine in mice.

    PubMed

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L

    1984-02-01

    The effects of taurine on the analgesic response to morphine, on the intensity of tolerance and on physical dependence were examined. Taurine induced a hyperalgesic state and attenuated morphine analgesia in mice. The hyperalgesia was maximal at a dose level of 1.5 mg/kg i.p., while the effects of higher doses (6.0 and 10.0 mg/kg) were masked by a depression of the animals' gross behavior. Taurine induced a dose related antagonism of morphine tolerance. The amino acid administered 30 min before naloxone, produced a partial reduction in the abstinence signs in the chronically treated mice. Taurine also attenuated the abstinence behavior when administered during the course of dependence. The results are consistent with taurine antagonism to the known effects of morphine on intracellular calcium disposition in nervous tissue.

  4. The effect of hydrolyzed Spirulina by malted barley on forced swimming test in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na-Hyung; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Lee, Ju-Young; Go, Hoyeon; Ko, Seong-Gyu; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, Hyung-Min; Um, Jae-Young

    2008-11-01

    Spirulina is a true puree of a filamentous, spiral-shaped blue alga and exerts the useful properties as a source of many biochemicals. This study investigated the antidepressant-like effect of hydrolyzed Spirulina by malted barley on the forced swimming test in mice. After the forced swimming test, we examined the levels of several blood biochemical parameters in mice. The effect of the hydrolyzed Spirulina by malted barley-treated group for 2 weeks on the immobility time was significantly reduced in comparison with the control group (p < .05). Plasma level of blood urea nitrogen and lactate dehydrogenase was significantly decreased in the hydrolyzed Spirulina by malted barley-treated group compared with the control group (p < .05). It had no effect on the variation of creatine kinase, glucose, total protein, and albumin levels. Therefore, these results suggest that hydrolyzed Spirulina by malted barley might be a candidate among antidepressant agents.

  5. Effects of inhaled Linalool in anxiety, social interaction and aggressive behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Linck, V M; da Silva, A L; Figueiró, M; Caramão, E B; Moreno, P R H; Elisabetsky, E

    2010-07-01

    Aromatherapy uses essential oils (EOs) for several medical purposes, including relaxation. The association between the use of aromas and a decrease in anxiety could be a valuable instrument in managing anxiety in an ever increasing anxiogenic daily life style. Linalool is a monoterpene commonly found as the major volatile component of EOs in several aromatic plant species. Adding to previously reported sedative effects of inhaled linalool, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inhaled linalool on anxiety, aggressiveness and social interaction in mice. Additionally, we investigated the effects of inhaled linalool on the acquisition phase of a step-down memory task in mice. Inhaled linalool showed anxiolytic properties in the light/dark test, increased social interaction and decreased aggressive behavior; impaired memory was only seen the higher dose of linalool. These results strengthen the suggestion that inhaling linalool rich essential oils can be useful as a mean to attain relaxation and counteract anxiety.

  6. [Oxazole derivatives as compounds modifying radiation effects in the body of mice].

    PubMed

    Burlakova, E V; Dukhovich, F S; Gorbatova, E N; Gaintseva, V D; Zhizhina, G P; Zavarykina, T M; Molochkina, E M; Pal'mina, N P; Smotriaeva, M A; Treshchenkova, Iu A; Fatkullina, L D; Shishkina, L N; Mal'tseva, E L

    2011-01-01

    A new class of substances exhibiting radioprotective and radiosensitizing effects depending on the concentration of the substance has been found. The radioprotective effect is probably due to the resonant absorption of radiation energy and its transformation into low-energy forms, as well as reactions with water radiolysis products. We studied the effects of 2,5-difeniloxazole and di[2-(5-feniloxazolil)]benzene in various concentrations in conjunction with irradiation on the growth of melanoma B-16 in mice and the average time of their lives. When using individual doses of irradiation and doses of preparations, we observed an increase in the average lifetime of mice and a reduced tumor size. These data allow us to conclude about the possibility of using these substances in the radiotherapy of tumors.

  7. The effect of cowpox virus infection on fecundity in bank voles and wood mice.

    PubMed Central

    Feore, S M; Bennett, M; Chantrey, J; Jones, T; Baxby, D; Begon, M

    1997-01-01

    Although epidemic infectious diseases are a recognized cause of changes in host population dynamics, there is little direct evidence for the effect of endemic infections on populations. Cowpox virus is an orthopoxvirus which is endemic in bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus), wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) and field voles (Microtus agrestis) in Great Britain. It does not cause obvious signs of disease nor does it affect survival, but in this study we demonstrate experimentally that it can reduce the fecundity of bank voles and wood mice by increasing the time to first litter by 20-30 days. The pathogenic mechanisms causing this effect are at present not known, but this finding suggests that natural subclinical infection could have a considerable effect on the dynamics of wild populations. PMID:9364786

  8. Histopathology effects of nickel nanoparticles on lungs, liver, and spleen tissues in male mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajdari, Marziyeh; Ziaee Ghahnavieh, Marziyeh

    2014-09-01

    Because of the classification of the nickel compounds as carcinogenic substances, there is a need for in vivo tests to nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs) for observing their effects on health experimentally. Spherical NiNPs with 10 nm in diameter and 75 ppm concentration were applied for investigating their toxicities within male albino mice as an in vivo model. We randomly made sham group, control group, and 75 ppm group (with five animals in each group). Then, the nanoparticles were injected into mice intraperitonealy for 7 days and after that their lungs, liver, and spleen were removed for histopathological observations. At the end of the test, section microscopic observations of liver, spleen, and lung in sham and control groups showed normal tissues but these tissues underwent significant abnormal effects in 75 ppm group. NiNPs can cause undesirable effects in lungs, liver, and spleen tissues with same condition of this study.

  9. Anti-inflammatory and Anti-tumorigenic Effects of Açai Berry in Helicobacter felis-infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yup; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Lee, Seonmin; Ham, Min Hee; Suh, Ji Hyung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic effect of açai berry after chronic Helicobacter felis colonization in the stomachs of C57BL/6 mice. Methods: A total of 57 four-week-old female C57BL/6 mice (18 control mice and 39 experimental mice) were used. The mice were administered orogastrically with vehicle only or vehicle containing H. felis, 5 times every other day. After inoculation of H. felis, mice were fed either a standard or an açai-containing diet and then sacrificed at 4, 24, and 52 weeks. The infection status and degree of inflammation were determined by culture and histopathology. The level of gastric mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO), TNF-α, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured by ELISA. Results: At 24 weeks after inoculation, mucosal atrophy and mucous metaplasia appeared in all infected mice. At 52 weeks after inoculation, dysplastic change was noted in 10%, 25%, and 50% of mice in the H. felis-control, H. felis-açai 5%, and H. felis-açai 10% groups, respectively. The neutrophil, monocyte, atrophy, and metaplasia grades of infected mice showed no significant difference among the H. felis-infected groups. H. felis-infected mice fed with açai berry showed no significant difference compared with H. felis-infected control mice in gastric mucosal MPO, TNF-α, and IL-1β levels. Conclusions: H. felis that colonized the stomachs of C57BL/6 mice provoked inflammation, and induced mucosal atrophy, metaplasia, and dysplasia. However, açai berry did not effectively prohibit the gastric carcinogenesis which was induced by chronic H. felis infection. PMID:27051649

  10. The Protective Effects of Buzui on Acute Alcoholism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Da-Chao; Gao, Shu-di; Hu, Xiao-yu; Yi, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of a traditional buzui recipe in anti-inebriation treatment. Buzui consists of Fructus Schisandrae Chinensis, Fructus Chebulae, Fructus Mume, Fructus Crataegi, Endothelium Corneum Gigeriae Galli, and Excrementum Bombycis. The buzui mixture was delivered by gavage, and ethanol was delivered subsequent to the final treatment. The effects of buzui on the righting reflex, inebriation rates, and the survival curve are depicted. Blood alcohol concentrations, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels were recorded. The activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as malonaldehyde (MDA) levels, were also measured. Our results demonstrated that a traditional buzui recipe showed significant effects on promoting wakefulness and the prevention of acute alcohol intoxication, accelerating the metabolism of alcohol in the liver and reducing the oxidative damage caused by acute alcoholism. PMID:26884793

  11. Microwave Effects on Learning and Memory in Mice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-30

    control) with free access to food and water while in this home cage. Apparatus. Behavioral testing occurred in an automated, active-avoidance apparatus...the daily training trials. Whereas the former strategy addresses perservering effects of longer duration exposures, the latter addresses proximity to...experimental subjects in small home cages. They had free access to food and water in the home cages. Apparatus. Microwave exposure apparatus was the horn system

  12. Protective effects of Zhuyeqing liquor on the immune function of normal and immunosuppressed mice in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Zhuyeqing Liquor (ZYQL), a well-known Chinese traditional health liquor, has various biological properties, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunoenhancement and cardiovascular protective effects. Methods The protective effects of Zhuyeqing Liquor (ZYQL) on the immune function was investigated in vivo in normal healthy mice and immunosuppressed mice treated with Cyclophosphamide (Cy, 100 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection on days 4, 8 and 12. ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) was administered via gavage daily for 14 days. The phagocytotic function of mononuclear phagocytic system was detected with carbon clearance methods, the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in serum were detected with Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immune organs were weighed and organ indexes (organ weight/body weight) of thymus and spleen were calculated. Meanwhile, the activity of lysozyme (LSZ) in serum and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT) in spleen tissue were measured. Results ZYQL significantly upgrades the K value for clearance of carbon particles in normal mice treated with ZYQL (400 mg/kg) and immunosuppressed mice treated with ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) together with Cy (100 mg/kg) in vivo. The treatment of ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) effectively increased the activity of serum lysozyme as well as promoted the serum levels of IL-6 and IFN-γ in normal mice and immunosuppressed mice. Furthermore, ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) had an antioxidant effects in immune system by enhancing the antioxidant enzyme activity of SOD, CAT and GSH-Px in vivo. In addition, ZYQL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) effectively elevated the Cy-induced decreased organ index (thymus and spleen). Conclusions The present work shows that the dose-dependent administration of ZYQL is capable of influencing immune responses, which implying that its valuable functional health may be attributed

  13. Sensitivity during the forced swim test is a key factor in evaluating the antidepressant effects of abscisic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Cong-Cong; Shu, Yu-Mian; Chen, Fang-Han; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2016-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a crucial phytohormone, is distributed in the brains of mammals and has been shown to have antidepressant effects in the chronic unpredictable mild stress test. The forced swim test (FST) is another animal model that can be used to assess antidepressant-like behavior in rodents. Here, we report that the antidepressant effects of ABA are associated with sensitivities to the FST in mice. Based on mean immobility in the 5-min forced swim pre-test, ICR mice were divided into short immobility mice (SIM) and long immobility mice (LIM) substrains. FST was carried out 8 days after drug administration. Learned helplessness, as shown by increased immobility, was only observed in SIM substrain and could be prevented by an 8-day ABA treatment. Our results show that ABA has antidepressant effects in SIM substrain and suggest that mice with learned helplessness might be more suitable for screening potential antidepressant drugs.

  14. Differential effects of Mas receptor deficiency on cardiac function and blood pressure in obese male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Shoemaker, Robin; Powell, David; Su, Wen; Thatcher, Sean; Cassis, Lisa

    2017-03-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [ANG-(1-7)] acts at Mas receptors (MasR) to oppose effects of angiotensin II (ANG II). Previous studies demonstrated that protection of female mice from obesity-induced hypertension was associated with increased systemic ANG-(1-7), whereas male obese hypertensive mice exhibited increased systemic ANG II. We hypothesized that MasR deficiency (MasR(-/-) ) augments obesity-induced hypertension in males and abolishes protection of females. Male and female wild-type (MasR(+/+) ) and MasR(-/-) mice were fed a low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) diet for 16 wk. MasR deficiency had no effect on obesity. At baseline, male and female MasR(-/-) mice had reduced ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening than MasR(+/+) mice. Male, but not female, HF-fed MasR(+/+) mice had increased systolic and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures compared with LF-fed controls. In HF-fed females, MasR deficiency increased DBP compared with LF-fed controls. In contrast, male HF-fed MasR(-/-) mice had lower DBP than MasR(+/+) mice. We quantified cardiac function after 1 mo of HF feeding in males of each genotype. HF-fed MasR(-/-) mice had higher left ventricular (LV) wall thickness than MasR(+/+) mice. Moreover, MasR(+/+) , but not MasR(-/-) , mice displayed reductions in EF from HF feeding that were reversed by ANG-(1-7) infusion. LV fibrosis was reduced in HF-fed MasR(+/+) but not MasR(-/-) ANG-(1-7)-infused mice. These results demonstrate that MasR deficiency promotes obesity-induced hypertension in females. In males, HF feeding reduced cardiac function, which was restored by ANG-(1-7) in MasR(+/+) but not MasR(-/-) mice. MasR agonists may be effective therapies for obesity-associated cardiovascular conditions.NEW & NOTEWORTHY MasR deficiency abolishes protection of female mice from obesity-induced hypertension. Male MasR-deficient obese mice have reduced blood pressure and declines in cardiac function. ANG-(1-7) infusion restores obesity-induced cardiac dysfunction of wild

  15. Neurogenomic Evidence for a Shared Mechanism of the Antidepressant Effects of Exercise and Chronic Fluoxetine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guo-Jen; Ben-David, Eyal; Tort Piella, Agnès; Edwards, Andrew; Flint, Jonathan; Shifman, Sagiv

    2012-01-01

    Several different interventions improve depressed mood, including medication and environmental factors such as regular physical exercise. The molecular pathways underlying these effects are still not fully understood. In this study, we sought to identify shared mechanisms underlying antidepressant interventions. We studied three groups of mice: mice treated with a widely used antidepressant drug – fluoxetine, mice engaged in voluntary exercise, and mice living in an enriched environment. The hippocampi of treated mice were investigated at the molecular and cellular levels. Mice treated with fluoxetine and mice who exercised daily showed, not only similar antidepressant behavior, but also similar changes in gene expression and hippocampal neurons. These changes were not observed in mice with environmental enrichment. An increase in neurogenesis and dendritic spine density was observed following four weeks of fluoxetine treatment and voluntary exercise. A weighted gene co-expression network analysis revealed four different modules of co-expressed genes that were correlated with the antidepressant effect. This network analysis enabled us to identify genes involved in the molecular pathways underlying the effects of fluoxetine and exercise. The existence of both neuronal and gene expression changes common to antidepressant drug and exercise suggests a shared mechanism underlying their effect. Further studies of these findings may be used to uncover the molecular mechanisms of depression, and to identify new avenues of therapy. PMID:22558262

  16. Effects of dietary fat on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma and changes in plasma cytokine concentrations in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study assessed the effects of dietary fat on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice. Three-week old male C57BL/6 mice were fed the AIN-93G standard diet or a 45% fat diet (kcal %) for seven weeks before they were subcutaneously injected with 2.5 x 105 viable cells into th...

  17. Neurogenomic evidence for a shared mechanism of the antidepressant effects of exercise and chronic fluoxetine in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Jen; Ben-David, Eyal; Tort Piella, Agnès; Edwards, Andrew; Flint, Jonathan; Shifman, Sagiv

    2012-01-01

    Several different interventions improve depressed mood, including medication and environmental factors such as regular physical exercise. The molecular pathways underlying these effects are still not fully understood. In this study, we sought to identify shared mechanisms underlying antidepressant interventions. We studied three groups of mice: mice treated with a widely used antidepressant drug--fluoxetine, mice engaged in voluntary exercise, and mice living in an enriched environment. The hippocampi of treated mice were investigated at the molecular and cellular levels. Mice treated with fluoxetine and mice who exercised daily showed, not only similar antidepressant behavior, but also similar changes in gene expression and hippocampal neurons. These changes were not observed in mice with environmental enrichment. An increase in neurogenesis and dendritic spine density was observed following four weeks of fluoxetine treatment and voluntary exercise. A weighted gene co-expression network analysis revealed four different modules of co-expressed genes that were correlated with the antidepressant effect. This network analysis enabled us to identify genes involved in the molecular pathways underlying the effects of fluoxetine and exercise. The existence of both neuronal and gene expression changes common to antidepressant drug and exercise suggests a shared mechanism underlying their effect. Further studies of these findings may be used to uncover the molecular mechanisms of depression, and to identify new avenues of therapy.