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Sample records for perinatal sepsis pops

  1. Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... multiple organ systems, causing them to fail. If sepsis progresses to septic shock, blood pressure drops dramatically, which may lead to death. Anyone can develop sepsis, but it's most common and most dangerous in ...

  2. Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Festic, Emir

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis represents a major challenge in medicine. It begins as a systemic response to infection that can affect virtually any organ system, including the central and peripheral nervous systems. Akin to management of stroke, early recognition and treatment of sepsis are just as crucial to a successful outcome. Sepsis can precipitate myasthenic crisis and lead to encephalopathy and critical illness neuropathy. Stroke and traumatic brain injury can predispose a patient to develop sepsis, whereas Guillain-Barré syndrome is similarly not uncommon following infection. This review article will first describe the essential principles of sepsis recognition, pathophysiology, and management and will then briefly cover the neurologic aspects associated with sepsis. Vigilant awareness of the clinical features of sepsis and timeliness of intervention can help clinicians prevent progression of this disease to a multisystem organ failure, which can be difficult to reverse even after the original source of infection is under control. PMID:23983879

  3. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BE. Perinatal viral infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ... K. Postnatal bacterial infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ...

  4. Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Prusakowski, Melanie K; Chen, Audrey P

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric sepsis is distinct from adult sepsis in its definitions, clinical presentations, and management. Recognition of pediatric sepsis is complicated by the various pediatric-specific comorbidities that contribute to its mortality and the age- and development-specific vital sign and clinical parameters that obscure its recognition. This article outlines the clinical presentation and management of sepsis in neonates, infants, and children, and highlights some key populations who require specialized care.

  5. Neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Iva Mihatov

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the most common cause of neonatal deaths with high mortality despite treatment. Neonatal sepsis can be classified into two subtypes depending upon onset of symptoms. There are many factors that make neonates more susceptable to infection. Signs of sepsis in neonates are often non-specific and high degree of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis. Some laboratory parameters can be helpful for screening of neonates with neonatal sepsis, but none of it is specific and sensitive enough to be used singly. Diagnostic approach mostly focuses on history and review of non specific signs and symptoms. Antibiotic treatment is the mainstay of treatment and supportive care is equally important. The aim of this review is to give an overview of neonatal sepsis, including incidence, etiology, clinical picture, diagnostics and therapy.

  6. Perinatal neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Jelin, Angie C.; Thiet, Mari-Paule

    2014-01-01

    Fetal or neonatal brain injury can result in lifelong neurologic disability. The most significant risk factor for perinatal brain injury is prematurity; however, in absolute numbers, full-term infants represent the majority of affected children. Research on strategies to prevent or mitigate the impact of perinatal brain injury (“perinatal neuroprotection”) has established the mitigating roles of magnesium sulfate administration for preterm infants and therapeutic hypothermia for term infants with suspected perinatal brain injury. Banked umbilical cord blood, erythropoietin, and a number of other agents that may improve neuronal repair show promise for improving outcomes following perinatal brain injury in animal models. Other preventative strategies include delayed umbilical cord clamping in preterm infants and progesterone in women with prior preterm birth or short cervix and avoidance of infections. Despite these advances, we have not successfully decreased the rate of preterm birth, nor are we able to predict term infants at risk of hypoxic brain injury in order to intervene prior to the hypoxic event. Further, we lack the ability to modulate the sequelae of neuronal cell insults or the ability to repair brain injury after it has been sustained. As a consequence, despite exciting advances in the field of perinatal neuroprotection, perinatal brain injury still impacts thousands of newborns each year with significant long-term morbidity and mortality. PMID:24592318

  7. Neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Birju A; Padbury, James F

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis continues to be a common and significant health care burden, especially in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBW <1500 g). Though intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has decreased the incidence of early-onset group B streptococcal infection dramatically, it still remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis. Moreover, some studies among VLBW preterm infants have shown an increase in early-onset sepsis caused by Escherichia coli. As the signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis are nonspecific, early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains a challenge. There have been a myriad of studies on various diagnostic markers like hematological indices, acute phase reactants, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, cytokines, and cell surface markers among others. Nonetheless, further research is needed to identify a biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy and validity. Some of the newer markers like inter α inhibitor proteins have shown promising results thereby potentially aiding in early detection of neonates with sepsis. In order to decrease the widespread, prolonged use of unnecessary antibiotics and improve the outcome of the infants with sepsis, reliable identification of sepsis at an earlier stage is paramount. PMID:24185532

  8. Dental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mueller, P O; Lowder, M Q

    1998-08-01

    Dental sepsis or periapical abscess formation constitutes a large percentage of dental conditions that afflict horses. Dental sepsis occurs when the pulp chamber of the tooth is exposed to the oral cavity or external environment, allowing bacterial localization with resulting infection. Although acute, primary, septic pulpitis in horses is rare, dental sepsis often results from colonization of the pulp chamber with pathogenic bacteria secondary to maleruption or impaction of teeth with secondary alveolar bone lysis, primary fractures of the tooth, mandible, or maxilla, periodontal disease, or infundibular necrosis. The sequela to pulpal infection are extensions into the periradicular tissues and mandibular or maxillary periapical abscess formation.

  9. Pop in a Popper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article describes Pop in a Popper, an effective lesson for teaching students how to choose and use words to give their writing fluency and flair. Pop in a Popper introduces the appositive: a group of words inserted after a noun to modify that noun. In simplest terms, writers pop this group of words into a sentence to tell more about a noun.…

  10. Jiffy Pop Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Irene

    1998-01-01

    Pans of popcorn are popped to varying degrees in order to compare them to the earth's surface with volcanic pressure building up in this demonstration. Volcanic activity is also related to bodily functions to help students make connections. For example, the release of gas through burping after drinking soda pop is related to the release of…

  11. Neonatal sepsis-- a global problem: an overview.

    PubMed

    Afroza, S

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is one of the major health problems throughout the world. Every year an estimated 30 million newborns acquire infection and 1-2 million of these die. The present review provides updates regarding neonatal sepsis to help paediatricians to protect the newborn from this deadly problem. The onset of sepsis within first 48 hours of life (early onset sepsis) is frequently associated with pre and perinatal predisposing factors while onset after 48-72 hours of life (late onset sepsis) frequently reflects infection acquired nosocomially. Some literatures say that early onset disease presents in the first 5-7 days of life. Klebsiella pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing neonatal sepsis in Bangladesh and neighbouring countries. Among many risk factors the single most important neonatal risk factor is low birth weight. Other main risk factors are invassive procedures in the postnatal period and inadequate hand washing before and after handling babies. Sepsis score is a useful method for early and rapid diagnosis of neonatal sepsis which was developed by Tollner U in 1982. Antibiotics should be given to most of the neonates suspected of infection. Ampicillin and gentamicin are the first drug of choice. In Bangladesh context sepsis score may be used as a good parameter for the early and rapid diagnosis of sepsis and that will guide the treatment plan. Clean and safe delivery, early and exclusive breastfeeding, strict postnatal cleanliness following adequate handwashing and aseptic technique during invasive procedure might reduce the incidence of neonatal sepsis. Prompt use of antibiotic according to standard policy is warranted to save the newborn lives from septicaemia.

  12. Popping All Over

    NASA Video Gallery

    With numerous active regions populating the Sun's surface, it is no surprise that over about two days (Mar. 6-8, 2011) SDO saw flares and coronal mass ejections popping off in many directions. The ...

  13. Pop-Art Panels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    James Rosenquist's giant Pop-art panels included realistic renderings of well-known contemporary foods and objects, juxtaposed with famous people in the news--largely from the 1960s, '70s and '80s--and really serve as visual time capsules. In this article, eighth-graders focus on the style of James Rosenquist to create their own Pop-art panel that…

  14. Do People "Pop Out"?

    PubMed

    Mayer, Katja M; Vuong, Quoc C; Thornton, Ian M

    2015-01-01

    The human body is a highly familiar and socially very important object. Does this mean that the human body has a special status with respect to visual attention? In the current paper we tested whether people in natural scenes attract attention and "pop out" or, alternatively, are at least searched for more efficiently than targets of another category (machines). Observers in our study searched a visual array for dynamic or static scenes containing humans amidst scenes containing machines and vice versa. The arrays consisted of 2, 4, 6 or 8 scenes arranged in a circular array, with targets being present or absent. Search times increased with set size for dynamic and static human and machine targets, arguing against pop out. However, search for human targets was more efficient than for machine targets as indicated by shallower search slopes for human targets. Eye tracking further revealed that observers made more first fixations to human than to machine targets and that their on-target fixation durations were shorter for human compared to machine targets. In summary, our results suggest that searching for people in natural scenes is more efficient than searching for other categories even though people do not pop out.

  15. Neonatal sepsis: progress towards improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shane, Andi L; Stoll, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are predisposed to infections during the perinatal period due to multiple exposures and a relatively compromised immune system. The burden of disease attributed to neonatal infections varies by geographic region and maternal and neonatal risk factors. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than 1.4 million neonatal deaths annually are the consequence of invasive infections. Risk factors for early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) include prematurity, immunologic immaturity, maternal Group B streptococcal colonization, prolonged rupture of membranes, and maternal intra-amniotic infection. Intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis administered to GBS-colonized women has reduced the burden of disease associated with early onset GBS invasive infections. Active surveillance has identified Gram-negative pathogens as an emerging etiology of early-onset invasive infections. Late-onset neonatal sepsis (LOS) attributable to Gram-positive organisms, including coagulase negative Staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among premature infants. Invasive candidiasis is an emerging cause of late-onset sepsis, especially among infants who receive broad spectrum antimicrobial agents. Prophylactic fluconazole administration to very low birthweight (VLBW) neonates during the first 6 weeks of life reduces invasive candidiasis in neonatal intensive care units with high rates of fungal infection. Prevention of healthcare associated infections through antimicrobial stewardship, limited steroid use, early enteral feeding, limited use of invasive devices and standardization of catheter care practices, and meticulous hand hygiene are important and cost-effective strategies for reducing the burden of late-onset neonatal sepsis.

  16. Disturbing Pop-Tart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Sojourner rover's front right camera imaged Pop-tart, a small rock or indurated soil material which was pushed out of the surrounding drift material by Sojourner's front left wheel during a soil mechanics experiment.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  17. Introduction to Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Derek S

    2011-10-07

    Sepsis is a significant health problem in both critically ill children and adults. While the mortality rate from sepsis is much lower in children, sepsis is directly responsible for over 4,000 childhood deaths per year in the United States alone. At face value, this number suggests that more children die per year in the United States from sepsis as the primary cause than from cancer. Unfortunately, there are few studies on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of sepsis in children. Moreover, extrapolation of adult data to critically ill children is probably not appropriate due to several key developmental differences in the host response to infection and response to therapy. Therefore, additional studies targeting sepsis in the pediatric population are urgently required.

  18. Numerical computation of Pop plot

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-03-23

    The Pop plot — distance-of-run to detonation versus initial shock pressure — is a key characterization of shock initiation in a heterogeneous explosive. Reactive burn models for high explosives (HE) must reproduce the experimental Pop plot to have any chance of accurately predicting shock initiation phenomena. This report describes a methodology for automating the computation of a Pop plot for a specific explosive with a given HE model. Illustrative examples of the computation are shown for PBX 9502 with three burn models (SURF, WSD and Forest Fire) utilizing the xRage code, which is the Eulerian ASC hydrocode at LANL. Comparison of the numerical and experimental Pop plot can be the basis for a validation test or as an aid in calibrating the burn rate of an HE model. Issues with calibration are discussed.

  19. THE ENDOTHELIUM IN SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Ince, Can; Mayeux, Philip R; Nguyen, Trung; Gomez, Hernando; Kellum, John A; Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo A; Hernandez, Glenn; Murray, Patrick; De Backer, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Sepsis affects practically all aspects of endothelial cell (EC) function and is thought to be the key factor in the progression from sepsis to organ failure. Endothelial functions affected by sepsis include vasoregulation, barrier function, inflammation, and hemostasis. These are among other mechanisms often mediated by glycocalyx shedding, such as abnormal nitric oxide metabolism, up-regulation of reactive oxygen species generation due to down-regulation of endothelial-associated antioxidant defenses, transcellular communication, proteases, exposure of adhesion molecules, and activation of tissue factor. This review covers current insight in EC-associated hemostatic responses to sepsis and the EC response to inflammation. The endothelial cell lining is highly heterogeneous between different organ systems and consequently also in its response to sepsis. In this context, we discuss the response of the endothelial cell lining to sepsis in the kidney, liver, and lung. Finally, we discuss evidence as to whether the EC response to sepsis is adaptive or maladaptive. This study is a result of an Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative XIV Sepsis Workgroup meeting held in Bogota, Columbia, between October 12 and 15, 2014.

  20. Neutrophil Dysfunction in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Liu, An-Lei; Gao, Shuang; Ma, Shui; Guo, Shu-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated host response to infection. In this article, we reviewed the correlation between neutrophil dysfunction and sepsis. Data Sources: Articles published up to May 31, 2016, were selected from the PubMed databases, with the keywords of “neutrophil function”, “neutrophil dysfunction”, and “sepsis”. Study Selection: Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the neutrophil function in infection and neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Results: We emphasized the diagnosis of sepsis and its limitations. Pathophysiological mechanisms involve a generalized circulatory, immune, coagulopathic, and/or neuroendocrine response to infection. Many studies focused on neutrophil burst or cytokines. Complement activation, impairment of neutrophil migration, and endothelial lesions are involved in this progress. Alterations of cytokines, chemokines, and other mediators contribute to neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Conclusions: Sepsis represents a severe derangement of the immune response to infection, resulting in neutrophil dysfunction. Neutrophil dysfunction promotes sepsis and even leads to organ failure. Mechanism studies, clinical practice, and strategies to interrupt dysregulated neutrophil function in sepsis are desperately needed. PMID:27824008

  1. THE ENDOTHELIUM IN SEPSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Can; Mayeux, Philip R.; Nguyen, Trung; Gomez, Hernando; Kellum, John A.; Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo A.; Hernandez, Glenn; Murray, Patrick; De Backer, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis affects practically all aspects of endothelial cell (EC) function and is thought to be the key factor in the progression from sepsis to organ failure. Endothelial functions affected by sepsis include vasoregulation, barrier function, inflammation, and hemostasis. These are among other mechanisms often mediated by glycocalyx shedding, such as abnormal nitric oxide metabolism, up-regulation of reactive oxygen species generation due to down-regulation of endothelial-associated antioxidant defenses, transcellular communication, proteases, exposure of adhesion molecules, and activation of tissue factor. This review covers current insight in EC-associated hemostatic responses to sepsis and the EC response to inflammation. The endothelial cell lining is highly heterogeneous between different organ systems and consequently also in its response to sepsis. In this context, we discuss the response of the endothelial cell lining to sepsis in the kidney, liver, and lung. Finally, we discuss evidence as to whether the EC response to sepsis is adaptive or maladaptive. This study is a result of an Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative XIV Sepsis Workgroup meeting held in Bogota, Columbia, between October 12 and 15, 2014. PMID:26871664

  2. Rapid diagnosis of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Bloos, Frank; Reinhart, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Fast and appropriate therapy is the cornerstone in the therapy of sepsis. However, the discrimination of sepsis from non-infectious causes of inflammation may be difficult. Biomarkers have been suggested to aid physicians in this decision. There is currently no biochemical technique available which alone allows a rapid and reliable discrimination between sepsis and non-infectious inflammation. Procalcitonin (PCT) is currently the most investigated biomarker for this purpose. C-reactive protein and interleukin 6 perform inferior to PCT in most studies and their value in diagnosing sepsis is not defined. All biomarkers including PCT are also released after various non-infectious inflammatory impacts. This shortcoming needs to be taken into account when biomarkers are used to aid the physician in the diagnosis of sepsis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based pathogen detection may improve time to adequate therapy but cannot rule out the presence of infection when negative. PMID:24335467

  3. Implementing sepsis bundles

    PubMed Central

    Jozwiak, Mathieu; Monnet, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis bundles represent key elements of care regarding the diagnosis and treatment of patients with septic shock and allow ones to convert complex guidelines into meaningful changes in behavior. Sepsis bundles endorsed the early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) and their implementation resulted in an improved outcome of septic shock patients. They induced more consistent and timely application of evidence-based care and reduced practice variability. These benefits mainly depend on the compliance with sepsis bundles, highlighting the importance of dedicated performance improvement initiatives, such as multifaceted educational programs. Nevertheless, the interest of early goal directed therapy in septic shock patients compared to usual care has recently been questioned, leading to an update of sepsis bundles in 2015. These new sepsis bundles may also exhibit, as the previous bundles, some limits and pitfalls and the effects of their implementation still needs to be evaluated. PMID:27713890

  4. [Recommendations for perinatal transport].

    PubMed

    Esqué Ruiz, M; Figueras Aloy, J; García Alix, A; Alomar Ribes, A; Blanco Bravo, D; Ferández Lorenzo, J R

    2001-08-01

    Perinatal transport should be integrated into a system of perinatal care within a regional health care program and should be planned according to the healthcare map of each community. We describe the various types of transport, their advantages and disadvantages, the resources required, and the protocol that should be followed in perinatal transfer. We highlight the importance of maternal and neonatal transport. The organization of transfers receives special attention, and we discuss the different functions of the coordinating, referral and receiving centers as well as those of the transport assistance team. We also discuss ethical-legal questions.

  5. Biomarkers of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Faix, James D

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is an unusual systemic reaction to what is sometimes an otherwise ordinary infection, and it probably represents a pattern of response by the immune system to injury. A hyper-inflammatory response is followed by an immunosuppressive phase during which multiple organ dysfunction is present and the patient is susceptible to nosocomial infection. Biomarkers to diagnose sepsis may allow early intervention which, although primarily supportive, can reduce the risk of death. Although lactate is currently the most commonly used biomarker to identify sepsis, other biomarkers may help to enhance lactate's effectiveness; these include markers of the hyper-inflammatory phase of sepsis, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines; proteins such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin which are synthesized in response to infection and inflammation; and markers of neutrophil and monocyte activation. Recently, markers of the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis, such as anti-inflammatory cytokines, and alterations of the cell surface markers of monocytes and lymphocytes have been examined. Combinations of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers in a multi-marker panel may help identify patients who are developing severe sepsis before organ dysfunction has advanced too far. Combined with innovative approaches to treatment that target the immunosuppressive phase, these biomarkers may help to reduce the mortality rate associated with severe sepsis which, despite advances in supportive measures, remains high.

  6. HUMAN HEALTH IMPACTS OF EXPOSURE TO POPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Stockholm Convention on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was adopted in 2001 to protect human health and the environment from chemicals that are highly toxic, persistent, bioaccumulative and undergo long range transport. These POPs include 9 pesticides, polychlorinated d...

  7. The Microcirculation in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Asha; Sethi, Ashok Kumar; Girotra, Gautam; Mohta, Medha

    2009-01-01

    Summary Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality in critically ill patients. The pathophysiology of sepsis involves a highly complex and integrated response, including the activation of various cell types, inflammatory mediators, and the haemostatic system. Recent evidence suggests an emerging role of the microcirculation in sepsis, necessitating a shift in our locus away Irom the macrohaemodynamics to ill icrohaemodynanmics in a septic patient. This review article provides a brief overview of the microcirculation, its assessment techniques, and specific therapies to resuscitate the microhaemodynamics. PMID:20640135

  8. Neutrophil paralysis in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Alves-Filho, José C; Spiller, Fernando; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2010-09-01

    Sepsis develops when the initial host response is unable to contain the primary infection, resulting in widespread inflammation and multiple organ dysfunction. The impairment of neutrophil migration into the infection site, also termed neutrophil paralysis, is a critical hallmark of sepsis, which is directly related to the severity of the disease. Although the precise mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood, there has been much advancement in the understanding of this field. In this review, we highlight the recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of neutrophil paralysis during sepsis.

  9. Prehospital Sepsis Care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jerrilyn; Lawner, Benjamin J

    2017-02-01

    Prehospital care providers are tasked with the delivery of time-sensitive care, and emergency medical services (EMS) systems must match patients to appropriate clinical resources. Modern systems are uniquely positioned to recognize and treat patients with sepsis. Interventions such as administration of intravenous fluid and transporting patients to the appropriate level of definitive care are linked to improved patient outcomes. As EMS systems refine their protocols for the recognition and stabilization of patients with suspected or presumed sepsis, EMS providers need to be educated about the spectrum of sepsis-related presentations and treatment strategies need to be standardized.

  10. Lessons in Pop: Does Pop Culture Belong in the Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    Many teachers are finding that weaving in examples from current movies, television, music, and popular fiction makes their lessons come alive for students. A clip from "The Daily Show" or rap lyrics can be vehicles to talk about politics and poetry. Pop culture is what students talk about in the hallways, so why not harness that interest and…

  11. Blacks in Pop Music: A Short Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickelman, Melinda

    1991-01-01

    A short history of black pop music includes artists who have changed pop music or culture and highlights from the 1920s into the 1980s, from Fats Waller to Michael Jackson. In black pop music, there is a direct line of influence from the sharecropper to the current Top 40. (SLD)

  12. Vitamin D and sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kempker, Jordan A.; Han, Jenny E.; Tangpricha, Vin; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Martin, Greg S.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency and sepsis are both highly prevalent worldwide problems and this article reviews the emerging science that is defining the intersections of these conditions. The importance of vitamin D’s role in skeletal health has long been understood but recent evidence is beginning to highlight its role in the functioning of other physiologic systems of the body. Basic science data reveal its integral role in local immune responses to pathogens and the systemic inflammatory pathways of sepsis. Furthermore, clinical scientists have found associations with respiratory infections, critical illness and sepsis but the causal relationship and its clinical impact have yet to be clearly defined. The article ends with speculations on the connections between racial disparities and seasonal differences in sepsis and vitamin D insufficiency. PMID:22928065

  13. Sepsis Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with infections of the lungs (e.g., pneumonia), urinary tract (e.g., kidney), skin, and gut. Staphylococcus aureus ( staph ), Escherichia coli ( E. coli ), and some types of Streptococcus (strep) are common germs that can cause sepsis. ...

  14. Neurologic complications of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, E; Pfausler, B

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades, the incidence of sepsis and resultant neurologic sequelae has increased, both in industrialized and low- or middle-income countries, by approximately 5% per year. Up to 300 patients per 100 000 population per year are reported to suffer from sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. Mortality is up to 30%, depending on the precision of diagnostic criteria. The increasing incidence of sepsis is partially explained by demographic changes in society, with aging, increasing numbers of immunocompromised patients, dissemination of multiresistant pathogens, and greater availability of supportive medical care in both industrialized and middle-income countries. This results in more septic patients being admitted to intensive care units. Septic encephalopathy is a manifestation especially of severe sepsis and septic shock where the neurologist plays a crucial role in diagnosis and management. It is well known that timely treatment of sepsis improves outcome and that septic encephalopathy may precede other signs and symptoms. Particularly in the elderly and immunocompromised patient, the brain may be the first organ to show signs of failure. The neurologist diagnosing early septic encephalopathy may therefore contribute to the optimal management of septic patients. The brain is not only an organ failing in sepsis (a "sepsis victim" - as with other organs), but it also overwhelmingly influences all inflammatory processes on a variety of pathophysiologic levels, thus contributing to the initiation and propagation of septic processes. Therefore, the best possible pathophysiologic understanding of septic encephalopathy is essential for its management, and the earliest possible therapy is crucial to prevent the evolution of septic encephalopathy, brain failure, and poor prognosis.

  15. [Severe sepsis and septic shock].

    PubMed

    Tønnesen, Else; Larsen, Kim

    2014-07-07

    Sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock are syndromes. The incidence of sepsis is as high as 35% and with mortality rates in the intensive care unit from 27% to 54% in sepsis and septic shock, respectively. Many new treatments have been tested but only few have been implemented in clinical practise. The treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock is based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines developed by an international expert panel. Early diagnosis, optimization of haemodynamics, rapid identification of focus and adequate antibiotic treatment are the most important strategies.

  16. Pregnancy & perinatal transmission update.

    PubMed

    Denison, R

    1998-09-01

    According to a June 1998 report from UNAIDS, the majority of children infected with HIV acquired it from their mothers during or near birth. One way to prevent perinatal transmission of HIV is to increase prevention efforts for women. Other ways to prevent perinatal transmission include using AZT treatment, avoiding breastfeeding, and choosing a C-section delivery instead of a vaginal delivery. One important study, called the Thai study, promoted a shorter course of AZT therapy that was less expensive, more accessible, and still prevented transmission in many cases. Several reasons are cited for why some women continue breastfeeding, despite the increased risk of transmitting HIV to their babies. An important factor in preventing perinatal transmission is the overall health of the mother, and her ability to maintain her health and treatment regimen while caring for a newborn.

  17. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cotena, Simona; Piazza, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is defined as a diffuse or multifocal cerebral dysfunction induced by the systemic response to the infection without clinical or laboratory evidence of direct brain infection. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. SAE generally occurs early during severe sepsis and precedes multiple-organ failure. The most common clinical feature of SAE is the consciousness alteration which ranges from mildly reduced awareness to unresponsiveness and coma. Diagnosis of SAE is primarily clinical and depends on the exclusion of other possible causes of brain deterioration. Electroencephalography (EEG) is almost sensitive, but it is not specific for SAE. Computed Tomography (CT) head scan generally is negative in case of SAE, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can show brain abnormalities in case of SAE, but they are not specific for this condition. Somatosensitive Evoked Potentials (SEPs) are sensitive markers of developing cerebral dysfunction in sepsis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CBF) analysis is generally normal, a part an inconstant elevation of proteins concentration. S100B and NSE have been proposed like biomarkers for diagnosis of SAE, but the existing data are controversial. SAE is reversible even if survivors of severe sepsis have often long lasting or irreversible cognitive and behavioral sequel; however the presence of SAE can have a negative influence on survival. A specific therapy of SAE does not exist and the outcome depends on a prompt and appropriate treatment of sepsis as whole.

  18. Neonatal sepsis, antibiotic therapy and later risk of asthma and allergy.

    PubMed

    Sobko, Tanja; Schiött, Jessica; Ehlin, Anna; Lundberg, Jon; Montgomery, Scott; Norman, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis and early antibiotic therapy affect bacterial colonisation and immune activation after birth. This could have implications for later risk of allergy and asthma. Using a validated questionnaire (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Children, ISAAC), we screened for asthma and allergy in three cohorts (total n = 834; median age 12, range 7-23 years) with different perinatal exposures as regards infection and antibiotics. Asthma, but not hay fever, was more prevalent after neonatal sepsis with adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04, 2.56] and early antibiotic therapy (OR 1.48 [0.93, 2.35]) as compared with a control group. There was a trend towards increased atopic eczema after neonatal sepsis (OR = 1.39 [CI = 0.98, 1.98]). We conclude that neonatal sepsis is associated with an increased risk for later development of asthma. Early antibiotic exposure may contribute to this association.

  19. Sepsis: An update in management.

    PubMed

    Galen, Benjamin T; Sankey, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Hospitalists are a critical link in providing evidence-based care for patients with sepsis across the disease spectrum, from early recognition to recovery. The past decade of sepsis research has led to significant findings that will change clinical practice for hospital medicine practitioners. Although the incidence of severe sepsis in the United States has continued to rise, in-hospital mortality has declined. Management of the spectrum of sepsis disorders is no longer restricted to the intensive care unit (ICU). This review article will provide an update in the management of sepsis for hospitalists based on recently published pivotal studies. The expanding evidence base in sepsis includes early goal-directed therapy/clinical endpoints/sepsis bundles, antibiotics and source control, volume resuscitation, ICU considerations (including the use of insulin and corticosteroids), mortality/complications, and the newly recognized condition of "sepsis survivorship".

  20. Mitochondrial Function in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Arulkumaran, Nishkantha; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Pinsky, Michael R.; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Schumacker, Paul T.; Gomez, Hernando; Gomez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are an essential part of the cellular infrastructure, being the primary site for high energy adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production through oxidative phosphorylation. Clearly, in severe systemic inflammatory states, like sepsis, cellular metabolism is usually altered and end organ dysfunction not only common but predictive of long term morbidity and mortality. Clearly, interest is mitochondrial function both as a target for intracellular injury and response to extrinsic stress have been a major focus of basic science and clinical research into the pathophysiology of acute illness. However, mitochondria have multiple metabolic and signaling functions that may be central in both the expression of sepsis and its ultimate outcome. In this review, the authors address five primary questions centered on the role of mitochondria in sepsis. This review should be used as both a summary source in placing mitochondrial physiology within the context of acute illness and as a focal point for addressing new research into diagnostic and treatment opportunities these insights provide. PMID:26871665

  1. Spin on perinatal testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Samnakay, Naeem; Tudehope, David; Walker, Rosslyn

    2006-11-01

    We describe a recent case of perinatal testicular torsion at our institution. The presentation, management and outcome of perinatal testicular torsion are quite different to testicular torsion in the general paediatric population. The literature describes a variety of management options for perinatal testicular torsion and these are briefly reviewed. In cases of unilateral perinatal testicular torsin, there is controversy over whether surgery to fix the contralateral testis is required, and if so, the appropriate timing for the surgery. A good understanding of the issues unique to perinatal torsion will facilitate appropriate counseling of parents of affected neonates.

  2. Essentials of sepsis management.

    PubMed

    Green, John M

    2015-04-01

    Despite remarkable advances in the knowledge of infection and human response to it, sepsis continues to be one of the most common challenges surgeons and critical care providers face. Surgeons confront the problem of infection every day, in treating established infections or reacting to a consequence of surgical intervention. Infections after surgery continue to be a problem despite massive efforts to prevent them. Patients rely on the surgeon's ability to recognize infection and treat it. Also, preventing nosocomial infection and antibiotic resistance is a primary responsibility. This article describes diagnostic and therapeutic measures for sepsis in the perioperative surgical patient.

  3. Revisiting caspases in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, M; Jacob, A; Wang, P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening illness that occurs due to an abnormal host immune network which extends through the initial widespread and overwhelming inflammation, and culminates at the late stage of immunosupression. Recently, interest has been shifted toward therapies aimed at reversing the accompanying periods of immune suppression. Studies in experimental animals and critically ill patients have demonstrated that increased apoptosis of lymphoid organs and some parenchymal tissues contributes to this immune suppression, anergy and organ dysfunction. Immediate to the discoveries of the intracellular proteases, caspases for the induction of apoptosis and inflammation, and their striking roles in sepsis have been focused elaborately in a number of original and review articles. Here we revisited the different aspects of caspases in terms of apoptosis, pyroptosis, necroptosis and inflammation and focused their links in sepsis by reviewing several recent findings. In addition, we have documented striking perspectives which not only rewrite the pathophysiology, but also modernize our understanding for developing novel therapeutics against sepsis. PMID:25412304

  4. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Neera; Duggal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis.

  5. Defining Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review Although infection rates have modestly decreased in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as a result of ongoing quality improvement measures, neonatal sepsis remains a frequent and devastating problem among hospitalized preterm neonates. Despite multiple attempts to address this unmet need, there have been minimal advances in clinical management, outcomes, and accuracy of diagnostic testing options over the last three decades. One strong contributor to a lack of medical progress is a variable case definition of disease. The inability to agree on a precise definition greatly reduces the likelihood of aligning findings from epidemiologists, clinicians, and researchers, which, in turn, severely hinders progress towards improving outcomes. Recent findings Pediatric consensus definitions for sepsis are not accurate in term infants and are not appropriate for preterm infants. In contrast to the defined multi-stage criteria for other devastating diseases encountered in the NICU (e.g., bronchopulmonary dysplasia), there is significant variability in the criteria used by investigators to substantiate the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Summary The lack of an accepted consensus definition for neonatal sepsis impedes our efforts towards improved diagnostic and prognostic options as well as accurate outcomes information for this vulnerable population. PMID:26766602

  6. Article "403. Toxicology of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs)"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are all synthetic chemicals, either intentionally or unintentionally produced/released. Some POPs are pesticides. Others are industrial products or unintended by-products resulting from industrial processes or combustions (see figure 1). POPs ...

  7. 7 CFR 51.1239 - Pops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... Standards for Cleaned Virginia Type Peanuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.1239 Pops. Pops means...

  8. Pop Culture Universe: Icons, Idols, Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Meghan

    2010-01-01

    This article features "Pop Culture Universe," which received the 2009 Dartmouth Medal honoring the creation of a reference work of outstanding quality. School librarians will find "Pop Culture Universe" a wonderful resource for assisting middle school and high school students with research projects on significant historical events that focus on…

  9. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  10. Sepsis and the heart.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J D; Doddi, M

    2010-01-01

    Septic shock, the most severe complication of sepsis, accounts for approximately 10% of all admissions to intensive care. Our understanding of its complex pathophysiology remains incomplete but clearly involves stimulation of the immune system with subsequent inflammation and microvascular dysfunction. Cardiovascular dysfunction is pronounced and characterized by elements of hypovolaemic, cytotoxic, and distributive shock. In addition, significant myocardial depression is commonly observed. This septic cardiomyopathy is characterized by biventricular impairment of intrinsic myocardial contractility, with a subsequent reduction in left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction and LV stroke work index. This review details the myocardial dysfunction observed in adult septic shock, and discusses the underlying pathophysiology. The utility of using the regulatory protein troponin for the detection of myocardial dysfunction is also considered. Finally, options for the management of sepsis-induced LV hypokinesia are discussed, including the use of levosimendan.

  11. Defining and Diagnosing Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael C

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome that encompasses infections of many different types and severity. Not surprisingly, it has confounded most attempts to apply a single definition, which has also limited the ability to develop a set of reliable diagnostic criteria. It is perhaps best defined as the different clinical syndromes produced by an immune response to infection that causes harm to the body beyond that of the local effects of the infection.

  12. Understanding pop-ins in spherical nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Siddhartha E-mail: siddharthapathak@gmail.com; Riesterer, Jessica L.; Michler, Johann; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2014-10-20

    Pop-ins, or sudden displacement-bursts at constant load in a nanoindentation test, are typically attributed to the difficulty of setting up potent dislocation sources in the very small indentation zones in these experiments. Such displacement (and strain) bursts would intuitively indicate a sharp drop in stress during the pop-in event itself. However, spherical indentation stress-strain curves routinely exhibit a high and stable indentation stress value during the pop-in, and the indentation stresses decrease only after a further finite amount of additional indentation displacement has been applied. In order to understand this discrepancy, we utilize a combination of interrupted spherical indentation tests along with depth profiling of the residual indentation surfaces using in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study pop-ins. The AFM surface profile maps show that there is an asymmetric profile change over a limited region around the indentation contact area for a single pop-in; the asymmetry disappears upon further loading beyond the pop-in. A plausible sequence of physical processes (related to metal plasticity) occurring underneath the indenter during and immediately after the occurrence of the pop-in is proposed to explain these observations.

  13. Understanding pop-ins in spherical nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Siddhartha; Riesterer, Jessica L.; Kalidindi, Surya R.; Michler, Johann

    2014-10-24

    In this study, pop-ins, or sudden displacement-bursts at constant load in a nanoindentation test, are typically attributed to the difficulty of setting up potent dislocation sources in the very small indentation zones in these experiments. Such displacement (and strain) bursts would intuitively indicate a sharp drop in stress during the pop-in event itself. However, spherical indentation stress-strain curves routinely exhibit a high and stable indentation stress value during the pop-in, and the indentation stresses decrease only after a further finite amount of additional indentation displacement has been applied. In order to understand this discrepancy, we utilize a combination of interrupted spherical indentation tests along with depth profiling of the residual indentation surfaces using in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study pop-ins. The AFM surface profile maps show that there is an asymmetric profile change over a limited region around the indentation contact area for a single pop-in; the asymmetry disappears upon further loading beyond the pop-in. A plausible sequence of physical processes (related to metal plasticity) occurring underneath the indenter during and immediately after the occurrence of the pop-in is proposed to explain these observations.

  14. Understanding pop-ins in spherical nanoindentation

    DOE PAGES

    Pathak, Siddhartha; Riesterer, Jessica L.; Kalidindi, Surya R.; ...

    2014-10-24

    In this study, pop-ins, or sudden displacement-bursts at constant load in a nanoindentation test, are typically attributed to the difficulty of setting up potent dislocation sources in the very small indentation zones in these experiments. Such displacement (and strain) bursts would intuitively indicate a sharp drop in stress during the pop-in event itself. However, spherical indentation stress-strain curves routinely exhibit a high and stable indentation stress value during the pop-in, and the indentation stresses decrease only after a further finite amount of additional indentation displacement has been applied. In order to understand this discrepancy, we utilize a combination of interruptedmore » spherical indentation tests along with depth profiling of the residual indentation surfaces using in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study pop-ins. The AFM surface profile maps show that there is an asymmetric profile change over a limited region around the indentation contact area for a single pop-in; the asymmetry disappears upon further loading beyond the pop-in. A plausible sequence of physical processes (related to metal plasticity) occurring underneath the indenter during and immediately after the occurrence of the pop-in is proposed to explain these observations.« less

  15. Coagulation and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Severe sepsis is almost invariably associated with systemic activation of coagulation. There is ample evidence that demonstrates a wide-ranging cross-talk between hemostasis and inflammation, which is probably implicated in the pathogenesis of organ dysfunction in patients with sepsis. Inflammation not only leads to initiation and propagation of coagulation activity, but coagulation also markedly influences inflammation. Molecular mechanisms that play a role in inflammation-induced effects on coagulation have been recognized in much detail. Pro-inflammatory cells and cyto- and chemokines can activate the coagulation system and downregulate crucial physiological anticoagulant mechanisms. Initiation of coagulation activation and consequent thrombin generation is caused by expression of tissue factor on activated monocytes and endothelial cells and is ineffectually offset by tissue factor pathway inhibitor. At the same time, endothelial-associated anticoagulant pathways, in particular the protein C system, is impaired by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Also, fibrin removal is severely obstructed by inactivation of the endogenous fibrinolytic system, mainly as a result of upregulation of its principal inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). Increased fibrin generation and impaired break down lead to deposition of (micro)vascular clots, which may contribute to tissue ischemia and ensuing organ dysfunction. The foundation of the management of coagulation in sepsis is the explicit and thorough treatment of the underlying disorder by antibiotic treatment and source control measures. Adjunctive strategies focused at the impairment of coagulation, including anticoagulants and restoration of physiological anticoagulant mechanisms, may supposedly be indicated and have been found advantageous in experimental and initial clinical trials.

  16. Sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick J

    2013-08-01

    Early recognition of sepsis and septic shock in children relies on obtaining an attentive clinical history, accurate vital signs, and a physical examination focused on mental status, work of breathing, and circulatory status. Laboratory tests may support the diagnosis but are not reliable in isolation. The goal of septic shock management is reversal of tissue hypoperfusion. The therapeutic end point is shock reversal. Mortality is significantly better among children when managed appropriately. Every physician who cares for children must strive to have a high level of suspicion and keen clinical acumen for recognizing the rare but potentially seriously ill child.

  17. Sepsis in Special Populations.

    PubMed

    Borloz, Matthew P; Hamden, Khalief E

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is recognized by the presence of physiologic and laboratory changes that reflect the inflammatory response to infection on cellular and systemic levels. Comorbid conditions, such as cirrhosis, end-stage renal disease, and obesity, alter patients' susceptibility to infection and their response to it once present. Baseline changes in vital signs and chronic medications often mask clues to the severity of illness. The physiologic, hematologic, and biochemical adjustments that accompany pregnancy and the puerperium introduce similar challenges. Emergency providers must remain vigilant for subtle alterations in the expected baseline for these conditions to arrive at appropriate management decisions.

  18. The role of the liver in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Li, Song; Li, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Despite the progress made in the clinical management of sepsis, sepsis morbidity and mortality rates remain high. The inflammatory pathogenesis and organ injury leading to death from sepsis are not fully understood for vital organs, especially the liver. Only recently has the role of the liver in sepsis begun to be revealed. Pre-existing liver dysfunction is a risk factor for the progression of infection to sepsis. Liver dysfunction after sepsis is an independent risk factor for multiple organ dysfunction and sepsis-induced death. The liver works as a lymphoid organ in response to sepsis. Acting as a double-edged sword in sepsis, the liver-mediated immune response is responsible for clearing bacteria and toxins but also causes inflammation, immunosuppression, and organ damage. Attenuating liver injury and restoring liver function lowers morbidity and mortality rates in patients with sepsis. This review summarizes the central role of liver in the host immune response to sepsis and in clinical outcomes.

  19. UniPOPS: Unified data reduction suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.; Garwood, Robert W.; Salter, Christopher J.; Stobie, Elizabeth B.; Cram, Thomas R.; Morgan, Lorrie; Vance, Bob; Hudson, Jerome

    2015-03-01

    UniPOPS, a suite of programs and utilities developed at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), reduced data from the observatory's single-dish telescopes: the Tucson 12-m, the Green Bank 140-ft, and archived data from the Green Bank 300-ft. The primary reduction programs, 'line' (for spectral-line reduction) and 'condar' (for continuum reduction), used the People-Oriented Parsing Service (POPS) as the command line interpreter. UniPOPS unified previous analysis packages and provided new capabilities; development of UniPOPS continued within the NRAO until 2004 when the 12-m was turned over to the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). The submitted code is version 3.5 from 2004, the last supported by the NRAO.

  20. Locating POPs Sources with Tree Bark.

    PubMed

    Peverly, Angela A; Salamova, Amina; Hites, Ronald A

    2015-12-01

    Locating sources of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to the atmosphere can sometimes be difficult. We suggest that tree bark makes an excellent passive atmospheric sampler and that spatial analysis of tree bark POPs concentrations can often pinpoint their sources. This is an effective strategy because tree bark is lipophilic and readily adsorbs and collects POPs from the atmosphere. As such, tree bark is an ideal sampler to find POPs sources globally, regionally, or locally. This article summarizes some work on this subject with an emphasis on kriged maps and a simple power-law model, both of which have been used to locate sources. Three of the four examples led directly to the pollutant's manufacturing plant.

  1. Gender differences in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Angele, Martin K; Pratschke, Sebastian; Hubbard, William J; Chaudry, Irshad H

    2014-01-01

    During sepsis, a complex network of cytokine, immune, and endothelial cell interactions occur and disturbances in the microcirculation cause organ dysfunction or even failure leading to high mortality in those patients. In this respect, numerous experimental and clinical studies indicate sex-specific differences in infectious diseases and sepsis. Female gender has been demonstrated to be protective under such conditions, whereas male gender may be deleterious due to a diminished cell-mediated immune response and cardiovascular functions. Male sex hormones, i.e., androgens, have been shown to be suppressive on cell-mediated immune responses. In contrast, female sex hormones exhibit protective effects which may contribute to the natural advantages of females under septic conditions. Thus, the hormonal status has to be considered when treating septic patients. Therefore, potential therapies could be derived from this knowledge. In this respect, administration of female sex hormones (estrogens and their precursors) may exert beneficial effects. Alternatively, blockade of male sex hormone receptors could result in maintained immune responses under adverse circulatory conditions. Finally, administration of agents that influence enzymes synthesizing female sex hormones which attenuate the levels of pro-inflammatory agents might exert salutary effects in septic patients. Prospective patient studies are required for transferring those important experimental findings into the clinical arena. PMID:24193307

  2. Cytopathic hypoxia in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fink, M

    1997-01-01

    Diminished availability of oxygen at the cellular level might account for organ dysfunction in sepsis. Although the classical forms of tissue hypoxia due to hypoxemia, anemia, or inadequate perfusion all might be important under some conditions, it seems increasingly likely that a fourth mechanism, namely cytopathic hypoxia, might play a role as well. The term cytopathic hypoxia is used to denote diminished production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) despite normal (or even supranormal) PO2 values in the vicinity of mitochondria within cells. At least in theory, cytopathic hypoxia could be a consequence of several different (but mutually compatible) pathogenic mechanisms, including diminished delivery of a key substrate (e.g., pyruvate) into the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, inhibition of key mitochondrial enzymes involved in either the TCA cycle or the electron transport chain, activation of the enzyme, poly-(ADP)-ribosylpolymerase (PARP), or collapse of the protonic gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane leading to uncoupling of oxidation (of NADH and FADH) from phosphorylation of ADP to form ATP. Tantalizing, but limited, data support the view that cytopathic hypoxia occurs in both animals and patients with sepsis or endotoxemia.

  3. Perinatal grief in Latino parents.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Claudia; Kavanaugh, Karen; Klima, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research exists that describes the meaning of perinatal loss to some parents, but the experience of loss from the perspective of Latino parents is not clearly understood. Additionally, current perinatal bereavement practices used often to facilitate memory making for parents (such as viewing or holding the baby, taking photographs, or collecting mementos) are based on research done primarily with non-Latino families. Are these common practices appropriate for this population? Because there is a paucity of research on this topic, this article describes what has been written over the past 30 years on the topic of grief and perinatal loss in Latino culture.

  4. Perinatal Grief in Latino Parents

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Claudia; Kavanaugh, Karen; Klima, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research exists that describes the meaning of perinatal loss to some parents, but the experience of loss from the perspective of Latino parents is not clearly understood. Additionally, current perinatal bereavement practices used often to facilitate memory-making for parents (such as viewing or holding the baby, taking photographs, or collecting mementos) are based upon research done primarily with non-Latino families. Are these common practices appropriate for this population? Because there is a paucity of research on this topic, this article describes what has been written over the past 30 years on the topic of grief and perinatal loss in Latino culture. PMID:20975393

  5. Perinatal mortality in rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, J

    1989-07-01

    Prolonged labour was the most frequent cause of perinatal death in a rural hospital in the south western highlands of Tanzania. After the introduction of an obstetric policy aiming to prevent prolonged labour by making use of the guidelines of the partogram, perinatal mortality was reduced from 71 to 39 per 1000 births. Baird's clinico-pathological classification is still considered a useful instrument for the discovery of avoidable factors in perinatal deaths. The concept of the partogram should be an integral part of the training of medical auxiliaries in the field of maternal and child health (MCH).

  6. Renal blood flow in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Langenberg, Christoph; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive; Wan, Li; Egi, Moritoki; Morgera, Stanislao

    2005-01-01

    Introduction To assess changes in renal blood flow (RBF) in human and experimental sepsis, and to identify determinants of RBF. Method Using specific search terms we systematically interrogated two electronic reference libraries to identify experimental and human studies of sepsis and septic acute renal failure in which RBF was measured. In the retrieved studies, we assessed the influence of various factors on RBF during sepsis using statistical methods. Results We found no human studies in which RBF was measured with suitably accurate direct methods. Where it was measured in humans with sepsis, however, RBF was increased compared with normal. Of the 159 animal studies identified, 99 reported decreased RBF and 60 reported unchanged or increased RBF. The size of animal, technique of measurement, duration of measurement, method of induction of sepsis, and fluid administration had no effect on RBF. In contrast, on univariate analysis, state of consciousness of animals (P = 0.005), recovery after surgery (P < 0.001), haemodynamic pattern (hypodynamic or hyperdynamic state; P < 0.001) and cardiac output (P < 0.001) influenced RBF. However, multivariate analysis showed that only cardiac output remained an independent determinant of RBF (P < 0.001). Conclusion The impact of sepsis on RBF in humans is unknown. In experimental sepsis, RBF was reported to be decreased in two-thirds of studies (62 %) and unchanged or increased in one-third (38%). On univariate analysis, several factors not directly related to sepsis appear to influence RBF. However, multivariate analysis suggests that cardiac output has a dominant effect on RBF during sepsis, such that, in the presence of a decreased cardiac output, RBF is typically decreased, whereas in the presence of a preserved or increased cardiac output RBF is typically maintained or increased. PMID:16137349

  7. Fluid Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Loflin, Rob; Winters, Michael E

    2017-02-01

    Since its original description in 1832, fluid resuscitation has become the cornerstone of early and aggressive treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock. However, questions remain about optimal fluid composition, dose, and rate of administration for critically ill patients. This article reviews pertinent physiology of the circulatory system, pathogenesis of septic shock, and phases of sepsis resuscitation, and then focuses on the type, rate, and amount of fluid administration for severe sepsis and septic shock, so providers can choose the right fluid, for the right patient, at the right time.

  8. Risk factors and prognosis for neonatal sepsis in southeastern Mexico: analysis of a four-year historic cohort follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neonatal sepsis is a worldwide public health issue in which, depending on the studied population, marked variations concerning its risk and prognostic factors have been reported. The aim of this study was to assess risk and prognostic factors for neonatal sepsis prevailing at a medical unit in southeastern Mexico. Thus, we used a historic cohort design to assess the association between a series of neonates and their mothers, in addition to hospital evolution features and the risk and prognosis of neonatal sepsis (defined by Pediatric Sepsis Consensus [PSC] criteria) in 11,790 newborns consecutively admitted to a Neonatology Service in Mérida, Mexico, between 2004 and 2007. Results Sepsis was found in 514 of 11,790 (4.3 %) newborns; 387 of these cases were categorized as early-onset (<72 h) (75.3 %) and 127, as late-onset (>72 h) (24.7 %). After logistic regression, risk factors for sepsis included the following: low birth weight; prematurity; abnormal amniotic fluid; premature membrane rupture (PMR) at >24 h; respiratory complications, and the requirement of assisted ventilation, O2 Inspiration fraction (IF) >60 %, or a surgical procedure. Some of these factors were differentially associated with early- or late-onset neonatal sepsis. The overall mortality rate of sepsis was 9.5 %. A marked difference in the mortality rate was found between early- and late-onset sepsis (p >0.0001). After Cox analysis, factors associated with mortality in newborns with sepsis comprised the following: prematurity; low birth weight; low Apgar score; perinatal asphyxia, and the requirement of any invasive medical or surgical procedure. Conclusions The incidence of neonatal sepsis in southeastern Mexico was 4.3 %. A different risk and prognostic profile between early- and late-onset neonatal sepsis was found. PMID:22691696

  9. A Survey on Current Practice of Management of Early Onset Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Afroze, S; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-04-01

    It was a survey type of cross sectional study where the participants were from different teaching/referral hospital across the country and was done to gather information regarding current practice of management of neonatal sepsis among paediatricians and neonatologists and was conducted on the spot during a national conference of Bangladesh Perinatal Society in December 2013. Specialists in neonatology, paediatrics, and some other disciplines working in different institutes across the country were requested to respond. Out of 150 physicians, 92 (61.33%) were neonatologists. Physicians suspected early onset neonatal sepsis (EONS) when there is history suggestive of prolonged rupture of membrane (74.77%), prolonged labour (9.33%), chorioamnionitis (7.33%) and maternal fever (2%). Clinical sepsis is found commonly (53.33%) which is later proved by laboratory evidences such as Hb%, TC, DC PBF (peripheral blood film), C-reactive protein, chest X-ray etc. Injection Ampicillin and Gentamycin are still the first choice of antibiotics (61.3%). Preferred route was intravenous (95.3%). Antibiotics were given for 7-10 days by most of the physicians (48.77%). However there is lack of uniformity among the participants in regard to taking decision about antibiotics, the choice of first line and the subsequent options of antibiotics. So, neonatal sepsis is the most important cause of neonatal mortality in the community. Therefore a standard protocolized approach for diagnosis and management of Early Onset Neonatal Sepsis may prove critical which is currently not in practice uniformly.

  10. Understanding brain dysfunction in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis often is characterized by an acute brain dysfunction, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its pathophysiology is highly complex, resulting from both inflammatory and noninflammatory processes, which may induce significant alterations in vulnerable areas of the brain. Important mechanisms include excessive microglial activation, impaired cerebral perfusion, blood–brain-barrier dysfunction, and altered neurotransmission. Systemic insults, such as prolonged inflammation, severe hypoxemia, and persistent hyperglycemia also may contribute to aggravate sepsis-induced brain dysfunction or injury. The diagnosis of brain dysfunction in sepsis relies essentially on neurological examination and neurological tests, such as EEG and neuroimaging. A brain MRI should be considered in case of persistent brain dysfunction after control of sepsis and exclusion of major confounding factors. Recent MRI studies suggest that septic shock can be associated with acute cerebrovascular lesions and white matter abnormalities. Currently, the management of brain dysfunction mainly consists of control of sepsis and prevention of all aggravating factors, including metabolic disturbances, drug overdoses, anticholinergic medications, withdrawal syndromes, and Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Modulation of microglial activation, prevention of blood–brain-barrier alterations, and use of antioxidants represent relevant therapeutic targets that may impact significantly on neurologic outcomes. In the future, investigations in patients with sepsis should be undertaken to reduce the duration of brain dysfunction and to study the impact of this reduction on important health outcomes, including functional and cognitive status in survivors. PMID:23718252

  11. Neonatal Sepsis and Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; de Menezes, Liliana Borges; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Antônia dos Reis, Marlene; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda; Celes, Mara Rúbia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and its signs and symptoms are nonspecific, which makes the diagnosis difficult. The routinely used laboratory tests are not effective methods of analysis, as they are extremely nonspecific and often cause inappropriate use of antibiotics. Sepsis is the result of an infection associated with a systemic inflammatory response with production and release of a wide range of inflammatory mediators. Cytokines are potent inflammatory mediators and their serum levels are increased during infections, so changes from other inflammatory effector molecules may occur. Although proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been identified as probable markers of neonatal infection, in order to characterize the inflammatory response during sepsis, it is necessary to analyze a panel of cytokines and not only the measurement of individual cytokines. Measurements of inflammatory mediators bring new options for diagnosing and following up neonatal sepsis, thus enabling early treatment and, as a result, increased neonatal survival. By taking into account the magnitude of neonatal sepsis, the aim of this review is to address the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of neonatal sepsis and its value as a diagnostic criterion. PMID:25614712

  12. Severe sepsis in older adults.

    PubMed

    Umberger, Reba; Callen, Bonnie; Brown, Mary Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis may be underrecognized in older adults. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review special considerations related to early detection of severe sepsis in older adults. Normal organ changes attributed to aging may delay early detection of sepsis at the time when interventions have the greatest potential to improve patient outcomes. Systems are reviewed for changes. For example, the cardiovascular system may have a limited or absent compensatory response to inflammation after an infectious insult, and the febrile response and recruitment of white blood cells may be blunted because of immunosenescence in aging. Three of the 4 hallmark responses (temperature, heart rate, and white blood cell count) to systemic inflammation may be diminished in older adults as compared with younger adults. It is important to consider that older adults may not always manifest the typical systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Atypical signs such as confusion, decreased appetite, and unsteady gait may occur before sepsis related organ failure. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria and a comparison of organ failure criteria were reviewed. Mortality rates in sepsis and severe sepsis remain high and are often complicated by multiple organ failures. As the numbers of older adults increase, early identification and prompt treatment is crucial in improving patient outcomes.

  13. Antibiotic use in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, M

    1998-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a life-threatening emergency and any delay in treatment may cause death. Initial signs of neonatal sepsis are slight and nonspecific. Therefore, in suspected sepsis, two or three days empirical antibiotic therapy should begin immediately after cultures have been obtained without awaiting the results. Antibiotics should be reevaluated when the results of the cultures and susceptibility tests are available. If the cultures are negative and the clinical findings are well, antibiotics should be stopped. Because of the nonspecific nature of neonatal sepsis, especially in small preterm infants, physicians continue antibiotics once started. If a baby has pneumonia or what appears to be sepsis, antibiotics should not be stopped, although cultures are negative. The duration of therapy depends on the initial response to the appropriate antibiotics but should be 10 to 14 days in most infants with sepsis and minimal or absent focal infection. In infants who developed sepsis during the first week of life, empirical therapy must cover group B streptococci, Enterobacteriaceae (especially E. coli) and Listeria monocytogenes. Penicillin or ampicillin plus an aminoglycoside is usually effective against all these organisms. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infants who developed sepsis beyond the first days of life must cover the organisms associated with early-onset sepsis as well as hospital-acquired pathogens such as staphylococci, enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Penicillin or ampicillin and an aminoglycoside combination may also be used in the initial therapy of late-onset sepsis as in cases with early-onset sepsis. In nosocomial infections, netilmicin or amikacin should be preferred. In cases showing increased risk of staphylococcal infection (e.g. presence of vascular catheter) or Pseudomonas infection (e.g. presence of typical skin lesions), antistaphylococcal or anti-Pseudomonas agents may be preferred in the initial empirical therapy. In

  14. Perinatal programming prevention measures.

    PubMed

    Larguía, A Miguel; González, María Aurelia; Dinerstein, Néstor Alejandro; Soto Conti, Constanza

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, there has been outstanding scientific progress related to perinatal programming and its epigenetic effects in health, and we can anticipate this trend will continue in the near future. We need to make use and apply these achievements to human neurodevelopment via prevention interventions. Based on the concept of the interaction between genome and ambiome, this chapter proposes low-cost easy-implementation preventive strategies for maternal and infant health institutions.Breastfeeding and human milk administration are the first preventive measures, as has been reviewed in the policy statement of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Another strategy is the Safe and Family-Centered Maternity Hospitals initiative that promotes and empowers the inclusion of the families and the respect for their rights, especially during pregnancy and birth. (This change of paradigm was approved and is recommended by both United Nations Children's Fund, UNICEF, and Pan American Health Organization, PAHO.) Then, there is also an important emphasis given to the sacred hour-which highlights the impact of bonding, attachment, and breastfeeding during the first hour of life-the pain prevention and treatment in newborns, the control of the "new morbidity" represented by late preterm infants, and finally, the importance of avoiding intrauterine and extrauterine growth restriction. (However, there are not yet clear recommendations about nutritional interventions in order to diminish the potential metabolic syndrome consequence in the adult.).

  15. Perinatal grief and mourning.

    PubMed

    Menke, J A; McClead, R E

    1990-01-01

    The grief and mourning that parents experience following a perinatal loss is as devastating as the loss of an older loved one. The pattern of mourning can be anticipated and interventions can be implemented. With proper help, the parents can pass through this catastrophic time in their lives with a minimum of scars. If the physician stops, reaches out, listens, and supports the parents, he or she can have a dramatic effect on the lives of these parents. In the same manner in which we started this paper, we close with a quotation from another parent who suffered a loss: Daughters may die, But why? For even daughters can't live with half a heart. Three days isn't much a life. But long enough to remember thin blue lips, uneven gasps in incubators, Racking breaths that cause a pain to those who watched. Long enough to remember I never held her Or felt her softness Or counted her toes. I didn't even know the color of her eyes. Dead paled hands not quite covered by the gown she Was to go home in. Moist earth smell. One small casket. And the tears. You see, I hold in my hand but souvenirs of an occasion. A sheet of paper filled with statistics, A certificate with smudged footprints, A tiny bracelet engraved "Girl, Smith." You say that you are sorry That you know how I feel. But you can't know because I don't feel. Not yet.

  16. Joints That Make Those Popping or Cracking Sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Joints That Make Those Popping or Cracking Sounds The noises may be irritating, but they're ... joints to make popping and cracking noises. These sounds can be caused by a number of things, ...

  17. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Gofton, Teneille E; Young, G Bryan

    2012-10-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a diffuse brain dysfunction that occurs secondary to infection in the body without overt CNS infection. SAE is frequently encountered in critically ill patients in intensive care units, and in up to 70% of patients with severe systemic infection. The severity of SAE can range from mild delirium to deep coma. Seizures and myoclonus are infrequent and cranial nerves are almost always spared, but most severe cases have an associated critical illness neuromyopathy. Development of SAE probably involves a number of mechanisms that are not mutually exclusive and vary from patient to patient. Substantial neurological and psychological morbidities often occur in survivors. Mortality is almost always due to multiorgan failure rather than neurological complications, and is almost 70% in patients with severe SAE. Further research into the pathophysiology, management and prevention of SAE is needed. This Review discusses the epidemiology and clinical presentation of SAE. Recent evidence for SAE pathophysiology is outlined and a diagnostic approach to patients with this syndrome is presented. Lastly, prognosis and management of SAE is discussed.

  18. [Perinatal obsessive-compulsive disorder].

    PubMed

    Mavrogiorgou, P; Illes, F; Juckel, G

    2011-09-01

    A perinatal obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is defined as an illness exhibiting first symptoms in the context of pregnancy and the postpartal period. There are no valid data up to date concerning the incidence of OCD, which might be of multifactorial origin, in this period in which females are highly vulnerable for psychiatric diseases. From a clinical point of view, obsessions and compulsions are mainly related to the well-being of the foetus or newborn baby. Differential diagnosis of perinatal OCD including pregnancy psychosis and post-partum depression is often difficult. Concerning treatment, non-pharmacological approaches should be preferred. Administration of SSRIs should be strongly restricted. However, there are no controlled therapy studies in patients with perinatal OCD. Furthermore, current knowledge about these patients is still limited. The aim of this review article is the presentation of phenomenology, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis and treatment of perinatal OCD. The mental situation of the female patients can be improved and stabilised if early diagnosis of a perinatal OCD leads to early initiation of an adequate therapy. This will then enable a good and stable mother-child relationship to develop.

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  20. Time's Up, Turkey--Pop-Up Thermometers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Richard; Everett, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Meat thermometers can be awkward to use in terms of placement and avoidance of bones. Because of these problems, each year 30 million Thanksgiving turkeys have a built-in thermometer that pops up when the turkey is properly cooked. Turkey timers are an example of how engineering solved a common, everyday problem. The following 5E learning cycle…

  1. Extra Credit Exercise: A Painless Pop Quiz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, B. Michael

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the extra credit exercise (ECE), a pop quiz variation that combines the benefits of frequent, unannounced testing with the features that make quizzes less aversive (the ECE are extra-credit and do not hurt the students' grades). Addresses the benefits of the ECE assignment and the students' reactions to it. (CMK)

  2. A Study of Statistics through Tootsie Pops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaberg, Shelby; Vitosh, Jason; Smith, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    A classic TV commercial once asked, "How many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie Roll Tootsie Pop?" The narrator claims, "The world may never know" (Tootsie Roll 2012), but an Internet search returns a multitude of answers, some of which include rigorous systematic approaches by academics to address the…

  3. Energy expenditure in rock/pop drumming.

    PubMed

    De La Rue, S E; Draper, S B; Potter, C R; Smith, M S

    2013-10-01

    Despite the vigorous nature of rock/pop drumming, there are no precise data on the energy expenditure of this activity. The aim of this study was to quantify the energy cost of rock/pop drumming. Fourteen male drummers (mean±SD; age 27±8 yrs.) completed an incremental drumming test to establish the relationship between energy expenditure and heart rate for this activity and a ramped cycle ergometer test to exhaustion as a criterion measure for peak values (oxygen uptake and heart rate). During live concert performance heart rate was continuously measured and used to estimate energy expenditure (from the energy expenditure vs. heart rate data derived from the drumming test). During concert performance, estimated energy expenditure (mean±SD) was 623±168 kcal.h⁻¹ (8.1±2.2 METs) during performances of 38.6±15.6 min, and drummers achieved a peak heart rate of 186±16 b.min⁻¹. During the drumming test participants attained 78.7±8.3% of the cycle ergometer peak oxygen uptake. Rock/pop drumming represents a relatively high-intensity form of physical activity and as such involves significant energy expenditure. Rock/pop drumming should be considered as a viable alternative to more traditional forms of physical activity.

  4. Sepsis care: getting it right every time.

    PubMed

    2016-10-06

    In the UK, there are an estimated 150,000 cases of sepsis per year, resulting in 44,000 deaths. This equates to more deaths than from bowel, breast and prostate cancer combined according to the Sepsis Trust.

  5. Current epidemiology of sepsis in mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xuelian; Du, Bin; Lu, Meizhu; Wu, Minming

    2016-01-01

    The disease burden of sepsis is a global issue. Most of the large-scale epidemiological investigations on sepsis have been carried out in developed countries. The population of 1.3 billion in mainland China accounts for approximately 1/5th of the whole world population. Thus, the knowledge of the incidence and mortality of sepsis in mainland China is vital before employing measures for its improvement. However, most of the epidemiological data of sepsis in mainland China was obtained from ICU settings, and thus lacks the population-based incidence and mortality of sepsis. In the present review, we summarized the limited literature encompassing the incidence, mortality, long-term outcome, and pathogens of sepsis in mainland China. Therefore, it might provide some valuable information regarding the sepsis disease burden and current issues in the management of sepsis in mainland China. PMID:27713882

  6. Established and novel biomarkers of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Faix, James D

    2011-04-01

    The increased incidence of sepsis, a systemic response to infection that occurs in some patients, has stimulated interest in identifying infected patients who are at risk and intervening early. When this condition progresses to severe sepsis (characterized by organ dysfunction), mortality is high. Hospitals that have implemented recommendations of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign have seen a reduction in mortality rate for hospital-acquired severe sepsis. They may reduce this further by focusing on new approaches to diagnosing sepsis, especially at an early stage. Sepsis is a complicated syndrome with many physiological derangements and many emerging laboratory markers of sepsis have been proposed as adjuncts to clinical evaluation. The list includes cytokines, acute phase proteins, neutrophil activation markers, markers of abnormal coagulation and, recently, markers of suppression of both the innate and adaptive immune response. The perfect biomarker would accurately identify patients at risk of developing severe sepsis and then guide targeted therapy.

  7. Risk factors associated with the different categories of piglet perinatal mortality in French farms.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, F; Edwards, S A; Robert, F; Kyriazakis, I

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to identify mortality patterns and to establish risk factors associated with different categories of piglet perinatal mortality in French farms. At farm level, the analyses were performed on data from 146 farms that experienced perinatal mortality problems. At piglet level, the analyses were performed on data from 155 farms (7761 piglets). All data were collected over a period of 10 years (2004-14) by a consulting company, using a non-probability sampling at farm level and a random sampling at sow level. Six main categories of mortality, determined by standardised necropsy procedure, represented 84.5% of all the perinatal deaths recorded. These six categories were, in order of significance: Death during farrowing, Non- viable, Early sepsis, Mummified, Crushing and Starvation. At farm level, the percentage of deaths due to starvation was positively correlated to the percentage of deaths due to crushing and the percentage of deaths during farrowing (r>0.30, P<0.05) .The percentage of deaths due to crushing was negatively correlated to the percentage of deaths due to early sepsis (r<-0.30, P<0.05) and positively correlated to the deaths due to acute disease (r>0.30, P<0.05). Patterns of perinatal mortality at farm level were identified using a principal component analysis. Based on these, the farms could be classified, using ascending hierarchical classification, into three different clusters, highlighting issues that underlie farm differences. Risk factors were compared at piglet level for the different categories of death. Compared to other categories of death, deaths during farrowing were significantly fewer during the night than during the day. Compared to other categories of death, the likelihood of non-viable piglets tended to be higher in summer than other seasons. A smaller number of deaths in the litter was also identified for the piglets classified as non-viable or mummified. For the six main categories of perinatal mortality, the piglets which died

  8. [Understanding the pathogenetic mechanisms of SIRS and sepsis and development of innovative therapies of sepsis].

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Naoki; Fujishima, Seitaro

    2004-12-01

    The concept of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) was introduced in 1992 to define and objectively diagnose sepsis. Over the last decade, the definition of sepsis has been used for inclusion criteria of multicenter trials to develop innovative therapies of sepsis. With the recent understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of sepsis, many drugs have been tested, but only two drugs (activated protein C and neutrophil-elastase inhibitor) have been approved for clinical use in sepsis or SIRS. Further understanding of basic pathophysiology of SIRS and sepsis holds promise to develop a new therapeutic strategy to improve survival of patients with SIRS and sepsis.

  9. Chocolate pop inspection and selection in situ using cross correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Constante, José J.; Flores, Jorge L.; Ruelas Lepe, Rubén; García-Torales, G.; González Álvarez, Alejandro

    2006-02-01

    We present an in situ image recognition system in order to inspect the standards of quality of chocolate pops during their production. In high percent, the stick of pops is not settling in the right position and it is our predictable quality problem. The recognition system compares a reference image with the image of chocolate pop under test, in order to determine if this pop has the stick in right position. As result of this work, we obtain the parameters that can help to determine which pops meet the standards of quality.

  10. Association of fungal sepsis and galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sanjay; Bharti, Bhavneet; Inusha, P

    2010-06-01

    Galactosemia is one of the rare inborn errors of metabolism, which if detected early can be treated effectively. Galactosemic infants have a significant increased risk of developing sepsis. E. coli sepsis is a known entity, and also an important cause of early mortality in these children. But fungal sepsis in these patients is rarely reported. Here is a case of 45 day-old child who presented with fungal sepsis, which on investigation turned out to be galactosemia.

  11. Transfusion-associated bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, S J; Friedman, L I; Dodd, R Y

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of sepsis caused by transfusion of bacterially contaminated blood components is similar to or less than that of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C virus infection, yet significantly exceeds those currently estimated for transfusion-associated human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B viruses. Outcomes are serious and may be fatal. In addition, transfusion of sterile allogenic blood can have generalized immunosuppressive effects on recipients, resulting in increased susceptibility to postoperative infection. This review examines the frequency of occurrence of transfusion-associated sepsis, the organisms implicated, and potential sources of bacteria. Approaches to minimize the frequency of sepsis are discussed, including the benefits and disadvantages of altering the storage conditions for blood. In addition, the impact of high levels of bacteria on the gross characteristics of erythrocyte and platelet concentrates is described. The potentials and limitations of current tests for detecting bacteria in blood are also discussed. PMID:7923050

  12. The inflammatory response in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bosmann, Markus; Ward, Peter A

    2013-03-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis and its accompanying systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and the events that lead to multiorgan failure and death are poorly understood. It is known that, in septic humans and rodents, the development of SIRS is associated with a loss of the redox balance, but SIRS can also develop in noninfectious states. In addition, a hyperinflammatory state develops, together with impaired innate immune functions of phagocytes, immunosuppression, and complement activation, collectively leading to septic shock and lethality. Here, we discuss recent insights into the signaling pathways in immune and phagocytic cells that underlie sepsis and SIRS and consider how these might be targeted for therapeutic interventions to reverse or attenuate pathways that lead to lethality during sepsis.

  13. Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE): a review.

    PubMed

    Green, Rebecca; Scott, L Keith; Minagar, Alireza; Conrad, Steven

    2004-05-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a poorly understood condition that is associated with severe sepsis and appears to have a negative influence on survival. The incidence of encephalopathy secondary to sepsis is unknown. Amino acid derangements, blood-brain barrier disruption, abnormal neurotransmitters, and direct CNS effect are possible causes of septic encephalopathy. Research has not defined the pathogenesis of SAE.

  14. Galactosemia presenting as recurrent sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Narendra; Rathi, Akanksha

    2011-12-01

    Galactosemia is a treatable metabolic disorder caused by the deficiency of enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) and inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. A case of neonate manifesting with recurrent Escherichia coli sepsis is presented here which turned out to be a classic galactosemia. No other common presenting features were observed in this infant except cataract on slit lamp examination. To the best of our knowledge, there is no case of galactosemia reported in literature which presented with recurrent neonatal sepsis without hepatomegaly, hyperbilirubinemia, bleeding disorder, vomiting, diarrhea, failure to thrive, hypoglycemia, coagulopathy, hemolysis or renal tubular acidosis.

  15. Vasopressors and Inotropes in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Leeanne; Berlin, David A; Arbo, John E

    2017-02-01

    Vasopressor and inotropes are beneficial in shock states. Norepinephrine is considered the first-line vasopressor for patients with sepsis-associated hypotension. Dobutamine is considered the first-line inotrope in sepsis, and should be considered for patients with evidence of myocardial dysfunction or ongoing signs of hypoperfusion. Vasopressor and inotrope therapy has complex effects that are often difficult to predict; emergency providers should consider the physiology and clinical trial data. It is essential to continually reevaluate the patient to determine if the selected treatment is having the intended result.

  16. Sepsis and Septic Shock: Lingering Questions.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Tiffany; Francis-Frank, Lyndave; Chong, Josebelo; Balaan, Marvin R

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are major health conditions in the United States, with a high incidence and mortality. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign, which was formed in 2002, formulates guidelines for the management of severe sepsis and septic shock and has actually demonstrated a reduction in mortality with institution of "sepsis bundles." Despite this, some elements of the guidelines have been questioned, and recent data suggest that strict compliance with bundles and protocols may not be necessary. Still, prompt recognition and treatment of sepsis and septic shock remain of utmost importance.

  17. [Molecular biology and immunopathogenetic mechanisms of sepsis].

    PubMed

    Průcha, M

    2009-01-01

    Sepsis, the systemic inflammatory response to infection, causes high mortality in patients in non-coronary units of intensive care. The most important characteristic of sepsis is the interaction between two subjects, the macro and the microorganism, associated with the dysfunction of innate and adaptive immunity. Sepsis is understood more as a dynamic syndrome characterized by many phenomenona which are often antagonistic. The inflammation, characterizing sepsis, does not act as a primary physiological compensatory mechanism and rather oscillates between the phase of hyperinflammatory response and anergy or immunoparalysis. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of sepsis is linked to the understanding of immunopathogenetic mechanisms, which characterize the interaction between the macro and microorganisms.

  18. Requirements for CEC POP Machine Protection System

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev, I.

    2015-02-18

    The requirements of CEC POP machine protection system are meant to prevent damage to a vacuum chamber by a missteered electron beam. In this example, beam energy = 22 MeV, Maximal bunch charge = 5 nC, Maximal repetition rate = 78 kHz, Normalized emittance = 5 mm mrad, Minimal β-function = 1 m. From this information the requirements of the protection system can be calculated by factoring the information into equations to find beam densities and temperature excursions.

  19. Investor Outlook: After the Biotech Bubble Popped.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven; Yang, Jerry

    2016-03-01

    After a few torrid years of value appreciation, the biotech "bubble" has precipitously popped over the past few months. In this report, we take a look at some of the factors that drove the run-up in valuations, the triggers that led to their substantial pullback, and where the industry may be headed from here. Gene therapy/editing companies have been particularly affected by these dynamics, raising a new set of questions and challenges for the group.

  20. Do People “Pop Out”?

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Katja M.; Vuong, Quoc C.; Thornton, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    The human body is a highly familiar and socially very important object. Does this mean that the human body has a special status with respect to visual attention? In the current paper we tested whether people in natural scenes attract attention and “pop out” or, alternatively, are at least searched for more efficiently than targets of another category (machines). Observers in our study searched a visual array for dynamic or static scenes containing humans amidst scenes containing machines and vice versa. The arrays consisted of 2, 4, 6 or 8 scenes arranged in a circular array, with targets being present or absent. Search times increased with set size for dynamic and static human and machine targets, arguing against pop out. However, search for human targets was more efficient than for machine targets as indicated by shallower search slopes for human targets. Eye tracking further revealed that observers made more first fixations to human than to machine targets and that their on-target fixation durations were shorter for human compared to machine targets. In summary, our results suggest that searching for people in natural scenes is more efficient than searching for other categories even though people do not pop out. PMID:26441221

  1. Estimating risks of perinatal death.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gordon C S

    2005-01-01

    The relative and absolute risks of perinatal death that are estimated from observational studies are used frequently in counseling about obstetric intervention. The statistical basis for these estimates therefore is crucial, but many studies are seriously flawed. In this review, a number of aspects of the approach to the estimation of the risk of perinatal death are addressed. Key factors in the analysis include (1) the definition of the cause of the death, (2) differentiation between antepartum and intrapartum events, (3) the use of the appropriate denominator for the given cause of death, (4) the assessment of the cumulative risk where appropriate, (5) the use of appropriate statistical tests, (6) the stratification of analysis of delivery-related deaths by gestational age, and (7) the specific features of multiple pregnancy, which include the correct determination of the timing of antepartum stillbirth and the use of paired statistical tests when outcomes are compared in relation to the birth order of twin pairs.

  2. What is next in sepsis: current trials in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Antonio; Niederman, Michael S; Torres, Antoni; Carlet, Jean

    2012-08-01

    International experts reviewed and updated the most recent and relevant scientific advances on severe sepsis during the 17th International Symposium on Infections in the Critically Ill Patients in Barcelona (Spain) in February 2012. All new pharmacological therapeutic strategies have failed to demonstrate a survival benefit. Despite the large variability among countries and hospitals, the improvement of standard care according to the Surviving Sepsis campaign recommendations reduced the 28-day mortality to 24%. These results may have implications for future clinical trials in which much larger samples sizes of patients at high risk of death will be necessary. The identification of novel proinflammatory endogeneous signals and pathways may lead to the discovery of new drugs to reduce inflammatory reactions and end-organ dysfunction in critically ill patients with sepsis. Extracorporeal blood purification stem or progenitor cells have received increasing interest for the treatment of inflammation and organ injury. A better understanding of how these therapies work is essential and its benefit should be confirmed in future prospective randomized studies.

  3. End Points of Sepsis Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John C; Orloski, Clinton J

    2017-02-01

    Resuscitation goals for the patient with sepsis and septic shock are to return the patient to a physiologic state that promotes adequate end-organ perfusion along with matching metabolic supply and demand. Ideal resuscitation end points should assess the adequacy of tissue oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption, and be quantifiable and reproducible. Despite years of research, a single resuscitation end point to assess adequacy of resuscitation has yet to be found. Thus, the clinician must rely on multiple end points to assess the patient's overall response to therapy. This review will discuss the role and limitations of central venous pressure (CVP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac output/index as macrocirculatory resuscitation targets along with lactate, central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2), central venous-arterial CO2 gradient, urine output, and capillary refill time as microcirculatory resuscitation endpoints in patients with sepsis.

  4. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  5. Sepsis and Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Beliz; Haliloğlu, Murat; Cinel, İsmail

    2014-12-01

    Acute kindney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome which is generally defined as an abrupt decline in glomerular filtration rate, causing accumulation of nitrogenous products and rapid development of fluid, electrolyte and acid base disorders. In intensive care unit sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of AKI. Sepsis-induced AKI literally acts as a biologic indicator of clinical deterioration. AKI triggers variety of immune, inflammatory, metabolic and humoral patways; ultimately leading distant organ dysfunction and increases morbidity and mortality. Serial mesurements of creatinine and urine volume do not make it possible to diagnose AKI at early stages. Serum creatinine influenced by age, weight, hydration status and become apparent only when the kidneys have lost 50% of their function. For that reason we need new markers, and many biomarkers in the diagnosis of early AKI activity is assessed. Historically "Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-Endstage" (RIFLE), "Acute Kidney Injury Netwok" (AKIN) and "The Kidney Disease/ Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) classification systems are used for diagnosing easily in clinical practice and research and grading disease. Classifications including diagnostic criteria are formed for the identification of AKI. Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin-C (Cys-C), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and also "cell cycle arrest" molecules has been concerned for clinical use. In this review the pathophysiology of AKI, with the relationship of sepsis and the importance of early diagnosis of AKI is evaluated.

  6. Sepsis and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bilgili, Beliz; Haliloğlu, Murat; Cinel, İsmail

    2014-01-01

    Acute kindney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome which is generally defined as an abrupt decline in glomerular filtration rate, causing accumulation of nitrogenous products and rapid development of fluid, electrolyte and acid base disorders. In intensive care unit sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of AKI. Sepsis-induced AKI literally acts as a biologic indicator of clinical deterioration. AKI triggers variety of immune, inflammatory, metabolic and humoral patways; ultimately leading distant organ dysfunction and increases morbidity and mortality. Serial mesurements of creatinine and urine volume do not make it possible to diagnose AKI at early stages. Serum creatinine influenced by age, weight, hydration status and become apparent only when the kidneys have lost 50% of their function. For that reason we need new markers, and many biomarkers in the diagnosis of early AKI activity is assessed. Historically “Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-Endstage” (RIFLE), “Acute Kidney Injury Netwok” (AKIN) and “The Kidney Disease/ Improving Global Outcomes” (KDIGO) classification systems are used for diagnosing easily in clinical practice and research and grading disease. Classifications including diagnostic criteria are formed for the identification of AKI. Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin-C (Cys-C), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and also “cell cycle arrest” molecules has been concerned for clinical use. In this review the pathophysiology of AKI, with the relationship of sepsis and the importance of early diagnosis of AKI is evaluated. PMID:27366441

  7. Biosensor of endotoxin and sepsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yang; Wang, Xiang; Wu, Xi; Gao, Wei; He, Qing-hua; Cai, Shaoxi

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the relation between biosensor of endotoxin and endotoxin of plasma in sepsis. Method: biosensor of endotoxin was designed with technology of quartz crystal microbalance bioaffinity sensor ligand of endotoxin were immobilized by protein A conjugate. When a sample soliton of plasma containing endotoxin 0.01, 0.03, 0.06, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0Eu, treated with perchloric acid and injected into slot of quartz crystal surface respectively, the ligand was released from the surface of quartz crystal to form a more stable complex with endotoxin in solution. The endotoxin concentration corresponded to the weight change on the crystal surface, and caused change of frequency that occurred when desorbed. The result was biosensor of endotoxin might detect endotoxin of plasma in sepsis, measurements range between 0.05Eu and 0.5Eu in the stop flow mode, measurement range between 0.1Eu and 1Eu in the flow mode. The sensor of endotoxin could detect the endotoxin of plasm rapidly, and use for detection sepsis in clinically.

  8. [Sepsis: a new look at the problem].

    PubMed

    Beloborodova, N V

    2013-01-01

    The recent proceedings of congresses and forums on sepsis were used to write this review. The available definitions of sepsis and ideas on its etiology and pathogenesis are critically analyzed. There is information on new concepts of sepsis and data on a search for new targets, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and biomarkers. It is hypothesized that there is a mechanism of action of bacteria on mitochondrial dysfunction and human hormonal regulation with low-molecular weight exometabolites, namely aromatic microbial metabolites.

  9. Pop tests of storable biopropellant liquid apogee engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Yukio; Tadano, Makoto; Sato, Masahiro; Kusaka, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Iihara, Sigeyasu; Ban, Hiroyuki

    1994-10-01

    A pressure-fed, blowdown, hydrazine/NTO apogee propulsion system had been selected for the ETS-6. One of the problems encountered during the development of the engine was the occurrence of pops (popping) at the higher operating chamber pressures. Pops are irregular high amplitude pressure pulses. It is generally agreed that pops is a liquid spray/gas two-phase explosion triggered by a local explosion near the jet impingement region. The effects of operating parameters on pops observed in the development tests of the apogee engine for the ETS-6 were inconsistent with those reported earlier for single impingement injectors; pops with the apogee engine injectors was more likely to occur at higher chamber pressures, higher injection velocities, and higher propellant temperatures. Pops data were correlated fairly well in chamber pressures (bar-P(sub c)) vs. fuel Reynolds number (R(sub ef)) plane. However, the range of operating parameters for the above correlation were very narrow since they were obtained during injector screening tests for a particular application to the apogee engine. It was also felt that the above correlation was too simplistic to capture any effect of design parameters of multi-element injectors. In the present study, the demarcation between pops and the pops-free region was determined in broader operating ranges and design parameters. The range of bar-P(sub c) and R(sub ef) was extended by exchanging graphite nozzle throat inserts with different throat diameters. The injectors were carefully selected to obtain effects, if any, of (1) film cooling fraction, (2) secondary mixing, and (3) number of elements and/or fuel orifice diameters. It was found that there was a threshold fuel Reynolds number below which no pops were observed at any chamber pressures and that the pops region curve in the bar-P(sub c)-R(sub ef) plane had two branches: upper branches and lower branches.

  10. Mechanical Ventilation in Sepsis: A Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Fernando G; Mazza, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is the main cause of close to 70% of all cases of acute respiratory distress syndromes (ARDS). In addition, sepsis increases susceptibility to ventilator-induced lung injury. Therefore, the development of a ventilatory strategy that can achieve adequate oxygenation without injuring the lungs is highly sought after for patients with acute infection and represents an important therapeutic window to improve patient care. Suboptimal ventilatory settings cannot only harm the lung, but may also contribute to the cascade of organ failure in sepsis due to organ crosstalk.Despite the prominent role of sepsis as a cause for lung injury, most of the studies that addressed mechanical ventilation strategies in ARDS did not specifically assess sepsis-related ARDS patients. Consequently, most of the recommendations regarding mechanical ventilation in sepsis patients are derived from ARDS trials that included multiple clinical diagnoses. While there have been important improvements in general ventilatory management that should apply to all critically ill patients, sepsis-related lung injury might still have particularities that could influence bedside management.After revisiting the interplay between sepsis and ventilation-induced lung injury, this review will reappraise the evidence for the major components of the lung protective ventilation strategy, emphasizing the particularities of sepsis-related acute lung injury.

  11. Antimicrobial Stewardship in the Management of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Pulia, Michael S; Redwood, Robert; Sharp, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis represents a unique clinical dilemma with regard to antimicrobial stewardship. The standard approach to suspected sepsis in the emergency department centers on fluid resuscitation and timely broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The lack of gold standard diagnostics and evolving definitions for sepsis introduce a significant degree of diagnostic uncertainty that may raise the potential for inappropriate antimicrobial prescribing. Intervention bundles that combine traditional quality improvement strategies with emerging electronic health record-based clinical decision support tools and rapid molecular diagnostics represent the most promising approach to enhancing antimicrobial stewardship in the management of suspected sepsis in the emergency department.

  12. Ready for Prime Time? Biomarkers in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is a common condition managed in the emergency department. Current diagnosis relies on physiologic criteria and suspicion of a source of infection using history, physical examination, laboratory studies, and imaging studies. The infection triggers a host response with the aim to destroy the pathogen, and this response can be measured. A reliable biomarker for sepsis should assist with earlier diagnosis, improve risk stratification, or improve clinical decision making. Current biomarkers for sepsis include lactate, troponin, and procalcitonin. This article discusses the use of lactate, procalcitonin, troponin, and novel biomarkers for use in sepsis.

  13. Phase Mixing of Popped Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candlish, G. N.; Smith, R.; Fellhauer, M.; Gibson, B. K.; Kroupa, P.; Assmann, P.

    2014-10-01

    As star clusters are expected to form with low star formation efficiencies, the gas in the cluster is expelled quickly and early in their development: the star cluster pops. This leads to an unbound stellar system. Previous N-body simulations have demonstrated the existence of a stepped number density distribution of cluster stars after popping, both in vertical position and vertical velocity, with a passing resemblance to a Christmas tree. Using numerical and analytical methods, we investigate the source of this structure, which arises due to the phase mixing of the out-of-equilibrium stellar system as it evolves in a background analytical potential. Considering only the vertical motions, we construct a theoretical model to describe the time evolution of the phase space distribution of stars in a Miyamoto-Nagai disk potential and a full Milky-Way type potential comprising bulge, halo and disk components, which is then compared with N- body simulations. Using our theoretical model, we investigate the possible observational signatures and the feasibility of detection.

  14. Climate change and environmental concentrations of POPs: A review.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Martí; Marquès, Montse; Mari, Montse; Domingo, José L

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the climate change impact on the concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has become a topic of notable concern. Changes in environmental conditions such as the increase of the average temperature, or the UV-B radiation, are likely to influence the fate and behavior of POPs, ultimately affecting human exposure. The state of the art of the impact of climate change on environmental concentrations of POPs, as well as on human health risks, is here reviewed. Research gaps are also identified, while future studies are suggested. Climate change and POPs are a hot issue, for which wide attention should be paid not only by scientists, but also and mainly by policy makers. Most studies reported in the scientific literature are focused on legacy POPs, mainly polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and pesticides. However, the number of investigations aimed at estimating the impact of climate change on the environmental levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is scarce, despite of the fact that exposure to PAHs and photodegradation byproducts may result in adverse health effects. Furthermore, no data on emerging POPs are currently available in the scientific literature. In consequence, an intensification of studies to identify and mitigate the indirect effects of the climate change on POP fate is needed to minimize the human health impact. Furthermore, being this a global problem, interactions between climate change and POPs must be addressed from an international perspective.

  15. [Premature rupture of membranes: maternal - perinatal morbidity and mortality in the Dominican Republic].

    PubMed

    Garrido Calderon, G; Perdomo, E M; Perez Vilorio, J B; Caputo Antonio, A

    1990-01-01

    Premature rupture of membranes is defined as expulsion of the amniotic liquid occurring at least 1 hour before initiation of uterine contractions and without apparent cervical changes. According to the literature, premature rupture of membranes occurs in 2-15% of all pregnancies, with an average of 10%. The etiology is considered multifactorial, and treatment remains controversial. A retrospective review was conducted to determine the occurrence of maternal or perinatal morbidity and mortality in 230 cases of premature rupture of membranes in a social security hospital in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, observed between 1983-88. Premature rupture occurred in 3.5% of cases according to the records. 37.4% of affected mothers were 21-25 years old and 69.6% were 21.30. 62.9% of the women were nulliparas. 2.2% had had no prenatal care, 59.1% had insufficient prenatal care, defined as 1-5 visits and only 36.1% had 6 or more visits. 81.3% of ruptures occurred at 37-42 weeks of gestation. In 64.8% of cases the pregnancy was terminated within 1-24 hours and 35.2% were considered prolonged. Prematurity and low birth weight was the most common perinatal disorders, affecting 10.9%. Respiratory difficulty syndrome affected 4.3%. 60% of infants with respiratory problems were born at less than 37 weeks gestation. Neonatal sepsis occurred in 3% of cases and prolapse of the umbilical cord in 1.3%. Perinatal mortality averaged 2.6%. Prematurity was a factor in all cases. Respiratory distress syndrome and neonatal sepsis were each present in 50% of cases and hyperbilirubinemia in 33%. 8.7% of the mothers developed chorioamnionitis. Only 23.9% terminated their pregnancies spontaneously. Oxytocin was used to induce labor in 30.4% and cesareans were performed in 44.8%.

  16. Guidelines for Perinatal Care. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Coll. of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.

    The basic concept emphasized in this book is that a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach within a regionalized system of perinatal care is a constant factor improving the quality of pregancy outcomes. This coordinated multidisciplinary approach has had an impact on perinatal care in three important areas: (1) improved and expanded understanding…

  17. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  18. Terrestrial mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric POPs pollution: a review.

    PubMed

    Harmens, H; Foan, L; Simon, V; Mills, G

    2013-02-01

    Worldwide there is concern about the continuing release of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) into the environment. In this study we review the application of mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric deposition of POPs. Examples in the literature show that mosses are suitable organisms to monitor spatial patterns and temporal trends of atmospheric concentrations or deposition of POPs. These examples include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The majority of studies report on PAHs concentrations in mosses and relative few studies have been conducted on other POPs. So far, many studies have focused on spatial patterns around pollution sources or the concentration in mosses in remote areas such as the polar regions, as an indication of long-range transport of POPs. Very few studies have determined temporal trends or have directly related the concentrations in mosses with measured atmospheric concentrations and/or deposition fluxes.

  19. A literature review on integrated perinatal care

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Charo; des Rivières-Pigeon, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Context The perinatal period is one during which health care services are in high demand. Like other health care sub-sectors, perinatal health care delivery has undergone significant changes in recent years, such as the integrative wave that has swept through the health care industry since the early 1990s. Purpose The present study aims at reviewing scholarly work on integrated perinatal care to provide support for policy decision-making. Results Researchers interested in integrated perinatal care have, by assessing the effectiveness of individual clinical practices and intervention programs, mainly addressed issues of continuity of care and clinical and professional integration. Conclusions Improvements in perinatal health care delivery appear related not to structurally integrated health care delivery systems, but to organizing modalities that aim to support woman-centred care and cooperative clinical practice. PMID:17786177

  20. Perinatal Depression: An Update and Overview

    PubMed Central

    Stuart-Parrigon, Kaela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 3 years there have been notable developments in screening and treatment of perinatal depression. Most importantly, the DSM-V has made only minor changes in the diagnostic criteria for perinatal depression as compared to the DSM-IV; “perinatal”, as opposed to “postpartum”, is a specifier for depression with a requirement that the depression onset occurs during pregnancy or the first 4 weeks postpartum. Advances in the treatment of perinatal depression have been made over the last 3 years, including both prevention and acute interventions. Additional support has emerged confirming the primary risk factors for perinatal depression: a personal or family history, low SES, and poor interpersonal support. There is general agreement that universal screening be conducted for all perinatal women, both by the woman’s obstetrician and the baby’s pediatrician. PMID:25034859

  1. Perinatal Safety: From Concept to Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Holly Powell

    2010-01-01

    Communication and teamwork problems are leading causes of documented preventable adverse outcomes in perinatal care. An essential component of perinatal safety is the organizational culture in which clinicians work. Clinicians’ individual and collective authority to question the plan of care and take action to change the direction of a clinical situation in the patient’s best interest can be viewed as their “agency for safety.” However, collective agency for safety and commitment to support nurses in their advocacy role is missing in many perinatal care settings. This paper draws from Organizational Accident Theory, High Reliability Theory, and Symbolic Interactionism to describe the nurse’s role in maintaining safety during labor and birth in acute care settings, and suggests actions for supporting the perinatal nurse at individual, group, and systems levels to achieve maximum safety in perinatal care. PMID:20147827

  2. Xenohormone transactivities are inversely associated to serum POPs in Inuit

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Tanja; Ghisari, Mandana; Hjelmborg, Philip S; Deutch, Bente; Bonefeld-Jorgensen, Eva C

    2008-01-01

    Background The persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are highly lipophilic and resistant to biodegradation and found in e.g. seafood and marine mammals. Greenlandic Inuit have high intake of marine food and thus high POP burden that varies according to local conditions and dietary preference. We do for the very first time report the serum POP related non-steroidal xenohormone activity of Inuit across Greenland. The aims were 1) to determine the integrated xenohormone bioactivities as an exposure biomarker of the actual lipophilic serum POP mixture measuring the effect on estrogen (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) transactivity in citizens from different Greenlandic districts and 2) to evaluate associations to serum POP markers (14 PCBs and 10 pesticides) and lifestyle characteristics. Methods Serum samples from 121 men and 119 women from Nuuk, Sisimiut and Qaanaaq were extracted using SPE-HPLC fractionation to obtain the serum POP fraction free of endogenous hormones. The serum POP fraction was used for determination of xenohormone transactivity using ER and AR reporter gene assays. Results In overall, the xenohormone transactivities differed between districts as well as between the genders. Associations between the transactivities and age, n-3/n-6 and smoker years were observed. The xenoestrogenic and xenoandrogenic transactivities correlated negatively to the POPs for the combined female and male data, respectively. Conclusion The non-steroidal xenohormone transactivities can be used as an integrated biomarker of POP exposure and lifestyle characteristics. The actual serum POP mixtures antagonized the age adjusted sex hormone receptor functions. Comparison of different study populations requires in addition to age inclusion of diet and lifestyle factors. PMID:18627625

  3. Pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy

    PubMed Central

    van Wensen, Remco JA; van Leuken, Maarten H; Bosscha, Koop

    2008-01-01

    Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a surgical procedure used worldwide for the treatment of grade III and IV hemorrhoids in all age groups. However, life-threatening complications occur occasionally. The following case report describes the development of pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy. A literature review of techniques used to manage major septic complications after stapled hemorrhoidopexy was performed. There is no standardized treatment currently available. Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a safe, effective and time-efficient procedure in the hands of experienced colorectal surgeons. PMID:18855996

  4. Burn sepsis and burn toxin

    PubMed Central

    Allgöwer, Martin; Städtler, Karl; Schoenenberger, Guido A

    1974-01-01

    The salient steps of a 20-year programme of research into the nature of burn disease are described. By burn disease we mean the late mortality and morbidity following burns. We have isolated a burn toxin which is derived from a thermal polymerization of cell membrane lipoproteins within the dermis and have studied its influence on the effects of sepsis. We have also used it in the development of active and passive immunization therapy of severe burns. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:4429330

  5. Maternal arrhythmia and perinatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Dana; Gonzalez, Juan M; Harris, Ian, S.; Sparks, Teresa; Killion, Molly; Thiet, Mari-Paule; Bianco, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if arrhythmia in the setting of maternal cardiac disease (MCD) affects perinatal outcomes. Study Design This is a retrospective cohort study of pregnant women with MCD who delivered from 2008 to 2013. Perinatal outcomes among women with an arrhythmia were compared to those without. Result Among 143 women; 36 (25%) had an arrhythmia. Those with an arrhythmia were more likely to have a spontaneous vaginal delivery (64% vs. 43%, p < 0.05) and required fewer operative vaginal births (8% vs. 27%, p=0.02). Pregnancies were more likely to be complicated by IUGR (17% vs. 5%, p < 0.05) although there were no differences in the rate of small for gestational age. The risk of IUGR remained increased after controlling for confounding (aOR 6.98, 95% CI 1.59–30.79, p=0.01). Two cases of placental abruption were identified among mothers with arrhythmia while none were identified in the controls (p < 0.05) Conclusion Patients with arrhythmias were more likely to have a spontaneous vaginal delivery. Our data suggests that these pregnancies were an increased risk for IUGR. PMID:27309629

  6. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy: not just delirium

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Machado, Fabio Santana; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Organ dysfunction is triggered by inflammatory insults and tissue hypoperfusion. The brain plays a pivotal role in sepsis, acting as both a mediator of the immune response and a target for the pathologic process. The measurement of brain dysfunction is difficult because there are no specific biomarkers of neuronal injury, and bedside evaluation of cognitive performance is difficult in an intensive care unit. Although sepsis-associated encephalopathy was described decades ago, it has only recently been subjected to scientific scrutiny and is not yet completely understood. The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involves direct cellular damage to the brain, mitochondrial and endothelial dysfunction and disturbances in neurotransmission. This review describes the most recent findings in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and focuses on its many presentations. PMID:22012058

  7. Perinatal Mortality in the United States, 1950-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell-Griner, Eve

    1986-01-01

    This report describes long-term trends in perinatal mortality in the United States in three basic parts: development of perinatal mortality measures, components of fetal and infant mortality, and trends and differentials in perinatal mortality. Perinatal deaths refer to the sum of spontaneous fetal deaths occurring after 20 weeks gestation plus…

  8. bayesPop: Probabilistic Population Projections

    PubMed Central

    Ševčíková, Hana; Raftery, Adrian E.

    2016-01-01

    We describe bayesPop, an R package for producing probabilistic population projections for all countries. This uses probabilistic projections of total fertility and life expectancy generated by Bayesian hierarchical models. It produces a sample from the joint posterior predictive distribution of future age- and sex-specific population counts, fertility rates and mortality rates, as well as future numbers of births and deaths. It provides graphical ways of summarizing this information, including trajectory plots and various kinds of probabilistic population pyramids. An expression language is introduced which allows the user to produce the predictive distribution of a wide variety of derived population quantities, such as the median age or the old age dependency ratio. The package produces aggregated projections for sets of countries, such as UN regions or trading blocs. The methodology has been used by the United Nations to produce their most recent official population projections for all countries, published in the World Population Prospects. PMID:28077933

  9. bayesPop: Probabilistic Population Projections.

    PubMed

    Ševčíková, Hana; Raftery, Adrian E

    2016-12-01

    We describe bayesPop, an R package for producing probabilistic population projections for all countries. This uses probabilistic projections of total fertility and life expectancy generated by Bayesian hierarchical models. It produces a sample from the joint posterior predictive distribution of future age- and sex-specific population counts, fertility rates and mortality rates, as well as future numbers of births and deaths. It provides graphical ways of summarizing this information, including trajectory plots and various kinds of probabilistic population pyramids. An expression language is introduced which allows the user to produce the predictive distribution of a wide variety of derived population quantities, such as the median age or the old age dependency ratio. The package produces aggregated projections for sets of countries, such as UN regions or trading blocs. The methodology has been used by the United Nations to produce their most recent official population projections for all countries, published in the World Population Prospects.

  10. Use of Early Biomarkers in Neonatal Brain Damage and Sepsis: State of the Art and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, Iliana; Auriti, Cinzia; Ronchetti, Maria Paola; Prencipe, Giusi; Gazzolo, Diego; Dotta, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The identification of early noninvasive biochemical markers of disease is a crucial issue of the current scientific research, particularly during the first period of life, since it could provide useful and precocious diagnostic information when clinical and radiological signs are still silent. The ideal biomarker should be practical and sensitive in the precocious identification of at risk patients. An earlier diagnosis may lead to a larger therapeutic window and improve neonatal outcome. Brain damage and sepsis are common causes of severe morbidity with poor outcome and mortality during the perinatal period. A large number of potential biomarkers, including neuroproteins, calcium binding proteins, enzymes, oxidative stress markers, vasoactive agents, and inflammatory mediators, have been so far investigated. The aim of the present review was to provide a brief overview of some of the more commonly investigated biomarkers used in case of neonatal brain damage and sepsis. PMID:25685774

  11. Use of early biomarkers in neonatal brain damage and sepsis: state of the art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bersani, Iliana; Auriti, Cinzia; Ronchetti, Maria Paola; Prencipe, Giusi; Gazzolo, Diego; Dotta, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The identification of early noninvasive biochemical markers of disease is a crucial issue of the current scientific research, particularly during the first period of life, since it could provide useful and precocious diagnostic information when clinical and radiological signs are still silent. The ideal biomarker should be practical and sensitive in the precocious identification of at risk patients. An earlier diagnosis may lead to a larger therapeutic window and improve neonatal outcome. Brain damage and sepsis are common causes of severe morbidity with poor outcome and mortality during the perinatal period. A large number of potential biomarkers, including neuroproteins, calcium binding proteins, enzymes, oxidative stress markers, vasoactive agents, and inflammatory mediators, have been so far investigated. The aim of the present review was to provide a brief overview of some of the more commonly investigated biomarkers used in case of neonatal brain damage and sepsis.

  12. Urinary (1)H-NMR and GC-MS metabolomics predicts early and late onset neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fanos, Vassilios; Caboni, Pierluigi; Corsello, Giovanni; Stronati, Mauro; Gazzolo, Diego; Noto, Antonio; Lussu, Milena; Dessì, Angelica; Giuffrè, Mario; Lacerenza, Serafina; Serraino, Francesca; Garofoli, Francesca; Serpero, Laura Domenica; Liori, Barbara; Carboni, Roberta; Atzori, Luigi

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to study one of the most significant causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality: neonatal sepsis. This pathology is due to a bacterial or fungal infection acquired during the perinatal period. Neonatal sepsis has been categorized into two groups: early onset if it occurs within 3-6 days and late onset after 4-7 days. Due to the not-specific clinical signs, along with the inaccuracy of available biomarkers, the diagnosis is still a major challenge. In this regard, the use of a combined approach based on both nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) and gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques, coupled with a multivariate statistical analysis, may help to uncover features of the disease that are still hidden. The objective of our study was to evaluate the capability of the metabolomics approach to identify a potential metabolic profile related to the neonatal septic condition. The study population included 25 neonates (15 males and 10 females): 9 (6 males and 3 females) patients had a diagnosis of sepsis and 16 were healthy controls (9 males and 7 females). This study showed a unique metabolic profile of the patients affected by sepsis compared to non-affected ones with a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.05).

  13. Abnormal heart rate characteristics preceding neonatal sepsis and sepsis-like illness.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M Pamela; O'Shea, T Michael; Bissonette, Eric A; Harrell, Frank E; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall

    2003-06-01

    Late-onset neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and early detection could prove beneficial. Previously, we found that abnormal heart rate characteristics (HRC) of reduced variability and transient decelerations occurred early in the course of neonatal sepsis and sepsis-like illness in infants in a single neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We hypothesized that this finding can be generalized to other NICUs. We prospectively collected clinical data and continuously measured RR intervals in all infants in two NICUs who stayed for >7 d. We defined episodes of sepsis and sepsis-like illness as acute clinical deteriorations that prompted physicians to obtain blood cultures and start antibiotics. A predictive statistical model yielding an HRC index was developed on a derivation cohort of 316 neonates in the University of Virginia NICU and then applied to the validation cohort of 317 neonates in the Wake Forest University NICU. In the derivation cohort, there were 155 episodes of sepsis and sepsis-like illness in 101 infants, and in the validation cohort, there were 118 episodes in 93 infants. In the validation cohort, the HRC index 1) showed highly significant association with impending sepsis and sepsis-like illness (receiver operator characteristic area 0.75, p < 0.001) and 2) added significantly to the demographic information of birth weight, gestational age, and days of postnatal age in predicting sepsis and sepsis-like illness (p < 0.001). Continuous HRC monitoring is a generally valid and potentially useful noninvasive tool in the early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis and sepsis-like illness.

  14. Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bones (common in children) Bowel (usually seen with peritonitis ) Kidneys (upper urinary tract infection , pyelonephritis or urosepsis) ... More Avian influenza Cellulitis Confusion Intravenous Meningitis Osteomyelitis Peritonitis Pneumonia - adults (community acquired) Septic shock Shock Urinary ...

  15. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of POPs in Greenlanders.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Gustavson, Kim; Rigét, Frank F; Dietz, Rune; Krüger, Tanja; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C

    2014-03-01

    Human exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and the potential health impact in the Arctic far from the emission sources have been highlighted in numerous studies. As a supplement to human POP biomonitoring studies, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was set up to estimate the fate of POPs in Greenlandic Inuit's liver, blood, muscle and adipose tissue following long-term exposure to traditional Greenlandic diet. The PBPK model described metabolism, excretion and POP accumulation on the basis of their physicochemical properties and metabolic rates in the organisms. Basic correlations between chemically analyzed blood POP concentrations and calculated daily POP intake from food questionnaire of 118 middle age (18-35years) Greenlandic Inuits from four cities in West Greenland (Qaanaaq: n=40; Qeqertarsuaq: n=36; Nuuk: n=20; Narsaq: n=22) taken during 2003 to 2006 were analyzed. The dietary items included were polar bear, caribou, musk oxen, several marine species such as whales, seals, bird and fish as well as imported food. The contaminant concentrations of the dietary items as well as their chemical properties, uptake, biotransformation and excretion allowed us to estimate the POP concentration in liver, blood, muscle and adipose tissue following long-term exposure to the traditional Greenlandic diet using the PBPK model. Significant correlations were found between chemically analyzed POP blood concentrations and calculated daily intake of POPs for Qeqertarsuaq, Nuuk and Narsaq Inuit but not for the northernmost settlement Qaanaaq, probably because the highest blood POP level was found in this district which might mask the interview-based POP calculations. Despite the large variation in circulating blood POP concentrations, the PBPK model predicted blood concentrations of a factor 2-3 within the actual measured values. Moreover, the PBPK model showed that estimated blood POP concentration increased significantly after consumption of meals

  16. Sepsis as a model of SIRS.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; He, Min; Zhang, Huili; Moochhala, Shabbir

    2009-01-01

    Sepsis describes a complex clinical syndrome that results from the host inability to regulate the inflammatory response against infection. Despite more than 20 years of extensive study, sepsis and excessive systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) are still the leading cause of death in intensive care units. The clinical study of sepsis and new therapeutics remains challenging due to the complexity of this disease. Therefore, many animal models have been employed to investigate the pathogenesis of sepsis and to preliminarily test potential therapeutics. However, so far, most therapeutics that have shown promising results in animal models failed in human clinical trials. In this chapter we will present an overview of different experimental animal models of sepsis and compare their advantages and disadvantage. The studies in animal models have greatly improved our understanding about the inflammatory mediators in sepsis. In this chapter we will also highlight the roles of several critical mediators including TNF-a , IL-1b , IL-6, chemokines, substance P, hydrogen sulfide and activated protein C in animal models of sepsis as well as in clinical studies.

  17. Pop-Up Constructions Motivate and Reinforce Science Learning for Upper Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Benjamin D.; Zhbanova, Ksenia S.; Parpucu, Harun; Alkouri, Zaid; Rule, Audrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Pop-up boxes and folder constructions support student inquiry while integrating art, craft, spatial, and creativity skills. Step-by-step illustrated directions for constructing pop-up boxes are provided with example images of pop-up boxes focused on ecological issues. Teachers used these pop-up constructions to assist fourth- and fifth-grade…

  18. [Role of the perinatal sexologist in the interdisciplinary perinatal health care team in Canada].

    PubMed

    de Pierrepont, C; Polomeno, V

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary health care teams are models of health care that are the way of the future. In this model, the sexologist has a unique and important role, particularly in perinatal health care where sexuality is a central component of health. Perinatal sexuality is a newly emerging discipline in which the perinatal sexologist has a double role to play: 1) to train other perinatal health professionals in sexuality; and 2) to educate and to intervene with future and new parenting couples by answering their multiple intimate and sexual questions and concerns during the transition to parenthood.

  19. Five additions to the list of Sepsidae Diptera for Vietnam: Perochaeta cuirassa sp. n., Perochaeta lobo sp. n., Sepsis spura sp. n., Sepsis sepsi Ozerov, 2003 and Sepsis monostigma Thompson, 1869

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Yuchen; Meier, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A recent collecting trip to Vietnam yielded three new species and two new records of Sepsidae (Diptera) for the country. Here we describe two new species in the species-poor genus Perochaeta (Perochaeta cuirassa sp. n. andPerochaeta lobo sp. n.) and one to the largest sepsid genus Sepsis (Sepsis spura sp. n.) which is also found in Sumatra and Sulawesi. Two additional Sepsis species are new records for Vietnam (Sepsis sepsi Ozerov, 2003; Sepsis monostigma Thompson, 1869). We conclude with a discussion of the distribution of Perochaeta and the three Sepsis species. PMID:21594042

  20. [Model of meningococcal sepsis in mice].

    PubMed

    Krasnoproshina, L I; Ermakova, L G; Belova, T N; Filippov, Iu V; Efimov, D D

    1978-11-01

    The authors studied a possibility of obtaining experimental meningococcus sepsis model on mice. The use of cyclophosphane, iron compounds, yolk medium produced no significant organism. When 4--5% mucine was injected intraperitoneally together with meningococcus culture mice died with sepsis phenomena. Differences were revealed in the sensitivity of linear and mongrel mice to meningococcus infection--AKR mice proved to be more sensitive. At the same time it was found that mongrel mice weighing from 10 to 12 g could be used to induce meningococcus sepsis.

  1. Where Sepsis and Antimicrobial Resistance Countermeasures Converge

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, Timothy J. J.; Urosevic, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The United Nations General Assembly debate on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) recognizes the global significance of AMR. Much work needs to be done on technology capability and capacity to convert the strategic intent of the debate into operational plans and tangible outcomes. Enhancement of the biomedical science–clinician interface requires better exploitation of systems biology tools for in-laboratory and point of care methods that detect sepsis and characterize AMR. These need to link sepsis and AMR data with responsive, real-time surveillance. We propose an AMR sepsis register, similar in concept to a cancer registry, to aid coordination of AMR countermeasures. PMID:28220145

  2. Pitfalls in the Treatment of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lars-Kristofer N; Chase, Karin

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is a challenging, dynamic, pathophysiology requiring expertise in diagnosis and management. Controversy exists as to the most sensitive early indicators of sepsis and sepsis severity. Patients presenting to the emergency department often lack complete history or clinical data that would point to optimal management. Awareness of these potential knowledge gaps is important for the emergency provider managing the septic patient. Specific areas of management including the initiation and management of mechanical ventilation, the appropriate disposition of the patient, and consideration of transfer to higher levels of care are reviewed.

  3. PUFFER (Pop-Up Flat Folding Explorer Robots)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karras, J.; Carpenter, K.; Fuller, C.; Parcheta, C.

    2016-10-01

    PUFFER (Pop-Up Flat Folding Explorer Robots) are origami-inspired folding robots with extreme terrain mobility. PUFFERs are low-volume, low-mass, and low-cost robots for high-reward extreme terrain science.

  4. Pop Culture Students Find Pleasure Leads to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanigel, Robert

    1978-01-01

    The growth of pop culture courses is discussed with emphasis on Morgan State's master's degree program. Reasons for student interest are cited along with problems as well as advantages of the curricular permissiveness and flexible scope. (LBH)

  5. RESEARCH ON EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION OF POP'S FROM COMBUSTION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chapter summarizes EPA's research on emissions and control of persistent organic pollutants (POPS) from combustion sources, with emphasis on source characterization and measurement, formation and destruction mechanisms, formation prevention, and flue gas cleaning. Laboratory exp...

  6. Paradoxical pop-ups: Why are they difficult to catch?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Michael K.; Nathan, Alan M.; Bahill, A. Terry; Baldwin, David G.

    2008-08-01

    Professional baseball players occasionally find it difficult to gracefully approach seemingly routine pop-ups. We describe a set of towering pop-ups with trajectories that exhibit cusps and loops near the apex. For a normal fly ball the horizontal velocity continuously decreases due to drag caused by air resistance. For pop-ups the Magnus force is larger than the drag force. In these cases the horizontal velocity initially decreases like a normal fly ball, but after the apex, the Magnus force accelerates the horizontal motion. We refer to this class of pop-ups as paradoxical because they appear to misinform the typically robust optical control strategies used by fielders and lead to systematic vacillation in running paths, especially when a trajectory terminates near the fielder. Former major league infielders confirm that our model agrees with their experiences.

  7. Fetal akinesia and multiple perinatal fractures.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Blackburn, W R; Wertelecki, W

    1995-02-13

    Two newborn infants with fetal akinesia sequence were noted to have multiple perinatal fractures of the long bones. The radiographic manifestations are characterized by gracile ribs, thin long bones, and multiple diaphyseal fractures. Consistent histopathologic changes of bone are irregular with focal areas of extreme diaphyseal thinning, thin and long marrow spicules, and with or without callous formation at fracture sites. Pathogenic mechanisms of bone fractures in fetal akinesia sequence and the differential diagnoses of congenital/perinatal bone fractures are discussed.

  8. Genetic and perinatal effects of abused substances

    SciTech Connect

    Brande, M.C.; Zimmerman, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the effects of several abused drugs, including opiates, cannabinoids, alcohol, nicotine, and cocaine, with special emphasis on the actions of these substances at the molecular and cellular levels. The first half deals with genetic effects, including molecular genetics, biochemical genetics, pharmacogenetics, cytogenetics, and genetic toxicity. The second half focuses on perinatal effects and covers: drug abuse during pregnancy; biochemical aspects of marihuana on male reproduction; and long-term behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of perinatal alcohol exposure.

  9. Perinatal depression: implications for child mental health

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Perinatal depression is common and primary care holds a crucial role for detecting, treating or, if necessary, providing referrals to mental health care for affected women. Family doctors should be aware of risk factors for peripartum depression, including previous history of depression, life events and interpersonal conflict. Perinatal depression has been associated with many poor outcomes, including maternal, child and family unit challenges. Infants and young children of perinatally depressed mothers are more likely to have a difficult temperament, as well as cognitive and emotional delays. The primary care setting is uniquely poised to be the screening and treatment site for perinatal depression; however, several obstacles, both at patient and systems level, have been identified that interfere with women's treatment engagement. Current published treatment guidelines favour psychotherapy above medicines as first line treatment for mild to moderate perinatal depression, while pharmacotherapy is first choice for severe depression, often in combination with psychosocial or integrative approaches. Among mothers who decide to stop taking their antidepressants despite ongoing depression during the perinatal period, the majority suffer from relapsing symptoms. If depression continues post‐partum, there is an increased risk of poor mother–infant attachment, delayed cognitive and linguistic skills in the infant, impaired emotional development and risk for behavioural problems in later life. Complex, comprehensive and multilevel algorithms are warranted to treat perinatal depression. Primary care doctors are best suited to initiate, carry out and evaluate the effectiveness of such interventions designed to prevent adverse outcomes of maternal perinatal depression on mother and child wellbeing. PMID:22477948

  10. WorldPop, open data for spatial demography

    PubMed Central

    Tatem, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    High resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions, their characteristics and changes over time are a prerequisite for the accurate measurement of the impacts of population growth, for monitoring changes and for planning interventions. WorldPop aims to meet these needs through the provision of detailed and open access spatial demographic datasets built using transparent approaches. The Scientific Data WorldPop collection brings together descriptor papers on these datasets and is introduced here. PMID:28140397

  11. Naturalization of immigrants and perinatal mortality

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Yvon; Buekens, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Background: Differences in neonatal mortality among immigrants have been documented in Belgium and elsewhere, and these disparities are poorly understood. Our objective was to compare perinatal mortality rates in immigrant mothers according to citizenship status. Methods: This was a population-based study using 2008 data from the Belgian birth register data pertaining to regions of Brussels and Wallonia. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for perinatal mortality according to naturalization status were calculated by logistic regression analyses adjusting for parents’ medical and social characteristics. Results: Four hundred and thirty-seven perinatal deaths were registered among 60 881 births (7.2‰). Perinatal mortality rate varied according to the origin of the mother and her naturalization status: among immigrants, non-naturalized immigrants had a higher incidence of perinatal mortality (10.3‰) than their naturalized counterparts (6.1‰) with an adjusted OR of 2.2, 95% CI (1.1–4.5). Conclusion: In a country with a high frequency of naturalization, and universal access to health care, naturalized immigrant mothers experience less perinatal mortality than their not naturalized counterparts. PMID:22490473

  12. Recent advances of perinatal medicine in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z

    1995-05-01

    Perinatal medicine has been practiced for only 30 years. The basis for such medicine is perinatal health care and the main theme is systemic monitoring and management of high-risk pregnancies. China has offered such practice since 1979, with the perinatal health care system derived from the former health care system for pregnant women. The rate of maternal mortality in China had fallen to 94.7/100,000 by 1989, while the perinatal mortality rate was 51.8/1000 as of 1986. Comparable rates for 1993 in the Shanghai area were 19.95/100,000 and 10.6/1000, respectively. A group of Baby Friendly Hospitals was formally approved by the Ministry of Health and the WHO-UNICEF joint committee. In Shanghai, 11 such maternity hospitals received this status in 1993, and 27 more in 1994. Recently, the social model of perinatal health care, as proposed by WHO-EURO, has been adopted in Shanghai, providing the mother the rights and freedom to choose appropriate health care management on her own. It is gaining emphasis in Shanghai that both medical and social models are mandatory in perinatal health care.

  13. [Identification of the patient with sepsis].

    PubMed

    Rossi, B; Piazza, C; Moraschini, F; Marchesi, G M; Fumagalli, R

    2004-05-01

    Sepsis may be defined as a clinical syndrome caused by an organism's response to infection. The complex alterations triggered by the infection include inflammation and systemic coagulopathy in the absence of effective fibrinolysis. Possible manifestations vary in entity and severity, ranging from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) to septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS). The nurse can play a fundamental role in the timely recognition of SIRS and in the early identification of the onset of signs of organ damage. In this way, an additional aid to establishing diagnosis can be provided and targeted treatment instituted. Following a brief presentation of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of sepsis, the manifestations and attendant risks are described, the most appropriate monitoring methods and the main nursing tasks in treating sepsis are discussed. We present the results of our experience in identifying patients with sepsis through the application of selection criteria adopted from clinical studies on the use of activated protein C.

  14. Understanding sepsis: from SIRS to septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hynes-Gay, Patricia; Lalla, Patti; Leo, Maria; Merrill-Bell, Audrey; Nicholson, Marjorie; Villaruel, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in non-coronary ICU patients, despite improvements in supportive treatment modalities such as antimicrobial drugs and ventilation therapy. Further, the incidence of sepsis is projected to increase in years to come, related to factors including a rise in immunosuppressed patient populations and more widespread use of invasive lines and procedures. In this article, the authors seek to advance nurses' understanding of sepsis by reviewing the SIRS to septic shock paradigm and using a case study to illustrate how a patient progressed along the continuum. The role of the critical care nurse is an important aspect of the care of these patients. Early identification of patients at risk for, or who are developing, sepsis is crucial in order to improve patient outcomes.

  15. Staghorn calculus endotoxin expression in sepsis.

    PubMed

    McAleer, Irene M; Kaplan, George W; Bradley, John S; Carroll, Stephen F

    2002-04-01

    Staghorn calculi are infrequent and generally are infected stones. Struvite or apatite calculi are embedded with gram-negative bacteria, which can produce endotoxin. Sepsis syndrome may occur after surgical therapy or endoscopic manipulation of infected or staghorn calculi. Sepsis, which can occur despite perioperative antibiotic use, may be due to bacteremia or endotoxemia. We present a child with an infected staghorn calculus who developed overwhelming sepsis and died after percutaneous stone manipulation. Endotoxin assay of stone fragments demonstrated an extremely high level of endotoxin despite low colony bacterial culture growth. This is the first reported case in which endotoxin was demonstrated in stone fragments from a child who died of severe sepsis syndrome after percutaneous staghorn stone manipulation.

  16. Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Bailey, Damian M

    2011-07-01

    Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress may prove the molecular basis underlying brain dysfunction in sepsis. In the current review, we describe how sepsis-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) trigger lipid peroxidation chain reactions throughout the cerebrovasculature and surrounding brain parenchyma, due to failure of the local antioxidant systems. ROS/RNS cause structural membrane damage, induce inflammation, and scavenge nitric oxide (NO) to yield peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). This activates the inducible NO synthase, which further compounds ONOO(-) formation. ROS/RNS cause mitochondrial dysfunction by inhibiting the mitochondrial electron transport chain and uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation, which ultimately leads to neuronal bioenergetic failure. Furthermore, in certain 'at risk' areas of the brain, free radicals may induce neuronal apoptosis. In the present review, we define a role for ROS/RNS-mediated neuronal bioenergetic failure and apoptosis as a primary mechanism underlying sepsis-associated encephalopathy and, in sepsis survivors, permanent cognitive deficits.

  17. Prevention of perinatal HIV transmission: the Perinatal HIV Hotline perspective.

    PubMed

    Waldura, Jess Fogler

    2011-01-01

    Among the most frequently asked questions by callers to the National Perinatal HIV Hotline are those on the use of hormonal contraception in women receiving antiretroviral therapy. Estradiol levels are reduced by ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PIs), nelfinavir, and nevirapine and increased by non-ritonavir-boosted PIs (except nelfinavir), efavirenz, and etravirine. Oral contraceptives do not affect antiretroviral drug levels, and several options are available for hormonal contraception that can compensate for or avoid the effects of antiretroviral drugs on estrogen levels. Other common questions on the hotline involve interpretation and management issues that arise from indeterminate Western blot test results early and late in pregnancy and from positive rapid test results during labor. Many questions focus on appropriate selection of antiretroviral drugs in pregnancy and the need to change regimens to reduce risk of birth defects in the child. This articlesummarizes a presentation by Jess Fogler Waldura, MD, at the 13th Annual Clinical Conference for the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program held in August 2010 in Washington, DC.

  18. [Maternal mortality and perinatal mortality].

    PubMed

    Boutaleb, Y; Mesbahi, M; Lahlou, D; Aderdour, M

    1982-01-01

    94 maternal deaths and 1546 fetal and neonatal deaths were registered among 28,706 births at the CHU Averroes in Casablanca between 1978-80. 45% of women who deliver at the clinic are very poor and only 10% are relatively well off. Obstetrical antecedents were noted in 27% of the fetal deaths. 70% of the maternal deaths occurred in women aged 20-34. 32 maternal deaths occurred among 16,232 women with 1-2 children, 30 among 6514 women with 3-5 children, and 32 among 5960 women with 6-14 children. 11,027 of the 28,706 were primaparas. Perinatal mortality was 4.46% among primaparas, 8.24% among grand multiparas, and 4.1% among secondiparas. In 58 of the 94 cases of maternal mortality the woman was hospitalized after attempting delivery at home or in a village clinic. Among women with 1 or 2 children, hemorrhage was the cause of death in 8 cases, infection in 7 cases, eclampsia in 3 cases, thromboembolism in 2 cases, uterine inversion in 2 cases, pulmonary tuberculosis in 1 case, embolism in 5 cases, and other causes 1 case each. Among women with 3-5 children hemorrhage was the cause of death in 10 cases, septicemia in 3 cases, uterine rupture in 3 cases, eclampsia in 3 cases, uterine inversion in 2 cases, viral hepatitis in 2 cases, emboli in 2 cases, and other reasons 1 case each. Among grand multiparas hemorrhage was the cause of death in 11 cases, uterine rupture in 12 cases, peritonitis in 2 cases, eclampsia in 2 cases, emboli in 2 cases, and other causes 1 case each. 19 of the maternal deaths were judged to have been avoidable with better management. Prematurity and birth weight of 1000-2500 g associated or not with other pathology were found in 714 of 1546 perinatal deaths. Of 390 cases of death in utero with retention and maceration, 68 were caused by reno-vascular syndromes, 76 by maternal infections, 33 by maternal syphilis, 26 by fetal malformation, 18 by maternal diabetes, 10 by Rh incompatability, and 159 by indeterminate causes. In 795 cases of

  19. Neonatal Infectious Diseases: Evaluation of Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul W.; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. The following chapter reviews recent trends in epidemiology, and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:23481106

  20. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis.

  1. Sepsis: From Pathophysiology to Individualized Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    László, Ildikó; Trásy, Domonkos; Molnár, Zsolt; Fazakas, János

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis has become a major health economic issue, with more patients dying in hospitals due to sepsis related complications compared to breast and colorectal cancer together. Despite extensive research in order to improve outcome in sepsis over the last few decades, results of large multicenter studies were by-and-large very disappointing. This fiasco can be explained by several factors, but one of the most important reasons is the uncertain definition of sepsis resulting in very heterogeneous patient populations, and the lack of understanding of pathophysiology, which is mainly based on the imbalance in the host-immune response. However, this heroic research work has not been in vain. Putting the results of positive and negative studies into context, we can now approach sepsis in a different concept, which may lead us to new perspectives in diagnostics and treatment. While decision making based on conventional sepsis definitions can inevitably lead to false judgment due to the heterogeneity of patients, new concepts based on currently gained knowledge in immunology may help to tailor assessment and treatment of these patients to their actual needs. Summarizing where we stand at present and what the future may hold are the purpose of this review. PMID:26258150

  2. Hurricane Katrina and perinatal health.

    PubMed

    Harville, Emily W; Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    We review the literature on the effects of Hurricane Katrina on perinatal health, and providing data from our own research on pregnant and postpartum women. After Katrina, obstetric, prenatal, and neonatal care was compromised in the short term, but increases in adverse birth outcomes such as preterm birth, low birthweight, and maternal complications were mostly limited to highly exposed women. Both pregnant and postpartum women had rates of post-traumatic stress disorder similar to, or lower than, others exposed to Katrina, and rates of depression similar to other pregnant and postpartum populations. Health behaviors, such as smoking and breastfeeding, may have been somewhat negatively affected by the disaster, whereas effects on nutrition were likely associated with limited time, money, and food choices, and indicated by both weight gain and loss. We conclude that, with a few specific exceptions, postdisaster concerns and health outcomes for pregnant and postpartum women were similar to those of other people exposed to Hurricane Katrina. In such situations, disaster planners and researchers should focus on providing care and support for the normal concerns of the peripartum period, such as breastfeeding, depression, and smoking cessation. Contraception needs to be available for those who do not want to become pregnant. Although additional physical and mental health care needs to be provided for the most severely exposed women and their babies, many women are capable of surviving and thriving in postdisaster environments.

  3. Fourth goal of perinatal medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Ounsted, C; Roberts, J C; Gordon, M; Milligan, B

    1982-01-01

    Reduction in maternal mortality, infant mortality, and infant morbidity have been successively the goals of perinatal medicine. The fourth is to reduce bonding failure. In July 1978 a preventive service was started in the John Radcliffe Maternity Hospital. A twice-weekly round is made. Midwives refer families who cause them concern. In the first year the referral rate ws 20.5 per 1000 liveborn babies. The referred sample differed from the hospital population in terms of maternal psychiatric history, marital state and babies' admission to special care. The main reasons for referral were: doubt about parenting ability (27%), psychiatric history (15%), disturbed behaviour in hospital (14%), and diffuse social and medical problems (17%). Long-term care was needed for only 14% of families. At their first birthdays, six babies were placed away from their natural parents; the sample had had a slightly higher than expected admission rate to hospital; the distribution of weights did not differ from the expected; doctors and health visitors were still concerned about one-quarter of the families. Seven cases of screening failure were found among those not referred to our service, but only one was seriously abused. No child referred in the first year has been seriously neglected or abused. PMID:6802338

  4. Maternal nutrition and perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Barger, Mary K

    2010-01-01

    Diet and patterns of eating during pregnancy can affect perinatal outcomes through direct physiologic effects or by stressing the fetus in ways that permanently affect phenotype. Supplements are not a magic nutritional remedy, and evidence of profound benefit for most supplements remains inconclusive. However, research supports calcium supplements to decrease preeclampsia. Following a low glycemic, Mediterranean-type diet appears to improve ovulatory infertility, decrease preterm birth, and decrease the risk of gestational diabetes. Although women in the United States have adequate levels of most nutrients, subpopulations are low in vitamin D, folate, and iodine. Vitamin D has increasingly been shown to be important not only for bone health, but also for glucose regulation, immune function, and good uterine contractility in labor. To ensure adequate vitamin and micronutrient intake, especially of folate before conception, all reproductive age women should take a multivitamin daily. In pregnancy, health care providers need to assess women's diets, give them weight gain recommendations based on their body mass index measurement, and advise them to eat a Mediterranean diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids (ingested as low-mercury risk fatty fish or supplements), ingest adequate calcium, and achieve adequate vitamin D levels through sun exposure or supplements. Health care providers should continue to spend time on nutrition assessment and counseling.

  5. Factors which affect mortality in neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Turhan, Esma Ebru; Gürsoy, Tuğba; Ovalı, Fahri

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Neonatal sepsis is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in newborns. The causative agents may be different in different units and may change in time. It was aimed to examine the microbiological agents leading to sepsis, clinical features and antibiotic resistances in babies with sepsis hospitalized in our unit in a two-year period. Material and Methods: The clinical features, microbiological and laboratory results, antibiotic resistance patterns and mortality rates of the newborns with sepsis followed up in our unit between 2010 and 2011 were examined in the patient record system. Results: 351 babies diagnosed with sepsis among 3219 patients hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit were included in the study. The mean gestational age was found to be 30.1±4.1 weeks, the mean birth weight was found to be 1417.4±759.1 g and the mean hospitalization time was found to be 43.6±34.4 days. Blood cultures were found to be positive in 167 (47.6%) patients, urine cultures were found to be positive in 6 (7.1%) patients and cerebrospinal fluid cultures were found to be positive in 34 (9.6%) cases. Candida grew in 5 patients (2 patients with early-onset sepsis and 3 patients with late-onset sepsis). The most common cause of sepsis was found to be staphylococci (coagulase negative staphylococcus was found in 65 patients (51%) and Staphylococcus aureus was found in 38 patients (39%). 49.6% (n=63) of the gram positive bacteriae and 60% (n=21) of the gram negative bacteriae were resistant to antibiotics. Six (7.1%) of the patients who were infected with these bacteriae were lost. In total 24 babies were lost because of sepsis. The bacteriae which caused to mortality with the highest rate included E. coli, coagulase negative staphylocicci, S. aureus and Klebsiella. Low birth weight, mechanical ventilation and parenteral nutrition were found to be significant risk factors in terms of mortality. Conclusions: Staphylococci were found to be the most common agents

  6. Improving Diagnosis of Sepsis After Burn Injury Using a Portable Sepsis Alert System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    the efficacy of the bedside decision support tool to detect burn sepsis using multicenter, prospective study, bedside laptops , and patient sensors...Task 4. Validate the efficacy of the bedside decision support tool to detect burn sepsis using multicenter, prospective study, bedside laptops , and

  7. Laboratory detection of sepsis: biomarkers and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Stefan; Carroll, Karen C

    2013-09-01

    Sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Rapid diagnosis and therapeutic interventions are desirable to improve the overall mortality in patients with sepsis. However, gold standard laboratory diagnostic methods for sepsis, pose a significant challenge to rapid diagnosis of sepsis by physicians and laboratories. This article discusses the usefulness and potential of biomarkers and molecular test methods for a more rapid clinical and laboratory diagnosis of sepsis. Because new technologies are quickly emerging, physicians and laboratories must appreciate the key factors and characteristics that affect the clinical usefulness and diagnostic accuracy of these test methodologies.

  8. Sepsis-related hypertensive response: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In daily practice acute arterial hypertension may occur during acute sepsis. No management guidelines concerning this issue figured in the latest sepsis campaign guidelines. Arterial hypertension occurring during sepsis could be an overlooked condition despite its potential haemodynamic harmful consequences. In this paper, a clinical study of acute hypertensive response related to sepsis is detailed. It shows that arterial hypertension, renal salt wasting and glomerular hyperfiltration can occur simultaneously during sepsis. Mechanisms and management options of sepsis-related arterial hypertensive response are also discussed. PMID:24855080

  9. Pathophysiology of sepsis and recent patents on the diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis for sepsis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Yasumasa; Matsukawa, Akihiro

    2009-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of powerful antibiotics and intensive care unit, sepsis is still life threatening and the mortality rate remains unchanged for the past three decades. Recent prospective trials with biological response modifiers have shown a modest clinical benefit. The pathological basis of sepsis is initially an excessive inflammatory response against invading pathogens, leading to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Evidence reveals that a variety of inflammatory mediators orchestrate the intense inflammation through complicated cellular interactions. More recent data indicate that most septic patients survive this stage and then subjected to an immunoparalysis phase, termed compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS), which is more fatal than the initial phase. Sepsis is a complicated clinical syndrome with multiple physiologic and immunologic abnormalities. In this review, we summarize the recent understandings of the pathophysiology of sepsis, and introduce recent patents on diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis for sepsis.

  10. Burkholderia cepacia sepsis among neonates.

    PubMed

    Patra, Saikat; Bhat Y, Ramesh; Lewis, Leslie Edward; Purakayastha, Jayashree; Sivaramaraju, V Vamsi; Kalwaje E, Vandana; Mishra, Swathi

    2014-11-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is a rare cause of sepsis in newborns and its transmission involves human contact with heavily contaminated medical devices and disinfectants. The authors aimed to determine epidemiology, clinical features, antibiotic sensitivity pattern, complications and outcome of blood culture proven B. cepacia infections in 12 neonates. All neonates were outborn, 5 preterm and 7 term. B. cepacia was isolated from blood in all and concurrently from CSF in three neonates. Lethargy and respiratory distress (41.7 %) were major presenting features. Five newborns (41.7 %) required mechanical ventilation for 3-7 d. Highest bacterial susceptibility was observed for meropenem (100 %), followed by cefoperazone-sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (all 83 %), ceftazidime (75 %) and ciprofloxacin (42 %). Piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin and cotrimoxazole either singly or in combination led to complete recovery of 11 (91.7 %) newborns; one developed hydrocephalus. Eight of nine infants who completed 6 mo follow up were normal. Prompt recognition and appropriate antibiotic therapy for B. cepacia infection results in complete recovery in majority.

  11. Perinatal Practices & Traditions Among Asian Indian Women.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    As the population in the United States grows more diverse, nurses caring for childbearing women must be aware of the many cultural traditions and customs unique to their patients. This knowledge and insight supports women and their families with the appropriate care, information, and resources. A supportive relationship builds trust, offers guidance, and allows for the new family to integrate information from nurses and other healthcare providers with the practice of certain perinatal cultural traditions. The Asian Indian culture is rich in tradition, specifically during the perinatal period. To support the cultural beliefs and practices of Asian Indian women during this time, nurses need to be aware of and consider multiple factors. Many women are navigating the new role of motherhood while making sense of and incorporating important cultural rituals. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of perinatal cultural practices and traditions specific to the Asian Indian culture that perinatal nurses may observe in the clinical setting. Cultural traditions and practices specific to the pregnancy and postpartum period are described together with symbolism and implications for nursing practice. It is important to note that information regarding perinatal customs is provided in an effort to promote culturally sensitive nursing care and may not pertain to all Asian Indian women living in the United States.

  12. Immunological monitoring to prevent and treat sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The clinical, human and economic burden associated with sepsis is huge. Initiatives such as the Surviving Sepsis Campaign aim to effectively reduce risk of death from severe sepsis and septic shock. Nonetheless, although substantial benefits raised from the implementation of this campaign have been obtained, much work remains if we are to realise the full potential promised by this strategy. A deeper understanding of the processes leading to sepsis is necessary before we can design an effective suite of interventions. Dysregulation of the immune response to infection is acknowledged to contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Production of both proinflammatory and immunosuppressive cytokines is observed from the very first hours following diagnosis. In addition, hypogammaglobulinemia is often present in patients with septic shock. Moreover, levels of IgG, IgM and IgA at diagnosis correlate directly with survival. In turn, nonsurvivors have lower levels of C4 (a protein of the complement system) than the survivors. Natural killer cell counts and function also seem to have an important role in this disease. HLA-DR in the surface of monocytes and counts of CD4+CD25+ T-regulatory cells in blood could also be useful biomarkers for sepsis. At the genomic level, repression of networks corresponding to major histocompatibility complex antigen presentation is observed in septic shock. In consequence, cumulative evidence supports the potential role of immunological monitoring to guide measures to prevent or treat sepsis in a personalised and timely manner (early antibiotic administration, immunoglobulin replacement, immunomodulation). In conclusion, although diffuse and limited, current available information supports the development of large comprehensive studies aimed to urgently evaluate immunological monitoring as a tool to prevent sepsis, guide its treatment and, as a consequence, diminish the morbidity and mortality associated with this severe condition. PMID

  13. Immune cell phenotype and function in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Thomas; Payen, Didier; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Marshall, John; Gomez, Hernando; Gomez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems play a critical role in the host response to sepsis. Moreover, their accessibility for sampling and their capacity to respond dynamically to an acute threat increases the possibility that leukocytes might serve as a measure of a systemic state of altered responsiveness in sepsis. The working group of the 14th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) conference sought to obtain consensus on the characteristic functional and phenotypic changes in cells of the innate and adaptive immune system in the setting of sepsis. Techniques for the study of circulating leukocytes were also reviewed and the impact on cellular phenotypes and leukocyte function of non extracorporeal treatments and extracorporeal blood purification therapies proposed for sepsis was analyzed. A large number of alterations in the expression of distinct neutrophil and monocyte surface markers have been reported in septic patients. The most consistent alteration seen in septic neutrophils is their activation of a survival program that resists apoptotic death. Reduced expression of HLA-DR is a characteristic finding on septic monocytes but monocyte antimicrobial function does not appear to be significantly altered in sepsis. Regarding adaptive immunity, sepsis-induced apoptosis leads to lymphopenia in patients with septic shock and it involves all types of T cells (CD4, CD8 and Natural Killer) except T regulatory cells, thus favoring immunosuppression. Finally, numerous promising therapies targeting the host immune response to sepsis are under investigation. These potential treatments can have an effect on the number of immune cells, the proportion of cell subtypes and the cell function. PMID:26529661

  14. Substance use in the perinatal period

    PubMed Central

    Forray, Ariadna; Foster, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal substance use remains a major public health problem and is associated with a number of deleterious maternal and fetal effects. Polysubstance use in pregnancy is common, and can potentiate adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Tobacco is the most commonly used substance in pregnancy, followed by alcohol and illicit substances. The treatments for perinatal substance use are limited and consist mostly of behavioral and psychosocial interventions. Of these contingency management has shown the most efficacy. More recently, novel interventions such as progesterone for postpartum cocaine use have shown promise. The purpose of this review is to examine the recent literature on the use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and opioids in the perinatal period, their effects on maternal and fetal health and current treatments. PMID:26386836

  15. Fetal and perinatal consequences of maternal obesity.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Chakrapani; Renfrew, Mary; McGuire, William

    2011-09-01

    In many industrialised countries, one in five women booking for antenatal care is obese. As well as affecting maternal health, maternal obesity may have important adverse consequences for fetal, neonatal and long-term health and well-being. Maternal obesity is associated with a higher risk of stillbirth, elective preterm birth and perinatal mortality. The incidence of severe birth defects, particularly neural tube and structural cardiac defects, appears to be higher in infants of obese mothers. Fetal macrosomia associated with maternal obesity and gestational diabetes predisposes infants to birth injuries, perinatal asphyxia and transitional problems such as neonatal respiratory distress and metabolic instability. Maternal obesity may also result in long-term health problems for offspring secondary to perinatal problems and to intrauterine and postnatal programming effects. Currently, the available interventions to prevent and treat maternal obesity are of limited proven utility and further research is needed to define the effects of maternal weight management interventions on fetal and neonatal outcomes.

  16. Neuromuscular Dysfunction in Experimental Sepsis and Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Çankayalı, İlkin; Boyacılar, Özden; Demirağ, Kubilay; Uyar, Mehmet; Moral, Ali Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrophysiological studies show that critical illness polyneuromyopathy appears in the early stage of sepsis before the manifestation of clinical findings. The metabolic response observed during sepsis causes glutamine to become a relative essential amino acid. Aims: We aimed to assess the changes in neuromuscular transmission in the early stage of sepsis after glutamine supplementation. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups. Rats in both groups were given normal feeding for one week. In the study group, 1 g/kg/day glutamine was added to normal feeding by feeding tube for one week. Cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) surgery was performed at the end of one week. Before and 24 hours after CLP, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle. Results: Latency measurements before and 24 hours after CLP were 0.68±0.05 ms and 0.80±0.09 ms in the control group and 0.69±0.07 ms and 0.73±0.07 ms in the study group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Since enteral glutamine prevented compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) latency prolongation in the early phase of sepsis, it was concluded that enteral glutamine replacement might be promising in the prevention of neuromuscular dysfunction in sepsis; however, further studies are required. PMID:27308070

  17. Perinatal Care for Women Who Are Addicted: Implications for Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    This article explores societal responses to perinatal drug abuse, including stigmatic attitudes and behaviors of health care workers. Empowering strategies are suggested by which social workers and clients can potentially redefine perinatal drug abuse as a health problem rather than a legal issue and improve the environment in which perinatal care…

  18. Sepsis leads to thyroid impairment and dysfunction in rat model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xingsheng; Shi, Songjing; Shi, Songchang

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis was a systemic response to a local infection. Apoptosis was observed in the experimental sepsis. In this study, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis was established in rats. We found that sepsis decreased thyroid hormone levels, including triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), free T3 (fT3), and free T4 (fT4). Besides, we detected the increasing expression level of Caspase-3 and increasing ratio of TUNEL positive cells in the thyroid after sepsis. Furthermore, a series of pathological ultrastructural changes were observed in thyroid follicular epithelial cells by CLP-induced sepsis. This study established a sepsis animal model and provided the cellular and molecular basis for decoding the pathological mechanism in thyroid with the occurrence of sepsis.

  19. Genetics and genomics: impact on perinatal nursing.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Judith A

    2011-01-01

    In 1953, Watson and Crick first described the structure of the DNA molecule, an event that led to a new understanding of the nature of heredity. Just 50 years later, a conference was held in Bethesda, Maryland to announce the completion of the sequencing of the human genome. The era of genomic healthcare has begun, and it has profound implications for nursing education, nursing practice, and nursing research. This article will highlight some important areas in perinatal and neonatal nursing that have been affected by genetics and genomics, as well as some emerging areas of research that will be relevant to perinatal and neonatal nursing.

  20. Sepsis Induces Telomere Shortening: a Potential Mechanism Responsible for Delayed Pathophysiological Events in Sepsis Survivors?

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Naara Mendes; Rios, Ester CS; de Lima, Thais Martins; Victorino, Vanessa Jacob; Barbeiro, Hermes; da Silva, Fabiano Pinheiro; Szabo, Csaba; Soriano, Francisco Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis survivors suffer from additional morbidities, including higher risk of readmissions, nervous system disturbances and cognitive dysfunction, and increased mortality, even several years after the initial episode of sepsis. In many ways, the phenotype of sepsis survivors resembles the phenotype associated with accelerated aging. Since telomere shortening is a hallmark of aging, we investigated whether sepsis also leads to telomere shortening. Male balb/c mice were divided into two groups: the control group received 100 μl of normal saline intraperitoneally (i.p.) and the sepsis group received 15 mg/kg of bacterial lipopolysaccharide i.p. After 48 h, animals were euthanized to collect blood, spleen and kidney. The human component of our study utilized blood samples obtained from patients in the trauma department and samples collected 7 d later in those patients who developed sepsis. Telomere length was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Since oxidative stress is a known inducer of telomere shortening, thiobarbituric acid–reactive substances and superoxide dismutase activity were analyzed to evaluate oxidative stress burden. Induction of endotoxemia in mice resulted in significant telomere shortening in spleen and kidney. Blood cells from patients who progressed to sepsis also exhibited a statistically significant reduction of telomere length. Endotoxemia in mice also induced an early-onset increase in oxidative stress markers but was not associated with a downregulation of telomerase protein expression. We conclude that endotoxemia and sepsis induce telomere shortening in various tissues and hypothesize that this may contribute to the pathogenesis of the delayed pathophysiological events in sepsis survivors. PMID:27925632

  1. Neonatal sepsis caused by Shewanella algae: A case report.

    PubMed

    Charles, Marie Victor Pravin; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of mortality among neonates, especially in developing countries. Most cases of neonatal sepsis are attributed to Escherichia coli and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Shewanella algae (S. algae) is a gram-negative saprophytic bacillus, commonly associated with the marine environment, which has been isolated from humans. Early onset neonatal sepsis caused by S. algae is uncommon. We report a case of S. algae blood stream infection in a newborn with early onset neonatal sepsis.

  2. Current concept of abdominal sepsis: WSES position paper

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although sepsis is a systemic process, the pathophysiological cascade of events may vary from region to region. Abdominal sepsis represents the host’s systemic inflammatory response to bacterial peritonitis. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates, and is the second most common cause of sepsis-related mortality in the intensive care unit. The review focuses on sepsis in the specific setting of severe peritonitis. PMID:24674057

  3. Nociceptin system as a target in sepsis?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Róisín; Stover, Cordula; Lambert, David G; Thompson, Jonathan P

    2014-10-01

    The nociceptin system comprises the nociceptin receptor (NOP) and the ligand nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) that binds to the receptor. The archetypal role of the system is in pain processing but the NOP receptor is also expressed on immune cells. Activation of the NOP receptor is known to modulate inflammatory responses, such as mast-cell degranulation, neutrophil rolling, vasodilation, increased vascular permeability, adhesion molecule regulation and leucocyte recruitment. As there is a loss of regulation of inflammatory responses during sepsis, the nociceptin system could be a target for therapies aimed at modulating sepsis. This review details the known effects of NOP activation on leucocytes and the vascular endothelium and discusses the most recent human and animal data on the role of the nociceptin system in sepsis.

  4. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Galley, H F

    2011-07-01

    Sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit (ICU), despite advances in healthcare and science. Marked oxidative stress as a result of the inflammatory responses inherent with sepsis initiates changes in mitochondrial function which may result in organ damage. Normally, a complex system of interacting antioxidant defences is able to combat oxidative stress and prevents damage to mitochondria. Despite the accepted role that oxidative stress-mediated injury plays in the development of organ failure, there is still little conclusive evidence of any beneficial effect of systemic antioxidant supplementation in patients with sepsis and organ dysfunction. It has been suggested, however, that antioxidant therapy delivered specifically to mitochondria may be useful.

  5. An Evidence Based Approach to Sepsis: Educational Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for recognizing and treating sepsis have been available for decades, yet healthcare providers do not adhere to the recommendations. Sepsis can progress rapidly if not recognized early. Literature reports reveal that sepsis is the leading cause of death in non-cardiac intensive care units (ICUs), and it is one of the most…

  6. The Use of Fluids in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Audrey A; Sherwin, Nomi K; Taylor, Robinson D

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to severe infection causing significant morbidity and mortality that costs the health care system $20.3 billion annually within the United States. It is well established that fluid resuscitation is a central component of sepsis management; however, to date there is no consensus as to the ideal composition of fluid used for resuscitation. In this review, we discuss the progression of clinical research comparing various fluids, as well as the historical background behind fluid selection for volume resuscitation. We conclude that the use of balanced fluids, such as Ringer’s Lactate, seems very promising but further research is needed to confirm their role. PMID:27081589

  7. Empyema following intra-abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, K C; Sethia, B; Reece, I J; Davidson, K G

    1984-09-01

    Over the past 9 years, ten patients have presented to the Thoracic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, with 12 empyemas secondary to intra-abdominal sepsis. In eight patients, the presenting signs and symptoms were wrongly attributed to primary intra-thoracic pathology. All were subsequently found to have intra-abdominal sepsis. The presence of empyema after recent abdominal surgery or abdominal pain strongly suggests a diagnosis of ipsilateral subphrenic abscess. Adequate surgical drainage is essential. In our experience, limited thoracotomy with subdiaphragmatic extension offers the best access to both pleural and subphrenic spaces and provides the greatest chance of eradicating infection on both sides of the diaphragm.

  8. Sepsis and septic shock: a review.

    PubMed

    Chong, Josebelo; Dumont, Tiffany; Francis-Frank, Lyndave; Balaan, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are a continuum of disease resulting from a complex host response to infection. They are major health issues in the United States, causing significant financial burden to the health care system in addition to multisystem morbidity and high rates of mortality. In recent decades, landmark trials in sepsis management have demonstrated improved mortality. Although the value of protocol-driven care is currently under question, it is clear that early recognition, prompt resuscitation, and timely use of antibiotics are of utmost importance.

  9. Fluid Resuscitation in Sepsis: Reexamining the Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Tirupakuzhi Vijayaraghavan, Bharath Kumar; Cove, Matthew Edward

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis results in widespread inflammatory responses altering homeostasis. Associated circulatory abnormalities (peripheral vasodilation, intravascular volume depletion, increased cellular metabolism, and myocardial depression) lead to an imbalance between oxygen delivery and demand, triggering end organ injury and failure. Fluid resuscitation is a key part of treatment, but there is little agreement on choice, amount, and end points for fluid resuscitation. Over the past few years, the safety of some fluid preparations has been questioned. Our paper highlights current concerns, reviews the science behind current practices, and aims to clarify some of the controversies surrounding fluid resuscitation in sepsis. PMID:25180196

  10. Sepsis Resuscitation in Resource-Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Meier, Brian; Staton, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    Our evolving understanding of the physiologic processes that lead to sepsis has led to updated consensus guidelines outlining priorities in the recognition and treatment of septic patients. However, an enormous question remains when considering how to best implement these guidelines in settings with limited resources, which include rural US emergency departments and low- and middle-income countries. The core principles of sepsis management should be a priority in community emergency departments. Similarly, cost-effective interventions are key priorities in low- and middle-income countries; however, consideration must be given to the unique challenges associated with such settings.

  11. Incidence and mortality of sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock in intensive care unit patients with candidemia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kevin; Schorr, Christa; Reboli, Annette C; Zanotti, Sergio; Tsigrelis, Constantine

    2015-08-01

    In this incidence study, of 16 074 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) from 1/1/2003 to 7/31/2011, 161 cases of candidemia were identified. The incidence of sepsis (27%), severe sepsis (31%), and septic shock (40%) was remarkably high in these cases of candidemia, as was the all-cause in-hospital mortality for sepsis (30%), severe sepsis (44%), and septic shock (65%).

  12. DRINKING WATER ARSENIC AND PERINATAL OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking Water Arsenic and Perinatal Outcomes
    DT Lobdell, Z Ning, RK Kwok, JL Mumford, ZY Liu, P Mendola

    Many studies have documented an association between drinking water arsenic (DWA) and cancer, vascular diseases, and dermatological outcomes, but few have investigate...

  13. Is there an association between female circumcision and perinatal death?

    PubMed Central

    Essen, Birgitta; Bodker, Birgit; Sjoberg, N-O; Gudmundsson, Saemundur; Ostergren, P-O; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In Sweden, a country with high standards of obstetric care, the high rate of perinatal mortality among children of immigrant women from the Horn of Africa raises the question of whether there is an association between female circumcision and perinatal death. METHOD: To investigate this, we examined a cohort of 63 perinatal deaths of infants born in Sweden over the period 1990-96 to circumcised women. FINDINGS: We found no evidence that female circumcision was related to perinatal death. Obstructed or prolonged labour, caused by scar tissue from circumcision, was not found to have any impact on the number of perinatal deaths. CONCLUSION: The results do not support previous conclusions that genital circumcision is related to perinatal death, regardless of other circumstances, and suggest that other, suboptimal factors contribute to perinatal death among circumcised migrant women. PMID:12219153

  14. Experiences with perinatal loss from the health professionals' perspective.

    PubMed

    Pastor Montero, Sonia María; Romero Sánchez, José Manuel; Hueso Montoro, César; Lillo Crespo, Manuel; Vacas Jaén, Ana Gema; Rodríguez Tirado, María Belén

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to know the experience of health professionals in situations of perinatal death and grief and to describe their action strategies in the management of perinatal loss. A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach was carried out through interviews conducted with 19 professionals. Three thematic categories were identified: Healthcare practice, feelings aroused by perinatal loss and meaning and beliefs about perinatal loss and grief. The results revealed that the lack of knowledge and skills to deal with perinatal loss are identified as the main reason behind unsuitable attitudes that are usually adopted in these situations. This generates anxiety, helplessness and frustration that compromise professional competency. The conclusion reached is that the promotion of training programs to acquire knowledge, skills and abilities in management of perinatal bereavement and the development of a clinical practice guideline for perinatal loss are necessary.

  15. Identification of quantitative trait loci for popping traits and kernel characteristics in sorghum grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Popped grain sorghum has developed a niche among specialty snack-food consumers. In contrast to popcorn, sorghum has not benefited from persistent selective breeding for popping efficiency and kernel expansion ratio. While recent studies have already demonstrated that popping characteristics are h...

  16. Deciding Where to Attend: Priming of Pop-Out Drives Target Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brascamp, Jan W.; Blake, Randolph; Kristjansson, Arni

    2011-01-01

    With attention and eye-movements humans orient to targets of interest. This orienting occurs faster when the same target repeats: priming of pop-out (PoP). While reaction times (RTs) can be important, PoP's real function could be to steer "where" to orient, a possibility underexposed in many current paradigms, as these predesignate a target to…

  17. Characterization of Xylella fastidiosa popP gene required for pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) possesses a two component regulatory system (TCS) popP-popQ which differentially regulates genes in response to environmental stimuli. To elucidate the role of popP in Pierce’s disease (PD) of grapes, a site-directed deletion method and chromosome-based genetic complementatio...

  18. 78 FR 38584 - Safety Zone; San Diego Symphony Summer POPS Fireworks 2013 Season, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego Symphony Summer POPS Fireworks... Symphony Summer POPS Fireworks 2013 season. This safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of the... San Diego Symphony Summer POPS, which will include a fireworks presentation from a barge in San...

  19. 75 FR 38412 - Safety Zone; San Diego POPS Fireworks, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego POPS Fireworks, San Diego, CA... zone on the ] navigable waters of San Diego Bay in support of the San Diego POPS Fireworks. This safety... San Diego POPS Fireworks, which will include fireworks presentations conducted from a barge in...

  20. Huntington II Simulation Program - POP. Student Workbook, Teacher's Guide, and Resource Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Ludwig; Friedland, James

    Described is the population growth computer model "POP." This program is designed to allow a student with little mathematical background to explore various simple mathematical models of population growth. Student exercises revolve around the growth of a gypsy-moth population. Three variations of population modeling are included in POP: POP 1,…

  1. Elucidating the role of genomics in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Kirpalani, Haresh; Cotten, Charles Michael

    2015-12-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in vulnerable preterm populations. Immature immune defenses, and environmental and maternal factors contribute to this risk, with as many as a third of very preterm infants experiencing sepsis during their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Epidemiologic and twin studies have suggested that there is a genetic contribution to sepsis predilection. Several investigators have conducted candidate gene association studies on variants of specific interest and potential functional significance in neonatal sepsis. In this review, we describe details of studies that have evaluated genetic susceptibility in neonatal sepsis, and summarize findings from a review of candidate gene association studies.

  2. Plugging into Pop at the Junior High Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Dick

    1979-01-01

    Describes a junior high music program in Ridgewood, New Jersey, which capitalizes on student interest in popular music through courses in rock music history, pop music choral concerts, and facilities offering modern music production and performance equipment. This article is part of a theme issue on popular music. (SJL)

  3. Cool Giant Atlases in the CRIRES-POP Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, C.; Lebzelter, T.; Crires-Pop Team

    2015-08-01

    The CRIRES-POP project will provide a public database of high resolution, high signal/noise near-infrared spectra of stars spanning the HR diagram. A relevant part of this library for the AGB community will be high quality reference spectra of several cool evolved giants.

  4. Some Professors Pop Pills for an Intellectual Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Professors know that some of their students pop Ritalin and other stimulants to give themselves a mental edge, but an informal survey suggests that some faculty members are also taking drugs for the express purpose of helping their careers. In an online survey of 1,400 readers published this month, the journal "Nature" found that 20 percent had…

  5. Structure for Storing Properties of Particles (PoP)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N. R.; Mattoon, C. M.; Beck, B. R.; Summers, N. C.; Brown, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Some evaluated nuclear databases are critical for applications such as nuclear energy, nuclear medicine, homeland security, and stockpile stewardship. Particle masses, nuclear excitation levels, and other “Properties of Particles” are essential for making evaluated nuclear databases. Currently, these properties are obtained from various databases that are stored in outdated formats. Moreover, the “Properties of Particles” (PoP) structure is being designed that will allow storing all information for one or more particles in a single place, so that each evaluation, simulation, model calculation, etc. can link to the same data. Information provided in PoP will include properties of nuclei, gammas and electrons (along with other particles such as pions, as evaluations extend to higher energies). Presently, PoP includes masses from the Atomic Mass Evaluation version 2003 (AME2003), and level schemes and gamma decays from the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL-3). The data are stored in a hierarchical structure. An example of how PoP stores nuclear masses and energy levels will be presented here.

  6. Structure for Storing Properties of Particles (PoP)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Beck, B.R.; Summers, N.C.; Brown, D.A.

    2014-06-15

    Evaluated nuclear databases are critical for applications such as nuclear energy, nuclear medicine, homeland security, and stockpile stewardship. Particle masses, nuclear excitation levels, and other “Properties of Particles” are essential for making evaluated nuclear databases. Currently, these properties are obtained from various databases that are stored in outdated formats. A “Properties of Particles” (PoP) structure is being designed that will allow storing all information for one or more particles in a single place, so that each evaluation, simulation, model calculation, etc. can link to the same data. Information provided in PoP will include properties of nuclei, gammas and electrons (along with other particles such as pions, as evaluations extend to higher energies). Presently, PoP includes masses from the Atomic Mass Evaluation version 2003 (AME2003), and level schemes and gamma decays from the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL-3). The data are stored in a hierarchical structure. An example of how PoP stores nuclear masses and energy levels will be presented here.

  7. Avengers Assemble! Using Pop-Culture Icons to Communicate Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, E. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Engaging communication of complex scientific concepts with the general public requires more than simplification. Compelling, relevant, and timely points of linkage between scientific concepts and the experiences and interests of the general public are needed. Pop-culture icons such as superheroes can represent excellent opportunities for exploring…

  8. Popping the Kernel Modeling the States of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitt, Austin; White, Orvil; Hanson, Debbie

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses how to use popcorn to engage students in model building and to teach them about the nature of matter. Popping kernels is a simple and effective method to connect the concepts of heat, motion, and volume with the different phases of matter. Before proceeding with the activity the class should discuss the nature of scientific…

  9. Global Epidemiology of Pediatric Severe Sepsis: The Sepsis Prevalence, Outcomes, and Therapies Study

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Scott L.; Pappachan, John; Wheeler, Derek; Jaramillo-Bustamante, Juan C.; Salloo, Asma; Singhi, Sunit C.; Erickson, Simon; Roy, Jason A.; Bush, Jenny L.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Thomas, Neal J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Limited data exist about the international burden of severe sepsis in critically ill children. Objectives: To characterize the global prevalence, therapies, and outcomes of severe sepsis in pediatric intensive care units to better inform interventional trials. Methods: A point prevalence study was conducted on 5 days throughout 2013–2014 at 128 sites in 26 countries. Patients younger than 18 years of age with severe sepsis as defined by consensus criteria were included. Outcomes were severe sepsis point prevalence, therapies used, new or progressive multiorgan dysfunction, ventilator- and vasoactive-free days at Day 28, functional status, and mortality. Measurements and Main Results: Of 6,925 patients screened, 569 had severe sepsis (prevalence, 8.2%; 95% confidence interval, 7.6–8.9%). The patients’ median age was 3.0 (interquartile range [IQR], 0.7–11.0) years. The most frequent sites of infection were respiratory (40%) and bloodstream (19%). Common therapies included mechanical ventilation (74% of patients), vasoactive infusions (55%), and corticosteroids (45%). Hospital mortality was 25% and did not differ by age or between developed and resource-limited countries. Median ventilator-free days were 16 (IQR, 0–25), and vasoactive-free days were 23 (IQR, 12–28). Sixty-seven percent of patients had multiorgan dysfunction at sepsis recognition, with 30% subsequently developing new or progressive multiorgan dysfunction. Among survivors, 17% developed at least moderate disability. Sample sizes needed to detect a 5–10% absolute risk reduction in outcomes within interventional trials are estimated between 165 and 1,437 patients per group. Conclusions: Pediatric severe sepsis remains a burdensome public health problem, with prevalence, morbidity, and mortality rates similar to those reported in critically ill adult populations. International clinical trials targeting children with severe sepsis are warranted. PMID:25734408

  10. [Innate immunity, Toll receptor and sepsis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    2003-01-01

    The innate immune response is the first line of defense against infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize bacterial lipopolysaccharide and other pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Intracellular signals initiated by interaction between Toll receptors and specific PAMPs results in inflammatory response. Sepsis and septic shock are the result of an exaggerated inflammatory systemic response induced by innate immune dysregulation.

  11. [Pharmaconutrition with parenteral selenium in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Langlois, P L; de Oliveira Figliolino, L F; Hardy, G; Manzanares, W

    2014-04-01

    Critical illness is characterized by oxidative stress which leads to multiple organ failure, and sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit. Over the last 2 decades, different antioxidant therapies have been developed to improve outcomes in septic patients. According to recent evidence, selenium therapy should be considered the cornerstone of the antioxidant strategies. Selenium given as selenious acid or sodium selenite should be considered as a drug or pharmaconutrient with prooxidant and cytotoxic effects when a loading dose in intravenous bolus form is administered, particularly in the early stage of severe sepsis/septic shock. To date, several phase ii trials have demonstrated that selenium therapy may be able to decrease mortality, improve organ dysfunction and reduce infections in critically ill septic patients. The effect of selenium therapy in sepsis syndrome must be confirmed by large, well designed phase iii clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to discuss current evidence on selenium pharmaconutrition in sepsis syndrome.

  12. Pathogenesis of Multiple Organ Failure in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a severe critical illness syndrome that arises from infectious insults. While the host immune system is generally beneficial, an overshooting and unregulated immune response can cause serious organ tissue injury. During sepsis, systemic hypotension, disturbed perfusion of the microcirculation, and direct tissue-toxicity caused by inflammatory immune reaction can occur and contribute to organ failure. The failure of two or more vital organ systems is termed multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and resembles a very critical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality. Importantly, no specific treatment strategy exists to efficiently prevent the development of MODS during sepsis. In this review, we aim to identify the relevant molecular immunological pathways involved in the pathogenesis of MODS during sepsis. We believe that a detailed understanding of this mechanism is necessary for the development of new treatment approaches for septic patients. In particular, knowledge of the endogenous regulators keeping the balance between necessary immune system activation to combat infections and prevention of host tissue damage would greatly improve the chances for the development of effective interventions.

  13. Translational research and biomarkers in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Speeckaert, Marijn M

    2015-12-07

    As neonatal sepsis is a severe condition, there is a call for reliable biomarkers to differentiate between infected and noninfected newborns. Although blood culture has been considered as the gold standard, this analysis is still too slow and limited by false negative results. Use of CRP is hampered by a physiological 3-day increase, resulting in a low sensitivity to detect sepsis at an early stage. A moderate diagnostic accuracy of other acute phase proteins has been demonstrated (serum amyloid A, procalcitonin, lipopolysaccharide binding protein, mannose binding lectin and hepcidin). In neonatal sepsis, changed chemokine/cytokine levels are observed before those of acute phase reactants. High IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α concentrations are detected in infected infants. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor has been used to identify bacteremia, whereas low plasma RANTES concentrations are characteristic for septicemia. Several cell adhesion molecules contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis. As an upregulated CD64 expression on granulocytes is found within 1-6h after bacterial invasion, serial CD64 measurements could guide antibiotic therapy. An increased CD11b/CD18 density can improve the diagnosis, and a positive correlation between CD11b and the severity of systemic inflammation has been reported. An early increase in sCD14-ST presepsin is also observed during sepsis, whereas high sTREM-1 values in early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) have been associated with mortality. Biomarkers resulting from proteomics are also promising. A 4-biomarker 'mass restricted' score has been validated as diagnostic for intra-amniotic infection and/or inflammation. S100A8 in amniotic fluid is a strong predictor of an increased incidence of EOS. Proteomic analysis of cord blood has revealed altered protein expression patterns. The ApoSAA score is useful for identifying sepsis and could guide prescription of antibiotics. (1)H-NMR and GC-MS metabolomics allow to diagnose septic shock, which is

  14. Regulation of Cellular Immune Responses in Sepsis by Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Carson, W F; Kunkel, S L

    2017-01-01

    Severe sepsis, septic shock, and related inflammatory syndromes are driven by the aberrant expression of proinflammatory mediators by immune cells. During the acute phase of sepsis, overexpression of chemokines and cytokines drives physiological stress leading to organ failure and mortality. Following recovery from sepsis, the immune system exhibits profound immunosuppression, evidenced by an inability to produce the same proinflammatory mediators that are required for normal responses to infectious microorganisms. Gene expression in inflammatory responses is influenced by the transcriptional accessibility of the chromatin, with histone posttranslational modifications determining whether inflammatory gene loci are set to transcriptionally active, repressed, or poised states. Experimental evidence indicates that histone modifications play a central role in governing the cytokine storm of severe sepsis, and that aberrant chromatin modifications induced during the acute phase of sepsis may mediate chronic immunosuppression in sepsis survivors. This review will focus on the role of histone modifications in governing immune responses in severe sepsis, with an emphasis on specific leukocyte subsets and the histone modifications observed in these cells during chronic stages of sepsis. Additionally, the expression and function of chromatin-modifying enzymes (CMEs) will be discussed in the context of severe sepsis, as potential mediators of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in sepsis responses. In summary, this review will argue for the use of chromatin modifications and CME expression in leukocytes as potential biomarkers of immunosuppression in patients with severe sepsis.

  15. Clinical analysis of cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, S J; Tang, X S; Zhao, W L; Qiu, H X; Wang, H; Feng, Z C

    2016-06-17

    With the advent of antibiotic resistance, pathogenic bacteria have become a major threat in cases of neonatal sepsis; however, guidelines for treatment have not yet been standardized. In this study, 15 cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis from our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, nine cases showed early-onset and six cases showed late-onset sepsis. Pathogens were characterized by genotyping and antibiotic sensitivity tests on blood cultures. Results demonstrated that in cases with early-onset sepsis, clinical manifestations affected mainly the respiratory tract, while late-onset sepsis was accompanied by intracranial infection. Therefore, we suggest including a cerebrospinal fluid examination when diagnosing neonatal sepsis. Bacterial genotyping indicated the bacteria were mainly type Ib, Ia, and III S. agalactiae. We recommend treatment with penicillin or ampicillin, since bacteria were resistant to clindamycin and tetracycline. In conclusion, our results provide valuable information for the clinical treatment of S. agalactiae sepsis in neonatal infants.

  16. Redox therapy in neonatal sepsis: reasons, targets, strategy, and agents.

    PubMed

    Bajčetić, Milica; Spasić, Snežana; Spasojević, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal sepsis is one of the most fulminating conditions in neonatal intensive care units. Antipathogen and supportive care are administered routinely, but do not deliver satisfactory results. In addition, the efforts to treat neonatal sepsis with anti-inflammatory agents have generally shown to be futile. The accumulating data imply that intracellular redox changes intertwined into neonatal sepsis redox cycle represent the main cause of dysfunction of mitochondria and cells in neonatal sepsis. Our aim here is to support the new philosophy in neonatal sepsis treatment, which involves the integration of mechanisms that are responsible for cellular dysfunction and organ failure, the recognition of the most important targets, and the selection of safe agents that can stop the neonatal sepsis redox cycle by hitting the hot spots. Redox-active agents that could be beneficial for neonatal sepsis treatment according to these criteria include lactoferrin, interleukin 10, zinc and selenium supplements, ibuprofen, edaravone, and pentoxifylline.

  17. Recognizing and managing severe sepsis: a common and deadly threat.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, Douglas; McCollam, Jill Shwed

    2007-06-01

    Through a literature review, the epidemiology and pathophysiology, including alterations in inflammation, coagulation, and impaired fibrinolysis that occur in the course of severe sepsis, is presented. Treatment guidelines that are evidence-based and endorsed by 11 professional societies representing multispecialty groups are described. Severe sepsis is common; 750,000 cases are estimated to occur annually in the United States. The mortality rate for severe sepsis still ranges from 30 to 50%, and is as high as 80 to 90% for septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction. Severe sepsis exists along a continuum initiated by a localized infection that triggers a systemic response. A cascade of inflammation and activation of the coagulation system associated with impaired fibrinolysis leads to alterations in microvascular circulation associated with organ dysfunction, severe sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and death. In an attempt to improve care and reduce mortality, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign and The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) have created two sepsis treatment bundles.

  18. Identifying Patients With Sepsis on the Hospital Wards.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Poushali; Edelson, Dana P; Churpek, Matthew M

    2017-04-01

    Sepsis contributes to up to half of all deaths in hospitalized patients, and early interventions, such as appropriate antibiotics, have been shown to improve outcomes. Most research has focused on early identification and treatment of patients with sepsis in the ED and the ICU; however, many patients acquire sepsis on the general wards. The goal of this review is to discuss recent advances in the detection of sepsis in patients on the hospital wards. We discuss data highlighting the benefits and limitations of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria for screening patients with sepsis, such as its low specificity, as well as newly described scoring systems, including the proposed role of the quick sepsis-related organ failure assessment (qSOFA) score. Challenges specific to detecting sepsis on the wards are discussed, and future directions that use big data approaches and automated alert systems are highlighted.

  19. Mechanisms, detection, and potential management of microcirculatory disturbances in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Imran; Nonas, Stephanie A

    2010-04-01

    Despite improvements in resuscitation and treatment of sepsis, the morbidity and mortality remain unacceptably high. Microvascular dysfunction has been shown to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of sepsis and is a potential new target in the management of sepsis. Clinical studies, aided by new techniques that allow for real-time assessment of the microcirculation, have shown that disturbances in microcirculatory flow are common in sepsis and correlate with worse outcomes. Bedside measurement of microcirculatory perfusion has become simpler and more accessible, and may provide key insights into prognosis in sepsis and guide future therapeutics, much like mean arterial pressure (MAP), lactate, and mixed central oxygen saturation (SvO(2)) do now. The authors review here the role of microcirculatory dysfunction in sepsis and its potential role as a therapeutic target in sepsis.

  20. The Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3)

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Mervyn; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Seymour, Christopher Warren; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Annane, Djillali; Bauer, Michael; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Bernard, Gordon R.; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Levy, Mitchell M.; Marshall, John C.; Martin, Greg S.; Opal, Steven M.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; van der Poll, Tom; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Angus, Derek C.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Definitions of sepsis and septic shock were last revised in 2001. Considerable advances have since been made into the pathobiology (changes in organ function, morphology, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and circulation), management, and epidemiology of sepsis, suggesting the need for reexamination. OBJECTIVE To evaluate and, as needed, update definitions for sepsis and septic shock. PROCESS A task force (n = 19) with expertise in sepsis pathobiology, clinical trials, and epidemiology was convened by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. Definitions and clinical criteria were generated through meetings, Delphi processes, analysis of electronic health record databases, and voting, followed by circulation to international professional societies, requesting peer review and endorsement (by 31 societies listed in the Acknowledgment). KEY FINDINGS FROMEVIDENCE SYNTHESIS Limitations of previous definitions included an excessive focus on inflammation, the misleading model that sepsis follows a continuum through severe sepsis to shock, and inadequate specificity and sensitivity of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria. Multiple definitions and terminologies are currently in use for sepsis, septic shock, and organ dysfunction, leading to discrepancies in reported incidence and observed mortality. The task force concluded the term severe sepsis was redundant. RECOMMENDATIONS Sepsis should be defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. For clinical operationalization, organ dysfunction can be represented by an increase in the Sequential [Sepsis-related] Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of 2 points or more, which is associated with an in-hospital mortality greater than 10%. Septic shock should be defined as a subset of sepsis in which particularly profound circulatory, cellular, and metabolic abnormalities are associated with a

  1. Prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease--revised guidelines from CDC, 2010.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McGee, Lesley; Schrag, Stephanie J

    2010-11-19

    Despite substantial progress in prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal (GBS) disease since the 1990s, GBS remains the leading cause of early-onset neonatal sepsis in the United States. In 1996, CDC, in collaboration with relevant professional societies, published guidelines for the prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease (CDC. Prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease: a public health perspective. MMWR 1996;45[No. RR-7]); those guidelines were updated and republished in 2002 (CDC. Prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease: revised guidelines from CDC. MMWR 2002;51[No. RR-11]). In June 2009, a meeting of clinical and public health representatives was held to reevaluate prevention strategies on the basis of data collected after the issuance of the 2002 guidelines. This report presents CDC's updated guidelines, which have been endorsed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Nurse-Midwives, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the American Society for Microbiology. The recommendations were made on the basis of available evidence when such evidence was sufficient and on expert opinion when available evidence was insufficient. The key changes in the 2010 guidelines include the following: • expanded recommendations on laboratory methods for the identification of GBS, • clarification of the colony-count threshold required for reporting GBS detected in the urine of pregnant women, • updated algorithms for GBS screening and intrapartum chemoprophylaxis for women with preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of membranes, • a change in the recommended dose of penicillin-G for chemoprophylaxis, • updated prophylaxis regimens for women with penicillin allergy, and • a revised algorithm for management of newborns with respect to risk for early-onset GBS disease. Universal screening at 35-37 weeks' gestation for maternal GBS

  2. Plasma soluble Tim-3 emerges as an inhibitor in sepsis: sepsis contrary to membrane Tim-3 on monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ren, F; Li, J; Jiang, X; Xiao, K; Zhang, D; Zhao, Z; Ai, J; Hou, C; Jia, Y; Han, G; Xie, L

    2015-11-01

    Immune dysfunction is the main characteristic of sepsis. T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) on the monocytes has been reported to promote immune homeostasis during sepsis, but the influences of plasm soluble Tim-3 (sTim-3) on the immune system during sepsis remain unknown. Here, 100 patients with different severities of sepsis (40 sepsis, 42 severe sepsis, and 18 septic shock) were enrolled in this study. The Tim-3 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) on the circulating monocytes were detected using flow cytometry. Plasma sTim-3 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Inflammatory factors and two kinds of A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) - ADAM10 and ADAM17 were assessed. The Tim-3 and HLA-DR on the monocytes decreased with increasing sepsis severity. The sTim-3 was reduced in the sepsis and severe sepsis patients but was elevated in the septic shock patients who exhibited significant immunosuppression as predicted by HLA-DR. sTim-3 levels were negatively correlated with IL-12 and TNF-α. ADAM10 and ADAM17, sheddases of Tim-3, exhibited trends toward elevations in the septic shock group. In conclusion, sTim-3 was involved in the development of sepsis. The homeostasis-promoting role of the Tim-3 on the monocytes was disrupted, while the inhibitory role of sTim-3 emerged during sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

  3. Alterations of T helper lymphocyte subpopulations in sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Li, Ming; Su, Longxiang; Wang, Huijuan; Xiao, Kun; Deng, Jie; Jia, Yanhong; Han, Gencheng; Xie, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Circulating lymphocyte number was significantly decreased in patients with sepsis. However, it remains unknown which severity phase (sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock) does it develop and what happen on each subpopulation. Eight patients with differing severities of sepsis (31 sepses, 33 severe sepses, and 16 septic shocks) were enrolled. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of Th1, Th2, and Th17; regulatory T (Treg) cell-specific transcription factor T-bet; GATA-3; RORgammat (RORγt); forkhead box P3 (FOXP3); and IL-17 mRNA were performed, and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect serum interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-4, and IL-10. In this study, the Th1, Th2, Treg transcription factors, and related cytokines IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 levels of sepsis and severe sepsis patients in peripheral blood were significantly higher than those of the normal controls. Except for IL-17, the T-bet, GATA-3, and IFN-γ levels of septic shock patients were lower than those of sepsis patients. We also observed that the proportions of Th17/Treg in the sepsis and septic shock groups were inversed. From the above, the inflammatory response especially the adaptive immune response is still activated in sepsis and severe sepsis, but significant immunosuppression was developed in septic shock. In addition, the proportion of Th17/Treg inversed may be associated with the illness aggravation of patients with sepsis.

  4. Autonomy and advocacy in perinatal nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Anne H

    2008-05-01

    Advocacy has been positioned as an ideal within the practice of nursing, with national guidelines and professional standards obliging nurses to respect patients' autonomous choices and to act as their advocates. However, the meaning of advocacy and autonomy is not well defined or understood, leading to uncertainty regarding what is required, expected and feasible for nurses in clinical practice. In this article, a feminist ethics perspective is used to examine how moral responsibilities are enacted in the perinatal nurse-patient relationship and to explore the interaction between the various threads that influence, and are in turn affected by, this relationship. This perspective allows for consideration of contextual and relational factors that impact on the way perinatal nursing care is given and received, and provides a framework for exploring the ways in which patient autonomy, advocacy and choice are experienced by childbearing women and their nurses during labour and birth.

  5. Nicotine Dependence Measures for Perinatal Women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Irene; Hall, Lynne A

    2016-03-02

    This integrative review provides an overview of nicotine dependence measures used with perinatal women and an evaluation of their psychometric properties. Fifty-five articles that met inclusion and exclusion criteria were identified from five different databases. Most of the studies used the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND). Other approaches included diagnostic tests, the Wisconsin Inventory of Smoking Dependence Motives (WISDM), the Tobacco Dependence Screener, and single-item measures. This review indicated that the FTND may not be the best option for measuring nicotine dependence in this population. The WISDM is a newer instrument that has excellent psychometric properties and captures nonnicotinic dimensions of nicotine dependence relevant to women. Future research is needed to assess its reliability in the perinatal population. Other recommendations from this review include the use of biomarker validation, thorough psychometric reporting on nicotine dependence instruments, and the use of multiple instruments to maximize comparability between nicotine dependence instruments.

  6. Perinatal Risk Factors for Mild Motor Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands, Beth; Kendall, Garth; Larkin, Dawne; Parker, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of mild motor disability (MMD) is a complex issue and as yet is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of perinatal risk factors in a cohort of 10-year-old boys and girls with (n = 362) and without (n = 1193) MMD. Among the males with MMD there was a higher prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage,…

  7. Highly improved perinatal states in Japan.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kazuo

    2014-08-01

    To report on improved perinatal states in Japan, governmental and United Nations Children's Fund reports were analyzed. Initial maternal mortality, which was 409.8 in 1899, decreased to 4.1 in 2010, with a reduction rate of 409.8/4.1 (102.4) in 111 years: 2.5 in the initial 50 years in home delivery and 39.3 in the later 60 years in hospital births. The difference between 2.5 versus 39.3 was attributed to the medicine and medical care provided in hospital births. The total reduction of neonatal mortality was 77.9/1.1 (70.8), and the rate in the initial 50 versus later 60 years was 2.8/25. Also, there was a big difference after introduction of extensive neonatal care. Virtual perinatal mortality after 22 weeks was estimated to be 428 in 1000 births in 1900 (i.e. those infants born at 22-28 weeks were unlikely to survive at that time), while the perinatal mortality was reported to be 22 weeks or more in 1979 (i.e. premature babies born at ≥22 weeks survived in 1979 because of the improved neonatal care). Actually, 60% of premature infants of 400-500 g survived in the neonatal intensive care unit. In a recent report, 36% of infants born at 22 weeks survived to 3 years. Although there were neurodevelopmental impairments, outcomes were improved. In conclusion, perinatal states have remarkably improved in Japan.

  8. Perinatal mortality attributable to complications of childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Kusiako, T.; Ronsmans, C.; Van der Paal, L.

    2000-01-01

    Very few population-based studies of perinatal mortality in developing countries have examined the role of intrapartum risk factors. In the present study, the proportion of perinatal deaths that are attributable to complications during childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh, was assessed using community-based data from a home-based programme led by professional midwives between 1987 and 1993. Complications during labour and delivery--such as prolonged or obstructed labour, abnormal fetal position, and hypertensive diseases of pregnancy--increased the risk of perinatal mortality fivefold and accounted for 30% of perinatal deaths. Premature labour, which occurred in 20% of pregnancies, accounted for 27% of perinatal mortality. Better care by qualified staff during delivery and improved care of newborns should substantially reduce perinatal mortality in this study population. PMID:10859856

  9. Blood Biomarkers for Evaluation of Perinatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Ernest M.; Burd, Irina; Everett, Allen D.; Northington, Frances J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products, and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the “liquid brain biopsy.” A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:27468268

  10. Action plan to reduce perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Bhakoo, O N; Kumar, R

    1990-01-01

    The government of India has set a goal of reducing perinatal mortality from its current rate of 48/1000 to 30-35/1000 by the year 2000. Perinatal deaths result from maternal malnutrition, inadequate prenatal care, complications of delivery, and infections in the postpartum period. Since reductions in perinatal mortality require attention to social, economic, and behavioral factors, as well as improvements in the health care delivery system, a comprehensive strategy is required. Social measures, such as raising the age at marriage to 18 years for females, improving the nutritional status of adolescent girls, reducing the strenuousness of work during pregnancy, improving female literacy, raising women's status in the society and thus in the family, and poverty alleviation programs, would all help eliminate the extent of complications of pregnancy. Measures required to enhance infant survival include improved prenatal care, prenatal tetanus toxoid immunization, use of sterile disposable cord care kits, the provision of mucus extractors and resuscitation materials to birth attendants, the creation of neonatal care units in health facilities, and more efficient referral of high-risk newborns and mothers. Since 90% of births in rural India take place at home priority must be given to training traditional birth attendants in the identification of high risk factors during pregnancy, delivery, and the newborn period.

  11. Incarceration, maternal hardship, and perinatal health behaviors.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Dora M; Wildeman, Christopher; Lee, Hedwig; Gjelsvik, Annie; Valera, Pamela; Clarke, Jennifer G

    2014-11-01

    Parental incarceration is associated with mental and physical health problems in children, yet little research directly tests mechanisms through which parental incarceration could imperil child health. We hypothesized that the incarceration of a woman or her romantic partner in the year before birth constituted an additional hardship for already-disadvantaged women, and that these additionally vulnerable women were less likely to engage in positive perinatal health behaviors important to infant and early childhood development. We analyzed 2006-2010 data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System to assess the association between incarceration in the year prior to the birth of a child and perinatal maternal hardships and behaviors. Women reporting incarceration of themselves or their partners in the year before birth of a child had .86 the odds (95 % CI .78-.95) of beginning prenatal care in the first trimester compared to women not reporting incarceration. They were nearly twice as likely to report partner abuse and were significantly more likely to rely on WIC and/or Medicaid for assistance during pregnancy. These associations persist after controlling for socioeconomic measures and other stressors, including homelessness and job loss. Incarceration of a woman or her partner in the year before birth is associated with higher odds of maternal hardship and poorer perinatal health behaviors. The unprecedented scale of incarceration in the US simultaneously presents an underutilized public health opportunity and constitutes a social determinant of health that may contribute to disparities in early childhood development.

  12. Neoplasms in young dogs after perinatal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, S.A.; Lee, A.C.; Angleton, G.M.; Saunders, W.J.; Miller, G.K.; Williams, J.S.; Brewster, R.D.; Long, R.I.

    1986-08-01

    For a study of the life-time effects of irradiation during development, 1,680 beagles were given single, whole-body exposures to /sup 60/Co gamma-radiation at one of three prenatal (preimplantation, embryonic, and fetal) or at one of three postnatal (neonatal, juvenile, and young adult) ages. Mean doses were 0, 0.16, or 0.83 Gy. For comparison with data on childhood cancer after prenatal irradiation, examination was made of tumors occurring in young dogs in this life-span experiment. Up to 4 years of age, 18 dogs had neoplasms diagnosed, 2 of these being in controls. Four dogs that were irradiated in the perinatal (late fetal or neonatal) period died of cancers prior to 2 years of age. This risk was of significant increase compared to the risks for other experimental groups and for the canine population in general. Overall, 71% (5 of 7) of all cancers and 56% (10 of 18) of all benign and malignant neoplasms seen in the first 4 years of life occurred in 29% (480 of 1680) of the dogs irradiated in the perinatal period. These data suggest an increased risk for neoplasia after perinatal irradiation in dogs.

  13. Untreated perinatal paternal depression: Effects on offspring.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Salvatore; Fusco, Maria Luigia

    2017-03-02

    Transition to parenthood represents an important life event which increases vulnerability to psychological disorders. Aim of this article is to analyze all studies which investigated the effects of untreated perinatal paternal depression in offspring. We searched pertinent, peer-reviewed articles published in English (January 1980 to April 2016) on MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Science.gov. Twenty-three studies met the inclusion criteria. Most of the reviewed studies suffer from methodological limitations, including the small sample, the lack of a structured psychiatric diagnosis, and inclusion bias. Despite such limitations, paternal depression seems to be associated with an increased risk of developmental and behavioural problems and even psychiatric disorders in offspring. In particular, in infants and toddlers such problems vary from increased crying to hyperactivity and conduct problems to psychological and developmental impairment, and poor social outcomes. School-age children of depressed fathers have a doubled risk for suffering from specific psychiatric disorders. Hence, facilitating access to vigorous and evidence based treatments is a public health opportunity for improving the quality of life of depressed parents and their children. Evidences emerging from this review actually suggest that the traditional gender-focused approach to perinatal mood disorders should be completed by a family-centred approach, in order to improve the effectiveness of perinatal mental health programs.

  14. A concept analysis of optimality in perinatal health.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Holly Powell

    2006-01-01

    This analysis was conducted to describe the concept of optimality and its appropriateness for perinatal health care. The concept was identified in 24 scientific disciplines. Across all disciplines, the universal definition of optimality is the robust, efficient, and cost-effective achievement of best possible outcomes within a rule-governed framework. Optimality, specifically defined for perinatal health care, is the maximal perinatal outcome with minimal intervention placed against the context of the woman's social, medical, and obstetric history.

  15. The Glyoxalase System and Methylglyoxal-Derived Carbonyl Stress in Sepsis: Glycotoxic Aspects of Sepsis Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Schmoch, Thomas; Uhle, Florian; Siegler, Benedikt H.; Fleming, Thomas; Morgenstern, Jakob; Nawroth, Peter P.; Weigand, Markus A.; Brenner, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis remains one of the leading causes of death in intensive care units. Although sepsis is caused by a viral, fungal or bacterial infection, it is the dysregulated generalized host response that ultimately leads to severe dysfunction of multiple organs and death. The concomitant profound metabolic changes are characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and profound transformations of the intracellular energy supply in both peripheral and immune cells. A further hallmark of the early phases of sepsis is a massive formation of reactive oxygen (ROS; e.g., superoxide) as well as nitrogen (RNS; e.g., nitric oxide) species. Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) form a third crucial group of highly reactive metabolites, which until today have been not the focus of interest in sepsis. However, we previously showed in a prospective observational clinical trial that patients suffering from septic shock are characterized by significant methylglyoxal (MG)-derived carbonyl stress, with the glyoxalase system being downregulated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In this review, we give a detailed insight into the current state of research regarding the metabolic changes that entail an increased MG-production in septicemia. Thus, we point out the special role of the glyoxalase system in the context of sepsis. PMID:28304355

  16. Sepsis management: An evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Baig, Muhammad Akbar; Shahzad, Hira; Jamil, Bushra; Hussain, Erfan

    2016-03-01

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines have outlined an early goal directed therapy (EGDT) which demonstrates a standardized approach to ensure prompt and effective management of sepsis. Having said that, there are barriers associated with the application of evidence-based practice, which often lead to an overall poorer adherence to guidelines. Considering the global burden of disease, data from low- to middle-income countries is scarce. Asia is the largest continent but most Asian countries do not have a well-developed healthcare system and compliance rates to resuscitation and management bundles are as low as 7.6% and 3.5%, respectively. Intensive care units are not adequately equipped and financial concerns limit implementation of expensive treatment strategies. Healthcare policy-makers should be notified in order to alleviate financial restrictions and ensure delivery of standard care to septic patients.

  17. Aeromonas hydrophila Sepsis Mimicking Vibrio vulnificus Infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Young; Nam, Hyun Min; Park, Kun; Park, Seok Don

    2011-09-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a facultatively anaerobic, asporogenous gram-negative rod that has often been regarded as an opportunistic pathogen in hosts with impairment of a local or general defense mechanism. A 68-year-old alcoholic woman presented with shock and gangrene on the right arm. At first, her clinical presentations were severe painful erythematous swelling that worsened within a few hours with development of gangrene, edema, and blisters. Bullous fluid and blood cultures yielded A. hydrophila. Histopathological findings of sections obtained from the vesicle revealed subepidermal vesicles; necrosis of the epidermis, papillary dermis, and subcutaneous fat; and massive hemorrhage in the subcutis. Despite all efforts to save the patient, she died 8 hours after admission. Clinical features of A. hydrophila sepsis resemble those of Vibrio vulnificus sepsis. Therefore, in addition to the case report, we compared the cultural, biochemical, and morphological differences between A. hydrophila and V. vulnificus for facilitation of early and accurate identification of the causative agent.

  18. Risk assessment in neonatal early onset sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sagori; Puopolo, Karen M

    2012-12-01

    The incidence of neonatal early onset sepsis has declined with the widespread use of intrapartum antibiotic therapies, yet early onset sepsis remains a potentially fatal condition, particularly among very low birth-weight infants. Clinical signs of neonatal infection are nonspecific and may be absent in the immediate postnatal period. Maternal and infant clinical characteristics, as well as infant laboratory values, have been used to identify newborns at risk and to administer empiric antibiotic therapy to prevent progression to more severe illness. Such approaches result in the evaluation of approximately 15% of asymptomatic term and late preterm infants and of nearly all preterm infants. The development of multivariate predictive models may provide more accurate methods of identifying newborns at highest risk and allow for more limited newborn antibiotic exposures.

  19. Carbon monoxide in the treatment of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nakahira, Kiichi; Choi, Augustine M K

    2015-12-15

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a low-molecular-weight gas, is endogenously produced in the body as a product of heme degradation catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes. As the beneficial roles of HO system have been elucidated in vitro and in vivo, CO itself has also been reported as a potent cytoprotective molecule. Whereas CO represents a toxic inhalation hazard at high concentration, low-dose exogenous CO treatment (~250-500 parts per million) demonstrates protective functions including but not limited to the anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects in preclinical models of human diseases. Of note, CO exposure confers protection in animal models of sepsis by inhibiting inflammatory responses and also enhancing bacterial phagocytosis in leukocytes. These unique functions of CO including both dampening inflammation and promoting host defense mechanism are mediated by multiple pathways such as autophagy induction or biosynthesis of specialized proresolving lipid mediators. We suggest that CO gas may represent a novel therapy for patients with sepsis.

  20. Leaching behavior of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in shredder residues.

    PubMed

    Sakai, S; Urano, S; Takatsuki, H

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that some kinds of waste contain persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as PCDD/DFs and PCBs. Leaching behaviors of these chemicals, however, have not been focused so much because of their low leachability. On the other hand, shredder residues originated from automobiles and electric appliances consist mainly of plastics, such as PVC, which contain additives including DEHP. In this study, contents analyses and leaching tests with and without surfactant-like substances for shredder residues were conducted. As a result, shredder residues from automobile and electric appliance contained PCBs in ppm level and a quantity of PCDD/DFs. Surfactant-like substances increase the leaching concentration of POPs. DEHP also leached out considerably even though using distilled water.

  1. The Parenteral Vitamin C Improves Sepsis and Sepsis-Induced Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome via Preventing Cellular Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yan-Fen

    2017-01-01

    Cellular immunosuppression appears to be involved in sepsis and sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Recent evidence showed that parenteral vitamin C (Vit C) had the ability to attenuate sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS. Herein, we investigated the impact of parenteral Vit C on cellular immunosuppression and the therapeutic value in sepsis. Using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), sepsis was induced in WT and Gulo−/− mice followed with 200 mg/Kg parenteral Vit C administration. The immunologic functions of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD4+CD25− T cells, as well as the organ functions, were determined. Administration of parenteral Vit C per se markedly improved the outcome of sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS of WT and Gulo−/− mice. The negative immunoregulation of Tregs was inhibited, mainly including inhibiting the expression of forkhead helix transcription factor- (Foxp-) 3, cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen- (CTLA-) 4, membrane associated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-βm+), and the secretion of inhibitory cytokines [including TGF-β and interleukin- (IL-) 10], as well as CD4+ T cells-mediated cellular immunosuppression which was improved by parenteral Vit C in WT and Gulo−/− septic mice. These results suggested that parenteral Vit C has the ability to improve the outcome of sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS and is associated with improvement in cellular immunosuppression. PMID:28210072

  2. The Parenteral Vitamin C Improves Sepsis and Sepsis-Induced Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome via Preventing Cellular Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Lei; Lu, Bin; Zhai, Jian-Hua; Liu, Yan-Cun; Qi, Hai-Xia; Yao, Ying; Chai, Yan-Fen; Shou, Song-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Cellular immunosuppression appears to be involved in sepsis and sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Recent evidence showed that parenteral vitamin C (Vit C) had the ability to attenuate sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS. Herein, we investigated the impact of parenteral Vit C on cellular immunosuppression and the therapeutic value in sepsis. Using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), sepsis was induced in WT and Gulo(-/-) mice followed with 200 mg/Kg parenteral Vit C administration. The immunologic functions of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, as well as the organ functions, were determined. Administration of parenteral Vit C per se markedly improved the outcome of sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS of WT and Gulo(-/-) mice. The negative immunoregulation of Tregs was inhibited, mainly including inhibiting the expression of forkhead helix transcription factor- (Foxp-) 3, cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen- (CTLA-) 4, membrane associated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β(m+)), and the secretion of inhibitory cytokines [including TGF-β and interleukin- (IL-) 10], as well as CD4(+) T cells-mediated cellular immunosuppression which was improved by parenteral Vit C in WT and Gulo(-/-) septic mice. These results suggested that parenteral Vit C has the ability to improve the outcome of sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS and is associated with improvement in cellular immunosuppression.

  3. Acknowledged Dependence and the Virtues of Perinatal Hospice

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal screening can lead to the detection and diagnosis of significantly life-limiting conditions affecting the unborn child. Recognizing the difficulties facing parents who decide to continue the pregnancy, some have proposed perinatal hospice as a new modality of care. Although the medical literature has begun to devote significant attention to these practices, systematic philosophical reflection on perinatal hospice has been relatively limited. Drawing on Alasdair MacIntyre’s account of the virtues of acknowledged dependence, I contend that perinatal hospice manifests and facilitates virtues essential to living well with human dependency and vulnerability. For this reason, perinatal hospice deserves broad support within society. PMID:26661051

  4. Dual role of astrocytes in perinatal asphyxia injury and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Romero, J; Muñiz, J; Logica Tornatore, T; Holubiec, M; González, J; Barreto, G E; Guelman, L; Lillig, C H; Blanco, E; Capani, F

    2014-04-17

    Perinatal asphyxia represents an important cause of severe neurological deficits including delayed mental and motor development, epilepsy, major cognitive deficits and blindness. However, at the moment, most of the therapeutic strategies were not well targeted toward the processes that induced the brain injury during perinatal asphyxia. Traditionally, experimental research focused on neurons, whereas astrocytes have been more related with the damage mechanisms of perinatal asphyxia. In this work, we propose to review possible protective as well as deleterious roles of astrocytes in the asphyctic brain with the aim to stimulate further research in this area of perinatal asphyxia still not well studied.

  5. Acknowledged Dependence and the Virtues of Perinatal Hospice.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Aaron D

    2016-02-01

    Prenatal screening can lead to the detection and diagnosis of significantly life-limiting conditions affecting the unborn child. Recognizing the difficulties facing parents who decide to continue the pregnancy, some have proposed perinatal hospice as a new modality of care. Although the medical literature has begun to devote significant attention to these practices, systematic philosophical reflection on perinatal hospice has been relatively limited. Drawing on Alasdair MacIntyre's account of the virtues of acknowledged dependence, I contend that perinatal hospice manifests and facilitates virtues essential to living well with human dependency and vulnerability. For this reason, perinatal hospice deserves broad support within society.

  6. New uses of legacy systems: examples in perinatal care.

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, A.; Vázquez, R.; Mendoza, G.; Zignago, A.; López, A.; Lucián, H.

    1999-01-01

    In this article, new uses of the Perinatal Information System at the Uruguayan Social Security health care facilities are described. The perinatal information system has been in place for over 13 years, with about 40 thousand clinical records on electronic files. A newly created Web interface allows a distributed access to existing perinatal information within the National Social Security Wide Area a Network. Perinatal data is also exported to a management information system, allowing to dynamically answer questions and make managerial decisions, and eventually link these data with other sources. Future steps regarding clinical information systems are outlined. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10566481

  7. The protein C pathway and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Della Valle, Patrizia; Pavani, Giulia; D'Angelo, Armando

    2012-03-01

    After the discovery of the key components of the protein C (PC) pathway a beneficial effect on survival of the infusion of activated protein C (APC) in animal models of sepsis was demonstrated, leading to the development of recombinant human activated protein C (rh-APC) as a therapeutic agent. It soon became clear that rather than the anticoagulant and profibrinolytic activities of APC, its anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties played a major role in the treatment of patients with severe sepsis. Such properties affect the response to inflammation of endothelial cells and leukocytes and are exerted through binding of APC to at least five receptors with intracellular signaling. The main APC protective mechanism involves binding of the Gla-domain to the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) and cleavage of protease activated receptor 1 (PAR-1), eliciting suppression of proinflammatory cytokines synthesis and of intracellular proapoptotic pathways and activation of endothelial barrier properties. However, thrombin cleaves PAR-1 with much higher catalytic efficiency, followed by pro-inflammatory, pro-apoptotic and barrier disruptive intracellular signaling, and it is unclear how APC can exert a protective activity through the cleavage of PAR-1 when thrombin is also present in the same environment. Interestingly, in endothelial cell cultures, PAR-1 cleavage by thrombin results in anti-inflammatory and barrier protective signaling provided occupation of EPCR by the PC gla-domain, raising the possibility that the beneficial effects of rh-APC might be recapitulated in vivo by administration of h-PC zymogen to patients with severe sepsis. Recent reports of h-PC infusion in animal models of sepsis support this hypothesis.

  8. Diabetes and Perinatal Mortality in Twin Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhong-Cheng; Zhao, Yan-Jun; Ouyang, Fengxiu; Yang, Zu-Jing; Guo, Yu-Na; Zhang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes in pregnancy has been associated with a paradoxically reduced risk of neonatal death in twin pregnancies. Risk “shift” may be a concern in that the reduction in neonatal deaths may be due to an increase in fetal deaths (stillbirths). This study aimed to clarify the impact of diabetes on the risk of perinatal death (neonatal death plus stillbirth) in twin pregnancies. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of twin births using the largest available dataset on twin births (the U.S. matched multiple birth data 1995-2000; 19,676 neonates from diabetic pregnancies, 541,481 from non-diabetic pregnancies). Cox proportional hazard models were applied to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) of perinatal death accounting for twin cluster-level dependence. Results Comparing diabetic versus non-diabetic twin pregnancies, overall perinatal mortality rate was counterintuitively lower [2.1% versus 3.3%, aHR 0.70 (95% confidence intervals 0.63-0.78)]. Individually, both stillbirth and neonatal mortality rates were lower in diabetic pregnancies, but we identified significant differences by gestational age and birth weight. Diabetes was associated with a survival benefit in pregnancies completed before 32 weeks [aHR 0.55 (0.48-0.63)] or with birth weight <1500 g [aHR 0.61 (0.53-0.69)]. In contrast, diabetes was associated with an elevated risk of perinatal death in pregnancies delivered between 32 and 36 weeks [aHR 1.38 (1.10-1.72)] or with birth weight >=2500 g [aHR 2.20 (1.55-3.13)]. Conclusions Diabetes in pregnancy appears to be “protective” against perinatal death in twin pregnancies ending in very preterm or very low birth weight births. Prospective studies are required to clarify whether these patterns of risk are real, or they are artifacts of unmeasured confounders. Additional data correlating these outcomes with the types of diabetes in pregnancy are also needed to distinguish the effects of pre-gestational vs. gestational diabetes

  9. Levels and Trends of Historic POPs (PCDD/Fs and PCBs) and Newer POPs (PBDEs) in U.S. Meat and Poultry and Implications for Human Exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentrations of several historic POPs, i.e. polychlorinated dibenzo p dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and polychlorinated biphenyls, along with a newer class of POPs, the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), were measured in domestic meat and poultry samples from 2002 and 2008. The ...

  10. A Study of Sepsis in Surgical Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hnatko, S. I.; Macdonald, G. R.; Rodin, A. E.

    1963-01-01

    Published records of the frequency of wound sepsis are often unreliable sources of information on the general frequency of this complication because of unstandardized methods of reporting and because of the various views of different investigators as to what constitutes sepsis. A method of infection reporting, its study and analysis are outlined. A survey of postoperative infections by this method for the years 1959, 1960 and 1961 revealed infection rates of 2.02%, 1.20% and 1.14%, respectively. For the same period the percentages of wound infections caused by Staph. aureus were 83.06%, 69.8% and 51.8%, respectively. The most prevalent phage types were 55/53/54 and 52/80/81/82, although types 80/81/82 and 80 were also involved. Infections with Gram-negative organisms were encountered more often in 1961 than in 1959. The majority of these were of mixed type, and followed abdominal surgery. There is need for more comprehensive study and analysis of postoperative wound sepsis and its complications. It was apparent from this study that, statistically, a relatively low rate of postoperative infections may mask a high rate following a specific surgical procedure. PMID:13954844

  11. Coagulation in patients with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel; Poll, Tom van der

    2015-02-01

    In the majority of patients with severe sepsis, systemic activation of coagulation is present. Increasing evidence points to an extensive cross-talk between coagulation and inflammation that may play an important role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Inflammation not only leads to activation of coagulation, but coagulation also considerably affects inflammatory activity. Molecular pathways that contribute to inflammation-induced activation of coagulation have been precisely identified. Proinflammatory cytokines and other mediators are capable of activating the coagulation system and downregulating important physiological anticoagulant pathways. Activation of the coagulation system and ensuing thrombin generation is dependent on expression of tissue factor on activated mononuclear cells and endothelial cells, and is insufficiently counteracted by TFPI. Simultaneously, endothelial-bound anticoagulant mechanism, in particular the protein C system, is shutoff by proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, fibrin removal is severely inhibited, because of inactivation of the fibrinolytic system, caused by an upregulation of its main inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). Increased fibrin formation and impaired removal lead to (micro)vascular thrombosis, which may result in tissue ischemia and subsequent organ damage. The cornerstone of the management of coagulation in sepsis is the specific and vigorous treatment of the underlying disorder. Strategies aimed at the inhibition of coagulation activation may theoretically be justified and have been found beneficial in experimental and initial clinical studies. Heparin may be an effective anticoagulant approach and alternative strategies comprise restoration of physiological anticoagulant pathways.

  12. Ethyl pyruvate: a novel treatment for sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fink, Mitchell P

    2007-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate (EP), a simple aliphatic ester derived from pyruvic acid, improves survival and ameliorates organ system dysfunction in mice with peritonitis induced by caecal ligation and perforation, even when treatment is started as late as 12-24 hours after the onset of sepsis. In studies using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophage like cells, EP inhibits activation of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NF-kappaB, and down regulates secretion of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF). In this reductionist in vitro system, EP also blocks secretion of the late-appearing pro inflammatory cytokine-like molecule, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In murine models of endotoxaemia or sepsis, treatment with EP decreases circulating levels of TNF and HMGB1. While the molecular events responsible for the salutary effects of EP remain to be elucidated, one mechanism may involve covalent modification of a critical thiol residue in the p65 component of NF-kappaB. EP warrants evaluation as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of sepsis in humans.

  13. Particularities regarding the etiology of sepsis in forensic services.

    PubMed

    Dermengiu, Dan; Curca, George Cristian; Ceausu, Mihai; Hostiuc, Sorin

    2013-09-01

    If in clinical practice definitive diagnostic criteria had been established, after death sepsis is often difficult to diagnose, especially if a site of origin is not found or if no clinical data are available. This article will analyze the etiology of sepsis in a medical-legal service with emphasis on the differences in diagnosing it in clinical and forensic environments. A total of 78 cases of sepsis cases diagnosed or confirmed at the autopsy were selected. The etiological agent was determined either during the hospitalization or by postmortem bacteriology. A high prevalence of Gram-negative sepsis was found, especially multidrug-resistant micro-organisms. Most frequent etiological agents were Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas, and Klebsiella. Polymicrobial sepsis is much more frequent than in nonforensic cases. In legal medicine, the prevalence of Gram-negative sepsis is much higher than in nonforensic autopsies, and the point of origin is shifted toward the skin and the gastrointestinal system.

  14. Sepsis-induced immune dysfunction: can immune therapies reduce mortality?

    PubMed Central

    Delano, Matthew J.; Ward, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response induced by an infection, leading to organ dysfunction and mortality. Historically, sepsis-induced organ dysfunction and lethality were attributed to the interplay between inflammatory and antiinflammatory responses. With advances in intensive care management and goal-directed interventions, early sepsis mortality has diminished, only to surge later after “recovery” from acute events, prompting a search for sepsis-induced alterations in immune function. Sepsis is well known to alter innate and adaptive immune responses for sustained periods after clinical “recovery,” with immunosuppression being a prominent example of such alterations. Recent studies have centered on immune-modulatory therapy. These efforts are focused on defining and reversing the persistent immune cell dysfunction that is associated with mortality long after the acute events of sepsis have resolved. PMID:26727230

  15. Incidence and Prognosis of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Gretchen L.; Morris, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the mortality rate among patients with sepsis is declining, the incidence of both sepsis and sepsis-related deaths is increasing, likely due to its presence in a growing elderly population. As atrial fibrillation is more common in the elderly, we hypothesize that its presence will be associated with greater mortality among patients with sepsis. Methods The Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) database of a large tertiary care medical center was queried for sepsis-related codes and atrial fibrillation. Results Atrial fibrillation was associated with older age and a higher mortality in this series of patients with sepsis. Conclusions Whether atrial fibrillation is a marker of disease severity or contributes to mortality is uncertain. Further studies are necessary to determine optimal management.

  16. Apoptosis and caspases regulate death and inflammation in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Richard S; Nicholson, Donald W

    2006-11-01

    Although the prevailing concept has been that mortality in sepsis results from an unbridled hyper-inflammatory cytokine-mediated response, the failure of more than 30 clinical trials to treat sepsis by controlling this cytokine response requires a 'rethink' of the molecular mechanism underpinning the development of sepsis. As we discuss here, remarkable new studies indicate that most deaths from sepsis are actually the result of a substantially impaired immune response that is due to extensive death of immune effector cells. Rectification of this apoptotic-inflammatory imbalance using modulators of caspases and other components of the cell-death pathway have shown striking efficacy in stringent animal models of sepsis, indicating an entirely novel path forward for the clinical treatment of human sepsis.

  17. Single versus successive pop-in modes in nanoindentation tests of single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yuzhi; Gao, Yanfei; Pharr, George M.; Bei, Hongbin

    2016-05-24

    From recent nanoindentation experiments, two types of pop-in modes have been identified: a single pop-in with a large displacement excursion, or a number of pop-ins with comparable and small displacement excursions. Theoretical analyses are developed here to study the roles played by indenter tip radius, pre-existing defect density, heterogeneous nucleation source type, and lattice resistance on the pop-in modes. The evolution of dislocation structures in earlier pop-ins provides input to modeling a stochastic, heterogeneous mechanism that may be responsible for the subsequent pop-ins. It is found that when the first pop-in occurs near theoretical shear stress, the pop-in mode is determined by the lattice resistance and tip radius. When the first pop-in occurs at low shear stress, whether the successive pop-in mode occurs depends on how the heterogeneous dislocation nucleation source density increases as compared to the increase of the total dislocation density. Lastly, the above transitions are found to correlate well with the ratio of indenter tip radius to the mean spacing of dislocation nucleation sources.

  18. Single versus successive pop-in modes in nanoindentation tests of single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Yuzhi; Gao, Yanfei; Pharr, George M.; ...

    2016-05-24

    From recent nanoindentation experiments, two types of pop-in modes have been identified: a single pop-in with a large displacement excursion, or a number of pop-ins with comparable and small displacement excursions. Theoretical analyses are developed here to study the roles played by indenter tip radius, pre-existing defect density, heterogeneous nucleation source type, and lattice resistance on the pop-in modes. The evolution of dislocation structures in earlier pop-ins provides input to modeling a stochastic, heterogeneous mechanism that may be responsible for the subsequent pop-ins. It is found that when the first pop-in occurs near theoretical shear stress, the pop-in mode ismore » determined by the lattice resistance and tip radius. When the first pop-in occurs at low shear stress, whether the successive pop-in mode occurs depends on how the heterogeneous dislocation nucleation source density increases as compared to the increase of the total dislocation density. Lastly, the above transitions are found to correlate well with the ratio of indenter tip radius to the mean spacing of dislocation nucleation sources.« less

  19. Constraining the PopIII IMF with high-z GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Maio, U.; Ciardi, B.; Salvaterra, R.

    2017-04-01

    We study the signatures of enrichment from PopIII stars in observations of PopII GRBs (GRBIIs) at high redshift by using numerical N-body/hydrodynamical simulations including atomic and molecular cooling, star formation and metal spreading from stellar populations with different initial mass functions (IMFs), yields and lifetimes. PopIII and PopII star formation regimes are followed simultaneously and both a top-heavy and a Salpeter-like IMF for pristine PopIII star formation are adopted. We find that the fraction of GRBIIs hosted in a medium previously enriched by PopIII stars (PopIII-dominated) is model-independent. Typical abundance ratios, such as [Si/O] versus[C/O] and [Fe/C] versus[Si/C], can help to disentangle enrichment from massive and intermediate PopIII stars, while low-mass first stars are degenerate with regular PopII generations. The properties of galaxies hosting PopIII-dominated GRBIIs are not very sensitive to the particular assumption on the mass of the first stars.

  20. Avengers Assemble! Using pop-culture icons to communicate science

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Engaging communication of complex scientific concepts with the general public requires more than simplification. Compelling, relevant, and timely points of linkage between scientific concepts and the experiences and interests of the general public are needed. Pop-culture icons such as superheroes can represent excellent opportunities for exploring scientific concepts in a mental “landscape” that is comfortable and familiar. Using an established icon as a familiar frame of reference, complex scientific concepts can then be discussed in a more accessible manner. In this framework, scientists and the general public use the cultural icon to occupy a commonly known performance characteristic. For example, Batman represents a globally recognized icon who represents the ultimate response to exercise and training. The physiology that underlies Batman's abilities can then be discussed and explored using real scientific examples that highlight truths and fallacies contained in the presentation of pop-culture icons. Critically, it is not important whether the popular representation of the icon shows correct science because the real science can be revealed in discussing the character through this lens. Scientists and educators can then use these icons as foils for exploring complex ideas in a context that is less threatening and more comfortable for the target audience. A “middle-ground hypothesis” for science communication is proposed in which pop-culture icons are used to exploring scientific concepts in a bridging mental landscape that is comfortable and familiar. This approach is encouraged for communication with all nonscientists regardless of age. PMID:25039082

  1. Emotional priming of pop-out in visual search.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Dominique; Amunts, Liana; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2008-04-01

    When searching for a discrepant target along a simple dimension such as color or shape, repetition of the target feature substantially speeds search, an effect known as feature priming of pop-out (V. Maljkovic and K. Nakayama, 1994). The authors present the first report of emotional priming of pop-out. Participants had to detect the face displaying a discrepant expression of emotion in an array of four face photographs. On each trial, the target when present was either a neutral face among emotional faces (angry in Experiment 1 or happy in Experiment 2), or an emotional face among neutral faces. Target detection was faster when the target displayed the same emotion on successive trials. This effect occurred for angry and for happy faces, not for neutral faces. It was completely abolished when faces were inverted instead of upright, suggesting that emotional categories rather than physical feature properties drive emotional priming of pop-out. The implications of the present findings for theoretical accounts of intertrial priming and for the face-in-the-crowd phenomenon are discussed.

  2. The pediatric sepsis biomarker risk model: potential implications for sepsis therapy and biology

    PubMed Central

    Alder, Matthew N; Lindsell, Christopher J; Wong, Hector R

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in adult and pediatric intensive care units. Heterogeneity of demographics, comorbidities, biological mechanisms, and severity of illness leads to difficulty in determining which patients are at highest risk of mortality. Determining mortality risk is important for weighing the potential benefits of more aggressive interventions and for deciding whom to enroll in clinical trials. Biomarkers can be used to parse patients into different risk categories and can outperform current methods of patient risk stratification based on physiologic parameters. Here we review the Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model that has also been modified and applied to estimate mortality risk in adult patients. We compare the two models and speculate on the biological implications of the biomarkers in patients with sepsis. PMID:24754535

  3. Inhibition of Intestinal Thiamin Transport in Rat Model of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Sassoon, Catherine S.; Zhu, Ercheng; Fang, Liwei; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Said, Hamid M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thiamin deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with sepsis, but the mechanism by which sepsis induces thiamin deficiency is unknown. This study aimed to determine the influence of various severity of sepsis on carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake, level of expressions of thiamin transporters (thiamin transporter-1 (THTR-1) and thiamin transporter-2 (THTR-2)), and mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate transporter (MTPPT). Design Randomized, controlled study Setting Research laboratory at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center Subjects Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into controls, mild, moderate and severe sepsis with equal number of animals in each group. Measurements and Main Results Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture with the cecum ligated below the cecal valve at 25 %, 50 % and 75 % of cecal length, defined as severe, moderate and mild sepsis, respectively. Control animals underwent laparotomy only. After 2 days of induced sepsis, carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake was measured using [3H]thiamin. Expressions of THTR-1, THTR-2, and MTPPT proteins and mRNA were measured. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were also measured. Sepsis inhibited [3H]thiamin uptake and the inhibition was a function of sepsis severity. Both cell membranes thiamin transporters and MTPPT expression levels were suppressed; also levels of ATP in the intestine of animals with moderate and severe sepsis were significantly lower than that of sham operated controls. Conclusions For the first time we demonstrated that sepsis inhibited carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake as a function of sepsis severity, suppressed thiamin transporters and MTPPT, leading to ATP depletion. PMID:27065466

  4. Experimental treatments for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guilang; Lyu, Juanjuan; Huang, Jingda; Xiang, Dan; Xie, Meiyan; Zeng, Qiyi

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection. Sepsis, which can lead to severe sepsis, septic shock, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, is an important cause of mortality. Pathogenesis is extremely complex. In recent years, cell hypoxia caused by mitochondrial dysfunction has become a hot research field. Sepsis damages the structure and function of mitochondria, conversely, mitochondrial dysfunction aggravated sepsis. The treatment of sepsis lacks effective specific drugs. The aim of this paper is to undertake a narrative review of the current experimental treatment for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis. The search was conducted in PubMed databases and Web of Science databases from 1950 to January 2014. A total of 1,090 references were retrieved by the search, of which 121 researches met all the inclusion criteria were included. Articles on the relationship between sepsis and mitochondria, and drugs used for mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis were reviewed retrospectively. The drugs were divided into four categories: (1) Drug related to mitochondrial matrix and respiratory chain, (2) drugs of mitochondrial antioxidant and free radical scavengers, (3) drugs related to mitochondrial membrane stability, (4) hormone therapy for septic mitochondria. In animal experiments, many drugs show good results. However, clinical research lacks. In future studies, the urgent need is to develop promising drugs in clinical trials. PMID:25983774

  5. TRPV1 and SP: key elements for sepsis outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Bodkin, Jennifer Victoria; Fernandes, Elizabeth Soares

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons play important roles in many disorders, including inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis. Sepsis is a potentially lethal systemic inflammatory reaction to a local bacterial infection, affecting thousands of patients annually. Although associated with a high mortality rate, sepsis outcome depends on the severity of systemic inflammation, which can be directly influenced by several factors, including the immune response of the patient. Currently, there is a lack of effective drugs to treat sepsis, and thus there is a need to develop new drugs to improve sepsis outcome. Several mediators involved in the formation of sepsis have now been identified, but the mechanisms underlying the pathology remain poorly understood. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor and the neuropeptide substance P (SP) have recently been demonstrated as important targets for sepsis and are located on sensory neurones and non-neuronal cells. Herein, we highlight and review the importance of sensory neurones for the modulation of sepsis, with specific focus on recent findings relating to TRPV1 and SP, with their distinct abilities to alter the transition from local to systemic inflammation and also modify the overall sepsis outcome. We also emphasize the protective role of TRPV1 in this context. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Neuropeptides. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-7 PMID:23145480

  6. Mass spectrometry for the discovery of biomarkers of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Katelyn R; Hummon, Amanda B

    2017-03-28

    Sepsis is a serious medical condition that occurs in 30% of patients in intensive care units (ICUs). Early detection of sepsis is key to prevent its progression to severe sepsis and septic shock, which can cause organ failure and death. Diagnostic criteria for sepsis are nonspecific and hinder a timely diagnosis in patients. Therefore, there is currently a large effort to detect biomarkers that can aid physicians in the diagnosis and prognosis of sepsis. Mass spectrometry is often the method of choice to detect metabolomic and proteomic changes that occur during sepsis progression. These "omics" strategies allow for untargeted profiling of thousands of metabolites and proteins from human biological samples obtained from septic patients. Differential expression of or modifications to these metabolites and proteins can provide a more reliable source of diagnostic biomarkers for sepsis. Here, we focus on the current knowledge of biomarkers of sepsis and discuss the various mass spectrometric technologies used in their detection. We consider studies of the metabolome and proteome and summarize information regarding potential biomarkers in both general and neonatal sepsis.

  7. Haemophilus influenzae: a forgotten cause of neonatal sepsis?

    PubMed

    Dobbelaere, A; Jeannin, P; Bovyn, T; Ide, L

    2015-06-01

    Due to the introduction of the conjugate vaccine against serotype b, neonatal sepsis caused by Haemophilus influenzae became very rare. There is little data in Belgium concerning the prevalence of H. influenzae early onset neonatal sepsis and articles about neonatal sepsis and H. influenzae published in the last decade are scarce. We report two invasive infections with a non-typeable H. influenzae. These cases show that neonatal sepsis caused by non-typeable H. influenzae may be underestimated and we believe that there is need for a better registration of this kind of infection.

  8. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Immune Cell Metabolism in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a life threatening condition mediated by systemic infection, but also triggered by hemorrhage and trauma. These are significant causes of organ injury implicated in morbidity and mortality, as well as post-sepsis complications associated with dysfunction of innate and adaptive immunity. The role of cellular bioenergetics and loss of metabolic plasticity of immune cells is increasingly emerging in the pathogenesis of sepsis. This review describes mitochondrial biology and metabolic alterations of immune cells due to sepsis, as well as indicates plausible therapeutic opportunities. PMID:28378540

  9. Incidence of Post-Operative Sepsis and Role of Charlson Co-Morbidity Score for Predicting Postoperative Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan; Mohammadi, Atefeh; Alibakhshi, Abbas; Jalali, Mehdi; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa

    2016-05-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are among mortality causes following major surgeries. The Charlson co-morbidity index consists of 19 weighted categories related to chronic health which measures the burden of co-morbidity. The goal of this study was to determine the incidence of postoperative sepsis in patients underwent gynecological and gastrointestinal cancer surgeries and predictive role of Charlson index for this situation. Two hundred and twenty-two patients who underwent gynecological and gastrointestinal cancer surgeries were evaluated. Sixty-four (28.6%) patients developed SIRS postoperatively. Forty-four (19.7%) patients developed sepsis postoperatively. Mean age, duration of hospitalization and surgery, the Charlson score were significantly higher in patients who developed sepsis than other cases. Blood transfusion and Charlson score were independent predictors of sepsis occurrence. Charlson co-morbidity index is a predictive factor for developing postoperative sepsis.

  10. Orientation search is mediated by distractor suppression: evidence from priming of pop-out.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Dominique; Yashar, Amit; Ruderman, Lital

    2013-04-05

    In search for a singleton target, performance is considerably improved when the target and distractors repeat than when they switch roles, an effect called priming of pop-out or PoP (Maljkovic & Nakayama, 1994). Although this phenomenon has been replicated across a variety of dimensions, orientation PoP has proved to be volatile. Recent research has shown that target activation and distractor inhibition mechanisms underlie PoP (Lamy, Antebi, et al., 2008). Relying on this finding, we show that unlike in color and shape search, only distractor inhibition processes contribute to PoP in orientation search, which resolves the apparent inconstancies in the literature. The implications of this finding for mechanisms underlying PoP and orientation singleton search are discussed.

  11. [Construction of index system for early warning of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) pollution incidents in China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Lü, Yong-Long; He, Gui-Zhen; Wang, Tie-Yu

    2014-10-01

    Early warning of pollution incidents caused by persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is urgently needed for China in the circumstances of serious POPs pollution and in increasing demand for improvement in chemical risk management. Given different categories of POPs and pollution incidents, the index system for early warning of POPs pollution accidents was built based on lifecycle theory and POPs formation mechanisms. It will be helpful for decision makers to enhance the early warning management of POPs pollution incidents in China. The index system for early warning includes two parts, early warning and mechanism for system operation. The indices include risk source indicators, warning indicators and warning level indicators. To ensure the effective implementation of this system, the mechanisms for response and policy guarantee were also formulated. These mechanisms contain dynamic inventory management and periodical assessment of risk sources, timely and effective report of warning conditions, as well as coordination and cooperation among the relevant departments.

  12. Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Assessment and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Misri, Shaila; Abizadeh, Jasmin; Sanders, Shawn; Swift, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Perinatal generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a high prevalence of 8.5%-10.5% during pregnancy and 4.4%-10.8% postpartum. Despite its attendant dysfunction in the patient, this potentially debilitating mental health condition is often underdiagnosed. This overview will provide guidance for clinicians in making timely diagnosis and managing symptoms appropriately. A significant barrier to the diagnosis of GAD in the perinatal population is difficulty in distinguishing normal versus pathological worry. Because a perinatal-specific screening tool for GAD is nonexistent, early identification, diagnosis and treatment is often compromised. The resultant maternal dysfunction can potentially impact mother-infant bonding and influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children. Comorbid occurrence of GAD and major depressive disorder changes the illness course and its treatment outcome. Psychoeducation is a key component in overcoming denial/stigma and facilitating successful intervention. Treatment strategies are contingent upon illness severity. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), relaxation, and mindfulness therapy are indicated for mild GAD. Moderate/severe illness requires pharmacotherapy and CBT, individually or in combination. No psychotropic medications are approved by the FDA or Health Canada in pregnancy or the postpartum; off-label pharmacological treatment is instituted only if the benefit of therapy outweighs its risk. SSRIs/SNRIs are the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders due to data supporting their efficacy and overall favorable side effect profile. Benzodiazepines are an option for short-term treatment. While research on atypical antipsychotics is evolving, some can be considered for severe manifestations where the response to antidepressants or benzodiazepines has been insufficient. A case example will illustrate the onset, clinical course, and treatment strategies of GAD through pregnancy and the postpartum.

  13. Incarceration, Maternal Hardship, and Perinatal Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Dora M.; Wildeman, Christopher; Lee, Hedwig; Gjelsvik, Annie; Valera, Pamela A.; Clarke, Jennifer G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Parental incarceration is associated with mental and physical health problems in children, yet little research directly tests mechanisms through which parental incarceration could imperil child health. We hypothesized that the incarceration of a woman or her romantic partner in the year before birth constituted an additional hardship for already-disadvantaged women, and that these additionally vulnerable women were less likely to engage in positive perinatal health behaviors important to infant and early childhood development. Methods We analyzed 2006-2010 data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS) to assess the association between incarceration in the year prior to the birth of a child and perinatal maternal hardships and behaviors. Results Women reporting incarceration of themselves or their partners in the year before birth of a child had 0.86 the odds (95% CI .78-.95) of beginning prenatal care in the first trimester compared to women not reporting incarceration. They were nearly twice as likely to report partner abuse and were significantly more likely to rely on WIC and/or Medicaid for assistance during pregnancy. These associations persist after controlling for socioeconomic measures and other stressors, including homelessness and job loss. Conclusions Incarceration of a woman or her partner in the year before birth is associated with higher odds of maternal hardship and poorer perinatal health behaviors. The unprecedented scale of incarceration in the U.S. simultaneously presents an underutilized public health opportunity and constitutes a social determinant of health that may contribute to disparities in early childhood development. PMID:24615355

  14. Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Assessment and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abizadeh, Jasmin; Sanders, Shawn; Swift, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Perinatal generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has a high prevalence of 8.5%–10.5% during pregnancy and 4.4%–10.8% postpartum. Despite its attendant dysfunction in the patient, this potentially debilitating mental health condition is often underdiagnosed. This overview will provide guidance for clinicians in making timely diagnosis and managing symptoms appropriately. A significant barrier to the diagnosis of GAD in the perinatal population is difficulty in distinguishing normal versus pathological worry. Because a perinatal-specific screening tool for GAD is nonexistent, early identification, diagnosis and treatment is often compromised. The resultant maternal dysfunction can potentially impact mother–infant bonding and influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children. Comorbid occurrence of GAD and major depressive disorder changes the illness course and its treatment outcome. Psychoeducation is a key component in overcoming denial/stigma and facilitating successful intervention. Treatment strategies are contingent upon illness severity. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), relaxation, and mindfulness therapy are indicated for mild GAD. Moderate/severe illness requires pharmacotherapy and CBT, individually or in combination. No psychotropic medications are approved by the FDA or Health Canada in pregnancy or the postpartum; off-label pharmacological treatment is instituted only if the benefit of therapy outweighs its risk. SSRIs/SNRIs are the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders due to data supporting their efficacy and overall favorable side effect profile. Benzodiazepines are an option for short-term treatment. While research on atypical antipsychotics is evolving, some can be considered for severe manifestations where the response to antidepressants or benzodiazepines has been insufficient. A case example will illustrate the onset, clinical course, and treatment strategies of GAD through pregnancy and the postpartum. PMID:26125602

  15. Asperger Syndrome: Familial and Pre- and Perinatal Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher; Cederlund, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Study familial and pre- and perinatal factors in Asperger Syndrome (AS). Methods: Hundred boys with AS had their records reviewed. "Pathogenetic subgroups" were defined according to presence of medical syndromes/chromosomal abnormalities, indices of familiarity, and pre- and perinatal risk factors predisposing to brain damage. Results:…

  16. Biomagnetism in perinatal medicine. Our experience in Greece.

    PubMed

    Kotini, A; Anastasiadis, A N; Koutlaki, N; Tamiolakis, D; Anninos, P; Anastasiadis, P

    2007-01-01

    This is a report on our experience in the application of biomagnetism in perinatal medicine. We provide a brief description of our research work in fetal magnetoencephalography and fetal magnetocardiography in normal, preeclamptic and IUGR pregnancies, together with hemodynamics of the umbilical cord and uterine arteries, providing a new approach to biomagnetism as a non invasive imaging modality in the investigation of perinatal complications.

  17. Marital Status as a Predictor of Perinatal Outcome in Finland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderbacka, Kristiina; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined association between mother's marital status and perinatal outcome among single births in Finland in 1987 (n=56,595 infants). Found that perinatal deaths, low birthweight, and preterm infants were more common among single mothers than among married mothers. Results for cohabiting mothers were more similar to those of married than to those…

  18. Barriers to and Facilitators of Perinatal Depression Screening.

    PubMed

    Harris, Allyssa L

    Depression is a significant health issue for women of reproductive age. A number of professional organizations have issued guidance regarding perinatal depression screening. However, some health care providers are reluctant to screen women. This column takes a second look at two recent research studies in which investigators examined the barriers to and facilitators of perinatal depression screening.

  19. Community Conversations with Parents to Improve Perinatal Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    The state of Indiana took a unique approach to developing a statewide plan to improve perinatal health outcomes by engaging parents in a series of focus groups, called Community Conversations in Perinatal Care (CCPC), to hear directly from consumers about their health care experiences and needs. Recognizing that disparities exist among different…

  20. Cortical Reorganization of Language Functioning Following Perinatal Left MCA Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Byars, Anna W.; Jacola, Lisa M.; Schapiro, Mark B.; Schmithorst, Vince J.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Holland, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Functional MRI was used to determine differences in patterns of cortical activation between children who suffered perinatal left middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and healthy children performing a silent verb generation task. Methods: Ten children with prior perinatal left MCA stroke (age 6-16 years) and ten healthy age matched…

  1. Modifying CBT for Perinatal Depression: What Do Women Want?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mahen, Heather; Fedock, Gina; Henshaw, Erin; Himle, Joseph A.; Forman, Jane; Flynn, Heather A.

    2012-01-01

    The evidence for the efficacy of CBT for depression during the perinatal period is mixed. This was a qualitative study that aimed to understand the perinatal-specific needs of depressed women in an effort to inform treatment modifications that may increase the relevance and acceptability of CBT during this period. Stratified purposeful sampling…

  2. Vitamin D Deficiency in Human and Murine Sepsis*

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Dhruv; Patel, Jaimin M.; Scott, Aaron; Lax, Sian; Dancer, Rachel C. A.; D’Souza, Vijay; Greenwood, Hannah; Fraser, William D.; Gao, Fang; Sapey, Elizabeth; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated as a pathogenic factor in sepsis and ICU mortality but causality of these associations has not been demonstrated. To determine whether sepsis and severe sepsis are associated with vitamin D deficiency and to determine whether vitamin D deficiency influences the severity of sepsis. Design, Setting, and Patients: Sixty-one patients with sepsis and severe sepsis from two large U.K. hospitals and 20 healthy controls were recruited. Murine models of cecal ligation and puncture and intratracheal lipopolysaccharide were undertaken in normal and vitamin D deficient mice to address the issue of causality. Measurements and Main Results: Patients with severe sepsis had significantly lower concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 than patients with either mild sepsis or age-matched healthy controls (15.7 vs 49.5 vs 66.5 nmol/L; p = 0.0001). 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations were significantly lower in patients who had positive microbiologic culture than those who were culture negative (p = 0.0023) as well as those who died within 30 days of hospital admission (p = 0.025). Vitamin D deficiency in murine sepsis was associated with increased peritoneal (p = 0.037), systemic (p = 0.019), and bronchoalveolar lavage (p = 0.011) quantitative bacterial culture. This was associated with reduced local expression of the cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide as well as evidence of defective macrophage phagocytosis (p = 0.029). In the intratracheal lipopolysaccharide model, 1,500 IU of intraperitoneal cholecalciferol treatment 6 hours postinjury reduced alveolar inflammation, cellular damage, and hypoxia. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is common in severe sepsis. This appears to contribute to the development of the condition in clinically relevant murine models and approaches to correct vitamin D deficiency in patients with sepsis should be developed. PMID:27632669

  3. Preventing Workplace Injuries Among Perinatal Nurses.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Laura; Hurst, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of perinatal nursing put nurses at risk for injuries, including frequent repetitive bending, lifting of clients, and exposure to potentially large amounts of body fluids such as blood and amniotic fluid. Violence is also a potential risk with stressful family situations that may arise around childbirth. Workplace injuries put a health care facility at risk for staff turnover, decreases in the number of skilled nurses, client dissatisfaction, workers' compensation payouts, and employee lawsuits. Through the use of safety equipment, improved safety and violence training programs, "no manual lift" policies, reinforcement of personal protective equipment usage, and diligent staff training to improve awareness, these risks can be minimized.

  4. Perinatal transmission of human papilomavirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Rombaldi, Renato L; Serafini, Eduardo P; Mandelli, Jovana; Zimmermann, Edineia; Losquiavo, Kamille P

    2009-06-21

    The purpose was to study the perinatal transmission of human papillomavirus DNA (HPV-DNA) in 63 mother-newborn pairs, besides looking at the epidemiological factors involved in the viral DNA transmission. The following sampling methods were used: (1) in the pregnant woman, when was recruited, in cervix and clinical lesions of the vagina, vulva and perineal region; (2) in the newborn, (a) buccal, axillary and inguinal regions; (b) nasopharyngeal aspirate, and (c) cord blood; (3) in the children, buccal was repeated in the 4th week and 6th and 12th month of life. HPV-DNA was identified using two methodologies: multiplex PCR (PGMY09 and MY11 primers) and nested-PCR (genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 42, 52 and 58). Perinatal transmission was considered when concordance was found in type-specific HPV between mother/newborn or mother/child. HPV-DNA genital was detected in 49 pregnant women submitted to delivery. Eleven newborns (22.4%, n = 11/49) were HPV-DNA positive. In 8 cases (16.3%, n = 8/49) there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. At the end of the first month of life three children (6.1%, n = 3/49) became HPV-DNA positive, while two remained positive from birth. In 3 cases (100%, n = 3/3) there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. In the 6th month, a child (2%, n = 1/49) had become HPV-DNA positive between the 1st and 6th month of life, and there was type specific HPV concordance of mother/newborn samples. All the HPV-DNA positive children (22.4%, n = 11/49) at birth and at the end first month of life (6.1%, n = 3/49) became HPV-DNA negative at the age of 6 months. The HPV-DNA positive child (2%, n = 1/49) from 1st to the 6th month of life became HPV-DNA negative between the 6th and 12th month of life and one child had anogenital warts. In the twelfth month all (100%, n = 49/49) the children studied were HPV-DNA negative. A positive and significant correlation was observed between perinatal transmission

  5. Presumed Perinatal Stroke: Risk Factors, Clinical and Radiological Findings.

    PubMed

    Ilves, Pilvi; Laugesaar, Rael; Loorits, Dagmar; Kolk, Anneli; Tomberg, Tiiu; Lõo, Silva; Talvik, Inga; Kahre, Tiina; Talvik, Tiina

    2016-04-01

    It is unknown why some infants with perinatal stroke present clinical symptoms late during infancy and will be identified as infants with presumed perinatal stroke. The risk factors and clinical and radiological data of 42 infants with presumed perinatal stroke (69% with periventricular venous infarction and 31% with arterial ischemic stroke) from the Estonian Pediatric Stroke Database were reviewed. Children with presumed perinatal stroke were born at term in 95% of the cases and had had no risk factors during pregnancy in 43% of the cases. Children with periventricular venous infarction were born significantly more often (82%) vaginally (P = .0213) compared to children with arterial stroke (42%); nor did they require resuscitation (P = .0212) or had any neurological symptoms after birth (P = .0249). Periventricular venous infarction is the most common type of lesion among infants with the presumed perinatal stroke. Data suggest that the disease is of prenatal origin.

  6. A medical geography of perinatal mortality in Metropolitan Cape Town.

    PubMed

    Rip, M R; Keen, C S; Kibel, M A

    1986-09-27

    An infant's weight at birth as well as its socio-economic environment are recognized as constituting two of the major risk factors associated with perinatal mortality. Spatial analyses of birth weight, socio-economic status and perinatal mortality in Metropolitan Cape Town for the year 1982 are presented in an attempt to assess the relationship between these variables at the suburb (or community) level. Variations in perinatal mortality for each suburb were found to be highly correlated with variations in the distribution of low birth weights. Overall, it would appear that the geography of the interrelationship between low birth weight and perinatal mortality tends, in part, to mirror long-standing gradients in socio-economic status--particularly for those coloured communities which show high perinatal death rates. To what extent these variations are associated with available antenatal and infant health care services can only be postulated. Points for possible community intervention are suggested.

  7. Perinatal depression: a review of US legislation and law.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Ann M; Segre, Lisa S

    2013-08-01

    Accumulating research documenting the prevalence and negative effects of perinatal depression, together with highly publicized tragic critical incidents of suicide and filicide by mothers with postpartum psychosis, have fueled a continuum of legislation. Specialists in perinatal mental health should recognize how their work influences legislative initiatives and penal codes, and take this into consideration when developing perinatal services and research. Yet, without legal expertise, the status of legislative initiatives can be confusing. To address this shortfall, we assembled an interdisciplinary team of academics specializing in law, as well as perinatal mental health, to summarize these issues. This review presents the relevant federal and state legislation and summarizes the criminal codes that governed the court decisions on cases in which a mother committed filicide because of postpartum psychosis. Moreover, the review aims to help researchers and providers who specialize in perinatal depression understand their role in this legal landscape.

  8. Specific binding of a Pop6/Pop7 heterodimer to the P3 stem of the yeast RNase MRP and RNase P RNAs.

    PubMed

    Perederina, Anna; Esakova, Olga; Koc, Hasan; Schmitt, Mark E; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2007-10-01

    Pop6 and Pop7 are protein subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP and RNase P. Here we show that bacterially expressed Pop6 and Pop7 form a soluble heterodimer that binds the RNA components of both RNase MRP and RNase P. Footprint analysis of the interaction between the Pop6/7 heterodimer and the RNase MRP RNA, combined with gel mobility assays, demonstrates that the Pop6/7 complex binds to a conserved region of the P3 domain. Binding of these proteins to the MRP RNA leads to local rearrangement in the structure of the P3 loop and suggests that direct interaction of the Pop6/7 complex with the P3 domain of the RNA components of RNases MRP and P may mediate binding of other protein components. These results suggest a role for a key element in the RNase MRP and RNase P RNAs in protein binding, and demonstrate the feasibility of directly studying RNA-protein interactions in the eukaryotic RNases MRP and P complexes.

  9. The experience of depression, anxiety, and mania among perinatal women.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Jo; Silver, Richard K; Elue, Rita; Adams, Marci G; La Porte, Laura M; Cai, Li; Kim, Jong Bae; Gibbons, Robert D

    2016-10-01

    We assessed differential item functioning (DIF) based on computerized adaptive testing (CAT) to examine how perinatal mood disorders differ from adult psychiatric disorders. The CAT-Mental Health (CAT-MH) was administered to 1614 adult psychiatric outpatients and 419 perinatal women with IRB approval. We examined individual item-level differences using logistic regression and overall score differences by scoring the perinatal data using the original bifactor model calibration based on the psychiatric sample data and a new bifactor model calibration based on the perinatal data and computing their correlation. To examine convergent validity, we computed correlations of the CAT-MH with contemporaneously administered Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scales (EPDS). The rate of major depression in the perinatal sample was 13 %. Rates of anxiety, mania, and suicide risk were 5, 6, and 0.4 %, respectively. One of 66 depression items, one of 69 anxiety items, and 15 of 53 mania items exhibited DIF (i.e., failure to discriminate between high and low levels of the disorder) in the perinatal sample based on the psychiatric sample calibration. Removal of these items resulted in correlations of the original and perinatal calibrations of r = 0.983 for depression, r = 0.986 for anxiety, and r = 0.932 for mania. The 91.3 % of cases were concordantly categorized as either "at-risk" or "low-risk" between the EPDS and the perinatal calibration of the CAT-MH. There was little evidence of DIF for depression and anxiety symptoms in perinatal women. This was not true for mania. Now calibrated for perinatal women, the CAT-MH can be evaluated for longitudinal symptom monitoring.

  10. Scoring systems for the characterization of sepsis and associated outcomes

    PubMed Central

    McLymont, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is responsible for the utilisation of a significant proportion of healthcare resources and has high mortality rates. Early diagnosis and prompt interventions are associated with better outcomes but is impeded by a lack of diagnostic tools and the heterogeneous and enigmatic nature of sepsis. The recently updated definitions of sepsis have moved away from the centrality of inflammation and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria which have been shown to be non-specific. Sepsis is now defined as a “life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection”. The Quick (q) Sequential (Sepsis-related) Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score is proposed as a surrogate for organ dysfunction and may act as a risk predictor for patients with known or suspected infection, as well as being a prompt for clinicians to consider the diagnosis of sepsis. Early warning scores (EWS) are track and trigger physiological monitoring systems that have become integrated within many healthcare systems for the detection of acutely deteriorating patients. The recent study by Churpek and colleagues sought to compare qSOFA to more established alerting criteria in a population of patients with presumed infection, and compared the ability to predict death or unplanned intensive care unit (ICU) admission. This perspective paper discusses recent advances in the diagnostic criteria for sepsis and how qSOFA may fit into the pre-existing models of acute care and sepsis quality improvement. PMID:28149888

  11. The Endothelial Glycocalyx: New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Koczera, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. The endothelial glycocalyx is one of the earliest sites involved during sepsis. This fragile layer is a complex network of cell-bound proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycan side chains, and sialoproteins lining the luminal side of endothelial cells with a thickness of about 1 to 3 μm. Sepsis-associated alterations of its structure affect endothelial permeability and result in the liberation of endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Once liberated in the circulatory system, DAMPs trigger the devastating consequences of the proinflammatory cascades in sepsis and septic shock. In this way, the injury to the glycocalyx with the consecutive release of DAMPs contributes to a number of specific clinical effects of sepsis, including acute kidney injury, respiratory failure, and septic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the extent of glycocalyx degradation serves as a marker of endothelial dysfunction and sepsis severity. In this review, we highlight the crucial role of the glycocalyx in sepsis as a diagnostic tool and discuss the potential of members of the endothelial glycocalyx serving as hopeful therapeutic targets in sepsis-associated multiple organ failures. PMID:27699168

  12. B cells enhance early innate immune responses during bacterial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M.; Scumpia, Philip O.; Weinstein, Jason S.; Delano, Matthew J.; Cuenca, Alex G.; Nacionales, Dina C.; Wynn, James L.; Lee, Pui Y.; Kumagai, Yutaro; Efron, Philip A.; Akira, Shizuo; Wasserfall, Clive; Atkinson, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Microbes activate pattern recognition receptors to initiate adaptive immunity. T cells affect early innate inflammatory responses to viral infection, but both activation and suppression have been demonstrated. We identify a novel role for B cells in the early innate immune response during bacterial sepsis. We demonstrate that Rag1−/− mice display deficient early inflammatory responses and reduced survival during sepsis. Interestingly, B cell–deficient or anti-CD20 B cell–depleted mice, but not α/β T cell–deficient mice, display decreased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production and reduced survival after sepsis. Both treatment of B cell–deficient mice with serum from wild-type (WT) mice and repletion of Rag1−/− mice with B cells improves sepsis survival, suggesting antibody-independent and antibody-dependent roles for B cells in the outcome to sepsis. During sepsis, marginal zone and follicular B cells are activated through type I interferon (IFN-I) receptor (IFN-α/β receptor [IFNAR]), and repleting Rag1−/− mice with WT, but not IFNAR−/−, B cells improves IFN-I–dependent and –independent early cytokine responses. Repleting B cell–deficient mice with the IFN-I–dependent chemokine, CXCL10 was also sufficient to improve sepsis survival. This study identifies a novel role for IFN-I–activated B cells in protective early innate immune responses during bacterial sepsis. PMID:21746813

  13. New perspectives on immunomodulatory therapy for bacteraemia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Opal, Steven M

    2010-12-01

    Systemic immune dysregulation is generally acknowledged to be the fundamental molecular mechanism that underlies the pathophysiology of severe sepsis and septic shock. In the presence of a systemic infection, microbial pathogens and their soluble mediators induce generalised immune activation and coagulation activation, leading to severe sepsis and septic shock. For decades, immune-based therapies have been devised with the specific intent of inhibiting the pro-inflammatory events that are thought to precipitate the septic process. Despite a clear therapeutic rationale based upon the available experimental evidence, anti-inflammatory therapies targeting the innate or acquired immune response have largely been unsuccessful in clinical trials of sepsis. Compelling evidence now exists that a prolonged state of sepsis-induced immune suppression follows the initial period of stabilisation and resuscitation in many critically ill patients. Sepsis-related immune suppression is evidenced by histological findings of markedly enhanced lymphocytic and monocytic apoptosis, poor response to neoantigens and recall antigens, and increased incidence of infections by opportunistic pathogens. Candidiasis, cytomegalovirus activation and secondary infections by relatively avirulent bacterial pathogens such as Stenotrophomonas and Acinetobacter spp. are commonplace in septic patients during prolonged Intensive Care Unit stays. Immunological tools to detect sepsis-induced immunosuppression are now available, and novel immunoadjuvants are in development to re-establish immune competence in sepsis patients. The intelligent use of immunomodulatory agents in sepsis will necessitate a personalised medicine approach to treat each patient at the appropriate time and with the optimal therapy.

  14. Fluid resuscitation in human sepsis: Time to rewrite history?

    PubMed

    Byrne, Liam; Van Haren, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Fluid resuscitation continues to be recommended as the first-line resuscitative therapy for all patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. The current acceptance of the therapy is based in part on long history and familiarity with its use in the resuscitation of other forms of shock, as well as on an incomplete and incorrect understanding of the pathophysiology of sepsis. Recently, the safety of intravenous fluids in patients with sepsis has been called into question with both prospective and observational data suggesting improved outcomes with less fluid or no fluid. The current evidence for the continued use of fluid resuscitation for sepsis remains contentious with no prospective evidence demonstrating benefit to fluid resuscitation as a therapy in isolation. This article reviews the historical and physiological rationale for the introduction of fluid resuscitation as treatment for sepsis and highlights a number of significant concerns based on current experimental and clinical evidence. The research agenda should focus on the development of hyperdynamic animal sepsis models which more closely mimic human sepsis and on experimental and clinical studies designed to evaluate minimal or no fluid strategies in the resuscitation phase of sepsis.

  15. System identification in Priming of Pop-Out.

    PubMed

    Martini, Paolo

    2010-10-12

    Inter-trial repetitions of a target's features in a visual search task reduce the time needed to find the target. Here I examine these sequential dependencies in the Priming of Pop-Out task (PoP) by means of system identification techniques. The results are as follows. Response time facilitation due to repetition of the target's features increases linearly with difficulty in segmenting the target from the distracters. However, z-scoring the reaction times normalizes responses by equating facilitation across levels of difficulty. Memory kernels, representing the influence of the current trial on any future trial, can then be calculated from data normalized and averaged across conditions and observers. The average target-defining feature kernel and the target position kernel are well fit by a sum of two exponentials model, comprised of a high-gain, fast-decay component and a low-gain, slow-decay component. In contrast, the average response-defining feature kernel is well fit by a single exponential model with very low-gain and decay similar to the slow component of the target-defining feature kernel. Analysis of single participant's data reveals that a fast-decay component is often also present for the response-defining feature, but can be either facilitatory or inhibitory and thus tends to cancel out in pooled data. Overall, the results are similar to integration functions of reward history recently observed in primates during frequency-matching experiments. I speculate that sequential dependencies in PoP result from learning mechanisms that bias the attentional weighting of certain aspects of the stimulus in an effort to minimize a prediction error signal.

  16. Fabrication of Pop-up Detector Arrays on Si Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Mary J.; Allen, Christine A.; Gordon, Scott A.; Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Mott, David B.; Stahle, Caroline K.; Wang, Liqin L.

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity is a basic requirement for a new generation of thermal detectors. To meet the requirement, close-packed, two-dimensional silicon detector arrays have been developed in NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The goal of the task is to fabricate detector arrays configured with thermal detectors such as infrared bolometers and x-ray calorimeters to use in space fliGht missions. This paper focuses on the fabrication and the mechanical testing of detector arrays in a 0.2 mm pixel size, the smallest pop-up detectors being developed so far. These array structures, nicknamed "PUDS" for "Pop-Up Detectors", are fabricated on I pm thick, single-crystal, silicon membranes. Their designs have been refined so we can utilize the flexibility of thin silicon films by actually folding the silicon membranes to 90 degrees in order to obtain close-packed two-dimensional arrays. The PUD elements consist of a detector platform and two legs for mechanical support while also serving as electrical and thermal paths. Torsion bars and cantilevers connecting the detector platform to the legs provide additional flexures for strain relief. Using micro-electromechanical structure (MEMS) fabrication techniques, including photolithography, anisotropic chemical etching, reactive-ion etching, and laser dicing, we have fabricated PLTD detector arrays of fourteen designs with a variation of four parameters including cantilever length, torsion bar length and width, and leg length. Folding tests were conducted to test mechanical stress distribution for the array structures. We obtained folding yields and selected optimum design parameters to reach minimal stress levels. Computer simulation was also employed to verify mechanical behaviors of PUDs in the folding process. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was utilized to examine the flatness of detectors and the alignment of detector pixels in arrays. The fabrication of thermistors and heaters on the pop-up detectors is under way

  17. Vitamin B-12 and Perinatal Health.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Julia L; Layden, Alexander J; Stover, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Vitamin B-12 deficiency (<148 pmol/L) is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, including developmental anomalies, spontaneous abortions, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (<2500 g). The importance of adequate vitamin B-12 status periconceptionally and during pregnancy cannot be overemphasized, given its fundamental role in neural myelination, brain development, and growth. Infants born to vitamin B-12-deficient women may be at increased risk of neural tube closure defects, and maternal vitamin B-12 insufficiency (<200 pmol/L) can impair infant growth, psychomotor function, and brain development, which may be irreversible. However, the underlying causal mechanisms are unknown. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links maternal vitamin B-12 status and perinatal outcomes. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency and associated risk of pregnancy complications, few prospective studies and, to our knowledge, only 1 randomized trial have examined the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of adverse perinatal outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions.

  18. [Perinatal innate immune activation and neuropsychological development].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taku

    2013-08-01

    Development of animal models is a crucial issue in biological psychiatry for the search of novel drug targets as well as the screening of candidate compounds. Epidemiologic studies suggest that environmental insults, such as prenatal infection and perinatal complication, are involved in the development of schizophrenia. Recently, we have developed a novel mouse model of viral infection during the perinatal stage by injecting polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (polyI:C) into neonatal mice. Neonatal treatment of mice with polyI:C, an inducer of innate immune responses via toll-like receptor 3, caused a significant increase in interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3) levels in the astrocytes of the hippocampus, which resulted in long-lasting brain dysfunction, including cognitive and emotional impairments as well as a deficit in depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the hippocampus in adulthood. Neonatal polyI:C-induced neuronal impairments have not been observed in IFITM3-KO mice. These findings suggest that the induction of IFITM3 expression in astrocytes by the activation of the innate immune system during the early stages of neurodevelopment has non-cell autonomous effects that affect subsequent neurodevelopment, leading to neuropathological impairments and brain dysfunction, by impairing endocytosis in astrocytes.

  19. Disasters and Perinatal Health: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Harville, EW; Xiong, X; Buekens, P

    2012-01-01

    Background The empirical literature on the effects of disaster on pregnancy and the postpartum period is limited. The objective of this review was to examine the existing evidence on the effect of disasters on perinatal health. Methods A systematic review was conducted by searching electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cinahl, PsycInfo), including literature on disasters and pregnancy outcomes (e.g., preterm birth, low birthweight, congenital anomalies), mental health, and child development. 110 articles were identified, but many published reports were anecdotes or recommendations rather than systematic studies. The final review included 49 peer-reviewed studies that met inclusion criteria. Results Studies addressing the World Trade Center disaster of September 11th and other terrorist attacks, environmental/chemical disasters, and natural disasters such as hurricanes and earthquakes were identified. Disasters of various types may reduce fetal growth in some women, though there does not appear to be an effect on gestational age at birth. Severity of exposure is the major predictor of mental health issues among pregnant and postpartum women. The mother's mental health after a disaster may more strongly influence on child development than any direct effect of disaster-related prenatal stress. Conclusions There is evidence that disaster impacts maternal mental health and some perinatal health outcomes, particular among highly-exposed women. Future research should focus on under-studied outcomes such as spontaneous abortion. Relief workers and clinicians should concentrate on the most exposed women, particularly with respect to mental health. PMID:21375788

  20. Perinatal cardiac arrest. Quality of the survivors.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, H; Neligan, G

    1975-01-01

    Steiner, H., and Neligan, G. (1975). Archives of Disease in Childhood, 50, 696. Perinatal cardiac arrest: quality of the survivors. Twenty-two consecutive survivors of perinatal cardiac arrest have been followed to a mean age of 4 1/4 years, using methods of neurological and developmental assessment appropriate to their ages. 4 showed evidence of gross, diffuse brain-damage (2 of these died before the age of 3 years). These were the only 4 survivors of the first month of life who took more than 30 minutes to establish regular, active respiration after their heartbeat had been restored. The arrest in these cases had occurred during or within 15 minutes of delivery, and followed antepartum haemorrhage, breech delivery, or prolapsed cord. The remaining 18 were free of any evidence of brain damage. In the majority of these the arrest had occurred during shoulder dystocia or exchange transfusion, or was unexplained; the heartbeat had been restored within 5 minutes in most cases, and regular, active respiration had been established within 30 minutes thereafter in all cases. PMID:1190819

  1. Endocrine consequences of perinatal methadone exposure.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, C; Bero, L; Ignar, D; Lurie, S; Field, E

    1987-01-01

    In summary, we have shown that marked acute responses as well as persistent changes in hypothalamopituitary responsivity to opiate challenge result from perinatal opioid addiction. We have also shown that different endocrine systems and opioid receptor subtypes develop at different rates, and that the responses of these systems depend upon the relative timing of the treatment regimen and the functional development of the particular opioid system involved. It should be emphasized that these studies have investigated only a single developmental window. The additional critical question of how opioid neuron function is affected by treatment during the period of active neuronal differentiation has not yet been answered. However, these studies do demonstrate the utility of this neuroendocrine model in assessing opioid function following chronic treatment regimens. By using neuroendocrine function as an end point, multiple systems can be studied simultaneously in the same animal. This has a particular advantage in studying the effects of chronic drug exposure on the developing nervous system, because hormone secretion is an easily quantifiable and early maturing functional index which can be used to identify vulnerable (and resistant) systems. Endogenous opioid systems appear to be particularly important in neuroendocrine regulation during the early phase of development, when other neural controls have not yet matured. Our preliminary results suggest that specific opioid systems that mature early may be especially important in the specific neuroendocrine effects of perinatal opiate addiction.

  2. Perinatal testicular torsion and medicolegal considerations.

    PubMed

    Massoni, F; Troili, G M; Pelosi, M; Ricci, S

    2014-06-01

    Perinatal testicular torsion (PTT) is a very complex condition because of rarity of presentation and diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. In presence of perinatal testicular torsion, the involvement of contralateral testis can be present also in absence of other indications which suggest the bilateral involvement; therefore, occurrences supported by literature do not exclude the use of surgery to avoid the risk of omitted or delayed diagnosis. The data on possible recovery of these testicles are not satisfactory, and treatment consists of an observational approach ("wait-and-see") or an interventional approach. The hypothesis of randomized clinical trials seems impracticable because of rarity of disease. The authors present a case of PTT, analyzing injuries due to clinical and surgical management of these patients, according to medicolegal profile. The delayed diagnosis and the choice of an incorrect therapeutic approach can compromise the position of healthcare professionals, defective in terms of skill, prudence and diligence. Endocrine insufficiency is an unfortunate event. The analysis of literature seems to support, because of high risk, a surgical approach aimed not only at resolution of unilateral pathology or prevention of a relapse, but also at prevention of contralateral testicular torsion.

  3. New insights into perinatal testicular torsion

    PubMed Central

    Van Kerrebroeck, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Perinatal testicular torsion is a relatively rare event that remains unrecognized in many patients or is suspected and treated accordingly only after an avoidable loss of time. The authors report their own experience with several patients, some of them quite atypical but instructive. Missed bilateral torsion is an issue, as are partial torsion, possible antenatal signs, and late presentation. These data are discussed together with the existing literature and may help shed new light on the natural course of testicular torsion and its treatment. The most important conclusion is that a much higher index of suspicion based on clinical findings is needed for timely detection of perinatal torsion. It is the authors’ opinion that immediate surgery is mandatory not only in suspected bilateral torsions but also in cases of possible unilateral torsions. There is no place for a more fatalistic “wait-and-see” approach. Whenever possible, even necrotic testes should not be removed during surgery because some endocrine function may be retained. PMID:19856186

  4. Vitamin B-12 and Perinatal Health123

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Julia L; Layden, Alexander J; Stover, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B-12 deficiency (<148 pmol/L) is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, including developmental anomalies, spontaneous abortions, preeclampsia, and low birth weight (<2500 g). The importance of adequate vitamin B-12 status periconceptionally and during pregnancy cannot be overemphasized, given its fundamental role in neural myelination, brain development, and growth. Infants born to vitamin B-12-deficient women may be at increased risk of neural tube closure defects, and maternal vitamin B-12 insufficiency (<200 pmol/L) can impair infant growth, psychomotor function, and brain development, which may be irreversible. However, the underlying causal mechanisms are unknown. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links maternal vitamin B-12 status and perinatal outcomes. Despite the high prevalence of vitamin B-12 deficiency and associated risk of pregnancy complications, few prospective studies and, to our knowledge, only 1 randomized trial have examined the effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation during pregnancy. The role of vitamin B-12 in the etiology of adverse perinatal outcomes needs to be elucidated to inform public health interventions. PMID:26374177

  5. The Balloon Popping Problem Revisited: Lower and Upper Bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hyunwoo; Chwa, Kyung-Yong

    We consider the balloon popping problem introduced by Immorlica et al. in 2007 [13]. This problem is directly related to the problem of profit maximization in online auctions, where an auctioneer is selling a collection of identical items to anonymous unit-demand bidders. The auctioneer has the full knowledge of bidders’ private valuations for the items and tries to maximize his profit. Compared with the profit of fixed price schemes, the competitive ratio of Immorlica et al.’s algorithm was in the range [1.64, 4.33]. In this paper, we narrow the gap to [1.659, 2].

  6. Reduced Expression of SARM in Mouse Spleen during Polymicrobial Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Zou, Lin; Cen, Dongzhi; Chao, Wei; Chen, Dunjin

    2016-12-01

    Objective Immune dysfunction, including prominent apoptosis of immune cells and decreased functioning of the remaining immune cells, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Sterile α and HEAT/armadillo motif-containing protein (SARM) is implicated in the regulation of immune cell apoptosis. This study aimed to elucidate SARM contributes to sepsis-induced immune cell death and immunosuppression. Methods A mouse model of polymicrobial sepsis was generated by cecum ligation and puncture (CLP). SARM gene and protein expression, caspase 3 cleavage and intracellular ATP production were measured in the mouse spleens. Results CLP-induced polymicrobial sepsis specifically attenuated both the gene and protein expression of SARM in the spleens. Moreover, the attenuation of SARM expression synchronized with splenocyte apoptosis, as evidenced by increased caspase 3 cleavage and ATP depletion. Conclusions These findings suggest that SARM is a potential regulator of sepsis-induced splenocyte apoptosis.

  7. Science review: The brain in sepsis – culprit and victim

    PubMed Central

    Sharshar, Tarek; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Orlikowski, David; Annane, Djillali

    2005-01-01

    On one side, brain dysfunction is a poorly explored complication of sepsis. On the other side, brain dysfunction may actively contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis. The current review aimed at summarizing the current knowledge about the reciprocal interaction between the immune and central nervous systems during sepsis. The immune-brain cross talk takes part in circumventricular organs that, being free from blood-brain-barrier, interface between brain and bloodstream, in autonomic nuclei including the vagus nerve, and finally through the damaged endothelium. Recent observations have confirmed that sepsis is associated with excessive brain inflammation and neuronal apoptosis which clinical relevance remains to be explored. In parallel, damage within autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems may contribute to sepsis induced organ dysfunction. PMID:15693982

  8. Oxidative Stress in Critically Ill Children with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Derek S

    2011-10-07

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. Sepsis accounts for significant morbidity and mortality in critically ill children as well. The pathophysiology of sepsis is characterized by a complex systemic inflammatory response, endothelial dysfunction, and alterations in the coagulation system, which lead to perturbations in the delivery of oxygen and metabolic substrates to the tissues, end-organ dysfunction, and ultimately death. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role as both a promoter and mediator of the systemic inflammatory response, suggesting potential targets for the treatment of critically ill children with the sepsis syndrome. Herein, we will provide a brief review of the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress in the pathophysiology of sepsis.

  9. Therapeutic potential of HMGB1-targeting agents in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haichao; Zhu, Shu; Zhou, Rongrong; Li, Wei; Sama, Andrew E.

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis refers to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome resulting from a microbial infection. The inflammatory response is partly mediated by innate immune cells (such as macrophages, monocytes and neutrophils), which not only ingest and eliminate invading pathogens but also initiate an inflammatory response upon recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The prevailing theories of sepsis as a dysregulated inflammatory response, as manifested by excessive release of inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor and high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), are supported by extensive studies employing animal models of sepsis. Here we review emerging evidence that support extracellular HMGB1 as a late mediator of experimental sepsis, and discuss the therapeutic potential of several HMGB1-targeting agents (including neutralising antibodies and steroid-like tanshinones) in experimental sepsis. PMID:18980707

  10. Role of pore-forming toxins in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Henneke, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Protein toxins are important virulence factors contributing to neonatal sepsis. The major pathogens of neonatal sepsis, group B Streptococci, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, secrete toxins of different molecular nature, which are key for defining the disease. Amongst these toxins are pore-forming exotoxins that are expressed as soluble monomers prior to engagement of the target cell membrane with subsequent formation of an aqueous membrane pore. Membrane pore formation is not only a means for immediate lysis of the targeted cell but also a general mechanism that contributes to penetration of epithelial barriers and evasion of the immune system, thus creating survival niches for the pathogens. Pore-forming toxins, however, can also contribute to the induction of inflammation and hence to the manifestation of sepsis. Clearly, pore-forming toxins are not the sole factors that drive sepsis progression, but they often act in concert with other bacterial effectors, especially in the initial stages of neonatal sepsis manifestation.

  11. Mass balance for POPs in hazardous and municipal solid waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Van Caneghem, J; Block, C; Van Brecht, A; Wauters, G; Vandecasteele, C

    2010-02-01

    The amount of different persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the input of waste incinerators was compared to that in the output. Three cases were considered: a rotary kiln incinerating hazardous waste, a grate furnace incinerating municipal solid waste (MSW) and the same grate furnace co-incinerating plastics of waste of electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) and automotive shredder residue (ASR) with MSW. The mass balance for PCBs in the rotary kiln indicates that these POPs are destroyed effectively during incineration. The grate furnace can be a sink or source of PCDD/Fs and PCBs depending on the concentrations in the incinerated waste. In order to compare the total amount of POPs in input and output, a methodology was developed whereby the amount of POPs was weighed according to minimal risk doses (MRDs) or cancer potency factors. For both incinerators the PCDD/Fs, PCBs and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the main contributors to total weighed POP output. In MSW, the PCDD/Fs, PBDD/Fs and polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) are the main contributors to the weighed POP input. The ratios of the weighed POP-input over -output clearly indicate that the rotary kiln incinerating hazardous waste is a weighed POP sink. The grate furnace incinerating MSW is a weighed POP sink or source depending on the POP-concentrations in the waste, but the difference between output and input is rather limited. When e.g. ASR and plastics of WEEE, containing high concentrations of PBDEs and PCBs, are co-incinerated in the grate furnace, it is clearly a weighed POP sink.

  12. Immunotherapy: A promising approach to reverse sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Patil, Naeem K; Bohannon, Julia K; Sherwood, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by dysregulated host responses to infection (Third International Consensus definition for Sepsis and septic shock). Despite decades of research, sepsis remains the leading cause of death in intensive care units. More than 40 clinical trials, most of which have targeted the sepsis-associated pro-inflammatory response, have failed. Thus, antibiotics and fluid resuscitation remain the mainstays of supportive care and there is intense need to discover and develop novel, targeted therapies to treat sepsis. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies over the past decade demonstrate unequivocally that sepsis not only causes hyper-inflammation, but also leads to simultaneous adaptive immune system dysfunction and impaired antimicrobial immunity. Evidences for immunosuppression include immune cell depletion (T cells most affected), compromised T cell effector functions, T cell exhaustion, impaired antigen presentation, increased susceptibility to opportunistic nosocomial infections, dysregulated cytokine secretion, and reactivation of latent viruses. Therefore, targeting immunosuppression provides a logical approach to treat protracted sepsis. Numerous pre-clinical studies using immunomodulatory agents such as interleukin-7, anti-programmed cell death 1 antibody (anti-PD-1), anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand antibody (anti-PD-L1), and others have demonstrated reversal of T cell dysfunction and improved survival. Therefore, identifying immunosuppressed patients with the help of specific biomarkers and administering specific immunomodulators holds significant potential for sepsis therapy in the future. This review focusses on T cell dysfunction during sepsis and discusses the potential immunotherapeutic agents to boost T cell function during sepsis and improve host resistance to infection.

  13. Differential expression of plasma miR-146a in sepsis patients compared with non-sepsis-SIRS patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lina; Wang, Hua-Cheng; Chen, Cha; Zeng, Jianming; Wang, Qian; Zheng, Lei; Yu, Huan-DU

    2013-04-01

    Sepsis is a subtype of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which is characterized by infection. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs), including miR-150, miR-146a and miR-223, are potential biomarkers of sepsis. In this study, we demonstrated that measuring the relative expression of miR-146a/U6 in plasma, using the 2(-ΔΔCt) method, provides a method for differentiating between sepsis and non-sepsis-SIRS. We observed a significant increase in miR-146a expression in the initial cohort of 6 non-sepsis-SIRS patients compared to the 4 sepsis patients (P=0.01) and in the second cohort of 8 non-sepsis-SIRS patients compared to the 10 sepsis patients (P=0.027). Additionally, we identified that sodium citrate and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) K2 may be used as anticoagulant reagents. Generation of a standard curve is not necessary in these diagnostic tests, unless the standard of normalization is carefully selected. Thus we provide more detailed guidance for the clinical use of circulating miRNA biomarkers.

  14. Hypomagnesemia in Critically Ill Sepsis Patients.

    PubMed

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg), also known as "the forgotten electrolyte", is the fourth most abundant cation overall and the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body. Mg deficiency has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. This article is a review of the literature regarding Mg abnormalities with emphasis on the implications of hypomagnesemia in critical illness and on treatment options for hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients with sepsis. Hypomagnesemia is common in critically ill patients, and there is strong, consistent clinical evidence, largely from observational studies, showing that hypomagnesemia is significantly associated with increased need for mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. Although the mechanism linking hypomagnesemia with poor clinical outcomes is not known, experimental data suggest mechanisms contributing to such outcomes. However, at the present time, there is no clear evidence that magnesium supplementation improves outcomes in critically ill patients with hypomagnesemia. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate the role of magnesium therapy for improving outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis.

  15. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome.

  16. e-POP Radio Science Using Amateur Radio Transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frissell, N. A.; Perry, G. W.; Miller, E. S.; Shovkoplyas, A.; Moses, M. L.; James, H. G.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    A major component of the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) mission is to utilize artificially generated radio emissions to study High Frequency (HF) radio wave propagation in the ionosphere. In the North American and European sectors, communications between amateur radio operators are a persistent and abundant source source of HF transmissions. We present the results of HF radio wave propagation experiments using amateur radio transmissions as an HF source for e-POP RRI. We detail how a distributed and autonomously operated amateur radio network can be leveraged to study HF radio wave propagation as well as the structuring and dynamics of the ionosphere over a large geographic region. In one case, the sudden disappearance of nearly two-dozen amateur radio HF sources located in the midwestern United States was used to detect a enhancement in foF2 in that same region. We compare our results to those from other more conventional radio instruments and models of the ionosphere to demonstrate the scientific merit of incorporating amateur radio networks for radio science at HF.

  17. Avengers Assemble! Using pop-culture icons to communicate science.

    PubMed

    Zehr, E Paul

    2014-06-01

    Engaging communication of complex scientific concepts with the general public requires more than simplification. Compelling, relevant, and timely points of linkage between scientific concepts and the experiences and interests of the general public are needed. Pop-culture icons such as superheroes can represent excellent opportunities for exploring scientific concepts in a mental “landscape” that is comfortable and familiar. Using an established icon as a familiar frame of reference, complex scientific concepts can then be discussed in a more accessible manner. In this framework, scientists and the general public use the cultural icon to occupy a commonly known performance characteristic. For example, Batman represents a globally recognized icon who represents the ultimate response to exercise and training. The physiology that underlies Batman’s abilities can then be discussed and explored using real scientific examples that highlight truths and fallacies contained in the presentation of pop-culture icons. Critically, it is not important whether the popular representation of the icon shows correct science because the real science can be revealed in discussing the character through this lens. Scientists and educators can then use these icons as foils for exploring complex ideas in a context that is less threatening and more comfortable for the target audience. A “middle-ground hypothesis” for science communication is proposed in which popculture icons are used to exploring scientific concepts in a bridging mental landscape that is comfortable and familiar. This approach is encouraged for communication with all nonscientists regardless of age.

  18. Late Pop III Star Formation During the Epoch of Reionization: Results from the Renaissance Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Wise, John H.

    2016-06-01

    We present results on the formation of Population III (Pop III) stars at redshift 7.6 from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of extremely high-resolution and physics-rich radiation transport hydrodynamics cosmological adaptive-mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift galaxy formation performed on the Blue Waters supercomputer. In a survey volume of about 220 comoving Mpc3, we found 14 Pop III galaxies with recent star formation. The surprisingly late formation of Pop III stars is possible due to two factors: (i) the metal enrichment process is local and slow, leaving plenty of pristine gas to exist in the vast volume; and (ii) strong Lyman-Werner radiation from vigorous metal-enriched star formation in early galaxies suppresses Pop III formation in (“not so”) small primordial halos with mass less than ˜3 × 107 M ⊙. We quantify the properties of these Pop III galaxies and their Pop III star formation environments. We look for analogs to the recently discovered luminous Ly α emitter CR7, which has been interpreted as a Pop III star cluster within or near a metal-enriched star-forming galaxy. We find and discuss a system similar to this in some respects, however, the Pop III star cluster is far less massive and luminous than CR7 is inferred to be.

  19. Understanding the potential impact of milk processing on the distribution of POPs residues in milk products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has long been acknowledged that human exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) occurs principally through our food. Therefore, market basket surveys of the food supply have been valuable tools to provide estimates of human exposures to POPs and the risks associated with these exposures. ...

  20. Contextual Distinctiveness Produces Long-Lasting Priming of Pop-Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, David R.; Milliken, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Maljkovic and Nakayama have demonstrated memory influences in singleton search from one trial to the next, an effect they termed "priming of pop-out" (PoP). This effect was described as resulting from the persistence of an implicit memory trace, the influence of which could be observed for around 5-8 subsequent trials. Thomson and…

  1. 46 CFR 162.018-5 - Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. 162.018-5... Compressed Gas § 162.018-5 Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. (a) Safety relief valves shall be so... adjustable blow-down construction shall be adjusted to close after blowing down not more than 5 percent...

  2. 46 CFR 162.018-5 - Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. 162.018-5... Compressed Gas § 162.018-5 Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. (a) Safety relief valves shall be so... adjustible blow-down construction shall be adjusted to close after blowing down not more than 5 percent...

  3. 46 CFR 162.018-5 - Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. 162.018-5... Compressed Gas § 162.018-5 Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. (a) Safety relief valves shall be so... adjustible blow-down construction shall be adjusted to close after blowing down not more than 5 percent...

  4. 46 CFR 162.018-5 - Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. 162.018-5... Compressed Gas § 162.018-5 Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. (a) Safety relief valves shall be so... adjustible blow-down construction shall be adjusted to close after blowing down not more than 5 percent...

  5. 46 CFR 162.018-5 - Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. 162.018-5... Compressed Gas § 162.018-5 Blow-down adjustment and popping tolerance. (a) Safety relief valves shall be so... adjustible blow-down construction shall be adjusted to close after blowing down not more than 5 percent...

  6. 76 FR 45693 - Safety Zone; San Diego POPS Fireworks, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego POPS Fireworks, San Diego, CA... temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of San Diego Bay in support of the San Diego POPS Fireworks..., participating vessels, and other vessels and users of the waterway during scheduled fireworks events....

  7. 77 FR 42647 - Safety Zone: San Diego Symphony POPS Fireworks; San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone: San Diego Symphony POPS Fireworks; San... Fireworks. This safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of the participants, crew, spectators... Hall are sponsoring the San Diego POPS Fireworks, which will include a fireworks presentation...

  8. Strategies for Using Pop Culture in Sport Psychology and Coaching Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The use of pop culture as a tool for learning and instruction is paramount. Therefore, it is imperative for teachers to be aware of, and incorporate, trends that are popular and reflect the student experience. This article addresses the pop culture trends that can positively affect teaching, coaching education, and sport psychology practice.…

  9. Neonatal–perinatal medicine in a transitional period in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Shao, Xiaomei; Cao, Yun; Xia, Shiwen; Yue, Hongni

    2013-01-01

    With an annual birth rate of 12‰, or 16 millions, of all population (1.34 billions), and an implementation of universal healthcare policy for all rural residents in recent years, China is undergoing a dramatic and profound transition in perinatal and neonatal healthcare as a part of the global campaign for reduction in mortality of children under 5 years old. This review describes recent development in neonatal–perinatal medicine, with special emphasis on general neonatal–perinatal care, respiratory and intensive care, neurological and infectious diseases, for a comprehensive view of the trend and challenge in relation with problems and solutions of the field. PMID:23759518

  10. [Perinatal Information System. Incorporation latency and impact on perinatal clinical registry].

    PubMed

    Simini, F; Fernández, A; Sosa, C; Díaz Rossello, J L

    2001-10-01

    The Perinatal Information System (SIP) is a clinical record, local management and quality assurance software standard in Latin America and the Caribbean. The time to implement SIP in a Maternity Hospital is evaluated as well as the effect of statistics on perinatal health indicators in subsequent years. In the sample of 20 Maternity Hospitals (5 Countries, 40% Private and 60% Public) 85% had a reliable information system by the third year of use of SIP. 15% of hospitals still had problems at that time that were already clear during the second year, a time corrective measures can still be taken. The evaluation of the impact of yearly reports shows that 58% of recommendations were fulfilled, specially those regarding the complete filling-in of clinical records (62%) and to a lesser extent variables that reflect clinical practices and organization of services (52%). The conclusion is that Maternity Hospitals in Latin America and the Caribbean have the capacity to adopt a complex tool of computerized clinical records for quality assurance of perinatal care and monitoring of health indicators.

  11. The combined effect of persistent organic pollutants in the serum POP mixture in Greenlandic Inuit: xenoestrogenic, xenoandrogenic and dioxin-like transactivities.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Tanja; Long, Manhai; Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C

    2012-12-01

    Greenlandic Inuit have high body burden of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). We analyzed the combined effect of the actual lipophilic serum POP mixture on estrogen-, androgen- and aryl hydrocarbon-receptor functions as effect biomarkers, and the associations between the effect biomarkers and serum POPs, and lifestyle characteristics. The serum POPs were extracted from 232 Inuit from Ittoqqortoormiit, Narsaq and Qeqertarsuaq. The POP-related receptor transactivities correlated negatively to the POP levels and were associated to the lifestyle characteristics. The POP-related receptor transactivities can be used as effect biomarkers. The serum POPs have hormone disruptive potentials.

  12. Broadening the phenotypic spectrum of POP1-skeletal dysplasias: identification of POP1 mutations in a mild and severe skeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Barraza-García, J; Rivera-Pedroza, C I; Hisado-Oliva, A; Belinchón-Martínez, A; Sentchordi-Montané, L; Duncan, E L; Clark, G R; Del Pozo, A; Ibáñez-Garikano, K; Offiah, A; Prieto-Matos, P; Cormier-Daire, V; Heath, K E

    2017-01-09

    Processing of Precursor 1 (POP1) is a large protein common to the ribonuclease-mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase-MRP) and RNase-P (RMRP) endoribonucleoprotein complexes. Although its precise function is unknown, it appears to participate in the assembly or stability of both complexes. Numerous RMRP mutations have been reported in individuals with cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH) but, to date, only three POP1 mutations have been described in two families with features similar to anauxetic dysplasia (AD). We present two further individuals, one with severe short stature and a relatively mild skeletal dysplasia and another in whom AD was suspected. Biallelic POP1 mutations were identified in both. A missense mutation and a novel single base deletion were detected in proband 1, p.[Pro582Ser]:[Glu870fs*5]. Markedly reduced abundance of RMRP and elevated levels of pre5.8s rRNA was observed. In proband 2, a homozygous novel POP1 mutation was identified, p.[(Asp511Tyr)];[(Asp511Tyr)]. These two individuals show the phenotypic extremes in the clinical presentation of POP1-dysplasias. Although CHH and other skeletal dysplasias caused by mutations in RMRP or POP1 are commonly cited as ribosomal biogenesis disorders, recent studies question this assumption. We discuss the past and present knowledge about the function of the RMRP complex in skeletal development.

  13. The autonomic nervous system and perinatal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Milner, R D; De Gasparo, M

    1981-01-01

    The development of the autonomic nervous system in relation to perinatal metabolism is reviewed with particular attention given to the adipocyte, hepatocyte and the A and B cells of the islets of Langerhans. Adrenergic receptors develop in the B cell independently of normal innervation and by the time of birth, in most species studied, the pancreas, liver and adipose tissue respond appropriately to autonomic signals. Birth is associated with a huge surge in circulating catecholamines which is probably responsible for the early postnatal rise in free fatty acids and glucagon concentrations in plasma. beta-Blocking drugs such as propranolol have an adverse effect on fetal growth and neonatal metabolism, being responsible for hypoglycemia and for impairing the thermogenic response to cold exposure. beta-Mimetic drugs are commonly used to prevent premature labour and may help the fetus in other ways, for example, by improving the placental blood supply and the delivery of nutrients by increasing maternal fat and carbohydrate mobilization.

  14. Cytomegalovirus myelitis in perinatally acquired HIV.

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, T; Funk, M; Linde, R; Jacobi, G; Horn, M; Kreuz, W

    1993-01-01

    A 7 year old child perinatally infected with HIV who died from progressive muscular paralysis and central nervous respiratory failure is described. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis with a special intravenous CMV hyper-immunoglobulin had been successfully conducted for more than four years. Macroscopic and microscopic immunohistochemical examination of the spinal cord revealed a diffuse CMV infiltration of the entire myelon. CMV infected cells were identified as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, macrophages, ependymal, endothelial, and Schwann cells. Other organs had no signs of CMV infection. Central nervous spinal CMV infection was most probably due to insufficient penetration of the blood-brain barrier by the CMV hyper-immunoglobulin. In suspicious cases early spinal magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 tesla) combined with an examination of urine and cerebrospinal fluid for CMV is recommended. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8385439

  15. Neonatal thyroid function: influence of perinatal factors.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, R C; Carpenter, L M; O'Grady, C M

    1985-01-01

    Indices of thyroid function were measured in 229 healthy term neonates at birth and at 5, 10, and 15 days of age. Results were analysed to assess whether maternal diabetes mellitus, toxaemia of pregnancy, intrapartum fetal distress, duration of labour, method of delivery, asphyxia at birth, race, sex, birthweight, birth length, head circumference, or method of feeding influenced any index. Thyroxine, the free thyroxine index, and free thyroxine concentrations at birth correlated with birthweight. Method of delivery influenced mean thyroxine and free thyroxine index values at birth and at age 5 days. Mean values of triiodothyronine, reverse triiodothyronine, thyroxine binding globulin, and thyroid stimulating hormone were not affected by any of the perinatal factors studied. Birthweight and perhaps method of delivery should be taken into account when interpreting neonatal thyroxine parameters but determination of thyroid stimulating hormone as a screen for congenital hypothyroidism in healthy term neonates circumvents these considerations. PMID:3977386

  16. Broader skills for working with perinatal depression.

    PubMed

    Marks, Lucy; McConnell, Jennifer; Baker, Martyn

    2005-08-01

    Health visitors' involvement in work with maternal depression has developed considerably over the last 10 years, with a focus upon problems in the postnatal period. In a paper last month we reported on research highlighting dilemmas that can arise for health visitors connected with a lack of an agreed conceptual framework. Conflicting roles they find themselves using when working with distressed mothers, and within a pressured organisational work setting, make it hard to give sufficient priority to such work. By focussing too narrowly on postnatal depression, other important perinatal psychological difficulties may be left unattended. We argue the need to create workplace time to address these issues by describing the provision of a training and supervision package to facilitate this. We give some informal indications of its success and some indicators of the broadening development of its membership and its content

  17. How midwives can help with perinatal depression.

    PubMed

    Morton, Joanne

    2014-03-01

    In 2011 a national children's charity led a campaign that identified why help with postnatal depression (PND) needed to improve; however PND remains a huge problem. Numerous cases are still coming to light where a mother has not sought help or has not been given adequate support, with disastrous consequences. Why is this still happening and what can health professionals do? Former practising midwife and specialist PND counsellor at a charity supporting women and families suffering from PND, Joanne Morton discusses why increasing awareness, education and understanding of perinatal illness are vital to limit the devastating effects of antenatal depression (AND) and PND and how standards of care must improve to help mothers in need.

  18. Construction and management of ARDS/sepsis registry with REDCap

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaoqing; Kozlowski, Natascha; Wu, Sulong; Jiang, Mei; Huang, Yongbo; Mao, Pu; Liu, Xiaoqing; He, Weiqun; Huang, Chaoyi; Zhang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to construct and manage an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)/sepsis registry that can be used for data warehousing and clinical research. Methods The workflow methodology and software solution of research electronic data capture (REDCap) was used to construct the ARDS/sepsis registry. Clinical data from ARDS and sepsis patients registered to the intensive care unit (ICU) of our hospital formed the registry. These data were converted to the electronic case report form (eCRF) format used in REDCap by trained medical staff. Data validation, quality control, and database management were conducted to ensure data integrity. Results The clinical data of 67 patients registered to the ICU between June 2013 and December 2013 were analyzed. Of the 67 patients, 45 (67.2%) were classified as sepsis, 14 (20.9%) as ARDS, and eight (11.9%) as sepsis-associated ARDS. The patients’ information, comprising demographic characteristics, medical history, clinical interventions, daily assessment, clinical outcome, and follow-up data, was properly managed and safely stored in the ARDS/sepsis registry. Data efficiency was guaranteed by performing data collection and data entry twice weekly and every two weeks, respectively. Conclusions The ARDS/sepsis database that we constructed and manage with REDCap in the ICU can provide a solid foundation for translational research on the clinical data of interest, and a model for development of other medical registries in the future. PMID:25276372

  19. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zea-Vera, Alonso

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the third leading cause of neonatal mortality and a major public health problem, especially in developing countries. Although recent medical advances have improved neonatal care, many challenges remain in the diagnosis and management of neonatal infections. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is complicated by the frequent presence of noninfectious conditions that resemble sepsis, especially in preterm infants, and by the absence of optimal diagnostic tests. Since neonatal sepsis is a high-risk disease, especially in preterm infants, clinicians are compelled to empirically administer antibiotics to infants with risk factors and/or signs of suspected sepsis. Unfortunately, both broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged treatment with empirical antibiotics are associated with adverse outcomes and increase antimicrobial resistance rates. Given the high incidence and mortality of sepsis in preterm infants and its long-term consequences on growth and development, efforts to reduce the rates of infection in this vulnerable population are one of the most important interventions in neonatal care. In this review, we discuss the most common questions and challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis, with a focus on developing countries. PMID:25604489

  20. Challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zea-Vera, Alonso; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2015-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the third leading cause of neonatal mortality and a major public health problem, especially in developing countries. Although recent medical advances have improved neonatal care, many challenges remain in the diagnosis and management of neonatal infections. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is complicated by the frequent presence of noninfectious conditions that resemble sepsis, especially in preterm infants, and by the absence of optimal diagnostic tests. Since neonatal sepsis is a high-risk disease, especially in preterm infants, clinicians are compelled to empirically administer antibiotics to infants with risk factors and/or signs of suspected sepsis. Unfortunately, both broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged treatment with empirical antibiotics are associated with adverse outcomes and increase antimicrobial resistance rates. Given the high incidence and mortality of sepsis in preterm infants and its long-term consequences on growth and development, efforts to reduce the rates of infection in this vulnerable population are one of the most important interventions in neonatal care. In this review, we discuss the most common questions and challenges in the diagnosis and management of neonatal sepsis, with a focus on developing countries.

  1. Neonatal sepsis: an old problem with new insights.

    PubMed

    Shah, Birju A; Padbury, James F

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis continues to be a common and significant health care burden, especially in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBW<1500 g). Though intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has decreased the incidence of early-onset group B streptococcal infection dramatically, it still remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis. Moreover, some studies among VLBW preterm infants have shown an increase in early-onset sepsis caused by Escherichia coli. As the signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis are nonspecific, early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains a challenge. There have been a myriad of studies on various diagnostic markers like hematological indices, acute phase reactants, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, cytokines, and cell surface markers among others. Nonetheless, further research is needed to identify a biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy and validity. Some of the newer markers like inter α inhibitor proteins have shown promising results thereby potentially aiding in early detection of neonates with sepsis. In order to decrease the widespread, prolonged use of unnecessary antibiotics and improve the outcome of the infants with sepsis, reliable identification of sepsis at an earlier stage is paramount.

  2. Diagnosis trajectories of prior multi-morbidity predict sepsis mortality

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Mette K.; Jensen, Anders Boeck; Nielsen, Annelaura Bach; Perner, Anders; Moseley, Pope L.; Brunak, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis affects millions of people every year, many of whom will die. In contrast to current survival prediction models for sepsis patients that primarily are based on data from within-admission clinical measurements (e.g. vital parameters and blood values), we aim for using the full disease history to predict sepsis mortality. We benefit from data in electronic medical records covering all hospital encounters in Denmark from 1996 to 2014. This data set included 6.6 million patients of whom almost 120,000 were diagnosed with the ICD-10 code: A41 ‘Other sepsis’. Interestingly, patients following recurrent trajectories of time-ordered co-morbidities had significantly increased sepsis mortality compared to those who did not follow a trajectory. We identified trajectories which significantly altered sepsis mortality, and found three major starting points in a combined temporal sepsis network: Alcohol abuse, Diabetes and Cardio-vascular diagnoses. Many cancers also increased sepsis mortality. Using the trajectory based stratification model we explain contradictory reports in relation to diabetes that recently have appeared in the literature. Finally, we compared the predictive power using 18.5 years of disease history to scoring based on within-admission clinical measurements emphasizing the value of long term data in novel patient scores that combine the two types of data. PMID:27812043

  3. Activated Complement Factors as Disease Markers for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflieh, Jean; Rushbrook, Julie; Worah, Samrat; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Early recognition and effective management are essential for improved outcome. However, early recognition is impeded by lack of clinically utilized biomarkers. Complement factors play important roles in the mechanisms leading to sepsis and can potentially serve as early markers of sepsis and of sepsis severity and outcome. This review provides a synopsis of recent animal and clinical studies of the role of complement factors in sepsis development, together with their potential as disease markers. In addition, new results from our laboratory are presented regarding the involvement of the complement factor, mannose-binding lectin, in septic shock patients. Future clinical studies are needed to obtain the complete profiles of complement factors/their activated products during the course of sepsis development. We anticipate that the results of these studies will lead to a multipanel set of sepsis biomarkers which, along with currently used laboratory tests, will facilitate earlier diagnosis, timely treatment, and improved outcome. PMID:26420913

  4. Characterising Cytokine Gene Expression Signatures in Patients with Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Grealy, Robert; White, Mary; Stordeur, Patrick; Kelleher, Dermot; Doherty, Derek G.; McManus, Ross; Ryan, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Severe sepsis in humans may be related to an underlying profound immune suppressive state. We investigated the link between gene expression of immune regulatory cytokines and the range of illness severity in patients with infection and severe sepsis. Methods. A prospective observational study included 54 ICU patients with severe sepsis, 53 patients with infection without organ failure, and 20 healthy controls. Gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results. Infection differed from health by decreased expression of the IL2, and IL23 and greater expression of IL10 and IL27. Severe sepsis differed from infection by having decreased IL7, IL23, IFNγ, and TNFα gene expression. An algorithm utilising mRNA copy number for TNFα, IFNγ, IL7, IL10, and IL23 accurately distinguished sepsis from severe sepsis with a receiver operator characteristic value of 0.88. Gene expression was similar with gram-positive and gram-negative infection and was similar following medical and surgical severe sepsis. Severity of organ failure was associated with serum IL6 protein levels but not with any index of cytokine gene expression in PBMCs. Conclusions. Immune regulatory cytokine gene expression in PBMC provides a robust method of modelling patients' response to infection. PMID:23935244

  5. Colloids in sepsis: evenly distributed molecules surrounded by uneven questions.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2013-05-01

    Colloids are frequently used for fluid expansion in the intensive care unit, although its use on several clinical scenarios remains unproven of any relevant clinical benefit. The purpose of this article was to carry out a narrative review regarding the safety and efficacy of colloids in patients with sepsis and septic shock, with emphasis on the most commonly used colloids, albumin and starches. Colloids are effective fluid expanders and are able to restore the hemodynamic profile with less total volume than crystalloids. These properties appear to be preserved even in patients with sepsis with increased capillary permeability. However, some colloids are associated with renal impairment and coagulation abnormalities. Starch use was associated with increased mortality in two large clinical trials. Also, starches probably have significant renal adverse effects and may be related to more need for renal replacement therapy in severe sepsis. Albumin is the only colloid that has been shown safe in patients with sepsis and that may be associated with improved outcomes on specific subpopulations. No trial so far found any robust clinical end point favoring colloid use in patients with sepsis. Because there is no proven benefit of the use of most colloids in patients with sepsis, its use should not be encouraged outside clinical trials. Albumin is the only colloid solution that has proven to be safe, and its use may be considered on hypoalbuminemic patients with sepsis. Nevertheless, there are no robust data to recommend routine albumin administration in sepsis. Starch use should be avoided in patients with sepsis because of the recent findings of a multicenter randomized study until further evidence is available.

  6. Investigating the Role of Pop Songs on Vocabulary Recall, Attitude and Retention of Iranian EFL Learners: The Case of Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakerian, Pouya; Rezaei, Omid; Murnani, Zeinab Toghyani; Moeinmanesh, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Pop songs are, in fact, an ideal source for incidental vocabulary learning because teenagers often spend large amounts of their free time listening to music and in particular to pop songs. Employing an experimental approach, this study attempted to investigate the role of pop songs on vocabulary recall, attitude and retention of Iranian advanced…

  7. Accurate coding in sepsis: clinical significance and financial implications.

    PubMed

    Chin, Y T; Scattergood, N; Thornber, M; Thomas, S

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is a major healthcare problem and leading cause of death worldwide. UK hospital mortality statistics and payments for patient episodes of care are calculated on clinical coding data. The accuracy of these data depends on the quality of coding. This study aimed to investigate whether patients with significant bacteraemia are coded for sepsis and to estimate the financial costs of miscoding. Of 54 patients over a one-month period with a significant bacteraemia, only 19% had been coded for sepsis. This is likely to lead to falsely high calculated hospital mortality. Furthermore, this resulted in an underpayment of £21,000 for one month alone.

  8. Challenges with Diagnosing and Managing Sepsis in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Kalin M.; Dy-Boarman, Eliza A.; Haase, Krystal K.; Maxvill, Kristen (Hesch); Pass, Steven; Alvarez, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis in older adults has many challenges that affect rate of septic diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring parameters. Numerous age-related changes and comorbidities contribute to increased risk of infections in older adults, but also atypical symptomatology that delays diagnosis. Due to various pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes in the older adult, medications are absorbed, metabolized, and eliminated at different rates as compared to younger adults, which increases risk of adverse drug reactions due to use of drug therapy needed for sepsis management. This review provides information to aid in diagnosis as well as offers recommendations for monitoring and treating sepsis in the older adult population. PMID:26687340

  9. Sepsis-associated takotsubo cardiomyopathy can be reversed with levosimendan.

    PubMed

    Karvouniaris, Marios; Papanikolaou, John; Makris, Demosthenes; Zakynthinos, Epameinondas

    2012-06-01

    Sepsis is a stressful physical condition, and at the acute phase, overstimulation of the sympathetic nervous system may occur; these events have the potential to induce cardiomyopathy. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a form of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, which occurs very rarely in sepsis. However, TTC management in critically ill patients with sepsis may be challenging because the use of exogenous catecholamines for circulatory support might augment further TTC. Herein, we report a rare case of TTC after urosepsis; and we point out that cardiac function may improve after catecholamine withdrawal and the application of calcium channel sensitizer levosimendan.

  10. The Physiology of Early Goal-Directed Therapy for Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lief, Lindsay; Arbo, John; Berlin, David A

    2016-10-05

    In 2001, Rivers and colleagues published a randomized controlled trial of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) for the treatment of sepsis. More than a decade later, it remains a landmark achievement. The study proved the benefits of early aggressive treatment of sepsis. However, many questions remain about specific aspects of the complex EGDT algorithm. Recently, 3 large trials attempted to replicate these results. None of the studies demonstrated a benefit of an EGDT protocol for sepsis. This review explores the physiologic basis of goal-directed therapy, including the hemodynamic targets and the therapeutic interventions. An understanding of the physiologic basis of EGDT helps reconcile the results of the clinical trials.

  11. Nutritional support in sepsis: still skeptical?

    PubMed

    Nitenberg, Gérard

    2000-08-01

    The immediate metabolic response to a septic challenge is probably adaptive, meaning that nutritional interference, mainly via the parenteral route, during this early phase of instability can do more harm than good. During the later phases, a gradual increase in enteral nutrition, at the expense of parenteral nutrition, combined with the administration of nutraceuticals such as glutamine and omega-3 fatty acids, can counteract wasting and modulate the complex inflammatory response and immunosuppression associated with sepsis. In these times of scarce resources, there is an urgent need to clearly document the efficacy of immuno/pharmaconutrients, individually and in combination, enterally or parenterally, before proposing them for routine management of septic patients in the intensive care unit.

  12. Sepsis, parenteral vaccination and skin disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    ASBSTRACT Disinfection should be required for all skin penetrative procedures including parenteral administration of vaccines. This review analyses medically attended infectious events following parenteral vaccination in terms of their microbiological aetiology and pathogenesis. Like ‘clean’ surgical site infections, the major pathogens responsible for these events were Staphylococcal species, implicating endogenous con-tamination as a significant source of infection. As 70% isopropyl alcohol swabbing has been shown to effectively disinfect the skin, it would be medico-legally difficult to defend a case of sepsis with the omission of skin disinfection unless the very low risk of this event was adequately explained to the patient and documented prior to vaccination. There was a significant cost-benefit for skin disinfection and cellulitis. Skin disinfection in the context of parenteral vaccination represents a new paradigm of medical practice; the use of a low cost intervention to prevent an event of very low prevalence but of significant cost. PMID:27295449

  13. An Immunological Perspective on Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Bernard; Razzaghian, Hamid; Lavoie, Pascal M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite concerted international efforts, mortality from neonatal infections remains unacceptably high in some areas of the world, particularly for premature infants. Recent developments in flow cytometry and next-generation sequencing technologies have led to major discoveries over the past few years, providing a more integrated understanding of the developing human immune system in the context of its microbial environment. We review these recent findings, focusing on how in human newborns incomplete maturation of the immune system before a full term of gestation impacts on their vulnerability to infection. We also discuss some of the clinical implications of this research in guiding the design of more-accurate age-adapted diagnostic and preventive strategies for neonatal sepsis. PMID:26993220

  14. Sepsis: from pattern to mechanism and back.

    PubMed

    An, Gary; Namas, Rami A; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical entity in which complex inflammatory and physiological processes are mobilized, not only across a range of cellular and molecular interactions, but also in clinically relevant physiological signals accessible at the bedside. There is a need for a mechanistic understanding that links the clinical phenomenon of physiologic variability with the underlying patterns of the biology of inflammation, and we assert that this can be facilitated through the use of dynamic mathematical and computational modeling. An iterative approach of laboratory experimentation and mathematical/computational modeling has the potential to integrate cellular biology, physiology, control theory, and systems engineering across biological scales, yielding insights into the control structures that govern mechanisms by which phenomena, detected as biological patterns, are produced. This approach can represent hypotheses in the formal language of mathematics and computation, and link behaviors that cross scales and domains, thereby offering the opportunity to better explain, diagnose, and intervene in the care of the septic patient.

  15. Optimizing the treatment of mood disorders in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Jones, Ian

    2015-06-01

    The perinatal period is a time of high risk for women with unipolar and bipolar mood disorders. We discuss treatment considerations for perinatal mood disorders, including unipolar and bipolar depression as well as postpartum psychosis. We further explore the unique issues faced by women and their families across the full trajectory of the perinatal period from preconception planning through pregnancy and following childbirth. Treatment of perinatal mood disorders requires a collaborative care approach between obstetrics practitioners and mental health providers, to ensure that a thoughtful risk : benefit analysis is conducted. It is vital to consider the risks of the underlying illness versus risks of medication exposure during pregnancy or lactation. When considering medication treatment, attention must be paid to prior medication trials that were most efficacious and best tolerated. Lastly, it is important to assess the impact of individual psychosocial stressors and lifestyle factors on treatment response.

  16. Perinatal care for women who are addicted: implications for empowerment.

    PubMed

    Carter, Carolyn S

    2002-08-01

    This article explores societal responses to perinatal drug abuse, including stigmatic attitudes and behaviors of health care workers that are directed toward women who abuse drugs during pregnancy. Health care providers' stigmatic responses can deter women from receiving perinatal care and place women and their unborn children at risk. Because poor women and women of color face a greater probability of being prosecuted or losing custody of their children for using drugs while they are pregnant, the article emphasizes societal responses to these client populations. Empowering strategies are suggested by which social workers and clients can potentially redefine perinatal drug abuse as a health problem rather than a legal issue and improve the environment in which perinatal care is provided.

  17. Levels and risk factors for perinatal mortality in Ahmedabad, India.

    PubMed Central

    Mavalankar, D. V.; Trivedi, C. R.; Gray, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    To estimate levels and determinants of perinatal mortality, we conducted a hospital-based surveillance and case-control study, linked with a population survey, in Ahmedabad, India. The perinatal mortality rate was 79.0 per 1000, and was highest for preterm low-birth-weight babies. The case-control study of 451 stillbirths, 160 early neonatal deaths and 1465 controls showed that poor maternal nutritional status, absence of antenatal care, and complications during labour were independently associated with substantially increased risks of perinatal death. Multivariate analyses indicate that socioeconomic factors largely operate through these proximate factors and do not have an independent effect. Estimates of attributable risk derived from the prevalence of exposures in the population survey suggest that improvements in maternal nutrition and antenatal and intrapartum care could result in marked reductions of perinatal mortality. PMID:1934237

  18. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors with... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Monitoring Devices § 884.2740 Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. (a) Identification. A...

  19. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors with... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Monitoring Devices § 884.2740 Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. (a) Identification. A...

  20. Optimizing the treatment of mood disorders in the perinatal period

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Jones, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The perinatal period is a time of high risk for women with unipolar and bipolar mood disorders. We discuss treatment considerations for perinatal mood disorders, including unipolar and bipolar depression as well as postpartum psychosis. We further explore the unique issues faced by women and their families across the full trajectory of the perinatal period from preconception planning through pregnancy and following childbirth. Treatment of perinatal mood disorders requires a collaborative care approach between obstetrics practitioners and mental health providers, to ensure that a thoughtful risk : benefit analysis is conducted. It is vital to consider the risks of the underlying illness versus risks of medication exposure during pregnancy or lactation. When considering medication treatment, attention must be paid to prior medication trials that were most efficacious and best tolerated. Lastly, it is important to assess the impact of individual psychosocial stressors and lifestyle factors on treatment response. PMID:26246794

  1. [Pathophysiology of sepsis--will the basic research contribute to the improvement of outcome in clinical sepsis?].

    PubMed

    Karima, Risuke

    2008-03-01

    In this decade, the molecular mechanism of sepsis has been strikingly clarified. Especially, the identification of toll-like receptors as the pivotal molecules for the recognition of the stimulation of the inflammatory products of microorganisms has contributed to the elucidation of intracellular signaling pathways which result in severe systemic inflammatory response in sepsis. The production and release of a variety of pro-inflammatory mediators have been found to be associated with severe systemic inflammation and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). In the pathophysiology of the development of MODS in sepsis, the disturbance of peripheral microcirculation, the insult of tissues and cells by leukocytes and activated complements and the augmentation of the disorder of fibrinolytic and coagulation systems, which often results in the outbreak of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), will be critically involved. Despite of the advance in the basic research regarding molecular pathophysiology of sepsis, sepsis is still accompanied by high mortality in clinical settings. Almost all clinical trials targeting sepsis-associated mediators have failed, except the substitution therapy of activated protein C. However, further trials based on the basic findings, including the therapies targeting the multiple mediators, will contribute to the improvement of outcome of clinical sepsis. ple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), pro-inflammatory mediator, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC).

  2. In-111 WBC imaging in musculoskeletal sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.; Ouzounian, T.J.; Webber, M.M.; Amstutz, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy and utility of the In-111 labeled WBC imaging in a series of patients who were suspected of having musculoskeletal sepsis. The labeling of the WBCs was patterned after a method previously described, in which the WBCs are labeled with In-111 oxine in plasma. The WBCs from 100 ml of blood are separated and incubated with In-111 oxine complex, and then 500 ..mu..Ci. of the labeled cells were reinjected into the patient. Images of the areas in question were obtained at 24 hrs. In some instances, 48 hour images were also obtained. Images were interpreted using consistent criteria. Forty imaging procedures were done on 39 patients. These included 39 total joint protheses, and 17 other images to evaluate possible osteomyelitis, septic arthritis or deep abscesses. Of these studies, 15 were positive, and 42 negative. The findings were then correlated with operative culture and pathology in 21, aspiration cultures and gram stains in 14, and with clinical findings in the remaining 21. This correlation showed 41 true negatives, 12 true positives, 1 false negative, and 2 false positives. The sensitivity was 92.9% and the specificity was 95.2%l. The false negative occurred in a patient on chronic suppressive antibiotic therapy for an infected total hip replacement. The false positive images occurred in a patient with active rheumatoid arthritis and in a patient imaged one month post operative placement of the prosthesis. These images were very useful in several septic patients who had many possible sites of infection. The authors conclude that In-III imaging is an accurate and useful non-invasive method of evaluating musculoskeletal sepsis.

  3. Inhibited muscle amino acid uptake in sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Hasselgren, P O; James, J H; Fischer, J E

    1986-01-01

    Amino acid uptake in vivo was determined in soleus (SOL) muscle, diaphragm, heart, and liver following intravenous injection of [3H]-alpha-amino-isobutyric acid ([3H]-AIB) in rats made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and in sham-operated controls. Muscle amino acid transport was also measured in vitro by determining uptake of [3H]-AIB in incubated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and SOL muscles. Results were expressed as distribution ratio between [3H]-AIB in intracellular and extracellular fluid. AIB uptake in vivo was reduced by 90% in SOL and cardiac muscle and by 45% in diaphragm 16 hours after CLP. In contrast, AIB uptake by liver was almost four times higher in septic than in control animals. AIB uptake in vitro was reduced by 18% in EDL 8 hours after CLP but was not significantly altered in SOL at the same time point. Sixteen hours after CLP, AIB uptake was significantly reduced in both muscles, i.e., by 17% in EDL and by 65% in SOL. When muscles from untreated rats were incubated in the presence of plasma from septic animals (16 hours CLP) or from animals injected with endotoxin (2 mg/kg body weight), AIB uptake was reduced. Addition of endotoxin in vitro (2-200 micrograms/ml) to incubated muscles did not affect AIB uptake. The results suggest that sepsis leads to marked impairment of amino acid transport system A in muscle and that this impairment is mediated by a circulating factor that is not endotoxin. Reduced uptake of amino acids by skeletal muscle during sepsis may divert amino acids to the liver for increased gluconeogenesis and protein synthesis. PMID:3963895

  4. A latent class approach for sepsis diagnosis supports use of procalcitonin in the emergency room for diagnosis of severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Given the acknowledged problems in sepsis diagnosis, we use a novel way with the application of the latent class analysis (LCA) to determine the operative characteristics of C-reactive protein (CRP), D-dimer (DD) and Procalcitonin (PCT) as diagnostic tests for sepsis in patients admitted to hospital care with a presumptive infection. Methods Cross-sectional study to determine the diagnostic accuracy of three biological markers against the gold standard of clinical definition of sepsis provided by an expert committee, and also against the likelihood of sepsis according to LCA. Patients were recruited in the emergency room within 24 hours of hospitalization and were follow-up daily until discharge. Results Among 765 patients, the expert committee classified 505 patients (66%) with sepsis, 112 (15%) with infection but without sepsis and 148 (19%) without infection. The best cut-offs points for CRP, DD, and PCT were 7.8 mg/dl, 1616 ng/ml and 0.3 ng/ml, respectively; but, neither sensitivity nor specificity reach 70% for any biomarker. The LCA analysis with the same three tests identified a “cluster” of 187 patients with several characteristics suggesting a more severe condition as well as better microbiological confirmation. Assuming this subset of patients as the new prevalence of sepsis, the ROC curve analysis identified new cut-off points for the tests and suggesting a better discriminatory ability for PCT with a value of 2 ng/ml. Conclusions Under a “classical” definition of sepsis three typical biomarkers (CRP, PCT and DD) are not capable enough to differentiate septic from non-septic patients in the ER. However, a higher level of PCT discriminates a selected group of patients with severe sepsis. PMID:24050481

  5. Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease presenting as hydrops fetalis

    PubMed Central

    BenHamida, Emira; Ayadi, Imene; Ouertani, Ines; Chammem, Maroua; Bezzine, Ahlem; BenTmime, Riadh; Attia, Leila; Mrad, Ridha; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease is very rare and is considered a variant of type 2 Gaucher disease that occurs in the neonatal period. The most distinct features of perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease are non-immune hydrops fetalis. Less common signs of the disease are hepatosplenomegaly, ichthyosis and arthrogryposis. We report a case of Gaucher's disease (type 2) diagnosed in a newborn who presented with Hydrops Fetalis. PMID:26327947

  6. Mother-Infant Antidepressant Levels, Maternal Depression and Perinatal Events

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Dorothy; Perel, James M.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Helsel, Joseph C.; Luther, James F.; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The authors explored the relationship of cord-maternal antidepressant concentration ratios and maternal depression with perinatal events and preterm birth. Method The investigators examined 21 mother-infant pairs with antidepressant exposure during pregnancy. The antidepressants included serotonergic reuptake inhibitors (SRI) and nortriptyline (noradrenergic inhibitor and mild SRI). The mothers were evaluated with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Depression ratings were repeated at 20, 30 and 36 weeks pregnancy. At delivery, investigators assessed cord and maternal antidepressant concentrations, neonatal outcomes on the Peripartum Events Scale (PES) and gestational weeks at birth. Results Mean cord-to-maternal concentration ratios were 0.52±0.35 (0.08–1.64) - parent drug and 0.54±0.17 (0.28–0.79) - metabolite. Nine of 21 mothers (43%) had a major depressive episode. From examining the maximum depression ratings, the mean SIGH-ADS score was 16.0±7.6. One-third (7/21) of infants had at least one perinatal event (PES≥1). The frequency of deliveries complicated by perinatal event(s) was similar in depressed and non-depressed mothers. There was no significant association between perinatal events and cord-to-maternal antidepressant concentration ratios or maternal depression levels. Exposure to short half-life antidepressants compared to fluoxetine resulted in more perinatal events (7/16 =44% vs 0/5=0%; p=0.06). Fourteen percent (3/21) of infants were preterm. Preterm birth was not associated with cord-to-maternal metabolite concentration ratios, depression levels or exposure to fluoxetine. Conclusion Antidepressant-exposed infants experienced a limited number of transient perinatal events. No association between cord-maternal concentration ratios or maternal depression and perinatal events could be identified. Contrary to other reports, we detected no increased risk for perinatal events with fluoxetine therapy compared to the short half

  7. Performance of Interleukin-27 as a Sepsis Diagnostic Biomarker in Critically Ill Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hector R.; Liu, Kathleen D.; Kangelaris, Kirsten N.; Lahni, Patrick; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We recently identified interleukin-27 (IL-27) as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker in children. Here we assess IL-27 as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker in critically ill adults with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. Methods IL-27 and procalcitonin (PCT) were measured from plasma samples in three groups: no sepsis (n = 78), pulmonary source of sepsis (n = 66), and non-pulmonary source of sepsis (n = 43). Receiver operating characteristic curves and classification and regression tree methodology were used to evaluate biomarker performance. Results IL-27 did not discriminate effectively between sepsis and sterile SIRS in unselected patients. The highest area under the curve (AUC) was 0.70 (95% C.I. 0.60 – 0.80) for IL-27 in subjects with a non-pulmonary source of sepsis. A decision tree incorporating IL-27, PCT, and age had an AUC of 0.79 (0.71 – 0.87) in subjects with a non-pulmonary source of sepsis. Compared to children with sepsis, adults with sepsis express less IL-27. Conclusions IL-27 performed overall poorly in this cohort as a sepsis diagnostic biomarker. Combining IL-27, PCT, and age reasonably estimated the risk of sepsis in subjects with a non-pulmonary source of sepsis. IL-27 may be a more reliable sepsis diagnostic biomarker in children than in adults. PMID:24848949

  8. POP bioaccumulation in macroinvertebrates of alpine freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Bizzotto, E C; Villa, S; Vighi, M

    2009-12-01

    This study serves to investigate the uptake of POPs in the different trophic levels (scrapers, collectors, predators, shredders) of macroinvertebrate communities sampled from a glacial and a non-glacial stream in the Italian Alps. The presented results show that the contaminant concentrations in glacial communities are generally higher compared to those from non-glacial catchments, highlighting the importance of glaciers as temporary sinks of atmospherically transported pollutants. Moreover, the data also suggests that in mountain systems snow plays an important role in influencing macroinvertebrate contamination. The main chemical uptake process to the macroinvertebrates is considered to be bioconcentration from water, as similar contaminant profiles were observed between the different trophic levels. The role of biomagnification/bioaccumulation is thought to be absent or negligible. The enrichment of chemicals observed in the predators is likely to be related to their greater lipid content compared to that of other feeding groups.

  9. Popping a Hole in High-Speed Pursuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA s Plum Brook Station, a 6,400-acre, remote test installation site for Glenn Research Center, houses unique, world-class test facilities, including the world s largest space environment simulation chamber and the world s only laboratory capable of full-scale rocket engine firings and launch vehicle system level tests at high-altitude conditions. Plum Brook Station performs complex and innovative ground tests for the U.S. Government (civilian and military), the international aerospace community, as well as the private sector. Popping a Hole in High-Speed Pursuits Recently, Plum Brook Station s test facilities and NASA s engineering experience were combined to improve a family of tire deflating devices (TDDs) that helps law enforcement agents safely, simply, and successfully stop fleeing vehicles in high-speed pursuit

  10. Perinatal pathology: practice suggestions for limited-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Drucilla J

    2013-06-01

    The practice of perinatal pathology in much of the world suffers, as do all subspecialties of anatomic pathology, from inadequate resources (equipment, consumables, and both professional and technical personnel), from lack of education (not only of the pathologist but also of the clinicians responsible for sending the specimens, and the technicians processing the specimens), and from lack of appropriate government sector support. Perinatal pathology has significant public health-related utility and should be championing its service by providing maternal and fetal/infant mortality and morbidity data to governmental health ministries. It is with this pathologic data that informed decisions can be made on health-related courses of action and allocation of resources. These perinatal pathology data are needed to develop appropriate public health initiatives, specifically toward achieving the Millennium Developmental Goals as the best way to effectively decrease infant and maternal deaths and to determine causes of perinatal mortality and morbidity. The following overview will focus on the utility of perinatal pathology specifically as related to its public health function and will suggest methods to improve its service in resource-poor settings. This article is offered not as a critique of the current practice that most pathologists find themselves working in globally, but to provide suggestions for improving perinatal pathology services, which could be implemented with the limited available resources and manpower most pathology departments currently have. In addition, we offer suggestions for graded improvements ("ramping up") over time.

  11. Agricultural pesticide exposure and perinatal mortality in central Sudan.

    PubMed Central

    Taha, T. E.; Gray, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Hospital- and community-based studies were conducted in central Sudan to investigate the association between pesticide exposure and perinatal mortality. The cases were 197 stillbirths in the hospital and 36 perinatal deaths in the community; the controls were 812 liveborn, normal-birth-weight infants in the hospital, and 1505 liveborn infants who survived for the first 7 days after birth in the community. The odds ratio (OR) of perinatal death associated with pesticide exposure was estimated using multiple logistic regression. There was a consistent and significant association between pesticide exposure and perinatal mortality in the hospital (adjusted OR = 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-2.8) and the community populations (adjusted OR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.1-6.4). The OR was significantly higher among women engaged in farming (3.6; 95% CI: 1.6-8.0), but not among women in nonfarming occupations (1.6; 95% CI: 0.8-3.3). The estimated attributable risks of perinatal death owing to pesticide exposure were 22.6% for hospital stillbirths and 15.7% for community perinatal deaths; but among women engaged in farming in the hospital population the attributable risks were substantially higher (34.5%). PMID:8324850

  12. Picroside II protects against sepsis via suppressing inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Zhou, Miao; Li, Chengbao; Chen, Yuanli; Fang, Wei; Xu, Guo; Shi, Xueyin

    2016-01-01

    Picroside II, an iridoid compound extracted from Picrorhiza, exhibits anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities. We explored the protective effects and mechanisms of picroside II in a mouse model of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), using three groups of mice: Group A (sham), Group B (CLP+NS) and Group C (CLP+20 mg/kg picroside II). The mortality in mice with sepsis was decreased by the administration of picroside II, and lung injury was alleviated simultaneously. Picroside II treatment enhanced bacterial clearance in septic mice. Further, picroside II treatment alleviated the inflammatory response in sepsis and enhanced immune function by inhibiting the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB pathways. Picroside II may represent an anti-inflammatory drug candidate, providing novel insight into the treatment of sepsis. PMID:28078023

  13. Use of biomarkers in pediatric sepsis: literature review

    PubMed Central

    Lanziotti, Vanessa Soares; Póvoa, Pedro; Soares, Márcio; Silva, José Roberto Lapa e; Barbosa, Arnaldo Prata; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in recent years, sepsis is still a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality in infants and children. The presence of biomarkers during the response to an infectious insult makes it possible to use such biomarkers in screening, diagnosis, prognosis (risk stratification), monitoring of therapeutic response, and rational use of antibiotics (for example, the determination of adequate treatment length). Studies of biomarkers in sepsis in children are still relatively scarce. This review addresses the use of biomarkers in sepsis in pediatric patients with emphasis on C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, interleukins 6, 8, and 18, human neutrophil gelatinase, and proadrenomedullin. Assessment of these biomarkers may be useful in the management of pediatric sepsis. PMID:28099644

  14. HDL in sepsis - risk factor and therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Morin, Emily E; Guo, Ling; Schwendeman, Anna; Li, Xiang-An

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a key component of circulating blood and plays essential roles in regulation of vascular endothelial function and immunity. Clinical data demonstrate that HDL levels drop by 40-70% in septic patients, which is associated with a poor prognosis. Experimental studies using Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoAI) null mice showed that HDL deficient mice are susceptible to septic death, and overexpressing ApoAI in mice to increase HDL levels protects against septic death. These clinical and animal studies support our hypothesis that a decrease in HDL level is a risk factor for sepsis, and raising circulating HDL levels may provide an efficient therapy for sepsis. In this review, we discuss the roles of HDL in sepsis and summarize the efforts of using synthetic HDL as a potential therapy for sepsis.

  15. Molecular Hydrogen Therapy Ameliorates Organ Damage Induced by Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yijun; Zhu, Duming

    2016-01-01

    Since it was proposed in 2007, molecular hydrogen therapy has been widely concerned and researched. Many animal experiments were carried out in a variety of disease fields, such as cerebral infarction, ischemia reperfusion injury, Parkinson syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, radiation injury, chronic hepatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, stress ulcer, acute sports injuries, mitochondrial and inflammatory disease, and acute erythema skin disease and other pathological processes or diseases. Molecular hydrogen therapy is pointed out as there is protective effect for sepsis patients, too. The impact of molecular hydrogen therapy against sepsis is shown from the aspects of basic vital signs, organ functions (brain, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, etc.), survival rate, and so forth. Molecular hydrogen therapy is able to significantly reduce the release of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress injury. Thereby it can reduce damage of various organ functions from sepsis and improve survival rate. Molecular hydrogen therapy is a prospective method against sepsis.

  16. Government introduces action plan to reduce deaths from sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kleebauer, Alistair

    2015-01-20

    Tackling sepsis - the potentially fatal over-reaction of the immune system to infection - must be given the same priority as reducing Clostridium difficile and MRSA infections, the government has said.

  17. Histamine H3 activation depresses cardiac function in experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Eschun, G; Bose, D; Jacobs, H; Yang, J J; Light, R B; Mink, S N

    1998-11-01

    In the heart, histamine (H3) receptors may function as inhibitory presynaptic receptors that decrease adrenergic norepinephrine release in conditions of enhanced sympathetic neural activity. We hypothesized that H3-receptor blockade might improve cardiovascular function in sepsis. In a canine model of Escherichia coli sepsis, we found that H3-receptor blockade increased cardiac output (3.6 to 5.3 l/min, P < 0.05), systemic blood pressure (mean 76 to 96 mmHg, P < 0.05), and left ventricular contractility compared with pretreatment values. Plasma histamine concentrations increased modestly in the H3-blocker-sepsis group compared with values obtained in a nonsepsis-time-control group. In an in vitro preparation, histamine H3 activation could be identified under conditions of septic plasma. We conclude that activation of H3 receptors may contribute to cardiovascular collapse in sepsis.

  18. Clinical Decision Support for Early Recognition of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Amland, Robert C; Hahn-Cover, Kristin E

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory response triggered by infection, with a high in-hospital mortality rate. Early recognition and treatment can reverse the inflammatory response, with evidence of improved patient outcomes. One challenge clinicians face is identifying the inflammatory syndrome against the background of the patient's infectious illness and comorbidities. An approach to this problem is implementation of computerized early warning tools for sepsis. This multicenter retrospective study sought to determine clinimetric performance of a cloud-based computerized sepsis clinical decision support system (CDS), understand the epidemiology of sepsis, and identify opportunities for quality improvement. Data encompassed 6200 adult hospitalizations from 2012 through 2013. Of 13% patients screened-in, 51% were already suspected to have an infection when the system activated. This study focused on a patient cohort screened-in before infection was suspected; median time from arrival to CDS activation was 3.5 hours, and system activation to diagnostic collect was another 8.6 hours.

  19. Development of an e-learning package for sepsis care.

    PubMed

    Davis, Anna; Henderson, James; Langmack, Gill

    Severe sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. This article describes the collaborative development and implementation of an interactive online learning package to understand the key role nurses have in recognising and then starting to apply the Sepsis Six care bundle in clinical practice. The e-learning package, developed in a UK teaching hospital, uses a case study approach to address the knowledge that is required to be able to recognise sepsis, to understand the processes that occur and the ongoing care and treatment required. The package is relevant to final-year student nurses, newly registered nurses in preceptorship and other health professionals involved in assessing and treating patients who may be developing sepsis.

  20. Sepsis in cirrhosis: emerging concepts in pathogenesis, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Philips, Cyriac Abby; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Infections and sepsis are more common in cirrhotic than in the general population and constitute the commonest cause of sudden worsening and death. The diagnosis of systemic inflammatory syndrome and sepsis are challenging in cirrhotics due to an underlying a state of hyperdynamic circulation. Further, poor nutritional and bone marrow reserves lead to modest host immune response, the so called immunoparalysis state and the outcome of antibiotic therapy is suboptimal. In this review, a comprehensive description of current and emerging concepts in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of sepsis with importance to current and novel biomarkers for diagnosis of sepsis in cirrhosis is presented. Furthermore, novel treatment options and preventive strategies are discussed to improve the overall survival.

  1. HDL in sepsis – risk factor and therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Emily E.; Guo, Ling; Schwendeman, Anna; Li, Xiang-An

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a key component of circulating blood and plays essential roles in regulation of vascular endothelial function and immunity. Clinical data demonstrate that HDL levels drop by 40–70% in septic patients, which is associated with a poor prognosis. Experimental studies using Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoAI) null mice showed that HDL deficient mice are susceptible to septic death, and overexpressing ApoAI in mice to increase HDL levels protects against septic death. These clinical and animal studies support our hypothesis that a decrease in HDL level is a risk factor for sepsis, and raising circulating HDL levels may provide an efficient therapy for sepsis. In this review, we discuss the roles of HDL in sepsis and summarize the efforts of using synthetic HDL as a potential therapy for sepsis. PMID:26557091

  2. Biomarkers for Sepsis: What Is and What Might Be?

    PubMed Central

    Biron, Bethany M.; Ayala, Alfred; Lomas-Neira, Joanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Every year numerous individuals develop the morbid condition of sepsis. Therefore, novel biomarkers that might better inform clinicians treating such patients are sorely needed. Difficulty in identifying such markers is in part due to the complex heterogeneity of sepsis, resulting from the broad and vague definition of this state/condition based on numerous possible clinical signs and symptoms as well as an incomplete understanding of the underlying pathobiology of this complex condition. This review considers some of the attempts that have been made so far, looking at both the pro- and anti-inflammatory response to sepsis, as well as genomic analysis, as sources of potential biomarkers. Irrespective, for functional biomarker(s) of sepsis to successfully translate from the laboratory to a clinical setting, the biomarker must be target specific and sensitive as well as easy to implement/interpret, and be cost effective, such that they can be utilized routinely in patient diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26417200

  3. Dry heat popping of amaranth seed might damage some of its essential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Tovar, L R; Brito, E; Takahashi, T; Miyazawa, T; Soriano, J; Fujimoto, K

    1989-12-01

    Amaranth was a major crop among the Aztecs. In Mexico the seed is popped and eaten with brown sugar. The crude protein content of the seed is 14 +/- 2% but its contents of lysine and tryptophan are 6.2 and 1.6 g/16 g N respectively. We developed a popping method based on a fluid bed system (FBS) whereas the traditional method (TM) is just to pop the seeds manually in a hot plate. Assays carried out were evaluation of racemization of the amaranth protein due to heat treatment, amino acid composition of the raw and heat treated seeds and a biological experiment testing whether leucine was the most limiting amino acid of amaranth protein. Male rats were fed both popped amaranths and roasted amaranth. Parboiled amaranth and casein were controls. The results were: (a) Lys, Arg and Cys were damaged in the heat treated seeds; (b) Asp, Met, Glu, Ala and Phe were racemized in that decreasing order in the seeds popped and roasted by the TM; (c) the estimated net protein retention (NPR) and estimated net protein utilization (NPU) of popped amaranths by either method were not different, but were lower than for the parboiled amaranth. The parboiled amaranth was not different from casein; (d) Leu was not the most limiting amino acid in any of the amaranth seeds tested. After Lys, sulfur amino acids appear to be the next most limiting in severely heat treated amaranth. The FBS seems to be a promising method for popping amaranth at industrial level.

  4. [Introduction of British guidelines in perinatal mental healthcare--towards enhancing the function of perinatal mental healthcare in Japan].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshihito

    2014-01-01

    Professionals in many different occupations, from psychiatrists, obstetricians, and pediatricians to nurses, midwives, pharmacists, clinical psychologists, public health nurses, and psychiatric social workers, are involved in perinatal mental healthcare. In order to enhance the function of such healthcare, it is necessary both to provide specialized training in each occupation and form a system and to smoothly conduct medical collaboration between different occupations. A deficiency in the medical function of perinatal mental healthcare greatly influences the mother and child's health, mental hygiene, and social life later in life. Therefore, a demand is seen for specialized staff and system formation capable of the following: 1) responding with appropriate perinatal management of female patients taking psychotropic drugs; 2) providing support and pregnancy consultation to female patients who wish to have children; and 3) properly handling postpartum mental disorder management, possibility of breastfeeding, and various issues that arise in mother-child relationships during upbringing. In the UK, the clinical guideline (NICE Clinical Guideline 45) for perinatal mental healthcare, which was created by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE), provides important guidelines on how to handle perinatal mental health. Aside from the NICE guideline, the Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines in Psychiatry indicates basic guidelines on prescribing perinatal drug therapy. In Japan, however, the current situation of perinatal mental healthcare is such that it has yet to be systemically developed. In this paper, we introduce the basic content in these British guidelines that should be noted. In addition, we consider the current status and future disposition of Japan's perinatal mental healthcare, with consideration for the differences in healthcare circumstances between Japan and the UK.

  5. A new integrated technique for the supportive treatment of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Harm, Stephan

    2017-03-06

    Although there has been continuous, intensive research for many years in the field of sepsis treatment, currently available treatment options are limited, and there is still a lack of systems that efficiently remove endotoxins as well as mediators. Here, we discuss a newly developed, integrated technique that combines different aspects for their use in extracorporeal blood purification for the supportive treatment of liver failure and sepsis.

  6. Early diagnosis of sepsis using serum hemoglobin subunit Beta.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hayoung; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Shin-Woo; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-02-01

    The development of new sepsis-specific biomarkers is mandatory to improve the detection and monitoring of the disease. Hemoglobin is the main oxygen and carbon dioxide carrier in cells of the erythroid lineage and is responsible for oxygen delivery to the respiring tissues of the body. Hemoglobin subunit beta (HBβ) is a component of a larger protein called hemoglobin. The aim of this study was to evaluate blood levels of HBβ in septic patients. A prospective study of 82 patients with sepsis was conducted. Furthermore, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery. Alternatively, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) or C57BL/6 mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/ml to HUVECs or 10 mg/kg to mice). The data showed that LPS induced upregulation of the synthesis and secretion of HBβ in LPS-treated HUVECs and in LPS-injected and CLP mice. In patients admitted to the intensive care unit with sepsis, circulating levels of HBβ were significantly high (sepsis, 64.93-114.76 ng/ml, n = 30; severe sepsis, 157.37-268.69 ng/ml, n = 22; septic shock, 309.98-427.03 ng/ml, n = 30) when compared to the levels of control donors (9.76-12.28 ng/ml, n = 21). Patients with septic shock had higher HBβ levels when compared to patients with severe sepsis. Furthermore, the HBβ levels in septic patients were higher than those in healthy volunteers. These results suggest that in septic patients, HBβ blood level is related to the severity of sepsis and may represent a novel endothelial cell dysfunction marker. Moreover, HBβ can be used as a biomarker to determine the severity of sepsis.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effect of Momordica charantia in sepsis mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Che-Yi; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Wang, Wei-Hsien; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2014-08-21

    Wild bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L. var. abbreviate Seringe), a common vegetable in Asia, is used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases, including inflammation. Extant literature indicates that wild bitter gourds have components that activate PPARα and PPARγ. This research probed the influence of adding wild bitter gourd to diets on inflammation responses in mice with sepsis induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS. Male BALB/c mice were divided normal, sepsis, positive control, and three experimental groups. The latter ate diets with low (1%), moderate (2%), and high (10%) ratios of wild bitter gourd lyophilized powder. Before mice were sacrificed, with the exception of the normal group, intraperitoneal injection of LPS induced sepsis in each group; positive control group was injected with LPS after PDTC. This experiment revealed starkly lower weights in groups with added wild bitter gourd than those of the remaining groups. Blood lipids (TG, cholesterol, and NEFA) were also lower in comparison to the sepsis group, and blood glucose concentrations recovered and approached normal levels. Blood biochemistry values related to inflammation reactions indicated GOT, GPT, C-RP, and NO concentrations of groups with added wild bitter gourd were all lower than those of the sepsis group. Secretion levels of the spleen pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α tallied significantly lower in comparison to the sepsis group, whereas secretion levels of IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokine increased. Expression level of proteins NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2 were significantly inhibited. Results indicate wild bitter gourd in diets promoted lipid metabolism, reducing fat accumulation, and improving low blood glucose in sepsis. Addition of wild bitter gourd can reduce inflammation biochemical markers or indicators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the body, hence improving the inflammation responses in mice with sepsis.

  8. A Review of GM-CSF Therapy in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Brittany; Szpila, Benjamin E.; Moore, Frederick A.; Efron, Philip A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Determine what clinical role, if any, GM-CSF may have in the clinical treatment of sepsis in the adult patient. Advancements in the management of sepsis have led to significant decreases in early mortality; however, sepsis remains a significant source of long-term mortality and disability which places strain on healthcare resources with a substantial growing economic impact. Historically, early multiple organ failure (MOF) and death in patients with severe sepsis was thought to result from an exaggerated proinflammatory response called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Numerous prospective randomized controlled trials (PRCTs) tested therapies aimed at decreasing the organ injury associated with an exaggerated inflammatory response. With few exceptions, the results from these PRCTs have been disappointing, and currently no specific therapeutic agent is approved to counteract the early SIRS response in patients with severe sepsis. It has long been recognized that there is a delayed immunosuppressive state that contributes to long-term morbidity. However, recent findings now support a concurrent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory response present throughout sepsis. Multiple immunomodulating agents have been studied to combat the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis with the goal of decreasing secondary infection, reducing organ dysfunction, decreasing ICU stays, and improving survival. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a myelopoietic growth factor currently used in patients with neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, has been studied as a potential immune-activating agent. The applicability of GM-CSF as a standard therapy for generalized sepsis is still largely understudied; however, small-scale studies available have demonstrated some improved recovery from infection, decreased hospital length of stay, decreased days requiring mechanical ventilation, and decreased medical costs. PMID

  9. Fourth WHO-coordinated survey of human milk for persistent organic pollutants (POPs): Belgian results.

    PubMed

    Colles, Ann; Koppen, Gudrun; Hanot, Vincent; Nelen, Vera; Dewolf, Marie-Christine; Noël, Etienne; Malisch, Rainer; Kotz, Alexander; Kypke, Karin; Biot, Pierre; Vinkx, Christine; Schoeters, Greet

    2008-10-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are chemicals that accumulate in the food chain and are toxic to humans and wildlife. The fourth World Health Organization (WHO) survey on POP levels in human milk (2006-2009) aims to provide baseline and trend information on human exposure to POPs. So far Belgium participated in all three previous rounds (1988, 1992, 2001). Whereas the first three rounds focused on determination of dioxins and PCBs in pooled (mixed) samples, the fourth survey comprised the analyses of individual milk samples for nine "basic POPs" (chlorinated pesticides and indicator PCBs) and of pooled milk samples for "basic POPs", "advanced POPs" (dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs) and "optional POPs" (polybrominated diphenylethers [PBDEs], polybrominated dioxins and dibenzofurans [PBrDD/F], mixed halogenated dioxins and dibenzofurans [PXDD/F] and hexabromocyclododecane [HBCD]). For the Belgian participation human milk samples were collected during the summer of 2006 from 197 women between 18 and 30 years old distributed over all Belgian provinces. The individual samples were analyzed in a Belgian Laboratory for "basic" POPs. A pooled sample was made from 178 individual samples and analyzed by the WHO Reference Laboratory for the "basic, advanced and optional" POPs. The results indicate that most organochlorinated pesticides banned 25-30 years ago were below or around detection limits in Belgian human milk samples although DDE was still found at low levels in all samples. Over the last five years the levels of marker PCBs and PCDD/Fs in Belgian human milk decreased, respectively, by 58% and 39%. For some of the other emerging or older compounds recent international data are needed to allow comparison. This shows the importance of international studies as run by WHO.

  10. Role of Exogenous Hsp72 on Liver Dysfunction during Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsen-Ni; Ho, Jia-Jing; Liu, Maw-Shung; Lee, Tzu-Ying; Lu, Mei-Chin; Liu, Chia-Jen; Huang, Li-Ju; Lue, Sheng-I; Yang, Rei-Chen

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of exogenous heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) in reversing sepsis-induced liver dysfunction. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Liver function was determined on the basis of the enzymatic activities of serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT). Apoptosis was determined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining. B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9, and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein expressions were analyzed using Western blotting. Results showed GOT and GPT levels increased during sepsis, and levels were restored following the administration of human recombinant Hsp72 (rhHsp72). Increased liver tissue apoptosis was observed during sepsis, and normal apoptosis resumed on rhHsp72 administration. The Bcl-2/Bax ratio, cleaved caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP protein expressions in the liver tissues were upregulated during sepsis and normalized after rhHsp72 treatment. We conclude that, during sepsis, exogenous Hsp72 restored liver dysfunction by inhibiting apoptosis via the mitochondria-initiated caspase pathway.

  11. Prognostic Implications of Serum Lipid Metabolism over Time during Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Park, Moo Suk; Park, Byung Hoon; Jung, Won Jai; Lee, In Seon; Kim, Song Yee; Kim, Eun Young; Jung, Ji Ye; Kang, Young Ae; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Chung, Kyung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite extensive research and an improved standard of care, sepsis remains a disorder with a high mortality rate. Sepsis is accompanied by severe metabolic alterations. Methods. We evaluated 117 patients with sepsis (severe sepsis [n = 19] and septic shock [n = 98]) who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Serum cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), free fatty acid (FFA), and apolipoprotein (Apo) A-I levels were measured on days 0, 1, 3, and 7. Results. Nonsurvivors had low levels of cholesterol, TG, HDL, LDL, and Apo A-I on days 0, 1, 3, and 7. In a linear mixed model analysis, the variations in TG, LDL, FFA, and Apo A-I levels over time differed significantly between the groups (p = 0.043, p = 0.020, p = 0.005, and p = 0.015, resp.). According to multivariate analysis, TG levels and SOFA scores were associated with mortality on days 0 and 1 (p = 0.018 and p = 0.008, resp.). Conclusions. Our study illustrated that TG levels are associated with mortality in patients with sepsis. This may be attributable to alterations in serum lipid metabolism during sepsis, thus modulating the host response to inflammation in critically ill patients. PMID:26351639

  12. Sepsis-induced elevation in plasma serotonin facilitates endothelial hyperpermeability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yicong; Hadden, Coedy; Cooper, Anthonya; Ahmed, Asli; Wu, Hong; Lupashin, Vladimir V.; Mayeux, Philip R.; Kilic, Fusun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpermeability of the endothelial barrier and resulting microvascular leakage are a hallmark of sepsis. Our studies describe the mechanism by which serotonin (5-HT) regulates the microvascular permeability during sepsis. The plasma 5-HT levels are significantly elevated in mice made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). 5-HT-induced permeability of endothelial cells was associated with the phosphorylation of p21 activating kinase (PAK1), PAK1-dependent phosphorylation of vimentin (P-vimentin) filaments, and a strong association between P-vimentin and ve-cadherin. These findings were in good agreement with the findings with the endothelial cells incubated in serum from CLP mice. In vivo, reducing the 5-HT uptake rates with the 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor, paroxetine blocked renal microvascular leakage and the decline in microvascular perfusion. Importantly, mice that lack SERT showed significantly less microvascular dysfunction after CLP. Based on these data, we propose that the increased endothelial 5-HT uptake together with 5-HT signaling disrupts the endothelial barrier function in sepsis. Therefore, regulating intracellular 5-HT levels in endothelial cells represents a novel approach in improving sepsis-associated microvascular dysfunction and leakage. These new findings advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to intracellular/extracellular 5-HT ratio in sepsis and refine current views of these signaling processes during sepsis. PMID:26956613

  13. New approaches to sepsis: molecular diagnostics and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Konrad; Bauer, Michael; Riedemann, Niels C; Hartog, Christiane S

    2012-10-01

    Sepsis is among the most common causes of death in hospitals. It arises from the host response to infection. Currently, diagnosis relies on nonspecific physiological criteria and culture-based pathogen detection. This results in diagnostic uncertainty, therapeutic delays, the mis- and overuse of antibiotics, and the failure to identify patients who might benefit from immunomodulatory therapies. There is a need for new sepsis biomarkers that can aid in therapeutic decision making and add information about screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and monitoring of the response to therapy. The host response involves hundreds of mediators and single molecules, many of which have been proposed as biomarkers. It is, however, unlikely that one single biomarker is able to satisfy all the needs and expectations for sepsis research and management. Among biomarkers that are measurable by assays approved for clinical use, procalcitonin (PCT) has shown some usefulness as an infection marker and for antibiotic stewardship. Other possible new approaches consist of molecular strategies to improve pathogen detection and molecular diagnostics and prognostics based on transcriptomic, proteomic, or metabolic profiling. Novel approaches to sepsis promise to transform sepsis from a physiologic syndrome into a group of distinct biochemical disorders and help in the development of better diagnostic tools and effective adjunctive sepsis therapies.

  14. Betulin attenuates lung and liver injuries in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Zhenning; Liu, Wei; Han, Xinfei; Zhao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a complex condition with unacceptable mortality. Betulin is a natural extract with multiple bioactivities. This study aims to evaluate the potential effects of betulin on lung and liver injury in sepsis. Cecal ligation and puncture was used to establish the rat model of sepsis. A single dose of 4mg/kg or 8mg/kg betulin was injected intraperitoneally immediately after the model establishment. The survival rate was recorded every 12h for 96h. The organ injury was examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining and serum biochemical test. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines and high mobility group box 1 in the serum were measured using ELISA. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of proteins in NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Betulin treatment significantly improved the survival rate of septic rats, and attenuated lung and liver injury in sepsis, including the reduction of lung wet/dry weight ratio and activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase in the serum. In addition, levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and high mobility group box 1 in the serum were also lowered by betulin treatment. Moreover, sepsis-induced activation of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathway was inhibited by betulin as well. Our findings demonstrate the protective effect of betulin in lung and liver injury in sepsis. This protection may be mediated by its anti-inflammatory and NF-κB and MAPK inhibitory effects.

  15. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers for Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Fabian; Roy, Sanchari; Trautwein, Christian; Roderburg, Christoph; Luedde, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis represents a major cause of lethality during intensive care unit (ICU) treatment. Pharmacological treatment strategies for sepsis are still limited and mainly based on the early initiation of antibiotic and supportive treatment. In this context, numerous clinical and serum based markers have been evaluated for the diagnosis, the severity, and the etiology of sepsis. However until now, few of these factors could be translated into clinical use. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) do not encode for proteins but regulate gene expression by inhibiting the translation or transcription of their target mRNAs. Recently it was demonstrated that miRNAs are released into the circulation and that the spectrum of circulating miRNAs might be altered during various pathologic conditions, such as inflammation, infection, and sepsis. By using array- and single PCR-based methods, a variety of deregulated miRNAs, including miR-25, miR-133a, miR-146, miR-150, and miR-223, were described in the context of sepsis. Some of the miRNAs correlated with the disease stage, as well as patients’ short and long term prognosis. Here, we summarize the current findings on the role of circulating miRNAs in the diagnosis and staging of sepsis in critically ill patients. We compare data from patients with findings from animal models and, finally, highlight the challenges and drawbacks that currently prevent the use of circulating miRNAs as biomarkers in clinical routine. PMID:26761003

  16. Role of Circulating Lymphocytes in Patients with Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    de Pablo, Raul; Monserrat, Jorge; Prieto, Alfredo; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome due to infection. The incidence rate is estimated to be up to 19 million cases worldwide per year and the number of cases is rising. Infection triggers a complex and prolonged host response, in which both the innate and adaptive immune response are involved. The disturbance of immune system cells plays a key role in the induction of abnormal levels of immunoregulatory molecules. Furthermore, the involvement of effector immune system cells also impairs the host response to the infective agents and tissue damage. Recently, postmortem studies of patients who died of sepsis have provided important insights into why septic patients die and showed an extensive depletion of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes and they found that circulating blood cells showed similar findings. Thus, the knowledge of the characterization of circulating lymphocyte abnormalities is relevant for the understanding of the sepsis pathophysiology. In addition, monitoring the immune response in sepsis, including circulating lymphocyte subsets count, appears to be potential biomarker for predicting the clinical outcome of the patient. This paper analyzes the lymphocyte involvement and dysfunction found in patients with sepsis and new opportunities to prevent sepsis and guide therapeutic intervention have been revealed. PMID:25302303

  17. Current trends in inflammatory and immunomodulatory mediators in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Monowar; Jacob, Asha; Yang, Weng-Lang; Matsuda, Akihisa; Wang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis refers to severe systemic inflammation in response to invading pathogens. An overwhelming immune response, as mediated by the release of various inflammatory mediators, can lead to shock, multiple organ damage, and even death. Cytokines, proteases, lipid mediators, gaseous substances, vasoactive peptides, and cell stress markers play key roles in sepsis pathophysiology. Various adhesion molecules and chemokines sequester and activate neutrophils into the target organs, further augmenting inflammation and tissue damage. Although the anti-inflammatory substances counterbalance proinflammatory mediators, prolonged immune modulation may cause host susceptibility to concurrent infections, thus reflecting enormous challenge toward developing effective clinical therapy against sepsis. To understand the complex interplay between pro- and anti-inflammatory phenomenon in sepsis, there is still an unmet need to study newly characterized mediators. In addition, revealing the current trends of novel mediators will upgrade our understanding on their signal transduction, cross-talk, and synergistic and immunomodulating roles during sepsis. This review highlights the latest discoveries of the mediators in sepsis linking to innate and adaptive immune systems, which may lead to resolution of many unexplored queries. PMID:23136259

  18. HMGB1 mediates anemia of inflammation in murine sepsis survivors.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Ferrer, Sergio I; Papoin, Julien; Dancho, Meghan E; Olofsson, Peder; Li, Jianhua; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Avancena, Patricia; Yang, Huan; Zou, Yong-Rui; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Volpe, Bruce T; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Diamond, Betty; Andersson, Ulf; Steinberg, Bettie M; Blanc, Lionel; Tracey, Kevin J

    2015-12-29

    Patients surviving sepsis develop anemia but the molecular mechanism is unknown. Here we observed that mice surviving polymicrobial Gram-negative sepsis develop hypochromic, microcytic anemia with reticulocytosis. The bone marrow of sepsis survivors accumulates polychromatophilic and orthochromatic erythroblasts. Compensatory extramedullary erythropoiesis in the spleen is defective during terminal differentiation. Circulating TNF and IL-6 are elevated for five days after the onset of sepsis, and serum HMGB1 levels are increased from day seven until at least day 28. Administration of recombinant HMGB1 to healthy mice mediates anemia with extramedullary erythropoiesis and significantly elevated reticulocyte counts. Moreover, administration of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibodies after sepsis significantly ameliorates the development of anemia (hematocrit 48.5±9.0% versus 37.4±6.1%, p<0.01, hemoglobin 14.0±1.7g/dL versus 11.7±1.2g/dL, p<0.01). Together, these results indicate that HMGB1 mediates anemia by interfering with erythropoiesis, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for anemia in sepsis.

  19. Sepsis-induced elevation in plasma serotonin facilitates endothelial hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Li, Yicong; Hadden, Coedy; Cooper, Anthonya; Ahmed, Asli; Wu, Hong; Lupashin, Vladimir V; Mayeux, Philip R; Kilic, Fusun

    2016-03-09

    Hyperpermeability of the endothelial barrier and resulting microvascular leakage are a hallmark of sepsis. Our studies describe the mechanism by which serotonin (5-HT) regulates the microvascular permeability during sepsis. The plasma 5-HT levels are significantly elevated in mice made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). 5-HT-induced permeability of endothelial cells was associated with the phosphorylation of p21 activating kinase (PAK1), PAK1-dependent phosphorylation of vimentin (P-vimentin) filaments, and a strong association between P-vimentin and ve-cadherin. These findings were in good agreement with the findings with the endothelial cells incubated in serum from CLP mice. In vivo, reducing the 5-HT uptake rates with the 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor, paroxetine blocked renal microvascular leakage and the decline in microvascular perfusion. Importantly, mice that lack SERT showed significantly less microvascular dysfunction after CLP. Based on these data, we propose that the increased endothelial 5-HT uptake together with 5-HT signaling disrupts the endothelial barrier function in sepsis. Therefore, regulating intracellular 5-HT levels in endothelial cells represents a novel approach in improving sepsis-associated microvascular dysfunction and leakage. These new findings advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to intracellular/extracellular 5-HT ratio in sepsis and refine current views of these signaling processes during sepsis.

  20. Immunotherapy of Sepsis: Blind Alley or Call for Personalized Assessment?

    PubMed

    Prucha, Miroslav; Zazula, Roman; Russwurm, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is the most frequent cause of death in noncoronary intensive care units. In the past 10 years, progress has been made in the early identification of septic patients and their treatment. These improvements in support and therapy mean that mortality is gradually decreasing, however, the rate of death from sepsis remains unacceptably high. Immunotherapy is not currently part of the routine treatment of sepsis. Despite experimental successes, the administration of agents to block the effect of sepsis mediators failed to show evidence for improved outcome in a multitude of clinical trials. The following survey summarizes the current knowledge and results of clinical trials on the immunotherapy of sepsis and describes the limitations of our knowledge of the pathogenesis of sepsis. Administration of immunomodulatory drugs should be linked to the current immune status assessed by both clinical and molecular patterns. Thus, a careful daily review of the patient's immune status needs to be introduced into routine clinical practice giving the opportunity for effective and tailored use of immunomodulatory therapy.

  1. New Approaches to Sepsis: Molecular Diagnostics and Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Michael; Riedemann, Niels C.; Hartog, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Sepsis is among the most common causes of death in hospitals. It arises from the host response to infection. Currently, diagnosis relies on nonspecific physiological criteria and culture-based pathogen detection. This results in diagnostic uncertainty, therapeutic delays, the mis- and overuse of antibiotics, and the failure to identify patients who might benefit from immunomodulatory therapies. There is a need for new sepsis biomarkers that can aid in therapeutic decision making and add information about screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and monitoring of the response to therapy. The host response involves hundreds of mediators and single molecules, many of which have been proposed as biomarkers. It is, however, unlikely that one single biomarker is able to satisfy all the needs and expectations for sepsis research and management. Among biomarkers that are measurable by assays approved for clinical use, procalcitonin (PCT) has shown some usefulness as an infection marker and for antibiotic stewardship. Other possible new approaches consist of molecular strategies to improve pathogen detection and molecular diagnostics and prognostics based on transcriptomic, proteomic, or metabolic profiling. Novel approaches to sepsis promise to transform sepsis from a physiologic syndrome into a group of distinct biochemical disorders and help in the development of better diagnostic tools and effective adjunctive sepsis therapies. PMID:23034322

  2. Emission of dioxins/furans and other U-POPs from test burns of non-POP pesticides in a hazardous waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    Khumsaeng, Thipsukon; Oanh, Nguyen Thi Kim; Kare, Karstensen H; Polprasert, Chongrak

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the results of test burns for obsolete pesticides (OPs) of the permethrin group in a high temperature incinerator (HTI) in Southeast Asia. Three test burn runs were conducted, a baseline run when no OP was fed to the incinerator, and two test runs with different mixtures of OP compounds (formula 1 and 2, refer to Table 1 for detail) containing chlorine in the feeding wastes. The unintentional formed persistent organic pollutants (U-POPs) including 17 dioxins/furans, 12 dioxin-like PCBs and 12 chlorobenzenes (CBs) were monitored in all input materials and all discharges (flue gas, scrubbing liquid and solid residues). The results show relatively high levels of the U-POPs in the flue gas emission with total dioxins/furans of 4.4, 3.4, and 8.4 ng I-TEQ/m(3) in the baseline, test run 1 and test run 2, respectively, which are above international acceptable emission levels. The PCB levels in flue gas were, respectively, 0.01, 0.3 and 0.4 ng I-TEQ/m(3). The baseline thus had similar U-POPs levels with the OP test runs. In stack emission, approximately 90% of the U-POPs and 100% of CBs were present in gas phase. The emission factors, mass of pollutants per metric ton (tonne) of input waste, of U-POPs associated with fly ash (from bag house) were the highest, followed by flue gas and bottom ash while those associated with scrubbing liquid were relatively low. Among the waste input material only the black toner power contained U-POPs, but at low levels. The profiles of the dioxins/furans and PCBs in the toner waste were significantly different from that in the discharges. Despite the overall good destruction and removal efficiency of permethrin (better than 90%) the high emission of U-POPs and CBs from the test burn is of another more serious concern. To our best knowledge the findings of this study are the first of this kind for the Southeast Asia. The findings emphasize that if not properly conducted a standard destruction technology of a non-POP

  3. Early sepsis does not increase the risk of late sepsis in very low birth weight neonates

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.; Hansen, Nellie I.; Das, Abhik; Cotten, C. Michael; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Bell, Edward F.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine whether preterm very low birth weight (VLBW) infants have an increased risk of late-onset sepsis (LOS) following early-onset sepsis (EOS). Study design Retrospective analysis of VLBW infants (401-1500 g) born September 1998 through December 2009 who survived >72 hours and were cared for within the NICHD Neonatal Research Network. Sepsis was defined by growth of bacteria or fungi in a blood culture obtained ≤72 hr of birth (EOS) or >72 hr (LOS) and antimicrobial therapy for ≥5 days or death <5 d while receiving therapy. Regression models were used to assess risk of death or LOS by 120d and LOS by 120d among survivors to discharge or 120d, adjusting for gestational age and other covariates. Results Of 34,396 infants studied 504 (1.5%) had EOS. After adjustment, risk of death or LOS by 120d did not differ overall for infants with EOS compared with those without EOS [RR:0.99 (0.89-1.09)] but was reduced in infants born at <25wk gestation [RR:0.87 (0.76-0.99), p=0.048]. Among survivors, no difference in LOS risk was found overall for infants with versus without EOS [RR:0.88 (0.75-1.02)], but LOS risk was shorter in infants with BW 401-750 g who had EOS [RR:0.80 (0.64-0.99), p=0.047]. Conclusions Risk of LOS after EOS was not increased in VLBW infants. Surprisingly, risk of LOS following EOS appeared to be reduced in the smallest, most premature infants, underscoring the need for age-specific analyses of immune function. PMID:23295144

  4. Evidence for healing interventions with perinatal bereavement.

    PubMed

    Capitulo, Kathleen Leask

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of perinatal grief and evidence-based healing interventions for it. The loss of a pregnancy or death of an infant causes profound grief, yet society has long minimized or ignored this grief, which is among the most painful of bereavement experiences. Throughout the last century, research on grief and the special needs of bereaved parents has changed the context of professional intervention from protective to supportive. The central focus of bereavement interventions is to assist families in healing by helping them make meaning of their losses. The use of symbols, spirituality, and rituals has been shown to help bring meaning. Research has shown that memories are key to healing, and that gender, age, and relationships bring different grief expressions and experiences. While children's understanding of loss and grief differs with developmental age, they should also be given the opportunity to participate in grief rituals and practices. Professionals who care for bereaved parents have a unique opportunity to offer support by validating their grief, facilitating rituals, providing mementos, and letting the bereaved tell their stories. While no intervention can bring back their beloved children, appropriate intervention can promote healing.

  5. Perinatal epidemiological risk factors for preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Bobić, Mirna Vuković; Habek, Dubravko; Habek, Jasna Čerkez

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, the impact of the potential perinatal epidemiological factors on preeclampsia development was assessed. This clinical study included 55 pregnant women with preeclampsia and control group of 50 healthy pregnant women. Positive family history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus or thromboembolic disease was recorded in 50% of women with preeclampsia versus 28% of control group women. Positive personal history of this disease was recorded in 15% of women with preeclampsia, whereas all control group women had negative personal history of preeclampsia. Dietary habits, i.e. the intake of meat and meat products, fruit and vegetables, coffee and alcohol drinks were similar in the two groups, without statistically significant differences. The women with preeclampsia and control women reported comparable habits; there was no difference in the consumption of meat, fruit, vegetables, coffee and alcohol, smoking, use of folate and oral hormonal contraception before pregnancy, or in physical activity as the potential risk factors for preeclampsia in current pregnancy. However, personal and family history of vascular disease proved to be significant risk factors for the occurrence of preeclampsia, emphasizing the need of lifestyle and dietary modifications with healthy dietary habits, while avoiding adverse habits in pregnancy.

  6. Visual function and perinatal focal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, E; Atkinson, J; Braddick, O; Anker, S; Nokes, L; Cowan, F; Rutherford, M; Pennock, J; Dubowitz, L

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the visual function of infants with perinatal cerebral infarction in whom the site and size of the lesion has been determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Twelve infants with cerebral infarction on MRI were studied with a battery of tests specifically designed to evaluate visual function in infancy. This included tests: for visual attention (fixation shifts); of cerebral asymmetry (optokinetic nystagmus, visual fields); for assessment of acuity (forced choice preferential looking); and neurophysiological measures of vision (phase reversal and orientation reversal visual evoked potential). RESULTS: A considerable incidence of abnormalities on at least one of the tests for visual function used was observed. The presence or severity of visual abnormalities could not always be predicted by the site and extent of the lesion seen on imaging. CONCLUSIONS: Early focal lesions affecting the visual pathway can, to some extent, be compensated for by the immature developing brain. These data suggest that all the infants presenting with focal lesions need to be investigated with a detailed assessment of various aspects of vision. Images PMID:8949687

  7. Behavioral effects of perinatal opioid exposure.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Anna; Tímár, Júlia; Zelena, Dóra

    2014-05-28

    Opioids are among the world's oldest known drugs used mostly for pain relief, but recreational use is also widespread. A particularly important problem is opioid exposure in females, as their offspring can also be affected. Adverse intrauterine and postnatal environments can affect offspring development and may lead to various disabilities later in life. It is clear that repetitive painful experiences, such as randomly occurring invasive procedures during neonatal intensive care, can permanently alter neuronal and synaptic organization and therefore later behavior. At the same time, analgesic drugs can also be harmful, inducing neuronal apoptosis or withdrawal symptoms in the neonate and behavioral alterations in adulthood. Hence, risk-benefit ratios should be taken into consideration when pain relief is required during pregnancy or in neonates. Recreational use of opioids can also alter many aspects of life. Intrauterine opioid exposure has many toxic effects, inducing poor pregnancy outcomes due to underdevelopment, but it is believed that later negative consequences are more related to environmental factors such as a chaotic lifestyle and inadequate prenatal care. One of the crucial components is maternal care, which changes profoundly in addicted mothers. In substance-dependent mothers, pre- and postnatal care has special importance, and controlled treatment with a synthetic opioid (e.g., methadone) could be beneficial. We aimed to summarize and compare human and rodent data, as it is important to close the gap between scientific knowledge and societal policies. Special emphasis is given to gender differences in the sensitivity of offspring to perinatal opioid exposure.

  8. Consultation needs in perinatal HIV care: experience of the National Perinatal HIV Consultation Service.

    PubMed

    Fogler, Jessica A; Weber, Shannon; Goldschmidt, Ronald H; Mahoney, Megan R; Cohan, Deborah

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluates the consultation needs of clinicians who provide perinatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care in the United States. The Perinatal Hotline (1-888-448-8765) is a telephone consultation service for providers who treat HIV-infected pregnant women and their infants. Hotline calls were analyzed for demographics about callers and their patients and information about consultation topics. There were 430 calls to the hotline from January 1, 2005, through June 30, 2006. Most calls (59.5%) were related to pregnant patients; 5.1% of the calls pertained to women currently in labor. The most common topic was HIV care in pregnancy (49.1%), particularly antiretroviral drug use (42.1%). HIV testing was discussed in 21.9%, and intrapartum treatment was discussed in 24.0%. Callers most often requested help choosing antiretroviral drug regimens; many of the discussions were about drug toxicities and viral resistance. Although the hotline received few calls about women in labor, the need for these consultations is expected to increase with the expanding use of rapid HIV testing. Access to 24-hour consultation can help ensure that state-of-the-art care is provided.

  9. Surgical Critical Care for the Patient with Sepsis and Multiple Organ Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaml, Gary J; Davis, Kimberly A

    2016-12-01

    Sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is common in the surgical intensive care unit. Sepsis involves infection and the patient's immune response. Timely recognition of sepsis and swift application of evidence-based interventions is critical to the success of therapy. This article reviews the nature of the septic process, existing definitions of sepsis, and current evidence-based treatment strategies for sepsis and MODS. An improved understanding of the process of sepsis and its relation to MODS has resulted in clinical definitions and scoring systems that allow for the quantification of disease severity and guidelines for treatment.

  10. [Immune monitoring in SIRS and sepsis based on the PIRO model].

    PubMed

    Meisel, C; Höflich, C; Volk, H-D

    2008-11-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening disease characterized by a complex interaction between pathogens and the immune system. The analysis of immune parameters in patients with sepsis or at risk for sepsis may help to identify predisposing factors and infection-specific reaction patterns, as well as to monitor the current functional state of the immune system. This may lead to personalized therapeutic strategies for improving outcome in sepsis. Based on the PIRO model (predisposition, insult, response, organ dysfunction), a pathophysiologically-oriented concept for the development of a new sepsis classification, this article reviews currently used and new parameters for immunomonitoring in SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome) and sepsis.

  11. Neonatal sepsis and multiple skin abscess in a newborn with Down's syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kali, Arunava; Sivaraman, Umadevi; Sreenivasan, Srirangaraj; Stephen, Selvaraj

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a leading cause of neonatal mortality. Congenital heart disease accounts for additional risk of sepsis in neonates. Here we report a case of Down's syndrome with late onset neonatal sepsis associated with multiple superficial skin abscesses simulating staphylococcal infection. The baby was empirically treated with vancomycin. Subsequently, multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae was detected from both pus and blood culture. Change to appropriate antibiotic resulted in clinical recovery. Although sepsis is one of the major ailments in neonates, atypical presentations of neonatal sepsis in Down's syndrome patients are underreported. Here we highlight the atypical presentation of Klebsiella sepsis and the importance of early antibiogram in such cases.

  12. Energy metabolism in sepsis and injury.

    PubMed

    Chioléro, R; Revelly, J P; Tappy, L

    1997-09-01

    The development of malnutrition is often rapid in critically ill patients with sepsis and severe trauma. In such patients, a wide array of hormonal and nonhormonal mediators are released, inducing complex metabolic changes. Hypermetabolism, associated with protein and fat catabolism, negative nitrogen balance, hyperglycemia, and resistance to insulin, constitute the hallmark of this response. Critically ill patients demonstrate a marked alteration in the adaptation to prolonged starvation: resting metabolic rate and tissue catabolism stay elevated, while ketogenesis remains suppressed. The response to nutrition support is impaired. Substrate use is modified in septic and traumatized patients. Glucose administration during severe aggression does not suppress the enhanced hepatic glucose production and the lipolysis. This phenomenon, related to tissue insulin resistance, ensures a high flow of glucose to the predominantly glucose-consuming cells, such as the wound, the inflammatory, and immune cells, all insulin-independent cells. In addition, the elevated protein catabolism is difficult to abolish, even during aggressive nutrition support. Thus, in patients with prolonged aggression, these alterations produce a progressive loss of body cell mass and foster the development of malnutrition and it dire complications. In this review, the relevant physiologic data and the nutritional implications related to energy metabolism in septic and injured patients are discussed, while potential therapeutic strategies are proposed.

  13. Late-onset neonatal sepsis: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Speer, Christian P

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of neonatal late-onset sepsis (LOS) is inversely related to the degree of maturity and varies geographically from 0.61% to 14.2% among hospitalised newborns. Epidemiological data on very low birth weight infants shows that the predominant pathogens of neonatal LOS are coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Gram-negative bacilli and fungi. Due to the difficulties in a prompt diagnosis of LOS and LOS-associated high risk of mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, empirical antibiotic treatment is initiated on suspicion of LOS. However, empirical therapy is often inappropriately used with unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics and a prolonged duration of treatment. The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative micro-organisms in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide is a serious concern, which requires thorough and efficient surveillance strategies and appropriate treatment regimens. Immunological strategies for preventing neonatal LOS are not supported by current evidence, and approaches, such as a strict hygiene protocol and the minimisation of invasive procedures in NICUs represent the cornerstone to reduce the burden of neonatal LOS.

  14. Provider communication on perinatal depression: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Farr, Sherry L; Ko, Jean Y; Burley, Kim; Gupta, Seema

    2016-02-01

    Women's lack of knowledge on symptoms of perinatal depression and treatment resources is a barrier to receiving care. We sought to estimate the prevalence and predictors of discussing depression with a prenatal care provider. We used the 2011 population-based data from 24 sites participating in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (n = 32,827 women with recent live births) to examine associations between maternal characteristics and report that a prenatal care provider discussed with her what to do if feeling depressed during or after pregnancy. Overall, 71.9 % of women reported discussing perinatal depression with their prenatal care provider (range 60.7 % in New York City to 85.6 % in Maine). Women were more likely to report a discussion on perinatal depression with their provider if they they were 18-29 years of age than over 35 years of age compared to older (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 18 to 19 y = 1.08, 20 to 24 y = 1.10, 25 to 29 y = 1.09), unmarried (aPR = 1.07) compared to married, had <12 years of education (aPR = 1.05) compared to > 12 years, and had no previous live births (aPR = 1.03) compared to ≥ 1 live births. Research is needed on effective ways to educate women about perinatal depression and whether increased knowledge on perinatal depression results in higher rates of treatment and shorter duration of symptoms.

  15. Why perinatal mortality cannot be a proxy for maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Akalin, M Z; Maine, D; de Francisco, A; Vaughan, R

    1997-12-01

    In recent years, the perinatal mortality rate (PNMR) has been proposed as a proxy measure of maternal mortality, because perinatal deaths are more frequent and potentially more easily measured. This report assesses evidence for an association between these two statistics. This study, based upon data from Matlab, Bangladesh, shows that the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) and the PNMR do not vary together over time, and that the PNMR does not reliably indicate either the magnitude or the direction of change in the MMR from year to year. Statistical analysis shows that the correlation between the PNMR and the MMR is not significantly different from zero. An examination of the major causes of maternal and perinatal deaths indicates that the two measures cannot be expected to vary together. Almost half of perinatal deaths result from causes that do not pose a threat to the mother's life, and almost half of maternal deaths result from causes that do not lead to perinatal death. Monitoring of the PNMR can give an inaccurate picture of maternal mortality and should not be used as a proxy.

  16. Consensus Bundle on Maternal Mental Health: Perinatal Depression and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Susan; Keats, John P; Hoffman, M Camille; Kay, Lisa B; Miller, Emily S; Simas, Tiffany A Moore; Frieder, Ariela; Hackley, Barbara; Indman, Pec; Raines, Christena; Semenuk, Kisha; Wisner, Katherine L; Lemieux, Lauren A

    2017-04-06

    Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions encountered by women of reproductive age. When left untreated, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have profound adverse effects on women and their children, ranging from increased risk of poor adherence to medical care, exacerbation of medical conditions, loss of interpersonal and financial resources, smoking and substance use, suicide, and infanticide. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are associated with increased risks of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity and are recognized as a significant patient safety issue. In 2015, the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care convened an interdisciplinary work group to develop an evidence-based patient safety bundle to address maternal mental health. The focus of this bundle is perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The bundle is modeled after other bundles released by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care and provides broad direction for incorporating perinatal mood and anxiety disorder screening, intervention, referral, and follow-up into maternity care practice across health care settings. This commentary provides information to assist with bundle implementation.

  17. HLA-G and mother-child perinatal HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ma; Czarnecki, Chris; Ramdahin, Suzie; Embree, Joanne; Plummer, Francis A

    2013-04-01

    Transplacental passage is a well-known phenomenon in HIV infection and immune responses at the maternal-fetal interface play a critical role in perinatal mother-to-child HIV transmission (MCHT). The high expression of HLA-G at the maternal-fetal interface and its role in mediating immune tolerance suggest that it could play an important role in MCHT. We investigated the role of HLA-G polymorphism in perinatal HIV transmission in 348 ART naïve mother-child pairs enrolled in a mother-child HIV transmission cohort, established in Nairobi, Kenya in 1986. Among the 348 children born to 266 HIV+ mothers, 258 were uninfected and 90 became infected perinatally. HLA-G exons 2 and 3 of 266 mothers and 251 children were sequenced and genotyped. Among 14 HLA-G alleles identified, only 4 alleles have a phenotype frequency above 10%. Correlation analysis showed that HLA-G(∗)01:03+ mothers were less likely to perinatally transmit HIV-1 to their children (p=0.038, Odds ratio:0.472, 95%CI:0.229-0.973). Mother-child HLA-G concordance was not associated with the increased perinatal HIV transmission. There was no significant difference in the general health between the transmitting mothers and the mothers who did not transmit HIV to their children.

  18. The Parental Experience of Pregnancy after Perinatal Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Pamela D.; DeBackere, Katrina; Kavanaugh, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the research literature on the parental experience of pregnancy, primarily maternal, subsequent to perinatal loss. Data Sources Computerized searches on CINAHL and PubMed databases. Study Selection Articles from indexed journals relevant to the objective were reviewed from January 1997 to December 2007. Only research-based studies in English were included. Data Extraction The review was performed using the methodology of Whittemore and Knafl (2005). Data were extracted and organized under headings: author/year/setting; purpose; sample; design/instruments; results; and nursing implications for parents during a pregnancy following a perinatal loss. Data Synthesis Depression and anxiety are frequently seen in pregnant women subsequent to a perinatal loss. The parental experience is filled with intense and conflicting emotions as parents balance being hopeful while worrying about another potential loss. Conclusions It is important for health care providers to evaluate the woman's obstetric history, acknowledge and validate previous perinatal loss, and discuss with her what would be helpful during the prenatal period with respect to the previous perinatal loss. PMID:18811772

  19. Midwifery care: a perinatal mental health case scenario.

    PubMed

    Marnes, Joanne; Hall, Pauline

    2013-12-01

    The establishment of the National Perinatal Depression Initiative (NPDI, 2008-2013) has brought a focus across Australia for the need to identify women at risk of perinatal mental health disorders, suggesting that routine screening by relevant health professionals may aid earlier detection, better care and improved outcomes. Midwives are frequently the primary point of contact in the perinatal period and thus ideally placed to identify, interpret and manage complex situations, including screening for perinatal mental health disorders. This paper offers strategies that could be implemented into daily midwifery practice in order to achieve the goals consistent with the National Perinatal Depression Initiative. A case study (Jen) and discussion, guided by recommendations from the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Competency standards and beyondblue Clinical Practice Guidelines, are used to demonstrate how midwifery care can be provided. In accordance with her legal obligations, the midwife should act within her scope of practice to undertake a series of psychosocial and medical assessments in order to best determine how midwifery care and support can be of benefit to Jen, her infant and her family. Suggestions described include administration of validated screening questionnaires, clinical interview, physical assessment, discussion with partner, awareness of the mother-infant interactions and questioning around baby's sleep and feeding. Based on evaluation of the information gained from a bio-psycho-social assessment, suggestions are made as to the midwifery care options that could be applied.

  20. Consensus Bundle on Maternal Mental Health: Perinatal Depression and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Susan; Keats, John P; Hoffman, M Camille; Kay, Lisa B; Miller, Emily S; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Frieder, Ariela; Hackley, Barbara; Indman, Pec; Raines, Christena; Semenuk, Kisha; Wisner, Katherine L; Lemieux, Lauren A

    Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions encountered by women of reproductive age. When left untreated, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have profound adverse effects on women and their children, ranging from increased risk of poor adherence to medical care, exacerbation of medical conditions, loss of interpersonal and financial resources, smoking and substance use, suicide, and infanticide. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are associated with increased risks of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity and are recognized as a significant patient safety issue. In 2015, the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care convened an interdisciplinary workgroup to develop an evidence-based patient safety bundle to address maternal mental health. The focus of this bundle is perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The bundle is modeled after other bundles released by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care and provides broad direction for incorporating perinatal mood and anxiety disorder screening, intervention, referral, and follow-up into maternity care practice across health care settings. This commentary provides information to assist with bundle implementation.

  1. Consensus Bundle on Maternal Mental Health: Perinatal Depression and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Susan; Keats, John P; Hoffman, M Camille; Kay, Lisa B; Miller, Emily S; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Frieder, Ariela; Hackley, Barbara; Indman, Pec; Raines, Christena; Semenuk, Kisha; Wisner, Katherine L; Lemieux, Lauren A

    2017-03-01

    Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions encountered by women of reproductive age. When left untreated, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have profound adverse effects on women and their children, ranging from increased risk of poor adherence to medical care, exacerbation of medical conditions, loss of interpersonal and financial resources, smoking and substance use, suicide, and infanticide. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are associated with increased risks of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity and are recognized as a significant patient safety issue. In 2015, the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care convened an interdisciplinary workgroup to develop an evidence-based patient safety bundle to address maternal mental health. The focus of this bundle is perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The bundle is modeled after other bundles released by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care and provides broad direction for incorporating perinatal mood and anxiety disorder screening, intervention, referral, and follow-up into maternity care practice across health care settings. This commentary provides information to assist with bundle implementation.

  2. Field calibration of low density polyethylene passive samplers for gaseous POPs.

    PubMed

    Khairy, Mohammed A; Lohmann, Rainer

    2014-03-01

    A field calibration study of low density polyethylene (LDPE) for measuring atmospheric concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was performed in East Providence (RI), USA. LDPE samplers were collected after 3, 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 days of exposure along with samples from a co-deployed high volume sampler. Uptake kinetics of POPs by LDPEs were confirmed both by using an uptake study over time and the inclusion of performance reference compounds (PRCs). Results indicated that only POPs with log sampler-air partitioning coefficient (KPE-A) ≤ 7.6 were approaching equilibrium by the end of the deployment period, whereas all the other POPs were still in the linear uptake rate. Sampling rates (1.0-80 m(3) per day) were higher for some POPs when compared to literature values possibly due to the open sampler housing design used. Derived KPE-As for the detected POPs in field calibration study were correlated against the compounds' octanol-air partitioning coefficients (log KOA): [log KPE-A = 0.88 ± 0.02 × log KOA + 0.40 ± 0.21 (R(2) = 0.96; n = 59; SE = 0.23)], and their subcooled liquid vapour pressures (log PL/Pa): [log KPE-A = -0.82 ± 0.02 × log PL + 6.22 ± 0.05 (R(2) = 0.96; n = 59; SE = 0.22)] to predict values for all POPs. PL was generally found to be a better predictor of KPE-A for all POPs.

  3. Improving the care of sepsis: Between system redesign and professional responsibility: A roundtable discussion in the world sepsis day, September 25, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Yaseen; Alamry, Ahmed; Levy, Mitchell M; Taher, Saadi; Marini, Abdellatif M

    2014-07-01

    This paper summarizes the roundtable discussion in September 25, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia as part of the World Sepsis Day held in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh. The objectives of the roundtable discussion were to (1) review the chasm between the current management of sepsis and best practice, (2) discuss system redesign and role of the microsystem in sepsis management, (3) emphasize the multidisciplinary nature of the care of sepsis and that improvement of the care of sepsis is the responsibility of all, (4) discuss the bundle concept in sepsis management, and (5) reflect on the individual responsibility of the health care team toward sepsis with a focus on accountability and the moral agent.

  4. Plastic as a carrier of POPs to aquatic organisms: a model analysis.

    PubMed

    Koelmans, Albert A; Besseling, Ellen; Wegner, Anna; Foekema, Edwin M

    2013-07-16

    It has been hypothesized that persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in microplastic may pose a risk to aquatic organisms. Here we develop and analyze a conceptual model that simulates the effects of plastic on bioaccumulation of POPs. The model accounts for dilution of exposure concentration by sorption of POPs to plastic (POP "dilution"), increased bioaccumulation by ingestion of plastic-containing POPs ("carrier"), and decreased bioaccumulation by ingestion of clean plastic ("cleaning"). The model is parametrized for the lugworm Arenicola marina and evaluated against recently published bioaccumulation data for this species from laboratory bioassays with polystyrene microplastic. Further scenarios include polyethylene microplastic, nanosized plastic, and open marine systems. Model analysis shows that plastic with low affinity for POPs such as polystyrene will have a marginal decreasing effect on bioaccumulation, governed by dilution. For stronger sorbents such as polyethylene, the dilution, carrier, and cleaning mechanism are more substantial. In closed laboratory bioassay systems, dilution and cleaning dominate, leading to decreased bioaccumulation. Also in open marine systems a decrease is predicted due to a cleaning mechanism that counteracts biomagnification. However, the differences are considered too small to be relevant from a risk assessment perspective.

  5. Software-Enabled Distributed Network Governance: The PopMedNet Experience

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Melanie; Erickson, Kyle; Wyner, Zachary; Malenfant, Jessica; Rosen, Rob; Brown, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The expanded availability of electronic health information has led to increased interest in distributed health data research networks. Distributed Research Network Model: The distributed research network model leaves data with and under the control of the data holder. Data holders, network coordinating centers, and researchers have distinct needs and challenges within this model. Software Enabled Governance: PopMedNet: The concerns of network stakeholders are addressed in the design and governance models of the PopMedNet software platform. PopMedNet features include distributed querying, customizable workflows, and auditing and search capabilities. Its flexible role-based access control system enables the enforcement of varying governance policies. Selected Case Studies: Four case studies describe how PopMedNet is used to enforce network governance models. Issues and Challenges: Trust is an essential component of a distributed research network and must be built before data partners may be willing to participate further. The complexity of the PopMedNet system must be managed as networks grow and new data, analytic methods, and querying approaches are developed. Conclusions: The PopMedNet software platform supports a variety of network structures, governance models, and research activities through customizable features designed to meet the needs of network stakeholders. PMID:27141522

  6. From mind-pops to hallucinations? A study of involuntary semantic memories in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Elua, Ia; Laws, Keith R; Kvavilashvili, Lia

    2012-04-30

    Involuntary semantic memories or mind-pops consist of isolated fragments of one's semantic knowledge (e.g., a word or a sentence, proper name, image or a melody) that come to mind unexpectedly, without any deliberate attempt to recall them. They can be experienced as alien and uncontrollable, and may share some phenomenological similarities with hallucinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the nature and frequency of mind-pops in people with schizophrenia (N=37), as well as clinically depressed (N=31) and non-clinical controls (N=31). Results showed that schizophrenia patients reported experiencing mind-pops more frequently than both depressed and non-clinical controls. Schizophrenia patients also reported a wider range of different types of mind-pops than non-clinical controls. The depressed group did not differ from non-clinical controls in the frequency and range of mind-pops, indicating that mind-pops are not characteristic of clinical populations in general, but may be particularly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. The possible implications of this finding to current models of auditory verbal hallucinations are discussed and the need for future research in this area is emphasized.

  7. Failure to Pop Out: Feature Singletons Do Not Capture Attention Under Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio Conditions.

    PubMed

    Rangelov, Dragan; Müller, Hermann J; Zehetleitner, Michael

    2017-04-03

    Pop-out search implies that the target is always the first item selected, no matter how many distractors are presented. However, increasing evidence indicates that search is not entirely independent of display density even for pop-out targets: search is slower with sparse (few distractors) than with dense displays (many distractors). Despite its significance, the cause of this anomaly remains unclear. We investigated several mechanisms that could slow down search for pop-out targets. Consistent with the assumption that pop-out targets frequently fail to pop out in sparse displays, we observed greater variability of search duration for sparse displays relative to dense. Computational modeling of the response time distributions also supported the view that pop-out targets fail to pop out in sparse displays. Our findings strongly question the classical assumption that early processing of pop-out targets is independent of the distractors. Rather, the density of distractors critically influences whether or not a stimulus pops out. These results call for new, more reliable measures of pop-out search and potentially a reinterpretation of studies that used relatively sparse displays. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Idiopathic Polyhydramnios: Severity and Perinatal Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Samantha L; Beamon, Carmen J; Chescheir, Nancy C; Stamilio, David

    2016-06-01

    Objective To estimate the association between the severity of idiopathic polyhydramnios and adverse outcomes. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of deliveries at one hospital from 2000 to 2012 with an amniotic fluid index (AFI) measurement ≥24 + 0 weeks' gestation. Pregnancies complicated by diabetes, multiples, or fetal anomalies were excluded. Exposure was the degree of polyhydramnios: normal (AFI 5-24 cm), mild (≥ 24-30 cm), and moderate-severe (> 30 cm). Primary outcomes were perinatal mortality, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission, and postpartum hemorrhage. Results There were 10,536 pregnancies: 10,188 with a normal AFI, 274 mild (78.74%), and 74 moderate-severe polyhydramnios (21.26%). Adverse outcomes were increased with idiopathic polyhydramnios: NICU admission (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.77-4.99), postpartum hemorrhage (AOR 15.81, 95% CI 7.82-31.96), macrosomia (AOR 3.41, 95% CI 2.61-4.47), low 5-minute Apgar score (AOR 2.60, 95% CI 1.57-4.30), and cesarean (AOR 2.16, 95% CI 1.74-2.69). There were increasing odds of macrosomia (mild: AOR 3.19, 95% CI 2.36-4.32; moderate-severe: AOR 4.44, 95% CI 2.53-7.79) and low 5-minute Apgar score (mild: AOR 2.24, 95% CI 1.23-4.08; moderate-severe: AOR 3.93, 95% CI 1.62-9.55) with increasing severity of polyhydramnios. Conclusion Idiopathic polyhydramnios is independently associated with increased risks of morbidity. There appears to be a dose-response relationship for neonatal macrosomia and low 5-minute Apgar score risks.

  9. Suitable reverberation times for halls for rock and pop music.

    PubMed

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric R; Gade, Anders C

    2010-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of popular music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of 20 rock music venues in Denmark and a questionnaire was used in a subjective assessment of those venues with professional rock musicians and sound engineers as expert listeners. Correlations between the measurements show that clarity, including bass frequencies down to 63 Hz, is important for the general impression of the acoustics of the hall. The best-rated halls in the study have reverberation times that are approximately frequency independent from 0.6 to 1.2 s for hall volumes from 1000 to 6000 m(3). The worst rated halls in the study had significantly higher reverberation times in the 63 and 125 Hz bands. Since most audiences at rock concerts are standing, absorption coefficients were measured with a standing audience from 63 Hz to 4 kHz. These measurements showed that a standing audience absorbs about five times as much energy in mid-/high-frequency bands as in low-frequency bands.

  10. No emotional "pop-out" effect in natural scene viewing.

    PubMed

    Acunzo, David J; Henderson, John M

    2011-10-01

    It has been shown that attention is drawn toward emotional stimuli. In particular, eye movement research suggests that gaze is attracted toward emotional stimuli in an unconscious, automated manner. We addressed whether this effect remains when emotional targets are embedded within complex real-world scenes. Eye movements were recorded while participants memorized natural images. Each image contained an item that was either neutral, such as a bag, or emotional, such as a snake or a couple hugging. We found no latency difference for the first target fixation between the emotional and neutral conditions, suggesting no extrafoveal "pop-out" effect of emotional targets. However, once detected, emotional targets held attention for a longer time than neutral targets. The failure of emotional items to attract attention seems to contradict previous eye-movement research using emotional stimuli. However, our results are consistent with studies examining semantic drive of overt attention in natural scenes. Interpretations of the results in terms of perceptual and attentional load are provided.

  11. Trends and disparities in sepsis hospitalisations in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ore, Timothy

    2015-12-14

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with sepsis admitted to hospitals in Victoria, Australia, during the period 2004-14. The data include incidence, severity and mortality.Methods In all, 44 222 sepsis hospitalisations were identified between 2004-05 and 2013-14 from the Victorian Admitted Episodes Dataset. The dataset contains clinical and demographic information on all admissions to acute public and private hospitals. Using the International Classification of Diseases (10th Revision) Australian Modification codes, incidence rates, severity of disease and mortality were calculated.Results Sepsis hospitalisation rates per 10 000 population increased significantly (P < 0.01) over the period, from 6.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 5.6-7.8) to 10.0 (95% CI 9.1-11.1), an annual growth rate of 3.8%. The age-standardised in-hospital death rates per 100 000 population grew significantly (P < 0.01) from 9.2 (95% CI 7.8-10.4) in 2004-05 to 13.0 (95% CI 11.7-14.6) in 2013-14, an annual growth rate of 3.1%. Among people under 45 years of age, the 0-4 years age group had the highest hospitalisation rate (3.0 per 10 000 population; 95% CI 2.7-3.4). Nearly half (46.2%) of all sepsis hospitalisations were among patients born overseas, with a rate of 14.5 per 10 000 population (95% CI 12.4-16.2) in that group compared with a rate of 5.9 per 10 000 population (95% CI 5.3-6.7) for patients born in Australia. The age-standardised sepsis hospitalisation rate was 2.6-fold greater in the lowest compared with highest socioeconomic areas (12.7 per 10 000 population (95% CI 11.2-13.8) vs 4.8 per 10 000 population (95% CI 4.1-5.7), respectively).Conclusion This paper shows a significant upward trend in both sepsis separation rates and in-hospital death rates over the period; unlike sepsis, in-hospital death rates from all diagnoses fell over the same period. The results can be used to stimulate review of

  12. Blood Culture Proven Early Onset Sepsis and Late Onset Sepsis in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Min; Chang, Meayoung; Kim, Ki-Soo

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains one of the most important causes of death and co-morbidity in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants. The aim of this study was to determine the current incidences of early-onset sepsis (EOS) and late-onset sepsis (LOS), the distribution of pathogens, and the impact of infection on co-morbidities in VLBW infants. We analyzed the data including sepsis episode from 2,386 VLBW infants enrolled in Korean Neonatal Network from January 2013 to June 2014. We defined EOS as a positive blood culture occurring between birth and 7 days of life and LOS after 7 days of life. Sepsis was found in 21.1% of VLBW infants. The risk of sepsis was inversely related to birth weight and gestational age. EOS was found in only 3.6% of VLBW infants, however the mortality rate was as high as 34.1%. EOS was associated with the increased odds for bronchopulmonary dysplasia and intraventricular hemorrhage. The vast majority of EOS was caused by Gram-positive organisms, particularly coagulase-negative staphylococci (30.6%). LOS developed in 19.4% of VLBW infants with a 16.1% mortality rate. Pathogens in LOS were dominated by coagulase-negative staphylococci (38.3%). Twenty-five percent and fifty percent of first LOS episode occurred after 12 days and 20 days from birth, respectively. Younger and smaller VLBW infants showed the earlier occurrence day for the 25% of first LOS episode. This study provides a recent nationwide epidemiology of sepsis in VLBW infants in Korea. Based on this study, successful strategies to reduce infections would improve survival and reduce morbidity.

  13. Source, Managemnt and Quantification of Unintentional POPs (PCDDD/Fs) in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charitra Sah, Ram

    2010-05-01

    The aim to prepare and present this paper is to highlight the source, management and quantification of the unintentional POPs in an unindustrialized least developing landlocked small country Nepal. The methodology adopted for this is the review of the relevant research documents and national initiative towards addressing this issues complemented with sharing of the first hand experience from the implementation of the POPs management activities undertaken by our organization. Nepal is a small country of size 147181 sq.km but having large sources of POPs including unintentional POPs (PCDD/Fs) mainly because of weak enforcement of the existing environment related laws, standards and international commitment including POPs Convention. Country became homes to about 75 tons of Obsolete Pesticide since last 30 years including about 44 percent (33 tons out of 75) are of known POPs. These obsolete pesticides including identified POPs have been poorly stored in some about 25 locations throughout the country. The major warehouse accommodating about 50 tons at Amlekhgunj has been located just in front of a high school where about 1000 children are being studying and found to have some health related problem due to the gasses emission from the warehouse as well as school playground field contaminated with these POPs pesticides. The playground soil contamination has been found from routine examination of the soil samples. In addition to pesticides including POPs were used in the agriculture and public health field in the past, there are several other practices as well as anthropogenic activities producing PCDD/Fs. The annual inventory of countrywide emission of unintentional POPs was estimated to be 312.55 g TEQ for Nepal (MOE 2004). This is very high for a country like Nepal least developing in terms of industrial and economy. This estimation was based on the UNEP Toolkit which has included the broad categories of waste such as waste incineration, ferrous and non ferrous metal

  14. Shared responsibility for electronic records: governance in perinatal data entry.

    PubMed

    Craswell, Alison; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents research undertaken as part of a larger research project to examine the factors that influence midwives when entering perinatal data. A grounded theory methodology was used to undertake qualitative interviews with 15 participants from 12 different hospitals across Queensland, Australia using three different systems for perinatal data collection. The findings surrounding accountability are presented revealing that a shift in governance relating to responsibility and accountability is not occurring in midwifery units across Queensland. Without assignation of responsibility for entries and accountability for mistakes or omissions, perinatal data records can be left incomplete or inaccurate. Increasing use of electronic health records and creation of digital hospitals indicates these issues are highly relevant in planning for these services.

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Perinatal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Freeman, Marlene P.

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies are increasingly sought out by patients with psychiatric disorders. This article provides a review of the evidence for several commonly utilized CAM therapies (i.e. omega-3 fatty acids, folate, S-adenosyl-methionine (SAMe), St. John’s Wort, bright light therapy, exercise, massage, and acupuncture) in the treatment of perinatal depression. A number of these treatments may be reasonable to consider for women during pregnancy or the postpartum, but the safety and efficacy of these relative to standard treatments must still be systematically determined. Evidence based use of CAM treatments for perinatal depression is discussed. Adequately powered systematic studies are necessary to determine the role of CAM in the treatment of perinatal depression. PMID:24041861

  16. Perinatal Programming of Asthma: The Role of Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Meghan B.; Kozyrskyj, Anita L.

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal programming, a dominant theory for the origins of cardiovascular disease, proposes that environmental stimuli influence developmental pathways during critical periods of prenatal and postnatal development, inducing permanent changes in metabolism. In this paper, we present evidence for the perinatal programming of asthma via the intestinal microbiome. While epigenetic mechanisms continue to provide new explanations for the programming hypothesis of asthma development, it is increasingly apparent that the intestinal microbiota plays an independent and potentially interactive role. Commensal gut bacteria are essential to immune system development, and exposures disrupting the infant gut microbiota have been linked to asthma. This paper summarizes the recent findings that implicate caesarean delivery, breastfeeding, perinatal stress, probiotics, and antibiotics as modifiers of infant gut microbiota in the development of asthma. PMID:22110540

  17. Maresin 1 Mitigates Inflammatory Response and Protects Mice from Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruidong; Wang, Yaxin; Ma, Zhijun; Ma, Muyuan; Wang, Di; Xie, Gengchen; Yin, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, frequently caused by infection of bacteria, is considered as an uncontrollable systematic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS). Maresin 1 (Mar1) is a new proresolving mediator with potent anti-inflammatory effect in several animal models. However, its effect in sepsis is still not investigated. To address this question, we developed sepsis model in BALB/c mice by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) with or without Mar1 treatment. Our data showed that Mar1 markedly improved survival rate and decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in CLP mice such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Furthermore, Mar1 reduced serum level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enhanced the bacteria clearance in mice sepsis model. Moreover, Mar1 attenuated lung injury and decreased level of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), creatinine (Cre), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) in serum in mice after CLP surgery. Treatment with Mar1 inhibited activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κb) pathway. In conclusion, Mar1 exhibited protective effect in sepsis by reducing LPS, bacteria burden in serum, inhibiting inflammation response, and improving vital organ function. The possible mechanism is partly involved in inhibition of NF-κb activation. PMID:28042205

  18. Role of Pore-Forming Toxins in Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Sonnen, Andreas F.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Protein toxins are important virulence factors contributing to neonatal sepsis. The major pathogens of neonatal sepsis, group B Streptococci, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, secrete toxins of different molecular nature, which are key for defining the disease. Amongst these toxins are pore-forming exotoxins that are expressed as soluble monomers prior to engagement of the target cell membrane with subsequent formation of an aqueous membrane pore. Membrane pore formation is not only a means for immediate lysis of the targeted cell but also a general mechanism that contributes to penetration of epithelial barriers and evasion of the immune system, thus creating survival niches for the pathogens. Pore-forming toxins, however, can also contribute to the induction of inflammation and hence to the manifestation of sepsis. Clearly, pore-forming toxins are not the sole factors that drive sepsis progression, but they often act in concert with other bacterial effectors, especially in the initial stages of neonatal sepsis manifestation. PMID:23710203

  19. Endocrine dysfunction in sepsis: a beneficial or deleterious host response?

    PubMed

    Gheorghiţă, Valeriu; Barbu, Alina Elena; Gheorghiu, Monica Livia; Căruntu, Florin Alexandru

    2015-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic, deleterious inflammatory host response triggered by an infective agent leading to severe sepsis, septic shock and multi-organ failure. The host response to infection involves a complex, organized and coherent interaction between immune, autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioral systems. Recent data have confirmed that disturbances of the autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems could contribute to sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Through this review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge about the endocrine dysfunction as response to sepsis, specifically addressed to vasopressin, copeptin, cortisol, insulin and leptin. We searched the following readily accessible, clinically relevant databases: PubMed, UpToDate, BioMed Central. The immune system could be regarded as a "diffuse sensory organ" that signals the presence of pathogens to the brain through different pathways, such as the vagus nerve, endothelial activation/dysfunction, cytokines and neurotoxic mediators and the circumventricular organs, especially the neurohypophysis. The hormonal profile changes substantially as a consequence of inflammatory mediators and microorganism products leading to inappropriately low levels of vasopressin, sick euthyroid syndrome, reduced adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia as well as hyperleptinemia. In conclusion, clinical diagnosis of this "pan-endocrine illness" is frequently challenging due to the many limiting factors. The most important benefits of endocrine markers in the management of sepsis may be reflected by their potential to be used as biomarkers in different scoring systems to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of death.

  20. Immunological Defects in Neonatal Sepsis and Potential Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Steven L.; Stortz, Julie A.; Mira, Juan C.; Larson, Shawn D.; Wynn, James L.; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in critical care medicine, neonatal sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with the greatest risk affecting very low birth weight, preterm neonates. The presentation of neonatal sepsis varies markedly from its presentation in adults, and there is no clear consensus definition of neonatal sepsis. Previous work has demonstrated that when neonates become septic, death can occur rapidly over a matter of hours or days and is generally associated with inflammation, organ injury, and respiratory failure. Studies of the transcriptomic response by neonates to infection and sepsis have led to unique insights into the early proinflammatory and host protective responses to sepsis. Paradoxically, this early inflammatory response in neonates, although lethal, is clearly less robust relative to children and adults. Similarly, the expression of genes involved in host protective immunity, particularly neutrophil function, is also markedly deficient. As a result, neonates have both a diminished inflammatory and protective immune response to infection which may explain their increased risk to infection, and their reduced ability to clear infections. Such studies imply that novel approaches unique to the neonate will be required for the development of both diagnostics and therapeutics in this high at-risk population. PMID:28224121

  1. [Usefulness of Procalcitonin Measurement for the Detection of Sepsis].

    PubMed

    Toh, Hiromi; Harada, Sadako; Kakudou, Tomoko; Era, Fumiyoshi; Tokushige, Chiemi; Yoshimura, Hisae; Kawashima, Hironobu; Ohkubo, Kumiko; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Matsunaga, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) is a frequently used marker for bacterial sepsis. The present study was aimed to assess the usefulness of PCT measurement in patient with sepsis. We studied the relationship between serum PCT level and blood culture in clinical 209 cases admitted from January 2010 through June 2010. We compared PCT level with blood culture results and other clinical data, and diagnosis such as sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) were obtained from the medical records. In the case of patients with positive blood cultures and PCT < 0.5 ng/mL, the false- positive blood culture was suspected. The possibility of bacteremia was high when PCT level was more than 0.5 ng/mL. Patients with PCT ≥ 2 ng/mL had significant correlation with the presence of sepsis. The PCT measurement could be performed and reported rapidly and provided valuable information before availability of culture results. In this study, we found that the PCT would be a useful biomarker for confirming and ruling out sepsis.

  2. Use of miRNAs as Biomarkers in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Dumache, Raluca; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Papurica, Marius; Dumbuleu, Corina Maria; Nartita, Radu; Sandesc, Dorel

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the most common causes of death in critical patients. Severe generalized inflammation, infections, and severe physiological imbalances significantly decrease the survival rate with more than 50%. Moreover, monitoring, evaluation, and therapy management often become extremely difficult for the clinician in this type of patients. Current methods of diagnosing sepsis vary based especially on the determination of biochemical-humoral markers, such as cytokines, components of the complement, and proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory compounds. Recent studies highlight the use of new biomarkers for sepsis, namely, miRNAs. miRNAs belong to a class of small, noncoding RNAs with an approximate content of 19–23 nucleotides. Following biochemical and physiological imbalances, the expression of miRNAs in blood or other body fluids changes significantly. Moreover, its stability, specificity, and selectivity make miRNAs ideal candidates for sepsis biomarkers. In conclusion, we can affirm that stable species of circulating miRNAs represent potential biomarkers for monitoring the evolution of sepsis. PMID:26221578

  3. Gram-negative sepsis: a dilemma of modern medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Bone, R C

    1993-01-01

    Gram-negative sepsis is an increasingly common problem, with up to 300,000 cases occurring each year in the United States alone. Despite the ongoing development of new antibiotics, mortality from gram-negative sepsis remains unacceptably high. To stimulate earlier therapeutic intervention by physicians, a new set of broad definitions has been proposed to define the systemic inflammatory response characteristic of sepsis. In this review, the signs and symptoms of this progressive, injurious process are reviewed and its management is discussed, as are the mechanisms by which bacterial endotoxin triggers the biochemical events that lead to such serious complications as shock, adult respiratory distress syndrome, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. These events often occur even when appropriate antimicrobial therapy has been instituted. An increased understanding of the structure of endotoxin and its role in the development of sepsis, together with advances in hybridoma technology, has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies that bind to endotoxin and significantly attenuate its adverse effects. These agents promise to substantially reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with gram-negative sepsis. PMID:8457980

  4. Sepsis and ARDS: The Dark Side of Histones.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiheng; Huang, Yongbo; Mao, Pu; Zhang, Jianrong; Li, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in management over the last several decades, sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) still remain major clinical challenges and the leading causes of death for patients in intensive care units (ICUs) due to insufficient understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of these diseases. However, recent studies have shown that histones, also known as chromatin-basic structure proteins, could be released into the extracellular space during severe stress and physical challenges to the body (e.g., sepsis and ARDS). Due to their cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects, extracellular histones can lead to excessive and overwhelming cell damage and death, thus contributing to the pathogenesis of both sepsis and ARDS. In addition, antihistone-based treatments (e.g., neutralizing antibodies, activated protein C, and heparin) have shown protective effects and have significantly improved the outcomes of mice suffering from sepsis and ARDS. Here, we review researches related to the pathological role of histone in context of sepsis and ARDS and evaluate the potential value of histones as biomarkers and therapeutic targets of these diseases.

  5. Crosstalk between inflammation and coagulation: the lessons of sepsis.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, Tom; Levi, Marcel

    2012-09-01

    Sepsis results in the concurrent activation of inflammatory and procoagulant pathways. Bacterial products and proinflammatory cytokines trigger the coagulation system primarily via induction of tissue factor. During sepsis, activation of coagulation is accompanied by impaired function of major anticoagulant mechanisms, including antithrombin, the protein C system and fibrinolysis. Protease activated receptors (PARs) form the molecular connection between coagulation and inflammation, and especially PAR1 seems to play an eminent role in sepsis pathogenesis. Activated protein C (APC) can cleave PAR1 when associated with either the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) or CD11b/CD18, resulting in broad cytoprotective effects mediated by sphingosine 1 phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 (S1P1). In contrast, activation of PAR1 by high dose thrombin results in barrier disruptive effects in endothelial cells via an S1P3 dependent mechanism. Recombinant APC protects against mortality in experimental endotoxemia and sepsis by effects that can be mediated by either EPCR - PAR1 dependent (endothelial cells, dendritic cells) or CD11b/CD18 - PAR1 dependent (macrophages) mechanisms. These protective APC effects do not rely on the anticoagulant properties of this protein. APC mutants that lack anticoagulant properties but retain the capacity to activate PAR1 are promising new drugs for sepsis treatment.

  6. Sepsis: Multiple Abnormalities, Heterogeneous Responses, and Evolving Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Iskander, Kendra N.; Osuchowski, Marcin F.; Stearns-Kurosawa, Deborah J.; Kurosawa, Shinichiro; Stepien, David; Valentine, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis represents the host's systemic inflammatory response to a severe infection. It causes substantial human morbidity resulting in hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Despite decades of intense research, the basic mechanisms still remain elusive. In either experimental animal models of sepsis or human patients, there are substantial physiological changes, many of which may result in subsequent organ injury. Variations in age, gender, and medical comorbidities including diabetes and renal failure create additional complexity that influence the outcomes in septic patients. Specific system-based alterations, such as the coagulopathy observed in sepsis, offer both potential insight and possible therapeutic targets. Intracellular stress induces changes in the endoplasmic reticulum yielding misfolded proteins that contribute to the underlying pathophysiological changes. With these multiple changes it is difficult to precisely classify an individual's response in sepsis as proinflammatory or immunosuppressed. This heterogeneity also may explain why most therapeutic interventions have not improved survival. Given the complexity of sepsis, biomarkers and mathematical models offer potential guidance once they have been carefully validated. This review discusses each of these important factors to provide a framework for understanding the complex and current challenges of managing the septic patient. Clinical trial failures and the therapeutic interventions that have proven successful are also discussed. PMID:23899564

  7. Thrombophilia risk is not increased in children after perinatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Colleen; Mineyko, Aleksandra; Massicotte, Patricia; Leaker, Michael; Jiang, Xiu Yan; Floer, Amalia; Kirton, Adam

    2017-03-03

    Perinatal stroke causes cerebral palsy and lifelong disability. Specific diseases are definable but mechanisms are poorly understood. Evidence suggests possible associations between arterial perinatal stroke and prothrombotic disorders but population-based, controlled, disease-specific studies are limited. Understanding thrombophilia in perinatal stroke informs pathogenesis models and clinical management. We conducted a population-based, prospective, case-control study to determine the association of specific perinatal stroke diseases with known thrombophilias. Children with idiopathic, MRI-classified neonatal arterial ischemic stroke (NAIS), arterial presumed perinatal ischemic stroke (APPIS), or fetal periventricular venous infarction (PVI) were recruited. Standardized thrombophilia evaluations were performed after 12 months of age on stroke cases and controls including quantified protein C and S, antithrombin, factors VIII/IX/XI, fibrinogen, lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies and genotyping of factor V Leiden (FVL), factor II G20210A (FII), and MTHFR C677T. A total of 212 children were studied: 46 NAIS, 34 APPIS, 55 PVI, and 77 controls (53% male, median 4.8 years). Of 14 parameters, no differences were observed in 12 including all common thrombophilias. Mean prothrombin time was shorter in arterial strokes (p<0.001). Rates of antiphospholipid antibodies were low, comparable to controls, and resolved on repeat testing. FVL and FII rates were comparable to population norms. Total number of possible abnormalities did not differ between cases and controls. Our prospective, population-based, controlled, disease-specific study suggests minimal association between perinatal stroke and thrombophilia. This does not exclude the possibility of disordered coagulation at the time of stroke but suggests testing in childhood is not indicated.

  8. Eating Disorders and Trauma History in Women with Perinatal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Zerwas, Stephanie; Leserman, Jane; Holle, Ann Von; Regis, Taylor; Bulik, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Although the prevalence of perinatal depression (depression occurring during pregnancy and postpartum) is 10%, little is known about psychiatric comorbidity in these women. We examined the prevalence of comorbid eating disorders (ED) and trauma history in women with perinatal depression. Methods A research questionnaire was administered to 158 consecutive patients seen in a perinatal psychiatry clinic during pregnancy (n=99) or postpartum (n=59). Measures included Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID) IV-based questions for lifetime eating psychopathology and assessments of comorbid psychiatric illness including the State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), and Trauma Inventory. Results In this cohort, 37.1% reported a putative lifetime ED history; 10.1% reported anorexia nervosa (AN), 10.1% reported bulimia nervosa (BN), 10.1% reported ED not otherwise specified-purging subtype (EDNOS-P), and 7.0% reported binge eating disorder (BED). Women with BN reported more severe depression (EPDS score, 19.1, standard deviation [SD 4.3], p=0.02; PHQ-severity 14.5, SD 7.4, p=0.02) than the referent group of women with perinatal depression and no ED history (EPDS 13.3, SD=6.1; PHQ 9.0, SD=6.2). Women with AN were more likely to report sexual trauma history than the referent group (62.5% vs. 29.3%, p<0.05), and those with BN were more likely report physical (50.0%, p<0.05) and sexual (66.7%, p<0.05) trauma histories. Conclusions ED histories were present in over one third of admissions to a perinatal psychiatry clinic. Women with BN reported more severe depression and histories of physical and sexual trauma. Screening for histories of eating psychopathology is important in women with perinatal depression. PMID:21671774

  9. Perinatal information systems for quality improvement: visions for today.

    PubMed

    Slagle, T A

    1999-01-01

    Today clinical information is used for a multitude of purposes beyond patient care documentation including quality review and improvement processes, allocation of resources, budgetary and long-term planning, productivity measurement, and justification to payers for services provided. Providers in perinatal medicine are faced with the challenge of finding methods to meet these information needs. Case examples of the different approaches to collecting and using obstetric and neonatal information are described. The role of computer-based patient records is outlined and solutions available to perinatal medicine are reviewed.

  10. Impact of Delayed Admission to the Intensive Care Unit from the Emergency Department upon Sepsis Outcomes and Sepsis Protocol Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Price, Lori Lyn; Andoh-Duku, Augustine; LaCamera, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Rationale. The impact of emergency department length of stay (EDLOS) upon sepsis outcomes needs clarification. We sought to better understand the relationship between EDLOS and both outcomes and protocol compliance in sepsis. Methods. We performed a retrospective observational study of septic patients admitted to the ICU from the ED between January 2012 and December 2015 in a single tertiary care teaching hospital. 287 patients with severe sepsis and septic shock were included. Study population was divided into patients with EDLOS < 6 hrs (early admission) versus ≥6 hours (delayed admission). We assessed the impact of EDLOS on hospital mortality, compliance with sepsis protocol, and resuscitation. Statistical significance was determined by chi-square test. Results. Of the 287 septic ED patients, 137 (47%) were admitted to the ICU in <6 hours. There was no significant in-hospital mortality difference between early and delayed admissions (p = 0.68). Both groups have similar compliance with the 3-hour protocol (p = 0.77). There was no significant difference in achieving optimal resuscitation within 12 hours (p = 0.35). Conclusion. We found that clinical outcomes were not significantly different between early and delayed ICU admissions. Additionally, EDLOS did not impact compliance with the sepsis protocol with the exception of repeat lactate draw.

  11. Severe sepsis and septic shock: clinical overview and update on management.

    PubMed

    Cawcutt, Kelly A; Peters, Steve G

    2014-11-01

    Sepsis is among the oldest themes in medicine; however, despite modern advances, it remains a leading cause of death in the United States. Every clinician should be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of sepsis, along with early management strategies, to expeditiously provide appropriate care and decrease resultant morbidity and mortality. This review addresses the definitions, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, management, and outcomes of patients with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock.

  12. 981: Evaluation of Burn Sepsis Automated Alerts in an Intensive Care Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    DEC 2014 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 981:Evaluation of Burn Sepsis Automated Alerts in an Intensive Care...BURN SEPSIS AUTOMATED ALERTS IN AN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT Elizabeth Mann-Salinas1, Nicole Caldwell1, Maria Serio-Melvin1, David Luellen1, Kevin Chung1...the burn unit initiated Sepsis Alert soft- ware. Continuous electronic medical record (EMR) screening used novel predic- tors of burn sepsis (Burn6

  13. The coagulopathy in sepsis: significance and implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saracco, Paola; Vitale, Pasquale; Scolfaro, Carlo; Pollio, Berardino; Pagliarino, Mauro; Timeus, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis related coagulopathy ranges from mild laboratory alterations up to severe disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). There is evidence that DIC is involved in the pathogenesis of microvascular dysfunction contributing to organ failure. Additionally, the systemic activation of coagulation, by consuming platelets and coagulation factors, may cause bleeding. Thrombin generation via the tissue factor/factor VIIa route, contemporary depression of antithrombin and protein C anticoagulant systems, as well as impaired fibrin degradation, due to high circulating levels of PAI-1, contribute to enhanced intravascular fibrin deposition. This deranged coagulopathy is an independent predictor of clinical outcome in patients with severe sepsis. Innovative supportive strategies aiming at the inhibition of coagulation activation should comprise inhibition of tissue factor-mediated activation or restoration of physiological anticoagulant pathways, as the administration of recombinant human activated protein C or concentrate. In spite of some promising initial studies, additional trials are needed to define their clinical effectiveness in adults and children with severe sepsis. PMID:22355515

  14. The future of murine sepsis and trauma research models

    PubMed Central

    Efron, Philip A.; Mohr, Alicia M.; Moore, Frederick A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent comparisons of the murine and human transcriptome in health and disease have called into question the appropriateness of the use of murine models for human sepsis and trauma research. More specifically, researchers have debated the suitability of mouse models of severe inflammation that is intended for eventual translation to human patients. This mini-review outlines this recent research, as well as specifically defines the arguments for and against murine models of sepsis and trauma research based on these transcriptional studies. In addition, we review newer advancements in murine models of infection and injury and define what we envision as an evolving but viable future for murine studies of sepsis and trauma. PMID:26034205

  15. Sepsis requiring intensive care following intramuscular injections: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Matzaroglou, Charis; Kalogeropoulou, Christina; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Filos, Kriton

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Intramuscular injections can rarely result in serious infectious complications such as abscesses which may progress to bacteraemia and generalized sepsis. These complications are rare, but can be life threatening, as they can lead to multi-organ failure associated with high morbidity and mortality. Case presentation In this report we present two patients who developed life-threatening infections after intramuscular injections. They were admitted to the hospital, had prompt surgical drainage, required ICU admission for severe sepsis, were treated with an early goal-directed therapy protocol and had a good outcome. Conclusion Sepsis is a rare, potentially life-threatening complication after intramuscular injections. Timely surgical drainage followed by appropriate ICU care and early goal directed therapy is crucial and may contribute to a good outcome in these rare cases. PMID:19918523

  16. A novel role for matrix metalloproteinase-8 in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Solan, Patrick D.; Dunsmore, Katherine E.; Denenberg, Alvin G.; Odoms, Kelli; Zingarelli, Basilia; Wong, Hector R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) mRNA expression was previously found to be increased in whole blood of children with septic shock. The impact of this finding on the severity and inflammatory response to sepsis is unknown. Here, we investigate the relationship between MMP-8 and disease severity in a children with septic shock. We further corroborate the role of MMP-8 in sepsis in a murine model. Design Retrospective observational clinical study and randomized controlled laboratory experiments. Setting Pediatric intensive care units and an animal research facility at an academic children’s hospital. Patients/Subjects Patients age ≤ 10 years admitted to the intensive care unit with a diagnosis of septic shock. For laboratory studies, we utilized male mice deficient for MMP-8 and male wild type C57/Bl6 mice. Interventions Blood from children with septic shock was analyzed for MMP-8 mRNA expression and MMP-8 activity, and correlated with disease severity based on mortality and degree of organ failure. A murine model of sepsis was used to explore the effect of genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of MMP-8 on the inflammatory response to sepsis. Finally, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. Measurements and Main Results Increased MMP-8 mRNA expression and activity in septic shock correlates with decreased survival and increased organ failure in pediatric patients. Genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of MMP-8 leads to improved survival and a blunted inflammatory profile in a murine model of sepsis. We also identify MMP-8 as a direct in vitro activator of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NF-κB. Conclusions MMP-8 is a novel modulator of inflammation during sepsis and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22020238

  17. Toxin Mediates Sepsis Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li; Da, Fei; Tan, Daniel C. S.; Nguyen, Thuan H.; Fu, Chih-Lung; Tan, Vee Y.; Sturdevant, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis is a major killer in hospitalized patients. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) with the leading species Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most frequent causes of nosocomial sepsis, with most infectious isolates being methicillin-resistant. However, which bacterial factors underlie the pathogenesis of CNS sepsis is unknown. While it has been commonly believed that invariant structures on the surface of CNS trigger sepsis by causing an over-reaction of the immune system, we show here that sepsis caused by methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis is to a large extent mediated by the methicillin resistance island-encoded peptide toxin, PSM-mec. PSM-mec contributed to bacterial survival in whole human blood and resistance to neutrophil-mediated killing, and caused significantly increased mortality and cytokine expression in a mouse sepsis model. Furthermore, we show that the PSM-mec peptide itself, rather than the regulatory RNA in which its gene is embedded, is responsible for the observed virulence phenotype. This finding is of particular importance given the contrasting roles of the psm-mec locus that have been reported in S. aureus strains, inasmuch as our findings suggest that the psm-mec locus may exert effects in the background of S. aureus strains that differ from its original role in the CNS environment due to originally “unintended” interferences. Notably, while toxins have never been clearly implied in CNS infections, our tissue culture and mouse infection model data indicate that an important type of infection caused by the predominant CNS species is mediated to a large extent by a toxin. These findings suggest that CNS infections may be amenable to virulence-targeted drug development approaches. PMID:28151994

  18. Optical detection of sepsis markers using liquid crystal based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCamley, Maureen K.; Artenstein, Andrew W.; Opal, Steven M.; Crawford, Gregory P.

    2007-02-01

    A liquid crystal based biosensor for the detection and diagnosis of sepsis is currently in development. Sepsis, a major clinical syndrome with a significant public health burden in the US due to a large elderly population, is the systemic response of the body to a localized infection and is defined as the combination of pathologic infection and physiological changes. Bacterial infections are responsible for 90% of cases of sepsis in the US. Currently there is no bedside diagnostic available to positively identify sepsis. The basic detection scheme employed in a liquid crystal biosensor contains attributes that would find value in a clinical setting, especially for the early detection of sepsis. Utilizing the unique properties of liquid crystals, such as birefringence, a bedside diagnostic is in development which will optically report the presence of biomolecules. In a septic patient, an endotoxin known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and can be found in the blood stream. It is hypothesized that this long chained molecule will cause local disruptions to the open surface of a sensor containing aligned liquid crystal. The bulk liquid crystal ampli.es these local changes at the surface due to the presence of the sepsis marker, providing an optical readout through polarizing microscopy images. Liquid crystal sensors consisting of both square and circular grids, 100-200 μm in size, have been fabricated and filled with a common liquid crystal material, 5CB. Homeotropic alignment was confirmed using polarizing microscopy. The grids were then contacted with either saline only (control), or saline with varying concentrations of LPS. Changes in the con.guration of the nematic director of the liquid crystal were observed through the range of concentrations tested (5mg/mL - 1pg/mL) which have been confirmed by a consulting physician as clinically relevant levels.

  19. Assessment of the spatial and temporal distribution of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Nordic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anttila, Pia; Brorström-Lundén, Eva; Hansson, Katarina; Hakola, Hannele; Vestenius, Mika

    2016-09-01

    Long-term atmospheric monitoring data (1994-2011) of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were assembled from a rural site in southern Sweden, Råö, and a remote, sub-Arctic site in Finland, Pallas. The concentration levels, congener profiles, seasonal and temporal trends, and projections were evaluated in order to assess the status of POPs in the Scandinavian atmosphere. Our data include atmospheric concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), altogether comprising a selection of 27 different compounds. The atmospheric POP levels were generally higher in the south, closer to the sources (primary emissions) of the pollutants. The levels of low-chlorinated PCBs and chlordanes were equal at the two sites, and one of the studied POPs, α-HCH, showed higher levels in the north than in the south. Declining temporal trends in the atmospheric concentrations for the legacy POPs - PCBs (2-4% per year), HCHs (6-7% per year), chlordanes (3-4% per year) and DTTs (2-5% per year) - were identified both along Sweden's west coast and in the sub-Arctic area of northern Finland. Most of PAHs did not show any significant long-term trends. The future projections for POP concentrations suggest that in Scandinavia, low-chlorinated PCBs and p,p‧-DDE will remain in the atmospheric compartment the longest (beyond 2030). HCH's and PCB180 will be depleted from the Nordic atmosphere first, before 2020, whereas chlordanes and rest of the PCBs will be depleted between the years 2020 and 2025. PCBs tend to deplete sooner and chlordanes later from the sub-Arctic compared to the south of Sweden. This study demonstrates that the international bans on legacy POPs have successfully reduced the concentrations of these particular substances in the Nordic atmosphere. However, the most long-lived compounds may continue in the atmospheric cycle for another couple of decades.

  20. Fatal sepsis caused by an unusual Klebsiella species that was misidentified by an automated identification system.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masafumi; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Shota; Akeda, Yukihiro; Yoshii, Tadashi; Miyaguchi, Shinichi; Inohara, Hidenori; Horii, Toshihiro; Oishi, Kazunori; Iida, Tetsuya; Tomono, Kazunori

    2013-05-01

    This is a description of fatal sepsis caused by infection with Klebsiella variicola, which is an isolate genetically related to Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient's condition was incorrectly diagnosed as common sepsis caused by K. pneumoniae, which was identified using an automated identification system, but next-generation sequencing and the non-fermentation of adonitol finally identified the cause of sepsis as K. variicola.

  1. Role of Toll-like receptors in the development of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Hironori; Ono, Satoshi; Efron, Philip A; Scumpia, Philip O; Moldawer, Lyle L; Mochizuki, Hidetaka

    2008-03-01

    The outcome of sepsis and septic shock has not significantly improved in recent decades despite the development of numerous drugs and supportive care therapies. To reduce sepsis-related mortality, a better understanding of molecular mechanism(s) associated with the development of sepsis and sepsis-related organ injury is essential. There is increasing evidence that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in the mediation of systemic responses to invading pathogens during sepsis. However, the role of TLRs in the development of sepsis and in sepsis-related organ injury remains debatable. In this review, we focus on the biological significance of TLRs during sepsis. Medline was searched for pertinent publications relating to TLRs, with emphasis on their clinical and pathophysiological importance in sepsis. In addition, a summary of the authors' own experimental data from this field was set in the context of current knowledge regarding TLRs. In both animal models and human sepsis, TLRs are highly expressed on monocytes/macrophages, and this TLR expression may not simply be a ligand-specific response in such an environment. The fact that TLR signaling enables TLRs to recognize harmful mediators induced by invading pathogens may be associated with a positive feedback loop for the inflammatory response among different cell populations. This mechanism(s) may contribute to the organ dysfunction and mortality that occurs in sepsis. A better understanding of TLR biology may unveil novel therapeutic approaches for sepsis.

  2. Neuroanatomy and Physiology of Brain Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mazeraud, Aurelien; Pascal, Quentin; Verdonk, Franck; Heming, Nicholas; Chrétien, Fabrice; Sharshar, Tarek

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE), a complication of sepsis, is often complicated by acute and long-term brain dysfunction. SAE is associated with electroencephalogram pattern changes and abnormal neuroimaging findings. The major processes involved are neuroinflammation, circulatory dysfunction, and excitotoxicity. Neuroinflammation and microcirculatory alterations are diffuse, whereas excitotoxicity might occur in more specific structures involved in the response to stress and the control of vital functions. A dysfunction of the brainstem, amygdala, and hippocampus might account for the increased mortality, psychological disorders, and cognitive impairment. This review summarizes clinical and paraclinical features of SAE and describes its mechanisms at cellular and structural levels.

  3. X-Ray Background at High Redshifts from Pop III Remnants: Results from Pop III Star Formation Rates in the Renaissance Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Ahn, Kyungjin; Norman, Michael L.; Wise, John H.; O'Shea, Brian W.

    2016-11-01

    Due to their long mean free paths, X-rays are expected to have global impacts on the properties of the intergalactic medium (IGM) by their large-scale heating and ionizing processes. At high redshifts, X-rays from Population (Pop) III binaries might have important effects on cosmic reionization and the Lyα forest. As a continuation of our previous work on Pop III binary X-rays, we use the Pop III distribution and evolution from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of self-consistent cosmological radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the formation of the first galaxies, to calculate the X-ray luminosity density and background over the redshift range 20≥slant z≥slant 7.6. As we find that Pop III star formation continues at a low, nearly constant rate to the end of reionization, X-rays are being continuously produced at significant rates compared to other possible X-ray sources, such as AGNs and normal X-ray binaries during the same period of time. We estimate that Pop III binaries produce approximately 6 eV of energy in the X-rays per hydrogen atom. We calculate the X-ray background for different monochromatic photon energies. KeV X-rays redshift and accumulate to produce a strong X-ray background spectrum extending to roughly 500 eV. The X-ray background is strong enough to heat the IGM to ˜1000 K and to ionize a few percent of the neutral hydrogen. These effects are important for an understanding of the neutral hydrogen hyperfine transition 21 cm line signatures, the Lyα forest, and the Thomson optical depth to the CMB.

  4. Sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock: current evidence for emergency department management.

    PubMed

    Booker, Ethan

    2011-05-01

    In the middle of a busy shift, a patient arrives by ambulance from a local long-term care facility with a report of altered mental status. You enter the room to find a chronically ill-appearing 85-year-old man with fever, tachycardia, and hypotension, and it is instantly apparent that this patient is septic. What is not clear is what the source is, what modifications in treatment might be necessary based on preexisting microbial resistance, and which of the array of invasive resuscitation techniques are appropriate when meaningful recovery is questionable and efforts may not be desired by the patient and family. You order IV fluids and broad-spectrum antibiotics; send lab tests, including lactate and cultures of blood, urine, and sputum; and begin to review his extensive history to discuss goals of care with his family and primary doctor. While reviewing these issues, a 54-year-old woman with a history of asthma is brought straight back from triage with respiratory distress. You listen to her lungs, expecting wheezes, but hear decreased lung sounds at the right base, preserved air movement elsewhere, and her skin radiates heat. Now, on the monitor, she has a heart rate of 135 beats per minute, blood pressure of 90/60 mm Hg, O2 saturation of 86%, and a temperature of 39.4 degrees C (103 degrees F). You again identify sepsis and instruct your team that you will be using your department's severe sepsis protocol. Equipment for monitoring and procedures is assembled, your staff provides preprinted order and monitoring flow sheets, and the ICU is alerted. Within an hour, the patient is intubated, has a central line placed, and has received IV fluids, broad-spectrum antibiotics and norepinephrine, and you are pleased to see a MAP of 67 mm Hg, a lactate decreasing from an initial value of 7.0, CVP of 10, and ScvO2 of 78%.

  5. Working together for women's empowerment: Strategies for interdisciplinary collaboration in perinatal care.

    PubMed

    Kwee, Janelle L; McBride, Hillary L

    2015-06-02

    Women's experiences of pregnancy, birth, and postpartum adjustment are often characterized by feelings of disempowerment, trauma, and emotional pain. Psychosocial perinatal care has not kept up with medical advances in perinatal care. Access to psychosocial care appears to be inadequate because of the following: (a) perinatal health care providers are insufficiently prepared to address emotional aspects of maternal care and (b) traditional, compartmentalized psychological services benefit only a subsection of perinatal women, often in an untimely manner. Practical and innovative psychosocial services, integrated into routine perinatal care, can provide widespread access to psychosocial resources for mothers and supports providers in delivering optimal care.

  6. Community-, Healthcare- and Hospital-Acquired Severe Sepsis Hospitalizations in the University HealthSystem Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Page, David B.; Donnelly, John P.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Severe sepsis poses a major burden on the U.S. healthcare system. Previous epidemiologic studies have not differentiated community-acquired severe sepsis from healthcare-associated severe sepsis or hospital-acquired severe sepsis hospitalizations. We sought to compare and contrast community-acquired severe sepsis, healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and hospital-acquired severe sepsis hospitalizations in a national hospital sample. Setting United States Interventions None Measurements & Main Results Prevalence of community-acquired severe sepsis, healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and hospital-acquired severe sepsis, adjusted hospital mortality, length of hospitalization, length of stay in an ICU, and hospital costs. Among 3,355,753 hospital discharges, there were 307,491 with severe sepsis, including 193,081 (62.8%) community-acquired severe sepsis, 79,581 (25.9%) healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and 34,829 (11.3%) hospital-acquired severe sepsis. Hospital-acquired severe sepsis and healthcare-associated severe sepsis exhibited higher in-hospital mortality than community-acquired severe sepsis (hospital-acquired [19.2%] vs healthcare-associated [12.8%] vs community-acquired [8.6%]). Hospital-acquired severe sepsis had greater resource utilization than both healthcare-associated severe sepsis and community-acquired severe sepsis, with higher median length of hospital stay (hospital acquired [17 d] vs healthcare associated [7 d] vs community-acquired [6 d]), median length of ICU stay (hospital-acquired [8 d] vs healthcare-associated [3 d] vs community-acquired [3 d]), and median hospital costs (hospital-acquired [$38,369] vs healthcare-associated [$8,796] vs community-acquired [$7,024]). Conclusions In this series, severe sepsis hospitalizations included CA-SS (62.8%), HCA-SS (25.9%) and HA-SS (11.3%) cases. HA-SS was associated with both higher mortality and resource utilization than CA-SS and HCA-SS. PMID:26110490

  7. The association between the brain and mind pops: a voxel-based morphometry study in 256 Chinese college students.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Wenfu; Wei, Dongtao; Yang, Wenjing; Yang, Ning; Qiao, Lei; Qiu, Jiang; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Zhang, Qinglin

    2016-06-01

    Mind pops or involuntary semantic memories refer to words, phrases, images, or melodies that suddenly pop into one's mind without any deliberate attempt to recall them. Despite their prevalence in everyday life, research on mind pops has started only recently. Notably, mind pops are very similar to clinical involuntary phenomena such as hallucinations in schizophrenia, suggesting their potential role in pathology. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between mind pops and the brain morphometry measured in 302 healthy young adults; after exclusions, 256 participants were included in our analyses. Specifically, the Mind Popping Questionnaire (MPQ) was employed to measure the degree of individual mind pops, whereas the Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) was used to compute the volumes of both gray and white matter tissues. Multiple regression analyses on MPQ and VBM metrics indicated that high-frequency mind pops were significantly associated with smaller gray matter volume in the left middle temporal gyrus as well as with larger gray and white matter volume in the right medial prefrontal cortex. This increase in mind pops is also linked to higher creativity and the personality trait of 'openness'. These data not only suggest a key role of the two regions in generating self-related thoughts, but also open a possible link between brain and creativity or personality.

  8. Association Between Isolated Single Umbilical Artery and Perinatal Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yajuan; Ren, Lidan; Zhai, Shanshan; Luo, Xiaohua; Hong, Teng; Liu, Rui; Ran, Limin; Zhang, Yingying

    2016-04-30

    BACKGROUND To evaluate the association between the isolated single umbilical artery (iSUA) and perinatal outcomes, including pregnancy outcomes and perinatal complications. MATERIAL AND METHODS We performed a meta-analysis of 15 eligible studies regarding the relationship between the iSUA and perinatal outcomes, including gestational age at delivery, nuchal cord, placental weight, small for gestational age (SGA), oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preeclampsia, and perinatal mortality. The overall odds ratios (OR) or standardized mean difference (SMD) were calculated. RESULTS The occurrence of nuchal cord was not found to be different between an iSUA and a three-vessel cord (TVC) fetus. For perinatal complications, the SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality showed dramatic difference between women with an iSUA and women with a TVC fetus, which implied that the presence of iSUA significantly increased the risk of perinatal complications. For other perinatal complications, such as PIH and preeclampsia, no significant association was detected. CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analysis suggests that the presence of iSUA would increase the risk of perinatal complications such as SGA, oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios, GDM, and perinatal mortality. Therefore, pregnant women with an iSUA fetus have poorer perinatal outcomes and more attention should be given to the management of their pregnancy compared to women with a TVC fetus.

  9. Perinatal Pitocin as an Early ADHD Biomarker: Neurodevelopmental Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurth, Lisa; Haussmann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a potential relationship between coincidental increases in perinatal Pitocin usage and subsequent childhood ADHD onset in an attempt to isolate a specific risk factor as an early biomarker of this neurodevelopmental disorder. Method: Maternal labor/delivery and corresponding childbirth records of 172 regionally diverse,…

  10. Relative Risk of Perinatal Complications in Common Childhood Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Raymond S.; Davis, Andrew S.

    2007-01-01

    Perinatal complications have been associated with a myriad of later-developing behavioral, neurological, and psychological disorders. These have included school-related disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, mood and anxiety disorders, and learning disabilities. This article reviews the research that considers the…

  11. Perinatal transmission of dengue: a report of 7 cases.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Christiane Fernandes; Lopes, Vânia Glória Silami; Brasil, Patrícia; Coelho, Janice; Muniz, Adriana Gouveia; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro

    2013-11-01

    Perinatal transmission of dengue virus was confirmed by the evidence of virus in fetal tissue, newborn serum, and placenta of pregnant women. Abortion, several different clinical findings, and placental inflammatory findings were documented. No association was seen between severity of maternal dengue and disease of the newborn.

  12. An Endangered Generation: Impact of Perinatal Drug Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Melanie M.

    This article reviews some of the literature on educational approaches for drug-exposed children. Common effects of prenatal and perinatal drug use on the female user, the developing fetus, and the neonate are reviewed. It is noted that female drug users have an increased incidence of medical complications during pregnancy; that the specific…

  13. Prenatal and Perinatal Risk Factors for Autism in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xin; Lv, Cong-Chao; Tian, Jiang; Miao, Ru-Juan; Xi, Wei; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Qi, Lihong

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study using 190 Han children with and without autism to investigate prenatal and perinatal risk factors for autism in China. Cases were recruited through public special education schools and controls from regular public schools in the same region (Tianjin), with frequency matching on sex and birth year. Unadjusted…

  14. Perinatal Staff Nurse Medical Device Use and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Edwina A.

    1998-01-01

    Survey responses from 48 perinatal nurses found that most learned about medical devices by reading manuals; 75% had received inservice training; and 95% learned from other staff. Inadequate knowledge was related to fear of causing patient harm. Initial learning method influenced what was learned, and hands-on experience was considered efficacious.…

  15. Prenatal and Perinatal Factors Associated with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilder, Deborah A.; Pinborough-Zimmerman, Judith; Bakian, Amanda V.; Miller, Judith S.; Dorius, Josette T.; Nangle, Barry; McMahon, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal and perinatal risk factors associated with intellectual disability (ID) were studied in 8-year-old Utah children from a 1994 birth cohort (N = 26,108) using broad ascertainment methods and birth records following the most current recording guidelines. Risk factor analyses were performed inclusive and exclusive of children with a known or…

  16. PREGNANCY AND PERINATAL HEALTH, BAMEN, INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    For developing countries, especially in remote rural areas, measures of maternal and perinatal health may be difficult to obtain because it is not systematically collected and/or electronic data is not available. We assisted the public health officials of Bayingnormen (BaMen), In...

  17. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. 884.2740 Section 884.2740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors...

  18. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. 884.2740 Section 884.2740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors...

  19. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. 884.2740 Section 884.2740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors...

  20. Perinatal Mental Health: Supporting New Families through Vulnerability and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Zero to Three is a single focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Noting that because the perinatal periodfrom the later stages of pregnancy through the first 6 months of the infants lifeis a period of…

  1. Assessing the knowledge of perinatal mental illness among student midwives.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Louise

    2015-11-01

    The experience of perinatal mental illness (mental illness occurring around the time of pregnancy) currently affect 1 in 10 women and can have adverse effects on the mother and her child (Massie and Szajnberg, 2002; O'Connor et al., 2002). The care and effective management of women experiencing perinatal mental illness is therefore an important issue for health care staff, managers, psychiatrists, commissioners and campaigners. Midwives play a significant part in caring for women throughout their pregnancies, during labour and up to the first month after birth. Midwives are in a unique position to assess a woman's well-being and to offer appropriate support. However, previous research has revealed that midwives often have poor understanding and knowledge of perinatal mental health issues and require improved training (Ross-Davie et al, 2006; McCann and Clark, 2010). This research project aims to systematically assess student midwives awareness of perinatal mental illness. The findings of this study will inform curriculum development for graduate and post-graduate midwifery students therefore improving the care and support women with mental illness receive from antenatal services. The findings from this study will also be used for the formation of an educational web-based programme for student and qualified midwives.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms for vascular endothelial growth factor in perinatal complications.

    PubMed

    Bányász, Ilona; Bokodi, Géza; Vásárhelyi, Barna; Treszl, András; Derzbach, László; Szabó, András; Tulassay, Tivadar; Vannay, Adám

    2006-12-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) infants have increased susceptibility to perinatal complications. An immature and impaired vascular system may possibly participate in these complications. There is evidence that supports the notion that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is an essential regulator of embryonic angiogenesis, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of perinatal complications. We aimed to test whether functional genetic polymorphisms of VEGF are associated with the risk of preterm birth or perinatal morbidity. We enrolled 128 LBW infants (< or = 1500 grams). VEGF T-460C, VEGF C-2578A and VEGF G+405C polymorphisms were determined by real-time PCR or PCR-RFLP, respectively. Their genotypes were compared with VEGF genotypes of 200 healthy, term neonates. The prevalence of the VEGF+405 C allele was higher in LBW infants than in healthy, term neonates (OR [95% CI]: 1.29 [1.01-1.65]). Carrier state for the VEGF -2578A allele was an independent risk factor for enterocolitis necrotisans (NEC) (adjusted OR [95% CI]: 2.77 [1.00-7.65]). The carrier state for the VEGF -2578AA genotype was associated with a decreased risk of acute renal failure (ARF) (adjusted OR [95% CI]: 0.2 [0.05-0.78]). These results suggest that VEGF G+405C polymorphism might be associated with a higher risk of preterm birth and that VEGF C-2578A polymorphism may participate in the development of perinatal complications such as NEC and ARF.

  3. Impaired Lung Mitochondrial Respiration Following Perinatal Nicotine Exposure in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Daniel T; Liu, Jie; Sakurai, Reiko; Rossiter, Harry B; Rehan, Virender K

    2016-04-01

    Perinatal smoke/nicotine exposure predisposes to chronic lung disease and morbidity. Mitochondrial abnormalities may contribute as the PPARγ pathway is involved in structural and functional airway deficits after perinatal nicotine exposure. We hypothesized perinatal nicotine exposure results in lung mitochondrial dysfunction that can be rescued by rosiglitazone (RGZ; PPARγ receptor agonist). Sprague-Dawley dams received placebo (CON), nicotine (NIC, 1 mg kg(-1)), or NIC + RGZ (3 mg kg(-1)) daily from embryonic day 6 to postnatal day 21. Parenchymal lung (~10 mg) was taken from adult male offspring for mitochondrial assessment in situ. ADP-stimulated O2 consumption was less in NIC and NIC + RGZ compared to CON (F[2,14] = 17.8; 4.5 ± 0.8 and 4.1 ± 1.4 vs. 8.8 ± 2.5 pmol s mg(-1); p < 0.05). The respiratory control ratio for ADP, an index of mitochondrial coupling, was reduced in NIC and remediated in NIC + RGZ (F[2,14] = 3.8; p < 0.05). Reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity and abnormal coupling were evident after perinatal nicotine exposure. RGZ improved mitochondrial function through tighter coupling of oxidative phosphorylation.

  4. Perinatal Substance Abuse: What's Best for the Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulsen, Marie Kanne

    This report, which is based on the work of the Perinatal Substance Exposure Think Tanks, establishes priorities for statewide services in California to young children who are prenatally exposed to alcohol and drugs. Although the report focuses on the developmental needs of children, it also examines efforts to provide prevention and treatment…

  5. Could Perinatal Asphyxia Induce a Synaptopathy? New Highlights from an Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, María Inés; Udovin, Lucas Daniel; Kusnier, Carlos; Kölliker-Frers, Rodolfo; de Souza, Wanderley

    2017-01-01

    Birth asphyxia also termed perinatal asphyxia is an obstetric complication that strongly affects brain structure and function. Central nervous system is highly susceptible to oxidative damage caused by perinatal asphyxia while activation and maturity of the proper pathways are relevant to avoiding abnormal neural development. Perinatal asphyxia is associated with high morbimortality in term and preterm neonates. Although several studies have demonstrated a variety of biochemical and molecular pathways involved in perinatal asphyxia physiopathology, little is known about the synaptic alterations induced by perinatal asphyxia. Nearly 25% of the newborns who survive perinatal asphyxia develop neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy and certain neurodevelopmental and learning disabilities where synaptic connectivity disturbances may be involved. Accordingly, here we review and discuss the association of possible synaptic dysfunction with perinatal asphyxia on the basis of updated evidence from an experimental model. PMID:28326198

  6. Could Perinatal Asphyxia Induce a Synaptopathy? New Highlights from an Experimental Model.

    PubMed

    Herrera, María Inés; Otero-Losada, Matilde; Udovin, Lucas Daniel; Kusnier, Carlos; Kölliker-Frers, Rodolfo; de Souza, Wanderley; Capani, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Birth asphyxia also termed perinatal asphyxia is an obstetric complication that strongly affects brain structure and function. Central nervous system is highly susceptible to oxidative damage caused by perinatal asphyxia while activation and maturity of the proper pathways are relevant to avoiding abnormal neural development. Perinatal asphyxia is associated with high morbimortality in term and preterm neonates. Although several studies have demonstrated a variety of biochemical and molecular pathways involved in perinatal asphyxia physiopathology, little is known about the synaptic alterations induced by perinatal asphyxia. Nearly 25% of the newborns who survive perinatal asphyxia develop neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy and certain neurodevelopmental and learning disabilities where synaptic connectivity disturbances may be involved. Accordingly, here we review and discuss the association of possible synaptic dysfunction with perinatal asphyxia on the basis of updated evidence from an experimental model.

  7. Mechanochemical conversion of brominated POPs into useful oxybromides: a greener approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnetta, Giovanni; Liu, Han; Zhang, Kunlun; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin; Deng, Shubo; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Brominated organic pollutants are considered of great concern for their adverse effect on human health and the environment, so an increasing number of such compounds are being classified as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Mechanochemical destruction is a promising technology for POPs safe disposal because it can achieve their complete carbonization by solvent-free high energy ball milling at room temperature. However, a large amount of co-milling reagent usually is necessary, so a considerable volume of residue is produced. In the present study a different approach to POPs mechanochemical destruction is proposed. Employing stoichiometric quantities of Bi2O3 or La2O3 as co-milling reagent, brominated POPs are selectively and completely converted into their corresponding oxybromides (i.e. BiOBr and LaOBr), which possess very peculiar properties and can be used for some actual and many more potential applications. In this way, bromine is beneficially reused in the final product, while POPs carbon skeleton is safely destroyed to amorphous carbon. Moreover, mechanochemical destruction is employed in a greener and more sustainable manner.

  8. Caulobacter PopZ forms an intrinsically disordered hub in organizing bacterial cell poles

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Joshua A.; Follett, Shelby E.; Wang, Haibi; Meadows, Christopher P.; Varga, Krisztina; Bowman, Grant R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite their relative simplicity, bacteria have complex anatomy at the subcellular level. At the cell poles of Caulobacter crescentus, a 177-amino acid (aa) protein called PopZ self-assembles into 3D polymeric superstructures. Remarkably, we find that this assemblage interacts directly with at least eight different proteins, which are involved in cell cycle regulation and chromosome segregation. The binding determinants within PopZ include 24 aa at the N terminus, a 32-aa region near the C-terminal homo-oligomeric assembly domain, and portions of an intervening linker region. Together, the N-terminal 133 aa of PopZ are sufficient for interacting with all binding partners, even in the absence of homo-oligomeric assembly. Structural analysis of this region revealed that it is intrinsically disordered, similar to p53 and other hub proteins that organize complex signaling networks in eukaryotic cells. Through live-cell photobleaching, we find rapid binding kinetics between PopZ and its partners, suggesting many pole-localized proteins become concentrated at cell poles through rapid cycles of binding and unbinding within the PopZ scaffold. We conclude that some bacteria, similar to their eukaryotic counterparts, use intrinsically disordered hub proteins for network assembly and subcellular organization. PMID:27791060

  9. Visual pop-out in barn owls: Human-like behavior in the avian brain.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Julius; Beissel, Christian; Rohn, Friederike; Adato, Yair; Wagner, Hermann; Ben-Shahar, Ohad

    2015-01-01

    Visual pop-out is a phenomenon by which the latency to detect a target in a scene is independent of the number of other elements, the distractors. Pop-out is an effective visual-search guidance that occurs typically when the target is distinct in one feature from the distractors, thus facilitating fast detection of predators or prey. However, apart from studies on primates, pop-out has been examined in few species and demonstrated thus far in rats, archer fish, and pigeons only. To fill this gap, here we study pop-out in barn owls. These birds are a unique model system for such exploration because their lack of eye movements dictates visual behavior dominated by head movements. Head saccades and interspersed fixation periods can therefore be tracked and analyzed with a head-mounted wireless microcamera--the OwlCam. Using this methodology we confronted two owls with scenes containing search arrays of one target among varying numbers (15-63) of similar looking distractors. We tested targets distinct either by orientation (Experiment 1) or luminance contrast (Experiment 2). Search time and the number of saccades until the target was fixated remained largely independent of the number of distractors in both experiments. This suggests that barn owls can exhibit pop-out during visual search, thus expanding the group of species and brain structures that can cope with this fundamental visual behavior. The utility of our automatic analysis method is further discussed for other species and scientific questions.

  10. THE FORMATION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES FROM LOW-MASS POP III SEEDS

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Fryer, Chris L.

    2012-09-01

    The existence of 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} black holes (BHs) in massive galaxies by z {approx} 7 is one of the great unsolved mysteries in cosmological structure formation. One theory argues that they originate from the BHs of Pop III stars at z {approx} 20 and then accrete at the Eddington limit down to the epoch of reionization, which requires that they have constant access to rich supplies of fuel. Because early numerical simulations suggested that Pop III stars were {approx}>100 M{sub Sun }, the supermassive black hole (SMBH) seeds considered up to now were 100-300 M{sub Sun }. However, there is a growing numerical and observational consensus that some Pop III stars were tens of solar masses, not hundreds, and that 20-40 M{sub Sun} BHs may have been much more plentiful at high redshift. However, we find that natal kicks imparted to 20-40 M{sub Sun} Pop III BHs during formation eject them from their halos and hence their fuel supply, precluding them from Eddington-limit growth. Consequently, SMBHs are far less likely to form from low-mass Pop III stars than from very massive ones.

  11. IAC-POP: FINDING THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF RESOLVED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Aparicio, Antonio E-mail: shidalgo@iac.es

    2009-08-15

    IAC-pop is a code designed to solve the star formation history (SFH) of a complex stellar population system, like a galaxy, from the analysis of the color-magnitude diagram (CMD). It uses a genetic algorithm to minimize a {chi}{sup 2} merit function comparing the star distributions in the observed CMD and the CMD of a synthetic stellar population. A parameterization of the CMDs is used, which is the main input of the code. In fact, the code can be applied to any problem in which a similar parameterization of an experimental set of data and models can be made. The method's internal consistency and robustness against several error sources, including observational effects, data sampling, and stellar evolution library differences, are tested. It is found that the best stability of the solution and the best way to estimate errors are obtained by several runs of IAC-pop with varying the input data parameterization. The routine MinnIAC is used to control this process. IAC-pop is offered for free use and can be downloaded from the site http://iac-star.iac.es/iac-pop. The routine MinnIAC is also offered under request, but support cannot be provided for its use. The only requirement for the use of IAC-pop and MinnIAC is referencing this paper and crediting as indicated in the site.

  12. Mechanochemical conversion of brominated POPs into useful oxybromides: a greener approach

    PubMed Central

    Cagnetta, Giovanni; Liu, Han; Zhang, Kunlun; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin; Deng, Shubo; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Brominated organic pollutants are considered of great concern for their adverse effect on human health and the environment, so an increasing number of such compounds are being classified as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Mechanochemical destruction is a promising technology for POPs safe disposal because it can achieve their complete carbonization by solvent-free high energy ball milling at room temperature. However, a large amount of co-milling reagent usually is necessary, so a considerable volume of residue is produced. In the present study a different approach to POPs mechanochemical destruction is proposed. Employing stoichiometric quantities of Bi2O3 or La2O3 as co-milling reagent, brominated POPs are selectively and completely converted into their corresponding oxybromides (i.e. BiOBr and LaOBr), which possess very peculiar properties and can be used for some actual and many more potential applications. In this way, bromine is beneficially reused in the final product, while POPs carbon skeleton is safely destroyed to amorphous carbon. Moreover, mechanochemical destruction is employed in a greener and more sustainable manner. PMID:27325373

  13. Psychosocial impact of perinatal loss among Muslim women

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Women of reproductive age are vulnerable to psychosocial problems, but these have remained largely unexplored in Muslim women in developing countries. The aim of this study was to explore and describe psychosocial impact and social support following perinatal loss among Muslim women. Methods A qualitative study was conducted in a specialist centre among Muslim mothers who had experienced perinatal loss. Purposive sampling to achieve maximum variation among Muslims in relation to age, parity and previous perinatal death was used. Data was collected by focus group discussion and in-depth unstructured interview until the saturation point met. Sixteen mothers who had recent perinatal loss of wanted pregnancy, had received antenatal follow up from public or private health clinics, and had delivery in our centre participated for the study. All of them had experienced psychological difficulties including feelings of confusion, emptiness and anxiety over facing another pregnancy. Results Two out of sixteen showed anger and one felt guilt. They reported experiencing a lack of communication and privacy in the hospital during the period of grief. Family members and friends play an important role in providing support. The majority agreed that the decision makers were husbands and families instead of themselves. The respondents felt that repetitive reminder of whatever happened was a test from God improved their sense of self-worth. They appreciated this reminder especially when it came from husband, family or friends closed to them. Conclusion Muslim mothers who had experienced perinatal loss showed some level of adverse psychosocial impact which affected their feelings. Husbands and family members were the main decision makers for Muslim women. Health care providers should provide psychosocial support during antenatal, delivery and postnatal care. On-going support involving husband should be available where needed. PMID:22708998

  14. US and territory telemedicine policies: identifying gaps in perinatal care

    PubMed Central

    Okoroh, Ekwutosi M.; Kroelinger, Charlan D.; Smith, Alexander M.; Goodman, David A.; Barfield, Wanda D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Perinatal regionalization is a system of maternal and neonatal risk-appropriate health care delivery in which resources are ideally allocated for mothers and newborns during pregnancy, labor and delivery, and postpartum, in order to deliver appropriate care. Typically, perinatal risk-appropriate care is provided in-person, but with the advancement of technologies, the opportunity to provide care remotely has emerged. Telemedicine provides distance-based care to patients by consultation, diagnosis, and treatment in rural or remote US jurisdictions (states and territories). OBJECTIVE We sought to summarize the telemedicine policies of states and territories and assess if maternal and neonatal risk-appropriate care is specified. STUDY DESIGN We conducted a 2014 systematic World Wide Web–based review of publicly available rules, statutes, regulations, laws, planning documents, and program descriptions among US jurisdictions (N=59) on telemedicine care. Policies including language on the topics of consultation, diagnosis, or treatment, and those specific to maternal and neonatal risk-appropriate care were categorized for analysis. RESULTS Overall, 36 jurisdictions (32 states; 3 territories; and District of Columbia) (61%) had telemedicine policies with language referencing consultation, diagnosis, or treatment; 29 (49%) referenced consultation, 30 (51%) referenced diagnosis, and 35 (59%) referenced treatment. In all, 26 jurisdictions (22 states; 3 territories; and District of Columbia) (44%), referenced all topics. Only 3 jurisdictions (3 states; 0 territories) (5%), had policy language specifically addressing perinatal care. CONCLUSION The majority of states have published telemedicine policies, but few specify policy language for perinatal risk-appropriate care. By ensuring that language specific to the perinatal population is included in telemedicine policies, access to maternal and neonatal care can be increased in rural, remote, and resource

  15. CLOCK DRAWING IN CHILDREN WITH PERI-NATAL STROKE

    PubMed Central

    Yousefian, Omid; Ballantyne, Angela O.; Doo, Alex; Trauner, Doris A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Children with peri-natal stroke may show evidence of contralateral spatial neglect. The goal of this study was to determine whether a clock drawing task commonly used in adults to identify neglect would be effective in detecting neglect in children with peri-natal stroke. METHODS Thirty-eight individuals (age range 6–21 years) with left hemisphere (LH) or right hemisphere (RH) peri-natal onset unilateral lesions and one hundred seventy-nine age-matched controls were given the free-drawn Clock Drawing Task (CDT) in a cross-sectional design. An adapted scoring system that evaluated right- and left-sided errors separately was developed as part of the investigation. RESULTS Children with LH lesions made a greater number of errors on both the right and left sides of the clock drawings in all age subgroups (6–8 years, 9–14 years, and 15–21 years) compared to controls. Children with RH lesions showed greater left and right errors in the younger groups compared to controls, with significantly poorer performance on the left at 6–8 years, suggestive of contralateral neglect. However, by ages 15–21 years, the RH lesion subjects no longer differed from controls. CONCLUSIONS Clock drawing can identify spatial neglect in children with early hemispheric damage. However, brain development is a dynamic process, and as children age, spatial neglect may no longer be evident. These findings demonstrate the limitations of predicting long-term outcome after peri-natal stroke from early neuro-cognitive data. Children with peri-natal stroke may require different neural pathways to accomplish specific skills or to overcome deficits, but ultimately they may have “typical” outcomes. PMID:26002051

  16. Perinatal Depression Algorithm: A Home Visitor Step-by-Step Guide for Advanced Management of Perinatal Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laszewski, Audrey; Wichman, Christina L.; Doering, Jennifer J.; Maletta, Kristyn; Hammel, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood professionals do many things to support young families. This is true now more than ever, as researchers continue to discover the long-term benefits of early, healthy, nurturing relationships. This article provides an overview of the development of an advanced practice perinatal depression algorithm created as a step-by-step guide…

  17. Therapeutic interventions in sepsis: current and anticipated pharmacological agents

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Prashant; Rao, G Madhava; Pandey, Gitu; Sharma, Shweta; Mittapelly, Naresh; Shegokar, Ranjita; Mishra, Prabhat Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome characterized by a multisystem response to a pathogenic assault due to underlying infection that involves a combination of interconnected biochemical, cellular and organ–organ interactive networks. After the withdrawal of recombinant human-activated protein C (rAPC), researchers and physicians have continued to search for new therapeutic approaches and targets against sepsis, effective in both hypo- and hyperinflammatory states. Currently, statins are being evaluated as a viable option in clinical trials. Many agents that have shown favourable results in experimental sepsis are not clinically effective or have not been clinically evaluated. Apart from developing new therapeutic molecules, there is great scope for for developing a variety of drug delivery strategies, such as nanoparticulate carriers and phospholipid-based systems. These nanoparticulate carriers neutralize intracorporeal LPS as well as deliver therapeutic agents to targeted tissues and subcellular locations. Here, we review and critically discuss the present status and new experimental and clinical approaches for therapeutic intervention in sepsis. PMID:24977655

  18. Fatal sepsis by Bacillus circulans in an immunocompromised patient

    PubMed Central

    Alebouyeh, M; Gooran Orimi, P; Azimi-rad, M; Tajbakhsh, M; Tajeddin, E; Jahani Sherafat, S; Nazemalhosseini mojarad, E; Zali, MR

    2011-01-01

    An immunosuppressed man was admitted to hospital with diarrhea and a history of urinary tract infection. He was subjected to treatment with antibiotics. The patient died of putative severe sepsis. The etiological agent was a carbapenemase producing isolate of Bacillus circulans with resistance to all prescribed antimicrobial agents. PMID:22347600

  19. Gentamicin resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hasvold, J; Bradford, L; Nelson, C; Harrison, C; Attar, M; Stillwell, T

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among term and preterm infants. Ampicillin and gentamicin are standard empiric therapy for early onset sepsis. Four cases of neonatal sepsis secondary to Escherichia coli (E. coli) found to be gentamicin resistant occurred within a five week period in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To determine whether these cases could be tied to a single vector of transmission, and to more broadly evaluate the incidence of gentamicin resistant strains of E. coli in the neonatal population at our institution compared to other centers, we reviewed the charts of the four neonates (Infants A through D) and their mothers. The E. coli isolates were sent for Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to evaluate for genetic similarity between strains. We also reviewed all positive E. coli cultures from one NICU over a two year period. Infants A and B had genetically indistinguishable strains which matched that of urine and placental cultures of Infant B's mother. Infant C had a genetically distinct organism. Infant D, the identical twin of Infant C, did not have typing performed. Review of all cultures positive for E. coli at our institution showed a 12.9 percent incidence of gentamicin-resistance. A review of other studies showed that rates of resistance vary considerably by institution. We conclude that gentamicin-resistant E. coli is a relatively uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis, but should remain a consideration in patients who deteriorate despite initiation of empiric antibiotics.

  20. Sepsis: Something old, something new, and a systems view.

    PubMed

    Namas, Rami; Zamora, Ruben; Namas, Rajaie; An, Gary; Doyle, John; Dick, Thomas E; Jacono, Frank J; Androulakis, Ioannis P; Nieman, Gary F; Chang, Steve; Billiar, Timothy R; Kellum, John A; Angus, Derek C; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2012-06-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome characterized by a multisystem response to a microbial pathogenic insult consisting of a mosaic of interconnected biochemical, cellular, and organ-organ interaction networks. A central thread that connects these responses is inflammation that, while attempting to defend the body and prevent further harm, causes further damage through the feed-forward, proinflammatory effects of damage-associated molecular pattern molecules. In this review, we address the epidemiology and current definitions of sepsis and focus specifically on the biologic cascades that comprise the inflammatory response to sepsis. We suggest that attempts to improve clinical outcomes by targeting specific components of this network have been unsuccessful due to the lack of an integrative, predictive, and individualized systems-based approach to define the time-varying, multidimensional state of the patient. We highlight the translational impact of computational modeling and other complex systems approaches as applied to sepsis, including in silico clinical trials, patient-specific models, and complexity-based assessments of physiology.