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Sample records for periadolescent period induces

  1. Exposure to nicotine during periadolescence or early adulthood alters aversive and physiological effects induced by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Jennifer A; Hutchison, Mary Anne; Chen, Scott A; Thorsell, Annika; Heilig, Markus; Riley, Anthony L

    2011-07-01

    The majority of smokers begin their habit during adolescence, which often precedes experimentation with alcohol. Interestingly, very little preclinical work has been done examining how exposure to nicotine during periadolescence impacts the affective properties of alcohol in adulthood. Understanding how periadolescent nicotine exposure influences the aversive effects of alcohol might help to explain why it becomes more acceptable to this preexposed population. Thus, Experiment 1 exposed male Sprague Dawley rats to either saline or nicotine (0.4mg/kg, IP) from postnatal days 34 to 43 (periadolescence) and then examined changes in the aversive effects of alcohol (0, 0.56, 1.0 and 1.8g/kg, IP) in adulthood using the conditioned taste aversion (CTA) design. Changes in blood alcohol concentration (BAC) as well as alcohol-induced hypothermia and locomotor suppression were also assessed. To determine if changes seen were specific to nicotine exposure during periadolescence, the procedures were replicated in adults (Experiment 2). Preexposure to nicotine during periadolescence attenuated the acquisition of the alcohol-induced CTAs (at 1.0g/kg) and the hypothermic effects of alcohol (1.0g/kg). Adult nicotine preexposure produced similar attenuation in alcohol's aversive (at 1.8g/kg) and hypothermic (1.8g/kg) effects. Neither adolescent nor adult nicotine preexposure altered BACs or alcohol-induced locomotor suppression. These results suggest that nicotine may alter the aversive and physiological effects of alcohol, regardless of the age at which exposure occurs, possibly increasing its overall reinforcing value and making it more likely to be consumed.

  2. Intermittent Voluntary Ethanol Drinking during Periadolescence Impairs Adult Spatial Learning after a Long Abstinence Period in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Ana; Garcia-Burgos, David; Manrique, Tatiana; Gonzalez, Felisa; Gallo, Milagros

    2011-01-01

    Although previous findings point to the long-term impact of ethanol exposure during periadolescence on hippocampal-dependent learning tasks, comparisons considering different onset and exposure periods during this developmental range of ages are still needed. The aim of this experiment was to determine whether intermittent voluntary chronic…

  3. Narrow band quantitative and multivariate electroencephalogram analysis of peri-adolescent period

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The peri-adolescent period is a crucial developmental moment of transition from childhood to emergent adulthood. The present report analyses the differences in Power Spectrum (PS) of the Electroencephalogram (EEG) between late childhood (24 children between 8 and 13 years old) and young adulthood (24 young adults between 18 and 23 years old). Results The narrow band analysis of the Electroencephalogram was computed in the frequency range of 0–20 Hz. The analysis of mean and variance suggested that six frequency ranges presented a different rate of maturation at these ages, namely: low delta, delta-theta, low alpha, high alpha, low beta and high beta. For most of these bands the maturation seems to occur later in anterior sites than posterior sites. Correlational analysis showed a lower pattern of correlation between different frequencies in children than in young adults, suggesting a certain asynchrony in the maturation of different rhythms. The topographical analysis revealed similar topographies of the different rhythms in children and young adults. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) demonstrated the same internal structure for the Electroencephalogram of both age groups. Principal Component Analysis allowed to separate four subcomponents in the alpha range. All these subcomponents peaked at a lower frequency in children than in young adults. Conclusions The present approaches complement and solve some of the incertitudes when the classical brain broad rhythm analysis is applied. Children have a higher absolute power than young adults for frequency ranges between 0-20 Hz, the correlation of Power Spectrum (PS) with age and the variance age comparison showed that there are six ranges of frequencies that can distinguish the level of EEG maturation in children and adults. The establishment of maturational order of different frequencies and its possible maturational interdependence would require a complete series including all the different ages. PMID

  4. N-acetylcysteine attenuates nicotine-induced kindling in female periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Adriana Mary Nunes Costa; Gomes, Patrícia Xavier L; de Oliveira, Gersilene V; de Araújo, Fernanda Yvelize R; Tomaz, Viviane S; Chaves Filho, Adriano José Maia; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa F; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; de Lucena, David Freitas; Macêdo, Danielle

    2016-06-01

    Kindling is a form of behavioral sensitization that is related to the progression of several neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder. We recently demonstrated that female periadolescent rats are more vulnerable to nicotine (NIC)-induced kindling than their male counterparts. Furthermore, we evidenced that decreases in brain antioxidative defenses may contribute to this gender difference. Here we aimed to determine the preventive effects of the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) against NIC-kindling in female periadolescent rats. To do this female Wistar rats at postnatal day 30 received repeated injections of NIC 2mg/kg, i.p. every weekday for up to 19 days. NAC90, 180 or 270 mg/kg, i.p. was administered 30 min before NIC. The levels of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, lipid peroxidation (LP) and nitrite were determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST). The development of kindling occurred at a median time of 16.5 days with 87.5% of NIC animals presenting stage 5 seizures in the last day of drug administration. NAC270 prevented the occurrence of kindling. NIC-kindled animals presented decreased levels of GSH and increased LP in the PFC, HC and ST, while SOD activity was decreased in the ST. NAC180 or 270 prevented the alterations in GSH induced by NIC, but only NAC270 prevented the alterations in LP. Nitrite levels increased in the ST of NAC270 pretreated NIC-kindled animals. Taken together we demonstrated that NAC presents anti-kindling effects in female animals partially through the restoration of oxidative alterations.

  5. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Interleukin-2 Treatment on the Sensitivity of Periadolescent Female Mice to Interleukin-2 and Dopamine Uptake Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, James S.; Zalcman, Steven S.; Zhu, Youhua; Siegel, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-2, a T-helper 1 (Th1) cell-derived cytokine, which potently modulates dopamine activity and neuronal excitability in mesolimbic structures, is linked with pathological outcomes (e.g., schizophrenia, depression, etc.) that at least partly reflect alterations in central dopaminergic processes. It has been suggested that dopamine neurons undergo pruning during adolescence and abnormalities in pruning predispose individuals to behavioral disorders. Since IL-2 is known as a neurodevelopmental factor affecting associated behavioral processes, the present study tested whether IL-2 can modulate stereotypic behaviors in both the periadolescent and adult periods. This study determined whether IL-2 treatment would produce long-lasting changes in sensitivity to a later challenge with IL-2 or GBR 12909, a highly selective dopamine uptake inhibitor. Four experiments were conducted. Firstly, a decrease in novelty-induced stereotypic behavior was observed in BALB/c periadolescent mice (38 days of age) following IL-2 administration (0.4 µg/2 ml) relative to vehicle control. In the second experiment, an initial dose of IL-2 was given in the periadolescent period, but did not affect rearing responses. A second dose of IL-2 given to the animals 30 days later as adults, resulted in a significant increase in rearing behaviors relative to control animals. In the third experiment, separate groups of experimental and control mice were administered GBR 12909, a highly selective dopamine reuptake inhibitor, 30 days following treatment with either IL-2 or vehicle. It was noted that this experimental group, which initially received IL-2, exhibited stereotypy, as evidenced by increased sniffing behavior. A fourth experiment revealed that IL-2 administered in periadolesecence and adulthood had no effect on other motor responses, indicating that IL-2 selectively modulates selective stereotypic behaviors. The results provide evidence, for the first time, that long-term changes in

  6. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L

    2013-10-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT--7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory.

  7. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L.; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT-7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory. PMID:23792034

  8. Long-term exposure to oral methylphenidate or dl-amphetamine mixture in peri-adolescent rhesus monkeys: effects on physiology, behavior, and dopamine system development.

    PubMed

    Soto, Paul L; Wilcox, Kristin M; Zhou, Yun; Kumar, Anil; Ator, Nancy A; Riddle, Mark A; Wong, Dean F; Weed, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    The stimulants methylphenidate and amphetamine are used to treat children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder over important developmental periods, prompting concerns regarding possible long-term health impact. This study assessed the effects of such a regimen in male, peri-adolescent rhesus monkeys on a variety of cognitive/behavioral, physiological, and in vivo neurochemical imaging parameters. Twice daily (0900 and 1200 hours), for a total of 18 months, juvenile male monkeys (8 per group) consumed either an unadulterated orange-flavored solution, a methylphenidate solution, or a dl-amphetamine mixture. Doses were titrated to reach blood/plasma levels comparable to therapeutic levels in children. [¹¹C]MPH and [¹¹C]raclopride dynamic PET scans were performed to image dopamine transporter and D₂-like receptors, respectively. Binding potential (BP(ND)), an index of tracer-specific binding, and amphetamine-induced changes in BP(ND) of [¹¹C]raclopride were estimated by kinetic modeling. There were no consistent differences among groups on the vast majority of measures, including cognitive (psychomotor speed, timing, inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility), general activity, physiological (body weight, head circumference, crown-to-rump length), and neurochemical (ie, developmental changes in dopamine transporter, dopamine D₂ receptor density, and amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release were as expected). Cytogenetic studies indicated that neither drug was a clastogen in rhesus monkeys. Thus, methylphenidate and amphetamine at therapeutic blood/plasma levels during peri-adolescence in non-human primates have little effect on physiological or behavioral/cognitive development.

  9. Early Developmental Low-Dose Methylmercury Exposure Alters Learning and Memory in Periadolescent but Not Young Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Albores-Garcia, Damaris; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Loera, Miriam J.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the effects of developmental methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on learning and memory at different ages. The possibility of the amelioration or worsening of the effects has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to assess whether low-dose MeHg exposure in utero and during suckling induces differential disturbances in learning and memory of periadolescent and young adult rats. Four experimental groups of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally exposed to MeHg or vehicle from gestational day 5 to weaning: (1) control (vehicle), (2) 250 μg/kg/day MeHg, (3) 500 μg/kg/day MeHg, and (4) vehicle, and treated on the test day with MK-801 (0.15 mg/kg i.p.), an antagonist of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor. The effects were evaluated in male offspring through the open field test, object recognition test, Morris water maze, and conditioned taste aversion. For each test and stage assessed, different groups of animals were used. MeHg exposure, in a dose-dependent manner, disrupted exploratory behaviour, recognition memory, spatial learning, and acquisition of aversive memories in periadolescent rats, but alterations were not observed in littermates tested in young adulthood. These results suggest that developmental low-dose exposure to MeHg induces age-dependent detrimental effects. The relevance of decreasing exposure to MeHg in humans remains to be determined. PMID:26885512

  10. Exposure to methylphenidate during peri-adolescence affects endocrine functioning and sexual behavior in female Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Guarraci, Fay A; Holifield, Caroline; Morales-Valenzuela, Jessica; Greene, Kasera; Brown, Jeanette; Lopez, Rebecca; Crandall, Christina; Gibbs, Nicole; Vela, Rebekah; Delgado, Melissa Y; Frohardt, Russell J

    2016-03-01

    The present study was designed to test the effects of methylphenidate (MPH) exposure on the maturation of endocrine functioning and sexual behavior. Female rat pups received either MPH (2.0mg/kg, i.p.) or saline twice daily between postnatal days 20-35. This period of exposure represents the time just prior to puberty as well as puberty onset. Approximately five weeks after the last injection of MPH or saline, female subjects were hormone-primed and tested during their first sexual experience. Subjects were given the choice to interact with a sexually active male or a sexually receptive female rat (i.e., the partner-preference test). The partner-preference paradigm allows us to assess multiple aspects of female sexual behavior. MPH exposure during peri-adolescence delayed puberty and, when mated for the first time, affected sexual behavior (e.g., increased time spent with the male stimulus and decreased the likelihood of leaving after mounts) during the test of partner preference. When monitoring estrous cyclicity, female subjects treated with MPH during peri-adolescence frequently experienced irregular estrous cycles. The results of the present study suggest that chronic exposure to a therapeutic dose of MPH around the onset of puberty alters long-term endocrine functioning, but with hormone priming, increases sensitivity to sexual stimuli.

  11. Maternal deprivation and early handling affect density of calcium binding protein-containing neurons in selected brain regions and emotional behavior in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Giachino, C; Canalia, N; Capone, F; Fasolo, A; Alleva, E; Riva, M A; Cirulli, F; Peretto, P

    2007-03-16

    Adverse early life experiences can induce neurochemical changes that may underlie modifications in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responsiveness, emotionality and cognition. Here, we investigated the expression of the calcium binding proteins (CBPs) calretinin, calbindin and parvalbumin, which identify subpopulations of GABAergic neurons and serve important functional roles by buffering intracellular calcium levels, following brief (early handling) and long (maternal deprivation) periods of maternal separation, as compared with non-handled controls. CBP-expressing neurons were analyzed in brain regions related to stress and anxiety. Emotionality was assessed in parallel using the social interaction test. Analyses were carried out at periadolescence, an important phase for the development of brain areas involved in stress responses. Our results indicate that density of CBP-immunoreactive neurons decreases in the paraventricular region of deprived rats but increases in the hippocampus and lateral amygdala of both early-handled and deprived rats when compared with controls. Emotionality is reduced in both early-handled and deprived animals. In conclusion, early handling and deprivation led to neurochemical and behavioral changes linked to stress-sensitive brain regions. These data suggest that the effects of early experiences on CBP containing neurons might contribute to the functional changes of neuronal circuits involved in emotional response.

  12. Neural and behavioural changes in male periadolescent mice after prolonged nicotine-MDMA treatment.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, Philip A; Ishola, Azeez O; Laoye, Babafemi J; Olatunji, Babawale P; Bankole, Oluwamolakun O; Shallie, Philemon D; Ogundele, Olalekan M

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between MDMA and Nicotine affects multiple brain centres and neurotransmitter systems (serotonin, dopamine and glutamate) involved in motor coordination and cognition. In this study, we have elucidated the effect of prolonged (10 days) MDMA, Nicotine and a combined Nicotine-MDMA treatment on motor-cognitive neural functions. In addition, we have shown the correlation between the observed behavioural change and neural structural changes induced by these treatments in BALB/c mice. We observed that MDMA (2 mg/Kg body weight; subcutaneous) induced a decline in motor function, while Nicotine (2 mg/Kg body weight; subcutaneous) improved motor function in male periadolescent mice. In combined treatment, Nicotine reduced the motor function decline observed in MDMA treatment, thus no significant change in motor function for the combined treatment versus the control. Nicotine or MDMA treatment reduced memory function and altered hippocampal structure. Similarly, a combined Nicotine-MDMA treatment reduced memory function when compared with the control. Ultimately, the metabolic and structural changes in these neural systems were seen to vary for the various forms of treatment. It is noteworthy to mention that a combined treatment increased the rate of lipid peroxidation in brain tissue.

  13. Neural and behavioural changes in male periadolescent mice after prolonged nicotine-MDMA treatment.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, Philip A; Ishola, Azeez O; Laoye, Babafemi J; Olatunji, Babawale P; Bankole, Oluwamolakun O; Shallie, Philemon D; Ogundele, Olalekan M

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between MDMA and Nicotine affects multiple brain centres and neurotransmitter systems (serotonin, dopamine and glutamate) involved in motor coordination and cognition. In this study, we have elucidated the effect of prolonged (10 days) MDMA, Nicotine and a combined Nicotine-MDMA treatment on motor-cognitive neural functions. In addition, we have shown the correlation between the observed behavioural change and neural structural changes induced by these treatments in BALB/c mice. We observed that MDMA (2 mg/Kg body weight; subcutaneous) induced a decline in motor function, while Nicotine (2 mg/Kg body weight; subcutaneous) improved motor function in male periadolescent mice. In combined treatment, Nicotine reduced the motor function decline observed in MDMA treatment, thus no significant change in motor function for the combined treatment versus the control. Nicotine or MDMA treatment reduced memory function and altered hippocampal structure. Similarly, a combined Nicotine-MDMA treatment reduced memory function when compared with the control. Ultimately, the metabolic and structural changes in these neural systems were seen to vary for the various forms of treatment. It is noteworthy to mention that a combined treatment increased the rate of lipid peroxidation in brain tissue. PMID:26088184

  14. Sex differences in tolerance to the locomotor depressant effects of lobeline in periadolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Harrod, Steven B.; Van Horn, M. Lee

    2009-01-01

    Lobeline is being tested in clinical trials as a pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine abuse and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Preclinical research demonstrates that lobeline produces locomotor hypoactivity apart from its therapeutic effects; however, the hypothesis that there are sex differences in hypoactivity or in the development of tolerance to its locomotor depressant effects has not been investigated. Periadolescent rats were injected with saline to determine baseline locomotor activity. Animals received saline or lobeline (1.0–10 mg/kg) daily for 7 consecutive days (post natal days 29–35), and were challenged with saline 24 h later to assess baseline activity. Lobeline produced hypoactivity in total horizontal activity and center distance travelled. Tolerance developed to the lobeline-induced hypoactivity and sex differences in lobeline tolerance were observed on both measures. Females acquired tolerance to lobeline 5.6 mg/kg at a slower rate than males. Saline challenge revealed a linear dose-dependent trend of hyperactivity on both measures, which indicates that rats exhibited altered locomotor behavior 24 h after the final lobeline treatment. These findings demonstrate sex differences in the hypoactive response to lobeline prior to puberty and suggest that females may experience more locomotor depressant effects than males. Chronic lobeline may induce hyperactivity following cessation of treatment. PMID:19766134

  15. Decreased Bdnf expression and reduced social behavior in periadolescent rats following prenatal stress.

    PubMed

    Berry, Alessandra; Panetta, Pamela; Luoni, Alessia; Bellisario, Veronica; Capoccia, Sara; Riva, Marco Andrea; Cirulli, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    Prenatal stress (PNS) is a risk factor for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. This study was aimed at assessing, in a rodent model, changes in gene expression profiles and behavioral output as a result of PNS, during periadolescence, a critical developmental period for the onset of psychopathology. Social behavior was studied in a standardized social interaction paradigm and the expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (Bdnf), a marker of neuronal plasticity, and of inhibitory and excitatory mechanisms (Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) and K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporters ratio, NKCC1/KCC2) was analyzed. Results indicate that PNS reduced Bdnf transcripts while increasing the NKCC1/KCC2 ratio, primarily in the hippocampus. In the prefrontal cortex, changes in Bdnf were found to be gender-dependent. These effects were accompanied by reduced levels of affiliative and investigative social behaviors. Interestingly, interaction with non-stressed subjects was able to improve sociality in PNS rats suggesting that the social environment could be exploited for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25783782

  16. High-fructose diet during periadolescent development increases depressive-like behavior and remodels the hypothalamic transcriptome in male rats.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Constance S; Burgado, Jillybeth; Kelly, Sean D; Johnson, Zachary P; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2015-12-01

    Fructose consumption, which promotes insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, has increased by over 25% since the 1970s. In addition to metabolic dysregulation, fructose ingestion stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis leading to elevations in glucocorticoids. Adolescents are the greatest consumers of fructose, and adolescence is a critical period for maturation of the HPA axis. Repeated consumption of high levels of fructose during adolescence has the potential to promote long-term dysregulation of the stress response. Therefore, we determined the extent to which consumption of a diet high in fructose affected behavior, serum corticosterone, and hypothalamic gene expression using a whole-transcriptomics approach. In addition, we examined the potential of a high-fructose diet to interact with exposure to chronic adolescent stress. Male Wistar rats fed the periadolescent high-fructose diet showed increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test in adulthood, irrespective of stress history. Periadolescent fructose-fed rats also exhibited elevated basal corticosterone concentrations relative to their chow-fed peers. These behavioral and hormonal responses to the high-fructose diet did not occur in rats fed fructose during adulthood only. Finally, rats fed the high-fructose diet throughout development underwent marked hypothalamic transcript expression remodeling, with 966 genes (5.6%) significantly altered and a pronounced enrichment of significantly altered transcripts in several pathways relating to regulation of the HPA axis. Collectively, the data presented herein indicate that diet, specifically one high in fructose, has the potential to alter behavior, HPA axis function, and the hypothalamic transcriptome in male rats.

  17. High-fructose diet during periadolescent development increases depressive-like behavior and remodels the hypothalamic transcriptome in male rats.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Constance S; Burgado, Jillybeth; Kelly, Sean D; Johnson, Zachary P; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2015-12-01

    Fructose consumption, which promotes insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, has increased by over 25% since the 1970s. In addition to metabolic dysregulation, fructose ingestion stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis leading to elevations in glucocorticoids. Adolescents are the greatest consumers of fructose, and adolescence is a critical period for maturation of the HPA axis. Repeated consumption of high levels of fructose during adolescence has the potential to promote long-term dysregulation of the stress response. Therefore, we determined the extent to which consumption of a diet high in fructose affected behavior, serum corticosterone, and hypothalamic gene expression using a whole-transcriptomics approach. In addition, we examined the potential of a high-fructose diet to interact with exposure to chronic adolescent stress. Male Wistar rats fed the periadolescent high-fructose diet showed increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test in adulthood, irrespective of stress history. Periadolescent fructose-fed rats also exhibited elevated basal corticosterone concentrations relative to their chow-fed peers. These behavioral and hormonal responses to the high-fructose diet did not occur in rats fed fructose during adulthood only. Finally, rats fed the high-fructose diet throughout development underwent marked hypothalamic transcript expression remodeling, with 966 genes (5.6%) significantly altered and a pronounced enrichment of significantly altered transcripts in several pathways relating to regulation of the HPA axis. Collectively, the data presented herein indicate that diet, specifically one high in fructose, has the potential to alter behavior, HPA axis function, and the hypothalamic transcriptome in male rats. PMID:26356038

  18. Effects of different concentrations of sugarcane alcohol on food intake and nutritional status of male and female periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves de Orange, Luciana; Bion, Francisca Martins; Rolim de Lima, Cybelle

    2009-03-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of food and alcohol intake on the nutritional and metabolic status of male and female periadolescent rats submitted to single (15%) and multiple (10%, 20%, 30%) concentrations of hydroalcoholic solutions of sugar-based alcohol associated with a feed mixture. Thirty-six periadolescent Wistar rats were used and randomly arranged into three groups: Group A (control; 0% ethanol; six males and six females), Group B (15% ethanol; six males and six females), and Group C (10%, 20%, and 30% ethanol; six males and six females). Food consumption, body weight, water intake (mL), ethanol intake (g/kg/day), ethanol preference in relation to water and different concentrations, and serum biochemical dosages (glucose, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein fraction, triglycerides, cholesterol/HDL [CT/HDL], albumin) were analyzed. Males from Group C ingested more feed than females, which consumed reducing amounts throughout the weeks studied. Males also had heavier body weight, which increased throughout the experimental period. The animals ingested more water (females ingested more than males) in the first experimental week. Group C had a higher ethanol intake and greater preference for ethanol over water in both genders than Group B, which decreased over the subsequent weeks. Serum glucose was lower in Group A, whereas the CT/HDL ratio was lower in Group C. These findings allow the conclusion that nutritional and metabolic impact resulting from alcohol intake is different between genders and between the different forms in which the drug is offered. It is important to warn the population about the concentrations of alcohol intake, which may influence the growth and development of adolescents, thereby compromising their quality of life.

  19. Magnetomechanically induced long period fiber gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Causado-Buelvas, Jesus D.; Gomez-Cardona, Nelson D.; Torres, Pedro

    2008-04-15

    In this work, we report a simple, flexible method to create long period fiber gratings mechanically by controlling the repulsion/attraction force between two magnets that pressing a plate with a periodic array of small glass cylinders to a short length of optical fiber. Via the photoelastic effect, the pressure points induce the required periodic refractive index modulation to create the LPFG. We found that the induced device exhibits spectral characteristics similar to those of other types of LPFG. As the optical properties of LPFGs are directly related to the nature of the applied perturbations, we show, to our knowledge for the frrst time, how is the evolution of birefringence effects in mechanically induced LPFGs.

  20. Daily patterns of ethanol drinking in peri-adolescent and adult alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Bell, Richard L; Rodd, Zachary A; Sable, Helen J K; Schultz, Jonathon A; Hsu, Cathleen C; Lumeng, Lawrence; Murphy, James M; McBride, William J

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol abuse among adolescents continues to be a major health problem for our society. Our laboratory has used the peri-adolescent alcohol-preferring, P, rat as an animal model of adolescent alcohol abuse. Even though peri-adolescent P rats consume more alcohol (g/kg/day) than their adult counterparts, it is uncertain whether their drinking is sufficiently aggregated to result in measurable blood ethanol concentrations (BECs). The objectives of this study were to examine daily alcohol drinking patterns of adolescent and adult, male and female P rats, and to determine whether alcohol drinking episodes were sufficiently aggregated to result in meaningful BECs. Male and female P rats were given 30 days of 24 h free-choice access to alcohol (15%, v/v) and water, with ad lib access to food, starting at the beginning of adolescence (PND 30) or adulthood (PND 90). Water and alcohol drinking patterns were monitored 22 h/day with a "lickometer" set-up. The results indicated that (a) peri-adolescent P rats consumed more water and total fluids than adult P rats, (b) female P rats consumed more water and total fluids than male P rats, (c) there were differences in alcohol, and water, licking patterns between peri-adolescent and adult and female and male P rats, (d) individual licking patterns revealed that alcohol was consumed in bouts often exceeding the amount required to self-administer 1 g/kg of alcohol, and (e) BECs at the end of the dark cycle, on the 30th day of alcohol access, averaged 50 mg%, with alcohol intakes during the last 1 to 2 h averaging 1.2 g/kg. Overall, these findings indicate that alcohol drinking patterns differ across the age and sex of P rats. This suggests that the effectiveness of treatments for reducing excessive alcohol intake may vary depending upon the age and/or sex of the subjects being tested.

  1. Effects of periadolescent ethanol exposure on alcohol preference in two BALB substrains.

    PubMed

    Blizard, David A; Vandenbergh, David J; Jefferson, Akilah L; Chatlos, Cynthia D; Vogler, George P; McClearn, Gerald E

    2004-01-01

    Ethanol exposure during adolescence is a rite of passage in many societies, but only a subset of individuals exposed to ethanol becomes dependent on alcohol. To explore individual differences in response to ethanol exposure, we compared the effects of periadolescent ethanol exposure on alcohol drinking in an animal model. Male and female mice of two BALB substrains were exposed to ethanol in one of three forms--choice [water vs. 10% (volume/volume) ethanol], forced (10% ethanol in a single bottle), or gradual (single bottle exposure, starting with 0.5% ethanol and increasing at 2-day intervals to 10% ethanol)--from the 6th through the 12th week of age and administered two-bottle alcohol preference tests (10% ethanol vs. water) for 15 days immediately thereafter. All three forms of ethanol exposure increased alcohol preference in male and female BALB/cByJ mice, relative to findings for ethanol-naive control animals. Only gradual ethanol exposure produced an increase in alcohol preference in BALB/cJ mice. During extended alcohol preference testing (for a total of 39 days) of mice in the gradual ethanol exposure group, the higher alcohol preference of the gradual ethanol-exposed BALB/cByJ male mice persisted, but alcohol preference of control group female mice in this strain--formerly ethanol naive, but at this point having received 10% ethanol in the two-bottle paradigm for 15 days--rose to the level of alcohol preference of female mice in the gradual ethanol exposure group. This finding demonstrated that both adolescent and adult ethanol exposure stimulated alcohol preference in female mice of this strain. Across days of testing in adulthood, alcohol preference of the gradual ethanol-exposed BALB/cJ mice decreased, resulting in a lack of effect of gradual exposure to ethanol on alcohol preference in both male and female mice of this strain during the period of extended testing. These strain differences support a genetic basis for the effects of ethanol exposure on

  2. Acute and constitutive increases in central serotonin levels reduce social play behaviour in peri-adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Schiepers, Olga J. G.; Schoffelmeer, Anton N. M.; Cuppen, Edwin; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Serotonin is an important modulator of social behaviour. Individual differences in serotonergic signalling are considered to be a marker of personality that is stable throughout lifetime. While a large body of evidence indicates that central serotonin levels are inversely related to aggression and sexual behaviour in adult rats, the relationship between serotonin and social behaviour during peri-adolescence has hardly been explored. Objective To study the effect of acute and constitutive increases in serotonin neurotransmission on social behaviour in peri-adolescent rats. Materials and methods Social behaviour in peri-adolesent rats (28–35 days old) was studied after genetic ablation of the serotonin transporter, causing constitutively increased extra-neuronal serotonin levels, and after acute treatment with the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine or the serotonin releasing agent 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). A distinction was made between social play behaviour that mainly occurs during peri-adolescence, and non-playful social interactions that are abundant during the entire lifespan of rats. Results In serotonin transporter knockout rats, social play behaviour was markedly reduced, while non-playful aspects of social interaction were unaffected. Acute treatment with fluoxetine or MDMA dose-dependently inhibited social play behaviour. MDMA also suppressed non-playful social interaction but at higher doses than those required to reduce social play. Fluoxetine did not affect non-playful social interaction. Conclusions These data show that both acute and constitutive increases in serotonergic neurotransmission reduce social play behaviour in peri-adolescent rats. Together with our previous findings of reduced aggressive and sexual behaviour in adult serotonin transporter knockout rats, these data support the notion that serotonin modulates social behaviour in a trait-like manner. PMID:17661017

  3. The Reinforcing Properties of Ethanol are Quantitatively Enhanced in Adulthood by Peri-Adolescent Ethanol, but not Saccharin, Consumption in Female Alcohol-Preferring (P) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Toalston, Jamie E.; Deehan, Gerald A.; Hauser, Sheketha R.; Engleman, Eric A.; Bell, Richard L.; Murphy, James M.; McBride, William J.; Rodd, Zachary A.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol drinking during adolescence is associated in adulthood with heavier alcohol drinking and an increased rate of alcohol dependence. Past research in our laboratory has indicated that peri-adolescent ethanol consumption can enhance the acquisition and reduce the rate of extinction of ethanol self-administration in adulthood. Caveats of the past research include reinforcer specificity, increased oral consumption during peri-adolescence, and a lack of quantitative assessment of the reinforcing properties of ethanol. The current experiments were designed to determine the effects of peri-adolescent ethanol or saccharin drinking on acquisition and extinction of oral ethanol self-administration and ethanol seeking, and to quantitatively assess the reinforcing properties of ethanol (progressive ratio). Ethanol or saccharin access by alcohol-preferring (P) rats occurred during postnatal day (PND) 30–60. Animals began operant self-administration of ethanol or saccharin after PND 85. After 10 weeks of daily operant self-administration, rats were tested in a progressive ratio paradigm. Two weeks later, self-administration was extinguished in all rats. Peri-adolescent ethanol consumption specifically enhanced the acquisition of ethanol self-administration, reduced the rate of extinction for ethanol self-administration, and quantitatively increased the reinforcing properties of ethanol during adulthood. Peri-adolescent saccharin consumption was without effect. The data indicate that ethanol consumption during peri-adolescence results in neuroadaptations that may specifically enhance the reinforcing properties of ethanol during adulthood. This increase in the reinforcing properties of ethanol could be a part of biological sequelae that are the basis for the effects of adolescent alcohol consumption on the increase in the rate of alcoholism during adulthood. PMID:26074425

  4. The reinforcing properties of ethanol are quantitatively enhanced in adulthood by peri-adolescent ethanol, but not saccharin, consumption in female alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Toalston, Jamie E; Deehan, Gerald A; Hauser, Sheketha R; Engleman, Eric A; Bell, Richard L; Murphy, James M; McBride, William J; Rodd, Zachary A

    2015-08-01

    Alcohol drinking during adolescence is associated in adulthood with heavier alcohol drinking and an increased rate of alcohol dependence. Past research in our laboratory has indicated that peri-adolescent ethanol consumption can enhance the acquisition and reduce the rate of extinction of ethanol self-administration in adulthood. Caveats of the past research include reinforcer specificity, increased oral consumption during peri-adolescence, and a lack of quantitative assessment of the reinforcing properties of ethanol. The current experiments were designed to determine the effects of peri-adolescent ethanol or saccharin drinking on acquisition and extinction of oral ethanol self-administration and ethanol seeking, and to quantitatively assess the reinforcing properties of ethanol (progressive ratio). Ethanol or saccharin access by alcohol-preferring (P) rats occurred during postnatal day (PND) 30-60. Animals began operant self-administration of ethanol or saccharin after PND 85. After 10 weeks of daily operant self-administration, rats were tested in a progressive ratio paradigm. Two weeks later, self-administration was extinguished in all rats. Peri-adolescent ethanol consumption specifically enhanced the acquisition of ethanol self-administration, reduced the rate of extinction for ethanol self-administration, and quantitatively increased the reinforcing properties of ethanol during adulthood. Peri-adolescent saccharin consumption was without effect. The data indicate that ethanol consumption during peri-adolescence results in neuroadaptations that may specifically enhance the reinforcing properties of ethanol during adulthood. This increase in the reinforcing properties of ethanol could be a part of biological sequelae that are the basis for the effects of adolescent alcohol consumption on the increase in the rate of alcoholism during adulthood.

  5. Laser-induced transient grating setup with continuously tunable period

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Flick, A.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A.; Khanolkar, A.; Abi Ghanem, M.; Boechler, N.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2015-12-15

    We present a modification of the laser-induced transient grating setup enabling continuous tuning of the transient grating period. The fine control of the period is accomplished by varying the angle of the diffraction grating used to split excitation and probe beams. The setup has been tested by measuring dispersion of bulk and surface acoustic waves in both transmission and reflection geometries. The presented modification is fully compatible with optical heterodyne detection and can be easily implemented in any transient grating setup.

  6. Periodic paralysis: An unusual presentation of drug-induced hyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Poonam; Chopra, Deepti; Patra, Surajeet K.; Madaan, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    Hyperkalemia is a life-threatening electrolyte abnormality. The most common cause of hyperkalemia includes renal disease and ingestion of medications. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may develop in patients with underlying renal impairment, disturbed cellular uptake of potassium load, excessive ingestion or infusion of potassium-containing substances. We report a case of “drug-induced severe hyperkalemia” presenting as periodic paralysis. A 67-year-old diabetic and hypertensive woman presented to emergency department with the complaint of intermittent episode of inability to walk for the past 5 days. Each episode lasted for 15-20 minutes and was associated with breathlessness and restlessness. There was no family history of periodic paralysis and drug history revealed that the patient was onolmesartan 20 mg per day (for past 2 years), perindopril 4 mg per day (for past 16 months), and torsemide 10 mg/day. On examination patient was found to be conscious, alert, and afebrile. Vitals were normal. Examination of cardiovascular and respiratory system did not reveal any significant finding. Blood report of the patient showed serum K+ level 8.6 mmol/l. All other investigations were within normal limits. A diagnosis of drug-induced hyperkalemia was made. Patient responded well to the symptomatic treatment. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first case report of drug-induced hyperkalemia presenting as periodic paralysis. PMID:24554915

  7. Methylphenidate improves performance on the radial arm maze in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Dow-Edwards, Diana L; Weedon, Jeremy C; Hellmann, Esther

    2008-01-01

    Methylphenidate (Ritalin; MPD) is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in childhood and adolescence and many clinical studies have documented its efficacy. Due to the limitations of conducting invasive research in humans, animal models can be beneficial for studying drug effects. However, few animal studies have demonstrated the effects of methylphenidate on cognitive processes. The objective of this study was to find a dose of methylphenidate that was effective in improving performance on a spatial working memory cognitive task when administered orally to periadolescent rats. Therefore, we dosed subjects with methylphenidate at 1 or 3 mg/kg/day via gastric intubation from postnatal day 22 to 59 and assessed the effects of the drug on performance on the radial arm maze each day. To enhance performance overall, a second experiment was conducted where the subjects were moderately food restricted (to 90% of the free-feeding weight). Results of Experiment 1 show that during the first week of testing only the 3 mg/kg MPD-treated males showed improved performance (entries prior to repeated entry) when ad lib fed and housed in pairs while the same dose significantly improved performance in both males and females under conditions of food-restriction and individual housing in Experiment 2. MPD also produced a pattern of increased errors and arms entered during the first week, especially in Experiment 2. MPD increased locomotor activity when tested at postnatal day 60 in both experiments. The data suggest that 3 mg/kg oral methylphenidate improves performance on a spatial cognitive task only early in treatment in the rat. While males show improvement under conditions of both high and low motivation, females only show MPD effects when highly motivated. Hypothetically, methylphenidate may improve radial arm maze performance through increased attention and improved spatial working memory and/or alterations in locomotion, reactivity to novelty or anxiety. Regardless, the

  8. Superconductivity-induced phase-periodic transport in nanoscale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Leadbeater, M.; Lambert, C.J.

    1997-07-01

    We present numerical results for the phase-periodic conductance of an Andreev interferometer and predict the existence of a voltage-induced crossover from a zero-phase minimum to a zero-phase maximum. This contrasts with a recent analysis of Stoof and Nazarov and Volkov, Allsopp, and Lambert, which predicts a vanishing amplitude of oscillation at zero temperature and voltage, respectively, and demonstrates that such behavior is nonuniversal. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Superconductivity-induced phase-periodic transport in nanoscale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leadbeater, M.; Lambert, C. J.

    1997-07-01

    We present numerical results for the phase-periodic conductance of an Andreev interferometer and predict the existence of a voltage-induced crossover from a zero-phase minimum to a zero-phase maximum. This contrasts with a recent analysis of Stoof and Nazarov and Volkov, Allsopp, and Lambert, which predicts a vanishing amplitude of oscillation at zero temperature and voltage, respectively, and demonstrates that such behavior is nonuniversal.

  10. Optimizing periodicity and polymodality in noise-induced genetic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Rué, Pau; Süel, Gürol M; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2011-06-01

    Many cellular functions are based on the rhythmic organization of biological processes into self-repeating cascades of events. Some of these periodic processes, such as the cell cycles of several species, exhibit conspicuous irregularities in the form of period skippings, which lead to polymodal distributions of cycle lengths. A recently proposed mechanism that accounts for this quantized behavior is the stabilization of a Hopf-unstable state by molecular noise. Here we investigate the effect of varying noise in a model system, namely an excitable activator-repressor genetic circuit, that displays this noise-induced stabilization effect. Our results show that an optimal noise level enhances the regularity (coherence) of the cycles, in a form of coherence resonance. Similar noise levels also optimize the multimodal nature of the cycle lengths. Together, these results illustrate how molecular noise within a minimal gene regulatory motif confers robust generation of polymodal patterns of periodicity.

  11. Periadolescent amphetamine treatment causes transient cognitive disruptions and long-term changes in hippocampal LTP depending on the endogenous expression of pleiotrophin.

    PubMed

    Gramage, Esther; Del Olmo, Nuria; Fole, Alberto; Martín, Yasmina B; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Amphetamine treatment during adolescence causes long-term cognitive deficits in rats. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a cytokine with important roles in the modulation of synaptic plasticity, whose levels of expression are significantly regulated by amphetamine administration. To test the possibility that the long-term consequences of periadolescent amphetamine treatment cross species and, furthermore, to test the hypothesis that PTN could be one of the factors involved in the adult cognitive deficits observed after periadolescent amphetamine administrations, we comparatively studied the long-term consequences of periadolescent amphetamine treatment (3 mg/kg intraperitoneal, daily during 10 days) in normal wild-type (PTN+/+) and in PTN genetically deficient (PTN-/-) mice. Within the first week after cessation of treatment, significant deficits in the passive avoidance and Y-maze tests were only observed in amphetamine-pretreated PTN-/- mice. However, 13 and 26 days after the last administration, we did not find significant differences in Y-maze between amphetamine- and saline-pretreated PTN-/- mice. In addition, we did not find any genotype- or treatment-related anxiogenic- or depressive-like behaviour in adult mice. Furthermore, we observed a significantly enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 hippocampal slices from saline-pretreated PTN-/- mice compared with saline-pretreated PTN+/+ mice. Interestingly, amphetamine pre-treatment during adolescence significantly enhanced LTP in adult PTN+/+ mice but did not cause any effect in PTN-/- mice, suggesting LTP mechanisms saturation in naïve PTN-/- mice. The data demonstrate that periadolescent amphetamine treatment causes transient cognitive deficits and long-term alterations of hippocampal LTP depending on the endogenous expression of PTN.

  12. Nanoscale Periodic Modulations on Sodium Chloride Induced by Surface Charges

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Kendal W; Qin, Shengyong; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Li, An-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The sodium chloride surface is one of the most common platforms for the study of catalysts, thin film growth, and atmospheric aerosols. Here we report a nanoscale periodic modulation pattern on the surface of a cleaved NaCl single crystal, revealed by non-contact atomic force microscopy with a tuning fork sensor. The surface pattern shows two orthogonal domains, extending over the entire cleavage surface. The spatial modulations exhibit a characteristic period of 5.4 nm, along 110 crystallographic directions of the NaCl. The modulations are robust in vacuum, not affected by the tip-induced electric field or gentle annealing (<300 C); however, they are eliminated after exposure to water and an atomically flat surface can be recovered by subsequent thermal annealing after water exposure. A strong electrostatic charging is revealed on the cleavage surface which may facilitate the formation of the observed metastable surface reconstruction.

  13. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krueger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2012-07-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on two different silica polymorphs (single-crystalline synthetic quartz and commercial fused silica glass) upon irradiation in air with multiple linearly polarized single- and double-fs-laser pulse sequences ({tau} = 150 fs pulse duration, {lambda} = 800 nm center wavelength, temporal pulse separation {Delta}t < 40 ps) is studied experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct types of fs-LIPSS [so-called low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSS (HSFL)] with different spatial periods and orientations were identified. Their appearance was characterized with respect to the experimental parameters peak laser fluence and number of laser pulses per spot. Additionally, the 'dynamics' of the LIPSS formation was addressed in complementary double-fs-pulse experiments with varying delays, revealing a characteristic change of the LSFL periods. The experimental results are interpreted on the basis of a Sipe-Drude model considering the carrier dependence of the optical properties of fs-laser excited silica. This new approach provides an explanation of the LSFL orientation parallel to the laser beam polarisation in silica - as opposed to the behaviour of most other materials.

  14. Dynamically tunable plasmonically induced transparency in periodically patterned graphene nanostrips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hua; Chen, Shuqi; Yu, Ping; Duan, Xiaoyang; Xie, Boyang; Tian, Jianguo

    2013-11-01

    We present a dynamically wavelength tunable plasmonically induced transparency (PIT) planar device composed of periodically patterned graphene nanostrips for the mid-infrared region. The PIT effect can be achieved by a single layer of graphene nanostrips for a fixed Fermi energy. The PIT resonant wavelength can be dynamically tuned while maintaining PIT modulation strength, transmission peaks, and spectral line width by varying the Fermi energy of graphene without re-optimizing and re-fabricating the nanostructures. A three-level plasmonic system is demonstrated to well explain the formation mechanism of the wavelength tunable PIT in the graphene nanostrips. This work may offer a further step in the development of a compact tunable PIT device.

  15. Periodization

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Daniel S.; Reiman, Michael P.; Walker, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinicians are constantly faced with the challenge of designing training programs for injured and noninjured athletes that maximize healing and optimize performance. Periodization is a concept of systematic progression—that is, resistance training programs that follow predictable patterns of change in training variables. The strength training literature is abundant with studies comparing periodization schemes on uninjured, trained, and untrained athletes. The rehabilitation literature, however, is scarce with information about how to optimally design resistance training programs based on periodization principles for injured athletes. The purpose of this review is to discuss relevant training variables and methods of periodization, as well as periodization program outcomes. A secondary purpose is to provide an anecdotal framework regarding implementation of periodization principles into rehabilitation programs. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search from 1979 to 2009 was implemented with the keywords periodization, strength training, rehabilitation, endurance, power, hypertrophy, and resistance training with the Boolean term AND in all possible combinations in the English language. Each author also undertook independent hand searching of article references used in this review. Results: Based on the studies researched, periodized strength training regimens demonstrate improved outcomes as compared to nonperiodized programs. Conclusions: Despite the evidence in the strength training literature supporting periodization programs, there is a considerable lack of data in the rehabilitation literature about program design and successful implementation of periodization into rehabilitation programs. PMID:23015982

  16. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation on tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo Chunlei

    2008-09-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate the generation of periodic surface structures on a technologically important material, tungsten, at both 400 and 800 nm, despite that the table values of dielectric constants for tungsten at these two wavelengths suggest the absence of surface plasmons, a wave necessary for forming periodic structures on metals. Furthermore, we find that the structure periods formed on tungsten are significantly less than the laser wavelengths. We believe that the dielectric constants of tungsten change significantly due to intense laser pulse heating and surface structuring and roughening at nanometer scales, permitting surface plasmon excitation and periodic structure formation.

  17. Inducing nonclassical lasing via periodic drivings in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; García-Ripoll, Juan José; Porras, Diego

    2014-11-01

    We show how a pair of superconducting qubits coupled to a microwave cavity mode can be used to engineer a single-atom laser that emits light into a nonclassical state. Our scheme relies on the dressing of the qubit-field coupling by periodic modulations of the qubit energy. In the dressed basis, the radiative decay of the first qubit becomes an effective incoherent pumping mechanism that injects energy into the system, hence turning dissipation to our advantage. A second, auxiliary qubit is used to shape the decay within the cavity, in such a way that lasing occurs in a squeezed basis of the cavity mode. We characterize the system both by mean-field theory and exact calculations. Our work may find applications in the generation of squeezing and entanglement in circuit QED, as well as in the study of dissipative few- and many-body phase transitions.

  18. Space charge induced beam instability in periodic focusing channela)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Qin, Qing

    2015-02-01

    The transverse evolution of the envelope of an intense, unbunched ion beam in a linear periodic transport channel can be modeled for the approximation of linear self-fields by the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij envelope equation. The envelope mismatched modes, or the second order even mode [I. Hofmann, Phys. Rew. E 57, 4713 (1998)], are the lowest order of resonance leading to collective instability that the designer should avoid, which suggests that an accelerator system should be established in the parameter region where the zero beam current phase advance σ0 less than 90°. In this paper, we systemically studied the resonance mechanisms which result in confluent resonance in quadrupole Focusing-Defocusing (FD) channel and parametric resonance in solenoid channel. We propose that the mismatch modes cannot be exactly separated in FD channel; if one mode is excited, there is always some contribution of the other. To verify the influence of the confluent resonance and parametric resonance, the 2D Poissons solver in the self-consistent particle-in-cell simulation code TOPOPIC is adopted to study the beam evolution in both channels. Our simulations results show that the emittance show significant growth both in the confluent resonance stop band and parametric resonance stop band. The influences of the higher order of resonance are also discussed.

  19. Impurity-induced antiferromagnetic domains in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benali, A.; Bai, Z. J.; Curro, N. J.; Scalettar, R. T.

    2016-08-01

    A central feature of the periodic Anderson model is the competition between antiferromagnetism, mediated by the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction at small conduction electron-local electron hybridization V , and singlet formation at large V . At zero temperature, and in dimension d >1 , these two phases are separated by a quantum critical point Vc. We use quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations to explore the effect of impurities which have a local hybridization V*Vc . We measure the suppression of singlet correlations and the antiferromagnetic correlations which form around the impurity, as well as the size of the resulting domain. Exact diagonalization calculations for linear chains allow us to verify that the qualitative features obtained at intermediate coupling and finite T persist to strong coupling and T =0 , regimes which are difficult to access with QMC. Our calculations agree qualitatively with NMR measurements in CeCoIn5 -xCdx .

  20. Space charge induced beam instability in periodic focusing channel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chao Qin, Qing

    2015-02-15

    The transverse evolution of the envelope of an intense, unbunched ion beam in a linear periodic transport channel can be modeled for the approximation of linear self-fields by the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij envelope equation. The envelope mismatched modes, or the second order even mode [I. Hofmann, Phys. Rew. E 57, 4713 (1998)], are the lowest order of resonance leading to collective instability that the designer should avoid, which suggests that an accelerator system should be established in the parameter region where the zero beam current phase advance σ{sub 0} less than 90°. In this paper, we systemically studied the resonance mechanisms which result in confluent resonance in quadrupole Focusing-Defocusing (FD) channel and parametric resonance in solenoid channel. We propose that the mismatch modes cannot be exactly separated in FD channel; if one mode is excited, there is always some contribution of the other. To verify the influence of the confluent resonance and parametric resonance, the 2D Poissons solver in the self-consistent particle-in-cell simulation code TOPOPIC is adopted to study the beam evolution in both channels. Our simulations results show that the emittance show significant growth both in the confluent resonance stop band and parametric resonance stop band. The influences of the higher order of resonance are also discussed.

  1. Lorazepam-induced effects on silent period and corticomotor excitability.

    PubMed

    Kimiskidis, V K; Papagiannopoulos, S; Kazis, D A; Sotirakoglou, K; Vasiliadis, G; Zara, F; Kazis, A; Mills, K R

    2006-09-01

    TMS studies on the CNS effects of benzodiazepines have provided contradictory results. The objective of this study is to describe the effects of lorazepam on silent period (SP) and corticomotor excitability. Twelve healthy male subjects (median age 35 years) were studied at baseline, following i.v. lorazepam administration and after reversal of the benzodiazepine effects with i.v. flumazenil. Lorazepam was given at a low-dose in one subject (0.0225 mg/kg bolus + 2 microg/kg/h infusion) and at a high-dose (0.045 mg/kg bolus + 2.6 microg/kg/h infusion) in the rest. Threshold (Thr) was measured at 1% steps. SPs were investigated with two complementary methods. First, SPs were elicited using a wide range of stimulus intensities (SIs) (from 5 to 100% maximum SI at 5% increments). At each SI, four SPs were obtained and the average value of SP duration was used to construct a stimulus/response (S/R) curve of SI versus SP .The resulting S/R curves were then fitted to a Boltzman function, the best-fit values of which were statistically compared for each experimental condition (i.e., baseline vs. lorazepam vs. flumazenil). Second, a large number of SPs (n=100) was elicited during each of the three experimental conditions using blocks of four stimuli with an intensity alternating between MT and 200% MT. This method was employed so as to reveal the dynamic, time-varying effects of lorazepam and flumazenil on SP duration at two stimulus intensity (SI) levels. MEP recruitment curves were constructed at rest and during activation and fitted to a Boltzman function the best-fit values of which were statistically compared for each experimental condition. Lorazepam at a low dose did not affect Thr, SP, or the active MEP recruitment curves. The high dose also had no effect on Thr and the active MEPs whereas the resting MEP recruitment curves were depressed post-lorazepam at the higher range of stimulus intensities. With regard to SP, the Max value of the S/R curve decreased from 251

  2. Laser-induced periodic annular surface structures on fused silica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Brelet, Yohann; Forestier, Benjamin; Houard, Aurelien; Yu, Linwei; Deng, Yongkai; Jiang, Hongbing

    2013-06-24

    We report on the formation of laser-induced periodic annular surface structures on fused silica irradiated with multiple femtosecond laser pulses. This surface morphology emerges after the disappearance of the conventional laser induced periodic surface structures, under successive laser pulse irradiation. It is independent of the laser polarization and universally observed for different focusing geometries. We interpret its formation in terms of the interference between the reflected laser field on the surface of the damage crater and the incident laser pulse.

  3. Peripherally induced EMG silent periods. Normal physiology and disorders of motor control.

    PubMed

    Ford, B; Fahn, S; Pullman, S L

    1995-01-01

    Periods of relative or absolute EMG suppression induced by peripheral stimulation have been described using a variety of experimental paradigms in normal subjects and in conditions of abnormal motor control. Peripherally induced silent periods represent complex inhibitory modulations of muscle activity and can be reproducibly evoked by cutaneous or mixed nerve electrical or mechanical stimuli. Features of the electromyographic suppression which most easily permit analysis include the degree of EMG inhibition, the latency and duration of the response, and the timing of the return of normal EMG activity following the stimulus, or S-X interval. When exteroceptive reflexes in craniocervical muscles are studied, alternating periods of EMG inhibition and facilitation have been described. Experiments designed to isolate the various contributants to EMG silence have not revealed a unitary electrophysiological basis for all of the silent period responses elicited by peripheral means. Thus, silent periods share a multifactorial origin that depends upon segmental spinal mechanisms which are heavily influenced by descending suprasegmental pathways. Because these mechanisms are affected in a variety of central disorders of motor control, study of peripherally induced silent periods may provide a window on the abnormal physiology of selected CNS diseases. Further study is required to elucidate the electrophysiology of peripherally induced silent periods, and to clarify the alterations in these negative motor phenomena that occur in central disorders of motor control. PMID:8848978

  4. Mechanisms of femtosecond LIPSS formation induced by periodic surface temperature modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Evgeny L.

    2016-06-01

    Here we analyze the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on metal surfaces upon single femtosecond laser pulses. Most of the existing models of the femtosecond LIPSS formation discuss only the appearance of a periodic modulation of the electron and ion temperatures. However the mechanism how the inhomogeneous surface temperature distribution induces the periodically-modulated surface profile under the conditions corresponding to ultrashort-pulse laser ablation is still not clear. Estimations made on the basis of different hydrodynamic instabilities allow to sort out mechanisms, which can bridge the gap between the temperature modulation and the LIPSS. The proposed theory shows that the periodic structures can be generated by single ultrashort laser pulses due to ablative instabilities. The Marangoni and Rayleigh-Bénard convection on the contrary cannot cause the LIPSS formation.

  5. Motion-induced magnetic resonance of Rb atoms in a periodic magnetostatic field.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, A; Enomoto, Y; Komaki, K; Yamazaki, Y

    2005-12-16

    We demonstrate that transitions between Zeeman-split sublevels of Rb atoms are resonantly induced by the motion of the atoms (velocity: approximately 100 m/s) in a periodic magnetostatic field (period: 1 mm) when the Zeeman splitting corresponds to the frequency of the magnetic field experienced by the moving atoms. A circularly polarized laser beam polarizes Rb atoms with a velocity selected using the Doppler effect and detects their magnetic resonance in a thin cell, to which the periodic field is applied with the arrays of parallel current-carrying wires.

  6. Ultraviolet and infrared femtosecond laser induced periodic surface structures on thin polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Rebollar, Esther; Castillejo, Marta; Vazquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Moreno, Pablo

    2012-01-23

    This work demonstrates the formation of femtosecond laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) by multipulse irradiation with the fundamental and 3rd harmonic of a linearly polarized Ti:sapphire laser (795 and 265 nm) on thin films of the polymers poly (ethylene terephthalate), poly (trimethylene terephthalate), and poly (carbonate bisphenol A) prepared by spin-coating. LIPSS, inspected by atomic force microscopy, are formed upon multiple pulse UV and IR irradiation with wavelength-sized period in a narrow range of fluences below the ablation threshold. Control and tunability of the size and morphology of the periodic structures become thus possible ensuring photochemical integrity of polymer films.

  7. Thyroid hormone alleviates demyelination induced by cuprizone through its role in remyelination during the remission period

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mao; Zhan, Xiao L; Ma, Zi Y; Chen, Xing S; Cai, Qi Y

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease induced by demyelination in the central nervous system, and the remission period of MS is crucial for remyelination. In addition, abnormal levels of thyroid hormone (TH) have been identified in MS. However, in the clinic, insufficient attention has been paid to the role of TH in the remission period. Indeed, TH not only functions in the development of the brain but also affects myelination. Therefore, it is necessary to observe the effect of TH on remyelination during this period. A model of demyelination induced by cuprizone (CPZ) was used to observe the function of TH in remyelination during the remission period of MS. Through weighing and behavioral tests, we found that TH improved the physical symptoms of mice impaired by CPZ. Supplementation of TH led to the repair of myelin as detected by immunohistochemistry and western blot. In addition, a sufficient TH supply resulted in an increase in myelinated axons without affecting myelin thickness and g ratio in the corpus callosum, as detected by electron microscopy. Double immunostaining with myelin basic protein and neurofilament 200 (NF200) showed that the CPZ-induced impairment of axons was alleviated by TH. Conversely, insufficient TH induced by 6-propyl-2-thiouracil resulted in the enlargement of mitochondria. Furthermore, we found that an adequate supply of TH promoted the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte lineage cells by immunofluorescence, which was beneficial to remyelination. Further, we found that TH reduced the number of astrocytes without affecting microglia. Conclusively, it was shown that TH alleviated demyelination induced by CPZ by promoting the development of oligodendrocyte lineage cells and remyelination. The critical time for remyelination is the remission period of MS. TH plays a significant role in alleviating demyelination during the remission period in the clinical treatment of MS. PMID:25577802

  8. DETECTION OF A CRITICAL PERIOD NECESSARY FOR ATRAZINE-INDUCED MAMMARY GLAND DELAYS IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection of a Critical Period Necessary for Atrazine-Induced Mammary Gland Delays in Rats.

    Jennifer L. Rayner1 and Suzanne E. Fenton2

    1 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, DESE, Chapel Hill, NC, and 2 Reproductive Toxicology Division, USEPA, NHEERL/ORD, R...

  9. Reversible photo-induced long-period fiber gratings in photonic liquid crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Liou, Jia-hong; Chang, Tin-hao; Lin, Ta; Yu, Chin-ping

    2011-03-28

    A novel light-controllable long-period fiber grating (LPFG) is demonstrated by making use of a PCF infiltrated with a photoresponsive liquid crystal (LC) mixture consisting of nematic LC molecules and light-sensitive 4-methoxyazobenzene (4MAB). With the aid of the photo-induced isomerization of 4MAB, the refractive index of the LC mixture can be modulated and the periodic index perturbation along the fiber can be achieved by exposing the PCF to a blue laser through a mask. The resonance wavelength and dip depth of the LPFG can be controlled by using different blue-laser irradiation time, numbers of period, and 4MAB concentrations. In addition, the photo-induced LPFG is erasable under green-laser illumination. PMID:21451702

  10. Asymmetric mode coupling in arc-induced long-period fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Rios, A.; Torres-Gomez, I.; Anzueto-Sanchez, G.; Selvas-Aguilar, R.; Duran-Ramirez, V. M.; Guerrero-Viramontes, J. A.; Toral-Acosta, D.; Salceda Delgado, G.; Castillo-Guzman, A.

    2016-04-01

    An extensive experimental study of the transverse modal field characteristics of mircrobend arc-induced long-period fiber gratings is presented. A wavelength scanning of the near-field intensity pattern inside each loss band in the transmission spectrum, shows a clear asymmetry in the transverse intensity distribution resulting from the fabrication method. This asymmetry reflects as a 10.7 dB difference in the notch depths for two orthogonal polarizations. Though a one year study, it was found that that environmental conditions during fabrication strongly affects the gratings characteristics. The best performance was obtained during the autumn season, where microbend arc-induced long-period fiber gratings produce wavelength filters with short lengths (between 10 and 30 periods for depths in excess of 20 dB) and the insertion loss may be as low as 0.12 dB.

  11. High spatial frequency periodic structures induced on metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jian-Wu; Zhang, Cheng-Yun; Liu, Hai-Ying; Dai, Qiao-Feng; Wu, Li-Jun; Lan, Sheng; Gopal, Achanta Venu; Trofimov, Vyacheslav A; Lysak, Tatiana M

    2012-01-16

    The high spatial frequency periodic structures induced on metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses was investigated experimentally and numerically. It is suggested that the redistribution of the electric field on metal surface caused by the initially formed low spatial frequency periodic structures plays a crucial role in the creation of high spatial frequency periodic structures. The field intensity which is initially localized in the grooves becomes concentrated on the ridges in between the grooves when the depth of the grooves exceeds a critical value, leading to the ablation of the ridges in between the grooves and the formation of high spatial frequency periodic structures. The proposed formation process is supported by both the numerical simulations based on the finite-difference time-domain technique and the experimental results obtained on some metals such as stainless steel and nickel.

  12. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on niobium by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, A.; Dias, A.; Gomez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S. M.; Rodriguez, A.

    2014-05-07

    The surface morphology of a Niobium sample, irradiated in air by a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800 nm and pulse duration of 100 fs, was examined. The period of the micro/nanostructures, parallel and perpendicularly oriented to the linearly polarized fs-laser beam, was studied by means of 2D Fast Fourier Transform analysis. The observed Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) were classified as Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (periods about 600 nm) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS, showing a periodicity around 300 nm, both of them perpendicularly oriented to the polarization of the incident laser wave. Moreover, parallel high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed with periods around 100 nm located at the peripheral areas of the laser fingerprint and overwritten on the perpendicular periodic gratings. The results indicate that this method of micro/nanostructuring allows controlling the Niobium grating period by the number of pulses applied, so the scan speed and not the fluence is the key parameter of control. A discussion on the mechanism of the surface topology evolution was also introduced.

  13. Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced periodic surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Torralva, Ben; Adams, David P.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2013-09-30

    Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a periodicity slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ∼50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are observed on the same timescale as material removal, suggesting that their formation involves material ejection.

  14. Subnanosecond-laser-induced periodic surface structures on prescratched silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Motoharu; Matsuo, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were fabricated on a prescratched silicon surface by irradiation with subnanosecond laser pulses. Low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL) were observed in the central and peripheral regions; both had a period Λ close to the laser wavelength λ, and the wavevector orientation was parallel to the electric field of the laser beam. The LSFL in the peripheral region seemed to be growing, that is, expanding in length with increasing number of pulses, into the outer regions. In addition, high-spatial-frequency LIPSS, Λ ≲ λ /2, were found along the scratches, and their wavevector orientation was parallel to the scratches.

  15. Development of solenoid-induced helical wiggler with four poles per period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Kiyochi, M.; Nakao, N.; Fujita, M.; Imasaki, K.; Nakai, S.; Mima, K.

    1999-06-01

    A new type of helical wiggler consisting of two staggered-iron arrays inserted into a solenoid field has been developed. The field measured by a test wiggler showed linear increment with the period. It was seen that 24% of the solenoid field contributed to the induced wiggler field when the gap length and the period of the wiggler were 16 and 24 mm, respectively. This wiggler would be useful for an FEL with a low-energy electron beam propagating in a strong axial guiding field.

  16. Periodic surface structure bifurcation induced by ultrafast laser generated point defect diffusion in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abere, Michael J.; Torralva, Ben; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2016-04-01

    The formation of high spatial frequency laser induced periodic surface structures (HSFL) with period <0.3 λ in GaAs after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses in air is studied. We have identified a point defect generation mechanism that operates in a specific range of fluences in semiconductors between the band-gap closure and ultrafast-melt thresholds that produces vacancy/interstitial pairs. Stress relaxation, via diffusing defects, forms the 350-400 nm tall and ˜90 nm wide structures through a bifurcation process of lower spatial frequency surface structures. The resulting HSFL are predominately epitaxial single crystals and retain the original GaAs stoichiometry.

  17. Topiramate-induced periodic limb movement disorder in a patient affected by focal epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Romigi, Andrea; Vitrani, Giuseppe; D'Aniello, Alfredo; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    Periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) is characterized by pathological periodic limb movements during sleep, insomnia and/or diurnal sleepiness, and the absence of another primary sleep disorder. We report a patient with complex partial seizures who developed PLMD while taking topiramate (TPM). He had no evidence of metabolic and/or other conditions inducing PLMD. He also had fragmented sleep and disruptive PLMS on polysomnography, and PLMS subsided with change of antiepileptic drug. Topiramate may modulate the dopaminergic pathway by inhibition of glutamate release, thereby inducing PLMD as observed in our patient. Although a single case does not allow any generalization, PLMD should be considered in patients complaining of insomnia and treated with TPM. PMID:25667887

  18. Laser-induced periodic alignment of Ag nanoparticles in soda-lime glass.

    PubMed

    Goutaland, François; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Sow, Mohamed Cherif; Ollier, Nadège; Vocanson, Francis

    2013-12-30

    One-, two- or three-dimensional arrays of closely spaced silver nanoparticles may lead to new optical properties, due to short or long range coupling between their resonant surface plasmons, so that the spatially controlled growth of silver nanoparticles provides an efficient way to tune their optical properties. Towards this way, we present here the periodic pattern of a glass surface with silver nanoparticles by continuous ultraviolet laser exposure. The formation of the 160 nm period pattern is well described by an interference-based model which agrees with the experimental conclusions, mainly obtained by various forms of microscopy. Statistical approach based on the autocorrelation function gives quantitative description about the quality of the order in the periodic structure and about the nanoparticles averaged diameter (80 nm). We also present the optical extinction spectrum of the Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structure (LIPSS)-containing area of the glass, which unusually shows several bands in the visible range. The period of 160 nm of the periodic structure is short enough to allow coupling between nanoparticles, which makes it a possible candidate for plasmon-based optical applications.

  19. From random inhomogeneities to periodic nanostructures induced in bulk silica by ultrashort laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, Anton; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Itina, Tatiana E.

    2016-02-01

    Femtosecond laser-induced volume nanograting formation is numerically investigated. The developed model solves nonlinear Maxwell's equations coupled with multiple rate free carrier density equations in the presence of randomly distributed inhomogeneities in fused silica. As a result of the performed calculations, conduction band electron density is shown to form nanoplanes elongated perpendicular to the laser polarization. Two types of nanoplanes are identified. The structures of the first type have a characteristic period of the laser wavelength in glass and are attributed to the interference of the incident and the inhomogeneity-scattered light waves. Field components induced by coherent multiple scattering in directions perpendicular to the laser polarization are shown to be responsible for the formation of the second type of structures with a subwavelength periodicity. In this case, the influence of the inhomogeneity concentration on the period of nanoplanes is shown. The calculation results not only help to identify the physical origin of the self-organized nanogratings, but also explain their period and orientation.

  20. Respiratory muscle activity during sleep-induced periodic breathing in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Hudgel, D W; Hamilton, H B

    1994-11-01

    During spontaneous sleep-induced periodic breathing in elderly subjects, we have found that tidal volume oscillations are related to reciprocal oscillations in upper airway resistance. The purpose of this study was to address the mechanism of the relationship between oscillations in tidal volume and upper airway resistance in elderly subjects with sleep-induced periodic breathing. We hypothesized that the spontaneous periodic breathing observed in non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep in elderly subjects would be closely related to fluctuations in upper airway resistance and not to changes in central motor drive to ventilatory pump muscles. Therefore, in eight healthy elderly subjects, we measured costal margin chest wall peak moving time average electrical inspiratory activity (CW EMG), ventilation variables, and upper airway resistance during sleep. Five of eight subjects had significant sine wave oscillations in upper airway resistance and tidal volume. For these five subjects, there was a reciprocal exponential relationship between peak upper airway inspiratory resistance and tidal volume or minute ventilation [r = -0.60 +/- 0.20 (SD) (P < 0.05) and -0.55 +/- 0.26 (P < 0.05), respectively], such that as resistance increased, ventilation decreased. The relationship between CW EMG and tidal volume or minute ventilation was quite low (r = 0.12 +/- 0.32 and -0.07 +/- 0.27, respectively). This study demonstrated that oscillations in ventilation during NREM sleep in elderly subjects were significantly related to fluctuations in upper airway resistance but were not related to changes in chest wall muscle electrical activity. Therefore, changes in upper airway caliber likely contribute to oscillations in ventilation seen during sleep-induced periodic breathing in the elderly.

  1. Reinforcing Properties and Neurochemical Response of Ethanol within the Posterior Ventral Tegmental Area Are Enhanced in Adulthood by Periadolescent Ethanol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Deehan, Gerald A.; Hauser, Sheketha R.; Engleman, Eric A.; Bell, Richard L.; Murphy, James M.; Truitt, William A.; McBride, William J.; Rodd, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol drinking during adolescence is associated with increased alcohol drinking and alcohol dependence in adulthood. Research examining the biologic consequences of adolescent ethanol (EtOH) consumption on the response to EtOH in the neurocircuitry shown to regulate drug reinforcement is limited. The experiments were designed to determine the effects of periadolescent alcohol drinking on the reinforcing properties of EtOH within the posterior ventral tegmental area (pVTA) and the ability of EtOH microinjected into the pVTA to stimulate dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh). EtOH access (24-hour free-choice) by alcohol-preferring rats occurred during postnatal days (PND) 30–60. Animals were tested for their response to EtOH after PND 85. Intracranial self-administration techniques were performed to assess EtOH self-infusion into the pVTA. In the second experiment, rats received microinjections of EtOH into the pVTA, and dialysis samples were collected from the AcbSh. The results indicate that in rats that consumed EtOH during adolescence, the pVTA was more sensitive to the reinforcing effects of EtOH (a lower concentration of EtOH supported self-administration) and the ability of EtOH microinjected into the pVTA to stimulate DA release in the AcbSh was enhanced (sensitivity and magnitude). The data indicate that EtOH consumption during adolescence altered the mesolimbic DA system to be more sensitive and responsive to EtOH. This increase in the response to EtOH within the mesolimbic DA during adulthood could be part of biologic sequelae that are the basis for the deleterious effects of adolescent alcohol consumption on the rate of alcoholism during adulthood. PMID:25150280

  2. Field-induced periodic distortions in a nematic liquid crystal: deuterium NMR study and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, A; Zakharov, A V

    2011-08-01

    The peculiarities in the dynamic of the director reorientation in a liquid crystal (LC) film under the influence of the electric E field directed at an angle α to the magnetic B field have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Time-resolved deuterium NMR spectroscopy is employed to investigate the field-induced director dynamics. Analysis of the experimental results, based on the predictions of hydrodynamic theory including both the director motion and fluid flow, provides an evidence for the appearance of the spatially periodic patterns in 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl LC film, at the angles α>60∘, in response to the suddenly applied E. These periodic distortions produce a lower effective rotational viscosity. This gives a faster response of the director rotation than for a uniform mode, as observed in our NMR experiment. PMID:21929001

  3. Stimulus-induced rhythmic, periodic, or ictal discharges (SIRPIDs): an intriguing EEG phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Mariana Ribeiro Marcondes da; Andrade, Joaquina; Garzon, Eliana

    2013-12-01

    SIRPIDs, an acronym for stimulus-induced rhythmic, periodic, or ictal discharges, were first named in 2004. This is a pattern observed in continuous electroencephalogram (CEEG) consistently elicited by stimulation in comatose patients. The pathophysiology of SIRPIDs probably involves dysregulation of subcortico-cortical projections, particularly thalamocortical circuit, in a markedly abnormal brain with hyperexci-table cortex. This may explain some studies found an association of prolonged periodic epileptiform discharges (PEDs) activity and a higher incidence of concurrent electrographic seizures and SIRPIDs. An association of SIRPIDs and poor prognosis has already been described. However, it is not yet possible to assert whether these discharges can cause neuronal injury or if they are simply a marker of severe brain injury. Objective of this paper is to review clinical relevance and pathophysiology of SIRPIDs, as well as its role as a brain response in the critically ill patient.

  4. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structural formation on sapphire with nanolayered gold coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kai; Wang, Cong; Duan, Ji'an; Guo, Chunlei

    2016-09-01

    Sapphire has a potential as a new generation of electronics display. However, direct processing of sapphire surface by visible or near-IR laser light is challenging since sapphire is transparent to these wavelengths. In this study, we investigate the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) on sapphire coated with nanolayered gold film. We found a reduced threshold by about 25 % in generating uniform LIPSSs on sapphire due to the nanolayered gold film. Different thickness of nanolayered gold films are studied, and it is shown that the change in thickness does not significantly affect the threshold reduction. It is believed that the diffusion of hot electrons in the gold films increases interfacial carrier density and electron-phonon coupling that results in a reduced threshold and more uniform periodic surface structure generation.

  5. Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Torralva, Ben; Adams, David P.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2014-06-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110 nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

  6. Effects of dispersion and filtering induced by periodic multilayer mirrors reflection on attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-You; Yin, Liang; Chen, Shu-Jing; Chen, Zhao-Yang; Ding, Ying-Chun

    2016-09-01

    Using temporal and spectral methods, the effects of dispersion and filtering induced by Mo/Si multilayer mirrors reflection on incident attosecond pulses were studied. First, two temporal parameters, the pulse broadening factor, and the energy loss factor, were defined to evaluate the effects of dispersion and filtering. Then, by analyzing these temporal parameters, we investigated and compared the dispersion and filtering effects on attosecond pulses. In addition, we explored the origins of pulse broadening and energy loss by analyzing the spectral and temporal characteristics of periodic Mo/Si multilayer mirrors. The results indicate that the filtering effect induced by Mo/Si multilayer mirrors reflection is the dominant reason for pulse broadening and energy loss. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11547183 and 11547241) and the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. JD1517 and 2652014012).

  7. Femtosecond laser induced periodic surface structures on multi-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Beltaos, Angela Kovačević, Aleksander G.; Matković, Aleksandar; Ralević, Uroš; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Jovanović, Djordje; Jelenković, Branislav M.; Gajić, Radoš

    2014-11-28

    In this work, we present an observation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on graphene. LIPSS on other materials have been observed for nearly 50 years, but until now, not on graphene. Our findings for LIPSS on multi-layer graphene were consistent with previous reports of LIPSS on other materials, thus classifying them as high spatial frequency LIPSS. LIPSS on multi-layer graphene were generated in an air environment by a linearly polarized femtosecond laser with excitation wavelength λ of 840 nm, pulse duration τ of ∼150 fs, and a fluence F of ∼4.3–4.4 mJ/cm{sup 2}. The observed LIPSS were perpendicular to the laser polarization and had dimensions of width w of ∼30–40 nm and length l of ∼0.5–1.5 μm, and spatial periods Λ of ∼70–100 nm (∼λ/8–λ/12), amongst the smallest of spatial periods reported for LIPSS on other materials. The spatial period and width of the LIPSS were shown to decrease for an increased number of laser shots. The experimental results support the leading theory behind high spatial frequency LIPSS formation, implying the involvement of surface plasmon polaritons. This work demonstrates a new way to pattern multi-layer graphene in a controllable manner, promising for a variety of emerging graphene/LIPSS applications.

  8. Ultrafast laser induced periodic sub-wavelength aluminum surface structures and nanoparticles in air and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Dar, Mudasir H.; Deepak, K. L. N.; Rao, D. Narayana

    2014-09-01

    In this communication, we demonstrate the generation of laser-induced periodic sub-wavelength surface structures (LIPSS) or ripples on a bulk aluminum (Al) and Al nanoparticles (NPs) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Al surface at normal incidence in air and by immersing in ethanol (C2H5OH) and water (H2O) using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ˜110 fs pulse duration and ˜800 nm wavelength. Field emission scanning electron microscope is utilized for imaging surface morphology of laser written structures and it reveals that the spatial periodicity as well as the surface morphology of the LIPSS depends on the surrounding dielectric medium and also on the various laser irradiation parameters. The observed LIPSS have been classified as low spatial frequency LIPSS which are perpendicularly oriented to the laser polarization with a periodicity from 460 to 620 nm and high spatial frequency LIPSS which spectacles a periodicity less than 100 nm with the orientation parallel to the polarization of the incident laser beam. Fabricated colloidal solutions, which contain the Al NPs, were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM results reveal the formation of internal cavities in Al NPs both in ethanol and water. Formation mechanism of LIPSS and cavities inside the nanoparticles are discussed in detail.

  9. Ultrafast laser induced periodic sub-wavelength aluminum surface structures and nanoparticles in air and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Dar, Mudasir H.; Rao, D. Narayana E-mail: dnr-laserlab@yahoo.com; Deepak, K. L. N.

    2014-09-21

    In this communication, we demonstrate the generation of laser-induced periodic sub-wavelength surface structures (LIPSS) or ripples on a bulk aluminum (Al) and Al nanoparticles (NPs) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Al surface at normal incidence in air and by immersing in ethanol (C₂H₅OH) and water (H₂O) using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ~110 fs pulse duration and ~800 nm wavelength. Field emission scanning electron microscope is utilized for imaging surface morphology of laser written structures and it reveals that the spatial periodicity as well as the surface morphology of the LIPSS depends on the surrounding dielectric medium and also on the various laser irradiation parameters. The observed LIPSS have been classified as low spatial frequency LIPSS which are perpendicularly oriented to the laser polarization with a periodicity from 460 to 620 nm and high spatial frequency LIPSS which spectacles a periodicity less than 100 nm with the orientation parallel to the polarization of the incident laser beam. Fabricated colloidal solutions, which contain the Al NPs, were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM results reveal the formation of internal cavities in Al NPs both in ethanol and water. Formation mechanism of LIPSS and cavities inside the nanoparticles are discussed in detail.

  10. Polarisation-dependent generation of fs-laser induced periodic surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräf, Stephan; Müller, Frank A.

    2015-03-01

    The formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPPS) was investigated on polished stainless steel surfaces under irradiation with fs-laser pulses characterised by a pulse duration τ = 300 fs, a laser wavelength λ = 1025 nm, a repetition frequency frep = 250 Hz and a laser fluence F = 1 J/cm2. For this purpose line scans with a scanning velocity v = 0.5 mm/s were performed in air environment at normal incidence utilising a well-defined temporal control of the electrical field vector. The generated surface structures were characterised by optical microscopy, by scanning electron microscopy and by atomic force microscopy in combination with Fourier transformation. The results reveal the formation of a homogenous and highly periodic surface pattern of ripples with a period Λexp ≈ 925 nm aligned perpendicular to the incident electric field vector for static linear polarisation states. Utilising a motor-driven rotation device it was demonstrated that a continuously rotating electric field vector allows to transfer the originally well-ordered periodic ripples into tailored disordered surface structures that could be of particular interest for e.g. absorbing surfaces, plasmonic enhanced optoelectronic devices and biomedical applications.

  11. Femtosecond diffraction dynamics of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krueger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2013-02-04

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on fused silica upon irradiation with linearly polarized fs-laser pulses (50 fs pulse duration, 800 nm center wavelength) is studied experimentally using a transillumination femtosecond time-resolved (0.1 ps-1 ns) pump-probe diffraction approach. This allows to reveal the generation dynamics of near-wavelength-sized LIPSS showing a transient diffraction at specific spatial frequencies even before a corresponding permanent surface relief was observed. The results confirm that the ultrafast energy deposition to the materials surface plays a key role and triggers subsequent physical mechanisms such as carrier scattering into self-trapped excitons.

  12. Mechanically induced long period fiber gratings on single mode tapered optical fiber for structure sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido-Navarro, María. G.; Marrujo-García, Sigifredo; Álvarez-Chávez, José A.; Velázquez-González, Jesús S.; Martínez-Piñón, Fernando; Escamilla-Ambrosio, Ponciano J.

    2015-08-01

    The modal characteristics of tapered single mode optical fibers and its strain sensing characteristics by using mechanically induced long period fiber gratings are presented in this work. Both Long Period Fiber Gratings (LPFG) and fiber tapers are fiber devices that couple light from the core fiber into the fiber cladding modes. The mechanical LPFG is made up of two plates, one flat and the other grooved. For this experiment the grooved plate was done on an acrylic slab with the help of a computer numerical control machine. The manufacturing of the tapered fiber is accomplished by applying heat using an oxygen-propane flame burner and stretching the fiber, which protective coating has been removed. Then, a polymer-tube-package is added in order to make the sensor sufficiently stiff for the tests. The mechanical induced LPFG is accomplished by putting the tapered fiber in between the two plates, so the taper acquires the form of the grooved plate slots. Using a laser beam the transmission spectrum showed a large peak transmission attenuation of around -20 dB. The resultant attenuation peak wavelength in the transmission spectrum shifts with changes in tension showing a strain sensitivity of 2pm/μɛ. This reveals an improvement on the sensitivity for structure monitoring applications compared with the use of a standard optical fiber. In addition to the experimental work, the supporting theory and numerical simulation analysis are also included.

  13. Sub-Diffraction Limited Writing based on Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS)

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaolong; Datta, Anurup; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M.; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-01-01

    Controlled fabrication of single and multiple nanostructures far below the diffraction limit using a method based on laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is presented. In typical LIPSS, multiple lines with a certain spatial periodicity, but often not well-aligned, were produced. In this work, well-controlled and aligned nanowires and nanogrooves with widths as small as 40 nm and 60 nm with desired orientation and length are fabricated. Moreover, single nanowire and nanogroove were fabricated based on the same mechanism for forming multiple, periodic structures. Combining numerical modeling and AFM/SEM analyses, it was found these nanostructures were formed through the interference between the incident laser radiation and the surface plasmons, the mechanism for forming LIPSS on a dielectric surface using a high power femtosecond laser. We expect that our method, in particular, the fabrication of single nanowires and nanogrooves could be a promising alternative for fabrication of nanoscale devices due to its simplicity, flexibility, and versatility. PMID:27721428

  14. Sub-Diffraction Limited Writing based on Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaolong; Datta, Anurup; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M.; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-10-01

    Controlled fabrication of single and multiple nanostructures far below the diffraction limit using a method based on laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is presented. In typical LIPSS, multiple lines with a certain spatial periodicity, but often not well-aligned, were produced. In this work, well-controlled and aligned nanowires and nanogrooves with widths as small as 40 nm and 60 nm with desired orientation and length are fabricated. Moreover, single nanowire and nanogroove were fabricated based on the same mechanism for forming multiple, periodic structures. Combining numerical modeling and AFM/SEM analyses, it was found these nanostructures were formed through the interference between the incident laser radiation and the surface plasmons, the mechanism for forming LIPSS on a dielectric surface using a high power femtosecond laser. We expect that our method, in particular, the fabrication of single nanowires and nanogrooves could be a promising alternative for fabrication of nanoscale devices due to its simplicity, flexibility, and versatility.

  15. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure on the Ti-based nanolayered thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Petrović, Suzana M.; Gaković, B.; Peruško, D.; Stratakis, E.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Čekada, M.; Fotakis, C.; Jelenković, B.

    2013-12-21

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) and chemical composition changes of Ti-based nanolayered thin films (Al/Ti, Ni/Ti) after femtosecond (fs) laser pulses action were studied. Irradiation is performed using linearly polarized Ti:Sapphire fs laser pulses of 40 fs pulse duration and 800 nm wavelength. The low spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL), oriented perpendicular to the laser polarization with periods slightly lower than the irradiation wavelength, was typically formed at elevated laser fluences. On the contrary, high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) with uniform period of 155 nm, parallel to the laser light polarization, appeared at low laser fluences, as well as in the wings of the Gaussian laser beam distribution for higher used fluence. LSFL formation was associated with the material ablation process and accompanied by the intense formation of nanoparticles, especially in the Ni/Ti system. The composition changes at the surface of both multilayer systems in the LSFL area indicated the intermixing between layers and the substrate. Concentration and distribution of all constitutive elements in the irradiated area with formed HSFLs were almost unchanged.

  16. Mechanically induced long period fiber gratings in Er3+ fiber for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido-Navarro, M. G.; Alvarez-Chavez, J. A.; Ceballos-Herrera, D. E.; Escamilla-Ambrosio, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    This work presents preliminary results on wavelength sensitivity due to mechanically induced long period fiber grating (LPFG) on both standard single-mode and Er-doped fibers. The work presents and compares results for both types of fibers under different torsion conditions. In order to apply the torsion one of the fiber ends is fixed while torsion is applied on the other end. A LPFG whose period is 503μm is used to press on the fiber after the torsion, this will allow for micro curvatures to be formed on the fiber, which will in turn generate a periodical index perturbation on it. Here, it was noted that the rejection band shifts to shorter wavelengths for Er-doped fibers. It was detected that for torsion of 6 turns applied to 10cm doped fiber the wavelength peaks can shift up to 25nm, which is longer than similar results reported on standard fibers. Therefore, by using Er-doped fibers this technique will give more sensitive and accurate results on the real conditions of the structure under study. These results can be employed for sensing applications, especially for small to medium size structures, being these structures mechanical, civil or aeronautical. Theoretical calculations and simulations are employed for experimental results validation.

  17. Pulsewidth dependence of laser-induced periodic surface structure formed on yttria-stabilized zirconia polycrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakehata, Masayuki; Yashiro, Hidehiko; Oyane, Ayako; Ito, Atsuo; Torizuka, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Three-mol% yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (3Y-TZP) is a fine engineering ceramic that offers high fracture resistance and flexural strength. Thus, it is often applied in mechanical components and medical implants. The surface roughness can be controlled to improve the device characters in some applications. Ultrashort pulse lasers can form laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on 3Y-TZP, which have never been investigated in detail. Therefore, this paper reports the formation and characteristics of LIPSS formed on 3Y-TZP, focusing on the pulsewidth dependence. The LIPSS was formed by a Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse amplification system, which generates 810 nmcentered 80-fs pulses at a 570 Hz repetition rate. The measured ablation threshold peak fluence was ~1.5 J/cm2 and the LIPSS was formed at the peak fluence of 2.7-7.7 J/cm2. For linearly polarized pulses, the lines of the LIPSS were oriented parallel to the polarization direction, and their period was comparable to or larger than the center wavelength of the laser. These characteristics differ from the reported characteristics of LIPSS on metals and dielectrics. The pulsewidth dependence of the ablation and LIPSS was investigated for different pulsewidths and signs of chirp. Under the investigated fluence condition, the LIPSS period increased with increasing pulsewidth for both signs of chirp. Similar pulsewidth dependencies were observed for circularly polarized pulses.

  18. Resonant-pattern formation induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Ke; Ouyang, Qi

    2006-09-01

    We report frequency-locked resonant patterns induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion Brusselator model. In the regime of 2:1 frequency-locking and homogeneous oscillation, the introduction of additive noise, which is colored in time and white in space, generates and sustains resonant patterns of hexagons, stripes, and labyrinths which oscillate at half of the forcing frequency. Both the noise strength and the correlation time control the pattern formation. The system transits from homogeneous to hexagons, stripes, and to labyrinths successively as the noise strength is adjusted. Good frequency-locked patterns are only sustained by the colored noise and a finite time correlation is necessary. At the limit of white noise with zero temporal correlation, irregular patterns which are only nearly resonant come out as the noise strength is adjusted. The phenomenon induced by colored noise in the forced reaction-diffusion system is demonstrated to correspond to noise-induced Turing instability in the corresponding forced complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  19. Resonant-pattern formation induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Ke; Ouyang, Qi

    2006-09-01

    We report frequency-locked resonant patterns induced by additive noise in periodically forced reaction-diffusion Brusselator model. In the regime of 2:1 frequency-locking and homogeneous oscillation, the introduction of additive noise, which is colored in time and white in space, generates and sustains resonant patterns of hexagons, stripes, and labyrinths which oscillate at half of the forcing frequency. Both the noise strength and the correlation time control the pattern formation. The system transits from homogeneous to hexagons, stripes, and to labyrinths successively as the noise strength is adjusted. Good frequency-locked patterns are only sustained by the colored noise and a finite time correlation is necessary. At the limit of white noise with zero temporal correlation, irregular patterns which are only nearly resonant come out as the noise strength is adjusted. The phenomenon induced by colored noise in the forced reaction-diffusion system is demonstrated to correspond to noise-induced Turing instability in the corresponding forced complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. PMID:17025732

  20. Sodium periodate-induced human suppressor cells for polyclonal B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M

    1982-09-01

    Sodium periodate (SP) induces proliferation of mature T cells. In this study, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) pretreated for 10 minutes at room temperature with increasing concentrations (0.1 to 5 mM) of SP before culture for 7 days in the presence of pokeweed mitogen (PWM) exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of IgG production, contrasting with an increase in 3H-thymidine uptake. When MNC from 70 normal individuals were pretreated with 1 and 2 mM SP, IgG production in culture was suppressed by 46.8 +/- 4.5% and 60.4 +/- 4.4% (mean +/- S.E.M.), respectively, as compared to IgG synthesis in the presence of PWM alone. Longitudinal studies of MNC obtained from the same normal individuals over 6-10 months showed similar degrees of suppression, indicating that the level of SP-inducible suppressor cell activity remains relatively constant, although the degree of suppression varies among normal persons. Both T cells and monocytes were required for PWM-driven IgG production and for SP-induced suppression. A soluble factor elaborated by SP-treated monocytes was also able to suppress IgG production. This model should provide useful information about abnormal regulation of IgG synthesis in various pathological conditions. PMID:6290661

  1. Resonant optical control of the electrically induced spin polarization by periodic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, F. G. G.; Gusev, G. M.; Bakarov, A. K.

    2014-07-01

    We show that the electron spin polarization generated by an electrical current may have its direction controlled and magnitude amplified by periodic optical excitation. The electrical and optical spin control methods were combined and implemented in a two-dimensional electron gas. By Kerr rotation in an external transverse magnetic field, we demonstrate unexpected long-lived coherent spin oscillations of the current-induced signal in a system with large spin-orbit interaction. Using a single linearly polarized pulse for spin manipulation and detection, we found a strong dependence on the pulse optical power and sample temperature indicating the relevance of the hole spin in the electron spin initialization. The signal was mapped in a Hall bar as function of the position relative to the injection contact. Finally, the presence of an in-plane spin polarization was directly verified by rotating the experimental geometry.

  2. Noise induced escape from a nonhyperbolic chaotic attractor of a periodically driven nonlinear oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Li, Yang; Liu, Xianbin

    2016-06-01

    Noise induced escape from the domain of attraction of a nonhyperbolic chaotic attractor in a periodically excited nonlinear oscillator is investigated. The general mechanism of the escape in the weak noise limit is studied in the continuous case, and the fluctuational path is obtained by statistical analysis. Selecting the primary homoclinic tangency as the initial condition, the action plot is presented by parametrizing the set of escape trajectories and the global minimum gives rise to the optimal path. Results of both methods show good agreements. The entire process of escape is discussed in detail step by step using the fluctuational force. A structure of hierarchical heteroclinic crossings of stable and unstable manifolds of saddle cycles is found, and the escape is observed to take place through successive jumps through this deterministic hierarchical structure.

  3. Temperature sensing on tapered single mode fiber using mechanically induced long period fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrujo-García, Sigifredo; Velázquez-González, Jesús Salvador; Pulido-Navarro, María. Guadalupe; González-Ocaña, Ernesto; Mújica-Ascencio, Saúl; Martínez-Piñón, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    The modeling of a temperature optical fiber sensor is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this work. The suggested structure to obtain the sensing temperature characteristics is by the use of a mechanically induced Long Period Fiber Grating (LPFG) on a tapered single mode optical fiber. A biconical fiber optic taper is made by applying heat using an oxygen-propane flame burner while stretching the single mode fiber (SMF) whose coating has been removed. The resulting geometry of the device is important to analyze the coupling between the core mode to the cladding modes, and this will determine whether the optical taper is adiabatic or non-adiabatic. On the other hand, the mechanical LPFG is made up of two plates, one grooved and other flat, the grooved plate was done on an acrylic slab with the help of a computerized numerical control machine (CNC). In addition to the experimental work, the supporting theory is also included.

  4. Noise induced escape from a nonhyperbolic chaotic attractor of a periodically driven nonlinear oscillator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Li, Yang; Liu, Xianbin

    2016-06-01

    Noise induced escape from the domain of attraction of a nonhyperbolic chaotic attractor in a periodically excited nonlinear oscillator is investigated. The general mechanism of the escape in the weak noise limit is studied in the continuous case, and the fluctuational path is obtained by statistical analysis. Selecting the primary homoclinic tangency as the initial condition, the action plot is presented by parametrizing the set of escape trajectories and the global minimum gives rise to the optimal path. Results of both methods show good agreements. The entire process of escape is discussed in detail step by step using the fluctuational force. A structure of hierarchical heteroclinic crossings of stable and unstable manifolds of saddle cycles is found, and the escape is observed to take place through successive jumps through this deterministic hierarchical structure. PMID:27368777

  5. Antireflection effect of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silicon.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, A Y; Guo, Chunlei

    2011-09-12

    Following direct femtosecond laser pulse irradiation, we produce a unique grating structure over a large area superimposed by finer nanostructures on a silicon wafer. We study, for the first time, the antireflection effect of this femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (FLIPSSs) in the wavelength range of 250 - 2500 nm. Our study shows that the FLIPSSs suppress both the total hemispherical and specular polarized reflectance of silicon surface significantly over the entire studied wavelength range. The total polarized reflectance of the processed surface is reduced by a factor of about 3.5 in the visible and 7 in the UV compared to an untreated sample. The antireflection effect of the FLIPSS surface is broadband and the suppression stays to the longest wavelength (2500 nm) studied here although the antireflection effect in the infrared is weaker than in the visible. Our FLIPSS structures are free of chemical contamination, highly durable, and easily controllable in size.

  6. Melanopsin resets circadian rhythms in cells by inducing clock gene Period1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Shuhei; Uehara, Tomoe; Matsuo, Minako; Kikuchi, Yo; Numano, Rika

    2014-02-01

    The biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes are under the control of internal clocks with the period of approximately 24 hr, circadian rhythms. The expression of clock gene Period1 (Per1) oscillates autonomously in cells and is induced immediately after a light pulse. Per1 is an indispensable member of the central clock system to maintain the autonomous oscillator and synchronize environmental light cycle. Per1 expression could be detected by Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP plasmid DNA in which firefly luciferase and Green Fluorescence Protein were rhythmically expressed under the control of the mouse Per1 promoter in order to monitor mammalian circadian rhythms. Membrane protein, MELANOPSIN is activated by blue light in the morning on the retina and lead to signals transduction to induce Per1 expression and to reset the phase of circadian rhythms. In this report Per1 induction was measured by reporter signal assay in Per1∷luc and Per1∷GFP fibroblast cell at the input process of circadian rhythms. To the result all process to reset the rhythms by Melanopsin is completed in single cell like in the retina projected to the central clock in the brain. Moreover, the phase of circadian rhythm in Per1∷luc cells is synchronized by photo-activated Melanopsin, because the definite peak of luciferase activity in one dish was found one day after light illumination. That is an available means that physiological circadian rhythms could be real-time monitor as calculable reporter (bioluminescent and fluorescent) chronological signal in both single and groups of cells.

  7. Influence of substrate microcrystallinity on the orientation of laser-induced periodic surface structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nürnberger, P.; Reinhardt, H.; Kim, H-C.; Yang, F.; Peppler, K.; Janek, J.; Hampp, N.

    2015-10-07

    The research in this paper deals with the angular dependence of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) by linearly polarized nanosecond laser pulses on polycrystalline austenitic stainless steel. Incident angles ranging from 45° to 70° lead to the generation of superimposed merely perpendicular oriented LIPSS on steel as well as on monocrystalline (100) silicon which was used as a reference material. Additional extraordinary orientations of superimposing LIPSS along with significantly different periodicities are found on polycrystalline steel but not on (100) silicon. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements indicate that the expansion of these LIPSS is limited to the grain size and affected by the crystal orientation of the individual grains. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows that LIPSS fringe heights are in good agreement with the theoretically predicted penetration depths of surface plasmon polaritons into stainless steel. These results indicate that optical anisotropies must be taken into account to fully describe the theory of light-matter interaction leading to LIPSS formation.

  8. Crystal orientation dependence of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure on (100) silicon.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lan; Han, Weina; Li, Xiaowei; Wang, Qingsong; Meng, Fantong; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-06-01

    It is widely believed that laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are independent of material crystal structures. This Letter reports an abnormal phenomenon of strong dependence of the anisotropic formation of periodic ripples on crystal orientation, when Si (100) is processed by a linearly polarized femtosecond laser (800 nm, 50 fs, 1 kHz). LIPSS formation sensitivity with a π/2 modulation is found along different crystal orientations with a quasi-cosinusoid function when the angle between the crystal orientation and polarization direction is changed from 0° to 180°. Our experiments indicate that it is much easier (or more difficult) to form ripple structures when the polarization direction is aligned with the lattice axis [011]/[011¯] (or [001]). The modulated nonlinear ionization rate along different crystal orientations, which arises from the direction dependence of the effective mass of the electron is proposed to interpret the unexpected anisotropic LIPSS formation phenomenon. Also, we demonstrate that the abnormal phenomenon can be applied to control the continuity of scanned ripple lines along different crystal orientations.

  9. Commensurability Oscillations of Composite Fermions Induced by the Periodic Potential of a Wigner Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, H.; Liu, Y.; Jo, I.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2016-08-01

    When the kinetic energy of a collection of interacting two-dimensional (2D) electrons is quenched at very high magnetic fields so that the Coulomb repulsion dominates, the electrons are expected to condense into an ordered array, forming a quantum Wigner crystal (WC). Although this exotic state has long been suspected in high-mobility 2D electron systems at very low Landau level fillings (ν ≪1 ), its direct observation has been elusive. Here we present a new technique and experimental results directly probing the magnetic-field-induced WC. We measure the magnetoresistance of a bilayer electron system where one layer has a very low density and is in the WC regime (ν ≪1 ), while the other ("probe") layer is near ν =1 /2 and hosts a sea of composite fermions (CFs). The data exhibit commensurability oscillations in the magnetoresistance of the CF layer, induced by the periodic potential of WC electrons in the other layer, and provide a unique, direct glimpse at the symmetry of the WC, its lattice constant, and melting. They also demonstrate a striking example of how one can probe an exotic many-body state of 2D electrons using equally exotic quasiparticles of another many-body state.

  10. Laser induced periodic surface structuring on Si by temporal shaped femtosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Almeida, G F B; Martins, R J; Otuka, A J G; Siqueira, J P; Mendonca, C R

    2015-10-19

    We investigated the effect of temporal shaped femtosecond pulses on silicon laser micromachining. By using sinusoidal spectral phases, pulse trains composed of sub-pulses with distinct temporal separations were generated and applied to the silicon surface to produce Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS). The LIPSS obtained with different sub-pulse separation were analyzed by comparing the intensity of the two-dimensional fast Fourier Transform (2D-FFT) of the AFM images of the ripples (LIPSS). It was observed that LIPSS amplitude is more emphasized for the pulse train with sub-pulses separation of 128 fs, even when compared with the Fourier transform limited pulse. By estimating the carrier density achieved at the end of each pulse train, we have been able to interpret our results with the Sipe-Drude model, that predicts that LIPSS efficacy is higher for a specific induced carrier density. Hence, our results indicate that temporal shaping of the excitation pulse, performed by spectral phase modulation, can be explored in fs-laser microstructuring. PMID:26480419

  11. Commensurability Oscillations of Composite Fermions Induced by the Periodic Potential of a Wigner Crystal.

    PubMed

    Deng, H; Liu, Y; Jo, I; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Baldwin, K W; Shayegan, M

    2016-08-26

    When the kinetic energy of a collection of interacting two-dimensional (2D) electrons is quenched at very high magnetic fields so that the Coulomb repulsion dominates, the electrons are expected to condense into an ordered array, forming a quantum Wigner crystal (WC). Although this exotic state has long been suspected in high-mobility 2D electron systems at very low Landau level fillings (ν≪1), its direct observation has been elusive. Here we present a new technique and experimental results directly probing the magnetic-field-induced WC. We measure the magnetoresistance of a bilayer electron system where one layer has a very low density and is in the WC regime (ν≪1), while the other ("probe") layer is near ν=1/2 and hosts a sea of composite fermions (CFs). The data exhibit commensurability oscillations in the magnetoresistance of the CF layer, induced by the periodic potential of WC electrons in the other layer, and provide a unique, direct glimpse at the symmetry of the WC, its lattice constant, and melting. They also demonstrate a striking example of how one can probe an exotic many-body state of 2D electrons using equally exotic quasiparticles of another many-body state. PMID:27610870

  12. Investigating the recovery period of rat brain tissue after electrolytic and 980-nm laser induced lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkulak, Ozguncem; Tabakoglu, H. Ozgur; Aksoy, Ayla; Canbeyli, Resit; Bilgin, Nes'e.; Kurtkaya, Ozlem; Sav, Aydin; Gulsoy, Murat

    2003-10-01

    The effects of 980-nm diode laser and electrolytic lesions in Wistar rat brain tissue were observed by immunohistochemical staining for CD68 marker and Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E). Bilateral lesions; laser lesions (2W/2sec) in the right hemispheres, and electrolytic lesions (1.5mA/20sec) in the left hemispheres were done through in vivo stereotaxic neurosurgical procedure. Subjects were classified into three groups due to the recovery period. Subjects in Group I, II, and III were sacrificed after 0, 2 and 7 days of recovery period respectively. After saline perfusion their brains were dislocated, and paraffin embedded sections were taken. One section for H&E and one for CD68 were cut consecutively in 3μm thickness by examining the lesion in every 30-μm thickness. CD68 was found more efficient marker than H&E in observing the after-effects of both types of lesions. The total damage of laser was smaller than that of electrosurgical unit. The shape of the ablated area in laser induced lesions was more spherical than that of electrosurgical unit. The number of macrophages increased as the recovery period increased for all subjects. Group III showed the highest number of macrophages in three, and the number of macrophages around electrolytic lesion is nearly 1.5 times higher than that of laser lesion. The remarkable ablating ability, the damage zone created and the healing of nearby tissue clearly showed that the 980-nm diode laser is an effective and useful alternative to electrosurgical unit in neurosurgery.

  13. Egr1 regulates lithium-induced transcription of the Period 2 (PER2) gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hyun; Yu, Hyun Sook; Park, Hong Guen; Ahn, Yong Min; Kim, Yong Sik; Lee, Young Han; Ha, Kyooseob; Shin, Soon Young

    2013-12-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the circadian molecular system is involved in the pathogenic and therapeutic mechanisms underlying bipolar disorders. Lithium, a representative mood stabilizer, has been reported to induce the Period 2 (PER2) gene; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms require further study. We found that lithium upregulated PER2 expression at the transcriptional level in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Promoter reporter analyses using serial deletions of the PER2 promoter revealed that two early growth response 1 (Egr1)-binding sites (EBS) between positions -180 and -100 are required for maximal activation of the PER2 promoter by lithium. Ectopic expression of Egr1 enhanced lithium-induced PER2 promoter activity, while a point mutation in EBS abolished it. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated that Egr1 bound directly to the PER2 promoter. Stimulation of the extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2/Elk1 pathway by lithium was functionally linked to PER2 expression through Egr1 induction, and lithium-induced PER2 expression was strongly attenuated by depletion of Egr1 by siRNA. Lithium also upregulated the expression of Per2 and Egr1 in mouse frontal cortex. Induction of Per2 by lithium was attenuated in Egr1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, lithium stimulates PER2 transcription through the ERK/Elk1/Egr1 pathway in neuronal cells, indicating a connection between the ERK-Egr1 pathway and a circadian gene system in the mechanism of action of lithium.

  14. Evidence of liquid phase during laser-induced periodic surface structures formation induced by accumulative ultraviolet picosecond laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, T. T. D.; Petit, A.; Semmar, N.

    2015-11-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Cu/Si or Cu/glass thin films using Nd:YAG laser beam (40 ps, 10 Hz, and 30 mJ/cm{sup 2}). The study of ablation threshold is always achieved over melting when the variation of the number of pulses increases from 1 to 1000. But the incubation effect is leading to reduce the threshold of melting as increasing the number of laser pulse. Also, real time reflectivity signals exhibit typical behavior to stress the formation of a liquid phase during the laser-processing regime and helps to determine the threshold of soft ablation. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses have shown the topology of the micro-crater containing regular spikes with different height. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allows finally to show three distinguished zones in the close region of isolated protrusions. The central zone is a typical crystallized area of few nanometers surrounded by a mixed poly-crystalline and amorphous area. Finally, in the region far from the protrusion zone, Cu film shows an amorphous structure. The real time reflectivity, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses evidence the formation of a liquid phase during the LIPSS formation in the picosecond regime.

  15. Electromyographic bursting following the cortical silent period induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chin, O; Cash, R F H; Thickbroom, G W

    2012-03-29

    In subjects performing voluntary background contraction, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) induces an interruption of electromyographic (EMG) activity known as the silent period (SP). This is thought to be mediated through the action of inhibitory cortical neurons, in particular involving γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B)) receptors. In some studies of the SP, a post-SP increase in EMG activity has been reported but not described in detail. In the present study we have sought to determine the presence and persistence of late EMG bursting associated with the return of voluntary drive after the SP, and to characterize the relationship to background contraction level, stimulus intensity, and SP duration. TMS was delivered at 3 levels of intensity (120, 140 and 160% of active motor threshold) and during 3 levels of voluntary contraction of the first dorsal interosseous muscle (10, 30 and 50% of maximum contraction) in a pseudo-randomized order in 11 healthy participants. The SP was followed by a brief (~60 ms) burst of EMG up to 290±42% of the pre-stimulus EMG level. Both SP duration and the amplitude of the EMG burst increased with TMS intensity (p<0.001). Burst amplitude correlated with SP duration (r2=0.750; p=0.003). We conclude that post-SP EMG bursting is a quantifiable phenomenon that depends on the strength of TMS and the duration of the SP. This bursting may correspond with the post inhibitory period of disinhibition that has recently been identified in human motor cortex. PMID:22330727

  16. Very long period conduit oscillations induced by rockfalls at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, Bernard; Dawson, Phillip

    2013-10-01

    Eruptive activity at the summit of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, beginning in 2010 and continuing to the present time is characterized by transient outgassing bursts accompanied by very long period (VLP) seismic signals triggered by rockfalls from the vent walls impacting a lava lake in a pit within the Halemaumau pit crater. We use raw data recorded with an 11-station broadband network to model the source mechanism of signals accompanying two large rockfalls on 29 August 2012 and two smaller average rockfalls obtained by stacking over all events with similar waveforms to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. To determine the source centroid location and source mechanism, we minimize the residual error between data and synthetics calculated by the finite difference method for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium that takes topography into account. We apply a new waveform inversion method that accounts for the contributions from both translation and tilt in horizontal seismograms through the use of Green's functions representing the seismometer response to translation and tilt ground motions. This method enables a robust description of the source mechanism over the period range 1-1000 s. The VLP signals associated with the rockfalls originate in a source region ˜1 km below the eastern perimeter of the Halemaumau pit crater. The observed waveforms are well explained by a simple volumetric source with geometry composed of two intersecting cracks including an east striking crack (dike) dipping 80° to the north, intersecting a north striking crack (another dike) dipping 65° to the east. Each rockfall is marked by a similar step-like inflation trailed by decaying oscillations of the volumetric source, attributed to the efficient coupling at the source centroid location of the pressure and momentum changes induced by the rock mass impacting the top of the lava column. Assuming a simple lumped parameter representation of the shallow magmatic system, the observed

  17. Laser-induced periodic surface structures of thin, complex multi-component films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Juergen; Varlamova, Olga; Ratzke, Markus; Uhlig, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond laser-induced regular nanostructures are generated on a complex multilayer target, namely a piece of a commercial, used hard disk memory. It is shown that after single-shot 800-nm irradiation at 0.26 J/cm2 only the polymer cover layer and—in the center—a portion of the magnetic multilayer are ablated. A regular array of linearly aligned spherical 450-nm features at the uncovered interface between cover and magnetic layers appears not to be produced by the irradiation. Only after about 10 pulses on one spot, classical ripples perpendicular to the laser polarization with a period of ≈700 nm are observed, with a modulation between 40 nm above and 40 nm below the pristine surface and an ablation depth only slightly larger than the thickness of the multilayer magnetic film. Further increase of the pulse number does not result in deeper ablation. However, 770-nm ripples become parallel to the polarization and are swelling to more than 120 nm above zero, much more than the full multilayer film thickness. In the spot periphery, much shallower 300-nm ripples are perpendicular to the strong modulation and the laser polarization. Irradiation with 0.49-J/cm2 pulses from an ultrafast white-light continuum results—in the spot periphery—in the formation of 200-nm ripples, only swelling above zero after removal of the polymer cover, without digging into the magnetic film.

  18. Tribological performance of sub-100-nm femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonse, J.; Höhm, S.; Koter, R.; Hartelt, M.; Spaltmann, D.; Pentzien, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.

    2016-06-01

    Sub-100-nm laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were processed on bulk titanium (Ti) surfaces by femtosecond laser pulse irradiation in air (30 fs pulse duration, 790 nm wavelength). The laser peak fluence, the spatial spot overlap, and the number of overscans were optimized in a sample-scanning geometry in order to obtain large surface areas (5 mm × 5 mm) covered homogeneously by the LIPSS. The laser-processed regions were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), white light interference microscopy (WLIM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The friction coefficient of the nanostructured surfaces was tested during 1000 cycles under reciprocal sliding conditions (1 Hz, 1.0 N normal load) against a 10-mm diameter ball of hardened 100Cr6 steel, both in paraffin oil and in engine oil used as lubricants. Subsequently, the corresponding wear tracks were qualified by OM, SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray analyses (EDX). The results of the tribological tests are discussed and compared to that obtained for near wavelength-sized fs-LIPSS, processed under somewhat different irradiation conditions. Some constraints for a beneficial effect of LIPSS on the tribological performance are provided.

  19. Temperament moderates the influence of periadolescent social experience on behavior and adrenocortical activity in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Caruso, M J; McClintock, M K; Cavigelli, S A

    2014-08-01

    Adolescence is a period of significant behavioral and physiological maturation, particularly related to stress responses. Animal studies that have tested the influence of adolescent social experiences on stress-related behavioral and physiological development have led to complex results. We used a rodent model of neophobia to test the hypothesis that the influence of adolescent social experience on adult behavior and adrenocortical function is modulated by pre-adolescent temperament. Exploratory activity was assessed in 53 male Sprague-Dawley rats to classify temperament and then they were housed in one of the three conditions during postnatal days (PND) 28-46: (1) with familiar kin, (2) with novel social partners, or (3) individually with no social partners. Effects on adult adrenocortical function were evaluated from fecal samples collected while rats were individually-housed and exposed to a 1-hour novel social challenge during PND 110-114. Adolescent-housing with novel or no social partners led to reduced adult glucocorticoid production compared to adolescent-housing with familiar littermates. Additionally, highly-exploratory pre-weanling rats that were housed with novel social partners during adolescence exhibited increased exploratory behavior and a more rapid return to basal glucocorticoid production in adulthood compared to those housed with familiar or no social partners during adolescence and compared to low-exploratory rats exposed to novel social partners. In sum, relatively short-term adolescent social experiences can cause transient changes in temperament and potentially longer-term changes in recovery of glucocorticoid production in response to adult social challenges. Furthermore, early temperament may modulate the influence of adolescent experiences on adult behavioral and adrenocortical function.

  20. Prolonged perinatal AZT administration and early maternal separation: effects on social and emotional behaviour of periadolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Venerosi, Aldina; Cirulli, Francesca; Capone, Francesca; Alleva, Enrico

    2003-02-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is an effective treatment in preventing perinatal transmission of HIV-1; however, a continuous re-evaluation of the risk-benefit ratio of human exposure to this drug is suggested by both clinical and animal studies. The objective of this study was to assess the medium and long-term effects of pre-postnatal AZT treatment on mouse social and emotional behaviour and the possible interactions between AZT exposure and disruptions in the mother-infant relationship. Pregnant CD-1 mice were administered per os with AZT (160 mg/kg) from pregnancy day 10, throughout delivery, to lactation day 10. In half of the litters, the offspring was separated from the mother for 3 h from postnatal days 2 (PND2) to PND14. On PND35, a 30-min social interaction test was performed and corticosterone levels were measured at the end of the session. On PND80, long-term effects of AZT on emotionality were assess by means of an elevated plus-maze. Results indicate that, on PND35, previous AZT exposure affected social behaviour of the experimental subjects, reducing aggressive interactions in males, while decreasing investigative behaviours in females. At adulthood, AZT inhibited exploratory behaviour in the plus-maze while increasing the frequency of risk-assessment postures in male mice. As for maternal deprivation, this early manipulation exerted a pro-aggressive effect in adolescent male mice, deprived subjects being overall characterised by higher activity levels and a deficit in habituation, an effect also observed in the plus-maze. A significant interaction between AZT and maternal deprivation was found for affiliative behaviours. As for corticosterone levels, no AZT effect was found, while maternal deprivation tended to reduce elevations of this hormone in response to stressful stimuli. Overall results from this study indicate that both AZT exposure and maternal deprivation induced gender-dependent changes in social and emotional behaviour both during adolescence and at

  1. Definition of Critical Periods for Hedgehog Pathway Antagonist-Induced Holoprosencephaly, Cleft Lip, and Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Galen W.; Melberg, Cal G.; Doroodchi, Padydeh; Parins, Kia F.; Kietzman, Henry W.; Everson, Joshua L.; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J.; Lipinski, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway mediates multiple spatiotemporally-specific aspects of brain and face development. Genetic and chemical disruptions of the pathway are known to result in an array of structural malformations, including holoprosencephaly (HPE), clefts of the lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), and clefts of the secondary palate only (CPO). Here, we examined patterns of dysmorphology caused by acute, stage-specific Hh signaling inhibition. Timed-pregnant wildtype C57BL/6J mice were administered a single dose of the potent pathway antagonist vismodegib at discrete time points between gestational day (GD) 7.0 and 10.0, an interval approximately corresponding to the 15th to 24th days of human gestation. The resultant pattern of facial and brain dysmorphology was dependent upon stage of exposure. Insult between GD7.0 and GD8.25 resulted in HPE, with peak incidence following exposure at GD7.5. Unilateral clefts of the lip extending into the primary palate were also observed, with peak incidence following exposure at GD8.875. Insult between GD9.0 and GD10.0 resulted in CPO and forelimb abnormalities. We have previously demonstrated that Hh antagonist-induced cleft lip results from deficiency of the medial nasal process and show here that CPO is associated with reduced growth of the maxillary-derived palatal shelves. By defining the critical periods for the induction of HPE, CL/P, and CPO with fine temporal resolution, these results provide a mechanism by which Hh pathway disruption can result in “non-syndromic” orofacial clefting, or HPE with or without co-occurring clefts. This study also establishes a novel and tractable mouse model of human craniofacial malformations using a single dose of a commercially available and pathway-specific drug. PMID:25793997

  2. Dynamics of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silicon by high spatial and temporal resolution imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, X.; Jia, T. Q. Peng, N. N.; Feng, D. H.; Zhang, S. A.; Sun, Z. R.

    2014-04-14

    The formation dynamics of periodic ripples induced by femtosecond laser pulses (pulse duration τ = 50 fs and central wavelength λ = 800 nm) are studied by a collinear pump-probe imaging technique with a temporal resolution of 1 ps and a spatial resolution of 440 nm. The ripples with periods close to the laser wavelength begin to appear upon irradiation of two pump pulses at surface defects produced by the prior one. The rudiments of periodic ripples emerge in the initial tens of picoseconds after fs laser irradiation, and the ripple positions keep unmoved until the formation processes complete mainly in a temporal span of 1500 ps. The results suggest that the periodic deposition of laser energy during the interaction between femtosecond laser pulses and sample surface plays a dominant role in the formation of periodic ripples.

  3. [Effect of induced abortion on prematurity. Analysis of the period from 1979 to 1984].

    PubMed

    Deutinger, J; Reinthaller, A; Riss, P

    1985-07-31

    Since induced abortion is legalized in Austria the number of patients with induced abortion in their anamnesis is increasing. This factor intensified the discussion about the consequences for following pregnancies, especially the number of preterm deliveries. We investigated the influence of induced abortion on prematurity using the records of primiparae who delivered in our hospital between 1979 and 1984. Previously performed induced abortion did not affect the number of preterm-deliveries, if patients underwent early prenatal care. Patients who had their first check-up after the 18th week of gestation showed a significant increase of preterm delivery.

  4. Antigen exposure in the late light period induces severe symptoms of food allergy in an OVA-allergic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kana; Kitagawa, Eri; Wada, Misaki; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Orihara, Kanami; Tahara, Yu; Nakao, Atsuhito; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-09-30

    The mammalian circadian clock controls many physiological processes that include immune responses and allergic reactions. Several studies have investigated the circadian regulation of intestinal permeability and tight junctions known to be affected by cytokines. However, the contribution of circadian clock to food allergy symptoms remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the role of the circadian clock in determining the severity of food allergies. We prepared an ovalbumin food allergy mouse model, and orally administered ovalbumin either late in the light or late in the dark period under light-dark cycle. The light period group showed higher allergic diarrhea and weight loss than the dark period group. The production of type 2 cytokines, IL-13 and IL-5, from the mesenteric lymph nodes and ovalbumin absorption was higher in the light period group than in the dark period group. Compared to the dark period group, the mRNA expression levels of the tight junction proteins were lower in the light period group. We have demonstrated that increased production of type 2 cytokines and intestinal permeability in the light period induced severe food allergy symptoms. Our results suggest that the time of food antigen intake might affect the determination of the severity of food allergy symptoms.

  5. Femtosecond laser induced periodic nanostructures on titanium dioxide film for improving biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinonaga, T.; Horiguchi, N.; Tsukamoto, M.; Nagai, A.; Yamashita, K.; Hanawa, T.; Matsushita, N.; Guoqiang, X.; Abe, N.

    2013-03-01

    Periodic nanostructures formation on Titanium dioxide (TiO2) film by scanning of femtosecond laser beam spot at fundamental and second harmonic wave is reported. Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used for biomaterials, because of its excellent anti-corrosion and high mechanical properties. However, Ti implant is typically artificial materials and has no biofunction. Hence, it is necessary for improving the bioactivity of Ti. Recently, coating of TiO2 film on Ti plate surface is useful methods to improve biocompatibility of Ti plate. Then, if periodic nanostructures were formed on the film surface, cell spreading might be controlled at one direction. We propose periodic nanostructures formation on TiO2 film by femtosecond laser irradiation. Cell spread could be controlled along the grooves of periodic nanostructures. In the experiments, the film was formed on Ti plate with an aerosol beam. A commercial femtosecond Ti : sapphire laser system was employed in our experiments. Periodic nanostructures, lying perpendicular to the laser electric field polarization vector, were formed on the film at fundamental and second harmonic wave. Periodic nanostructures were also produced on Ti plate with femtosecond laser. The period of periodic nanostructures on the film was much shorter than that on Ti plate. By cell test, there was a region of cell spreading along the grooves of periodic nanostructures on the film formed with femtosecond laser at fundamental wave. On bare film surface, cell spreading was observed at all direction. These results suggest that direction of cell spread could be controlled by periodic nanostructures formation on the film.

  6. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic nanostructure creation on PET surface for controlling of cell spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Shinonaga, Togo; Kawa, Takuya

    2016-03-01

    A new method of periodic nanostructure formation on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surface has been developed, employing a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 1045 nm. To generate structured films, the PET was placed in contact with a silicon (Si) wafer, followed by irradiation with the laser focused on the Si wafer, passing through the PET film. In order to evaluate the surface morphology, atomic force microscopy analysis was conducted on both treated and untreated PET surfaces. From the results, nanostructures with a period of 600 nm and height of 100 nm were formed on the PET film surface by laser treatment. A cell cultivation test was carried out on PET films with and without periodic nanostructures, showing that for nanostructured films, the cells (MG-63) were spread along the periodic grooves; in contrast, random cell spreading was observed for cultures grown on the untreated PET film.

  7. Learning and Memory Deficits in Male Adult Mice Treated with a Benzodiazepine Sleep-Inducing Drug during the Juvenile Period.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yusuke; Tanemura, Kentaro; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Ideta-Otsuka, Maky; Aisaki, Ken-Ichi; Kitajima, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Masanobu; Kanno, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is also known to be important for brain development. Therefore, disturbances of GABA receptor (GABA-R) mediated signaling (GABA-R signal) during brain development may influence normal brain maturation and cause late-onset brain malfunctions. In this study, we examined whether the stimulation of the GABA-R signal during brain development induces late-onset adverse effects on the brain in adult male mice. To stimulate the GABA-R signal, we used either the benzodiazepine sleep-inducing drug triazolam (TZ) or the non-benzodiazepine drug zolpidem (ZP). We detected learning and memory deficits in mice treated with TZ during the juvenile period, as seen in the fear conditioning test. On the other hand, ZP administration during the juvenile period had little effect. In addition, decreased protein expression of GluR1 and GluR4, which are excitatory neurotransmitter receptors, was detected in the hippocampi of mice treated with TZ during the juvenile period. We measured mRNA expression of the immediate early genes (IEGs), which are neuronal activity markers, in the hippocampus shortly after the administration of TZ or ZP to juvenile mice. Decreased IEG expression was detected in mice with juvenile TZ administration, but not in mice with juvenile ZP administration. Our findings demonstrate that TZ administration during the juvenile period can induce irreversible learning and memory deficits in adult mice. It may need to take an extra care for the prescription of benzodiazepine sleep-inducing drugs to juveniles because it might cause learning and memory deficits. PMID:27489535

  8. Learning and Memory Deficits in Male Adult Mice Treated with a Benzodiazepine Sleep-Inducing Drug during the Juvenile Period

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Yusuke; Tanemura, Kentaro; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Ideta-Otsuka, Maky; Aisaki, Ken-Ichi; Kitajima, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Masanobu; Kanno, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is also known to be important for brain development. Therefore, disturbances of GABA receptor (GABA-R) mediated signaling (GABA-R signal) during brain development may influence normal brain maturation and cause late-onset brain malfunctions. In this study, we examined whether the stimulation of the GABA-R signal during brain development induces late-onset adverse effects on the brain in adult male mice. To stimulate the GABA-R signal, we used either the benzodiazepine sleep-inducing drug triazolam (TZ) or the non-benzodiazepine drug zolpidem (ZP). We detected learning and memory deficits in mice treated with TZ during the juvenile period, as seen in the fear conditioning test. On the other hand, ZP administration during the juvenile period had little effect. In addition, decreased protein expression of GluR1 and GluR4, which are excitatory neurotransmitter receptors, was detected in the hippocampi of mice treated with TZ during the juvenile period. We measured mRNA expression of the immediate early genes (IEGs), which are neuronal activity markers, in the hippocampus shortly after the administration of TZ or ZP to juvenile mice. Decreased IEG expression was detected in mice with juvenile TZ administration, but not in mice with juvenile ZP administration. Our findings demonstrate that TZ administration during the juvenile period can induce irreversible learning and memory deficits in adult mice. It may need to take an extra care for the prescription of benzodiazepine sleep-inducing drugs to juveniles because it might cause learning and memory deficits. PMID:27489535

  9. Large local temperature gradient induced by surface plasmon heating of periodic metal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Ryoko; Sakai, Hitomi

    Mixtures of several gas or solution having different concentration can be separated by the gradient of temperature. This is the so-called Soret effect. This phenomenon is quite important for chemical reaction and material condensation/separation. For activating large Soret effect, it would be useful to focus on the surface plasmon heating (SPH) of metal nanostructures that interact with light. In this work, a local temperate gradient was created with the aid of SPH achieved for periodic silver structures in a mesoscopic length scale fabricated by a nanosphere lithography method. Excitation of this periodic structure (by blue laser, for example) could create a localized periodic temperature gradient, as large as ~1,000 K/ μm, as suggested from preliminary heat-transfer calculation. Experimental and theoretical results will be presented on site

  10. Earthquake Induced Damage Mechanism of Long Period Structures Using Energy Response

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yongfeng; Li Hui

    2008-07-08

    This paper presents a method of expounding the damage of RC long period frame structure using energy analysis method. Since the damage of structures usually occurs under major earthquakes, the structure is assumed to be in elasto-plastic state, and degraded Bouc-Wen model is used to describe the hysteretic component of the restoring force. A double index damage criterion defined by the maximum drift and energy absorption is used as the damage criterion. The energy transferring relation in a structure is derived, and both momentary and cumulative energy response is used to reflect the delay of the collapse of a long period structure. The mechanism of collapse delay of the long period structure is suggested through a numerical example combing the energy response and time history response.

  11. Dopamine and serotonin signaling during two sensitive developmental periods differentially impact adult aggressive and affective behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qinghui; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Mahadevia, Darshini; Huang, Yung-Yu; Balsam, Daniel; Mann, J John; Gingrich, Jay A; Ansorge, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacologic blockade of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) or serotonin transporter (5-HTT) has antidepressant and anxiolytic efficacy in adulthood. Yet, genetically conferred MAOA or 5-HTT hypo-activity is associated with altered aggression and increased anxiety/depression. Here we test the hypothesis that increased monoamine signaling during development causes these paradoxical aggressive and affective phenotypes. We find that pharmacologic MAOA blockade during early postnatal development (P2-P21) but not during peri-adolescence (P22-41) increases anxiety- and depression-like behavior in adult (> P90) mice, mimicking the effect of P2-21 5-HTT inhibition. Moreover, MAOA blockade during peri-adolescence, but not P2-21 or P182-201, increases adult aggressive behavior, and 5-HTT blockade from P22-P41 reduced adult aggression. Blockade of the dopamine transporter, but not the norepinephrine transporter, during P22-41 also increases adult aggressive behavior. Thus, P2-21 is a sensitive period during which 5-HT modulates adult anxiety/depression-like behavior, and P22-41 is a sensitive period during which DA and 5-HT bi-directionally modulate adult aggression. Permanently altered DAergic function as a consequence of increased P22-P41 monoamine signaling might underlie altered aggression. In support of this hypothesis, we find altered aggression correlating positively with locomotor response to amphetamine challenge in adulthood. Proving that altered DA function and aggression are causally linked, we demonstrate that optogenetic activation of VTA DAergic neurons increases aggression. It therefore appears that genetic and pharmacologic factors impacting dopamine and serotonin signaling during sensitive developmental periods can modulate adult monoaminergic function and thereby alter risk for aggressive and emotional dysfunction. PMID:24589889

  12. A protective effect of sulphinpyrazone against coronary occlusion-induced shortening of myocardial refractory periods in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Northover, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    The hearts of anaesthetized, artificially ventilated rats were exposed, and the left coronary artery occluded. The diastolic threshold voltage for stimulation (DTV), the duration of the bipolar electrogram (DBE) and the functional refractory period (FRP) of the ischaemic area were measured at minute intervals for an hour after occlusion. Coronary occlusion caused a rise in DTV, a prolongation of the DBE and a biphasic change in the FRP, with an initial prolongation phase (1-4 min) followed by a decline to below pre-occlusion values (5-15 min). Episodes of ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VT) were most frequent during the period 5-15 min after the onset of occlusion of the coronary artery. This coincided with the period when FRP was minimal and the difference between DBE and FRP was maximal. Pretreatment of rats with sulphinpyrazone (2.5-40 mg kg-1) or indomethacin (5-20 mg kg-1) protected against the episodes of coronary occlusion-induced VT and against the associated decline in FRP of the ischaemic muscle. Sulphinpyrazone was more effective than indomethacin in this respect and a combination of the two drugs was approximately as effective as sulphinpyrazone alone. It was concluded that sulphinpyrazone protects rats against coronary occlusion-induced episodes of VT by reducing the risk of ventricular action potential re-entry. This effect is probably due to protection against the ischaemia-induced shortening of the myocardial FRP. PMID:3708212

  13. Diffusion-induced periodic transition between oscillatory modes in amplitude-modulated patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaodong; He, Yuxiu; Wang, Shaorong; Gao, Qingyu; Epstein, Irving R.; Wang, Qun

    2014-06-15

    We study amplitude-modulated waves, e.g., wave packets in one dimension, overtarget spirals and superspirals in two dimensions, under mixed-mode oscillatory conditions in a three-variable reaction-diffusion model. New transition zones, not seen in the homogeneous system, are found, in which periodic transitions occur between local 1{sup N−1} and 1{sup N} oscillations. Amplitude-modulated complex patterns result from periodic transition between (N − 1)-armed and N-armed waves. Spatial recurrence rates provide a useful guide to the stability of these modulated patterns.

  14. Spectral analysis of induced color change on periodically nanopatterned silk films.

    PubMed

    Amsden, Jason J; Perry, Hannah; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Gopinath, Ashwin; Kaplan, David L; Dal Negro, Luca; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate controllable structural color based on periodic nanopatterned 2D lattices in pure protein films of silk fibroin. We show here periodic lattices in silk fibroin films with feature sizes of hundreds of nanometers that exhibit different colors as a function of varying lattice spacing. Further, when varying the index of refraction contrast between the nanopatterned lattice and its surrounding environment by applying liquids on top of the lattices, colorimetric shifts are observed. The effect is characterized experimentally and theoretically and a simple example of glucose concentration sensing is presented. This is the first example of a functional sensor based on silk fibroin optics. PMID:19997366

  15. Surface birefringence of self-assembly periodic nanostructures induced on 6H-SiC surface by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Juan; Dai, Ye; Tao, Wenjun; Gong, Min; Ma, Guohong; Zhao, Quanzhong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we report the birefringence effect of surface self-assembly periodic nanostructures induced on 6H-SiC by femtosecond laser irradiation. Birefringence characteristic (e.g. cross-polarized image), measured by cross polarized microscopy, was found to be controlled by both single pulse energy and scanning velocity. Comparing birefringence measurement results of nanostructures and morphology characterization by Scanning electron microscopy, it is shown that ∼200 nm-period deep-subwavelength periodic ripples (DSWR) plays a dominating role in the birefringence effect. Raman spectra show that the change of retardance with pulse energy and scanning velocity is most possibly caused by the thickness variation of DSWR. Finally, a light attenuator based on a single layer of DSWR structure on 6H-SiC surface was constructed and tested by light source of 800 nm to have a tunable attenuating ratio of 69-100%.

  16. Thermally induced dephasing in periodically poled KTiOPO4 nonlinear crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Pennington, D M; Jovanovic, I; Liao, Z M; Payne, S A; Drobshoff, A D; Ebbers, C A; Taylor, L R

    2004-03-18

    Experimental data that exhibits a continuous-wave, second-harmonic intensity threshold (15 kW/cm{sup 2}) that causes two-photon nonlinear absorption which leads to time-dependent photochromic damage in periodically poled KTiOPO{sub 4} is presented and verified through a thermal dephasing model.

  17. Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation induced by a pre-fabricated surface groove.

    PubMed

    Kafka, K R P; Austin, D R; Li, H; Yi, A Y; Cheng, J; Chowdhury, E A

    2015-07-27

    Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse (probe) from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripples are observed to form asynchronously, with the first one forming after 50 ps and others forming sequentially outward from the groove edge at larger time delays. A 1-D analytical model of electron heating including both the laser pulse and surface plasmon polariton excitation at the groove edge predicts ripple period, melt spot diameter, and qualitatively explains the asynchronous time-evolution of LIPSS formation.

  18. Temporal femtosecond pulse shaping dependence of laser-induced periodic surface structures in fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xuesong; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin Zhang, Kaihu; Yu, Dong; Yu, Yanwu; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-07-21

    The dependence of periodic structures and ablated areas on temporal pulse shaping is studied upon irradiation of fused silica by femtosecond laser triple-pulse trains. Three types of periodic structures can be obtained by using pulse trains with designed pulse delays, in which the three-dimensional nanopillar arrays with ∼100–150 nm diameters and ∼200 nm heights are first fabricated in one step. These nanopillars arise from the break of the ridges of ripples in the upper portion, which is caused by the split of orthogonal ripples in the bottom part. The localized transient electron dynamics and corresponding material properties are considered for the morphological observations.

  19. Anisotropy-induced wave steering in periodic linear and nonlinear lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadei, Filippo; Rimoli, Julian; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2012-02-01

    Structural lattice configurations can be designed with tailored topologies which provide them with unusual behaviors, such as negative bulk modulus, negative Poisson's ratios, or extreme anisotropyootnotetextM. Ruzzene et al. Phisica Status Solidi B, 242, 665 (2005). The latter is of particular relevance to explore the inherent anisotropic behavior of periodic lattices as a design paradigm for wave guiding and steering applications. The equivalent material anisotropy of square and skew periodic lattices is investigated through the application of Bloch's theoremootnotetextBloch F., Z. Physik 52, 555 (1928) to the finite element discretization of the representative unit cell. The in-plane directions of wave propagation are determined through detailed analysis of the longitudinal and shear wave velocities, and verified through full-field wave propagation simulations. Similar wave behaviors are investigated analytically and experimentally for multilayer composite panels with anisotropic lay-ups in order to demonstrate the feasibility of micro structural design as an effective approach for wave management.

  20. The efficacy of periodic +Gz exposure in the prevention of bedrest induced orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, D. A.; Vernikos, J.; Duvoisin, M. R; Stinn, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    What is the most efficient dosage of periodic exposure to positive 1G(z) during microgravity to maintain a functional upright position after returning to a positive 1G(z) environment? The answer has implications for the type of countermeasures astronauts will be required to perform during long term space flight. Methods: Nine males were subjected to four different positive 1G exposure protocols plus a control protocol ('zero G(z)') during four days of continuous bedrest. The four positive 1G(z) exposures consisted of periodic standing or walking, each for a total period of two or four hours. Each subject was returned for bedrest on five different occasions over a period of approximately one year to obtain data on each of the nine subjects across all four positive 1G(z) treatments and the control. A 30 min tilt test was used to measure orthostatic response during pre and post bedrest. Results: In terms of survival rate (percentage of subjects who did not faint after 30 sec of tilt), four hours of intermittent standing was the only protocol that maintained a rate comparable to pre bedrest levels (87.5 percent). Although the other three positive 1G(z) protocols performed better than the 'zero G(z) control (22.2 percent), only the four hour standing returned post bedrest survival rates to pre bedrest levels. Conclusions: The results will need to be evaluated with regards to a variety of other physiological systems which are known to decondition during microgravitry.

  1. On multiple alternating steady states induced by periodic spin phase perturbation waveforms.

    PubMed

    Buračas, Giedrius T; Jung, Youngkyoo; Lee, Jongho; Buxton, Richard B; Wong, Eric C; Liu, Thomas T

    2012-05-01

    Direct measurement of neural currents by means of MRI can potentially open a high temporal resolution (10-100 ms) window applicable for monitoring dynamics of neuronal activity without loss of the high spatial resolution afforded by MRI. Previously, we have shown that the alternating balanced steady state imaging affords high sensitivity to weak periodic currents owing to its amplification of periodic spin phase perturbations. This technique, however, requires precise synchronization of such perturbations to the radiofrequency pulses. Herein, we extend alternating balanced steady state imaging to multiple balanced alternating steady states for estimation of neural current waveforms. Simulations and phantom experiments show that the off-resonance profile of the multiple alternating steady state signal carries information about the frequency content of driving waveforms. In addition, the method is less sensitive than alternating balanced steady state to precise waveform timing relative to radiofrequency pulses. Thus, multiple alternating steady state technique is potentially applicable to MR imaging of the waveforms of periodic neuronal activity.

  2. Delay-induced state transition and resonance in periodically driven tumor model with immune surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Han, Qinglin; Zeng, Chunhua; Wang, Hua; Fu, Yunchang; Zhang, Chun

    2014-06-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a tumor growth model under the presence of immune surveillance is investigated. Time delay and cross-correlation between multiplicative and additive noises are considered in the system. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is calculated when periodic signal is introduced multiplicatively. Our results show that: (i) the time delay can accelerate the transition from the state of stable tumor to that of extinction, however the correlation between two noises can accelerate the transition from the state of extinction to that of stable tumor; (ii) the time delay and correlation between two noises can lead to a transition between SR and double SR in the curve of SNR as a function of additive noise intensity, however for the curve of SNR as a function of multiplicative noise intensity, the time delay can cause the SR phenomenon to disappear, and the cross-correlation between two noises can lead to a transition from SR to stochastic reverse-resonance. Finally, we compare the SR phenomenon for the multiplicative periodic signal with that for additive periodic signal in the tumor growth model with immune surveillance.

  3. Chaotic and periodic motions of a cyclic bus induced by speedup.

    PubMed

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2002-10-01

    We study the effect of speedup on the dynamical behavior of a single cyclic bus in a bus system with many bus stops. We present a nonlinear-map model of a cyclic bus to take into account the speedup. When the cyclic bus is delayed, the bus speeds up to retrieve the delay. It is found that the cyclic bus exhibits chaotic motion with increasing speedup. The chaotic motion depends on both speedup and the number of bus stops. Also, it is shown that the dynamical transition between the chaotic and periodic motions occurs with the increase of bus stops. The dependence of the recurrence time (one period) and Liapunov exponent on both speedup and the number of bus stops is calculated for distinct dynamic states. It is shown that the speedup has a significant effect on the bus motion. For a piecewise linear-map model, the cyclic bus does not exhibit the chaotic motion but a complex oscillatory motion with multiple periods occurs.

  4. Oxidative stress, biochemical alterations, and hyperlipidemia in female rats induced by lead chronic toxicity during puberty and post puberty periods

    PubMed Central

    Alya, Annabi; Ines, Dhouib Bini; Montassar, Lasram; Najoua, Gharbi; Saloua, El Fazâa

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Lead (Pb) is a toxic metal inducing many destructive effects leading to a broad range of physiological, biochemical, and neurological dysfunctions in humans and laboratory animals. Materials and Methods: Here, we investigated the effect of chronic exposure to Pb (50 mg/l) on oxidative stress, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and lipid profile of two different age groups of female rats treated with Pb from delivery until puberty period (40 days, Pb40) and post puberty period (65 days, Pb65). Results: Our results clearly show that the administration of Pb produces oxidative damage in liver and kidney, as strongly suggested by the significant increase in TBARS, decrease in total SH, and the alteration of SOD activity. Elevation in liver function biomarkers, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and reduction in total protein (liver and plasma) and albumin are evidence of perturbations of liver synthetic function. In young Pb-treated group, Pb-induced nephropathy was more pronounced by the increase in the levels of creatinine, urea, and uric acid. However, hyperlipidemia was evident for both Pb-exposed groups leading to a potential risk for cardiovascular diseases and atherosclerosis. Conclusion: It is concluded that Pb induces metabolic and oxidative disturbances depending on the age of the animals, which are not negligible. PMID:26730340

  5. Distinct neuroplasticity processes are induced by different periods of acrobatic exercise training.

    PubMed

    Salame, Samira; Garcia, Priscila C; Real, Caroline C; Borborema, Juliana; Mota-Ortiz, Sandra R; Britto, Luiz R G; Pires, Raquel S

    2016-07-15

    Short and long-term physical exercise induce physiological and structural changes in brain motor areas. The relationship between changes of structural and synaptic proteins in brain motor areas and acrobatic exercise is less understood. Our aim was to evaluate the expression of synapsin I (SYS), synaptophysin (SYP), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), neurofilament (NF), and a marker for recent neuronal activity (Egr-1) in the motor cortex, striatum and cerebellum of adult rats subjected to acrobatic exercise (AE, for 1-4 weeks). We used adult Wistar rats, divided into 4 groups based on duration of acrobatic training, namely 1 week (AE1, n=15), 2 weeks (AE2, n=15), 4 weeks (AE4, n=15), and sedentary (SED, n=15). In AE groups, the rats covered 5 times a circuit that was composed of obstacles, three times a week. The protein levels were analyzed by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The results revealed that short-term AE (AE1 and AE2) induced MAP2 decreases and NF, SYP and Egr-1 increases in the motor cortex; an increase of MAP2, SYS and SYP in the dorsolateral striatum, whereas the dorsomedial striatum showed increased NF, SYS, SYP and Egr-1. Granular cerebellar layer showed increased NF and Egr-1, with increased NF and SYP in the molecular layer. Long-term AE (AE4) promoted an increase of MAP2, SYP and Egr-1 in motor cortex; MAP2, SYS and SYP in the dorsomedial striatum; and NF and Egr-1 in the cerebellar granular layer. In conclusion, our data suggest that different durations of AE induce distinct plastic responses among distinct cortical and subcortical circuits. PMID:27126278

  6. Prediction of flow induced sound and vibration of periodically stiffened plates.

    PubMed

    Maxit, Laurent; Denis, Vivien

    2013-01-01

    Stiffened structures excited by the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) occur very frequently in engineering applications; for instance, in the wings of airplanes or the pressure hulls of submarines. To improve knowledge of the interaction between stiffened structures and TBL, this paper deals with the modeling of infinite periodically stiffened plates excited by TBL. The mathematical formulation of the problem is well-established in the literature. The originality of the present work relies on the use of a wavenumber-point reciprocity technique for evaluating the response of the plate to convected harmonic pressure waves. It follows a methodology for estimating the vibro-acoustic response of the plate excited by the TBL from the wall pressure spectrum and its displacements in the wavenumber space due to point excitations located at the receiving positions. The computing process can be reduced to the numerical integration of an analytical expression in the case of a periodically stiffened plate. An application to a naval test case highlights the effect of Bloch-Floquet waves on the vibrations of the plate and its radiated pressure in the fluid.

  7. Mechanical buckling induced periodic kinking/stripe microstructures in mechanically peeled graphite flakes from HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Manrui; Liu, Ze; Zheng, Quan-shui; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical exfoliation is a widely used method to isolate high quality graphene layers from bulk graphite. In our recent experiments, some ordered microstructures, consisting of a periodic alternation of kinks and stripes, were observed in thin graphite flakes that were mechanically peeled from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented to attribute the formation of such ordered structures to the alternation of two mechanical processes during the exfoliation: (1) peeling of a graphite flake and (2) mechanical buckling of the flake being subjected to bending. In this model, the width of the stripes L is determined by thickness h of the flakes, surface energy , and critical buckling strain . Using some appropriate values of and that are within the ranges determined by other independent experiments and simulations, the predicted relations between the stripe width and the flake thickness agree reasonably well with our experimental measurements. Conversely, measuring the L- h relations of the periodic microstructures in thin graphite flakes could help determine the critical mechanical buckling strain and the interface energy.

  8. Periodic oscillation and fine structure of wedge-induced oblique detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Ming-Yue; Fan, Bao-Chun; Dong, Gang

    2011-12-01

    An oblique detonation wave for a Mach 7 inlet flow over a long enough wedge of 30° turning angle is simulated numerically using Euler equation and one-step rection model. The fifth-order WENO scheme is adopted to capture the shock wave. The numerical results show that with the compression of the wedge wall the detonation wave front structure is divided into three sections: the ZND model-like strcuture, single-sided triple point structure and dual-headed triple point strucuture. The first structure is the smooth straight, and the second has the characteristic of the triple points propagating dowanstream only with the same velocity, while the dual-headed triple point structure is very complicated. The detonation waves facing upstream and downstream propagate with different velocities, in which the periodic collisions of the triple points cause the oscillation of the detonation wave front. This oscillation process has temporal and spatial periodicity. In addition, the triple point trace are recorded to obtain different cell structures in three sections.

  9. Numerical simulation of short period Earth rotation variations induced by ocean tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Andreas; Schindelegger, Michael; Seitz, Florian

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamic Model for Earth Rotation and Gravity (DyMEG) has been used in several previous studies for the numerical simulation of Earth rotation (polar motion and length-of-day) on time scales from seasons to decades. Our current activities aim at the extension of the model and its application for the simulation of high frequency Earth rotation signals with periods of a few hours up to several days. This requires several model adaptations, such as the incorporation of additional excitation mechanisms as well as the identification and implementation of an appropriate numerical integrator. Here we particularly focus on the effect of ocean tides as they - due to their strictly periodic signal characteristics - provide a good possibility to evaluate the performance of the model and to detect potential computational problems. Secondary effects due to atmospheric and non-tidal oceanic influences are incorporated as well. We validate the simulated polar motion and length-of-day time series against hourly GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) data and conventional ocean tide routines of the IERS (International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service).

  10. Gas Exchange and Phytoluminography of Single Red Kidney Bean Leaves during Periods of Induced Stomatal Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Ellenson, James L.; Raba, Richard M.

    1983-01-01

    This report examines the capabilities of a new approach to the study of gas exchange and electron transport properties of single, intact leaves. The method combines conventional aspects of analysis with an image intensification system that records the spatial distribution of delayed light emission (DLE) over single leaf surfaces. The combined system was used to investigate physiological perturbations induced by exposure of single leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris cv `California Light Red' to a combination of SO2 (0.5 microliters per liter) and ozone (0.1 microliters per liter). Exposure of one-half of a leaf to this combination induced DLE and stomatal oscillations, but only in the half of the leaf exposed to the combined gases. Examination of phytoluminographs taken during these oscillations revealed distinct leaf patches where the greatest changes in DLE intensity occurred. This phenomenon is interpreted to be evidence that control of stomatal activity of intact plant leaves occurs within discrete leaf areas defined within the vascular network. Images Fig. 6 PMID:16662989

  11. Multi-Cell High Latitude Density Structure Induced by Ion Drag during Active Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Crowley, G.

    2012-12-01

    During active periods two-cell convection patterns can produce four-cell density structure in the high-latitude thermosphere. During these periods density perturbations approaching 50% are possible. The occurrence of density structures that are more complex than the forcing itself suggests that the structure is caused by a profound change in the balance of forces. Using a General Circulation Model of the thermosphere, we compare the balance of forces in the upper and lower thermosphere during active and quiet times. We also examine the thermal structure caused by the dynamical adjustment to ion-drag forcing in relation to the other terms as a balanced state is approached. Simulations reveal that where ion drag is unable to accelerate the atmosphere into rapid motion (during quiet times or at low thermospheric altitudes) the Coriolis force is the dominant inertial term, and for fixed pressure levels centers of cyclonic motion are (per the usual meteorology relations) colder and denser than the surrounding air, while centers of anticyclonic motion are warmer and less dense. At fixed heights, densities are high in the evening anticyclonic gyre, and low in the dawn cyclonic gyre. However, this situation is radically changed during active periods when the atmosphere is spun up to rapid motion and the centrifugal force resulting from curved trajectories is the dominant inertial force. When this occurs, the high latitude anticyclones and cyclones both become centers of relatively cold high density air at fixed height. Cold low-density centers are found on both the dawn and dusk sides with a trough of low density air over the pole connecting them. This intrusion of low density splits the evening high density region that exists under quiet conditions giving the four cell pattern found by Crowley et al. [1989; 1996a, b]. Crowley, G., J. Schoendorf, R. G. Roble, F. A. Marcos (1996a). Cellular structures in the high latitude lower thermosphere, J. Geophys. Res. 101, 211

  12. First principles simulation of laser-induced periodic surface structure using the particle-in-cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Chowdhury, Enam A.

    2015-11-01

    We present our results of a fundamental simulation of a periodic grating structure formation on a copper target during the femtosecond-pulse laser damage process, and compare our results to recent experiment. The particle-in-cell (PIC) method is used to model the initial laser heating of the electrons, a two-temperature model (TTM) is used to model the thermalization of the material, and a modified PIC method is employed to model the atomic transport leading to a damage crater morphology consistent with experimental grating structure formation. This laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is shown to be directly related to the formation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and their interference with the incident laser pulse.

  13. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on tool steel by multiple picosecond laser pulses of different polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorčič, Peter; Sedlaček, Marko; Podgornik, Bojan; Reif, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are produced on cold work tool steel by irradiation with a low number of picosecond laser pulses. As expected, the ripples, with a period of about 90% of the laser wavelength, are oriented perpendicular to the laser polarization. Subsequent irradiation with the polarization rotated by 45° or 90° results in a corresponding rotation of the ripples. This is visible already with the first pulse and becomes almost complete - erasing the previous orientation - after as few as three pulses. The phenomenon is not only observed for single-spot irradiation but also for writing long coherent traces. The experimental results strongly defy the role of surface plasmon-polaritons as the predominant key to LIPSS formation.

  14. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica upon two-color double-pulse irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Höhm, S.; Herzlieb, M.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2013-12-16

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon irradiation of fused silica with multiple irradiation sequences consisting of laser pulse pairs (50 fs single-pulse duration) of two different wavelengths (400 and 800 nm) is studied experimentally. Parallel polarized double-pulse sequences with a variable delay Δt between −10 and +10 ps and between the individual fs-laser pulses were used to investigate the LIPSS periods versus Δt. These two-color experiments reveal the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition to the silica surface by the first laser pulse for LIPSS formation. The second laser pulse subsequently reinforces the previously seeded spatial LIPSS frequencies.

  15. Strong angular magneto-induced anisotropy of Voigt effect in metal-dielectric metamaterials with periodic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelniker, Yakov M.; Bergman, David J.

    2014-03-01

    When an applied magnetic field has an arbitrary direction with respect to the lattice axes of a periodically microstructured or nanostructured metamaterial, the effective permittivity tensor of the metamaterial sample becomes anisotropic and all its components can be nonzero. This is true even if the microstructure has a high symmetry, e.g., cubic or triangular. It is found that the strong magneto-induced anisotropy which appears in the macroscopic response leads to an unusually strong anisotropic behavior of the Voigt effect and other magneto-optical effects. That is, these phenomena become strongly dependent on the direction of the applied static magnetic field, as well as on the direction of the time-dependent electromagnetic field, with respect to the symmetry axes of the periodic microstructure.

  16. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on silicon upon polarization controlled two-color double-pulse irradiation.

    PubMed

    Höhm, Sandra; Herzlieb, Marcel; Rosenfeld, Arkadi; Krüger, Jörg; Bonse, Jörn

    2015-01-12

    Two-color double-fs-pulse experiments were performed on silicon wafers to study the temporally distributed energy deposition in the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS). A Mach-Zehnder interferometer generated parallel or cross-polarized double-pulse sequences at 400 and 800 nm wavelength, with inter-pulse delays up to a few picoseconds between the sub-ablation 50-fs-pulses. Multiple two-color double-pulse sequences were collinearly focused by a spherical mirror to the sample. The resulting LIPSS characteristics (periods, areas) were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A wavelength-dependent plasmonic mechanism is proposed to explain the delay-dependence of the LIPSS. These two-color experiments extend previous single-color studies and prove the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition for LIPSS formation.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis for Reactor Period Induced by Positive Reactivity Using One-point Adjoint Kinetic Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, G.; Tsuji, M.; Narabayashi, T.

    2014-04-01

    In order to better predict a kinetic behavior of a nuclear fission reactor, an improvement of the delayed neutron parameters is essential. The present paper specifies important nuclear data for a reactor kinetics: Fission yield and decay constant data of 86Ge, some bromine isotopes, 94Rb, 98mY and some iodine isotopes. Their importance is quantified as sensitivities with a help of the adjoint kinetic equation, and it is found that they are dependent on an inserted reactivity (or a reactor period). Moreover, dependence of sensitivities on nuclear data files is also quantified using the latest files. Even though the currently evaluated data are used, there are large differences among different data files from a view point of the delayed neutrons.

  18. Periodic density-functional calculations on work-function change induced by adsorption of halogens on Cu(111).

    PubMed

    Roman, Tanglaw; Groß, Axel

    2013-04-12

    Using periodic density-functional theory calculations, we address the work-function change induced by the adsorption of chlorine and iodine on Cu(111) which are shown to change the work function in opposite ways, contrary to what one may expect for these two electron acceptors. In contrast to previous studies, we demonstrate that substrate effects play only a minor role in work-function changes brought about by halogen adsorption on metals. Instead, polarization on the adsorbate not only explains the sign of the work-function change as a contributor to a positive surface dipole moment, but it is also the decisive factor in the dependence of adsorption-induced work-function changes on the coverage of halogens on metal surfaces.

  19. Impairment of heme biosynthesis induces short circadian period in body temperature rhythms in mice.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Reiko; Satoh, Yoko; Watanabe, Yukino; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kudo, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoichi; Mashino, Tadahiko; Mitsumoto, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that the function of mammalian clock gene transcripts is controlled by the binding of heme in vitro. To examine the effects of heme on biological rhythms in vivo, we measured locomotor activity (LA) and core body temperature (T(b)) in a mouse model of porphyria with impaired heme biosynthesis by feeding mice a griseofulvin (GF)-containing diet. Mice fed with a 2.0% GF-containing diet (GF2.0) transiently exhibited phase advance or phase advance-like phenomenon by 1-3 h in terms of the biological rhythms of T(b) or LA, respectively (both, P < 0.05) while mice were kept under conditions of a light/dark cycle (12 h:12 h). We also observed a transient, ~0.3 h shortening of the period of circadian T(b) rhythms in mice kept under conditions of constant darkness (P < 0.01). Interestingly, the observed duration of abnormal circadian rhythms in GF2.0 mice lasted between 1 and 3 wk after the onset of GF ingestion; this finding correlated well with the extent of impairment of heme biosynthesis. When we examined the effects of therapeutic agents for acute porphyria, heme, and hypertonic glucose on the pathological status of GF2.0 mice, it was found that the intraperitoneal administration of heme (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or glucose (9 g·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 7 days partially reversed (50%) increases in urinary δ-aminolevulinic acids levels associated with acute porphyria. Treatment with heme, but not with glucose, suppressed the phase advance (-like phenomenon) in the diurnal rhythms (P < 0.05) and restored the decrease of heme (P < 0.01) in GF2.0 mice. These results suggest that impairments of heme biosynthesis, in particular a decrease in heme, may affect phase and period of circadian rhythms in animals.

  20. Determinants of HIV-induced brain changes in three different periods of the early clinical course: A data mining analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bokai; Kong, Xiangnan; Kettering, Casey; Yu, Philip; Ragin, Ann

    2015-01-01

    To inform an understanding of brain status in HIV infection, quantitative imaging measurements were derived at structural, microstructural and macromolecular levels in three different periods of early infection and then analyzed simultaneously at each stage using data mining. Support vector machine recursive feature elimination was then used for simultaneous analysis of subject characteristics, clinical and behavioral variables, and immunologic measures in plasma and CSF to rank features associated with the most discriminating brain alterations in each period. The results indicate alterations beginning in initial infection and in all periods studied. The severity of immunosuppression in the initial virus host interaction was the most highly ranked determinant of earliest brain alterations. These results shed light on the initial brain changes induced by a neurotropic virus and their subsequent evolution. The pattern of ongoing alterations occurring during and beyond the period in which virus is suppressed in the systemic circulation supports the brain as a viral reservoir that may preclude eradication in the host. Data mining capabilities that can address high dimensionality and simultaneous analysis of disparate information sources have considerable utility for identifying mechanisms underlying onset of neurological injury and for informing new therapeutic targets. PMID:26413474

  1. Determinants of HIV-induced brain changes in three different periods of the early clinical course: A data mining analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bokai; Kong, Xiangnan; Kettering, Casey; Yu, Philip; Ragin, Ann

    2015-01-01

    To inform an understanding of brain status in HIV infection, quantitative imaging measurements were derived at structural, microstructural and macromolecular levels in three different periods of early infection and then analyzed simultaneously at each stage using data mining. Support vector machine recursive feature elimination was then used for simultaneous analysis of subject characteristics, clinical and behavioral variables, and immunologic measures in plasma and CSF to rank features associated with the most discriminating brain alterations in each period. The results indicate alterations beginning in initial infection and in all periods studied. The severity of immunosuppression in the initial virus host interaction was the most highly ranked determinant of earliest brain alterations. These results shed light on the initial brain changes induced by a neurotropic virus and their subsequent evolution. The pattern of ongoing alterations occurring during and beyond the period in which virus is suppressed in the systemic circulation supports the brain as a viral reservoir that may preclude eradication in the host. Data mining capabilities that can address high dimensionality and simultaneous analysis of disparate information sources have considerable utility for identifying mechanisms underlying onset of neurological injury and for informing new therapeutic targets. PMID:26413474

  2. Optically induced excitonic electroabsorption in a periodically delta-doped InGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, A.; Maserjian, J.

    1991-01-01

    Large optically induced Stark shifts have been observed in a periodically delta-doped InGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well structure. With an excitation intensity of 10 mW/sq cm, an absolute quantum well absorption change of 7000/cm was measured with a corresponding differential absorption change as high as 80 percent. The associated maximum change in the quantum well refractive index is 0.04. This material is promising for device development for all-optical computing and signal processing.

  3. Influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures and lattice defects accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sedao, Xxx; Garrelie, Florence Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Pigeon, Florent; Maurice, Claire; Quey, Romain

    2014-04-28

    The influence of crystal orientation on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) has been investigated on a polycrystalline nickel sample. Electron Backscatter Diffraction characterization has been exploited to provide structural information within the laser spot on irradiated samples to determine the dependence of LIPSS formation and lattice defects (stacking faults, twins, dislocations) upon the crystal orientation. Significant differences are observed at low-to-medium number of laser pulses, outstandingly for (111)-oriented surface which favors lattice defects formation rather than LIPSS formation.

  4. Polarization induced Z2 and Chern topological phases in a periodically driving field.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shu-Ting; Savrasov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Z2 and Chern topological phases such as newly discovered quantum spin Hall and original quantum Hall states hardly both co-exist in a single material due to their contradictory requirement on the time-reversal symmetry (TRS). We show that although the TRS is broken in systems with a periodically driving field, an effective TRS can still be defined provided the ac-field is linearly polarized or certain other conditions are satisfied. The controllable TRS provides us a route to manipulate contradictory phases by tuning the polarization. To demonstrate the idea, we consider a tight-binding model that is relevant to several monolayered materials as a benchmark system. Our calculation shows not only topological Z2 to Chern phase transition occurs but rich Chern phases are also observed. In addition, we also discussed the realization of our proposal in real materials, such as spin-orbit coupled graphene and crystal Bismuth. This opens the possibility of manipulating various topological phases in a single material and can be a promising approach to engineer new electronic states of matter. PMID:26965181

  5. Polarization induced Z2 and Chern topological phases in a periodically driving field

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Shu-Ting; Savrasov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Z2 and Chern topological phases such as newly discovered quantum spin Hall and original quantum Hall states hardly both co–exist in a single material due to their contradictory requirement on the time–reversal symmetry (TRS). We show that although the TRS is broken in systems with a periodically driving field, an effective TRS can still be defined provided the ac–field is linearly polarized or certain other conditions are satisfied. The controllable TRS provides us a route to manipulate contradictory phases by tuning the polarization. To demonstrate the idea, we consider a tight-binding model that is relevant to several monolayered materials as a benchmark system. Our calculation shows not only topological Z2 to Chern phase transition occurs but rich Chern phases are also observed. In addition, we also discussed the realization of our proposal in real materials, such as spin-orbit coupled graphene and crystal Bismuth. This opens the possibility of manipulating various topological phases in a single material and can be a promising approach to engineer new electronic states of matter. PMID:26965181

  6. Observation of Geometric Parametric Instability Induced by the Periodic Spatial Self-Imaging of Multimode Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Tonello, Alessandro; Barthélémy, Alain; Couderc, Vincent; Shalaby, Badr Mohamed; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Spatiotemporal mode coupling in highly multimode physical systems permits new routes for exploring complex instabilities and forming coherent wave structures. We present here the first experimental demonstration of multiple geometric parametric instability sidebands, generated in the frequency domain through resonant space-time coupling, owing to the natural periodic spatial self-imaging of a multimode quasi-continuous-wave beam in a standard graded-index multimode fiber. The input beam was launched in the fiber by means of an amplified microchip laser emitting sub-ns pulses at 1064 nm. The experimentally observed frequency spacing among sidebands agrees well with analytical predictions and numerical simulations. The first-order peaks are located at the considerably large detuning of 123.5 THz from the pump. These results open the remarkable possibility to convert a near-infrared laser directly into a broad spectral range spanning visible and infrared wavelengths, by means of a single resonant parametric nonlinear effect occurring in the normal dispersion regime. As further evidence of our strong space-time coupling regime, we observed the striking effect that all of the different sideband peaks were carried by a well-defined and stable bell-shaped spatial profile.

  7. Observation of Geometric Parametric Instability Induced by the Periodic Spatial Self-Imaging of Multimode Waves.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Tonello, Alessandro; Barthélémy, Alain; Couderc, Vincent; Shalaby, Badr Mohamed; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Spatiotemporal mode coupling in highly multimode physical systems permits new routes for exploring complex instabilities and forming coherent wave structures. We present here the first experimental demonstration of multiple geometric parametric instability sidebands, generated in the frequency domain through resonant space-time coupling, owing to the natural periodic spatial self-imaging of a multimode quasi-continuous-wave beam in a standard graded-index multimode fiber. The input beam was launched in the fiber by means of an amplified microchip laser emitting sub-ns pulses at 1064 nm. The experimentally observed frequency spacing among sidebands agrees well with analytical predictions and numerical simulations. The first-order peaks are located at the considerably large detuning of 123.5 THz from the pump. These results open the remarkable possibility to convert a near-infrared laser directly into a broad spectral range spanning visible and infrared wavelengths, by means of a single resonant parametric nonlinear effect occurring in the normal dispersion regime. As further evidence of our strong space-time coupling regime, we observed the striking effect that all of the different sideband peaks were carried by a well-defined and stable bell-shaped spatial profile. PMID:27203323

  8. Stability analysis of two coupled Lorenz lasers and the coupling-induced periodic to chaotic transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Lee, Kayee

    1987-01-01

    A linear stability analysis of two Lorenz lasers coupled by their electric fields has been performed, and it is shown that the bad cavity condition becomes a function of coupling and that a good cavity instability may occur if the injected fields are inverted before injection. In addition, it is shown that the symmetrically coupled Lorenz system is isomorphic to the original Lorenz system with new parameters. The stability analysis also predicts a lowering of the second laser threshold with coupling for both the chaotic and self-pulsing regimes. Numerical integration of the equations is in agreement with these predictions and has revealed a coupling induced transition from self-pulsing to chaotic behavior. The classification of the behavior of the coupled system in the parameter space of the coupling constants has been investigated and shows that the results of symmetric coupling allow enough of a margin for an experimental test of the theory. This would allow experimentalists to observe the actual Lorenz instability at excitations as low as 4-5 times above threshold.

  9. Environmental tobacco smoke in the early postnatal period induces impairment in brain myelination.

    PubMed

    Torres, Larissa H; Annoni, Raquel; Balestrin, Natalia T; Coleto, Priscila L; Duro, Stephanie O; Garcia, Raphael C T; Pacheco-Neto, Maurílio; Mauad, Thais; Camarini, Rosana; Britto, Luiz R G; Marcourakis, Tania

    2015-11-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is associated with high morbidity and mortality, mainly in children. However, few studies focus on the brain development effects of ETS exposure. Myelination mainly occurs in the early years of life in humans and the first three postnatal weeks in rodents and is sensitive to xenobiotics exposure. This study investigated the effects of early postnatal ETS exposure on myelination. BALB/c mice were exposed to ETS generated from 3R4F reference research cigarettes from the third to the fourteenth days of life. The myelination of nerve fibers in the optic nerve by morphometric analysis and the levels of Olig1 and myelin basic protein (MBP) were evaluated in the cerebellum, diencephalon, telencephalon, and brainstem in infancy, adolescence, and adulthood. Infant mice exposed to ETS showed a decrease in the percentage of myelinated fibers in the optic nerve, compared with controls. ETS induced a decrease in Olig1 protein levels in the cerebellum and brainstem and an increase in MBP levels in the cerebellum at infant. It was also found a decrease in MBP levels in the telencephalon and brainstem at adolescence and in the cerebellum and diencephalon at adulthood. The present study demonstrates that exposure to ETS, in a critical phase of development, affects the percentage of myelinated fibers and myelin-specific proteins in infant mice. Although we did not observe differences in the morphological analysis in adolescence and adulthood, there was a decrease in MBP levels in distinctive brain regions suggesting a delayed effect in adolescence and adulthood.

  10. Laser induced periodic surface structure formation in germanium by strong field mid IR laser solid interaction at oblique incidence.

    PubMed

    Austin, Drake R; Kafka, Kyle R P; Trendafilov, Simeon; Shvets, Gennady; Li, Hui; Yi, Allen Y; Szafruga, Urszula B; Wang, Zhou; Lai, Yu Hang; Blaga, Cosmin I; DiMauro, Louis F; Chowdhury, Enam A

    2015-07-27

    Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS or ripples) were generated on single crystal germanium after irradiation with multiple 3 µm femtosecond laser pulses at a 45° angle of incidence. High and low spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL and LSFL, respectively) were observed for both s- and p-polarized light. The measured LSFL period for p-polarized light was consistent with the currently established LIPSS origination model of coupling between surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and the incident laser pulses. A vector model of SPP coupling is introduced to explain the formation of s-polarized LSFL away from the center of the damage spot. Additionally, a new method is proposed to determine the SPP propagation length from the decay in ripple depth. This is used along with the measured LSFL period to estimate the average electron density and Drude collision time of the laser-excited surface. Finally, full-wave electromagnetic simulations are used to corroborate these results while simultaneously offering insight into the nature of LSFL formation.

  11. Hunting for the beat in the body: on period and phase locking in music-induced movement

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Birgitta; Thompson, Marc R.; Luck, Geoff; Saarikallio, Suvi H.; Toiviainen, Petri

    2014-01-01

    Music has the capacity to induce movement in humans. Such responses during music listening are usually spontaneous and range from tapping to full-body dancing. However, it is still unclear how humans embody musical structures to facilitate entrainment. This paper describes two experiments, one dealing with period locking to different metrical levels in full-body movement and its relationships to beat- and rhythm-related musical characteristics, and the other dealing with phase locking in the more constrained condition of sideways swaying motions. Expected in Experiment 1 was that music with clear and strong beat structures would facilitate more period-locked movement. Experiment 2 was assumed to yield a common phase relationship between participants' swaying movements and the musical beat. In both experiments optical motion capture was used to record participants' movements. In Experiment 1 a window-based period-locking probability index related to four metrical levels was established, based on acceleration data in three dimensions. Subsequent correlations between this index and musical characteristics of the stimuli revealed pulse clarity to be related to periodic movement at the tactus level, and low frequency flux to mediolateral and anteroposterior movement at both tactus and bar levels. At faster tempi higher metrical levels became more apparent in participants' movement. Experiment 2 showed that about half of the participants showed a stable phase relationship between movement and beat, with superior-inferior movement most often being synchronized to the tactus level, whereas mediolateral movement was rather synchronized to the bar level. However, the relationship between movement phase and beat locations was not consistent between participants, as the beat locations occurred at different phase angles of their movements. The results imply that entrainment to music is a complex phenomenon, involving the whole body and occurring at different metrical levels

  12. Hunting for the beat in the body: on period and phase locking in music-induced movement.

    PubMed

    Burger, Birgitta; Thompson, Marc R; Luck, Geoff; Saarikallio, Suvi H; Toiviainen, Petri

    2014-01-01

    Music has the capacity to induce movement in humans. Such responses during music listening are usually spontaneous and range from tapping to full-body dancing. However, it is still unclear how humans embody musical structures to facilitate entrainment. This paper describes two experiments, one dealing with period locking to different metrical levels in full-body movement and its relationships to beat- and rhythm-related musical characteristics, and the other dealing with phase locking in the more constrained condition of sideways swaying motions. Expected in Experiment 1 was that music with clear and strong beat structures would facilitate more period-locked movement. Experiment 2 was assumed to yield a common phase relationship between participants' swaying movements and the musical beat. In both experiments optical motion capture was used to record participants' movements. In Experiment 1 a window-based period-locking probability index related to four metrical levels was established, based on acceleration data in three dimensions. Subsequent correlations between this index and musical characteristics of the stimuli revealed pulse clarity to be related to periodic movement at the tactus level, and low frequency flux to mediolateral and anteroposterior movement at both tactus and bar levels. At faster tempi higher metrical levels became more apparent in participants' movement. Experiment 2 showed that about half of the participants showed a stable phase relationship between movement and beat, with superior-inferior movement most often being synchronized to the tactus level, whereas mediolateral movement was rather synchronized to the bar level. However, the relationship between movement phase and beat locations was not consistent between participants, as the beat locations occurred at different phase angles of their movements. The results imply that entrainment to music is a complex phenomenon, involving the whole body and occurring at different metrical levels

  13. Involvement of protein synthesis in recovery from refractory period of electrical depolarization induced by osmotic stimulation in Chara corallina.

    PubMed

    Shimmen, Teruo

    2011-09-01

    Upon addition of sorbitol to the external medium of an internodal cell of Chara corallina, a transient depolarization is induced at its nodal end (Shimmen in Plant Cell Physiol 44:1215-1224, 2003). In the present study, refractory period was found to be very long, 2-4 h. Recovery from refractoriness was completely inhibited by inhibitors of eukaryote-type protein synthesis, cycloheximide or anisomysin, but not by inhibitors of prokaryote-type protein synthesis. This suggested that proteinous factor(s) responsible for generation of the depolarization is lost or inactivated upon depolarization and synthesized during the resting state. Low temperature, which is supposed to inhibit protein synthesis, also inhibited recovery from refractoriness. When unstimulated internodal cells were incubated in the medium containing an inhibitor of eukaryote-type protein synthesis, generation of the depolarization was almost completely inhibited. This result suggested that the factor is slowly turning over even in the absence of osmotic stimulation.

  14. Structural and optical properties of titanium functionalized periodic mesostructured organosilica framework via evaporation-induced self-assembly method.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahab, M; He, Chaobin

    2013-04-01

    We describe an evaporation-induced self-assembly method for incorporating Ti into framework of ethane-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO). The X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), solid-state 29Si and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and UV-vis spectroscopy were used to elucidate the optical and structural properties of Ti-incorporated PMO materials. The degree of mesopore ordering and the structural properties were found to be dependent on the loading of Ti into the framework of PMO materials, as confirmed by XRD, and surface structural properties. UV-vis spectra also support the incorporation of Ti into framework of PMO. TEM analyses suggested the formation of mesopores for the pure PMO and Ti-incorporated PMO samples. The solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectra have confirmed the presence of organic fragment in the final PMO framework.

  15. Measurement of the temporal evolution of periodic induced displacement derivatives using stoboscopic electronic speackle-shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo D.; Davila, Abundio; Mendiola, G.; Kaufmann, Guillermo H.

    2001-02-01

    Single pulsed subtraction electronic speckle-shearing pattern interferometry is used to measure the time evolution of deformations induced by periodic impulse loading on a metal plate. This is accomplished with a stroboscopic system based on a pulsed laser and an interline-transfer CCD camera running at 60 frames/s. In a few seconds, a sequence of hundreds of interferograms is recorded with an effective sampling time interval of some tens of microseconds. We describe the experimental setup used to generate the transient deformation on the metal plate and also the synchronization of laser pulses and image acquisition. Several correlation fringe patterns are presented, showing the time evolution of the deformation. Finally, these data are used to calculate optical phase maps and displacement derivative fields for different times after the application of the dynamic load on the object.

  16. Holistic differential analysis of embryo-induced alterations in the proteome of bovine endometrium in the preattachment period.

    PubMed

    Berendt, Frank J; Fröhlich, Thomas; Schmidt, Susanne E M; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Wolf, Eckhard; Arnold, Georg J

    2005-07-01

    During the peri-implantation period, molecular signaling between embryo and endometrium (layer of tissue lining the uterus lumen) is supposed to be crucial for the maintenance of pregnancy. To investigate embryo-induced alterations in the proteome of bovine endometrium in the preattachment period (day 18), we used monozygotic cattle twins (generated by embryo splitting) as a model eliminating genetic variability as a source for proteome differences. One of the twins was pregnant after the transfer of two in vitro produced blastocysts, while the corresponding twin received a sham-transfer and served as a nonpregnant control. The two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) analysis of the endometrium samples of three twin pairs (pregnant/nonpregnant) revealed four proteins with significantly higher abundance (p < 10(-9)) in each sample derived from the pregnant animals: Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor beta; 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20 alpha-HSD); soluble NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase 1; and acyl-CoA-binding protein. To verify the accuracy of the 2-D DIGE quantification, the abundances of 20 alpha-HSD were quantified by a targeted cleavable isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) approach. The mass spectrometry-based ICAT quantification matched perfectly the results obtained by 2-D DIGE quantification, demonstrating the accuracy of our data. These results demonstrate that our model (monozygotic twins) in combination with the appropriate analytical tools is particularly suitable for the detection of the proteins involved in the embryo-maternal interactions.

  17. Variations in the pre-ejection period induced by ventricular extra systoles may be feasible to predict fluid responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Vistisen, Simon Tilma; Andersen, Kristian Kjær; Frederiksen, Christian Alcaraz; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2014-08-01

    Monitoring that can predict fluid responsiveness is an unsettled matter for spontaneously breathing patients. Based on the convincing results with dynamic monitoring based on preload variations induced by mechanical ventilation, we hypothesised that the extra systolic post-ectopic beat could constitute a similar intermittent preload shift inducing a brief variation in blood pressure and that the magnitude of this variation could predict the hemodynamic response to volume expansion in sedated pigs. Ten pigs were sedated and hemodynamically monitored and four intravascular volume shifts were made: blood depletion (25% of estimated blood volume; 660 ml), retransfusion (of 500 ml depleted blood), and two sequential volume expansions (500 ml colloid each). Between volume shifts, supraventricular and ventricular extra systoles were induced by a pacemaker. Hemodynamic variables such as pulse pressure (PP) and pre-ejection period (PEP) were determined for each heart beat and the hemodynamic changes in the post-ectopic beats compared to sinus beats was extracted (e.g. ∆PP and ∆PEP) and used to predict fluid responsiveness of subsequent volume expansions which was determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Ventricular extra systoles were generally useful for fluid responsiveness prediction (ROC areas >0.65). ∆PEP variables best predicted fluid responsiveness: ∆PEP derived from arterial pressure curve and ECG had ROC area of 0.84 and sensitivity of 0.77 and specificity of 0.71; ∆PEP derived from plethysmographic curve and ECG had ROC area of 0.79 and sensitivity of 0.71 and specificity of 0.70. However, ∆PP was not a useful variable in this study (ROC area <0.65). Hemodynamic analysis of post ectopic beats may be a feasible method for fluid responsiveness prediction. PMID:24203263

  18. Semantic Wavelet-Induced Frequency-Tagging (SWIFT) Periodically Activates Category Selective Areas While Steadily Activating Early Visual Areas

    PubMed Central

    Koenig-Robert, Roger; VanRullen, Rufin; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2015-01-01

    Primate visual systems process natural images in a hierarchical manner: at the early stage, neurons are tuned to local image features, while neurons in high-level areas are tuned to abstract object categories. Standard models of visual processing assume that the transition of tuning from image features to object categories emerges gradually along the visual hierarchy. Direct tests of such models remain difficult due to confounding alteration in low-level image properties when contrasting distinct object categories. When such contrast is performed in a classic functional localizer method, the desired activation in high-level visual areas is typically accompanied with activation in early visual areas. Here we used a novel image-modulation method called SWIFT (semantic wavelet-induced frequency-tagging), a variant of frequency-tagging techniques. Natural images modulated by SWIFT reveal object semantics periodically while keeping low-level properties constant. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we indeed found that faces and scenes modulated with SWIFT periodically activated the prototypical category-selective areas while they elicited sustained and constant responses in early visual areas. SWIFT and the localizer were selective and specific to a similar extent in activating category-selective areas. Only SWIFT progressively activated the visual pathway from low- to high-level areas, consistent with predictions from standard hierarchical models. We confirmed these results with criterion-free methods, generalizing the validity of our approach and show that it is possible to dissociate neural activation in early and category-selective areas. Our results provide direct evidence for the hierarchical nature of the representation of visual objects along the visual stream and open up future applications of frequency-tagging methods in fMRI. PMID:26691722

  19. Semantic Wavelet-Induced Frequency-Tagging (SWIFT) Periodically Activates Category Selective Areas While Steadily Activating Early Visual Areas.

    PubMed

    Koenig-Robert, Roger; VanRullen, Rufin; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2015-01-01

    Primate visual systems process natural images in a hierarchical manner: at the early stage, neurons are tuned to local image features, while neurons in high-level areas are tuned to abstract object categories. Standard models of visual processing assume that the transition of tuning from image features to object categories emerges gradually along the visual hierarchy. Direct tests of such models remain difficult due to confounding alteration in low-level image properties when contrasting distinct object categories. When such contrast is performed in a classic functional localizer method, the desired activation in high-level visual areas is typically accompanied with activation in early visual areas. Here we used a novel image-modulation method called SWIFT (semantic wavelet-induced frequency-tagging), a variant of frequency-tagging techniques. Natural images modulated by SWIFT reveal object semantics periodically while keeping low-level properties constant. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we indeed found that faces and scenes modulated with SWIFT periodically activated the prototypical category-selective areas while they elicited sustained and constant responses in early visual areas. SWIFT and the localizer were selective and specific to a similar extent in activating category-selective areas. Only SWIFT progressively activated the visual pathway from low- to high-level areas, consistent with predictions from standard hierarchical models. We confirmed these results with criterion-free methods, generalizing the validity of our approach and show that it is possible to dissociate neural activation in early and category-selective areas. Our results provide direct evidence for the hierarchical nature of the representation of visual objects along the visual stream and open up future applications of frequency-tagging methods in fMRI. PMID:26691722

  20. Growth Period Effects on the Protective Properties of Aloe vera Against t-BHP-Induced Oxidative Stress in Chang Cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jin-Woo; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Yon-Suk; Lee, Jae Woong; Lee, Jeong-Jun; Pyo, Han-Jong; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2015-12-28

    Aloe vera has been used in traditional medicine for the therapy of a variety of disorders, such as wounds and burns. However, few studies have examined the antioxidant capacities of A. vera plants during different growth periods. In order to investigate the effects of growth on antioxidant activity, A. vera was prepared from 2-, 4-, 6-, 8-, and 12-month-old aloe. The extracts from 6-month-old A. vera showed the highest contents of flavonoids (9.750 mg catechin equivalent/g extract) and polyphenols (23.375 mg gallic acid equivalent/g extract) and the highest ferric reducing antioxidant power (0.047 mM ferrous sulfate equivalent/mg extract). The extract from 6-month-old A. vera exhibited the highest free radical scavenging potential, and the lowest IC50 values were found for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (0.26 mg/ml) and alkyl radicals (0.50 mg/ml). In addition, the extract from 6-month-old A. vera showed the greatest effects on cell viability in normal liver cells. Based on these findings, the extract from 6-month-old A. vera was examined further in order to determine its protective potential against tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative stress. The extract from 6-monthold A. vera at a concentration of 0.25 mg/ml showed the highest protective activity against t-BHP-induced reactive oxygen species production. These findings suggested that harvesting regimens were critical in the regulation of effects of the bioactive potential of A. vera on antioxidant activity.

  1. Periodic driving control of Raman-induced spin-orbit coupling in Bose-Einstein condensates: The heating mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Llorente, J. M.; Plata, J.

    2016-06-01

    We focus on a technique recently implemented for controlling the magnitude of synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in ultracold atoms in the Raman-coupling scenario. This technique uses a periodic modulation of the Raman-coupling amplitude to tune the SOC. Specifically, it has been shown that the effect of a high-frequency sinusoidal modulation of the Raman-laser intensity can be incorporated into the undriven Hamiltonian via effective parameters, whose adiabatic variation can therefore be used to tune the SOC. Here, we characterize the heating mechanisms that can be relevant to this method. We identify the main mechanism responsible for the heating observed in the experiments as basically rooted in driving-induced transfer of population to excited states. Characteristics of that process determined by the harmonic trapping, the decay of the excited states, and the technique used for preparing the system are discussed. Additional heating, rooted in departures from adiabaticity in the variation of the effective parameters, is also described. Our analytical study provides some clues that may be useful in the design of strategies for curbing the effects of heating on the efficiency of the control methods.

  2. Periodic Evolution of a Xe I Population in an Oscillatory Discharge Captured Through Time-Synchronized Laser Induced Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2014-10-01

    We track the evolution of the Xe I 6 s '[ 1 / 2 ] 1 - 6 p '[ 3 / 2 ] 2 (834.68 nm air) transition lineshape in a plasma discharge oscillating at 60 Hz. Two time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence techniques based on phase sensitive detection of the fluorescence signal are demonstrated, yielding consistent results. One approach used previously involves a sample-and-hold procedure that collects fluorescence signal at a particular phase in the oscillation period and holds the average value until the following sample. The second method is based on fast switching of the fluorescence signal; only the signal collected inside the acquisition gate is sent to a lock-in amplifier for processing. Both methods rely on modulating the exciting laser beam and the latter permits operation at a much higher frequency range with reduced spectral noise density. The maximum observed peak fluorescence intensity occurs at low discharge currents, although the peak intensity drops to zero at zero discharge current. The peak intensity also decreases at the discharge current maximum. Time-varying properties of the xenon neutrals are extracted from a lineshape analysis. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. CVY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  3. Sex-dependent effects of early maternal deprivation on MDMA-induced conditioned place preference in adolescent rats: possible neurochemical correlates.

    PubMed

    Llorente-Berzal, Alvaro; Manzanedo, Carmen; Daza-Losada, Manuel; Valero, Manuel; López-Gallardo, Meritxell; Aguilar, María A; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, José; Viveros, Maria-Paz

    2013-09-01

    The early neonatal stage constitutes a sensitive period during which exposure to adverse events can increase the risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. Maternal deprivation (MD) is a model of early life stress that induces long-term behavioural and physiological alterations, including susceptibility to different drugs of abuse. In the present study we have used the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm to address the influence of MD on the rewarding effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymetamphetamine (MDMA) in adolescent animals of both sexes. We have previously observed in adolescent rats that MD induces modifications in the serotonergic and endocannabinoid systems, which play a role in the rewarding effects of MDMA. In light of this evidence, we hypothesized that MD would alter the psychobiological consequences of exposure to MDMA. Neonatal Wistar rats underwent MD (24h, on PND 9) or were left undisturbed (controls). The animals were conditioned with 2.5mg/kg MDMA during the periadolescent period (PND 34-PND 43) and were tested in the open-field test at the end of adolescence (PND 60). Animals were sacrificed on PND 68-75 and levels of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid were measured in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex, while the expression of hippocampal CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) and circulating levels of corticosterone and leptin were also measured. Control males showed CPP after administration of MDMA. However, no MDMA-induced CPP was detected in control females or MD males, and MD had no effect on open field activity in any group. A reduction in striatal and cortical 5-HT levels, increased expression of hippocampal CB1R and a marked trend towards higher circulating leptin levels were observed in MDMA-treated MD males. Our results demonstrate for the first time that MD reduces the rewarding effects of MDMA in a sex-dependent manner. We propose that this effect is related, at least in part, with alterations of the serotonergic

  4. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic structure adjustments based on electron dynamics control: from subwavelength ripples to double-grating structures.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuesong; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin; Wang, Sumei; Yuan, Yanping; Lu, Yongfeng

    2013-10-01

    This study proposes a method for adjusting subwavelength ripple periods and the corresponding double-grating structures formed on fused silica by designing femtosecond laser pulse trains based on localized transient electron density control. Four near-constant period ranges of 190-490 nm of ripples perpendicular to the polarization are obtained by designing pulse trains to excite and modulate the surface plasmon waves. In the period range of 350-490 nm, the double-grating structure is fabricated in one step, which is probably attributable to the grating-assisted enhanced energy deposition and subsequent thermal effects.

  5. Periodic porous stripe patterning in a polymer blend film induced by phase separation during spin-casting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Kyung; Taki, Kentaro; Nagamine, Shinsuke; Ohshima, Masahiro

    2008-08-19

    A periodic striping pattern with microscale pore size is observed on the surface of thin films prepared by spin-casting from a polystyrene (PS) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) blend solution. The pattern is created by the convection generated by thermal gradients in the solution between the substrate and film solution during solvent evaporation, the radial flow of the spin-coated solution, and the primary and secondary phase separation of the PS and PEG solutions. The formation mechanism of the periodic porous stripe pattern is discussed, wherein the effects of the polymer blend weight ratio, polymer concentration, and drying rate on the formation of the periodic porous striping pattern are investigated using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy.

  6. Spin- and valley-dependent commensurability oscillations and electric-field-induced quantum Hall plateaux in periodically modulated silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Shakouri, Kh.; Peeters, F. M.; Vasilopoulos, P.; Vargiamidis, V.; Hai, G.-Q.

    2014-05-26

    We study the commensurability oscillations in silicene subject to a perpendicular electric field E{sub z}, a weak magnetic field B, and a weak periodic potential V=V{sub 0}cos(Cy),C=2π/a{sub 0} with a{sub 0} its period. The field E{sub z} and/or the modulation lift the spin degeneracy of the Landau levels and lead to spin and valley resolved Weiss oscillations. The spin resolution is maximal when the field E{sub z} is replaced by a periodic one E{sub z}=E{sub 0}cos(Dy),D=2π/b{sub 0}, while the valley one is maximal for b{sub 0} = a{sub 0}. In certain ranges of B values, the current is fully spin or valley polarized. Additional quantum Hall conductivity plateaux arise due to spin and valley intra-Landau-level transitions.

  7. Formation of 100-nm periodic structures on a titanium surface by exploiting the oxidation and third harmonic generation induced by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Feng; Zhang, Cheng-Yun; Li, Hui; Dai, Qiao-Feng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shao-Long

    2014-11-17

    Periodic surface structures with periods as small as about one-tenth of the irradiating femtosecond (fs) laser light wavelength were created on the surface of a titanium (Ti) foil by exploiting laser-induced oxidation and third harmonic generation (THG). They were achieved by using 100-fs laser pulses with a repetition rate of 1 kHz and a wavelength ranging from 1.4 to 2.2 μm. It was revealed that an extremely thin TixOy layer was formed on the surface of the Ti foil after irradiating fs laser light with a fluence smaller than the ablation threshold of Ti, leading to a significant enhancement in THG which may exceed the ablation threshold of TixOy. As compared with Ti, the maximum efficacy factor for TixOy appears at a larger normalized wavevector in the direction perpendicular to the polarization of the fs laser light. As a result, the THG-dominated laser ablation of TixOy induces 100-nm periodic structures parallel to the polarization of the fs laser light. The depth of the periodic structures was found to be ~10 nm by atomic force microscopy and the formation of the thin TixOy layer was verified by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  8. Euclidian embeddings of periodic nets: definition of a topologically induced complete set of geometric descriptors for crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Eon, Jean-Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    Crystal-structure topologies, represented by periodic nets, are described by labelled quotient graphs (or voltage graphs). Because the edge space of a finite graph is the direct sum of its cycle and co-cycle spaces, a Euclidian representation of the derived periodic net is provided by mapping a basis of the cycle and co-cycle spaces to a set of real vectors. The mapping is consistent if every cycle of the basis is mapped on its own net voltage. The sum of all outgoing edges at every vertex may be chosen as a generating set of the co-cycle space. The embedding maps the cycle space onto the lattice L. By analogy, the concept of the co-lattice L* is defined as the image of the generators of the co-cycle space; a co-lattice vector is proportional to the distance vector between an atom and the centre of gravity of its neighbours. The pair (L, L*) forms a complete geometric descriptor of the embedding, generalizing the concept of barycentric embedding. An algebraic expression permits the direct calculation of fractional coordinates. Non-zero co-lattice vectors allow nets with collisions, displacive transitions etc. to be dealt with. The method applies to nets of any periodicity and dimension, be they crystallographic nets or not. Examples are analyzed: α-cristobalite, the seven unstable 3-periodic minimal nets etc.

  9. Short period wave generation in Moss Landing Harbor caused by offshore landslides induced by the Loma Prieta earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner-Taggart, J.M.; Barminski, R.F. Jr. )

    1991-07-01

    Short period waves were observed in the Moss Landing Harbor approximately 2 minutes after the October 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Offshore submarine landslides in the region of wave generation was noted by scuba divers and recorded by side scanning sonographs, fathometer records and ROV video footage taken in the area after the quake. These waves are believed to have been generated by offshore submarine landslides along the canyon walls of the Monterey Canyon directly offshore of the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories.

  10. Inkjet printed periodical micropatterns made of inert alumina ceramics induce contact guidance and stimulate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Lauria, Ines; Kramer, Michael; Schröder, Teresa; Kant, Sebastian; Hausmann, Anne; Böke, Frederik; Leube, Rudolf; Telle, Rainer; Fischer, Horst

    2016-10-15

    Bioinert high performance ceramics exhibit detrimental features for implant components with direct bone contact because of their low osseointegrating capability. We hypothesized that periodical microstructures made of inert alumina ceramics can influence the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC). In this study, we manufactured pillared arrays made of alumina ceramics with periodicities as low as 100μm and pillar heights of 40μm employing direct inkjet printing (DIP) technique. The response of hMSC to the microstructured surfaces was monitored by measuring cell morphology, viability and formation of focal adhesion complexes. Osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was investigated by alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization assays and expression analysis of respective markers. We demonstrated that MSCs react to the pillars with contact guidance. Subsequently, cells grow onto and form connections between the microstructures, and at the same time are directly attached to the pillars as shown by focal adhesion stainings. Cells build up tissue-like constructs with heights up to the micropillars resulting in increased cell viability and osteogenic differentiating properties. We conclude that periodical micropatterns on the micrometer scale made of inert alumina ceramics can mediate focal adhesion dependent cell adhesion and stimulate osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs.

  11. Watching the wind: seismic data contamination at long-periods due to atmospheric pressure-field-induced tilting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, S.; Bodin, P.; Hagel, K.; Fletcher, D.

    2010-12-01

    Long-period noise generated by the elastic response of the Earth to atmospheric pressure fluctuations has long been recognized as a limiting factor for seismic investigations. The quality of seismic data recorded by sensitive, near-surface broadband seismometers can be severely corrupted by this effect. During the recent installation of a new broadband site on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington, the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network recorded and investigated elevated daytime noise levels at periods exceeding 30 seconds. Substantial power spectral density variations of the background noise field, 15-20 dB, were observed in the horizontal component seismograms. The pattern of the long-period noise exhibited striking correlations with local fluctuations of the air temperature and wind speed as measured nearby the seismic station by the National Weather Service Forecast Office, Seattle, Washington, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Several past studies have demonstrated that local wind systems may lead to variations of the atmospheric pressure field that deform the ground and perturb seismograms. The rotational component of this motion is detected by horizontal-component seismometers because at periods longer than the sensor’s low corner frequency the sensor is acting essentially as a tiltmeter. We obtained a transfer function that describes the response of the broadband seismometer to a tilt step change and estimated the amplitude of tilt noise to be on the order of 10-9 - 10-8 radians. Within the seismic pass-band of the sensor, it is not possible to remove the tilt signal from the observed seismograms because the details of the tilting depend on the pressure field variations, the compliance of the near surface to pressure variations, and the design and construction of the seismometer vault itself. At longer periods, using the seismic data to recover tilts of tectonic origin is made challenging because of the needed instrument correction

  12. Cardiac induced localised motion of the human torso detected by a long period grating fibre optic sensing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allsop, T.; Lloyd, G.; Bhamber, R. S.; Hadzievski, L.; Halliday, M.; Webb, D. J.

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular health of the human population is a major concern for medical clinicians, with cardiovascular diseases responsible for 48% of all deaths worldwide, according to the World Health Organisation. Therefore the development of new practicable and economical diagnostic tools to scrutinise the cardiovascular health of humans is a major driver for clinicians. We offer a new technique to obtain seismocardiographic signals covering both ballistocardiography (below 20Hz) and audible heart sounds (20Hz upwards). The detection scheme is based upon an array of curvature/displacement sensors using fibre optic long period gratings interrogated using a variation of the derivative spectroscopy interrogation technique.

  13. A Fe-C coated long-period fiber grating sensor for corrosion-induced mass loss measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yizheng; Tang, Fujian; Bao, Yi; Tang, Yan; Chen, Genda

    2016-05-15

    This Letter reports a Fe-C coated long period fiber gratings sensor with a grating period of 387±0.1  μm for corrosion monitoring of low carbon steel in a 3.5 wt. % NaCl solution. An LPFG sensor was first deposited with a 0.8 μm thick layer of silver (Ag) and then electroplated with a 20 μm thick Fe-C coating. The chemical composition of the Fe-C coating was designed to include the main elements of low carbon steel. The resonant wavelength of the coated sensor was correlated with the mass loss of steel over time. Test results indicated a corrosion sensitivity of 0.0423 nm per 1% mass loss up to 80% Fe-C mass loss and 0.576 nm per 1% mass loss between 80% and 95% Fe-C mass loss. The corrosion sensitivity of such a Fe-C coated LPFG sensor was a trade-off for the service life of the sensor, both depending on thicknesses of the inner silver layer and the outer Fe-C coating.

  14. Fluid flow induced by periodic temperature oscillation over a flat plate: Comparisons with the classical Stokes problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debashis; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-05-01

    We delineate the dynamics of temporally and spatially periodic flow over a flat plate originating out of periodic thermoviscous expansion of the fluid, as a consequence of a thermal wave applied on the plate wall. We identify two appropriate length scales, namely, the wavelength of the temperature wave and the thermal penetration depth, so as to bring out the complex thermo-physical interaction between the fluid and the solid boundaries. Our results reveal that the entire thermal fluctuation and the subsequent thermoviscous actuation remain confined within a "thermo-viscous boundary layer." Based on the length scales and the analytical solution for the temperature field, we demarcate three different layers, namely, the wall layer (which is further sub-divided into various sub-layers, based on the temperature field), the intermediate layer, and the outer layer. We show that the interactions between the pressure oscillation and temperature-dependent viscosity yield a unidirectional time-averaged (mean) flow within the wall layer opposite to the direction of motion of the thermal wave. We also obtain appropriate scalings for the time-averaged velocity, which we further substantiate by full scale numerical simulations. Our analysis may constitute a new design basis for simultaneous control of the net throughput and mixing over a solid boundary, by the judicious employment of a traveling temperature wave.

  15. A Fe-C coated long-period fiber grating sensor for corrosion-induced mass loss measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yizheng; Tang, Fujian; Bao, Yi; Tang, Yan; Chen, Genda

    2016-05-15

    This Letter reports a Fe-C coated long period fiber gratings sensor with a grating period of 387±0.1  μm for corrosion monitoring of low carbon steel in a 3.5 wt. % NaCl solution. An LPFG sensor was first deposited with a 0.8 μm thick layer of silver (Ag) and then electroplated with a 20 μm thick Fe-C coating. The chemical composition of the Fe-C coating was designed to include the main elements of low carbon steel. The resonant wavelength of the coated sensor was correlated with the mass loss of steel over time. Test results indicated a corrosion sensitivity of 0.0423 nm per 1% mass loss up to 80% Fe-C mass loss and 0.576 nm per 1% mass loss between 80% and 95% Fe-C mass loss. The corrosion sensitivity of such a Fe-C coated LPFG sensor was a trade-off for the service life of the sensor, both depending on thicknesses of the inner silver layer and the outer Fe-C coating. PMID:27176989

  16. Interference induced periodic oscillation of convolutional-surface-plasmon resonance for a metal nanoparticle encapsulated by a dielectric microsphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Song; Liu, Huizhe; Wu, Lin; Eng Png, Ching; Bai, Ping

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical study is performed on the plasmonic properties of a metal nanoparticle encapsulated by a large microsphere, where the microsphere’s diameter is comparable with or larger than the incident wavelength. Due to interaction between the reflected and refracted waves, we show that a unique optical interference (or whisper-gallery-mode-like) pattern is generated inside the microsphere. Such an interference pattern further interacts with the metal nanoparticle embedded inside, which modifies the spectral response of the metal NP and creates a convolutional-surface-plasmon resonance (cSPR). The peak of resultant cSPR oscillates periodically with respect to the microsphere’s diameter due to the repeated occurrence of the constructive and destructive interferences. Our results also show that the periodicity of oscillation is mainly determined by the microsphere’s refractive index, but is less independent on the metal nanoparticle’s size. These findings might be potentially utilized in designing multi-scale plasmon structures in various applications such as sensors, drug delivery and photocatalysis.

  17. Novelty-induced conditioned place preference, sucrose preference, and elevated plus maze behavior in adult rats after repeated exposure to methylphenidate during the preweanling period.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Cynthia A; Der-Ghazarian, Taleen; Britt, Cynthia E; Varela, Fausto A; Kozanian, Olga O

    2013-06-01

    Early treatment with methylphenidate has a persistent effect on the affective (i.e., anxiety- and depressive-like) behaviors of adult rats and mice. Interestingly, age at methylphenidate exposure appears to be a critical determinant influencing the expression of affective behaviors. In the present study, we exposed rats to methylphenidate during the preweanling period (i.e., PD 11-PD 20) because this ontogenetic period is analogous to early childhood in humans (an age associated with increasing methylphenidate usage). Rats were injected with methylphenidate (0, 2, or 5mg/kg) from PD 11 to PD 20 and reactivity to rewarding and aversive stimuli were measured in early adulthood. Specifically, novelty-induced CPP, sucrose preference, and elevated plus maze behavior were assessed on PD 60. Early treatment with 2 or 5mg/kg methylphenidate increased total time spent in the white compartment of the CPP chamber. This methylphenidate-induced effect occurred regardless of exposure condition. Performance on the elevated plus maze was also impacted by early methylphenidate exposure, because rats treated with 5mg/kg methylphenidate spent more time in the closed compartment of the elevated plus maze than vehicle controls. Early methylphenidate exposure did not alter sucrose preference. These data indicate that exposing rats to methylphenidate during the preweanling period differentially affects anxiety-like behavior depending on the type of anxiety-provoking stimulus. Specifically, early methylphenidate exposure decreased aversion to a bright white room when measured on a novelty-induced CPP task, whereas methylphenidate caused a long-term increase in anxiety when measured on the elevated plus maze. PMID:23466690

  18. Novelty-induced conditioned place preference, sucrose preference, and elevated plus maze behavior in adult rats after repeated exposure to methylphenidate during the preweanling period.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Cynthia A; Der-Ghazarian, Taleen; Britt, Cynthia E; Varela, Fausto A; Kozanian, Olga O

    2013-06-01

    Early treatment with methylphenidate has a persistent effect on the affective (i.e., anxiety- and depressive-like) behaviors of adult rats and mice. Interestingly, age at methylphenidate exposure appears to be a critical determinant influencing the expression of affective behaviors. In the present study, we exposed rats to methylphenidate during the preweanling period (i.e., PD 11-PD 20) because this ontogenetic period is analogous to early childhood in humans (an age associated with increasing methylphenidate usage). Rats were injected with methylphenidate (0, 2, or 5mg/kg) from PD 11 to PD 20 and reactivity to rewarding and aversive stimuli were measured in early adulthood. Specifically, novelty-induced CPP, sucrose preference, and elevated plus maze behavior were assessed on PD 60. Early treatment with 2 or 5mg/kg methylphenidate increased total time spent in the white compartment of the CPP chamber. This methylphenidate-induced effect occurred regardless of exposure condition. Performance on the elevated plus maze was also impacted by early methylphenidate exposure, because rats treated with 5mg/kg methylphenidate spent more time in the closed compartment of the elevated plus maze than vehicle controls. Early methylphenidate exposure did not alter sucrose preference. These data indicate that exposing rats to methylphenidate during the preweanling period differentially affects anxiety-like behavior depending on the type of anxiety-provoking stimulus. Specifically, early methylphenidate exposure decreased aversion to a bright white room when measured on a novelty-induced CPP task, whereas methylphenidate caused a long-term increase in anxiety when measured on the elevated plus maze.

  19. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica upon multiple cross-polarized double-femtosecond-laser-pulse irradiation sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Rohloff, M.; Das, S. K.; Hoehm, S.; Grunwald, R.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krueger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2011-07-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon irradiation of fused silica with multiple irradiation sequences consisting of five Ti:sapphire femtosecond (fs) laser pulse pairs (150 fs, 800 nm) is studied experimentally. A Michelson interferometer is used to generate near-equal-energy double-pulse sequences with a temporal pulse delay from -20 to +20 ps between the cross-polarized individual fs-laser pulses ({approx}0.2 ps resolution). The results of multiple double-pulse irradiation sequences are characterized by means of Scanning Electron and Scanning Force Microscopy. Specifically in the sub-ps delay domain striking differences in the surface morphologies can be observed, indicating the importance of the laser-induced free-electron plasma in the conduction band of the solids for the formation of LIPSS.

  20. Caffeine in the neonatal period induces long-lasting changes in sleep and breathing in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Montandon, Gaspard; Horner, Richard L; Kinkead, Richard; Bairam, Aida

    2009-11-15

    Caffeine is commonly used clinically to treat apnoeas and unstable breathing associated with premature birth. Caffeine antagonizes adenosine receptors and acts as an efficient respiratory stimulant in neonates. Owing to its persistent effects on adenosine receptor expression in the brain, neonatal caffeine administration also has significant effects on maturation of the respiratory control system. However, since adenosine receptors are critically involved in sleep regulation, and sleep also modulates breathing, we tested the hypothesis that neonatal caffeine treatment disrupts regulation of sleep and breathing in the adult rat. Neonatal caffeine treatment (15 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was administered from postnatal days 3-12. At adulthood (8-10 weeks old), sleep and breathing were measured with a telemetry system and whole-body plethysmography respectively. In adult rats treated with caffeine during the neonatal period, sleep time was reduced, sleep onset latency was increased, and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep was fragmented compared to controls. Ventilation at rest was higher in caffeine-treated adult rats compared to controls across sleep/wake states. Hypercapnic ventilatory responses were significantly reduced in caffeine-treated rats compared to control rats across sleep/wake states. Additional experiments in adult anaesthetized rats showed that at similar levels of arterial blood gases, phrenic nerve activity was enhanced in caffeine-treated rats. This study demonstrates that administration of caffeine in the neonatal period alters respiratory control system activity in awake and sleeping rats, as well as in the anaesthetized rats, and also has persistent disrupting effects on sleep that are apparent in adult rats.

  1. In situ monitoring of laser-induced periodic surface structures formation on polymer films by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Rebollar, Esther; Rueda, Daniel R; Martín-Fabiani, Ignacio; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Álvaro; García-Gutiérrez, Mari-Cruz; Portale, Giuseppe; Castillejo, Marta; Ezquerra, Tiberio A

    2015-04-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on model spin-coated polymer films has been followed in situ by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) using synchrotron radiation. The samples were irradiated at different repetition rates ranging from 1 up to 10 Hz by using the fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm) with pulses of 8 ns. Simultaneously, GISAXS patterns were acquired during laser irradiation. The variation of both the GISAXS signal with the number of pulses and the LIPSS period with laser irradiation time is revealing key kinetic aspects of the nanostructure formation process. By considering LIPSS as one-dimensional paracrystalline lattice and using a correlation found between the paracrystalline disorder parameter, g, and the number of reflections observed in the GISAXS patterns, the variation of the structural order of LIPSS can be assessed. The role of the laser repetition rate in the nanostructure formation has been clarified. For high pulse repetition rates (i.e., 10 Hz), LIPSS evolve in time to reach the expected period matching the wavelength of the irradiating laser. For lower pulse repetition rates LIPSS formation is less effective, and the period of the ripples never reaches the wavelength value. Results support and provide information on the existence of a feedback mechanism for LIPSS formation in polymer films.

  2. Application of a characteristic periods-based (CPB) approach to estimate earthquake-induced displacements of landslides through dynamic numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martino, S.; Lenti, L.; Delgado, J.; Garrido, J.; Lopez-Casado, C.

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between seismic waves and slopes is an important topic to provide reliable scenarios for earthquake-(re)triggered landslides. The physical properties of seismic waves as well as slope topography and geology can significantly modify the local seismic response, influencing landslide triggering. A novel approach is here applied to two case studies in Andalusia (southern Spain) for computing the expected earthquake-induced displacements of existing landslide masses. Towards this aim, dynamic stress-strain numerical modelling was carried out using a selection of seismic signals characterized by different spectral content and energy. In situ geophysical measurements, consisting of noise records and temporary seismometric arrays, were carried out to control the numerical outputs in terms of local seismic response. The results consist of relationships between the characteristic period, Tm, of the seismic signals and the characteristic periods of the landslide masses, related to the thickness (Ts) and length (Tl), respectively. These relationships show that the larger the horizontal dimension (i.e. length of landslide) of a landslide is, the more effective the contribution (to the resulting coseismic displacement) of the long-period seismic waves is, as the maximum displacements are expected for a low Tm at each energy level of the input. On the other hand, when the local seismic response mainly depends on stratigraphy (i.e. landslide thickness), the maximum expected displacements occur close to the resonance period of the landslide, except for high-energy seismic inputs.

  3. The role of stoichiometric vacancy periodicity in pressure-induced amorphization of the Ga{sub 2}SeTe{sub 2} semiconductor alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Jabbar, N. M.; Kalkan, B.; MacDowell, A. A.; Huang, G.-Y.; Gronsky, R.; Bourret-Courchesne, E. D.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-08-04

    We observe that pressure-induced amorphization of Ga{sub 2}SeTe{sub 2} (a III-VI semiconductor) is directly influenced by the periodicity of its intrinsic defect structures. Specimens with periodic and semi-periodic two-dimensional vacancy structures become amorphous around 10–11 GPa in contrast to those with aperiodic structures, which amorphize around 7–8 GPa. The result is an instance of altering material phase-change properties via rearrangement of stoichiometric vacancies as opposed to adjusting their concentrations. Based on our experimental findings, we posit that periodic two-dimensional vacancy structures in Ga{sub 2}SeTe{sub 2} provide an energetically preferred crystal lattice that is less prone to collapse under applied pressure. This is corroborated through first-principles electronic structure calculations, which demonstrate that the energy stability of III-VI structures under hydrostatic pressure is highly dependent on the configuration of intrinsic vacancies.

  4. The Comparisons of Cerebral Hemodynamics Induced by Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Arousal and Periodic Limb Movement with Arousal: A Pilot NIRS Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS) with periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS) are two sleep disorders characterized by repetitive respiratory or movement events associated with cortical arousals. We compared the cerebral hemodynamic changes linked to periodic apneas/hypopneas with arousals (AHA) in four OSA-patients with periodic limb movements (PLMA) with arousals in four patients with RLS-PLMS using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). AHA induced homogenous pattern of periodic fluctuations in oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin, i.e., the decrease of HbO2 was accompanied by an increase of HHb during the respiratory event and resolved to reverse pattern when cortical arousal started. Blood volume (BV) showed the same pattern as HHb but with relative smaller amplitude in most of the AHA events.These changing patterns were significant as Wilcoxon signed-rank tests gave p < 0.001 when comparing the area under the curve of these hemodynamic parameters to zero. By contrast, in PLMA limb movements induced periodic increments in HbO2 and BV (Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, p < 0.001), but HHb changed more heterogeneously even during the events coming from the same patient. Heart rate (HR) also showed different patterns between AHA and PLMA. It significantly decreased during the respiratory event (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then increased after the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001); while in PLMA HR first increased preceding the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then decreased. The results of this preliminary study show that both AHA and PLMA induce changes in cerebral hemodynamics. The occurrence of cortical arousal is accompanied by increased HR in both events, but by different BV changes (i.e., decreased/increased BV in AHA/PLMA, respectively). HR changes may partially account for the increased cerebral hemodynamics during PLMA

  5. The Comparisons of Cerebral Hemodynamics Induced by Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Arousal and Periodic Limb Movement with Arousal: A Pilot NIRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS) with periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS) are two sleep disorders characterized by repetitive respiratory or movement events associated with cortical arousals. We compared the cerebral hemodynamic changes linked to periodic apneas/hypopneas with arousals (AHA) in four OSA-patients with periodic limb movements (PLMA) with arousals in four patients with RLS-PLMS using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). AHA induced homogenous pattern of periodic fluctuations in oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin, i.e., the decrease of HbO2 was accompanied by an increase of HHb during the respiratory event and resolved to reverse pattern when cortical arousal started. Blood volume (BV) showed the same pattern as HHb but with relative smaller amplitude in most of the AHA events.These changing patterns were significant as Wilcoxon signed-rank tests gave p < 0.001 when comparing the area under the curve of these hemodynamic parameters to zero. By contrast, in PLMA limb movements induced periodic increments in HbO2 and BV (Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, p < 0.001), but HHb changed more heterogeneously even during the events coming from the same patient. Heart rate (HR) also showed different patterns between AHA and PLMA. It significantly decreased during the respiratory event (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then increased after the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001); while in PLMA HR first increased preceding the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then decreased. The results of this preliminary study show that both AHA and PLMA induce changes in cerebral hemodynamics. The occurrence of cortical arousal is accompanied by increased HR in both events, but by different BV changes (i.e., decreased/increased BV in AHA/PLMA, respectively). HR changes may partially account for the increased cerebral hemodynamics during PLMA

  6. The Comparisons of Cerebral Hemodynamics Induced by Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Arousal and Periodic Limb Movement with Arousal: A Pilot NIRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS) with periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS) are two sleep disorders characterized by repetitive respiratory or movement events associated with cortical arousals. We compared the cerebral hemodynamic changes linked to periodic apneas/hypopneas with arousals (AHA) in four OSA-patients with periodic limb movements (PLMA) with arousals in four patients with RLS-PLMS using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). AHA induced homogenous pattern of periodic fluctuations in oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin, i.e., the decrease of HbO2 was accompanied by an increase of HHb during the respiratory event and resolved to reverse pattern when cortical arousal started. Blood volume (BV) showed the same pattern as HHb but with relative smaller amplitude in most of the AHA events.These changing patterns were significant as Wilcoxon signed-rank tests gave p < 0.001 when comparing the area under the curve of these hemodynamic parameters to zero. By contrast, in PLMA limb movements induced periodic increments in HbO2 and BV (Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, p < 0.001), but HHb changed more heterogeneously even during the events coming from the same patient. Heart rate (HR) also showed different patterns between AHA and PLMA. It significantly decreased during the respiratory event (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then increased after the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001); while in PLMA HR first increased preceding the occurrence of cortical arousal (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001) and then decreased. The results of this preliminary study show that both AHA and PLMA induce changes in cerebral hemodynamics. The occurrence of cortical arousal is accompanied by increased HR in both events, but by different BV changes (i.e., decreased/increased BV in AHA/PLMA, respectively). HR changes may partially account for the increased cerebral hemodynamics during PLMA

  7. Period meter for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rusch, Gordon K.

    1976-01-06

    An improved log N amplifier type nuclear reactor period meter with reduced probability for noise-induced scrams is provided. With the reactor at low power levels a sampling circuit is provided to determine the reactor period by measuring the finite change in the amplitude of the log N amplifier output signal for a predetermined time period, while at high power levels, differentiation of the log N amplifier output signal provides an additional measure of the reactor period.

  8. Periodic maternal deprivation induces gender-dependent alterations in behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to emotional stress in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wigger, A; Neumann, I D

    1999-04-01

    There is evidence that stressful events during the neonatal "stress hyporesponsive period" may influence both emotional behavior and the maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in rats. We tested whether periodic maternal deprivation (180 min daily on postnatal days 3-10, PMD) caused chronic changes in emotional behavior and HPA axis activity in either male or female adult rats, or both. In addition, HPA secretory responses to human/rat corticotropin-releasing factor (CRH, 50 ng/kg i.v.) were determined in the adult males. In the elevated plus-maze test, adult (4-5 months of age) PMD-treated animals of both sexes displayed increased anxiety-related behavior compared to control rats. This was indicated by a reduction in the number of entries (male: 70% reduction, p < 0.01; female: 31% reduction, p < 0.01) and amount of time spent on the open arms (male: 86% reduction, p < 0.01; female: 40% reduction, NS). Neuroendocrine parameters were also altered in PMD-treated rats in a gender-dependent manner. Whereas basal plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone levels did not differ significantly between PMD and control groups of either sex, the ACTH response to elevated plus-maze exposure, a predominantly emotional stressor, was higher in male (p < 0.01), but not female, PMD animals than in the respective controls. In contrast, PMD had no effect on behavioral (duration of struggling) or HPA axis responses to forced swimming (90 s, 19 degrees C), a complex and predominantly physical stressor, in either male or female rats. In response to CRH stimulation, PMD-treated males did not show differences in the ACTH secretion compared to controls, indicating alterations in HPA axis regulation at a suprapituitary level. Thus, PMD caused long-term changes in the emotional behavior of adult rats of both sexes, although to a differing degree in males and females, whereas it appeared to cause predominantly alterations in the HPA axis response in males

  9. Induced magnetization and power loss for a periodically driven system of ferromagnetic nanoparticles with randomly oriented easy axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, S. I.; Lyutyy, T. V.; Pedchenko, B. O.; Hryshko, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of an elliptically polarized magnetic field on a system of noninteracting, single-domain ferromagnetic nanoparticles characterized by a uniform distribution of easy axis directions. Our main goal is to determine the average magnetization of this system and the power loss in it. In order to calculate these quantities analytically, we develop a general perturbation theory for the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation and find its steady-state solution for small magnetic field amplitudes. On this basis, we derive the second-order expressions for the average magnetization and power loss, investigate their dependence on the magnetic field frequency, and analyze the role of subharmonic resonances resulting from the nonlinear nature of the LLG equation. For arbitrary amplitudes, the frequency dependence of these quantities is obtained from the numerical solution of this equation. The impact of transitions between different regimes of regular and chaotic dynamics of magnetization, which can be induced in nanoparticles by changing the magnetic field frequency, is examined in detail.

  10. Sensitive and critical periods in the development of handling induced seizures in mice lacking synapsins: differences between synapsin I and synapsin II knockouts.

    PubMed

    Etholm, Lars; Bahonjic, Elma; Heggelund, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Mice lacking either synapsin I or synapsin II develop handling induced seizures from around two months of age. In mice lacking synapsin I (synapsin 1 knock-out mice, Syn1KO mice) such seizures can either consist of mild myoclonic jerks or of fully developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and the two seizure types are quite evenly distributed. In mice lacking synapsin II (synapsin 2 knock-out mice, Syn2KO mice) all seizures are in the form of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Through the use of specialized animal rearing procedures whereby human-animal interaction was minimized (minimal handling procedures), this study investigated effects of handling also prior to the emergence of actual seizures. The effect of minimal handling procedures was significant in both genotypes, but most pronounced in Syn1KO mice. In this genotype, minimal handling reduced the frequency of mild seizures, and completely eliminated generalized tonic-clonic seizures when the animals were tested with regular handling at 4 1/2 months of age. Neither seizure frequency nor generalized tonic-clonic seizures could be re-established through regular handling from 4 1/2 to 8 months. This suggests that the period up to 4 1/2 months constitute a sensitive period for seizures in general, and a critical period for generalized tonic-clonic seizures in this genotype. In Syn2KO mice minimal handling did not remove generalized tonic-clonic seizures, as such seizures were present when handling was introduced at 4 1/2 months. We found an initial reduction of seizure frequency, but the seizure frequency eventually reached levels seen in mice kept under regular handling regimes. Thus, it is unlikely that the period up to 4 1/2 months is a sensitive period in the Syn2KO genotype.

  11. Sensitive and critical periods in the development of handling induced seizures in mice lacking synapsins: differences between synapsin I and synapsin II knockouts.

    PubMed

    Etholm, Lars; Bahonjic, Elma; Heggelund, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Mice lacking either synapsin I or synapsin II develop handling induced seizures from around two months of age. In mice lacking synapsin I (synapsin 1 knock-out mice, Syn1KO mice) such seizures can either consist of mild myoclonic jerks or of fully developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and the two seizure types are quite evenly distributed. In mice lacking synapsin II (synapsin 2 knock-out mice, Syn2KO mice) all seizures are in the form of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Through the use of specialized animal rearing procedures whereby human-animal interaction was minimized (minimal handling procedures), this study investigated effects of handling also prior to the emergence of actual seizures. The effect of minimal handling procedures was significant in both genotypes, but most pronounced in Syn1KO mice. In this genotype, minimal handling reduced the frequency of mild seizures, and completely eliminated generalized tonic-clonic seizures when the animals were tested with regular handling at 4 1/2 months of age. Neither seizure frequency nor generalized tonic-clonic seizures could be re-established through regular handling from 4 1/2 to 8 months. This suggests that the period up to 4 1/2 months constitute a sensitive period for seizures in general, and a critical period for generalized tonic-clonic seizures in this genotype. In Syn2KO mice minimal handling did not remove generalized tonic-clonic seizures, as such seizures were present when handling was introduced at 4 1/2 months. We found an initial reduction of seizure frequency, but the seizure frequency eventually reached levels seen in mice kept under regular handling regimes. Thus, it is unlikely that the period up to 4 1/2 months is a sensitive period in the Syn2KO genotype. PMID:23570901

  12. Subsurface modifications in indium phosphide induced by single and multiple femtosecond laser pulses: A study on the formation of periodic ripples

    SciTech Connect

    Couillard, M.; Borowiec, A.; Haugen, H. K.; Preston, J. S.; Griswold, E. M.; Botton, G. A.

    2007-02-01

    We use cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy to study the damage induced below the surface of indium phosphide (InP) samples by single and multiple femtosecond laser pulses with a photon energy lower than the InP band gap. Single-pulse irradiation creates a {approx}100 nm deep crater with a resolidified surface layer consisting of quasiamorphous indium phosphide. The resolidified layer has a thickness of {approx}60 nm at the center and extends laterally beyond the edge of the crater rim. Exposure to multiple femtosecond pulses of 2050 nm center wavelength results in the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) with two different periods, one ({approx}1730 nm) less than but close to the laser wavelength and one ({approx}470 nm) four times smaller. Segregation beneath both types of ripples leads to the formation of In-rich particles embedded in the resolidified surface layer. Extended defects are detected only below the center of the multiple-pulse crater and their distribution appears to be correlated with the LIPSS modulation. Finally, LIPSS formation is discussed in terms of the observed subsurface microstructures.

  13. Exploring global changes in nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in agriculture induced by livestock production over the 1900-2050 period.

    PubMed

    Bouwman, Lex; Goldewijk, Kees Klein; Van Der Hoek, Klaas W; Beusen, Arthur H W; Van Vuuren, Detlef P; Willems, Jaap; Rufino, Mariana C; Stehfest, Elke

    2013-12-24

    Crop-livestock production systems are the largest cause of human alteration of the global nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycles. Our comprehensive spatially explicit inventory of N and P budgets in livestock and crop production systems shows that in the beginning of the 20th century, nutrient budgets were either balanced or surpluses were small; between 1900 and 1950, global soil N surplus almost doubled to 36 trillion grams (Tg) · y(-1) and P surplus increased by a factor of 8 to 2 Tg · y(-1). Between 1950 and 2000, the global surplus increased to 138 Tg · y(-1) of N and 11 Tg · y(-1) of P. Most surplus N is an environmental loss; surplus P is lost by runoff or accumulates as residual soil P. The International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science, and Technology for Development scenario portrays a world with a further increasing global crop (+82% for 2000-2050) and livestock production (+115%); despite rapidly increasing recovery in crop (+35% N recovery and +6% P recovery) and livestock (+35% N and P recovery) production, global nutrient surpluses continue to increase (+23% N and +54% P), and in this period, surpluses also increase in Africa (+49% N and +236% P) and Latin America (+75% N and +120% P). Alternative management of livestock production systems shows that combinations of intensification, better integration of animal manure in crop production, and matching N and P supply to livestock requirements can effectively reduce nutrient flows. A shift in human diets, with poultry or pork replacing beef, can reduce nutrient flows in countries with intensive ruminant production.

  14. Exploring global changes in nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in agriculture induced by livestock production over the 1900–2050 period

    PubMed Central

    Bouwman, Lex; Goldewijk, Kees Klein; Van Der Hoek, Klaas W.; Beusen, Arthur H. W.; Van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Willems, Jaap; Rufino, Mariana C.; Stehfest, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Crop-livestock production systems are the largest cause of human alteration of the global nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycles. Our comprehensive spatially explicit inventory of N and P budgets in livestock and crop production systems shows that in the beginning of the 20th century, nutrient budgets were either balanced or surpluses were small; between 1900 and 1950, global soil N surplus almost doubled to 36 trillion grams (Tg)·y−1 and P surplus increased by a factor of 8 to 2 Tg·y−1. Between 1950 and 2000, the global surplus increased to 138 Tg·y−1 of N and 11 Tg·y−1 of P. Most surplus N is an environmental loss; surplus P is lost by runoff or accumulates as residual soil P. The International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science, and Technology for Development scenario portrays a world with a further increasing global crop (+82% for 2000–2050) and livestock production (+115%); despite rapidly increasing recovery in crop (+35% N recovery and +6% P recovery) and livestock (+35% N and P recovery) production, global nutrient surpluses continue to increase (+23% N and +54% P), and in this period, surpluses also increase in Africa (+49% N and +236% P) and Latin America (+75% N and +120% P). Alternative management of livestock production systems shows that combinations of intensification, better integration of animal manure in crop production, and matching N and P supply to livestock requirements can effectively reduce nutrient flows. A shift in human diets, with poultry or pork replacing beef, can reduce nutrient flows in countries with intensive ruminant production. PMID:21576477

  15. Twist Sensitivity of Cladding-Mode Resonances and Its Cross-Sensitivity to Strain and Temperature in a Mechanically Induced Long-Period Fiber Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Anitha S.; Sudeep Kumar, V. P.; Joe, Hubert

    2014-09-01

    Twist sensitivity of cladding-mode resonances in a mechanically induced long-period fiber grating formed over a single-mode fiber is experimentally demonstrated and theoretically analyzed. Of the two usual cladding-mode resonances corresponding to LP11 and LP12, higher-order mode LP12 is more sensitive to twist in comparison with the lower-order mode LP11. The extent of down-shifting of resonant wavelengths depends on twist-induced circular birefringence and the modal field distribution of the cladding-modes inside the fiber. When the fiber is severely twisted to 3.5 rad/cm, a shift sensitivity is observed of 1 nm/(rad/cm) for the LP11 mode and 4.23 nm/(rad/cm) for the LP12 mode. The fiber breaks when the twist rate exceeds 3.5 rad/cm. In comparison with LP12, the LP11 resonance is almost independent of the axial strain variation with an ultra-low sensitivity of 0.18 pm/με, and it is also almost insensitive to the temperature variation with a coefficient of 35 pm/°C. Forming the LP11 resonance far away from its cut-off wavelength, a widely tunable band-pass filter is also demonstrated with a very high twist sensitivity of 8.75 nm/(rad/cm) and negligible cross-sensitivity to strain and temperature. The experimental and theoretical results are very useful in selecting sensitive and stable cladding-mode resonances in the design of new mechanically induced long-period fiber gratings based torsion sensors and tunable band-pass filters.

  16. On the role of surface plasmon polaritons in the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures upon irradiation of silicon by femtosecond-laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bonse, Joern; Krueger, Joerg; Rosenfeld, Arkadi

    2009-11-15

    The formation of nearly wavelength-sized laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) on single-crystalline silicon upon irradiation with single or multiple femtosecond-laser pulses (pulse duration tau=130 fs and central wavelength lambda=800 nm) in air is studied experimentally and theoretically. In our theoretical approach, we model the LIPSS formation by combining the generally accepted first-principles theory of Sipe and co-workers with a Drude model in order to account for transient intrapulse changes in the optical properties of the material due to the excitation of a dense electron-hole plasma. Our results are capable to explain quantitatively the spatial periods of the LIPSSs being somewhat smaller than the laser wavelength, their orientation perpendicular to the laser beam polarization, and their characteristic fluence dependence. Moreover, evidence is presented that surface plasmon polaritons play a dominant role during the initial stage of near-wavelength-sized periodic surface structures in femtosecond-laser irradiated silicon, and it is demonstrated that these LIPSSs can be formed in silicon upon irradiation by single femtosecond-laser pulses.

  17. Variations in the pre-ejection period induced by deep breathing do not predict the hemodynamic response to early haemorrhage in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vistisen, Simon Tilma; Juhl-Olsen, Peter; Frederiksen, Christian Alcaraz; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring that can predict fluid responsiveness is an unsettled matter for spontaneously breathing patients. Mechanical ventilation induces cyclic variations in blood pressure, e.g. pulse pressure variation, whose magnitude predicts fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. In this study, we hypothesised that a deep breathing manoeuvre with its effect on heart rate variability (HRV) could induce similar cyclic variations in blood pressure in spontaneously breathing healthy subjects and that the magnitude of these variations could predict the hemodynamic response to controlled haemorrhage. 37 blood donors were instructed to perform two simple deep breathing manoeuvres prior to blood donation; one manoeuvre with a respiratory cycle every 10 s (0.1 Hz) and one every 6 s (0.167 Hz). The variation in the pre-ejection period (∆PEP) was captured with the electrocardiographic and plethysmographic curves, while the hemodynamic response to haemorrhage was estimated with the cardiac output change assessed with ultrasonography. Respiratory HRV was estimated with root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD). Deep breathing induced cyclic changes in ∆PEP magnitude was significantly correlated to RMSSD (p < 0.005). ∆PEP indexed to RMSSD increased significantly following haemorrhage at the 0.167 Hz respiratory frequency (p = 0.01). At none of the respiratory manoeuvres was ∆PEP nor ∆PEP/RMSSD prior to haemorrhage correlated to changes in cardiac output following haemorrhage. Deep breathing induces cyclic changes in blood pressure that are strongly dependent on HRV. These blood pressure variations do, however, not predict the cardiac output response to controlled haemorrhage. PMID:24165897

  18. Stress during a Critical Postnatal Period Induces Region-Specific Structural Abnormalities and Dysfunction of the Prefrontal Cortex via CRF1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Dun; Liao, Xue-Mei; Uribe-Mariño, Andrés; Liu, Rui; Xie, Xiao-Meng; Jia, Jiao; Su, Yun-Ai; Li, Ji-Tao; Schmidt, Mathias V; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Si, Tian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    During the early postnatal period, environmental influences play a pivotal role in shaping the development of the neocortex, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC) that is crucial for working memory and goal-directed actions. Exposure to stressful experiences during this critical period may disrupt the development of PFC pyramidal neurons and impair the wiring and function of related neural circuits. However, the molecular mechanisms of the impact of early-life stress on PFC development and function are not well understood. In this study, we found that repeated stress exposure during the first postnatal week hampered dendritic development in layers II/III and V pyramidal neurons in the dorsal agranular cingulate cortex (ACd) and prelimbic cortex (PL) of neonatal mice. The deleterious effects of early postnatal stress on structural plasticity persisted to adulthood only in ACd layer V pyramidal neurons. Most importantly, concurrent blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1) by systemic antalarmin administration (20 μg/g of body weight) during early-life stress exposure prevented stress-induced apical dendritic retraction and spine loss in ACd layer V neurons and impairments in PFC-dependent cognitive tasks. Moreover, the magnitude of dendritic regression, especially the shrinkage of apical branches, of ACd layer V neurons predicted the degree of cognitive deficits in stressed mice. Our data highlight the region-specific effects of early postnatal stress on the structural plasticity of prefrontal pyramidal neurons, and suggest a critical role of CRF1 in modulating early-life stress-induced prefrontal abnormalities. PMID:25403725

  19. Irregular Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... number of days after the last one. The Menstrual Cycle Most girls get their first period between the ... to skip periods or to have an irregular menstrual cycle. Illness, rapid weight change, or stress can also ...

  20. Ultrashort pulse laser dicing of thin Si wafers: the influence of laser-induced periodic surface structures on the backside breaking strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Egle, Bernadette; Piredda, Giovanni; Stroj, Sandra; Fasching, Gernot; Bodea, Marius; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    High power electronic chips are usually fabricated on about 50 µm thin Si wafers to improve heat dissipation. At these chip thicknesses mechanical dicing becomes challenging. Chippings may occur at the cutting edges, which reduce the mechanical stability of the die. Thermal load changes could then lead to sudden chip failure. Ultrashort pulsed lasers are a promising tool to improve the cutting quality, because thermal side effects can be reduced to a minimum. However, laser-induced periodic surface structures occur at the sidewalls and at the trench bottom during scribing. The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of these periodic structures on the backside breaking strength of the die. An ultrafast laser with a pulse duration of 380 fs and a wavelength of 1040 nm was used to cut a wafer into single chips. The pulse energy and the number of scans was varied. The cuts in the wafer were investigated using transmitted light microscopy, the sidewalls of the cut chips were investigated using scanning electron and confocal microscopy, and the breaking strength was evaluated using the 3-point bending test. The results indicated that periodic holes with a distance of about 20–30 µm were formed at the bottom of the trench, if the number of scans was set too low to completely cut the wafer; the wafer was only perforated. Mechanical breaking of the bridges caused 5 µm deep kerfs in the sidewall. These kerfs reduced the breaking strength at the backside of the chip to about 300 MPa. As the number of scans was increased, the bridges were ablated and the wafer was cut completely. Periodic structures were observed on the sidewall; the roughness was below 1 µm. The surface roughness remained on a constant level even when the number of scans was doubled. However, the periodic structures on the sidewall seemed to vanish and the probability to remove local flaws increases with the number of scans. As a consequence, the breaking strength was increased to about

  1. Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of the spectral variations of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons at the Pic du Midi over a 2-y period.

    PubMed

    Cheminet, A; Hubert, G; Lacoste, V; Boscher, D

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer extended to high energies (HERMEIS) was employed to measure continuously the cosmic-ray-induced neutron spectra over a long-term period (2 y) at mountain altitude and medium geomagnetic latitude (Pic du Midi de Bigorre in the French Pyrenees, +2885 m, 5.6 GV). The results showed 1-y sinusoidal oscillations in the integrated fluence rates. The amplitude of these oscillations depends on the neutron energetic domain. The fluence rate of thermal neutrons was 53 % higher in August than that in February. Those of epithermal neutrons with energies between 0.4 eV and 0.1 MeV and evaporation neutrons (from 0.1 to 20 MeV) were ∼25 % higher in the summer than those in the winter. Finally, the cascade neutron fluence rate (>20 MeV) remained quite the same (<10 % variation). To understand the effects of local and seasonal changes in the measurement environment, GEANT4 simulations were performed. The nature of rock and thickness of the snow cover during the winter period (given by meteorological data) were investigated. A reasonable agreement between experiments and calculations was found.

  2. Highly Ordered Periodic Au/TiO₂ Hetero-Nanostructures for Plasmon-Induced Enhancement of the Activity and Stability for Ethanol Electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhao; Wang, Qiyu; Zheng, Weitao; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2016-03-01

    The catalytic electro-oxidation of ethanol is the essential technique for direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) in the area of alternative energy for the ability of converting the chemical energy of alcohol into the electric energy directly. Developing highly efficient and stable electrode materials with antipoisoning ability for ethanol electro-oxidation remains a challenge. A highly ordered periodic Au-nanoparticle (NP)-decorated bilayer TiO2 nanotube (BTNT) heteronanostructure was fabricated by a two-step anodic oxidation of Ti foil and the subsequent photoreduction of HAuCl4. The plasmon-induced charge separation on the heterointerface of Au/TiO2 electrode enhances the electrocatalytic activity and stability for the ethanol oxidation under visible light irradiation. The highly ordered periodic heterostructure on the electrode surface enhanced the light harvesting and led to the greater performance of ethanol electro-oxidation under irradiation compared with the ordinary Au NPs-decorated monolayer TiO2 nanotube (MTNT). This novel Au/TiO2 electrode also performed a self-cleaning property under visible light attributed to the enhanced electro-oxidation of the adsorbed intermediates. This light-driven enhancement of the electrochemical performances provides a development strategy for the design and construction of DAFCs. PMID:26863505

  3. Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of the spectral variations of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons at the Pic du Midi over a 2-y period.

    PubMed

    Cheminet, A; Hubert, G; Lacoste, V; Boscher, D

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer extended to high energies (HERMEIS) was employed to measure continuously the cosmic-ray-induced neutron spectra over a long-term period (2 y) at mountain altitude and medium geomagnetic latitude (Pic du Midi de Bigorre in the French Pyrenees, +2885 m, 5.6 GV). The results showed 1-y sinusoidal oscillations in the integrated fluence rates. The amplitude of these oscillations depends on the neutron energetic domain. The fluence rate of thermal neutrons was 53 % higher in August than that in February. Those of epithermal neutrons with energies between 0.4 eV and 0.1 MeV and evaporation neutrons (from 0.1 to 20 MeV) were ∼25 % higher in the summer than those in the winter. Finally, the cascade neutron fluence rate (>20 MeV) remained quite the same (<10 % variation). To understand the effects of local and seasonal changes in the measurement environment, GEANT4 simulations were performed. The nature of rock and thickness of the snow cover during the winter period (given by meteorological data) were investigated. A reasonable agreement between experiments and calculations was found. PMID:24345464

  4. Beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton running period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arduini, G.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruce, R.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. 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C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; RØhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Boeriu, O. E. Vickey; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses various observations on beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton run. Building on published results based on 2011 data, the correlations between background and residual pressure of the beam vacuum are revisited. Ghost charge evolution over 2012 and its role for backgrounds are evaluated. New methods to monitor ghost charge with beam-gas rates are presented and observations of LHC abort gap population by ghost charge are discussed in detail. Fake jets from colliding bunches and from ghost charge are analysed with improved methods, showing that ghost charge in individual radio-frequency buckets of the LHC can be resolved. Some results of two short periods of dedicated cosmic-ray background data-taking are shown; in particular cosmic-ray muon induced fake jet rates are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to the fake jet rates from beam background. A thorough analysis of a particular LHC fill, where abnormally high background was observed, is presented. Correlations between backgrounds and beam intensity losses in special fills with very high β* are studied.

  5. Laser-induced periodic surface structures on 6H-SiC single crystals using temporally delayed femtosecond laser double-pulse trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Juan; Tao, Wenjun; Song, Hui; Gong, Min; Ma, Guohong; Dai, Ye; Zhao, Quanzhong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a time-delay-adjustable double-pulse train with 800-nm wavelength, 200-fs pulse duration and a repetition rate of 1 kHz, produced by a collinear two-beam optical system like a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, was employed for irradiation of 6H-SiC crystal. The dependence of the induced structures on time delay of double-pulse train for parallel-polarization configuration was studied. The results show that as the time delay of collinear parallel-polarization dual-pulse train increased, the induced near-subwavelength ripples (NSWRs) turn from irregular rippled pattern to regularly periodic pattern and have their grooves much deepened. The characteristics timescale for this transition is about 6.24 ps. Besides, the areas of NSWR were found to decay exponentially for time delay from 0 to 1.24 ps and then slowly increase for time delay from 1.24 to 14.24 ps. Analysis shows that multiphoton ionization effect, grating-assisted surface plasmon coupling effect, and timely intervene of second pulse in a certain physical stage experienced by 6H-SiC excited upon first pulse irradiation may contribute to the transition of morphology details.

  6. Enhanced long term potentiation and decreased AMPA receptor desensitization in the acute period following a single kainate induced early life seizure.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Heather; Bernard, Paul B; Castano, Anna M; Benke, Tim A

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal seizures are associated with long term disabilities including epilepsy and cognitive deficits. Using a neonatal seizure rat model that does not develop epilepsy, but develops a phenotype consistent with other models of intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), we sought to isolate the acute effects of a single episode of early life seizure on hippocampal CA1 synaptic development and plasticity. We have previously shown chronic changes in glutamatergic synapses, loss of long term potentiation (LTP) and enhanced long term depression (LTD), in the adult male rat ~50days following kainic acid (KA) induced early life seizure (KA-ELS) in post-natal (P) 7day old male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the present work, we examined the electrophysiological properties and expression levels of glutamate receptors in the acute period, 2 and 7days, post KA-ELS. Our results show for the first time enhanced LTP 7days after KA-ELS, but no change 2days post KA-ELS. Additionally, we report that ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-propionic acid type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) desensitization is decreased in the same time frame, with no changes in AMPAR expression, phosphorylation, or membrane insertion. Inappropriate enhancement of the synaptic connections in the acute period after the seizure could alter the normal patterning of synaptic development in the hippocampus during this critical period and contribute to learning deficits. Thus, this study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which KA-ELS alters early network properties that potentially lead to adverse outcomes. PMID:26706598

  7. Small reduction of neurokinin-1 receptor-expressing neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex area induces abnormal breathing periods in awake goats.

    PubMed

    Wenninger, J M; Pan, L G; Klum, L; Leekley, T; Bastastic, J; Hodges, M R; Feroah, T; Davis, S; Forster, H V

    2004-11-01

    In awake rats, >80% bilateral reduction of neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R)-expressing neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötzC) resulted in hypoventilation and an "ataxic" breathing pattern (Gray PA, Rekling JC, Bocchiaro CM, Feldman JL, Science 286: 1566-1568, 1999). Accordingly, the present study was designed to gain further insight into the role of the pre-BötzC area NK1R-expressing neurons in the control of breathing during physiological conditions. Microtubules were chronically implanted bilaterally into the medulla of adult goats. After recovery from surgery, the neurotoxin saporin conjugated to substance P, specific for NK1R-expressing neurons, was bilaterally injected (50 pM in 10 microl) into the pre-BötzC area during the awake state (n = 8). In unoperated goats, 34 +/- 0.01% of the pre-BötzC area neurons are immunoreactive for the NK1R, but, in goats after bilateral injection of SP-SAP into the pre-BötzC area, NK1R immunoreactivity was reduced to 22.5 +/- 2.5% (29% decrease, P < 0.01). Ten to fourteen days after the injection, the frequency of abnormal breathing periods was sixfold greater than before injection (107.8 +/- 21.8/h, P < 0.001). Fifty-six percent of these periods were breaths of varying duration and volume with an altered respiratory muscle activation pattern, whereas the remaining were rapid, complete breaths with coordinated inspiratory-expiratory cycles. The rate of occurrence and characteristics of abnormal breathing periods were not altered during a CO2 inhalation-induced hyperpnea. Pathological breathing patterns were eliminated during non-rapid eye movement sleep in seven of eight goats, but they frequently occurred on arousal from non-rapid eye movement sleep. We conclude that a moderate reduction in pre-BötzC NK1R-expressing neurons results in state-dependent transient changes in respiratory rhythm and/or eupneic respiratory muscle activation patterns. PMID:15247160

  8. Periodic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    Periodic polymers can be made by self assembly, directed self assembly and by photolithography. Such materials provide a versatile platform for 1, 2 and 3D periodic nano-micro scale composites with either dielectric or impedance contrast or both, and these can serve for example, as photonic and or phononic crystals for electromagnetic and elastic waves as well as mechanical frames/trusses. Compared to electromagnetic waves, elastic waves are both less complex (longitudinal modes in fluids) and more complex (longitudinal, transverse in-plane and transverse out-of-plane modes in solids). Engineering of the dispersion relation between wave frequency w and wave vector, k enables the opening of band gaps in the density of modes and detailed shaping of w(k). Band gaps can be opened by Bragg scattering, anti-crossing of bands and discrete shape resonances. Current interest is in our group focuses using design - modeling, fabrication and measurement of polymer-based periodic materials for applications as tunable optics and control of phonon flow. Several examples will be described including the design of structures for multispectral band gaps for elastic waves to alter the phonon density of states, the creation of block polymer and bicontinuous metal-carbon nanoframes for structures that are robust against ballistic projectiles and quasi-crystalline solid/fluid structures that can steer shock waves.

  9. Nuclear apoJ: A low dose radiation inducible regulator of cell death. Final report for period September 15, 1998 - September 14, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Aronow, Bruce J.

    2002-04-19

    This project was based on preliminary data that was published by Dr. Boothman (Yang et al. 2000) which indicated a strong induction of apoJ gene expression, increased secretion of the protein, and accumulation of an apparently somewhat different form of the apoJ protein in the nucleus of MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells undergoing response to DNA damage. A clone expressing apoJ protein was isolated that was capable of interacting with Ku80, a component of the double strand break repair complex that is essential for the successful repair of rearranging immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes as evidenced by failure to produce mature B and T cells in the absence of Ku70. ApoJ clones isolated and characterized by Dr. Boothman bound strongly to a Ku-70 ''bait'' protein. Over-expression of these same clones in a cell line was capable of killing the cell. ApoJ is very strongly induced in many instances of programmed cell death and has been proposed repeatedly to play some sort of effector role in the process. Our principle hypothesis for this study was that the strong induction of the apoJ gene and the particular expression of a nuclear form of the protein was potentially a causal factor in the decision point made by the cell as it attempts to repair double-strand breakage based DNA damage. The hypothesis was that if sufficiently high damage occurred, it would be deleterious to maintain the cell's viability through continued DNA repair. One method to inhibit DNA repair might be by inhibiting proteins such as Ku-70 that are necessary for double-strand break repair. If apoJ does play a critical role in tipping the decision balance over to cell death, we reasoned that deficiency of apoJ would cause increased accumulation of cells with DNA damage and that this might decrease cell death in response to DNA damage and increase tumor occurrence rates. To test this hypothesis and its potential implications, we exposed wildtype and apoJ deficient animals that we constructed through

  10. Liquid-crystal periodic zigzags from geometrical and surface-anchoring-induced confinement: Origin and internal structure from mesoscopic scale to molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dong Ki; Yoon, Jinhwan; Kim, Yun Ho; Choi, M. C.; Kim, Jehan; Sakata, Osami; Kimura, Shigeru; Kim, Mahn Won; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Clark, Noel A.; Ree, Moonhor; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2010-10-01

    We figured out periodic undulations of lamellae “zigzags” in liquid crystals under confinement by glass and patterned silicon hybrid cell, but in the absence of applied fields. The optical and internal structures of zigzags have been investigated from mesoscopic scale to molecular level by convoluting real and reciprocal space probes, such as polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microbeam x-ray diffraction. The homeotropic anchoring happens at air/liquid crystal, while planar one appears at glass or patterned silicon surfaces. The wetting and displacement of lamellae near the glass surface give rise to tilting and bending in the stacking of lamellae. This can provide a solution for the origin of periodic zigzags: asymmetric strain exerted to lamellae at two-dimensional glass surface and one-dimensional-like pattern. This can give a hint for potential photonic applications such as optical gratings and modulators due to its high periodicity.

  11. Power spectra and auto correlation analysis of hyperfine-induced long period oscillations in the tunneling current of coupled quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Harack, B.; Leary, A.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Gupta, J. A.; Payette, C.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-04

    We outline power spectra and auto correlation analysis performed on temporal oscillations in the tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots. The current is monitored for ∼2325 s blocks as the magnetic field is stepped through a high bias feature displaying hysteresis and switching: hallmarks of the hyperfine interaction. Quasi-periodic oscillations of ∼2 pA amplitude and of ∼100 s period are observed in the current inside the hysteretic feature. Compared to the baseline current outside the hysteretic feature the power spectral density is enhanced by up to three orders of magnitude and the auto correlation displays clear long lived oscillations about zero.

  12. Self-organization of a periodic structure between amorphous and crystalline phases in a GeTe thin film induced by femtosecond laser pulse amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumata, Y.; Morita, T.; Morimoto, Y.; Shintani, T.; Saiki, T.

    2014-07-21

    A self-organized fringe pattern in a single amorphous mark of a GeTe thin film was formed by multiple femtosecond pulse amorphization. Micro Raman measurement indicates that the fringe is a periodic alternation between crystalline and amorphous phases. The period of the fringe is smaller than the irradiation wavelength and the direction is parallel to the polarization direction. Snapshot observation revealed that the fringe pattern manifests itself via a complex but coherent process, which is attributed to crystallization properties unique to a nonthermally amorphized phase and the distinct optical contrast between crystalline and amorphous phases.

  13. Period-three route to chaos induced by a cyclic-fold bifurcation in passive dynamic walking of a compass-gait biped robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritli, Hassène; Khraief, Nahla; Belghith, Safya

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a study of the passive dynamic walking of a compass-gait biped robot as it goes down an inclined plane. This biped robot is a two-degrees-of-freedom mechanical system modeled by an impulsive hybrid nonlinear dynamics with unilateral constraints. It is well-known to possess periodic as well as chaotic gaits and to possess only one stable gait for a given set of parameters. The main contribution of this paper is the finding of a window in the parameters space of the compass-gait model where there is multistability. Using constraints of a grazing bifurcation on the basis of a shooting method and the Davidchack-Lai scheme, we show that, depending on initial conditions, new passive walking patterns can be observed besides those already known. Through bifurcation diagrams and Floquet multipliers, we show that a pair of stable and unstable period-three gait patterns is generated through a cyclic-fold bifurcation. We show also that the stable period-three orbit generates a route to chaos.

  14. Regulation of breeding behavior: do energy-demanding periods induce a change in prolactin or corticosterone baseline levels in the common tern (Sterna hirundo)?

    PubMed

    Riechert, Juliane; Chastel, Olivier; Becker, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    Hormones are involved in reproductive decisions, linking environmental cues and body condition and adapting behavior. Mass loss is often accompanied by decreased prolactin and increased corticosterone concentrations, influencing incubation and brooding behavior and ultimately triggering nest desertion. Using blood-sucking bugs (Dipetalogaster maxima), we measured baseline prolactin, corticosterone, and ketone body values in incubating common terns (Sterna hirundo) between 2006 and 2009 during energy-demanding periods: 50 pairs were sampled hungry (after an incubation bout) and again fed (after foraging). In a second approach, we sampled 57 other pairs (experienced and inexperienced birds) three times over their individual breeding period, because reproduction, especially chick rearing, is a very energy-demanding process. In line with the common physiological pattern of fasting, we found significantly lower baseline prolactin values in hungry terns, which were negatively related to mass loss over the incubation bout, whereas corticosterone and ketone body levels were marginally increased. Compared to that in the incubation phase, the prolactin level dropped after hatching of chicks in inexperienced birds, perhaps indicating lower parental expenditure. Corticosterone, on the other hand, increased after hatching in males, probably linked to higher foraging activity, as males mainly deliver food during the first days. These energy-demanding periods clearly influenced hormones and ketone bodies, maybe reinforced by the low energy margin of this small seabird species, but energy reserves were not depleted to a level affecting behavior or reproductive success.

  15. Neurotoxic Effect of Benzo[a]pyrene and Its Possible Association with 6-Hydroxydopamine Induced Neurobehavioral Changes during Early Adolescence Period in Rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Patel, Bhupesh; Patri, Manorama

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to persistent genotoxicants like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) during postnatal days causes neurobehavioral changes in animal models. However, neurotoxic potential of B[a]P and its association with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced neurobehavioral changes are yet to be explored. The growth of rat brain peaks at the first week of birth and continues up to one month with the attainment of adolescence. Hence, the present study was conducted on male Wistar rats at postnatal day 5 (PND 5) following single intracisternal administration of B[a]P to compare with neurobehavioral and neurotransmitter changes induced by 6-OHDA at PND 30. Spontaneous motor activity was significantly increased by 6-OHDA showing similar trend following B[a]P administration. Total distance travelled in novel open field arena and elevated plus maze was significantly increased following B[a]P and 6-OHDA administration. Neurotransmitter estimation showed significant alleviation of dopamine in striatum following B[a]P and 6-OHDA administration. Histopathological studies of striatum by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining revealed the neurodegenerative potential of B[a]P and 6-OHDA. Our results indicate that B[a]P-induced spontaneous motor hyperactivity in rats showed symptomatic similarities with 6-OHDA. In conclusion, early postnatal exposure to B[a]P in rats causing neurobehavioral changes may lead to serious neurodegenerative consequences during adolescence.

  16. Neurotoxic Effect of Benzo[a]pyrene and Its Possible Association with 6-Hydroxydopamine Induced Neurobehavioral Changes during Early Adolescence Period in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Patel, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to persistent genotoxicants like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) during postnatal days causes neurobehavioral changes in animal models. However, neurotoxic potential of B[a]P and its association with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced neurobehavioral changes are yet to be explored. The growth of rat brain peaks at the first week of birth and continues up to one month with the attainment of adolescence. Hence, the present study was conducted on male Wistar rats at postnatal day 5 (PND 5) following single intracisternal administration of B[a]P to compare with neurobehavioral and neurotransmitter changes induced by 6-OHDA at PND 30. Spontaneous motor activity was significantly increased by 6-OHDA showing similar trend following B[a]P administration. Total distance travelled in novel open field arena and elevated plus maze was significantly increased following B[a]P and 6-OHDA administration. Neurotransmitter estimation showed significant alleviation of dopamine in striatum following B[a]P and 6-OHDA administration. Histopathological studies of striatum by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining revealed the neurodegenerative potential of B[a]P and 6-OHDA. Our results indicate that B[a]P-induced spontaneous motor hyperactivity in rats showed symptomatic similarities with 6-OHDA. In conclusion, early postnatal exposure to B[a]P in rats causing neurobehavioral changes may lead to serious neurodegenerative consequences during adolescence. PMID:27034665

  17. The effect of repeated administrations of llama ovulation-inducing factor (OIF/NGF) during the peri-ovulatory period on corpus luteum development and function in llamas.

    PubMed

    Fernández, A; Ulloa-Leal, C; Silva, M; Norambuena, C; Adams, G P; Guerra, M; Ratto, M H

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that repeated administrations of OIF/NGF during the peri-ovulatory period (pre-ovulatory, ovulatory, early post-ovulatory), will enhance the luteotrophic effect in llamas. Female llamas were examined daily by transrectal ultrasonography in B- and Doppler-mode using a scanner equipped with a 7.5-MHz linear-array transducer to monitor ovarian follicle and luteal dynamics. When a growing follicle ≥7mm was detected, llamas were assigned randomly to one of the three groups and given 1mg of purified OIF/NGF im (intramuscular) (a) pre-ovulation (single dose; n=12), (b) pre-ovulation and at the time of ovulation (2 doses, n=10), or (c) pre-ovulation, at the time of ovulation, and 24h after ovulation (3 doses, n=10). The pre-ovulatory follicle diameter at the time of treatment, ovulation rate and the first day of CL detection did not differ (P=0.3) among groups. However, maximum CL diameter was greatest (P=0.003) in llamas in the 2-dose group, and smallest in the 3-dose group. Accordingly, the 2 dose-group had the largest day-to-day profile for CL diameter (P<0.01), area of CL vascularization (<0.01), and plasma progesterone concentration (P=0.01) compared to the other groups. Interestingly, the luteal response to 3-doses of OIF/NGF during the peri-ovulatory period was not different from a single dose. In conclusion, OIF/NGF isolated from llama seminal plasma is luteotrophic and the effect on CL size and function is affected by the number and timing of treatments during the peri-ovulatory period.

  18. Neonatal exposure to benzo[a]pyrene induces oxidative stress causing altered hippocampal cytomorphometry and behavior during early adolescence period of male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhupesh; Das, Saroj Kumar; Das, Swagatika; Das, Lipsa; Patri, Manorama

    2016-05-01

    Environmental neurotoxicants like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have been well documented regarding their potential to induce oxidative stress. However, neonatal exposure to B[a]P and its subsequent effect on anti-oxidant defence system and hippocampal cytomorphometry leading to behavioral changes have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effect of acute exposure of B[a]P on five days old male Wistar pups administered with single dose of B[a]P (0.2 μg/kg BW) through intracisternal mode. Control group was administered with vehicle i.e., DMSO and a separate group of rats without any treatment was taken as naive group. Behavioral analysis showed anxiolytic-like behavior with significant increase in time spent in open arm in elevated plus maze. Further, significant reduction in fall off time during rotarod test showing B[a]P induced locomotor hyperactivity and impaired motor co-ordination in adolescent rats. B[a]P induced behavioral changes were further associated with altered anti-oxidant defence system involving significant reduction in the total ATPase, Na(+) K(+) ATPase, Mg(2+) ATPase, GR and GPx activity with a significant elevation in the activity of catalase and GST as compared to naive and control groups. Cytomorphometry of hippocampus showed that the number of neurons and glia in B[a]P treated group were significantly reduced as compared to naive and control. Subsequent observation showed that the area and perimeter of hippocampus, hippocampal neurons and neuronal nucleus were significantly reduced in B[a]P treated group as compared to naive and control. The findings of the present study suggest that the alteration in hippocampal cytomorphometry and neuronal population associated with impaired antioxidant signaling and mood in B[a]P treated group could be an outcome of neuromorphological alteration leading to pyknotic cell death or impaired differential migration of neurons during early postnatal brain development.

  19. Cells anticipate periodic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-01

    We show that an amoeboid organism can anticipate the timing of periodic events. The plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum moves rapidly under favourable conditions, but stops moving when transferred to less-favourable conditions. Plasmodia exposed to unfavourable conditions, presented in three consecutive pulses at constant intervals, reduced their locomotive speed in response to each episode. When subsequently subjected to favourable conditions, the plasmodia spontaneously reduced their locomotive speed at the time point when the next unfavourable episode would have occurred. This implied anticipation of impending environmental change. After this behaviour had been evoked several times, the locomotion of the plasmodia returned to normal; however, the anticipatory response could subsequently be induced by a single unfavourable pulse, implying recall of the memorized periodicity. We explored the mechanisms underlying these behaviours from a dynamical systems perspective. Our results hint at the cellular origins of primitive intelligence and imply that simple dynamics might be sufficient to explain its emergence.

  20. Dynamics of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon femtosecond two-color double-pulse irradiation of metals, semiconductors, and dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhm, S.; Herzlieb, M.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2016-06-01

    In order to address the dynamics and physical mechanisms of LIPSS formation for three different classes of materials (metals, semiconductors, and dielectrics), two-color double-fs-pulse experiments were performed on Titanium, Silicon and Fused Silica. For that purpose a Mach-Zehnder interferometer generated polarization controlled (parallel or cross-polarized) double-pulse sequences at 400 nm and 800 nm wavelength, with inter-pulse delays up to a few picoseconds. Multiple of these two-color double-pulse sequences were collinearly focused by a spherical mirror to the sample surfaces. The fluence of each individual pulse (400 nm and 800 nm) was always kept below its respective ablation threshold and only the joint action of both pulses lead to the formation of LIPSS. Their resulting characteristics (periods, areas) were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The periods along with the LIPSS orientation allow a clear identification of the pulse which dominates the energy coupling to the material. For strong absorbing materials (Silicon, Titanium), a wavelength-dependent plasmonic mechanism can explain the delay-dependence of the LIPSS. In contrast, for dielectrics (Fused Silica) the first pulse always dominates the energy deposition and LIPSS orientation, supporting a non-plasmonic formation scenario. For all materials, these two-color experiments confirm the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition stage for LIPSS formation.

  1. Human bronchial epithelial cell injuries induced by fine particulate matter from sandstorm and non-sandstorm periods: Association with particle constituents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Li, Ning; Deng, Furong; Buglak, Nicholas; Park, George; Su, Shu; Ren, Aiguo; Shen, Guofeng; Tao, Shu; Guo, Xinbiao

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the exacerbation of respiratory diseases following sandstorm-derived particulate matter (PM) exposure. The presence of anthropogenic and biological agents on the sandstorm PM and the escalation of PM<2.5μm (PM2.5) pollution in China have led to serious concerns regarding the health effects of PM2.5 during Asian sandstorms. We investigated how changes in PM2.5 composition, as the weather transitioned towards a sandstorm, affected human airway epithelial cells. Six PM2.5 samples covering two sandstorm events and their respective background and transition periods were collected in Baotou, an industrial city near the Gobi Desert in China. PM samples from all three periods had mild cytotoxicity in human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B, which was positively correlated with the contents of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and several metals. All PM samples potently increased the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8). Endotoxin in all samples contributed significantly to the IL-6 response, with only a minor effect on IL-8. Cr was positively correlated with both IL-6 and IL-8 release, while Si was only associated with the increase of IL-6. Our study suggests that local agricultural and industrial surroundings in addition to the sandstorm play important roles in the respiratory effects of sandstorm-derived PM. PMID:27593287

  2. Effects of vegetative-periodic-induced rhizosphere variation on the uptake and translocation of metals in Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex. Steudel growing in the Sun Island Wetland.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jieting; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Yang, Jixian; Li, Shiyang; Li, Zhe

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the vegetative periodic effect of rhizosphere on the patterns of metal bioaccumulation, the concentrations of Mg, K, Ca, Mn, Zn, Fe, Cu, Cr, Ni, Cd and Pb in the corresponding rhizosphere soil and tissues of Phragmites australis growing in the Sun Island wetland (Harbin, China) were compared. The concentrations of Zn, Fe, Cu, Cr, Ni, Cd and Pb in roots were higher than in shoots, suggesting that roots are the primary accumulation organs for these metals and there exists an exclusion strategy for metal tolerance. In contrast, the rest of the metals showed an opposite trend, suggesting that they were not restricted in roots. Harvesting would particularly be an effective method to remove Mn from the environment. The concentrations of metals in shoots were generally higher in autumn than in summer, suggesting that Ph. australis possesses an efficient root-to-shoot translocation system, which is activated at the end of the growing season and allows more metals into the senescent tissues. Furthermore, metal bioaccumulation of Ph. australis was affected by vegetative periodic variation through the changing of physicochemical and microbial conditions. The rhizospheric microbial characteristics were significantly related to the concentrations of Mg, K, Zn, Fe and Cu, suggesting that microbial influence on metal accumulation is specific and selective, not eurytopic.

  3. Pregnancy-Induced ISG-15 and MX-1 Gene Expression is Detected in the Liver of Holstein-Friesian Heifers During Late Peri-Implantation Period.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, M M; Mense, K; Knaack, H; Sandra, O; Schmicke, M

    2016-02-01

    The bovine embryonic signal interferon-τ (IFN-τ) produced by the trophoblast is known to pass through the uterine fluid towards the endometrium and further into the maternal blood, where IFN-τ induces specific expression of interferon-stimulated gene expression (ISG), for example in peripheral leucocytes. In sheep, it was shown experimentally by administration of IFN-τ that ISG is also detectable in the liver. The objective was to test whether ISG can be detected in liver biopsy specimens from Holstein-Friesian heifers during early pregnancy. Liver biopsies were taken on day 18 from pregnant and non-pregnant heifers (n = 19), and the interferon-stimulated protein 15 kDa (ISG-15) and myxovirus-resistance protein-1 (MX-1) gene expression was detected. The expression of both MX-1 (p: 24.33 ± 7.40 vs np: 9.00 ± 4.02) and ISG-15 (p: 43.73 ± 23.22 vs 7.83 ± 3.63) was higher in pregnant compared to non-pregnant heifers (p < 0.05). In conclusion, pregnancy induced ISG-15 and MX-1 gene expression in the liver already at day 18 in cattle. PMID:26549692

  4. [KINETICS OF PHOTO-INDUCED FREE RADICALS IN THE HUMAN HAIR CHESTNUT COLOR AFTER SHORT PERIODS OF RED, GREEN, BLUE AND WHITE LIGHT EXPOSURE].

    PubMed

    Tskhvediani, N; Chikvaidze, E; Tsibadze, A; Kvachadze, I; Gogoladze, T; Katsitadze, A

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the kinetics of photo-induced free radicals in the human hair chestnut color with short-term exposure to visible light in different frequency ranges. Studies carried out on human volunteers aged 17-21 years (n=37). Hairs of volunteers of the study were not treated with dyes and other active cosmetic preparations. Hairs bundled in a bun had a length - 1.5 cm, weight - 40 mg. At the beginning background EPR-spectrum of a sample was measured and then hairs were irradiated with visible light (blue, green, red and white) of different wavelength subsequently; exposure duration - 60 minutes; after the exposure the kinetics of photo-induced free radicals was measured within 60 minutes. The radiation source was selected LED array of the four crystals that provides a nearly monochromatic radiation spectrum having no parasitic infrared and ultraviolet radiations. The studies give a reason to assume that the impact on hairs by visible electromagnetic rays a leading factor is their frequency characteristics: on the one hand - the proximity of the blue light to ultraviolet radiation, and on the other - the red light to the infrared range.

  5. Chronic NMDA receptor blockade in early postnatal period, but not in adulthood, impairs methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Furuie, Hiroki; Yamada, Kazuo; Ichitani, Yukio

    2016-03-15

    Early postnatal glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blockade in animals is known to produce various behavioral deficits in adulthood. In the present study rats postnatally (day 7-20) treated chronically with MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, were tested later in adulthood in methamphetamine (MAP)-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) using a unbiased procedure in a three-compartment apparatus. Rats with the same chronic treatment in adulthood were also tested. CPP test consisted of a baseline test before conditioning, place conditioning, and a preference test after conditioning. Rats postnatally treated with MK-801 did not show any evidence of preference for MAP-paired compartment compared with that for unpaired one in the preference test that was shown in rats postnatally treated with saline. On the other hand, rats treated with MK-801 in adulthood were not affected by the treatment and showed significant CPP as was shown in saline-treated control animals. Results suggest the possibility that chronic early postnatal, but not adulthood, NMDA receptor blockade induces persistent deficit of subsequent appetitive classical conditioning. PMID:26748255

  6. [KINETICS OF PHOTO-INDUCED FREE RADICALS IN THE HUMAN HAIR CHESTNUT COLOR AFTER SHORT PERIODS OF RED, GREEN, BLUE AND WHITE LIGHT EXPOSURE].

    PubMed

    Tskhvediani, N; Chikvaidze, E; Tsibadze, A; Kvachadze, I; Gogoladze, T; Katsitadze, A

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the kinetics of photo-induced free radicals in the human hair chestnut color with short-term exposure to visible light in different frequency ranges. Studies carried out on human volunteers aged 17-21 years (n=37). Hairs of volunteers of the study were not treated with dyes and other active cosmetic preparations. Hairs bundled in a bun had a length - 1.5 cm, weight - 40 mg. At the beginning background EPR-spectrum of a sample was measured and then hairs were irradiated with visible light (blue, green, red and white) of different wavelength subsequently; exposure duration - 60 minutes; after the exposure the kinetics of photo-induced free radicals was measured within 60 minutes. The radiation source was selected LED array of the four crystals that provides a nearly monochromatic radiation spectrum having no parasitic infrared and ultraviolet radiations. The studies give a reason to assume that the impact on hairs by visible electromagnetic rays a leading factor is their frequency characteristics: on the one hand - the proximity of the blue light to ultraviolet radiation, and on the other - the red light to the infrared range. PMID:27249443

  7. Chronic NMDA receptor blockade in early postnatal period, but not in adulthood, impairs methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Furuie, Hiroki; Yamada, Kazuo; Ichitani, Yukio

    2016-03-15

    Early postnatal glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blockade in animals is known to produce various behavioral deficits in adulthood. In the present study rats postnatally (day 7-20) treated chronically with MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, were tested later in adulthood in methamphetamine (MAP)-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) using a unbiased procedure in a three-compartment apparatus. Rats with the same chronic treatment in adulthood were also tested. CPP test consisted of a baseline test before conditioning, place conditioning, and a preference test after conditioning. Rats postnatally treated with MK-801 did not show any evidence of preference for MAP-paired compartment compared with that for unpaired one in the preference test that was shown in rats postnatally treated with saline. On the other hand, rats treated with MK-801 in adulthood were not affected by the treatment and showed significant CPP as was shown in saline-treated control animals. Results suggest the possibility that chronic early postnatal, but not adulthood, NMDA receptor blockade induces persistent deficit of subsequent appetitive classical conditioning.

  8. Analytical model for transverse mode conversion at all-optically induced, transient long-period gratings: from continuous-wave to ultrafast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig, Tim; Sparenberg, Kai; Fallnich, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    Transverse mode conversion at an index grating, all-optically induced by multi-mode interference and the optical Kerr effect, is commonly studied by numerical simulations relying on either multi-mode implementations of the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation or beam propagation methods. Here, we present and discuss an analytical model describing the directed energy exchange between two probe modes moderated by two control modes. The analytical model can be derived in a four-wave mixing representation as well as in a material representation in analogy to the different numerical approaches demonstrating their equivalence. The analytical nature of the model is used to provide general insight into the conversion process in dependence on phase mismatch as well as induced coupling strength. While being a continuous-wave model, the applicability of the model for mode conversion using ultrashort pulses is discussed and guidelines for using the model as a first estimate for experiments or for more precise but time-consuming numerical simulations are given.

  9. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  10. Controls on geyser periodicity.

    PubMed

    Ingebritsen, S E; Rojstaczer, S A

    1993-11-01

    Geyser eruption frequency is not constant over time and has been shown to vary with small (induced by seismic events, atmospheric loading, and Earth tides. The geyser system is approximated as a permeable conduit of intensely fractured rock surrounded by a less permeable rock matrix. Numerical simulation of this conceptual model yields a set of parameters that controls geyser existence and periodicity. Much of the responsiveness to remote seismicity and other small strains in the Earth can be explained in terms of variations in permeability and lateral recharge rates.

  11. Controls on geyser periodicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Rojstaczer, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Geyser eruption frequency is not constant over time and has been shown to vary with small (???10-6) strains induced by seismic events, atmospheric loading, and Earth tides. The geyser system is approximated as a permeable conduit of intensely fractured rock surrounded by a less permeable rock matrix. Numerical simulation of this conceptual model yields a set of parameters that controls geyser existence and periodicity. Much of the responsiveness to remote seismicity and other small strains in the Earth can be explained in terms of variations in permeability and lateral recharge rates.

  12. Controls on geyser periodicity.

    PubMed

    Ingebritsen, S E; Rojstaczer, S A

    1993-11-01

    Geyser eruption frequency is not constant over time and has been shown to vary with small (induced by seismic events, atmospheric loading, and Earth tides. The geyser system is approximated as a permeable conduit of intensely fractured rock surrounded by a less permeable rock matrix. Numerical simulation of this conceptual model yields a set of parameters that controls geyser existence and periodicity. Much of the responsiveness to remote seismicity and other small strains in the Earth can be explained in terms of variations in permeability and lateral recharge rates. PMID:17757358

  13. [Dynamics of the induced chromosomal instability in welsh onion (Allium fistulosum L.): gamma irradiation of the seeds of different storage periods].

    PubMed

    Lazarenko, L M; Bezrukov, V F

    2006-01-01

    The chromosome aberrations in root meristem cells of welsh onion (Allium fistulosum L.) seeds after gamma-irradiation (5 and 10 Gy) of different-aged seeds (7, 19, 31, 43 and 55 months of storage) were studied. The irradiation dose of 5 Gy significantly increased the frequency of aberrant anaphases (FAA) for 31- and 43-months seeds; the dose of 10 Gy significantly increased the FAA in seeds of all age groups. The irradiation of young (7 months) seeds resulted in decreasing of the fraction of bridges to the control level of the old (55-months) seeds for the dose of 5 Gy and below the control level of the old seeds--for the dose of 10 Gy. Some peculiarities of cytogenetic parameters of genome instability and the germinating capacity of the seeds made it possible to suppose that the third year of storage is a critical period for the welsh onion seeds. PMID:17100278

  14. Physical chemistry of molten salt batteries. Final report for period October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980. Current-induced composition gradients in molten LiCl-KCl

    SciTech Connect

    Braunstein, J.; Cantor, S.; Vallet, C.E.

    1981-03-01

    Current induced composition gradients were demonstrated in the molten LiCl-KCl eutectic mixture, the electrolyte of an LiAl/LiCl-KCl/FeS/sub x/ battery. The gradients were produced by electrolysis of the salt between LiAl electrodes at currents of 50 to 100 mA cm/sup -2/, and quenching. Analysis of composition profiles in quenched samples was by atomic absorption spectroscopy, which gave good precision, and by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy in a scanning electron microscope (SEM/EDX), which gave good distance resolution. Work is in progress to improve the precision of the SEM/EDX measurements to that demonstrated in model systems.

  15. Periodic mechanical stress induces the extracellular matrix expression and migration of rat nucleus pulposus cells by upregulating the expression of intergrin α1 and phosphorylation of downstream phospholipase Cγ1

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Gongming; He, Jin; Nong, Luming; Xie, Hua; Huang, Yongjing; Xu, Nanwei; Zhou, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disk degeneration (IDD) is a major cause of low back pain and an important socioeconomic burden. Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in the interverterbal disk is important for IDD. Stress of a suitable frequency and amplitude promotes the synthesis of the ECM of NP cells, however, the associated mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated The present study aimed to investigate the effect of integrin α1 on the migration and ECM synthesis of NP cells under soft periodic mechanical stress. Rat NP cells were isolated and plated onto slides, and were then treated with or without the use of a periodic mechanical stress system. The expression levels of integrin α1, α5 and αv, ECM collagen 2A1 (Col2A1) and aggrecan, and the phosphorylation of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLCγ1) were measured using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. Cell migration was assayed using a scratch experiment. The results showed that exposure to periodic mechanical stress significantly induced the mRNA expression levels of Col2A1 and aggrecan, cell migration, mRNA expression of integrin α1 and phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 of the NP, compared with the control (P<0.05). Inhibition of the PLCγ1 protein by U73122 significantly decreased the ECM expression under periodic mechanical stress (P<0.05). Small interfering RNA-mediated integrin α1 gene knockdown suppressed the mRNA expression levels of Col2A1 and aggrecan, and suppressed the migration and phosphorylation of PLCγ1 of the NP cells under periodic mechanical stress, compared with the control (P<0.05). In conclusion, periodic mechanical stress induced ECM expression and the migration of NP cells via upregulating the expression of integrin α1 and the phosphorylation of downstream PLCγ1. These findings provide novel information to aid the understanding of the pathogenesis and development of IDD. PMID:27484337

  16. Field observation of morpho-dynamic processes during storms at a Pacific beach, Japan: role of long-period waves in storm-induced berm erosion.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Masaru; Seki, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Many ultrasonic wave gages were placed with a small spacing across the swash zone to monitor either sand level or water level. Continuous monitoring conducted for a few years enabled the collection of data on the change in wave properties as well as swash-zone profiles. Data sets including two cases of large-scale berm erosion were analyzed. The results showed that 1) shoreline erosion started when high waves with significant power in long-period (1 to 2 min.) waves reached the top of a well-developed berm with the help of rising tide; 2) the beach in the swash zone was eroded with higher elevation being more depressed, while the bottom elevation just outside the swash zone remained almost unchanged; and 3) erosion stopped in a few hours after the berm was completely eroded or the swash-zone slope became uniformly mild. These findings strongly suggest that long waves play a dominant role in the swash-zone dynamics associated with these erosional events.

  17. Anxiogenic role of vasopressin during the early postnatal period: maternal separation-induced ultrasound vocalization in vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats.

    PubMed

    Varga, János; Fodor, Anna; Klausz, Barbara; Zelena, Dóra

    2015-11-01

    Both animal and human studies suggest that in adulthood, plasma vasopressin level correlates well with anxiety. Little is known about the mood regulation during the perinatal period. Here, we aim to investigate the influence of vasopressin on anxiety during the early postnatal age. As a sign of distress, rat pups emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) when they are separated from their mother. This USV was detected in 7- to 8-day-old vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro pups, and they were compared to their heterozygote littermates and wild-type pups. The results were confirmed by V1b antagonist treatment (SSR149415 10 mg/kg ip 30 min before test) in wild-types. Chlordiazepoxide (3 mg/kg ip 30 min before test)-an anxiolytic-was used to test the interaction with the GABAergic system. At the end of the test, stress-hormone levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Vasopressin-deficient pups vocalized substantially less than non-deficient counterparts. Treatment with V1b antagonist resulted in similar effect. Chlordiazepoxide reduced the frequency and duration of the vocalization only in wild-types. Reduced vocalization was accompanied by smaller adrenocorticotropin levels but the level of corticosterone was variable. Our results indicate that the anxiolytic effect of vasopressin deficiency (both genetic and pharmacological) exists already during the early postnatal age. Vasopressin interacts with the GABAergic system. As mood regulation does not go parallel with glucocorticoid levels, we suggest that vasopressin might have a direct effect on special brain areas.

  18. Periodic Evolution of a Xe I Population in an Oscillatory Discharge: Comparison between Time-Synchronized Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Measurements and A Dynamic Collisional-Radiative Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Chris V.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Plasma Physics Laboratory Team

    2014-10-01

    We study the evolution of the Xe I 6 s '[ 1 / 2 ] 1 - 6 p '[ 3 / 2 ] 2 (834.68 nm air) transition lineshape in a plasma discharge oscillating at 60 Hz using time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements and a collisional-radiative model. Two different time-synchronized LIF techniques based on phase sensitive detection of the fluorescence signal are applied, yielding consistent results. The maximum observed peak fluorescence intensity occurs at low values of the discharge current, although the peak intensity drops to zero at zero discharge current. The peak intensity also decreases at the discharge current maximum. A dynamic collisional-radiative model of the weakly ionized xenon discharge is also implemented, based on a set of rate equations. The proper electron impact cross-sections and radiative decay rates are identified from the literature and used to compute accurate rate coefficients with the Boltzmann solver Bolsig+, including the time-varying electric field. The time evolution of the probed excited state density predicted by the model shows good agreement with the experimental measurements. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. CVY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  19. The effects of botulinum neurotoxin A induced muscle paresis during a critical period upon muscle and spinal cord development in the rat.

    PubMed

    Clowry, Gavin J; Walker, Lauren; Davies, Pattina

    2006-12-01

    The second postnatal week is a critical period in rat motor development. The expansion of corticospinal innervation coincides with elimination of polyneuronal innervation of muscles, onset of quadrupedal locomotion and refinement of muscle afferent input to the ventral horn. Such developmental events are believed to be activity-dependent. In the present study, muscle afferent activity was temporarily reduced by injecting distal forelimb muscles with botulinum toxin A (BTX). Injections of toxin or saline were made unilaterally on postnatal day (P) 7 which in BTX-treated animals lead to a profound loss of movement in the affected limb over the next week before function returned. The neural tracer cholera toxin B (CTB) was injected into the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) at either P14 or P28. Allowing 3 days for tracer transport, the spinal cords were sectioned and immunostained for CTB and cJun. In separate experiments, behavioural testing of the forelimb was carried out between P35 and P49. Then, sections of EDC muscle were immunostained for slow myosin. An increased density of ventral horn muscle afferent boutons was observed at P17 in BTX-treated animals compared to controls, however, by P31, this difference was not significant. However, CTB labelling also revealed significantly increased motor axon terminals in the ventral Renshaw cell region in BTX-treated animals at P31, accompanied by raised expression of cJun in ipsilateral motoneurones. BTX-treated animals showed deficits in ladder walking, and their muscles contained a higher density and significantly more clustering of slow myosin expressing muscle fibres than controls. Temporary reduction in activity did not significantly alter muscle afferent development, but temporary blockade of neuromuscular junctions did affect both muscle and motor axon, in the longer term. PMID:16928374

  20. Analysis of the return period and correlation between the reservoir-induced seismic frequency and the water level based on a copula: A case study of the Three Gorges reservoir in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Qiuwen

    2016-11-01

    Studies have considered the many factors involved in the mechanism of reservoir seismicity. Focusing on the correlation between reservoir-induced seismicity and the water level, this study proposes to utilize copula theory to build a correlation model to analyze their relationships and perform the risk analysis. The sequences of reservoir induced seismicity events from 2003 to 2011 in the Three Gorges reservoir in China are used as a case study to test this new methodology. Next, we construct four correlation models based on the Gumbel, Clayton, Frank copula and M-copula functions and employ four methods to test the goodness of fit: Q-Q plots, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test, the minimum distance (MD) test and the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) test. Through a comparison of the four models, the M-copula model fits the sample better than the other three models. Based on the M-copula model, we find that, for the case of a sudden drawdown of the water level, the possibility of seismic frequency decreasing obviously increases, whereas for the case of a sudden rising of the water level, the possibility of seismic frequency increasing obviously increases, with the former being greater than the latter. The seismic frequency is mainly distributed in the low-frequency region (Y ⩽ 20) for the low water level and in the middle-frequency region (20 < Y ≤ 80) for both the medium and high water levels; the seismic frequency in the high-frequency region (Y > 80) is the least likely. For the conditional return period, it can be seen that the period of the high-frequency seismicity is much longer than those of the normal and medium frequency seismicity, and the high water level shortens the periods.

  1. Generation of laser-induced periodic surface structures in indium-tin-oxide thin films and two-photon lithography of ma-N photoresist by sub-15 femtosecond laser microscopy for liquid crystal cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klötzer, Madlen; Afshar, Maziar; Feili, Dara; Seidel, Helmut; König, Karsten; Straub, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) is a widely used electrode material for liquid crystal cell applications because of its transparency in the visible spectral range and its high electrical conductivity. Important examples of applications are displays and optical phase modulators. We report on subwavelength periodic structuring and precise laser cutting of 150 nm thick indium-tin-oxide films on glass substrates, which were deposited by magnetron reactive DC-sputtering from an indiumtin target in a low-pressure oxygen atmosphere. In order to obtain nanostructured electrodes laser-induced periodic surface structures with a period of approximately 100 nm were generated using tightly focused high-repetition rate sub-15 femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser light, which was scanned across the sample by galvanometric mirrors. Three-dimensional spacers were produced by multiphoton photopolymerization in ma-N 2410 negative-tone photoresist spin-coated on top of the ITO layers. The nanostructured electrodes were aligned in parallel to set up an electrically switchable nematic liquid crystal cell.

  2. Attention Reorients Periodically.

    PubMed

    Dugué, Laura; Roberts, Mariel; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-06-20

    Reorienting of voluntary attention enables the processing of stimuli at previously unattended locations. Although studies have identified a ventral fronto-parietal network underlying attention [1, 2], little is known about whether and how early visual areas are involved in involuntary [3, 4] and even less in voluntary [5] reorienting, and their temporal dynamics are unknown. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the occipital cortex to interfere with attentional reorienting and study its role and temporal dynamics in this process. Human observers performed an orientation discrimination task, with either valid or invalid attention cueing, across a range of stimulus contrasts. Valid cueing induced a behavioral response gain increase, higher asymptotic performance for attended than unattended locations. During subsequent TMS sessions, observers performed the same task, with high stimulus contrast. Based on phosphene mapping, TMS double pulses were applied at one of various delays to a consistent brain location in retinotopic areas (V1/V2), corresponding to the evoked signal of the target or distractor, in a valid or invalid trial. Thus, the stimulation was identical for the four experimental conditions (valid/invalid cue condition × target/distractor-stimulated). TMS modulation of the target and distractor were both periodic (5 Hz, theta) and out of phase with respect to each other in invalid trials only, when attention had to be disengaged from the distractor and reoriented to the target location. Reorientation of voluntary attention periodically involves V1/V2 at the theta frequency. These results suggest that TMS probes theta phase-reset by attentional reorienting and help link periodic sampling in time and attention reorienting in space.

  3. Exposure to a Highly Caloric Palatable Diet During Pregestational and Gestational Periods Affects Hypothalamic and Hippocampal Endocannabinoid Levels at Birth and Induces Adiposity and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in Male Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Vázquez, Mariam; Bindila, Laura; Lomazzo, Ermelinda; Hofmann, Clementine; Blanco, Rosario Noemí; Alén, Francisco; Antón, María; Decara, Juan; Ouro, Daniel; Orio, Laura; Suarez, Juan; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Gómez de Heras, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to unbalanced diets during pre-gestational and gestational periods may result in long-term alterations in metabolism and behavior. The contribution of the endocannabinoid system to these long-term adaptive responses is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the impact of female rat exposure to a hypercaloric-hypoproteic palatable diet during pre-gestational, gestational and lactational periods on the development of male offspring. In addition, the hypothalamic and hippocampal endocannabinoid contents at birth and the behavioral performance in adulthood were investigated. Exposure to a palatable diet resulted in low weight offspring who exhibited low hypothalamic contents of arachidonic acid and the two major endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol) at birth. Palmitoylethanolamide, but not oleoylethanolamide, also decreased. Additionally, pups from palatable diet-fed dams displayed lower levels of anandamide and palmitoylethanolamide in the hippocampus. The low-weight male offspring, born from palatable diet exposed mothers, gained less weight during lactation and although they recovered weight during the post-weaning period, they developed abdominal adiposity in adulthood. These animals exhibited anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze and open field test and a low preference for a chocolate diet in a food preference test, indicating that maternal exposure to a hypercaloric diet induces long-term behavioral alterations in male offspring. These results suggest that maternal diet alterations in the function of the endogenous cannabinoid system can mediate the observed phenotype of the offspring, since both hypothalamic and hippocampal endocannabinoids regulate feeding, metabolic adaptions to caloric diets, learning, memory, and emotions. PMID:26778987

  4. Cannabis Induced Periodic Catatonia: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajaj, Vikrant; Pathak, Prashant; Mehrotra, Saurabh; Singh, Vijender; Govil, Sandeep; Khanna, Aman

    2011-01-01

    Catatonia is a syndrome of specific motor abnormalities closely associated with disorders in mood, affect, thought and cognition. The principal signs of the disorder are mutism, immobility, negativism, posturing, stereotypy and echo phenomena. Catatonia is commonly seen in various psychiatric disorders, neurological disorders and certain medical…

  5. Familial Periodic Paralyses

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS NINDS Familial Periodic Paralyses Information Page Synonym(s): Periodic Paralyses Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What are Familial Periodic Paralyses? Is there any treatment? What is the ...

  6. Stress-induced oxytocin release and oxytocin cell number and size in prepubertal and adult male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Sumeet; Liu, Clarissa; Galdamez, Josselyn; So, Veronica M; Romeo, Russell D

    2016-08-01

    Studies indicate that adolescent exposure to stress is a potent environmental factor that contributes to psychological and physiological disorders, though the mechanisms that mediate these dysfunctions are not well understood. Periadolescent animals display greater stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responses than adults, which may contribute to these vulnerabilities. In addition to the HPA axis, the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal tract (HNT) is also activated in response to stress. In adults, stress activates this system resulting in secretion of oxytocin from neurons in the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei. However, it is currently unknown whether a similar or different response occurs in prepubertal animals. Given the influence of these hormones on a variety of emotional behaviors and physiological systems known to change as an animal transitions into adulthood, we investigated stress-induced HPA and HNT hormonal responses before and after stress, as well as the number and size of oxytocin-containing cells in the SON and PVN of prepubertal (30d) and adult (70d) male and female rats. Though we found the well-established protracted adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone response in prepubertal males and females, only adult males and prepubertal females showed a significant stress-induced increase in plasma oxytocin levels. Moreover, though we found no pubertal changes in the number of oxytocin cells, we did find a pubertal-related increase in oxytocin somal size in both the SON and PVN of males and females. Taken together, these data indicate that neuroendocrine systems can show different patterns of stress reactivity before and after adolescent development and that these responses can be further modified by sex. Given the impact of these hormones on a variety of systems, it will be imperative to further explore these changes in hormonal stress reactivity and their role in adolescent health. PMID:26972154

  7. The Periodic Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2013-01-01

    The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy…

  8. [Scientific periodicals: quality criteria].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria Cecilia Gonzaga; Krzyzanowski, Rosaly Favero

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents a historical literature review on the evaluation of periodicals and the methodology employed for their evaluation. It emphasizes the attention that should be given to the contents of the periodicals and their format based on technical standards in order to reach a global quality of the publications. This paper includes a summary of the most important aspects of the technical standards for periodicals and scientific articles.

  9. Saturn's variable radio period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Gurnett, D. A.; Cecconi, B.

    Temporal modulations in radio emissions are often used to determine the rotation rate of the emitting body. The rotation period (presumably) of Jupiter's interior was established in this way [Burke et al., 1962] and has recently been refined by Higgins et al. [1997]. Rotation periods for the remainder of the outer planet gas giants were determined from Voyager planetary radio astronomy observations. Similar techniques have been applied to astrophysical objects, including pulsars, for which the radio period is assumed to be the rotation period of the neutron star. In 2001, however, this simple relation between the radio period and rotation period became suspect, at least for the case of Saturn. Galopeau and Lecacheux [2001] reported that the radio period of Saturn had changed by as much as 1% from that determined by Voyager and, further, exhibited variations on time scales of years. More recently, Cassini observations indicate that the Saturn kilometric radiation is modulated with a period longer than that observed by Voyager and that this period is variable on a time scale of a year or less. The recent Higgins et al. result suggests that Jupiter's period is steady, within measurement accuracy. There are no additional measurements from Uranus or Neptune with which to look for time variations in their radio periods. For conservation of energy and angular momentum reasons, true variations of the rotation period of Saturn's deep interior are not believed to be a viable explanation for the variation in radio period, hence, it would appear that there is some disconnection of the radio period from the rotation period in the case of Saturn. One possible contributing factor may be that since Saturn's magnetic field is very accurately aligned with its rotational axis, there is no first-order beaming effect caused by the wobbling of the magnetic field, contrary to the situation at the other magnetized planets. Another explanation suggested by Galopeau and Lecacheux [2001] and

  10. Sequences close to periodic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchnik, Andrei A.; Pritykin, Yurii L.; Semenov, Aleksei L.

    2009-10-01

    This paper is a survey of concepts and results connected with generalizations of the notion of a periodic sequence, both classical and new. The topics discussed relate to almost periodicity in such areas as combinatorics on words, symbolic dynamics, expressibility in logical theories, computability, Kolmogorov complexity, and number theory. Bibliography: 124 titles.

  11. Multidimensional period doubling structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Yup; Flom, Dvir; Ben-Abraham, Shelomo I

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops the formalism necessary to generalize the period doubling sequence to arbitrary dimension by straightforward extension of the substitution and recursion rules. It is shown that the period doubling structures of arbitrary dimension are pure point diffractive. The symmetries of the structures are pointed out. PMID:27126116

  12. The Living Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…

  13. Canakinumab (ACZ885, a fully human IgG1 anti-IL-1β mAb) induces sustained remission in pediatric patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) represents a spectrum of three auto-inflammatory syndromes, familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease/chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome (NOMID/CINCA) with etiology linked to mutations in the NLRP3 gene resulting in elevated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release. CAPS is a rare hereditary auto-inflammatory disease, which may start early in childhood and requires a life-long treatment. Canakinumab, a fully human anti-IL-1β antibody, produces sustained selective inhibition of IL-1β. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of canakinumab in the treatment of pediatric CAPS patients. Methods Seven pediatric patients (five children and two adolescents) with CAPS were enrolled in a phase II, open-label study of canakinumab in patients with CAPS. Canakinumab was administered at a dose of 2 mg/kg subcutaneously (s.c.) (for patients with body weight ≤ 40 kg) or 150 mg s.c. (for patients with body weight > 40 kg) with re-dosing upon each relapse. The primary efficacy variable was time to relapse following achievement of a complete response (defined as a global assessment of no or minimal disease activity and no or minimal rash and values for serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and/or serum amyloid A (SAA) within the normal range, < 10 mg/L). Results All patients achieved a complete response within seven days after the first dose of canakinumab and responses were reinduced on retreatment following relapse. Improvements in symptoms were evident within 24 hours after the first dose, according to physician assessments. The estimated median time to relapse was 49 days (95% CI 29 to 68) in children who received a dose of 2 mg/kg. Canakinumab was well tolerated. One serious adverse event, vertigo, was reported, but resolved during treatment. Conclusions Canakinumab, 2 mg/kg or

  14. Haemocytic periodicity and periodic disorders: Periodic neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, lymphocytosis and anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Hobart A.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated of rhythmic numerical oscillation of each of the blood cells either independently or in combinations. The cyclic changes originate in the marrow of some normal persons and animals without causing illness, and can be induced experimentally. In more than 100 reported instances, periodic oscillations of various cells were accompanied by respective episodes of the disorders named in the title. The disorders may be transitory but usually recur throughout life and occasionally are fatal. All resist therapy. Features in common suggest an interrelationship of the haemal disorders and other disparate heritable periodic diseases. Theoretically, the rhythms are regulated by ubiquitous, inherent, intracellular bioclocks controlled hypothalamically or neurohumorally in relation to a feedback mechanism. Reactions to long cycles are of greater clinical importance than disturbances arising from the circadian rhythm. PMID:4397784

  15. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Jalali, Bahram

    2009-03-01

    We propose a new class of photonic devices based on periodic stress fields in silicon that enable second-order nonlinearity as well as quasi-phase matching. Periodically poled silicon (PePSi) adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on second-order nonlinear effects. As an example of the utility of the PePSi technology, we present simulations showing that midwave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50%.

  16. Genealogy of periodic trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    de Adguiar, M.A.M.; Maldta, C.P.; de Passos, E.J.V.

    1986-05-20

    The periodic solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of periodic families are given in plots of energy vs. period. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub x//sup 2/ + p/sub y//sup 2/) + 1/2 x/sup 2/ + 3/2 y/sup 2/ - x/sup 2/y + 1/12 x/sup 4/. Properties of the families of curves are pointed out. (LEW)

  17. Periodized Daubechies wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, J.M.; Leaf, G.K.; Schlossnagle, G.

    1996-03-01

    The properties of periodized Daubechies wavelets on [0,1] are detailed and counterparts which form a basis for L{sup 2}(R). Numerical examples illustrate the analytical estimates for convergence and demonstrated by comparison with Fourier spectral methods the superiority of wavelet projection methods for approximations. The analytical solution to inner products of periodized wavelets and their derivatives, which are known as connection coefficients, is presented, and their use ius illustrated in the approximation of two commonly used differential operators. The periodization of the connection coefficients in Galerkin schemes is presented in detail.

  18. Your First Period

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe asthma). Always follow the directions on the bottle about how much to take. Exercise. Place a ... days. Glossary Amenorrhea: The absence of menstrual periods. Egg: The female reproductive cell produced in and released ...

  19. The Periodic Table CD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Alton J.; Holmes, Jon L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of the digitized version of The Periodic Table Videodisc. Provides details about the organization of information and access to the data via Macintosh and Windows computers. (DDR)

  20. Setting the Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saturnelli, Annette

    1985-01-01

    Examines problems resulting from different forms of the periodic table, indicating that New York State schools use a form reflecting the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's 1984 recommendations. Other formats used and reasons for standardization are discussed. (DH)

  1. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... high levels of thyroid hormone in their blood ( hyperthyroidism , thyrotoxicosis). Causes This is a rare condition that ... include a family history of periodic paralysis and hyperthyroidism. Symptoms Symptoms involve attacks of muscle weakness or ...

  2. The Jovian period in the Sun?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    The 41-year measurements of the Doppler effect of the photosphere performed at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, discovered two periods of global oscillations of the Sun: 9600.606(12) s and 9597.929(15) s. Their beat period, 398.4(2.9) d, well agrees with a synodic orbital period of Jupiter, PJ = 398.9 d, raising a new problem for solar physics, cosmogony and cosmology. A hypothesis is advanced that the PJ beating of the Sun is induced by gravitation of Jupiter, revolving in a privileged reference system "the Sun - the Earth".

  3. 24 CFR 203.266 - Period covered by periodic MIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Period covered by periodic MIP. 203.266 Section 203.266 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...-Periodic Payment § 203.266 Period covered by periodic MIP. The initial MIP shall cover the period...

  4. 24 CFR 203.266 - Period covered by periodic MIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Period covered by periodic MIP. 203.266 Section 203.266 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...-Periodic Payment § 203.266 Period covered by periodic MIP. The initial MIP shall cover the period...

  5. 24 CFR 203.266 - Period covered by periodic MIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Period covered by periodic MIP. 203.266 Section 203.266 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...-Periodic Payment § 203.266 Period covered by periodic MIP. The initial MIP shall cover the period...

  6. 24 CFR 203.266 - Period covered by periodic MIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Period covered by periodic MIP. 203.266 Section 203.266 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...-Periodic Payment § 203.266 Period covered by periodic MIP. The initial MIP shall cover the period...

  7. 24 CFR 203.266 - Period covered by periodic MIP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Period covered by periodic MIP. 203.266 Section 203.266 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...-Periodic Payment § 203.266 Period covered by periodic MIP. The initial MIP shall cover the period...

  8. Hyperthyroid hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Neki, N S

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroid periodic paralysis (HPP) is a rare life threatening complication of hyperthyroidism commonly occurring in young Asian males but sporadically found in other races. It is characterised by hypokalemia and acute onset paraparesis with prevalence of one in one hundred thousand (1 in 100000). The symptoms resolve promptly with potassium supplementation. Nonselective beta blockers like propranol can also be used to ameliorate and prevent subsequent paralytic attack. We report a case of 22 year old male presenting with hyperthyroid periodic paralysis (HPP) having very low serum potassium level. PMID:27648066

  9. Periodically kicked turbulence

    PubMed

    Lohse

    2000-10-01

    Periodically kicked turbulence is theoretically analyzed within a mean-field theory. For large enough kicking strength A and kicking frequency f the Reynolds number grows exponentially and then runs into some saturation. The saturation level Re(sat) can be calculated analytically; different regimes can be observed. For large enough Re we find Re(sat) approximately Af, but intermittency can modify this scaling law. We suggest an experimental realization of periodically kicked turbulence to study the different regimes we theoretically predict and thus to better understand the effect of forcing on fully developed turbulence. PMID:11089041

  10. Hyperthyroid hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Neki, N.S.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroid periodic paralysis (HPP) is a rare life threatening complication of hyperthyroidism commonly occurring in young Asian males but sporadically found in other races. It is characterised by hypokalemia and acute onset paraparesis with prevalence of one in one hundred thousand (1 in 100000). The symptoms resolve promptly with potassium supplementation. Nonselective beta blockers like propranol can also be used to ameliorate and prevent subsequent paralytic attack. We report a case of 22 year old male presenting with hyperthyroid periodic paralysis (HPP) having very low serum potassium level. PMID:27648066

  11. Spontaneous periodic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Kloos, R T

    1995-09-01

    Spontaneous periodic hypothermia is a rare syndrome of recurrent, centrally mediated hypothermia without an identifiable systemic cause or brain lesion. Most patients defend a temporarily lowered temperature "set point" during episodes of hypothermia, despite manifesting many well-known systemic consequences of core temperature hypothermia. No case of death directly attributable to an episode of spontaneous periodic hypothermia has been reported, although many of the serious systemic effects of hypothermia have been documented in these cases, so it is not unlikely that death may occur. The syndrome's cause, and that of Shapiro syndrome, remains unknown. Pharmacologic trials to date have been only modestly successful. Anticonvulsant agents, clonidine, and cyproheptadine appear the most likely to succeed, with cyproheptadine being a reasonable first choice. Given that the term "spontaneous periodic hypothermia" describes a syndrome, and not a pathophysiologic mechanism, it is likely to encompass a common eventuality, arrived at via several different pathways. One can postulate mechanisms such as structural abnormalities, trauma, infection, irritation, and degeneration involving strategic locations which create a focus for epileptic or other periodic dysfunction whose scope involves the centers for thermoregulation. The existence of 2 distinct, oppositional thermoregulatory centers would allow for speculation of similar mechanisms accounting for cases of both periodic hypo- and hyperthermia (61). Postmortem data regarding the hypothalamic and surrounding areas from future cases of Shapiro syndrome and spontaneous periodic hypothermia would be of great interest. Further, more sensitive in vivo testing methods are clearly needed. The role of PET or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with technetium 99m-labeled hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (Tc 99m HMPAO) performed acutely during an episode remains to be characterized (64, 103, 105). The term

  12. Periodicity of extinction: A 1988 update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepkowski, J. John, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The hypothesis that events of mass extinction recur periodically at approximately 26 my intervals is an empirical claim based on analysis of data from the fossil record. The hypothesis has become closely linked with catastrophism because several events in the periodic series are associated with evidence of extraterrestrial impacts, and terrestrial forcing mechanisms with long, periodic recurrences are not easily conceived. Astronomical mechanisms that have been hypothesized include undetected solar companions and solar oscillation about the galactic plane, which induce comet showers and result in impacts on Earth at regular intervals. Because these mechanisms are speculative, they have been the subject of considerable controversy, as has the hypothesis of periodicity of extinction. In response to criticisms and uncertainties, a data base was developed on times of extinction of marine animal genera. A time series is given and analyzed with 49 sample points for the per-genus extinction rate from the Late Permian to the Recent. An unexpected pattern in the data is the uniformity of magnitude of many of the periodic extinction events. Observations suggest that the sequence of extinction events might be the result of two sets of mechanisms: a periodic forcing that normally induces only moderate amounts of extinction, and independent incidents or catastrophes that, when coincident with the periodic forcing, amplify its signal and produce major-mass extinctions.

  13. Scheduling: Seven Period Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Driven by stable or declining financial resources many school districts are considering the costs and benefits of a seven-period day. While there is limited evidence that any particular scheduling model has a greater impact on student learning than any other, it is clear that the school schedule is a tool that can significantly impact teacher…

  14. Periodic Table of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…

  15. A Modern Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrenden-Harker, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modern Periodic Table based on the electron distribution in the outermost shell and the order of filling of the sublevels within the shells. Enables a student to read off directly the electronic configuration of the element and the order in which filling occurs. (JRH)

  16. Getting Your Period

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a woman to have a baby. During sexual intercourse, the egg can get fertilized by a male’s sperm and then attach to the lining of the uterus ( endometrium ) and grow into a baby. ( Read more about reproduction. ) Does your period come each month? top Menstrual ...

  17. Astrophysical implications of periodicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Two remarkable discoveries of the last decade have profound implications for astrophysics and for geophysics. These are the discovery by Alvarez et al., that certain mass extinctions are caused by the impact on the earth of a large asteroid or comet, and the discovery by Raup and Sepkoski that such extinctions are periodic, with a cycle time of 26 to 30 million years. The validity of both of these discoveries is assumed and the implications are examined. Most of the phenomena described depend not on periodicity, but just on the weaker assumption that the impacts on the earth take place primarily in showers. Proposed explanations for the periodicity include galactic oscillations, the Planet X model, and the possibility of Nemesis, a solar companion star. These hypotheses are critically examined. Results of the search for the solar companion are reported. The Deccan flood basalts of India have been proposed as the impact site for the Cretaceous impact, but this hypotheisis is in contradiction with the conclusion of Courtillot et al., that the magma flow began during a period of normal magnetic field. A possible resolution of this contradiction is proposed.

  18. Evaluation of the antihistamine effects of olopatadine and levocetirizine during a 24-h period: a double-blind, randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled comparison in skin responses induced by histamine iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Tomohiro; Kasugai, Chikatoshi; Tanaka, Rui; Ando, Takashi; Ogawa, Akina; Akita, Yoichi; Watanabe, Daisuke

    2013-12-01

    The antihistamine effects of olopatadine and levocetirizine, in standard-dose application described in their information (5 mg twice a day for olopatadine; 5 mg once daily for levocetirizine), were examined from 11.5 to 24 h after application. The test was designed in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled study of 12 healthy volunteers on histamine-induced flare and wheal response using an iontophoresis technique. The suppressive effect of olopatadine on the wheals induced by a 0.1-mA histamine iontophoresis lasted for 24 h after dosing. Both drugs inhibited flare induced by histamine iontophoresis almost completely until 24 h after the first administration. Suppression of the 0.2-mA-induced wheal response by levocetirizine, taken once daily, decreased with time, although 0.1-mA-induced flare was almost completely suppressed by the drug. Olopatadine completely suppressed even the wheal response induced by a 0.2-mA histamine iontophoresis. Compared with the placebo, the two drugs significantly suppressed the subjective itching assessed by visual analog scale at all intervals. There were no significant differences in subjective drowsiness and objective cognitive function between drug- and placebo-treated subjects. These results demonstrate that olopatadine seems to be more potent than levocetirizine when administrated in a standard dose. In conclusion, mild to moderate urticaria could be controlled by standard application as described in their information. On the other hand, severe urticaria could be managed by a standard application of olopatadine, but levocetirizine may need an additional dose to control severe urticaria. PMID:24303975

  19. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreiro, J.E.; Arguelles, D.J.; Rams, H. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is reported in a Hispanic man with an unusual recurrence six weeks after radioactive iodine treatment. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis has now been well characterized in the literature: it occurs primarily in Orientals with an overwhelming male preponderance and a higher association of specific HLA antigens. Clinical manifestations include onset after high carbohydrate ingestion or heavy exertion, with progressive symmetric weakness leading to flaccid paralysis of the extremities and other muscle groups, lasting several hours. If hypokalemia is present, potassium administration may help abort the attack. Although propranolol can be efficacious in preventing further episodes, the only definitive treatment is establishing a euthyroid state. The pathophysiology is still controversial, but reflects altered potassium and calcium dynamics as well as certain morphologic characteristics within the muscle unit itself.

  20. Periodic minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Alan L.

    1985-04-01

    A minimal surface is one for which, like a soap film with the same pressure on each side, the mean curvature is zero and, thus, is one where the two principal curvatures are equal and opposite at every point. For every closed circuit in the surface, the area is a minimum. Schwarz1 and Neovius2 showed that elements of such surfaces could be put together to give surfaces periodic in three dimensions. These periodic minimal surfaces are geometrical invariants, as are the regular polyhedra, but the former are curved. Minimal surfaces are appropriate for the description of various structures where internal surfaces are prominent and seek to adopt a minimum area or a zero mean curvature subject to their topology; thus they merit more complete numerical characterization. There seem to be at least 18 such surfaces3, with various symmetries and topologies, related to the crystallographic space groups. Recently, glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) was shown by Longley and McIntosh4 to take the shape of the F-surface. The structure postulated is shown here to be in good agreement with an analysis of the fundamental geometry of periodic minimal surfaces.

  1. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  2. Long term sex-dependent psychoneuroendocrine effects of maternal deprivation and juvenile unpredictable stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Llorente, R; Miguel-Blanco, C; Aisa, B; Lachize, S; Borcel, E; Meijer, O C; Ramirez, M J; De Kloet, E R; Viveros, M P

    2011-04-01

    We have analysed the long-term psychoneuroendocrine effects of maternal deprivation (MD) [24 h at postnatal day (PND) 9] and/or exposure to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) during the periadolescent period (PND 28 to PND 43) in male and female Wistar rats. Animals were tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM, anxiety) at PND 44 and in two memory tests, spontaneous alternation and novel object recognition (NOT) in adulthood. The expression of hippocampal glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors, as well as of synaptophysin, neural cell adhesion molecule and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, was analysed by in situ hybridisation in selected hippocampal regions. Endocrine determinations of leptin, testosterone and oestradiol plasma levels were carried out by radioimmunoassay. Young CUS animals showed decreased anxiety behaviour in the EPM (increased percentage of time and entries in the open arms) irrespective of neonatal treatment. Memory impairments were induced by the two stressful treatments as was revealed by the NOT, with males being most clearly affected. Although each stressful procedure, when considered separately, induced different (always decrements) effects on the three synaptic molecules analysed and affected males and females differently, the combination of MD and CUS induced an unique disruptive effect on the three synaptic plasticity players. MD induced a long-term significant decrease in hippocampal GR only in males, whereas CUS tended to increase MR in males and decrease MR in females. Both neonatal MD and periadolescent CUS induced marked reductions in testosterone and oestradiol in males, whereas MD male animals also showed significantly decreased leptin levels. By contrast, in females, none of the hormones analysed was altered by any of the stressful procedures. Taking our data together in support of the 'two-hit' hypothesis, MD during neonatal life and/or exposure to CUS during the periadolescent period induced a permanent

  3. Progression of DNA damage induced by a glyphosate-based herbicide in fish (Anguilla anguilla) upon exposure and post-exposure periods--insights into the mechanisms of genotoxicity and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Marques, Ana; Guilherme, Sofia; Gaivão, Isabel; Santos, Maria Ana; Pacheco, Mário

    2014-11-01

    Roundup® is a glyphosate-based herbicide widely used with both agricultural and non-agricultural purposes, which has been demonstrated to represent a risk to non-target aquatic organisms, namely fish. Among the described effects to fish, genotoxicity has been pointed out as one of the most hazardous. However, the genotoxic mechanisms of Roundup® as well as the involvement of the oxidative DNA damage repair system are not entirely understood. Hence, this work aimed to improve the knowledge on the progression of DNA damage upon short-term exposure (3 days) and post-exposure (1-14 days) periods in association with DNA repair processes in Anguilla anguilla exposed to Roundup® (58 and 116 μg L⁻¹). DNA damage in hepatic cells was evaluated by the comet assay improved with the DNA-lesion specific endonucleases FPG and EndoIII. In order to evaluate the oxidative DNA damage repair ability, an in vitro base excision repair (BER) assay was performed, testing hepatic subcellular extracts. Besides the confirmation of the genotoxic potential of this herbicide, oxidative damage was implicit as an important mechanism of genetic damage, which showed to be transient, since DNA integrity returned to the control levels on the first day after cessation of exposure. An increased capacity to repair oxidative DNA damage emerging in the post-exposure period revealed to be a crucial pathway for the A. anguilla recovery; nevertheless, DNA repair machinery showed to be susceptible to inhibitory actions during the exposure period, disclosing another facet of the risk associated with the tested agrochemical.

  4. Microcantilever actuation via periodic internal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jungchul; King, William P.

    2007-12-15

    This paper reports electrothermal actuation of silicon microcantilevers having integrated resistive heaters. Periodic electrical excitation induced periodic resistive heating in the cantilever, while the cantilever deflection was monitored with a photodetector. Excitation was either at the cantilever resonant frequency, f{sub 0}, f{sub 0}/2, or f{sub 0}/3. When the time averaged maximum cantilever temperature was 174 deg. C, the cantilever out-of-plane actuation amplitude was 484 nm near the cantilever resonance frequency of 24.9 kHz. This actuation was sufficiently large to operate the cantilever in intermittent contact mode and scan a calibration grating of height of 20 nm.

  5. Periodic Boundary Motion in Thermal Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Libchaber, Albert

    2000-05-08

    A free-floating plate is introduced in a Benard convection cell with an open surface. It partially covers the cell and distorts the local heat flux, inducing a coherent flow that in turn moves the plate. Remarkably, the plate can be driven to a periodic motion even under the action of a turbulent fluid. The period of the oscillation depends on the coverage ratio, and on the Rayleigh number of the convective system. The plate oscillatory behavior observed in this experiment may be related to a geological model, in which continents drift in a quasiperiodic fashion. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. On the boundedness of the periodic Hilbert transform on generalized periodic Morrey spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baituyakov, Sheraly; Baituyakova, Zhuldyz; Ilyasova, Meruert

    2016-08-01

    The Hilbert transform is one of the most important operators in the field of signal theory. Mainly, the importance of the transform is due to its property to extend real functions into analytic functions. This property certainly induces a vast number of applications, especially in signal theory, and obviously the Hilbert transform is not merely of interest for mathematicians. In this paper we prove the boundedness of periodic Hilbert transform on generalized periodic Morrey spaces. As a consequence we able to give uniform estimates of the operator norms of the partial sums on generalized periodic Morrey spaces.

  7. Transition from non-periodic to periodic explosions.

    PubMed

    Cartes, Carlos; Descalzi, Orazio

    2015-12-13

    We show the existence of periodic exploding dissipative solitons. These non-chaotic explosions appear when higher-order nonlinear and dispersive effects are added to the complex cubic-quintic Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling soliton transmission lines. This counterintuitive phenomenon is the result of period-halving bifurcations leading to order (periodic explosions), followed by period-doubling bifurcations (or intermittency) leading to chaos (non-periodic explosions). PMID:26527807

  8. Periodically oscillating plasma sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar

    2005-05-15

    The periodically oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very high densities and temperatures during the collapse phase of the oscillation. A requirement for POPS is that the electron injection produces a stable harmonic oscillator potential. This has been demonstrated in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device and verified by particle simulation. Also, the POPS oscillation has been confirmed experimentally through observation that the ions in the potential well exhibit resonance behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the observed POPS frequencies and the theoretical predictions has been observed for a wide range of potential well depths and three different ion species. Practical applications of POPS require large plasma compressions. These large compressions have been observed in particle simulations, although space charge neutralization remains a major issue.

  9. [Bibliometry of biomedical periodicals].

    PubMed

    Similowski, T; Derenne, J P

    1995-01-01

    Bibliometry or the science citation index is a quantitative evaluation of periodical literature, biomedical or others. It depends above all on an analysis of citations which allows for a calculation of different indices characterising and classifying journals (number of articles published, frequency of citation, impact, topicality...). The applications of bibliometry are varied from the administration of library collections to the appreciation of the significance of a review in its own speciality area. By extension the bibliometry index are sometimes used to evaluate the importance of a discipline in the literature, the place of a nation within a discipline, the significance of certain opinions or the quality of research. The intrinsic limits of bibliometry are such that this last application should be handled with caution. In effect, various biases can mechanically affect the value of different indices and particularly the fact that an article appearing in a prestigious review should not prejudge its quality such as the relevance of the question posed, the validity of the methodology employed or the accuracy of the results. For this, the study of citations is insufficient and some qualitative or semi-quantitative criteria bearing on the contents of the article should be used (critical reading, gate analysis, etc.) This general review has, as its aim, to expose both the definitions and limits of bibliometry illustrating them with some information calculated from the principal respiratory journals.

  10. Epigenetics in the perioperative period

    PubMed Central

    Lirk, P; Fiegl, H; Weber, N C; Hollmann, M W

    2015-01-01

    The perioperative period is characterized by profound changes in the body's homoeostatic processes. This review seeks to address whether epigenetic mechanisms may influence an individual's reaction to surgery and anaesthesia. Evidence from animal and human studies suggests that epigenetic mechanisms can explain many facets of susceptibility to acute and chronic pain, making them potential therapeutic targets. Modern pain management is still based upon opiates, and both the developmental expression of opioid receptors and opioid-induced hyperalgesia have been linked to epigenetic mechanisms. In general, opiates seem to increase global DNA methylation levels. This is in contrast to local anaesthetics, which have been ascribed a global demethylating effect. Even though no direct investigations have been carried out, the potential influence of epigenetics on the inflammatory response that follows surgery seems a promising area for research. There is a considerable body of evidence that supports the involvement of epigenetics in the complex process of wound healing. Epigenetics is an important emerging research topic in perioperative medicine, with a huge potential to positively influence patient outcome. PMID:25073649

  11. The redoubtable ecological periodic table

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological periodic tables are repositories of reliable information on quantitative, predictably recurring (periodic) habitat–community patterns and their uncertainty, scaling and transferability. Their reliability derives from their grounding in sound ecological principle...

  12. New Galactic Double Periodic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennickent, R. E.; Rosales, J.

    2014-10-01

    We discovered two new Double Periodic Variables in the ASAS catalogue of variable stars, viz., V495 Cen and V4142 Sgr. Other 3 candidates for Double Periodic Variables were found. All systems have relatively long orbital periods. We present improved ephemerides and disentangled light curves.

  13. 75 FR 1301 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... 39 CFR Part 3050 Periodic Reporting AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule... rulemaking proceeding to consider changes in the analytical methods approved for use in periodic reporting.\\1... Docket No. RM2009-10, Order on Analytical Principles Used in Periodic Reporting (Proposals Three...

  14. Evolutionary ecology of periodical insects.

    PubMed

    Heliövaara, K; Väisänen, R; Simon, C

    1994-12-01

    To be periodical, a species must have a fixed life cycle length and adults must appear synchronously, reproduce only once, and die. The consequence of this life history is that, at a given location, adults of a periodical species will be absent or rare in some years and abundant in others. The relative scarcity of periodical Insect species suggests that periodicity does not evolve easily. The major obstacle to its evolution is selection favoring life cycles In which the offspring of any given female appear over a two- or three-year period. Chance events which disrupt this 'bet-hedging' strategy set the stage for periodicity. Mathematical models predict that, given certain initial conditions, intraspecific competition and predation favor its development. Recent studies suggest that periodicity is rarely perfect but that it can persist in the face of limited gene flow through time.

  15. Positive periodic solutions of delayed periodic Lotka-Volterra systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei; Chen, Tianping

    2005-01-01

    In this Letter, for a general class of delayed periodic Lotka-Volterra systems, we prove some new results on the existence of positive periodic solutions by Schauder's fixed point theorem. The global asymptotical stability of positive periodic solutions is discussed further, and conditions for exponential convergence are given. The conditions we obtained are weaker than the previously known ones and can be easily reduced to several special cases.

  16. Fractional-period excitations in continuum periodic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nistazakis, H. E.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Porter, Mason A.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Nicolin, A.; Chin, J. K.

    2006-12-15

    We investigate the generation of fractional-period states in continuum periodic systems. As an example, we consider a Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an optical-lattice potential. We show that when the potential is turned on nonadiabatically, the system explores a number of transient states whose periodicity is a fraction of that of the lattice. We illustrate the origin of fractional-period states analytically by treating them as resonant states of a parametrically forced Duffing oscillator and discuss their transient nature and potential observability.

  17. On the Period-Amplitude and Amplitude-Period Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Examined are Period-Amplitude and Amplitude-Period relationships based on the cyclic behavior of the 12-month moving averages of monthly mean sunspot numbers for cycles 0.23, both in terms of Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 contingency tables and linear regression analyses. Concerning the Period-Amplitude relationship (same cycle), because cycle 23's maximum amplitude is known to be 120.8, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) suggest that its period will be 131 +/- 24 months (using all cycles) or 131 +/- 18 months (ignoring cycles 2 and 4, which have the extremes of period, 108 and 164 months, respectively). Because cycle 23 has already persisted for 142 months (May 1996 through February 2008), based on the latter prediction, it should end before September 2008. Concerning the Amplitude-Period relationship (following cycle maximum amplitude versus preceding cycle period), because cycle 23's period is known to be at least 142 months, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) suggest that cycle 24's maximum amplitude will be about less than or equal to 96.1 +/- 55.0 (using all cycle pairs) or less than or equal to 91.0 +/- 36.7 (ignoring statistical outlier cycle pairs). Hence, cycle 24's maximum amplitude is expected to be less than 151, perhaps even less than 128, unless cycle pair 23/24 proves to be a statistical outlier.

  18. From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besalú, Emili

    2013-01-01

    A periodic table is constructed from the consideration of periodic properties and the application of the principal components analysis technique. This procedure is useful for objects classification and data reduction and has been used in the field of chemistry for many applications, such as lanthanides, molecules, or conformers classification.…

  19. Changing Periods of ST Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S.; Butterworth, N.; Pearce, A.

    2015-12-01

    ST Puppis is a reasonably bright W Virginis variable star, a Type 2 Cepheid with a record of substantial and erratic period changes—21 during the interval 1900 to 1985 with a range of magnitude from 17.4 to 19.2. It was observed as part of Variable Stars South's Cepheid project by Butterworth in 2014 and 2015 using DSLR photometry in BGR passbands and visually by Pearce in 2015. The known period changes are shown graphically and doubtful ones examined and discarded if necessary. With its period and amplitude with a frequently changing period it is a suitable and worthwhile object for visual observing.

  20. Assessing Periodicity of Periodic Leg Movements During Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Rummel, Christian; Gast, Heidemarie; Schindler, Kaspar; Müller, Markus; Amor, Frédérique; Hess, Christian W.; Mathis, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Background: Periodic leg movements (PLM) during sleep consist of involuntary periodic movements of the lower extremities. The debated functional relevance of PLM during sleep is based on correlation of clinical parameters with the PLM index (PLMI). However, periodicity in movements may not be reflected best by the PLMI. Here, an approach novel to the field of sleep research is used to reveal intrinsic periodicity in inter movement intervals (IMI) in patients with PLM. Methods: Three patient groups of 10 patients showing PLM with OSA (group 1), PLM without OSA or RLS (group 2) and PLM with RLS (group 3) are considered. Applying the “unfolding” procedure, a method developed in statistical physics, enhances or even reveals intrinsic periodicity of PLM. The degree of periodicity of PLM is assessed by fitting one-parameter distributions to the unfolded IMI distributions. Finally, it is investigated whether the shape of the IMI distributions allows to separate patients into different groups. Results: Despite applying the unfolding procedure, periodicity is neither homogeneous within nor considerably different between the three clinically defined groups. Data-driven clustering reveals more homogeneous and better separated clusters. However, they consist of patients with heterogeneous demographic data and comorbidities, including RLS and OSA. Conclusions: The unfolding procedure may be necessary to enhance or reveal periodicity. Thus this method is proposed as a pre-processing step before analyzing PLM statistically. Data-driven clustering yields much more reasonable results when applied to the unfolded IMI distributions than to the original data. Despite this effort no correlation between the degree of periodicity and demographic data or comorbidities is found. However, there are indications that the nature of the periodicity might be determined by long-range interactions between LM of patients with PLM and OSA. PMID:20948585

  1. Time domain period determination techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stellingwerf, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Two simple period determination schemes are discussed. They are well suited to problems involving non-sinusoidal periodic phenomena sampled at a few irregularly spaced points. Statistical properties are discussed. The techniques are applied to the double mode Cepheids BK Cen and TU Cas as test cases.

  2. 76 FR 297 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... 39 CFR Part 3050 Periodic Reporting AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of proposed... a proposed change in certain analytical methods used in periodic reporting. This action responds to... INFORMATION: Regulatory History, 75 FR 58449 (Sept. 24, 2010). On December 20, 2010, the Postal Service...

  3. 75 FR 7426 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... 39 CFR Part 3050 Periodic Reporting AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Advance notice of...-789-6820 or stephen.sharfman@prc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Contents I. Background II... approved for use in periodic reporting.\\1\\ The Postal Service labels its proposal ``Proposal One''...

  4. Latino Periodicals: A Selection Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerena, Salvador, Ed.; Pisano, Vivian M., Ed.

    This guide is a collection development tool of national scope for librarians who need in-depth coverage of Latino periodicals suitable for public, school, and academic libraries. Periodicals evaluated include general interest and popular magazines and newspapers that appeal to Spanish-speaking, bilingual, and English-speaking library patrons and…

  5. 76 FR 296 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... consider a proposed change in certain analytical methods used in periodic reporting. The proposed change... rulemaking proceeding to consider changes in the analytical methods approved for use in periodic reporting.\\1... Requesting Initiation of a Proceeding to Consider Proposed Changes in Analytic Principles (Proposals...

  6. 76 FR 52915 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... informal rulemaking on proposed changes in certain analytical methods used in periodic reporting. The... rulemaking proceeding to consider changes in the analytical methods approved for use in periodic reporting.\\1... Proposed Changes in Analytical Principles (Proposals Four-Eight), August 8, 2011 (Petition). Proposal...

  7. Explore Stochastic Instabilities of Periodic Points by Transition Path Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yu; Lin, Ling; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    We consider the noise-induced transitions from a linearly stable periodic orbit consisting of T periodic points in randomly perturbed discrete logistic map. Traditional large deviation theory and asymptotic analysis at small noise limit cannot distinguish the quantitative difference in noise-induced stochastic instabilities among the T periodic points. To attack this problem, we generalize the transition path theory to the discrete-time continuous-space stochastic process. In our first criterion to quantify the relative instability among T periodic points, we use the distribution of the last passage location related to the transitions from the whole periodic orbit to a prescribed disjoint set. This distribution is related to individual contributions to the transition rate from each periodic points. The second criterion is based on the competency of the transition paths associated with each periodic point. Both criteria utilize the reactive probability current in the transition path theory. Our numerical results for the logistic map reveal the transition mechanism of escaping from the stable periodic orbit and identify which periodic point is more prone to lose stability so as to make successful transitions under random perturbations.

  8. Laser-Induced Periodical Structures Fabrication for Third Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytova, T. A.; Makarov, S. V.; Tsypkin, A. N.; Milichko, V. A.; Mukhin, I. S.; Yulin, A. V.; Putilin, S. E.; Baranov, M. A.; Krasnok, A. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel strategy for self-adjusted fabrication of large-scale array of resonant silicon nanoparticles (metasurface) on a thin silicon film. The self-adjusting mechanism is based on the effect of resonant nanogratings formation under intense multishot femtosecond irradiation of a thin silicon film. The resulting metasurfaces allow for generation of ultraviolet laser pulses at a wavelength of 270 nm with conversion efficiency up to 10-6 and high peak (≈100 kW/sm2) and average power (≈1.5 μW). Such high peak power from ultrathin metasurface makes the generated UV pulses applicable in a wide range of applications: precise nanolithography, ultrafast photoexcitation etc.

  9. Forward Period Analysis Method of the Periodic Hamiltonian System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    Using the forward period analysis (FPA), we obtain the period of a Morse oscillator and mathematical pendulum system, with the accuracy of 100 significant digits. From these results, the long-term [0, 1060] (time unit) solutions, ranging from the Planck time to the age of the universe, are computed reliably and quickly with a parallel multiple-precision Taylor series (PMT) scheme. The application of FPA to periodic systems can greatly reduce the computation time of long-term reliable simulations. This scheme provides an efficient way to generate reference solutions, against which long-term simulations using other schemes can be tested. PMID:27727295

  10. Schuler Period in LEO Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Russell J.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper generalizes and extends the concept of the Schuler oscillation that occurs in the theory of inertial navigation systems, allowing one to see how the Schuler phenomenon affects inertial navigation systems operating in space. We show why a low earth orbit satellite's orbital period is identical to the period of the Schuler pendulum, which is the period of the errors for terrestrial inertial navigation systems. We also show that the generalized form of the Schuler oscillation takes the same form as the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations for satellite relative motion and that the period of the out-of-plane motion in neighboring satellite relative trajectories is the same as the Schuler period. Finally, we describe how INS gyro drift manifests itself in different coordinate systems for the orbital case. These results may assist orbital flight dynamics and attitude control systems engineers in the design and analysis of INS-equipped spacecraft

  11. LYRA Mid-Term Periodicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauters, L.; Dominique, M.; Dammasch, I. E.

    2016-08-01

    The spectra of the PROBA2/LYRA data, similarly to every other solar time series, show predominant periodicities that can be of solar or instrumental origin. In this article, we compare the main periodicities characterizing the LYRA spectrum to those found in the sunspot number, in the 10.7 cm flux, in an X-ray flare index, and in the sunspot area evolution. We focused on the 2010 to 2014 time range, for which the LYRA data are available, although we also briefly address the evolution of the main periodicities in the longer range. The mid-term periodicities at {˜} 28, {˜} 44, {˜} 54, {˜} 59, {˜} 100, {˜} 110, and {˜} 150 days appear as highly significant in several analyzed datasets. The consistency of distinct periodicities between datasets provides characteristics for the global Sun. This consistency also strengthens the reliability of LYRA data.

  12. Incorporating Spectra Into Periodic Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Alanna; Hong, J.; Protopapas, P.; Kashyap, V.

    2011-09-01

    The Chandra surveys have resulted in a wealth of data on low-luminosity X-ray sources (Lx 1030-34 erg/s) of Galactic scales beyond the local solar neighborhood. Many of these are compact binaries, in particular, cataclysmic variables, often identified by their periodic X-ray variability and spectra. Hong et al. (2009, 2011) have used energy quantiles (Hong, Schlegel & Grindlay, 2004) as a fast, robust indicator of spectral hardness and absorption of the X-ray sources. Energy quantiles also enable a simple but effective illustration of spectral changes with phase in these periodic systems: e.g. absorption by the accreting material is understood to drive the periodic light-curves. An interesting question is how to best make use of the information encapsulated in the periodic change in energy spectrum, along with the periodic change in intensity, especially for cases of ambiguous period determination? And, how to do it computationally efficiently? A first approach is to do the period search in intensity, as is standard; and then use a criterion of spectral variation to verify possible periods. Huijse, Zegers & Protopapas (2011) recently demonstrated a powerful period estimation technique using information potential and correntropy embedded in the light curve. Similar quantities based on energies (or energy quantiles) of X-ray photons can serve as criteria of spectral variation. A different approach treats the spectrum variations and intensity variations completely independently, searching through period-space in each, and then combining the results. A more general method would include both at the same time, looking for statistically significant variations above what is expected for a constant (in intensity and spectrum).

  13. Periodic and Quasi-Periodic Orbitsfor the Standard Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berretti, Alberto; Gentile, Guido

    We consider both periodic and quasi-periodic solutions for the standard map, and we study the corresponding conjugating functions, i.e. the functions conjugating the motions to trivial rotations. We compare the invariant curves with rotation numbers ω satisfying the Bryuno condition and the sequences of periodic orbits with rotation numbers given by their convergents ωN = pN/qN. We prove the following results for N--> ∞: (1) for rotation numbers ωNN we study the radius of convergence of the conjugating functions and we find lower bounds on them, which tend to a limit which is a lower bound on the corresponding quantity for ω (2) the periodic orbits consist of points which are more and more close to the invariant curve with rotation number ω (3) such orbits lie on analytical curves which tend uniformly to the invariant curve.

  14. Cyclical Period Changes in Short-Period Dwarf Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, R.; Borges, B. W.; Bond, H. E.; Jablonski, F.; Steiner, J. E.; Grauer, A. D.

    2004-01-01

    The observed-minus-calculated (O-C) diagrams of the eclipse timings of three dwarf novae of the SU UMa sub-class are presented and discussed. The (O-C) diagrams cover 28 24 and 15 years respectively for Z~Cha V2051~Oph and V4140~Sgr and show clear orbital period changes. Z~Cha shows conspicuous cyclical changes of period 28+/-2 yr and amplitude 60+/-12 s. V2051~Oph shows a cyclical period change of period 22+/-2 yr and amplitude 17+/-3 s. The (O-C) diagram of V4140~Sgr shows less convincing evidence but can also be explained in terms of a cyclical period modulation with an amplitude of about 16s and a time scale of 6.9+/-0.3 years. The best explanation for these observations is that of a solar-type magnetic activity cycle in the secondary star modulating its radius and consequently the mass transfer rate and the orbital separation on time scales of years. These results support the recent findings of Ak Ozkan & Mattei that the quiescent magnitudes and outburst interval of a sample of dwarf novae (including many SU UMa stars) show cyclical variations produced by solar-type magnetic activity cycles. Our results also confirm that the fully-convective secondary stars of these short period binaries still possess non-negligible magnetic fields.

  15. Negative Diffusion Over Many Synodic Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mark C.; Stewart, G. R.

    2011-04-01

    In previous work we have looked at the migration of ring particles due to collisions in moon wakes caused by passing a moon massive enough to induce a forced eccentricity on the order of 10^-5 or more. In these systems, particles move rapidly toward regions of higher density in a process we call negative diffusion. This process can cause the radial width of a particle distribution to drop by 90% or more in certain configurations. Our earlier work focused on a single pass by the moon to remove complications due to resonances. Here we will present longer simulations that follow the material for 100 synodic periods to demonstrate how this process can contain material over longer periods of time and how resonances with the moons impact the evolution of the distribution of particle semimajor axes. The exact nature of the evolution is complicated by the fact that particles not only move toward regions of higher density, but also climb up the eccentricity gradients induced by resonances. In addition, the exact placement of narrow bands of material relative to resonances alters the forced eccentricity and hence the effectiveness of the negative diffusion.

  16. 75 FR 65593 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... Rules Concerning Periodic Reporting of Service Performance Measurements and Customer Satisfaction, May... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION... waiver request. SUMMARY: The Commission is establishing a docket to address a recent Postal...

  17. 76 FR 80312 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    .... SUMMARY: The Commission is establishing a docket to consider new measurement of Flats Sequencing Systems... of the Business Reply Mail cost model in periodic reporting of service performance measurement...). Proposal Sixteen: proposed productivity measurement for Flats Sequencing System. Proposal...

  18. Autism: a "critical period" disorder?

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Jocelyn J; Fagiolini, Michela

    2011-01-01

    Cortical circuits in the brain are refined by experience during critical periods early in postnatal life. Critical periods are regulated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory (E/I) neurotransmission in the brain during development. There is now increasing evidence of E/I imbalance in autism, a complex genetic neurodevelopmental disorder diagnosed by abnormal socialization, impaired communication, and repetitive behaviors or restricted interests. The underlying cause is still largely unknown and there is no fully effective treatment or cure. We propose that alteration of the expression and/or timing of critical period circuit refinement in primary sensory brain areas may significantly contribute to autistic phenotypes, including cognitive and behavioral impairments. Dissection of the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing well-established critical periods represents a powerful tool to identify new potential therapeutic targets to restore normal plasticity and function in affected neuronal circuits.

  19. Period Adjustment of TT Scuti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederbloom, Steve E.

    1985-12-01

    The RR Lyrae variable TT Scuti was studied using photographic photometry. The O-C data show a possible downwards curve, which would indicate a decreasing period, but the results are not conclusive. New linear elements are: JD(max) = 2439384.915 + 0.45293855 E. A limit for the maximum rate of change of the period is -0.03 +/- 0.04 cycles per million years.

  20. 27 CFR 6.66 - Calculation of period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calculation of period. 6.66 Section 6.66 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Extension of Credit § 6.66 Calculation of period. For the purpose of this part,...

  1. Acute and carryover effects in mice of MDMA ("ecstasy") administration during periadolescence.

    PubMed

    Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Bianchi, Mauro; Gerra, Gilberto; Laviola, Giovanni

    2002-07-12

    In spite of the increasing evidence concerning its neurotoxicity, young human individuals are often involved in the recreational use of amphetamine-type stimulants such as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy"). A study aimed to investigate short- and long-term consequences of a repeated and intermittent MDMA administration (0, 5 or 10 mg/kg i.p., 3 days treatment history) was conducted in mice. Mice were injected at different phases in development, namely at early (28 days old), middle (38 days old) or late (52 days old) adolescence. When assessed for nociceptive response, a dose-dependent analgesia was found in middle and late adolescent mice. Carryover consequences of previous MDMA treatment were then investigated at adulthood (80 days old). In a social interaction test, levels of environment exploration and social behaviour resulted markedly increased in drug-free state as a function of drug exposure during development, whereas others behaviours were reduced. MDMA challenge (5-mg/kg dose) produced the expected hyperactivity, as well as a marked increment of hypothalamic serotonin (5-hydroxyhyptamine, 5-HT) levels. Mice treated chronically with MDMA during middle and late adolescence were associated with important reductions of the indoleamine. As a whole, these results indicate a differential long-term vulnerability to behavioural and neurotoxicant effects of MDMA as a function of the developmental stage of exposure.

  2. Shortest recurrence periods of novae

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Mariko; Saio, Hideyuki; Hachisu, Izumi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-10-01

    Stimulated by the recent discovery of the 1 yr recurrence period nova M31N 2008-12a, we examined the shortest recurrence periods of hydrogen shell flashes on mass-accreting white dwarfs (WDs). We discuss the mechanism that yields a finite minimum recurrence period for a given WD mass. Calculating the unstable flashes for various WD masses and mass accretion rates, we identified a shortest recurrence period of about two months for a non-rotating 1.38 M {sub ☉} WD with a mass accretion rate of 3.6 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. A 1 yr recurrence period is realized for very massive (≳ 1.3 M {sub ☉}) WDs with very high accretion rates (≳ 1.5 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}). We revised our stability limit of hydrogen shell burning, which will be useful for binary evolution calculations toward Type Ia supernovae.

  3. Bragg interactions in periodic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggard, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The interaction of electromagnetic waves of wavelength lambda with periodic structures of spatial period lambda are studied. The emphasis of the work is on Bragg interactions where lambda approximately equal to 2 lambda/N and the Bragg order N takes on the values 1, 2,.... An extended coupled waves (ECW) theory is developed for the case N greater or equal to 2 and the results of the theory are found to compare favorably with the exact results of Floquet theory. Numerous numerical results are displayed as Brillouin diagrams for the first few Bragg orders. Moreover, explicit expressions for coupling coefficients, bandgap shifts and bandgap widths are derived for singly periodic media. Particular note is taken of phase speeding effects.

  4. Periodicity in marine extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepkoski, J. John, Jr.; Raup, David M.

    1986-01-01

    The periodicity of extinction events is examined in detail. In particular, the temporal distribution of specific, identifiable extinction events is analyzed. The nature and limitations of the data base on the global fossil record is discussed in order to establish limits of resolution in statistical analyses. Peaks in extinction intensity which appear to differ significantly from background levels are considered, and new analyses of the temporal distribution of these peaks are presented. Finally, some possible causes of periodicity and of interdependence among extinction events over the last quarter billion years of earth history are examined.

  5. Rotational Period of 2770 Tsvet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Lorenzo; Papini, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    Photometric observations of main-belt asteroid 2770 Tsvet were made over three nights during 2014 March. Lightcurve analysis shows a synodic period P = 7.82 ± 0.01 h with an amplitude A = 0.47 ± 0.03 mag.

  6. 76 FR 8325 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Service Performance Measurements and Customer Satisfaction, May 25, 2010, at 22-24 (Order No. 465). Order... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION... certain temporary waivers from periodic reporting of service performance measurement. Establishing...

  7. On Some Periodic Toda Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Kac, M.; Van Moerbeke, Pierre

    1975-01-01

    A discrete version of Floquet's theory is developed and applied to a system of non-linear differential equations related to the periodic Toda lattice. A special solution previously found by Toda is thus seen to fit into the formalism of inverse scattering problems. PMID:16592244

  8. Shell Games: Uncovering Periodic Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes activities (demonstrations/experiments) used to introduce history of periodic properties--without electrons, orbitals, filling shells, or any conception of atoms beyond Dalton's model. Activities supplement first chapter in a currently available chemistry text. Indicates potential danger of experiments if proper safety precautions are…

  9. The Period of Salutary Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, John T.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presents a lesson designed to teach students about the period of Salutary Neglect (100 years before the French and Indian Wars) and its effects on later historical events. Provides an advance organizer which puts students in a situation of salutary neglect and includes student and teacher resources on the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, and the…

  10. Quantifying periodicity in omics data.

    PubMed

    Amariei, Cornelia; Tomita, Masaru; Murray, Douglas B

    2014-01-01

    Oscillations play a significant role in biological systems, with many examples in the fast, ultradian, circadian, circalunar, and yearly time domains. However, determining periodicity in such data can be problematic. There are a number of computational methods to identify the periodic components in large datasets, such as signal-to-noise based Fourier decomposition, Fisher's g-test and autocorrelation. However, the available methods assume a sinusoidal model and do not attempt to quantify the waveform shape and the presence of multiple periodicities, which provide vital clues in determining the underlying dynamics. Here, we developed a Fourier based measure that generates a de-noised waveform from multiple significant frequencies. This waveform is then correlated with the raw data from the respiratory oscillation found in yeast, to provide oscillation statistics including waveform metrics and multi-periods. The method is compared and contrasted to commonly used statistics. Moreover, we show the utility of the program in the analysis of noisy datasets and other high-throughput analyses, such as metabolomics and flow cytometry, respectively.

  11. 76 FR 20906 - Periodic Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... a proposed change in certain analytical methods used in periodic reporting. This action responds to... an informal rulemaking proceeding to consider changes in the analytical methods approved for use in... Proceeding to Consider Proposed Changes in Analytic Principles (Proposal One), April 6, 2011...

  12. Quantifying actin wave modulation on periodic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Driscoll, Meghan; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parker, Joshua; Fourkas, John; Carlsson, Anders; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Actin is the essential builder of the cell cytoskeleton, whose dynamics are responsible for generating the necessary forces for the formation of protrusions. By exposing amoeboid cells to periodic topographical cues, we show that actin can be directionally guided via inducing preferential polymerization waves. To quantify the dynamics of these actin waves and their interaction with the substrate, we modify a technique from computer vision called ``optical flow.'' We obtain vectors that represent the apparent actin flow and cluster these vectors to obtain patches of newly polymerized actin, which represent actin waves. Using this technique, we compare experimental results, including speed distribution of waves and distance from the wave centroid to the closest ridge, with actin polymerization simulations. We hypothesize the modulation of the activity of nucleation promotion factors on ridges (elevated regions of the surface) as a potential mechanism for the wave-substrate coupling. Funded by NIH grant R01GM085574.

  13. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis associated with multiple sleep onset REM periods.

    PubMed

    Iranzo, A; Santamaria, J

    1999-12-15

    A 24-year-old man with sporadic hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HPP) presented with moderate excessive daytime sleepiness and transitory episodes of weakness which occurred during and after sleep. Multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) demonstrated the presence of five sleep onset REM periods (SOREMPs) and a sleep latency of five minutes. Treatment with a diuretic which decreases serum potassium resolved all the clinical symtomps and a new MSLT showed the absence of SOREMPs and a sleep latency of 13.5 minutes. To our knowledge, the patient herein reported is the first case that associates sleep abnormalities and multiple SOREMPs with HPP. Furthermore, the present case suggests that SOREMPs may be explained by an increased extracellular potassium conductance related to HPP.

  14. Platelet function in the postprandial period

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postprandial hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia have been related to cardiovascular events. Among different underlying mechanisms platelet activation seems to be responsible too. No comparable data between various tests in normo- vs. hyperlipidemics before and at different time intervals are available after a fat meal. We aimed to compare 9 of them within the same patients at several time points in postprandial hyperlipidemia. Results For some tests baseline values between the groups were significantly different (TXB2, platelet sensitivity, sedimentation and WU-test). However, hyperlipidemia revealed a variable influence on the tests examined. Some of the available tests apparently sensitive to show platelet activation reflect the increase in triglycerides (TG), such as the sedimentation index. ADP-induced platelet aggregatory activity in count adjusted washed isolated platelet samples during postprandial hyperlipidemia indicates mildly enhanced platelet activity, but does not seem to induce significant changes in aggregation. In patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (> 400 mg/dl fasting) changes in platelet function are more pronounced due to delayed decay and may last up to 16 hours paralleling TG reaching the prevalue. The overwhelming majority of platelet function tests do not significantly respond to postprandial hyperlipidemia. The correlation between the tests applied is poor. For standardization purpose, platelet aggregation tests, aimed to examine proaggregatory capacity in atherosclerosis, should only be performed at the same time of the day after a fasting period > 6 hours. The great variation in preanalytical work-up on comparison of various tests, large number of platelet tests available and their respective potential value are discussed. Conclusions At present, the suspicion that platelet function is significantly activated in the postprandial period cannot be supported by any of the tests used. The information provided is valuable to

  15. Periodic spacing between consecutive equatorial plasma bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makela, J. J.; Vadas, S. L.; Muryanto, R.; Duly, T.; Crowley, G.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze three-years of data collected by a field-aligned airglow imaging system located at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory near La Serena, Chile to determine the occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs). On 317 of the 552 predominately clear nights of observations, structure indicative of EPBs is present. On 123 of these nights, multiple EPBs with periodic spacings were recorded with 88 nights showing 3 or more consecutive bubbles. We suggest that the periodic spacing of EPBs could be related to the properties of an underlying seed mechanism, namely gravity waves (GWs). The distribution of spacings compares favorably to the spectrum of GW induced traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) measured by Vadas and Crowley (2010) from a similar geographic latitude in the northern hemisphere. Furthermore, the distribution of spacings decreases from 2006 through 2009, tracking the corresponding decrease in the thermospheric neutral temperature, Tn. As Tn decreases, GWs with larger horizontal wavelengths have smaller initial amplitudes and cannot propagate as easily to EPB seeding altitudes. Thus, our observations are consistent with GW theory.

  16. Bacterial responses to periodic micropillar array.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiang; Leng, Yang; Lu, Xiong; Ren, Fuzeng; Wang, Kefeng; Ding, Yonghui; Yang, Meng

    2015-01-01

    For a basic understanding and potential biomedical applications of surface topographical effects on bacterial responses, this study focuses on not only the bacterial retention but also the bacterial growth, proliferation, and viability that are significant post-retentive behaviors playing critical roles in infections of medical implants. Specifically, periodic micropillar arrays (SiPA ) with nine different feature sizes were fabricated on silicon substrates with photolithography and dry etching methods. The SiPA was cultured with Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli for different periods to investigate the bacterial retention, growth and proliferation behavior on a patterned surface. The experimental results show that a significant reduction of bacterial retention, growth, and proliferation can be achieved when the pillar size is reduced to the submicrometer level. However, micropillars have no obvious influence on the viability of the bacteria within 24 h. On the basis of the bacterial experiment results, it is inferred that the topographical effects may have resulted from bacterial confinement by micropillars, either limiting the attachment area for individual bacterium or trapping a bacterium between pillars. Furthermore, the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theoretical analysis indicates the effects might have come from the topographic induced surface property changes, mainly hydrophobicity, which is represented by the changes in the interaction free energy of Lifshitz-van der Waals among different periodic micropillar arrays. This study could help to deepen the understanding about the surface topographical effects on bacterial responses and may provide a guidance for the future medical implant surface design to decrease the infection risk by avoiding the surface topography which could attract more bacteria.

  17. Quantum gates by periodic driving

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Z. C.; Wang, W.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Topological quantum computation has been extensively studied in the past decades due to its robustness against decoherence. One way to realize the topological quantum computation is by adiabatic evolutions—it requires relatively long time to complete a gate, so the speed of quantum computation slows down. In this work, we present a method to realize single qubit quantum gates by periodic driving. Compared to adiabatic evolution, the single qubit gates can be realized at a fixed time much shorter than that by adiabatic evolution. The driving fields can be sinusoidal or square-well field. With the sinusoidal driving field, we derive an expression for the total operation time in the high-frequency limit, and an exact analytical expression for the evolution operator without any approximations is given for the square well driving. This study suggests that the period driving could provide us with a new direction in regulations of the operation time in topological quantum computation. PMID:26911900

  18. Periodic Structures in Optical Fibres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Duncan Paul

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The work presented in this thesis concerns techniques for the formation of periodic structures in optical fibres. Two different methods of producing such structures are studied in detail. The first of these involves a breakdown mechanism (known as the 'fibre fuse') that permanently damages the core glass in a periodic manner leaving it unable to guide light. The dynamics of this mechanism are studied, with a view to controlling it for the production of interactive grating structures. It is determined that, due to a sharp rise in fibre absorption with temperature, a thermal shock -wave, with a typical thermal gradient of several hundred degrees Kelvin per micron, forms and travels along the fibre, heating the core glass to such an extent that damage occurs. The periodicity of the resultant damage arises from thermal focusing and defocusing of light in the region of this shock-wave. The second method makes use of the photorefractivity observed in certain germanosilicate fibres on exposure to moderate intensity blue light of wavelength ~480nm or UV light ~240nm. A single-mode fibre transmission filter is demonstrated for the first time, produced by exposing a fibre Sagnac loop mirror to 488nm holographic fringes. Average index changes are shown to occur if such fibres are exposed to spatially uniform blue or UV light, indicating that grating formation is by a different mechanism to the local charge separation which occurs in photorefractive crystals. The various characteristics of these average index changes are measured and analysed, with the conclusion that they result from defect centre formation, driven by two photon absorption with blue light, or single photon absorption with UV light. Associated birefringence changes are also measured and are exploited in a hi-bi fibre to periodically perturb the birefringence axes, producing a narrow-line transmission filter.

  19. Down hole periodic seismic generator

    DOEpatents

    Hardee, Harry C.; Hills, Richard G.; Striker, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  20. Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator

    DOEpatents

    Hardee, Harry C.; Hills, Richard G.; Striker, Richard P.

    1991-07-16

    An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  1. Addressing Stability Robustness, Period Uncertainties, and Startup of Multiple-Period Repetitive Control for Spacecraft Jitter Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Edwin S.

    Repetitive Control (RC) is a relatively new form of control that seeks to converge to zero tracking error when executing a periodic command, or when executing a constant command in the presence of a periodic disturbance. The design makes use of knowledge of the period of the disturbance or command, and makes use of the error observed in the previous period to update the command in the present period. The usual RC approaches address one period, and this means that potentially they can simultaneously address DC or constant error, the fundamental frequency for that period, and all harmonics up to Nyquist frequency. Spacecraft often have multiple sources of periodic excitation. Slight imbalance in reaction wheels used for attitude control creates three disturbance periods. A special RC structure was developed to allow one to address multiple unrelated periods which is referred to as Multiple-Period Repetitive Control (MPRC). MPRC in practice faces three main challenges for hardware implementation. One is instability due to model errors or parasitic high frequency modes, the second is degradation of the final error level due to period uncertainties or fluctuations, and the third is bad transients due to issues in startup. Regarding these three challenges, the thesis develops a series of methods to enhance the performance of MPRC or to assist in analyzing its performance for mitigating optical jitter induced by mechanical vibration within the structure of a spacecraft testbed. Experimental analysis of MPRC shows contrasting advantages over existing adaptive control algorithms, such as Filtered-X LMS, Adaptive Model Predictive Control, and Adaptive Basis Method, for mitigating jitter within the transmitting beam of Laser Communication (LaserCom) satellites.

  2. Period-doubling reconstructions of semiconductor partial dislocations

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ji -Sang; Huang, Bing; Wei, Su -Huai; Kang, Joongoo; McMahon, William E.

    2015-09-18

    Atomic-scale understanding and control of dislocation cores is of great technological importance, because they act as recombination centers for charge carriers in optoelectronic devices. Using hybrid density-functional calculations, we present period-doubling reconstructions of a 90° partial dislocation in GaAs, for which the periodicity of like-atom dimers along the dislocation line varies from one to two, to four dimers. The electronic properties of a dislocation change drastically with each period doubling. The dimers in the single-period dislocation are able to interact, to form a dispersive one-dimensional band with deep-gap states. However, the inter-dimer interaction for the double-period dislocation becomes significantly reduced; hence, it is free of mid-gap states. The Ga core undergoes a further period-doubling transition to a quadruple-period reconstruction induced by the formation of small hole polarons. Lastly, the competition between these dislocation phases suggests a new passivation strategy via population manipulation of the detrimental single-period phase.

  3. Period-doubling reconstructions of semiconductor partial dislocations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, Ji -Sang; Huang, Bing; Wei, Su -Huai; Kang, Joongoo; McMahon, William E.

    2015-09-18

    Atomic-scale understanding and control of dislocation cores is of great technological importance, because they act as recombination centers for charge carriers in optoelectronic devices. Using hybrid density-functional calculations, we present period-doubling reconstructions of a 90° partial dislocation in GaAs, for which the periodicity of like-atom dimers along the dislocation line varies from one to two, to four dimers. The electronic properties of a dislocation change drastically with each period doubling. The dimers in the single-period dislocation are able to interact, to form a dispersive one-dimensional band with deep-gap states. However, the inter-dimer interaction for the double-period dislocation becomes significantly reduced;more » hence, it is free of mid-gap states. The Ga core undergoes a further period-doubling transition to a quadruple-period reconstruction induced by the formation of small hole polarons. Lastly, the competition between these dislocation phases suggests a new passivation strategy via population manipulation of the detrimental single-period phase.« less

  4. Induced Abortion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Induced Abortion Patient Education FAQs Induced Abortion Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Induced Abortion FAQ043, May 2015 PDF Format Induced ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  5. Rotational period of GQ Lupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broeg, C.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Guenther, E.; Gaedke, A.; Bedalov, A.; Neuhäuser, R.; Walter, F. M.

    2007-06-01

    Aims: We wanted to determine the rotation parameters of GQ Lup A, thereby constraining the evolutionary history of the GQ Lup system. Methods: We have undertaken a photometric monitoring campaign on GQ Lup A consisting of two epochs spaced one year apart. We also searched the photometric archives to enlarge the data set. Results: We were able to determine the photometric period (8.45±0.2 days) in both epochs in several photometric bands. This periodicity could also be found in some of the archival data. The combined false-alarm probability is 0.015. The variation is most likely caused by hot spots on the surface of GQ Lup A. This, combined with high-resolution spectra (v sin i) allows calculation of GQ Lup A's inclination (i=27±5°). Radial velocity data also contains this period but is inconclusive. Nevertheless, the RV data supports the interpretation that hot spots cause the photometric variation. We use the known K-band variability, amplitude, and phase of GQ Lup A together with a new image of GQ Lup A+b, taken quasi-simultaneously with our monitoring of the star, to confirm the magnitude and, hence, luminosity of the companion. Based on observations obtained on Cerro Paranal, Chile, in ESO program 075.C-0710(C) and on La Silla, Chile, in ESO programs 074.C-0034(A),075.C-0710(E), 075.C-0710(F), 075.C-0202(A), 076.C-0010(A) as well as with ANDICAM of the SMARTS consortium. Photometry data of epochs I and II are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/468/1039

  6. Periodic roads and quantized wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos Valadares, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    We propose a simple approach to determine all possible wheels that can roll smoothly without slipping on a periodic roadbed, while maintaining the center of mass at a fixed height. We also address the inverse problem that of obtaining the roadbed profile compatible with a specific wheel and all other related "quantized wheels." The role of symmetry is highlighted, which might preclude the center of mass from remaining at a fixed height. A straightforward consequence of such geometric quantization is that the gravitational potential energy and the moment of inertia are discrete, suggesting a parallelism between macroscopic wheels and nano-systems, such as carbon nanotubes.

  7. Periodic permanent magnet focused klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Ives, R Lawrence

    2015-04-21

    A periodic permanent magnet (PPM) klystron has beam transport structures and RF cavity structures, each of which has permanent magnets placed substantially equidistant from a beam tunnel formed about the central axis, and which are also outside the extent of a cooling chamber. The RF cavity sections also have permanent magnets which are placed substantially equidistant from the beam tunnel, but which include an RF cavity coupling to the beam tunnel for enhancement of RF carried by an electron beam in the beam tunnel.

  8. Inducing puberty.

    PubMed

    Delemarre, Eveline M; Felius, Bram; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A

    2008-12-01

    Puberty is the result of increasing pulsatile secretion of the hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), which stimulates the release of gonadotropins and in turn gonadal activity. In general in females, development of secondary sex characteristics due to the activity of the gonadal axis, i.e., the growth of breasts, is the result of exposure to estrogens, while in boys testicular growth is dependent on gonadotropins and virilization on androgens. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is a rare disease. More common is the clinical picture of delayed puberty, often associated with a delay of growth and more often familial occurring. Especially, boys are referred because of the delay of growth and puberty. A short course (3-6 months) of androgens may help these boys to overcome the psychosocial repercussions, and during this period an increase in the velocity of height growth and some virilization will occur. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism may present in a congenital form caused by developmental disorders, some of which are related to a genetic disorder, or secondary to hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction due to, among others, a cerebral tumor. In hypogonadotropic hypogonadism puberty can be initiated by the use of pulsatile GnRH, gonadotropins, and sex steroids. Sex steroids will induce development of the secondary sex characteristics alone, while combined administration of gonadotropins and GnRH may induce gonadal development including fertility.

  9. 43 CFR 10010.45 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Time periods. 10010.45 Section 10010.45... Environmental Impact Statements § 10010.45 Time periods. (a) The minimum review period for a draft EIS will be... proposed reductions in time periods or any extensions of time periods proposed by those agencies....

  10. 43 CFR 10010.45 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Time periods. 10010.45 Section 10010.45... Environmental Impact Statements § 10010.45 Time periods. (a) The minimum review period for a draft EIS will be... proposed reductions in time periods or any extensions of time periods proposed by those agencies....

  11. 43 CFR 10010.45 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Time periods. 10010.45 Section 10010.45... Environmental Impact Statements § 10010.45 Time periods. (a) The minimum review period for a draft EIS will be... proposed reductions in time periods or any extensions of time periods proposed by those agencies....

  12. 7 CFR 930.7 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Definitions § 930.7 Fiscal period. Fiscal period is synonymous with fiscal year and means the 12-month period beginning on July 1 of any year and ending on June 30 of the following year, or such other period as the... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fiscal period. 930.7 Section 930.7...

  13. Periodic bedrock ridges on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David R.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Becker, Scott K.

    2012-03-01

    Evidence for sediment transport and erosion by wind is widespread over the surface of Mars today and was likely a major geomorphic process for much of its geological past. Although Martian surface features resembling aeolian dunes and ripples have been recognized since the Mariner and Viking missions, such features have been interpreted previously as active, indurated, or exhumed sedimentary forms. Here we report evidence based on High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images that show some megaripple forms are eroded into cohesive substrate rather than being composed of loose granular material or fossilized dunes. Exposure of stratigraphic continuity within layered, cohesive material extending crest to trough through features with mean wavelengths of 18 to 51 m demonstrates the primarily erosional formation of what we term periodic bedrock ridges (PBRs). Hence some surfaces on Mars previously considered to be covered by wind-deposited material are actually wind-carved exposures that offer windows into Martian history. PBRs lack the distinctive streamlining associated with wind-parallel yardangs and comparison of PBR orientation to yardangs, megayardangs, and active sedimentary dunes in the same vicinity confirm that these PBRs formed transverse to prevailing winds. Observed wavelengths of PBRs are comparable to those predicted by a simple model for erosional wavelengths of periodic transverse bed forms owing to the spacing of flow separations within the flow. Recognition of these transverse aeolian erosional forms brings up the question of how widespread Martian PBRs are and how many have been misinterpreted as active or indurated (fossilized) sedimentary dunes.

  14. Quasi-periodic spatiotemporal filtering.

    PubMed

    Burghouts, Gertjan J; Geusebroek, Jan-Mark

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents the online estimation of temporal frequency to simultaneously detect and identify the quasiperiodic motion of an object. We introduce color to increase discriminative power of a reoccurring object and to provide robustness to appearance changes due to illumination changes. Spatial contextual information is incorporated by considering the object motion at different scales. We combined spatiospectral Gaussian filters and a temporal reparameterized Gabor filter to construct the online temporal frequency filter. We demonstrate the online filter to respond faster and decay faster than offline Gabor filters. Further, we show the online filter to be more selective to the tuned frequency than Gabor filters. We contribute to temporal frequency analysis in that we both identify ("what") and detect ("when") the frequency. In color video, we demonstrate the filter to detect and identify the periodicity of natural motion. The velocity of moving gratings is determined in a real world example. We consider periodic and quasiperiodic motion of both stationary and nonstationary objects. PMID:16764282

  15. Permeability relation for periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Dunn, K J; LaTorraca, G A; Bergman, D J

    1998-01-01

    The permeability relation for periodic porous media is studied with respect to other petrophysical parameters such as formation factor, porosity, surface-to-volume ratio, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time. All these quantities were computed for periodic structures of simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic arrays of touching and overlapping spheres. The formation factors were calculated by using a method which is based on a Fourier-space representation of an integral equation for the electric potential in a two-component composite. The nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time for the case where surface-enchanced relaxation plays a dominant role is known to be V P/rho S (VP is the pore volume, S is the pore surface, is the surface relaxation strength) when rho is not too large. Previously calculated permeabilities for these structures from the literature were used for correlation studies with other petrophysical parameters. Various correlation schemes among these quantities, such as k = aTbFc, and k = aTb phi c, were investigated, where k is permeability, T is the NMR relaxation time, phi is the porosity, and F is the formation factor. PMID:9803908

  16. Adult cortical plasticity following injury: Recapitulation of critical period mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    Nahmani, Marc; Turrigiano, Gina G.

    2014-01-01

    A primary goal of research on developmental critical periods is the recapitulation of a juvenile-like state of malleability in the adult brain that might enable recovery from injury. These ambitions are often framed in terms of the simple reinstatement of enhanced plasticity in the growth-restricted milieu of an injured adult brain. Here, we provide an analysis of the similarities and differences between deprivation-induced and injury-induced cortical plasticity, to provide for a nuanced comparison of these remarkably similar processes. As a first step, we review the factors that drive ocular dominance plasticity in the primary visual cortex of the uninjured brain during the critical period (CP) and in adults, to highlight processes that might confer adaptive advantage. In addition, we directly compare deprivation-induced cortical plasticity during the CP and plasticity following acute injury or ischemia in mature brain. We find that these two processes display a biphasic response profile following deprivation or injury: an initial decrease in GABAergic inhibition and synapse loss transitions into a period of neurite expansion and synaptic gain. This biphasic response profile emphasizes the transition from a period of cortical healing to one of reconnection and recovery of function. Yet while injury-induced plasticity in adult shares several salient characteristics with deprivation-induced plasticity during the CP, the degree to which the adult injured brain is able to functionally rewire, and the time required to do so, present major limitations for recovery. Attempts to recapitulate a measure of CP plasticity in an adult injury context will need to carefully dissect the circuit alterations and plasticity mechanisms involved while measuring functional behavioral output to assess their ultimate success. PMID:24791715

  17. A Mechanism for Producing Short-Period Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleton, Peter P.; Kisseleva-Eggleton, Ludmila

    2006-08-01

    When three point masses form a hierarchical triple system, the short-period orbit can be severely modified by the long-period orbit if the two orbits are inclined to each other by more than about 39^deg (sin^{-1}sqrt{2/5}). Such an inclination can induce ‘Kozai cycles’ (Kozai, 1962), in which the eccentricity of the inner orbit cycles by a large amount while its period and therefore semimajor axis remains roughly constant. During those periastra when the eccentricity is largest, tidal friction may become important, and this can result in a secular shrinkage of the orbit, until it becomes circularised at a period of a few days. However, apsidal motion due to either GR or to the quadrupolar distortion of the components (if they are no longer treated as point masses) can reduce the range of eccentricity. We explore the limits on outer and inner orbital period that these perturbations imply. If the components are F/G/K/M dwarfs, then rotationally-driven dynamo activity can become important at the short periods that can occur in the right circumstances. It can cause the period to shorten further. The result may be a contact binary, and/or a merger in which the two stars of the inner pair coalesce to form a single rapidly rotating star. We suggest that this may be the origin of AB Dor, a very rapidly rotating K dwarf that is probably about 50 Myr old.

  18. Are trees able to grow in periods of stem shrinkage?

    PubMed

    Zweifel, Roman; Haeni, Matthias; Buchmann, Nina; Eugster, Werner

    2016-08-01

    Separating continuously measured stem radius (SR) fluctuations into growth-induced irreversible stem expansion (GRO) and tree water deficit-induced reversible stem shrinkage (TWD) requires a conceptualization of potential growth processes that may occur during periods of shrinking and expanding SR below a precedent maximum. Here, we investigated two physiological concepts: the linear growth (LG) concept, assuming linear growth, versus the zero growth (ZG) concept, assuming no growth during periods of stem shrinkage. We evaluated the physiological mechanisms underlying these two concepts and assessed their respective plausibilities using SR data obtained from 15 deciduous and evergreen trees. The application of the LG concept produced steady growth rates, whereas growth rates varied strongly under the ZG concept, more in accordance with mechanistic expectations. Further, growth increased for a maximum of 120 min after periods of stem shrinkage, indicating limited growth activity during those periods. However, this extra growth was found to be a small fraction of total growth only. Furthermore, TWD under the ZG concept was better explained by a hydraulic plant model than TWD under the LG concept. We conclude that periods of stem shrinkage allow for very little growth in the four tree species investigated. However, further studies should focus on obtaining independent growth data to ultimately validate these findings.

  19. Are trees able to grow in periods of stem shrinkage?

    PubMed

    Zweifel, Roman; Haeni, Matthias; Buchmann, Nina; Eugster, Werner

    2016-08-01

    Separating continuously measured stem radius (SR) fluctuations into growth-induced irreversible stem expansion (GRO) and tree water deficit-induced reversible stem shrinkage (TWD) requires a conceptualization of potential growth processes that may occur during periods of shrinking and expanding SR below a precedent maximum. Here, we investigated two physiological concepts: the linear growth (LG) concept, assuming linear growth, versus the zero growth (ZG) concept, assuming no growth during periods of stem shrinkage. We evaluated the physiological mechanisms underlying these two concepts and assessed their respective plausibilities using SR data obtained from 15 deciduous and evergreen trees. The application of the LG concept produced steady growth rates, whereas growth rates varied strongly under the ZG concept, more in accordance with mechanistic expectations. Further, growth increased for a maximum of 120 min after periods of stem shrinkage, indicating limited growth activity during those periods. However, this extra growth was found to be a small fraction of total growth only. Furthermore, TWD under the ZG concept was better explained by a hydraulic plant model than TWD under the LG concept. We conclude that periods of stem shrinkage allow for very little growth in the four tree species investigated. However, further studies should focus on obtaining independent growth data to ultimately validate these findings. PMID:27189708

  20. Regulation of period 1 expression in cultured rat pineal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Dirden, James C.; Tosini, Gianluca

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro expression of Period 1 (Per1), Period 2 (Per2) and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) genes in the rat pineal gland to understand the mechanism(s) regulating the expression of these genes in this organ. Pineals, when maintained in vitro for 5 days, did not show circadian rhythmicity in the expression of any of the three genes monitored. Norepinephrine (NE) induced AA-NAT and Per1, whereas its effect on Per2 was negligible. Contrary to what was observed in other systems, NE stimulation did not induce circadian expression of Per1. The effect of NE on Per1 level was dose- and receptor subtype-dependent, and both cAMP and cGMP induced Per1. Per1 was not induced by repeated NE - or forskolin - stimulation. Protein synthesis was not necessary for NE-induced Per1, but it was for reduction of Per1 following NE stimulation. Per1 transcription in pinealocytes was activated by BMAL1/CLOCK. Our results indicate that important differences are present in the regulation of these genes in the mammalian pineal. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. A periodic table for cancer.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Cancers exhibit differences in metastatic behavior and drug sensitivity that correlate with certain tumor-specific variables such as differentiation grade, growth rate/extent and molecular regulatory aberrations. In practice, patient management is based on the past results of clinical trials adjusted for these biomarkers. Here, it is proposed that treatment strategies could be fine-tuned upfront simply by quantifying tumorigenic spatial (cell growth) and temporal (genetic stability) control losses, as predicted by genetic defects of cell-cycle-regulatory gatekeeper and genome-stabilizing caretaker tumor suppressor genes, respectively. These differential quantifications of tumor dysfunction may in turn be used to create a tumor-specific 'periodic table' that guides rational formulation of survival-enhancing anticancer treatment strategies.

  2. Periodic folding of viscous sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, Neil M.

    2003-09-01

    The periodic folding of a sheet of viscous fluid falling upon a rigid surface is a common fluid mechanical instability that occurs in contexts ranging from food processing to geophysics. Asymptotic thin-layer equations for the combined stretching-bending deformation of a two-dimensional sheet are solved numerically to determine the folding frequency as a function of the sheet’s initial thickness, the pouring speed, the height of fall, and the fluid properties. As the buoyancy increases, the system bifurcates from “forced” folding driven kinematically by fluid extrusion to “free” folding in which viscous resistance to bending is balanced by buoyancy. The systematics of the numerically predicted folding frequency are in good agreement with laboratory experiments.

  3. Spontaneous periodic hypothermia and hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Dundar, Nihal Olgac; Boz, Adil; Duman, Ozgur; Aydin, Funda; Haspolat, Senay

    2008-12-01

    We present a patient diagnosed with Shapiro syndrome without corpus callosum agenesis. A 4-year-old-girl was admitted to the hospital with complaints of sweating, cooling, and drowsiness that continued during the last week of her admission. Attacks occurred almost daily, and lasted for about 1 hour. All laboratory findings, as well as Holter and echocardiography results, were normal. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intact corpus callosum, and electroencephalography obtained during an attack revealed normal findings. However, technetium 99m-labeled hexamethylpropylene amine oxime brain single-photon emission computed tomography indicated increased perfusion in the right thalamus, basal ganglia, and inferior frontal areas during a hypothermic period. Although oxcarbazepine reduced the frequency of attacks, they were not halted completely. The patient responded better to carbamazepine. PMID:19027594

  4. Adrafinil-induced orofacial dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Thobois, Stéphane; Xie, Jing; Mollion, Helena; Benatru, Isabelle; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2004-08-01

    We describe the first case of orofacial abnormal movements induced by adrafinil, a vigilance promoting agent of the same pharmacological class as modafinil. The dyskinesias did not spontaneously recover despite adrafinil withdrawal for a 4-month period. They were secondly dramatically improved by tetrabenazine, a presynaptic dopaminergic depleting drug which was introduced after the 4-month adrafinil-free period. PMID:15300665

  5. 7 CFR 1280.613 - Voting period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voting period. 1280.613 Section 1280.613 Agriculture... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1280.613 Voting period. The term voting period means a 4-week period to be announced by the Secretary for voting the referendum. Procedures...

  6. 7 CFR 1280.613 - Voting period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Voting period. 1280.613 Section 1280.613 Agriculture... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1280.613 Voting period. The term voting period means a 4-week period to be announced by the Secretary for voting the referendum. Procedures...

  7. 7 CFR 926.5 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.5 Fiscal period. Fiscal period is synonymous with fiscal year and crop year and means the 12-month period... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fiscal period. 926.5 Section 926.5...

  8. 7 CFR 924.7 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON AND IN UMATILLA COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 924.7 Fiscal period. Fiscal period is synonymous with fiscal year and means the 12-month period ending on March 31 of... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fiscal period. 924.7 Section 924.7...

  9. 7 CFR 926.5 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.5 Fiscal period. Fiscal period is synonymous with fiscal year and crop year and means the 12-month period... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fiscal period. 926.5 Section 926.5...

  10. 7 CFR 926.5 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.5 Fiscal period. Fiscal period is synonymous with fiscal year and crop year and means the 12-month period... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fiscal period. 926.5 Section 926.5...

  11. 7 CFR 916.7 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.7 Fiscal period. Fiscal period is synonymous with fiscal year and means the 12-month period beginning on March 1 of one year and ending on the last day of February of the... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fiscal period. 916.7 Section 916.7...

  12. 7 CFR 926.5 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.5 Fiscal period. Fiscal period is synonymous with fiscal year and crop year and means the 12-month period... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fiscal period. 926.5 Section 926.5...

  13. 7 CFR 924.7 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON AND IN UMATILLA COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 924.7 Fiscal period. Fiscal period is synonymous with fiscal year and means the 12-month period ending on March 31 of... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fiscal period. 924.7 Section 924.7...

  14. 7 CFR 926.5 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.5 Fiscal period. Fiscal period is synonymous with fiscal year and crop year and means the 12-month period... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fiscal period. 926.5 Section 926.5...

  15. 46 CFR 9.8 - Broken periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Broken periods. 9.8 Section 9.8 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 9.8 Broken periods. In computing extra compensation where the services rendered are in broken periods and less than 2 hours intervene between such broken periods the time served should be...

  16. 46 CFR 9.8 - Broken periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Broken periods. 9.8 Section 9.8 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 9.8 Broken periods. In computing extra compensation where the services rendered are in broken periods and less than 2 hours intervene between such broken periods the time served should be...

  17. 46 CFR 9.8 - Broken periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Broken periods. 9.8 Section 9.8 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 9.8 Broken periods. In computing extra compensation where the services rendered are in broken periods and less than 2 hours intervene between such broken periods the time served should be...

  18. 46 CFR 9.8 - Broken periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Broken periods. 9.8 Section 9.8 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 9.8 Broken periods. In computing extra compensation where the services rendered are in broken periods and less than 2 hours intervene between such broken periods the time served should be...

  19. 46 CFR 9.8 - Broken periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Broken periods. 9.8 Section 9.8 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 9.8 Broken periods. In computing extra compensation where the services rendered are in broken periods and less than 2 hours intervene between such broken periods the time served should be...

  20. Hearing and Infinite-Period Bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2011-03-01

    Auditory and vestibular systems present us with biological sensors that can achieve sub-nanometer sensitivity orders of magnitude in the dynamic range, while operating in a fluid-immersed, room-temperature environment. While the mechanisms behind this extreme sensitivity and robustness of the inner ear have not been fully explained, nonlinear response has been shown to be crucial to its proper function. Recent experiments have recorded innate motility of hair cells of the bullfrog sacculus, under varying degrees of steady-state offset. The bundle deflection was shown to suppress or enhance spontaneous oscillations, and affect the sensitivity of the mechanical response. We will present a theoretical model based on cubic nonlinearity and show that in different parameter regimes, the system can be induced to cross a supercritical Hopf bifurcation, an infinite-period bifurcation, or a multi-critical point. Comparing the numerical simulation to the experiment, we will present evidence that the multi-critical point corresponds most closely to the dynamic state of saccular hair cells. Further, we will discuss the crossing of the bifurcation, and the sensitivity of the phase-locked response in various frequency regimes.

  1. Long period grating response to gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan; Stǎncalie, Andrei; Neguţ, Daniel; Delepine-Lesoille, Sylvie; Lablonde, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    We report the evaluation of one long period grating (LPG) and one fiber Bragg grating (FBG) under gamma irradiation. The LPG was produced by the melting-drawing method based on CO2 laser assisted by a micro-flame and was engraved in a commercial single mode fiber SMF28 from Corning, grating length 25 mm, grating pitch of 720 μm. After the manufacturing of the grating, the fiber was re-coated with Acrylate and the grating was inserted into special ceramic case transparent to gamma radiation. The FBG is commercialized by Technica SA, and it is written in SMF-28 optical fiber (λ= 1546 nm; grating length of 12 mm; reflectivity > 80 %; bandwidth - BW @3 dB < 0.3 nm; side lobe suppress ratio - SLSR >15 dB; Acrylate recoating). By on-line monitoring of the LPG wavelength deep with an optical fiber interrogator during the irradiation exposure and pauses, both the irradiation induced shift (maximum 1.45 nm) and the recovery (in the range of 200 pm) phenomena were observed. Temperature sensitivity of the LPS was not affected by gamma irradiation.

  2. Periodic stratification at the head of estuarine salt tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong H.; Sanford, Lawrence; Hwang, Jin H.

    2014-05-01

    Conventionally, tidal straining has been known to induce more stratified condition during ebb in estuarine settings, i.e., strain-induced periodic stratification (SIPS). As opposed to the traditional tidal straining concept, observation data from the upperreach of Chesapeake Bay demonstrate that the water column is more stratified during flood than ebb, which results in condensed suspended sediment concentration near the bed during flood. In order to assess the stability of stratified flow, a composite Froude number is estimated for the outputs from an idealized 2-dimensional vertical numerical simulation. The results show theconsistency with the conventional tidal straining in case of relatively stronger density-induced bottom flow (e.g., Normal Periodic Stratification,NPS). However, the opposite case, i.e., stratified flow during flood, is observed when freshwater flow is relatively stronger in the upper layer (i.e., Inverse Periodic Stratification, IPS). Finally, this study shows that a composite Froude number analysis can be a proper indicator representing thetidal variability in the mixing pattern at the head of estuarine salt tips.

  3. Periodic motion near the surface of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Baoyin, Hexi; Li, Hengnian

    2015-12-01

    We are interested in the periodic motion and bifurcations near the surface of an asteroid. The gravity field of an irregular asteroid and the equation of motion of a particle near the surface of an asteroid are studied. The periodic motions around the major body of triple asteroid 216 Kleopatra and the OSIRIS-REx mission target-asteroid 101955 Bennu are discussed. We find that motion near the surface of an irregular asteroid is quite different from the motion near the surface of a homoplastically spheroidal celestial body. The periodic motions around the asteroid 101955 Bennu and 216 Kleopatra indicate that the geometrical shapes of the orbits are probably very sophisticated. There exist both stable periodic motions and unstable periodic motions near the surface of the same irregular asteroid. This periodic motion which is unstable can be resonant or non-resonant. The period-doubling bifurcation and pseudo period-doubling bifurcation of periodic orbits coexist in the same gravity field of the primary of the triple asteroid 216 Kleopatra. It is found that both of the period-doubling bifurcations of periodic orbits and pseudo period-doubling bifurcation of periodic orbits have four different paths. The pseudo period-doubling bifurcation found in the potential field of primary of triple asteroid 216 Kleopatra shows that there exist stable periodic orbits near the primary's equatorial plane, which gives an explanation for the motion stability of the triple asteroid 216 Kleopatra's two moonlets, Alexhelios and Cleoselene.

  4. Characterization of electronic structure of periodically strained graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Aslani, Marjan; Garner, C. Michael Nishi, Yoshio; Kumar, Suhas; Nordlund, Dennis; Pianetta, Piero

    2015-11-02

    We induced periodic biaxial tensile strain in polycrystalline graphene by wrapping it over a substrate with repeating pillar-like structures with a periodicity of 600 nm. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined to have introduced biaxial strains in graphene in the range of 0.4% to 0.7%. Its band structure was characterized using photoemission from valance bands, shifts in the secondary electron emission, and x-ray absorption from the carbon 1s levels to the unoccupied graphene conduction bands. It was observed that relative to unstrained graphene, strained graphene had a higher work function and higher density of states in the valence and conduction bands. We measured the conductivity of the strained and unstrained graphene in response to a gate voltage and correlated the changes in their behavior to the changes in the electronic structure. From these sets of data, we propose a simple band diagram representing graphene with periodic biaxial strain.

  5. Characterization of electronic structure of periodically strained graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Aslani, Marjan; Garner, C. Michael; Kumar, Suhas; Nordlund, Dennis; Pianetta, Piero; Nishi, Yoshio

    2015-11-03

    We induced periodic biaxial tensile strain in polycrystalline graphene by wrapping it over a substrate with repeating pillar-like structures with a periodicity of 600 nm. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined to have introduced biaxial strains in graphene in the range of 0.4% to 0.7%. Its band structure was characterized using photoemission from valance bands, shifts in the secondary electron emission, and x-ray absorption from the carbon 1s levels to the unoccupied graphene conduction bands. It was observed that relative to unstrained graphene, strained graphene had a higher work function and higher density of states in the valence and conduction bands. Furthermore, we measured the conductivity of the strained and unstrained graphene in response to a gate voltage and correlated the changes in their behavior to the changes in the electronic structure. From these sets of data, we propose a simple band diagram representing graphene with periodic biaxial strain.

  6. [Impact of maternal overnutrition on the periconceptional period].

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Miguel Abraham

    2015-05-01

    Overnutrition may lead to obesity. Maternal obesity may affect fertility not only via anovulation, but also through direct effects on oocytes and preimplantation embryos, indicating that the periconceptional period is sensitive to conditions of overnutrition. The periconceptional period includes from folliculogenesis to implantation. Animal model studies suggest that oocytes derived from obese females usually have a small size and mitochondrial abnormalities. These disruptions are probably induced by changes in the components of the ovarian follicular fluid. Experimental evidence also suggests that obesity may affect the microenvironment in oviducts and uterus, resulting in development of preimplantation embryos with reduced cell numbers and up-regulation of proinflammatory genes. However, further research is needed for in-depth characterization of the effects of maternal obesity during the periconceptional period.

  7. Decadal period external magnetic field variations determined via eigenanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, R. M.; Whaler, K. A.; Macmillan, S.; Beggan, C.; Velímský, J.; Olsen, N.

    2016-06-01

    We perform a reanalysis of hourly mean magnetic data from ground-based observatories spanning 1997-2009 inclusive, in order to isolate (after removal of core and crustal field estimates) the spatiotemporal morphology of the external fields important to mantle induction, on (long) periods of months to a full solar cycle. Our analysis focuses on geomagnetically quiet days and middle to low latitudes. We use the climatological eigenanalysis technique called empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs), which allows us to identify discrete spatiotemporal patterns with no a priori specification of their geometry -- the form of the decomposition is controlled by the data. We apply a spherical harmonic analysis to the EOF outputs in a joint inversion for internal and external coefficients. The results justify our assumption that the EOF procedure responds primarily to the long-period external inducing field contributions. Though we cannot determine uniquely the contributory source regions of these inducing fields, we find that they have distinct temporal characteristics which enable some inference of sources. An identified annual-period pattern appears to stem from a north-south seasonal motion of the background mean external field distribution. Separate patterns of semiannual and solar-cycle-length periods appear to stem from the amplitude modulations of spatially fixed background fields.

  8. Quasi-periodic oscillations of Jupiter's inner radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Roberto; Godfrey, Leith; Lou, Yu-Qing

    2014-04-01

    Radio and X-ray studies of Jupiter have detected quasi-periodic flux variability with timescales of ~20 min and ~45 min at some epochs but not others. Yu-Qing Lou and collaborators have suggested that this is caused by oscillations of the magnetosphere when it is buffeted by fast solar wind. We want to monitor Jupiter in the L-band with the ATCA: (1) to accurately characterise the variability over a wide bandwidth, during fast solar wind phases (v >~ 600 km/s); (2) to search for low-amplitude quasi-periodic variability during slow/intermediate wind phases or put an upper limit to the variability at those epochs; (3) to study the response of the characteristic oscillation timescales to different solar wind conditions. The induced magnetospheric oscillation model can be applied to broader astrophysical contexts, such as the Earth's magnetosphere, and quasi-periodic oscillations in accreting neutron-star and black holes. Jupiter provides a natural lab for our modelling of induced magnetospheric quasi-periodic oscillations.

  9. Man Made Elements Periodic Table, Astronomical Periodic Table, Geographic Periodic Table-Dimitri Mendeleev Imitation in the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, J.-T.

    2013-11-01

    A man made elements periodic table, including every single current element not just synthetic elements can be built differently than the naturally occurring element periodic table. Implications for knowing producible elements in space travel.

  10. Ethanol consumption in mice: relationships with circadian period and entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Jennifer L.; Do, David T.; Grahame, Nicholas J.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Gorman, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    A functional connection between the circadian timing system and alcohol consumption is suggested by multiple lines of converging evidence. Ethanol consumption perturbs physiological rhythms in hormone secretion, sleep and body temperature, and conversely, genetic and environmental perturbations of the circadian system can alter alcohol intake. A fundamental property of the circadian pacemaker, the endogenous period of its cycle under free-running conditions, was previously shown to differ between selectively bred High- (HAP) and Low- (LAP) Alcohol Preferring replicate 1 mice. To test whether there is a causal relationship between circadian period and ethanol intake, we induced experimental, rather than genetic, variations in free-running period. Male inbred C57Bl/6J mice and replicate 2 male and female HAP2 and LAP2 mice were entrained to light:dark cycles of 26 h or 22 h or remained in a standard 24 h cycle. Upon discontinuation of the light:dark cycle, experimental animals exhibited longer and shorter free-running periods, respectively. Despite robust effects on circadian period and clear circadian rhythms in drinking, these manipulations failed to alter the daily ethanol intake of the inbred strain or selected lines. Likewise, driving the circadian system at long and short periods produced no change in alcohol intake. In contrast with replicate 1 HAP and LAP lines, there was no difference in free-running period between ethanol naïve HAP2 and LAP2 mice. HAP2 mice, however, were significantly more active than LAP2 mice as measured by general home-cage movement and wheel running, a motivated behavior implicating a selection effect on reward systems. Despite a marked circadian regulation of drinking behavior, the free-running and entrained period of the circadian clock does not determine daily ethanol intake. PMID:20880659

  11. Dearth of short-period Neptunian exoplanets: A desert in period-mass and period-radius planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazeh, T.; Holczer, T.; Faigler, S.

    2016-05-01

    A few studies have reported a significant dearth of exoplanets with Neptune mass and radius with orbital periods below 2-4 d. This cannot be explained by observational biases because many Neptunian planets with longer orbital periods have been detected. The existence of this desert is similar to the appearance of the so-called brown-dwarf desert that suggests different formation mechanisms of planets and stellar companions with short orbital periods. Similarly, the Neptunian desert might indicate different mechanisms of formation and evolution for hot Jupiters and short-period super-Earths. We here follow a previous study and examine the location and shape of the desert in both the period-mass and period-radius planes, using the currently available large samples of planets. The desert in the period-mass plane has a relatively sharp upper edge, with a planetary mass that is inversely proportional to the planetary orbital period, while the lower, somewhat blurred, boundary is located along masses that are apparently linearly proportional to the period. The desert in the period-radius plane of the transiting planets is less clear. It seems as if the radius along the upper boundary is inversely proportional to the period to the power of one-third, while the lower boundary shows a radius that is proportional to the period to the power of two-thirds. The combination of the two upper bounds of the desert, in the period-mass and period-radius planes, yields a planetary mass-radius relation of Rp/RJup ≃ (1.2 ± 0.3)(Mp/MJup)0.27 ± 0.11 for 0.1 ≲ Mp/MJup ≲ 1. The derived shape of the desert, which might extend up to periods of 5-10 d, could shed some light on the formation and evolution of close-in planets.

  12. 7 CFR 1205.20 - Representative period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Representative period. 1205.20 Section 1205.20 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... period means the 2006 calendar year....

  13. Periodic behavior in a random environment.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, H A

    1994-04-01

    Animals' tendency to search periodically in temporally random environments was studied by presenting rats with random-interval (RI) 60-s and 120-s schedules. Power spectra revealed a periodicity of responding of 20-50 s for all animals regardless of condition. A second periodicity of 5-10-s was strongest under the RI 60-s schedule. Optimality theory suggests that periodic responding is better than random responding in obtaining food sooner on average, but the theory does not account for multiple periodicities. These multiple periodicities also cannot be explained by a single-oscillator, information-processing version of scalar expectancy theory (J. Gibbon & R. M. Church, 1992) or by the behavioral theory of timing (P.R. Killeen & J. G. Fetterman, 1988). The periodicities are consistent with a connectionist version of scalar expectancy theory that has nonscalar emergent properties, including multiple periodicities that are not proportional to the rate of random events.

  14. 25 CFR 140.11 - License period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... is the owner or beneficial owner or holds a use right to the land on which the business is to be... land on which the business is to be conducted. The license period shall correspond to the period of...

  15. Continuing Diversity: A Column of Periodical Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juedes, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents brief reviews of four periodicals that address diversity themes. Periodicals reviewed are: "Parabola: The Magazine of Myth and Traditions,""Race, Sex & Class: An Interdisciplinary Journal,""Third Force," and "Rhythm Music Magazine." Purchase information is included. (GR)

  16. 75 FR 65677 - Periodic Reporting Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... periodic reporting of service performance measurement for Applications and Mailing Permits, pursuant to... performance measurement reporting requirements. ADDRESSES: Submit comments electronically via the Commission's... Exception from Periodic Reporting of Service Performance Measurement, September 30, 2010 (Request); see...

  17. The two periods of TT ARIETIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorstensen, J. R.; Smak, J.; Hessman, F. V.

    1985-05-01

    To clarify the spectroscopic period and demonstrate that the spectroscopic and photometric periods are distinct, velocities of the cataclysmic variable TT Ari in its high and intermediate photometric states are obtained. Evidence for periodicity is found near the period of Cowley et al. (1975) in both the high-state and intermediate-state velocities and in a reanalysis of the Cowley et al. velocities no evidence is found for periodicity near the photometric period. Since no single period fits all the data well and since the original Cowley et al. period fits all the high-state data quite well, it is shown that the velocities change phase between the high and the intermediate states. Results indicate that the intermediate-state velocities lag the high-state velocities by 0.28 of a cycle and that in the high-state data, the gamma velocities tend to be systematically lower for the high-order Balmer lines.

  18. 24 CFR 58.21 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Time periods. 58.21 Section 58.21...: Environmental Review Procedures § 58.21 Time periods. All time periods in this part shall be counted in calendar days. The first day of a time period begins at 12:01 a.m. local time on the day following...

  19. 24 CFR 58.21 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Time periods. 58.21 Section 58.21...: Environmental Review Procedures § 58.21 Time periods. All time periods in this part shall be counted in calendar days. The first day of a time period begins at 12:01 a.m. local time on the day following...

  20. 24 CFR 58.21 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Time periods. 58.21 Section 58.21...: Environmental Review Procedures § 58.21 Time periods. All time periods in this part shall be counted in calendar days. The first day of a time period begins at 12:01 a.m. local time on the day following...

  1. 24 CFR 58.21 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Time periods. 58.21 Section 58.21...: Environmental Review Procedures § 58.21 Time periods. All time periods in this part shall be counted in calendar days. The first day of a time period begins at 12:01 a.m. local time on the day following...

  2. 24 CFR 58.21 - Time periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Time periods. 58.21 Section 58.21...: Environmental Review Procedures § 58.21 Time periods. All time periods in this part shall be counted in calendar days. The first day of a time period begins at 12:01 a.m. local time on the day following...

  3. Study of gratings with variable periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Pérez, Arturo; Fuentes-Tapia, Israel; Toxqui-López, Santa; Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Ordoñez-Padilla, Manuel Jorge; Mejias-Brizuela, Nildia Y.

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical study with sinusoidal amplitude diffraction gratings, elaborated with variable periods is shown. The diffraction pattern behavior and the symmetry degree of the gratings were observed. The grating period is increased, fringe to fringe, starting with a small period and ending with a big period that is; the grating edge, start with high spatial frequency and finish with low spatial frequency. This gratings modulation causes a widening in the diffracted orders.

  4. Liftings and stresses for planar periodic frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Borcea, Ciprian; Streinu, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    We formulate and prove a periodic analog of Maxwell’s theorem relating stressed planar frameworks and their liftings to polyhedral surfaces with spherical topology. We use our lifting theorem to prove deformation and rigidity-theoretic properties for planar periodic pseudo-triangulations, generalizing features known for their finite counterparts. These properties are then applied to questions originating in mathematical crystallography and materials science, concerning planar periodic auxetic structures and ultrarigid periodic frameworks. PMID:26973370

  5. 40 CFR 35.538 - Project period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Project period. 35.538 Section 35.538... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Performance Partnership Grants § 35.538 Project period. If... that is added to a Performance Partnership Grant extends beyond the end of the project period for...

  6. 40 CFR 35.538 - Project period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Project period. 35.538 Section 35.538... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Performance Partnership Grants § 35.538 Project period. If... that is added to a Performance Partnership Grant extends beyond the end of the project period for...

  7. 40 CFR 35.538 - Project period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Project period. 35.538 Section 35.538... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Performance Partnership Grants § 35.538 Project period. If... that is added to a Performance Partnership Grant extends beyond the end of the project period for...

  8. 40 CFR 35.538 - Project period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Project period. 35.538 Section 35.538... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Performance Partnership Grants § 35.538 Project period. If... that is added to a Performance Partnership Grant extends beyond the end of the project period for...

  9. 7 CFR 1437.5 - Coverage period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Coverage period. 1437.5 Section 1437.5 Agriculture... Provisions § 1437.5 Coverage period. (a) The coverage period is the time during which coverage is available against loss of production of the eligible crop as a result of natural disaster. (b) The coverage...

  10. Prebifurcation periodic ghost orbits in semiclassical quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Kus, M. ); Haake, F. ); Delande, D. )

    1993-10-04

    Classical periodic orbits are stationary-phase points in path integral representations of quantum propagators. We show that complex solutions of the stationary-phase equation, not corresponding to real classical periodic orbits, give additional contributions to the propagator which can be important, especially near bifurcations. We reveal the existence and relevance of such periodic ghost orbits for a kicked top.

  11. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used in... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240...

  12. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used in... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240...

  13. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used in... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240...

  14. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used in... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240...

  15. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used in... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240...

  16. 40 CFR 46.195 - Project period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Project period. 46.195 Section 46.195... During the Fellowship § 46.195 Project period. Based on the “Date Fellow Will Enter on Duty” which you enter on the Activation Notice (see § 46.185(a)), EPA will establish the project period for...

  17. 30 CFR 725.14 - Grant periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grant periods. 725.14 Section 725.14 Mineral... REGULATIONS REIMBURSEMENTS TO STATES § 725.14 Grant periods. The Director or his authorized designee shall normally approve a grant for a period of one year or less. OSM shall fund a program that extends over...

  18. 49 CFR 236.588 - Periodic test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Periodic test. 236.588 Section 236.588..., Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Inspection and Tests; Locomotive § 236.588 Periodic test. Except as provided in § 236.586, periodic test of the automatic train stop, train control, or cab signal...

  19. 47 CFR 22.1035 - Construction period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction period. 22.1035 Section 22.1035 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1035 Construction period. The construction period (see § 22.142)...

  20. 30 CFR 725.14 - Grant periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grant periods. 725.14 Section 725.14 Mineral... REGULATIONS REIMBURSEMENTS TO STATES § 725.14 Grant periods. The Director or his authorized designee shall normally approve a grant for a period of one year or less. OSM shall fund a program that extends over...

  1. 30 CFR 887.13 - Grant period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... remaining at the end of any grant period to us according to 43 CFR part 12. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Grant period. 887.13 Section 887.13 Mineral... LAND RECLAMATION SUBSIDENCE INSURANCE PROGRAM GRANTS § 887.13 Grant period. The grant funding...

  2. 30 CFR 887.13 - Grant period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... remaining at the end of any grant period to us according to 43 CFR part 12. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grant period. 887.13 Section 887.13 Mineral... LAND RECLAMATION SUBSIDENCE INSURANCE PROGRAM GRANTS § 887.13 Grant period. The grant funding...

  3. 30 CFR 725.14 - Grant periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Grant periods. 725.14 Section 725.14 Mineral... REGULATIONS REIMBURSEMENTS TO STATES § 725.14 Grant periods. The Director or his authorized designee shall normally approve a grant for a period of one year or less. OSM shall fund a program that extends over...

  4. 39 CFR 3055.55 - Periodicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Periodicals. 3055.55 Section 3055.55 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL SERVICE PERFORMANCE AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION REPORTING Periodic Reporting of Service Performance Achievements § 3055.55 Periodicals. (a) Within County...

  5. 12 CFR 226.7 - Periodic statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH... periodic rates apply to different types of transactions, the types of transactions to which the periodic... amount(s) of any other type of finance charge. If there is more than one periodic rate, the amount of...

  6. 7 CFR 1230.621 - Voting period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.621 Voting period. The term Voting period means the 3-consecutive business day period for in-person voting. Referendum...

  7. 7 CFR 1230.621 - Voting period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.621 Voting period. The term Voting period means the 3-consecutive business day period for in-person voting. Referendum...

  8. 32 CFR 552.80 - Suspension period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Suspension period. 552.80 Section 552.80 National... Suspension period. All solicitation privileges suspended by installation commanders will be for a specific time. Normally, it will not exceed 2 years. When the suspension period expires, the agent may...

  9. 32 CFR 552.80 - Suspension period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Suspension period. 552.80 Section 552.80 National... Suspension period. All solicitation privileges suspended by installation commanders will be for a specific time. Normally, it will not exceed 2 years. When the suspension period expires, the agent may...

  10. 5 CFR 9901.411 - Appraisal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....411 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND LABOR RELATIONS... PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) Performance Management § 9901.411 Appraisal period. (a) Except as provided in... period, an employee has not met the minimum period of performance, management may extend the...

  11. 10 CFR 603.1295 - Periodic audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Periodic audit. 603.1295 Section 603.1295 Energy... Used in this Part § 603.1295 Periodic audit. An audit of a participant, performed at an agreed-upon... an audit may cover. A periodic audit of a participant differs from an award-specific audit of...

  12. 32 CFR 37.1325 - Periodic audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Periodic audit. 37.1325 Section 37.1325 National... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1325 Periodic audit. An audit of... awards. Appendix C to this part describes what such an audit may cover. A periodic audit of a...

  13. 40 CFR 35.108 - Funding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Funding period. 35.108 Section 35.108... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants Preparing An Application § 35.108 Funding period. The Regional Administrator and applicant may negotiate the length of the funding period for environmental program...

  14. 40 CFR 35.508 - Funding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Funding period. 35.508 Section 35.508... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Preparing An Application § 35.508 Funding period. The Regional Administrator and applicant may negotiate the length of the funding period for...

  15. 40 CFR 35.108 - Funding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Funding period. 35.108 Section 35.108... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants Preparing An Application § 35.108 Funding period. The Regional Administrator and applicant may negotiate the length of the funding period for environmental program...

  16. 40 CFR 35.508 - Funding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Funding period. 35.508 Section 35.508... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Preparing An Application § 35.508 Funding period. The Regional Administrator and applicant may negotiate the length of the funding period for...

  17. 40 CFR 35.508 - Funding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Funding period. 35.508 Section 35.508... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Preparing An Application § 35.508 Funding period. The Regional Administrator and applicant may negotiate the length of the funding period for...

  18. 40 CFR 35.108 - Funding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Funding period. 35.108 Section 35.108... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants Preparing An Application § 35.108 Funding period. The Regional Administrator and applicant may negotiate the length of the funding period for environmental program...

  19. 40 CFR 35.108 - Funding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Funding period. 35.108 Section 35.108... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants Preparing An Application § 35.108 Funding period. The Regional Administrator and applicant may negotiate the length of the funding period for environmental program...

  20. 40 CFR 35.508 - Funding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Funding period. 35.508 Section 35.508... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Preparing An Application § 35.508 Funding period. The Regional Administrator and applicant may negotiate the length of the funding period for...

  1. 40 CFR 35.108 - Funding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Funding period. 35.108 Section 35.108... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants Preparing An Application § 35.108 Funding period. The Regional Administrator and applicant may negotiate the length of the funding period for environmental program...

  2. 40 CFR 35.508 - Funding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Funding period. 35.508 Section 35.508... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Preparing An Application § 35.508 Funding period. The Regional Administrator and applicant may negotiate the length of the funding period for...

  3. 14 CFR 325.6 - Periodic reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Periodic reviews. 325.6 Section 325.6... REGULATIONS ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE PROCEDURES § 325.6 Periodic reviews. (a) The Department will start a periodic review of essential air service within 1 year of the date of the previous determination...

  4. 14 CFR 413.15 - Review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review period. 413.15 Section 413.15... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE APPLICATION PROCEDURES § 413.15 Review period. (a) Review period duration. Unless otherwise specified in this chapter, the FAA reviews and makes a decision on an application...

  5. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Idle status period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Idle status period. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY VOYAGE DATA Sec. 5 Idle status period. (a) The General Agent shall place a vessel in idle status during the period of reactivation...

  6. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Idle status period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Idle status period. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY VOYAGE DATA Sec. 5 Idle status period. (a) The General Agent shall place a vessel in idle status during the period of reactivation...

  7. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Idle status period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Idle status period. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY VOYAGE DATA Sec. 5 Idle status period. (a) The General Agent shall place a vessel in idle status during the period of reactivation...

  8. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Idle status period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Idle status period. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY VOYAGE DATA Sec. 5 Idle status period. (a) The General Agent shall place a vessel in idle status during the period of reactivation...

  9. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Idle status period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Idle status period. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY VOYAGE DATA Sec. 5 Idle status period. (a) The General Agent shall place a vessel in idle status during the period of reactivation...

  10. 5 CFR 9901.411 - Appraisal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....411 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND LABOR RELATIONS... PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) Performance Management § 9901.411 Appraisal period. (a) Except as provided in... period, an employee has not met the minimum period of performance, management may extend the...

  11. 14 CFR 413.15 - Review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Review period. 413.15 Section 413.15 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE APPLICATION PROCEDURES § 413.15 Review period. (a) Review period duration. Unless otherwise specified in this...

  12. 14 CFR 413.15 - Review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Review period. 413.15 Section 413.15 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE APPLICATION PROCEDURES § 413.15 Review period. (a) Review period duration. Unless otherwise specified in this...

  13. 14 CFR 413.15 - Review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Review period. 413.15 Section 413.15 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE APPLICATION PROCEDURES § 413.15 Review period. (a) Review period...

  14. 14 CFR 413.15 - Review period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Review period. 413.15 Section 413.15 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE APPLICATION PROCEDURES § 413.15 Review period. (a) Review period duration. Unless otherwise specified in this...

  15. 16 CFR 1107.21 - Periodic testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... body. Periodic testing must be conducted pursuant to either paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section.... Component part testing pursuant to 16 CFR part 1109 may be used to support the periodic testing requirements... assessment body for periodic testing to the applicable children's product safety rules at least once...

  16. 16 CFR 1107.21 - Periodic testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... body. Periodic testing must be conducted pursuant to either paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section.... Component part testing pursuant to 16 CFR part 1109 may be used to support the periodic testing requirements... assessment body for periodic testing to the applicable children's product safety rules at least once...

  17. 32 CFR 37.1325 - Periodic audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Periodic audit. 37.1325 Section 37.1325 National... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1325 Periodic audit. An audit of... awards. Appendix C to this part describes what such an audit may cover. A periodic audit of a...

  18. 47 CFR 22.1035 - Construction period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Construction period. 22.1035 Section 22.1035 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1035 Construction period. The construction period (see § 22.142)...

  19. 47 CFR 22.1035 - Construction period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Construction period. 22.1035 Section 22.1035 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1035 Construction period. The construction period (see § 22.142)...

  20. 47 CFR 22.1035 - Construction period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Construction period. 22.1035 Section 22.1035 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1035 Construction period. The construction period (see § 22.142)...

  1. 47 CFR 22.1035 - Construction period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Construction period. 22.1035 Section 22.1035 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1035 Construction period. The construction period (see § 22.142)...

  2. Spurious periods in the terrestrial impact crater record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetsu, L.; Pelt, J.

    2000-01-01

    We present a simple solution to the controversy over periodicity in the ages of terrestrial impact craters and the epochs of mass extinctions of species. The first evidence for a 28.4 million year cycle in catastrophic impacts on Earth was presented in 1984. Our re-examination of this earlier Fourier power spectrum analysis reveals that the rounding of the impact crater data distorted the Monte Carlo significance estimates obtained for this cycle. This conclusion is confirmed by theoretical significance estimates with the Fourier analysis, as well as by both theoretical and Monte Carlo significance estimates with the Rayleigh method. We also apply other time series analysis methods to six subsamples of the currently available more extensive impact crater record and one sample of mass extinction epochs. This analysis reveals the spurious ``human-signal'' induced by rounding. We demonstrate how the data rounding interferes with periodicity analysis and enhances artificial periodicities between 10 and 100 million years. Only integer periodicities connected to irregular multimodal phase distributions reach a significance of 0.001 or 0.01. We detect no real periodicity in the ages of terrestrial impact craters, nor in the epochs of mass extinctions of species.

  3. Systematics-insensitive Periodic Signal Search with K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Ruth; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Johnson, John A.

    2016-02-01

    From pulsating stars to transiting exoplanets, the search for periodic signals in K2 data, Kepler’s two-wheeled extension, is relevant to a long list of scientific goals. Systematics affecting K2 light curves due to the decreased spacecraft pointing precision inhibit the easy extraction of periodic signals from the data. We here develop a method for producing periodograms of K2 light curves that are insensitive to pointing-induced systematics; the Systematics-insensitive Periodogram (SIP). Traditional sine-fitting periodograms use a generative model to find the frequency of a sinusoid that best describes the data. We extend this principle by including systematic trends, based on a set of “eigen light curves,” following Foreman-Mackey et al., in our generative model as well as a sum of sine and cosine functions over a grid of frequencies. Using this method we are able to produce periodograms with vastly reduced systematic features. The quality of the resulting periodograms are such that we can recover acoustic oscillations in giant stars and measure stellar rotation periods without the need for any detrending. The algorithm is also applicable to the detection of other periodic phenomena such as variable stars, eclipsing binaries and short-period exoplanet candidates. The SIP code is available at https://github.com/RuthAngus/SIPK2.

  4. The time-transgressive termination of the African Humid Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Timothy M.; McKay, Nicholas P.; Hughen, Konrad A.; Overpeck, Jonathan T.; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Heil, Clifford W.; King, John; Scholz, Christopher A.; Peck, John

    2015-02-01

    During the African Humid Period about 14,800 to 5,500 years ago, changes in incoming solar radiation during Northern Hemisphere summers led to the large-scale expansion and subsequent collapse of the African monsoon. Hydrologic reconstructions from arid North Africa show an abrupt onset and termination of the African Humid Period. These abrupt transitions have been invoked in arguments that the African monsoon responds rapidly to gradual forcing as a result of nonlinear land surface feedbacks. Here we present a reconstruction of precipitation in humid tropical West Africa for the past 20,000 years using the hydrogen isotope composition of leaf waxes preserved in sediments from Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana. We show that over much of tropical and subtropical Africa the monsoon responded synchronously and predictably to glacial reorganizations of overturning circulation in the Atlantic Ocean, but the response to the relatively weaker radiative forcing during the African Humid Period was more spatially and temporally complex. A synthesis of hydrologic reconstructions from across Africa shows that the termination of the African Humid Period was locally abrupt, but occurred progressively later at lower latitudes. We propose that this time-transgressive termination of the African Humid Period reflects declining rainfall intensity induced directly by decreasing summer insolation as well as the gradual southward migration of the tropical rainbelt that occurred during this interval.

  5. Light period regulation of carbohydrate partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janes, Harry W.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that the photosynthetic period is important in regulating carbon partitioning. Even when the same amount of carbon is fixed over a 24h period considerably more is translocated out of the leaf under the longer photosynthetic period. This is extremely important when parts of the plant other than the leaves are to be sold. It is also important to notice the amount of carbon respired in the short photosynthetic period. The light period effect on carbohydrate fixation, dark respiration, and translocation is shown in this report.

  6. A highly specific test for periodicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ansmann, Gerrit

    2015-11-15

    We present a method that allows to distinguish between nearly periodic and strictly periodic time series. To this purpose, we employ a conservative criterion for periodicity, namely, that the time series can be interpolated by a periodic function whose local extrema are also present in the time series. Our method is intended for the analysis of time series generated by deterministic time-continuous dynamical systems, where it can help telling periodic dynamics from chaotic or transient ones. We empirically investigate our method's performance and compare it to an approach based on marker events (or Poincaré sections). We demonstrate that our method is capable of detecting small deviations from periodicity and outperforms the marker-event-based approach in typical situations. Our method requires no adjustment of parameters to the individual time series, yields the period length with a precision that exceeds the sampling rate, and its runtime grows asymptotically linear with the length of the time series.

  7. Long Periodic Terms in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretagnon, P.

    1982-01-01

    The long period variations of the first eight planets in the solar system are studied. First, the Lagrangian solution is calculated and then the long period terms with fourth order eccentricities and inclinations are introduced into the perturbation function. A second approximation was made taking into account the short period terms' contribution, namely the perturbations of first order with respect to the masses. Special attention was paid to the determination of the integration constants. The relative importance of the different contributions is shown. It is useless, for example, to introduce the long period terms of fifth order if no account has been taken of the short period terms. Meanwhile, the terms that have been neglected would not introduce large changes in the integration constants. Even so, the calculation should be repeated with higher order short period terms and fifth order long periods.

  8. Sawtooth period control by power modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauret, Menno; Schuster, Eugenio; de Baar, Marco; Felici, Federico; Heemels, Maurice; Gomes, Alexander; Goodman, Tim; Kim, Doohyun; Sauter, Olivier; Vandersteen, Gerd; Witvoet, Gert; Lennholm, Morten

    2015-11-01

    It is foreseen that long sawtooth oscillations will occur during ITER H-mode scenarios leading to confinement loss and even disruptions. Sawtooth period control is therefore crucial. Most sawtooth period control approaches depend on changing the deposition location of electron-cyclotron current drive (ECCD) near r(q =1). In contrast to this, several TCV and AUG experiments with fixed ECCD deposition location show that ECCD power modulation, either periodic or feedback controlled, can lead to fast and reliable period control. To understand this nonlinear phenomenon, a reduced and `hybrid' reset model has been derived that models the nonlinear dynamics. Analysis reveals that the sawtooth period can be controlled by power modulation, even in the case of significant model uncertainties or when there is a significant lengthening effect of the fast particles on the sawtooth period, as there will be in ITER. The model can also be used to design period control using ICRH influencing this fast particle effect.

  9. Talbot effect of quasi-periodic grating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Wei; Li, Furui; Wang, Junhong; Teng, Shuyun

    2013-07-20

    Theoretic and experimental studies of the Talbot effect of quasi-periodic gratings are performed in this paper. The diffractions of periodic and quasi-periodic square aperture arrays in Fresnel fields are analyzed according to the scalar diffraction theory. The expressions of the diffraction intensities of two types of quasi-periodic gratings are deduced. Talbot images of the quasi-periodic gratings are predicted to appear at multiple certain distances. The quasi-periodic square aperture arrays are produced with the aid of a liquid crystal light modulator, and the self-images of the quasi-periodic gratings are measured successfully in the experiment. This study indicates that even a structure in short-range disorder may take on the self-imaging effect in a Fresnel field. PMID:23872752

  10. Long periodic terms in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretagnon, P.

    1982-06-01

    The long period variations of the first eight planets in the solar system are studied. First, the Lagrangian solution is calculated and then the long period terms with fourth order eccentricities and inclinations are introduced into the perturbation function. A second approximation was made taking into account the short period terms' contribution, namely the perturbations of first order with respect to the masses. Special attention was paid to the determination of the integration constants. The relative importance of the different contributions is shown. It is useless, for example, to introduce the long period terms of fifth order if no account has been taken of the short period terms. Meanwhile, the terms that have been neglected would not introduce large changes in the integration constants. Even so, the calculation should be repeated with higher order short period terms and fifth order long periods.

  11. Cutaneous silent period in human FDI motor units.

    PubMed

    Kahya, Mehmet C; Yavuz, S Utku; Türker, Kemal S

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to use both the probability-based and the frequency-based analyses methods simultaneously to examine cutaneous silent period (CSP) induced by strong electrical currents. Subjects were asked to contract their first dorsal interosseus muscles so that one motor unit monitored via intramuscular wire electrodes discharged at a rate of approximately 8 Hz. Strong electrical stimuli were delivered to the back of the hand that created a subjective discomfort level of between 4 and 7 [0-10 visual analogue scale] and induced cutaneous silent period in all units. It was found that the duration of the CSP was significantly longer when the same data were analysed using frequency-based analysis method compared with the probability-based methods. Frequency-based analysis indicated that the strong electrical stimuli induce longer lasting inhibitory currents than what was indicated using the probability-based analyses such as surface electromyogram and peristimulus time histogram. Usage of frequency-based analysis for bringing out the synaptic activity underlying CSP seems essential as its characteristics have been subject to a large number of studies in experimental and clinical settings.

  12. Synthetic chemistry with periodic mesostructures at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Manik; Landskron, Kai

    2013-11-19

    Over the last two decades, researchers have studied extensively the synthesis of mesostructured materials, which could be useful for drug delivery, catalytic cracking of petroleum, or reinforced plastics, among other applications. However, until very recently researchers used only temperature as a thermodynamic variable for synthesis, completely neglecting pressure. In this Account, we show how pressure can affect the synthetic chemistry of periodic mesoporous structures with desirable effects. In its simplest application, pressure can crystallize the pore walls of periodic mesoporous silicas, which are difficult to crystallize otherwise. The motivation for the synthesis of periodic mesoporous silica materials (with pore sizes from 2 to 50 nm) 20 years ago was to replace the microporous zeolites (which have pore sizes of <2 nm) in petroleum cracking applications, because the larger pore size of mesoporous materials allows for faster transport of larger molecules. However, these mesoporous materials could not replace zeolite materials because they showed lower hydrothermal stability and lower catalytic activity. This reduced performance has been attributed to the amorphous nature of the mesoporous materials' channel walls. To address this problem, we developed the concept of "nanocasting at high pressure". Through this approach, we produced hitherto-unavailable, periodic mesostructured silicas with crystalline pore walls. In nanocasting, we compress a periodic mesostructured composite (e.g. a periodic mesoporous silica with carbon-filled pores) and subsequently heat it to induce the selective crystallization of one of the two phases. We attain the necessary high pressure for synthesis using piston-cylinder and multianvil apparatuses. Using periodic mesostructured silica/carbon nanocomposites as starting material, we have produced periodic mesoporous coesite and periodic mesoporous quartz. The quartz material is highly stable under harsh hydrothermal conditions (800

  13. Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L.; Laskar, A.; Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z.; Menq, F.; Tang, Y.

    2014-07-28

    Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5 Hz to 50 Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

  14. HeteroGenome: database of genome periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Chaley, Maria; Kutyrkin, Vladimir; Tulbasheva, Gayane; Teplukhina, Elena; Nazipova, Nafisa

    2014-01-01

    We present the first release of the HeteroGenome database collecting latent periodicity regions in genomes. Tandem repeats and highly divergent tandem repeats along with the regions of a new type of periodicity, known as profile periodicity, have been collected for the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We obtained data with the aid of a spectral-statistical approach to search for reliable latent periodicity regions (with periods up to 2000 bp) in DNA sequences. The original two-level mode of data presentation (a broad view of the region of latent periodicity and a second level indicating conservative fragments of its structure) was further developed to enable us to obtain the estimate, without redundancy, that latent periodicity regions make up ∼10% of the analyzed genomes. Analysis of the quantitative and qualitative content of located periodicity regions on all chromosomes of the analyzed organisms revealed dominant characteristic types of periodicity in the genomes. The pattern of density distribution of latent periodicity regions on chromosome unambiguously characterizes each chromosome in genome. Database URL: http://www.jcbi.ru/lp_baze/ PMID:24857969

  15. Probabilistic stellar rotation periods with Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Ruth; Aigrain, Suzanne; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Stellar rotation has many applications in the field of exoplanets. High-precision photometry from space-based missions like Kepler and K2 allows us to measure stellar rotation periods directly from light curves. Stellar variability produced by rotation is usually not sinusoidal or perfectly periodic, therefore sine-fitting periodograms are not well suited to rotation period measurement. Autocorrelation functions are often used to extract periodic information from light curves, however uncertainties on rotation periods measured by autocorrelation are difficult to define. A ‘by eye’ check, or a set of heuristic criteria are used to validate measurements and rotation periods are only reported for stars that pass this vetting process. A probabilistic rotation period measurement method, with a suitable generative model bypasses the need for a validation stage and can produce realistic uncertainties. The physics driving the production of variability in stellar light curves is still poorly understood and difficult to model. We therefore use an effective model for stellar variability: a Gaussian process with a quasi-periodic covariance function. By injecting fake signals into Kepler light curves we show that the GP model is well suited to quasi-periodic, non-sinusoidal signals, is capable of modelling noise and physical signals simultaneously and provides probabilistic rotation period measurements with realistic uncertainties.

  16. Cyclical period changes in Z Chamaeleontis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, R.; Jablonski, F.; Oliveira, E.; Vrielmann, S.; Woudt, P. A.; Catalán, M. S.

    2002-09-01

    We report the identification of cyclical changes in the orbital period of the eclipsing dwarf nova Z Cha. We used times of mid-eclipse collected from the literature and our new eclipse timings to construct an observed-minus-calculated diagram covering 30 yr of observations (1972-2002). The data present cyclical variations that can be fitted by a linear plus sinusoidal function with period 28 +/- 2 yr and amplitude 1.0 +/- 0.2 min. The statistical significance of this period by an F-test is larger than 99.9 per cent. The derived fractional period change, ΔP/P= 4.4 × 10-7, is comparable to that of other short-period cataclysmic variables (CVs), but is one order of magnitude smaller than those of the long-period CVs. Separate fits to the first and second halves of the data lead to ephemerides with quite different cycle periods and amplitudes, indicating that the variation is not sinusoidal or, most probably, is not strictly periodic. The observed cyclical period change is possibly caused by a solar-type magnetic activity cycle in the secondary star. An incremental variation in the Roche lobe of the secondary star of is required in order to explain both the observed period change and the modulation of the quiescent brightness previously reported by Ak, Ozkan & Mattei.

  17. Do triatomic molecules echo atomic periodicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Hefferlin, R. Barrow, J.

    2015-03-30

    Demonstrations of periodicity among triatomic-molecular spectroscopic constants underscore the role of the periodic law as a foundation of chemistry. The objective of this work is to prepare for another test using vibration frequencies ν{sub 1} of free, ground-state, main-group triatomic molecules. Using data from four data bases and from computation, we have collected ν{sub 1} data for molecules formed from second period atoms.

  18. Long period coupling terms for Lagrange's equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A generalization of that portion of the work of Berger, which deals with the long period coupling effect of certain pairs of zonal harmonics. Long period terms arising from the short short period coupling of zonal harmonics are derived for Lagrange's equations. The formulation is general so that the results are valid for any pairs of zonal harmonics. Formulas are given to generate the various functions and integrals needed for the results given. Checks have been made against the work of Kozai.

  19. 18 CFR 154.303 - Test periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Test periods. 154.303... Changes § 154.303 Test periods. Statements A through M, O, P, and supporting schedules, in § 154.312 and § 154.313, must be based upon a test period. (a) If the natural gas company has been in operation for...

  20. 18 CFR 154.303 - Test periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Test periods. 154.303... Changes § 154.303 Test periods. Statements A through M, O, P, and supporting schedules, in § 154.312 and § 154.313, must be based upon a test period. (a) If the natural gas company has been in operation for...

  1. Lightcurve and Rotation Period of 1044 Teutonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzler, Alberto Silva; Ferreira, Diogo Henrique; Dos Santos, Tarcio Henrique Ribeiro; Novaes, Alberto Brum

    2008-03-01

    The minor planet 1044 Teutonia was observed 2007 June 8-9 UT, during 3.7h, in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The synodic period from the collected data are best fit by a period 2.84 ± 0.04 h and with an amplitude of 0.20 ± 0.03. However, the period of 3.153 ± 0.003 reported by Behrend et al. (2006) cannot be eliminated.

  2. Preparing to perform: periodization and dance.

    PubMed

    Wyon, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the historical and current literature on periodization in sport before applying the concept to dance from scientific and anecdotal points of view. Preparing the dancer through the use of a periodization model, in a professional or vocational setting, will potentially help prevent overtraining and its link to injury, while improving the dancer's readiness to perform optimally. Practical examples of tapering and periodization of training are discussed for companies and vocational schools.

  3. Unstable periodic orbits in human epileptic hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Pen-Ning Yu; Min-Chi Hsiao; Dong Song; Liu, Charles Y; Heck, Christi N; Millett, David; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-01-01

    Inter-ictal activity is studied in hippocampal slices resected from patients with epilepsy using local field potential recording. Inter-ictal activity in the dentate gyrus (DG) is induced by high-potassium (8 mM), low-magnesium (0.25 mM) aCSF with additional 100 μM 4-aminopyridine(4-AP). The dynamics of the inter-ictal activity is investigated by developing the first return map with inter-pulse intervals. Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) are detected in the hippocampal slice at the DG area according to both the topological recurrence method and the periodic orbit transform method. Surrogate analysis suggests the presence of UPOs in hippocampal slices from patients with epilepsy. This finding also suggests that inter-ictal activity is a chaotic system and will allow us to apply chaos control techniques to manipulate inter-ictal activity.

  4. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis. A single fiber electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    De Grandis, D; Fiaschi, A; Tomelleri, G; Orrico, D

    1978-06-01

    The neurophysiological findings obtained with standard electromyography (EMG) and single fiber EMG (SFEMG) in a case of hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HoPP) are reported. During the period between paralytic attacks the only abnormalities consisted of scanty fibrillation potentials and, with SFEMG, a fiber density increase. In the first stage of an induced paralytic attack the most striking feature was decrease in fiber density, slight increase in jitter with several blocks. These results indicate a failure of the membrane surface to propagate an action potential. In some fibers the block is likely to be permanent, thus explaining the decrease in fiber density. The jitter increase is due to a slight abnormality at the synaptic site or to a variation in the propagation velocity of the muscle fiber. PMID:690662

  5. Influences of periodic mechanical deformation on pinned spiral waves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Peng, Liang; Zheng, Qiang; Zhao, Ye-Hua; Ying, He-Ping

    2014-09-01

    In a generic model of excitable media, we study the behavior of spiral waves interacting with obstacles and their dynamics under the influences of simple periodic mechanical deformation (PMD). Depending on the characteristics of the obstacles, i.e., size and excitability, the rotation of a pinned spiral wave shows different scenarios, e.g., embedding into or anchoring on an obstacle. Three different drift phenomena induced by PMD are observed: scattering on small partial-excitable obstacles, meander-induced unpinning on big partial-excitable obstacles, and drifting around small unexcitable obstacles. Their underlying mechanisms are discussed. The dependence of the threshold amplitude of PMD on the characteristics of the obstacles to successfully remove pinned spiral waves on big partial-excitable obstacles is studied. PMID:25273183

  6. Coherent peculiar velocities and periodic redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.T.; Steinhardt, P.J.; Turner, M.S. Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Batavia Chicago Univ., IL )

    1991-01-01

    A coherent, sinusoidal peculiar velocity field of 0.003 amplitude and wavelength of 128/h Mpc could explain the apparent redshift periodicity seen in the recent pencil-beam survey of Broadhurst et al. (1990). Such a peculiar velocity field could arise if the power spectrum of density perturbations has a strong feature at about this wavelength. This explanation has additional predictions: the phase, period, and strength of the periodicity should vary in different directions; the strength of the periodicity should decrease at higher redshifts; and there should be more thin structures perpendicular to the line of sight than parallel to it. 28 refs.

  7. NONPARAMETRIC BAYESIAN ESTIMATION OF PERIODIC LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuyang; Khardon, Roni; Protopapas, Pavlos

    2012-09-01

    Many astronomical phenomena exhibit patterns that have periodic behavior. An important step when analyzing data from such processes is the problem of identifying the period: estimating the period of a periodic function based on noisy observations made at irregularly spaced time points. This problem is still a difficult challenge despite extensive study in different disciplines. This paper makes several contributions toward solving this problem. First, we present a nonparametric Bayesian model for period finding, based on Gaussian Processes (GPs), that does not make assumptions on the shape of the periodic function. As our experiments demonstrate, the new model leads to significantly better results in period estimation especially when the light curve does not exhibit sinusoidal shape. Second, we develop a new algorithm for parameter optimization for GP which is useful when the likelihood function is very sensitive to the parameters with numerous local minima, as in the case of period estimation. The algorithm combines gradient optimization with grid search and incorporates several mechanisms to overcome the high computational complexity of GP. Third, we develop a novel approach for using domain knowledge, in the form of a probabilistic generative model, and incorporate it into the period estimation algorithm. Experimental results validate our approach showing significant improvement over existing methods.

  8. Strange attractors and their periodic repetition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiudong; Oksasoglu, Ali

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we present some important findings regarding a comprehensive characterization of dynamical behavior in the vicinity of two periodically perturbed homoclinic solutions. Using the Duffing system, we illustrate that the overall dynamical behavior of the system, including strange attractors, is organized in the form of an asymptotic invariant pattern as the magnitude of the applied periodic forcing approaches zero. Moreover, this invariant pattern repeats itself with a multiplicative period with respect to the magnitude of the forcing. This multiplicative period is an explicitly known function of the system parameters. The findings from the numerical experiments are shown to be in great agreement with the theoretical expectations. PMID:21456842

  9. 45 CFR 1336.51 - Project period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR NATIVE AMERICANS, NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS Financial Assistance Provisions § 1336.51 Project period. The Notice...

  10. 7 CFR 1220.111 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.111 Fiscal period. The...

  11. 7 CFR 1220.111 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.111 Fiscal period. The...

  12. 7 CFR 1220.111 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.111 Fiscal period. The...

  13. 7 CFR 1220.111 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.111 Fiscal period. The...

  14. 7 CFR 1220.111 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.111 Fiscal period. The...

  15. Doppler effects on periodicities in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, J. F.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere of Saturn exhibits a wide variety of periodic phenomena in magnetic fields, charged particles, and radio emissions. The periodicities are observed from a moving spacecraft, so an issue arises about the periodicities being influenced by the Doppler effects. Doppler effects can be investigated using models of the periodicities and then flying the spacecraft through the model, effectively measuring any Doppler phenomena with the simulation. Using 200 days of typical elliptical orbits from the Cassini mission at Saturn, three models were tested: an azimuthal wave (or "searchlight") model, a radial wave (or "pond ripple") model, and a model of an outwardly traveling spiral wave. The azimuthal wave model produced virtually no Doppler effects in the periodicities because its wave vector is nearly perpendicular to the spacecraft trajectory. The radial wave model generated strong Doppler effects of an upshifted and a downshifted signal (a dual period) on either side of the true period, because the wave vector is either parallel or antiparallel to the spacecraft trajectory. Being intermediate to the searchlight and radial waves, the spiral wave produced Doppler effects but only for low wave speeds (<10 RS/h). For higher wave speeds the Doppler effects were not as clear. The Doppler effects can be mitigated by employing only observations beyond ~15 RS where the spacecraft speed is low compared to the wave speed. The observed periodicities over the same 200 day interval do not show evidence of Doppler effects but generally display a single feature at the expected ~10.7 h period.

  16. 7 CFR 1206.7 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.7 Fiscal period. Fiscal...

  17. 7 CFR 1206.7 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.7 Fiscal period. Fiscal...

  18. 7 CFR 1206.7 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.7 Fiscal period. Fiscal...

  19. 7 CFR 1206.7 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.7 Fiscal period. Fiscal...

  20. 7 CFR 1206.7 - Fiscal period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.7 Fiscal period. Fiscal...