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Sample records for perijaensis nuevo culicoides

  1. Morphological description of the fourth instar larva: Culicoides cataneii and Culicoides sahariensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Slama, Darine; Khedher, Asma; Bdira, Sassi; Khayech, Fethi; Delecolle, Jean-claude; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda; Emna, Chaker

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out of the region of Monastir in Central Tunisia, between July and August 2010. Larvae were collected using a floatation technique with magnesium sulfate in mud samples. The fourth instar larva of Culicoides cataneii Clastrier, 1957 and Culicoides sahariensis Callot, Kremer, Bailly-Choumara, 1970 are described, illustrated and drawn. Measurements of instars IV are also presented. This is the first record of Culicoides cataneii and Culicoides sahariensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to Tunisia.

  2. Phermonal Control of Biting Midges (Culicoides SPP).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-28

    AD-A113 915 FLORIDA MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY LAB VERO BEACH F/G 6/3 PHERMONAL CONTROL OF BITING MIDGES ( CULICOIDES SPP ).(U) APR 82 J R LINLEY» D A...BITING MIDGES ( CULICOIDES SPP .) By Dr. 0. R. Linley, co-principal investigator, Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory, Institute of Food and...CONTROL OF BITING MIDGES ( CULICOIDES SPP .) Annual ’ 35/01/81-04/30/82 7. AUTHORS J. R. Unley 0. A. Carlson » PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME

  3. Culicoides: The Controller of Orbivirus Transmission

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides sonorensis are biting midges of great agricultural importance as vectors of several emerging/re-emerging arboviruses world-wide including bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease, African horse sickness, vesicular stomatitis, and Schmallenberg. C. sonorensis feed primarily on domestic sh...

  4. Biting Midges of the Genus Culicoides in South Carolina Zoos

    PubMed Central

    Nelder, Mark P.; Swanson, Dustin A.; Adler, Peter H.; Grogan, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected during the summer of 2007 at the Greenville and Riverbanks Zoos in South Carolina with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traps equipped with ultraviolet or incandescent lights and baited with carbon dioxide. Sixteen species of Culicoides were collected, four of which represented more than 80%. They were Culicoides guttipennis (Coquillett), Culicoides mulrenanni Beck, Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen), and Culicoides sanguisuga (Coquillett). C. guttipennis was found on a dead colobus monkey and a dead golden-headed lion tamarin; Culicoides husseyi Wirth & Blanton was collected from an unidentified, abandoned bird's nest. Ultraviolet light-equipped traps captured significantly more Culicoides specimens than traps with incandescent light. Half of the collected species previously have been associated with vertebrate pathogens, indicating a potential risk to captive animals. PMID:20569132

  5. Description of the Pupa of Culicoides crucifer Clastrier (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Ronderos, M M; Spinelli, G R; Keppler, R L F

    2013-10-01

    The pupa of Culicoides crucifer Clastrier is described, illustrated and photomicrographed by using binocular microscope and phase-contrast microscopy from material collected in an artificial container in Manaus, Brazil. The pupa shows features typical of pupae occurring in calm and clean waters, and it is compared with its similar congeners of the subgenus Haematomyiidium, Culicoides annuliductus Wirth and Culicoides debilipalpis Lutz.

  6. Morphology and DNA barcoding reveal three species in one: description of Culicoides cryptipulicaris sp. nov. and Culicoides quasipulicaris sp. nov. in the subgenus Culicoides.

    PubMed

    Talavera, S; Muñoz-Muñoz, F; Verdún, M; Pagès, N

    2017-06-01

    Species of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are well known for their importance in the field of medical and veterinary entomology. Culicoides spp. transmit a wide variety of pathogens, primarily viruses that affect animals and humans. In Europe, the most economically important disease transmitted by Culicoides is bluetongue (BT). Culicoides spp. have been recently involved as primary vectors for Schmallenberg disease. The taxonomy within the subgenus Culicoides has been historically difficult and reorganizations have been proposed regularly. The subgenus Culicoides includes species that are considered to be potential vectors for BT. High morphological intraspecific variability has been attributed to these species. This highlights the apparent presence of previously undetected cryptic species diversity in the subgenus. In the present study, a detailed morphological and molecular study of specimens belonging to Culicoides pulicaris s.l. and specimens resembling a cross between C. pulicaris and Culicoides punctatus revealed the presence of two new species: Culicoides cryptipulicaris and Culicoides quasipulicaris. Females of C. quasipulicaris and males of both species were morphologically distinguished from C. pulicaris (Linnaeus, 1758), whereas females of C. cryptipulicaris were identified using molecular techniques exclusively. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  7. Occurrence of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Tunisia, with emphasis on the bluetongue vector Culicoides imicola.

    PubMed

    Hammami, S; Bouzid, M; Hammou, F; Fakhfakh, E; Delecolle, J C

    2008-06-01

    Following the bluetongue (BT) outbreaks in Tunisia from 1999 to 2002, BTV (bluetongue virus) serotype 2 was isolated; however, no entomological investigation was performed. In the study presented here, we assessed the Culicoides species populations (particularly C. imicola) in proximity to the BT outbreaks locations, both as a retrospective analysis and to update the list of Culicoides species present in Tunisia. The insects were caught using light traps and the species identification was performed according to the standard entomological methods. This study reveaaled the presence of significant numbers of C. imicola in all the tested locations. In addition, we reported a new Culicoides species for the Tunisian fauna C. punctatus.

  8. New Neotropical Culicoides and redescription of Culicoides reticulatus Lutz (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Santarém, Maria Clara Alves; Da Trindade, Rosimeire Lopes; Da Silva, Tiago Do Nascimento; Castellón, Eloy Guillermo; Patiu, Cátia Antunes De Mello; Felippe-Bauer, Maria Luiza

    2014-05-13

    Seven new species of the Culicoides reticulatus species group are described and illustrated based on specimens from Colombia, Panama and Brazilian states of northern (Amazonas, Pará and Roraima) and southeast region (Rio de Janeiro). The new species are compared with their similar congener, Culicoides reticulatus Lutz, and a systematic key, table with numerical characters to the females of the species are provided. Redescription of Culicoides reticulatus Lutz is given based on type series deposited in the Ceratopogonidae Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Brazil. The distribution of these species is presented in figure 9.

  9. Innate Mammalian Immune Response to Culicoides Feeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hematophagous Culicoides spp. biting midges are of great agricultural importance as livestock and wildlife pests and as vectors of orbiviruses such as bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease, and African horse sickness viruses, as well as vesicular stomatitis, bovine ephemeral fever and Schmallenb...

  10. A morphological investigation of Culicoides spp. biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Alison

    2004-06-01

    Features of the antennae, maxillary palps, and mouthparts of the females of seven species of Culicoides spp. biting midges collected from a montane rainforest site in Trinidad, West Indies, were studied by light and scanning electron microscopy. Comparisons were made with two British species, Culicoides impunctatus and Culicoides nubeculosus. Species-specific differences were demonstrated in the camber and pitch of mandibular teeth, the size and shape of the subapical labral sensilla, the size and depth of the palpal sensory pit, and the number and shape of heads of the palpal sensilla. Counts of sensilla coeloconica and palpal sensilla were suggested as being contributory features for the prediction of host preference, indicating that Culicoides darlingtonae, Culicoides glabellus, Culicoides insinuatus, Culicoides paraensis, and Culicoides pseudodiabolicus were probably mammalophilic species. The host preferences of Culicoides heliconiae and Culicoides flavivenula could not be determined accurately.

  11. Pheromonal Control of Biting Midges (Culicoides Spp.).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    4 I. INTRODUCTION Biting midges, principally of the genus Culicoides, are important as vectors of human and animal diseases. Particularly, in the...this species could be held relatively easily in laboratory culture. II. OBJECTIVES * The principal objectives of the study were as follows. (1...their capacity to stimulate males sexually. These studies also examined whether killing the females or removing their wings affected the - stimulus

  12. Culicoides Biting Midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) of Kenya

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    The immature stages of fulvithorax are undescribed. Culicoides fulvithorax adults were reared from rotting banana and plantain stems in Cameroon...noting that breeding sites of this type were alter- natives to banana and plantain stems. In Nigeria, Dipeolu & Ogunrinade (1976) col- lected adults...adults (as pallidipennis) from rotting banana and plantain stems in Cam- eroon. Clastrier & Wirth (1961) reported (as pal- Zidipennis) two males from

  13. Laboratory Infection of Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) with Weldona Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weldona virus was originally isolated in 1990, from a pool of unidentified Ceratopogonidae collected near Weldona, Colorado. The ceratopogonids were probably Culicoides spp. but the natural insect vector of this virus remains unknown. We fed Weldona virus to Culicoides sonorensis Wirth and Jones in...

  14. Culicoides species attracted to horses with and without insect hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    van der Rijt, Renske; van den Boom, Robin; Jongema, Yde; van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M Sloet

    2008-10-01

    The aims of this study were to determine (1) which species of Culicoides is most commonly attracted to horses, (2) whether horses suffering insect hypersensitivity attract more Culicoides spp. than unaffected horses, and (3) the times when Culicoides spp. are most active. Horses affected by insect hypersensitivity and unaffected horses were placed inside mosquito netting tents for 30 min at different times of the day. All Culicoides spp. trapped inside the tents were collected and identified. C. obsoletus was the most common species found, followed by C. pulicaris. Healthy horses attracted slightly more midges than horses that were affected with insect hypersensitivity. All of the Culicoides species were most active at sunset, less so at sunrise and very few or no midges were trapped in the afternoon or at night.

  15. First detection of endosymbiotic bacteria in biting midges Culicoides pulicaris and Culicoides punctatus, important Palaearctic vectors of bluetongue virus.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S E; Rice, A; Hurst, G D D; Baylis, M

    2014-12-01

    Heritable bacteria have been highlighted as important components of vector biology, acting as required symbionts with an anabolic role, altering competence for disease transmission, and affecting patterns of gene flow by altering cross compatibility. In this paper, we tested eight U.K. species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) midge for the presence of five genera of endosymbiotic bacteria: Cardinium (Bacteroidales: Bacteroidaceae); Wolbachia (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae); Spiroplasma (Entomoplasmatales: Spiroplasmataceae); Arsenophonus (Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae), and Rickettsia (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae). Cardinium spp. were detected in both sexes of Culicoides pulicaris and Culicoides punctatus, two known vectors of bluetongue virus. Cardinium spp. were not detected in any other species, including the Culicoides obsoletus group, the main vector of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses in northern Europe. The other endosymbionts were not detected in any Culicoides species. The Cardinium strain detected in U.K. Culicoides species is very closely related to the Candidatus Cardinium hertigii group C, previously identified in Culicoides species in Asia. Further, we infer that the symbiont is not a sex ratio distorter and shows geographic variation in prevalence within a species. Despite its detection in several species of Culicoides that vector arboviruses worldwide, the absence of Cardinium in the C. obsoletus group suggests that infections of these symbionts may not be necessary to the arboviral vector competence of biting midges.

  16. Some New Records of Culicoides Species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abdigoudarzi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Biting midges of the genus Culicoides act as vectors for important diseases affecting humans and both wild and domestic animals. Collection of adult Culicoides specimens in the near vicinity of vertebrate hosts is the major part of any bluetongue surveillance plan. There are old records of Culicoides species dated from 1963, 1968 and 1975. Therefore, it was decided to collect different ceratopogonids members using a light trap. Methods: One night catching using light traps with a suction fan was performed at representative sites (25 places) located in North Western Provinces (Ardebil, Eastern Azerbaijan, Western Azerbaijan and Zanjan) of Iran (suspected farms for clinical records of Bluetongue virus or serodiagnosis of the Bluetongue virus). Samples were detected and identified primarily and were sent to a reference center for final verification. Results: Seven Culicoides species including (Culicoides circumscriptus, C. flavidus, C. longipennis, C. pulicaris, C. puncatatus, C. nubeculosus, and three species from Culicoides (Oecacta) are under study in reference laboratory in Poland and C. puncticollis were confirmed from Iran. Conclusion: Morphological and explanation of each species was regarded in this study. In comparison to old record, there are four new records of Culicoides species from Iran and one species is regarded suspected for viral transmission. PMID:28032099

  17. The salivary secretome of the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are hematophagous insects with over 1400 species distributed throughout the world. Many of these species are of particular agricultural importance as primary vectors of bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease and Schmallenberg viruses. Detailed s...

  18. Differential emergence of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from on-farm breeding substrates in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Geoffrey M; Jess, Stephen; Murchie, Archie K

    2013-05-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of a number of viral diseases worldwide. Following the unforeseen outbreak of bluetongue in northern Europe (2006–2009) there was a need to clarify on-farm breeding substrates utilized by temperate Culicoides spp. Six substrates (cow dung, cow slurry, horse dung, sheep dung, maize silage and soil) were investigated for Culicoides spp. emergence over a 31-week period. Overall, most Obsoletus group Culicoides emerged from the cow dung and the most Pulicaris group Culicoides emerged from the sheep dung. Furthermore, Culicoides of the Obsoletus group were found to be abundant in cow slurry and sheep dung. Temperature played a significant role in the emergence times of adult Culicoides. The Obsoletus group appear to have undergone 3 generations during the experimental period. The sex ratio of emergent Obsoletus group Culicoides was affected by substrate type, with a greater proportion of males emerging from cow dung and slurry compared with the other substrates.

  19. Culicoides midge trap enhancement with animal odour baits in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Mands, V; Kline, D L; Blackwell, A

    2004-12-01

    Examples of the commercial trap Mosquito Magnet Pro (MMP emitting attractant 1-octen-3-ol in carbon dioxide 500 mL/min generated from propane fuel), were run 24 h/day on the Isle of Skye, Scotland, during June-August 2001 and evaluated for catching Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). From 30 days trapping, the catch averaged 2626 +/- 1358 Culicoides females/trap/day (mean +/- SE, range 558 +/- 139 to 6088 +/- 3597, for five sets of six consecutive nights), predominantly the pest Culicoides impunctatus Goetghebuer (68% overall), plus C. vexans (Staeger) > C. delta Edwards > C. pulicaris (L.) > C. lupicaris Downs & Kettle > C. albicans (Winnertz) > other Culicoides spp. Attempts were made to enhance the odour baiting system by adding hexane-extracts (2.1 mg/day) of hair samples from large host animals, resulting in the following effects on Culicoides collections: sheep - 53 %, red deer - 26 %, calf + 20%, pony + 40%, water buffalo + 262%, with greatest increases for C. impunctatus and C. pulicaris. Serial concentrations of these animal extracts (10(-1) - 10(-3) x 2.2 g/mL) were assayed on parous female C. impunctatus response in a Y-tube olfactometer (air-flow 150 mL/min), and by electroantennogram (EAG) on Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen laboratory-reared parous females. Positive behavioural responses to host odours were dose-dependent: the water buffalo extract being most active (threshold 0.22 g/mL), similar to deer, whereas other host extracts were > or = 10-fold less active. Correspondingly, the EAG threshold was lowest for water buffalo, 10-fold greater for deer, calf and pony, but not detected for sheep. If the active component(s) of these host extracts can be identified and synthesized, they might be employed to improve the capture of Culicoides midges for local control by removal trapping.

  20. Two new species and new records of biting midges of the genus Culicoides from northwestern Argentina (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Gustavo Ricardo; Aybar, Cecilia Veggiani; Juri, María Julia Dantur; de Grosso, Mercedes Lizarralde; Marino, Pablo Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The following two new species of Culicoides from the Argentinean Yungas are described, illustrated and placed to subgenus or species group and compared with related congeners: Culicoides calchaqui Spinelli & Veggiani Aybar and Culicoides willinki Spinelli & Veggiani Aybar. Culicoides daedaloides Wirth & Blanton is recorded for the first time for Argentina and Culicoides pseudoheliconiae Felippe-Bauer is firstly mentioned from the northwestern region of the country. PMID:23903973

  1. Species diversity and seasonal abundance of Culicoides biting midges in northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Aybar, C A Veggiani; Juri, M J Dantur; De Grosso, M S Lizarralde; Spinelli, G R

    2010-03-01

    The species diversity and seasonal abundance of biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were studied in northwestern Argentina during the period 2003-2005. A total of 5437 Culicoides specimens were collected using CDC light traps in three areas of the mountainous rainforest area. The most common species were Culicoides paraensis (Goeldi) and C. insignis Lutz, Culicoides lahillei (Iches), C. venezuelensis Ortiz & Mirsa, C. debilipalpis Lutz and C. crescentis Wirth & Blanton were also collected. Culicoides paraensis was abundant during the summer, and C. insignis and C. lahillei during late summer and early fall. Accumulated rainfall was the climatic variable most related to fluctuation in abundance of C. paraensis.

  2. Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) taxonomy: current challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Harrup, L E; Bellis, G A; Balenghien, T; Garros, C

    2015-03-01

    Culicoides Latreille biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) cause a significant biting nuisance to humans, livestock and equines, and are the biological vectors of a range of internationally important pathogens of both veterinary and medical importance. Despite their economic significance, the delimitation and identification of species and evolutionary relationships between species within this genus remains at best problematic. To date no phylogenetic study has attempted to validate the subgeneric classification of the genus and the monophyly of many of the subgenera remains doubtful. Many informal species groupings are also known to exist but few are adequately described, further complicating accurate identification. Recent contributions to Culicoides taxonomy at the species level have revealed a high correlation between morphological and molecular analyses although molecular analyses are revealing the existence of cryptic species. This review considers the methods for studying the systematics of Culicoides using both morphological and genetic techniques, with a view to understanding the factors limiting our current understanding of Culicoides biology and hence arbovirus epidemiology. In addition, we examine the global status of Culicoides identification, highlighting areas that are poorly addressed, including the potential implementation of emerging technologies. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) taxonomy: Current challenges and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Harrup, L.E.; Bellis, G.A.; Balenghien, T.; Garros, C.

    2015-01-01

    Culicoides Latreille biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) cause a significant biting nuisance to humans, livestock and equines, and are the biological vectors of a range of internationally important pathogens of both veterinary and medical importance. Despite their economic significance, the delimitation and identification of species and evolutionary relationships between species within this genus remains at best problematic. To date no phylogenetic study has attempted to validate the subgeneric classification of the genus and the monophyly of many of the subgenera remains doubtful. Many informal species groupings are also known to exist but few are adequately described, further complicating accurate identification. Recent contributions to Culicoides taxonomy at the species level have revealed a high correlation between morphological and molecular analyses although molecular analyses are revealing the existence of cryptic species. This review considers the methods for studying the systematics of Culicoides using both morphological and genetic techniques, with a view to understanding the factors limiting our current understanding of Culicoides biology and hence arbovirus epidemiology. In addition, we examine the global status of Culicoides identification, highlighting areas that are poorly addressed, including the potential implementation of emerging technologies. PMID:25535946

  4. Does covering of farm-associated Culicoides larval habitat reduce adult populations in the United Kingdom?

    PubMed

    Harrup, L E; Gubbins, S; Barber, J; Denison, E; Mellor, P S; Purse, B V; Carpenter, S

    2014-03-17

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are the biological vectors of a range of internationally important arboviruses of livestock, including bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently emerging Schmallenberg virus (SBV). Culicoides species in the subgenus Avaritia (in the UK: Culicoides obsoletus Meigen, Culicoides scoticus Downes & Kettle, Culicoides dewulfi Goetghebuer and Culicoides chiopterus Meigen) have been implicated in BTV transmission in northern Europe and to a varying degree utilise cattle dung as a larval development substrate. The collection of cattle dung into heaps on farms provides a localised source of Culicoides emergence in close proximity to livestock. This study assesses the impact of covering dung heaps prior to the onset of adult Culicoides activity with the aim of reducing recruitment to the local adult populations at four livestock farms in England. Light suction trap catches of adult Culicoides from these farms were compared with those from four untreated control farms from a wide geographic range across the UK. It was demonstrated that implementing control of emergence from dung heaps did not have a significant impact upon the local adult subgenus Avaritia abundance at the treated farm holdings and that the onset of Culicoides activity was similarly unaffected. Use of this method in isolation is unlikely to have an effect in reducing the risk of BTV and SBV transmission. The implications of these results for control of farm-associated Culicoides in Europe are discussed.

  5. Impact of freezing on the emergence of Culicoides chiopterus and Culicoides dewulfi from bovine dung.

    PubMed

    Steinke, S; Lühken, R; Kiel, E

    2015-04-15

    The emergence of Culicoides chiopterus (Meigen), 1830 and C. dewulfi Goetghebuer, 1936 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from cowpats in northwestern Germany was investigated. In order to investigate the survival of both species at low temperatures, cowpat subsamples were frozen for 48h at -18 and -21°C. Emergence from frozen and non-frozen samples was compared. The number of emerging adults of C. chiopterus from samples frozen at -18°C was greatly reduced and no emergence was observed from samples frozen at -21°C. No adult C. dewulfi emerged from frozen samples, suggesting this species is less resistant to these temperatures, compared to C. chiopterus.

  6. The geographical distribution and first molecular analysis of Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species in the Southern and Southeastern Turkey during the 2012 outbreak of bovine ephemeral fever.

    PubMed

    Dik, B; Muz, D; Muz, M N; Uslu, U

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the geographical distribution and molecular analysis of Culicoides species in the Southern and Southeastern Turkey during the 2012 outbreak of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF). The midge specimens caught by Onderstepoort-type light traps from livestock farms were tested for molecular evidence of existence of viral genome. Blood specimens were collected from clinically BEF-suspected acute febrile cattle. Total nucleic acid samples obtained from field specimens were checked against the BEF virus G gene and Culicoides internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) gene. A total of 20,845 Culicoides specimens (20,569 ♀♀, 276 ♂♂) comprising 11 species (Culicoides badooshensis, Culicoides circumscriptus, Culicoides gejgelensis, Culicoides imicola, Culicoides kibunensis, Culicoides longipennis, Culicoides newsteadi, Culicoides nubeculosus, Culicoides odiatus, Culicoides punctatus, Culicoides schultzei, Culicoides spp.) were collected. C. schultzei (18,032) was found as the dominant species and followed by C. imicola (1,857), C. nubeculosus complex (545), and C. circumscriptus (259), respectively. C. kibunensis was identified as new species for this region. PCR positivity of BEF was found 37.14% (13/35) in blood samples whereas no viral genome was obtained from Culicoides specimens. Culicoides spp. ITS-1 gene sequences were analyzed phylogenetically with GenBank ITS-1 sequences. Molecular homology of Culicoides ITS-1 gene was ranged between 62.74 and 71.39%. The results described first molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of Culicoides ITS-1 gene with reference to the 2012 BEF outbreak in Turkey.

  7. Oropouche virus. IV. Laboratory transmission by Culicoides paraensis.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, F P; Hoch, A L; Gomes, M L; Roberts, D R

    1981-01-01

    Biological transmission of Oropouche (ORO) virus by Culicoides paraensis (Goeldi) has been successfully demonstrated in the laboratory. Adult Culicoides, collected in an area where ORO virus was absent, were infected by feeding on viremic hamsters and then periodically exposed to susceptible hamsters at specific intervals post-infectious blood meal. These C. paraensis were capable of biological transmission of the virus 4-9 days post-feeding on viremic hamsters circulating 6.7-9.9 log10SMLD50/ml virus. Infection rates of 54% and 80% were found for C. paraensis assayed 7 days post-feeding. Virus transmission rates for these experiments were 83% and 25%, respectively. No evidence of mechanical transmission of ORO virus by C. paraensis was observed when interrupted feeding of Culicoides on viremic hamsters was followed by feeding on susceptible hamsters.

  8. Culicoides biting midges, arboviruses and public health in Europe.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Simon; Groschup, Martin H; Garros, Claire; Felippe-Bauer, Maria Luiza; Purse, Bethan V

    2013-10-01

    The emergence of multiple strains of bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recent discovery of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in Europe have highlighted the fact that exotic Culicoides-borne arboviruses from remote geographic areas can enter and spread rapidly in this region. This review considers the potential for this phenomenon to impact on human health in Europe, by examining evidence of the role of Culicoides biting midges in the zoonotic transmission and person-to-person spread of arboviruses worldwide. To date, the only arbovirus identified as being primarily transmitted by Culicoides to and between humans is Oropouche virus (OROV). This member of the genus Orthobunyavirus causes major epidemics of febrile illness in human populations of South and Central America and the Caribbean. We examine factors promoting sustained outbreaks of OROV in Brazil from an entomological perspective and assess aspects of the epidemiology of this arbovirus that are currently poorly understood, but may influence the risk of incursion into Europe. We then review the secondary and rarely reported role of Culicoides in the transmission of high-profile zoonotic infections, while critically reviewing evidence of this phenomenon in endemic transmission and place this in context with the presence of other potential vector groups in Europe. Scenarios for the incursions of Culicoides-borne human-to-human transmitted and zoonotic arboviruses are then discussed, along with control measures that could be employed to reduce their impact. These measures are placed in the context of legislative measures used during current and ongoing outbreaks of Culicoides-borne arboviruses in Europe, involving both veterinary and public health sectors. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that Culicoides dewulfi should not be considered part of the Culicoides obsoletus complex.

    PubMed

    Schwenkenbecher, J M; Mordue, A J; Piertney, S B

    2009-08-01

    Analysis of DNA sequence data has proven invaluable for defining the relationships among taxa, as well as resolving their evolutionary histories. Here, we analyzed DNA sequence variation of one mitochondrial gene (COI) and two nuclear regions (ITSI and II) to clarify the phylogenetic position of Culicoides dewulfi, a midge species widely spread in Europe and a suspected vector for bluetongue virus. Various authors have described C. dewulfi either as part of the Culicoides obsoletus sensu lato complex or as a separate taxonomic group. A maximum likelihood phylogeny, based upon an optimal model of sequence evolution, placed C. dewulfi outwith the C. obsoletus s.l. complex. Shimodaira-Hasegawa test highlighted that this topology was significantly more likely than any topology that placed C. dewulfi anywhere else in the phylogeny. As such, C. dewulfi should not be considered part of the C. obsoletus s.l. complex and instead be treated as a separate group, phylogenetically close to the classical Old World vector C. imicola.

  10. Ecology of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in southcentral Florida and experimental Culicoides vectors of the avian hematozoan Haemoproteus danilewskyi Kruse.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Greiner, Ellis C

    2003-01-01

    To determine the vectors of Haemoproteus danilewskyi in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in southcentral Florida (USA), we conducted a 2 yr study from January 1993 to December 1995 of the presence and seasonal abundance of Culicoides spp. Of the 14 species of Culicoides captured in Centers for Disease Control light traps, 10 were ornithophilic. Of these, C. edeni, C. knowltoni, C. stellifer, C. beckae, and C. arboricola were most abundant, representing 46% of the total collection and 99% of the ornithophilic collection. The presence of C. stellifer in Bennett trap collections represents a new biting record for this species on passerine birds. We experimentally challenged the most abundant ornithophilic species to determine which were capable of supporting sporogonic development of H. danilewskyi. Culicoides edeni, C. knowltoni, and C. arboricola supported sporogonic development of H. danilewskyi.

  11. Field studies on Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) activity and response to deltamethrin applications to sheep in northeastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Mullens, Bradley A; Gerry, Alec C; Monteys, Victor Sarto I; Pinna, M; González, A

    2010-01-01

    An enclosure trapping experiment compared numbers and engorgement of Culicoides spp. taken from treated sheep (7.5% deltamethrin) to Culicoides from untreated sheep. Attack rates were low (0.2/min), but 58% of Culicoides obsoletus s.l. and 67% of Culicoides parroti Kieffer engorged on untreated sheep, and no engorgement occurred on treated sheep on 0 and 4 d posttreatment. A UV light trap in a livestock barn collected eight Culicoides spp. (510 individuals), dominated by C. obsoletus (Meigen) (68%), Culicoides imicola Kieffer (19%), Culicoides circumscriptus Kieffer (8%), and Culicoides alazanicus Dzhafarov (4%). A more powerful but nonattractive fan trap collected five species (121 individuals) dominated by C. obsoletus (48%), C. imicola (36%), C. alazanicus (8%), and C. circumscriptus (7%). Parity of C. obsoletus and C. imicola did not vary between the light and fan traps. Engorged Culicoides in the barn (33 C. obsoletus and three C. imicola) had fed on sheep or goats (precipitin test).

  12. Detection of Low-Level Cardinium and Wolbachia Infections in Culicoides

    PubMed Central

    Mee, Peter T.; Weeks, Andrew R.; Walker, Peter J.; Hoffmann, Ary A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts have been identified as potentially useful biological control agents for a range of invertebrate vectors of disease. Previous studies of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species using conventional PCR assays have provided evidence of Wolbachia (1/33) and Cardinium (8/33) infections. Here, we screened 20 species of Culicoides for Wolbachia and Cardinium, utilizing a combination of conventional PCR and more sensitive quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Low levels of Cardinium DNA were detected in females of all but one of the Culicoides species screened, and low levels of Wolbachia were detected in females of 9 of the 20 Culicoides species. Sequence analysis based on partial 16S rRNA gene and gyrB sequences identified “Candidatus Cardinium hertigii” from group C, which has previously been identified in Culicoides from Japan, Israel, and the United Kingdom. Wolbachia strains detected in this study showed 98 to 99% sequence identity to Wolbachia previously detected from Culicoides based on the 16S rRNA gene, whereas a strain with a novel wsp sequence was identified in Culicoides narrabeenensis. Cardinium isolates grouped to geographical regions independent of the host Culicoides species, suggesting possible geographical barriers to Cardinium movement. Screening also identified Asaia bacteria in Culicoides. These findings point to a diversity of low-level endosymbiont infections in Culicoides, providing candidates for further characterization and highlighting the widespread occurrence of these endosymbionts in this insect group. PMID:26150447

  13. Host preferences of ornithophilic biting midges of the genus Culicoides in the Eastern Balkans.

    PubMed

    Bobeva, A; Zehtindjiev, P; Ilieva, M; Dimitrov, D; Mathis, A; Bensch, S

    2015-09-01

    Many biting midges of the genus Culicoides Latreille, 1809 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are competent vectors of a diverse number of pathogens. The identification of their feeding behaviour and of vector-host associations is essential for understanding their transmission capacity. By applying two different nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, of which one targeted the avian cyt b gene and the other targeted the COI gene of a wide range of vertebrates, we identified the blood hosts of six biting midge species including Culicoides circumscriptus, Culicoides festivipennis, Culicoides punctatus, Culicoides pictipennis, Culicoides alazanicus and Culicoides cf. griseidorsum, the latter two of which are reported in Bulgaria for the first time. Bird DNA was found in 50.6% of 95 investigated bloodmeals, whereas mammalian DNA was identified in 13.7%. Two Culicoides species were found to feed on both birds and mammals. There was remarkable diversity in the range of avian hosts: 23 species from four orders were identified in the abdomens of four Culicoides species. The most common bird species identified was the magpie, Pica pica (n = 7), which was registered in all four ornithophilic biting midge species. Six bloodmeals from the great tit, Parus major, were recorded only in C. alazanicus. None of the studied species of Culicoides appeared to be restricted to a single avian host. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  14. Detection of Low-Level Cardinium and Wolbachia Infections in Culicoides.

    PubMed

    Mee, Peter T; Weeks, Andrew R; Walker, Peter J; Hoffmann, Ary A; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts have been identified as potentially useful biological control agents for a range of invertebrate vectors of disease. Previous studies of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species using conventional PCR assays have provided evidence of Wolbachia (1/33) and Cardinium (8/33) infections. Here, we screened 20 species of Culicoides for Wolbachia and Cardinium, utilizing a combination of conventional PCR and more sensitive quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Low levels of Cardinium DNA were detected in females of all but one of the Culicoides species screened, and low levels of Wolbachia were detected in females of 9 of the 20 Culicoides species. Sequence analysis based on partial 16S rRNA gene and gyrB sequences identified "Candidatus Cardinium hertigii" from group C, which has previously been identified in Culicoides from Japan, Israel, and the United Kingdom. Wolbachia strains detected in this study showed 98 to 99% sequence identity to Wolbachia previously detected from Culicoides based on the 16S rRNA gene, whereas a strain with a novel wsp sequence was identified in Culicoides narrabeenensis. Cardinium isolates grouped to geographical regions independent of the host Culicoides species, suggesting possible geographical barriers to Cardinium movement. Screening also identified Asaia bacteria in Culicoides. These findings point to a diversity of low-level endosymbiont infections in Culicoides, providing candidates for further characterization and highlighting the widespread occurrence of these endosymbionts in this insect group. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Inducing RNA interference in the arbovirus vector, Culicoides sonorensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biting midges in the genus Culicoides are important vectors of arboviral diseases, including Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease, Bluetongue, and likely Schmallenberg, which cause significant economic burden worldwide. Research on these vectors has been hindered by the lack of a sequenced genome, the diff...

  16. Factors affecting Culicoides species composition and abundance in avian nests.

    PubMed

    Martínez-de la Puente, J; Merino, S; Tomás, G; Moreno, J; Morales, J; Lobato, E; Talavera, S; Sarto I Monteys, V

    2009-08-01

    Mechanisms affecting patterns of vector distribution among host individuals may influence the population and evolutionary dynamics of vectors, hosts and the parasites transmitted. We studied the role of different factors affecting the species composition and abundance of Culicoides found in nests of the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus). We identified 1531 females and 2 males of 7 different Culicoides species in nests, with C. simulator being the most abundant species, followed by C. kibunensis, C. festivipennis, C. segnis, C. truncorum, C. pictipennis and C. circumscriptus. We conducted a medicationxfumigation experiment randomly assigning bird's nests to different treatments, thereby generating groups of medicated and control pairs breeding in fumigated and control nests. Medicated pairs were injected with the anti-malarial drug Primaquine diluted in saline solution while control pairs were injected with saline solution. The fumigation treatment was carried out using insecticide solution or water for fumigated and control nests respectively. Brood size was the main factor associated with the abundance of biting midges probably because more nestlings may produce higher quantities of vector attractants. In addition, birds medicated against haemoparasites breeding in non-fumigated nests supported a higher abundance of C. festivipennis than the rest of the groups. Also, we found that the fumigation treatment reduced the abundance of engorged Culicoides in both medicated and control nests, thus indicating a reduction of feeding success produced by the insecticide. These results represent the first evidence for the role of different factors in affecting the Culicoides infracommunity in wild avian nests.

  17. Schmallenberg virus in Culicoides spp. biting midges, the Netherlands, 2011.

    PubMed

    Elbers, Armin R W; Meiswinkel, Rudy; van Weezep, Erik; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M; Kooi, Engbert A

    2013-01-01

    To determine which species of Culicoides biting midges carry Schmallenberg virus (SBV), we assayed midges collected in the Netherlands during autumn 2011. SBV RNA was found in C. scoticus, C. obsoletus sensu stricto, and C. chiopterus. The high proportion of infected midges might explain the rapid spread of SBV throughout Europe.

  18. Schmallenberg Virus in Culicoides spp. Biting Midges, the Netherlands, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Meiswinkel, Rudy; van Weezep, Erik; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M.; Kooi, Engbert A.

    2013-01-01

    To determine which species of Culicoides biting midges carry Schmallenberg virus (SBV), we assayed midges collected in the Netherlands during autumn 2011. SBV RNA was found in C. scoticus, C. obsoletus sensu stricto, and C. chiopterus. The high proportion of infected midges might explain the rapid spread of SBV throughout Europe. PMID:23260040

  19. Evaluation of Insecticides, Clothing Repellents, and other Approaches to the Control of Sand Flies, Culicoides spp

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    reverse alde If nec•seary &,d !drntlly by block q nmb*r) Seasonal population dynamics, Culicoides spp ., treated screens, habitat characterization, and...ment trap collections were collected during and immediately after the spray application. This is particularly true for Culicoides spp . since they... Culicoides spp . attacks by this method. An area 12 m X 12 m was enclosed by a 2 m high net barrier. In different tests two different chemicals were used

  20. Flight and swarming behaviour of Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) on a livestock farm in Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Gonza Lez, Mikel; Alarco N-Elbal, Pedro M; Venter, Gert J; Lo Pez, Sergio

    2017-06-30

    The efficacy of sweep nets and a CDC white light-suction trap for the sampling of Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were compared on a livestock farm in Northern Spain during the Summer of 2013. A total of 6,082 specimens representing 26 species were collected with sweep nets in 4 areas at di erent heights (ground level, 1.5 m, and 3 m), and 8,463 specimens representing 28 species with a single white light trap. Eight species - Culicoides brunnicans, Culicoides punctatus, Culicoides obsoletus/Culicoides scoticus, Culicoides lupicaris, Culcoides picturatus, Culicoides achrayi, and Culicoides simulator - were dominant and accounted for 97.4% and 97.2% of the total specimens collected with both methods, sweep nets, and light traps, respectively. The sex ratios with sweep netting and light trapping were strongly female biased (78.4% and 97.1%, respectively). Nulliparous and parous females were predominantly captured with both methods. A high percentage (17%) of gravid females was, however, captured on manure at ground level while sweeping. Searches for male swarms revealed the presence of several C. punctatus swarms consisting of 26 to 196 males and 3 swarms of C. obsoletus that ranged from 1 to 12 males in size. This study suggested that both methods are suitable and complementary tools for Culicoides sampling.

  1. The prevalence of Culicoides spp. in 3 geographic areas of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Christie; Venter, Estelle; Steyn, Jumari; Coetzee, Peter; van Vuuren, Moritz; Crafford, Jan; Schütte, Christine; Venter, Gert

    2016-09-30

    The seasonal abundance of Culicoides midges, the vector of Bluetongue and African horse sickness viruses (BTV/AHSV) and the presence of viruses in midges were determined in 3 geographic areas in South Africa. In the Onderstepoort area, more than 500,000 Culicoides midges belonging to 27 species were collected. Eighteen midge species were collected throughout Winter and the presence of AHSV and BTV RNA in midges was detected using real time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The nucleic acid of AHSV was found in 12 pools out of total pools of 35 Culicoides. Twenty‑five Culicoides species were detected in the Mnisi area. The RNA of BTV was detected in 75.9% of the midge pools collected during Winter and 51.2% of those collected during Autumn. Antibodies for BTV were detected in 95% of cattle sampled using a competitive enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA). The dominant species in these 2 areas was Culicoides imicola. Eight Culicoides species were collected in Namaqualand. Culicoides imicola represented the 0.9% and Culicoides bolitinos the 1.5% of total catches, respectively. Antibodies for AHSV were detected in 4.4% of 874 equines tested using an indirect ELISA. Results showed that transmission of AHSV and BTV can carry on throughout Winter and the outbreak may begin as soon as Culicoides populations reach a certain critical level.

  2. Behavior of larval Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in response to an invertebrate predator, Hydra Littoralis (Anthomedusae: Hydridae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Larvae of Culicoides sonorensis a blood feeding ceratopogonid are aquatic. In their natural habitat they are exposed to numerous predators. Predator avoidance behavior has not been studied in most Culicoides spp. Based on laboratory data the larvae of Culicoides sonorensis behave differently when cn...

  3. Environmental Drivers of Culicoides Phenology: How Important Is Species-Specific Variation When Determining Disease Policy?

    PubMed Central

    Searle, Kate R.; Barber, James; Stubbins, Francesca; Labuschagne, Karien; Carpenter, Simon; Butler, Adam; Denison, Eric; Sanders, Christopher; Mellor, Philip S.; Wilson, Anthony; Nelson, Noel; Gubbins, Simon; Purse, Bethan V.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2006, arboviruses transmitted by Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have caused significant disruption to ruminant production in northern Europe. The most serious incursions involved strains of bluetongue virus (BTV), which cause bluetongue (BT) disease. To control spread of BTV, movement of susceptible livestock is restricted with economic and animal welfare impacts. The timing of BTV transmission in temperate regions is partly determined by the seasonal presence of adult Culicoides females. Legislative measures therefore allow for the relaxation of ruminant movement restrictions during winter, when nightly light-suction trap catches of Culicoides fall below a threshold (the ‘seasonally vector free period’: SVFP). We analysed five years of time-series surveillance data from light-suction trapping in the UK to investigate whether significant inter-specific and yearly variation in adult phenology exists, and whether the SVFP is predictable from environmental factors. Because female vector Culicoides are not easily morphologically separated, inter-specific comparisons in phenology were drawn from male populations. We demonstrate significant inter-specific differences in Culicoides adult phenology with the season of Culicoides scoticus approximately eight weeks shorter than Culicoides obsoletus. Species-specific differences in the length of the SVFP were related to host density and local variation in landscape habitat. When the Avaritia Culicoides females were modelled as a group (as utilised in the SFVP), we were unable to detect links between environmental drivers and phenological metrics. We conclude that the current treatment of Avaritia Culicoides as a single group inhibits understanding of environmentally-driven spatial variation in species phenology and hinders the development of models for predicting the SVFP from environmental factors. Culicoides surveillance methods should be adapted to focus on concentrated assessments of species

  4. Environmental drivers of Culicoides phenology: how important is species-specific variation when determining disease policy?

    PubMed

    Searle, Kate R; Barber, James; Stubbins, Francesca; Labuschagne, Karien; Carpenter, Simon; Butler, Adam; Denison, Eric; Sanders, Christopher; Mellor, Philip S; Wilson, Anthony; Nelson, Noel; Gubbins, Simon; Purse, Bethan V

    2014-01-01

    Since 2006, arboviruses transmitted by Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have caused significant disruption to ruminant production in northern Europe. The most serious incursions involved strains of bluetongue virus (BTV), which cause bluetongue (BT) disease. To control spread of BTV, movement of susceptible livestock is restricted with economic and animal welfare impacts. The timing of BTV transmission in temperate regions is partly determined by the seasonal presence of adult Culicoides females. Legislative measures therefore allow for the relaxation of ruminant movement restrictions during winter, when nightly light-suction trap catches of Culicoides fall below a threshold (the 'seasonally vector free period': SVFP). We analysed five years of time-series surveillance data from light-suction trapping in the UK to investigate whether significant inter-specific and yearly variation in adult phenology exists, and whether the SVFP is predictable from environmental factors. Because female vector Culicoides are not easily morphologically separated, inter-specific comparisons in phenology were drawn from male populations. We demonstrate significant inter-specific differences in Culicoides adult phenology with the season of Culicoides scoticus approximately eight weeks shorter than Culicoides obsoletus. Species-specific differences in the length of the SVFP were related to host density and local variation in landscape habitat. When the Avaritia Culicoides females were modelled as a group (as utilised in the SFVP), we were unable to detect links between environmental drivers and phenological metrics. We conclude that the current treatment of Avaritia Culicoides as a single group inhibits understanding of environmentally-driven spatial variation in species phenology and hinders the development of models for predicting the SVFP from environmental factors. Culicoides surveillance methods should be adapted to focus on concentrated assessments of species

  5. The Hypersensitivity of Horses to Culicoides Bites in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Gail S.; Belton, Peter; Kleider, Nicholas

    1988-01-01

    Culicoides hypersensitivity is a chronic, recurrent, seasonal dermatitis of horses that has a worldwide distribution, but has only recently been reported in Canada. It is characterized by intense pruritus resulting in lesions associated with self-induced trauma. A survey of veterinarians and horse-owners in British Columbia showed no differences in susceptibility due to the sex, color, breed, or height of the horses. The prevalence of the disease in the 209 horses surveyed was 26%. Horses sharing the same pasture could be unaffected. The disease was reported primarily from southwestern British Columbia; it occurred between April and October and usually affected the ventral midline, mane, and tail. Horses were generally less than nine years old when the clinical signs first appeared ([unk]=5.9 yr). Culicoides hypersensitivity was common in the lineage of several affected horses, possibly indicating a genetic susceptibility. Most cases were severe enough to require veterinary attention and some horses were euthanized. PMID:17423117

  6. The salivary secretome of the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis

    PubMed Central

    Lehiy, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are hematophagous insects with over 1400 species distributed throughout the world. Many of these species are of particular agricultural importance as primary vectors of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses, yet little is known about Culicoides genomics and proteomics. Detailed studies of members from other blood-feeding Dipteran families, including those of mosquito (Culicidae) and black fly (Simuliidae), have shown that protein components within the insect’s saliva facilitate the blood feeding process. To determine the protein components in Culicoides sonorensis midges, secreted saliva was collected for peptide sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry. Forty-five secreted proteins were identified, including members of the D7 odorant binding protein family, Kunitz-like serine protease inhibitors, maltase, trypsin, and six novel proteins unique to C. sonorensis. Identifying the complex myriad of proteins in saliva from blood-feeding Dipteran species is critical for understanding their role in blood feeding, arbovirus transmission, and possibly the resulting disease pathogenesis. PMID:24949243

  7. Bluetongue outbreaks: Looking for effective control strategies against Culicoides vectors.

    PubMed

    Benelli, Giovanni; Buttazzoni, Luca; Canale, Angelo; D'Andrea, Armando; Del Serrone, Paola; Delrio, Gavino; Foxi, Cipriano; Mariani, Susanna; Savini, Giovanni; Vadivalagan, Chithravel; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Toniolo, Chiara; Nicoletti, Marcello; Serafini, Mauro

    2017-05-20

    Several arthropod-borne diseases are now rising with increasing impact and risks for public health, due to environmental changes and resistance to pesticides currently marketed. In addition to community surveillance programs and a careful management of herds, a next-generation of effective products is urgently needed to control the spread of these diseases, with special reference to arboviral ones. Natural product research can afford alternative solutions. Recently, a re-emerging of bluetongue disease is ongoing in Italy. Bluetongue is a viral disease that affects ruminants and is spread through the bite of bloodsucking insects, especially Culicoides species. In this review, we focused on the importance of vector control programs for prevention or bluetongue outbreaks, outlining the lack of effective tools in the fight against Culicoides vectors. Then, we analyzed a field case study in Sardinia (Italy) concerning the utilization of the neem cake (Azadirachta indica), to control young instar populations of Culicoides biting midges, the vectors of bluetongue virus. Neem cake is a cheap and eco-friendly by-product obtained from the extraction of neem oil. Overall, we propose that the employ of neem extraction by-products as aqueous formulations in muddy sites close to livestock grazing areas may represent an effective tool in the fight against the spread of bluetongue virus in the Mediterranean areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Salivary gland extracts of Culicoides sonorensis inhibit murine lymphocyte proliferation and NO production by macrophages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides biting midges serve as vectors of pathogens affecting humans and domestic animals. Culicoides sonorensis is a vector of several arboviruses in North America that cause substantial economic losses to the U.S. livestock industry. Previous studies showed that C. sonorensis saliva, like the s...

  9. Collection and analysis of salivary proteins from the biting midge Culicoides nubeculosus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salivary proteins of hematophagous Culicoides spp. are thought to play an important role in pathogen transmission and skin hypersensitivity. Analysis of these proteins, however, has been problematic due to the difficulty in obtaining adequate amounts of secreted Culicoides saliva. In the current stu...

  10. Evaluation of in vitro methods for assessment of infection of Australian Culicoides spp. with bluetongue viruses.

    PubMed

    Van der Saag, Matthew; Nicholas, Adrian; Ward, Michael; Kirkland, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Biting midges from the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are the vectors of several globally important arboviruses that affect livestock. These include orbiviruses from the bluetongue virus (BTV) and African horse sickness virus (AHSV) groups and members of the Simbu serogroup of orthobunyaviruses, such as the recently emerged Schmallenberg virus. In this article, the authors evaluate several methods for feeding wild‑caught Australian Culicoides on BTV infected preparations of blood and sucrose. Feeding Culicoides on the membrane of embryonated chicken eggs was identified as the preferred feeding method. Although, cotton wool pads soaked in either virus‑infected blood or virus‑sucrose mixtures were also successful. A non‑destructive nucleic acid extraction technique for the detection of viral RNA in Culicoides was also evaluated as it allows for readily differentiating infected from non‑infected Culicoides.

  11. Does covering of farm-associated Culicoides larval habitat reduce adult populations in the United Kingdom?☆

    PubMed Central

    Harrup, L.E.; Gubbins, S.; Barber, J.; Denison, E.; Mellor, P.S.; Purse, B.V.; Carpenter, S.

    2014-01-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are the biological vectors of a range of internationally important arboviruses of livestock, including bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently emerging Schmallenberg virus (SBV). Culicoides species in the subgenus Avaritia (in the UK: Culicoides obsoletus Meigen, Culicoides scoticus Downes & Kettle, Culicoides dewulfi Goetghebuer and Culicoides chiopterus Meigen) have been implicated in BTV transmission in northern Europe and to a varying degree utilise cattle dung as a larval development substrate. The collection of cattle dung into heaps on farms provides a localised source of Culicoides emergence in close proximity to livestock. This study assesses the impact of covering dung heaps prior to the onset of adult Culicoides activity with the aim of reducing recruitment to the local adult populations at four livestock farms in England. Light suction trap catches of adult Culicoides from these farms were compared with those from four untreated control farms from a wide geographic range across the UK. It was demonstrated that implementing control of emergence from dung heaps did not have a significant impact upon the local adult subgenus Avaritia abundance at the treated farm holdings and that the onset of Culicoides activity was similarly unaffected. Use of this method in isolation is unlikely to have an effect in reducing the risk of BTV and SBV transmission. The implications of these results for control of farm-associated Culicoides in Europe are discussed. PMID:24472769

  12. Culicoides species composition and environmental factors influencing African horse sickness distribution at three sites in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, Danica; Piketh, Stuart; Labuschagne, Karien; Venter, Gert; Greyling, Telane; Mienie, Charlotte; de Waal, Tania; van Hamburg, Huib

    2016-11-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) is one of the most lethal infectious, non-contagious, vector-borne disease of equids. The causative agent, African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is transmitted via Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). AHS is endemic to Namibia but detailed studies of Culicoides communities and influencing environmental parameters are limited. This study aims to determine the Culicoides species composition at three different sites and to assess environmental parameters influencing the geographical distribution of AHS in Namibia. Weekly collections of Culicoides were made during the AHS peak season from January to May for 2013 and 2014 using the Onderstepoort 220V UV-light trap. Out of 397 collections made, 124 collections (3287 Culicoides) were analysed for AHSV presence with RT-qPCR. A total of 295 collections were analysed for total Culicoides (all collected Culicoides individuals) and in 75% of these collections the Culicoides were identified to species level. C. imicola was the dominant species with proportional representation of 29.9%. C. subschultzei, C. exspectator and C. ravus each contribute more than 10% to the species composition. The lowest number of Culicoides was collected at Aus 9980, a total of 21819 at Windhoek and the highest number at Okahandja 47343. AHSV was present at all three sites during 2013 but only in Windhoek and Okahandja during 2014. Multivariate analyses of data from the two year survey indicate the environmental parameters in order of importance for the distribution of AHS in Namibia as precipitation>temperature>clay>relative humidity>NDVI. The implication of these findings is that any precipitation event increases Culicoides numbers significantly. Together with these results the high number of species found of which little is known regarding their vector competence, add to the complexity of the distribution of AHS in Namibia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuevo Observatorio Virtual Argentino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissera, P. B.

    We summarized the main events in the creation of the Nuevo Observatorio Virtual Argentino (NOVA) and its objectives. We also discuss the present advances and the goals for the near future. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  14. Feeding behaviour of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) on cattle and sheep in northeast Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Culicoides spp. play an important role in the transmission of several vector-borne pathogens such as Bluetongue and Schmallenberg virus in Europe. To better understand the biology of local Culicoides species, a study divided into three parts was performed in northeast Germany to elucidate the feeding activity patterns (study A), preferential landing and feeding sites (study B) and host feeding preferences (study C) of Culicoides spp. using cattle and sheep as baits. Methods In study A, the activity of Culicoides spp. was monitored over a 72 h period by collecting insects at regular intervals from the interior of drop traps with cattle or sheep standing inside. In study B, Culicoides spp. were directly aspirated from the coat and fleece of cattle and sheep during the peak activity period of Culicoides. In study C, Culicoides spp. were collected using drop traps with either cattle or sheep standing inside and located 10 m apart. Results In study A, 3,545 Culicoides midges belonging to 13 species were collected, peak activity was observed at sunset. In study B, 2,024 Culicoides midges were collected. A significantly higher number of midges was collected from the belly and flank of cattle in comparison to their head region. In study C, 3,710 Culicoides midges were collected; 3,077 (83%) originated from cattle and 633 (17%) from sheep. Nearly half (46.7%) of the midges collected from cattle were engorged, significantly more than the number of engorged midges collected from sheep (7.5%). Culicoides from the Obsoletus complex (C. obsoletus and C. scoticus) were the most common Culicoides species encountered, followed by C. punctatus. Other species identified were C. dewulfi, C. chiopterus, C. pulicaris, C. lupicaris, C. pallidicornis, C. subfascipennis, C. achrayi, C. stigma, C. griseidorsum and C. subfagineus, the last two species are reported for the first time in Germany. Engorged C. chiopterus were collected in relatively high numbers from sheep

  15. Feeding behaviour of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) on cattle and sheep in northeast Germany.

    PubMed

    Ayllón, Tania; Nijhof, Ard M; Weiher, Wiebke; Bauer, Burkhard; Allène, Xavier; Clausen, Peter-Henning

    2014-01-18

    Culicoides spp. play an important role in the transmission of several vector-borne pathogens such as Bluetongue and Schmallenberg virus in Europe. To better understand the biology of local Culicoides species, a study divided into three parts was performed in northeast Germany to elucidate the feeding activity patterns (study A), preferential landing and feeding sites (study B) and host feeding preferences (study C) of Culicoides spp. using cattle and sheep as baits. In study A, the activity of Culicoides spp. was monitored over a 72 h period by collecting insects at regular intervals from the interior of drop traps with cattle or sheep standing inside. In study B, Culicoides spp. were directly aspirated from the coat and fleece of cattle and sheep during the peak activity period of Culicoides. In study C, Culicoides spp. were collected using drop traps with either cattle or sheep standing inside and located 10 m apart. In study A, 3,545 Culicoides midges belonging to 13 species were collected, peak activity was observed at sunset. In study B, 2,024 Culicoides midges were collected. A significantly higher number of midges was collected from the belly and flank of cattle in comparison to their head region. In study C, 3,710 Culicoides midges were collected; 3,077 (83%) originated from cattle and 633 (17%) from sheep. Nearly half (46.7%) of the midges collected from cattle were engorged, significantly more than the number of engorged midges collected from sheep (7.5%). Culicoides from the Obsoletus complex (C. obsoletus and C. scoticus) were the most common Culicoides species encountered, followed by C. punctatus. Other species identified were C. dewulfi, C. chiopterus, C. pulicaris, C. lupicaris, C. pallidicornis, C. subfascipennis, C. achrayi, C. stigma, C. griseidorsum and C. subfagineus, the last two species are reported for the first time in Germany. Engorged C. chiopterus were collected in relatively high numbers from sheep, suggesting that this species may

  16. First overview of the Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) livestock associated species of Reunion Island, Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Desvars, A; Grimaud, Y; Guis, H; Esnault, O; Allène, X; Gardès, L; Balenghien, T; Baldet, T; Delécolle, J C; Garros, C

    2015-02-01

    This study establishes the first faunistic inventory of livestock associated Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species of Reunion Island (Indian Ocean), where bluetongue and epizootic hemorrhagic disease are regularly recorded. Single night-catches were performed at 41 sites using light suction traps at altitudes ranging from 0 to 1525 m, from March to April 2005. Five species were recorded: Culicoides imicola, Culicoides bolitinos, Culicoides enderleini, Culicoides grahamii, and Culicoides kibatiensis, among which at least the first three species are known to be involved in virus transmission to ruminants and equids. This is the first record of C. bolitinos, C. kibatiensis, and C. enderleini on the island. C. imicola was the most abundant species along the sea coast. C. bolitinos was more abundant inland and on two sites on the east coast. C. kibatiensis and C. grahamii were less abundant than the other three species and limited to two foci. Spatial distribution analysis of the different species showed that C. bolitinos, C. enderleini and C. imicola were collected at low altitudes, while the other two species were found at higher altitude. A morphological identification key for adult females and males is given, as well as cytochrome oxydase subunit I sequences. Phylogenetic reconstructions showed a clear divergence between C. bolitinos from Reunion Island and mainland Africa. This monograph will help to identify the Culicoides species in the poorly known entomological fauna of the south-western Indian Ocean region.

  17. Biting of anthropophilic Culicoides fulvithorax (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a vector of Mansonella perstans in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Akinboye, Dora Olufunmilola; Olateju, Taiwo Monroof; Ayanbiyi, Oluwatoyin Adepeju; Kuloyo, Olukayode Olakunle; Fenuga, Oluwalolami Oluwaseun

    2006-01-01

    Anthropophilic Culicoides were investigated in a rural community endemic for Mansonella perstans in Ijebu North area of western Nigeria between December 2003 and October 2004. Three hundred and fifty-nine adults of Culicoides fulvithorax collected by human bait in the morning were dissected for Mansonella perstans larvae, and 1.95% of infection rate was found. Seasonal abundance of C. fulvithorax was investigated by monthly biting rates, and showed that higher prevalence was observed in rainy season, with peak in September. Culicoides prevalence was positively correlated with rainfall and relative humidity, but not temperature. Human perceptions on the behavior of these biting midges were determined by interviewing 854 self-selected villagers, of which 86.5% of the interviewees confessed having experienced Culicoides bites. Between 76.5 and 99.1% of the various age groups complained body reactions to Culicoides bites. Itching was the most frequent body reaction. No interviewees associated Culicoides with transmission of any parasitic infections. The results showed need to adequately control Culicoides in the community. PMID:16514285

  18. Biting of anthropophilic Culicoides fulvithorax (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a vector of Mansonella perstans in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Agbolade, Olufemi Moses; Akinboye, Dora Olufunmilola; Olateju, Taiwo Monroof; Ayanbiyi, Oluwatoyin Adepeju; Kuloyo, Olukayode Olakunle; Fenuga, Oluwalolami Oluwaseun

    2006-03-01

    Anthropophilic Culicoides were investigated in a rural community endemic for Mansonella perstans in Ijebu North area of western Nigeria between December 2003 and October 2004. Three hundred and fifty-nine adults of Culicoides fulvithorax collected by human bait in the morning were dissected for Mansonella perstans larvae, and 1.95% of infection rate was found. Seasonal abundance of C. fulvithorax was investigated by monthly biting rates, and showed that higher prevalence was observed in rainy season, with peak in September. Culicoides prevalence was positively correlated with rainfall and relative humidity, but not temperature. Human perceptions on the behavior of these biting midges were determined by interviewing 854 self-selected villagers, of which 86.5% of the interviewees confessed having experienced Culicoides bites. Between 76.5 and 99.1% of the various age groups complained body reactions to Culicoides bites. Itching was the most frequent body reaction. No interviewees associated Culicoides with transmission of any parasitic infections. The results showed need to adequately control Culicoides in the community.

  19. Impacts of climate, host and landscape factors on Culicoides species in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Purse, B V; Falconer, D; Sullivan, M J; Carpenter, S; Mellor, P S; Piertney, S B; Mordue Luntz, A J; Albon, S; Gunn, G J; Blackwell, A

    2012-06-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) vector a wide variety of internationally important arboviral pathogens of livestock and represent a widespread biting nuisance. This study investigated the influence of landscape, host and remotely-sensed climate factors on local abundance of livestock-associated species in Scotland, within a hierarchical generalized linear model framework. The Culicoides obsoletus group and the Culicoides pulicaris group accounted for 56% and 41%, respectively, of adult females trapped. Culicoides impunctatus Goetghebuer and C. pulicaris s.s. Linnaeus were the most abundant and widespread species in the C. pulicaris group (accounting for 29% and 10%, respectively, of females trapped). Abundance models performed well for C. impunctatus, Culicoides deltus Edwards and Culicoides punctatus Meigen (adjusted R(2) : 0.59-0.70), but not for C. pulicaris s.s. (adjusted R(2) : 0.36) and the C. obsoletus group (adjusted R(2) : 0.08). Local-scale abundance patterns were best explained by models combining host, landscape and climate factors. The abundance of C. impunctatus was negatively associated with cattle density, but positively associated with pasture cover, consistent with this species' preference in the larval stage for lightly grazed, wet rush pasture. Predicted abundances of this species varied widely among farms even over short distances (less than a few km). Modelling approaches that may facilitate the more accurate prediction of local abundance patterns for a wider range of Culicoides species are discussed.

  20. RNA interference targets arbovirus replication in Culicoides cells.

    PubMed

    Schnettler, Esther; Ratinier, Maxime; Watson, Mick; Shaw, Andrew E; McFarlane, Melanie; Varela, Mariana; Elliott, Richard M; Palmarini, Massimo; Kohl, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Arboviruses are transmitted to vertebrate hosts by biting arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, and midges. These viruses replicate in both arthropods and vertebrates and are thus exposed to different antiviral responses in these organisms. RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific RNA degradation mechanism that has been shown to play a major role in the antiviral response against arboviruses in mosquitoes. Culicoides midges are important vectors of arboviruses, known to transmit pathogens of humans and livestock such as bluetongue virus (BTV) (Reoviridae), Oropouche virus (Bunyaviridae), and likely the recently discovered Schmallenberg virus (Bunyaviridae). In this study, we investigated whether Culicoides cells possess an antiviral RNAi response and whether this is effective against arboviruses, including those with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes, such as BTV. Using reporter gene-based assays, we established the presence of a functional RNAi response in Culicoides sonorensis-derived KC cells which is effective in inhibiting BTV infection. Sequencing of small RNAs from KC and Aedes aegypti-derived Aag2 cells infected with BTV or the unrelated Schmallenberg virus resulted in the production of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (viRNAs) of 21 nucleotides, similar to the viRNAs produced during arbovirus infections of mosquitoes. In addition, viRNA profiles strongly suggest that the BTV dsRNA genome is accessible to a Dicer-type nuclease. Thus, we show for the first time that midge cells target arbovirus replication by mounting an antiviral RNAi response mainly resembling that of other insect vectors of arboviruses.

  1. RNA Interference Targets Arbovirus Replication in Culicoides Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schnettler, Esther; Ratinier, Maxime; Watson, Mick; Shaw, Andrew E.; McFarlane, Melanie; Varela, Mariana; Elliott, Richard M.; Palmarini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Arboviruses are transmitted to vertebrate hosts by biting arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, and midges. These viruses replicate in both arthropods and vertebrates and are thus exposed to different antiviral responses in these organisms. RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific RNA degradation mechanism that has been shown to play a major role in the antiviral response against arboviruses in mosquitoes. Culicoides midges are important vectors of arboviruses, known to transmit pathogens of humans and livestock such as bluetongue virus (BTV) (Reoviridae), Oropouche virus (Bunyaviridae), and likely the recently discovered Schmallenberg virus (Bunyaviridae). In this study, we investigated whether Culicoides cells possess an antiviral RNAi response and whether this is effective against arboviruses, including those with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes, such as BTV. Using reporter gene-based assays, we established the presence of a functional RNAi response in Culicoides sonorensis-derived KC cells which is effective in inhibiting BTV infection. Sequencing of small RNAs from KC and Aedes aegypti-derived Aag2 cells infected with BTV or the unrelated Schmallenberg virus resulted in the production of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (viRNAs) of 21 nucleotides, similar to the viRNAs produced during arbovirus infections of mosquitoes. In addition, viRNA profiles strongly suggest that the BTV dsRNA genome is accessible to a Dicer-type nuclease. Thus, we show for the first time that midge cells target arbovirus replication by mounting an antiviral RNAi response mainly resembling that of other insect vectors of arboviruses. PMID:23269795

  2. Protection of horses against Culicoides biting midges in different housing systems in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, V J; Page, P C; Kopp, C; Mathis, A; von Niederhäusern, R; Burger, D; Herholz, C

    2015-06-15

    Species belonging to the Culicoides complexes (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae), obsoletus and pulicaris, in Switzerland, are potential vectors of both bluetongue virus (BTV) and African horse sickness virus (AHSV). The epidemic of BTV in 2006 and 2007 in Europe has highlighted the risk of introduction and spread of vector-borne diseases in previously non-endemic areas. As a measure of prevention, as part of an integrated control programme in the event of an outbreak of African horse sickness (AHS), it is of utmost importance to prevent, or substantially reduce, contact between horses and Culicoides. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of three protection systems, net, fan, repellent, or combinations thereof, with regard to their potential to reduce contact between horses and Culicoides. Three different equine housing systems, including individual boxes (BX), group housing systems (GR), and individual boxes with permanently accessible paddock (BP) were used. The efficacy of the protection systems were evaluated by comparing the total number counts of collected female Culicoides, of non-blood-fed and blood-fed Culicoides, respectively, with UV black light traps. The study was conducted over 3 summer months during 2012 and 2013 each and focused on the efficacy and practicality of the protection systems. The repellent was tested in 2012 only and not further investigated in 2013, as it showed no significant effect in reducing Culicoides collected in the light traps. Net protection system provided the best overall protection for the total number of female Culicoides, non-blood-fed and blood-fed Culicoides in all tested housing systems. The net, with a pore size of 0.1825 mm(2), reduced the total number of Culicoides collected in the housing systems BP, GR and BX by 98%, 85% and 67%, respectively. However, in the GR housing system, no significant difference between the effectiveness of the fan and the net were determined for any of the three Culicoides

  3. The phenology and population dynamics of Culicoides spp. in different ecosystems in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Takken, Willem; Verhulst, Niels; Scholte, Ernst-Jan; Jacobs, Frans; Jongema, Yde; van Lammeren, Ron

    2008-10-15

    The Netherlands has enjoyed a relatively free state of vector-borne diseases of economic importance for more than one century. Emerging infectious diseases may change this situation, threatening the health of humans, domestic livestock and wildlife. In order to be prepared for the potential outbreak of vector-borne diseases, a study was undertaken to investigate the distribution and seasonal dynamics of candidate vectors of infectious diseases with emphasis on bluetongue vectors (Culicoides spp.). The study focused primarily on the relationship between characteristic ecosystems suitable for bluetongue vectors and climate, as well as on the phenology and population dynamics of these vectors. Twelve locations were selected, distributed over four distinct habitats: a wetland area, three riverine systems, four peat land areas and four livestock farms. Culicoides populations were sampled continuously using CO(2)-baited counterflow traps from July 2005 until August 2006, with an interruption from November 2005 to March 2006. All vectors were identified to species level. Meteorological and environmental data were collected at each location. Culicoides species were found in all four different habitat types studied. Wetland areas and peat bogs were rich in Culicoides spp. The taxonomic groups Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen) and Culicoides pulicaris (Linnaeus) were strongly associated with farms. Eighty-eight percent of all Culicoides consisted of the taxon C. obsoletus/Culicoides scoticus. On the livestock farms, 3% of Culicoides existed of the alleged bluetongue vector Culicoides dewulfi Goetghebuer. Culicoides impunctatus Goetghebuer was strongly associated with wetland and peat bog. Many Culicoides species were found until late in the phenological season and their activity was strongly associated with climate throughout the year. High annual variations in population dynamics were observed within the same study areas, which were probably caused by annual variations in

  4. The Spatio-Temporal Distribution Patterns of Biting Midges of the Genus Culicoides in Salta Province, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Aybar, Cecilia A. Veggiani; Juri, María J. Dantur; Santana, Mirta; de Grosso, Mercedes S. Lizarralde; Spinelli, Gustavo R.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this survey was to analyze the spatio-temporal distribution patterns of Culicoides Latreille species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) and their relationship with environmental variables in Salta, northwestern Argentina. Culicoides were collected monthly from January 2003 through December 2005. The influence of the climatic variables on population abundance was analyzed with a multilevel Poisson regression. A total of 918 specimens belonging to five species were collected. The most abundant species was Culicoides paraensis Goeldi (65.5%), followed by Culicoides lahillei Iches (14.6%) and Culicoides debilipalpis Lutz (7.6%). The highest seasonal abundance for C. paraensis, C. debilipalpis and C. lahillei occurred during the spring and summer. A Poisson regression analysis showed that the mean maximum and minimum temperature and the mean maximum and minimum humidity were the variables with the greatest influence on the population abundance of Culicoides species. PMID:23461794

  5. The spatio-temporal distribution patterns of biting midges of the genus Culicoides in Salta province, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Aybar, Cecilia A Veggiani; Juri, María J Dantur; Santana, Mirta; de Grosso, Mercedes S Lizarralde; Spinelli, Gustavo R

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this survey was to analyze the spatio-temporal distribution patterns of Culicoides Latreille species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) and their relationship with environmental variables in Salta, northwestern Argentina. Culicoides were collected monthly from January 2003 through December 2005. The influence of the climatic variables on population abundance was analyzed with a multilevel Poisson regression. A total of 918 specimens belonging to five species were collected. The most abundant species was Culicoides paraensis Goeldi (65.5%), followed by Culicoides lahillei Iches (14.6%) and Culicoides debilipalpis Lutz (7.6%). The highest seasonal abundance for C. paraensis, C. debilipalpis and C. lahillei occurred during the spring and summer. A Poisson regression analysis showed that the mean maximum and minimum temperature and the mean maximum and minimum humidity were the variables with the greatest influence on the population abundance of Culicoides species.

  6. Seasonal abundance of four Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) at Al-Ahsa oasis, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abu, Elzein E M E; Hilali, M A; Al-Afaleq, A I; Mellor, P S; Boorman, J; Al-Atiya, S; Al, Naiem A

    2002-06-01

    This report constitutes the first study of Culicoides spp. and their seasonal abundance at Al-Ahsa, the largest oasis in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. New Jersey light traps were used to collect the midges at Mastock farm and Al-Mansura village. The mean monthly abundance was determined from October 1993 to October 1994. The mean monthly number per trap reached its minimum value during January 1994, increasing gradually from February to reach its maximum value during September 1994. During the study period, the following species were collected: Culicoides schultzei group (September), non-spotted group of Culicoides (September), Culicoides imicola (May) and Culicoides newstaedi (March). The potential importance of the Culicoides spp. in relation to arboviral activity in Saudi Arabia is discussed.

  7. Inducing RNA interference in the arbovirus vector, Culicoides sonorensis

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Mary K.; Nayduch, D.; Michel, K.

    2014-01-01

    Biting midges in the genus Culicoides are important vectors of arboviral diseases, including epizootic hemorrhagic disease, bluetongue, and likely Schmallenberg, which cause significant economic burden worldwide. Research on these vectors has been hindered by the lack of a sequenced genome, the difficulty of consistent culturing of certain species, and the absence of molecular techniques such as RNA interference (RNAi). Here, we report the establishment of RNAi as a research tool for the adult midge, Culicoides sonorensis. Based on previous research and transcriptome analysis, which revealed putative siRNA pathway member orthologs, we hypothesized that adult C. sonorensis midges have the molecular machinery needed to preform RNA silencing. Injection of control dsRNA, dsGFP, into the hemocoel 2–3 day old adult female midges resulted in survival curves that support virus transmission. DsRNA injection targeting the newly identified C. sonorensis inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (CsIAP1) ortholog, resulted in a 40% decrease of transcript levels and 73% shortened median survivals as compared to dsGFP-injected controls. These results reveal the conserved function of IAP1. Importantly, they also demonstrate the feasibility of RNAi by dsRNA injection in adult midges, which will greatly facilitate studies of the underlying mechanisms of vector competence in C. sonorensis. PMID:25293805

  8. Blood Meal Analysis of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Central Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Darine; Haouas, Najoua; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda; Chaker, Emna

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the host preferences of Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Central Tunisia, we identified the source of blood meals of field collected specimens by sequencing of the cytochrome b (cyt b) mitochondrial locus and Prepronociceptine single copy nuclear gene. The study includes the most common and abundant livestock associated species of biting midges in Tunisia: C. imicola, C. jumineri, C. newsteadi, C. paolae, C. cataneii, C. circumscriptus, C. kingi, C. pseudojumineri, C. submaritimus, C. langeroni, C. jumineri var and some unidentified C. species. Analysis of cyt b PCR products from 182 field collected blood-engorged females’ midges revealed that 92% of them fed solely on mammalian species, 1.6% on birds, 2.4% on insects and 0.8% on reptiles. The blast results identified the blood origin of biting midges to the species level with exact or nearly exact matches (≥98%). The results confirm the presence of several Culicoides species, including proven vectors in Central Tunisia. Blood meal analyses show that these species will indeed feed on bigger mammals, thereby highlighting the risk that these viruses will be able to spread in Tunisia. PMID:25793285

  9. Quantifying bluetongue virus in adult Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Eva; Mertens, Peter P C; Shaw, Andrew E; Brownlie, Joe; Mellor, Philip S; Carpenter, Simon T

    2008-01-01

    A TissueLyser system (QIAGEN) was used to rapidly and accurately estimate bluetongue virus "loads" in individual adult Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). The optimized homogenization program that was developed, involved shaking insects for 1 min at 25 Hz with 2- or 3-mm stainless steel ball bearings. This program was used to measure the quantities of bluetongue virus present in insects that had either been inoculated or had ingested a viremic bloodmeal through an artificial membrane. The virus titers obtained using either infection technique and the optimized program did not differ significantly from those obtained using a polypropylene motor-driven pestle, a method that is currently in common use for studies of vector competence). The advantages of the new method, as a rapid means of detecting fully disseminated infections in individual field-caught flies, are discussed. Its use is compared with the processing of pools of Culicoides by conventional methods, where the extent of dissemination of the virus is unknown and could wrongly implicate species that are of low importance in transmission.

  10. Estimating Culicoides sonorensis biting midge abundance using digital image analysis.

    PubMed

    Osborne, C J; Mayo, C E; Mullens, B A; Maclachlan, N J

    2014-12-01

    ImageJ is an open-source software tool used for a variety of scientific objectives including cell counting, shape analysis and image correction. This technology has previously been used to estimate mosquito abundance in surveillance efforts. However, the utility of this application for estimating abundance or parity in the surveillance of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) has not yet been tested. Culicoides sonorensis (Wirth and Jones), a biting midge often measuring 2.0-2.5 mm in length, is an economically important vector of ruminant arboviruses in California. Current surveillance methods use visual sorting for the characteristics of midges and are very time-intensive for large studies. This project tested the utility of ImageJ as a tool to assist in gross trap enumeration as well as in parity analysis of C. sonorensis in comparison with traditional visual methods of enumeration using a dissecting microscope. Results confirmed that automated counting of midges is a reliable means of approximating midge numbers under certain conditions. Further evaluation confirmed accurate and time-efficient parity analysis in comparison with hand sorting. The ImageJ software shows promise as a tool that can assist and expedite C. sonorensis surveillance. Further, these methods may be useful in other insect surveillance activities.

  11. Papular dermatitis induced in guinea pigs by the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Histological, ultrastructural, and virological examinations were performed on abdominal skin from guinea pigs after a blood meal by colony-bred biting midges, Culicoides sonorensis. Small, superficial, cutaneous, crateriform ulcers with necrosis of superficial dermis developed at feeding sites and ...

  12. Schmallenberg Virus in Culicoides Biting Midges in the Netherlands in 2012.

    PubMed

    Elbers, A R W; Meiswinkel, R; van Weezep, E; Kooi, E A; van der Poel, W H M

    2015-06-01

    A total of 130 pools of Culicoides biting midges collected between May and September 2012 in the Netherlands were assayed for Schmallenberg virus (SBV). The Culicoides midges were caught in the same area as where in 2011 a high proportion of Culicoides pools tested positive for SBV, in majority with a high viral load (Ct values between 20 and 30). Two of a total of 42 pools comprising 50 midges/pool of the Obsoletus complex from the 2012 collection tested weak positive (Ct values: 34.96 and 37.66), indicating a relatively low viral load. On an individual midge level, the proportion of SBV-infected Culicoides of the Obsoletus complex caught in the same area and in a comparable period of the year was significantly lower in 2012 (0.1% = 1 per 1050 tested) compared with 2011 (0.56% = 13 per 2300 tested).

  13. Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) as vectors of bluetongue virus in South Africa - a review.

    PubMed

    Venter, Gert Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to consolidate vector competence studies on Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) as vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV) done over a period 25 years at the ARC‑Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute in South Africa. In 1944, it was demonstrated for the first time in South Africa that Culicoides midges transmit BTV. In 1991, field‑collected Culicoides imicola were fed on blood containing BTV‑3 or ‑6 and the infection rates were established as being 31% and 24%, respectively. In 1998, Culicoides bolitinos was shown to have a higher infection prevalence and virus titre/midge than C. imicola. This species was then shown to have a higher transmission potential for BTV‑1 over a range of incubation temperatures wider than the one showed by C. imicola. Attenuation of BTV also does not reduce its ability to infect competent Culicoides species. Oral susceptibility studies, involving 29 BTV isolates of various serotypes, indicated differences between various geographic virus isolates and Culicoides populations evaluated. While low recovery rates of European BTV strains from South African Culicoides species suggest co‑adaptation between orbiviruses and vectors in a given locality, co‑adaption was shown not to be essential for virus transmission. Cumulative results since 1991 provide evidence that at least 13 livestock‑associated Culicoides species are susceptible to BTV. Susceptibility results are supported by field isolations from 5 of these species. This implies that multi‑vector potential for the transmission of BTV will complicate the epidemiology of BT. It must be emphasised that neither oral susceptibility nor virus isolation/detection from field‑collected specimens is proof that a species is a confirmed field vector.

  14. Vector species of Culicoides midges implicated in the 2012‑2014 Bluetongue epidemics in Italy.

    PubMed

    Goffredo, Maria; Catalani, Monica; Federici, Valentina; Portanti, Ottavio; Marini, Valeria; Mancini, Giuseppe; Quaglia, Michela; Santilli, Adriana; Teodori, Liana; Savini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, serotypes 1 and 4 of bluetongue virus (BTV) entered and co‑circulated in Sardinia. The following year, BTV‑1 spread all over Sardinia and invaded Sicily and the Italian Tyrrenian coast. In 2014, this strain spread extensively in mainland Italy, causing severe outbreaks. In late 2014, BTV‑4 was detected in Southern Italy (Apulia region). This study reports the detection of BTV in species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) collected in Italy during the epidemics between 2012 and 2014. A total of 2,925 pools (83,102 midges), sorted from 651 collections made on 339 affected farms of 12 Italian regions, were tested for the presence of BTV by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT‑PCR). The study clearly shows that Culicoides imicola and Obsoletus complex have played a crucial role in the bluetongue (BT) epidemics in Italy in 2012‑2014. Nevertheless, it also shows that other species may have played a role in transmitting BTV during these outbreaks. Culicoides dewulfi and at least 3 species of the Pulicaris complex, namely Culicoides pulicaris, Culicoides newsteadi and Culicoides punctatus, were found positive to BTV. Serotype 1 was detected in all species tested, whereas the BTV‑4 was detected in the Obsoletus complex, C. imicola, and C. newsteadi.

  15. The effect of high frequency sound on Culicoides numbers collected with suction light traps.

    PubMed

    Venter, Gert J; Labuschagne, Karien; Boikanyo, Solomon N B; Morey, Liesl

    2012-11-07

    Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), are involved in the transmission of various pathogens that cause important diseases of livestock worldwide. The use of insect repellents to reduce the attack rate of these insects on livestock could play an important role as part of an integrated control programme against diseases transmitted by these midges. The objective of this study was to determine whether high frequency sound has any repellent effect on Culicoides midges. The number of midges collected with 220 V Onderstepoort white light traps fitted with electronic mosquito repellents (EMRs), emitting 5-20 KHz multi-frequency sound waves, was compared with that of two untreated traps. Treatments were rotated in two replicates of a 4 x 4 randomised Latin square design. Although fewer midges were collected in the two traps fitted with EMRs, the average number collected over eight consecutive nights was not significantly different. The EMRs also had no influence on any of the physiological groups of Culicoides imicola Kieffer or the species composition of the Culicoides population as determined with light traps. The results indicate that high frequency sound has no repellent effect on Culicoides midges. There is therefore no evidence to support their promotion or use in the protection of animals against pathogens transmitted by Culicoides midges.

  16. Identification of abundant proteins and potential allergens in Culicoides nubeculosus salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A D; Heesom, K J; Mawby, W J; Mellor, P S; Russell, C L

    2008-03-15

    IgE-mediated type 1 hypersensitivity reactions to the bites of insects are a common cause of skin disease in horses. Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is most frequently associated with bites of Culicoides spp. and occurs in all parts of the world where horses and Culicoides coexist. The main allergens that cause IBH are probably some of the abundant proteins in the saliva of Culicoides associated with blood feeding. Western blots of Culicoides proteins separated by 1D gel-electrophoresis detected strong IgE responses in all horses with IBH to antigens in protein extracts from wild caught Culicoides, but only weak responses to salivary antigens from captive bred C. nubeculosus which may reflect important differences among allergens from different species of Culicoides or differences between thorax and salivary gland antigens. 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify several of the abundant proteins in the saliva of C. nubeculosus. These included maltase, members of the D7 family, and several small, basic proteins associated with blood feeding. The most frequently detected IgE-binding proteins were in a group of proteins with pI>8.5 and mass 40-50kDa. Mass spectrometry identified two of these allergenic proteins as similar to hyaluronidase and a heavily glycosylated protein of unknown function that have previously been identified in salivary glands of C. sonorensis.

  17. Emergence of Culicoides obsoletus group species from farm-associated habitats in Germany.

    PubMed

    Steinke, S; Lühken, R; Balczun, C; Kiel, E

    2016-06-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) may transmit several arboviruses to ruminant livestock. The species of the Obsoletus group are considered to be among the most important vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV) in northern Europe. As agricultural environments offer suitable habitats for the development of their immature stages, the emergence of adult Culicoides from potential breeding sites was investigated at 20 cattle farms throughout Germany in 2012 and 2013. In analyses of species-specific habitat preferences and relationships between Culicoides abundance in breeding substrates and their physicochemical characteristics, dungheaps emerged as the most important substrate for the development of Culicoides obsoletus sensu stricto (s.s.) (Meigen), whereas Culicoides chiopterus (Meigen) and Culicoides dewulfi Goetghebuer were generally restricted to cowpats. A decreasing pH value was associated with a higher abundance or a higher probability of observing these three species. Furthermore, the abundance of C. obsoletus s.s. was positively related to increasing moisture. Dungheaps were very productive breeding sites for this species and are therefore suggested as a target for potential control measures. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  18. Larval development and emergence sites of farm-associated Culicoides in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Harrup, L E; Purse, B V; Golding, N; Mellor, P S; Carpenter, S

    2013-12-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are the biological vectors of internationally important arboviruses of livestock including bluetongue virus (BTV). Information on the habitats used by Culicoides for larval development is valuable for establishing targeted vector control strategies and for improving local scale models of vector abundance. This study combines emergence trap collections of adult Culicoides identified using molecular markers and physiochemical measurements of habitats to investigate larval development sites of Palaearctic Culicoides in South East England. The known range of larval habitats for several Culicoides species is extended and the potential BTV vector species C. obsoletus and C. scoticus are confirmed to co-occur in many larval habitats. The presence of emerging C. obsoletus was favoured by increasing substrate moisture level [odds ratio (OR) 6.94 (2.30; 20.90)] and substrate pH [OR 4.80 (1.66; 13.90)] [bias-corrected Dxy : 0.68; area under the curve (AUC): 0.86] rather than any particular larval habitat type, as expected for a species with relatively wide larval habitat preference. Of the newly emerged sub-genus Avaritia individuals collected, 23% were observed to have a degree of abdominal pigmentation commonly inferred to indicate parity. If consistent across species and locations, this observation represents a potential source of error for age structure analyses of Culicoides populations.

  19. Molecular detection of Culicoides spp. and Culicoides imicola, the principal vector of bluetongue (BT) and African horse sickness (AHS) in Africa and Europe.

    PubMed

    Cêtre-Sossah, Catherine; Baldet, Thierry; Delécolle, Jean-Claude; Mathieu, Bruno; Perrin, Aurélie; Grillet, Colette; Albina, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    Bluetongue (BT) and African Horse Sickness (AHS) are infectious arthropod-borne viral diseases affecting ruminants and horses, respectively. Culicoides imicola Kieffer, 1913, a biting midge, is the principal vector of these livestock diseases in Africa and Europe. Recently bluetongue disease has re-emerged in the Mediterranean Basin and has had a devastating effect on the sheep industry in Italy and on the islands of Sicily, Sardinia, Corsica and the Balearics, but fortunately, has not penetrated onto mainland France and Spain. To survey for the presence of C. imicola, an extensive light-trap network for the collection of Culicoides, was implemented in 2002 in southern mainland France. The morphological identification of Culicoides can be both tedious and time-consuming because its size ranges from 1.5 to 3 mm. Therefore, an ITS1 rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostic assay was developed to rapidly and reliably identify Culicoides spp. and C. imicola. The aim of this work was to set up a rapid test for the detection of C. imicola amongst a pool of insects collected in areas at risk for BT. The sequence similarity of the rDNA (nuclear ribosomal DNA), which is greater within species than between species, is the foundation of its utilisation in species-diagnostic assays. The alignment of the 11 ITS1 sequences of Culicoides obtained from Genbank and EMBL databases helped us to identify one region in the 5' end and one in the 3' end that appear highly conserved. PCR primers were designed within these regions to amplify genus-specific fragments. In order to set up a C. imicola-specific PCR, another forward primer was designed and used in combination with the previously designed reverse primer. These primers proved to be highly specific and sensitive and permitted a rapid diagnostic separation of C. imicola from Culicoides spp.

  20. Rapid diagnostic PCR assays for members of the Culicoides obsoletus and Culicoides pulicaris species complexes, implicated vectors of bluetongue virus in Europe.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Damien V; Carpenter, Simon; Barber, James; Mellor, Philip S; Dallas, John F; Mordue Luntz, A Jennifer; Piertney, Stuart B

    2007-09-20

    Biting midges of the Culicoides obsoletus Meigen and Culicoides pulicaris L. species complexes (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are increasingly implicated as vectors of bluetongue virus in Palearctic regions. However, predicting epidemiological risk and the spread of disease is hampered because whilst vector competence of Culicoides is expressed only in adult females, morphological identification of constituent species is only readily applicable to adult males and some species distinguishing traits have overlapping character states. Furthermore, adult males are typically rare in field collections, making characterisation of Culicoides communities impossible. Here we highlight the utility of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) DNA sequences for taxonomic resolution and species identification of all species within C. obsoletus and C. pulicarus complexes. Culicoides were collected from 18 sites in the UK and Continental Europe, and identified to species level, or species complex level, based on morphological characters. The sample comprised four species from the C. obsoletus complex (n = 88) and five species from the C. pulicaris complex (n = 39). The DNA sequence of the 5' end of the COI gene was obtained from all individuals. Each member species formed a well-supported reciprocally monophyletic clade in a maximum likelihood phylogeny. Levels of DNA sequence divergence were sufficiently high between species to allow the design of species-specific PCR primers that can be used in PCR for identification of members of the C. pulicaris complex or in a multiplex PCR to identify members of the C. obsoletus complex. This approach provides a valuable diagnostic tool for monitoring species composition in mixed field collections of Culicoides.

  1. Repellent effect of topical deltamethrin on blood feeding by Culicoides on horses.

    PubMed

    Robin, M; Archer, D; McGowan, C; Garros, C; Gardès, L; Baylis, M

    2015-05-30

    African horse sickness (AHS) is a vectorborne disease spread by Culicoides biting midges. The UK's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs currently suggests using topical deltamethrin for AHS control; however, no data are available regarding its efficacy in the horse. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of topical deltamethrin on blood feeding by Culicoides on horses and to investigate which Culicoides species blood fed on horses. Three pairs of horses were placed in partially enclosed cages that allowed samples representing the Culicoides interacting with individual horses to be sampled. Four data collection sessions were completed before one horse from each pair was topically treated with 10 ml of 1 per cent deltamethrin solution and another four sessions were then carried out. Collected Culicoides were identified and each biting midge examined to see if it had blood fed. The most abundant species collected were C. chiopterus, C. dewulfi, C. obsoletus and C. scoticus (44.3 per cent) and either C. pulicaris or C. punctatus (34.7 per cent). These species were also more likely to have blood fed than other species, supporting their potential role as AHS vectors if the virus were to reach the UK. There was no significant effect of treatment on blood feeding by Culicoides. The results do not support the use of topical deltamethrin to prevent blood feeding by Culicoides on individual horses; however, the study does not investigate the effect that the widespread use of topical deltamethrin might have on vector numbers or disease transmission from viraemic individuals during an outbreak of AHS. British Veterinary Association.

  2. Comparison of different light sources for trapping Culicoides biting midges, mosquitoes and other dipterans.

    PubMed

    González, Mikel; Alarcón-Elbal, Pedro María; Valle-Mora, Javier; Goldarazena, Arturo

    2016-08-15

    The response of Culicoides biting midges, mosquitoes and other dipterans to different wavelengths was evaluated in a farm meadow in northern Spain. A total of 9449 specimens of 23 species of Culicoides, 5495 other ceratopogonids (non-biting midges), 602 culicids and 12428 other mixed dipterans were captured. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suction light traps fitted with five light emitting diodes (LEDs) (white, green, red, blue, ultraviolet) were run for 15 consecutive nights. Significantly more Culicoides were collected in those traps fitted with green, blue or ultraviolet (UV) lights than in red and white-baited LED traps for the most abundant species captured: C. punctatus (37.5%), C. cataneii (26.5%) and C. obsoletus/C. scoticus (20.4%). Similar results were obtained for non-Culicoides ceratopogonids, mosquitoes and other mixed dipterans. Wavelengths in green (570nm) resulted effective for targeting some Culicoides species, culicids and other midges. In a second trial, the effectiveness of 4-W white and UV tubes was compared to traps fitted with UV LED and a standard incandescent light bulb. More specimens of all taxa were collected with fluorescent black light (UV) traps than with the other light sources, except culicids, which were recovered in high numbers from fluorescent white light traps.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of Culicoides species from France based on nuclear ITS1-rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Perrin, A; Cetre-Sossah, C; Mathieu, B; Baldet, T; Delecolle, J-C; Albina, E

    2006-06-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) play important roles in the transmission of viral diseases affecting wild and domestic ruminants and horses, including Bluetongue (BT) and African horse sickness (AHS) respectively. In southern Europe, BT has been largely transmitted by the classical Afro-Asian vector Culicoides imicola Kieffer. However, other species such as C. obsoletus Meigen, C. scoticus Downs & Kettle and C. pulicaris Linné may also be involved in BTV transmission. As a consequence of the discovery of C. imicola followed by BTV-2 outbreaks on the island of Corsica in October 2000, further studies on these biting midges have been carried out. To better characterize the evolution and phylogenetic relations of Culicoides, molecular analysis in parallel with a morphology-based taxonomic approach were performed. Phylogenetic analyses of French Culicoides species were undertaken using the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) as a molecular target. This region was shown to be useful in understanding evolutionary and genetic relationships between species. Construction of several trees showed that molecular phylogeny within the genus Culicoides correlates not only with morphological-based taxonomy but also with ecological patterns.

  4. The oral susceptibility of South African field populations of Culicoides to African horse sickness virus.

    PubMed

    Venter, G J; Wright, I M; Van Der Linde, T C; Paweska, J T

    2009-12-01

    Twenty-two isolates of African horse sickness virus (AHSV), representing its distinct serotypes, geographical and historical origins, were fed to three populations of South African livestock-associated Culicoides spp. (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae). Infective blood meals included 12 recent isolates, nine historical reference strains and one live attenuated vaccine strain serotype 7 (AHSV-7) of the virus. Field-collected midges were fed through a chicken-skin membrane on sheep blood spiked with one of the viruses, which concentrations ranged from 5.4 to 8.8 log(10)TCID(50)/mL of blood. After 10 days incubation at 23.5 degrees C, AHSV was isolated from 11 Culicoides species. Standard in vitro passaging of AHSV-7, used for the preparation of live attenuated vaccine, did not reduce its ability to infect Culicoides species. Virus recovery rates in orally infected Culicoides midges differed significantly between species and populations, serotypes, isolates and seasons. Significant variations in oral susceptibility recorded in this study emphasize a complex inter-relationship between virus and vector, which is further influenced by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors. As it is not possible to standardize all these factors under laboratory conditions, conclusive assessment of the role of field-collected Culicoides midges in the transmission of orbiviruses remains problematic. Nevertheless, results of this study suggest the potential for multi-vector transmission of AHSV virus in South Africa.

  5. PCR identification of Culicoides dewulfi midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), potential vectors of bluetongue in Germany.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Anja; Clausen, Peter-Henning; Bauer, Burkhard; Steuber, Stephan

    2009-08-01

    Due to the severe outbreaks of bluetongue disease (BTD) in the years 2006/2007 in Germany in the absence of the main African vector Culicoides imicola, a rapid and easy applicable method for identification of autochthonous Culicoides spp. had to be developed. Morphological identification is time-consuming, rendering impossible the identification of large numbers of midges in a short period of time. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based procedure in connection with a species-specific primer greatly simplifies the identification process. The region of internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) of the ribosomal DNA has shown great potential for developing a reliable PCR-based procedure. Culicoides midges were caught with ultraviolet-light traps installed on different farms in Germany during 2007 and 2008. The midges were mounted on slides and morphologically characterised. Midge DNA was extracted and the ITS-1 region amplified using conservative primers. Potential primer regions within ITS-1 were determined and a species-specific Culicoides dewulfi primer was developed to correctly identify autochthonous C. dewulfi, one of the suspected BTV vectors in northwestern Europe. The developed primer was used to identify C. dewulfi in a pool of Culicoides midges from a farm in the state of Brandenburg.

  6. Culicoides (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae) collected during epizootics of hemorrhagic disease among captive white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Smith, K E; Stallknecht, D E

    1996-05-01

    To help determine specific vectors of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) and bluetongue (BT) viruses for white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus Zimmermann, in the southeastern United States, Culicoides sp. midges were collected during epizootics of hemorrhagic disease among captive white-tailed deer in Georgia, Mississippi, and North Carolina. Culicoides variipennis (Coquillett), a confirmed vector of EHD and BT viruses, was present in low numbers in light-trap collections made at all sites. Collections from deer made in Georgia and North Carolina yielded only a single specimen of C. variipennis. Other Culicoides species present in far greater numbers during the epizootics included C. lahillei Lutz, C. paraensis (Goeldi), and C. stellifer (Coquillett) C. lahillei warrants particular attention as a potential vector because its readily feeds on white-tailed deer and was by far the predominant species collected from deer during the epizootics.

  7. Newly emerged nulliparous Culicoides imicola Kieffer (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) with pigmented abdomen.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Yehuda; Mumcuoglu, Kosta

    2009-03-23

    The method of segregating nulliparous and parous females of Culicoides spp. based on the presence of burgundy-red pigment inside the abdominal wall of parous Culicoides midges, is used worldwide. Out of 320 females of Culicoides imicola trapped by emergence traps, set over an artificial breeding site for 10 and 24 days, 73 (22.8%) showed a red-pigmentation despite the fact that they were nulliparous. This finding indicated that 23% of the "parous" females that are examined for the presence of arboviruses and other pathogens or for age-grading purposes, are actually old nulliparous females, which had no chance of acquiring pathogens. This bias in parous rate distorts upward the calculation of vectorial capacity.

  8. SALIVARY GLAND EXTRACTS OF CULICOIDES SONORENSIS INHIBIT MURINE LYMPHOCYTE PROLIFERATION AND NO PRODUCTION BY MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    BISHOP, JEANETTE V.; MEJIA, J. SANTIAGO; PÉREZ DE LEÓN, ADALBERTO A.; TABACHNICK, WALTER J.; TITUS, RICHARD G.

    2006-01-01

    Culicoides biting midges serve as vectors of pathogens affecting humans and domestic animals. Culicoides sonorensis is a vector of several arboviruses in North American that cause substantial economic losses to the US livestock industry. Previous studies showed that C. sonorensis saliva, like the saliva of many hematophagous arthropods, contains numerous pharmacological agents that affect hemostasis and early events in the inflammatory response, which may enhance the infectivity of Culicoides-borne pathogens. This paper reports on the immunomodulatory properties of C. sonorensis salivary gland extracts on murine immune cells and discusses the possible immunomodulatory role of C. sonorensis saliva in vesicular stomatitis virus infection of vertebrate hosts. Splenocytes treated with C. sonorensis mitogens were significantly affected in their proliferative response, and peritoneal macrophages secreted significantly less NO. A 66-kDa glycoprotein was purified from C. sonorensis salivary gland extract, which may be in part responsible for these observations and may be considered as a vaccine candidate. PMID:16968936

  9. Toward development of neem-based repellents against the Scottish Highland biting midge Culicoides impunctatus.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, A; Evans, K A; Strang, R H C; Cole, M

    2004-12-01

    Oil of neem, from the tree Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae), was evaluated for repellent and antifeedant activity against Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), by three complementary methods with serial dilutions. Electroantennograms revealed the sensitivity of Culicoides nubeculosus (Meigen) females to neem > or = 0.10%. Culicoides impunctatus Goetghebuer females were repelled by > or = 1% in a Y-tube olfactometer, Using a membrane feeder for wild-caught parous females of C. impunctatus, the proportion blood-feeding was significantly reduced by topical applications of neem oil > or = 0.10% concentrations, with blood-feeding completely prevented by > or =1%. On the basis of these response data, we developed 2% neem-based formulations for personal protection against biting midges.

  10. Bovine Arboviruses in Culicoides Biting Midges and Sentinel Cattle in Southern Japan from 2003 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Kato, T; Shirafuji, H; Tanaka, S; Sato, M; Yamakawa, M; Tsuda, T; Yanase, T

    2016-12-01

    Epizootic congenital abnormalities, encephalomyelitis and febrile illnesses in cattle caused by arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are prevalent in Japan. Causative viruses including orthobunyaviruses, orbiviruses and rhabdovirus are thought to be transmitted by Culicoides biting midges. Recently, the incursions of several arboviruses, potentially Culicoides-borne, were newly confirmed in Japan. However, their spread pattern and exact vector species are currently uncertain. Attempts to isolate arboviruses from Culicoides biting midges and sentinel cattle were conducted in Kagoshima, located at the southernmost end of the main islands of Japan, a potentially high-risk area for incursion of arboviral diseases and outbreak of endemic ones. Seventy-eight isolates comprising Akabane, Peaton and Sathuperi viruses of the genus Orthobunyavirus of the family Bunyaviridae, bluetongue virus serotype 16, D'Aguilar virus, Bunyip Creek virus and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus serotype 1 of the genus Orbivirus of the family Reoviridae, a potentially novel rhabdovirus of the genus Ephemerovirus and unidentified orbivirus-like viruses were obtained from Culicoides biting midges and sentinel cattle between 2003 and 2013. Akabane, Sathuperi, D'Aguilar and Bunyip Creek viruses were selectively isolated from Culicoides oxystoma, suggesting this vector's responsibility for these arbovirus outbreaks. The results of virus isolation also implied that C. tainanus, C. jacobsoni and C. punctatus are competent for the transmission of bluetongue virus serotype 16, Peaton virus and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus serotype 1, respectively. Our monitoring in Culicoides biting midges and sentinel cattle detected the circulation of Akabane virus just prior to the accumulations of bovine congenital abnormalities and encephalomyelitis by it around study sites in 2003, 2006, 2008 and 2013. Silent circulations of the other arboviruses, including potentially new viruses, were also

  11. A histamine release assay to identify sensitization to Culicoides allergens in horses with skin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bettina; Childs, Bronwen A; Erb, Hollis N

    2008-12-15

    Skin hypersensitivity is an allergic disease induced in horses by allergens of Culicoides midges. The condition is typically diagnosed by clinical signs and in some horses in combination with allergy testing such as intradermal skin testing or serological allergen-specific IgE determination. Here, we describe an alternative method for allergy testing: a histamine release assay (HRA) that combines the functional aspects of skin testing with the convenience of submitting a blood sample. The assay is based on the principle that crosslinking of allergen-specific IgE bound via high-affinity IgE receptors to the surfaces of mast cells and basophils induces the release of inflammatory mediators. One of these mediators is histamine. The histamine was then detected by a colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The histamine assay was used to test 33 horses with skin hypersensitivity and 20 clinically healthy control animals for histamine release from their peripheral blood basophils after stimulation with Culicoides allergen extract or monoclonal anti-IgE antibody. An increased histamine release was observed in the horses with skin hypersensitivity compared to the control group after allergen-specific stimulation with Culicoides extract (p=0.023). In contrast, stimulation with anti-IgE induced similar amounts of released histamine in both groups (p=0.46). For further evaluation of the HRA, we prepared a receiver operating-characteristic (ROC) curve and performed a likelihood-ratio analysis for assay interpretation. Our results suggested that the assay is a valuable diagnostic tool to identify sensitization to Culicoides allergens in horses. Because some of the clinically healthy horses also showed sensitization to Culicoides extract, the assay cannot be used to distinguish allergic from non-allergic animals. The observation that sensitization is sometimes detectable in non-affected animals suggested that clinically healthy horses use immune mechanisms to control the

  12. Saliva proteins of vector Culicoides modify structure and infectivity of bluetongue virus particles.

    PubMed

    Darpel, Karin E; Langner, Kathrin F A; Nimtz, Manfred; Anthony, Simon J; Brownlie, Joe; Takamatsu, Haru-Hisa; Mellor, Philip S; Mertens, Peter P C

    2011-03-14

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) are related orbiviruses, transmitted between their ruminant hosts primarily by certain haematophagous midge vectors (Culicoides spp.). The larger of the BTV outer-capsid proteins, 'VP2', can be cleaved by proteases (including trypsin or chymotrypsin), forming infectious subviral particles (ISVP) which have enhanced infectivity for adult Culicoides, or KC cells (a cell-line derived from C. sonorensis). We demonstrate that VP2 present on purified virus particles from 3 different BTV strains can also be cleaved by treatment with saliva from adult Culicoides. The saliva proteins from C. sonorensis (a competent BTV vector), cleaved BTV-VP2 more efficiently than those from C. nubeculosus (a less competent/non-vector species). Electrophoresis and mass spectrometry identified a trypsin-like protease in C. sonorensis saliva, which was significantly reduced or absent from C. nubeculosus saliva. Incubating purified BTV-1 with C. sonorensis saliva proteins also increased their infectivity for KC cells ∼10 fold, while infectivity for BHK cells was reduced by 2-6 fold. Treatment of an 'eastern' strain of EHDV-2 with saliva proteins of either C. sonorensis or C. nubeculosus cleaved VP2, but a 'western' strain of EHDV-2 remained unmodified. These results indicate that temperature, strain of virus and protein composition of Culicoides saliva (particularly its protease content which is dependent upon vector species), can all play a significant role in the efficiency of VP2 cleavage, influencing virus infectivity. Saliva of several other arthropod species has previously been shown to increase transmission, infectivity and virulence of certain arboviruses, by modulating and/or suppressing the mammalian immune response. The findings presented here, however, demonstrate a novel mechanism by which proteases in Culicoides saliva can also directly modify the orbivirus particle structure, leading to increased

  13. Breeding sites of Culicoides pachymerus Lutz in the Magdalena River basin, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Carrasquilla, María Cristina; Guhl, Felipe; Zipa, Yaneth; Ferro, Cristina; Pardo, Raúl Hernando; Cabrera, Olga Lucía; Santamaría, Erika

    2010-03-01

    The breeding sites of Culicoides pachymerus are described for the first time in western Boyacá Province, Colombia, where this species is a public health problem. In addition to being a nuisance due to its enormous density and its high biting rates, C. pachymerus cause dermatological problems in the human population. Analysis of microhabitats by the sugar flotation technique and the use of emergence traps allowed us to recover 155 larvae of Culicoides spp and 65 adults of C. pachymerus from peridomiciliary muddy substrates formed by springs of water and constant rainwater accumulation. These important findings could aid in the design of integrated control measures against this pest.

  14. Abundance of biting midge species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae, Culicoides spp.) on cattle farms in Korea.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Chung, Joon-Yee; Kwon, Mee-Soon; Kim, Toh-Kyung; Lee, Tae-Uk; Bae, You-Chan

    2013-01-01

    Culicoides biting midges were collected on three cattle farms weekly using light traps overnight from May to October between 2010 and 2011 in the southern part of Korea. The seasonal and geographical abundance of Culicodes spp. were measured. A total of 16,538 biting midges were collected from 2010 to 2011, including seven species of Culicoides, four of which represented 98.42% of the collected specimens. These four species were Culicodes (C.) punctatus (n = 14,413), C. arakawae (n = 1,120), C. oxystoma (n = 427), and C. maculatus (n = 318). C. punctatus was the predominant species (87.15%).

  15. Rapid spread of Schmallenberg virus-infected biting midges (Culicoides spp.) across Denmark in 2012.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, L D; Kirkeby, C; Bødker, R; Kristensen, B; Rasmussen, T B; Belsham, G J; Bøtner, A

    2014-02-01

    Detection of Schmallenberg virus RNA, using real-time RT-PCR, in biting midges (Culicoides spp.) caught at 48 locations in 2011 and four well-separated farms during 2012 in Denmark, revealed a remarkably rapid spread of virus-infected midges across the country. During 2012, some 213 pools of obsoletus group midges (10 specimens per pool) were examined, and of these, 35 of the 174 parous pools were Schmallenberg virus RNA positive and 11 of them were positive in the heads. Culicoides species-specific PCRs identified both C. obsoletus and C. dewulfi as vectors of Schmallenberg virus.

  16. The dying of the light: crepuscular activity in Culicoides and impact on light trap efficacy at temperate latitudes.

    PubMed

    Meiswinkel, R; Elbers, A R W

    2016-03-01

    The light trap is the tool of choice for conducting large-scale Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) vector surveillance programmes. Its efficacy is in doubt, however. To assess this, hourly changes in Culicoides activity over the 24-h diel were determined comparatively by way of light trapping and aerial sweeping, and correlated against light intensity. In the Netherlands, sweeping around cattle at pasture revealed that, in early summer, Culicoides are active throughout the diel, and that their abundance peaks during the crepuscular period and falls to a low during the brightest hours of the day. By contrast, the light trap was able to accumulate Culicoides only at night (i.e. after illuminance levels had dropped to 0 lux and midge activity had begun to decline). Although Culicoides chiopterus and species of the Culicoides obsoletus complex were similarly abundant around livestock, they differed critically in their hours of peak activity, being largely diurnal and nocturnal, respectively. This polarity helps to explain why, routinely, the C. obsoletus complex dominates light trap collections and C. chiopterus does not. Inability to accumulate Culicoides at light intensity levels above 0 lux means that, at ever-higher latitudes, particularly beyond 45° N, the progressive northward lengthening of the twilight period will have an increasingly adverse impact upon the efficacy of the light trap as a vector surveillance tool.

  17. Effects of permethrin (Flypor) and fenvalerate (Acadrex60, Arkofly) on Culicoides species-the vector of Bluetongue virus.

    PubMed

    Schmahl, Günter; Klimpel, Sven; Walldorf, Volker; Schumacher, Bärbel; Jatzlau, Antja; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2009-03-01

    Bluetongue disease struggles ruminants in Europe since summer 2006, introducing high levels of morbidity and mortality. Besides vaccination, the application of insecticides is another means to protect cattle and sheep from infections with the Bluetongue virus, which is transmitted in Europe by female specimens of Culicoides species (Culicoides obsoletus and in a few cases of Culicoides pulicaris and Culicoides dewulfi). The present study deals with the effects of permethrin (Flypor) and fenvalerate (Arkofly, Acadrex 60) on freshly caught Culicoides specimens when brought into contact for 15, 30, 60 or 120 s with hair of cattle or sheep treated topically 7,14, 21, 28 or 35 days before. The experiments clearly showed that the lege arte application of these compounds (products) onto the hair of the experimental animals succeeds in killing Culicoides specimens when brought into contact with hair from feet of animals being treated even 35 days before. This test was needed to make sure that the products do reach the feet and belly of the animals in sufficient amounts, since this region is the predominant biting site of the Culicoides midges.

  18. Activity of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) inside and outside of livestock stables in late winter and spring.

    PubMed

    Kameke, Daniela; Kampen, Helge; Walther, Doreen

    2017-03-01

    Culicoides Latreille, 1809 midge species are the putative vectors of Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in Europe. To gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of the diseases, basic knowledge about the overwintering of the vectors is needed. Therefore, we investigated culicoid activity in relation to air temperature at livestock stables during late winter and spring season. Ceratopogonids were captured weekly indoors and outdoors on three cattle farms, three horse farms and one sheep farm in the federal state of Brandenburg, Germany between January and May, 2015 by BG-Sentinel UV-light suction traps. First seasonal activity was measured inside a sheep barn and cattle stables in mid-March, suggesting the existence of a preceding vector-free period. The first species at all trapping sites were members of the Obsoletus Complex followed by Culicoides punctatus (Meigen), 1804 and Culicoides pulicaris (Linnaeus), 1758 simultaneously. In total, 160 collections were made, including 3465 Culicoides specimens with 2790 (80.6%) of them being members of the Obsoletus Complex. The remaining 675 individuals belonged to six other culicoid species. 59.8% of all Culicoides were collected indoors, and almost five times as many midges were sampled on cattle farms as on horse farms. Cattle farms harboured seven species while only two species were found on the horse and the sheep farms, respectively. Temperatures, husbandry practises and the presence/quality of potential breeding sites might be responsible for the difference in species and numbers of caught specimens between livestock holdings.

  19. Surveillance of biting midges (Culicoides spp.) in Northern Ireland: influence of seasonality, surrounding habitat and livestock housing.

    PubMed

    Jess, S; Thompson, G M; Clawson, S; Forsythe, I W N; Rea, I; Gordon, A W; Murchie, A K

    2017-08-26

    Biting midges, Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), are important vectors of viral pathogens. Following the outbreak of bluetongue serotype 8 in Europe between 2006 and 2009, many Culicoides surveillance programmes were initiated to identify vector-active periods, in accordance with European Commission regulation 2007/1266/EC. This study utilized surveillance data from 4 years of continuous light-trapping at 14 sites in Northern Ireland. The number of captured Culicoides varied from none during the vector-free period (December-April) to more than 36 000 per night during peak activity in the summer. The Obsoletus group represented 75% of Culicoides collected and the Pulicaris group represented 21%. A total of 91% of Culicoides were female, of which 42% were parous. Abundance data, sex ratios and parous rates suggested that both the Obsoletus and Pulicaris groups underwent three generations/year. The Obsoletus group was associated with cattle-rearing habitats and woodland, the Impunctatus group was found in habitats related to sheep rearing and the Pulicaris group were associated with both cattle and sheep. Housing did not reduce incursion of female Obsoletus group Culicoides but it did for males and for the Pulicaris group Culicoides. The influence of housing was strongly affected by time of year, probably reflecting the presence of livestock indoors/outdoors. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  20. A study of Culicoides in Rondônia, in the Brazilian Amazon: species composition, relative abundance and potential vectors.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, L P C; Pereira Júnior, A M; Farias, E S; Almeida, J F; Rodrigues, M S; Resadore, F; Pessoa, F A C; Medeiros, J F

    2017-03-01

    There is very little information available about Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in the western Brazilian Amazon. However, studies of the fauna of this region are essential to knowledge of the species and potential vectors within it. Thus, the present study aims to evaluate the abundance, richness and composition of Culicoides species in rural areas in the state of Rondônia, Brazil. Culicoides specimens were collected in forest and pasture environments in the municipality of Porto Velho, using light traps. A total of 1708 individuals (1136 females and 572 males) belonging to 33 species were collected; 28 of these samples represent new records for the state of Rondônia and include the first record of Culicoides contubernalis in Brazil. Culicoides insignis was the most abundant species (86.1%). Species richness was greater in forest areas (32 species, 96.96%), whereas pastures presented the greatest number of Culicoides captured (n = 1540, 90.1%). This study shows that Culicoides populations differ between forest and pasture environments and indicates that the abundance of C. insignis is an important factor in epidemiological vigilance studies in the region.

  1. Emergence of Culicoides obsoletus from indoor and outdoor breeding sites.

    PubMed

    Ninio, Camille; Augot, Denis; Dufour, Barbara; Depaquit, Jérôme

    2011-12-29

    Culicoides obsoletus (Diptera: Ceratopogondae) is considered as the probable main vector of Bluetongue virus (BTV) in northern Europe. Its breeding sites are poorly documented at the present time. We report numerous emergences of C. obsoletus s. str. from soil samples collected in two holdings between August and September 2010. Specimens were collected regularly in the laboratory during 80 days. In one holding, 1584 C. obsoletus midges emerged from used litter collected inside a dairy cow building and 211 C. obsoletus midges emerged from manure left outside the farm buildings. In the second holding, the number of emergences observed was much lower, especially for indoor samples. We discuss the impact of the farming practices on the abundance of emergence between both holdings on one side and between indoor and outdoor breeding sites on the other side. The observation of a peak in emergence and high emergence rates recorded in the laboratory for indoor samples let us assume that these breeding sites are of great importance, especially when it comes to understand the biology of this widespread species and its role in the transmission of BTV. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Studies of the mortality rate of Culicoides imicola in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Baylis, M; Touti, J; Bouayoune, H; Moudni, L; Taoufiq, B; el Hasnaoui, H

    1998-01-01

    Daily mortality rates of female Culicoides imicola were found for eight sites in Morocco in 1994 and for six sites in 1995. The mortality rates were found by operating Pirbright-type light traps for a number of consecutive nights in late summer or autumn and finding the parous rate assuming a feeding interval of 3 to 5 days. The mortality rates were calculated according to established methods. In Morocco the daily mortality rates were found to vary from about 5% per day (Arbaoua, 1994, 1995 and Sidi Moussa 1995) up to 20-25% per day (Berkane, Marrakech, Tangier). In general, estimates of daily mortality rate were consistent between the two years of study. Among sites, daily mortality rate was significantly correlated with the average night-time minimum wind speed but not mean or maximum night-time wind speeds, or with temperature, humidity or saturation deficit. The observed mortality rates suggest that at Arbaoua, were 1,000 flies to become infected with African horse sickness virus, at least 330 would live long enough to take 3 or more infective blood meals on hosts. At Berkane, the survival rate per 1,000 is less than 10. In general, the pattern observed for daily mortality rate, combined with the relative population sizes of C. imicola in Morocco, agree well with the observed distribution of African horse sickness in the country during the 1989-1991 epizootic.

  3. Validation of fluorescent dust marking of Culicoides biting midges and the design of a self-marking technique.

    PubMed

    Kluiters, Georgette; Hunter, Kristina; Baylis, Matthew

    2015-01-27

    Investigation of insect flight patterns frequently involves the use of dispersal studies. A common method for studying insect dispersal is mark-release-recapture (MRR) techniques using wild-caught insects in their natural environment; however, this requires a suitable marker. At present, no studies have been performed to identify markers that are suitable for use in midges within the Obsoletus Group, and visible by eye or down a light microscope. A series of 11 experiments were undertaken to determine the effectiveness of three colours of Brilliant General Purpose (BGP) fluorescent dusts in marking Culicoides midges. Three areas were focused on: 1) dust properties, 2) the effect on Culicoides, and 3) dust application in the field. All three dusts were insoluble in water, 10% washing-up liquid and 70% ethanol. They were visible down a microscope, with and without the use of a black light, and two were highly visible without the need for a microscope. The dusts remained adherent to the marked Culicoides for the duration of the experiments, did not transfer between marked and unmarked individuals or the environment, and remained adherent when the Culicoides were stored in an ethanol or water-based solution. The dusts had no effect on the mortality rate of the insects over the 48 hrs of the experiment. There were no significant differences between the recorded behaviours undertaken by undusted control Culicoides and the BGP fluorescent dusted Culicoides. Field-based marking of Culicoides can be achieved using a 'self-marking' technique, whereby the trapping vessel is pre-dusted with fluorescent dust prior to trapping the individuals to be marked. This is the first study to identify BGP fluorescent dusts as markers for use with Obsoletus Group Culicoides. BGP fluorescent dusts provide a quick and effective method of marking and identifying Culicoides for both field and laboratory studies. The self-marking technique minimises the time needed to handle specimens prior to

  4. Understanding and exploiting olfaction for the surveillance and control of Culicoides biting midges

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are found worldwide with the exception of only a few countries including New Zealand, Patagonia, the Hawaiian Isles and Antarctica. They are a nuisance pest to human beings, but transmit a number of diseases that mainly affect livestock. Like many haema...

  5. Ovine catarrhal fever (Bluetongue): analysis of Culicoides species in seropositive farms.

    PubMed

    Guercio, A; Di Marco, P; Manno, C; Di Bella, C; Purpari, G; Torina, A

    2010-04-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is an orbiviral disease of wild and domestic ruminants, mainly sheep. In Sicily, the first Bluetongue outbreak occurred in October 2000; there have been 76 recorded outbreaks so far. The National Surveillance Plan, based on European Union Commission Decision 138/2001/CE, establishes serological and entomological surveys. This plan consists of controls of seronegative cattle, called 'sentry' as indicators for the presence and circulation of virus in defined areas. To check the seroconversions, the regional territory has been subdivided in 400 km(2) areas including 58 seronegative cattle, periodically checked by serological tests. All positive sera have been tested to detect the specific serotype by the National Reference Centre for Exotic Diseases (CESME) at the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale Abruzzo e Molise in Teramo (IZS Teramo). Moreover, entomological surveillance has been implemented in seropositive herds, to investigate the presence of insect vectors belonging to Culicoides genus. The goal of the present communication is to report on the different species of Culicoides found in the farms with Bluetongue virus and to investigate on the probable role of new competent vectors. This paper concerns data analysis of 581 light-trap catches collected in 321 farms from 2003 to 2008. We observed that 82% of checked farms were positive for Culicoides spp., and only 10% of the farms were positive for Culicoides imicola.

  6. Effects of temperature and photoperiod on the development of overwintering immature Culicoides chiopterus and C. dewulfi.

    PubMed

    Lühken, Renke; Steinke, Sonja; Hoppe, Nikolai; Kiel, Ellen

    2015-11-30

    In areas with harsh winters, several studies have recorded low numbers - or even zero - adult Culicoides during the winter period followed by a population peak in the subsequent spring. This experimental study determined whether temperature, photoperiod, or the combination thereof affect the development of overwintering immature dung breeding Culicoides, resulting in this peak. Temperature had a significant impact on the development period of Culicoides chiopterus (Meigen), 1830 and C. dewulfi Goetghebuer, 1936. In treatments with constant high temperature, emergence occurred shortly after the beginning of the experiment (mean=day 9). In contrast, no individuals emerged from the other two treatments, as long as the temperatures were below 10°C. In these treatments, the emergence of Culicoides started when the temperature exceeded 20°C for some days (mean=day 33). There was no significant difference between the two photoperiods (February or April day length; 9 h:15 h [light:dark] vs. 13 h:11 h). Our results highlight the importance of temperature on the spring emergence of C. chiopterus and C. dewulfi, but the response to the four temperature-photoperiod treatments did not differ between the two species.

  7. Effects of Viral Infection on Blood-Feeding Behavior in Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary vector of bluetongue virus (BTV) in North America and a competent vector of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Little is known about how viral infection of this midge affects its blood feeding behavior. Midges were intrathoracically inoc...

  8. Blood Feeding Behavior of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infected Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine whether vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection of Culicoides sonorensis affects subsequent blood feeding behavior, midges injected with either virus-infected or virus-free cell lysates were allowed to blood feed for short (10 min) or long (60 min) periods of time on days 2, 3, and 4...

  9. Potential for Transovarial Transmission of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an insect transmitted rhabdovirus which causes economically devastating disease in cattle and horses in the western U.S. Important insect vectors identified thus far include Lutzomyia shannoni sand flies, Simulium vittatum black flies, and Culicoides sonorensis bi...

  10. Effects of Viral Infection on Blood Feeding Behavior and Fecundity in Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary vector of bluetongue virus (BTV) in North America and a competent vector of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Little is known about how viral infection of this midge affects its blood feeding behavior and fecundity. Blood feeding succes...

  11. Blood Feeding Behavior of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infected Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary vector of Bluetongue virus in North America and a competent vector of Vesicular Stomatitis virus (VSV). Little is known about how viral infection of this midge affects blood feeding behavior and how this might affect virus transmission....

  12. Management of North American Culicoides biting midges: Current knowledge and research needs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of two important viruses infecting North American ruminants: bluetongue (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHDV). While these viruses have been identified for over 60 years, we still lack an adequate understanding of t...

  13. Control of Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)blood feeding on sheep with long lasting repellent pesticides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides sonorensis is the primary vector of bluetongue and epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses in North America. Bluetongue disease is considered one of the most economically important arthropod-borne diseases of sheep in North America because it causes significant morbidity and mortality and ...

  14. Effects of Melezitose and Stachyose on Adult Longevity and Virus Persistence in Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A wide variety of blood feeding Diptera feed on extrafloral sugar sources such as homopteran honeydew. he significance of these sugar sources to insect survival and disease transmission are poorly known. Culicoides sonorensis can survive on plant sugars but might feed on homopteran honeydew. The su...

  15. PCR amplification and sequencing of ITS1 rDNA of Culicoides arakawae.

    PubMed

    Li, G Q; Hu, Y L; Kanu, S; Zhu, X Q

    2003-02-28

    The first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) of nuclear ribosomal DNA from Culicoides arakawae was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced. The wDNAsis software was used to analyze the ITS1 sequences of C. arakawae and other nine species of Culicoides, which were obtained from GenBank and EMBL databases. For all species, the lengths of the ITS1 were 316-469 bp, and the G+C contents were 26.79-34.53%. Based on the lengths of the ITS1 sequences, the 10 Culicoides species could be divided into two groups. The first group consisted of C. arakawae, C. albicans, C. cubitalis, C. pulicaris and C. punctatus, and the second group comprised C. impunctatus, C. nubeculosus, C. variipennis, C. grisescens and C. imicola. The lengths for the first group were 316-347 bp and the second group were 457-469 bp. C. arakawae belonged to the first group by its ITS1 sequence length. Sequence analysis revealed that C. arakawae was genetically more similar to the first group than it was to the second group, consistent with results based on sequence length. The alignment of ITS1 (the alignment length was 500 bp including the gaps) sequences showed that there was a highly conserved region, which was between 288 and 388 bp, except for a few insertions and substitutions. These findings have important implications for the molecular identification of C. arakawae, for studying its molecular genetics and epidemiology, and for studying the molecular systematics of Culicoides.

  16. Assessment of the repellent effect of citronella and lemon eucalyptus oil against South African Culicoides species.

    PubMed

    Venter, Gert J; Labuschagne, Karien; Boikanyo, Solomon N B; Morey, Liesl

    2014-08-08

    The use of insect repellents to reduce the attack rate of Culicoides species (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae) should form part of an integrated control programme to combat African horse sickness and other diseases transmitted by these blood-feeding midges. In the present study the repellent effects of a commercially available mosquito repellent, a combination of citronella and lemon eucalyptus oils, on Culicoides midges was determined. The number of midges collected with two 220 V Onderstepoort traps fitted with 8 W 23 cm white light tubes and baited with peel-stick patches, each containing 40 mg of active ingredient, was compared with that of two unbaited traps. Two trials were conducted and in each trial the four traps were rotated in two replicates of a 4 x 4 randomised Latin square design. Although more midges were collected in the baited traps, the mean number in the baited and unbaited traps was not significantly different. This mosquito repellent did not influence either the species composition or the physiological groups of Culicoides imicola Kieffer. The higher mean numbers in the baited traps, although not statistically significant, may indicate that this mosquito repellent might even attract Culicoides midges under certain conditions.

  17. Papular Dermatitis Induced in Guinea Pig by Biting Midge Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidaie)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Histological, ultrastructural, and virological examinations were performed on abdominal skin from guinea pigs after a blood meal by colony-bred biting midges, Culicoides sonorensis. Small, superficial, cutaneous, crateriform ulcers with necrosis of superficial dermis developed at feeding sites and h...

  18. Collection of Culicoides spp. with four light trap models during different seasons in the Balearic Islands.

    PubMed

    del Río, R; Monerris, M; Miquel, M; Borràs, D; Calvete, C; Estrada, R; Lucientes, J; Miranda, M A

    2013-07-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is a viral disease that affects ruminants, being especially pathogenic in certain breeds of sheep. Its viral agent (bluetongue virus; BTV) is transmitted by several species of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Different models of suction light traps are being used in a number of countries for the collection of BTV vector species. To determine the relative effectiveness of different light traps under field conditions, four traps (Onderstepoort, Mini-CDC, Rieb and Pirbright) were compared. These traps were rotated between four sites on a cattle farm in Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) for several non-consecutive nights. Results showed remarkable disparities in the efficacy of the traps for the collection of Culicoides midges. The highest number of midges collected in the Onderstepoort trap (x¯±SD=62±94.2) was not significantly different from that collected in the Mini-CDC (x¯±SD=58±139.2). The Rieb trap collected the lowest number of midges (x¯±SD=3±4.0). Significantly higher mean numbers of midges were collected in the Onderstepoort than in either the Pirbright (P=0.002) or Rieb traps (P=0.008). There were also differences in the Culicoides species composition as determine with the various traps. These results indicate that the Onderstepoort or Mini-CDC traps will be more effective than either the Rieb or Pirbright traps for the collection of large numbers of Culicoides midges.

  19. Culicoides species associated with sheep in the Netherlands and the effect of a permethrin insecticide.

    PubMed

    Griffioen, Karien; van Gemst, Dennis B J; Pieterse, Maarten C; Jacobs, Frans; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M

    2011-11-01

    Culicoides spp. act as vectors for a number of viral diseases of animals including bluetongue in sheep. The aims of this study were to determine: (1) which Culicoides spp. are associated with sheep in The Netherlands; (2) the time of the day when they are most active; and (3) the effect of treatment of animals with a permethrin insecticide. Two pairs of sheep were each housed within mosquito tents of either one or two layers of netting and all trapped Culicoides spp. were identified microscopically. For the permethrin insecticide study, one of two pairs of sheep was treated with 3.6% permethrin and all animals were housed in tents of similar design. Of the 6210 midges captured, 54.1% were identified as C. chiopterus and 42.7% as C. obsoletus. C. imicola was not identified. The average insect feeding rate was 35-40% and midge activity was greatest around sunset. Permethrin treatment reduced the number of midges captured by 50% and also resulted in a decrease in the percentage of midges that had fed. The findings provide useful information on the behaviour and distribution of Culicoides spp. that will facilitate the development of appropriate control strategies to minimise the risk of insect-vector borne virus diseases such as bluetongue.

  20. Culicoides-virus interactions: infection barriers and possible factors underlying vector competence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the United States, Culicoides midges vector arboviruses of economic importance such as Bluetongue Virus and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus. A limited number of studies have demonstrated the complexities of midge-virus interactions, including dynamic changes in virus titer and prevalence over...

  1. Long-distance aerial dispersal modelling of Culicoides biting midges: case studies of incursions into Australia.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Debbie; Melville, Lorna; Weir, Richard; Davis, Steven; Bellis, Glenn; Zalucki, Myron P; Walker, Peter J; Durr, Peter A

    2014-06-19

    Previous studies investigating long-distance, wind-borne dispersal of Culicoides have utilised outbreaks of clinical disease (passive surveillance) to assess the relationship between incursion and dispersal event. In this study, species of exotic Culicoides and isolates of novel bluetongue viruses, collected as part of an active arbovirus surveillance program, were used for the first time to assess dispersal into an endemic region. A plausible dispersal event was determined for five of the six cases examined. These include exotic Culicoides specimens for which a possible dispersal event was identified within the range of two days--three weeks prior to their collection and novel bluetongue viruses for which a dispersal event was identified between one week and two months prior to their detection in cattle. The source location varied, but ranged from Lombok, in eastern Indonesia, to Timor-Leste and southern Papua New Guinea. Where bluetongue virus is endemic, the concurrent use of an atmospheric dispersal model alongside existing arbovirus and Culicoides surveillance may help guide the strategic use of limited surveillance resources as well as contribute to continued model validation and refinement. Further, the value of active surveillance systems in evaluating models for long-distance dispersal is highlighted, particularly in endemic regions where knowledge of background virus and vector status is beneficial.

  2. Long-distance aerial dispersal modelling of Culicoides biting midges: case studies of incursions into Australia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies investigating long-distance, wind-borne dispersal of Culicoides have utilised outbreaks of clinical disease (passive surveillance) to assess the relationship between incursion and dispersal event. In this study, species of exotic Culicoides and isolates of novel bluetongue viruses, collected as part of an active arbovirus surveillance program, were used for the first time to assess dispersal into an endemic region. Results A plausible dispersal event was determined for five of the six cases examined. These include exotic Culicoides specimens for which a possible dispersal event was identified within the range of two days – three weeks prior to their collection and novel bluetongue viruses for which a dispersal event was identified between one week and two months prior to their detection in cattle. The source location varied, but ranged from Lombok, in eastern Indonesia, to Timor-Leste and southern Papua New Guinea. Conclusions Where bluetongue virus is endemic, the concurrent use of an atmospheric dispersal model alongside existing arbovirus and Culicoides surveillance may help guide the strategic use of limited surveillance resources as well as contribute to continued model validation and refinement. Further, the value of active surveillance systems in evaluating models for long-distance dispersal is highlighted, particularly in endemic regions where knowledge of background virus and vector status is beneficial. PMID:24943652

  3. The range of attraction for light traps catching Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Culicoides are vectors of e.g. bluetongue virus and Schmallenberg virus in northern Europe. Light trapping is an important tool for detecting the presence and quantifying the abundance of vectors in the field. Until now, few studies have investigated the range of attraction of light traps. Methods Here we test a previously described mathematical model (Model I) and two novel models for the attraction of vectors to light traps (Model II and III). In Model I, Culicoides fly to the nearest trap from within a fixed range of attraction. In Model II Culicoides fly towards areas with greater light intensity, and in Model III Culicoides evaluate light sources in the field of view and fly towards the strongest. Model II and III incorporated the directionally dependent light field created around light traps with fluorescent light tubes. All three models were fitted to light trap collections obtained from two novel experimental setups in the field where traps were placed in different configurations. Results Results showed that overlapping ranges of attraction of neighboring traps extended the shared range of attraction. Model I did not fit data from any of the experimental setups. Model II could only fit data from one of the setups, while Model III fitted data from both experimental setups. Conclusions The model with the best fit, Model III, indicates that Culicoides continuously evaluate the light source direction and intensity. The maximum range of attraction of a single 4W CDC light trap was estimated to be approximately 15.25 meters. The attraction towards light traps is different from the attraction to host animals and thus light trap catches may not represent the vector species and numbers attracted to hosts. PMID:23497628

  4. Modelling the Abundances of Two Major Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Species in the Niayes Area of Senegal.

    PubMed

    Diarra, Maryam; Fall, Moussa; Lancelot, Renaud; Diop, Aliou; Fall, Assane G; Dicko, Ahmadou; Seck, Momar Talla; Garros, Claire; Allène, Xavier; Rakotoarivony, Ignace; Bakhoum, Mame Thierno; Bouyer, Jérémy; Guis, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    In Senegal, considerable mortality in the equine population and hence major economic losses were caused by the African horse sickness (AHS) epizootic in 2007. Culicoides oxystoma and Culicoides imicola, known or suspected of being vectors of bluetongue and AHS viruses are two predominant species in the vicinity of horses and are present all year-round in Niayes area, Senegal. The aim of this study was to better understand the environmental and climatic drivers of the dynamics of these two species. Culicoides collections were obtained using OVI (Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute) light traps at each of the 5 sites for three nights of consecutive collection per month over one year. Cross Correlation Map analysis was performed to determine the time-lags for which environmental variables and abundance data were the most correlated. C. oxystoma and C. imicola count data were highly variable and overdispersed. Despite modelling large Culicoides counts (over 220,000 Culicoides captured in 354 night-traps), using on-site climate measures, overdispersion persisted in Poisson, negative binomial, Poisson regression mixed-effect with random effect at the site of capture models. The only model able to take into account overdispersion was the Poisson regression mixed-effect model with nested random effects at the site and date of capture levels. According to this model, meteorological variables that contribute to explaining the dynamics of C. oxystoma and C. imicola abundances were: mean temperature and relative humidity of the capture day, mean humidity between 21 and 19 days prior a capture event, density of ruminants, percentage cover of water bodies within a 2 km radius and interaction between temperature and humidity for C. oxystoma; mean rainfall and NDVI of the capture day and percentage cover of water bodies for C. imicola. Other variables such as soil moisture, wind speed, degree days, land cover or landscape metrics could be tested to improve the models. Further work

  5. The range of attraction for light traps catching Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, Carsten; Græsbøll, Kaare; Stockmarr, Anders; Christiansen, Lasse E; Bødker, René

    2013-03-15

    Culicoides are vectors of e.g. bluetongue virus and Schmallenberg virus in northern Europe. Light trapping is an important tool for detecting the presence and quantifying the abundance of vectors in the field. Until now, few studies have investigated the range of attraction of light traps. Here we test a previously described mathematical model (Model I) and two novel models for the attraction of vectors to light traps (Model II and III). In Model I, Culicoides fly to the nearest trap from within a fixed range of attraction. In Model II Culicoides fly towards areas with greater light intensity, and in Model III Culicoides evaluate light sources in the field of view and fly towards the strongest. Model II and III incorporated the directionally dependent light field created around light traps with fluorescent light tubes. All three models were fitted to light trap collections obtained from two novel experimental setups in the field where traps were placed in different configurations. Results showed that overlapping ranges of attraction of neighboring traps extended the shared range of attraction. Model I did not fit data from any of the experimental setups. Model II could only fit data from one of the setups, while Model III fitted data from both experimental setups. The model with the best fit, Model III, indicates that Culicoides continuously evaluate the light source direction and intensity. The maximum range of attraction of a single 4W CDC light trap was estimated to be approximately 15.25 meters. The attraction towards light traps is different from the attraction to host animals and thus light trap catches may not represent the vector species and numbers attracted to hosts.

  6. Collection and analysis of salivary proteins from the biting midge Culicoides nubeculosus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Langner, Kathrin F A; Darpel, Karin E; Denison, Eric; Drolet, Barbara S; Leibold, Wolfgang; Mellor, Philip S; Mertens, Peter P C; Nimtz, Manfred; Greiser-Wilke, Irene

    2007-03-01

    Salivary proteins of hematophagous Culicoides spp. are thought to play an important role in pathogen transmission and skin hypersensitivity. Analysis of these proteins, however, has been problematic due to the difficulty in obtaining adequate amounts of secreted Culicoides saliva. In the current study, a collection method for midge saliva was developed. Over a 3-d period, 3- to 5-d-old male and female Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were repeatedly placed onto the collection system and allowed to deposit saliva into a filter. Salivary products were eluted from the filters and evaluated by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry as well as by intradermal testing and determination of clotting time. Gel electrophoresis revealed approximately 55 protein spots displaying relative molecular masses from 5 to 67 kDa and isoelectric points ranging from 4.5 to 9.8. The majority of molecular species analyzed by mass spectrometry showed high convergence with salivary proteins recently obtained from a cDNA library of Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones, including proteins involved in sugarmeal digestion, defense, and coagulation inhibition as well as members of the D7 family and unclassified salivary proteins. In addition, the proteome analysis revealed a number of peptides that were related to proteins from insect species other than Culicoides. Intradermal injection of the saliva in human skin produced edema, vasodilatation, and pruritus. The anticoagulant activity of the saliva was demonstrated by significantly prolonged clotting times for human platelets. The potential role of the identified salivary proteins in the transmission of pathogens and the induction of allergies is discussed.

  7. Gene discovery and differential expression analysis of humoral immune response elements in female Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Female Culicoides sonorensis midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of pathogens that impact livestock and wildlife in the United States. Little is known about their molecular functioning, including components of their immune system. Because the insect immune response is involved ...

  8. Culicoides vector species on three South American camelid farms seropositive for bluetongue virus serotype 8 in Germany 2008/2009.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Claudia; Ziller, Mario; Kampen, Helge; Gauly, Matthias; Beer, Martin; Grevelding, Christoph G; Hoffmann, Bernd; Bauer, Christian; Werner, Doreen

    2015-12-15

    Palearctic species of Culicoides (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae), in particular of the Obsoletus and Pulicaris complexes, were identified as putative vectors of bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) on ruminant farms during the epizootic in Germany from 2006 to 2009. BTV may cause severe morbidity and mortality in ruminants and sporadically in South American camelids (SAC). However, the fauna of Culicoides spp. on SAC farms has not been investigated. Therefore, the ceratopogonid fauna was monitored on three farms with BTV-seropositive SAC in Germany. Black-light traps were set up on pastures and in stables from summer 2008 to autumn 2009. Additionally, ceratopogonids were caught in emergence traps mounted on llama dung and dung-free pasture from spring to autumn 2009. After morphological identification, selected Culicoides samples were analysed for BTV-RNA by real-time RT-PCR. The effects of the variables 'location', 'temperature' and 'humidity' on the number of Culicoides caught in black-light traps were modelled using multivariable Poisson regression. In total, 26 species of Culicoides and six other genera of biting midges were identified. The most abundant Culicoides spp. collected both outdoors and indoors with black-light traps belonged to the Obsoletus (77.4%) and Pulicaris (16.0%) complexes. The number of Culicoides peaked in summer, while no biting midges were caught during the winter months. Daily collections of Culicoides were mainly influenced by the location and depended on the interaction of temperature and humidity. In the emergence traps, species of the Obsoletus complex predominated the collections. In summary, the absence of BTV-RNA in any of the analysed Culicoides midges and in the BTV-seropositive SAC on the three farms together with the differences in the pathogenesis of BTV-8 in SAC compared to ruminants suggests a negligible role of SAC in the spread of the virus. Although SAC farms may provide similar suitable habitats for putative Culicoides

  9. [Preliminary evaluation of the Culicoides biting nuisance (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in the province of Boyacá, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Erika; Cabrera, Olga Lucía; Zipa, Yaneth; Ferro, Cristina; Ahumada, Martha Liliana; Pardo, Raúl Hernando

    2008-12-01

    Inhabitants in the western border of Boyacá province have reported high nuisance levels and dermatologic problems caused by the intensely irritating bites of the very small flies of the genus Culicoides. A survey was carried out to locate the affected area, identify the anthropophylic Culicoides species and estimate its abundance in Boyacá. Nuisance reports and clinical records of dermatologic cases associated with Culicoides bites were requested from health authorities in counties where nuisance reports had been received or which had geographical features apparently favorable for Culicoides infestations. An outdoors entomological survey using human landing catches was undertaken in areas reporting a pest problem. Culicoides infestations were confirmed as a serious nuisance problem in the rural areas of nine counties located in the western foothills of the Eastern Range of the Colombian Andes. Although available epidemiological records were fragmented, it was established that in six counties 11.4% of the dermatitis cases (total=2,472 cases) reported between 2003 and 2005 were attributed to the Culicoides bites. The entomological survey identified Culicoides pachymerus as the dominant species, 99.3% of 3,389 caught females. Biting rates in the most intensely affected areas reach a geometric mean of 52 females/person per 5 minutes. Multivariate analysis indicated that abundance of C. pachymerus had a negative relationship with altitude. Based on its dominance and high biting rates, C. pachymerus is probably the species responsible for the high nuisance levels caused by Culicoides bites and the associated dermatological pathology, within the study area.

  10. New Agar Technique Compared with Sand Flotation for Obtaining Salt Marsh Culicoides mississippiensis Hoffman (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Larvae,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-26

    compared with 1% and 2% (wt/v) agar formulations for extracting Culicoides ndisaiooippiensis Hoffman larvae from marsh soil samples. The 1% agar formula...been used to recover larvae of biting midges (CuZ.,o;1aa spp .) from salt marsh substrate (soil) samples. They are: (1) sieve-flotation (Kettle and Lawson...Kettle et al., (1975) in which tabanid and culicoid larvae were successfully reared in agar media, we decided that one possibility was to replace the

  11. A comparison of commercial light-emitting diode baited suction traps for surveillance of Culicoides in northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Hope, Andrew; Gubbins, Simon; Sanders, Christopher; Denison, Eric; Barber, James; Stubbins, Francesca; Baylis, Matthew; Carpenter, Simon

    2015-04-22

    The response of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to artificial light sources has led to the use of light-suction traps in surveillance programmes. Recent integration of light emitting diodes (LED) in traps improves flexibility in trapping through reduced power requirements and also allows the wavelength of light used for trapping to be customized. This study investigates the responses of Culicoides to LED light-suction traps emitting different wavelengths of light to make recommendations for use in surveillance. The abundance and diversity of Culicoides collected using commercially available traps fitted with Light Emitting Diode (LED) platforms emitting ultraviolet (UV) (390 nm wavelength), blue (430 nm), green (570 nm), yellow (590 nm), red (660 nm) or white light (425 nm - 750 nm with peaks at 450 nm and 580 nm) were compared. A Centre for Disease Control (CDC) UV light-suction trap was also included within the experimental design which was fitted with a 4 watt UV tube (320-420 nm). Generalised linear models with negative binomial error structure and log-link function were used to compare trap abundance according to LED colour, meteorological conditions and seasonality. The experiment was conducted over 49 nights with 42,766 Culicoides caught in 329 collections. Culicoides obsoletus Meigen and Culicoides scoticus Downes and Kettle responded indiscriminately to all wavelengths of LED used with the exception of red which was significantly less attractive. In contrast, Culicoides dewulfi Goetghebuer and Culicoides pulicaris Linnaeus were found in significantly greater numbers in the green LED trap than in the UV LED trap. The LED traps collected significantly fewer Culicoides than the standard CDC UV light-suction trap. Catches of Culicoides were reduced in LED traps when compared to the standard CDC UV trap, however, their reduced power requirement and small size fulfils a requirement for trapping in logistically challenging areas or where many

  12. Genetic structure and population dynamics of the biting midges Culicoides obsoletus and Culicoides scoticus: implications for the transmission and maintenance of bluetongue.

    PubMed

    Pili, E; Carcangiu, L; Oppo, M; Marchi, A

    2010-12-01

    Culicoides species belonging to the Obsoletus complex (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have been indicated as primary bluetongue (BT) vectors in many European countries and their possible involvement in the maintenance and overwintering of BT viruses has been suggested, even in regions where Culicoides imicola Keiffer is the main vector. The Obsoletus complex includes two predominant taxa, Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen) and Culicoides scoticus Downes & Kettle. However, the role played by each species in the epidemiology of BT is still unknown. Taxonomic identification is mainly based on the morphology of male genitalia and the lack of other reliable diagnostic features makes the screening of trap-collected vector populations, mainly females, particularly difficult. Although molecular markers have facilitated species identification, little information is yet available on the biology, abundance and population dynamics of the two taxa. The aim of this work was to investigate the genetic profile and temporal distribution of C. obsoletus and C. scoticus by using isozyme electrophoresis applied to adult midges, collected weekly at two selected farms in southern Sardinia. A total of nine enzyme loci were analysed and five of them provided diagnostic allozyme markers (Hk, Mdh, Pgi, Idh-1 and Idh-2). Nei's genetic distance between the two taxa was in the range of other well-separated taxa (D = 1.792), supporting their status as true species. Culicoides scoticus represented almost 61% of the 562 specimens analysed; its genetic structure was characterized by a very low level of intra-population variation (mean heterozygosity H(e) = 0.019) and higher genetic divergence between populations (F(ST) = 0.0016) than in C. obsoletus. The latter species had significantly more heterozygotes (H(e) = 0.123), a higher percentage of polymorphic loci, and no inter-population differentiation (F(ST) ≅ 0). We suggest that different biological and ecological constraints, such as breeding habitat

  13. Is the morphology of Culicoides intersexes parasitized by mermithid nematodes a parasite adaptation? A morphometric approach to Culicoides circumscriptus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Francesc; Ramoneda, Josep; Pagès, Nonito; Pujol, Nuria; Talavera, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    Mermithidae is a family of endoparasitic nematodes known to cause intersexuality in arthropods. Intersexes of the genus Culicoides parasitized by mermithids have been the object of several studies aiming to describe their particular morphology. Culicoides intersexes are specimens with male genitalia and feminized sexually dimorphic structures, i.e. antennae, mouthparts and wings. To date, these specimens have only been described qualitatively and a quantitative approach supported by statistical analysis is lacking. Here we conduct morphometric analyses of sexually dimorphic structures in a sample of Culicoides circumscriptus that includes 34 intersexes with the aim of describing precisely the intersexual morphology. The morphology of antennae and the mouthparts was studied by multivariate statistical analysis of linear measures, and wing form by implementing geometric morphometrics techniques. While intersex wings proved to have a similar size to male wings, their shape was intermediate between males and females. However, when allometric shape variation was removed, the wing shape of intersexes was almost identical to that of females. The intersex antennae were morphometrically of the female type, especially when size variation was considered. In contrast, the measured mouthparts (the labrum and the third palpal segment) were halfway between males and females, even when body size was considered. Overall, the antennae and the wings showed a higher degree of feminization than the mouthparts. These findings indicate that the degree of feminization depends both on the morphological structure and on body size. Moreover, we propose that the feminization of the wings and antennae has an adaptive meaning for the parasite, which would favor female-like traits in order to access more easily its breeding sites, where the parasite has plenty of new hosts to infect. Female-like antennae would be beneficial to detect these sites, while having female-like wings would favor the

  14. The distribution in Kenya of bluetongue virus and antibody, and the Culicoides vector*

    PubMed Central

    Davies, F. G.; Walker, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Sera from domestic cattle, sheep and goats and 11 wild bovid species taken at 41 locations throughout Kenya were screened for antibody to bluetongue virus using the indirect fluorescent antibody method. Positive sera were found at 39 locations and in all the species tested. The distribution of clinical disease was mapped and found to be more restricted than the distribution of antibody. Culicoides were collected in light traps at 55 locations throughout Kenya. The presumptive vector of bluetongue in Kenya, C. pallidipennis, was the most widespread species, found in 38 locations. Both the distribution of antibody and Culicoides have been tabulated by ecological zones to demonstrate that bluetongue virus in its natural state in cattle and wild bovids is far more widespread than clinical bluetongue disease seen in exotic sheep of restricted distribution; and that C. pallidipennis has great ecological range. PMID:4362414

  15. Bluetongue, Schmallenberg - what is next? Culicoides-borne viral diseases in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, two pathogens transmitted by Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), bluetongue virus and Schmallenberg virus, have caused serious economic losses to the European livestock industry, most notably affecting sheep and cattle. These outbreaks of arboviral disease have highlighted large knowledge gaps on the biology and ecology of indigenous Culicoides species. With these research gaps in mind, and as a means of assessing what potential disease outbreaks to expect in the future, an international workshop was held in May 2013 at Wageningen University, The Netherlands. It brought together research groups from Belgium, France, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom and The Netherlands, with diverse backgrounds in vector ecology, epidemiology, entomology, virology, animal health, modelling, and genetics. Here, we report on the key findings of this workshop. PMID:24685104

  16. Progress and knowledge gaps in Culicoides genetics, genomics and population modelling: 2003 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Simon

    2016-09-30

    In the 10 years, since the last international meeting on Bluetongue virus (BTV) and related Orbiviruses in Sicily, there have been huge advances in explorations of the genetics and genomics of Culicoides, culminating in the imminent release of the rst full genome de novo assembly for the genus. In parallel, mathematical models used to predict Culicoides adult distribution, seasonality, and dispersal have also increased in sophistication, re ecting advances in available computational power and expertise. While these advances have focused upon the outbreaks of BTV in Europe, there is an opportunity to extend these techniques to other regions as part of global studies of the genus. This review takes a selective approach to examining the past decade of research in these areas and provides a personal viewpoint of future directions of research that may prove productive.

  17. The transmission of Haemoproteus belopolskyi (Haemosporida: Haemoproteidae) of blackcap by Culicoides impunctatus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Valkiunas, Gediminas; Iezhova, Tatjana A

    2004-02-01

    Haemoproteus belopolskyi of blackcap, Sylvia atricapilla, underwent sporogony in wild-caught female biting midges, Culicoides impunctatus, which were experimentally infected by feeding them on naturally infected birds. The engorged flies were held for 8-12 days to allow development of sporozoites and then aspirated and triturated in 0.85% saline. Seven uninfected nestlings of blackcap at the age of 20-21 days were inoculated into the pectoral muscle with 0.3 ml of the slurry containing approximately 45 sporozoites. Parasitemia of H. belopolskyi developed in 6 nestlings, with a prepatent period of 11-12 days. The maximum parasitemia varied between 0.9 and 16% of erythrocytes in different experimental hosts. Culicoides impunctatus is an experimental vector of H. belopolskyi. It is likely to be the important natural vector of Haemoproteus spp. of passerine birds in Europe.

  18. Foraging range of arthropods with veterinary interest: New insights for Afrotropical Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) using the ring method.

    PubMed

    Bakhoum, M T; Fall, M; Seck, M T; Gardès, L; Fall, A G; Diop, M; Mall, I; Balenghien, T; Baldet, T; Gimonneau, G; Garros, C; Bouyer, J

    2016-05-01

    The identification of blood meal source of arthropod vector species contributes to the understanding of host-vector-pathogen interactions. The aim of the current work was to identify blood meal source in Culicoides biting midge species, biological vectors of internationally important arboviruses of livestock and equids, using a new ecological approach. We examined the correlation between blood meal source identified in engorged Culicoides females collected in a suction light trap and the available vertebrate hosts along four rings (200, 500, 1000 and 2000 m) centered at the trap site and described the foraging range of the three main vector species of veterinary interest present in the study area, Culicoides imicola, Culicoides kingi and Culicoides oxystoma. The study was performed in four sites localized in the Niayes region of Senegal (West Africa) where recent outbreaks of African horse sickness occurred. Blood meal source identification was carried out by species-specific multiplex PCRs with genomic DNA extracted from the abdomen of engorged females collected during nine night collections for twenty-six collections. The four most abundant hosts present in the studied area (horse, cattle, goat and sheep) were surveyed in each ring zone. The blood meal source varied according to Culicoides species and host availability in each site. C. oxystoma and C. imicola females mainly fed on horses readily available at 200 m maximum from the trap location whereas females of C. kingi fed mainly on cattle, at variable distances from the traps (200 to 2000 m). C. oxystoma may also feed on other vertebrates. We discuss the results in relation with the transmission of Culicoides-borne arboviruses and the species dispersion capacities.

  19. Sugar-feeding behaviour and longevity of European Culicoides biting midges.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, C; Mathis, A; Vorburger, C

    2015-03-01

    Most haematophagous insect vectors can also use sugar as an energy source; thus their sugar-feeding behaviour influences their longevity and blood-feeding rate and hence their vectorial capacity. Scant information is available on the sugar-feeding behaviour of Culicoides Latreille biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), which are vectors of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses. The longevity of laboratory-reared Culicoides nubeculosus (Meigen) under fluctuating temperatures (16 and 28 °C) and with access to water or water and blood was on average 6.4 days and 8.9 days, respectively, which was around one third of the lifespan of siblings with access to sugar or sugar and blood (22.2 days and 27.1 days, respectively). Access to honeydew significantly increased the midge's longevity, whereas the provision of extrafloral nectaries had no impact. Females with access to sugar produced a significantly higher number of eggs (65.5 ± 5.2) than their starved sisters (45.4 ± 8.4). More than 80% of field-caught female Culicoides from the two most abundant European groups, Obsoletus (n = 2243) and Pulicaris (n = 805), were fructose-positive. Fructose-positivity was high in all physiological stages and no seasonal variability was noted. The high rate of natural sugar feeding of Culicoides offers opportunities for the development of novel control strategies using toxic sugar baits and for the monitoring of vector-borne diseases using sugar-treated FTA (nucleic acid preservation) cards in the field. © 2014 The Royal Entomological Society.

  20. Endemic mansonellosis in Emohua local government area, Nigeria: human parasitaemia and Culicoides biting patterns.

    PubMed

    Uttah, E C; Etim, S; Okonofua, C; Effiom, O E

    2011-03-01

    The study was aimed at elucidating the prevalence and intensity of Mansonella perstans microfilaraemia in the Emohua Local Government Area, Nigeria, and ascertaining the abundance, circadian, and the annual biting patterns of the Culicoides vector. Thick smear of 50 µl finger-prick blood stained with Giemsa was examined microscopically in a cross-sectional study. Vector landing collection on human bait was employed in a longitudinal study of the vector biting patterns, carried out between July 2005 and August 2006. Of 1486 individuals examined, 11.2% of both males and females were positive for M. perstans microfilaraemia. Microfilaraemia appeared early in life. The overall geometric mean intensity among those with positive microfilaraemia was 117 mf/ml (121 mf/ml for males and 113 mf/ml for females). The differences in geometric mean intensity between different age groups were statistically significant (one-way analysis of variance; p <0.05), being highest in the oldest age group (266 mf/ml). A total of 1183 female Culicoides sp were caught from September 2005 to August 2006. The abundance of Culicoides sp was seasonal. The circadian biting activity had a broad peak between 0700 and 1200 hrs. The monthly biting rates ranged from zero bite per person per month in January 2006 to 1151 bites per person per month in June 2006. The annual biting rate was 7382 bites per person per year. Majority of those with positive microfilaraemia were poor socioeconomically, underscoring the need for health education and application of effective control measures against Culicoides biting midges in Emohua.

  1. A spatial assessment of Culicoides spp. distribution and bluetongue disease risk areas in Austria.

    PubMed

    Silbermayr, Katja; Hackländer, Klaus; Doscher, Crile; Koefer, Josef; Fuchs, Klemens

    2011-01-01

    Bluetongue disease (BT) was introduced into Central Europe in the summer of 2006 and has since affected most European countries. In this study we analysed the distribution of the biting midge vector Culicoides spp. in Austria and modelled Bluetongue disease risk zones. Culicoides spp. abundance data was collected from weekly catches of 14 months from 54 trapping locations. The corresponding weather data mean temperature (p < 0.001), wind (p < 0.001), relative humidity (p = 0.019) and altitude (p = 0.059) were identified as predictors on Culicoides spp. distribution in a regression model (R 2.8.0). The majority of catches were detected at temperatures above 10 degrees C and at relative humidities between 65-80%. The point data of these parameters originating from 186 meteorological stations were interpolated using the Geostatistical Analyst Kriging tool (ESRI ArcGIS 9.3). To create seasonal risk maps we overlaid regions with optimal temperature and humidity conditions with domestic ruminants density data. Our results show that the summer season holds the greatest risk of a BT epidemic with 25.9% of the analysed area providing optimal conditions for vector abundance and 12.4% showing contact risk with ruminant hosts. This project (1) provides fundamental data on the Culicoides spp. distribution in Austria, (2) determines limiting climatic parameters on vector abundance and (3) identifies risk areas by including areas of possible host-parasite-interactions. These high-risk areas can subsequently be given special attention for precautionary monitoring and surveillance measures.

  2. Detection of Schmallenberg virus in different Culicoides spp. by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    De Regge, N; Deblauwe, I; De Deken, R; Vantieghem, P; Madder, M; Geysen, D; Smeets, F; Losson, B; van den Berg, T; Cay, A B

    2012-12-01

    To identify possible vectors of Schmallenberg virus (SBV), we tested pools containing heads of biting midges (Culicoides) that were caught during the summer and early autumn of 2011 at several places in Belgium by real-time RT-PCR. Pools of heads originating from following species: C. obsoletus complex, C. dewulfi and C. chiopterus were found positive, strongly indicating that these species are relevant vectors for SBV.

  3. A Spatial Simulation Model for the Dispersal of the Bluetongue Vector Culicoides brevitarsis in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Joel K.; Milne, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The spread of Bluetongue virus (BTV) among ruminants is caused by movement of infected host animals or by movement of infected Culicoides midges, the vector of BTV. Biologically plausible models of Culicoides dispersal are necessary for predicting the spread of BTV and are important for planning control and eradication strategies. Methods A spatially-explicit simulation model which captures the two underlying population mechanisms, population dynamics and movement, was developed using extensive data from a trapping program for C. brevitarsis on the east coast of Australia. A realistic midge flight sub-model was developed and the annual incursion and population establishment of C. brevitarsis was simulated. Data from the literature was used to parameterise the model. Results The model was shown to reproduce the spread of C. brevitarsis southwards along the east Australian coastline in spring, from an endemic population to the north. Such incursions were shown to be reliant on wind-dispersal; Culicoides midge active flight on its own was not capable of achieving known rates of southern spread, nor was re-emergence of southern populations due to overwintering larvae. Data from midge trapping programmes were used to qualitatively validate the resulting simulation model. Conclusions The model described in this paper is intended to form the vector component of an extended model that will also include BTV transmission. A model of midge movement and population dynamics has been developed in sufficient detail such that the extended model may be used to evaluate the timing and extent of BTV outbreaks. This extended model could then be used as a platform for addressing the effectiveness of spatially targeted vaccination strategies or animal movement bans as BTV spread mitigation measures, or the impact of climate change on the risk and extent of outbreaks. These questions involving incursive Culicoides spread cannot be simply addressed with non-spatial models. PMID

  4. Potential Distribution Map of Culicoides insignis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), Vector of Bluetongue Virus, in Northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Veggiani Aybar, Cecilia A; Díaz Gomez, Romina A; Dantur Juri, María J; Lizarralde de Grosso, Mercedes S; Spinelli, Gustavo R

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides insignis Lutz is incriminated as a vector of bluetongue virus (BTV) to ruminants in America. In South America, almost all countries have serological evidence of BTV infections, but only four outbreaks of the disease have been reported. Although clinical diseases have never been cited in Argentina, viral activity has been detected in cattle. In this study, we developed a potential distribution map of Culicoides insignis populations in northwestern Argentina using Maximum Entropy Modeling (Maxent). For the analyses, information regarding both data of specimen collections between 2003 and 2013, and climatic and environmental variables was used. Variables selection was based on the ecological relevance in relation to Culicoides spp. biology and distribution in the area. The best Maxent model according to the Jackknife test included 53 C. insignis presence records and precipitation of the warmest quarter, altitude, and precipitation of the wettest month. Accuracy was evaluated by the area under the curve (AUC = 0.97). These results provide an important analytical resource of high potential for both the development of suitable control strategies and the assessment of disease transmission risk in the region. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  5. Culicoides Midge Bites Modulate the Host Response and Impact on Bluetongue Virus Infection in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Pages, Nonito; Talavera, Sandra; Viarouge, Cyril; Lorca-Oro, Cristina; Jouneau, Luc; Charley, Bernard; Zientara, Stéphan; Bensaid, Albert; Solanes, David; Pujols, Joan; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Many haematophagous insects produce factors that help their blood meal and coincidently favor pathogen transmission. However nothing is known about the ability of Culicoides midges to interfere with the infectivity of the viruses they transmit. Among these, Bluetongue Virus (BTV) induces a hemorrhagic fever- type disease and its recent emergence in Europe had a major economical impact. We observed that needle inoculation of BTV8 in the site of uninfected C. nubeculosus feeding reduced viraemia and clinical disease intensity compared to plain needle inoculation. The sheep that developed the highest local inflammatory reaction had the lowest viral load, suggesting that the inflammatory response to midge bites may participate in the individual sensitivity to BTV viraemia development. Conversely compared to needle inoculation, inoculation of BTV8 by infected C. nubeculosus bites promoted viraemia and clinical symptom expression, in association with delayed IFN- induced gene expression and retarded neutralizing antibody responses. The effects of uninfected and infected midge bites on BTV viraemia and on the host response indicate that BTV transmission by infected midges is the most reliable experimental method to study the physio-pathological events relevant to a natural infection and to pertinent vaccine evaluation in the target species. It also leads the way to identify the promoting viral infectivity factors of infected Culicoides in order to possibly develop new control strategies against BTV and other Culicoides transmitted viruses. PMID:24421899

  6. Culicoides midge bites modulate the host response and impact on bluetongue virus infection in sheep.

    PubMed

    Pages, Nonito; Bréard, Emmanuel; Urien, Céline; Talavera, Sandra; Viarouge, Cyril; Lorca-Oro, Cristina; Jouneau, Luc; Charley, Bernard; Zientara, Stéphan; Bensaid, Albert; Solanes, David; Pujols, Joan; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Many haematophagous insects produce factors that help their blood meal and coincidently favor pathogen transmission. However nothing is known about the ability of Culicoides midges to interfere with the infectivity of the viruses they transmit. Among these, Bluetongue Virus (BTV) induces a hemorrhagic fever- type disease and its recent emergence in Europe had a major economical impact. We observed that needle inoculation of BTV8 in the site of uninfected C. nubeculosus feeding reduced viraemia and clinical disease intensity compared to plain needle inoculation. The sheep that developed the highest local inflammatory reaction had the lowest viral load, suggesting that the inflammatory response to midge bites may participate in the individual sensitivity to BTV viraemia development. Conversely compared to needle inoculation, inoculation of BTV8 by infected C. nubeculosus bites promoted viraemia and clinical symptom expression, in association with delayed IFN- induced gene expression and retarded neutralizing antibody responses. The effects of uninfected and infected midge bites on BTV viraemia and on the host response indicate that BTV transmission by infected midges is the most reliable experimental method to study the physio-pathological events relevant to a natural infection and to pertinent vaccine evaluation in the target species. It also leads the way to identify the promoting viral infectivity factors of infected Culicoides in order to possibly develop new control strategies against BTV and other Culicoides transmitted viruses.

  7. First Records of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a Known Vector of Bluetongue Virus, in Southern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Jewiss-Gaines, A; Barelli, L; Hunter, F F

    2016-12-27

    Ceratopogonidae (Diptera) were collected on sheep farms in southern Ontario to establish whether Culicoides spp pose a threat to the livestock industry. Specimens were collected in modified CO2-baited Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light traps, returned to the laboratory, freeze-killed, and identified to species under a microscope. In addition to Culicoides variipennis (Coquillet), we found that Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones occurred on a number of farms over a 2-yr period. These records represent a significant departure from C. sonorensis' previously known geographical distribution. We present spatial and temporal distribution data for both species, with an emphasis on C. sonorensis DNA sequence information is presented so that researchers lacking the necessary taxonomic skills can determine whether C. sonorensis is present in their collections. To differentiate C. sonorensis from C. variipennis, taxonomically reliable and informative traits were found in EF1α and, to a lesser extent, in ITS1, whereas the universal barcode region of cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) was unsuitable.

  8. Isolation of Tibet orbivirus, TIBOV, from Culicoides Collected in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wenwen; Guo, Xiaofang; Fu, Shihong; Feng, Yun; Nie, Kai; Song, Jingdong; Li, Yang; Ma, Xuejun; Liang, Guodong; Zhou, Hongning

    2015-01-01

    We isolated a novel virus strain (YN12246) from Culicoides spp. specimens collected at the China-Laos-Myanmar border in southern Yunnan Province. This virus had a cytopathic effect (CPE) on both insect cells (C6/36) and mammalian cells (BHK-21). Electron microscopy revealed the structure of the virions to be spherical with a diameter of 75 nm. Polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrated that the viral genome consisted of 10 segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), with a distribution pattern of 3-3-3-1. The coding sequences of 9 genome segments of YN12246 (Seg1, Seg3-Seg10) were obtained by high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing. Comparisons of conserved genome segments 1 and 3 (Seg1 and Seg3), encoding the polymerase-VP1 and sub-core T2 protein, respectively, showed that YN12246 groups with the Culicoides-borne orbiviruses. The highest levels of sequence identity were detected between YN12246 and Tibet orbivirus (TIBOV), indicating that they belong to the same virus species (with amino acid identity of 98.8% and 96.4% for the polymerase and T2 protein, respectively). The data presented here confirm that YN12246 is a member of the TIBOV species, which was first isolated from mosquitoes in 2009. This is the first report of the isolation of TIBOV from Culicoides.

  9. Isolation of Tibet orbivirus, TIBOV, from Culicoides Collected in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yun; Nie, Kai; Song, Jingdong; Li, Yang; Ma, Xuejun; Liang, Guodong; Zhou, Hongning

    2015-01-01

    We isolated a novel virus strain (YN12246) from Culicoides spp. specimens collected at the China-Laos-Myanmar border in southern Yunnan Province. This virus had a cytopathic effect (CPE) on both insect cells (C6/36) and mammalian cells (BHK-21). Electron microscopy revealed the structure of the virions to be spherical with a diameter of 75 nm. Polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrated that the viral genome consisted of 10 segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), with a distribution pattern of 3-3-3-1. The coding sequences of 9 genome segments of YN12246 (Seg1, Seg3-Seg10) were obtained by high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing. Comparisons of conserved genome segments 1 and 3 (Seg1 and Seg3), encoding the polymerase-VP1 and sub-core T2 protein, respectively, showed that YN12246 groups with the Culicoides-borne orbiviruses. The highest levels of sequence identity were detected between YN12246 and Tibet orbivirus (TIBOV), indicating that they belong to the same virus species (with amino acid identity of 98.8% and 96.4% for the polymerase and T2 protein, respectively). The data presented here confirm that YN12246 is a member of the TIBOV species, which was first isolated from mosquitoes in 2009. This is the first report of the isolation of TIBOV from Culicoides. PMID:26295700

  10. Farms, pastures and woodlands: the fine-scale distribution of Palearctic Culicoides spp. biting midges along an agro-ecological gradient.

    PubMed

    Rigot, T; Drubbel, M Vercauteren; Delécolle, J-C; Gilbert, M

    2013-03-01

    The spatial epidemiology of Bluetongue virus (BTV) at the landscape level relates to the fine-scale distribution and dispersal capacities of its vectors, midges belonging to the genus Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Although many previous researches have carried out Culicoides sampling on farms, little is known of the fine-scale distribution of Culicoides in the landscape immediately surrounding farms. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of Culicoides populations at increasing distances from typical dairy farms in north-west Europe, through the use of eight Onderstepoort-type black-light traps positioned along linear transects departing from farms, going through pastures and entering woodlands. A total of 16 902 Culicoides were collected in autumn 2008 and spring 2009. The majority were females, of which more than 97% were recognized as potential vectors. In pastures, we found decreasing numbers of female Culicoides as a function of the distance to the farm. This pattern was modelled by leptokurtic models, with parameters depending on season and species. By contrast, the low number of male Culicoides caught were homogeneously distributed along the transects. When transects entered woodlands, we found a higher abundance of Culicoides than expected considering the distance of the sampling sites to the farm, although this varied according to species.

  11. Culicoides (Avaritia) gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)--a possible vector species of the Obsoletus group new to the European fauna.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, Carsten; Dominiak, Patrycja

    2014-09-30

    Culicoides gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984, known previously only from Siberia, is a boreal species included into the Obsoletus group of Culicoides sg. Avaritia. Members of the subgenus can act as vectors of various diseases. In Europe they are involved in the transmission of the Schmallenberg virus and bluetongue virus. Culicoides gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984 is reported for the first time in Europe with new country records from Norway, Poland and Sweden. Culicoides gornostaevae Mirzaeva, 1984 has not been previously mentioned from Europe, even though there has been an extensive monitoring of Culicoides species during the last decades. Most probably this species has been notoriously overlooked in the materials, because of the problems with identification of the females of the subgenus Avaritia. Similar to other species of the Obsoletus group, C. gornostaevae should be regarded as a possible vector for Schmallenberg and bluetongue virus.

  12. Discrimination of Culicoides midge larvae using multiplex polymerase chain reaction assays based on DNA sequence variation at the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase I gene.

    PubMed

    Schwenkenbecher, Jan M; Mordue, A Jennifer; Switek, Krzysztof; Piertney, Stuart B

    2009-05-01

    The recent spread of Bluetongue disease in northwestern Europe has indicated the ability of Palaearctic Culicoides species to vector the disease. Because the different midge species vary in their ability to harbor and transmit the Bluetongue virus, quick and reliable identification is necessary to resolve the species composition of midge communities, both adult and larval, at any place at any given time point. Given that morphological identification of Culicoides species is problematic, we developed three multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays that facilitate high-throughput analysis of midge specimens. One assay distinguishes between species of the so-called Culicoides obsoletus s.l. complex (including C. dewulfi), whereas two assays facilitate differentiation of species of the Culicoides pulicaris s.l. complex. These assays yield two PCR products: one species-specific and one generic band. We show the application of the assays in the analysis of Culicoides larvae from three different farms in northeast Scotland.

  13. Application of an embryonated chicken egg model to assess the vector competence of Australian Culicoides midges for bluetongue viruses.

    PubMed

    VAN DER Saag, M R; Ward, M P; Kirkland, P D

    2017-09-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of a number of globally important arboviruses that affect livestock, including bluetongue virus (BTV), African horse sickness virus and the recently emerged Schmallenberg virus. In this study, a model using embryonated chicken eggs (ECEs) was utilized to undertake vector competence studies of Australian Culicoides spp. for 13 laboratory-adapted or wild-type virus strains of BTV. A total of 7393 Culicoides brevitarsis were reared from bovine dung, and 3364 Culicoides were induced to feed from ECEs infected with different strains of BTV. Of those, 911 (27%) survived the putative extrinsic incubation period of 9-12 days. In some trials, virus was also transmitted onward to uninfected ECEs, completing the transmission cycle. This model does not rely on the use of colonized midges and has the capacity to assess the vector competence of field-collected insects with strains of virus that have not previously been passaged in laboratory culture systems. There is also potential for this model to be used in investigations of the competence of Culicoides spp. for other arboviruses. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  14. Spatial and temporal distribution of Culicoides species in mainland Portugal (2005-2010). Results of the Portuguese Entomological Surveillance Programme.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rita; Wilson, Anthony J; Nunes, Telmo; Ramilo, David W; Amador, Rita; Madeira, Sara; Baptista, Filipa M; Harrup, Lara E; Lucientes, Javier; Boinas, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is transmitted by Culicoides biting midges and causes an infectious, non-contagious disease of ruminants. It has been rapidly emerging in southern Europe since 1998. In mainland Portugal, strains of BTV belonging to three serotypes have been detected: BTV-10 (1956-1960), BTV-4 (2004-2006 and 2013) and BTV-1 (2007-2012). This paper describes the design, implementation and results of the Entomological Surveillance Programme covering mainland Portugal, between 2005 and 2010, including 5,650 caches. Culicoides imicola Kieffer was mostly found in central and southern regions of Portugal, although it was sporadically detected in northern latitudes. Its peak activity occurred in the autumn and it was active during the winter months in limited areas of the country. Obsoletus group was present at the highest densities in the north although they were found throughout the country in substantial numbers. Culicoides activity occurred all year round but peaked in the spring. A generalized linear mixed model was developed for the analysis of the environmental factors associated with activity of the species of Culicoides suspected vectors of BTV in the country. For C. imicola Kieffer, the most important variables were month, diurnal temperature range (DTR), the number of frost days (FRS) and median monthly temperature (TMP). For the Obsoletus group, the most important factors were month, diurnal temperature range (DTR), and linear and quadratic terms for median monthly temperature (TMP). The results reported can improve our understanding of climatic factors in Culicoides activity influencing their distribution and seasonal pattern.

  15. A new tool for the molecular identification of Culicoides species of the Obsoletus group: the glass slide microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Deblauwe, I; de Witte, J C; de Deken, G; de Deken, R; Madder, M; van Erk, S; Hoza, F A; Lathouwers, D; Geysen, D

    2012-03-01

    Culicoides species of the Obsoletus group (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are potential vectors of bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV 8), which was introduced into central Western Europe in 2006. Correct morphological species identification of Obsoletus group females is especially difficult and molecular identification is the method of choice. In this study we present a new molecular tool based on probe hybridization using a DNA microarray format to identify Culicoides species of the Obsoletus group. The internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) gene sequences of 55 Culicoides belonging to 13 different species were determined and used, together with 19 Culicoides ITS1 sequences sourced from GenBank, to design species-specific probes for the microarray test. This test was evaluated using the amplified ITS1 sequences of another 85 Culicoides specimens, belonging to 11 species. The microarray test successfully identified all samples (100%) of the Obsoletus group, identifying each specimen to species level within the group. This test has several advantages over existing polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular tools, including possible capability for parallel analysis of many species, high sensitivity and specificity, and low background signal noise. Hand-spotting of the microarray slide and the use of detection chemistry make this alternative technique affordable and feasible for any diagnostic laboratory with PCR facilities.

  16. Culicoides obsoletus extract relevant for diagnostics of insect bite hypersensitivity in horses.

    PubMed

    van der Meide, Nathalie M A; Meulenbroeks, Chantal; van Altena, Christine; Schurink, Anouk; Ducro, Bart J; Wagner, Bettina; Leibold, Wolfgang; Rohwer, Jens; Jacobs, Frans; van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M Sloet; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Tijhaar, Edwin

    2012-10-15

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an allergic dermatitis in horses caused by the bites of Culicoides species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the applicability of whole body extracts of C. obsoletus (the main species found feeding on horses in the Netherlands), C. nubeculosus (rarely found in The Netherlands) and C. sonorensis (typical for North America) for diagnosis of IBH in horses in The Netherlands. Blood and serum samples of 10 clinically confirmed IBH affected and 10 healthy control horses were used to evaluate the IgE titers (ELISA) against the Culicoides whole body extracts of the three Culicoides species. Basophil degranulation was assessed by histamine release test (HRT) after stimulation with these extracts at 5, 0.5 and 0.05 μg/ml. IBH affected horses had significantly higher IgE titers against C. obsoletus than against C. nubeculosus and C. sonorensis. Furthermore, C. obsoletus induced significantly higher histamine release in whole blood of IBH affected horses compared to the other extracts at 0.5 μg/ml. Western blot data revealed IgE binding to many proteins in C. obsoletus extract. This interaction was absent or weak in C. nubeculosus and C. sonorensis extracts for IBH affected horses. Results on individual level indicate that the HRT is more sensitive than ELISA in diagnosing IBH. However, ELISA is more practical as a routine test, therefore the ELISA was further evaluated using C. obsoletus extract on 103 IBH affected and 100 healthy horses, which resulted in a test sensitivity and specificity of 93.2% and 90.0%, respectively. The IgE ELISA readings enabled the analysis of the predicted probability of being IBH affected. From an optical density 450nm value of 0.33 onwards, the probability of IBH affected was more than 0.9. The results presented in this paper show that the use of native Culicoides spp. that feed on horse, is important for improved diagnosis and that the described ELISA based on C. obsoletus can be used routinely

  17. Comparison of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and molecular biology techniques for identification of Culicoides (Diptera: ceratopogonidae) biting midges in senegal.

    PubMed

    Sambou, Masse; Aubadie-Ladrix, Maxence; Fenollar, Florence; Fall, Becaye; Bassene, Hubert; Almeras, Lionel; Sambe-Ba, Bissoume; Perrot, Nadine; Chatellier, Sonia; Faye, Ngor; Parola, Philippe; Wade, Boubacar; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2015-02-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides are implicated as vectors for a wide variety of pathogens. The morphological identification of these arthropods may be difficult because of a lack of detailed investigation of taxonomy for this species in Africa. However, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) profiling is efficient for arthropod identification at the species level. This study established a spectrum database of Culicoides spp. from Senegal using MALDI-TOF. Identification of Culicoides insects to the species level before mass spectrometry was performed on the basis of morphological characters. MALDI-TOF MS reference spectra were determined for 437 field-caught Culicoides of 10 species. The protein profiles of all tested Culicoides revealed several peaks with mass ranges of 2 to 20 kDa. In a validation study, 72 Culicoides specimens in the target species were correctly identified at the species level with a similarity of 95 to 99.9%. Four Culicoides protein profiles were misidentified. Nevertheless, six SuperSpectra (C. imicola, C. enderleini, C. oxystoma, C. kingi, C. magnus, and C. fulvithorax) were created. Abdomens of midges were used to amplify and sequence a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI). The results obtained using the MALDI-TOF MS method were consistent with the morphological identification and similar to the genetic identification. Protein profiling using MALDI-TOF is an efficient approach for the identification of Culicoides spp., and it is economically advantageous for approaches that require detailed and quantitative information of vector species that are collected in field. The database of African Culicoides MS spectra created is the first database in Africa. The COI sequences of five Culicoides species that were previously noncharacterized using molecular methods were deposited in GenBank.

  18. Species Diversity and Seasonal Distribution of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Jeju-do, Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Chul; Bellis, Glenn A.; Kim, Myung-Soon; Klein, Terry A.; Gopurenko, David; Cai, Du-Cheng; Seo, Hyun-Ji; Cho, In-Soo; Park, Jee-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Biting midges belonging to the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected by Mosquito Magnet® and black light traps at 5 sites on Jeju-do, Republic of Korea (Korea), from May-November 2013 to determine species diversity and seasonal distribution. A total of 4,267 specimens were collected, of which 99.9% were female. The most common species was Culicoides tainanus (91.8%), followed by C. lungchiensis (7.2%) and C. punctatus (0.6%), while the remaining 4 species accounted for <0.5% of all Culicoides spp. that were collected. High numbers of C. tainanus were collected in May, followed by decreasing numbers through August, and then increasing numbers through November when surveillance was terminated. Peak numbers of C. lungchiensis were collected during September, with low numbers collected from May-August and October-November. The presence of C. lungchiensis in Korea was confirmed by morphological and molecular analyses. PMID:26323852

  19. New species records of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) for the state of Rondônia in Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luis Paulo Costa; Farias, Emanuelle de Sousa; Gil, Luiz Herman Soares; Pessoa, Felipe Arley Costa; Medeiros, Jansen Fernandes

    2017-01-01

    Culicoides biting midges are small insects that are proven vectors of pathogens that cause disease in animals and humans. There are 1,368 species of Culicoides in the world, including 149 species in Brazil and 122 species in the Brazilian Amazon Basin. This study documents specimens that were collected between 2013 and 2015 in the municipalities of Alvorada d'Oeste, Buritis, Cacoal, Costa Marques, Espigão d'Oeste, Guajará-Mirim, Pimenta Bueno, Porto Velho and São Francisco Guaporé. Collections were performed using HP light traps in forest, pasture and peridomicilie environments. Species newly recorded in Rondônia State include Culicoides carpenteri Wirth & Blanton, 1953; C. dasyophrus Macfie, 1940; C. eublepharus Macfie, 1948; C. galindoi Wirth & Blanton, 1953; C. heliconiae Fox & Hoffman, 1944; and C. ignacioi Forattini, 1957. This is the first record in Brazil of C. darlingtonae Wirth & Blanton, 1971.

  20. New species records of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) for the state of Rondônia in Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Emanuelle de Sousa; Gil, Luiz Herman Soares; Pessoa, Felipe Arley Costa; Medeiros, Jansen Fernandes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Culicoides biting midges are small insects that are proven vectors of pathogens that cause disease in animals and humans. There are 1,368 species of Culicoides in the world, including 149 species in Brazil and 122 species in the Brazilian Amazon Basin. This study documents specimens that were collected between 2013 and 2015 in the municipalities of Alvorada d’Oeste, Buritis, Cacoal, Costa Marques, Espigão d’Oeste, Guajará-Mirim, Pimenta Bueno, Porto Velho and São Francisco Guaporé. Collections were performed using HP light traps in forest, pasture and peridomicilie environments. New information Species newly recorded in Rondônia State include Culicoides carpenteri Wirth & Blanton, 1953; C. dasyophrus Macfie, 1940; C. eublepharus Macfie, 1948; C. galindoi Wirth & Blanton, 1953; C. heliconiae Fox & Hoffman, 1944; and C. ignacioi Forattini, 1957. This is the first record in Brazil of C. darlingtonae Wirth & Blanton, 1971. PMID:28765729

  1. An annotated checklist of Culicoides Latreille, 1809 (Insecta: Ceratopogonidae: Diptera) with incorporation of a vector species list from India.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Emon; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Joardar, S N; Saha, Goutam K; Banerjee, Dhriti

    2016-12-01

    Culicoides Latreille, 1809 (Insecta : Diptera : Ceratopogonidae) are small nematocerous biological vectors of a wide range of pathogens of veterinary and medical importance. They are distributed worldwide but prefer warm, damp, and muddy areas. Female midges require blood for egg maturation. Studies on taxonomy, proper identification keys, and distribution patterns of these flies across different geographical regions of India of these flies are limited. This article provides an updated checklist of Culicoides spp. from India collected from various scattered publications, along with their synonyms and details on their subgenera, geographical distribution, and type locality. A compiled list of different Culicoides vectors from India has also been included separately in this article, along with the type of the diseases spread.

  2. In situ immune infrared fluorescent staining for detection and quantitation of bluetongue virus in Culicoides insect cell culture.

    PubMed

    Mecham, James O; Brown, Philip L; McHolland, Linda E

    2009-06-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is transmitted to sheep, cattle and other ruminants by Culicoides spp. of biting midges. Cell lines have been developed from Culicoides sonorensis; however, techniques to detect and quantitate viable virus directly in these insect cells are lacking. In situ immune infrared fluorescent staining techniques were developed to visualize and quantitate BTV infection in Culicoides cell culture by both an endpoint titration and an agarose overlay fluorescent focus assay. Insect cell cultures infected with BTV were fixed, permeabilized and reacted with virus-specific monoclonal antibody and fluorescent-labeled secondary antibody. Virus replication in the infected cells was visualized and quantitated by measuring fluorescence with an infrared imager. The sensitivity of virus detection in insect cell culture using these techniques was comparable to or better than detection by standard techniques in vertebrate cell culture.

  3. Identification and isolation of cDNA clones encoding the abundant secreted proteins in the saliva proteome of Culicoides nubeculosus.

    PubMed

    Russell, C L; Heesom, K J; Arthur, C J; Helps, C R; Mellor, P S; Day, M J; Torsteinsdottir, S; Björnsdóttir, T S; Wilson, A D

    2009-06-01

    Culicoides spp. are vectors of several infectious diseases of veterinary importance and a major cause of allergy in horses and other livestock. Their saliva contains a number of proteins which enable blood feeding, enhance disease transmission and act as allergens. We report the construction of a novel cDNA library from Culicoides nubeculosus linked to the analysis of abundant salivary gland proteins by mass spectrometry. Fifty-four novel proteins sequences are described including those of the enzymes maltase, hyaluronidase and two serine proteases demonstrated to be present in Culicoides salivary glands, as well as several members of the D7 family and protease inhibitors with putative anticoagulant activity. In addition, several families of abundant proteins with unknown function were identified including some of the major candidate allergens that cause insect bite hypersensitivity in horses.

  4. Species Diversity and Seasonal Distribution of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Jeju-do, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Chul; Bellis, Glenn A; Kim, Myung-Soon; Klein, Terry A; Gopurenko, David; Cai, Du-Cheng; Seo, Hyun-Ji; Cho, In-Soo; Park, Jee-Yong

    2015-08-01

    Biting midges belonging to the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected by Mosquito Magnet(®) and black light traps at 5 sites on Jeju-do, Republic of Korea (Korea), from May-November 2013 to determine species diversity and seasonal distribution. A total of 4,267 specimens were collected, of which 99.9% were female. The most common species was Culicoides tainanus (91.8%), followed by C. lungchiensis (7.2%) and C. punctatus (0.6%), while the remaining 4 species accounted for <0.5% of all Culicoides spp. that were collected. High numbers of C. tainanus were collected in May, followed by decreasing numbers through August, and then increasing numbers through November when surveillance was terminated. Peak numbers of C. lungchiensis were collected during September, with low numbers collected from May-August and October-November. The presence of C. lungchiensis in Korea was confirmed by morphological and molecular analyses.

  5. Are Bogs Reservoirs for Emerging Disease Vectors? Evaluation of Culicoides Populations in the Hautes Fagnes Nature Reserve (Belgium)

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jean-Yves; Smeets, François; Simonon, Grégory; Fagot, Jean; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frédéric; Losson, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Several species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges serve as biological vectors for the bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently described Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in northern Europe. Since their recent emergence in this part of the continent, these diseases have caused considerable economic losses to the sheep and cattle industries. Much data is now available that describe the distribution, population dynamics, and feeding habits of these insects. However, little is known regarding the presence of Culicoides in unusual habitats such as peaty marshes, nor their potential vector capacity. This study evaluated Culicoides biting midges present in the bogs of a Belgian nature reserve compared to those residing at a nearby cattle farm. Culicoides were trapped in 2011 at four different sites (broadleaved and coniferous forested areas, open environments, and at a scientific station) located in the Hautes Fagnes Nature Reserve (Belgium). An additional light trap was operated on a nearby cattle farm. Very high numbers of biting midges were captured in the marshy area and most of them (70 to 95%) were Culicoides impunctatus, a potential vector of BTV and other pathogens. In addition, fewer numbers of C. obsoletus/C. scoticus species, C. chiopterus, and C. dewulfi were observed in the bogs compared to the farm. The wet environment and oligotrophic nature of the soil were probably responsible for these changes in the respective populations. A total of 297,808 Culicoides midges belonging to 27 species were identified during this study and 3 of these species (C. sphagnumensis, C. clintoni and C. comosioculatus) were described in Belgium for the first time. PMID:23799137

  6. Are bogs reservoirs for emerging disease vectors? Evaluation of culicoides populations in the Hautes Fagnes Nature Reserve (Belgium).

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Jean-Yves; Smeets, François; Simonon, Grégory; Fagot, Jean; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frédéric; Losson, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Several species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges serve as biological vectors for the bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently described Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in northern Europe. Since their recent emergence in this part of the continent, these diseases have caused considerable economic losses to the sheep and cattle industries. Much data is now available that describe the distribution, population dynamics, and feeding habits of these insects. However, little is known regarding the presence of Culicoides in unusual habitats such as peaty marshes, nor their potential vector capacity. This study evaluated Culicoides biting midges present in the bogs of a Belgian nature reserve compared to those residing at a nearby cattle farm. Culicoides were trapped in 2011 at four different sites (broadleaved and coniferous forested areas, open environments, and at a scientific station) located in the Hautes Fagnes Nature Reserve (Belgium). An additional light trap was operated on a nearby cattle farm. Very high numbers of biting midges were captured in the marshy area and most of them (70 to 95%) were Culicoides impunctatus, a potential vector of BTV and other pathogens. In addition, fewer numbers of C. obsoletus/C. scoticus species, C. chiopterus, and C. dewulfi were observed in the bogs compared to the farm. The wet environment and oligotrophic nature of the soil were probably responsible for these changes in the respective populations. A total of 297,808 Culicoides midges belonging to 27 species were identified during this study and 3 of these species (C. sphagnumensis, C. clintoni and C. comosioculatus) were described in Belgium for the first time.

  7. Increased interleukin-1beta mRNA expression in skin biopsies of horses with Culicoides hypersensitivity following challenge with Culicoides nubeculosus extract.

    PubMed

    Kolm, Gabriela; Knapp, Elzbieta; Wagner, Regina; Klein, Dieter

    2006-09-15

    Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) is a primary cytokine of the skin that has a pivotal role in keratinocyte differentiation, epidermal wound healing and host defense. Pathological increase of cutaneous IL-1beta is associated with edema formation, epidermal hyperproliferation and atopic dermatitis in humans. However, in horses the role of cutaneous IL-1beta in edema formation and allergic skin disease has not been characterised so far. Particularly in Culicoides hypersensitivity (CHS), intradermal injection of Culicoides extract may be associated with enhanced transcription of local IL-1beta. To examine the mRNA expression of IL-1beta and its receptor antagonist IL-1RA in the skin of horses, biopsy specimens of horses affected and non-affected by CHS prior and following intradermal challenge with a commercial C. nubeculosus extract were examined. Our hypothesis was that cutaneous IL-1beta mRNA was significantly upregulated in horses with CHS in response to Culicoides allergen. Biopsies were taken from sites prior to and 4 h following intradermal challenge with C. nubeculosus extract. In order to obtain reliable data, real time PCR was performed and genes of interest were normalized using three different housekeeping genes, beta-actin, GAPDH, beta-2-microglobulin. No significant difference was detected in non-challenged cutaneous IL-1beta mRNA and IL-1RA mRNA levels between CHS affected and non-affected horses. Intradermal injection of C. nubeculosus extract resulted in local upregulation of IL-1beta mRNA both in horses with typical history, characteristic clinical signs for CHS and a positive intradermal skin test (IDT), and non-affected horses with a negative IDT. However, the difference in prior and post challenged site IL-1beta mRNA levels only reached statistical significance in the affected horses (p=0.01 versus 0.7). In contrast, IL-1RA mRNA levels did not demonstrate any modification following intradermal injection with C. nubeculosus in either group. In contrast

  8. Comparison of Vertebrate Cytochrome b and Prepronociceptin for Blood Meal Analyses in Culicoides

    PubMed Central

    Hadj-Henni, Leila; De Meulemeester, Thibaut; Depaquit, Jérôme; Noël, Philippe; Germain, Adeline; Helder, Remi; Augot, Denis

    2015-01-01

    To date, studies on host preferences and blood meal identification have been conducted for Culicoides species using molecular-based methods such as PCR techniques to amplify only a fragment from universal vertebrate mitochondrial genes such as cytochrome c oxidase subunit I or cytochrome b (Cyt b). The vertebrate prepronociceptin gene (PNOC) was also tested in this field. However, the choice of molecular marker to identify blood meal is critical. The objective of our study is to compare the ability of Cyt b and PNOC as molecular markers for blood meal identification depending on the stage of blood meal digestion. In order to determine whether these Cyt b and PNOC could provide a positive result, 565 blood-fed females of Culicoides spp were collected and morphologically identified. The samples were collected between 2012 and 2014, in two localities in France. The collection localities were near either livestock or a forest. To catch the specimens, we used UV CDC miniature light traps. PNOC sequence of donkeys (Equus asinus) was sequenced and submitted because it was missing in GenBank. Our findings emphasize that the PNOC marker is not suitable to separate closely related Equid species such as horses and donkeys. The Cyt b marker was able to identify 204 more samples when compared to PNOC (99.55% of specimens). Cyt b appears to be better able to detect the origin of blood meals from females with digested blood in their abdomens. We conclude that Cyt b is a good marker as it increases the accuracy of blood meal identification of engorged females containing digested blood in their abdomens. The host opportunist behavior of Culicoides, especially that of C. obsoletus and C. scoticus, the main vectors of BTV in Europe was also highlighted. PMID:26664944

  9. Transmission of Oropouche Virus from Man to Hamster by the Midge ’Culicoides Paraensis’,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    AD-AI09 916 ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH UNIT APO NEW YORK 09676. FIG 6/5 "MTRANSMISSION OF OROPOUCHE VIRUS FROM MAN TO HAMSTER BT THE MIOG--ETC(U) UNLSIID...NO- 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMUE I ’ r14 7’ j 16 4. TITLE ( nd Subtitle) . TYPE O REPORT &PE OCTRANSMISS ION OF OROPOUCHE VIRUS FROM MAN TO HAMSTER...Washington, DC 20005 Dear Sirs: Please consider the inclosed manuscript, "Transmission of Oropouche virus from man to hamster by the midge Culicoides

  10. Transmission of Oropouche virus from man to hamster by the midge Culicoides paraensis.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, F P; Travassos da Rosa, A P; Gomes, M L; LeDuc, J W; Hoch, A L

    1982-03-05

    Oropouche virus (arbovirus family Bunyaviridae, Simbu serological group) was experimentally transmitted from man to hamster by the bite of the midge Culicoides paraensis. Infection rates and transmission rates were determined after the midge had engorged on patients with viremia. The threshold titer necessary to enable infection or transmission by the midges was approximately 5.3 log10 of the median lethal dose of the virus in suckling mice per milliliter of blood. Transmission was achieved 6 to 12 days after C. paraensis had taken the infective blood meal. This represents conclusive evidence of transmission of an arbovirus of public health importance to man by a member of the Ceratopogonidae family.

  11. The influence of host number on the attraction of biting midges, Culicoides spp., to light traps.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Saenz, A; McCarter, P; Baylis, M

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary study was undertaken to investigate how the number of sheep below a light-suction trap affects the number of female Culicoides obsoletus Meigen (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) caught. As the number of sheep increased from zero to three, the number of midges caught increased, but there appeared to be no further increase when six sheep were used. The lack of increase between three and six sheep is attributable to different activity rates on certain nights, perhaps in response to weather, and suggests, therefore, that catches in light traps increase linearly with sheep numbers, at least for small host numbers.

  12. Non-structural protein NS3/NS3a is required for propagation of bluetongue virus in Culicoides sonorensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes non-contagious haemorrhagic disease in ruminants and is transmitted by Culicoides spp. biting midges. BTV encodes four non-structural proteins of which NS3/NS3a is functional in virus release. NS3/NS3a is not essential for in vitro virus replication. However...

  13. Seasonal Abundance of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Collected by Mosquito Magnet® in Northern Gyeonggi-do (Province), Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Chul; Bellis, Glenn A.; Kim, Myung-Soon; Klein, Terry A.; Chong, Sung-Tae

    2014-01-01

    Biting midges (Culicoides: Ceratopogonidae) were collected by Mosquito Magnet® traps at the Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission (NNSC) camp and Daeseongdong village inside the demilitarized zone (DMZ) and near the military demarcation line (MDL) separating North and South Korea and at Warrior Base (US Army training site) and Tongilchon 3 km south of the DMZ in northern Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea (ROK), from May-October 2010-2012, to determine their seasonal distributions. A total of 18,647 Culicoides females (18,399; 98.7%) and males (248; 1.3%) comprising 16 species were collected. Overall, the most commonly collected species was Culicoides nipponensis (42.9%), followed by C. erairai (29.2%), C. punctatus (20.3%), C. arakawae (3.3%), C. pallidulus (1.8%), and C. circumscriptus (1.4%), while the remaining 10 species accounted for only 1.1% of all Culicoides spp. collected. The seasonal distribution of C. nipponensis was bimodal, with high numbers collected during May-June and again during September. C. erairai was more frequently collected during June-July, followed by sharply decreased populations from August-October. C. punctatus was collected in low numbers from May-September with high numbers collected during October. C. erairai was predominantly collected from the NNSC camp (85.1% of all C. erairai collected) located adjacent to the MDL at Panmunjeom in the northernmost part of Gyeonggi-do (Province), while other sites yielded low numbers of specimens. PMID:24623883

  14. Culicoides species abundance and potential over-wintering of African horse sickness virus in the Onderstepoort area, Gauteng, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Venter, Gert J; Labuschagne, Karien; Majatladi, Daphney; Boikanyo, Solomon N B; Lourens, Carina; Ebersohn, Karen; Venter, Estelle H

    2014-11-14

    In South Africa, outbreaks of African horse sickness (AHS) occur in summer; no cases are reported in winter, from July to September. The AHS virus (AHSV) is transmitted almost exclusively by Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), of which Culicoides imicola is considered to be the most important vector. The over-wintering mechanism of AHSV is unknown. In this study, more than 500 000 Culicoides midges belonging to at least 26 species were collected in 88 light traps at weekly intervals between July 2010 and September 2011 near horses in the Onderstepoort area of South Africa. The dominant species was C. imicola. Despite relatively low temperatures and frost, at least 17 species, including C. imicola, were collected throughout winter (June-August). Although the mean number of midges per night fell from > 50 000 (March) to < 100 (July and August), no midge-free periods were found. This study, using virus isolation on cell cultures and a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, confirmed low infection prevalence in field midges and that the detection of virus correlated to high numbers. Although no virus was detected during this winter period, continuous adult activity indicated that transmission can potentially occur. The absence of AHSV in the midges during winter can be ascribed to the relatively low numbers collected coupled to low infection prevalence, low virus replication rates and low virus titres in the potentially infected midges. Cases of AHS in susceptible animals are likely to start as soon as Culicoides populations reach a critical level.

  15. Effects of Ivermectin on the Susceptibility of Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to Bluetongue and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ivermectin is one of the most frequently used antiparasitic drugs in the livestock industry. It is toxic to insects, because it can hyperpolarize their nerve and muscle cells and increases cellular membrane permeability to chloride ions, which leads to muscular paralysis. The mortality of Culicoides...

  16. Seasonal abundance of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) collected by mosquito Magnet® in Northern Gyeonggi-do (Province), Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Chul; Bellis, Glenn A; Kim, Myung-Soon; Klein, Terry A; Chong, Sung-Tae; Park, Jee-Yong

    2014-02-01

    Biting midges (Culicoides: Ceratopogonidae) were collected by Mosquito Magnet® traps at the Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission (NNSC) camp and Daeseongdong village inside the demilitarized zone (DMZ) and near the military demarcation line (MDL) separating North and South Korea and at Warrior Base (US Army training site) and Tongilchon 3 km south of the DMZ in northern Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea (ROK), from May-October 2010-2012, to determine their seasonal distributions. A total of 18,647 Culicoides females (18,399; 98.7%) and males (248; 1.3%) comprising 16 species were collected. Overall, the most commonly collected species was Culicoides nipponensis (42.9%), followed by C. erairai (29.2%), C. punctatus (20.3%), C. arakawae (3.3%), C. pallidulus (1.8%), and C. circumscriptus (1.4%), while the remaining 10 species accounted for only 1.1% of all Culicoides spp. collected. The seasonal distribution of C. nipponensis was bimodal, with high numbers collected during May-June and again during September. C. erairai was more frequently collected during June-July, followed by sharply decreased populations from August-October. C. punctatus was collected in low numbers from May-September with high numbers collected during October. C. erairai was predominantly collected from the NNSC camp (85.1% of all C. erairai collected) located adjacent to the MDL at Panmunjeom in the northernmost part of Gyeonggi-do (Province), while other sites yielded low numbers of specimens.

  17. Association between host species choice and morphological characters of main sensory structures of Culicoides in the Palaeartic region.

    PubMed

    Augot, Denis; Hadj-Henni, Leila; Strutz, Stavana E; Slama, Darine; Millot, Christine; Depaquit, Jérôme; Millot, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) serve as vectors of several mammalian and avian diseases, including bluetongue, Schmallenberg, African horse sickness, avian malaria and Oropouche. Host preference investigations are necessary to assess the transmission routes of vector-borne diseases and to inform mitigation strategies. A recent study examining the main sensory structures (palps and antennae) of Culicoides species suggests that they be classified as ornithophilic or mammalophilic according to their feeding habits. We analyzed Culicoides host preferences according to the literature and carried out a multiple correspondence analysis linking these preferences with morphological data. Seven out of 12 variables were found to be reliable predictors of host preference in Culicoides species: Antenna Flagellomer-Sensilla Coeloconica-Number: (7-10) and (11-13); Antenna Flagellomer-Sensilla Coeloconica IV-X: presence; Palpus-size: wide and/or narrow opening and shallow pit; Palpus-Shape: strongly swollen; Antenna-Short sensilla trichodea-distal part segment IV to X-Number: 2 seta each. Our results demonstrate that the presence of sensilla coeloconica and the maxillary palpus can be used to separate ornithophilic and mammalophilic or ornithophilic/mammalophilic species.

  18. Studying Culicoides vectors of BTV in the post-genomic era: resources, bottlenecks to progress and future directions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are a major vector group responsible for the biological transmission of a wide variety of globally significant arboviruses, including bluetongue virus (BTV). In this review we examine current biological resources for the study of this genus, with a...

  19. Collection of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) using CO2 and enantiomers of 1-octen-3-ol in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Harrup, L E; Logan, J G; Cook, J I; Golding, N; Birkett, M A; Pickett, J A; Sanders, C; Barber, J; Rogers, D J; Mellor, P S; Purse, B V; Carpenter, S

    2012-01-01

    The host kairomones carbon dioxide (CO2) and 1-octen-3-ol elicit a host seeking response in a wide range of haematophagous Diptera. This study investigates the response of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to these cues using field-based experiments at two sites in the United Kingdom with very different species complements. Traps used for surveillance (miniature CDC model 512) and control (Mosquito Magnet Pro) were modified to release ratios of (R)- and (S)-1-octen-3-ol enantiomers in combination with CO2 and, in the case of the latter trap type, a thermal cue. Abundance and species diversity were then compared between these treatments and against collections made using a trap with a CO2 lure only, in a Latin square design. In both habitats, results demonstrated that semiochemical lures containing a high proportion of the (R)-enantiomer consistently attracted a greater abundance of host-seeking Culicoides females than any other treatment. Culicoides collected using an optimal stimulus of 500 ml/min CO2 combined with 4.1 mg/h (R)-1-octen-3-ol were then compared with those collected on sheep through the use of a drop trap. While preliminary in nature, this trial indicated Culicoides species complements are similar between collections made using the drop trap in comparison to the semiochemical-baited CDC trap, and that there are advantages in using (R)-1-octen-3-ol.

  20. Impact of the blood meal on humoral immunity and microbiota in the gut of female Culicoides sonorensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although Culicoides sonorensis is an important vector of orbiviruses that cause significant disease in domestic and wild ruminants in the USA, little is known about factors contributing to midge vector competence. In other vectors such as mosquitoes, interactions between the humoral immune response,...

  1. [Occurrence of biting midges (Culicoides spp.) at three different altitudes in an alpine region of Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Tschuor, A C; Kaufmann, C; Schaffner, F; Mathis, A

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this field study was to investigate the occurrence of biting midges (Culicoides spp.), the potential vectors of the bluetongue virus (BTV), in an alpine region of Switzerland (Vals/GR) at altitudes between 1300 and 2000 meters above sea level (m a.s.l.). For this purpose, insects were caught with UV-light traps once weekly from the end of June to the end of October 2008. Midges were found on all altitudes investigated, but distinct differences in the abundance at different stations were noticed. Most midges were caught at the intermediate station (about 1500 m a.s.l.) whereas the catches on the two alps (approximately 2000 m a.s.l.) varied considerably. The predominance of midges belonging to the Pulicaris complex, whose vector competence regarding bluetongue virus (BTV) is largely unknown, rose with increasing altitude. To identify potential breeding habitats, 17 soil samples of three farms were incubated in the laboratory. Different insects emerged but none of them was a Culicoides spp. and, therefore, the habitats of juvenile stages remain unknown. From our results we can conclude that most likely there are no midges-free zones in all of the agriculturally utilized areas (including the alpine summer pastures) of Switzerland. This strongly indicates that cattle, sheep, goats and camelids which are permanently or temporarily kept in regions of higher altitude in Switzerland should be vaccinated against bluetongue.

  2. Impact of experimental flooding on larvae and pupae of dung-breeding Culicoides.

    PubMed

    Steinke, S; Lühken, R; Kiel, E

    2016-10-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) spend the greatest part of their life in the larval stage. However, knowledge on the immature stages and the impact of abiotic factors on their development is still poor. Therefore, we investigated the effect of flooding on the larvae and pupae of Culicoides chiopterus (Meigen, 1830) and C. dewulfi Goetghebuer, 1936. In water, the larvae of both species showed head-to-tail flexions and sinuous flexions, at slow rates, but were not able to swim. Flooding of larvae for 24 h did not affect the number of emerging adults; flooding of pupae significantly reduced the emergence rate of C. chiopterus, compared to the control group, while C. dewulfi was not affected. Pupae were not able to float and no pupae survived flooding for 10 days. After flooding of larvae for 10 days, 50 % of C. chiopterus and 4 % of C. dewulfi completed the pre-adult development. During this treatment, 84 % of C. chiopterus and 48 % of C. dewulfi larvae pupated in water.

  3. Culicoides Hypersensitivity in the Horse: 15 Cases in Southwestern British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Kleider, N.; Lees, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The investigation of a chronic, seasonal dermatitis of horses in southwestern British Columbia is described. Typically the history indicated an insidious onset, followed by a gradual progression in the severity of the signs each year. Lesions appeared during the warmer months of the year and tended to regress during the winter. The clinical signs consisted of areas of pruritus and excoriation, affecting predominantly the ventral midline, mane and tailhead. In all cases corticosteroid therapy relieved the pruritus and allowed the lesions to heal. The salient pathological findings were hyperkeratosis, spongiosis and a dermal infiltration of eosinophils together with mononuclear cells. These changes are typical of an allergic dermatitis, which has been recognized in many parts of the world as a hypersensitivity reaction to the bites of Culicoides spp. In this instance, the epidemiological findings relating to the geographic area, the local insect population and the distribution of lesions implicated Culicoides obsoletus as the etiological agent. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 2.Figure 3.FIGURE 4.Figure 5. PMID:17422351

  4. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Culicoides Species in Mainland Portugal (2005–2010). Results of the Portuguese Entomological Surveillance Programme

    PubMed Central

    Ramilo, David W.; Amador, Rita; Madeira, Sara; Baptista, Filipa M.; Harrup, Lara E.; Lucientes, Javier; Boinas, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is transmitted by Culicoides biting midges and causes an infectious, non-contagious disease of ruminants. It has been rapidly emerging in southern Europe since 1998. In mainland Portugal, strains of BTV belonging to three serotypes have been detected: BTV-10 (1956-1960), BTV-4 (2004-2006 and 2013) and BTV-1 (2007-2012). This paper describes the design, implementation and results of the Entomological Surveillance Programme covering mainland Portugal, between 2005 and 2010, including 5,650 caches. Culicoides imicola Kieffer was mostly found in central and southern regions of Portugal, although it was sporadically detected in northern latitudes. Its peak activity occurred in the autumn and it was active during the winter months in limited areas of the country. Obsoletus group was present at the highest densities in the north although they were found throughout the country in substantial numbers. Culicoides activity occurred all year round but peaked in the spring. A generalized linear mixed model was developed for the analysis of the environmental factors associated with activity of the species of Culicoides suspected vectors of BTV in the country. For C. imicola Kieffer, the most important variables were month, diurnal temperature range (DTR), the number of frost days (FRS) and median monthly temperature (TMP). For the Obsoletus group, the most important factors were month, diurnal temperature range (DTR), and linear and quadratic terms for median monthly temperature (TMP). The results reported can improve our understanding of climatic factors in Culicoides activity influencing their distribution and seasonal pattern. PMID:25906151

  5. Protection of livestock against bluetongue virus vector Culicoides imicola using insecticide-treated netting in open areas.

    PubMed

    Calvete, C; Estrada, R; Miranda, M A; Del Rio, R; Borrás, D; Beldron, F J; Martínez, A; Calvo, A J; Lucientes, J

    2010-06-01

    The protection of livestock against Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) using physical barriers or chemically treated barriers is difficult owing to the small size of these biting midges and animal welfare concerns associated with the reduction of air flow. Culicoides imicola Kieffer is the main bluetongue virus vector in the Mediterranean basin, including the southern Iberian peninsula, where livestock is mainly housed in open pens or sheds which offer no physical protection against C. imicola. In this study we assessed the efficacy of surrounding yearling ewe pens with a canvas barrier or a cypermethrin-treated canvas barrier in reducing the entry of Culicoides spp. and C. imicola. Analyses were based on comparisons of Culicoides catches in traps in pens with and without barriers, and in traps located outside pens. Although there was no clear reduction in the abundance of Culicoides other than C. imicola in pens with either barrier, the C. imicola presence was markedly reduced by the insecticide-treated barrier compared with the untreated barrier; the latter did not reduce the abundance of this species in pens. Estimates of the protection conferred against C. imicola by the treated barrier differed depending on whether catch comparisons were based on outside traps or on traps located inside no-barrier pens. The results suggest that the use of insecticide-treated barriers may reduce contact between livestock and C. imicola in open areas or sheds. More research is necessary to assess the degree of protection as a function of barrier height, C. imicola abundance, and the size of the area to be protected.

  6. Host feeding patterns of Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) within the Picos de Europa National Park in northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Calvo, J H; Berzal, B; Calvete, C; Miranda, M A; Estrada, R; Lucientes, J

    2012-12-01

    Blood meal identification can provide information about the natural host-feeding patterns or preferences of Culicoides species. Such information could indirectly provide data indicating which reservoirs are significant in associated vector-borne diseases. We positively identified the host species through DNA sequencing of the cytochrome b gene in 144 of the 170 (84.7%) blood meal specimens tested. In the remaining samples, identification of the blood-meal source was unsuccessful, possibly due to the post-ingestion time prior to sampling or the availability of the species-specific cytochrome b gene sequences in the database. The majority of identified blood meals were derived from mammalian blood (95.8%), and only six contained chicken blood. We identified five species as mammalian hosts for Culicoides spp.: sheep (87.7%), human (6.5%), cattle (3.7%) and Savi's Pine Vole (Micrototus savii) (2.1%). The results suggested that large mammals, specifically ruminants, were most frequently fed upon by biting midges (Culicoides spp.), but evidence of opportunistic feeding behaviour was also found. Host feeding behaviour of Culicoides species may also be influenced by the relative abundance of a particular host species in the area being studied. In this sense, Savi's Pine Vole, a wild species, was found to be a locally relevant host and a putative reservoir for viruses transmitted by species of biting midges belonging to the Culicoides genus. Finally, feeding on multiple potential host species was observed. One midge acquired blood meals from human and chicken hosts, while four other midges fed on two different sheep.

  7. Functional Validation of Apoptosis Genes IAP1 and DRONC in Midgut Tissue of the Biting Midge Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) by RNAi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Culicoides biting midges transmit multiple ruminant viruses, including bluetongue virus and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus, causing significant economic burden worldwide due to trade restrictions and production loss. To limit the spread of these viruses, control strategies focus on ...

  8. A survey of Culicoides developmental sites on a farm in northern Spain, with a brief review of immature habitats of European species.

    PubMed

    González, Mikel; López, Sergio; Mullens, Bradley A; Baldet, Thierry; Goldarazena, Arturo

    2013-01-16

    Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) belonging to the Obsoletus and Pulicaris groups are considered to be the main vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV) in non Mediterranean Europe. Selected terrestrial microhabitats (n=17) on a farm in northern Spain were sampled repeatedly over a year-long period and characterized for use by Culicoides species for immature development. Concurrent use of CDC light traps showed the presence of 37 species and 66,575 specimens of adult Culicoides. A total of 28 species and 11,396 individuals emerged from laboratory-maintained soil samples. Culicoides obsoletus and Culicoides scoticus (pooled as Obsoletus complex) were particularly abundant (comprising 58.6% and 74.5% of the total collections in light traps and emergence traps respectively). Potential key vectors of animal viruses (such as BTV) were found in two main terrestrial types of microhabitats. In the case of C. obsoletus, different types of manure (old and composted manure, manure mixed with organic matter, and fresh manure) produced most of the specimens. In contrast, larvae of C. scoticus and Culicoides lupicaris were associated with soil substantially comprised of rotting leaf litter that included the parasitic plant Lathraea clandestina. Several species, Culicoides festivipennis, Culicoides punctatus and Culicoides brunnicans, were very common in mud at pond margins. Indeed, pond microhabitats and runoff below barn rooflines supported the greatest species richness. In the pond habitat, 49.4% of Culicoides specimens emerged from mud at the water edge, as opposed to 50 cm above (32.4%) and 1 meter above waterline (18%). Similar species richness, but statistically significant differences in abundance, were observed among the four pond microhabitats. Overall, the majority of the specimens were found in the upper layer (0-3 cm), except in manure, where they preferred deeper layers (>6 cm). Maximum peaks of abundance occurred in both light traps and soil samples in summer

  9. Seasonal dynamics of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges, potential vectors of African horse sickness and bluetongue viruses in the Niayes area of Senegal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The African horse sickness epizootic in Senegal in 2007 caused considerable mortality in the equine population and hence major economic losses. The vectors involved in the transmission of this arbovirus have never been studied specifically in Senegal. This first study of the spatial and temporal dynamics of the Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species, potential vectors of African horse sickness in Senegal, was conducted at five sites (Mbao, Parc Hann, Niague, Pout and Thies) in the Niayes area, which was affected by the outbreak. Methods Two Onderstepoort light traps were used at each site for three nights of consecutive collection per month over one year to measure the apparent abundance of the Culicoides midges. Results In total, 224,665 specimens belonging to at least 24 different species (distributed among 11 groups of species) of the Culicoides genus were captured in 354 individual collections. Culicoides oxystoma, Culicoides kingi, Culicoides imicola, Culicoides enderleini and Culicoides nivosus were the most abundant and most frequent species at the collection sites. Peaks of abundance coincide with the rainy season in September and October. Conclusions In addition to C. imicola, considered a major vector for the African horse sickness virus, C. oxystoma may also be involved in the transmission of this virus in Senegal given its abundance in the vicinity of horses and its suspected competence for other arboviruses including bluetongue virus. This study depicted a site-dependent spatial variability in the dynamics of the populations of the five major species in relation to the eco-climatic conditions at each site. PMID:24690198

  10. Explorando nuevos horizontes en NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, G. L.

    A pesar de la incesante expansión del Universo iniciada con el Big Bang 14 mil millones de años atrás, nuestro Universo se siente cada día más cercano. La inquebrantable vocación de la humanidad por descubrir nuevos horizontes ha permitido el acercamiento de civilizaciones en nuestro planeta y nos ha permitido conocer nuestro lugar en el Universo como nunca antes. En este artículo presento una breve sinopsis de nuestro trabajo que se relaciona con diversas investigaciones con implicaciones astrobiológicas, desde el origen de los ingredientes de la "sopa de la vida", hasta la evolución y composición de la atmósfera de Marte.

  11. Seasonal Dynamics, Parity Rate, and Composition of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Occurring in the Vicinity of Wild and Domestic Ruminants in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Rádrová, Jana; Mračková, Marie; Galková, Zdenka; Lamka, Jírí; Račka, Karol; Barták, Pavel; Votýpka, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In the light of the emergence of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses in northern and central Europe, an extensive entomological survey within the framework of a bluetongue control program was undertaken from 2008 to 2013 in the Czech Republic to investigate Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) collected in close proximity of domestic livestock and semiwild ruminants. Insects were sampled using CDC black-light suction traps placed overnight near ruminants in farms or in forest game preserves to provide data on Culicoides fauna collected near these two groups of hosts inhabiting different environments. From almost a half million biting midge specimens collected at 41 sampling sites, 34 species were identified including three species newly recorded for the Czech Republic: Culicoides (Oecacta) clastrieri Callot, Kremer & Deduit, Culicoides (Oecacta) odiatus Austen, and Culicoides (Pontoculicoides) saevus Kieffer. The Culicoides obsoletus species group, incriminated as a bluetongue virus vector, was predominant in both domestic livestock (91%) and semiwild game (52%). A relatively high proportion (around 30%) of C. obsoletus Meigen females with pigmented abdomen (= more likely parous) was observed from spring till autumn. In contrast, adult biting midges were found to be largely absent during at least three winter months, approximately December till March, which could be considered as the biting midge vector-free period.

  12. The effect of a topical insecticide containing permethrin on the number of Culicoides midges caught near horses with and without insect bite hypersensitivity in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    de Raat, I J; van den Boom, R; van Poppel, M; van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M M Sloet

    2008-10-15

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) in horses is most likely caused by Culicoides species, although other insects may also play a role. Until now no effective cure has been found for this condition, although numerous therapeutic and preventive measures have been used to control insect hypersensitivity. One such method is to apply a topical insecticide to horses. In this study, the effect of a topical insecticide containing permethrin (3.6%) was examined in seven pairs of horses. The horses were placed inside a tent trap to collect Culicoides spp. and other insects attracted to the horses on two subsequent evenings. On the first evening, both horses were untreated. After the end of this session, one horse of each pair was treated with the pour-on insecticide; treated horses were kept separate from untreated horses. The next evening the pairs of horses were again placed inside the tent trap and insects were collected. Similar percentages of Culicoides were trapped as in earlier studies (C. obsoletus 95.34% and C. pulicaris 4.54%), with healthy horses attracting more Culicoides than horses affected by IBH. The number of Culicoides, the percentage of blood-fed Culicoides obsoletus, and the total number of insects attracted to horses 24 hours after treatment with permethrin were reduced but the reduction was not statistically significant. No negative side effects of permethrin administration were observed.

  13. Detection of Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania braziliensis in Culicoides (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) in an endemic area of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Brazilian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, José Manuel Macário; Rodrigues, Bruno Leite; Bandeira, Maria da Conceição Abreu; Moraes, Jorge Luiz Pinto; Fonteles, Raquel Silva; Pereira, Silma Regina Ferreira

    2016-12-01

    Biting midges in the genus Culicoides act as vectors of arboviruses throughout the world and as vectors of filariasis in Latin America, the Caribbean, and parts of Africa. Although Culicoides spp. are currently not considered to be vectors of Leishmania protozoa, the high abundance of biting midges in areas with active cutaneous leishmaniasis transmission points to the possibility of Culicoides infection by these pathogens. We used PCR to test captured Culicoides species for natural infection with Leishmania spp. We tested 450 Culicoides females, divided into 30 pools of 15 individuals each, as follows: nine pools of C. foxi (135 specimens), seven pools of C. filariferus (105), seven pools of C. insignis (105), five pools of C. ignacioi (75), and two pools of C. flavivenula (30). PCR confirmed the presence of Leishmania braziliensis DNA in C. ignacioi (0.14%), C. insignis (0.14%), and C. foxi (0.11); and Le. amazonensis DNA in C. filariferus (0.14%) and C. flavivenula (0.50%). We conclude that these Culicoides species can be naturally infected, but vector competence and transmission capability must be confirmed in future studies. Our results warrant further investigation into the role of these biting midge species in the leishmaniasis epidemiological cycle.

  14. An appraisal of current and new techniques intended to protect bulls against Culicoides and other haematophagous nematocera: the case of Schmergow, Brandenburg, Germany.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Burkhard; Jandowsky, Anabell; Schein, Eberhard; Mehlitz, Dieter; Clausen, Peter-Henning

    2009-08-01

    The outbreak of bluetongue (BTV-8) in many parts of north-western Europe led to efforts to curb the spread of the disease, particularly in farms with valuable livestock, as on a stud bull farm in Schmergow, Brandenburg, Germany. In the abundance of the putative BT vectors, Palaearctic Culicoides species, several vector control methods were applied in the hope for a reduction of the target insect populations. Insecticide-impregnated ear tags and regular treatments at 6-week intervals of all bulls with deltamethrin pour on were expected to achieve the desired control of the biting midges. Additionally, insecticide-treated mosquito fences circumventing much of the pens were tried for the first time against Culicoides. Two suction black-light traps (BioGents(R) sentinel traps) helped to monitor the densities of Culicoides and other haematophagous nematocera during the trial period from July to December 2007. Despite all efforts, the densities of Culicoides were not distinctly reduced. Several thousand midges were repeatedly recorded during one-night catches. Examinations of midges and other haematophagous nematocera (Aedes and Anopheles species) revealed high percentages of successful feedings between 10% and 35% for Culicoides and more than 50% for Aedes and Anopheles species. Since all insects were caught inside the pens, the concept of endophily vs exophily or endophagy vs exophagy for some Culicoides species needs to be revised accordingly. Also, stabling of valuable livestock does not reduce the host-vector interface and, hence, the risk of transmission of BT.

  15. Seasonal allergic dermatitis in sheep associated with Ctenocephalides and Culicoides bites.

    PubMed

    Yeruham, I; Perl, S; Braverman, Y

    2004-12-01

    The clinical, epidemiological and histopathological findings of two pruritic dermatites in sheep in Israel are described. The first type of dermatitis affected mainly young animals with lesions predominantly on the legs. It occurred from March to November, with a peak in June. The second type affected animals of all ages and was mainly on the ventrum. It was sporadic but occurred throughout the year with a peak in October. The morbidity rate of this syndrome reached 4.3% in one flock. The histopathology of both conditions was consistent with an allergic dermatitis. Fleas and midges were collected and identified as Ctenocephalides felis felis and various species of Culicoides. The population density, seasonal activity, geographical distribution and feeding behaviour preferences of the insects and the incidence of the two types of dermatitis suggest that fleas and midges were the causal agents. Flea and midge bite pruritic dermatoses should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sarcoptic and psoroptic mange.

  16. Failure to propagate equine infectious anemia virus in mosquitoes and Culicoides variipennis.

    PubMed

    Shen, D T; Gorham, J R; Jones, R H; Crawford, T B

    1978-05-01

    Laboratory-colonized mosquitoes, Culex tarsalis, aedes aegypti, Culiseta inornata, and Anopheles free-borni, and the biting gnat, Culicoides variipennis, were exposed to equine infectious anemia virus. Exposure to the virus was by intrathoracic inoculation for mosquitoes and by oral ingestion of an infective blood meal through a membrane for C variipennis. After various intervals, groups of 15 to 20 insects were homogenized and inoculated into susceptible ponies. Positive immunodiffusion test results were used as criterion for equine infectious anemia infection in ponies. Virus was not detected in the 4 species of mosquitoes at 3, 6, 12, and 18 days after inoculation, or in C variipennis at 6, 8, 12, 14, 21, and 26 days after oral exposure to the virus.

  17. Temperature Dependence of the Extrinsic Incubation Period of Orbiviruses in Culicoides Biting Midges

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Simon; Wilson, Anthony; Barber, James; Veronesi, Eva; Mellor, Philip; Venter, Gert; Gubbins, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Background The rate at which viruses replicate and disseminate in competent arthropod vectors is limited by the temperature of their environment, and this can be an important determinant of geographical and seasonal limits to their transmission by arthropods in temperate regions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we present a novel statistical methodology for estimating the relationship between temperature and the extrinsic incubation period (EIP) and apply it to both published and novel data on virus replication for three internationally important orbiviruses (African horse sickness virus (AHSV), bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV)) in their Culicoides vectors. Our analyses show that there can be differences in vector competence for different orbiviruses in the same vector species and for the same orbivirus in different vector species. Both the rate of virus replication (approximately 0.017-0.021 per degree-day) and the minimum temperature required for replication (11-13°C), however, were generally consistent for different orbiviruses and across different Culicoides vector species. The estimates obtained in the present study suggest that previous publications have underestimated the replication rate and threshold temperature because the statistical methods they used included an implicit assumption that all negative vectors were infected. Conclusions/Significance Robust estimates of the temperature dependence of arbovirus replication are essential for building accurate models of transmission and for informing policy decisions about seasonal relaxations to movement restrictions. The methodology developed in this study provides the required robustness and is superior to methods used previously. Importantly, the methods are generic and can readily be applied to other arbovirus-vector systems, as long as the assumptions described in the text are valid. PMID:22125649

  18. Bluetongue Disease Risk Assessment Based on Observed and Projected Culicoides obsoletus spp. Vector Densities

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Katharina; Rubel, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Bluetongue is an arboviral disease of ruminants causing significant economic losses. Our risk assessment is based on the epidemiological key parameter, the basic reproduction number. It is defined as the number of secondary cases caused by one primary case in a fully susceptible host population, in which values greater than one indicate the possibility, i.e., the risk, for a major disease outbreak. In the course of the Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) outbreak in Europe in 2006 we developed such a risk assessment for the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Austria. Basic reproduction numbers were calculated using a well-known formula for vector-borne diseases considering the population densities of hosts (cattle and small ruminants) and vectors (biting midges of the Culicoides obsoletus spp.) as well as temperature dependent rates. The latter comprise the biting and mortality rate of midges as well as the reciprocal of the extrinsic incubation period. Most important, but generally unknown, is the spatio-temporal distribution of the vector density. Therefore, we established a continuously operating daily monitoring to quantify the seasonal cycle of the vector population by a statistical model. We used cross-correlation maps and Poisson regression to describe vector densities by environmental temperature and precipitation. Our results comprise time series of observed and simulated Culicoides obsoletus spp. counts as well as basic reproduction numbers for the period 2009–2011. For a spatio-temporal risk assessment we projected our results from the location of Vienna to the entire region of Austria. We compiled both daily maps of vector densities and the basic reproduction numbers, respectively. Basic reproduction numbers above one were generally found between June and August except in the mountainous regions of the Alps. The highest values coincide with the locations of confirmed BTV cases. PMID:23560090

  19. The emergence of Schmallenberg virus across Culicoides communities and ecosystems in Europe.

    PubMed

    Balenghien, Thomas; Pagès, Nonito; Goffredo, Maria; Carpenter, Simon; Augot, Denis; Jacquier, Elisabeth; Talavera, Sandra; Monaco, Federica; Depaquit, Jérôme; Grillet, Colette; Pujols, Joan; Satta, Giuseppe; Kasbari, Mohamed; Setier-Rio, Marie-Laure; Izzo, Francesca; Alkan, Cigdem; Delécolle, Jean-Claude; Quaglia, Michela; Charrel, Rémi; Polci, Andrea; Bréard, Emmanuel; Federici, Valentina; Cêtre-Sossah, Catherine; Garros, Claire

    2014-10-15

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV), a novel arboviral pathogen, has emerged and spread across Europe since 2011 inflicting congenital deformities in the offspring of infected adult ruminants. Several species of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have been implicated in the transmission of SBV through studies conducted in northern Europe. In this study Culicoides from SBV outbreak areas of mainland France and Italy (Sardinia) were screened for viral RNA. The role of both C. obsoletus and the Obsoletus complex (C. obsoletus and C. scoticus) in transmission of SBV were confirmed in France and SBV was also discovered in a pool of C. nubeculosus for the first time, implicating this species as a potential vector. While collections in Sardinia were dominated by C. imicola, only relatively small quantities of SBV RNA were detected in pools of this species and conclusive evidence of its potential role in transmission is required. In addition to these field-based studies, infection rates in colony-derived individuals of C. nubeculosus and field-collected C. scoticus are also examined in the laboratory. Rates of infection in C. nubeculosus were low, confirming previous studies, while preliminary examination of C. scoticus demonstrated that while this species can replicate SBV to a potentially transmissible level, further work is required to fully define comparative competence between species in the region. Finally, the oral competence for SBV of two abundant and widespread mosquito vector species in the laboratory is assessed. Neither Aedes albopictus nor Culex pipiens were demonstrated to replicate SBV to transmissible levels and appear unlikely to play a major role in transmission. Other vector competence data produced from studies across Europe to date is then comprehensively reviewed and compared with that generated previously for bluetongue virus.

  20. Vector competence of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) for vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Barbara S; Campbell, Corey L; Stuart, Melissa A; Wilson, William C

    2005-05-01

    To determine the vector competence of Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones midges for vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-New Jersey, insects were experimentally infected per os and sampled over time. Viral replication, as determined by in situ hybridization, was seen in epithelial, neural, and hemolymph cell types throughout the insect. Spatial and temporal distribution of virus was determined by immunohistochemical examination of sequentially sampled insects. Tissues of the alimentary canal were infected in a temporal pattern that paralleled the route of digestion/absorption: foregut and midgut by day 1, surrounding hemolymph and Malpighian tubules by day 3, and finally the midgut/ hindgut junction, hindgut, and rectal region by day 5. The circulation of virus in the hemolymph by day 3 coincided with infection of the dermis and fat bodies, the salivary glands, eyes, cerebral and subthoracic ganglia, and the ovaries. Oviduct epithelium and ovarial sheaths were infected by day 3, followed by infection of the developing oocytes by day 5. Interestingly, neural infections were seen in the subabdominal ganglia innervating the midgut in 33% of insects by 1 d postfeeding in the absence of positive staining in the hemolymph or surrounding tissues. A retrograde axonal transport infection route for these ganglia is discussed. The disseminated, productive, noncytolytic infection in Culicoides is consistent with that of an efficient biological vector for VSV. Virus readily replicated throughout the insect, passing both midgut and salivary gland infection barriers and reaching transmission-related organs in 3 d. Establishing the competence of this insect vector for VSV provides the foundation for animal transmission studies in the future. The possibility of horizontal, transovarial, and mechanical transmission is discussed.

  1. Haemoproteus tartakovskyi (Haemoproteidae): Complete sporogony in Culicoides nubeculosus (Ceratopogonidae), with implications for avian haemoproteid experimental research.

    PubMed

    Žiegytė, Rita; Bernotienė, Rasa; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Valkiūnas, Gediminas

    2016-01-01

    Numerous recent studies have addressed the molecular characterization, distribution and genetic diversity of Haemoproteus spp. (Haemoproteidae). Some species of these blood parasites cause severe disease in birds, and heavy infections are often lethal in biting midges (Ceratopogonidae) and other blood-sucking insects. However, information about the vectors of haemoproteids is scarce. This presents an obstacle for better understanding the mechanisms of host-parasite interactions and the epidemiology of haemoproteosis. Here we investigated the sporogonic development of Haemoproteus tartakovskyi, a widespread bird parasite, in experimentally infected biting midges, Culicoides nubeculosus. These biting midges are widespread in the Europe. The insects were cultivated under laboratory conditions. Unfed females were allowed to take blood meals on wild caught siskins Carduelis spinus naturally infected with H. tartakovskyi (lineage hSISKIN1). Engorged females were maintained at 22-23 °C, dissected at intervals, and examined for sporogonic stages. Mature ookinetes of H. tartakovskyi were seen in the midgut content between 6 and 48 h post infection, oocysts were observed in the midgut wall 3-4 days post infection (dpi). Sporozoites were first reported in the salivary gland preparations 7 dpi. In accordance with microscopy data, polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing confirmed presence of the corresponding parasite lineage in experimentally infected biting midges. This study indicates that C. nubeculosus willingly takes blood meals on birds and is a vector of H. tartakovskyi. These biting midges are readily amenable to cultivation under laboratory conditions. Culicoides nubeculosus transmits Haemoproteus parasites infecting parrots, owls and siskins, birds belonging to different families and orders. Thus, this vector provides a convenient model for experimental research with avian haemoproteids.

  2. Bluetongue disease risk assessment based on observed and projected Culicoides obsoletus spp. vector densities.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Katharina; Rubel, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Bluetongue is an arboviral disease of ruminants causing significant economic losses. Our risk assessment is based on the epidemiological key parameter, the basic reproduction number. It is defined as the number of secondary cases caused by one primary case in a fully susceptible host population, in which values greater than one indicate the possibility, i.e., the risk, for a major disease outbreak. In the course of the Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) outbreak in Europe in 2006 we developed such a risk assessment for the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Austria. Basic reproduction numbers were calculated using a well-known formula for vector-borne diseases considering the population densities of hosts (cattle and small ruminants) and vectors (biting midges of the Culicoides obsoletus spp.) as well as temperature dependent rates. The latter comprise the biting and mortality rate of midges as well as the reciprocal of the extrinsic incubation period. Most important, but generally unknown, is the spatio-temporal distribution of the vector density. Therefore, we established a continuously operating daily monitoring to quantify the seasonal cycle of the vector population by a statistical model. We used cross-correlation maps and Poisson regression to describe vector densities by environmental temperature and precipitation. Our results comprise time series of observed and simulated Culicoides obsoletus spp. counts as well as basic reproduction numbers for the period 2009-2011. For a spatio-temporal risk assessment we projected our results from the location of Vienna to the entire region of Austria. We compiled both daily maps of vector densities and the basic reproduction numbers, respectively. Basic reproduction numbers above one were generally found between June and August except in the mountainous regions of the Alps. The highest values coincide with the locations of confirmed BTV cases.

  3. Midgut and salivary gland transcriptomes of the arbovirus vector Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Campbell, C L; Vandyke, K A; Letchworth, G J; Drolet, B S; Hanekamp, T; Wilson, W C

    2005-04-01

    Numerous Culicoides spp. are important vectors of livestock or human disease pathogens. Transcriptome information from midguts and salivary glands of adult female Culicoides sonorensis provides new insight into vector biology. Of 1719 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from adult serum-fed female midguts harvested within 5 h of feeding, twenty-eight clusters of serine proteases were derived. Four clusters encode putative iron binding proteins (FER1, FERL, PXDL1, PXDL2), and two clusters encode metalloendopeptidases (MDP6C, MDP6D) that probably function in bloodmeal catabolism. In addition, a diverse variety of housekeeping cDNAs were identified. Selected midgut protease transcripts were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR): TRY1_115 and MDP6C mRNAs were induced in adult female midguts upon feeding, whereas TRY1_156 and CHYM1 were abundant in midguts both before and immediately after feeding. Of 708 salivary gland ESTs analysed, clusters representing two new classes of protein families were identified: a new class of D7 proteins and a new class of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors. Additional cDNAs representing putative immunomodulatory proteins were also identified: 5' nucleotidases, antigen 5-related proteins, a hyaluronidase, a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, mucins and several immune response cDNAs. Analysis by q-PCR showed that all D7 and Kunitz domain transcripts tested were highly enriched in female heads compared with other tissues and were generally absent from males. The mRNAs of two additional protease inhibitors, TFPI1 and TFPI2, were detected in salivary glands of paraffin-embedded females by in situ hybridization.

  4. Range expansion of the Bluetongue vector, Culicoides imicola, in continental France likely due to rare wind-transport events.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Stéphanie; Huber, Karine; Pagès, Nonito; Talavera, Sandra; Burgin, Laura E; Carpenter, Simon; Sanders, Christopher; Dicko, Ahmadou H; Djerbal, Mouloud; Goffredo, Maria; Lhor, Youssef; Lucientes, Javier; Miranda-Chueca, Miguel A; Pereira Da Fonseca, Isabel; Ramilo, David W; Setier-Rio, Marie-Laure; Bouyer, Jérémy; Chevillon, Christine; Balenghien, Thomas; Guis, Hélène; Garros, Claire

    2016-06-06

    The role of the northward expansion of Culicoides imicola Kieffer in recent and unprecedented outbreaks of Culicoides-borne arboviruses in southern Europe has been a significant point of contention. We combined entomological surveys, movement simulations of air-borne particles, and population genetics to reconstruct the chain of events that led to a newly colonized French area nestled at the northern foot of the Pyrenees. Simulating the movement of air-borne particles evidenced frequent wind-transport events allowing, within at most 36 hours, the immigration of midges from north-eastern Spain and Balearic Islands, and, as rare events, their immigration from Corsica. Completing the puzzle, population genetic analyses discriminated Corsica as the origin of the new population and identified two successive colonization events within west-Mediterranean basin. Our findings are of considerable importance when trying to understand the invasion of new territories by expanding species.

  5. Range expansion of the Bluetongue vector, Culicoides imicola, in continental France likely due to rare wind-transport events

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Stéphanie; Huber, Karine; Pagès, Nonito; Talavera, Sandra; Burgin, Laura E.; Carpenter, Simon; Sanders, Christopher; Dicko, Ahmadou H.; Djerbal, Mouloud; Goffredo, Maria; Lhor, Youssef; Lucientes, Javier; Miranda-Chueca, Miguel A.; Pereira Da Fonseca, Isabel; Ramilo, David W.; Setier-Rio, Marie-Laure; Bouyer, Jérémy; Chevillon, Christine; Balenghien, Thomas; Guis, Hélène; Garros, Claire

    2016-01-01

    The role of the northward expansion of Culicoides imicola Kieffer in recent and unprecedented outbreaks of Culicoides-borne arboviruses in southern Europe has been a significant point of contention. We combined entomological surveys, movement simulations of air-borne particles, and population genetics to reconstruct the chain of events that led to a newly colonized French area nestled at the northern foot of the Pyrenees. Simulating the movement of air-borne particles evidenced frequent wind-transport events allowing, within at most 36 hours, the immigration of midges from north-eastern Spain and Balearic Islands, and, as rare events, their immigration from Corsica. Completing the puzzle, population genetic analyses discriminated Corsica as the origin of the new population and identified two successive colonization events within west-Mediterranean basin. Our findings are of considerable importance when trying to understand the invasion of new territories by expanding species. PMID:27263862

  6. Towards the PCR-based identification of Palaearctic Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae): results from an international ring trial targeting four species of the subgenus Avaritia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of internationally important arboviruses. To understand the role of Culicoides in the transmission of these viruses, it is essential to correctly identify the species involved. Within the western Palaearctic region, the main suspected vector species, C. obsoletus, C. scoticus, C. dewulfi and C. chiopterus, have similar wing patterns, which makes it difficult to separate and identify them correctly. Methods In this study, designed as an inter-laboratory ring trial with twelve partners from Europe and North Africa, we assess four PCR-based assays which are used routinely to differentiate the four species of Culicoides listed above. The assays based on mitochondrial or ribosomal DNA or microarray hybridisation were tested using aliquots of Culicoides DNA (extracted using commercial kits), crude lysates of ground specimens and whole Culicoides (265 individuals), and non-Culicoides Ceratopogonidae (13 individuals) collected from across Europe. Results A total of 800 molecular assays were implemented. The in-house assays functioned effectively, although specificity and sensitivity varied according to the molecular marker and DNA extraction method used. The Obsoletus group specificity was overall high (95-99%) while the sensitivity varied greatly (59.6-100%). DNA extraction methods impacted the sensitivity of the assays as well as the type of sample used as template for the DNA extraction. Conclusions The results are discussed in terms of current use of species diagnostic assays and the future development of molecular tools for the rapid differentiation of cryptic Culicoides species. PMID:24884950

  7. Assessment of vector/host contact: comparison of animal-baited traps and UV-light/suction trap for collecting Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), vectors of Orbiviruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence and massive spread of bluetongue in Western Europe during 2006-2008 had disastrous consequences for sheep and cattle production and confirmed the ability of Palaearctic Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to transmit the virus. Some aspects of Culicoides ecology, especially host-seeking and feeding behaviors, remain insufficiently described due to the difficulty of collecting them directly on a bait animal, the most reliable method to evaluate biting rates. Our aim was to compare typical animal-baited traps (drop trap and direct aspiration) to both a new sticky cover trap and a UV-light/suction trap (the most commonly used method to collect Culicoides). Methods/results Collections were made from 1.45 hours before sunset to 1.45 hours after sunset in June/July 2009 at an experimental sheep farm (INRA, Nouzilly, Western France), with 3 replicates of a 4 sites × 4 traps randomized Latin square using one sheep per site. Collected Culicoides individuals were sorted morphologically to species, sex and physiological stages for females. Sibling species were identified using a molecular assay. A total of 534 Culicoides belonging to 17 species was collected. Abundance was maximal in the drop trap (232 females and 4 males from 10 species) whereas the diversity was the highest in the UV-light/suction trap (136 females and 5 males from 15 species). Significant between-trap differences abundance and parity rates were observed. Conclusions Only the direct aspiration collected exclusively host-seeking females, despite a concern that human manipulation may influence estimation of the biting rate. The sticky cover trap assessed accurately the biting rate of abundant species even if it might act as an interception trap. The drop trap collected the highest abundance of Culicoides and may have caught individuals not attracted by sheep but by its structure. Finally, abundances obtained using the UV-light/suction trap did not estimate accurately Culicoides

  8. Quantifying Dispersal of European Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Vectors between Farms Using a Novel Mark-Release-Recapture Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeby, Carsten; Bødker, René; Stockmarr, Anders; Lind, Peter; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Studying the dispersal of small flying insects such as Culicoides constitutes a great challenge due to huge population sizes and lack of a method to efficiently mark and objectively detect many specimens at a time. We here describe a novel mark-release-recapture method for Culicoides in the field using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as marking agent without anaesthesia. Using a plate scanner, this detection technique can be used to analyse thousands of individual Culicoides specimens per day at a reasonable cost. We marked and released an estimated 853 specimens of the Pulicaris group and 607 specimens of the Obsoletus group on a cattle farm in Denmark. An estimated 9,090 (8,918–9,260) Obsoletus group specimens and 14,272 (14,194–14,448) Pulicaris group specimens were captured in the surroundings and subsequently analysed. Two (0.3%) Obsoletus group specimens and 28 (4.6%) Pulicaris group specimens were recaptured. The two recaptured Obsoletus group specimens were caught at the release point on the night following release. Eight (29%) of the recaptured Pulicaris group specimens were caught at a pig farm 1,750 m upwind from the release point. Five of these were recaptured on the night following release and the three other were recaptured on the second night after release. This is the first time that movement of Culicoides vectors between farms in Europe has been directly quantified. The findings suggest an extensive and rapid exchange of disease vectors between farms. Rapid movement of vectors between neighboring farms may explain the the high rate of spatial spread of Schmallenberg and bluetongue virus (BTV) in northern Europe. PMID:23630582

  9. Intradermal testing of horses with and without insect bite hypersensitivity in The Netherlands using an extract of native Culicoides species.

    PubMed

    Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M; van Poppel, Miriam; de Raat, Inge J; van den Boom, Robin; Savelkoul, Huub F J

    2009-10-01

    Intradermal tests using a Culicoides nubeculosus extract have proven unreliable for diagnosis of equine insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) in the Netherlands. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of an extract derived from the Dutch species C. obsoletus and C. pulicaris. Thirteen pairs of horses were tested, each pair consisting of one horse with IBH and the other a healthy control. Each horse was injected intradermally with 0.1 mL of three concentrations of Culicoides whole body extract (1 : 1000 w/v, 1 : 10,000 w/v and 1 : 25,000 w/v), histamine solution (0.01 mg/mL, positive control) and phosphate-buffered saline (negative control). Skin responses were evaluated after 30 min and at 1, 4 and 24 h. At all time points the absolute wheal diameter elicited by Culicoides extract 1 : 1000 w/v was significantly larger (P < 0.01) in the IBH horses than in the control horses. Using the 1 : 10,000 w/v extract the difference was significant at 1, 4 and 24 h and using the 1 : 25,000 w/v extract only at 24 h. The relative wheal diameter was greater in IBH than in control horses at all concentrations and time points except at 0.5 h for the 1 : 10,000 w/v and 1 : 25,000 w/v concentrations. At the 1 : 1000 w/v concentration, the sensitivity and specificity was 92% using the relative wheal diameter. These results indicate that intradermal testing using 1 : 1000 w/v concentration Culicoides extracts relevant to the locality provides useful support for a clinical diagnosis of equine insect hypersensitivity.

  10. Evaluation of Insecticides, Clothing Repellents, and Other Approaches to the Control of Coastal Sand Flies, Culicoides spp.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    normally employed for mosquito adulticiding . However, the insecticide was applied in two treatements spaced ca. 20 minutes apart using 2 aircraft to take...Repellency determinations of four commercial products against six species of ceratopogonid biting midges. Mosquito News 41:7-12. Roberts, R. H. and D. L...Culicoides mississippiensis Hoffman (accepted by Mosquito News). Harlan, Ii., C. E. Schreck and D. L. Kline. Insect repellent jacket tests against

  11. First Report of 13 Species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Mainland Portugal and Azores by Morphological and Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Pereira da Fonseca, Isabel; Delécolle, Jean-Claude; Wilson, Anthony; Meireles, José; Lucientes, Javier; Ribeiro, Rita; Boinas, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) contains important vectors of animal and human diseases, including bluetongue, African horse sickness and filariosis. A major outbreak of bluetongue occurred in mainland Portugal in 2004, forty eight years after the last recorded case. A national Entomological Surveillance Plan was initiated in mainland Portugal, Azores and the Madeira archipelagos in 2005 in order to better understand the disease and facilitate policy decisions. During the survey, the most prevalent Culicoides species in mainland Portugal was C. imicola (75.3%) and species belonging to the Obsoletus group (6.5%). The latter were the most prevalent in Azores archipelago, accounting for 96.7% of the total species identified. The Obsoletus group was further characterized by multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction to species level showing that only two species of this group were present: C. obsoletus sensu strictu (69.6%) and C. scoticus (30.4%). Nine species of Culicoides were detected for the first time in mainland Portugal: C. alazanicus, C. bahrainensis, C. deltus, C. lupicaris, C. picturatus, C. santonicus, C. semimaculatus, C. simulator and C. subfagineus. In the Azores, C. newsteadi and C. circumscriptus were identified for the first time from some islands, and bluetongue vectors belonging to the Obsoletus group (C. obsoletus and C. scoticus) were found to be widespread. PMID:22536340

  12. Laboratory and field evaluations of chemical and plant-derived potential repellents against Culicoides biting midges in northern Spain.

    PubMed

    González, M; Venter, G J; López, S; Iturrondobeitia, J C; Goldarazena, A

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy of 23 compounds in repelling Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), particularly Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen) females, was determined by means of a Y-tube olfactometer. The 10 most effective compounds were further evaluated in landing bioassays. The six most promising compounds (including chemical and plant-derived repellents) were evaluated at 10% and 25% concentrations in field assays using Centers for Disease Control (CDC) light traps. At least three compounds showed promising results against Culicoides biting midges with the methodologies used. Whereas olfactometer assays indicated DEET at 1 µg/µL to be the most effective repellent, filter paper landing bioassays showed plant-derived oils to be better. Light traps fitted with polyester mesh impregnated with a mixture of octanoic, decanoic and nonanoic fatty acids at 10% and 25% concentrations collected 2.2 and 3.6 times fewer midges than control traps and were as effective as DEET, which is presently considered the reference standard insect repellent. The best plant-derived product was lemon eucalyptus oil. Although these have been reported as safe potential repellents, the present results indicate DEET and the mixture of organic fatty acids to be superior and longer lasting. © 2014 The Royal Entomological Society.

  13. Comparison of two trapping methods for Culicoides biting midges and determination of African horse sickness virus prevalence in midge populations at Onderstepoort, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Elisabeth G; Venter, Gert J; Labuschagne, Karien; Page, Patrick C; Mullens, Bradley A; MacLachlan, N James; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Guthrie, Alan J

    2012-04-30

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of a variety of pathogens including African horse sickness virus (AHSV), a member of the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus. AHSV causes African horse sickness (AHS), an endemic disease of equids with an extremely high mortality rate in horses in sub-Saharan Africa. Culicoides (Avaritia) imicola Kieffer is considered to be the principal vector of AHSV and is the dominant Culicoides species in South Africa. Due to the global distribution of Culicoides vectors, there is a potential risk of AHS spreading from endemic areas to areas traditionally free of the disease, which could have a severe economical impact on the affected equine industry. As part of any risk assessment it is essential to monitor known vectors as well as potential vector species. In the present study, sampling of Culicoides insects was compared using overnight collections in the conventional Onderstepoort light trap and mechanical aspiration of midges at sunset from bait horses. Culicoides imicola was confirmed as the predominant species using both trapping methods. Other species, mainly Culicoides (Avaritia) bolitinos Meiswinkel and Culicoides (Avaritia) gulbenkiani Caeiro, were highly underrepresented in the light trap collections, but made a significant contribution to the mechanical aspiration catches. The time for optimal collection differed between the trapping methods, leading to the conclusion that mechanical aspiration is a useful addition to conventional light trap collection and possibly the better choice when investigating insect vectors. An infection rate of 1.14% was calculated for the midge population based on real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays of collected Culicoides midges, which exceeds previous estimates. This is probably due to the increased sensitivity of the RT-qPCR assay used in this study as compared to the virus isolation assays used in previous studies. RT

  14. Characterization of internal transcribed spacer (ITS1)-ITS2 region of ribosomal RNA gene from 25 species of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Y; Yanase, T; Tsuda, T; Noda, H

    2009-09-01

    We determined nucleotide sequences of the nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2a-2S-ITS2 region in 103 individuals of 25 Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from 11 locations in Japan. Ribosomal RNA genes, 5.8S and 2S rDNA, were highly conserved among the species with few variations. The ITS2a region showed length variation among species. Both ITS1 and ITS2 showed highly varied sequences among species. The noticeable indel regions among ITS1 sequences are present in some Culicoides species, separating species into two types having long or short ITS1 region. However, Culicoides cylindratus Kitaoka possesses both types of ITS1 in each individual; these results seem to indicate that the ITS1-long type was the prototype and the short type was produced through deletion in many Culicoides species. One species, belonging to subgenus Avaritia, possessed an Avaritia-specific sequence in ITS1 and phylogenetically formed a monophyletic group. Geographical genotypes in a species were not clear. Species-specific sequence features were observed, enabling molecular identification of Culicoides species.

  15. Ecological correlates of bluetongue virus in Spain: predicted spatial occurrence and its relationship with the observed abundance of the potential Culicoides spp. vector.

    PubMed

    Calvete, C; Estrada, R; Miranda, M A; Borrás, D; Calvo, J H; Lucientes, J

    2009-11-01

    Using data from bluetongue (BT) outbreaks caused by viral serotype 4 (BTV-4) in Spain during 2004-2005, a predictive model for BTV-4 occurrence in peninsular Spain was developed. An autologistic regression model was employed to estimate the relationships between BTV-4 presence and bioclimatic-related and host-availability-related variables. In addition, the observed abundances of the main potential Culicoides vectors during 2004-2005, namely Culicoides imicola, Culicoides obsoletus group, and species of the Culicoides pulicaris group, were compared between BTV-4 presence/absence areas predicted by the model. BTV-4 occurrence was mainly explained by bioclimatic variables, although a consideration of host-availability variables led to improved fit of the model. The area of BTV-4 presence predicted by the model largely resembled the core distribution area of C. imicola, and this species was the most abundant Culicoides spp. in predicted BTV-4 presence areas. The results suggest that the spatial expansion of BTV-4 took place only as far as those areas in which C. imicola populations efficiently transmitted the virus.

  16. Seasonal abundance of biting midges, Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), collected at cowsheds in the southern part of the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Chul; Bellis, Glenn A; Kim, Myung-Soon; Chong, Sung-Tae; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Park, Jee-Yong; Yeh, Jung-Yong; Klein, Terry A

    2012-06-01

    Black light traps were used to measure the seasonal and geographical distribution of Culicoides spp. (biting midges or no-see-ums) at 9 cowsheds in the southern half of the Republic of Korea (ROK) from June through October 2010. A total of 25,242 Culicoides females (24,852; 98.5%) and males (390; 1.5%) comprising of 9 species were collected. The most commonly collected species was Culicoides punctatus (73.0%) followed by C. arakawae (25.7%), while the remaining 7 species accounted for <1.0% of all Culicoides spp. collected. The mean number of Culicoides spp. collected per trap night (Trap Index [TI]) was highest for C. punctatus (409.3), followed by C. arakawae (144.2), C. tainanus (4.1), C. oxystoma (1.2), C. circumscriptus (0.7), C. homotomus (0.6), C. erairai (0.4), C. kibunensis (0.3), and C. nipponensis (0.04). Peak TIs were observed for C. punctatus (1,188.7) and C. arakawae (539.0) during July and August, respectively. C. punctatus and C. arakawae have been implicated in the transmission of arboviruses and other pathogens of veterinary importance that adversely impact on animal and bird husbandry.

  17. DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide)/PMD (para-menthane-3,8-diol) repellent-treated mesh increases Culicoides catches in light traps.

    PubMed

    Murchie, A K; Clawson, S; Rea, I; Forsythe, I W N; Gordon, A W; Jess, S

    2016-09-01

    Biting midges (Culicoides spp.) are vectors of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses. Treatment of mesh barriers is a common method for preventing insect-vectored diseases and has been proposed as a means of limiting Culicoides ingression into buildings or livestock transporters. Assessments using animals are costly, logistically difficult and subject to ethical approval. Therefore, initial screening of test repellents/insecticides was made by applying treatments to mesh (2 mm) cages surrounding Onderstepoort light traps. Five commercial treatments were applied to cages as per manufacturers' application rates: control (water), bendiocarb, DEET/p-menthane-3,8-diol (PMD) repellent, Flygo (a terpenoid based repellent) and lambda-cyhalothrin. The experimental design was a 5 × 5 Latin square, replicated in time and repeated twice. Incongruously, the traps surrounded by DEET/PMD repellent-treated mesh caught three to four times more Obsoletus group Culicoides (the commonest midge group) than the other treatments. A proposed hypothesis is that Obsoletus group Culicoides are showing a dose response to DEET/PMD, being attracted at low concentrations and repelled at higher concentrations but that the strong light attraction from the Onderstepoort trap was sufficient to overcome close-range repellence. This study does not imply that DEET/PMD is an ineffective repellent for Culicoides midges in the presence of an animal but rather that caution should be applied to the interpretation of light trap bioassays.

  18. The Biting Midge Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) Is Capable of Developing Late Stage Infections of Leishmania enriettii

    PubMed Central

    Seblova, Veronika; Sadlova, Jovana; Vojtkova, Barbora; Votypka, Jan; Carpenter, Simon; Bates, Paul Andrew; Volf, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite their importance in animal and human health, the epidemiology of species of the Leishmania enriettii complex remains poorly understood, including the identity of their biological vectors. Biting midges of the genus Forcipomyia (Lasiohelea) have been implicated in the transmission of a member of the L. enriettii complex in Australia, but the far larger and more widespread genus Culicoides has not been investigated for the potential to include vectors to date. Methodology/Principal Findings Females from colonies of the midges Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen and C. sonorensis Wirth & Jones and the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis Lutz & Nevia (Diptera: Psychodidae) were experimentally infected with two different species of Leishmania, originating from Australia (Leishmania sp. AM-2004) and Brazil (Leishmania enriettii). In addition, the infectivity of L. enriettii infections generated in guinea pigs and golden hamsters for Lu. longipalpis and C. sonorensis was tested by xenodiagnosis. Development of L. enriettii in Lu. longipalpis was relatively poor compared to other Leishmania species in this permissive vector. Culicoides nubeculosus was not susceptible to infection by parasites from the L. enriettii complex. In contrast, C. sonorensis developed late stage infections with colonization of the thoracic midgut and the stomodeal valve. In hamsters, experimental infection with L. enriettii led only to mild symptoms, while in guinea pigs L. enriettii grew aggressively, producing large, ulcerated, tumour-like lesions. A high proportion of C. sonorensis (up to 80%) feeding on the ears and nose of these guinea pigs became infected. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that L. enriettii can develop late stage infections in the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis. This midge was found to be susceptible to L. enriettii to a similar degree as Lutzomyia longipalpis, the vector of Leishmania infantum in South America. Our results support the hypothesis that some

  19. Duration of repellency of N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide, citronella oil and cypermethrin against Culicoides species when applied to polyester mesh.

    PubMed

    Page, P C; Labuschagne, K; Nurton, J P; Venter, G J; Guthrie, A J

    2009-07-07

    The repellent efficacy of 15% N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET), 0.6% citronella oil, and 0.3% alpha-cyano-cypermethrin against Culicoides species was compared in three 5x5 Latin squares (15 replicates) under South African field conditions. DEET, citronella oil or alpha-cyano-cypermethrin were applied to polyester meshes that were fitted to down-draught suction 220V UV light traps which were operated overnight. No significant repellent effect against Culicoides was found for the citronella oil or the alpha-cyano-cypermethrin. DEET had a significant repellent effect against Culicoides species and C. imicola for all catches made from after sunset to before sunrise.

  20. Modelling the Northward Expansion of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) under Future Climate Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lysyk, Timothy; Johnson, Gregory; Marshall, Shawn; Berger, Kathryn; Cork, Susan Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is affecting the distribution of pathogens and their arthropod vectors worldwide, particularly at northern latitudes. The distribution of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) plays a key role in affecting the emergence and spread of significant vector borne diseases such as Bluetongue (BT) and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) at the border between USA and Canada. We used 50 presence points for C. sonorensis collected in Montana (USA) and south-central Alberta (Canada) between 2002 and 2012, together with monthly climatic and environmental predictors to develop a series of alternative maximum entropy distribution models. The best distribution model under current climatic conditions was selected through the Akaike Information Criterion, and included four predictors: Vapour Pressure Deficit of July, standard deviation of Elevation, Land Cover and mean Precipitation of May. This model was then projected into three climate change scenarios adopted by the IPCC in its 5th assessment report and defined as Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5. Climate change data for each predictor and each RCP were calculated for two time points pooling decadal data around each one of them: 2030 (2021–2040) and 2050 (2041–2060). Our projections showed that the areas predicted to be at moderate-high probability of C. sonorensis occurrence would increase from the baseline scenario to 2030 and from 2030 to 2050 for each RCP. The projection also indicated that the current northern limit of C. sonorensis distribution is expected to move northwards to above 53°N. This may indicate an increased risk of Culicoides-borne diseases occurrence over the next decades, particularly at the USA-Canada border, as a result of changes which favor C. sonorensis presence when associated to other factors (i.e. host and pathogen factors). Recent observations of EHD outbreaks in northern Montana and southern Alberta supported our projections and

  1. Insecticidal effects of deltamethrin in laboratory and field populations of Culicoides species: how effective are host-contact reduction methods in India?

    PubMed

    De Keyser, Rien; Cassidy, Clare; Laban, Swathi; Gopal, Prakash; Pickett, John A; Reddy, Yarabolu K; Prasad, Minakshi; Prasad, Gaya; Chirukandoth, Sreekumar; Senthilven, Kandasamy; Carpenter, Simon; Logan, James G

    2017-01-31

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is transmitted by Culicoides biting midges and causes bluetongue (BT), a clinical disease observed primarily in sheep. BT has a detrimental effect on subsistence farmers in India, where hyperendemic outbreaks impact on smallholdings in the southern states of the country. In this study, we establish a reliable method for testing the toxic effects of deltamethrin on Culicoides and then compare deltamethrin with traditional control methods used by farmers in India. Effects of deltamethrin were initially tested using a colonised strain of Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen and a modified World Health Organisation exposure assay. This method was then applied to field populations of Culicoides spp. in India. The field population of C. oxystoma in India had a greater LC50 (0.012 ± 0.009%) for deltamethrin than laboratory-reared C.nubeculosus (0.0013 ± 0.0002%). Exposure of C. nubeculosus to deltamethrin at higher ambient temperatures resulted in greater rates of knockdown but a lower mortality rate at 24 h post-exposure. Behavioural assays with C. nubeculosus in WHO tubes provided evidence for contact irritancy and spatial repellence caused by deltamethrin. The field experiments in India, however, provided no evidence for repellent or toxic effects of deltamethrin. Traditional methods such as the application of neem oil and burning of neem leaves also provided no protection. Our study demonstrates that field-collected Culicoides in India are less susceptible to deltamethrin exposure than laboratory-bred C. nubeculosus and traditional methods of insect control do not provide protection to sheep. These low levels of susceptibility to deltamethrin have not been recorded before in field populations of Culicoides and suggest resistance to synthetic pyrethrioids. Alternative insect control methods, in addition to vaccination, may be needed to protect Indian livestock from BTV transmission.

  2. Curiosity --El nuevo robot explorador de Marte

    NASA Image and Video Library

    El nuevo Laboratorio Científico de Marte llamado Curiosity tiene grandes preguntas que responder una vez que llegue a Marte. Infórmese sobre la misión con el analista de trayectoria de la NASA Fern...

  3. The relationship between climate and the distribution of Culicoides imicola in Iberia.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, P; Capela, R; Pro, M J; Ortega, M D; Pena, I; Rubio, C; Gasca, A; Mellor, P S

    1998-01-01

    The biting midge Culicoides imicola was captured at 17 of 27 farms in Spain and Portugal during a survey of its distribution following outbreaks of African horse sickness in Iberia that occurred between 1987 and 1990. Farms were sampled approximately twice weekly from October 1992 to February 1995. Farms were widely spaced apart (maximum 850 km) and had considerable variation in climate. Across sites, summer temperatures ranged from 18.3 degrees C-27.2 degrees C; in winter the range was 4.4 degrees C-11.6 degrees C. Relative humidities in summer ranged from 37.2% to 90.1%. Proximity to southern Spain (Seville) was the most significant predictor of the presence/absence of C. imicola, but high summer temperatures and possibly dry summer conditions, were also important. Vila Nova de Milfontes in Portugal, where C. imicola was abundant and the climate is relatively cool, was an exception to the climatic trends at the other 26 sites. This exception points to a lack of knowledge of climatic requirements for immature development of C. imicola. The absence of C. imicola from the three most easterly sites, which have apparently favourable climates, suggests a relatively recent invasion by this species into Iberia.

  4. Comparison of several different trapping methods for Culicoides variipennis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Anderson, J R; Linhares, A X

    1989-09-01

    When battery operated CDC miniature incandescent and black light traps (with and without light bulbs) were operated with and without CO2, the rank of trap effectiveness for total numbers of female Culicoides variipennis caught was: black light plus CO2; CO2-baited trap without light bulb; black light without CO2; incandescent light plus CO2 and incandescent light without CO2. In 1983, the black light trap plus CO2 caught significantly more males and females than any other traps, and the incandescent light trap without CO2 caught significantly fewer females than any other traps. There were significant differences also in times gnats were collected, as well as in the gonotrophic condition of females caught in traps and that different traps caught different physiological/reproductive segments of the population. All catches revealed that gravid females began flying only a few min before sunset and peaked in the 1st h after sunset. Because it caught significantly larger numbers of females than other traps and because it was selectively attractive to gravid and parous females, the black light trap would be the trap of choice when large numbers of parous females are desired in arbovirus isolation studies.

  5. Orientation behaviour of Culicoides obsoletus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a relevant virus vector in northern Europe, toward host-associated odorant cues.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Jean-Yves; Verheggen, François J; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frédéric

    2015-07-30

    Some Culicoides biting midge species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological virus vectors worldwide and have recently been associated with outbreaks of important epizootic diseases such as bluetongue and Schmallenberg in northern Europe. These diseases, which affect domestic and wild ruminants, have caused considerable economic losses. Knowledge of host preferences of these biting midges - especially of the relevant vectors of arboviruses near farms, such as Culicoides obsoletus in northern Europe - is essential to understand pathogen transmission cycles and the epidemiology of associated diseases. This study aimed to determine host preferences of C. obsoletus using an in-field flight tunnel containing pairs of calf, sheep, chicken, and human hosts (and controls) and a laboratory two-choice bioassay containing volatile extracts of host skin (and controls). Behavioural responses of nulliparous C. obsoletus females in the in-field flight tunnel showed a preference for human (but also calf and sheep) hosts, probably due to their exhalation of greater quantities of carbon dioxide. The laboratory experiment revealed that volatile organic compounds released from the skin of chicken and sheep seemed to attract this species. Culicoides obsoletus, thus, seems to have a wide host range and to be particularly attracted by humans under field conditions. A better understanding of vector-host interaction could enable the development of control strategies against adult biting midges, by exploiting insect-repelling or -attractive semiochemicals. Volatile extracts of chicken and/or sheep skin could be used to identify volatile compounds attractive to C. obsoletus, which in turn could be used in baited traps. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Entomopathogenic Fungus as a Biological Control for an Important Vector of Livestock Disease: The Culicoides Biting Midge

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Minshad Ali; Pope, Edward C.; Carpenter, Simon; Scholte, Ernst-Jan; Butt, Tariq M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The recent outbreak of bluetongue virus in northern Europe has led to an urgent need to identify control measures for the Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges that transmit it. Following successful use of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae against larval stages of biting midge Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen, we investigated the efficacy of this strain and other fungi (Beauveria bassiana, Isaria fumosorosea and Lecanicillium longisporum) as biocontrol agents against adult C. nubeculosus in laboratory and greenhouse studies. Methodology/Findings Exposure of midges to ‘dry’ conidia of all fungal isolates caused significant reductions in survival compared to untreated controls. Metarhizium anisopliae strain V275 was the most virulent, causing a significantly decrease in midge survival compared to all other fungal strains tested. The LT50 value for strain V275 was 1.42 days compared to 2.21–3.22 days for the other isolates. The virulence of this strain was then further evaluated by exposing C. nubeculosus to varying doses (108–1011 conidia m−2) using different substrates (horse manure, damp peat, leaf litter) as a resting site. All exposed adults were found to be infected with the strain V275 four days after exposure. A further study exposed C. nubeculosus adults to ‘dry’ conidia and ‘wet’ conidia (conidia suspended in 0.03% aq. Tween 80) of strain V275 applied to damp peat and leaf litter in cages within a greenhouse. ‘Dry’ conidia were more effective than ‘wet’ conidia, causing 100% mortality after 5 days. Conclusion/Significance This is the first study to demonstrate that entomopathogenic fungi are potential biocontrol agents against adult Culicoides, through the application of ‘dry’ conidia on surfaces (e.g., manure, leaf litter, livestock) where the midges tend to rest. Subsequent conidial transmission between males and females may cause an increased level of fungi-induced mortality in midges

  7. Entomopathogenic fungus as a biological control for an important vector of livestock disease: the Culicoides biting midge.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Minshad Ali; Pope, Edward C; Carpenter, Simon; Scholte, Ernst-Jan; Butt, Tariq M

    2011-01-10

    The recent outbreak of bluetongue virus in northern Europe has led to an urgent need to identify control measures for the Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges that transmit it. Following successful use of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae against larval stages of biting midge Culicoides nubeculosus Meigen, we investigated the efficacy of this strain and other fungi (Beauveria bassiana, Isaria fumosorosea and Lecanicillium longisporum) as biocontrol agents against adult C. nubeculosus in laboratory and greenhouse studies. Exposure of midges to 'dry' conidia of all fungal isolates caused significant reductions in survival compared to untreated controls. Metarhizium anisopliae strain V275 was the most virulent, causing a significantly decrease in midge survival compared to all other fungal strains tested. The LT(50) value for strain V275 was 1.42 days compared to 2.21-3.22 days for the other isolates. The virulence of this strain was then further evaluated by exposing C. nubeculosus to varying doses (10(8)-10(11) conidia m(-2)) using different substrates (horse manure, damp peat, leaf litter) as a resting site. All exposed adults were found to be infected with the strain V275 four days after exposure. A further study exposed C. nubeculosus adults to 'dry' conidia and 'wet' conidia (conidia suspended in 0.03% aq. Tween 80) of strain V275 applied to damp peat and leaf litter in cages within a greenhouse. 'Dry' conidia were more effective than 'wet' conidia, causing 100% mortality after 5 days. This is the first study to demonstrate that entomopathogenic fungi are potential biocontrol agents against adult Culicoides, through the application of 'dry' conidia on surfaces (e.g., manure, leaf litter, livestock) where the midges tend to rest. Subsequent conidial transmission between males and females may cause an increased level of fungi-induced mortality in midges thus reducing the incidence of disease.

  8. Culicoides Species Communities Associated with Wild Ruminant Ecosystems in Spain: Tracking the Way to Determine Potential Bridge Vectors for Arboviruses

    PubMed Central

    Talavera, Sandra; Muñoz-Muñoz, Francesc; Durán, Mauricio; Verdún, Marta; Soler-Membrives, Anna; Oleaga, Álvaro; Arenas, Antonio; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Estrada, Rosa; Pagès, Nitu

    2015-01-01

    The genus Culicoides Latreille 1809 is a well-known vector for protozoa, filarial worms and, above all, numerous viruses. The Bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently emerged Schmallenberg virus (SBV) are responsible for important infectious, non-contagious, insect-borne viral diseases found in domestic ruminants and transmitted by Culicoides spp. Both of these diseases have been detected in wild ruminants, but their role as reservoirs during the vector-free season still remains relatively unknown. In fact, we tend to ignore the possibility of wild ruminants acting as a source of disease (BTV, SBV) and permitting its reintroduction to domestic ruminants during the following vector season. In this context, a knowledge of the composition of the Culicoides species communities that inhabit areas where there are wild ruminants is of major importance as the presence of a vector species is a prerequisite for disease transmission. In this study, samplings were conducted in areas inhabited by different wild ruminant species; samples were taken in both 2009 and 2010, on a monthly basis, during the peak season for midge activity (in summer and autumn). A total of 102,693 specimens of 40 different species of the genus Culicoides were trapped; these included major BTV and SBV vector species. The most abundant vector species were C. imicola and species of the Obsoletus group, which represented 15% and 11% of total numbers of specimens, respectively. At the local scale, the presence of major BTV and SBV vector species in areas with wild ruminants coincided with that of the nearest sentinel farms included in the Spanish Bluetongue Entomological Surveillance Programme, although their relative abundance varied. The data suggest that such species do not exhibit strong host specificity towards either domestic or wild ruminants and that they could consequently play a prominent role as bridge vectors for different pathogens between both types of ruminants. This finding would support the

  9. Culicoides Species Communities Associated with Wild Ruminant Ecosystems in Spain: Tracking the Way to Determine Potential Bridge Vectors for Arboviruses.

    PubMed

    Talavera, Sandra; Muñoz-Muñoz, Francesc; Durán, Mauricio; Verdún, Marta; Soler-Membrives, Anna; Oleaga, Álvaro; Arenas, Antonio; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Estrada, Rosa; Pagès, Nitu

    2015-01-01

    The genus Culicoides Latreille 1809 is a well-known vector for protozoa, filarial worms and, above all, numerous viruses. The Bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently emerged Schmallenberg virus (SBV) are responsible for important infectious, non-contagious, insect-borne viral diseases found in domestic ruminants and transmitted by Culicoides spp. Both of these diseases have been detected in wild ruminants, but their role as reservoirs during the vector-free season still remains relatively unknown. In fact, we tend to ignore the possibility of wild ruminants acting as a source of disease (BTV, SBV) and permitting its reintroduction to domestic ruminants during the following vector season. In this context, a knowledge of the composition of the Culicoides species communities that inhabit areas where there are wild ruminants is of major importance as the presence of a vector species is a prerequisite for disease transmission. In this study, samplings were conducted in areas inhabited by different wild ruminant species; samples were taken in both 2009 and 2010, on a monthly basis, during the peak season for midge activity (in summer and autumn). A total of 102,693 specimens of 40 different species of the genus Culicoides were trapped; these included major BTV and SBV vector species. The most abundant vector species were C. imicola and species of the Obsoletus group, which represented 15% and 11% of total numbers of specimens, respectively. At the local scale, the presence of major BTV and SBV vector species in areas with wild ruminants coincided with that of the nearest sentinel farms included in the Spanish Bluetongue Entomological Surveillance Programme, although their relative abundance varied. The data suggest that such species do not exhibit strong host specificity towards either domestic or wild ruminants and that they could consequently play a prominent role as bridge vectors for different pathogens between both types of ruminants. This finding would support the

  10. A comparison of a new centrifuge sugar flotation technique with the agar method for the extraction of immature Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) life stages from salt marsh soils.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two sampling techniques, agar extraction (AE) and centrifuge sugar flotation extraction (CSFE) were compared to determine their relative efficacy to recover immature stages of Culicoides spp from salt marsh substrates. Three types of samples (seeded with known numbers of larvae, homogenized field s...

  11. Sticky-trapping biting midges (Culicoides spp.) alighting on cattle and sheep: effects of trap colour and evidence for host preference.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G M; Jess, S; Gordon, A W; Murchie, A K

    2014-08-01

    Sticky traps were mounted on heifers and sheep to assess Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) host preference. Initially, four coloured 200-cm(2) sticky traps (white, clear, yellow and blue) were attached to the backs of each of ten Friesian heifers that were released into open pasture for 24 h, repeated on six occasions. More Obsoletus group Culicoides were caught on the white and clear traps than on the yellow and blue. Trap position on the right or left flank also affected midge catch, probably due to heifer orientation in the field. Next, six Friesian heifers and six Charollais hoggets each had one clear and one white sticky strap attached to their backs for one 24-h period per week, repeated for 24 weeks. Overall, Obsoletus group Culicoides comprised 91.8% (n = 5, 955) of the midge catch but there was no evidence of host preference, either discounting or including host live weight in the analyses. However, Pulicaris group Culicoides did demonstrate a significant host preference for sheep, providing that the analysis was adjusted for live weight. On heifers, the Pulicaris group comprised 7.5% of biting midges caught, whereas on hoggets, it comprised 12.7%.

  12. Distribution (presence / absence) of Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota: Clarifying the Epidemiology of Bluetongue Disease in the North-Central United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The presence or absence of the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis, a primary vector of bluetongue viruses (BTV) in North America, was assessed on ranches and farms across the north-central region of the United States (U.S.), specifically the states of Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota, as pa...

  13. Identification, expression, and characterization of a major salivary allergen (Cul s 1) of the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis relevant for summer eczema in horses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salivary proteins of Culicoides biting midges are thought to play a key role in the induction of summer eczema (SE), a seasonal recurrent allergic dermatitis in horses. The present study describes the identification of a candidate allergen in artificially collected saliva of the North American speci...

  14. A survey of biting midges of the genus Culicoides Latreille, 1809 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in NE Bulgaria, with respect to transmission of avian haemosporidians.

    PubMed

    Bobeva, Aneliya; Zehtindjiev, Pavel; Bensch, Staffan; Radrova, Jana

    2013-12-01

    This study presents data from a molecular survey of the species of the genus Culicoides from the region of Kalimok Field Station (NE Bulgaria) and haemosporidian parasites occurring in them in order to investigate the host-parasite specificity of haemosporidians to their dipteran vectors. The identification of Culicoides spp. was carried out by morphological and molecular-genetic methods. We collected and analysed 230 individuals of the genus Culicoides. Nine species were found. Eight species were identified morphologically; Culicoides obsoletus, C. riethi, C. newsteadi, C. circumscriptus, C. festivipennis, C. punctatus, C. pictipennis and C. puncticollis. The ninth species might be classified as either of C. nubeculosus or C. riethi and its identification needs additional investigations. The total prevalence of Haemoproteus in the examined biting midges was 2.17%. Three individuals of C. pictipennis were infected with the Haemoproteus lineage TURDUS2 (prevalence 16.67%), a common parasite of thrushes (Turdidae). Two individuals of C. circumscriptus contained Haemoproteus lineages (prevalence 2.78%); these were the lineage HAWF2 (previously reported from Coccothraustes coccothraustes) and a new lineage CULCIR1 not previously reported in the literature.

  15. Colonization of the Mediterranean basin by the vector biting midge species Culicoides imicola: an old story.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, S; Garros, C; Lombaert, E; Walton, C; Restrepo, J; Allene, X; Baldet, T; Cetre-Sossah, C; Chaskopoulou, A; Delecolle, J-C; Desvars, A; Djerbal, M; Fall, M; Gardes, L; de Garine-Wichatitsky, M; Goffredo, M; Gottlieb, Y; Gueye Fall, A; Kasina, M; Labuschagne, K; Lhor, Y; Lucientes, J; Martin, T; Mathieu, B; Miranda, M; Pages, N; Pereira da Fonseca, I; Ramilo, D W; Segard, A; Setier-Rio, M-L; Stachurski, F; Tabbabi, A; Talla Seck, M; Venter, G; Zimba, M; Balenghien, T; Guis, H; Chevillon, C; Bouyer, J; Huber, K

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the demographic history and genetic make-up of colonizing species is critical for inferring population sources and colonization routes. This is of main interest for designing accurate control measures in areas newly colonized by vector species of economically important pathogens. The biting midge Culicoides imicola is a major vector of orbiviruses to livestock. Historically, the distribution of this species was limited to the Afrotropical region. Entomological surveys first revealed the presence of C. imicola in the south of the Mediterranean basin by the 1970s. Following recurrent reports of massive bluetongue outbreaks since the 1990s, the presence of the species was confirmed in northern areas. In this study, we addressed the chronology and processes of C. imicola colonization in the Mediterranean basin. We characterized the genetic structure of its populations across Mediterranean and African regions using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers, and combined phylogeographical analyses with population genetics and approximate Bayesian computation. We found a west/east genetic differentiation between populations, occurring both within Africa and within the Mediterranean basin. We demonstrated that three of these groups had experienced demographic expansions in the Pleistocene, probably because of climate changes during this period. Finally, we showed that C. imicola could have colonized the Mediterranean basin in the Late Pleistocene or Early Holocene through a single event of introduction; however, we cannot exclude the hypothesis involving two routes of colonization. Thus, the recent bluetongue outbreaks are not linked to C. imicola colonization event, but rather to biological changes in the vector or the virus. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Allergen-Specific Cytokine Polarization Protects Shetland Ponies against Culicoides obsoletus-Induced Insect Bite Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroeks, Chantal; van der Lugt, Jaco J.; van der Meide, Nathalie M. A.; Willemse, Ton; Rutten, Victor P. M. G.; Zaiss, Dietmar M. W.

    2015-01-01

    The immunological mechanisms explaining development of an allergy in some individuals and not in others remain incompletely understood. Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a common, seasonal, IgE-mediated, pruritic skin disorder that affects considerable proportions of horses of different breeds, which is caused by bites of the insect Culicoides obsoletus (C. obsoletus). We investigated the allergen-specific immune status of individual horses that had either been diagnosed to be healthy or to suffer of IBH. Following intradermal allergen injection, skin biopsies were taken of IBH-affected and healthy ponies and cytokine expression was determined by RT-PCR. In addition, allergen-specific antibody titers were measured and cytokine expression of in vitro stimulated, allergen-specific CD4 T-cells was determined. 24 hrs after allergen injection, a significant increase in mRNA expression of the type-2 cytokine IL-4 was observed in the skin of IBH-affected Shetland ponies. In the skin of healthy ponies, however, an increase in IFNγ mRNA expression was found. Analysis of allergen-specific antibody titers revealed that all animals produced allergen-specific antibodies, and allergen-specific stimulation of CD4 T-cells revealed a significant higher percentage of IFNγ-expressing CD4 T-cells in healthy ponies compared to IBH-affected ponies. These data indicate that horses not affected by IBH, in contrast to the so far established dogma, are not immunologically ignorant but have a Th1-skewed allergen-specific immune response that appears to protect against IBH-associated symptoms. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of a natural situation, in which an allergen-specific immune skewing is protective in an allergic disorder. PMID:25901733

  17. Allergen-Specific Cytokine Polarization Protects Shetland Ponies against Culicoides obsoletus-Induced Insect Bite Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Meulenbroeks, Chantal; van der Lugt, Jaco J; van der Meide, Nathalie M A; Willemse, Ton; Rutten, Victor P M G; Zaiss, Dietmar M W

    2015-01-01

    The immunological mechanisms explaining development of an allergy in some individuals and not in others remain incompletely understood. Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a common, seasonal, IgE-mediated, pruritic skin disorder that affects considerable proportions of horses of different breeds, which is caused by bites of the insect Culicoides obsoletus (C. obsoletus). We investigated the allergen-specific immune status of individual horses that had either been diagnosed to be healthy or to suffer of IBH. Following intradermal allergen injection, skin biopsies were taken of IBH-affected and healthy ponies and cytokine expression was determined by RT-PCR. In addition, allergen-specific antibody titers were measured and cytokine expression of in vitro stimulated, allergen-specific CD4 T-cells was determined. 24 hrs after allergen injection, a significant increase in mRNA expression of the type-2 cytokine IL-4 was observed in the skin of IBH-affected Shetland ponies. In the skin of healthy ponies, however, an increase in IFNγ mRNA expression was found. Analysis of allergen-specific antibody titers revealed that all animals produced allergen-specific antibodies, and allergen-specific stimulation of CD4 T-cells revealed a significant higher percentage of IFNγ-expressing CD4 T-cells in healthy ponies compared to IBH-affected ponies. These data indicate that horses not affected by IBH, in contrast to the so far established dogma, are not immunologically ignorant but have a Th1-skewed allergen-specific immune response that appears to protect against IBH-associated symptoms. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of a natural situation, in which an allergen-specific immune skewing is protective in an allergic disorder.

  18. Complete development of three species of Haemoproteus (Haemosporida, Haemoproteidae) in the biting midge Culicoides impunctatus (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Liutkevicius, Gediminas; Iezhova, Tatjana A

    2002-10-01

    Development of Haemoproteus balmorali, H. dolniki, and H. tartakovskyi was followed in experimentally infected biting midges Culicoides impunctatus on the Curonian Spit in the Baltic Sea. Wild-caught flies were allowed to take blood meals on naturally infected spotted flycatchers Muscicapa striata, chaffinches Fringilla coelebs, or crossbills Loxia curvirostra harboring mature gametocytes of these parasites. The engorged biting midges were collected, held at 14-18 C, and dissected daily. Mature ookinetes of H. balmorali, H. dolniki, and H. tartakovskyi were numerous in the midgut content 36 hr postinfection (PI). Oocysts were first seen in the midgut wall 3 days PI. They were numerous in the midgut on the fourth day PI. Sporozoites were seen in salivary glands 5 days PI. The percentage of experimentally infected biting midges with sporozoites of H. balmorali was 36.1%: 8.8% with H. dolniki and 31.2% with H. tartakovskyi. Culicoides impunctatus is likely to be an important vector of Haemoproteus spp. in Europe. All investigated species of parasites can be distinguished on the basis of morphology or size (or both) of their vector stages. Morphological features of the ookinetes, oocysts, and sporozoites should be given more prominence in the description of new species of hemoproteids.

  19. [Monitoring of biting midges (Culicoides spp.), the potential vectors of the bluetongue virus, in the 12 climatic regions of Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, C; Schaffner, F; Mathis, A

    2009-05-01

    Midges of the genus Culicoides are the only known biological vectors of the bluetongue disease virus (BTV). Their occurrence at altitudes below 900 meters above sea level (m a.s.l.) is monitored in Switzerland by the Swiss Federal Veterinary Office, to determine vector-free periods around winter. In this study, data about the number of midges caught at stations representing the 12 climatic regions of Switzerland are shown. The tiny midges of 1-3 mm in size were caught once per week with UV light traps and grouped under the stereomicroscope into Obsoletus complex, Pulicaris complex and other Culicoides spp. Midges were caught at all stations, albeit in very different numbers. The highest monthly average was 10,000 midges per night (Dittingen/BL); the third highest average of all 12 stations was recorded for the highest-located station (Juf/GR, 2130 m a.s.l.). At stations below 1500 m a.s.l., midges of the Obsoletus complex (98% in Dittingen), which in Central Europe are most likely considered to be responsible for the transmission of BTV, were predominant. With increasing altitude, midges of the Pulicaris complex prevailed (91% in Juf). Hence, there are no regions of the populated areas in Switzerland which are free of midges, but the vector competence regarding BTV of the various midges needs to be urgently clarified.

  20. Cuticular and internal chemical composition of biting midges Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), potential vectors of viral diseases.

    PubMed

    González, Mikel; López, Sergio; Rosell, Gloria; Goldarazen, Arturo; Guerrero, Angel

    2014-08-01

    The chemical profile of the cuticle and internal tissues of four species of Culicoides have been studied for the first time by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The chemical composition of females of C. obsoletus s.l. and C. lupicaris, vectors of diverse viral diseases, have been compared with that of other biting midges, such as C. kibunensis and C. fascipennis, and the non-biting midge Forcipomyia bipunctata. A total of 61 compounds belonging to 8 major chemical classes were identified in cuticular and internal tissues in n-hexane extracts. The compounds include carboxylic acids (CAs) (C6-C20), with C16:0, C16:1 and C18:1 being dominant, branched hydrocarbons (C29 to C38 mono/di/trimethylalkanes), linear hydrocarbons (C15 to C33, mainly odd chain carbons), terpenes (geranylacetone, geranylgeraniol acetate, squalene, terpenic alcohol), steroids (cholesterol), aldehydes (C9-C10 and even chain C20 to C30), and esters. The chemical profile depends on the species and whether the extracts are external (cuticle) or internal. The contents of linear and branched hydrocarbons and aldehydes was high in cuticular extracts but practically absent in internal tissues, which were, in contrast, rich in CAs, terpenes and steroids. The results are discussed and compared with other Culicoides midges and mosquito-related species.

  1. Identifying environmental drivers of insect phenology across space and time: Culicoides in Scotland as a case study.

    PubMed

    Searle, K R; Blackwell, A; Falconer, D; Sullivan, M; Butler, A; Purse, B V

    2013-04-01

    Interpreting spatial patterns in the abundance of species over time is a fundamental cornerstone of ecological research. For many species, this type of analysis is hampered by datasets that contain a large proportion of zeros, and data that are overdispersed and spatially autocorrelated. This is particularly true for insects, for which abundance data can fluctuate from zero to many thousands in the space of weeks. Increasingly, an understanding of the ways in which environmental variation drives spatial and temporal patterns in the distribution, abundance and phenology of insects is required for management of pests and vector-borne diseases. In this study, we combine the use of smoothing techniques and generalised linear mixed models to relate environmental drivers to key phenological patterns of two species of biting midges, Culicoides pulicaris and C. impunctatus, of which C. pulicaris has been implicated in transmission of bluetongue in Europe. In so doing, we demonstrate analytical tools for linking the phenology of species with key environmental drivers, despite using a relatively small dataset containing overdispersed and zero-inflated data. We demonstrate the importance of landcover and climatic variables in determining the seasonal abundance of these two vector species, and highlight the need for more empirical data on the effects of temperature and precipitation on the life history traits of palearctic Culicoides spp. in Europe.

  2. Prevalence of the symbiont Cardinium in Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) vector species is associated with land surface temperature.

    PubMed

    Morag, Neta; Klement, Eyal; Saroya, Yonatan; Lensky, Itamar; Gottlieb, Yuval

    2012-10-01

    Prevalence of infection by bacterial symbionts may reflect their interactions with the host and has been shown to be correlated with environmental factors. Yet, it is still unclear whether infection by symbionts is determined by environmental factors affecting the early or imago stage of the host. Here, we identified and localized the symbiont Candidatus Cardinium hertigii (Bacteroidetes) in sympatric Culicoides biting midge species, examined its abundance, and studied its association with environmental factors. The prevalence of adult infection differed, with 50.7% from C. imicola, 31.4% from C. oxystoma, and 0% from C. schultzei gp., although phylogenetic analyses showed that Cardinium in these species is almost identical. In addition, prevalence of infection differed between climate regions, with lowest prevalence in the arid region and highest prevalence in the Mediterranean region. Multivariate linear regression analysis of Cardinium prevalence together with climatic and satellite imagery data-derived environmental variables revealed that infection prevalence is significantly associated with land surface temperature and explained up to 89.7% of infection prevalence variability. These findings suggest that the observed variation of Cardinium infection of the imago stage of Culicoides may be influenced by environmental conditions during the latter's early developmental stages.

  3. Circadian activity of Culicoides oxystoma (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), potential vector of bluetongue and African horse sickness viruses in the Niayes area, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Fall, Moussa; Fall, Assane G; Seck, Momar T; Bouyer, Jérémy; Diarra, Maryam; Balenghien, Thomas; Garros, Claire; Bakhoum, Mame T; Faye, Ousmane; Baldet, Thierry; Gimonneau, Geoffrey

    2015-08-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are important vectors of arboviruses in Africa. Culicoides oxystoma has been recently recorded in the Niayes region of Senegal (West Africa) and its high abundance on horses suggests a potential implication in the transmission of the African horse sickness virus in this region. This species is also suspected to transmit bluetongue virus to imported breeds of sheep. Little information is available on the biology and ecology of Culicoides in Africa. Therefore, understanding the circadian host-seeking activity of this putative vector is of primary importance to assess the risk of the transmission of Culicoides-borne pathogens. To achieve this objective, midges were collected using a sheep-baited trap over two consecutive 24-h periods during four seasons in 2012. A total of 441 Culicoides, belonging to nine species including 418 (94.8%) specimens of C. oxystoma, were collected. C. oxystoma presented a bimodal circadian host-seeking activity at sunrise and sunset in July and was active 3 h after sunrise in April. Daily activity appeared mainly related to time periods. Morning activity increased with the increasing temperature up to about 27 °C and then decreased with the decreasing humidity, suggesting thermal limits for C. oxystoma activity. Evening activity increased with the increasing humidity and the decreasing temperature, comprised between 20 and 27 °C according to seasons. Interestingly, males were more abundant in our sampling sessions, with similar activity periods than females, suggesting potential animal host implication in the facilitation of reproduction. Finally, the low number of C. oxystoma collected render practical vector-control recommendations difficult to provide and highlight the lack of knowledge on the bio-ecology of this species of veterinary interest.

  4. Control techniques for Culicoides biting midges and their application in the U.K. and northwestern Palaearctic.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, S; Mellor, P S; Torr, S J

    2008-09-01

    The recent emergence of bluetongue virus (Reoviridae: Orbivirus) (BTV) in northern Europe, for the first time in recorded history, has led to an urgent need for methods to control the disease caused by this virus and the midges that spread it. This paper reviews various methods of vector control that have been employed elsewhere and assesses their likely efficacy for controlling vectors of BTV in northern Europe. Methods of controlling Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have included: (a) application of insecticides and pathogens to habitats where larvae develop; (b) environmental interventions to remove larval breeding sites; (c) controlling adult midges by treating either resting sites, such as animal housing, or host animals with insecticides; (d) housing livestock in screened buildings, and (e) using repellents or host kairomones to lure and kill adult midges. The major vectors of BTV in northern Europe are species from the Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen) and Culicoides pulicaris (L.) groups, for which there are scant data on breeding habits, resting behaviour and host-oriented responses. Consequently, there is little information on which to base a rational strategy for controlling midges or for predicting the likely impact of interventions. However, data extrapolated from the results of vector control operations conducted elsewhere, combined with some assessment of how acceptable or not different methods may be within northern Europe, indicate that the treatment of livestock and animal housing with pyrethroids, the use of midge-proofed stabling for viraemic or high-value animals and the promotion of good farm practice to at least partially eliminate local breeding sites are the best options currently available. Research to assess and improve the efficacy of these methods is required and, in the longer term, efforts should be made to develop better bait systems for monitoring and, possibly, controlling midges. All these studies will need better methods of

  5. Vector competence of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 7

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is a vector of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotypes 1 and 2 in North America, where these viruses are well-known pathogens of white-tailed deer (WTD) and other wild ruminants. Although historically rare, reports of clinical EHDV infection in cattle have increased in some parts of the world over the past decade. In 2006, an EHDV-7 epizootic in cattle resulted in economic loss for the Israeli dairy industry. White-tailed deer are susceptible to EHDV-7 infection and disease; however, this serotype is exotic to the US and the susceptibility of C. sonorensis to this cattle-virulent EHDV is not known. The objective of the study was to determine if C. sonorensis is susceptible to EHDV-7 infection and is a competent vector. Methods To evaluate the susceptibility of C. sonorensis, midges were fed on EHDV-7 infected WTD, held at 22 ± 1°C, and processed individually for virus isolation and titration on 4–16 days post feeding (dpf). Midges with a virus titer of ≥102.7 median tissue culture infective doses (TCID50)/midge were considered potentially competent. To determine if infected C. sonorensis were capable of transmitting EHDV-7 to a host, a susceptible WTD was then fed on by a group of 14–16 dpf midges. Results From 4–16 dpf, 45% (156/350) of midges that fed on WTD with high titer viremia (>107 TCID50/ml) were virus isolation-positive, and starting from 10–16 dpf, 32% (35/109) of these virus isolation-positive midges were potentially competent (≥102.7 TCID50/midge). Midges that fed on infected deer transmitted the virus to a susceptible WTD at 14–16 dpf. The WTD developed viremia and severe clinical disease. Conclusion This study demonstrates that C. sonorensis is susceptible to EHDV-7 infection and can transmit the virus to susceptible WTD, thus, C. sonorensis should be considered a potential vector of EHDV-7. Together with previous work, this study demonstrates that North America

  6. Vector competence of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 7.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Mark G; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Stallknecht, David E; Allison, Andrew B; Carter, Deborah L; Drolet, Barbara S; Klement, Eyal; Mead, Daniel G

    2012-10-17

    Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is a vector of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotypes 1 and 2 in North America, where these viruses are well-known pathogens of white-tailed deer (WTD) and other wild ruminants. Although historically rare, reports of clinical EHDV infection in cattle have increased in some parts of the world over the past decade. In 2006, an EHDV-7 epizootic in cattle resulted in economic loss for the Israeli dairy industry. White-tailed deer are susceptible to EHDV-7 infection and disease; however, this serotype is exotic to the US and the susceptibility of C. sonorensis to this cattle-virulent EHDV is not known. The objective of the study was to determine if C. sonorensis is susceptible to EHDV-7 infection and is a competent vector. To evaluate the susceptibility of C. sonorensis, midges were fed on EHDV-7 infected WTD, held at 22 ± 1°C, and processed individually for virus isolation and titration on 4-16 days post feeding (dpf). Midges with a virus titer of ≥ 10(2.7) median tissue culture infective doses (TCID(50))/midge were considered potentially competent. To determine if infected C. sonorensis were capable of transmitting EHDV-7 to a host, a susceptible WTD was then fed on by a group of 14-16 dpf midges. From 4-16 dpf, 45% (156/350) of midges that fed on WTD with high titer viremia (>10(7) TCID(50)/ml) were virus isolation-positive, and starting from 10-16 dpf, 32% (35/109) of these virus isolation-positive midges were potentially competent (≥ 10(2.7) TCID(50)/midge). Midges that fed on infected deer transmitted the virus to a susceptible WTD at 14-16 dpf. The WTD developed viremia and severe clinical disease. This study demonstrates that C. sonorensis is susceptible to EHDV-7 infection and can transmit the virus to susceptible WTD, thus, C. sonorensis should be considered a potential vector of EHDV-7. Together with previous work, this study demonstrates that North America has a susceptible ruminant and

  7. Effect of Temperature on Replication of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Viruses in Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Ruder, Mark G; Stallknecht, David E; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Carter, Deborah L; Pfannenstiel, Robert S; Allison, Andrew B; Mead, Daniel G

    2015-09-01

    Replication of arboviruses, including orbiviruses, within the vector has been shown to be temperature dependent. Cooler ambient temperatures slow virus replication in arthropod vectors, whereas viruses replicate faster and to higher titers at warmer ambient temperatures. Previous research with epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotype 1 demonstrated that higher temperatures were associated with shorter extrinsic incubation periods in Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones, a confirmed vector of EHDV in North America. To further our understanding of the effect of temperature on replication of EHDV within the vector, C. sonorensis were experimentally infected with one of three EHDV strains representing three serotypes (1, 2, and 7). Midges were fed defibrinated white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) blood spiked with EHDV (≥10(6.5) TCID(50)/ml) through a parafilm membrane using an artificial feeding device and were then held at 20, 25, or 30°C. In addition to this in vitro method, a white-tailed deer experimentally infected with EHDV-7 was used to provide an infectious bloodmeal to determine if the results were comparable with those from the in vitro feeding method. Whole midges were processed for virus isolation and titration at regular intervals following feeding; midges with ≥10(2.7) TCID(50) were considered potentially competent to transmit virus. The virus recovery rates were high throughout the study and all three viruses replicated within C. sonorensis to high titer (≥ 10(2.7) TCID(50)/midge). Across all virus strains, the time to detection of potentially competent midges decreased with increasing temperature: 12-16 d postfeeding (dpf) at 20°C, 4-6 dpf at 25°C, and 2-4 dpf at 30°C. Significant differences in replication of the three viruses in C. sonorensis were observed, with EHDV-2 replicating to a high titer in a smaller proportion of midges and with lower peak titers. The findings are consistent with previous studies of related

  8. Nuevos Destinos: A CD-ROM for Advanced Beginning Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Provides a description of the Nuevos Destinos CD-ROM, a joint production for students learning Spanish at the advanced-beginning, intermediate-low, or native-speaker level. Nuevos Destinos involves students in meaningful ways by asking them to solve real-world problems encountered in law offices. (Author/VWL)

  9. Culicoides Latreille biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) of the Dongzhaigang mangrove forest, Hainan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Hui; Gopurenko, David; Cai, DU-Cheng; Yang, Ye-Meng; Hu, Rong; Thepparat, Arunrat; Wardhana, April H; Kim, Heung-Chul; Klein, Terry A; Kim, Myung-Soon; Bellis, Glenn A

    2017-01-31

    The biting midge fauna of Dongzhaigang Mangrove Forest, Hainan Province, China was sampled on 14 October 2015 using three methods: a pan light trap operated from dusk until dawn the following morning and sweep net and human landing collections performed between 16:15-17:15 hr. Eight species, including two new records for China, Culicoides palawanensis and C. niphanae, and one new record for Hainan, C. circumbasalis, were collected. A key to assist with identification of specimens of these species is provided. DNA barcodes supported the morphological identification of some of these species and identified the potential presence of cryptic species and/or deep population structure in others. The newly recorded species were morphologically similar to species previously reported from Hainan, highlighting the need for further investigation into the taxonomy of biting midges in this region. Species composition and abundance varied considerably between the three collection techniques suggesting that multiple techniques likely provide a more comprehensive sample of biting midge fauna.

  10. Detection of bluetongue virus serotype 17 in Culicoides variipennis by nucleic acid blot and sandwich hybridization techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Schoepp, R J; Bray, J F; Olson, K E; el-Hussein, A; Holbrook, F R; Blair, C D; Roy, P; Beaty, B J

    1990-01-01

    Molecular hybridization techniques were developed for the detection and surveillance of bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 17 in the insect vector Culicoides variipennis, a biting midge. Radiolabeled RNA and cDNA probes were generated from sequences of the L3 segment of BTV serotype 17. These probes were used to detect BTV RNA in pools of infected C. variipennis by hybridizing the probes directly to analyte immobilized on nylon membranes or by using a nucleic acid sandwich hybridization test. Hybridization procedures were able to detect 1 infected C. variipennis in a pool of 50 and as little as 3.55 log10 50% tissue culture infective doses per ml of virus. These hybridization techniques provide an alternative to virus isolation for the surveillance of BTV in vector populations. Images PMID:2172294

  11. Geographical distribution of Culicoides (DIPTERA: CERATOPOGONIDAE) in mainland Portugal: Presence/absence modelling of vector and potential vector species.

    PubMed

    Ramilo, David W; Nunes, Telmo; Madeira, Sara; Boinas, Fernando; da Fonseca, Isabel Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases are not only accounted responsible for their burden on human health-care systems, but also known to cause economic constraints to livestock and animal production. Animals are affected directly by the transmitted pathogens and indirectly when animal movement is restricted. Distribution of such diseases depends on climatic and social factors, namely, environmental changes, globalization, trade and unplanned urbanization. Culicoides biting midges are responsible for the transmission of several pathogenic agents with relevant economic impact. Due to a fragmentary knowledge of their ecology, occurrence is difficult to predict consequently, limiting the control of these arthropod vectors. In order to understand the distribution of Culicoides species, in mainland Portugal, data collected during the National Entomologic Surveillance Program for Bluetongue disease (2005-2013), were used for statistical evaluation. Logistic regression analysis was preformed and prediction maps (per season) were obtained for vector and potentially vector species. The variables used at the present study were selected from WorldClim (two climatic variables) and CORINE databases (twenty-two land cover variables). This work points to an opposite distribution of C. imicola and species from the Obsoletus group within mainland Portugal. Such findings are evidenced in autumn, with the former appearing in Central and Southern regions. Although appearing northwards, on summer and autumn, C. newsteadi reveals a similar distribution to C. imicola. The species C. punctatus appears in all Portuguese territory throughout the year. Contrary, C. pulicaris is poorly caught in all areas of mainland Portugal, being paradoxical present near coastal areas and higher altitude regions.

  12. Geographical distribution of Culicoides (DIPTERA: CERATOPOGONIDAE) in mainland Portugal: Presence/absence modelling of vector and potential vector species

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Sara; Boinas, Fernando; da Fonseca, Isabel Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases are not only accounted responsible for their burden on human health-care systems, but also known to cause economic constraints to livestock and animal production. Animals are affected directly by the transmitted pathogens and indirectly when animal movement is restricted. Distribution of such diseases depends on climatic and social factors, namely, environmental changes, globalization, trade and unplanned urbanization. Culicoides biting midges are responsible for the transmission of several pathogenic agents with relevant economic impact. Due to a fragmentary knowledge of their ecology, occurrence is difficult to predict consequently, limiting the control of these arthropod vectors. In order to understand the distribution of Culicoides species, in mainland Portugal, data collected during the National Entomologic Surveillance Program for Bluetongue disease (2005–2013), were used for statistical evaluation. Logistic regression analysis was preformed and prediction maps (per season) were obtained for vector and potentially vector species. The variables used at the present study were selected from WorldClim (two climatic variables) and CORINE databases (twenty-two land cover variables). This work points to an opposite distribution of C. imicola and species from the Obsoletus group within mainland Portugal. Such findings are evidenced in autumn, with the former appearing in Central and Southern regions. Although appearing northwards, on summer and autumn, C. newsteadi reveals a similar distribution to C. imicola. The species C. punctatus appears in all Portuguese territory throughout the year. Contrary, C. pulicaris is poorly caught in all areas of mainland Portugal, being paradoxical present near coastal areas and higher altitude regions. PMID:28683145

  13. Genotyping of whole genome amplified reduced representation libraries reveals a cryptic population of Culicoides brevitarsis in the Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Maria G; Aitken, Nicola C; Jack, Cameron; Chuah, Aaron; Oguya, James; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Kemp, Steve; Bellis, Glenn A; Nicholas, Adrian; Walker, Peter J; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard

    2016-09-30

    The advent of genotyping by Next Generation Sequencing has enabled rapid discovery of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and high throughput genotyping of large populations at an affordable cost. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS), a reduced representation library sequencing method, allows highly multiplexed sequencing of genomic subsets. This method has limitations for small organisms with low amounts of genomic DNA, such as the bluetongue virus (BTV) vectors, Culicoides midges. This study employed the GBS method to isolate SNP markers de novo from whole genome amplified Culicoides brevitarsis genomic DNA. The individuals were collected from regions representing two different Australian patterns of BTV strain distribution: the Northern Territory (NT) and the east coast. We isolated 8145 SNPs using GBS. Phylogenetic analysis conducted using the filtered 3263 SNPs revealed the presence of a distinct C. brevitarsis sub-population in the NT and this was confirmed by analysis of mitochondrial DNA. Two loci showed a very strong signal for selection and were unique to the NT population. Bayesian analysis with STRUCTURE indicated a possible two-population cluster. The results suggest that genotyping vectors with high density markers in combination with biological and environmental data is useful. However, more extensive sampling over a wider spatial and temporal range is needed. The presence of sub-structure in populations and loci under natural selection indicates the need for further investigation of the role of vectors in shaping the two Australian systems of BTV transmission. The described workflow is transferable to genotyping of small, non-model organisms, including arthropod vectors of pathogens of economic and medical importance.

  14. Factors associated with Culicoides Obsoletus complex spp.-specific IgE reactivity in Icelandic horses and Shetland ponies.

    PubMed

    Schurink, Anouk; van der Meide, Nathalie M A; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Ducro, Bart J; Tijhaar, Edwin

    2014-09-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a common allergic skin disease in horses, caused by biting insects of the Culicoides spp. In The Netherlands, Culicoides spp. of the Obsoletus complex are the most important midges involved in IBH. The aim of the present study was to identify and quantify associations between several endogenous (host) and exogenous (environmental) factors and immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity against Obsoletus complex-derived whole body extract or seven recombinant allergens, measured by ELISA. Data from 143 Icelandic horses and 177 Shetland ponies were analysed using multivariable models. In addition, the relationship between IgE reactivity and severity of clinical signs in IBH-affected horses was examined. Positive correlations were found between Obsoletus complex-specific IgE and severity of clinical signs. Disease status (IBH affected or control), breed and the interaction between IBH status and breed were significantly associated with IgE reactivity against several Obsoletus complex allergens. Significantly greater IgE reactivity was seen in IBH-affected horses compared to controls. The differences in IgE values between cases and controls were most pronounced in Icelandic horses. Shetland pony controls had significantly greater IgE reactivity compared to Icelandic horse controls, while differences in IgE values comparing Shetland pony cases and Icelandic horse cases were not significant. Severity of clinical signs and IgE reactivity in IBH-affected horses against several Obsoletus complex allergens appeared to be related. Consideration of the factors associated with Obsoletus complex-specific IgE in horses might further improve interpretation and accuracy of IgE ELISA test results within these breeds, although further research is required.

  15. Assessment of population genetic structure in the arbovirus vector midge, Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), using multi-locus DNA microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Maria G; Beebe, Nigel W; Gopurenko, David; Bellis, Glenn; Nicholas, Adrian; Ogugo, Moses; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Kemp, Steve; Walker, Peter J; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard

    2015-09-25

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a major pathogen of ruminants that is transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp.). Australian BTV serotypes have origins in Asia and are distributed across the continent into two distinct episystems, one in the north and another in the east. Culicoides brevitarsis is the major vector of BTV in Australia and is distributed across the entire geographic range of the virus. Here, we describe the isolation and use of DNA microsatellites and gauge their ability to determine population genetic connectivity of C. brevitarsis within Australia and with countries to the north. Eleven DNA microsatellite markers were isolated using a novel genomic enrichment method and identified as useful for genetic analyses of sampled populations in Australia, northern Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Timor-Leste. Significant (P < 0.05) population genetic subdivision was observed between all paired regions, though the highest levels of genetic sub-division involved pair-wise tests with PNG (PNG vs. Australia (FST = 0.120) and PNG vs. Timor-Leste (FST = 0.095)). Analysis of multi-locus allelic distributions using STRUCTURE identified a most probable two-cluster population model, which separated PNG specimens from a cluster containing specimens from Timor-Leste and Australia. The source of incursions of this species in Australia is more likely to be Timor-Leste than PNG. Future incursions of BTV positive C. brevitarsis into Australia may be genetically identified to their source populations using these microsatellite loci. The vector's panmictic genetic structure within Australia cannot explain the differential geographic distribution of BTV serotypes.

  16. Virus recovery rates for wild-type and live-attenuated vaccine strains of African horse sickness virus serotype 7 in orally infected South African Culicoides species.

    PubMed

    Venter, G J; Paweska, J T

    2007-12-01

    Previously reported virus recovery rates from Culicoides (Avaritia) imicola Kieffer and Culicoides (Avaritia) bolitinos Meiswinkel (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) orally infected with vaccine strain of African horse sickness virus serotype 7 (AHSV-7) were compared with results obtained from concurrently conducted oral infections with five recent AHSV-7 isolates from naturally infected horses from various localities in South Africa. Culicoides were fed sheep bloods spiked with 10(7.6) TCID(50)/mL of a live-attenuated vaccine strain AHSV-7, and with five field isolates in which virus titre in the bloodmeals ranged from 10(7.1) to 10(8.2) TCID(50)/mL). After an extrinsic incubation of 10 days at 23.5 degrees C, virus recovery rates were significantly higher in C. imicola (13.3%) and C. bolitinos (4.2%) infected with the live-attenuated virus than in midges infected with any of the field isolates. The virus recovery rates for the latter groups ranged from 0% to 9.5% for C. imicola and from 0% to 1.5% for C. bolitinos. The C. imicola population at Onderstepoort was significantly more susceptible to infection with AHSV-7 isolated at Onderstepoort than to the virus strains isolated from other localities. Results of this study suggest that tissue culture attenuation of AHSV-7 does not reduce its ability to orally infect competent Culicoides species and may even lead to enhanced replication in the vector. Furthermore, oral susceptibility in a midge population appears to vary for geographically distinct isolates of AHSV-7.

  17. The Culicoides sonorensis inhibitor of apoptosis 1 protein protects mammalian cells from apoptosis induced by infection with African horse sickness virus and bluetongue virus.

    PubMed

    Vermaak, Elaine; Maree, Francois F; Theron, Jacques

    2017-03-04

    African horse sickness virus (AHSV) and bluetongue virus (BTV) are arboviruses of the genus Orbivirus that are transmitted to their vertebrate hosts by Culicoides biting midges. These orbiviruses exhibit lytic infection (apoptosis) in mammalian cells, but cause persistent infection with no cytopathic effects in Culicoides sonorensis cells. Although regulation of apoptosis could thus be integral for establishing persistent virus infection in midge cells, nothing is known about the presence and function of apoptosis pathways in Culicoides midges and their derived cell lines. Here, we report the cloning and functional characterization of an inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP), designated CsIAP1, from C. sonorensis cells. The CsIAP1 protein contains two baculoviral IAP repeat (BIR) domains and a RING domain. Silencing of the Cs iap1 gene in C. sonorensis cells caused apoptosis, indicating that CsIAP1 plays a role in cell survival. Stable expression of the CsIAP1 protein in BSR mammalian cells suppressed apoptosis induced by AHSV-4 and BTV-10 infection, and biochemical data indicated that CsIAP1 is an inhibitor of mammalian caspase-9, an initiator caspase in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Mutagenesis studies indicated that the BIR2 and RING domains are required for the anti-apoptotic activity of CsIAP1. The results suggest that the mechanism by which CsIAP1 suppresses apoptosis in insect cells may involve inhibition of a Culicoides caspase-9 homologue through a mechanism that requires both the BIR2 and RING domains. This study provides the first evidence that the CsIAP1 protein is a key negative regulator of apoptosis in C. sonorensis cells.

  18. Use of real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for the detection of African horse sickness virus replication in Culicoides imicola.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Elisabeth G; Venter, Gert J; Joone, Christopher; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Guthrie, Alan J

    2011-11-11

    Despite its important role as vector for African horse sickness virus (AHSV), very little information is available on the dissemination of this virus in Culicoides (Avaritia) imicola Kieffer (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). This study reports on the applicability of a real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) to detect AHSV in dissected midges. A total of 96 midges were fed on AHSV-infected blood, after which one test group was dissected into head/thorax and abdomen segments immediately after feeding and the other only after 10 days of incubation. The majority of the midges (96%) ingested the virus successfully and there was no significant difference between the virus concentration in the heads/thoraxes and the abdomens immediately after feeding. After incubation, virus was detected in 51% of the midges and it was confined to the abdomen in the majority of these. The fact that virus was detected only in the heads/thoraxes of four Culicoides midges after incubation suggests the presence of a mesenteronal escape barrier. Replication in the salivary glands was not shown. An increase of the mean virus concentration in the abdomen after incubation indicates localised viral replication. The real-time RT-qPCR is recommended for further studies investigating the replication and dissemination of AHSV in Culicoides midges.

  19. Heterogeneity of ITS1 sequences in the biting midge Culicoides impunctatus (Goetghebuer) suggests a population in Argyll, Scotland, may be genetically distinct.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Allyson; Blackwell, Alison; Malloch, Gaynor; Fenton, Brian

    2004-06-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) is a useful genomic region for understanding evolutionary and genetic relationships. In the current study, variation in ITS1 from eight Culicoides species was analysed by PCR, DNA restriction analysis, cloning, and sequencing. ITS1 variants were essentially homogenized within a species, as sequences were identical or closely related. However, Culicoides impunctatus ITS1 sequences derived from one (Argyll) of five populations contained considerable genomic diversity. The secondary structure of each ITS1 was computed. The structure aided the production of an accurate alignment and the identification of a large indel. A phylogenetic analysis was performed. Some of the sequences from the diverse Argyll C. impunctatus population were more related to Culicoides imicola, a vector of animal pathogens in the Old World, than they were to the other C. impunctatus sequences. Thus, the rDNA ITS1 regions of individuals in the Argyll C. impunctatus population were not conforming to the general theory of rDNA homogenization through molecular drive.

  20. The virtual absence of Culicoides imicola (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in a light-trap survey of the colder, high-lying area of the eastern Orange Free State, South Africa, and implications for the transmission of arboviruses.

    PubMed

    Venter, G J; Meiswinkel, R

    1994-12-01

    Altogether 52 078 Culicoides biting midges of 35 species were collected during February 1990 and 1993 in 40 light-trap collections made on 17 cattle and/or sheep farms in the Bethlehem and Fouriesburg districts of the colder, high-lying eastern Orange Free State. Culicoides (Avaritia) bolitinos was by far the most abundant species, representing 50.9% of all specimens collected. Culicoides (A.) imicola, considered to be the most common stock-associated species in the summer rainfall areas of southern Africa, and the only proven vector of bluetongue virus (BTV) and African horsesickness virus (AHSV) in the subregion, was uncommon, comprising only 1.4%. While AHS is apparently absent, BT and bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) are endemic in this cooler, high-lying area of South Africa. The virtual absence of C. imicola implies that other Culicoides species, such as C. bolitinos and C. cornutus, may be involved in transmitting BT virus (and perhaps BEF) in the eastern Orange Free State, and possibly elsewhere in Africa. Virus isolation attempts made on 45 single species pools of C. bolitinos, C. pycnostictus, C. milnei, C. leucostictus, C. zuluensis and C. gulbenkiani were, however, negative. Finally, 20 of 28 blood-engorged Culicoides of 11 species, which were tested against cattle, sheep, horse, pig and bird antisera, tested only positive against cattle antisera.

  1. Larval development sites of the main Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in northern Europe and distribution of coprophilic species larvae in Belgian pastures.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Jean-Yves; Brostaux, Yves; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frédéric

    2014-10-15

    Some Culicoides species of biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological virus vectors worldwide and have indeed been associated with outbreaks of important epizoonoses in recent years, such as bluetongue and Schmallenberg disease in northern Europe. These diseases, which affect domestic and wild ruminants, have caused considerable economic losses. Knowledge of substrates suitable for Culicoides larval development is important, particularly for the main vector temperate species. This study, realized during two years, aimed to highlight the larval development sites of these biting midge species in the immediate surroundings of ten Belgian cattle farms. Moreover, spatial distribution of the coprophilic Culicoides larvae (C. chiopterus and C. dewulfi) within pastures was studied with increasing distance from farms along linear transects (farm-pasture-woodland). A total of 4347 adult specimens belonging to 13 Culicoides species were obtained by incubation of 2131 soil samples belonging to 102 different substrates; 18 of these substrates were suitable for larval development. The Obsoletus complex (formed by two species) was observed in a wide range of substrates, including silage residues, components of a chicken coop, dung adhering to walls inside stables, leftover feed along the feed bunk, a compost pile of sugar beet residues, soil of a livestock trampling area, and decaying wood, while the following served as substrates for the other specimens: C. chiopterus, mainly cow dung; C. dewulfi, cow dung and molehill soil; C. circumscriptus, algae; C. festivipennis, algae and soil in stagnant water; C. nubeculosus, algae and silt specifically from the edge of a pond; C. punctatus, mainly wet soil between silage reserves; C. salinarius, algae; and C. stigma, algae and wet soil between silage reserves. We also recorded significantly higher densities of coprophilic larvae within pastures in cow dung located near forests, which is likely due to the localization of

  2. Molecular characterization of Swiss Ceratopogonidae (Diptera) and evaluation of real-time PCR assays for the identification of Culicoides biting midges.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Claudia E; Kaufmann, Christian; Schaffner, Francis; Mathis, Alexander

    2012-03-23

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of several viruses of veterinary relevance, and they can cause insect bite hypersensitivity. As the morphological identification of these tiny insects is a difficult task in many cases, alternative approaches are expedient. With the aim to develop real-time PCRs, we determined partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (mt COI) sequences from 380 Culicoides midges representing three regions of Switzerland, namely the Alps, Midland north of the Alps (Atlantic climate), and South of the Alps (Mediterranean climate). The same region was also sequenced from non-biting midges of the genera Atrichopogon, Brachypogon, Dasyhelea, Forcipomyia and Serromyia. A total of 21 Culicoides species were identified by morphology. Sequence variability (haplotypes) was observed in all species. For each of C. grisescens and C. obsoletus, a novel cryptic species was identified. Whereas all individuals of C. grisescens and of the cryptic C. obsoletus species (O2) originated only from Alpine sites, the known C. obsoletus (O1) species was found in all three regions. Further, a sister taxon to C. pulicaris was identified based on the mt COI sequences and named Culicoides sp. Alignments of available mtCOI sequences from Ceratopogonidae (GenBank, this study) were used to design real-time PCR primers and probes to distinguish C. chiopterus, C. deltus, C. dewulfi, C. grisescens (including the cryptic species), C. imicola, C. lupicaris, C. obsoletus O1, C. obsoletus O2, C. pulicaris, C. scoticus and Culicoides sp. Specificities of primers and probes was tested with cloned targets representing 1 to 4 haplotypes of 18 Culicoides spp. and 1 haplotype each from 4 other Ceratopogonidae. No cross-reactivity was observed when plasmid template representing 5 × 10(6) gene copies was tested, but it was evident (Ct values ≤ 30) in few instances when plasmid template representing 5 × 10(9) gene copies was utilized, the

  3. Selective cloning, characterization, and production of the Culicoides nubeculosus salivary gland allergen repertoire associated with equine insect bite hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Schaffartzik, Anna; Marti, Eliane; Torsteinsdottir, Sigurbjörg; Mellor, Philip S; Crameri, Reto; Rhyner, Claudio

    2011-02-15

    Salivary gland proteins of Culicoides spp. have been suggested to be among the main allergens inducing IgE-mediated insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH), an allergic dermatitis of the horse. The aim of our study was to identify, produce and characterize IgE-binding salivary gland proteins of Culicoides nubeculosus relevant for IBH by phage surface display technology. A cDNA library constructed with mRNA derived from C. nubeculosus salivary glands was displayed on the surface of filamentous phage M13 and enriched for clones binding serum IgE of IBH-affected horses. Ten cDNA inserts encoding putative salivary gland allergens were isolated and termed Cul n 2 to Cul n 11. However, nine cDNA sequences coded for truncated proteins as determined by database searches. The cDNA sequences were amplified by PCR, subcloned into high level expression vectors and expressed as hexahistidine-tagged fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. Preliminary ELISA results obtained with these fusions confirmed the specific binding to serum IgE of affected horses. Therefore, the putative complete open reading frames derived from BLAST analyses were isolated by RACE-PCR and subcloned into expression vectors. The full length proteins expressed in Escherichia coli showed molecular masses in the range of 15.5-68.7 kDa in SDS-PAGE in good agreement with the masses calculated from the predicted protein sequences. Western blot analyses of all recombinant allergens with a serum pool of IBH-affected horses showed their ability to specifically bind serum IgE of sensitized horses, and ELISA determinations yielded individual horse recognition patterns with a frequency of sensitization ranging from 13 to 57%, depending on the allergen tested. The in vivo relevance of eight of the recombinant allergens was demonstrated in intradermal skin testing. For the two characterized allergens Cul n 6 and Cul n 11, sensitized horses were not available for intradermal tests. Control horses without clinical signs of IBH

  4. Full genome characterization of the culicoides-borne marsupial orbiviruses: Wallal virus, Mudjinbarry virus and Warrego viruses.

    PubMed

    Belaganahalli, Manjunatha N; Maan, Sushila; Maan, Narender S; Pritchard, Ian; Kirkland, Peter D; Brownlie, Joe; Attoui, Houssam; Mertens, Peter P C

    2014-01-01

    Viruses belonging to the species Wallal virus and Warrego virus of the genus Orbivirus were identified as causative agents of blindness in marsupials in Australia during 1994/5. Recent comparisons of nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) sequences have provided a basis for the grouping and classification of orbivirus isolates. However, full-genome sequence data are not available for representatives of all Orbivirus species. We report full-genome sequence data for three additional orbiviruses: Wallal virus (WALV); Mudjinabarry virus (MUDV) and Warrego virus (WARV). Comparisons of conserved polymerase (Pol), sub-core-shell 'T2' and core-surface 'T13' proteins show that these viruses group with other Culicoides borne orbiviruses, clustering with Eubenangee virus (EUBV), another orbivirus infecting marsupials. WARV shares <70% aa identity in all three conserved proteins (Pol, T2 and T13) with other orbiviruses, consistent with its classification within a distinct Orbivirus species. Although WALV and MUDV share <72.86%/67.93% aa/nt identity with other orbiviruses in Pol, T2 and T13, they share >99%/90% aa/nt identities with each other (consistent with membership of the same virus species - Wallal virus). However, WALV and MUDV share <68% aa identity in their larger outer capsid protein VP2(OC1), consistent with membership of different serotypes within the species - WALV-1 and WALV-2 respectively.

  5. Worldwide Niche and Future Potential Distribution of Culicoides imicola, a Major Vector of Bluetongue and African Horse Sickness Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Sylvain; Guis, Hélène; Tran, Annelise; Garros, Claire; Balenghien, Thomas; Kriticos, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    We modelled the ecoclimatic niche of Culicoides imicola, a major arthropod vector of midge-borne viral pathogens affecting ruminants and equids, at fine scale and on a global extent, so as to provide insight into current and future risks of disease epizootics, and increase current knowledge of the species' ecology. Based on the known distribution and ecology of C. imicola, the species' response to monthly climatic conditions was characterised using CLIMEX with 10′ spatial resolution climatic datasets. The species' climatic niche was projected worldwide and under future climatic scenarios. The validated model highlights the role of irrigation in supporting the occurrence of C. imicola in arid regions. In Europe, the modelled potential distribution of C. imicola extended further West than its reported distribution, raising questions regarding ongoing process of colonization and non-climatic habitat factors. The CLIMEX model highlighted similar ecological niches for C. imicola and the Australasian C. brevitarsis raising questions on biogeography and biosecurity. Under the climate change scenarios considered, its' modelled potential distribution could expand northward in the Northern hemisphere, whereas in Africa its range may contract in the future. The biosecurity risks from bluetongue and African horse sickness viruses need to be re-evaluated in regions where the vector's niche is suitable. Under a warmer climate, the risk of vector-borne epizootic pathogens such as bluetongue and African horse sickness viruses are likely to increase as the climate suitability for C. imicola shifts poleward, especially in Western Europe. PMID:25391148

  6. Lack of Evidence for Laboratory and Natural Vertical Transmission of Bluetongue Virus in Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Osborne, C J; Mayo, C E; Mullens, B A; McDermott, E G; Gerry, A C; Reisen, W K; MacLachlan, N J

    2015-03-01

    Culicoides sonorensis (Wirth & Jones) is the principal North American vector of bluetongue virus (BTV). BTV infection of livestock is distinctly seasonal (late summer and fall) in temperate regions of the world such as California, which has led to speculation regarding vertical transmission of the virus within the midge vector as a potential mechanism for interseasonal maintenance ("overwintering") of the virus. To evaluate potential vertical transmission of BTV in its midge vector, we fed adult midges BTV-spiked blood and used a BTV-specific quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay to evaluate parent, egg, and progeny stages of laboratory-reared C. sonorensis for the presence of viral nucleic acid. Whereas BTV nucleic acid was weakly detected in egg batches of virus-fed female midges, virus was never detected in subsequent progeny stages (larvae, pupae, and F1 generation adults). Similarly, BTV was not detected in pools of larvae collected from the waste-water lagoon of a BTV-endemic dairy farm in northern California during the seasonal period of virus transmission. Collectively, these results indicate that BTV is not readily transmitted vertically in C. sonorensis, and that persistence of the virus in long-lived parous female midges is a more likely mechanism for overwintering of BTV in temperate regions. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  7. Incursion and range expansion in the bluetongue vector Culicoides imicola in the Mediterranean basin: a phylogeographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nolan, D V; Dallas, J F; Piertney, S B; Mordue Luntz, A J

    2008-12-01

    The bluetongue (BT) vector Culicoides imicola Kieffer (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) has undergone widespread range expansion across most of the Mediterranean basin, concomitant with the largest BT epizootic outbreaks on record. Knowledge of the substructure of this vector expansion would be useful for identifying specific source-expansion systems. To this end we analysed the haplotype diversity of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene in 273 C. imicola from 88 Mediterranean sites and outgroups. All the C. imicola haplotypes (n = 26) formed a single, distinct clade in comparison with haplotypes of four other species of the Imicola group from southern Africa, confirming C. imicola as a single phylospecies. Haplotype distribution showed extreme differentiation across the Mediterranean basin, with four common haplotypes each predominating in different areas. Eastern and western areas characterized by distinct BT incursions accounted for most of the molecular variance in haplotype composition. Shared common haplotypes identified one area of incursion and expansion encompassing the western half of the Mediterranean basin, with evidence of population growth, and another system encompassing Anatolian Turkey, the Aegean Islands and mainland Greece. A third area of range expansion was identified in the central Mediterranean, with a possible source in Algeria and unsampled parts of central North Africa. We conclude that the expansion of C. imicola in the Mediterranean basin consists of at least three incursions followed by expansions and that the western system experiences conditions promoting high population growth.

  8. Equine insect bite hypersensitivity: immunoblot analysis of IgE and IgG subclass responses to Culicoides nubeculosus salivary gland extract.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, W; Wilson, A D; Mellor, P; Doherr, M G; Torsteinsdottir, S; Zurbriggen, A; Jungi, T; Marti, E

    2006-09-15

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an allergic dermatitis of horses caused by IgE-mediated reactions to bites of Culicoides and sometimes Simulium spp. The allergens causing IBH are probably salivary gland proteins from these insects, but they have not yet been identified. The aim of our study was to identify the number and molecular weight of salivary gland extract (SGE) proteins derived from Culicoides nubeculosus which are able to bind IgE antibodies (ab) from the sera of IBH-affected horses. Additionally, we sought to investigate the IgG subclass (IgGa, IgGb and IgGT) reactivity to these proteins. Individual IgE and IgG subclass responses to proteins of C. nubeculosus SGE were evaluated by immunoblot in 42 IBH-affected and 26 healthy horses belonging to different groups (Icelandic horses born in Iceland, Icelandic horses and horses from different breeds born in mainland Europe). Additionally, the specific antibody response was studied before exposure to bites of Culicoides spp. and over a period of 3 years in a cohort of 10 Icelandic horses born in Iceland and imported to Switzerland. Ten IgE-binding protein bands with approximate molecular weights of 75, 66, 52, 48, 47, 32, 22/21, 19, 15, 13/12 kDa were found in the SGE. Five of these bands bound IgE from 50% or more of the horse sera. Thirty-nine of the 42 IBH-affected horses but only 2 of the 26 healthy horses showed IgE-binding to the SGE (p<0.000001). Similarly, more IBH-affected than healthy horses had IgGa ab binding to the Culicoides SGE (19/22 and 9/22, respectively, p<0.01). Sera of IBH-affected horses contained IgE, IgGa and IgGT but not IgGb ab against significantly more protein bands than the sera of the healthy horses. The cohort of 10 Icelandic horses confirmed these results and showed that Culicoides SGE specific IgE correlates with onset of IBH. IBH-affected horses that were born in Iceland had IgGa and IgGT ab (p< or =0.01) as well as IgE ab (p=0.06) against a significantly higher number of

  9. Evaluation of an IgE ELISA with Culicoides spp. extracts and recombinant salivary antigens for diagnosis of insect bite hypersensitivity in Warmblood horses.

    PubMed

    Peeters, L M; Janssens, S; Goddeeris, B M; De Keyser, K; Wilson, A D; Kaufmann, C; Schaffartzik, A; Marti, E; Buys, N

    2013-10-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) in horses represents an immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated hypersensitivity to salivary antigens from biting midges (Culicoides spp.). The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the performances of IgE ELISAs using recombinant Culicoides spp. Obsoletus group salivary gland antigens or crude whole body extracts ('ObsWBE'), C. nubeculosus recombinant proteins (Culn1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 10) and Obsoletus group recombinant proteins (Culo1 and 2). IgE levels were measured in plasma of 343 Warmblood horses classified as IBH-affected (n=167) and IBH-unaffected (n=176) according to the owners' descriptions. IBH-affected horses were subdivided based on the severity of their clinical signs at sampling and whether or not their IBH history was considered to be classical. The accuracies of the tests increased when clinical signs at sampling were more pronounced or when the IBH history could be considered as classical. A combination of IgE levels against the three best performing Culicoides spp. recombinant proteins (Culn4, Culo1 and Culo2) and ObsWBE resulted in the best performing test. When IBH-affected horses showing a classical history of the disease and severe clinical signs were compared with IBH-unaffected horses, the Youden's index at the optimal cut-off for the three tests in combination was 0.67. This optimal cut-off had a sensitivity of 70%, a specificity of 97% and a total accuracy of 92%. The performance of the IgE ELISA was affected by the severity of IBH clinical signs at sampling and was improved when IgE levels against several recombinant proteins were combined. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. First molecular identification of the vertebrate hosts of Culicoides imicola in Europe and a review of its blood-feeding patterns worldwide: implications for the transmission of bluetongue disease and African horse sickness.

    PubMed

    Martínez-DE LA Puente, J; Navarro, J; Ferraguti, M; Soriguer, R; Figuerola, J

    2017-07-27

    Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of pathogens that affect wildlife, livestock and, occasionally, humans. Culicoides imicola (Kieffer, 1913) is considered to be the main vector of the pathogens that cause bluetongue disease (BT) and African horse sickness (AHS) in southern Europe. The study of blood-feeding patterns in Culicoides is an essential step towards understanding the epidemiology of these pathogens. Molecular tools that increase the accuracy and sensitivity of traditional methods have been developed to identify the hosts of potential insect vectors. However, to the present group's knowledge, molecular studies that identify the hosts of C. imicola in Europe are lacking. The present study genetically characterizes the barcoding region of C. imicola trapped on farms in southern Spain and identifies its vertebrate hosts in the area. The report also reviews available information on the blood-feeding patterns of C. imicola worldwide. Culicoides imicola from Spain feed on blood of six mammals that include species known to be hosts of the BT and AHS viruses. This study provides evidence of the importance of livestock as sources of bloodmeals for C. imicola and the relevance of this species in the transmission of BT and AHS viruses in Europe. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  11. A Broad Assessment of Factors Determining Culicoides imicola Abundance: Modelling the Present and Forecasting Its Future in Climate Change Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Pelayo; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Estrada, Rosa; Márquez, Ana Luz; Miranda, Miguel Angel; Gortázar, Christian; Lucientes, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is still present in Europe and the introduction of new serotypes from endemic areas in the African continent is a possible threat. Culicoides imicola remains one of the most relevant BT vectors in Spain and research on the environmental determinants driving its life cycle is key to preventing and controlling BT. Our aim was to improve our understanding of the biotic and abiotic determinants of C. imicola by modelling its present abundance, studying the spatial pattern of predicted abundance in relation to BT outbreaks, and investigating how the predicted current distribution and abundance patterns might change under future (2011–2040) scenarios of climate change according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. C. imicola abundance data from the bluetongue national surveillance programme were modelled with spatial, topoclimatic, host and soil factors. The influence of these factors was further assessed by variation partitioning procedures. The predicted abundance of C. imicola was also projected to a future period. Variation partitioning demonstrated that the pure effect of host and topoclimate factors explained a high percentage (>80%) of the variation. The pure effect of soil followed in importance in explaining the abundance of C. imicola. A close link was confirmed between C. imicola abundance and BT outbreaks. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to consider wild and domestic hosts in predictive modelling for an arthropod vector. The main findings regarding the near future show that there is no evidence to suggest that there will be an important increase in the distribution range of C. imicola; this contrasts with an expected increase in abundance in the areas where it is already present in mainland Spain. What may be expected regarding the future scenario for orbiviruses in mainland Spain, is that higher predicted C. imicola abundance may significantly change the rate of transmission of orbiviruses. PMID:21151914

  12. A broad assessment of factors determining Culicoides imicola abundance: modelling the present and forecasting its future in climate change scenarios.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Pelayo; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Estrada, Rosa; Márquez, Ana Luz; Miranda, Miguel Angel; Gortázar, Christian; Lucientes, Javier

    2010-12-06

    Bluetongue (BT) is still present in Europe and the introduction of new serotypes from endemic areas in the African continent is a possible threat. Culicoides imicola remains one of the most relevant BT vectors in Spain and research on the environmental determinants driving its life cycle is key to preventing and controlling BT. Our aim was to improve our understanding of the biotic and abiotic determinants of C. imicola by modelling its present abundance, studying the spatial pattern of predicted abundance in relation to BT outbreaks, and investigating how the predicted current distribution and abundance patterns might change under future (2011-2040) scenarios of climate change according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. C. imicola abundance data from the bluetongue national surveillance programme were modelled with spatial, topoclimatic, host and soil factors. The influence of these factors was further assessed by variation partitioning procedures. The predicted abundance of C. imicola was also projected to a future period. Variation partitioning demonstrated that the pure effect of host and topoclimate factors explained a high percentage (>80%) of the variation. The pure effect of soil followed in importance in explaining the abundance of C. imicola. A close link was confirmed between C. imicola abundance and BT outbreaks. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to consider wild and domestic hosts in predictive modelling for an arthropod vector. The main findings regarding the near future show that there is no evidence to suggest that there will be an important increase in the distribution range of C. imicola; this contrasts with an expected increase in abundance in the areas where it is already present in mainland Spain. What may be expected regarding the future scenario for orbiviruses in mainland Spain, is that higher predicted C. imicola abundance may significantly change the rate of transmission of orbiviruses.

  13. Spatio-temporal genetic variation of the biting midge vector species Culicoides imicola (Ceratopogonidae) Kieffer in France.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Stéphanie; Huber, Karine; Guis, Hélène; Setier-Rio, Marie-Laure; Goffredo, Maria; Allène, Xavier; Rakotoarivony, Ignace; Chevillon, Christine; Bouyer, Jérémy; Baldet, Thierry; Balenghien, Thomas; Garros, Claire

    2016-03-11

    Introduction of vector species into new areas represents a main driver for the emergence and worldwide spread of vector-borne diseases. This poses a substantial threat to livestock economies and public health. Culicoides imicola Kieffer, a major vector species of economically important animal viruses, is described with an apparent range expansion in Europe where it has been recorded in south-eastern continental France, its known northern distribution edge. This questioned on further C. imicola population extension and establishment into new territories. Studying the spatio-temporal genetic variation of expanding populations can provide valuable information for the design of reliable models of future spread. Entomological surveys and population genetic approaches were used to assess the spatio-temporal population dynamics of C. imicola in France. Entomological surveys (2-3 consecutive years) were used to evaluate population abundances and local spread in continental France (28 sites in the Var department) and in Corsica (4 sites). We also genotyped at nine microsatellite loci insects from 3 locations in the Var department over 3 years (2008, 2010 and 2012) and from 6 locations in Corsica over 4 years (2002, 2008, 2010 and 2012). Entomological surveys confirmed the establishment of C. imicola populations in Var department, but indicated low abundances and no apparent expansion there within the studied period. Higher population abundances were recorded in Corsica. Our genetic data suggested the absence of spatio-temporal genetic changes within each region but a significant increase of the genetic differentiation between Corsican and Var populations through time. The lack of intra-region population structure may result from strong gene flow among populations. We discussed the observed temporal variation between Corsica and Var as being the result of genetic drift following introduction, and/or the genetic characteristics of populations at their range edge. Our results

  14. Population Genetic Structure and Potential Incursion Pathways of the Bluetongue Virus Vector Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Tay, W T; Kerr, P J; Jermiin, L S

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides brevitarsis is a vector of the bluetongue virus (BTV), which infects sheep and cattle. It is an invasive species in Australia with an assumed Asian/South East Asian origin. Using one mitochondrial marker (i.e., part of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene) and six nuclear markers, we inferred population genetic structure and possible incursion pathways for Australian C. brevitarsis. Nine mitochondrial haplotypes, with low nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0-0.7%) among these, were identified in a sample of 70 individuals from seven sites. Both sets of markers revealed a homogeneous population structure, albeit with evidence of isolation by distance and two genetically distinct clusters distributed along a north-to-south cline. No evidence of a cryptic species complex was found. The geographical distribution of the mitochondrial haplotypes is consistent with at least two incursion pathways into Australia since the arrival of suitable livestock hosts. By contrast, 15 mitochondrial haplotypes, with up to four times greater nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0-2.9%) among these, were identified in a sample of 16 individuals of the endemic C. marksi (sampled from a site in South Australia and another in New South Wales). A phylogenetic tree inferred using the mitochondrial marker revealed that the Australian and Japanese samples of C. brevitarsis are as evolutionarily different from one another as some of the other Australian species (e.g., C. marksi, C. henryi, C. pallidothorax) are. The phylogenetic tree placed four of the species endemic to Australia (C. pallidothorax, C. bundyensis, C. marksi, C. henryi) in a clade, with a fifth such species (C. bunrooensis) sharing a common ancestor with that clade and a clade comprising two Japanese species (C. verbosus, C. kibunensis).

  15. Population Genetic Structure and Potential Incursion Pathways of the Bluetongue Virus Vector Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Tay, W. T.; Kerr, P. J.; Jermiin, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Culicoides brevitarsis is a vector of the bluetongue virus (BTV), which infects sheep and cattle. It is an invasive species in Australia with an assumed Asian/South East Asian origin. Using one mitochondrial marker (i.e., part of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene) and six nuclear markers, we inferred population genetic structure and possible incursion pathways for Australian C. brevitarsis. Nine mitochondrial haplotypes, with low nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0–0.7%) among these, were identified in a sample of 70 individuals from seven sites. Both sets of markers revealed a homogeneous population structure, albeit with evidence of isolation by distance and two genetically distinct clusters distributed along a north-to-south cline. No evidence of a cryptic species complex was found. The geographical distribution of the mitochondrial haplotypes is consistent with at least two incursion pathways into Australia since the arrival of suitable livestock hosts. By contrast, 15 mitochondrial haplotypes, with up to four times greater nucleotide sequence diversity (0.0–2.9%) among these, were identified in a sample of 16 individuals of the endemic C. marksi (sampled from a site in South Australia and another in New South Wales). A phylogenetic tree inferred using the mitochondrial marker revealed that the Australian and Japanese samples of C. brevitarsis are as evolutionarily different from one another as some of the other Australian species (e.g., C. marksi, C. henryi, C. pallidothorax) are. The phylogenetic tree placed four of the species endemic to Australia (C. pallidothorax, C. bundyensis, C. marksi, C. henryi) in a clade, with a fifth such species (C. bunrooensis) sharing a common ancestor with that clade and a clade comprising two Japanese species (C. verbosus, C. kibunensis). PMID:26771743

  16. Insect bite hypersensitivity in the horse: comparison of IgE-binding proteins in salivary gland extracts from Simulium vittatum and Culicoides nubeculosus.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, W; Mellor, P S; Torsteinsdóttir, S; Marti, E

    2009-11-15

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an IgE-mediated allergic dermatitis of horses caused by bites of insects such as Culicoides or Simulium spp. The aim of the present study was to compare the IgE-binding pattern of sera of IBH-affected horses to Culicoides nubeculosus and Simulium vittatum salivary gland extracts (SGE). Individual IgE responses to proteins of S. vittatum and C. nubeculosus SGEs were evaluated in 15 IBH-affected and three healthy horses on immunoblots. Fourteen out of the 15 IBH-affected but none of the healthy horses showed individual IgE binding patterns to seven and six main protein bands in C. nubeculosus and S. vittatum SGE, respectively. These 14 sera showed IgE-binding to proteins from SGE of both C. nubeculosus and S. vittatum, but they reacted with fewer protein bands derived from S. vittatum than from C. nubeculosus SGE. Sera showing IgE-binding to a 32 kDa band from C. nubeculosus always bound to a 32 kDa band from S. vittatum. Similarly, all sera binding to a 70 kDa band from C. nubeculosus reacted with a corresponding band in S. vittatum SGE. The 70 kDa bands from S. vittatum and C. nubeculosus were identified by mass spectrometry as heat shock protein-70-cognate-3.

  17. Trap placement and attractant choice affect capture and create sex and parity biases in collections of the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis.

    PubMed

    McDermott, E G; Mayo, C E; Gerry, A C; Mullens, B A

    2016-09-01

    Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary North American vector of bluetongue virus (BTV), which can cause high morbidity and mortality in ruminant livestock or wildlife. Worldwide, most Culicoides surveillance relies on light (usually UV) traps typically placed near animals or larval development sites. However, the trapping method can cause sex, species and parity biases in collections. We collected C. sonorensis from three dairies in California using suction traps baited with CO2 , UV light or CO2  + UV placed near animals, wastewater ponds, or in fields. Higher numbers of parous females were collected using CO2  + UV traps, although this difference was only significant on one dairy. UV traps were poor at collecting nulliparous females, but the addition of UV to a trap increased the abundance of males in a collection. Traps set in open fields collected significantly higher numbers of males and females than in either of the other two locations. In some cases, there was a significant interaction between the trap type and site. We discuss the limitations of traditional trapping methodologies for C. sonorensis and make suggestions for vector surveillance.

  18. Seasonal dynamics of biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae, Culicoides spp.) on dairy farms of Central Germany during the 2007/2008 epidemic of bluetongue.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Peter-Henning; Stephan, Anja; Bartsch, Stefanie; Jandowsky, Anabell; Hoffmann-Köhler, Peggy; Schein, Eberhard; Mehlitz, Dieter; Bauer, Burkhard

    2009-08-01

    The unforeseen outbreak of bluetongue in north-western Europe in August 2006 raised the question, which Culicoides spp. were involved in the transmission of bluetongue virus (BTV). Based on the decision 2007/20/EU of December 2006, a large-scale entomological surveillance programme was initiated in the five affected EU member states including Germany. This paper reports on the entomological findings obtained from March/April 2007 to May 2008 at 15 sampling sites in the federal states of Lower Saxony (eastern region), Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Brandenburg and Saxony-Anhalt: The number of captured biting midges in one trap varied from none or few Culicoides during winter (December 2007 to April 2008) to up to more than 12,500 individuals during summer and autumn. Catches of the C. obsoletus group were consistently higher than those of the C. pulicaris group. C. imicola, the principal afro-asiatic vector of BTV, was not detected. High numbers of midges were caught inside the cattle sheds. Eleven pools of biting midges were RT-PCR-positive to BTV-8 including pools of non-engorged midges of the C. obsoletus and of the C. pulicaris groups. The first BTV-genome positive pool of midges was detected in August 2007; the remaining genome-positive pools were detected during October and November 2007.

  19. Detection of bluetongue virus RNA in field-collected Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) following the discovery of bluetongue virus serotype 1 in white-tailed deer and cattle in Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Becker, M E; Reeves, W K; Dejean, S K; Emery, M P; Ostlund, E N; Foil, L D

    2010-03-01

    In November 2004, bluetongue virus (family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus, BTV) serotype 1 (BTV-1) was detected for the first time in the United States from a hunter-killed deer in St. Mary Parish, LA. In 2005, sera surveys were conducted on three cattle farms near the area where the deer was found, and BTV-1-seropositive cattle were found on two of the three farms; in 2006, sera surveys from the cattle on the three farms did not detect any BTV-1-positive animals. The purpose of this study was to survey ceratopogonid populations at the three farms and test field-collected specimens for the presence of BTV and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus, EHDV). Miniature CDC light traps and New Jersey traps were used to capture ceratopogonids on the three farms from January 2006 through November 2007. In total, 3,319 ceratopogonids were captured, including 1,790 specimens of 10 different species of Culicoides. IR-RT-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to screen for BTV and EHDV in 264 pools representing 2,309 specimens collected at the farms. All positive samples were sequenced for serotype determination. Five pools of 275 (1.8%) were positive for BTV. Pools of four species of Culicoides were found to be positive: Culicoides crepuscularis (Malloch), Culicoides debilipalpis Lutz (two pools), Culicoides haematopotus Malloch, and Gulicoidesfurens (Poey). The amplicons of the positive specimens were sequenced and found to be identical to both BTV-17 and BTV-13. During our study, no BTV-1 transmission was detected in cattle, and no BTV-1 was detected in specimens of ceratopogonids.

  20. Detection of the Schmallenberg virus in nulliparous Culicoides obsoletus/scoticus complex and C. punctatus--the possibility of transovarial virus transmission in the midge population and of a new vector.

    PubMed

    Larska, Magdalena; Lechowski, Lech; Grochowska, Maria; Żmudziński, Jan F

    2013-10-25

    The arthropod-borne Schmallenberg virus (SBV) emerged in Europe in the late summer/autumn of 2011. SBV spread across the continent until 2012. This paper presents SBV detection in female Culicoides spp. caught in UV traps located in 23 different locations in Poland. The midges were divided into pools containing 20.5 individual insects on average according to species and parity status. The study was based on duplex real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) for the detection of the SBV S segment and culicoid 18S gene fragments. Forty-four out of 402 midge pools tested (10.9%) were found to be positive for the presence of viral RNA. The SBV positive Culicoides came from 10 traps spread randomly across the country and were collected between August and October 2012. The timing of the SBV positive midge collections and the locations of the traps corresponded to the epizootic situation of SBV in ruminants. SBV RNA was most frequently identified in gravid midges (36.4%), while in nulliparous, blood-fed and parous midges the percentages were 10.8% 13.0% and 8.1%, respectively. The majority (82%) of SBV positive pools belonged to Culicoides obsoletus/scoticus complex; however, viral RNA was also found in 8 out of the 149 (5.4%) Culicoides punctatus pools tested. While no statistical differences in the Ct values between different parity groups were found, the bimodal distribution observed at the Ct frequency plots suggested active SBV replication, especially in parous and gravid midge females, and sub-transmissible infection in nulliparous and blood-fed insects. The most important findings included identification of C. punctatus as a new possible vector of SBV and the recovery of viral RNA from the nulliparous females which may suggest transovarial transmission in C. obsoletus/scoticus complex and C. punctatus.

  1. The Mexican Meteorite Nuevo Mercurio (H5): Characteristics of Chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-de La Cruz, K. E.; Ortega-Gutiérrez, F.

    2006-03-01

    A study of the chondrules of Nuevo Mercurio (H5). There are some primary characteristics that can be observed, such as the relationship between chondrule size and their texture, and presence of opaque minerals (troilite and/or Fe-Ni alloys).

  2. GT-10 - EARTH SKY - COAHUILA & NUEVO LEON, MEXICO

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-18

    S66-45763 (18-21 July 1966) --- Don Martin Reservoir and Sabinas River Valley area of the States of Coahuila and Nuevo Leon, Mexico, as seen from the Gemini-10 spacecraft. Taken with a J. A. Maurer 70mm camera, using Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome, MS (S.O. 217) color film. Photo credit: NASA

  3. Mycobacterium lepromatosis Infections in Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia S.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Avanzi, Charlotte; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of infection caused by the recently described pathogen Mycobacterium lepromatosis is unknown. Here, we describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic outcomes of five lepromatous leprosy patients suffering from M. lepromatosis infection in Nuevo Léon, Mexico. Diagnosis was facilitated by a new highly specific PCR procedure. PMID:25809978

  4. Genetic characterization and molecular identification of the bloodmeal sources of the potential bluetongue vector Culicoides obsoletus in the Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Martínez, Javier; Ferraguti, Martina; Morales-de la Nuez, Antonio; Castro, Noemí; Figuerola, Jordi

    2012-07-24

    Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges are vectors for a diversity of pathogens including bluetongue virus (BTV) that generate important economic losses. BTV has expanded its range in recent decades, probably due to the expansion of its main vector and the presence of other autochthonous competent vectors. Although the Canary Islands are still free of bluetongue disease (BTD), Spain and Europe have had to face up to a spread of bluetongue with disastrous consequences. Therefore, it is essential to identify the distribution of biting midges and understand their feeding patterns in areas susceptible to BTD. To that end, we captured biting midges on two farms in the Canary Islands (i) to identify the midge species in question and characterize their COI barcoding region and (ii) to ascertain the source of their bloodmeals using molecular tools. Biting midges were captured using CDC traps baited with a 4-W blacklight (UV) bulb on Gran Canaria and on Tenerife. Biting midges were quantified and identified according to their wing patterns. A 688 bp segment of the mitochondrial COI gene of 20 biting midges (11 from Gran Canaria and 9 from Tenerife) were PCR amplified using the primers LCO1490 and HCO2198. Moreover, after selected all available females showing any rest of blood in their abdomen, a nested-PCR approach was used to amplify a fragment of the COI gene from vertebrate DNA contained in bloodmeals. The origin of bloodmeals was identified by comparison with the nucleotide-nucleotide basic alignment search tool (BLAST). The morphological identification of 491 female biting midges revealed the presence of a single morphospecies belonging to the Obsoletus group. When sequencing the barcoding region of the 20 females used to check genetic variability, we identified two haplotypes differing in a single base. Comparison analysis using the nucleotide-nucleotide basic alignment search tool (BLAST) showed that both haplotypes belong to Culicoides obsoletus, a

  5. Cloning, production and characterization of antigen 5 like proteins from Simulium vittatum and Culicoides nubeculosus, the first cross-reactive allergen associated with equine insect bite hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Schaffartzik, A; Marti, E; Crameri, R; Rhyner, C

    2010-09-15

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an IgE-mediated seasonal dermatitis of the horses associated with bites of Simulium (black fly) and Culicoides (midge) species. Although cross-reactivity between Simulium and Culicoides salivary gland extracts has been demonstrated, the molecular nature of the allergens responsible for the observed cross-reactivity remains to be elucidated. In this report we demonstrate for the first time in veterinary medicine that a homologous allergen, present in the salivary glands of both insects, shows extended IgE cross-reactivity in vitro and in vivo. The cDNA sequences coding for both antigen 5 like allergens termed Sim v 1 and Cul n 1 were amplified by PCR, subcloned in high level expression vectors, and produced as [His](6)-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli. The highly pure recombinant proteins were used to investigate the prevalence of sensitization in IBH-affected horses by ELISA and their cross-reactive nature by Western blot analyses, inhibition ELISA and intradermal skin tests (IDT). The prevalence of sensitization to Sim v 1 and Cul n 1 among 48 IBH-affected horses was 37% and 35%, respectively. In contrast, serum IgE levels to both allergens in 24 unaffected horses did not show any value above background. Both proteins strongly bound serum IgE from IBH-affected horses in Western blot analyses, demonstrating the allergenic nature of the recombinant proteins. Extended inhibition ELISA experiments clearly showed that Sim v 1 in fluid phase is able to strongly inhibit binding of serum IgE to solid phase coated Cul n 1 in a concentration dependent manner and vice versa. This crucial experiment shows that the allergens share common IgE-binding epitopes. IDT with Sim v 1 and Cul n 1 showed clear immediate and late phase reactions to the allergen challenges IBH-affected horses, whereas unaffected control horses do not develop relevant immediate hypersensitivity reactions. In some horses, however, mild late phase reactions were

  6. Genetic characterization and molecular identification of the bloodmeal sources of the potential bluetongue vector Culicoides obsoletus in the Canary Islands, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges are vectors for a diversity of pathogens including bluetongue virus (BTV) that generate important economic losses. BTV has expanded its range in recent decades, probably due to the expansion of its main vector and the presence of other autochthonous competent vectors. Although the Canary Islands are still free of bluetongue disease (BTD), Spain and Europe have had to face up to a spread of bluetongue with disastrous consequences. Therefore, it is essential to identify the distribution of biting midges and understand their feeding patterns in areas susceptible to BTD. To that end, we captured biting midges on two farms in the Canary Islands (i) to identify the midge species in question and characterize their COI barcoding region and (ii) to ascertain the source of their bloodmeals using molecular tools. Methods Biting midges were captured using CDC traps baited with a 4-W blacklight (UV) bulb on Gran Canaria and on Tenerife. Biting midges were quantified and identified according to their wing patterns. A 688 bp segment of the mitochondrial COI gene of 20 biting midges (11 from Gran Canaria and 9 from Tenerife) were PCR amplified using the primers LCO1490 and HCO2198. Moreover, after selected all available females showing any rest of blood in their abdomen, a nested-PCR approach was used to amplify a fragment of the COI gene from vertebrate DNA contained in bloodmeals. The origin of bloodmeals was identified by comparison with the nucleotide-nucleotide basic alignment search tool (BLAST). Results The morphological identification of 491 female biting midges revealed the presence of a single morphospecies belonging to the Obsoletus group. When sequencing the barcoding region of the 20 females used to check genetic variability, we identified two haplotypes differing in a single base. Comparison analysis using the nucleotide-nucleotide basic alignment search tool (BLAST) showed that both haplotypes belong to

  7. Cloning and expression of candidate allergens from Culicoides obsoletus for diagnosis of insect bite hypersensitivity in horses.

    PubMed

    van der Meide, Nathalie M A; Roders, Nathalie; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M; Schaap, Peter J; van Oers, Monique M; Leibold, Wolfgang; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Tijhaar, Edwin

    2013-06-15

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an IgE-mediated (Type I) hypersensitivity reaction induced by allergens from biting midges of the Culicoides spp. The aim of the present study was to identify, clone and express recombinant allergens from C. obsoletus, the main species found feeding on horses in the Netherlands, by sequence homology searches on the C. obsoletus specific RNA database, with previously described allergens from C. nubeculosus and C. sonorensis. BLAST searches with these described allergens resulted in similarity hits with 7 genes coding for C. obsoletus allergens. These allergens were expressed as hexahistidine tagged recombinant proteins in E. coli. Allergens were termed Cul o 1-Cul o 7. A maltase (Cul o 1) plus Cul s 1 (maltase of C. sonorensis) were additionally expressed in insect cells using the baculovirus expression system to compare homologous allergens from different species produced with different expression systems in diagnostic in vitro and in vivo tests. We demonstrate that IBH affected horses in the Netherlands show higher IgE levels to Cul o 1 than to Cul s 1, as determined by an IgE ELISA. Furthermore, we show that Cul o 1 produced in E. coli is at least as suitable for in vitro diagnosis of IBH affected horses as Cul o 1 produced in the baculovirus/insect cell expression system. The resulting proteins were evaluated for their ability to discriminate IBH affected and healthy horses by ELISA and intradermal testing. The frequency of positive test results by ELISA within IBH affected horses ranged from 38% to 67% for the different allergens. When results of IgE-binding to Cul o 1-Cul o 7 were combined the test had a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 85%. The capability of the allergens to induce Type I hypersensitivity reaction in IBH affected horses was demonstrated by an intradermal test. The results show that E. coli expressed recombinant allergens from C. obsoletus are valuable tools to determine the allergen specific

  8. Nuevos sistemas de frecuencia intermedia para el IAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olalde, J. C.; Perilli, D.; Larrarte, J. J.

    Se presenta el diagrama en bloques de los nuevos sistemas de Frecuencia Intermedia para los dos radiómetros instalados en el IAR. Entre las características más importantes del sistema podemos mencionar la posibilidad de conectar cualquiera de las dos antenas a los ``backend" disponibles: analizador espectral de alta resolución (META II) de 0,05 Hz, autocorrelador de 1008 canales y contínuo. Se incorporan al sistema nuevos sintetizadores de frecuencia implementados con PLL y la moderna técnica de síntesis digital directa. Por último, el conjunto del sistema es susceptible de ser configurado por las computadoras de adquisición de datos, supervisadas por otra, que entrega el estado de funcionamiento actual y evita la selección de configuraciones incorrectas por parte del usuario.

  9. Characterization of two new rhabdoviruses isolated from midges (Culicoides SPP) in the Brazilian Amazon: proposed members of a new genus, Bracorhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Diniz, J A P; Nunes, M R T; Travassos da Rosa, A P A; Cruz, A C R; de Souza, W; Medeiros, D B A; Chiang, J O; Vasconcelos, P F C

    2006-12-01

    Itacaiunas and Curionopolis viruses were isolated from Culicoides midges in Parauapebas municipality, Pará state, Brazil, in 1984 and 1985, respectively. Itacaiunas virus infected newborn mice and mosquito cells (C6/36), but did not replicate in some mammalian cell lineages; while Curionopolis virus infected only mice. Neither virus showed a serological relationship with any of the 195 known arboviruses circulating in Brazil, nor against 38 other rhabdoviruses isolated worldwide. Both virus particles are bullet-shaped and similar in morphology to that observed for other members of the family Rhabdoviridae. Partial nucleotide sequencing of the N protein showed that those two viruses constitute a separate clade in the family Rhabdoviridae, which we propose to be a new genus, designated Bracorhabdovirus.

  10. The Reference Transcriptome of the Adult Female Biting Midge (Culicoides sonorensis) and Differential Gene Expression Profiling during Teneral, Blood, and Sucrose Feeding Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nayduch, Dana; Lee, Matthew B.; Saski, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other important vectors such as mosquitoes and sandflies, genetic and genomic tools for Culicoides biting midges are lacking, despite the fact that they vector a large number of arboviruses and other pathogens impacting humans and domestic animals world-wide. In North America, female Culicoides sonorensis midges are important vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), orbiviruses that cause significant disease in livestock and wildlife. Libraries of tissue-specific transcripts expressed in response to feeding and oral orbivirus challenge in C. sonorensis have previously been reported, but extensive genome-wide expression profiling in the midge has not. Here, we successfully used deep sequencing technologies to construct the first adult female C. sonorensis reference transcriptome, and utilized genome-wide expression profiling to elucidate the genetic response to blood and sucrose feeding over time. The adult female midge unigene consists of 19,041 genes, of which less than 7% are differentially expressed during the course of a sucrose meal, while up to 52% of the genes respond significantly in blood-fed midges, indicating hematophagy induces complex physiological processes. Many genes that were differentially expressed during blood feeding were associated with digestion (e.g. proteases, lipases), hematophagy (e.g., salivary proteins), and vitellogenesis, revealing many major metabolic and biological factors underlying these critical processes. Additionally, key genes in the vitellogenesis pathway were identified, which provides the first glimpse into the molecular basis of anautogeny for C. sonorensis. This is the first extensive transcriptome for this genus, which will serve as a framework for future expression studies, RNAi, and provide a rich dataset contributing to the ultimate goal of informing a reference genome assembly and annotation. Moreover, this study will serve as a foundation for subsequent studies of

  11. Identification of the Genome Segments of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 26 (Isolate KUW2010/02) that Restrict Replication in a Culicoides sonorensis Cell Line (KC Cells)

    PubMed Central

    Pullinger, Gillian D.; Guimerà Busquets, Marc; Nomikou, Kyriaki; Boyce, Mark; Attoui, Houssam; Mertens, Peter P.

    2016-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) can infect most ruminant species and is usually transmitted by adult, vector-competent biting midges (Culicoides spp.). Infection with BTV can cause severe clinical signs and can be fatal, particularly in naïve sheep and some deer species. Although 24 distinct BTV serotypes were recognized for several decades, additional ‘types’ have recently been identified, including BTV-25 (from Switzerland), BTV-26 (from Kuwait) and BTV-27 from France (Corsica). Although BTV-25 has failed to grow in either insect or mammalian cell cultures, BTV-26 (isolate KUW2010/02), which can be transmitted horizontally between goats in the absence of vector insects, does not replicate in a Culicoides sonorensis cell line (KC cells) but can be propagated in mammalian cells (BSR cells). The BTV genome consists of ten segments of linear dsRNA. Mono-reassortant viruses were generated by reverse-genetics, each one containing a single BTV-26 genome segment in a BTV-1 genetic-background. However, attempts to recover a mono-reassortant containing genome-segment 2 (Seg-2) of BTV-26 (encoding VP2), were unsuccessful but a triple-reassortant was successfully generated containing Seg-2, Seg-6 and Seg-7 (encoding VP5 and VP7 respectively) of BTV-26. Reassortants were recovered and most replicated well in mammalian cells (BSR cells). However, mono-reassortants containing Seg-1 or Seg-3 of BTV-26 (encoding VP1, or VP3 respectively) and the triple reassortant failed to replicate, while a mono-reassortant containing Seg-7 of BTV-26 only replicated slowly in KC cells. PMID:26890863

  12. Identification of the Genome Segments of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 26 (Isolate KUW2010/02) that Restrict Replication in a Culicoides sonorensis Cell Line (KC Cells).

    PubMed

    Pullinger, Gillian D; Guimerà Busquets, Marc; Nomikou, Kyriaki; Boyce, Mark; Attoui, Houssam; Mertens, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) can infect most ruminant species and is usually transmitted by adult, vector-competent biting midges (Culicoides spp.). Infection with BTV can cause severe clinical signs and can be fatal, particularly in naïve sheep and some deer species. Although 24 distinct BTV serotypes were recognized for several decades, additional 'types' have recently been identified, including BTV-25 (from Switzerland), BTV-26 (from Kuwait) and BTV-27 from France (Corsica). Although BTV-25 has failed to grow in either insect or mammalian cell cultures, BTV-26 (isolate KUW2010/02), which can be transmitted horizontally between goats in the absence of vector insects, does not replicate in a Culicoides sonorensis cell line (KC cells) but can be propagated in mammalian cells (BSR cells). The BTV genome consists of ten segments of linear dsRNA. Mono-reassortant viruses were generated by reverse-genetics, each one containing a single BTV-26 genome segment in a BTV-1 genetic-background. However, attempts to recover a mono-reassortant containing genome-segment 2 (Seg-2) of BTV-26 (encoding VP2), were unsuccessful but a triple-reassortant was successfully generated containing Seg-2, Seg-6 and Seg-7 (encoding VP5 and VP7 respectively) of BTV-26. Reassortants were recovered and most replicated well in mammalian cells (BSR cells). However, mono-reassortants containing Seg-1 or Seg-3 of BTV-26 (encoding VP1, or VP3 respectively) and the triple reassortant failed to replicate, while a mono-reassortant containing Seg-7 of BTV-26 only replicated slowly in KC cells.

  13. [Trypanosoma cruzi in triatomines from Nuevo Leon, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Molina-Garza, Zinnia Judith; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Galaviz-Silva, Lucio; Molina-Garza, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in triatomines from Nuevo León using the standardization of an improved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. From July to September 2005, 52 triatomines were captured in General Terán, a municipality located in Nuevo León. They were analyzed using optical microscopy (OM) and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as standards of reference, to develop a technique for detecting the parasite using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Using OM and PCR, 31 triatomines were found to be positive and 21 negative. Using ELISA, 27 samples were identified as positive and 25 negative (specificity 100%, sensitivity 87%, negative predictive value 84%, and positive predictive value 100%). The prevalence of infected triatomines was 59.61% with OM and PCR, and 51.92% with ELISA. Our data confirm that the ELISA assay in triatomines is a fast, reliable and useful tool. Since it was possible to simultaneously analyze a large number of samples with high sensibility and specificity values, the ELISA test proves to be useful for new epidemiologic studies having a high number of vectors. It is also less expensive than PCR. It is therefore recommended for epidemiological and preventive surveillance programs as a first screening test before conducting a confirmatory test using PCR.

  14. Crossing Borders and Building Bridges: A Video Ethnography of Special Education in Nuevo Progresso, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowdermilk, John; Pecina, Julie; Fielding, Cheryl; Beccera, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a video ethnographic study of a special education school on the Texas/Mexico Border. The public school is located in Nuevo Progreso, which is a town in the Río Bravo Municipality in the state of Tamaulipas in Mexico. The town is located on the United States-Mexico border. The Progreso-Nuevo Progreso International…

  15. Crossing Borders and Building Bridges: A Video Ethnography of Special Education in Nuevo Progresso, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowdermilk, John; Pecina, Julie; Fielding, Cheryl; Beccera, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a video ethnographic study of a special education school on the Texas/Mexico Border. The public school is located in Nuevo Progreso, which is a town in the Río Bravo Municipality in the state of Tamaulipas in Mexico. The town is located on the United States-Mexico border. The Progreso-Nuevo Progreso International…

  16. Identification, expression and characterization of a major salivary allergen (Cul s 1) of the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis relevant for summer eczema in horses

    PubMed Central

    Langner, Kathrin F. A.; Jarvis, Donald L.; Nimtz, Manfred; Heselhaus, Julia E.; McHolland, Linda E.; Leibold, Wolfgang; Drolet, Barbara S.

    2009-01-01

    Salivary proteins of Culicoides biting midges are thought to play a key role in summer eczema (SE), a seasonal recurrent allergic dermatitis in horses. The present study describes the identification, expression and clinical relevance of a candidate allergen of the North American midge Culicoides sonorensis. Immunoblot analysis of midge saliva revealed a 66 kDa protein (Cul s 1) that was bound by IgE from several SE-affected (SE+) horses. Further characterization by fragmentation, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics identified Cul s 1 as maltase, an enzyme involved in sugar meal digestion. A cDNA encoding Cul s 1 was isolated and expressed as a polyhistidine-tagged fusion protein in a baculovirus/insect cell expression system. The clinical relevance of the affinity-purified recombinant Cul s 1 (rCul s 1) was investigated by immunoblotting, histamine release testing (HRT) and intradermal testing (IDT) in eight SE+ and eight control horses. Seven SE+ horses had rCul s 1-specific IgE, whereas only one control animal had IgE directed against this allergen. Furthermore, the HRT showed rCul s 1 induced basophil degranulation in samples from seven of eight SE+ horses but in none of the control animals. rCul s 1 also induced immediate (7/8), late-phase (8/8) and delayed (1/8) skin reactivity in IDT on all SE+ horses that had a positive test with the whole body extract (WBE) of C. sonorensis. None of the control horses showed immediate or delayed skin reactivity with rCul s 1, and only one control horse had a positive late-phase response, while several non-specific late-phase reactions were observed with the insect WBE. Thus, we believe rCul s 1 is the first specific salivary allergen of C. sonorensis to be described that promises to advance both in vitro and in vivo diagnosis and may contribute to the development of immunotherapy for SE in horses. PMID:18708061

  17. A blood pressure survey in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Caamano, A G; Cooper, R; Cedres, L; Barriero, L A; Dominquez, R C

    1982-01-01

    A blood pressure survey was carried out in 1976 in the city of Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, which involved 6,351 persons 30-69 years old. The study sample was recruited so as to represent an approximation of the overall distribution of occupational classes in the urban population. Members of the population sample were relatively young and of low educational attainment. To the extent that comparisons among surveys are feasible, mean blood pressure levels and hypertension rates were roughly comparable to those found in the white population of the United States. Although no firm conclusions can be drawn from the survey, a trend toward somewhat higher hypertension rates within the professional and managerial class was observed in some age groups in Laredo. PMID:7063591

  18. Christopher Columbus and Culicoides: was C. jamaicensis Edwards, 1922 introduced into the Mediterranean 500 years ago and later re-named C. paolae Boorman 1996?

    PubMed

    Meiswinkel, R; Labuschagne, K; Goffredo, M

    2004-01-01

    The biting midge, Culicoides paolae Boorman, described from specimens collected in the extreme south of Italy in 1996, belongs in the subgenus Drymodesmyia. This subgenus was erected by Vargas in 1960 for the so-called Copiosus species group, an assemblage of 22 species endemic to the tropical regions of the New World and, where known, breed in vegetative materials including the decaying leaves (cladodes) and fruits of Central American cacti. The Mexican peoples have utilised these cacti for over 9,000 years; one of these, Opuntia ficus-indica Linnaeus, was brought to Europe by Christopher Columbus following his voyages of discovery. As a taxon C. paolae is very similar to the Central American C. jamaicensis Edwards, 1922 raising the possibility that it (or a closely related species of Drymodesmyia) was introduced into the Mediterranean Region at the time of Columbus, but was (perplexingly) discovered only 500 years later and named C. paolae. The comparison of Sardinian specimens of C. paolae with Panamanian material of C. jamaicensis (housed in the Natural History Museum in London) confirmed the two species to be very similar but unusual differences were noted around the precise distribution of the sensilla coeloconica on the female flagellum. Until it is understood whether these differences represent either intra- or interspecific variation, the question of the possible synonymy of C. paolae must be held in abeyance.

  19. [Field efficacy of repellent formulation containing para-menthane-3,8-diol and lemongrass against Culicoides pachymerus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Erika; Cabrera, Olga Lucía; Zipa, Yaneth; Pardo, Raúl Hernando

    2012-09-01

    Culicoides pachymerus is a major pest species for the inhabitants of the western Boyacá province of Colombia. The effect of a repellent lotion based on p-menthane-3,8-diol (16%) and lemongrass oil (2%) was evaluated against the bites of C. pachymerus. The repellent lotion was compared simultaneously with a control (no treatment) by human landing catches of C. pachymerus on the forearms of paired volunteers situated near human dwellings. Protection percentage and protection time for 3 to 6 h after repellent application was calculated. The test was repeated ten times. Only two females of C. pachymerus were collected on arms with the repellent treatment. In contrast, the mean biting rate in the untreated control was 47.7 midges/person/10 min. Mean protection percentage of the repellent was 100% up to 4 h and 99.5% up to 5 h. Protection time was 332.2 and 338.2 min in the two replicates where bites of C. pachymerus were confirmed. In the remaining eight replicates protection time exceeded the test duration. The repellent showed high efficacy against C. pachymerus, up to 5 h post-application.

  20. Effects of ultra-low volume and thermal fog malathion, Scourge and naled applied against caged adult Culicoides furens and Culex quinquefasciatus in open and vegetated terrain.

    PubMed

    Linley, J R; Jordan, S

    1992-03-01

    The adulticidal effect of ULV and thermal fog malathion, Scourge and naled was tested at 2x label dosage (1.42, 0.22, 0.39 oz/acre, respectively) against caged Culicoides furens and Culex quinquefasciatus in open and vegetated (orange grove) terrain. Cages were at 122 cm elevation and positioned at 15.2, 45.7, 76.2, 106.7, 137.2 and 167.6 m from the line of insecticide release. Ultra-low volume applications of all 3 insecticides were markedly more effective than thermal fog under all conditions, especially in vegetated terrain. Of the 3 insecticides, malathion performed the poorest, especially against Cx. quinquefasciatus (in which there was some resistance) and particularly when applied as thermal fog. Scourge and naled were about equally effective. The best adulticide against C. furens was naled, which was clearly superior applied as ULV. It yielded 75% mortality out to 283 m in the open, and to 38 m in the presence of dense vegetation.

  1. Effects of altitude, distance and waves of movement on the dispersal in Australia of the arbovirus vector, Culicoides brevitarsis Kieffer (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Alan L; Spohr, Lorraine J; Barchia, Idris M

    2004-10-14

    The dispersal of the biting midge and arbovirus vector Culicoides brevitarsis in the Bellinger, Macleay and Hastings river valleys and up the escarpment of the great dividing range (GDR) of mid-northern coastal New South Wales, Australia, from 1995 to 2003 was studied. The midge moved up these valleys from the endemic coastal plain in at least two waves between October and May, and both waves were modelled. Dispersal time can be explained by direct distance from the coast and the altitude of the sites. Dispersal times due to distance were similar at 18.2 +/- 2.2 (S.D.) and 15.9 +/- 2.6 weeks per 100 km for first- and second-occurrences at fixed altitude. Time of the first wave was extended 0.48 +/- 0.22 weeks for every 100-m rise in altitude and the second by 1.14 +/- 0.24 weeks for every 100-m rise for a set distance. Although C. brevitarsis can move up the escarpment of the GDR (and possibly transmit virus), vector dispersal, survival and establishment at and beyond the top of the range are limited. A third model showed that previously described slower movement of C. brevitarsis up the more-southerly Hunter valley relative to movements down the coastal plain also was related to increasing altitude.

  2. Record of two species of Culicoides (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) new for Madagascar and molecular study showing the paraphylies of the subgenus Oecacta and the Schultzei group.

    PubMed

    Augot, D; Randrianambinintsoa, F J; Gasser, A; Depaquit, J

    2013-08-01

    Culicoides are vectors of diseases of Veterinary Medicine importance (bluetongue, African horse sickness, Schmallenberg virus) all over the world. In the present study, we report two species new for Madagascar: C. nevilli and C. enderleini. They belong to the Schultzei group which is sometimes classified in the subgenus Oecacta and sometimes in the subgenus Remmia, depending on authors. Consequently, we carried out a molecular cladistics of these groups based on cytochrome C oxidase subunit I mtDNA sequences. We processed the Malagasy specimens and some C. furens (the Oecacta type-species) caught in Florida and we analyzed their sequences and those available in Genbank: C. schultzei, C. oxystoma, C. festivipennis, C. brunnicans, C. kibunensis, C. truncorum and C. vexans. C. (Avaritia) imicola have been selected as an outgroup. The maximum parsimony analysis showed the paraphylies of the Schultzei group (=Remmia) and of the subgenus Oecacta if the first group is excluded from the latter. Our results underline the doubtful current classification and need to be validated by other molecular markers in the future.

  3. Las características más fascinantes del nuevo Robot

    NASA Image and Video Library

    impresionante es la palabra que describe perfectamente al nuevo robot Curiosity por su tamaño, sus instrumentos científicos y la manera en que la NASA planifica hacerlo aterrizar en Marte de forma ...

  4. [Metabolic syndrome prevalence in teenagers of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon].

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Villareal, Velia Margarita; López Alvarenga, Juan C; Bastarrachea, Raúl A; Rizo-Baeza, María Mercedes; Cortés-Castell, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (SM) and its components in teenagers from the metropolitan area of Monterrey Nuevo Leon, Mexico (AMM). A transversal research involving 254 teenage students from 10 to 19 years old. To research investigated their personal characteristics, anthropometrics measures, glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol HDL. The SM definition was adapted from the one suggested by the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII). The SM prevalence was 9.4 % (IC95%: 5.8 to 13.0), there was not a difference between the sexes. The prevalence among each SM component was: 24.4% for high triglycerides, 20.1% for abdominal obesity, 19.0% for cholesterol of lipoproteins of a high density (HDL-c) low, 11.4 % for high glucose and for high blood pressure (9.1% diastolic and 5.9% systolic). The prevalent SM phenotypes were corporal mass (IMC) (OR = 4.93, IC95%: 2.26, 10.73) and the IMC interaction of the teenager with a family history of obesity (OR = 1.37, IC95%: 1.0, 1.87). It was observed that those with a family history of diabetes type 2 only experienced a marginal effect. The SM prevalence in teenagers from AMM is high it was an alarming situation if it continues into adulthood. The existence of obesity in relatives of the first and second grade, altogether with teenager IMC are important prediction factors of SM.

  5. Amphibians and Reptiles of the state of Nuevo León, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Espinal, Julio A; Smith, Geoffrey R; Cruz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We compiled a check list of the herpetofauna of Nuevo León. We documented 132 species (23 amphibians, 109 reptiles), representing 30 families (11 amphibians, 19 reptiles) and 73 genera (17 amphibians, 56 reptiles). Only two species are endemic to Nuevo León. Nuevo León contains a relatively high richness of lizards in the genus Sceloporus. Overlap in the herpetofauna of Nuevo León and states it borders is fairly extensive. Of 130 native species, 102 are considered species of Least Concern in the IUCN red list, four are listed as Vulnerable, five are listed as Near Threatened, and four are listed as Endangered. According to SEMARNAT, 78 species are not of conservation concern, 25 are subject to Special Protection, 27 are Threatened, and none are listed as in Danger of Extinction. Given current threats to the herpetofauna, additional efforts to understand the ecology and status of populations in Nuevo León are needed.

  6. Amphibians and Reptiles of the state of Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Lemos-Espinal, Julio A.; Smith, Geoffrey R.; Cruz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compiled a check list of the herpetofauna of Nuevo León. We documented 132 species (23 amphibians, 109 reptiles), representing 30 families (11 amphibians, 19 reptiles) and 73 genera (17 amphibians, 56 reptiles). Only two species are endemic to Nuevo León. Nuevo León contains a relatively high richness of lizards in the genus Sceloporus. Overlap in the herpetofauna of Nuevo León and states it borders is fairly extensive. Of 130 native species, 102 are considered species of Least Concern in the IUCN red list, four are listed as Vulnerable, five are listed as Near Threatened, and four are listed as Endangered. According to SEMARNAT, 78 species are not of conservation concern, 25 are subject to Special Protection, 27 are Threatened, and none are listed as in Danger of Extinction. Given current threats to the herpetofauna, additional efforts to understand the ecology and status of populations in Nuevo León are needed. PMID:27408562

  7. Altitudinal variation and bio-climatic variables influencing the potential distribution of Culicoides orientalis Macfie, 1932, suspected vector of Bluetongue virus across the North Eastern Himalayan belt of Sikkim.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Emon; Hazra, Surajit; Saha, Goutam Kumar; Banerjee, Dhriti

    2017-09-19

    Culicoides orientalis was first recorded from Sikkim, in the year 1963, but no evidence based disease outbreak were available. In the last 50 years, 260 Bluetongue disease outbreaks caused by Culicoides species have been evidenced from India. Moreover, in recent years with increase of average temperature worldwide and increase in longevity of arthropod vectors like Culicoides along with a geographical range shift to new suitable warmer regions has increased the potentiality of vector borne disease outbreak throughout the world. The Himalayan range of Sikkim in India is a biodiversity hotspot and is extremely sensitive to such global climate changes. An attempt has been made to evaluate the altitude, climate and environmental data on selected study sites of Sikkim for a period of two years (2014-2015) for discerning potential distribution of C.orientalis in this region. The altitude, temperature, precipitation and potential distribution range maps of C. orientalis showed the areas of highest species abundance within the altitudinal range of 550-1830m, with some species extending its range up to 3750m, with average precipitation of 2010-2590mm and mean temperature of 11-18°C. The Maximum Entropy Modelling (MaxEnt) and the Jackknife test of the MaxEnt model further revealed that the major contributing factors governing C. orientalis distribution are annual precipitation (78.8%), followed by precipitation of driest quarter (8.3%) and mean temperature of the warmest quarter (3.3%). Accuracy of the study was evaluated by the area under the curve (AUC=0.860). The Biplot on F1-F2 axes (N=16, α=0.05) in the PCA showed the linear depiction of all the variables considered in our study, major contributors were annual precipitation, precipitation of driest quarter and mean temperature of warmest quarter being the primary factors governing species distribution, as analogous to results of the MaxEnt model. This study would help in developing strategies for monitoring and

  8. On the study of the transmission networks of blood parasites from SW Spain: diversity of avian haemosporidians in the biting midge Culicoides circumscriptus and wild birds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Blood-sucking flying insects play a key role in the transmission of pathogens of vector-borne diseases. However, at least for the case of avian malaria parasites, the vast majority of studies focus on the interaction between parasites and vertebrate hosts, but there is a lack of information regarding the interaction between the parasites and the insect vectors. Here, we identified the presence of malaria and malaria-like parasite lineages harbored by the potential vector Culicoides circumscriptus (Kieffer). Also, we identified some nodes of the transmission network connecting parasite lineages, potential insect vectors and avian hosts by comparing Haemoproteus and Plasmodium lineages isolated from insects with those infecting wild birds in this and previous studies. Methods Using a molecular approach, we analysed the presence of blood parasites in a total of 97 biting midges trapped in the Doñana National Park (SW Spain) and surrounding areas. Also, 123 blood samples from 11 bird species were analyzed for the presence of blood parasite infections. Blood parasites Haemoproteus and Plasmodium were identified by amplification of a 478 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gen. Results Thirteen biting midges harboured blood parasites including six Haemoproteus and two Plasmodium lineages, supporting the potential role of these insects on parasite transmission. Moreover, ten (8.1%) birds carried blood parasites. Seven Plasmodium and one Haemoproteus lineages were isolated from birds. Overall, six new Haemoproteus lineages were described in this study. Also, we identified the transmission networks of some blood parasites. Two Haemoproteus lineages, hCIRCUM03 and GAGLA03, were identical to those isolated from Corvus monedula in southern Spain and Garrulus glandarius in Bulgaria, respectively. Furthermore, the new Haemoproteus lineage hCIRCUM05 showed a 99% similarity with a lineage found infecting captive penguins in Japan. Conclusions The comparison

  9. Sellers' Revisited: A Big Data Reassessment of Historical Outbreaks of Bluetongue and African Horse Sickness due to the Long-Distance Wind Dispersion of Culicoides Midges.

    PubMed

    Durr, Peter A; Graham, Kerryne; van Klinken, Rieks D

    2017-01-01

    The possibility that outbreaks of bluetongue (BT) and African horse sickness (AHS) might occur via long-distance wind dispersion (LDWD) of their insect vector (Culicoides spp.) was proposed by R. F. Sellers in a series of papers published between 1977 and 1991. These investigated the role of LDWD by means of visual examination of the wind direction of synoptic weather charts. Based on the hypothesis that simple wind direction analysis, which does not allow for wind speed, might have led to spurious conclusions, we reanalyzed six of the outbreak scenarios described in Sellers' papers. For this reanalysis, we used a custom-built Big Data application ("TAPPAS") which couples a user-friendly web-interface with an established atmospheric dispersal model ("HYSPLIT"), thus enabling more sophisticated modeling than was possible when Sellers undertook his analyzes. For the two AHS outbreaks, there was strong support from our reanalysis of the role of LDWD for that in Spain (1966), and to a lesser degree, for the outbreak in Cyprus (1960). However, for the BT outbreaks, the reassessments were more complex, and for one of these (western Turkey, 1977) we could discount LDWD as the means of direct introduction of the virus. By contrast, while the outbreak in Cyprus (1977) showed LDWD was a possible means of introduction, there is an apparent inconsistency in that the outbreaks were localized while the dispersion events covered much of the island. For Portugal (1956), LDWD from Morocco on the dates suggested by Sellers is very unlikely to have been the pathway for introduction, and for the detection of serotype 2 in Florida (1982), LDWD from Cuba would require an assumption of a lengthy survival time of the midges in the air column. Except for western Turkey, the BT reanalyses show the limitation of LDWD modeling when used by itself, and indicates the need to integrate susceptible host population distribution (and other covariate) data into the modeling process. A further

  10. Sellers’ Revisited: A Big Data Reassessment of Historical Outbreaks of Bluetongue and African Horse Sickness due to the Long-Distance Wind Dispersion of Culicoides Midges

    PubMed Central

    Durr, Peter A.; Graham, Kerryne; van Klinken, Rieks D.

    2017-01-01

    The possibility that outbreaks of bluetongue (BT) and African horse sickness (AHS) might occur via long-distance wind dispersion (LDWD) of their insect vector (Culicoides spp.) was proposed by R. F. Sellers in a series of papers published between 1977 and 1991. These investigated the role of LDWD by means of visual examination of the wind direction of synoptic weather charts. Based on the hypothesis that simple wind direction analysis, which does not allow for wind speed, might have led to spurious conclusions, we reanalyzed six of the outbreak scenarios described in Sellers’ papers. For this reanalysis, we used a custom-built Big Data application (“TAPPAS”) which couples a user-friendly web-interface with an established atmospheric dispersal model (“HYSPLIT”), thus enabling more sophisticated modeling than was possible when Sellers undertook his analyzes. For the two AHS outbreaks, there was strong support from our reanalysis of the role of LDWD for that in Spain (1966), and to a lesser degree, for the outbreak in Cyprus (1960). However, for the BT outbreaks, the reassessments were more complex, and for one of these (western Turkey, 1977) we could discount LDWD as the means of direct introduction of the virus. By contrast, while the outbreak in Cyprus (1977) showed LDWD was a possible means of introduction, there is an apparent inconsistency in that the outbreaks were localized while the dispersion events covered much of the island. For Portugal (1956), LDWD from Morocco on the dates suggested by Sellers is very unlikely to have been the pathway for introduction, and for the detection of serotype 2 in Florida (1982), LDWD from Cuba would require an assumption of a lengthy survival time of the midges in the air column. Except for western Turkey, the BT reanalyses show the limitation of LDWD modeling when used by itself, and indicates the need to integrate susceptible host population distribution (and other covariate) data into the modeling process. A

  11. On the study of the transmission networks of blood parasites from SW Spain: diversity of avian haemosporidians in the biting midge Culicoides circumscriptus and wild birds.

    PubMed

    Ferraguti, Martina; Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Ruiz, Santiago; Soriguer, Ramón; Figuerola, Jordi

    2013-07-15

    Blood-sucking flying insects play a key role in the transmission of pathogens of vector-borne diseases. However, at least for the case of avian malaria parasites, the vast majority of studies focus on the interaction between parasites and vertebrate hosts, but there is a lack of information regarding the interaction between the parasites and the insect vectors. Here, we identified the presence of malaria and malaria-like parasite lineages harbored by the potential vector Culicoides circumscriptus (Kieffer). Also, we identified some nodes of the transmission network connecting parasite lineages, potential insect vectors and avian hosts by comparing Haemoproteus and Plasmodium lineages isolated from insects with those infecting wild birds in this and previous studies. Using a molecular approach, we analysed the presence of blood parasites in a total of 97 biting midges trapped in the Doñana National Park (SW Spain) and surrounding areas. Also, 123 blood samples from 11 bird species were analyzed for the presence of blood parasite infections. Blood parasites Haemoproteus and Plasmodium were identified by amplification of a 478 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gen. Thirteen biting midges harboured blood parasites including six Haemoproteus and two Plasmodium lineages, supporting the potential role of these insects on parasite transmission. Moreover, ten (8.1%) birds carried blood parasites. Seven Plasmodium and one Haemoproteus lineages were isolated from birds. Overall, six new Haemoproteus lineages were described in this study. Also, we identified the transmission networks of some blood parasites. Two Haemoproteus lineages, hCIRCUM03 and GAGLA03, were identical to those isolated from Corvus monedula in southern Spain and Garrulus glandarius in Bulgaria, respectively. Furthermore, the new Haemoproteus lineage hCIRCUM05 showed a 99% similarity with a lineage found infecting captive penguins in Japan. The comparison of the parasite lineages isolated in

  12. Exploratory trial to determine the efficacy of the PYthon and the PYthon Magnum slow-release insecticide ear tags for the control of midges (Culicoides spp.), attacking sheep and cattle and flies attacking cattle.

    PubMed

    Goosen, H; de Vries, P J T; Fletcher, M G

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the prophylactic action of the chemical combination zeta-cypermethrin and piperonyl butoxide, administered by means of slow-release insecticide-impregnated ear tags, against biting midges (Culicoides spp) attacking sheep and against midges, horn flies (Haematobia irritant), stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans), and houseflies (Musca domestica) attacking cattle. Treated sheep and cattle were protected 100 percent against blood-feeding midges for two months and there was a clear reduction in the number of midges collected from treated animals. Three days after the ear tags were attached to cattle, the number of horn flies on the cattle was reduced to practically zero and remained at a low level until the end of the trial (day 85). There was also a strong reduction in the numbers of stable flies and houseflies counted.

  13. James Monroe High School Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, 1986-1987. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Ana L.; And Others

    In its second year of Title VII funding, James Monroe High Schools's Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes (Project New Horizons) served 344 limited-English-speaking recent arrivals from Latin America and the Caribbean, in grades 9 through 12. The program has built on the strengths of the high school's extensive computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program,…

  14. James Monroe High School Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, a 3-year Title VII-funded bilingual education program, serves 287 Spanish speaking students at James Monroe High School (Bronx, New York). This report evaluates the project's first year of operation, 1985-86. The report contains an introduction describing the school and project goals; information on student…

  15. Nuevos Horizontes, James Monroe High School, 1987-1988. Evaluation Section Report. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Tomi D.; Lista, Carlos

    Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes (Project New Horizons) at James Monroe High School (New York City) served 328 students of limited English proficiency (LEP) in grades 9-12 during the final year of a 3-year funding cycle. The project's purpose was to build on the strengths of the school's extensive computer-assisted instructional program in order to…

  16. Comprehensive Education Bolivarian-Style: The Alternative School in Barrio Pueblo Nuevo, Venezuela

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Mike

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author traces revolutionary developments in an alternative school in Barrio Pueblo Nuevo, Mérida, in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, a school that caters for students between 4 and 14. He begins by recounting some fieldwork done at the school on his behalf by Edward Ellis in 2010. He goes on to discuss a video made at…

  17. Comprehensive Education Bolivarian-Style: The Alternative School in Barrio Pueblo Nuevo, Venezuela

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Mike

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author traces revolutionary developments in an alternative school in Barrio Pueblo Nuevo, Mérida, in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, a school that caters for students between 4 and 14. He begins by recounting some fieldwork done at the school on his behalf by Edward Ellis in 2010. He goes on to discuss a video made at…

  18. Exploración del Nuevo Laboratorio Científico de Marte

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Únase a Fernando Abilleira, un analista de trayectoria de la NASA para la Oficina de Exploración de Marte, y conozca las nuevas tecnologías que el nuevo robot Curiosity del Laboratorio Científico d...

  19. Un Dia Nuevo for Schools. 2000 & Beyond: The Changing Face of American Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2000-01-01

    This issue, the third in a series on the demographic forces shaping public education in the United States, examines the effect of the influx of Hispanic American and Indian immigrants. The first section, "Una Dia Nuevo for Schools," discusses how schools must adjust as Hispanic immigrants fan out to areas beyond those where they have…

  20. Effect of channelization of Rio Puerto Nuevo on ground-water levels in the San Juan metropolitan area, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Padilla, Ingrid

    1991-01-01

    Channelization and concrete lining of the Rio Puerto Nuevo and its tributaries in the San Juan Metropolitan area has been proposed to control flooding in low lying areas adjacent to the stream. Concern about the effect of these channel modifications on the ground-water system prompted the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to conduct an investigation of surface-water and ground-water interactions in the Rio Puerto Nuevo basin in 1988. A principal objective of this investigation was to determine the potential effect of channelization of the Rio Puerto Nuevo on ground-water levels.

  1. Un nuevo estudio del cúmulo abierto Tr 14 en la región de Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, B.; Malaroda, S.; Levato, H.; Morrell, N.

    Presentamos nuevos datos espectroscópicos de 9 objetos entre los miembros más brillantes de Tr 14. Hemos medido un total de 80 nuevos espectrogramas para contribuir a la determinación de la real naturaleza de estos objetos desde el punto de vista de la duplicidad. Del nuevo material debemos concluir que la mayoría de las estrellas en la muestra son simples. Sin embargo existen algunos objetos cuyo seguimiento debe continuar ya que no nos es posible efectuar conclusiones definitivas con el presente material.

  2. Results from the organ and tissue transplant program in Nuevo Leon, Mexico, 1996 to 2001.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, H; Cabriales, H

    2003-12-01

    Before 1996, solid organs from cadaveric donors (CD) did not account for more than 2% of all transplants. The need for more transplants led the state to undergo several legislative, societal, organizational, and infrastructure changes. A descriptive analysis of the evolution of the transplant program in the State of Nuevo León, Mexico, from 1996 to 2001. Trimester reports have been routinely performed since 1996 from the 14 institutions that are licensed to perform organ and tissue transplants in the State of Nuevo León, Mexico. All reports were concentrated and a descriptive analysis is presented herein. From 1996 until 2001, a total of 1457 organ and tissue (OT) transplants have been performed. At the end of this period, there was a 214% increase in the total number of transplants. By 2001, 73% of the program's total of 1457 OT transplants came from cadaveric donors. The state transplant program of Nuevo León has experienced a dramatic growth since 1996. The percent of organs transplanted from cadaveric donors is one of the highest in Mexico. There is still much work to be done at the state and national levels; better epidemiological studies and dialysis registries are needed as well as investment in transplant research.

  3. Assessing biodiversity in Nuevo Leon, Mexico: Are nature reserves the answer?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cantu, C.; Wright, R.G.; Scott, J.M.; Strand, Espen

    2004-01-01

    The Mexican state of Nuevo Leon, located in the northeastern portion of the country, currently has 26 state and three federal nature reserves covering approximately 4.5% of its land area. These reserves were established for a variety of reasons not necessarily related to conservation purposes. In 2000 in response to a growing concern about the lack of organized conservation reserve planning to protect the important biological and physical features of Mexico, the Mexican Commission for Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity proposed 12 new terrestrial reserves for Nuevo Leon. The new reserves, if established, would increase the proportion of protected lands in the state to almost 24% of the state's land area. We compiled a Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis using digital thematic maps of physical and ecological features to examine how well the existing and proposed reserves incorporated the major biological and physical features of the state. The existing reserves are located primarily in regions with elevations > 1,000-1,500 m, on less productive soils, and are dominated by pine and oak forest cover types. As a result, the state's dominant biotic region - low elevation coastal plain with xeric scrub vegetation - is disproportionately under represented in the current reserve system. The new reserves would expand the protection of biophysical resources throughout the state. However, the inclusion of important resources in the low elevation coastal lands would still be limited.

  4. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  5. [Effects of reforestation on tree pollen sensitization in inhabitants of Nuevo Leon, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Palma-Gómez, Samuel; González-Díaz, Sandra Nora; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Macías-Weinmann, Alejandra; Amaro-Vivian, Laura Elizabeth; Pérez-Vanzzini, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Mujica, José Julio; Yong-Rodríguez, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    Climate change has implications for health, ecology and society. Urban green areas are a key element in the planning of cities, promoting citizen interaction with the environment, as well as health. Lack of planning and design of these areas as well as the selection of ornamental trees can be a trigger of pollen allergy in the surrounding population. Reforestation is among the programs implemented by the government that have an impact on allergy. Environmental reforestation programs do not take into account the allergenic potential of some species. In the last 4 years, the government of Nuevo Leon, Mexico, has planted nearly 18,000 Quercus species trees, in addition to an unknown number of Fraxinus species trees that are listed as tree species with high pollen production. To identify changes in tree pollen sensitization, based on environmental reforestation programs. A retrospective and descriptive study was done in which positive skin prick tests to pollen from trees in the interval of 2010-2014 were analyzed, correlating between tree species used for reforestation and increased sensitivity to the former. A statistically significant increase in pollen sensitization to species with which Nuevo Leon was reforested was found, along with a decrease in sensitization to the species that were not reforested. Reforestation contributes to some extent to the change in the pattern of positive skin tests and may result in more frequent exacerbations of respiratory diseases. It is an activity that should always be regulated and assisted by experts in the according field.

  6. Rainfall thresholds for the initiation of shallow landslides in Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Castillo, L. R. M.; Kubota, T.; Cantu Silva, I.; Hasnawir, H.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of rainfall on the occurrence of landslides depends on many factors such as landslide dimensions, kinematics or material involved. It is widely recognized that shallow landslides are usually triggered by short intense storms. Nuevo Leon state located in northeast Mexico is highly prone to the occurrence of this kind of slope failures due to its geologic, geomorphologic, climatic attributes and location, being targeted by tropical cyclones during the Atlantic hurricane season. A database of rainfall events that have resulted in shallow landslides on the region was compiled; the data indicated that there is a coincidence between the occurrence of shallow landslides and extreme rainfall events. A threshold curve in the form of I= αD-β was established to describe the threshold in where I is the rainfall intensity by rainfall event in mm/day and D is the duration of rainfall event in days. Duration of the rainfall events that triggered shallow landslides ranged from 2 to 5 days, with maximum intensity of 236 mm/day and a minimum intensity of 57.7 mm/day. From the data analyzed we could obtain a regression value of I = 109.77D-1.76 and established a new minimum rainfall intensity-duration threshold for the initiation of rainfall-induced shallow landslides that can be used for the development of a early warning system in Nuevo Leon, Mexico

  7. Learning Styles and Attitudes toward Online Education in Four Universities in the State of Nuevo Leon, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez de Monarrez, Patricia; Korniejczuk, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to find the relation-ship between the predominant learning styles among university online students and their attitude toward online education. Data were collected from 385 students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs from four universities in the state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Significant effects of…

  8. Learning Styles and Attitudes toward Online Education in Four Universities in the State of Nuevo Leon, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez de Monarrez, Patricia; Korniejczuk, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to find the relation-ship between the predominant learning styles among university online students and their attitude toward online education. Data were collected from 385 students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs from four universities in the state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Significant effects of…

  9. Pesticide residues in orange fruit from citrus orchards in Nuevo Leon State, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Jacobo, A; Alcantar-Rosales, V M; Alonso, D; Heras-Ramírez, M E; Elizarragaz-De La Rosa, D; Lugo-Melchor, O Y; Gaspar-Ramirez, O

    2017-04-04

    Some international organizations established Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) in food to protect human health. Mexico lacks regulations in this matter, affecting national and international trade from agroindustry. The aim of this study was to diagnose pesticide residues in oranges from Nuevo Leon, México, in citrus orchards. In May 2014, 100 orange fruit samples were taken randomly from orchards and subjected to analysis for 93 pesticides at residual level by GC/QQQ-MS and LCQ-TOF-MS. Results showed presence of 15 pesticide residues in the samples. The comparison of the residual levels of pesticides found in orange samples among the MRLs allowed by USA, EU and Japanese regulations demonstrated that all samples were below MRLs issued by USA and Japan. Some orange samples were above MRLs issued by the EU. This provides a basis to establish strategies in order to satisfy International Standards to protect human health and encourage Food Safety in Mexico.

  10. An analysis of nonpayment of water services in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Benitez, Ismael; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

    2008-08-01

    In many developing and developed cities, nonpayment for water services undermines the financial health of water utilities; in poorer areas, it also hinders the water utilities' ability to serve poor households. However, nonpayment has not received much attention in the literature so far. In this paper, we analyze nonpayment for a unique data set of households from Nuevo Laredo, Mexico. Our fieldwork and basic statistics indicate that nonpayment is very common and affects both poor and affluent households, so ability to pay may only partly explain nonpayment. Using panel data models to control for unobserved household characteristics (to avoid omitted variable bias) and after accounting for monthly effects, we find that long-term delinquent households consume ˜3% more water than do other families; this number is larger for households who are retired and affluent, which further compounds the adverse consequences of nonpayment.

  11. Ethnobotany in Rayones, Nuevo León, México.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Castillón, Eduardo; Garza-López, Miriam; Villarreal-Quintanilla, José Ángel; Salinas-Rodríguez, María Magdalena; Soto-Mata, Brianda Elizabeth; González-Rodríguez, Humberto; González-Uribe, Dino Ulises; Cantú-Silva, Israel; Carrillo-Parra, Artemio; Cantú-Ayala, César

    2014-09-01

    Trough collections of plants and interviews with 110 individuals, an ethnobotanical study was conducted in order to determine the knowledge and use plant species in Rayones, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. The aim of this study was to record all useful plants and their uses, to know whether differences exist in the knowledge about the number of species and uses between women and men, and to know if there is a correlation between the age of individuals and knowledge of species and their uses. A total of 110 persons were interviewed (56 men, 56 women). Semistructured interviews were carried out. The data were analyzed by means of Student t test and the Pearson Correlation Coeficient. A total of 252 species, 228 genera and 91 families of vascular plants were recorded. Astraceae, Fabaceae and are the most important families with useful species and Agave and Opuntia are the genera with the highest number of useful species. One hundred and thirty six species are considered as medicinal. Agave, Acacia and Citrus are the genera with the highest number of medicinal species. Other uses includes edible, spiritual rituals, construction and ornamentals. There was a non-significant correlation between the person's age and number of species, but a significant very low negative correlation between the person's age and number of uses was found. Knowing their medicinal uses is an important issue for the people of Rayones. Boiling and preparing infusions are the main ways of using plants by residents. The leaves, the branches, and the fruits are the most commonly used parts. Almost 18% of the flora is used for wood and construction purposes. Several uses such as cosmetic, shampoo, firming skin tonics and health hair products recorded in Rayones has not been reported for other areas in the state of Nuevo León. In Rayones, women have a greater knowledge about plants and their uses than men, particularly, medicinal plants, but, men have a greater knowledge about wood and construction species.

  12. Ethnobotany in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park, Nuevo León, México

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Eduardo; Villarreal, José A; Cantú, César; Cabral, Ismael; Scott, Laura; Yen, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    An ethnobotanical study in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park (CMNP), Nuevo Leon, Mexico was conducted. In spite of the large area (1,773.7 km2), heterogeneous physiography, contrasting plant communities and high species diversity of the CMNP, very little was previously known about its useful plants. Based on 95 interviews with inhabitants of the region who were 35 years or older, we recorded ethnobotanical data of 240 species (comprising 170 genera and 69 botanical families), and 146 different uses. Most of the cited uses (98) were found to be medicinal ones. Background An ethnobotanical study in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park (CMNP), Nuevo Leon, Mexico was conducted. In spite of the large area (1,773.7 km2), heterogeneous physiography, contrasting plant communities and high species diversity of the CMNP, very little was previously known about its useful plants. Based on 95 interviews with inhabitants of the region who were 35 years old or older, we recorded ethnobotanical data of 240 species (comprising 170 genera and 69 botanical families), and 146 different uses. Most of the cited uses (98) were found to be medicinal ones. Methods Ninety five inhabitants 35 years old and oldest were interviewed to know what are the main plant uses in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park. Results and discussion Two hundred and forty species, 170 genera, and 69 families of useful plants and 146 different uses were recorded. We found most of the uses to be medicinal (98), while the rest (48) represent various purposes. Herbaceous plants are the most used, followed by shrubs and trees. PMID:17263889

  13. [Digestive tract malignant neoplasms in patients of No. 11 area IMSS in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas.].

    PubMed

    Neri-Jiménez, U

    2008-01-01

    In the last years, mortality due to malignant neoplasms has shown a reduction in its growing tendencies in developed countries. However,the profile of cancer mortality in developing countries still presents a clear upward pattern, and Mexico is not the exception, for the mortality rate due to malignant tumors has shown an increase recently, which constitutes a great challenge for health institutions. To determine the frequency of malignant neoplasms in the digestive tract in patients treated in the General Hospital Area No. 11 of Mexican Institute of Social Security in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas,Mexico. From 11,386 histopathologic reports carried out in the Department of Pathology of the General Hospital Area No. 11 IMSS in the year 2000-2006, 165 patients were reported,diagnosed with malignant neoplasms of the digestive tract (NMTD); patients age and gender were analyzed as well as affected areas and histological stock. Benign neoplasms and metastasis were excluded. From the study of 165 cases of patients with malignant neoplasms of digestive tract (NMTD),the most affected age was patients between 60-75 years old, predilection for male (63.78%) and female(36.21%) subjects. According to the Pathology report, 24.4% were diagnosed with hepatic cancer,23.03% were colon and rectum cancer, 20.00%were stomach cancer, 13.33% with pancreatic cancer,and 7.27% were cancer of esophagus. The rest was located in other levels. Malignant neoplasms of digestive tract in patients of General Hospital Area No. 11IMSS in Nuevo Laredo are relevant in relation with other Medial Centers may be regional factors contribute to this behavior.

  14. Distribution of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota: clarifying the epidemiology of bluetongue disease in the northern Great Plains region of the United States.

    PubMed

    Schmidtmann, E T; Herrero, M V; Green, A L; Dargatz, D A; Rodriquez, J M; Walton, T E

    2011-05-01

    The presence or absence of the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a primary vector of bluetongue viruses (genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae, BTV) in North America, was assessed on ranches and farms across the Northern Great Plains region of the United States, specifically Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota, as part of a 2-yr regional study of BTV exposure among cattle. Blacklight/suction trap samples totaling 280 2-night intervals were taken at 140 aquatic sites (potential larval habitat for C. sonorensis) on 82 livestock operations (ranches and farms) that span a south-to-north gradient of expected decreasing risk for exposure to BTV. In Nebraska, C. sonorensis populations were common and widespread, present at 15 of 18 operations. Of 32 operations sampled in South Dakota, seven of which were sampled in successive years, 18 were positive for C. sonorensis; 13 of 14 operations located west of the Missouri River were positive, whereas 13 of 18 operations east of the river were negative. Of 32 operations sampled in North Dakota, seven of which were sampled both years, 12 were positive for C. sonorensis. Six of eight operations located west and south of the Missouri River in North Dakota were positive, whereas 18 of 24 operations east and north of the river were negative for C. sonorensis. These data illustrate a well-defined pattern of C. sonorensis spatial distribution, with populations consistently present across Nebraska, western South Dakota, and western North Dakota; western South Dakota, and North Dakota encompass the Northwestern Plains Ecoregion where soils are nonglaciated and evaporation exceeds precipitation. In contrast, C. sonorensis populations were largely absent east of the Missouri River in South Dakota and North Dakota; this area comprises the Northwestern Glaciated Plains Ecoregion and Northern Glaciated Plains Ecoregion where surface soils reflect Wisconsinan glaciation and precipitation exceeds

  15. Seasonal Variation and Impact of Waste-Water Lagoons as Larval Habitat on the Population Dynamics of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera:Ceratpogonidae) at Two Dairy Farms in Northern California

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Christie E.; Osborne, Cameron J.; Mullens, Bradley A.; Gerry, Alec C.; Gardner, Ian A.; Reisen, William K.; Barker, Christopher M.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2014-01-01

    dispersal of Culicoides midges is essential for the creation of models to predict BTV infection of livestock and to develop sound abatement strategies. PMID:24586925

  16. Seasonal variation and impact of waste-water lagoons as larval habitat on the population dynamics of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera:Ceratpogonidae) at two dairy farms in northern California.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Christie E; Osborne, Cameron J; Mullens, Bradley A; Gerry, Alec C; Gardner, Ian A; Reisen, William K; Barker, Christopher M; Maclachlan, N James

    2014-01-01

    dispersal of Culicoides midges is essential for the creation of models to predict BTV infection of livestock and to develop sound abatement strategies.

  17. Ethnobotany in Rayones, Nuevo León, México

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trough collections of plants and interviews with 110 individuals, an ethnobotanical study was conducted in order to determine the knowledge and use plant species in Rayones, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. The aim of this study was to record all useful plants and their uses, to know whether differences exist in the knowledge about the number of species and uses between women and men, and to know if there is a correlation between the age of individuals and knowledge of species and their uses. Methods A total of 110 persons were interviewed (56 men, 56 women). Semistructured interviews were carried out. The data were analyzed by means of Student t test and the Pearson Correlation Coeficient. Results A total of 252 species, 228 genera and 91 families of vascular plants were recorded. Astraceae, Fabaceae and are the most important families with useful species and Agave and Opuntia are the genera with the highest number of useful species. One hundred and thirty six species are considered as medicinal. Agave, Acacia and Citrus are the genera with the highest number of medicinal species. Other uses includes edible, spiritual rituals, construction and ornamentals. There was a non-significant correlation between the person’s age and number of species, but a significant very low negative correlation between the person’s age and number of uses was found. Conclusions Knowing their medicinal uses is an important issue for the people of Rayones. Boiling and preparing infusions are the main ways of using plants by residents. The leaves, the branches, and the fruits are the most commonly used parts. Almost 18% of the flora is used for wood and construction purposes. Several uses such as cosmetic, shampoo, firming skin tonics and health hair products recorded in Rayones has not been reported for other areas in the state of Nuevo León. In Rayones, women have a greater knowledge about plants and their uses than men, particularly, medicinal plants, but, men have a greater

  18. El bosque estatal del nuevo milenio antes y después del huracán Georges

    Treesearch

    A.E. Lugo; E. Román Nunci; M. Quinones; H. Marcano Vega; I. Vicéns

    2005-01-01

    We studied changes that occurred between 1997 and 2005 on a secondary wet subtropical urban forest in the University of Puerto Rico’s Botanical Garden (Bosque Estatal del Nuevo Milenio). Hurricane Georges passed south of the forest on November 21, 1998 with 127 km/h winds. The study consisted of identifying species in 40 plots of 254 m2 each, measuring the diameter at...

  19. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in dogs and small mammals in Nuevo León, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Galaviz-Silva, Lucio; Mercado-Hernández, Roberto; Zárate-Ramos, José J; Molina-Garza, Zinnia J

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important public health concern in areas extending from South America northward into the southern United States of America. Although this hemoflagellate has many wild and domestic mammalians reported as reservoir hosts, studies on this subject are scarce in Nuevo León state, a region located in northeastern Mexico. This cross-sectional study showed that the general prevalence of T. cruzi infection in Nuevo León state was 14.5% (35/241), this percentage matching the ones determined by PCR and traditional diagnostics. Localities and infected mammals did not significantly differ (χ(2)=6.098, p=0.192); however the number of infected animals was highly correlated with mammalian species (p=0.009). Striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) were found to be the most infected overall (11/34, 32.3%), while dogs (Canis familiaris) had the lowest prevalence. In conclusion, although the prevalence of T. cruzi infection in small mammals was lower in Nuevo León than in other states of Mexico, our results provide new locality records, including striped skunks, opossums (Didelphis marsupialis) and dogs, and extend the recorded area to woodrats (Neotoma micropus). Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Ethnobotany in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park, Nuevo León, México.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Eduardo; Villarreal, José A; Cantú, César; Cabral, Ismael; Scott, Laura; Yen, Carmen

    2007-01-30

    An ethnobotanical study in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park (CMNP), Nuevo Leon, Mexico was conducted. In spite of the large area (1,773.7 km2), heterogeneous physiography, contrasting plant communities and high species diversity of the CMNP, very little was previously known about its useful plants. Based on 95 interviews with inhabitants of the region who were 35 years old or older, we recorded ethnobotanical data of 240 species (comprising 170 genera and 69 botanical families), and 146 different uses. Most of the cited uses (98) were found to be medicinal ones. Ninety five inhabitants 35 years old and oldest were interviewed to know what are the main plant uses in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park. Two hundred and forty species, 170 genera, and 69 families of useful plants and 146 different uses were recorded. We found most of the uses to be medicinal (98), while the rest (48) represent various purposes. Herbaceous plants are the most used, followed by shrubs and trees.

  1. [Prevalence of hymenoptera sting allergy in veterinary medicine students from Monterey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Arias Cruz, Alfredo; Monsiváis Toscano, Gina; Gallardo Martínez, Gabriela; González Díaz, Sandra Nora; Galindo Rodríguez, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    The reported prevalence of allergic systemic reactions to hymenoptera venom occur in up to 3.3% and large local reactions occur in 17% in the general population. To investigate the prevalence of hymenoptera sting allergy in a group of veterinary medicine students from Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. A transverse and observational study was done with 64 students of veterinary medicine. We conducted a questionnaire about the students' history of insect allergy and atopy. Skin test with allergenic extracts of bee and ant were practiced to all subjects. We performed aeroallergen skin prick test to the subjets with suspected atopy. Students age ranged from 17 to 25 years (mean 20.2) and 37 were males. Twenty students (31.3%) had clinical history of atopy and positive skin tests to aeroallergens. On the other hand, 5 students (7.8%), including 2 atopic, had suffered large local reactions, but none of them had suffered systemic reactions. Bee and ant skin tests were positive in 15.6% and 31.3% of the students respectively. There was no difference in the prevalence of hymenoptera allergy between atopic and non atopic subjects (p < 0.05). Further, the frequency of atopy in subjects with positive skin tests for bee and ant was 50%. The prevalence of large local reactions and hymenoptera sensitization found in this group was similar to that found in other epidemiologic studies.

  2. Analysis of the dispersion of air pollutants from a factory Asphalt in Nuevo Vallarta, Nay., Mex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Gonzalez, F. M.; Gaitán-Rodríguez, M.; Cornejo-López, V. M.; Morales-Hernández, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    An asphalt factory has operated intermittently near the urban area of Nuevo Vallarta on Banderas Bay, Nayarit, Mex. This factory has emissions that can affect the health of people living in the colonies nearest are Valle Dorado and San Vicente. The dispersion of emissions depends on the wind (sea breeze-land breeze) and the roof of the inversion, these phenomena determined by the density and temperature of the lower layers of the atmosphere. Asphalts are dark colored binder materials, formed by a complex non-volatile hydrocarbon chains and high molecular weight. Asphalts are produced from petroleum, but by a process of evaporation of the volatiles, leaving the asphalt alone. Therefore, the material emitted by the fireplace are mainly low molecular weight hydrocarbons known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The Emergency Response Guide 2008 developed by various agencies in Canada, U.S. and Mexico mentions that the hydrocarbon gas can have health effects. Animal studies have shown that PAHs can cause harmful effects to the skin, body fluids and some PAHs are carcinogenic. An analysis of the wind field, monthly and seasonal averages for the years 2010 and 2011, recorded in AWS administered by the CEMCO and other stations located near the study area.

  3. [Diagnosis of health needs of the elderly population of a community of Puerto Nuevo].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Cordero, B M; Figueroa Negrón, C; Pérez Vigo, M C; Anadón Vázquez, D; Oliver Vázquez, M

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the health needs of the non-institutionalized population, 65 years and over, residing in a sector of the community of Puerto Nuevo. This was the first urbanization established in Puerto Rico in the early 50's. The "snowball" technique was use to identify all the residents 65 year and over of the mentioned sector. Eighty five elderly persons were interviewed to gather data of the following variables: demographics, health conditions, preventive measures, activities of daily living (ADLs, IADLs), health services utilization, psychosocial aspects and use of programs and services available for the elderly population. Statistical analysis included descriptive measures and chi-square. Results revealed a population with a higher education and economic level than the average for this age group in Puerto Rico. People over 75 years over reported more functional limitations than the 65-74 years interviewees did. In comparison with men, women were less educated and presented a higher percent of widows, persons living alone and functional limitations. In almost all the interviewees, help was available in case of need. The majority expressed satisfaction with their family and social lives. Very few utilized programs and services available for elderly persons. It is concluded that in order to improve their quality of life, this population needs to be managed in an holistic mode to address their biopsychosocial needs and to be educated in health promotion issues to prevent further functional limitations. They also need education about the available services for elderly persons.

  4. Biomarkers of environmental stress in gills of ribbed mussel Aulacomya atra atra (Nuevo Gulf, Northern Patagonia).

    PubMed

    Giarratano, Erica; Gil, Mónica N; Malanga, Gabriela

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we assessed in gills of native ribbed mussels Aulacomya atra atra from three sites within Nuevo Gulf (Northern Patagonia) several biomarkers such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid radicals (LR), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and metallothionein (MT). Furthermore, concentrations of main trace metals (Fe, Al, Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb) were quantified in mussel tissue. Results showed significant induction of SOD, GST, MT and MDA, as well as, higher concentration of Fe, Al and Cd in winter than in summer. The high MDA content measured in mussels from Folías Wreck seemed to be caused by the very high levels of Fe that would come from the corrosion of the vessel. Mussels from the control site Punta Cuevas presented the lowest levels of Cd and the highest of Al in winter. Despite positive correlations were found between Al and GST and MT, no spatial differentiation was detected in those biomarkers. On the other hand, MT was only related to Al been most likely influenced by environmental variables than by the trace metals. It has to be highlighted that the relationship detected among water temperature, nutrients and antioxidant responses in gills is probably related to the fact that this tissue is in direct contact with water and it is sensitive to its fluctuations. Taking into account that mussel gill is a tissue actively proliferating and the first target of contaminants present in water, so that changes in its antioxidant system can provide an earlier warning signal than in other tissues.

  5. Estudio del comportamiento tribologico y de las interacciones de superficie de nuevos nanofluidos ionicos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Rodriguez, Tulia

    tribocorrosion processes. The formation of a coating layer on magnesium alloys from phosphonate imidazolium ionic liquids by immersion and by chronoamperometry has been described. The new coatings reduce the abrasive wear in the magnesium-aluminium alloy but they are not effective in the magnesium-zinc alloy, which prevent the formation of continuous coatings. Los liquidos ionicos son sales liquidas a temperatura ambiente o bajas temperaturas que presentan excelentes propiedades fisico-quimicas. En el presente trabajo se estudian como lubricantes en problemas tribologicos complejos como la lubricacion de metales contra si mismos, el desarrollo de lubricantes base agua y de nuevas superficies autolubricadas. Cuando no es posible reducir la friccion y desgaste mediante lubricacion, como en las aleaciones de magnesio, los liquidos ionicos se han estudiado como precursores de recubrimientos protectores. Se han determinado las interacciones superficiales y los procesos de corrosion sobre cobre y sobre acero con diferentes liquidos ionicos proticos y aproticos para desarrollar nuevos lubricantes y aditivos. En el contacto cobre/cobre, excepto el liquido ionico protico derivado del oleato, todos los liquidos ionicos estudiados presentan mejor comportamiento tribologico que el lubricante comercial Polialfaolefina 6. En el contacto acero/zafiro, los nuevos liquidos ionicos proticos son buenos lubricantes cuando se utilizan en estado puro, y, como aditivos en agua, generan peliculas adsorbidas sobre la superficie del metal reduciendo la friccion y el desgaste tras la evaporacion del agua. Para evitar el periodo de alta friccion inicial en presencia de agua, se han generado peliculas superficiales de liquido ionico sobre el acero en condiciones estaticas. El mejor comportamiento lubricante tanto en el contacto cobre/cobre como en el contacto acero/zafiro se obtiene para el liquido ionico protico derivado del anion adipato, con dos grupos carboxilicos. Las interacciones de los grupos

  6. The Culicoides of Southeast Asia (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    comprised largely of the families Dip- terocarpaceae and Leguminosae . The main layer, 21 to 30 m in height, forms an unbroken canopy except directly...teak forests (Tectona grandis L ) are characteristic and important commercially. Among the trees, Acacia and other Leguminosae are con- spicuous, as...bamboo. Mountain Forest. In Mountain Forest (fig. 18) the families Dipterocarpaceae, / Leguminosae , Burseraceae, Sapotaceae, etc., gradually are

  7. "Optics 4 every1", the hands-on optics outreach program of the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viera-González, Perla M.; Sánchez-Guerrero, Guillermo E.

    2016-09-01

    The Fisica Pato2 (Physics 4 every1) outreach group started as a need of hands-on activities and active Science demonstrations in the education for kids, teenagers and basic education teachers in Nuevo Leffon maintaining a main objective of spread the word about the importance of Optics and Photonics; for accomplish this objective, since November 2013 several outreach events are organized every year by the group. The program Optics 4 every1 is supported by the Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas of the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon and the International Society for Optics and Photonics and consist in quick hands-on activities and Optics demonstrations designed for teach basic optical phenomena related with light and its application in everyday life. During 2015, with the purpose of celebrate the International Year of Light 2015, the outreach group was involved in 13 different events and reached more than 8,000 people. The present work explains the activities done and the outcome obtained with this program.

  8. Viviendo Con Incendios: Una guia para los duenos de casas en Nuevo Mexico [Living with Fire: A Guide for the Homeowner-New Mexico

    Treesearch

    U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management

    2008-01-01

    La posibilidad de perdidas humanas y de propiedad en Nuevo Mexico debido a un incendio forestal ha ido incrementando. Para responder a este peligro, entidades locales, estatales, federales, particulares y sin fines de lucro se han unido para crear Como Reducir la Amenaza de Incendios Forestales, un programa dirigido a los propietarios de casas. Este no es un programa...

  9. Medicinal plants in the southern region of the State of Nuevo León, México.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Castillón, Eduardo; Soto-Mata, Brianda Elizabeth; Garza-López, Miriam; Villarreal-Quintanilla, José Ángel; Jiménez-Pérez, Javier; Pando-Moreno, Marisela; Sánchez-Salas, Jaime; Scott-Morales, Laura; Cotera-Correa, Mauricio

    2012-12-11

    Although the flora of the State of Nuevo León is well known, there are few records of ethnobotancial information. An ethnobotanical study was undertaken in order to know the medicinal plants used by people living at the scrublands and oak-pine forest areas in the southern Nuevo León. Collection of plants specimens and interviews were carried out among the people of the municipalities of Aramberri, Galeana, and Zaragoza. Since former studies in the region are scarce, the aim of this work was to record the medicinal species and their uses in the scrublands and oak-pine forest areas, of southern Nuevo León, Mexico, and also to know if there are differences in the number of species and number of uses knowledge by people. Field work was carried out over a 2 years period; useful plants were collected and a total of 105 people from 46 different villages were interviewed. A database was compiled using data collected by means of semi structured interviews. The data were analyzed by means of non-parametric statistics, using goodness-of-fit test (Chi-squared) (number of species known by people of each municipality, number of uses known by people of each municipality), Chi-squared modified to incorporate the Yates Correction (number of species known by people living at scrublands and oak-pine forest); the Kruskall-Wallis test (number of species known by women and men of the three municipalities), and the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (age and number of species known, and age and number of uses). A total of 163 medicinal plant species were recorded in the study area, comprising 108 wild and 55 cultivated plants. A total of 117 species were recorded in the oak-pine forest, and 111 in the scrublands area, a total of 68 were recorded in both areas; 68 medicinal species are used in all three municipalities, 40 wild and 28 cultivated. We documented 235 different medicinal uses. The most common plant parts used for medicinal purposes were found to be leaves (123 species

  10. Assessment of polychlorinated biphenyls and mercury levels in soil and biological samples from San Felipe, Nuevo Mercurio, Zacatecas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Costilla-Salazar, Rogelio; Trejo-Acevedo, Antonio; Rocha-Amador, Diana; Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván Nelinho

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate contamination by polychlorinated biphenyls and mercury in soil, and to assess exposure level to both contaminants in children living in San Felipe, Nuevo Mercurio, Zacatecas, Mexico. We found soil levels of total polychlorinated biphenyls ranging from non detectable (nd) to 190 μg/kg. Mercury soil levels ranged from 8.9 to 10215.0 mg/kg. Exposure levels of total polychlorinated biphenyls assessed in blood and urinary mercury in children living in the studied community were 1,600 ± 8,800 ng/g lipid and 4.2 ± 7.1 μg/g creatinine, respectively.

  11. Medicinal plants in the southern region of the State of Nuevo León, México

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the flora of the State of Nuevo León is well known, there are few records of ethnobotancial information. An ethnobotanical study was undertaken in order to know the medicinal plants used by people living at the scrublands and oak-pine forest areas in the southern Nuevo León. Collection of plants specimens and interviews were carried out among the people of the municipalities of Aramberri, Galeana, and Zaragoza. Since former studies in the region are scarce, the aim of this work was to record the medicinal species and their uses in the scrublands and oak-pine forest areas, of southern Nuevo León, Mexico, and also to know if there are differences in the number of species and number of uses knowledge by people. Methods Field work was carried out over a 2 years period; useful plants were collected and a total of 105 people from 46 different villages were interviewed. A database was compiled using data collected by means of semi structured interviews. The data were analyzed by means of non-parametric statistics, using goodness-of-fit test (Chi-squared) (number of species known by people of each municipality, number of uses known by people of each municipality), Chi-squared modified to incorporate the Yates Correction (number of species known by people living at scrublands and oak-pine forest); the Kruskall-Wallis test (number of species known by women and men of the three municipalities), and the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (age and number of species known, and age and number of uses). Results A total of 163 medicinal plant species were recorded in the study area, comprising 108 wild and 55 cultivated plants. A total of 117 species were recorded in the oak-pine forest, and 111 in the scrublands area, a total of 68 were recorded in both areas; 68 medicinal species are used in all three municipalities, 40 wild and 28 cultivated. We documented 235 different medicinal uses. The most common plant parts used for medicinal purposes were

  12. [The small halophilic zygopteric odonate, Mortonagrion hirosei, of central Japan, a predator utilizable against tiny stinging diptera of coastal salt marshes, especially Ceratopogonidae of the genera Culicoides and Oecacta, pests of sea shores in southwestern U.S.A. and Caribbean area].

    PubMed

    Vasserot, J

    1986-01-01

    Among stinging diptera pullulating in coastal salt marshes Ceratopogonidae gnats (mainly of genus Culicoides and Oecacta) are especially troublesome, particularly in Southeastern U. S. A. and Caribbean area, escaping attacks of most predators by their tiny size. But the zygopteric odonate insect Mortonagrion hirosei is well fitted for hunting those minute diptera, by its tiny size and its behaviour, seeking shelter between halophilic plants (2 facts explaining that it was not discovered in central Japan before 1971...). Its larvae, living in brackish waters of coastal lagoons, can devour those of Ceratopogonidae and at least young stages of those of Mosquitoes whose some halophilic species are dangerous vectors of diseases. According to similarity of climates M. hirosei can certainly thrive in Southeastern U. S. A., and probably in Southern Europe. At lower latitudes problems for completion of annual cycle could perhaps arise from lack of hivernal cooling. It is necessary to make at the world scale methodical researches for other species of zygopteric odonates of similar ecology which could exist in other countries, both for avoiding harmful competition of introduced M. hirosei with native species still unknown and for fulfilling the same ecological function in areas of climate no suitable for this Japanese insect. Introduction of M. hirosei in new geographic areas would be very useful, too, for protection of this interesting species threatened by human activities in its natural biotopes, made of discontinuous and rather little areas.

  13. Persistent Organic Pollutants and Heavy Metal Concentrations in Soil from the Metropolitan Area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Orta-García, Sandra Teresa; Ochoa-Martinez, Angeles Catalina; Carrizalez-Yáñez, Leticia; Varela-Silva, José Antonio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Pruneda-Álvarez, Lucia Guadalupe; Torres-Dosal, Arturo; Guzmán-Mar, Jorge Luis; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE), and four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, and lead) in outdoor surface soils (50 samples) collected from the metropolitan area of Monterrey in Mexico. Total PBDEs levels ranged from 1.80 to 127 µg/kg, with mean total PBDEs level of 14.2 ± 21.5 µg/kg (geometric mean ± standard deviation). For PCBs, the mean total level in the studied soils was 23.5 ± 20.2 µg/kg (range 4.0-65.5 µg/kg). An important finding in our study was that all soil samples (100%) had detectable levels of the metabolite p,p'-DDE. Moreover, the mean total DDT level (∑p'p-DDT and p'p-DDE) was approximately 132 ± 175 µg/kg. The mean levels for arsenic, cadmium, and lead in soil were 5.30 ± 1.35 (range 1.55-7.85) mg/kg, 2.20 ± 1.20 (range 0.65-6.40) mg/kg, and 455 ± 204 (range 224-1230) mg/kg, respectively. Our study has several limitations, the most notable of which is the small sample of soils evaluated. However, this screening study provided concentration data for the occurrence of POPs and four heavy metals in soil from the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, and taking into consideration that soil is an important pathway of exposure for people, a biomonitoring program for the surveillance of the general population in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon is deemed necessary.

  14. Swath Bathymetry Surveys of the Monterey Bay Area from Point Ano Nuevo to Moss Landing, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Logan, Joshua B.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes swath bathymetry and backscatter data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey on the continental shelf within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary between Point A?o Nuevo and Moss Landing, in San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, Calif. The survey was done for the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), in field activities S-7-09-MB and S-10-09-MB, by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The data were aquired in two seperate surveys: (1) between August 13, 2009 and September 3, 2009, personnel from WCMG completed field activity S-7-09-MB, from Point A?o Nuevo south to Table Rock, as well as a block west of Soquel Canyon; (2) between October 12 and December 16, 2009, WCMG conducted field activity S-10-09-MB, surveying between Table Rock and Moss Landing.

  15. Parasitological examination for presence of hookworms (Uncinaria spp.) in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) at Año Nuevo State Reserve, California (2012).

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Kuzmina, T A; Spraker, T R; Jaggi, N; Costa, D P; Crocker, D E; Tolliver, S C; Tift, M S

    2012-10-01

    Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris Gill, 1866), inhabiting rookeries on the mainland of Año Nuevo State Reserve in central California, were investigated in 2012 for presence of hookworms (Uncinaria spp.). Material collected and examined for hookworms included: blubber (n = 15), stomach and intestines (n = 21) from dead pups; feces from the rectum of weaned pups (n = 23); sand containing apparent feces in areas of weaned pups (n = 28) and sand without apparent feces in areas of weaned pups (n = 54); milk from females (n =23) at 5 days and about 23 to 26 days postpartum; and placenta from one female. Evidence of hookworm presence was not detected in any of the samples examined. Possible reasons why hookworms were not found in northern elephant seals on the mainland of Año Nuevo State Reserve are discussed.

  16. Turning scientific approaches into practical conservation actions: the case of Comunidad Indigena de Nuevo San Juan Parangaricutiro, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, A; Bocco, G; Torres, A

    2001-05-01

    Optimum natural resource management and biodiversity conservation are desirable goals. These, however, often exclude each other, since maximum economic benefits have promoted drastic reductions in biodiversity throughout the world. This dilemma confronts local stakeholders, who usually go for maximizing economic inputs, whereas other social (e.g., academic) sectors are favor conservation practices. In this paper we describe the way two scientific approaches--landscape and participatory research--were used to develop sound and durable land use scenarios. These two approaches included expert knowledge of both social and environmental conditions in indigenous communities. Our major emphasis was given to detect spatially explicit land use scenarios and capacity building in order to construct a decision support system operated by stakeholders of the Comunidad Indigena de Nuevo San Juan Parangaricutiro in Mexico. The system for decision-making was fed with data from inventories of both abiotic and biotic biodiversity components. All research, implementation, and monitoring activities were conducted in close collaboration with members of the indigenous community. As a major result we obtained a number of forest alternative uses that favor emerging markets and make this indigenous community less dependent on a single market. Furthermore, skilled members of the community are now running the automated system for decision-making. In conclusion, our results were better expressed as products with direct benefits in local livelihoods rather than pure academic outputs.

  17. Interferon Gamma-Based Detection of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Border States of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Oren, Eyal; Alatorre-Izaguirre, Gabriela; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Moreno-Treviño, Maria Guadalupe; Garcialuna-Martinez, Javier; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world's population is infected with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Tuberculosis (TB) rates in the border states are higher than national rates in both the US and Mexico, with the border accounting for 30% of total registered TB cases in both countries. However, LTBI rates in the general population in Mexican border states are unknown. In this region, LTBI is diagnosed using the tuberculin skin test (TST). New methods of detection more specific than TST have been developed, although there is currently no gold standard for LTBI detection. Our objective is to demonstrate utility of the Quantiferon TB gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test compared with the TST to detect LTBI among border populations. This is an observational, cross-sectional study carried out in border areas of the states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Participants (n = 210) provided a TST and blood sample for the QFT-GIT. Kappa coefficients assessed the agreement between TST and QFT-GIT. Participant characteristics were compared using Fisher exact tests. Thirty-eight percent of participants were diagnosed with LTBI by QFT-GIT. The proportion of LTBI detected using QFT-GIT was almost double [38% (79/210)] that found by TST [19% (39/210)] (P < 0.001). Concordance between TST and QFT-GIT was low (kappa = 0.37). We recommend further studies utilizing the QFT-GIT test to detect LTBI among border populations.

  18. Interferon Gamma-Based Detection of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Border States of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Eyal; Alatorre-Izaguirre, Gabriela; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Moreno-Treviño, Maria Guadalupe; Garcialuna-Martinez, Javier; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world’s population is infected with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Tuberculosis (TB) rates in the border states are higher than national rates in both the US and Mexico, with the border accounting for 30% of total registered TB cases in both countries. However, LTBI rates in the general population in Mexican border states are unknown. In this region, LTBI is diagnosed using the tuberculin skin test (TST). New methods of detection more specific than TST have been developed, although there is currently no gold standard for LTBI detection. Our objective is to demonstrate utility of the Quantiferon TB gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test compared with the TST to detect LTBI among border populations. This is an observational, cross-sectional study carried out in border areas of the states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Participants (n = 210) provided a TST and blood sample for the QFT-GIT. Kappa coefficients assessed the agreement between TST and QFT-GIT. Participant characteristics were compared using Fisher exact tests. Thirty-eight percent of participants were diagnosed with LTBI by QFT-GIT. The proportion of LTBI detected using QFT-GIT was almost double [38% (79/210)] that found by TST [19% (39/210)] (P < 0.001). Concordance between TST and QFT-GIT was low (kappa = 0.37). We recommend further studies utilizing the QFT-GIT test to detect LTBI among border populations. PMID:26484340

  19. The Ni, Fe and CO contents of metal phases in the Allende, Holbrook and Nuevo Mercurio chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.; Smith, D. G. W.; Launspach, S.

    1983-12-01

    The Ni, Fe and Co contents of metal phases in the Allende, Holbrook and Nuevo Mercurio chondrites have been obtained using an automated electron microprobe fitted with both wavelength and energy dispersive spectrometers. Co contents of kamacite in these chondrites are inconsistent with those reported previously, but the general tendency of Co to increase in the kamacite in chondrites from H, L to LL groups, is supported by the study. Although the variation patterns of Ni-Co observed so far for L4, H5 and CV3 chondrites are simple, six L6 chondrites, including those reported previously, show significant difference in Co contents and the concentration and abundance charcateristics of Ni-Fe-Co patterns of the metal phases. The great similarity of composition of each region of these patterns obtained from two samples of Holbrook and two samples of Allende which came from different collections, indicate that the variation patterns of Ni-Co in the metal phases provide a means of characterizing or 'fingerprinting', as do the great differences in the variation patterns of Fe-Ni-Co which occur from one chondrite to another or even within the same group and petrologic type.

  20. Airborne pollen of Carya, Celtis, Cupressus, Fraxinus and Pinus in the metropolitan area of Monterrey Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Estrada, Alejandra; Alvarado-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Torres-Cepeda, Teresa Elizabeth; Foroughbakhch-Pournavab, Rahim; Hernández-Piñero, Jorge Luis

    2008-01-01

    The concentration of pollen grains in the atmosphere over the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, was analyzed throughout a year from March 2003-February 2004, focused on the genus Carya, Celtis, Cupressus, Fraxinus and Pinus owing to their interest as etiological pollinosis agents in diverse regions of the world. A 7-day Hirst type volumetric spore and pollen trap was located on a building roof of the city at 15 m from ground level for continuous sampling. The total quantity of pollen recorded for the study period was 21,083 grains/m(3), corresponding to 49.75 % of the taxa of interest. February and March were the months with higher pollen amounts in the air with 7,525 and 2,781 grains/m(3), respectively, and amounted to 49 % of total year through pollen. Fraxinus was the genus which contributed to the largest amount of pollen with 28 % of total grains (5,935 grains/m(3)) followed by Cupressus with 13 % (2,742 grains/ m(3)). Celtis, Pinus and Carya contributed with 5.3 % , 2.7 % , and 0.6 % of total pollen, respectively. These results indicate that Fraxinus and Cupressus are present in the area in sufficient quantity to indicate likely involvement in the origin of allergic disorders in the human population.

  1. Geo-social and health disparities among persons with disabilities living in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon and Dallas, Texas.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Silviya P; Small, Eusebius; Campillo, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    In low and high income countries alike, disability exacerbates social, economic, and health disparities, in spite of their differences. This study seeks to identify factors that predict the circumstances people with disabilities face, including poverty. A cross-sectional study design was employed using census track level data for the cities of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, and Dallas, Texas, from Mexico 2010 and USA 2000 census data collections. Two methods, spatial autocorrelation and geographically weighted regression were used to identify spatial patterns of disability and to explore the relation between disability and context-specific socio-demographic factors. Results indicated that people with disabilities living below the poverty line experience high segregation levels in the semi-central zones of Dallas. In Monterrey, people with disabilities clustered in central areas of the city. A Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) from both data analyses reported high goodness of fit (R ≥ 0.8 for Dallas data and R ≥ 0.7 for Monterrey data, respectively) and predictability of disability prevalence when social disadvantage factors such as unemployment, housing insecurity, household living conditions, and lack of education were present. The divergent and sometimes conflicting trends in practices and policies addressing disability in low and high income environments renders a reexamination of the framework of disability. An understanding of local characteristics joins a grounded socio-cultural understanding of the various contexts that shape location-based social networks and political decisions in providing such an analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of the Nuevo Leon Magnetic Anomaly and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.E.; Corrigan, D.J.; Wilt, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The broad dipolar magnetic anomaly whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I power plant, has long been suspected to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3-3.5 km over the anomaly, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed magnetic field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 x 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analysed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed them to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the magnetic anomaly, the magnetic source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of peridotite-gabbro plutons. The suite of igneous rocks was probably emplaced at a shallow depth in response to crustal extension and thinning brought on by en echelon strike-slip faulting. The bottom of the magnetic source body, at an estimated depth of 6 km, is presumed to be at or near that of the Curie isotherm (575/sup 0/C) for magnetite, the principal ferromagnetic mineral in peridotiticgabbroic rocks. The geological model derived from the magnetic study is generally supported by other geophysical data. In particular, earthquake data suggest dike injection is occurring at depths of 6-11 km in an area beneath the magnetic source. Thus, it is possible that heat for the geothermal field is being maintained by continuing crustal extension and magmatic activity.

  3. Analysis of the Nuevo Leon magnetic anomaly and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.E.; Wilt, M.J.; Corrigan, D.J.

    1982-10-01

    The broad dipolar magnetic anomaly whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I Power Plant, has long been suspected to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3 to 3.5 km over the anomaly, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed magnetic field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 by 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analyzed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed tham to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in-situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the magnetic anomaly, the magnetic source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of peridotite-gabbro plutons. the suite of igneous rocks was probably passively emplaced at a shallow depth in response to crustal extension and thinning brought on by strike-slip faulting. The bottom of the magnetic source body, at an estimated depth of 6 km, is presumed to be at or near that of the Curie isotherm (575/sup 0/C) for magnetite, the principal ferromagnetic mineral in peridotitic-gabbroic rocks. The geological model derived from the magnetic study is generally supported by other geophysical data. In particular, earthquake data suggest dike injection is occurring at depths of 6 to 11 km in an area beneath the magnetic source. Thus, it is possible that heat for the geothermal field is being maintained by continuing crustal extension and magmatic activity.

  4. Preliminary environmental monitoring of water quality in the Rio Grande in the Laredo-Nuevo Laredo Region.

    PubMed

    Buelna, Genoveva; Riffat, Rumana

    2007-08-01

    The international border region of the Rio Grande faces severe environmental and economic challenges. Contamination and degradation of its fragile lotic environments are mainly due to stresses from rapid population growth and unchecked industrial development. This study evaluates the water quality of the Rio Grande in the area of Nuevo Laredo, Mexico and Laredo, Texas, USA, in terms of physical, chemical and bacteriological parameters, as well as total metals, organochlorine pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOC), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) and radioactivity. Surface water samples were collected at 3 sites along the river. Two additional non-river sites (potable water and residual water) were studied for a better assessment of water quality in the region. Three series of samples were taken every other day during one week (November 3 to November 8, 2005) from the five sampling sites. Levels of oil and grease in all the river samples exceeded the limits established by Mexican regulations. Concentrations of aluminum above the permissible limits for source of drinking water and for quality for protection of freshwater biota were also found in all of the river sites. A number of unregulated elements (Cd, Sr, Mg, Na, Fe, Si, Li and K) appeared in the river samples. The average concentrations of Ba and Na in the potable water samples were below the permissible limits. Ca, Sr, Mg and Si were also found but are not regulated. The majority of the organic compounds studied in both the river and in residual water samples was below detection limits. In all the potable water samples, bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane were found above their limit of quantitation (LOQ), but these compounds are not regulated. This preliminary study suggests the need for consistent periodic monitoring to track the environmental status of the Rio Grande.

  5. Population data of 24 STRs in Mexican-Mestizo population from Monterrey, Nuevo Leon (Northeast, Mexico) based on Powerplex(®) Fusion and GlobalFiler(®) kits.

    PubMed

    Ramos-González, Benito; Aguilar-Velázquez, José Alonso; Chávez-Briones, María de Lourdes; Delgado-Chavarría, Juan Ramón; Alfaro-Lopez, Elizabeth; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor

    2016-03-01

    The STR loci included into new commercial human identification kits compels geneticists estimating forensic parameters for interpretation purposes in forensic casework. Therefore, we studied for the first time in Mexico the GlobalFiler(®) and Powerplex(®) Fusion systems in 326 and 682 unrelated individuals, respectively. These individuals are resident of the Monterrey City of the Nuevo Leon state (Northeast, Mexico). Population data from 23 autosomal STRs and the Y-STR locus DYS391 are reported and compared against available STR data from American ethnic groups and the unique Mexican population studied with Powerplex(®) Fusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Profile of sensitization to allergens in children with atopic dermatitis assisting to Allergology Service of University Hospital, Nuevo Leon, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Yong-Rodríguez, Adrián; Macías-Weinmann, Alejandra; Palma-Gómez, Samuel; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Pérez-Vanzzini, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Mujica, José Julio; González-Díaz, Sandra Nora

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: la sensibilización a alergenos observada en la dermatitis atópica aumenta el riesgo del niño a padecer rinitis alérgica y asma. Los estudios recientes indican que entre mayor actividad de proteasas haya en los alergenos a los que se está sensibilizado, hay mayor defecto en la barrera cutánea y mayor gravedad de la enfermedad. Objetivos: conocer el patrón de sensibilización a los alergenos en niños con dermatitis atópica atendidos en el Servicio de Alergología del Hospital Universitario de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León y conocer si estos niños tienen mayor sensibilización a los antígenos con actividad proteolítica. Material y método: estudio retrospectivo en el que revisamos los reportes de las pruebas cutáneas por punción realizadas en nuestro servicio a niños de 5 meses a 16 años de edad, con diagnóstico de dermatitis atópica, de enero de 2012 a enero de 2014. Evaluamos la frecuencia de sensibilización a aeroalergenos y alimentos, así como el tamaño de la roncha en la respuesta cutánea para cada alergeno en particular. Resultados: se incluyeron los reportes de pruebas cutáneas de 66 niños, 30 hombres y 36 mujeres. Cuarenta y seis pacientes estaban sensibilizados a aeroalergenos y 38 a alimentos. Los ácaros del polvo de casa (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus/Dermatophagoides farinae) fueron los alergenos con mayor frecuencia de respuesta positiva en las pruebas cutáneas. De los niños con sensibilización a alimentos, sólo los niños sensibilizados a la leche de vaca, al huevo y al pescado tuvieron una roncha mayor de 6 mm de diámetro. CONCLUSIÓN: en los niños con dermatitis atópica es común la sensibilización a aeroalergenos con alta actividad de proteasas y la polisensibilización es muy común. La sensibilización a alimentos es común en estos pacientes, pero sólo un pequeño porcentaje de ellos muestra respuestas cutáneas lo suficientemente grandes para relacionarlas con gravedad de la enfermedad.

  7. Causes of death in preweaned northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris, Gill, 1866), Año Nuevo State Reserve, California, 2012.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Terry R; Lyons, Eugene T; Kuzmina, Tetiana A; Tift, Michael S; Raverty, Stephen; Jaggi, Nicole; Crocker, Daniel E

    2014-03-01

    During an ongoing physiological ecology study on pups and adult female northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris, Gill, 1866) on the mainland rookery at Año Nuevo State Reserve (California), an opportunity was afforded to collect fresh dead pups for parasitology and necropsy. The investigation was undertaken to delineate the causes of death of northern elephant seals recovered from Año Nuevo State Reserve. Prior to this study, there was no evidence of increased mortality or health problems on this rookery. Necropsies, histology, and ancillary diagnostic studies were conducted on 21 fresh dead preweaned pups. Ages ranged from 1 stillbirth to pups approximately 2 weeks of age. Gross lesions included varying degrees of bruising, hemorrhage, lacerations, and fractures attributed to blunt force trauma to the head, chest, and/or abdomen in 16 pups; starvation in 6 pups; bite wounds in 2 pups; generalized icterus in 2 pups; presumptive drowning in 2 pups; and 1 stillbirth. Most pups had multiple gross lesions. Following light microscopic examination, pups could be assigned into 4 general diagnostic categories: 1) trauma, 2) nutritional status, 3) infectious conditions, and 4) congenital anomalies. This investigation of preweaned pup mortality of northern elephant seals in California further refines diagnostic categories for perinatal pup mortality.

  8. [Pediculus capitis in schoolchildren of the urban area of Nuevo León, México: Analyses of associated factors].

    PubMed

    Molina-Garza, Zinnia J; Galaviz-Silva, Lucio

    2017-09-01

    Pediculosis capitis is a recurring problem affecting 6 to 12 millions of children annually; there are no epidemiological data on this subject in the state of Nuevo León, and there are few in México. Therefore, new contributions are needed to design control strategies based on factors that may predispose to head lice infestation. To determine the prevalence of Pediculus capitis in primary school children and to evaluate risk factors and individual or socioeconomic characteristics statistically associated with infestation. We included 840 schoolchildren from six municipalities after parents and children signed an informed consent. Ectoparasites were collected from infested children using a finetoothed comb. Participants were interviewed using a questionnaire on individual and socioeconomic variables including age, gender, education, hair characteristics, overcrowding, and siblings with pediculosis, among others. The overall prevalence of head lice in schoolchildren was 28% (235/840), the highest prevalence was among girls (33.7%, 140/417), and children from the fifth grade (10-11 years old) were the most affected (6.2%; 52/840). Female gender, long hair and the father's education level were significantly associated with P. capitis. Our results showed that the P. capitis prevalence in Nuevo León is one of the highest in Mexico, that it constitutes a real public health problem, and that there is need to establish prevention programs at home and school to decrease or to control P. capitis with the support of public health authorities.

  9. [Frequency of color blindness and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency in non-industrialized populations in the state of Nuevo León, México].

    PubMed

    Ceda-Flores, R M; Arriaga-Ríos, G; Muñoz-Campos, J; Bautista-Peña, V A; Angeles Rojas-Alvarado, M; González-Quiróga, G; Leal-Garza, C H; Garza-Chapa, R

    1990-01-01

    In order to know if there would be genetic structural differences among non industrial and industrial populations, two genetic markers were studied: color-blindness (CPC) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD), in students, males and females that were resident in five non industrial populations in the State of Nuevo Leon. The results were compared with the information for industrial zone from the Monterrey Metropolitan area (AMM). It was found that the frequencies of CPC and G6PD in non industrial populations (2.57 and 0.00 per cent), were lower than the ones in the industrial AMM (4.0 and 0.66 per cent), probably as a result that in the first populations, with minor urbanization, the main factors that influence are: natural selection, interacial mixed or genetic drift and the second population is the immigration, since 1940 to present time, of Mexican populations with greater influence from the Indians and Africans.

  10. Desarrollo de un instrumento para medir percepciones sobre el contexto de construccion del conocimiento cientifico de estudiantes universitarios de nuevo ingreso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ramirez, Jaime Antonio

    En esta investigacion, se desarrollo un instrumento que permite medir percepciones relacionadas al contexto de constriccion del conocimiento cientifico. Se examinaron instrumentos existentes y se encontro que el VOSTS (Views on science, technology, and society), instrumento desarrollado empiricamente en Canada por Aikenhead, Ryan y Fleming, podia traducirse y validarse en el contexto cultural puertorriqueno. El instrumento es extenso, consta de 113 reactivos, cada uno con una premisa basica relacionada a la tematica ciencia, tecnologia y sociedad y un numero de alternativas relacionadas a la premisa que oscila entre siete y trece. Se delimito su utilizacion a los quince reactivos identificados por los autores como relacionados a la construccion social del conocimiento cientifico. Metodologicamente, se procedio a utilizar el modelo de adaptacion intercultural, que permite que el instrumento desarrollado satisfaga las dimensiones de equivalencia semantica, de contenido, tecnica, de criterio y conceptual, atemperado asi al instrumento original. Se cumplio con este proposito mediante la traduccion de la version original en ingles al espanol y viceversa. Se utilizaron comites para examinar la traduccion y la retro-traduccion del instrumento. Se realizo una prueba piloto con estudiantes universitarios de nuevo ingreso, utilizando el instrumento traducido para asegurar su intelegibilidad. La confiabilidad del instrumento se determino mediante la intervencion de un panel de expertos quienes clasificaron las distintas posiciones dentro de cada reactivo en: realista, con merito e ingenua; se transformaron estas opciones en valores numericos lo que permitio establecer una escala Likert para cada una. Se suministro el instrumento a una muestra de estudiantes universitarios de nuevo ingreso con caracteristicas similares a las de la poblacion puertorriquena en cuanto a ejecucion en las pruebas de aptitud verbal y matematica del College Board. Los resultados de sus contestaciones

  11. Diel and Seasonal Activities of Culicoides spp. near Yankeetown, Florida.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    Corbet , 1965; Davies, 1966; Braverman, 1970). The major characteristics of all traps are a lower section that covers the pupal habitat and an upper...frequency of emergence. Corbet (1964) defines 4 basic temporal patterns of emergence in insects: continuous, rhythmic, sporadic, and seasonal...obsened at dusk (Kline and Roberts, 1992 ). The activity of L. torrens Townsend, L. foulki Clastrier and Wirth, and L. knowltoni is diurnally bimodal

  12. Randomized Controlled Trial of Nuevo Amanecer: A Peer-delivered Stress Management Intervention for Spanish-speaking Latinas with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nápoles, Anna María; Santoyo-Olsson, Jasmine; Ortiz, Carmen; Gregorich, Steven; Lee, Howard E.; Duron, Ysabel; Graves, Kristi; Luce, Judith A.; McGuire, Peggy; Díaz-Méndez, Marynieves; Stewart, Anita L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Latinas with breast cancer suffer symptom and psychosocial health disparities. Effective interventions have not been developed for or tested in this population. Purpose We describe community-based participatory research methods used to develop and implement the Nuevo Amanecer program, a culturally tailored, peer-delivered cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention for low-income Spanish-speaking Latinas with breast cancer, and unique considerations in implementing a randomized controlled trial to test the program in community settings. Methods We applied an implementation science framework to delineate the methodological phases used to develop and implement the Nuevo Amanecer program and trial, emphasizing community engagement processes. Results In phase 1, we established project infrastructure: academic and community Co-Principal Investigators, community partners, community advisory board, steering committee, and funding. In phase 2, we identified three program inputs: formative research, a community best practices model, and an evidence-based intervention tested in non-Latinas. In phase 3, we created the new program by integrating and adapting intervention components from the three sources, making adaptations to accommodate low-literacy, Spanish language, cultural factors, community context, and population needs. In phase 4, we built community capacity for the program and trial by training field staff (recruiters and interventionists embedded in community sites), compensating field staff, and creating a system for identifying potential participants. In phase 5, we implemented and monitored the program and trial. Engaging community partners in all phases has resulted in a new, culturally tailored program that is suitable for newly diagnosed Latinas with breast cancer and a trial that is acceptable and supported by community and clinical partners. Lessons Learned Engagement of community-based organizations and cancer survivors as research

  13. [Teaching-inservice integration in primary care. Experience of the Facultad de Enfermería de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Castillo, M A; Espinoza de Benavides, S; Rodríguez Aguilar, L; Martínez Maldonado, J M

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the reasons which justify the need to integrate teaching in-service and health care delivery in nursing, and the mechanisms to achieve efficiency in health programs. In 1976 the Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon (Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León), as an educational and training center and as a means for scientific and humanistic endeavor to foster the development of the community it serves, began a joint experimental project with the health sector, by means of the Guadalupe Health Program and the Nursing Development Program, with the participation of the Schools of Medicine, Nursing and Dentistry. Special importance is attached to the objectives and organization of these nursing programs, the teaching in-service methodology, and the functions and responsibilities of teachers, students and support staff. The achievements of eleven years of work are reported.

  14. First Detection of the Kdr Mutation T929I in Head Lice (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae) in Schoolchildren of the Metropolitan Area of Nuevo Leon and Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Garcia, Gustavo; Villanueva-Segura, Karina; Trujillo-Rodriguez, Gerardo; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Iram P; Lopez-Monroy, Beatriz; Flores, Adriana E

    2017-07-01

    The head louse Pediculus humanus capitis (De Geer) is a hematophagous ectoparasite that inhabits the human scalp. Infestations by this insect are commonly known as pediculosis, which is more common in younger groups. These infestations are asymptomatic; however, skin irritation from scratching occasionally may cause secondary bacterial infections. In recent years, the prevalence of pediculosis has increased in children; this increase has been attributed to louse resistance to the insecticides used as a control measure for infestation. The aim of the present study was to determine the presence and frequency of the knockdown resistance mutation (kdr) T929I in 468 head lice collected from 32 elementary schools in the metropolitan area of Nuevo Leon (24) and Yucatan (8), Mexico. This is the first report of a knockdown resistance (kdr) mechanism in head lice from Mexico. The T929I mutation was present in all of the sampled schools, with variability observed in its allelic and genotypic frequencies. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Infection levels and seasonality of monogeneans in the largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides (Perciformes: Centrarchidae) from Nuevo León, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Galaviz-Silva, L; Iruegas-Buentello, F J; Escobar-González, B; Molina-Garza, Z J

    2016-11-01

    Largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, is a native fish species with special importance for sport fishing competitions in Nuevo León, Mexico. However, no study has investigated the parasitic fauna of M. salmoides, and no reports are available on monogenean parasites in this fish species. Therefore, we described the monogenean parasites of M. salmoides and the effects of season and fish condition factor in five reservoirs: La Boca (LB), El Cuchillo-Solidaridad (CS), Sombreretillo (S), Laguna Salinillas (LS) and Cerro Prieto (CP). The monogeneans infecting M. salmoides were Clavunculus unguis and Acolpenteron ureteroecetes (collected in all localities), as well as Syncleithrium fusiformis, Haplocleidus furcatus, Clavunculus bifurcatus and Urocleidus principalis (CS). Clavunculus unguis had the highest prevalence in fish from all reservoirs. The abundance of monogeneans was generally greater in late spring to autumn than in winter. Although season was not correlated with abundance (r s = 0.0934, P <  0.0154), the months of highest temperature (from May to September) were positively correlated with parasite abundance. A significant association was observed between fish condition factor and the presence of monogeneans (P <  0.05), except for A. ureteroecetes. Our findings include five new geographic records for C. unguis, S. fusiformis, H. furcatus and C. bifurcatus.

  16. Percepcion de los profesores universitarios acerca del concepto cultura cientifica y de sus implicaciones en el nuevo bachillerato del Recinto de Rio Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Pastrana, Nilsa

    El Senado Academico del Recinto de Rio Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico aprobo en el ano academico 2005-2006 la Certificacion 46, que contiene los lineamientos de un nuevo bachillerato. Este nuevo bachillerato introdujo cambios significativos en el curriculo tradicional. Entre ellos se encuentra la reduccion del componente de educacion general y el de Ciencias Biologicas en particular. La reduccion de creditos en el componente de Ciencias Biologicas ha obligado a reevaluar el concepto de cultura cientifica que desarrollan esos cursos. El proposito del estudio consistio en auscultar las percepciones de los profesores de las Facultades de Administracion de Empresas, Humanidades, Ciencias Sociales, Ciencias Naturales, Educacion y Estudios Generales del Recinto de Rio Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico en torno al concepto de cultura cientifica, los contenidos disciplinares del curso de Ciencias Biologicas y la reduccion de creditos en el nuevo bachillerato. Las preguntas que guiaron la investigacion fueron: ¿cuales son las percepciones que tienen los profesores de las Facultades de Administracion de Empresas, Ciencias Sociales, Estudios Generales, Ciencias Naturales, Humanidades y Educacion, en torno al concepto de cultura cientifica y los contenidos disciplinares del curso de Ciencias Biologicas? ¿cuales son las percepciones que tienen los profesores de Ciencias Biologicas en torno al concepto cultura cientifica y los contenidos disciplinares del curso de Ciencias Biologicas? ¿existen diferencias significativas por facultad, genero, experiencia, rango y nombramiento en las percepciones que tienen los profesores del Recinto de Rio Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico sobre los elementos que caracterizan la cultura cientifica y los contenidos biologicos que deben tener los egresados del Recinto? ¿que implicaciones curriculares tienen estos testimonios en el desarrollo del concepto de cultura cientifica en el nuevo bachillerato? Para realizar la

  17. Antibody profile to Borrelia burgdorferi in veterinarians from Nuevo León, Mexico, a non-endemic area of this zoonosis

    PubMed Central

    Skinner-Taylor, Cassandra M.; Salinas, José A.; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Galán-Wong, Luis J.; Maldonado, Guadalupe; Garza-Elizondo, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Lyme disease is a tick-borne disease caused by infections with Borrelia. Persons infected with Borrelia can be asymptomatic or can develop disseminated disease. Diagnosis and recognition of groups at risk of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is of great interest to contemporary rheumatology. There are a few reports about Borrelia infection in Mexico, including lymphocytoma cases positive to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto by PCR and a patient with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Veterinarians have an occupational risk due to high rates of tick contact. The aim of this work was to investigate antibodies to Borrelia in students at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Zootechnics, at Nuevo León, Mexico, and determine the antibody profile to B. burgdorferi antigens. Material and methods Sera were screened using a C6 ELISA, IgG and IgM ELISA using recombinant proteins from B. burgdorferi, B. garinii and B. afzelii. Sera with positive or grey-zone values were tested by IgG Western blot to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. Results All volunteers reported tick exposures and 72.5% remembered tick bites. Only nine persons described mild Lyme disease related symptoms, including headaches, paresthesias, myalgias and arthralgias. None of the volunteers reported erythema migrans. Nine samples were confirmed by IgG Western blot. The profile showed 89% reactivity to OspA, 67% to p83, and 45% to BmpA. Conclusions Positive sera samples shared antibody reactivity to the markers of late immune response p83 and BmpA, even if individuals did not present symptoms of Lyme arthritis or post-Lyme disease. The best criterion to diagnose Lyme disease in our country remains to be established, because it is probable that different strains coexist in Mexico. This is the first report of antibodies to B. burgdorferi in Latin American veterinarians. Veterinarians and high-risk people should be alert to take precautionary measures to prevent tick-borne diseases. PMID:27504018

  18. Antibody profile to Borrelia burgdorferi in veterinarians from Nuevo León, Mexico, a non-endemic area of this zoonosis.

    PubMed

    Skinner-Taylor, Cassandra M; Flores, Maria S; Salinas, José A; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Galán-Wong, Luis J; Maldonado, Guadalupe; Garza-Elizondo, Mario A

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne disease caused by infections with Borrelia. Persons infected with Borrelia can be asymptomatic or can develop disseminated disease. Diagnosis and recognition of groups at risk of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is of great interest to contemporary rheumatology. There are a few reports about Borrelia infection in Mexico, including lymphocytoma cases positive to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto by PCR and a patient with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Veterinarians have an occupational risk due to high rates of tick contact. The aim of this work was to investigate antibodies to Borrelia in students at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Zootechnics, at Nuevo León, Mexico, and determine the antibody profile to B. burgdorferi antigens. Sera were screened using a C6 ELISA, IgG and IgM ELISA using recombinant proteins from B. burgdorferi, B. garinii and B. afzelii. Sera with positive or grey-zone values were tested by IgG Western blot to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. All volunteers reported tick exposures and 72.5% remembered tick bites. Only nine persons described mild Lyme disease related symptoms, including headaches, paresthesias, myalgias and arthralgias. None of the volunteers reported erythema migrans. Nine samples were confirmed by IgG Western blot. The profile showed 89% reactivity to OspA, 67% to p83, and 45% to BmpA. Positive sera samples shared antibody reactivity to the markers of late immune response p83 and BmpA, even if individuals did not present symptoms of Lyme arthritis or post-Lyme disease. The best criterion to diagnose Lyme disease in our country remains to be established, because it is probable that different strains coexist in Mexico. This is the first report of antibodies to B. burgdorferi in Latin American veterinarians. Veterinarians and high-risk people should be alert to take precautionary measures to prevent tick-borne diseases.

  19. Mexican-American Cooperative Program at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field: Analysis of the Nuevo Leon magnetic anomaly and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, N. E.; Wilt, M. J.; Corrigan, D. J.

    1982-10-01

    The broad dipolar magnetic anomaly whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I Power Plant, has long been suspended to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3 to 3.5 km over the anomaly, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed magnetic field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 by 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analyzed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed them to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in-situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the magnetic anomaly, the magnetic source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of periodotite-gabbro plutons.

  20. Analysis of the climate controls on the isotopic composition of precipitation ( δ18O) at Nuevo Rocafuerte, 74.5°W, 0.9°S, 250 m, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villacís, Marcos; Vimeux, Françoise; Taupin, Jean Denis

    2008-01-01

    The interpretation of the isotopic composition of Andean ice cores (oxygen-18 and deuterium) is still in debate. In 2000, an ice core has been extracted from the Chimborazo glacier, in Ecuador, and the isotopic composition has been measured with a seasonal temporal resolution over the last century. To reliably interpret this isotopic record in terms of climate, an isotopic calibration based on modern precipitation is needed. Thus, since 2001, an Ecuadorian network has been set up to monitor the isotopic composition of precipitation. Here, we present the first results from February 2001 to November 2002 at the site of the Nuevo Rocafuerte station (74.5°W, 0.9°S, 250 m). Our study shows that at both daily and seasonal timescales, the local meteorological parameters are very poor factors to explain the isotopic variability. However, the rainout upstream (intensity of the convection over the Ecuadorian Amazon) can explain up to 70% of the isotopic variability at the seasonal timescale. Thus, the isotopic records from the Chimborazo glacier could offer a record of the past variability of the Ecuadorian precipitation over the Amazon basin.

  1. Camino Nuevo Middle School, Los Angeles, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimm, Alice

    2003-01-01

    Describes the title school building, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on the architects, manufacturers/suppliers, and construction team; a general building description; and a commentary on the design. Also includes the floor plan and photographs. (EV)

  2. Spanish Summary (Nuevos meteoritos encountrados en lmilac)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-03-01

    Desde tiempos prehistoricos han sido coleccionadas piedras que caen dei cielo. Hasta hace poco eran la unica fuente para hacer estudios de laboratorio de la materia extragal, ktica, e incluso en nuestra era espacial, siguen siendo una valiosa fuente de investigacion de la temprana historia dei sistema solar. Se estima que como termine medio cada kilometro cuadrado de la superficie terrestre es golpeada cada millon de aiios por un meteorito con un pese superior a 500 gramos. La mayoria se pierden en los oceanos 0 caen en regiones con escasa poblacion. Como resultado, los museos en el munda reciben anualmente tan solo alrededor de 6 meteoritos cuya caida fuera atestiguada. Otros llegan por hallazgos casuales que en la mayoria de los casos son meteoritos que han cardo en tiempos prehistoricos.

  3. Manitos and Chicanos in Nuevo Mexico Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Flaviano Chris

    1974-01-01

    The article briefly reviews New Mexico's political history, surveys the present socio-political status of its Spanish speaking population, and examines the effects of the Chicano Movimiento on Manitos in New Mexico. (NQ)

  4. Camino Nuevo Middle School, Los Angeles, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimm, Alice

    2003-01-01

    Describes the title school building, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on the architects, manufacturers/suppliers, and construction team; a general building description; and a commentary on the design. Also includes the floor plan and photographs. (EV)

  5. Effect of temperature on replication of epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses in Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Replication of many arboviruses, including some orbiviruses, within the vector has been shown to be temperature-dependent. In general, cooler ambient temperatures slow virus replication in arthropod vectors, whereas viruses replicate faster and to higher titers at warmer ambient temperatures. Prev...

  6. Age-Grading the Biting Midge Culicoides Sonorensis Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Age grading of insects is important in controlling and monitoring of both insect populations and vector-borne diseases. Microscopy and morphological techniques exist to age grade most blood feeding flies but these techniques are laborious, often destructive to the insects, and slow. Near-infrared ...

  7. Colonization of the Mediterranean Basin by the vector biting midge species Culicoides imicola: an old story

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding the demographic history and genetic make-up of colonizing species is critical for inferring population sources and colonization routes. This is of main interest for designing accurate control measures in areas newly colonized by vector species of economically important pathogens. The b...

  8. Update on the Culicoides sonorensis transcriptome project: a peek into the molecular biology of the midge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Next Generation Sequencing is transforming the way scientists collect and measure an organism’s genetic background and gene dynamics, while bioinformatics and super-computing are merging to facilitate parallel sample computation and interpretation at unprecedented speeds. Analyzing the complete gene...

  9. Evaluation of Insecticides, Repellents, and Other Approaches to the Control of Coastal Stand Flies, Culicoides spp.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    chemicals that have been approved for use against mosquitoes by agencies concerned with the protection of man and his environment. These studies were to...toxicity tests (wind tunnel evaluations of adulticides). We felt that compounds registered for control of mosquitoes , if used properly, can give some...compound tested in the first study. Propoxur was slightly less effective than naled. b. Droplet-size Studies In mosquito control, aerosol droplet size

  10. Phenotypic differentiation and phylogenetic signal of wing shape in western European biting midges, Culicoides spp., of the subgenus Avaritia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Muñoz, F; Talavera, S; Carpenter, S; Nielsen, S A; Werner, D; Pagès, N

    2014-09-01

    In the past decade biting midges of the subgenus Avaritia (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have been popular subjects of applied entomological studies in Europe owing to their implication as biological vectors in outbreaks of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses. This study uses a combination of cytochrome oxidase subunit I barcode sequencing and geometric morphometric analyses to investigate wing shape as a means to infer species identification within this subgenus. In addition the congruence of morphological data with different phylogenetic hypotheses is tested. Five different species of the subgenus Avaritia were considered in the study (C. obsoletus (Meigen); C. scoticus Kettle and Lawson; C. chiopterus (Meigen); C. dewulfi Goetghebuer and C. imicola (Kieffer)). The study demonstrated that over 90% of individuals could be separated correctly into species by their wing shape and that patterns of morphological differentiation derived from the geometric morphometric analyses were congruent with phylogenies generated from sequencing data. Morphological data produced are congruent with monophyly of the subgenus Avaritia and the exclusion of C. dewulfi from the group containing C. obsoletus, C. scoticus and C. chiopterus. The implications of these results and their importance in a wider context of integrating multiple data types to interpret both phylogeny and species characterization is discussed.

  11. Effect of Culicoides Sonorensis Salivary Proteins on Clinical Disease Outcome in Experimental Bluetongue Virus Serotype 8 Infection of Dorset Sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bluetongue is an insect-transmitted disease of domestic and wild ruminants. In the U.S., sheep are the most susceptible livestock species. Severity and form of clinical disease varies greatly depending on the outbreak serotype or specific strain within a serotype. To predict disease risk from any of...

  12. Las Tierras de Nuevo Mexico. [The Lands of New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swadesh, Frances Leon; And Others

    New Mexico was inhabited thousands of years ago. Each group of settlers saw the land in distinct ways. For some, its beauty consisted of its quality, the abundance of water, and the hope of a good harvest. For others, its beautiful sites were of more importance. Thus, each group established its own manner of living on the land and of using it.…

  13. Posible influencia de exoplanetas sobre la actividad estelar: nuevos resultados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, M. G.; Collado, A. E.; Jaque Arancibia, M.; Saffe, C. E.; Buccino, A. P.

    2017-10-01

    Our main aim of this work is to analyze 2 phenomena possibly related and at the same time very discussed in the literature. On the one hand, the difference in the activity levels shown by stars with and without planets. On the other hand, the excess of Lithium (Li) depletion presented by stars with planets when they are compared to stars with similar characteristics that do not host planets. To reach our main aim, the work has been divided into 3 stages. Thus, in this second contribution we present an analysis of the activity indexes calculated for the whole sample. To do so, we used high resolution spectra () of 1004 FGK stars taken with the HARPS (High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher) spectrograph, installed in the 3.6 m ESO telescope. We do not find a significant difference in the activity indexes of stars with and without planets. Furthermore, the chromosphere activity is not correlated with the mass of the planet.

  14. Estudio tribologico de nuevos nanofluidos ionicos y nanomateriales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurin Serrano, Noelia

    The present work has focused on tribology and surface engineering of materials and interfaces. In the first place, four new halogen-free ionic liquids have been studied as boundary lubricants in reciprocating steel-sapphire and steel-epoxy resin contacts. Two different steel surface roughness have been compared, finding not only low friction, but also non-measurable wear, in the case of higher roughness. New ionic nanofluids have been obtained by dispersion of two commercial graphene grades in the ionic liquid 1-octyl-3-methylimidazlium tetrafluoroborate, finding the best friction reducing and antiwear performance in pin-on-disc sapphire-steel and steel-epoxy resin contacts. New aqueous lubricants have been developed by addition of new dispersions of graphene in a protic ionic liquid free from contaminant elements, as it is an ammonium cation citrate anion derivative. Controlled water evaporation leads to new self-lubricating surfaces. In the present work, the tribological performance of a fragile low wear-resistance materials such as epoxy resin has been improved by addition of variables concentrations of the ionic liquid 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate or carbon nanophases such as singlewalled carbon nanotubes or graphene. Blended with the ionic liquid or previously modified by it. The first epoxy resin materials with ability of self-healing the abrasion surface damage, due to the addition of ionic liquid, are described. New epoxy resin matrix nanocomposites, obtained by combination of carbon nanophases and ionic liquid, show better tribological behavior than the materials containing any of the additives separately. Finally, a new research line on the cure of the new epoxy matrix nanocomoposites as protective coatings on steel substrates has been initiated.

  15. Jose de Escandon--Colonizer of Nuevo Santander.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Hubert J.

    Jose de Escandon's colonization work in the present Mexican state of Tamaulipas and the lower Rio Grande valley forms an essential part of the Spanish northern borderlands. Many of the land grants in the area, ranching, and some of the present day agricultural industries originated with the colonization projects initiated by Escandon, who proved…

  16. Nuevos fenómenos en erupciones cometarias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A.

    Se discuten aquí tres procesos físicos novedosos encontrados en la actividad de cometas: 1) El rol de una distribución de granos de hielo como fuente extendida de H2O en la coma, 2) El efecto de una discontinuidad en el plasma cometario, llamada Cometopausa, sobre la excitación del radical OH , y 3) La actividad por erupciones a grandes distancias heliocéntricas (r > 5 AU). Con respecto a 1) y 2), se presentan modelos que ajustan bien con las observaciones. En cuanto a 3), se presentan explicaciones posibles al fenómeno, y se trata el interesante caso de Chirón 2060, basándose en observaciones propias tomadas desde el CASLEO y datos anteriores.

  17. Sustainable ranching: A new paradigm (Ganaderia Sustentable: Un Nuevo Paradigma)

    Treesearch

    Ivan Aguirre

    2006-01-01

    Today, rural communities need to take a new approach to decision-making and administration with regards to the causes and solutions to the processes of land deterioration. If the damages caused by drought, flood, and erosion were valued in monetary terms, opportunity costs, and value of human life, we would readily realize the benefits of investment in rural production...

  18. Nuevos modelos para estrellas centrales de nebulosas planetarias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller Bertolami, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    The recent computations by 2016A&A...588A..25M of the post-Asymptotic Giant Branch evolution show that the post-AGB phase is, at least, three to ten times faster than shown by previous evolutionary computations. The new models are also 0.1-0.3 dex brighter than the previous models with similar remnant masses. As a consequence the adoption of these models in future studies will have a significant impact in the determination of masses and ages of central stars of planetary nebulae. Preliminary studies suggest that the new models will help us to understand mysterious invariance of the cut-off of the planetary nebula luminosity function.

  19. Bilingual Intercultural Teacher Education: "Nuevos Maestros Para Bolivia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delany-Barmann, Gloria

    2009-01-01

    Educational reform efforts in Bolivia have created possibilities for teacher-training institutions to focus on bilingual intercultural education. How teacher trainers and future teachers embark upon this endeavor differs somewhat depending on the sociolinguistic, historical, and institutional contexts of each community. This article reports…

  20. Bilingual Intercultural Teacher Education: "Nuevos Maestros Para Bolivia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delany-Barmann, Gloria

    2009-01-01

    Educational reform efforts in Bolivia have created possibilities for teacher-training institutions to focus on bilingual intercultural education. How teacher trainers and future teachers embark upon this endeavor differs somewhat depending on the sociolinguistic, historical, and institutional contexts of each community. This article reports…

  1. Evaluation of Insecticides, Insect Growth Regulators, Skin and Clothing Repellents, and Other Approaches to the Control of Coastal Sand Flies, Culicoides spp.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    insecticides as household --creen treatments against ’, I, spp. blting midges. Mosquito News: 40: 399-402. Schreck, C. E., 1). Kline, and N. Smith...1179. Protection afforded by the insect repellent jacket against four species of biting midge (Diptera: !’c/, ,it;’s;)M. Mosquito News 39: 739-742. --m...insecticides as household screen treatments against Cuiiooides spp. biting midges. Mosquito News 40: 399-402. MANUSCRIPTS Kline, D. L., and R. H. Roberts

  2. Pequeno glosario del nuevo lenguaje politico-social (A Concise Dictionary of New Sociopolitical Terms).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, D.

    1980-01-01

    Lists terms from current sociopolitical language, continuing from an earlier issue of "Yelmo" and covering the second half of the alphabet, "J" to "X". Provides definitions and context quotations for all items, and in some cases, notes on their historical origin. Includes borrowings from English and from some regional…

  3. Glosario adicional del nuevo lenguaje politico-social (Supplementary Glossary of Socio-Political Neologisms).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, D.

    1981-01-01

    Presents the first part of a glossary of new social and political terms. Each entry is followed by a paragraph defining its meaning and origin, and by one or more quotations, where the word appears in unusually extensive contexts. Quotations are taken mostly from the news media. (MES)

  4. Nuevos rangos altitudinales para dos especies de la avifauna de Nicaragua

    Treesearch

    M.A. Torrez; Wayne Arendt; I. Castillo

    2015-01-01

    We document the elevational range expansions of two Nicaraguan bird species, scaled pigeon (Patagioenas speciosa) and collared plover (Charadrius collaris). The previously reported elevational range of Patagioenas speciosa was sea level to 600 m. We observed the species in shade coffee at Santa Maura farm at an elevation of 1115 masl. Historically, the second species,...

  5. Nuevos aspectos en el estudio de la particula D en el experimento FOCUS de Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Quinones Gonzalez, Jose A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to improve the reconstruction techniques of the decays of the particles that contain charm in the quark composition using the information of the Target Silicon Detector of the experiment E831 (FOCUS). That experiment runs during 1997 to 1998 in Fermilab National Laboratory. The objective of the experiment was improving the understanding of the particles that contain charm. Adding the Target Silicon Detector information in the reconstruction process of the primary vertex the position error. This reduction produces an improvement in the mass signal and the knowledge of the charm particles properties. This ad to the possibility's that in other analysis will use the techniques developed in this work.

  6. Approval of Alternative Test Method for Puerto Nuevo Wastewater Treatment Plant, San Juan, Puerto Rico Memorandum

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This December 2008 memorandum is from Conniesue Oldham of the Measurement Technology Group to Marcus E. Kantz in EPA Region 2. This memorandum is regarding a request to use an alternative test method at the Puerto Neuvo wastewater treatment plant

  7. [Prevalence of overweight and obesity in children from Monterrey, Nuevo León].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Herrera, Ricardo Jorge; Mathiew-Quirós, Álvaro; Díaz-Sánchez, Oscar; Reyes-Treviño, Norma Orelia; Álvarez-Álvarez, Criselda; Villanueva-Montemayor, Daniel; de la Garza-Salinas, Laura Hermila; González-Guajardo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric obesity is a major health problem around the globe. It has increased in the last decades up to 30 % (in 2010). The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children from zero to 14 years from three family medicine units and one school. A prospective study of prevalence, which included children of both sexes who assisted to three family medicine units and a junior high school. We assessed the somatometry and compared it in accordance to the World Health Organization 2006-2007 references and standards. The overall overweight and obesity prevalence in 1624 children was 45.5 % (15.5 % of overweight and 29.9 % of obesity, respectively). A total of 354 of 840 women (42.1 %) and 385 of 784 men (49 %) had overweight and obesity (p < 0.05). In both sexes, we did not observed a difference in overweight (15.7, women; 15.4, men). However, with regards to obesity, women showed 26.4 versus 33.6 of men (p < 0.05). We observed only one family unit with major obesity prevalence, which probably had an initial overestimation. We found one of the highest prevalences of overweight and obesity in children at a national level: up to 45 % in a state of Mexican northwestern. Obesity doubled overweight, and it was almost 10 % higher in men than in women.

  8. Nuevos patrones en el gobierno de los colegios (New Patterns of School Governance). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renchler, Ron

    This digest in Spanish explains why public-school governance is receiving increasing scrutiny. It identifies who is held accountable for results in the current governance system and describes recent proposals for transforming governance structures. Since many reforms of the past decade bypassed the school board and district office, reformers are…

  9. El nuevo panorama de la Dinámica Galáctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivovaroff, Michael James

    En general, la tendencia imperante en Dinámica Galáctica ha sido considerar que los movimientos estelares son básicamente regulares y que el caos no tiene mayor relevancia en los sistemas estelares. Sin embargo, en el último lustro se vienen acumulando pruebas de la importancia del movimiento caótico en ciertos sistemas estelares que existen en la naturaleza. Por una parte, sobre todo el grupo de David Merritt, lo ha mostrado en los casos de galaxias elípticas con concentraciones centrales de materia; por otra parte, en nuestro propio grupo, lo hemos mostrado para el caso de los satélites galácticos. Las consecuencias de estos hallazgos son tanto de tipo técnico, por la necesidad de construir modelos que contengan órbitas caóticas, como astrofísico, por los efectos del caos sobre la estacionariedad y evolución de los sistemas estelares en los que se presenta.

  10. Nuevos Anglicismos en el Espanol Peninsular (New Anglicisms in Peninsular Spanish)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arango, Guillermo

    1975-01-01

    Linguists should not only observe but actively try to control the internationalization of languages. Borrowings may be harmful to the smooth functioning of a language and contribute to the loss of its distinctive character. (Text is in Spanish.) (TL)

  11. Binarias en cúmulos abiertos: ?`Qué hay de nuevo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levato, H.

    Las herramientas modernas para detectar duplicidad han jugado un papel fundamental en el resurgimiento del estudio de la binaridad en cúmulos abiertos. El fracaso de las teorías de bifurcación para explicar la formación de estrellas dobles ha puesto en consideración los encuentros de estrellas en cúmulos para formar binarias. Existen muchas pruebas empíricas que pueden realizarse para verificar las creencias actuales. En esta revisión del tema se hace un breve resumen de la historia del problema y se analiza el conocimiento actual. Se proponen las investigaciones y programas que darían lugar a la comprobación de las predicciones que surgen de considerar que las binarias en cúmulos se forman por encuentros.

  12. Pequeno glosario del nuevo lenguaje politico-social (A Concise Dictionary of New Sociopolitical Terms).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, D.

    1980-01-01

    Lists terms from current sociopolitical language, continuing from an earlier issue of "Yelmo" and covering the second half of the alphabet, "J" to "X". Provides definitions and context quotations for all items, and in some cases, notes on their historical origin. Includes borrowings from English and from some regional…

  13. Glosario adicional del nuevo lenguaje politico-social (Supplementary Glossary of Socio-Political Neologisms).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, D.

    1981-01-01

    Presents the first part of a glossary of new social and political terms. Each entry is followed by a paragraph defining its meaning and origin, and by one or more quotations, where the word appears in unusually extensive contexts. Quotations are taken mostly from the news media. (MES)

  14. El Nuevo Aspecto de la Educacion Bilingue. [The New Aspect of Bilingual Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Rafael M.

    1976-01-01

    The scope of legal issues regarding bilingual education is analyzed. The article emphasizes the need for bilingual educators to increase their efforts to: (1) promote active community involvement in education, (2) encourage young minority people to become teachers, (3) awaken the sensibility of educators for what is really valuable in the…

  15. Sistemas Eolicos Pequenos para Generacion de Electricidad: Una guia para consumidores en Nuevo Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-09-01

    This Spanish version of the popular Small Wind Electric Systems: A New Mexico Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  16. An Improved, high-throughput method for detection of bluetongue virus RNA in Culicodes midges

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new rapid (less than 6 h from insect-to-results) high-throughput assay is reported that is sensitive and specific for detecting BTV RNA in Culicoides biting midges. Homogenization and extraction of nucleic acids from individual Culicoides specimens were performed in a 96-well plate format using sp...

  17. Detection of bluetongue virus RNA in field-collected Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) following the discovery of bluetongue virus serotype 1 in white-tailed deer and cattle in Louisiana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In November 2004, bluetongue virus (family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus, BTV) serotype 1 (BTV-1) was detected for the first time in the United States from a hunter-killed deer in St. Mary Parish, LA. In 2005, sera surveys were conducted on three cattle farms near the area where the deer was found, an...

  18. Possible means of introduction of bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) to Sweden in August 2008: comparison of results from two models for atmospheric transport of the Culicoides vector.

    PubMed

    Agren, E C C; Burgin, L; Lewerin, S Sternberg; Gloster, J; Elvander, M

    2010-09-25

    In September 2008, bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) infection was detected for the first time in Sweden, in a dairy herd on the west coast. Two different previously published operational atmospheric dispersion models indicate that midges from infected regions in Europe are likely to have reached Sweden by atmospheric transport during an estimated infection window. Both models indicated that the likely dates for the incursion of midges were overnight on August 6 to 7 and August 14 to 15; however, the less constrained model indicated a number of additional possible dates. The distribution of infected herds detected by active surveillance coincides with the regions that were indicated by the models to have been reached by midges from regions in Denmark and Germany with infected herds. It is likely that several points of introduction of infected midges occurred, possibly on different occasions. No alternative routes for introduction of the infection to Sweden were identified, supporting the theory that BTV-8 was introduced by infected midges carried by the wind.

  19. Seroepidemiology of bluetongue in South Bengal.

    PubMed

    Halder, Arkendu; Joardar, Siddhartha N; Isore, Devi Prasad; Samanta, Indranil; Parui, Panchanan; Banerjee, Dhriti; Lodh, Chandan

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of revealing the epidemiological intricacies of bluetongue (BT) in the southern part of West Bengal state, the present study was undertaken to assess seroprevalence of BT along with identification of the vector of the disease, i.e., Culicoides midges available in the region in their breeding season with conducive environmental factors, if any. A total of 1509 (sheep-504, goat-1005) samples were collected from three different agroclimatic zones of South Bengal viz. new alluvial, red laterite and coastal saline. To detect anti-BT antibodies in the collected serum samples, indirect-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (i-ELISA) was performed. Culicoides midges were collected from those agro-climatic zones of South Bengal for species identification. The meteorological parameters, viz. temperature (maximum and minimum), rainfall and relative humidity of three agro-climatic zones of South Bengal were analyzed for the months of July to December during 2010-2013. The overall seropositivity was 33.13% and 30.24% in sheep and goat, respectively as assessed by i-ELISA. In South Bengal, the predominant species of Culicoides found were Culicoides schultzei, Culicoides palpifer and Culicoides definitus. Since virus transmitting species of Culicoides midges could be detected in South Bengal, besides high seropositivity in ruminants, the possibility of circulating BT virus in South Bengal is quite imminent.

  20. Seroepidemiology of bluetongue in South Bengal

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Arkendu; Joardar, Siddhartha N.; Isore, Devi Prasad; Samanta, Indranil; Parui, Panchanan; Banerjee, Dhriti; Lodh, Chandan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: With the aim of revealing the epidemiological intricacies of bluetongue (BT) in the southern part of West Bengal state, the present study was undertaken to assess seroprevalence of BT along with identification of the vector of the disease, i.e., Culicoides midges available in the region in their breeding season with conducive environmental factors, if any. Materials and Methods: A total of 1509 (sheep-504, goat-1005) samples were collected from three different agroclimatic zones of South Bengal viz. new alluvial, red laterite and coastal saline. To detect anti-BT antibodies in the collected serum samples, indirect-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (i-ELISA) was performed. Culicoides midges were collected from those agro-climatic zones of South Bengal for species identification. The meteorological parameters, viz. temperature (maximum and minimum), rainfall and relative humidity of three agro-climatic zones of South Bengal were analyzed for the months of July to December during 2010-2013. Results: The overall seropositivity was 33.13% and 30.24% in sheep and goat, respectively as assessed by i-ELISA. In South Bengal, the predominant species of Culicoides found were Culicoides schultzei, Culicoides palpifer and Culicoides definitus. Conclusion: Since virus transmitting species of Culicoides midges could be detected in South Bengal, besides high seropositivity in ruminants, the possibility of circulating BT virus in South Bengal is quite imminent. PMID:27051176

  1. Lipid production by pure and mixed cultures of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa isolated in Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Reyna-Martínez, Raúl; Gomez-Flores, Ricardo; López-Chuken, Ulrico J; González-González, Rosario; Fernández-Delgadillo, Sergio; Balderas-Rentería, Isaias

    2015-01-01

    Given the well-known environmental drawbacks of using fossil fuels, advances in the field of alternative energy have become a worldwide technological priority. Special interest has been focused on the production of biodiesel obtained from oleaginous microorganisms. In the present research, lipid production by two species, microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa and yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was assessed, independently and in mixed culture to evaluate a possible synergy. Fatty acid analysis was performed by gas chromatography. Among pure and mixed cultures of both strains and several culturing conditions, the highest biomass and lipid productivity was obtained by C. pyrenoidosa (8.05 and 1.62 g/L, respectively). The results of this study showed that both strains used are in fact oleaginous strains as they were found to reach up to 20 % of lipids, in addition, lipids in both pure and mixed cultures were mainly of triglycerides (>90 %), composed of fatty acid chains between 16 and 18 carbons.

  2. New Photocatalysts for Hydrogen Production; Nuevos Fotocatalizadores para la Producción de Hidrógeno

    DOE PAGES

    García, Abraham; Cotto, María; Duconge, José; ...

    2014-06-10

    The use of hydrogen as replacement for fossil fuels, on which we depend today, is a matter of great relevance. The sustainable generation of hydrogen as fuel is relevant from an environmental and economic point of view. In this study we have explored new synthetic routes for developing new photocatalysts to be used in water splitting, for hydrogen production. Different techniques have been used to produce hydrogen, such as electrolysis, even though these processes have been found to be energetically non suitable. In this research various photocatalytic materials were presented as possible alternatives for using in water splitting processes. Characterizationmore » of the new synthesized materials has been done by using different experimental techniques including Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), surface area BET, and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The efficiency of the synthesized photocatalysts was determined by evaluating the hydrogen evolution by the photocatalytic water splitting reaction.« less

  3. Entre el Renacimiento y el Nuevo Mundo: Vida y obras de Hernan Perez de Oliva (1494?-1531)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellus Perez, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Hernan Perez de Oliva (1494?-1531) was a learned Spanish humanist who wrote his major works in the decades following the discovery of America. By articulating events of his career and literary life, my goal is to comprehend his contributions to the early literary production regarding the newly-found Americas. The thesis consists of three parts.…

  4. Una Crisis para la Educacion Bilingue en Nuevo Mexico. (A Crisis for Bilingual Education in New Mexico)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavides, Ezequiel

    1976-01-01

    Written in Spanish and English, this article briefly reviews the bilingual picture in New Mexico. If New Mexico is to succeed in attracting Federal monies for bilingual education, it must strive for unity in its efforts and objectives. (NQ)

  5. PLANETALP338: Un nuevo código para la síntesis poblacional de sistemas planetarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, M. P.; Guilera, O. M.; de Elía, G. C.

    2016-08-01

    In the last years, the observational progress allowed us to study and characterize exoplanets in different planetary systems. From a theoretical point of view, the population synthesis models allow us to link the diversity of planetary systems to the protoplanetary disks where they are formed. In this work, we present the main characteristics of a new code, named PlanetaLP338, able to calculate the formation of a planetary system and to describe the evolution of the embryos and planetesimals while the gas is still present in the protoplanetary disk. Our model incorporates the main physical phenomena for planetary formation such as type I and II migrations, gaseous accretion, water delivery in embryos and planetesimals, and mergers between embryos taking into account their respective atmospheres. A particular application of PlanetaLP338 is its automatization to generate population synthesis and to analize the different types of resulting planetary systems. The aim of this work is to explore the ranges of physical parameters that generate planetary systems analog to the Solar System in order to improve our knowledge about its formation.

  6. "La Biblioteca Es Importante": A Case Study of an Emergent Bilingual Public Library in the Nuevo U.S. South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Steven; Alvarez, Sara P.

    2016-01-01

    Research examining ethnolinguistic community schools (García, Zakharia, & Otcu, 2013) proposes that local spaces not directly affiliated with schools sustain bilingualism and identity. Though researchers often theorize about how community schools sustain home language literacies, less research examines how local public spaces sustain…

  7. Nuevos escenarios de la migración México-Estados Unidos. Las consecuencias de la guerra antiinmigrante

    PubMed Central

    MASSEY, Douglas S.; PREN, Karen A.; DURAND, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    La historia de la migración México-Estados Unidos se caracteriza por una serie de periodos durante los cuales los patrones migratorios se transforman y evolucionan como respuesta a los cambios en la política migratoria de Estados Unidos. En la década de 1990 se dio uno de estos cambios, lo que provocó el paso de la ‘era de la contradicción’ a la ‘era de la marginalización’. Actualmente, un gran número de migrantes indocumentados permanecen al margen de la ley, precisamente en un periodo en el que las penas se han incrementado y la persecución ha alcanzado niveles récord. De manera cada vez más notoria, los migrantes indocumentados, por la represión interna y fronteriza, quedan obligados a romper los lazos que los vinculaban con sus lugares de destino, pero al mismo tiempo se sienten cada vez más extraños en una tierra donde la aplicación de políticas antiinmigrantes es cosa de todos los días, lo que los sitúa en una posición de marginalización y gran vulnerabilidad. PMID:21209790

  8. Una Crisis para la Educacion Bilingue en Nuevo Mexico. (A Crisis for Bilingual Education in New Mexico)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavides, Ezequiel

    1976-01-01

    Written in Spanish and English, this article briefly reviews the bilingual picture in New Mexico. If New Mexico is to succeed in attracting Federal monies for bilingual education, it must strive for unity in its efforts and objectives. (NQ)

  9. [Lead concentrations in the blood of residents of the city of Monterrey, Nuevo León].

    PubMed

    Junco Muñoz, P; Arrieta Alcalde, N D

    1993-01-01

    Six hundred and seventy one inhabitants from Monterrey City, Mexico, were studied during an eight months period to know their blood lead (PbB) content, as a biological indicator of environmental lead exposure in that city. Thirty per cent of these population were males and 70 per cent were females. The group was divided by sex in workers and non-workers. Men were (81.6 per cent) both, blue and white collar, and showed non-occupational lead exposure. Students and housewives were considered as a non-workers group and accounting 18.3 per cent in that group. For men the mean value of blood lead in workers and non-workers was 14.38 and 14.08 micrograms/dl, and for women it was 13.11 and 13.35 micrograms/dl for workers and non-workers, respectively. The entire group was divided again in smokers; and non-smokers; while smokers had a mean PbB of 15.11 micrograms/dl, the non-smokers group had a PbB mean value of 12.92 micrograms/dl, which is 2.19 micrograms/dl more higher in those having the smoking habit. No significant differences were found between blood lead content and alcoholism as well as "lead grazed pottery" used as food ware. Statistical analysis for blood lead (PbB) and sex (t-Student), PbB and smoking habit (ANOVA) and PbB and place of residence were all significant (p < 0.05). An increment of 28 per cent in PbB was found in the group of less than 10 years of age (17.23 micrograms/dl) when compared to the mean value of PbB in the whole population (13.60 micrograms/dl).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Perfil de Estudiantes de Nuevo Ingreso 1985-86 = Profile of First-Year Students 1985-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilarino de Medina, Ivonne

    In August 1985, a study was conducted to develop a profile of first-year students at Ponce Technological University College (PTUC), as part of a student follow-up project undertaken at all University of Puerto Rico system units. A questionnaire designed by the University of Puerto Rico Institutional Research Committee was administered in class to…

  11. Variation in the gene frequencies of three generations of humans from Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Flores, R M; Garza-Chapa, R

    1989-04-01

    Allele frequencies for the ABO, Rh, MNSs, Duffy, Kidd, Lutheran, P and Lewis blood group systems in 207 persons whose 4 grandparents were born in the Monterrey Metropolitan area (MMA), grouped into 3 generations, were ascertained along with other related population from the MMA, Mestizos from Saltillo, Coahuila and Tlaxcala, and from the populations thought to have contributed to their genetic constitution (native Mexican Indians and Spanish). Genetic admixture and distance estimates were calculated. Gene frequencies of the three generations from MMA are intermediate to those of the ancestral populations, indicating that they are Mestizo but with a genetic structure different from Mestizos of Saltillo and Tlaxcala. Both genetic admixture and distance estimates indicate that the oldest generation exhibits the greatest Spanish influence which decreases in the youngest generation and in the other MMA populations as a result of the immigration from the central states of Mexico.

  12. Entre el Renacimiento y el Nuevo Mundo: Vida y obras de Hernan Perez de Oliva (1494?-1531)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellus Perez, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Hernan Perez de Oliva (1494?-1531) was a learned Spanish humanist who wrote his major works in the decades following the discovery of America. By articulating events of his career and literary life, my goal is to comprehend his contributions to the early literary production regarding the newly-found Americas. The thesis consists of three parts.…

  13. "La Biblioteca Es Importante": A Case Study of an Emergent Bilingual Public Library in the Nuevo U.S. South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Steven; Alvarez, Sara P.

    2016-01-01

    Research examining ethnolinguistic community schools (García, Zakharia, & Otcu, 2013) proposes that local spaces not directly affiliated with schools sustain bilingualism and identity. Though researchers often theorize about how community schools sustain home language literacies, less research examines how local public spaces sustain…

  14. Absence of antibodies against Bordetella pertussis in pregnant women and newborns in the state of Nuevo Leon.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías; Ramírez-Aranda, José Manuel; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Irasema; Perales-Dávila, José; García-Elizondo, Francisco Javier; Gómez-Gómez, Celina; Galindo-Galindo, Edgar; Rodríguez-Moreno, Marco Antonio; Ballesteros-Elizondo, Romelia

    2014-09-01

    To assess placental transfer of antibodies to the child at birth and at 2 months of age. For the quantification of anti-PT IgG antibodies, we used an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay standardized by The National Institute of Epidemiologic Diagnosis and Reference (InDRE). Samples were considered negative from 0 to 48 IU/mL, indeterminate from 49 to 93 IU/mL and positive at ≥94 IU/mL. We performed a cross-sectional assessment of anti-PT IgG antibody levels in the mother, umbilical cord, and child. There was a higher concentration of IgG anti-TP in the umbilical cord (4.3%) and in the mother (1.4%), but a total absence was observed in the child (0%). The vulnerability of children to Bordetella pertussis shows the need to implement effective immunization strategies, whether actively, in the child, or passively through the mother, adolescents, and adults who are in contact with the child.

  15. New Photocatalysts for Hydrogen Production; Nuevos Fotocatalizadores para la Producción de Hidrógeno

    SciTech Connect

    García, Abraham; Cotto, María; Duconge, José; Márquez, Francisco

    2014-06-10

    The use of hydrogen as replacement for fossil fuels, on which we depend today, is a matter of great relevance. The sustainable generation of hydrogen as fuel is relevant from an environmental and economic point of view. In this study we have explored new synthetic routes for developing new photocatalysts to be used in water splitting, for hydrogen production. Different techniques have been used to produce hydrogen, such as electrolysis, even though these processes have been found to be energetically non suitable. In this research various photocatalytic materials were presented as possible alternatives for using in water splitting processes. Characterization of the new synthesized materials has been done by using different experimental techniques including Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), surface area BET, and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The efficiency of the synthesized photocatalysts was determined by evaluating the hydrogen evolution by the photocatalytic water splitting reaction.

  16. Border Environmental Education Resource Guide: Southern New Mexico, South Texas, Northern Chihuahua, Northern Coahuila, Northern Nuevo Leon, Northern Tamaulipas = Guia de Recursos de Educacion Ambiental en la Frontera: Sur de Nuevo Mexico, Sur de Texas, Norte de Chihuahua, Norte de Coahuila, Norte de Nuevo Leon, Norte de Tamaulipas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meissner, David, Comp.

    This guide provides educators and residents of the border with useful information about environmental education program offerings along the eastern half of the United States-Mexico border. The programs listed in the guide represent a broad range of educational efforts focused on understanding the environment and solving environmental problems in…

  17. Oropouche Virus. 3. Entomological Observations from Three Epidemics in Para, Brazil, 1975,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-06

    by block number) OROPOUCHE VIRUS, CULICOIDES PARAENSIS, EPIDEMICS, BRAZIL, PARA I&2 ABSThAC (Cantmus = revers e e* I nessamy and idewtty by block nmbe...8217)URBAN EPIDEMTCS OF OROPOUCHE ORO FEVER IN THREE MUNICIPALITIES IN PARA, BR.tZIL WERE SrUDIED IN 1975. CULICOIDES PARAENSIS GOELDI WERE COLLECTED...Medicine and Hygiene OROPOUCHE VIRUS III. ENTOMOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS FROM THREE EPIDEMICS IN PARA, BRAZIL, 1975* DONALD R. ROBERTS, ALFRED L. HOCH

  18. World Reference Center for Arboviruses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    AfriGa Liw Asia alia Amea mcrica Vector(s) African horsesickness 9 + + + Culicoides Bluetongue 23 + + + 3 5 + Culicoides Changuinola >12 12 Lutzomyia ...different temperatures after formalin fixation. An ETA was performed with cells immediately after fixation and with cells after 2 months’ storage at varying... temperatures . The dengue-1 MIAF titer on dengue virus-infected C6/36 cells was 1:6400 on fresh cells. The MIAF titer decreased greater than 32-fold

  19. [Epidemiology of gunshot wounds in the University Hospital "Dr. José Eleuterio González" of the Autonomous University of Nuevo León].

    PubMed

    Canseco Cavazos, José; Palacios-Zertuche, Jorge; Reyna-Sepúlveda, Francisco; Álvarez-Villalobos, Neri; Alatorre-López, Louisiana; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo

    The incidence of deaths and injuries associated with gunshot wounds deserves special attention, mainly because of its repercussions on hospital resources and the diagnosis and treatment protocols. To perform an analysis on the epidemiological factors associated with gunshot wounds. An analysis was made of multiple variables of all patients diagnosed with gunshot wounds during the period between 2005 and 2015. A total of 605 cases were found, and an additional sub-group of 314 cases was obtained for a deeper analysis. The overall mortality rate was 7.9%. The main anatomical region was the abdomen, with 44%. A total of 324 laparotomies were performed, 124 incisions of the thoracic wall, and 72 vascular examinations. In the sub-group of 314 cases, a 16.9% and 42% of laparotomies and vascular examinations, respectably, were reported without evidence of injury to internal organs. Morbidity and mortality increases when 2 or more wounds are present with multiple organ injuries, in patients with multiple transfusions, or in those transferred to the intensive care unit. The incorporation of a physical evaluation format by all the departments involved is suggested for patients that are attended with gunshot wounds, in order to obtain more epidemiological information of these injuries for further studies. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. Pequeno glosario del nuevo lenguaje politico-social (Segunda Parte) [A Small Glossary of the New Socio-Political Language (Part Two)].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, D.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a list of 46 new socio-political terms in Spanish that are being used more frequently in literature today. Definitions of the terms are included as well as the sources where the terms were used. (NCR)

  1. New Sounds of the English Consonants for Spanish Speakers Learning English (Sonidos Nuevos de las Consonantes Inglesas Para los de Habla Espanola Aprendiendo Ingles).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagore, Mary Louise

    This book "represents an effort to present in simply and readily understood terms some of the sounds in English that create problems for the Spanish speaker learning English." Each of the 18 chapters teaches a specific consonant through a comparison of the Spanish and English pronunciations, facial diagrams, explanations of articulation, minimal…

  2. Reflections on the Birth and First Year of Bienvenidos, Nuevos Amigos! A Service-Learning Project in Eldorado, Texas, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Katrina

    This brief paper tells the story of a group of high school students in West Texas who worked together to solve a language problem in their local public schools. They determined that there was a need to have better bilingual resources and services available to new arrivals with limited or no English language speaking ability. The bulk of the paper…

  3. Assessment of major ions and trace elements in groundwater supplied to the Monterrey metropolitan area, Nuevo León, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mora, Abrahan; Mahlknecht, Jürgen; Rosales-Lagarde, Laura; Hernández-Antonio, Arturo

    2017-08-01

    The Monterrey metropolitan area (MMA) is the third greatest urban area and the second largest economic city of Mexico. More than four million people living in this megacity use groundwater for drinking, industrial and household purposes. Thus, major ion and trace element content were assessed in order to investigate the main hydrochemical properties of groundwater and determine if groundwater of the area poses a threat to the MMA population. Hierarchical cluster analysis using all the groundwater chemical data showed five groups of water. The first two groups were classified as recharge waters (Ca-HCO3) coming from the foothills of mountain belts. The third group was also of Ca-HCO3 water type flowing through lutites and limestones. Transition zone waters of group four (Ca-HCO3-SO4) flow through the valley of Monterrey, whereas discharge waters of group 5 (Ca-SO4) were found toward the north and northeast of the MMA. Principal component analysis performed in groundwater data indicates four principal components (PCs). PC1 included major ions Si, Co, Se, and Zn, suggesting that these are derived by rock weathering. Other trace elements such as As, Mo, Mn, and U are coupled in PC2 because they show redox-sensitive properties. PC3 indicates that Pb and Cu could be the less mobile elements in groundwater. Although groundwater supplied to MMA showed a high-quality, high mineralized waters of group 5 have NO3(-) concentrations higher than the maximum value proposed by international guidelines and SO4(2-), NO3(-), and total dissolved solid concentrations higher than the maximum levels allowed by the Mexican normative.

  4. Nuevos resultados sobre la cinemática global y nuclear de NGC 253: movimientos no circulares y emisión en Br γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camperi, J. A.; Gunthardt, G. I.; Díaz, R. J.; Agüuero, M. P.; Gimeno, G.; Pessev, P.

    Continuing with previous research (Camperi et al., BAAA, 54, 377, 2011), new heliocentric radial velocity distributions are presented for the nearby galaxy NGC 253, obtained from the ionized hydrogen recombination line Hα. These distributions have been derived from long-slit spectroscopy for various position angles. It is also shown the heliocentric radial velocity distribution corresponding to part of the infrared data (ionized hydrogen recombination line Brγ) observed with the Phoenix spectrograph of the Gemini South Observatory. Sequential mapping with the long slit using this instrument will enable to study in detail the kinematics of the galaxy's core, which is strongly obscured by dust. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  5. La distribución de objetos en el Cinturón de Kuiper y la posible existencia de un nuevo planeta en el Sistema Solar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunini, A.

    A pesar de que la capacidad observacional no lo limita, no se han descubierto objetos en el Cinturón de Kuiper más allá de las 50 AU. Recientemente, hemos propuesto que un embrión planetario originalmente formado en la región de Urano-Neptuno, y posteriormente migrado hacia distancias mayores a 50-60 AU, puede explicar este hecho. Presentamos simulaciones numéricas de acreción del Sistema Solar exterior que muestran cómo, naturalmente, podriamos esperar que un planeta de este tipo se encuentre actualmente en regiones distantes del sistema solar. Analizamos además la posibilidad de detectarlo con instrumentos actuales.

  6. Pequeno glosario del nuevo lenguaje politico-social (Segunda Parte) [A Small Glossary of the New Socio-Political Language (Part Two)].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, D.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a list of 46 new socio-political terms in Spanish that are being used more frequently in literature today. Definitions of the terms are included as well as the sources where the terms were used. (NCR)

  7. Nuevo enfoque de la ensenanza de las matematicas en el nivel de primaria (A New Approach to the Teaching of Mathematics at the Primary School Level).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez Lozano, Blanca; And Others

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1500 words) of a new approach to the teaching of mathematics in Mexican elementary schools. Three aspects of mathematical reform are discussed: (1) syllabus content; (2) teaching methods; and (3) the question of introducing the pupil to modern mathematics at the earliest possible stage…

  8. Estudio de nuevos vidrios y materiales vitrocristalinos del sistema Li2O-CdO-SiO2 con posible utilidad en la industria nuclear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon Lopez, Jesus M.

    La electrodialisis es una tecnica que permite concentrar disoluciones salinas obteniendose como consecuencia de esta operacion dos corrientes acuosas: una concentrada en sales y otra diluida. La posibilidad de aplicar esta tecnica al tratamiento de residuos acuosos radiactivos ha sido puesta de manifiesto y en la actualidad existen instalaciones piloto en varios paises. Se ha estudiado el comportamiento de estroncio y cesio en el proceso por ser sus isotopos estroncio-90 y cesio-137 los productos de fision de vida mas larga producidos en los reactores de potencia.

  9. [Prevalence of reactions secundary to mosquito bites Aedes aegypti at en el Regional Center of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, de Monterrey, Nuevo Leon].

    PubMed

    González Diaz, Sandra Nora; Cruz, Alfredo Arias; Sedó Mejía, Giovanni A; Rojas Lozano, Antonio A; Valenzuela, Enrique Avitia; Vidaurri Ojeda, Alma C

    2010-01-01

    although systemic reactions resulting from hymenoptera stings have been studied extensively, the prevalence of allergic reactions to mosquitoes is unknown. to investigate the prevalence of allergic reactions to Aedes aegypti bites in patients seeking treatment at the Allergy and Clinical Immunology Regional Center of Jose E Gonzalez University Hospital in Monterrey, Mexico. we carried out a cross-sectional, descriptive study that included patients receiving skin tests for aeroallergens; skin sensitivity to mosquito bites was also tested. A questionnaire was used to obtain information about previous allergic reactions to mosquito bites. a total of 482 patients between 2 and 60 years of age were included; 53% were female, 407 (84.4%) had a history of local reactions to mosquito bites. Twelve patients (2.4%) stated a history of large local reaction; three (0.6%) of them with a positive skin prick test, one (0.2%) of those had systemic reaction history to mosquito. Eighty five (17.6%) patients had a positive mosquito skin test and 307 (63.6%) had a positive skin test for at least one aeroallergen. Seventy-eight (91.7%) of the 85 patients with a positive mosquito skin test had a history of local skin reactions to mosquito bite (odds ratio: 2.303 [confidence interval (CI) 1.037-5.10]. There was no statistically significance association between allergic diseases and mosquito allergy. adverse reactions and allergic reactions to mosquito bites occur frequently. However mosquito allergy is low. Further studies are required to determine the prevalence of mosquito allergy in the general population.

  10. Uso de Cebos para el Control de la Termita de Formosa, Coptotermes formosanus, en Zonas Arboladas en la Ciudad de Nuevo Orleáns

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A total of 220 underground termite stations were installed 1 meter away from the base of trees located in the median area of seven blocks of Esplanade Avenue, New Orleans, LA. Aspen wood was used to monitor termite populations. A nutritionally based bait matrix developed by United States Department ...

  11. New Sounds of the English Consonants for Spanish Speakers Learning English (Sonidos Nuevos de las Consonantes Inglesas Para los de Habla Espanola Aprendiendo Ingles).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagore, Mary Louise

    This book "represents an effort to present in simply and readily understood terms some of the sounds in English that create problems for the Spanish speaker learning English." Each of the 18 chapters teaches a specific consonant through a comparison of the Spanish and English pronunciations, facial diagrams, explanations of articulation, minimal…

  12. Instalación de un nuevo telescopio robótico en la estación de altura Cesco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M. A. Perna, P.; Mauas, P.; Veltri, A.; Hereñú, H.

    In this paper we present the works done for the installation of a 16 inches reflector telescope at the Carlos U. Cesco high altitude station of the Observatorio Astronómico Félix Aguilar; San Juan; Argentina. We describe the implementation of the software and hardware needed for the remote control of the instrument and its future robotization. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  13. Nuevo enfoque de la ensenanza de las matematicas en el nivel de primaria (A New Approach to the Teaching of Mathematics at the Primary School Level).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez Lozano, Blanca; And Others

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1500 words) of a new approach to the teaching of mathematics in Mexican elementary schools. Three aspects of mathematical reform are discussed: (1) syllabus content; (2) teaching methods; and (3) the question of introducing the pupil to modern mathematics at the earliest possible stage…

  14. Sistemas Eólicos Pequeños para Generación de Electricidad: Una guia para consumidores en Nuevo México

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-10-01

    This Spanish version of the popular Small Wind Electric Systems: A New Mexico Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  15. Angiomatosis dérmica difusa de la mama: aportación de un nuevo caso en paciente no fumadora.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Marquez, Ana Maria; Gargallo-Moneva, Vanessa; Rodriguez-Peralto, Jose Luis; Lopez-Gomez, Sara

    2016-04-18

    Diffuse cutaneous angiomatosis is one of the reactive angiomatoses. Historically, it is associated with lesions located in the lower extremities. Breast localization is uncommon, but may be under-reported. We report a non-smoking woman who exhibited this vascular condition of both breasts.

  16. Fungal spores in four catholic churches in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo León State, Mexico--First study.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Alejandra Rocha; Torres, Elizabeth Molina; Vázquez, Marco Antonio Alvarado; Piñero, Jorge Luis Hernandez; Lucio, Marco Antonio Guzmán; Martínez, Sergio Manuel Salcedo

    2015-01-01

    About 500,000 species of fungi have been described to-date, although an estimated between 1 - 1.5 million species may occur. They have a wide distribution in nature, contributing to the decomposition of organic matter and playing a part in the biogeochemical cycles of major nutrients. A small number are considered pathogens of animals and plants. There is ample historical evidence that certain types of allergies are associated with fungi; exposure to fungal allergens occurs in both outdoor and indoor spaces. Many indoor allergens are the same as those found outside buildings, entering through windows and doors, ventilation systems, or through cracks or other fissures in the walls. To determine the diversity and abundance of fungal spores inside four churches in the metropolitan area of Monterrey city in Mexico. The study was carried out from July 2009 - January 2010 using a Hirst type volumetric collector (Burkard Manufacturing Co Ltd). A total of 31,629 spores from 54 taxa were registered in the four churches. The building that showed the highest amount of spores was the Santa Catarina Mártir Church with 12,766 spores, followed by Cristo Rey with 7,155 and Nuestra Señora del Roble with 6,887. Regularly high concentrations of spores were recorded from 14:00 - 20:00 hours. The highest concentration value was observed at the church of Santa Catarina Mártir at 16:00 hours with 1153 spores/m 3 air. The most abundant spores in the four churches studied corresponded to Cladosporium, the Aspergillus/Penicillium complex, Coprinus, Ganoderma, Curvularia and Ustilago.

  17. High Prevalence of Mansonella perstans Filariasis in Rural Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Bassene, Hubert; Sambou, Masse; Fenollar, Florence; Clarke, Siân; Djiba, Sawdiatou; Mourembou, Gaël; L. Y., Alioune Badara; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Large parts of African and American countries are colonized by Mansonella, a very common but poorly described filarial nematode. Bloodsucking flies of the genus Culicoides are suspected to be the vector of Mansonella perstans, but no study in Senegal has confirmed that Culicoides can transmit the parasite. Designed specific real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) can be used to identify microfilaria in stained blood smears. This study was performed in July and December 2010 in the southeastern Senegal, which is known to be endemic for M. perstans. We analyzed 297 blood smears from febrile and afebrile resident people by qPCR. The global prevalence of M. perstans was approximately 14.5% in both febrile and afebrile individuals. The age group of > 30 years had the highest prevalence (22.0%). No Culicoides among 1,159 studied specimens was positive for M. perstans and its vector in Senegal still requires identification. PMID:26078318

  18. Epidemiology of Mansonella perstans filariasis in the forest region of south Congo.

    PubMed

    Noireau, F; Itoua, A; Carme, B

    1990-06-01

    A study of Mansonella perstans filariasis conducted in the Chaillu mountains, Southern Congo, showed that 108 of 134 Pygmies (80.6%) and 79 of 302 Bantus (26.2%) presented with microfilaraemia. The mean microfilarial densities were also significantly higher in the Pygmies (1213 ml-1 of blood) than in the Bantus (136 ml-1). Ninety eight per cent of the Culicoides taken which had bitten man in the daytime were C. grahamii, and 0.8% of these were infected with filarial larvae. Two other species of Culicoides (C. kumbaensis and C. rutshuruensis) might also play a role in the transmission of M. perstans.

  19. Spatio-temporal patterns of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) occurrence in the Continental USA (1980-2010)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Statement of the hypothesis or research question. Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) is a Culicoides insect-borne viral disease of wild and domestic ruminants commonly reported in the USA. While the severity of disease varies by geographic location, mortality rates can be as high as 90...

  20. [List of the type species of Ceratopogonidae (Diptera, Nematocera) deposited in the Entomological Collection of Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Felippe-Bauer, M; Oliveira Sd, S

    2001-11-01

    A list of all type specimens of the Family Ceratopogonidae, present in the Entomological Collection of Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil is presented. This list includes the genera Bahiahelea, Culicoides, Dasyhelea, Downeshelea, Forcipomyia, Leptoconops, Mallochohelea, Monohelea, Neobezzia, Palpomyia and Sphaerohelea.

  1. Susceptibility of North American white-tailed deer to the Netherlands strain of BTV serotype 8

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    World-wide there are at least 24 serotypes of bluetongue virus (BTV), a complex non-enveloped virus in the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus. Bluetongue (BT) is an arthropod-borne disease of cattle, sheep, goats, and deer and is transmitted by Culicoides biting midges. In 2006, bluetongue serotype ...

  2. The Dutch strain of BTV-8 in white-tailed deer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus, contains ten double stranded RNA segments encoding at least ten viral proteins. Bluetongue (BT) is an arthropod-borne disease; transmission to ruminants, including cattle, sheep, goats, and deer species by bites of species of Culicoides. In...

  3. Immune responses to ectoparasites of horses, with a focus on insect bite hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A D

    2014-11-01

    Horses are affected by a wide variety of arthropod ectoparasites, ranging from lice which spend their entire life on the host, through ticks which feed over a period of days, to numerous biting insects that only transiently visit the host to feed. The presence of ectoparasites elicits a number of host responses including innate inflammatory responses, adaptive immune reactions and altered behaviour; all of which can reduce the severity of the parasite burden. All of these different responses are linked through immune mechanisms mediated by mast cells and IgE antibodies which have an important role in host resistance to ectoparasites, yet immune responses also cause severe pathological reactions. One of the best described examples of such pathological sequelae is insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) of horses; an IgE-mediated type 1 hypersensitivity to the salivary proteins of Culicoides spp. associated with T-helper-2 production of IL4 and IL13. Importantly, all horses exposed to Culicoides have an expanded population of Culicoides antigen-specific T cells with this pattern of cytokine production, but in those which remain healthy, the inflammatory reaction is tempered by the presence of FoxP3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells that express IL10 and TGF-beta, which suppresses the IL4 production by Culicoides antigen-activated T cells.

  4. Insecticidal sugar baits for adult biting midges

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the latest trends in mosquito control is the use of insecticidal sugar baits (ISBs) to reduce adult mosquito populations. Tested here is the ability of ISB’s to knock-down the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis, a disease vector of bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease, and vesicular sto...

  5. Additional notes on biting midges from the subtropical forest of northeastern Argentina (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Ayala, Mahia M; Spinelli, Gustavo R; Funes, Amparo; Ronderos, María M

    2015-03-30

    Adult males and pupae of Culicoides guarani Ronderos & Spinelli and Parabezzia brasiliensis Spinelli & Grogan are fully described and illustrated with a modern criterium from material recently collected in the vicinities of the city of Posadas in Misiones province, Argentina. Both species are compared with their most similar congeners. Besides, Bezzia blantoni Spinelli & Wirth and B. brevicornis (Kieffer) are firstly recorded from Misiones province.

  6. Detection of a Novel Reassortant Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus in the United States Containing RNA Segments Derived from Both Exotic and Endemic Serotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) is a Culicoides-transmitted orbivirus that infects domestic and wild ruminants and is provisionally distributed throughout Africa, North America, Australia, East Asia, and the Middle East. Historically, of the seven proposed serotypes of EHDV, only EHDV-1 a...

  7. Comparison of cellular and humoral immunoassays for the assessment of summer eczema in horses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to compare and analyze three common diagnostic methods for summer eczema (SE) in horses, an allergic dermatitis caused by bites of Culicoides spp. Nine horses with a medical history of SE and nine control animals were intradermally challenged with whole body extracts ...

  8. In situ immune infrared fluorescent staining for detection and quantification of bluetongue virus in insect cell culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is transmitted to sheep, cattle and other ruminants by Culicoides spp. of biting midges. Cell lines developed from C. sonorensis have facilitated studies of virus replication and the role of the insect vector in BTV transmission. However, techniques for directly detecting viru...

  9. In Situ Immune Infrared Fluorescent Staining for Detection and Quantification of Bluetongue Virus in Cullicoides Insect Cell Culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is transmitted to sheep, cattle and other ruminants by Culicoides spp. of biting midges. Cell lines have been developed from C. sonorensis; however, techniques for directly detecting and quantifying virus in these insect cells are lacking. In situ immune infrared fluorescent s...

  10. Osmoregulatory Organs of Immature Culicodes Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The water saturated soils and wet feces in livestock feed lots support a variety of Diptera including Musca spp. and Culicoides spp. Aquatic insects that must regulate the ion concentrations of their haemolymph; and fresh water insects tend to loose ions to their aquatic environment. The larvae of C...

  11. Disabled infectious single animal (DISA) vaccine against Bluetongue by deletion of viroporin-like NS3/NS3a expression is effective, safe, and enables differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The prototype virus species of the genus Orbivirus (family Reoviridae) is bluetongue virus (BTV) consisting of at least 27 serotypes. Bluetongue is a noncontagious haemorrhagic disease of ruminants spread by competent species of Culicoides biting midges in large parts of the world leading to huge ec...

  12. Host and Potential Vector Susceptibility to an Emerging Orbivirus in the United States: Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Serotype 6

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) viruses (EHDV) are orbiviruses transmitted by Culicoides biting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. EHDV-1 and -2 are enzootic in the U.S., where EHD is the most significant viral disease of white-tailed deer (WTD; Odocoileus virginianus) and reports of EHD in ...

  13. Full-Genome Characterisation of Orungo, Lebombo and Changuinola Viruses Provides Evidence for Co-Evolution of Orbiviruses with Their Arthropod Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Jaafar, Fauziah; Belhouchet, Mourad; Belaganahalli, Manjunatha; Tesh, Robert B.; Mertens, Peter P. C.; Attoui, Houssam

    2014-01-01

    The complete genomes of Orungo virus (ORUV), Lebombo virus (LEBV) and Changuinola virus (CGLV) were sequenced, confirming that they each encode 11 distinct proteins (VP1-VP7 and NS1-NS4). Phylogenetic analyses of cell-attachment protein ‘outer-capsid protein 1′ (OC1), show that orbiviruses fall into three large groups, identified as: VP2(OC1), in which OC1 is the 2nd largest protein, including the Culicoides transmitted orbiviruses; VP3(OC1), which includes the mosquito transmitted orbiviruses; and VP4(OC1) which includes the tick transmitted viruses. Differences in the size of OC1 between these groups, places the T2 ‘subcore-shell protein’ as the third largest protein ‘VP3(T2)’ in the first of these groups, but the second largest protein ‘VP3(T2)’ in the other two groups. ORUV, LEBV and CGLV all group with the Culicoides-borne VP2(OC1)/VP3(T2) viruses. The G+C content of the ORUV, LEBV and CGLV genomes is also similar to that of the Culicoides-borne, rather than the mosquito-borne, or tick borne orbiviruses. These data suggest that ORUV and LEBV are Culicoides- rather than mosquito-borne. Multiple isolations of CGLV from sand flies suggest that they are its primary vector. OC1 of the insect-borne orbiviruses is approximately twice the size of the equivalent protein of the tick borne viruses. Together with internal sequence similarities, this suggests its origin by duplication (concatermerisation) of a smaller OC1 from an ancestral tick-borne orbivirus. Phylogenetic comparisons showing linear relationships between the dates of evolutionary-separation of their vector species, and genetic-distances between tick-, mosquito- or Culicoides-borne virus-groups, provide evidence for co-evolution of the orbiviruses with their arthropod vectors. PMID:24475112

  14. Que hay de nuevo acerca de la inmersion? Un Breve Recorrido por sus Fundamentos y por las Investigaciones Actuales (What's New in Immersion? A Brief Overview of Its Bases and Present-Day Research).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierra, Josu

    This discussion briefly surveys the development of the immersion method of second language teaching, outlining the central program strategies and characteristics using Curtain's and Pesola's descriptions. An overview of recent research focuses on error correction and feedback studies as an example of pedagogical-methodological evolution in this…

  15. Task-Based Language Learning: Old Approach, New Style. A New Lesson to Learn (Aprendizaje basado en tareas: un antiguo enfoque, un nuevo estilo. Una nueva lección para aprender)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodríguez-Bonces, Mónica; Rodríguez-Bonces, Jeisson

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Task-Based Language Learning (TBL) and its use in the teaching and learning of foreign languages. It begins by defining the concept of TBL, followed by a presentation of its framework and implications, and finally, a lesson plan based on TBL. The article presents an additional stage to be considered when planning…

  16. A Preliminary RCT of CBT-AD for Adherence and Depression among HIV-Positive Latinos on the U.S. –Mexico Border: The Nuevo Día Study

    PubMed Central

    Simoni, Jane M.; Wiebe, John S.; Sauceda, John A.; Huh, David; Sanchez, Giselle; Longoria, Virginia; Bedoya, C. Andres; Safren, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a preliminary RCT among 40 HIV-positive Latinos of Mexican descent on the U.S.-Mexico border who indicated imperfect adherence and depressive symptomatology. Participants were randomly assigned to culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) with an alarmed pillbox or usual care. Outcomes were depressive symptoms (self-report and blind clinician ratings), adherence (self-report and electronic pillbox), and biological markers. The intervention, delivered in English and Spanish, proved feasible and acceptable. Generalized estimating equations in intent-to-treat analyses showed some effects of “moderate” to “large” size, with maintenance over time. For example, intervention (vs. control) participants demonstrated at post-intervention a greater drop in BDI scores (OR = - 3.64, p = .05) and greater adherence according to the electronic pillbox (OR = 3.78, p = .03). Biological markers indicated some relative improvement for CD4 count but not VL. The promising results suggest a larger trial to determine efficacy is warranted. PMID:23812892

  17. A preliminary RCT of CBT-AD for adherence and depression among HIV-positive Latinos on the U.S.-Mexico border: the Nuevo Día study.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Jane M; Wiebe, John S; Sauceda, John A; Huh, David; Sanchez, Giselle; Longoria, Virginia; Andres Bedoya, C; Safren, Steven A

    2013-10-01

    We conducted a preliminary RCT among 40 HIV-positive Latinos of Mexican descent on the U.S.-Mexico border who indicated imperfect adherence and depressive symptomatology. Participants were randomly assigned to culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy for adherence and depression with an alarmed pillbox or usual care. Outcomes were depressive symptoms (self-report and blind clinician ratings), adherence (self-report and electronic pillbox), and biological markers. The intervention, delivered in English and Spanish, proved feasible and acceptable. Generalized estimating equations in intent-to-treat analyses showed some effects of "moderate" to "large" size, with maintenance over time. For example, intervention (vs. control) participants demonstrated at post-intervention a greater drop in BDI scores (OR = -3.64, p = 0.05) and greater adherence according to the electronic pillbox (OR = 3.78, p = 0.03). Biological markers indicated some relative improvement for CD4 count but not VL. The promising results suggest a larger trial to determine efficacy is warranted.

  18. Nuevo Amanecer: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Community-Based, Peer-Delivered Stress Management Intervention to Improve Quality of Life in Latinas With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ortíz, Carmen; Santoyo-Olsson, Jasmine; Stewart, Anita L.; Gregorich, Steven; Lee, Howard E.; Durón, Ysabel; McGuire, Peggy; Luce, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated a community-based, translational stress management program to improve health-related quality of life in Spanish-speaking Latinas with breast cancer. Methods. We adapted a cognitive–behavioral stress management program integrating evidence-based and community best practices to address the needs of Latinas with breast cancer. Spanish-speaking Latinas with breast cancer were randomly assigned to an intervention or usual-care control group. Trained peers delivered the 8-week intervention between February 2011 and February 2014. Primary outcomes were breast cancer–specific quality of life and distress, and general symptoms of distress. Results. Of 151 participants, 95% were retained at 6 months (between May 2011 and May 2014). Improvements in quality of life from baseline to 6 months were greater for the intervention than the control group on physical well-being, emotional well-being, breast cancer concerns, and overall quality of life. Decreases from baseline to 6 months were greater for the intervention group on depression and somatization. Conclusions. Results suggest that translation of evidence-based programs can reduce psychosocial health disparities in Latinas with breast cancer. Integration of this program into community-based organizations enhances its dissemination potential. PMID:25905829

  19. Little Steps for New Parents: A Week-by-Week Guide and Journal for Baby's First Year = Pasitos para nuevos padres: Una guia y diario semanal para el primer ano del bebe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Sandy

    Providing young infants with a loving and interesting environment through play will have a positive impact on their future. This book, designed for first time parents, provides simple and enjoyable activities intended to promote brain development during the first year. The book's introduction discusses the importance of the environment during the…

  20. Un Nuevo Convenio para el Aprendizaje: Una Sociedad para Mejorar los Resultados Educativos en el Estado de Nueva York (A New Compact for Learning: A Partnership To Improve Educational Results in New York State).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Elementary, Middle and Secondary Education.

    This Spanish translation of the abridged version of "A New Compact for Learning" acknowledges the current U.S. education system's inadequacy to educate U.S. citizenry and introduces New York State's New Compact for Learning, intended as a plan to reorganize New York's own system. The compact's fundamental principles are: (1) recognizing…

  1. Preliminary Geologic Map of the Laredo, Crystal City-Eagle Pass, San Antonio, and Del Rio 1 x 2 Quadrangles, Texas, and the Nuevo Laredo, Ciudad Acuna, Piedras Negras, and Nueva Rosita 1 x 2 Quadrangles, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, William R.; Berry, Margaret E.; VanSistine, D. Paco; Snyders, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this map is to provide an integrated, bi-national geologic map dataset for display and analyses on an Arc Internet Map Service (IMS) dedicated to environmental health studies in the United States-Mexico border region. The IMS web site was designed by the US-Mexico Border Environmental Health Initiative project and collaborators, and the IMS and project web site address is http://borderhealth.cr.usgs.gov/. The objective of the project is to acquire, evaluate, analyze, and provide earth, biologic, and human health resources data within a GIS framework (IMS) to further our understanding of possible linkages between the physical environment and public health issues. The geologic map dataset is just one of many datasets included in the web site; other datasets include biologic, hydrologic, geographic, and human health themes.

  2. The Upper Campanian - lower Maastrichtian cephalopod fauna of Botellos, Nuevo León: a key to understand faunal turnover across the Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary in NE Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifrim, Christina; De La Cerda, Jacobo Edgar Lara; Peña Ponce, Victor Hugo; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    A new cephalopod collection from the Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary interval of NE Mexico, consisting of 1076 individuals assigned to 29 species and 22 genera is presented. This collection is a mix of ammonoids, one coleoid and one nautilid, which originate from at least three ammonoid biozones: The upper Campanian Exiteloceras jenneyi and Nostoceras (Nostoceras) hyatti zones, and the lower Maastrichtian Pachydiscus (Pachydiscus) neubergicus Zone. The age of the collection is thus middle late Campanian to late early Maastrichtian, and it closes a stratigraphic gap between faunas described formerly from this region. The specimens are nuclei collected from the desert pavement. The abundance of specimens allows for a comparison to other Campanian-Maastrichtian ammonoid records from Mexico, North America and Europe.

  3. Isolations of African horse sickness virus from vector insects made during the 1988 epizootic in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, P. S.; Boned, J.; Hamblin, C.; Graham, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the first isolations of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) from insects in Spain. Seven isolations of AHSV serotype 4 were made; four from Culicoides imicola a known vector of the virus elsewhere, two from mixed pools of Culicoides species not including C. imicola and one from blood engorged mosquitoes. Three further isolations of AHSV serotype 4 were also made from horses kept adjacent to the insect collecting sites. This work presents the first definitive identification of the vectors of AHSV in Spain during the 1987, 88 and 89 epizootics. Suggestions are also made concerning the significance of these findings with regard to the epidemiology of African horse sickness in Spain. PMID:2209746

  4. Bluetongue and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus isolation from vertebrate and invertebrate hosts at a common geographic site.

    PubMed

    Foster, N M; Metcalf, H E; Barber, T L; Jones, R H; Luedke, A J

    1980-01-15

    One serotype of bluetongue virus (BTV) and two serotypes of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) were isolated from vertebrate and invertebrate hosts on a farm in Colorado. The isolations were from blood samples collected a week apart from a dairy heifer with stomatitis and laminitis; EHDV serotypes 1 and 2 were isolated from the first blood sample, and BTV serotype 13 and EHDV serotype 1 were isolated from the second. Antibodies to EHDV and BTV were detected in the serum from this heifer. Both EHDV serotypes and BTV serotype 13 were isolated from pools of female biting gnats (Culicoides variipennis) that had not had a recent blood meal. The BTV insect isolate was biologically transmitted by female gnats from an infected donor sheep to a recipient host sheep. Culicoides variipennis was the predominant insect collected during three nights of light trap captures at the farm.

  5. Susceptibility of pekin and muscovy ducks to Haemoproteus nettionis.

    PubMed

    Sibley, L D; Werner, J K

    1984-04-01

    Domestic muscovy (Caririna moschata) and pekin (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings were exposed to or injected with homogenates of Culicoides flies collected at White Pine, Michigan. Gametocytes of Haemoproteus nettionis were detected in both species of ducks at 16 days post-exposure. Culicoides downesi was indicated as a vector of H. nettionis in northern Michigan. Blood infections occurred with a higher prevalence and reached a higher intensity in muscovy ducks. Endogenous tissue stages of H. nettionis were located in endothelial cells of the lung and occasionally in the heart and spleen. Attempts to infect domestic ducklings by blood or tissue inoculations from wood ducks (Aix sponsa) infected with H. nettionis were not successful, even though schizonts of H. nettionis were seen in these wood ducks at necropsy. No morbidity or mortality was observed in any ducks infected with H. nettionis.

  6. Changes in relative species compositions of biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) and an outbreak of Oropouche virus in Iquitos, Peru.

    PubMed

    Mercer, David R; Castillo-Pizango, Maikol J

    2005-07-01

    Species compositions of Culicoides paraensis (Goeldi) (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), the major vector of Oropouche virus to humans in Central and South American urban cycles, and Culicoides insinuatus Ortiz & Leon differed along a northeast-to-southwest transect across Iquitos, Department of Loreto, Peru. The relative distributions of the species were consistent with patterns of human outbreaks along the Amazon River. We resumed collection of biting midges between May 2000 and January 2004 at three sites previously sampled (1996 -1997) to determine whether the known vector was expanding its range relative to the earlier survey. C. paraensis did not replace C. insinuatus across the region surveyed. Instead, C. insinuatus dominated the more southern sites and significantly increased its relative proportion at all three sites. Apparently, microhabitat differences and not range expansion by C. paraensis were responsible for differences in species compositions across the sample sites.

  7. A Deterministic Model to Quantify Risk and Guide Mitigation Strategies to Reduce Bluetongue Virus Transmission in California Dairy Cattle.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Christie; Shelley, Courtney; MacLachlan, N James; Gardner, Ian; Hartley, David; Barker, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The global distribution of bluetongue virus (BTV) has been changing recently, perhaps as a result of climate change. To evaluate the risk of BTV infection and transmission in a BTV-endemic region of California, sentinel dairy cows were evaluated for BTV infection, and populations of Culicoides vectors were collected at different sites using carbon dioxide. A deterministic model was developed to quantify risk and guide future mitigation strategies to reduce BTV infection in California dairy cattle. The greatest risk of BTV transmission was predicted within the warm Central Valley of California that contains the highest density of dairy cattle in the United States. Temperature and parameters associated with Culicoides vectors (transmission probabilities, carrying capacity, and survivorship) had the greatest effect on BTV's basic reproduction number, R0. Based on these analyses, optimal control strategies for reducing BTV infection risk in dairy cattle will be highly reliant upon early efforts to reduce vector abundance during the months prior to peak transmission.

  8. Disease Vector Ecology Profile: Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    Studies of Mosquitoes of the Genus Haemagogus in Colombia (Diptera, Culicidae). Am. J. Hyg., 43: 13-28. Lane, J. 1953. Neotropical Culicidae...malariae and P. ovale). Female mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles are the exclusive vectors of human malaria. During feeding, the mosquito ingests...birds are implicated reservoirs. The biting midge, Culicoides paraensis, is a proven vector. Culex quinquefasciatus is also capable of transmission

  9. Disease Vector Ecology Profile: Bolivia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    Arnell, J.H. 1973. Mosquito Studies (Diptera, Culicidae). XXXII. A Revision of the Genus Haemagogus. Contrib. Am. Ent. Inst., 10(2): 1-174...parasites (P. vivax , P. falciparum, P. malariae and P. ovale). Female mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles are the exclusive vectors of human malaria...and possibly wild birds are implicated reservoirs. The biting midge, Culicoides paraensis, is a proven vector. Culex quinquefasciatus is also

  10. Bluetongue Virus Serotype 1 Outbreak in the Basque Country (Northern Spain) 2007–2008. Data Support a Primary Vector Windborne Transport

    PubMed Central

    García-Lastra, Rodrigo; Leginagoikoa, Iratxe; Plazaola, Jose M.; Ocabo, Blanca; Aduriz, Gorka; Nunes, Telmo; Juste, Ramón A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bluetongue (BT) is a vector-borne disease of ruminants that has expanded its traditional global distribution in the last decade. Recently, BTV-1 emerged in Southern Spain and caused several outbreaks in livestock reaching the north of the country. The aim of this paper was to review the emergence of BTV-1 in the Basque Country (Northern Spain) during 2007 and 2008 analyzing the possibility that infected Culicoides were introduced into Basque Country by winds from the infected areas of Southern Spain. Methodology/Principal Findings We use a complex HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model to draw wind roses and backward wind trajectories. The analysis of winds showed September 28 to October 2 as the only period for the introduction of infected midges in the Basque Country. These wind trajectories crossed through the areas affected by serotype 1 on those dates in the South of the Iberian Peninsula. Additionally meteorological data, including wind speed and humidity, and altitude along the trajectories showed suitable conditions for Culicoides survival and dispersion. Conclusions/Significance An active infection in medium-long distance regions, wind with suitable speed, altitude and trajectory, and appropriate weather can lead to outbreaks of BTV-1 by transport of Culicoides imicola, not only over the sea (as reported previously) but also over the land. This shows that an additional factor has to be taken into account for the control of the disease which is currently essentially based on the assumption that midges will only spread the virus in a series of short hops. Moreover, the epidemiological and serological data cannot rule out the involvement of other Culicoides species in the spread of the infection, especially at a local level. PMID:22479628

  11. FAMILY CERATOPOGONIDAE.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Gustavo A; Wolff, Marta

    2016-06-14

    Two hundred and thirty five species of Ceratopogonids arranged in 28 genera are listed for Colombia, mostly Culicoides (112 species) and Forcipomyia (50 species). For each listed species, information on type locality, type category and sex, location of type material, species distribution, localities for Colombia and main references, is provided. Localities are not specified for 17 species in which the literature searching was negative. Forcipomyia squamitibia Lutz and Bezzia clavipennis are excluded from the list.

  12. Bluetongue virus serotype 1 outbreak in the Basque Country (Northern Spain) 2007-2008. Data support a primary vector windborne transport.

    PubMed

    García-Lastra, Rodrigo; Leginagoikoa, Iratxe; Plazaola, Jose M; Ocabo, Blanca; Aduriz, Gorka; Nunes, Telmo; Juste, Ramón A

    2012-01-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is a vector-borne disease of ruminants that has expanded its traditional global distribution in the last decade. Recently, BTV-1 emerged in Southern Spain and caused several outbreaks in livestock reaching the north of the country. The aim of this paper was to review the emergence of BTV-1 in the Basque Country (Northern Spain) during 2007 and 2008 analyzing the possibility that infected Culicoides were introduced into Basque Country by winds from the infected areas of Southern Spain. We use a complex HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model to draw wind roses and backward wind trajectories. The analysis of winds showed September 28 to October 2 as the only period for the introduction of infected midges in the Basque Country. These wind trajectories crossed through the areas affected by serotype 1 on those dates in the South of the Iberian Peninsula. Additionally meteorological data, including wind speed and humidity, and altitude along the trajectories showed suitable conditions for Culicoides survival and dispersion. An active infection in medium-long distance regions, wind with suitable speed, altitude and trajectory, and appropriate weather can lead to outbreaks of BTV-1 by transport of Culicoides imicola, not only over the sea (as reported previously) but also over the land. This shows that an additional factor has to be taken into account for the control of the disease which is currently essentially based on the assumption that midges will only spread the virus in a series of short hops. Moreover, the epidemiological and serological data cannot rule out the involvement of other Culicoides species in the spread of the infection, especially at a local level.

  13. Characterization of Viral Communities of Biting Midges and Identification of Novel Thogotovirus Species and Rhabdovirus Genus

    PubMed Central

    Temmam, Sarah; Monteil-Bouchard, Sonia; Robert, Catherine; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Sambou, Masse; Aubadie-Ladrix, Maxence; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg; Desnues, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    More than two thirds of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, and among them RNA viruses represent the majority. Ceratopogonidae (genus Culicoides) are well-known vectors of several viruses responsible for epizooties (bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, etc.). They are also vectors of the only known virus infecting humans: the Oropouche virus. Female midges usually feed on a variety of hosts, leading to possible transmission of emerging viruses from animals to humans. In this context, we report here the analysis of RNA viral communities of Senegalese biting midges using next-generation sequencing techniques as a preliminary step toward the identification of potential viral biohazards. Sequencing of the RNA virome of three pools of Culicoides revealed the presence of a significant diversity of viruses infecting plants, insects and mammals. Several novel viruses were detected, including a novel Thogotovirus species, related but genetically distant from previously described tick-borne thogotoviruses. Novel rhabdoviruses were also detected, possibly constituting a novel Rhabdoviridae genus, and putatively restricted to insects. Sequences related to the major viruses transmitted by Culicoides, i.e., African horse sickness, bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viruses were also detected. This study highlights the interest in monitoring the emergence and circulation of zoonoses and epizooties using their arthropod vectors. PMID:26978389

  14. Identifying equine premises at high risk of introduction of vector-borne diseases using geo-statistical and space-time analyses.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, B; Perez, A M; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2011-06-15

    The identification of premises that may play an important role in the introduction or spread of animal diseases is fundamental to the development of risk-based surveillance and control programs. A combination of geo-statistical and cluster analysis methods was used to identify geographical areas and periods of time at highest risk for introduction of the African horse sickness virus (AHSV) into the Castile and Leon (CyL) region of Spain. Risk was estimated based on the predicted premises-specific abundance of Culicoides spp., a vector for AHSV, and on the frequency of equine introductions from outside regions. The largest abundance of Culicoides spp. was observed between May and September in the northern region of CyL. Six significant (P-value <0.01) space-time clusters of equine premises were found, at which presence of Culicoides spp. was predicted and live equidae were introduced from outside CyL. The clusters included 37 equine premises and took place between April and December. These results will contribute to updating plans for prevention of AHSV introduction and spread in Spain. The methodological approach developed here may be adapted and applied to design and establish risk-based surveillance and control programs for Spain and other European countries.

  15. African Horse Sickness Virus: History, Transmission, and Current Status.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Simon; Mellor, Philip S; Fall, Assane G; Garros, Claire; Venter, Gert J

    2017-01-31

    African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is a lethal arbovirus of equids that is transmitted between hosts primarily by biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). AHSV affects draft, thoroughbred, and companion horses and donkeys in Africa, Asia, and Europe. In this review, we examine the impact of AHSV critically and discuss entomological studies that have been conducted to improve understanding of its epidemiology and control. The transmission of AHSV remains a major research focus and we critically review studies that have implicated both Culicoides and other blood-feeding arthropods in this process. We explore AHSV both as an epidemic pathogen and within its endemic range as a barrier to development, an area of interest that has been underrepresented in studies of the virus to date. By discussing AHSV transmission in the African republics of South Africa and Senegal, we provide a more balanced view of the virus as a threat to equids in a diverse range of settings, thus leading to a discussion of key areas in which our knowledge of transmission could be improved. The use of entomological data to detect, predict and control AHSV is also examined, including reference to existing studies carried out during unprecedented outbreaks of bluetongue virus in Europe, an arbovirus of wild and domestic ruminants also transmitted by Culicoides.

  16. A preventive immunization approach against insect bite hypersensitivity: Intralymphatic injection with recombinant allergens in Alum or Alum and monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir, Sigridur; Svansson, Vilhjalmur; Stefansdottir, Sara Bjork; Schüpbach, Gertraud; Rhyner, Claudio; Marti, Eliane; Torsteinsdottir, Sigurbjorg

    2016-04-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an IgE-mediated dermatitis of horses caused by bites of Culicoides insects, not indigenous to Iceland. Horses born in Iceland and exported to Culicoides-rich areas are frequently affected with IBH. The aims of the study were to compare immunization with recombinant allergens using the adjuvant aluminum hydroxide (Alum) alone or combined with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) for development of a preventive immunization against IBH. Twelve healthy Icelandic horses were vaccinated intralymphatically three times with 10 μg each of four recombinant Culicoides nubeculosus allergens in Alum or in Alum/MPLA. Injection with allergens in both Alum and Alum/MPLA resulted in significant increase in specific IgG subclasses and IgA against all r-allergens with no significant differences between the adjuvant groups. The induced antibodies from both groups could block binding of allergen specific IgE from IBH affected horses to a similar extent. No IgE-mediated reactions were induced. Allergen-stimulated PBMC from Alum/MPLA horses but not from Alum only horses produced significantly more IFNγ and IL-10 than PBMC from non-vaccinated control horses. In conclusion, intralymphatic administration of small amounts of pure allergens in Alum/MPLA induces high IgG antibody levels and Th1/Treg immune response and is a promising approach for immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy against IBH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of Viral Communities of Biting Midges and Identification of Novel Thogotovirus Species and Rhabdovirus Genus.

    PubMed

    Temmam, Sarah; Monteil-Bouchard, Sonia; Robert, Catherine; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Sambou, Masse; Aubadie-Ladrix, Maxence; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg; Desnues, Christelle

    2016-03-11

    More than two thirds of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, and among them RNA viruses represent the majority. Ceratopogonidae (genus Culicoides) are well-known vectors of several viruses responsible for epizooties (bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, etc.). They are also vectors of the only known virus infecting humans: the Oropouche virus. Female midges usually feed on a variety of hosts, leading to possible transmission of emerging viruses from animals to humans. In this context, we report here the analysis of RNA viral communities of Senegalese biting midges using next-generation sequencing techniques as a preliminary step toward the identification of potential viral biohazards. Sequencing of the RNA virome of three pools of Culicoides revealed the presence of a significant diversity of viruses infecting plants, insects and mammals. Several novel viruses were detected, including a novel Thogotovirus species, related but genetically distant from previously described tick-borne thogotoviruses. Novel rhabdoviruses were also detected, possibly constituting a novel Rhabdoviridae genus, and putatively restricted to insects. Sequences related to the major viruses transmitted by Culicoides, i.e., African horse sickness, bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viruses were also detected. This study highlights the interest in monitoring the emergence and circulation of zoonoses and epizooties using their arthropod vectors.

  18. High Prevalence of Mansonella perstans Filariasis in Rural Senegal.

    PubMed

    Bassene, Hubert; Sambou, Masse; Fenollar, Florence; Clarke, Siân; Djiba, Sawdiatou; Mourembou, Gaël; L Y, Alioune Badara; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2015-09-01

    Large parts of African and American countries are colonized by Mansonella, a very common but poorly described filarial nematode. Bloodsucking flies of the genus Culicoides are suspected to be the vector of Mansonella perstans, but no study in Senegal has confirmed that Culicoides can transmit the parasite. Designed specific real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) can be used to identify microfilaria in stained blood smears. This study was performed in July and December 2010 in the southeastern Senegal, which is known to be endemic for M. perstans. We analyzed 297 blood smears from febrile and afebrile resident people by qPCR. The global prevalence of M. perstans was approximately 14.5% in both febrile and afebrile individuals. The age group of > 30 years had the highest prevalence (22.0%). No Culicoides among 1,159 studied specimens was positive for M. perstans and its vector in Senegal still requires identification. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  19. Analysis of the Association of Climate, Weather and Herd Immunity with the Spread of Equine Encephalosis Virus in Horses in Israel.

    PubMed

    Aharonson-Raz, K; Steinman, A; Kavkovsky, A; Bumbarov, V; Berlin, D; Lichter-Peled, A; Berke, O; Klement, E

    2017-04-01

    It is claimed that the distribution of Culicoides-borne viruses is highly influenced by climate. Equine encephalosis virus (EEV) is a Culicoides-borne orbivirus which affects horses and was recently found to be endemic in Israel. To test whether climate is a crucial factor in the geographical distribution of EEV, we collected blood samples from horses in Israel during the years 2002, 2007 and 2010 and tested them for the abundance of antibodies to EEV. Samples were also collected in 2011 from horses that were seronegative to the virus in 2010, to determine the rate of infection with EEV. It was found that seroprevalence fluctuated between the years and that in each year it was highest in a different climatic region. Interestingly, analysis of infection rate at the different farms showed a negative association with seroprevalence at prior observations. In addition, analysis of precipitation preceding the outbreak of EEV which occurred during 2008 revealed that an extremely dry period existed several months prior to the febrile outbreak with the average precipitation of spring 2008 being significantly lower than the average spring precipitation of the years 1997-2009. It is therefore conjectured that exposure to EEV is not climate specific. Rather, it is highly influenced by herd immunity and weather fluctuations which might change annually. This finding may have important implications for the prediction of the abundance of Culicoides-borne viruses in endemic regions. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. The Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agreement (DR-CAFTA): Understanding the Reasons Why the Dominican Republic (DR) Joined the CAFTA Negotiations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Tania Polanco, “EEUU rechaza impuesto de Republica Dominicana a bebidas edulcoradas,” El Nuevo Día, December 6, 2004. 13 John McCarthy, “Dominican...205 Tania Polanco, “EEUU rechaza impuesto de Republica Dominicana a bebidas edulcoradas,” El Nuevo Día, December 6, 2004. 75 sweetened beverages is...209 Tania Polanco, “EEUU rechaza impuesto de Republica Dominicana a bebidas edulcoradas,”El Nuevo Día,” December