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Sample records for perineural catheter placement

  1. Randomized comparison of popliteal-sciatic perineural catheter tip migration and dislocation in a cadaver model using two catheter designs

    PubMed Central

    Steffel, Lauren; Howard, Steven K.; Borg, Lindsay; Leng, Jody C.; Kim, T. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Background New catheter-over-needle (CON) technology for continuous peripheral nerve blockade has emerged, but its effect on the risk of perineural catheter tip dislocation is unknown. Less flexible catheters may be more likely to migrate away from the nerve with simulated patient movement. In the present study, we evaluated catheter tip migration between CON catheters and traditional catheter-through-needle (CTN) catheters during ultrasound-guided short-axis in-plane (SAX-IP) insertion. Methods We evaluated the migration of popliteal-sciatic catheters in a prone, unembalmed male cadaver. Thirty catheter placement trials were divided randomly into two groups based on the catheter type: CON or CTN. A single anesthesiology resident placed the catheters by SAX-IP insertion, and the catheters were then examined by ultrasound before and after ipsilateral knee range of motion (ROM) exercises (0°–130° flexion). A blinded expert regional anesthesiologist performed caliper measurements on the ultrasound images before and after the ROM exercises. The primary outcome was the change in distance from the catheter tip to the center of the nerve (cm) between before and after the ROM exercises. Results The change in the tip-to-nerve distance (median [10th–90th percentile]) was 0.06 (−0.16 to 0.23) cm for the CTN catheter and 0.00 (−0.12 to 0.69) for the CON catheter (P = 0.663). However, there was a statistically significant increase in dislocation out of the nerve compartment for the CON catheter (4/15; 0/15 for CTN) (P = 0.043). Conclusions Although the use of different catheter designs had no effect on the change in the measured migration distance of popliteal-sciatic catheters, 27% of the CON catheters were dislocated out of the nerve compartment. These results may influence the choice of catheter design when using SAX-IP perineural catheter insertion. PMID:28184270

  2. Principles of tunneled cuffed catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Heberlein, Wolf

    2011-12-01

    Tunneled cuffed catheters provide reliable and instant long-term intravenous access for a large variety of therapeutic purposes, including chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, and apheresis. The most frequent application is for patients with renal failure as an access device for hemodialysis. In this capacity, the rate of catheter use has remained stable in the United States, despite the promotion of arteriovenous fistulas and arteriovenous grafts. The latter 2 procedures achieve superior longevity and much higher cost-efficiency. Tunneled catheters, however, serve as bridging devices during maturation of newly placed arteriovenous fistulas or as the final option in patients in whom fistulas and grafts have failed. High-quality vascular access is a hallmark of interventional radiology, and its significance for patient care and for our specialty cannot be overestimated. Familiarity with basic concepts of the device and procedural techniques are crucial to achieve successful long-term venous access. The following article demonstrates key concepts of tunneled venous catheter placement by means of dialysis, inasmuch as dialysis catheters represent the most commonly placed tunneled central venous catheters. The principles of placement and techniques utilized, however, are applicable to devices that are used for chemotherapy or parenteral nutrition, such as the Hickman, Broviac, Groshong, or tunneled peripherally inserted central catheters.

  3. ATLS: Catheter and tube placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.; Pepper, L.; Orsak, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment are: to evaluate the rack mounted equipment and medical supplies necessary for medical procedures; to evaluate the attachments, mounting points, and inner drawer assemblies for the medical supplies; and to evaluate the procedures for performing medical scenarios. The resources available in the HMF miniracks to accomplish medical scenarios and/or procedures include: medical equipment mounted in the racks; a patch panel with places to attach tubing and catheters; self contained drawers full of critical care medical supplies; and an ALS 'backpack' for deploying supplies. The attachment lines, tubing and associated medical supplies will be deployed and used with the equipment and a patient mannequin. Data collection is provided by direct observations by the inflight experimenters, and analysis of still and video photography.

  4. Intermittent back pain after central venous catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Rosa, U W; Foreman, M; Willsie-Ediger, S

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of inadvertent azygos placement of a central venous catheter. The patient experienced ill-defined back pain associated with total parenteral nutrition infusion. The catheter malposition remained unrecognized and resulted in extensive diagnostic work-up. Symptoms resolved after the catheter was withdrawn.

  5. Central venous catheter placement: where is the tip?

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, George M

    2012-09-01

    The insertion of central venous catheters is a common bedside procedure performed in intensive care units. Here, we present a case of an 82-year-old man who underwent insertion of a central venous catheter in the internal jugular vein without perceived complications. Postprocedural radiographs showed rostral migration of the catheter, and computed tomography performed coincidentally showed cannulation of the jugular bulb at the level of the jugular foramen. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document migration of a central venous catheter from the internal jugular vein into the dural sinuses, as confirmed by computed tomography. The case highlights the importance of acquiring postprocedural radiographs for all insertions of central venous catheters to confirm catheter placement.

  6. Lumbar Catheter Placement Using Paramedian Approach Under Fluoroscopic Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Khan, Asif A.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Herial, Nabeel A.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Suri, M. Fareed K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar catheter placement under fluoroscopic guidance may reduce the rate of technical failures and associated complications seen with insertion guided by manually palpable landmarks. Methods We reviewed our experience with 43 attempted lumbar catheter placements using paramedian approach under fluoroscopic guidance and ascertained rates of technical success, and clinical events. Results Among the 43 patients, 18, 1, and 1 patients were on aspirin (with dipyrimadole in 2), clopidogrel, and combination of both, respectively. Lumbar catheter placement was successful in 42 of 43 attempted placements. Floroscopic guidance was critical in three patients; one patient had severe cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) depletion (empty thecal sac phenomenon) following pituitary surgery leading to no cerebrospinal fluid return despite correct placement confirmation under fluoroscopy. Two patients had spinal needle placement at the junction between epidural and cerebrospinal fluid spaces (junctional position) leading to cerebrospinal fluid return but inability to introduce the lumbar catheter. After confirmation of position by the injection of contrast or radiographic landmarks the needle was advanced by indenting the subcutaneous tissue or reinserting at a spinal level above the first insertion. The lumbar catheter remained in position over a mean period (±standard deviation) of 4.1(±2.3) days. Improvement in hydrocephalus was seen in two patients with intracranial mass lesions. One patient developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage through the insertion track following removal of catheter and required skin suturing at the site of insertion. Conclusions We observed a high technical success rate with low rate of complications even in patients with intracranial mass lesions, those on ongoing antiplatelet medications or in whom insertion would not be possible guided by manually palpable landmarks. PMID:26958156

  7. Ambulatory setting for peritoneal dialysis catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ivan D

    2008-01-01

    A modified fluoroscopic technique by adding ultrasound-assistance ensuring entry into the abdominal cavity and avoiding the risk of epigastric artery injury under direct ultrasound visualization was recently published. This study demonstrated that the technique was minimally invasive and allowed for accurate assessment of entry into the abdominal cavity and avoidance of vascular injury. In the current analysis, we report the impact of this technique on hospital stay during a peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter insertion. Twenty-six PD catheters have been placed on an outpatient basis using this technique. All catheter insertions were successful. Patients were discharge on the same day of the procedure. There were no procedure-related complication or related to short hospital stay. An ambulatory setting allows for a short hospital stay without compromising patient care. This brief paper explains in detail the pre, peri and postoperative period and follow-up.

  8. Device for Catheter Placement of External Ventricular Drain

    PubMed Central

    Ann, Jae-Min; Oh, Jae-Sang; Yoon, Seok-Mann

    2016-01-01

    To introduce a new device for catheter placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This device was composed of three portions, T-shaped main body, rectangular pillar having a central hole to insert a catheter and an arm pointing the tragus. The main body has a role to direct a ventricular catheter toward the right or left inner canthus and has a shallow longitudinal opening to connect the rectangular pillar. The arm pointing the tragus is controlled by back and forth movement and turn of the pillar attached to the main body. Between April 2012 and December 2014, 57 emergency EVDs were performed in 52 patients using this device in the operating room. Catheter tip located in the frontal horn in 52 (91.2%), 3rd ventricle in 2 (3.5%) and in the wall of the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle in 3 EVDs (5.2%). Small hemorrhage along to catheter tract occurred in 1 EVD. CSF was well drained through the all EVD catheters. The accuracy of the catheter position and direction using this device were 91% and 100%, respectively. This device for EVD guides to provide an accurate position of catheter tip safely and easily. PMID:27226870

  9. Electromagnetically tracked placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacolick, Laura; Patel, Neilesh; Tang, Jonathan; Levy, Elliot; Cleary, Kevin R.

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes a computer program to utilize electromagnetic tracking guidance during insertion of peripherally inserted central catheters. Placement of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) line is a relatively simple, routine procedure in which a catheter is inserted into the veins of the lower arm and threaded up the arm to the vena cava to sit just above the heart. However, the procedure requires x-ray verification of the catheter position and is usually done under continuous fluoroscopic guidance. The computer program is designed to replace fluoroscopic guidance in this procedure and make PICC line placement a bedside procedure. This would greatly reduce the time and resources dedicated to this procedure. The physician first goes through a quick registration procedure to register the patient space with the computer screen coordinates. Once registration is completed, the program provides a continuous, real-time display of the position of the catheter tip overlaid on an x-ray image of the patient on an adjacent computer screen. Both the position and orientation of the catheter tip is shown. The display is very similar to that shown when using fluoroscopy.

  10. Ultrasound/fluoroscopy-assisted placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ivan D

    2007-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters may be inserted blindly, surgically, and either by laparoscopic, peritoneoscopic, or fluoroscopic approach. A modified fluoroscopic technique by adding ultrasound-assistance was performed in the present study to ensure entry into the abdominal cavity under direct ultrasound visualization. From March 2005 to May 2007, ultrasound-fluoroscopic guided placement of PD catheters was attempted in 32 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Preoperative evaluation was performed on all patients prior to the procedure. After initial dissection of the subcutaneous tissue anterior to the anterior rectus sheath, the needle was inserted into the abdominal cavity under the guidance of ultrasound. The position of the epigastric artery was also examined using ultrasonography to avoid the risk of arterial injury. PD catheters were successfully placed in 31 of the 32 ESRD patients using this technique. In all of these patients, the needle could be seen entering the abdominal cavity using an ultrasound. In one patient the procedure was abandoned because of bowel puncture by the micro-puncture needle that was inadvertently advanced into a loop of bowel. This patient did not develop acute abdomen nor needed any intervention. One patient died 4 days after placement of the catheter of unrelated causes. One patient was started on acute peritoneal dialysis the same day of catheter placement without any complications. The rest of the patients started peritoneal dialysis within 2-6 weeks of catheter placement. None of the patients had bleeding related to arterial injury as ultrasound was able to visualize the epigastric artery. Our experience shows that ultrasound-fluoroscopic technique is minimally invasive and allows for accurate assessment of the entry into the abdominal cavity. This technique can avoid the risk of vascular injury altogether.

  11. [Placement of central venous catheters and patient safety].

    PubMed

    de Jonge, E

    2007-01-27

    Placement of a central venous catheter is one of the most common invasive procedures and is associated with septic and mechanical complications, such as bleeding and pneumothorax. Up to 30% of attempts to cannulate the central vein fail. Correct positioning of the patient can help to maximise the success rate. For placement of catheters in the subclavian vein, patients should be in the Trendelenburg position without the use of a shoulder roll to retract the shoulders. Traditionally, central venous catheters are placed using a 'blind' technique that relies on external anatomical reference marks to localise the vein. However, unnoticed anatomical variations or central venous thrombosis may contribute to cannulation failure with this technique. The use of ultrasound has been shown to increase the success rate and avoid mechanical complications when placing a catheter in the internal jugular vein. It may also increase the success rate in subclavian vein catheterisation. To increase patient safety, the use of ultrasound when placing a central venous catheter should be embraced and become the standard of care.

  12. The Ultrasound-Only Central Venous Catheter Placement and Confirmation Procedure.

    PubMed

    Saul, Turandot; Doctor, Michael; Kaban, Nicole L; Avitabile, Nicholas C; Siadecki, Sebastian D; Lewiss, Resa E

    2015-07-01

    The placement of a central venous catheter remains an important intervention in the care of critically ill patients in the emergency department. We propose an ultrasound-first protocol for 3 aspects of central venous catheter placement above the diaphragm: dynamic procedural guidance, evaluation for pneumothorax, and confirmation of the catheter tip location.

  13. Complications of Permanent Hemodialysis Catheter Placement; Need for Better Pre-Implantation Algorithm?

    PubMed

    Premuzic, Vedran; Smiljanic, Ranko; Perkov, Drazen; Gavranic, Bruna Brunetta; Tomasevic, Boris; Jelakovic, Bojan

    2016-08-01

    There is a correlation between central venous cannulation and the development of central venous stenosis. Minor retrosternal vein lesions can be easily missed. Computerized tomographic (CT) venography is the diagnostic procedure of choice. The aim of this study was to examine the complications after catheter implantation in patients with prior permanent catheter placement and to evaluate present diagnostic procedures performed prior to choosing permanent access site in order to reduce possible complications after catheter placement. Complications of permanent CVC insertion in our department were analyzed between October 2011 and February 2015. We have implanted the Tesio twin catheter system and the Hickman Bard dual lumen catheter. All patients with prior permanent dialysis catheter were evaluated with color doppler, while patients with suspected central venous stenosis (CVS) or thrombosis were evaluated with phlebography or CT venography prior to catheter placement. One hundred and ninety-eight permanent dialysis catheters were placed (173 Tesio [87.4%] and 25 Hickman [12.6%]) in 163 patients. There were 125 patients (76.7%) with prior temporary catheter and 61 (48.8%) of them had more than one prior permanent catheter (1.92 catheter per person).There were 4/61 (6.5%) patients with catheter-related complications without prior phlebography and CT venography. Phlebography and CT venography were performed in 30 (24.0%) patients with suspected CVS/thrombosis and with dialysis vintage of 76.23 months (52.78-98.28). Phlebography and CT venography were more sensitive than color doppler in the detection of CVS/thrombosis in patients with prior permanent catheter placements (P < 0.001). Since this diagnostic algorithm was introduced prior to catheter placement there were no catheter insertion-related complications or dysfunctions (P < 0.001). All our procedures on patients with prior permanent catheters followed preliminary color doppler diagnostics. Nevertheless

  14. A comparative analysis of radiological and surgical placement of central venous catheters

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Kieran D.; Fisher, Ross; Warnock, Neil; Winfield, David A.; Reed, Malcolm W.; Gaines, Peter A.

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. To compare the differences in practice and outcome of all radiologically and surgically placed central venous catheters retrospectively over a 2-year period simultaneously, at a single institution. Methods.A total of 253 Hickman catheters were inserted in 209 patients; 120 were placed radiologically in 102 patients and 133 were placed surgically in 107 patients. The indication was chemotherapy in 76% of radiological and in 47% of surgical cases; the remainder were for total parenteral nutrition and venous access. Results. There were 6 (4.5%) primary surgical failures and a further 17 (13%) surgical cases requiring multiple placement attempts. Pneumothorax occurred once (0.8%) surgically and four times (3.3%) radiologically. There were no radiological primary misplacements but there were five (3.7%) surgical ones. Catheter or central vein thrombosis occurred in four (3.3%) radiological and five (3.7%) surgical cases. The rate of infection per 1000 catheter-days was 1.9 in radiologically placed catheters and 4.0 in surgically placed ones (p<0.001). Average catheter life-span was similar for the two placement methods (100{+-}23 days). Conclusion. Radiological placement is consistently more reliable than surgical placement. There are fewer placement complications and fewer catheter infections overall.

  15. Accidental subclavian artery catheterization during attempted internal jugular central venous catheter placement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Bharat; Kamal, Manoj; Purohit, Anamika; Rana, Kirti; Chouhan, Dilip Singh

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheter placement has been routinely employed for anesthetic and intensive care management. Despite proper technique used and expertise complications do occur; some of which are related to catheter misplacements. We report a case in which subclavian artery was accidently catheterized during attempted internal jugular venous cannulation.

  16. Transhepatic Guidance of Translumbar Hemodialysis Catheter Placement in the Setting of Chronic Infrarenal IVC Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Jonathan M. Regalado, Sidney; Navuluri, Rakesh Zangan, Steven; Thuong Van Ha; Funaki, Brian

    2010-06-15

    When patients with end-stage renal disease have exhausted both conventional and unconventional venous access options, creative solutions must be sought for hemodialysis catheter placement in order to ensure survival. This case describes a patient in urgent need of a dialysis catheter despite total occlusion of the jugular, subclavian, and femoral veins. Occlusion of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and right renal vein resulted in failed attempts at translumbar catheter placement. A gooseneck snare was temporarily advanced through the liver to the IVC for use as a fluoroscopic target to facilitate successful single-puncture, translumbar catheterization.

  17. The supraclavicular fossa ultrasound view for central venous catheter placement and catheter change over guidewire.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Chan; Klebach, Christian; Heinze, Ingo; Hoeft, Andreas; Baumgarten, Georg; Weber, Stefan

    2014-12-23

    The supraclavicular fossa ultrasound view can be useful for central venous catheter (CVC) placement. Venipuncture of the internal jugular veins (IJV) or subclavian veins is performed with a micro-convex ultrasound probe, using a neonatal abdominal preset with a probe frequency of 10 Mhz at a depth of 10-12 cm. Following insertion of the guidewire into the vein, the probe is shifted to the right supraclavicular fossa to obtain a view of the superior vena cava (SVC), right pulmonary artery and ascending aorta. Under real-time ultrasound view, the guidewire and its J-tip is visualized and pushed forward to the lower SVC. Insertion depth is read from guidewire marks using central venous catheter. CVC is then inserted following skin and venous dilation. The supraclavicular fossa view is most suitable for right IJV CVC insertion. If other insertion sites are chosen the right supraclavicular fossa should be within the sterile field. Scanning of the IJVs, brachiocephalic veins and SVC can reveal significant thrombosis before venipuncture. Misplaced CVCs can be corrected with a change over guidewire technique under real-time ultrasound guidance. In conjunction with a diagnostic lung ultrasound scan, this technique has a potential to replace chest radiograph for confirmation of CVC tip position and exclusion of pneumothorax. Moreover, this view is of advantage in patients with a non-p-wave cardiac rhythm were an intra-cardiac electrocardiography (ECG) is not feasible for CVC tip position confirmation. Limitations of the method are lack of availability of a micro-convex probe and the need for training.

  18. Placement of Hemodialysis Catheters Through Stenotic or Occluded Central Thoracic Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Claude Deglise, Sebastien; Saucy, Francois; Mathieu, Claudine; Haesler, Erik; Doenz, Francesco; Corpataux, Jean Marc; Qanadli, Salah Dine

    2009-07-15

    A method for hemodialysis catheter placement in patients with central thoracic venous stenosis or occlusion is described and initial results are analyzed. Twelve patients, with a mean age of 63.2 years (42-80 years), with central venous stenosis or occlusion, and who required a hemodialysis catheter were reviewed. All lesions were confirmed by helical CT or phlebography. Five patients had stenosis while seven patients were diagnosed with an occlusion of thoracic central veins. All patients were asymptomatic, without sign of superior vena cava syndrome. After percutaneous transstenotic catheterization or guidewire-based recannalization in occlusions, a balloon dilatation was performed and a stent was placed, when necessary, prior to catheter placement. Technical success was 92%. Three patients had angioplasty alone and nine patients had angioplasty with stent placement. Dialysis catheters were successfully inserted through all recannalized accesses. No immediate complication occurred, nor did any patient develop superior vena cava syndrome after the procedure. The mean follow-up was 21.8 months (range, 8-48 months). Three patients developed a catheter dysfunction with fibrin sheath formation (at 7, 11, and 12 months after catheter placement, respectively). Two were successfully managed by percutaneous endovascular approach and one catheter was removed. In conclusion, for patients with central venous stenosis or occlusion and those who need a hemodialysis catheter, catheter insertion can be reliably achieved immediately after endovascular recannalization with acceptable technical and long-term success rates. This technique should be considered as an alternative procedure for placing a new hemodialysis catheter through a patent vein.

  19. A clever technique for placement of a urinary catheter over a wire

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Joel E.; Heinemann, Adam; Badalament, Robert; Davalos, Julio G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to present a straightforward, step-by-step reproducible technique for placement of a guide-wire into any type of urethral catheter, thereby offering a means of access similar to that of a council-tip in a situation that may require a different type of catheter guided over a wire. Materials and Methods: Using a shielded intravenous catheter inserted into the eyelet of a urinary catheter and through the distal tip, a “counsel-tip” can be created in any size or type of catheter. Once transurethral bladder access has been achieved with a hydrophilic guide-wire, this technique will allow unrestricted use of catheters placed over a wire facilitating guided catheterization. Results: Urethral catheters of different types and sizes are easily advanced into the bladder with wire-guidance; catheterization is improved in the setting of difficult urethral catheterization (DUC). Cost analysis demonstrates benefit overuse of traditional council-tip catheter. Conclusion: Placing urinary catheters over a wire is standard practice for urologists, however, use of this technique gives the freedom of performing wire-guided catheterization in more situations than a council-tip allows. This technique facilitates successful transurethral catheterization over wire in the setting of DUC for all catheter types and styles aiding in urologic management of patients at a cost benefit to the health care system. PMID:26229328

  20. CT-Guided Placement of a Drainage Catheter Within a Pelvic Abscess Using a Transsacral Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Iguchi, Toshihiro Asami, Shinya; Kubo, Shinichiro; Kin, Hitoshi; Katusi, Kuniaki; Sakurai, Jun; Hiraki, Takao; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2007-11-15

    A 66-year-old man underwent CT-guided drainage catheter placement within a pelvic abscess with a diameter of 46 mm. We performed the drainage by a transsacral approach because it was considered the safest and most feasible approach. An 8G bone marrow biopsy needle was used to penetrate the sacrum to create a path for subsequent drainage catheter insertion. After withdrawal of the biopsy needle, a 6 Fr catheter was advanced into the abscess cavity through the path using the Seldinger technique. Except for bearable pain, no procedure-related complications occurred. Twenty-nine days after the placement, the catheter was withdrawn safely and the abscess cavity had shrunk remarkably.

  1. Sonographically guided placement of intravenous catheters in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Pinkernelle, Jens; Raschzok, Nathanael; Teichgräber, Ulf K M

    2009-07-01

    Many procedures in minipigs require establishment of reliable deep venous access with a large-bore catheter. In animal experiments, such catheters are typically implanted surgically. In clinical settings, however, ultrasound imaging is routinely used to facilitate safe, minimally invasive puncture of deep vessels. The authors describe a technique for using ultrasound guidance to puncture and cannulate the minipig femoral vein. They carried out the procedure in six minipigs for the purpose of injecting contrast agents for subsequent imaging scans. The procedure was ultimately successful in all pigs, took 10 min on average and resulted in no physiological complications. In one minipig, however, a 10-cm-long catheter became dislodged from the femoral vein; use of a longer (25-cm-long) catheter was optimal for establishing reliable intravenous access.

  2. Choice of valve type and poor ventricular catheter placement: Modifiable factors associated with ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure.

    PubMed

    Jeremiah, Kealeboga Josephine; Cherry, Catherine Louise; Wan, Kai Rui; Toy, Jennifer Ah; Wolfe, Rory; Danks, Robert Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt insertion is a common neurosurgical procedure, essentially unchanged in recent years, with high revision rates. We aimed to identify potentially modifiable associations with shunt failure. One hundred and forty patients who underwent insertion of a VP shunt from 2005-2009 were followed for 5-9years. Age at shunt insertion ranged from 0 to 91years (median 44, 26% <18years). The main causes of hydrocephalus were congenital (26%), tumour-related (25%), post-haemorrhagic (24%) or normal pressure hydrocephalus (19%). Fifty-eight (42%) patients required ⩾1 shunt revision. Of these, 50 (88%) were for proximal catheter blockage. The median time to first revision was 108days. Early post-operative CT scans were available in 105 patients. Using a formal grading system, catheter placement was considered excellent in 49 (47%) but poor (extraventricular) in 13 (12%). On univariate analysis, younger age, poor ventricular catheter placement and use of a non-programmable valve were associated with shunt failure. On logistic regression modelling, the independent associations with VP shunt failure were poor catheter placement (odds ratio [OR] 4.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-18.9, p=0.02) and use of a non-programmable valve (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-1.0, p=0.04). In conclusion, poor catheter placement (revision rate 77%) was found to be the strongest predictor of shunt failure, with no difference in revisions between excellent (43%) and moderate (43%) catheter placement. Avoiding poor placement in those with mild or moderate ventriculomegaly may best reduce VP shunt failures. There may also be an influence of valve choice on VP shunt survival.

  3. Ventriculoperitoneal Shunting Surgery with Open Distal Shunt Catheter Placement in the Treatment of Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Xiaobo; Zhao, Jinchuan; Hou, Kun; Gao, Xianfeng; Sun, Yang; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaona

    2015-11-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPS) is a major therapy for hydrocephalus, but has a significant risk of device malfunctioning. In this study, we explored a novel distal shunt catheter placement method in VPS for the treatment of hydrocephalus. Five patients with different etiologies of hydrocephalus underwent VPS with open distant shunt catheter attached outside. We analyzed different variables (age, gender, medical history, clinical presentation, indication for surgery and surgical technique, postoperative complications) and occurrence of shunt failure and infection. All hydrocephalus patients who received the distal shunt catheter placed outside can undergo regular VPS again after the condition improves. The modified VPS in the treatment of hydrocephalus with the distal shunt catheter placed outside could potentially reduce the necessity of repeat surgery for addressing the complications caused by catheter obstruction and infections, reduce the chance of adhesions, and would be of benefit to those patients who need future revisions.

  4. Sensory perineuritis.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, W B; Squier, M V

    1988-01-01

    A case of sensory perineuritis is described, affecting individual cutaneous nerves in the extremities and with a chronic inflammatory exudate confined to the perineurium in a sural nerve biopsy. No cause was found. The condition slowly resolved on steroid treatment. Images PMID:3379419

  5. Minimum current requirement for confirming the localization of an epiradicular catheter placement

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji Seon; Shim, Jae Hang; Kim, Dong Won; Kang, Min Serk

    2012-01-01

    Background Based on the necessity to confirm the epiradicular catheter misplacement, epiradicular threshold current for the confirmation of catheter tip localization is required. Methods Thirty-four adult patients with low extremity radiating pain were to receive epiradicular catheterization at the lumbosacral level. The epidural space was accessed percutaneously in cranial to caudal direction. A metal coil-reinforced epidural catheter was inserted and advanced caudolaterally toward the target neural foramen until the catheter tip was located below the bisection of pedicle. The electrical stimulation was performed after catheter placement in epidural and epiradicular space. Using the constant current nerve stimulator, the stimulating current was increased from 0 to 5 mA (pulse width of 0.3 ms; frequency of 2 Hz) until adequate motor contraction was evident. The threshold current for motor response with epidural space (EDmA) and epiradicular space (ERmA) placement were recorded upon electrical stimulation. In addition, the threshold charge for motor response with epidural (EDnC) and epiradicular (ERnC) placement were recorded. Results Of 34 catheters intentionally placed in the epiradicular space, ERmA was 0.53 ± 0.48 mA. The ERnC was significantly lower than EDnC (P < 0.05). The EDmA and ERmA were below 1 mA in 3 patients and above 1 mA in 4 patients, respectively. Conclusions We conclude that, threshold current for motor response seems to be lower for epiradicular compared with epidural placement, although we were not able to directly investigate the epidural threshold current. The threshold current of epiradicular space overlap that in the epidural space. PMID:23060981

  6. Risk factors associated with distal catheter migration following ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement.

    PubMed

    Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley O; Khanna, Ryan; Rasmussen, Zachary D; Flouty, Oliver; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Greenlee, Jeremy; Howard, Matthew A

    2016-03-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement is used to treat hydrocephalus. Shunt migration following VP shunt placement has been reported. The risk factors related to this complication have not been previously evaluated to our knowledge. In this retrospective cohort study, we aimed to determine risk factors leading to distal catheter migration and review the literature on the current methods of management and prevention. Adult patients undergoing VP shunt placement from June 2011 to December 2013 at a single institution were identified using electronic health records. The records were reviewed for demographic and procedural information, and subsequent treatment characteristics. The parameters of patients with distal shunt migration were compared to those undergoing new VP shunt placement for the same time period. We identified 137 patients undergoing 157 new VP shunt procedures with an average age of 57.7 ± standard deviation of 18.4 years old. There were 16 distal shunt migrations. Body mass index >30 kg/m(2) and number of previous shunt procedures were found to be independent risk factors for distal catheter migration. Obesity and number of previous shunt procedures were factors for distal catheter migration. Providers and patients should be aware of these possible risk factors prior to VP shunt placement.

  7. Simplified point-of-care ultrasound protocol to confirm central venous catheter placement: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sean P.; Assaf, Samer; Lahham, Shadi; Subeh, Mohammad; Chiem, Alan; Anderson, Craig; Shwe, Samantha; Nguyen, Ryan; Fox, John C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current standard for confirmation of correct supra-diaphragmatic central venous catheter (CVC) placement is with plain film chest radiography (CXR). We hypothesized that a simple point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) protocol could effectively confirm placement and reduce time to confirmation. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled a convenience sample of patients in the emergency department and intensive care unit who required CVC placement. Correct positioning was considered if turbulent flow was visualized in the right atrium on sub-xiphoid, parasternal or apical cardiac ultrasound after injecting 5 cc of sterile, non-agitated, normal saline through the CVC. RESULTS: Seventy-eight patients were enrolled. POCUS had a sensitivity of 86.8% (95%CI 77.1%–93.5%) and specificity of 100% (95%CI 15.8%–100.0%) for identifying correct central venous catheter placement. Median POCUS and CXR completion were 16 minutes (IQR 10–29) and 32 minutes (IQR 19–45), respectively. CONCLUSION: Ultrasound may be an effective tool to confirm central venous catheter placement in instances where there is a delay in obtaining a confirmatory CXR. PMID:28123616

  8. Calvarial slope affecting accuracy of Ghajar Guide technique for ventricular catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaechan; Son, Wonsoo; Park, Ki-Su; Kim, Min Young; Lee, Joomi

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The Ghajar Guide technique is used to direct a ventricular catheter at a 90° angle to the skull surface at Kocher's point. However, the human calvaria is not completely spherical. Lateral to the sagittal midline, the calvaria slopes downward with individual variation and thereby affects the accuracy of ventricular catheter placement. Accordingly, the authors investigated the accuracy of the orthogonal catheter trajectory using radiographic simulation and examined the effect of the calvarial slope on this accuracy. METHODS A catheter trajectory orthogonal to the skull surface at Kocher's point and the ideal catheter trajectory to the foramen of Monro were drawn bilaterally on coronal head images of 52 patients with hydrocephalus. The correction angle, the difference between the 2 catheter trajectories, was then measured. Meanwhile, the calvarial slope was measured around Kocher's point by using a coronal head image. The correlation between the correction angle and factors such as the calvarial slope and bicaudate index was then assessed using a Pearson correlation analysis. RESULTS The ventricular catheter trajectory orthogonal to the skull at Kocher's point in the patients with hydrocephalus led to a catheter trajectory into the ipsilateral (70.2%) or contralateral (29.8%) lateral ventricles. The correction angles ranged from -3.3° to 16.4° (mean ± SD 5.7° ± 3.7°). In 87 (83.7%) head sides, lateral deviation from the orthogonal trajectory was required to approximate the ideal trajectory, and the correction angle ranged from 2.0° to 16.4° (mean 6.7° ± 2.9°). The calvarial slope in the 104 head sides ranged from 15.6° to 32.5° (mean 24.2° ± 3.1°). Pearson correlation analysis revealed a strong positive correlation (r = 0.733) between the calvarial slope and the correction angle. CONCLUSIONS The accuracy of ventricular catheter placement using the Ghajar Guide technique is affected primarily by the calvarial slope around Kocher's point. A

  9. Is the elapsed time following the placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheter an individual risk factor for shunt fractures?

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Metin; Cakin, Hakan; Ozdemir, Niyazi; Gocmez, Cuneyt; Ozturk, Sait; Erol, Fatih S

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether the resistance of peritoneal catheters against the retraction force changed over time following shunt placement, and the role of this resistance in shunt fracture is discussed. We investigated peritoneal catheters removed from patients treated with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt because of hydrocephalus; previously, patients underwent shunt revision. The maximum tension, maximum elongation and elongation percentages of the peritoneal catheters were measured. The mean and maximum tension values of the revised peritoneal catheters were increased compared to the unused catheters. The maximum elongation and elongation rates were significantly decreased. The changes in the maximum elongation, elongation rate and tension values were unrelated to the time elapsed after catheter insertion. This finding indicates that the time elapsed following peritoneal catheter placement was not an individual factor based on the strength of the response of the organism to the foreign body and the mechanical trauma exposed in shunt fractures.

  10. A system for visualization and automatic placement of the endoclamp balloon catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, Hugo; Stüdeli, Thomas; Sette, Mauro; Samset, Eigil; Gersak, Borut

    2010-02-01

    The European research network "Augmented Reality in Surgery" (ARIS*ER) developed a system that supports minimally invasive cardiac surgery based on augmented reality (AR) technology. The system supports the surgical team during aortic endoclamping where a balloon catheter has to be positioned and kept in place within the aorta. The presented system addresses the two biggest difficulties of the task: lack of visualization and difficulty in maneuvering the catheter. The system was developed using a user centered design methodology with medical doctors, engineers and human factor specialists equally involved in all the development steps. The system was implemented using the AR framework "Studierstube" developed at TU Graz and can be used to visualize in real-time the position of the balloon catheter inside the aorta. The spatial position of the catheter is measured by a magnetic tracking system and superimposed on a 3D model of the patient's thorax. The alignment is made with a rigid registration algorithm. Together with a user defined target, the spatial position data drives an actuator which adjusts the position of the catheter in the initial placement and corrects migrations during the surgery. Two user studies with a silicon phantom show promising results regarding usefulness of the system: the users perform the placement tasks faster and more accurately than with the current restricted visual support. Animal studies also provided a first indication that the system brings additional value in the real clinical setting. This work represents a major step towards safer and simpler minimally invasive cardiac surgery.

  11. JUGULAR CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER PLACEMENT THROUGH A MODIFIED SELDINGER TECHNIQUE FOR LONG-TERM VENOUS ACCESS IN CHELONIANS.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Mariana A; Divers, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Long-term or repeated venous access in chelonians is difficult to obtain and manage, but can be critically important for administration of medications and blood sampling in hospitalized patients. Jugular catheterization provides the most rapid and secure route for vascular access, but catheters can be difficult to place, and maintaining catheter patency may be challenging. Long multilumen polyurethane catheters provide flexibility and sampling access, and minimize difficulties, such as catheter displacement, that have been encountered with traditional over-the-needle catheters. We describe placement of 4 Fr. 13-cm polyurethane catheters in three chelonians with the use of a modified Seldinger technique. Venous access was obtained with the use of an over-the-needle catheter, which allowed placement of a 0.018-in.-diameter wire, over which the polyurethane catheter was placed. Indwelling time has ranged between 1 and 4 mo currently. All tortoises were sedated for this procedure. Polyurethane central catheters provide safe, long-term venous access that allows clinicians to perform serial blood sampling as well as intravenous administration of medications, anesthetic agents, and fluids. A jugular catheter can also allow central venous pressure measurement. Utilization of central line catheters was associated with improvements in diagnostic efficiency and therapeutic case management, with minimal risks and complications.

  12. Temporary hemodialysis catheter placement by nephrology fellows: implications for nephrology training.

    PubMed

    Clark, Edward G; Schachter, Michael E; Palumbo, Andrea; Knoll, Greg; Edwards, Cedric

    2013-09-01

    The insertion of temporary hemodialysis catheters is considered to be a core competency of nephrology fellowship training. Little is known about the adequacy of training for this procedure and the extent to which evidence-based techniques to reduce complications have been adopted. We conducted a web-based survey of Canadian nephrology trainees regarding the insertion of temporary hemodialysis catheters. Responses were received from 45 of 68 (66%) eligible trainees. The median number of temporary hemodialysis catheters inserted during the prior 6 months of training was 5 (IQR, 2-11), with 9 (20%) trainees reporting they had inserted none. More than one-third of respondents indicated that they were not adequately trained to competently insert temporary hemodialysis catheters at both the femoral and internal jugular sites. These findings are relevant to a discussion of the current adequacy of procedural skills training during nephrology fellowship. With respect to temporary hemodialysis catheter placement, there is an opportunity for increased use of simulation-based teaching by training programs. Certain infection control techniques and use of real-time ultrasound should be more widely adopted. Consideration should be given to the establishment of minimum procedural training requirements at the level of both individual training programs and nationwide certification authorities.

  13. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  14. EM-Navigated Catheter Placement for Gynecologic Brachytherapy: An Accuracy Study.

    PubMed

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-12

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and/or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  15. Accidental carotid artery catheterization during attempted central venous catheter placement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maietta, Pauline Marie

    2012-08-01

    More than 2.1 million central venous catheters are placed annually. While carotid artery cannulation is rare, its effects can be devastating. Anesthesia providers frequently work with central venous catheters in the perioperative setting. Therefore, it is imperative that they be able to identify and react appropriately to carotid artery injury both in preexisting central lines and those that they have placed. This case report details a case of accidental carotid artery catheterization during attempted right internal jugular vein catheterization and the steps taken to treat the patient following its recognition. A discussion of technique for central venous catheterization, indications for suspicion of arterial puncture, methods for confirming venous or arterial placement, appropriate methods for management of carotid artery cannulation, and the benefit of ultrasound in central venous cannulation follow. Through the appropriate use of equipment, early detection and management of carotid artery injury, and proper training, patient outcomes may be improved.

  16. Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter into the azygous vein

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, Iain Gilmore, Christopher

    2015-06-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental as it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation.

  17. Ventricular catheter placement accuracy in non-stereotactic shunt surgery for hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Lind, Christopher R P; Tsai, Amy M C; Lind, Christina J; Law, Andrew J J

    2009-07-01

    We aimed to compare the accuracy of different shunt catheter approaches to the lateral ventricle in adults with hydrocephalus. We conducted a retrospective review of 138 consecutive patients with hydrocephalus undergoing freehand initial shunt surgery. Of these, 79 had a post-operative brain scan and therefore the results were available for analysis. Scans were graded for successful catheter tip placement in the ventricular target zones: the frontal horn for frontal and occipital approaches, and the atrium for the parietal approach. Ventricular target zones were successfully catheterized in 85% of parietal and 64% of frontal shunts (this difference is not statistically significant). In contrast, only 42% of occipital shunts were correctly placed (p<0.01). Therefore, parietal and frontal catheters are more likely to be placed successfully in the target ventricle. This may be due to the smaller range of successful trajectories open to the occipital approach. Solutions to this problem may include using the theoretically favourable frontal approach for freehand surgery or using stereotactic guidance.

  18. Convection-enhanced delivery catheter placements for high-grade gliomas: complications and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Tal; Ram, Zvi; Kanner, Andrew A

    2012-04-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of compounds into brain tumors reportedly circumvents the blood brain barrier. CED intends to increase drug delivery to malignant cells, reaching high local therapeutic concentration and decreasing or eliminating systemic side effects. Clinical experience and published data on catheter placement (CP) surgery are scarce. We propose practical and technical guidelines for planning CED based on our experience. We retrospectively analyzed the medical charts and relevant neuroimages of 25 patients following the insertion of 64 CED catheters. The patients were enrolled in at least one of four clinical trials using CED for treating recurrent glioblastoma multiforme in our institution between 2003-2006. Intra- and postoperative complications related to CP surgery and the difficulties and pitfalls of planning were evaluated. There were 29 CP surgeries. Forty-four peritumoral brain tissue catheters were inserted in 16 CP surgeries following tumor resection in 16 patients, and 20 catheters were placed into the tumor in 13 procedures in 10 patients. The lesions were in or near eloquent brain tissue areas in 13 of all CP surgeries. Complications included increased edema (31%), infection (6.9%), bleeding (6.9%) and seizures (13.8%). Significant neurological deterioration occurred in 4 patients (13.8%). Difficulties in adhering to CP surgery guidelines included lesion site (superficial, mesial temporal lobe, proximity to CSF spaces), proximity to eloquent cortical areas, tissue density that interfered with the trajectory, and technical limitations of stereotactic instruments. CED procedures for high-grade gliomas may be associated with surgical morbidity. Adherence to guidelines might be difficult because of lesion site and complicated by brain and tumor tissue characteristics. This should be considered while planning clinical trials that use convection-based technology.

  19. A Missing Guide Wire After Placement of Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Kashif, Muhammad; Hashmi, Hafiz; Jadhav, Preeti; Khaja, Misbahuddin

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 50 Final Diagnosis: Retained guidewire removal by interventional radiology Symptoms: Swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Fluoroscopic retrieval of the guidewire Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: Central venous catheterization is a common tool used in critically ill patients to monitor central venous pressure and administer fluids and medications such as vasopressors. Here we present a case of a missing guide wire after placement of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC), which was incidentally picked up by bedside ultrasound in the intensive care unit. Case Report: A 50-year-old Hispanic male was admitted to the intensive care unit for alcohol intoxication. He was managed for septic shock and required placement of a peripherally inserted central line in his left upper extremity for antibiotics and vasopressor administration. A bedside ultrasound performed by the intensivist to evaluate upper extremity swelling revealed a foreign body in the left arm. Percutaneous procedure by Interventional radiologist was required for retrieval of the guidewire. Conclusions: Guide wire related complications are rarely reported, but are significantly associated with mortality and morbidity. The use of ultrasound guidance placement of PICC lines decreases the risk of complications, provides better optimal vein selection, and enhances success. PMID:27920421

  20. Emergency Department Placement and Management of Indwelling Urinary Catheters in Older Adults: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Kartik; Rosen, Tony; Mulcare, Mary R.; Clark, Sunday; Hayes, Jaime; Lachs, Mark S.; Flomenbaum, Neal

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Indwelling Urinary Catheters (IUCs) are placed frequently in older adults in the emergency department (ED). While often a critical intervention, IUCs carry significant risks, particularly for geriatric patients, including infection, delirium, and falls. In addition, once placed, IUCs are rarely removed in the ED and may remain for an extended period after transfer of care, leading to poor outcomes. The purpose of this research was to examine the current knowledge, attitudes, and practice of ED nurses and other providers regarding IUC placement and management in older adults. METHODS We surveyed ED providers including nurses, attending physicians, Emergency Medicine (EM) residents, nurse practitioners (NPs), and physician assistants (PAs) at a large, urban, academic medical center. We developed comprehensive written questionnaires designed using items from previously validated instruments and questions created specifically for this study. In addition, we assessed providers' management of 25 unique clinical scenarios, each representing an established appropriate or inappropriate indication for IUC placement. RESULTS 127 ED providers participated: 43 nurses, 21 attending physicians, 47 residents, and 17 NP/PAs. 91% of nurses and 88% of other providers reported comfort with appropriate indications for IUC placement. Despite this, in the clinical vignettes nurses correctly identified the appropriate approach for IUC placement in only 40% of cases and other providers in only 37%. Reported practices were most divergent from accepted standards in delirium, with 3% of nurses and 1% of other providers appropriately avoiding IUC placement. Practice varied widely between individual providers, with the nurse participants reporting appropriate practice in 16%–64% of clinical scenarios and other providers in 8%–68%. Few nurses or other providers reported reassessing their patients for IUC removal at transfer to the hospital upstairs (28% of nurses and 7% of other

  1. C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Needle Path Overlay for Fluoroscopic-Guided Placement of Translumbar Central Venous Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Alda; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Rohm, Esther; Wallace, Michael J.

    2009-07-15

    C-arm cone beam computed tomography is an advanced 3D imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat-panel-based angiography systems. The overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real-time fluoroscopy. This overlay technology was used to guide the placement of three percutaneous translumbar inferior vena cava catheters.

  2. [Significance of ultrasonics in the placement of a central venous catheter].

    PubMed

    Sauer, W; Luft, D; Risler, T; Renn, W; Eggstein, M

    1988-09-16

    An ultrasound investigation was undertaken of the neck region of 42 patients with normal neck anatomy in order to determine whether the results of ultrasound-gained topographical data provided pointers to the choice of entry site to the internal jugular vein (IJV). In addition, the IJV was punctured under ultrasound control in 23 patients in an intensive care unit in whom there was a problem of increased bleeding tendency, anatomical difficulty or previously failed "blind" puncture. In all of them a central venous catheter was placed without complication by the Seldinger technique via the primary chosen point for puncture. An approach through the sternocleidomastoid muscle, between the cricoid level and the "central" place of puncture between the two bellies of the sternocleidomastoid muscle proved to be the most satisfactory compromise between easy application of the ultrasound head, large vein diameter and reduction of any risk of mistakenly puncturing artery or pleura. This approach has to be varied according to the ultrasound findings. It is concluded from this experience that ultrasound is suitable for the placement of central venous catheters. But since the equipment is bulky it cannot be used in an emergency.

  3. Impact of multislice CT angiography on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sone, Miyuki; Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 +/- 0/2.9 +/- 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 +/- 0/2.9 +/- 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 +/- 0.2/2.9 +/- 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 +/- 0.3/2.9 +/- 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 +/- 0.4/2.9 +/- 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 +/- 0.2/2.9 +/- 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 +/- 0.8/2.2 +/- 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 +/- 0.8/2.6 +/- 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC.

  4. Impact of Multislice CT Angiography on Planning of Radiological Catheter Placement for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Miyuki Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-15

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.3/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 {+-} 0.4/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 {+-} 0.8/2.2 {+-} 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 {+-} 0.8/2.6 {+-} 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC.

  5. Laparoscopic-assisted catheter insertion for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: A case report of simple technique for optimal placement

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Nakauchi, Masaya; Nagao, Kazuhiro; Oike, Fumitaka; Tanaka, Takahiro; Gunji, Daigo; Okada, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    A 40-year-old male underwent tube placement surgery for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). A 2-cm skin incision was made, and the peritoneum was reflected enough to perform secure fixation. A swan-necked, double-felted silicone CAPD catheter was inserted, and the felt cuff was sutured to the peritoneum to avoid postoperative leakage. An adequate gradient for tube fixation to the abdominal wall was confirmed. The CAPD tube was passed through a subcutaneous tunnel. Aeroperitoneum was induced to confirm that there was no air leakage from the sites of CAPD insertion. Two trocars were placed, and we confirmed that the CAPD tube led to the rectovesical pouch. Tip position was reliably observed laparoscopically. Optimal patency of the CAPD tube was confirmed during surgery. Placement of CAPD catheters by laparoscopic-assisted surgery has clear advantages in simplicity, safety, flexibility, and certainty. Laparoscopic technique should be considered the first choice for CAPD tube insertion. PMID:24179625

  6. [Two Cases of Retained Guide Wires after Placement of a Central Venous Catheter via the Internal Jugular Vein].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Masumori, Yasushi; Tanigawa, Saori; Miyakawa, Hidetoshi; Sakamoto, Miki; Tateda, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    We report two cases of a retained guide wire after perioperative placement of a central venous catheter during a six-month period. Case 1: A 73-year-old male was scheduled for an open cholecystectomy and hepatectomy. After induction of anesthesia, a central venous (CV) catheter was inserted via the right internal jugular vein using an ultrasound guide. Chest radiographs showed a retained guide wire in the inferior vena cava immediately after surgery, which was removed by interventional radiologist before the patient emerged from anesthesia. Case 2: A 77-year-old male was scheduled for colostomy closure. The surgeon inserted a CV catheter in the right internal jugular vein 4 days before the colostomy. Chest radiographs revealed a retained guide wire in the inferior vena cava, which was removed by interventional radiologists before the patient emerged from anesthesia. Although a retained guide wire is a rare complication, awareness of this mishap is necessary to prevent it from happening.

  7. Echocardiographic diagnosis of air embolism associated with central venous catheter placement: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maddukuri, Prasad; Downey, Brian C; Blander, Jessica A; Pandian, Natesa G; Patel, Ayan R

    2006-04-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is a valuable tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected air embolism. This report describes the presentation and evaluation of a critically ill woman with spontaneous air embolism occurring during a central venous catheter replacement. Bedside TTE established the diagnosis of air embolism, allowing prompt initiation of appropriate therapy. This case report highlights this uncommon but potentially life-threatening complication of central line placement and the utility of echocardiography in its evaluation.

  8. Placement of long-term hemodialysis catheter (permcath) in patients with end-stage renal disease through external jugular vein

    PubMed Central

    Beigi, Ali Akbar; Sharifi, Ali; Gaheri, Hafez; Abdollahi, Saeed; Esfahani, Morteza Abdar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The number of patients with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) has progressively increased in the population. Kidney transplantation is the specific treatment for such patients; however a majority of patients will require hemodialysis before kidney transplantation. The present study aims to investigate using the external jugular vein (EJV) for Permcath placement in these patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive and analytical study was conducted in Alzahra Medical Center, Isfahan, in 2012. Catheters were inserted by cutting down the right EJV. The patency rate and potential complications were studied. The obtained data was analyzed using SPSS 21.0. Results: Out of 45 live patients, within three months of surgery, 40 patients (81.6%) had no complications and dialysis continued through Permcath. Permcath Thrombosis occurred in two patients (4.4%). Catheter infection led to the removal of it in one patient (2.2%) 1.5 months after surgery. And accidental catheter removal occurred in one patient. Conclusion: Placement of the permcath in the external jugular vein can be a safe, uncomplicated, and reliable method for patients requiring hemodialysis, and can be a life-saving alternative in patients without accessible internal jugular vein. PMID:25590030

  9. Effect of Ultrasound-Guided Placement of Difficult-to-Place Peripheral Venous Catheters: A Prospective Study of a Training Program for Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Partovi-Deilami, Kohyar; Nielsen, Jesper K; Moller, Ann M; Nesheim, Sara-Sophie S; Jorgensen, Vibeke L

    2016-04-01

    Patients with difficult intravenous access (DIVA) often experience discomfort because of failed attempts to place peripheral venous catheters (PVCs); however, ultrasound guidance may improve this problem with catheter placement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of ultrasound when operated by nurse anesthetists for these patients. This prospective observational study with a pre/post design focused on inpatients with DIVA referred for PVC placement, a service provided by nurse anesthetists in most Scandinavian hospitals. The rate of success, procedure time, number of skin punctures, discomfort, catheter size, location, and incidence of central venous catheter placement are reported before and after implementation of a training program and a mobile service using ultrasound to place difficult-to-place PVCs. The success rate increased from 0% (0 of 33 patients) to 83% (58 of 70 patients) with ultrasound. Procedure time was reduced from 20 to 10 minutes, discomfort was unchanged, and the median number of skin punctures decreased from 3 to 2. The incidence of central venous catheter placement dropped from 34% to 7%. Implementation of a training program and a mobile service in which nurse anesthetists performed ultrasound-guided PVC placement improved the success rate and quality of care in patients with DIVA.

  10. Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy Technology, Physics of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Thermometry, and Technical Considerations for Proper Catheter Placement During Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nitesh V; Mian, Matthew; Stafford, R Jason; Nahed, Brian V; Willie, Jon T; Gross, Robert E; Danish, Shabbar F

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced thermal therapy has become a powerful tool in the neurosurgical armamentarium. The physics of laser therapy are complex, but a sound understanding of this topic is clinically relevant, as many centers have incorporated it into their treatment algorithm, and educated patients are demanding consideration of its use for their disease. Laser ablation has been used for a wide array of intracranial lesions. Laser catheter placement is guided by stereotactic planning; however, as the procedure has popularized, the number of ways in which the catheter can be inserted has also increased. There are many technical nuances for laser placement, and, to date, there is not a clear understanding of whether any one technique is better than the other. In this review, we describe the basic physics of magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy and describe the several common techniques for accurate Visualase laser catheter placement in a stepwise fashion.

  11. Peritoneoscintigraphy in detection of improper placement of peritoneal catheter into bowel lumen prior to chromic phosphate P-32 therapy. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Neutze, J.; Van Nostrand, D.; Major, W.

    1985-11-01

    Radionuclide peritoneoscintigraphy has been used prior to chromic phosphate P-32 (P-32CP) intraperitoneal therapy to assure proper placement of the catheter in the peritoneal cavity, to exclude loculation, and to predict inadequate distribution of P-32CP. This is a case report of the detection of a peritoneal catheter improperly placed into the bowel lumen by pretherapy radionuclide peritoneoscintigraphy, and this case demonstrates the distinguishing characteristics of the radiocolloid distribution secondary to an intraluminal injection relative to an intraperitoneal injection.

  12. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-03-15

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  13. Endoscopic transaqueductal placement of a single-catheter cyst-ventriculoperitoneal shunt in a neonate with Dandy-Walker malformation-associated hydrocephalus: case report.

    PubMed

    Morigaki, Ryoma; Pooh, Kyong-Hon; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu

    2011-01-01

    A neonate with hydrocephalus associated with Dandy-Walker malformation was successfully treated with an endoscopic placement of a transaqueductal ventricular single catheter. The modified catheter was provided with additional fenestration on its proximal side to allow simultaneous drainage from both the supra- and infratentorial compartments. This technique is well known for isolated fourth ventricles, but has not been applied to hydrocephalus associated with Dandy-Walker malformation. The cyst-ventriculoperitoneal shunt effectively drained both compartments. The patient was doing well 18 months after the surgical procedure. Endoscopic transaqueductal shunt placement can be considered, especially in patients with aqueductal patency.

  14. Central venous catheter placement in the inferior vena cava via the direct translumbar approach.

    PubMed

    Elduayen, B; Martínez-Cuesta, A; Vivas, I; Delgado, C; Pueyo, J C; Bilbao, J I

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical aspects and efficacy of placing tunneled central venous access catheters (CVA) in the inferior vena cava (IVC) via a direct translumbar approach. Between August 1994 and July 1998, 50 CVA (Hickman 13.5 F) were placed in the IVC via a direct translumbar approach in 46 patients (10 males, 36 females) with a mean age of 39.9 years (age range 10-87 years). The indications were chemotherapy administration plus leukoaphoresis (n = 39), bone marrow transplantation (n = 2) and hemodialysis (n = 5). The reasons for placing the CVA in the IVC were cosmetic (n = 34), supradiaphragmatic venous thrombosis (n = 8), previous catheter infection (n = 2), and non-functioning arteriovenous fistula (n = 2). There were no immediate complications. The mean period of time the CVA was in place was 3 months (15 days to 15 months), during which the function was excellent. The commonest late complication was infection (4 local, 6 bacteremia). Others included: pain (n = 2), ureteric fistula (n = 1), pericatheter fibrin sheath formation (n = 6) and catheter-tip impaction (n = 2). Two catheters were damaged due to postprocedural inappropriate manipulations and two others fell off due to incorrect fixation. Due to these complications, it was necessary to remove ten catheters, replace an additional four and reposition two. Direct translumbar catheterization of the IVC is a safe and effective way of placing a long-term CVA with a moderate complication rate.

  15. Ultrasound-guided tunneled lower extremity peripherally inserted central catheter placement in infants.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Subramanian; Moe, David C; Vo, Jack N

    2013-12-01

    Tunneled lower extremity peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are placed in infants under combined ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance in the interventional radiology suite. In infants requiring a bedside procedure, image guidance is limited, often using portable radiographs during the procedure. This report demonstrates feasibility of placing tunneled lower extremity PICCs using ultrasound as the sole imaging modality for vascular access, intravascular length measurement, and final confirmation of catheter tip position in a case series of 15 critically ill infants. The technique negates the need for added imaging confirmation methods that use ionizing radiation and can be performed at the bedside.

  16. Wound healing and catheter thrombosis after implantable venous access device placement in 266 breast cancers treated with bevacizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Irène; Cottu, Paul H; Fourchotte, Virginie; Sanchez, Sebastian; Fromantin, Isabelle; Kirov, Krassen; Guillaume, Alain; Pelloquin, Anne; Esteve, Marc; Salmon, Remy J

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, in a population with metastatic breast cancer treated with bevacizumab therapy, the incidence of wound dehiscence after placement of an implantable venous access device (VAD) and to study the risk of catheter thrombosis. This study enrolled all VADs placed by 14 anesthetists between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2009: 273 VADs in patients treated with bevacizumab therapy and 4196 VADs in patients not treated with bevacizumab therapy. In the bevacizumab therapy group, 13 cases of wound dehiscence occurred in 12 patients requiring removal of the VAD (4.76%). All cases of dehiscence occurred when bevacizumab therapy was initiated less than 7 days after VAD placement. Bevacizumab therapy was initiated less than 7 days after VAD placement in 150 cases (13 of 150: 8.6%). The risk of dehiscence was the same from 0 to 7 days. In parallel, the VAD wound dehiscence rate in patients not receiving bevacizumab therapy was eight of 4197 cases (0.19%) (Fisher's test significant, P<0.001). No risk factors of dehiscence were identified: anesthetists, learning curves, and irradiated patients. VAD thrombosis occurred in four patients (1.5%). In parallel, VAD thrombosis occurred in 51 of 4197 patients (1.2%) not receiving bevacizumab therapy (Fisher's test not significant; P=0.43). Bevacizumab therapy was permanently discontinued in five patients related to wound dehiscence and in one patient due to extensive skin necrosis. These data suggest the need to observe an interval of at least 7 days between VAD placement and initiation of bevacizumab therapy to avoid the risk of a wound dehiscence requiring chest wall port explant. The risk of VAD thrombosis does not require any particular primary prevention.

  17. Laparotomy versus Laparoscopic Placement of Distal Catheter in Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Seop; Park, Kyung Bum; Lee, Chul Hee; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Han, Jong Woo

    2010-01-01

    Objective Traditionally, peritoneal catheter is inserted with midline laparotomy incision in ventriculoperitoneal (V-P) shunt procedures. Complications of V-P shunt is not uncommon and have been reported to occur in 5-37% of cases. The aim of this study is to compare the clinical outcomes and the operation time between laparotomy and laparoscopic groups. Methods A total of 155 V-P shunt procedures were performed to treat hydrocephalic patients of various origins in our institute between June 2006 to January 2010; 95 of which were laparoscopically guided and 65 were not. We reviewed the operation time, surgery-related complications, and intraoperative and postoperative problems. Results In the laparoscopy group, the mean duration of the procedure (52 minutes) was significantly shorter (p < 0.001) than the laparotomy group (109 minutes). There were two cases of malfunctions and one incidence of diaphragm injury in the laparotomy group. In contrast, there were neither malfunction nor any internal organ injuries in the laparoscopy group (p = 0.034). There were total of two cases of infections from both groups (p = 0.7). Conclusion Laparoscopically guided insertions of distal shunt catheter is considered a fast and safe method in contrast to the laparotomy technique. This method allows the exact localization of the peritoneal catheter and a confirmation of its patency. PMID:21113359

  18. Surgical Placement of Catheters for Long-term Cardiovascular Exercise Testing in Swine.

    PubMed

    De Wijs-Meijler, Daphne P M; Stam, Kelly; van Duin, Richard W B; Verzijl, Annemarie; Reiss, Irwin K; Duncker, Dirk J; Merkus, Daphne

    2016-02-09

    This protocol describes the surgical procedure to chronically instrument swine and the procedure to exercise swine on a motor-driven treadmill. Early cardiopulmonary dysfunction is difficult to diagnose, particularly in animal models, as cardiopulmonary function is often measured invasively, requiring anesthesia. As many anesthetic agents are cardiodepressive, subtle changes in cardiovascular function may be masked. In contrast, chronic instrumentation allows for measurement of cardiopulmonary function in the awake state, so that measurements can be obtained under quiet resting conditions, without the effects of anesthesia and acute surgical trauma. Furthermore, when animals are properly trained, measurements can also be obtained during graded treadmill exercise. Flow probes are placed around the aorta or pulmonary artery for measurement of cardiac output and around the left anterior descending coronary artery for measurement of coronary blood flow. Fluid-filled catheters are implanted in the aorta, pulmonary artery, left atrium, left ventricle and right ventricle for pressure measurement and blood sampling. In addition, a 20 G catheter is positioned in the anterior interventricular vein to allow coronary venous blood sampling. After a week of recovery, swine are placed on a motor-driven treadmill, the catheters are connected to pressure and flow meters, and swine are subjected to a five-stage progressive exercise protocol, with each stage lasting 3 min. Hemodynamic signals are continuously recorded and blood samples are taken during the last 30 sec of each exercise stage. The major advantage of studying chronically instrumented animals is that it allows serial assessment of cardiopulmonary function, not only at rest but also during physical stress such as exercise. Moreover, cardiopulmonary function can be assessed repeatedly during disease development and during chronic treatment, thereby increasing statistical power and hence limiting the number of animals

  19. Surgical treatment of sacral perineural cyst--case report.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Shigeo; Miki, Takanori; Miyaji, Yuki; Minami, Hiroaki; Masuda, Atsushi; Tominaga, Shogo; Yoshida, Yasuhisa; Yamaura, Ikuya; Natsume, Shigeatsu; Yoshida, Kozo

    2011-01-01

    A 67-year-old man presented with persistent penis and scrotum pain due to S-2 and S-3 radiculopathy caused by a sacral perineural cyst. The cyst was treated with microsurgical partial cyst removal and cyst wall imbrication, together with closure of the point through which cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowed from the subarachnoid space into the cyst cavity. His pain resolved without recurrence of the cyst or complications. Symptomatic perineural cysts are quite rare. Surgical closure of the point through which CSF flows from the subarachnoid space into the cyst cavity is the most important intervention for symptomatic perineural cysts. If the source of CSF leakage cannot be detected, placement of a cyst-subarachnoid shunt should be considered in addition to partial cyst removal and cyst wall imbrication.

  20. Initial Experience with Computed Tomography and Fluoroscopically Guided Placement of Push-Type Gastrostomy Tubes Using a Rupture-Free Balloon Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Takeshi Tanabe, Masahiro; Yamatogi, Shigenari; Shimizu, Kensaku; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement of push-type gastrostomy tubes using a rupture-free balloon (RFB) catheter under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic guidance. A total of 35 patients (23 men and 12 women; age range 57-93 years [mean 71.7]) underwent percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement of a push-type gastrostomy tube using an RFB catheter between April 2005 and July 2008. Technical success, procedure duration, and complications were analyzed. Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement was considered technically successful in all patients. The median procedure time was 39 {+-} 13 (SD) min (range 24-78). The average follow-up time interval was 103 days (range 7-812). No major complications related to the procedure were encountered. No tubes failed because of blockage, and neither tube dislodgement nor intraperitoneal leakage occurred during the follow-up period. The investigators conclude that percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement with push-type tubes using an RFB catheter is a safe and effective means of gastric feeding when performed by radiologists.

  1. Placement of a port catheter through collateral veins in a patient with central venous occlusion.

    PubMed

    Teichgräber, Ulf Karl-Martin; Streitparth, Florian; Gebauer, Bernhard; Benter, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Long-term utilization of central venous catheters (CVCs) for parenteral nutrition has a high incidence of central venous complications including infections, occlusions, and stenosis. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with a malabsorption caused by short gut syndrome due to congenital aganglionic megacolon. The patient developed a chronic occlusion of all central neck and femoral veins due to long-term use of multiple CVCs over more than 20 years. In patients with central venous occlusion and venous transformation, the implantation of a totally implanted port system by accessing collateral veins is an option to continue long-term parenteral nutrition when required. A 0.014-in. Whisper guidewire (Terumo, Tokyo) with high flexibility and steerability was chosen to maneuver and pass through the collateral veins. We suggest this approach to avoid unfavorable translumbar or transhepatic central venous access and to conserve the anatomically limited number of percutaneous access sites.

  2. Placement of a Port Catheter Through Collateral Veins in a Patient with Central Venous Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl-Martin Streitparth, Florian; Gebauer, Bernhard; Benter, Thomas

    2010-04-15

    Long-term utilization of central venous catheters (CVCs) for parenteral nutrition has a high incidence of central venous complications including infections, occlusions, and stenosis. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with a malabsorption caused by short gut syndrome due to congenital aganglionic megacolon. The patient developed a chronic occlusion of all central neck and femoral veins due to long-term use of multiple CVCs over more than 20 years. In patients with central venous occlusion and venous transformation, the implantation of a totally implanted port system by accessing collateral veins is an option to continue long-term parenteral nutrition when required. A 0.014-in. Whisper guidewire (Terumo, Tokyo) with high flexibility and steerability was chosen to maneuver and pass through the collateral veins. We suggest this approach to avoid unfavorable translumbar or transhepatic central venous access and to conserve the anatomically limited number of percutaneous access sites.

  3. Entrapment of J-tip guidewires by Venatech and stainless-steel Greenfield vena cava filters during central venous catheter placement: percutaneous management in four patients.

    PubMed

    Andrews, R T; Geschwind, J F; Savader, S J; Venbrux, A C

    1998-01-01

    We present four patients in whom bedside placement of a central venous catheter was complicated by entrapment of a J-tip guidewire by a previously placed vena cava (VC) filter. Two Venatech filters were fragmented and displaced into the superior VC or brachiocephalic vein during attempted withdrawal of the entrapped wire. Two stainless-steel Greenfield filters remained in place and intact. Fluoroscopically guided extraction of both wires entrapped by Greenfield filters was successfully performed in the angiography suite.

  4. Superior success rate of intracavitary electrocardiogram guidance for peripherally inserted central catheter placement in patients with cancer: A randomized open-label controlled multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Aifeng; Feng, Yuling; Wu, Xiancui; Yang, Yiqun; Chen, Ping; Qiu, Zhenzhu; Qi, Jing; Chen, Chuanying; Wei, Jia; Qin, Minyi; Kong, Weiwei; Chen, Xiangyu; Xu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Background Intracavitary electrocardiogram (IC ECG) guidance emerges as a new technique for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) placement and demonstrates many potential advantages in recent observational studies. Aims To determine whether IC ECG-guided PICCs provide more accurate positioning of catheter tips compared to conventional anatomical landmarks in patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Methods In this multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled study (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02409589), a total of 1,007 adult patients were assigned to receive either IC ECG guidance (n = 500) or anatomical landmark guidance (n = 507) for PICC positioning. The confirmative catheter tip positioning x-ray data were centrally interpreted by independent radiologists. All reported analyses in the overall population were performed on an intention-to-treat basis. Analyses of pre-specified subgroups and a selected large subpopulation were conducted to explore consistency and accuracy. Results In the IC ECG-guided group, the first-attempt success rate was 89.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86.5% to 91.9%), which was significantly higher than 77.4% (95% CI, 73.7% to 81.0%) in the anatomical landmark group (P < 0.0001). This trend of superiority of IC ECG guidance was consistently noted in almost all prespecified patient subgroups and two selected large subpopulations, even when using optimal target rates for measurement. In contrast, the superiority nearly disappeared when PICCs were used via the left instead of right arms (interaction P-value = 0.021). No catheter-related adverse events were reported during the PICC intra-procedures in either group. Conclusions Our findings indicated that the IC ECG-guided method had a more favorable positioning accuracy versus traditional anatomical landmarks for PICC placement in adult patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Furthermore, there were no significant safety concerns reported for catheterization using

  5. Comparison between the fixation of peritoneal dialysis catheters to the peritoneal wall and the conventional placement technique: clinical experience and follow-up of a new implant technique for peritoneal dialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Io, Hiroaki; Maeda, Kunimi; Sekiguchi, Yoshimi; Shimaoka, Tetsutaro; Aruga, Seiki; Nakata, Junichiro; Nakamoto, Hirotaka; Hotta, Yoko; Koyanagi, Ichiro; Inaba, Masanori; Kanda, Reo; Nakano, Takanori; Wakabayashi, Keiichi; Sasaki, Yuu; Inuma, Jiro; Kaneko, Kayo; Hamada, Chieko; Fukui, Mitsumine; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters often become severely dislocated, which may lead to malfunction. With the aim of preventing this complication, we have developed a simple method of fixing the catheter downwards in the peritoneal cavity (fixation technique), a technique that does not require a laparoscope. Sixteen patients were implanted using the conventional placement technique and 25 patients were implanted using the fixation technique. The location of the catheter tip was classified from grade 1 (downward, normal) to 5 (dislocated). The frequency of dislocation (defined as the extended time and/or decrease in volume when draining the PD solution) was measured for both the fixation technique and conventional placement technique. There was a significant difference in grade between the fixation technique (2.72 ± 1.01) and conventional technique (3.92 ± 1.31). The time until first dislocation was significantly different between the fixation technique (59.3 ± 48.1 days) and conventional technique (8.8 ± 14.6 days). The time until any dislocation was significantly different between the fixation technique (69.2 ± 41.9 days) and conventional technique (12.9 ± 13.7 days). Complications were not significantly different between the fixation technique and conventional technique. The fixation technique appears to be simple, safe, and useful for preventing severe dislocation and for lengthening the time until dislocation in PD patients.

  6. [Perineural pseudoinvasion in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, K; Hauptmann, S

    2000-09-01

    The occurrence of perineural epithelial complexes within the pancreas cannot always be regarded as evidence of malignancy. Chronic pancreatitis can induce alterations in the anatomy of the organ with a histological picture comparable to that of neural invasion. The important criteria for differential diagnosis are neuroendocrine differentiation of these cells or their ductular morphology without atypia.

  7. A comparative study of two techniques (electrocardiogram- and landmark-guided) for correct depth of the central venous catheter placement in paediatric patients undergoing elective cardiovascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Barnwal, Neeraj Kumar; Dave, Sona T; Dias, Raylene

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The complications of central venous catheterisation can be minimized by ensuring catheter tip placement just above the superior vena cava-right atrium junction. We aimed to compare two methods, using an electrocardiogram (ECG) or landmark as guides, for assessing correct depth of central venous catheter (CVC) placement. Methods: In a prospective randomised study of sixty patients of <12 years of age, thirty patients each were allotted randomly to two groups (ECG and landmark). After induction, central venous catheterisation was performed by either of the two techniques and position of CVC tip was compared in post-operative chest X-ray with respect to carina. Unpaired t-test was used for quantitative data and Chi-square test was used for qualitative data. Results: In ECG group, positions of CVC tip were above carina in 12, at carina in 9 and below carina in 9 patients. In landmark group, the positions of CVC tips were above carina in 10, at carina in 4 and below carina in 16 patients. Mean distance of CVC tip in ECG group was 0.34 ± 0.23 cm and 0.66 ± 0.35 cm in landmark group (P = 0.0001). Complications occurred in one patient in ECG group and in nine patients in landmark group (P = 0.0056). Conclusion: Overall, landmark-guided technique was comparable with ECG technique. ECG-guided technique was more precise for CVC tip placement closer to carina. The incidence of complications was more in the landmark group. PMID:27512162

  8. Perineural spread in head and neck tumors.

    PubMed

    Brea Álvarez, B; Tuñón Gómez, M

    2014-01-01

    Perineural spread is the dissemination of some types of head and neck tumors along nervous structures. Perineural spread has negative repercussions on treatment because it requires more extensive resection and larger fields of irradiation. Moreover, perineural spread is associated with increased local recurrence, and it is considered an independent indicator of poor prognosis in the TNM classification for tumor staging. However, perineural spread often goes undetected on imaging studies. In this update, we review the concept of perineural spread, its pathogenesis, and the main pathways and connections among the facial nerves, which are essential to understand this process. Furthermore, we discuss the appropriate techniques for imaging studies, and we describe and illustrate the typical imaging signs that help identify perineural spread on CT and MRI. Finally, we discuss the differential diagnosis with other entities.

  9. Computed Tomography-Guided Central Venous Catheter Placement in a Patient with Superior Vena Cava and Inferior Vena Cava Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rivero, Maria A.; Shaw, Dennis W.W.; Schaller, Robert T. Jr.

    1999-01-15

    An 18-year-old man with a gastrointestinal hypomotility syndrome required lifelong parenteral nutrition. Both the superior and inferior vena cava were occluded. Computed tomography guidance was used to place a long-term central venous catheter via a large tributary to the azygos vein.

  10. Catheter-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2010-01-01

    Intravascular catheters and urinary catheters are the 2 most commonly inserted medical devices in the United States, and they are likewise the two most common causes of nosocomially acquired bloodstream infection. Biofilm formation on the surfaces of indwelling catheters is central to the pathogenesis of infection of both types of catheters. The cornerstone to any preventive strategy of intravascular catheter infections is strict attention to infection control practices. Antimicrobial-impregnated intravascular catheters are a useful adjunction to infection control measures. Prevention of urinary catheter–associated infection is hindered by the numbers and types of organisms present in the periurethral area as well as by the typically longer duration of catheter placement. Antimicrobial agents in general have not been effective in preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection in persons with long-term, indwelling urethral catheters. Preventive strategies that avoid the use of antimicrobial agents may be necessary in this population. PMID:15111369

  11. Urokinase Lysis for Acute Left Subclavian Artery Thrombosis after Placement of Infusion Catheter: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hiroshi; Kimura, Motomasa; Yoshimura, Norihiko; Takano, Tooru; Takaki, Satoshi; Awaji, Masanori; Sakai, Kunio

    2002-03-15

    We present two cases of acute subclavian and/or axillary arterial occlusion after transaxillary catheterization with an implantable port for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy. They were successfully treated with thrombolytic therapy using intraarterial administration of urokinase without removal of the infusion catheter system. We consider that this treatment is suitable for managing acute thrombosis of the conduit artery after catheterization for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy.

  12. [The bladder catheter].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, D M

    1996-09-01

    The benefit of the transurethral catheter to protect or measure renal function is well accepted. Urethral stricture and infection of the lower urinary tract as the complications should lead to a cautious use of catheters. A careful placement, the choice of the best material and a correct management help to avoid complications. Alternatives are discussed.

  13. Vascular Access for Placement of Tunneled Dialysis Catheters for Hemodialysis: A Systematic Approach and Clinical Practice Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Keith; Osiason, Adam; Salsamendi, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The role of interventional radiology in the overall management of patients on dialysis continues to expand. In patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the use of tunneled dialysis catheters (TDCs) for hemodialysis has become an integral component of treatment plans. Unfortunately, long-term use of TDCs often leads to infections, acute occlusions, and chronic venous stenosis, depletion of the patient's conventional access routes, and prevention of their recanalization. In such situations, the progressive loss of venous access sites prompts a systematic approach to alternative sites to maximize patient survival and minimize complications. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each vascular access option. We illustrate the procedures with case histories and images from our own experience at a highly active dialysis and transplant center. We rank each vascular access option and classify them into tiers based on their relative degrees of effectiveness. The conventional approaches are the most preferred, followed by alternative approaches and finally the salvage approaches. It is our intent to have this review serve as a concise and informative reference for physicians managing patients who need vascular access for hemodialysis. PMID:26167389

  14. Perineural cyst presenting like cubital tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bayrakli, Fatih; Kurtuncu, Murat; Karaarslan, Ercan; Ozgen, Serdar

    2012-06-01

    Perineural cysts are believed to be asymptomatic; however, they rarely cause symptoms related to nerve root compression. Cervical symptomatic perineural cysts are in fact exceedingly rare. There are no reported cervical perineural cysts in the literature that present like cubital tunnel syndrome. A patient with motor weakness of the abductor and adductor muscles of the fingers of the left hand and hypoesthesia in the hypothenar region of the left hand presented at our clinic. A neurological examination, and neuroradiological and electrophysiological evaluations supported the finding that the patient's clinical condition was caused by a perineural cyst located around the C8 neural root. The neurological symptoms of the patient markedly improved after medical treatment. We reported the first cervical perineural cyst as presenting like cubital tunnel syndrome patient in the literature. The visualization of perineural cyst may need extra magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sections in order to view the nerve root through the neural foramen or extraforaminal area. These lesions are benign, and the appropriate treatment is curative.

  15. Multi-catheter interstitial brachytherapy for partial breast irradiation: an audit of implant quality based on dosimetric evaluation comparing intra-operative versus post-operative placement

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, Lavanya; Joshi, Kishor; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji; Sarin, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The use of multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy (MIB) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in early breast cancer (EBC) patients outside the trial setting has increased. Hence, there is a need to critically evaluate implant quality. Moreover, there is a scarcity of reports using an open cavity technique. We report the dosimetric indices of open and closed cavity MIB techniques. Material and methods The dosimetric parameters of 60 EBC patients treated with MIB (open and closed cavity) who underwent three dimensional, computerized tomography (CT) based planning for APBI from November 2011 to July 2015 were evaluated. Coverage Index (CI), Dose Homogeneity Index (DHI), Conformity Index (COIN), Plan Quality Index (PQI), and Dose Non-uniformity Index (DNR) were assessed. Results Forty-one patients underwent open cavity and 19 patients underwent closed cavity placement of brachytherapy catheters. The median number of planes was 4 and median number of needles was 20. Median dose was 34 Gy with dose per fraction of 3.4 Gy, given twice a day, 6 hours apart. The D90 of the cavity and clinical target volume (CTV) were 105% and 89%, respectively. The median doses to the surgical clips were greater than 100%. The median CI of the cavity and CTV was 0.96 and 0.82, respectively. The DHI and COIN index of the CTV was 0.73 and 0.67. There were no significant differences in the dosimetric parameters based on whether the technique was done open or closed. Conclusions Critical evaluation of the dosimetric parameters of MIB-APBI is important for optimal results. While the open and closed techniques have similar dosimetry, our institutional preference is for an open technique which eases the procedure due to direct visualization of the tumor cavity. PMID:27257415

  16. Cervical perineural cyst masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-04-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

  17. Cervical Perineural Cyst Masquerading as a Cervical Spinal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor. PMID:24761204

  18. Clinical experience of symptomatic sacral perineural cyst.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki Tae; Lee, Hyun Young; Lim, Kyung Joon

    2012-07-01

    Tarlov or perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly at the sacral spine level arising between covering layers of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion and are usually asymptomatic. Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon but sometimes require surgical treatment. A 69-year-old male presented with pain in the buttock. He was diagnosed as having a sacral cyst with magnetic resonance imaging. For the nonoperative diagnosis and treatment, caudal peridurography and block were performed. After the treatment, the patient's symptom was relieved. We suggest a caudal peridural block is effective in relieving pain from a sacral cyst.

  19. Clinical Experience of Symptomatic Sacral Perineural Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ki Tae; Lee, Hyun Young

    2012-01-01

    Tarlov or perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly at the sacral spine level arising between covering layers of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion and are usually asymptomatic. Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon but sometimes require surgical treatment. A 69-year-old male presented with pain in the buttock. He was diagnosed as having a sacral cyst with magnetic resonance imaging. For the nonoperative diagnosis and treatment, caudal peridurography and block were performed. After the treatment, the patient's symptom was relieved. We suggest a caudal peridural block is effective in relieving pain from a sacral cyst. PMID:22787551

  20. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider's office. An indwelling catheter has a small balloon inflated on the end of it. This prevents ... When the catheter needs to be removed, the balloon is deflated. CONDOM CATHETERS Condom catheters can be ...

  1. Management of post-operative pain by placement of an intraoperative intercostal catheter after single port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery: a propensity-score matched study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-Feng; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Liu, Hung-Pin; Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Liu, Yun-Hen; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Chao, Yin-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background The establishment of a golden standard for post-operative analgesia after thoracic surgery remains an unresolved issue. Benefiting from the rapid development of single port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), a good candidate for the alleviation of patients’ pain is the placement of an intercostal catheter (ICC) safely after uniport VATS. We hypothesized that continual infusion through ICC could provide effective analgesia for patients with only one wound and we evaluate its postoperative analgesic function in uniport VATS patients with or without intercostal nerve blockade. Methods Since March 2014, 235 patients received various kinds of single port VATS. We identified 50 patients who received single port VATS with intercostal nerve blockade and retrospectively compared them with a group of patients who had received single port VATS without intercostal nerve blockade. The operative time, post operation day 0, 1, 2, 3 and discharge day pain score, narcotic requirements, drainage duration and post-operative hospital stay were collected. In order to establish a well-balanced cohort study, we also used propensity scores matching (1:1) to compare the short term clinical outcome in two groups. Results No operative deaths occurred in this study. The uniport VATS with intercostal nerve blockade group was associated with less post operation day 0 and day 1 pain score, and narcotic requirements in our cohort study (P<0.001, <0.001, and 0.003). After propensity scores matching, there were 50 patients in each group. Mean day 0 and day 1, day 2, day 3 pain score, drainage duration, post-operative hospital stay, and narcotic requirements were smaller in uniport VATS with intercostal nerve blockade (P<0.001, <0.001, 0.038, 0.007, 0.02, 0.042, and 0.003). Conclusions In conclusion, in patients post single port VATS, continual intercostal nerve block with levobupivacaine infusion appears to be a safe, effective and promising technique in our study, associated

  2. Surgical results of sacral perineural (Tarlov) cysts.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masato; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Ito, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ikuma, Hisanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the surgical outcomes and to determine indicators of the necessity of surgical intervention. Twelve consecutive patients harboring symptomatic sacral perineural cysts were treated between 1995 and 2003. All patients were assessed for neurological deficits and pain by neurological examination. Magnetic resonance of imaging, computerized tomography, and myelography were performed to detect signs of delayed filling of the cysts. We performed a release of the valve and imbrication of the sacral cysts with laminectomies in 8 cases or recapping laminectomies in 4 cases. After surgery, symptoms improved in 10 (83%) of 12 patients, with an average follow-up of 27 months. Ten patients had sacral perineural cysts with signs of positive filling defect. Two (17%) of 12 patients experienced no significant improvement. In one of these patients, the filling defect was negative. In conclusion, a positive filling defect may become an indicator of good treatment outcomes.

  3. Sacral Perineural Cyst Accompanying Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Chang Il; Shin, Ho; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2009-01-01

    Although most of sacral perineural cysts are asymptomatic, some may produce symptoms. Specific radicular pain may be due to distortion, compression, or stretching of nerve root by a space occupying cyst. We report a rare case of S1 radiculopathy caused by sacral perineural cyst accompanying disc herniation. The patient underwent a microscopic discectomy at L5-S1 level. However, the patient's symptoms did not improved. The hypesthesia persisted, as did the right leg pain. Cyst-subarachnoid shunt was set to decompress nerve root and to equalize the cerebrospinal fluid pressure between the cephalad thecal sac and cyst. Immediately after surgery, the patient had no leg pain. After 6 months, the patient still remained free of leg pain. PMID:19352483

  4. Management of Symptomatic Sacral Perineural Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianqiang; Sun, Yongdong; Huang, Xin; Luan, Wenzhong

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been no consensus on the optimal treatment of symptomatic sacral perineural cysts. Most previous reports concerning the management methods were either sporadic case reports or a series of limited cases. This study is to further optimize the management for patients with symptomatic sacral perineural cysts by analyzing the outcomes of a cohort of patients who were treated with different strategies. Methods and Findings We reviewed the outcomes of 15 patients with symptomatic sacral perineural cysts who were managed by three different modalities from 1998 through 2010. Six patients underwent microsurgical cyst fenestration and cyst wall imbrication. Seven patients underwent a modified surgical procedure, during which the cerebrospinal fluid leak aperture was located and repaired. Two patients were treated with medication and physical therapy. Outcomes of the patients were assessed by following up (13 months to 10 years). All of the six patients treated with microsurgical cyst fenestration and cyst wall imbrication experienced complete or substantial relief of their preoperative symptoms. However, the symptoms of one patient reappeared eight months after the operation. Another patient experienced a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Six of the seven patients treated with the modified surgical operation experienced complete or substantial resolution of their preoperative symptoms, with only one patient who experienced temporary worsening of his preoperative urine incontinence, which disappeared gradually one month later. No new postoperative neurological deficits, no cerebrospinal fluid leaks and no recurrence were observed in the seven patients. The symptoms of the two patients treated with conservative measures aggravated with time. Conclusions Microsurgical operation should be a treatment consideration in patients with symptomatic sacral perineural cysts. Furthermore, the surgical procedure with partial cyst removal and aperture repair

  5. A unilateral optic perineuritis in a teenager - A case report.

    PubMed

    Ameilia, Ahmad; Shatriah, Ismail; Wan-Hitam, Wan Hazabbah; Yunus, Rohaizan

    2015-06-01

    Optic perineuritis is an uncommon inflammatory disorder that involves optic nerve sheath. Numerous case reports have been published on optic perineuritis in adults, the majority of whom had bilateral presentation. There are limited data on optic perineuritis occurring in pediatric patients. We report a teenager who presented with a unilateral sign that mimicked the presentation of optic neuritis. The orbit and brain magnetic resonance imaging confirmed features of unilateral optic perineuritis. She was treated with a high dose of corticosteroids for 2weeks, and her final visual outcome was satisfactory. No signs of relapse were noted during follow-up visits.

  6. Sciatic neuralgia associated with a perineural (Tarlov) cyst

    PubMed Central

    Emary, Peter C.; Taylor, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Perineural (Tarlov) cysts are rare and are usually asymptomatic and an incidental finding on routine spinal imaging. Presented here is a case of sciatic neuralgia in a 56-year-old patient whose clinical symptoms correlated with a lower lumbar perineural cyst. PMID:27713584

  7. Sciatic neuralgia associated with a perineural (Tarlov) cyst.

    PubMed

    Emary, Peter C; Taylor, John A

    2016-09-01

    Perineural (Tarlov) cysts are rare and are usually asymptomatic and an incidental finding on routine spinal imaging. Presented here is a case of sciatic neuralgia in a 56-year-old patient whose clinical symptoms correlated with a lower lumbar perineural cyst.

  8. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  9. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention. PMID:26504733

  10. Clonidine added to a continuous interscalene ropivacaine perineural infusion to improve postoperative analgesia: a randomized, double-blind, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ilfeld, Brian M; Morey, Timothy E; Thannikary, Lisa J; Wright, Thomas W; Enneking, F Kayser

    2005-04-01

    Although clonidine has been shown to increase the duration of local anesthetic action and prolong postoperative analgesia when included in single-injection nerve blocks, the only controlled investigation of the efficacy of this practice to improve analgesia for continuous perineural local anesthetic infusion failed to discern any clinically relevant benefits. For this study, we used a larger dose of clonidine in an attempt to improve analgesia. Patients (n = 20) undergoing moderately painful orthopedic surgery of the shoulder received an interscalene brachial plexus block (40 mL of mepivacaine 1.5%, epinephrine 2.5 microg/mL, and clonidine 50 microg) and a perineural catheter before surgery. After surgery, ropivacaine 0.2% or ropivacaine 0.2% plus clonidine 2 microg/mL was delivered via the catheter for 3 days (basal rate, 5 mL/h; patient-controlled bolus, 5 mL; lockout, 1 h). Investigators and patients were blind to random group assignment. The primary outcome variable was designated as the most intense pain during the day after surgery. Secondary end-points included additional pain scores, patient-controlled bolus doses, oral analgesic use, sleep quality, and catheter- or infusion-related complications. There were no statistically significant differences between groups for any of the variables investigated. We conclude that adding clonidine 2 microg/mL to a ropivacaine interscalene perineural infusion does not decrease breakthrough pain intensity the day after surgery. For the additional end-points, our negative findings are only suggestive of a lack of effect and require further study for verification.

  11. Continuous infraclavicular perineural infusion with clonidine and ropivacaine compared with ropivacaine alone: a randomized, double-blinded, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ilfeld, Brian M; Morey, Timothy E; Enneking, F Kayser

    2003-09-01

    Although clonidine has been shown to increase the duration of local anesthetic action and prolong postoperative analgesia when included in single-injection nerve blocks, a controlled investigation of the efficacy of this practice to improve analgesia for continuous perineural local anesthetic infusion has not been reported. In this study, ambulatory patients (n = 34) undergoing moderately painful upper extremity orthopedic surgery received an infraclavicular brachial plexus block (mepivacaine 1.5%, epinephrine 2.5 micro g/mL, and bicarbonate 0.1 mEq/mL) and a perineural catheter before surgery. After surgery, patients were discharged home with a portable infusion pump delivering either ropivacaine 0.2% or ropivacaine 0.2% plus clonidine 1 micro g/mL via the catheter for 3 days (basal, 8 mL/h; patient-controlled bolus, 2 mL every 20 min). Investigators and patients were blinded to random group assignment. Daily end-points included pain scores, patient-controlled bolus doses, oral analgesic use, sleep quality, and symptoms of catheter- or infusion-related complications. Adding clonidine to ropivacaine resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the number of self-administered 2-mL bolus doses on postoperative Days 0 and 1 (P < 0.02), but this decreased actual local anesthetic consumption by an average of only 2-7 mL/d (P < 0.02). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups for any of the other variables investigated, including sleep quality or oral analgesic requirements. We conclude that adding 1 micro g/mL of clonidine to a ropivacaine infraclavicular perineural infusion does not provide clinically relevant improvements in analgesia, sleep quality, or oral analgesic requirements for ambulatory patients having moderately painful upper extremity surgery.

  12. A symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cyst -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung Hee; Kim, Jin Mo

    2012-01-01

    Lumbosacral perineural cysts are formed by the arachnoid membrane of the nerve root at the lumbosacral level. Most of these cysts are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for other causes of chronic lower back pain. This type of cyst requires a differential diagnosis to distinguish it from other causes of radiating pain and neurological symptoms. In the present case, a symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cyst was found, and pain relief was achieved by non-surgical treatment. A lumbosacral perineural cyst was identified from a differential diagnosis of a lumbar disc disorder that presented as radiating pain and neurological symptoms. PMID:22679550

  13. Antibiotic lock for treatment of tunneled hemodialysis catheter bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ivan D

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-related bacteremia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among catheter-dependent hemodialysis patients. Microorganism biofilm matrix formation in the catheter is the pathogenic process of this entity. Administration of systemic antibiotics and removal of the offending catheter is the most logical treatment. This article discusses an alternative option, instillation of an antibiotic-lock solution into the lumen of the catheter plus systemic antibiotic therapy. Recent studies suggest that this strategy could treat the infection and salvage the catheter, thus avoiding the need for further interventional procedures including but not limited to the removal of the catheter, placement of a temporary catheter, and finally placement of a new permanent catheter. The implementation of this effective approach will reduce morbidity and possibly reduce the cost and interventions associated with it.

  14. Reducing inappropriate urinary catheter use: quality care initiatives.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Catherine; Clements, Charlotte; Hopper, Adrian

    Healthcare-acquired urinary infection presents a substantial burden for patients and the healthcare system. Urinary tract infections have not gained the same level of media attention as other healthcare-associated infections, yet interventions to reduce urinary catheter use are one of the top ten recommended patient safety strategies. To improve practice around urinary catheter placement and removal requires interventions to change the expectations and habits of nurses, medical teams and patients regarding the need for a urinary catheter. In the authors' trust, a redesign of the existing urinary catheter device record was undertaken to help avoid unnecessary placement of catheters, and resulted in a reduction of urinary catheters in situ longer than 48 hours. Other strategies included implementation of catheter rounds in a high-usage area, and credit-card-sized education cards. A catheter 'passport' was introduced for patients discharged with a catheter to ensure information for insertion and ongoing use were effectively communicated.

  15. Enhancing Post-Traumatic Pain Relief with Alternative Perineural Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0099 TITLE: Enhancing Post-Traumatic Pain Relief...DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2010-31 Aug 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhancing Post-Traumatic Pain Relief with Alternative Perineural Drugs 5a. CONTRACT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The primary objective of this proposal was to identify perineural drug combinations that enhance pain relief by

  16. Serendipitous detection of an errant central venous catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Romdall, K.; Griep, R.

    1985-09-01

    The inappropriate placement of a patient's central venous catheter in the pleural space by the serendipitous injection of Tc-99m labeled red blood cells through the catheter during a GI bleeding study was discovered. Position and patency of central venous lines can be incidentally evaluated by using existing central venous catheters for administration of radiopharmaceuticals during radionuclide imaging studies.

  17. Inhibitory effect of sustained perivascular delivery of paclitaxel on neointimal hyperplasia in the jugular vein after open cutdown central venous catheter placement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongyup; Kim, Younglim; Hwang, Ji Woong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Inhibitory effect of paclitaxel on neointimal hyperplasia after open cutdown has not been elucidated. Methods For the control group (n = 16), silicone 2.7-Fr catheters were placed via the right external jugular vein with the cutdown method. For the treatment group (n = 16), a mixture of 0.65 mg of paclitaxel and 1 mL of fibrin glue was infiltrated around the exposed vein after cutdown. After scheduled intervals (1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks), the vein segment was harvested and morphometric analysis was performed on cross-sections. Results Proliferation of smooth muscle cell (SMC) was strongly suppressed in the treatment group, and the ratio of neointima to vein wall was significantly reduced in the treatment group (8 weeks; 0.63 ± 0.08 vs. 0.2 ± 0.08, P < 0.05). Luminal patency was significantly more preserved in the treatment group, and the luminal area was significantly wider in the paclitaxel-treated group compared to the control group (8 weeks; 1.91 ± 0.43 mm2 vs. 5.1 ± 0.43 mm2, P < 0.05). Mean SMC counts measured at 1 and 2 weeks after cutdown were significantly lower in the treatment group (2 weeks; 115 ± 22 vs. 62 ± 22). Paclitaxel was undetectable in systemic circulation (<10 ng/mL). Conclusion Sustained perivascular delivery of paclitaxel with fibrin glue was effective in inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in rat jugular vein after open cutdown. PMID:28203557

  18. Pleiotrophin promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Hu, Xiu-Feng; Feng, Xiao-Shan; Gao, She-Gan

    2013-10-21

    Perineural invasion (PNI) in pancreatic cancer is an important cause of local recurrence, but little is known about its mechanism. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an important neurotrophic factor. It is of interest that our recent experimental data showed its involvement in PNI of pancreatic cancer. PTN strongly presents in the cytoplasm of pancreatic cancer cells, and high expression of PTN and its receptor may contribute to the high PNI of pancreatic cancer. Correspondingly, PNI is prone to happen in PTN-positive tumors. We thus hypothesize that, as a neurite growth-promoting factor, PTN may promote PNI in pancreatic cancer. PTN is released at the time of tumor cell necrosis, and binds with its high-affinity receptor, N-syndecan on pancreatic nerves, to promote neural growth in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, neural destruction leads to a distorted neural homeostasis. Neurons and Schwann cells produce more N-syndecan in an effort to repair the pancreatic nerves. However, the abundance of N-syndecan attracts further PTN-positive cancer cells to the site of injury, creating a vicious cycle. Ultimately, increased PTN and N-syndecan levels, due to the continuous nerve injury, may promote cancer invasion and propagation along the neural structures. Therefore, it is meaningful to discuss the relationship between PTN/N-syndecan signaling and PNI in pancreatic cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of PNI in pancreatic cancer.

  19. A rare case of atypical skull base meningioma with perineural spread

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Henry; Morley, Simon; Alegre-Abarrategui, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Atypical meningioma is a rare cause of perineural tumour spread. In this report, we present the case of a 46-year-old female with an atypical meningioma of the skull base demonstrating perineural tumour spread. We describe the imaging features of this condition and its distinguishing features from other tumours exhibiting perineural spread. PMID:27200171

  20. Catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Shenasa, M

    1991-02-01

    Catheter ablation is gaining increasing interest for the therapy of symptomatic, sustained arrhythmias of various origins. The scope of this review is to give an overview of the biophysical aspects and major characteristics of some of the most widely used energy sources in catheter ablation, e.g., the discharge of conventional defibrillators, modified defibrillators, laser light, and radiofrequency current application. Results from animal studies are considered to explain the basic mechanisms of catheter ablation. The recent achievements with the use of radiofrequency current to modify or ablate cardiac conduction properties are outlined in more detail.

  1. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you during the procedure. Machines will measure your heart’s activity. All types of ablation require cardiac catheterization to place flexible tubes, or catheters, inside your heart to make the scars. Your doctor will clean ...

  2. Catheter Embolization

    MedlinePlus

    ... the scrotum that may be a cause of infertility. Catheter embolization may be used alone or combined ... in patients with diabetes or other pre-existing kidney disease. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  3. Urinary catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  4. Hemodialysis catheter-associated central venous stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yevzlin, Alexander S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the pathophysiology, epidemiology, and interventional treatment of central vein stenosis (CVS) that may result from central vein catheter (CVC) placement. The precise mechanism of CVC-associated CVS remains largely undefined, though anatomic considerations appear to play a prominent pathologic role. The impact of CVC-associated CVS on arteriovenous fistula outcomes is reviewed. The percutaneous treatment of CVS, observation, angioplasty, or angioplasty with stent placement is reviewed, along with potential surgical treatment options. As the treatment outcomes of CVC-associated CVS have been disappointing, catheter avoidance remains the best strategy.

  5. Surgical options for recalcitrant carpal tunnel syndrome with perineural fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua M; Jacoby, Sidney M; Osterman, A Lee

    2012-03-01

    Surgical release of the transverse carpal ligament for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is, in general, a very successful procedure. Some patients, however, fail this standard release and have persistent or recurrent symptoms. Such recalcitrance may relate to incomplete release but more often relates to perineural or intraneural fibrosis of the median nerve. While there is no good treatment for intraneural fibrosis, numerous procedures have evolved in an attempt to treat perineural fibrosis which restricts nerve gliding. These include procedures to isolate the nerve from scar as well as procedures to bring neovascularization to the median nerve. This review describes the various surgical treatment options for recalcitrant CTS as well as their reported outcomes.

  6. Comparison of three techniques for ultrasound-guided femoral nerve catheter insertion: A randomized, blinded trial

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Ehab; Atim, Abdulkadir; Ghosh, Raktim; Bauer, Maria; Sreenivasalu, Thilak; Kot, Michael; Kurz, Andrea; Dalton, Jarrod E.; Mascha, Edward J.; Mounir-Soliman, Loran; Zaky, Sherif; Esa, Wael Ali Sakr; Udeh, Belinda L.; Barsoum, Wael; Sessler, Daniel I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ultrasound guidance for continuous femoral perineural catheters may be supplemented by electrical stimulation through a needle or through a stimulating catheter. We tested the primary hypothesis that ultrasound guidance alone is noninferior on both postoperative pain scores and opioid requirement and superior on at least one of the two. Secondarily, we compared all interventions on insertion time and incremental cost. Methods Patients having knee arthroplasty with femoral nerve catheters were randomly assigned to catheter insertion guided by: 1) ultrasound alone (n=147); 2) ultrasound and electrical stimulation through the needle (n=152); or, 3) ultrasound and electrical stimulation through both the needle and catheter (n=138). Noninferiority between any two interventions was defined for pain as no more than 0.5 points worse on a 0–10 Verbal Response Scale (VRS) scale and for opioid consumption as no more than 25% greater than the mean. Results The stimulating needle group was significantly noninferior to the stimulating catheter (difference (95% CI) in mean VRS pain score [stimulating needle versus stimulating catheter] of −0.16 (−0.61, 0.29), P<0.001; percent difference in mean IV morphine equivalent dose of −5% (−25%, 21%), P=0.002) and to ultrasound only (difference in mean VRS pain score of −0.28 (−0.72, 0.16), P<0.001; percent difference in mean IV morphine equivalent dose of −2% (−22%, 25%), P=0.006). In addition, the use of ultrasound alone for femoral nerve catheter insertion was faster and cheaper than the other two methods. Conclusion Ultrasound guidance alone without adding either stimulating needle or needle/catheter combination thus appears to be the best approach to femoral perineural catheters. PMID:24758775

  7. Growth and Survival Mechanisms Associated with Perineural Invasion in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    CANCER RESEARCH 64, 6082–6090, September 1, 2004] Growth and Survival Mechanisms Associated with Perineural Invasion in Prostate Cancer Gustavo E...Departments of 1Pathology, 2Urology, and 3Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas ABSTRACT Perineural invasion (PNI) is...PNI. Cancer cells in a perineural location acquire a survival and growth advantage using a NFB survival pathway. Targeting PNI might help detain local

  8. Perineural dexmedetomidine effects on sciatic nerve in rat.

    PubMed

    Yektaş, Abdulkadir; Çabalar, Murat; Sar, Mehmet; Alagöl, Ayşin; Çelik, Duygu Sultan; Yayla, Vildan; Tolga, Deniz

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that high dose dexmedetomidine would increase the duration of antinociception to a thermal stimulus in a rat model of sciatic nerve blockade without causing nerve damage. The rats were anesthetized with isoflurane. After electromyography (EMG) recordings, right sciatic nerves were explored and perineural injections were delivered: Group D (n=7), 40μgμgkg(-1) dexmedetomidine administration, Group II (n=6), (0.2mL) saline administration, Group III (n=2), only surgically exploration of the right sciatic nevre. Time to paw withdrawal latency (PAW) to a thermal stimulus for both paws and an assessment of motor function were measured every 30min after the nerve block until a return to baseline. The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) of right and left sciatic nerves were recorded 10 times per each nerve once more after perineural injections at 14 day. After EMG recordings, right and the part of left sciatic nerve were excised at a length of at minimum 15mm for histopathological examination. Comparison of right/left CMAP amplitude ratios before and 14 days after the procedure showed a statistically significant difference (p=0.000). There were no differences in perineural inflammation between the Group D, Group S, and Group E at 14 days.

  9. [Perineural dexmedetomidine effects on sciatic nerve in rat].

    PubMed

    Yektaş, Abdulkadir; Çabalar, Murat; Sar, Mehmet; Alagöl, Ayşin; Çelik, Duygu Sultan; Yayla, Vildan; Tolga, Deniz

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that high dose dexmedetomidine would increase the duration of antinociception to a thermal stimulus in a rat model of sciatic nerve blockade without causing nerve damage. The rats were anesthetized with isoflurane. After electromyography (EMG) recordings, right sciatic nerves were explored and perineural injections were delivered: Group D (n=7), 40μgμgkg(-1) dexmedetomidine administration, Group II (n=6), (0.2mL) saline administration, Group III (n=2), only surgically exploration of the right sciatic nevre. Time to paw withdrawal latency (PAW) to a thermal stimulus for both paws and an assessment of motor function were measured every 30min after the nerve block until a return to baseline. The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) of right and left sciatic nerves were recorded 10 times per each nerve once more after perineural injections at 14 day. After EMG recordings, right and the part of left sciatic nerve were excised at a length of at minimum 15mm for histopathological examination. Comparison of right/left CMAP amplitude ratios before and 14 days after the procedure showed a statistically significant difference (p=0.000). There were no differences in perineural inflammation between the Group D, Group S, and Group E at 14 days.

  10. Symptomatic cervical perineural (Tarlov) cyst: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zibis, AH; Fyllos, AH; Arvanitis, DL

    2015-01-01

    Background: Perineural (Tarlov) cysts are benign, usually asymptomatic, cerebrospinal fluid filled cysts of the spine, most often found in the sacral region. Description of case: We report a Tarlov cyst, located in the cervical spine, in a 44-year-old woman who presented with a 3-week history of radicular symptoms of the right C6 root. The perineural cyst was identified at the C5-C6 level following magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine. A conservative approach was chosen, with the use of a soft cervical collar for two weeks, a 15-day-course of oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication and instructions concerning limitation of her activities. The outcome of this approach was 90% improvement of her symptoms 24 months after her diagnosis. Conclusion: This is the first report of a cervical Tarlov cyst treated conservatively without the use of oral or injected steroids. The perineural cyst should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with radicular symptoms. Hippokratia 2015, 19 (1): 76-77. PMID:26435653

  11. Keyword: Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassuto, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    The practical goal of graduate education is placement of graduates. But what does "placement" mean? Academics use the word without thinking much about it. "Placement" is a great keyword for the graduate-school enterprise. For one thing, its meaning certainly gives a purpose to graduate education. Furthermore, the word is a portal into the way of…

  12. Two cases of symptomatic perineural cysts (tarlov cysts) in one family: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jun; Kim, Il Sup; Lee, Sang Won; Son, Byung Chul

    2008-09-01

    Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the etiologies of perineural cysts, but the accurate etiologies remain unclear. We experienced two cases of symptomatic sacral perineural cysts (Tarlov cysts) in one family, who presented with perianal paresthesia. Both of them were operated and postoperatively their symptoms were disappeared immediately. We experienced the excellent treatment outcome with the surgical management of symptomatic perineural cysts in the sacral region. We assume that the theory of congenital origin including a familial tendency is the most plausible of the hypotheses that have been proposed.

  13. Two Cases of Symptomatic Perineural Cysts (Tarlov Cysts) in One Family: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Sang Won; Son, Byung Chul

    2008-01-01

    Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the etiologies of perineural cysts, but the accurate etiologies remain unclear. We experienced two cases of symptomatic sacral perineural cysts (Tarlov cysts) in one family, who presented with perianal paresthesia. Both of them were operated and postoperatively their symptoms were disappeared immediately. We experienced the excellent treatment outcome with the surgical management of symptomatic perineural cysts in the sacral region. We assume that the theory of congenital origin including a familial tendency is the most plausible of the hypotheses that have been proposed. PMID:19096672

  14. Ventricular catheter entry site and not catheter tip location predicts shunt survival: a secondary analysis of 3 large pediatric hydrocephalus studies.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, William E; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Wellons, John C; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Tamber, Mandeep S; Limbrick, David D; Browd, Samuel R; Naftel, Robert P; Shannon, Chevis N; Simon, Tamara D; Holubkov, Richard; Illner, Anna; Cochrane, D Douglas; Drake, James M; Luerssen, Thomas G; Oakes, W Jerry; Kestle, John R W

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurate placement of ventricular catheters may result in prolonged shunt survival, but the best target for the hole-bearing segment of the catheter has not been rigorously defined. The goal of the study was to define a target within the ventricle with the lowest risk of shunt failure. METHODS Five catheter placement variables (ventricular catheter tip location, ventricular catheter tip environment, relationship to choroid plexus, catheter tip holes within ventricle, and crosses midline) were defined, assessed for interobserver agreement, and evaluated for their effect on shunt survival in univariate and multivariate analyses. De-identified subjects from the Shunt Design Trial, the Endoscopic Shunt Insertion Trial, and a Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network study on ultrasound-guided catheter placement were combined (n = 858 subjects, all first-time shunt insertions, all patients < 18 years old). The first postoperative brain imaging study was used to determine ventricular catheter placement for each of the catheter placement variables. RESULTS Ventricular catheter tip location, environment, catheter tip holes within the ventricle, and crosses midline all achieved sufficient interobserver agreement (κ > 0.60). In the univariate survival analysis, however, only ventricular catheter tip location was useful in distinguishing a target within the ventricle with a survival advantage (frontal horn; log-rank, p = 0.0015). None of the other catheter placement variables yielded a significant survival advantage unless they were compared with catheter tips completely not in the ventricle. Cox regression analysis was performed, examining ventricular catheter tip location with age, etiology, surgeon, decade of surgery, and catheter entry site (anterior vs posterior). Only age (p < 0.001) and entry site (p = 0.005) were associated with shunt survival; ventricular catheter tip location was not (p = 0.37). Anterior entry site lowered the risk of shunt failure compared

  15. Management of Dysfunctional Catheters and Tubes Inserted by Interventional Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Engstrom, Bjorn I.; Lungren, Matthew P.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive percutaneous interventions are often used for enteral nutrition, biliary and urinary diversion, intra-abdominal fluid collection drainage, and central venous access. In most cases, radiologic and endoscopic placement of catheters and tubes has replaced the comparable surgical alternative. As experience with catheters and tubes grows, it becomes increasingly evident that the interventional radiologist needs to be an expert not only on device placement but also on device management. Tube dysfunction represents the most common complication requiring repeat intervention, which can be distressing for patients and other health care professionals. This manuscript addresses the etiologies and solutions to leaking and obstructed feeding tubes, percutaneous biliary drains, percutaneous catheter nephrostomies, and drainage catheters, including abscess drains. In addition, we will address the obstructed central venous catheter. PMID:26038615

  16. Perineural Spread of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Manifesting as Ophthalmoplegia

    PubMed Central

    Koukkoulli, Antigoni; Koutroumanos, Nikolas; Kidd, Desmond

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT An 89-year-old female presented with horizontal diplopia and was diagnosed with VI nerve palsy attributed to a microvascular event. She subsequently progressed to develop an orbital apex syndrome, with neuroimaging demonstrating tumour invasion. Eighteen months earlier, she had squamous cell carcinoma of the forehead excised with clear margins. Intraneural and perineural spread of squamous carcinoma from the face to the cranial cavity is an important cause of delayed cranial nerve palsies after local excision of the skin tumour. PMID:27928347

  17. Practical Aspects of Nontunneled and Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Edward; Kappel, Joanne; MacRae, Jennifer; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Nontunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs) are typically used when vascular access is required for urgent renal replacement therapy. The preferred site for NTHC insertion in acute kidney injury is the right internal jugular vein followed by the femoral vein. When aided by real-time ultrasound, mechanical complications related to NTHC insertion are significantly reduced. The preferred site for tunneled hemodialysis catheters placement is the right internal jugular vein followed by the left internal jugular vein. Ideally, the catheter should be inserted on the opposite side of a maturing or planned fistula/graft. Several dual-lumen, large-diameter catheters are available with multiple catheter tip designs, but no one catheter has shown significant superior performance. PMID:28270920

  18. Practical Aspects of Nontunneled and Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters.

    PubMed

    Clark, Edward; Kappel, Joanne; MacRae, Jennifer; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Miller, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Nontunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs) are typically used when vascular access is required for urgent renal replacement therapy. The preferred site for NTHC insertion in acute kidney injury is the right internal jugular vein followed by the femoral vein. When aided by real-time ultrasound, mechanical complications related to NTHC insertion are significantly reduced. The preferred site for tunneled hemodialysis catheters placement is the right internal jugular vein followed by the left internal jugular vein. Ideally, the catheter should be inserted on the opposite side of a maturing or planned fistula/graft. Several dual-lumen, large-diameter catheters are available with multiple catheter tip designs, but no one catheter has shown significant superior performance.

  19. Neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters: recommendations for prevention of insertion and postinsertion complications.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Pamela R; Miller, Kellee M

    2008-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) continue to be necessary in neonatal care. They benefit many premature infants and those needing long-term intravenous access. An experienced inserter, early recognition of PICC candidates, early PICC placement, knowledge of anatomy, and correct choice of vein all increase placement success. As with any invasive procedure, there are risks. These include pain, difficulty advancing the catheter, damage to vessels, catheter malposition, and bleeding. Utilizing assessment skills, following the product manufacturer's instructions, and carefully placing the catheter should minimize most of these risks. Additional risks include postinsertion complications such as occlusions, thrombosis, catheter failure, infection, and catheter malposition. Proper nursing care--which includes controlling infection, properly securing the catheter, and changing the dressing as needed--is key to preventing complications and maintaining the PICC until treatment has been completed.

  20. Comparison of french-pezzar and Malecot catheters for percutaneously placed gastrostomy tubes in cats.

    PubMed

    DeBowes, L J; Coyne, B; Layton, C E

    1993-06-15

    Gastrostomy tubes were placed percutaneously in 28 cats by use of an endoscope. French-pezzar mushroom-tip catheters were used for 14 of the procedures, and Malecot catheters were used for the remainder. Inner flanges were not used in gastrostomy tube placement. The french-pezzar catheters remained in place and functional for 2 weeks in all 14 cats. The Malecot catheters remained in place and functional for 2 weeks in 4 cats. Malecot catheters pulled out in 10 cats, and 2 of these cats died or were euthanatized because of complications. The gastrostomy tubes were removed in 18 cats 2 weeks after placement by applying gentle, steady traction and removing the entire catheter or by cutting the tube flush with the skin and leaving the catheter tip in the cat's stomach. Neither method of removal was associated with problems.

  1. Acute effects of perineural administration of sodium hyaluronate on palmar digital neurectomy sites in horses.

    PubMed

    Murray, R C; Gaughan, E M; DeBowes, R M; Mosier, D A; Hoskinson, J J

    1994-10-01

    Biaxial palmar digital neurectomy of all limbs was performed on 6 mixed-breed castrated adult male horses, using a standard guillotine method. Using a Teflon catheter, 20 mg (2 ml) of sodium hyaluronate (group 1), 2 ml of phosphate-buffered saline solution (group 2), or catheter placement with no infusion (group 3) was applied to 4 (group 1) or 2 (groups 2 and 3) of 8 incisions/horse. Treatments were administered after closure of the neurectomy incision, and the catheter was removed. Horses were evaluated daily for 1 week, then weekly over a 9-week period for evidence of lameness, swelling, and ultrasonographic changes. On week 9, horses were euthanatized and neurectomy sites were removed en bloc for histologic evaluation of axonal regrowth, inflammation, and fibrosis. Neither lameness nor sign of painful neuroma was observed clinically in any of the horses. Neurectomy eliminated cutaneous heel sensation in all limbs for the duration of the study. Swelling was evident at all neurectomy sites. There were no significant differences between treatment sites for measurement of pastern circumference or ultrasonographic evaluation of incisional swelling. Foci of ultrasonographic hyperechogenicity increased over time, but there was no significant difference in hyperechogenicity between treatment groups. Histologic evidence of neuroma formation was observed at all sites. Morphometric assessment of neuroma cross-sectional areas revealed no significant difference between the groups, as did subjective histologic assessment of neuroma density and fibrous tissue content.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Vascular Access Tracking System: a Web-Based Clinical Tracking Tool for Identifying Catheter Related Blood Stream Infections in Interventional Radiology Placed Central Venous Catheters.

    PubMed

    Morrison, James; Kaufman, John

    2016-12-01

    Vascular access is invaluable in the treatment of hospitalized patients. Central venous catheters provide a durable and long-term solution while saving patients from repeated needle sticks for peripheral IVs and blood draws. The initial catheter placement procedure and long-term catheter usage place patients at risk for infection. The goal of this project was to develop a system to track and evaluate central line-associated blood stream infections related to interventional radiology placement of central venous catheters. A customized web-based clinical database was developed via open-source tools to provide a dashboard for data mining and analysis of the catheter placement and infection information. Preliminary results were gathered over a 4-month period confirming the utility of the system. The tools and methodology employed to develop the vascular access tracking system could be easily tailored to other clinical scenarios to assist in quality control and improvement programs.

  3. Technological advances for PICC placement and management.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Janet

    2007-06-01

    Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is often complicated by the infant's small size and previous use of the peripheral veins, making the traditional means of insertion inadequate. New techniques and technologies, previously reserved for pediatric and adult patients, are now available for use in neonates and can enhance the practice of neonatal PICC teams. The modified Seldinger technique allows insertion of the PICC via smaller peripheral veins while decreasing venous trauma and enhancing the rate of successful placement. A second useful technique, the catheter exchange procedure, allows insertion of a new catheter within the same vein when complications such as occlusion, breakage, or inappropriate position occur and require removal of the currently dwelling PICC. Clinicians caring for neonates and infants must continually update their knowledge and skill by incorporating new techniques into their practice.

  4. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter Noninfectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M.; MacRae, Jennifer M.; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Kappel, Joanne; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Pike, Pamela; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2016-01-01

    Noninfectious hemodialysis catheter complications include catheter dysfunction, catheter-related thrombus, and central vein stenosis. The definitions, causes, and treatment strategies for catheter dysfunction are reviewed below. Catheter-related thrombus is a less common but serious complication of catheters, requiring catheter removal and systemic anticoagulation. In addition, the risk factors, clinical manifestation, and treatment options for central vein stenosis are outlined. PMID:28270922

  5. Evaluation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Patients with Idiopathic Optic Perineuritis using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Byon, Ik Soo; Jung, Jae Ho; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Seo, Je Hyun; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Hee-Young

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the effect of idiopathic Optic perineuritis on the retinal nerve fiber layer, and determine the ability of optical coherence tomography to evaluate retinal nerve fiber loss after idiopathic Optic perineuritis. Four patients were assessed in this study. In all cases, average retinal nerve fiber layer was significantly thinner in the affected eye in comparison with the normal reference value and with the value for the contralateral normal eye at 12 months after the onset of optic perineuritis. Our study revealed that retinal nerve fiber layer loss occurs in idiopathic optic nerve sheath inflammation. PMID:27928329

  6. Catheter malplacement during central venous cannulation through arm veins in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Arvind; Bithal, Parmod K; Dash, Harihar; Chauhan, Rajendra S; Mohanty, Bibekanand

    2003-07-01

    For successful catheter placement, central venous cannulation (CVC) through internal jugular vein and subclavian vein has been recommended in both adult and pediatric patients. But it carries a risk of serious complications, such as pneumothorax, carotid, or subclavian artery puncture, which can be life-threatening, particularly in critically ill children. So a prospective study was carried out to determine the success rate of correct catheter tip placement during CVC through antecubital veins in pediatric neurosurgical patients. A total of 200 pediatric patients (age 1-15 years) of either sex were studied. Basilic or cephalic veins of either arm were selected. All the patients were cannulated in the operation room under general anesthesia. Single lumen, proper size catheters (with stillete) were used for cannulation. The catheter was inserted in supine position with the arm abducted at right angle to the body and neck turned ipsilaterally. The length of insertion was determined from cubital fossa to the right second intercostal space. The exact position of the tip of the catheter was confirmed radiologically in ICU. Correct catheter tip placement was achieved in 98 (49%) patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of data shows that there was no statistically significant difference among correct and incorrect catheter tip placement in relation to factors including sex, side of cannulation (left or right), and type of vein (basilic or cephalic). The analysis of correct catheter tip placement in relation to age showed that the highest success rate was achieved in children of age group 6 to 10 years (60.2%) followed by 30.6% in the 11 to 15 year group. The lowest success rate of tip placement of only 9.2% was observed in younger children of age 1 to 5 years, which is statistically significant (P = 0.001). Of 102 incorrect placements reported, 37% were in 1 to 5 year age group versus 9.2% correct tip placements. The most common unsatisfactory placements were

  7. [Silastic catheters: pinpointing the end tip of the catheter by means of electrocardiographic monitoring].

    PubMed

    Giraldo Lozano, L; Barjau Capdevila, M

    1997-10-01

    The placement of catheters with a silastic center has been a common procedure in neonatal intensive care units for several years. Nonetheless, this procedure, like many others, bears its risks and complications if not properly carried out. The majority of complications, which are described in medical journals, include arrhythmias, myocardiac perforations, thrombosis, hemorrhage in the pleura, etc., and these are related with the catheter and its possible movement inside the blood vessel where it was originally inserted. The usual exploratory procedure to pinpoint the end tip of the catheter has been an ordinary x-ray, but often this x-ray does not allow one to see precisely where the catheter tip is located. This problem is caused by the tiny catheter calibre which does not allow for all the necessary contrast; because of this, it is frequently necessary to administer a radiopaque contrasting sub-stance and then repeat the x-ray in order to ensure that the catheter tip is located exactly where it should be. By means of electrocardiographic monitoring, a three-pronged key with an electrode and a 5.85% sodium chloride solution, it is possible to pinpoint the end tip of the catheter without resorting to an x-ray nor administering a contrasting solution.

  8. Mandibular Canal Widening and Bell's Palsy: Sequelae of Perineural Invasion in Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Gopinath Thilak Parepady; Sherigar, Vishwanath; Satya, Shree; Gohil, Sourabh M.

    2016-01-01

    Perineural invasion is an underrecognized route of metastatic spread along the nerve bundles within the nerve sheath into the surrounding tissues. It hinders the ability to establish local control as tumour cells can traverse along nerve tracts well beyond the extent of any local invasion rendering them inoperable and unresectable. Perineural invasion is a marker of poor prognosis. Oral submucous fibrosis with oral cancer constitutes a clinicopathologically distinct disease. Our case highlights an enigmatic presentation of oral submucous fibrosis and its coexistence with oral cancer presenting with unusual neurological disturbance of the inferior alveolar nerve and facial nerve and diffuse widening of the mandibular canal. The objective of this case report is to enumerate the significance of perineural invasion in determining the course of the disease and necessitate the need for future studies that can shed light on molecular mediators and pathogenesis of perineural spread. PMID:28025626

  9. ADCON-T/N reduces in vivo perineural adhesions in a rat sciatic nerve reoperation model.

    PubMed

    Palatinsky, E A; Maier, K H; Touhalisky, D K; Mock, J L; Hingson, M T; Coker, G T

    1997-06-01

    Excessive perineural scarring may affect the result of peripheral nerve surgery. The ability of a novel implant material (ADCON-T/N) to prevent this complication was tested in 38 rats. Four weeks after a bilateral sciatic nerve external neurolysis, a secondary bilateral lysis of the adhesions was performed; ADCON-T/N was locally implanted at one side, while the contralateral side was left untreated. Four or 8 weeks later, perineural adhesions were dissected in 24 animals and graded blindly. Significantly fewer perineural adhesions were found in ADCON-T/N treated nerves compared with controls at both 4 and 8 weeks. Residual implant material or adverse effects were not observed at either time. Histological examination of the neurolysis sites in another 14 animals confirmed these findings at both time intervals. This study shows that ADCON-T/N is effective in inhibiting perineural adhesions, is resorbed within 4 weeks and is well tolerated.

  10. Mandibular Canal Widening and Bell's Palsy: Sequelae of Perineural Invasion in Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Gopinath Thilak Parepady; Sherigar, Vishwanath; Shetty, Sameep S; Satya, Shree; Gohil, Sourabh M

    2016-01-01

    Perineural invasion is an underrecognized route of metastatic spread along the nerve bundles within the nerve sheath into the surrounding tissues. It hinders the ability to establish local control as tumour cells can traverse along nerve tracts well beyond the extent of any local invasion rendering them inoperable and unresectable. Perineural invasion is a marker of poor prognosis. Oral submucous fibrosis with oral cancer constitutes a clinicopathologically distinct disease. Our case highlights an enigmatic presentation of oral submucous fibrosis and its coexistence with oral cancer presenting with unusual neurological disturbance of the inferior alveolar nerve and facial nerve and diffuse widening of the mandibular canal. The objective of this case report is to enumerate the significance of perineural invasion in determining the course of the disease and necessitate the need for future studies that can shed light on molecular mediators and pathogenesis of perineural spread.

  11. Effect of Arm Positioning on Entrapment of Infraclavicular Nerve Block Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Rahul; Kendall, Mark C.; Nader, Antoun; Weeks, Jessica J.

    2017-01-01

    Continuous brachial plexus nerve block catheters are commonly inserted for postoperative analgesia after upper extremity surgery. Modifications of the insertion technique have been described to improve the safety of placing an infraclavicular brachial plexus catheter. Rarely, these catheters may become damaged or entrapped, complicating their removal. We describe a case of infraclavicular brachial plexus catheter entrapment related to differences in arm positioning during catheter placement and removal. Written authorization to obtain, use, and disclose information and images was obtained from the patient. PMID:28348896

  12. Perineural fibrosis of superficial peroneal nerve complicating ankle sprain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Acus, R W; Flanagan, J P

    1991-02-01

    The peroneal nerve is susceptible to traction injury during inversion ankle sprains. Previously, these traction lesions have been identified only at the fibular neck and popliteal fossa level. This report illustrates a previously unreported condition of perineural fibrosis of the superficial peroneal nerve at the level of the ankle following an inversion ankle sprain. Perineural fibrosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent pain after ankle sprain.

  13. [Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with perineural differentiation (malignant perineurinoma) of the cervix uteri].

    PubMed

    Dolzhikov, A A; Mukhina, T S

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a case of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with perineural differentiation and at the rare site of the cervix uteri in a 57-year-old patient. The diagnosis was established on the basis of extensive immunohistochemical examination, by excluding the similar neoplasms and detecting an immunophenotype characteristic of perineural differentiation. There are data available in the literature on the morphological and immunophenotypical characteristics of this tumor.

  14. Misplaced central venous catheters: applied anatomy and practical management.

    PubMed

    Gibson, F; Bodenham, A

    2013-03-01

    Large numbers of central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed each year and misplacement occurs frequently. This review outlines the normal and abnormal anatomy of the central veins in relation to the placement of CVCs. An understanding of normal and variant anatomy enables identification of congenital and acquired abnormalities. Embryological variations such as a persistent left-sided superior vena cava are often diagnosed incidentally only after placement of a CVC, which is seen to take an abnormal course on X-ray. Acquired abnormalities such as stenosis or thrombosis of the central veins can be problematic and can present as a failure to pass a guidewire or catheter or complications after such attempts. Catheters can also be misplaced outside veins in a patient with otherwise normal anatomy with potentially disastrous consequences. We discuss the possible management options for these patients including the various imaging techniques used to verify correct or incorrect catheter placement and the limitations of each. If the course of a misplaced catheter can be correctly identified as not lying within a vulnerable structure then it can be safely removed. If the misplaced catheter is lying within or traversing large and incompressible arteries or veins, it should not be removed before consideration of what is likely to happen when it is removed. Advice and further imaging should be sought, typically in conjunction with interventional radiology or vascular surgery. With regard to misplaced CVCs, in the short term, a useful aide memoir is: 'if in doubt, don't take it out'.

  15. A pilot study to assess adductor canal catheter tip migration in a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Leng, Jody C; Harrison, T Kyle; Miller, Brett; Howard, Steven K; Conroy, Myles; Udani, Ankeet; Shum, Cynthia; Mariano, Edward R

    2015-04-01

    An adductor canal catheter may facilitate early ambulation after total knee arthroplasty, but there is concern over preoperative placement since intraoperative migration of catheters may occur from surgical manipulation and result in ineffective analgesia. We hypothesized that catheter type and subcutaneous tunneling may influence tip migration for preoperatively inserted adductor canal catheters. In a male unembalmed human cadaver, 20 catheter insertion trials were divided randomly into one of four groups: flexible epidural catheter either tunneled or not tunneled; or rigid stimulating catheter either tunneled or not tunneled. Intraoperative patient manipulation was simulated by five range-of-motion exercises of the knee. Distance and length measurements were performed by a blinded regional anesthesiologist. Changes in catheter tip to nerve distance (p = 0.225) and length of catheter within the adductor canal (p = 0.467) were not different between the four groups. Two of five non-tunneled stimulating catheters (40 %) were dislodged compared to 0/5 in all other groups (p = 0.187). A cadaver model may be useful for assessing migration of regional anesthesia catheters; catheter type and subcutaneous tunneling may not affect migration of adductor canal catheters based on this preliminary study. However, future studies involving a larger sample size, actual patients, and other catheter types are warranted.

  16. The stuck central venous catheter: a word of caution.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Neeti; Choudhury, Minati; Kiran, Usha; Chowdhury, Ujjwal

    2008-10-01

    The placement of central venous catheter (CVC) through internal jugular vein is not free from potential hazards. We report two cases of triple lumen central venous catheter, placed into right internal jugular vein, which got entrapped in patients who had undergone mitral valve replacement. The entrapment of catheter went unnoticed until the time of removal. Subsequent investigations, mechanism of entrapment, prevention, and removal is described. To conclude, we encountered an unusual cause of stuck central venous catheter, in the left atrial suture line. Removal of central venous catheter requires utmost care, and should never be done by forceful traction in the postoperative cardiac surgical patients, as it may lead to disruption of suture lines or rupture of vessels.

  17. Emergent Right Coronary Artery Thrombectomy with a Jet Aspiration Thrombectomy Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Teiyu; Furui, Shigeru; Isshiki, Takaaki; Toyoizumi, Hideki; Kohtake, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Kohji; Suzuki, Shigeru; Harasawa, Arimi; Sasaki, Yasushi

    1999-07-15

    A saline-jet aspiration thrombectomy (JAT) catheter was used in a patient with acute myocardial infarction. A right coronary arteriogram showed complete thrombotic occlusion at the proximal segment. With this catheter the thrombus was removed without complications in 5 sec. The patient underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and placement of a Palmaz-Schatz stent after successful thrombectomy. Thrombectomy with a JAT catheter was very useful in this patient.0.

  18. Prognosis and Progression of ESCC Patients with Perineural Invasion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guanghui; Feng, Fan; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Shushang; Zheng, Gaozan; Xiao, Shuao; Cai, Lei; Yang, Xuewen; Li, Guocai; Lian, Xiao; Guo, Man; Sun, Li; Yang, Jianjun; Fan, Daiming; Lu, Qun; Zhang, Hongwei

    2017-03-03

    Perineural invasion (PNI) has been recognized as a poor prognostic factor in several malignancies, but the definition and pathogenesis of PNI in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains to be defined. PNI was evaluated by H&E staining and S100 immunohistochemistry. The predictive value of PNI in the prognosis of ESCC patients was analyzed. PNI was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. A total of 54 specimens (17.88%) were defined as PNI-a and 99 specimens (32.78%) as PNI-b. S100 staining was superior to H&E staining for PNI detection (50.66% vs 27.15%, P < 0.001, κ = 0.506). Tumor depth (P = 0.001), tumor stage (P = 0.010), and vascular invasion (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with PNI. PIN-a and PNI-b had significant lower disease free survival (DFS) and disease specific survival (DSS) than PNI-0 patients, and the prognosis of PNI-b patients was significantly worse than PNI-a patients for DFS (P = 0.009). PNI was an independent predictor for DFS and DSS in ESCC as evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. ESCC cells could metastasize along the nerve in vitro and in vivo, and PNI was a dynamic process. S100 staining significantly improved the accuracy of PNI detection. PNI was associated with local recurrence and poor prognosis of ESCC patients.

  19. Sacral perineural cyst mimicking inflammatory low back pain.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, P

    2015-02-01

    This case describes a 46-year-old woman with local pelvic and perineal pain, persisting for 2 years at presentation. The pain worsened during the night and morning and was alleviated during daily activities. Low back pain was associated with morning stiffness lasting longer than 2 h. Sometimes, she felt pain and numbness along her left S1 dermatome, without overt bladder or bowel incontinence. Lasegue's sign was negative. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were elevated (35 mm/h and 9.4, respectively) and Mennel's sign was present on both sides, indicating possible inflammation of the sacroiliac joints. However, radiographs of the lumbosacral spine and sacroiliac joints were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a large spinal meningeal cyst in the sacrum (60 × 37 × 22 mm) consisting of multiple perineural cysts. The cyst eroded the surrounding sacral bone structures, narrowed several sacral foramina, and compressed neighboring nerve fibers. MRI findings on sacroiliac and hip joints were normal.

  20. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coude catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coude catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coude catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coudé catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coudé catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  5. Efficacy of percutaneous pigtail catheters for thoracostomy at bedside

    PubMed Central

    Penupolu, Sudheer; Flores, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective Given the potential morbidity of traditional chest tube insertion, use of pigtail is desirable. The purpose of this case series is to determine the efficacy of bedside pigtail thoracostomy catheters in Adult population by using bedside ultrasound by the pulmonologists. Methods It is a retrospective case series, which describes the importance of bedside pigtail catheters placements for emergent symptomatic relief for the patients. Predicting a successful drainage, procedure is a complex and multifactorial process based on size, location, character and configuration of the abscess. Results Our experience shows that the use of standard size (7-8.5 F) pigtail catheters is usually very successful in draining of the pleural fluids. Less time consumption, lower cost and bedside technique makes it superior to conventional chest tube placement in many aspects. Conclusions Percutaneous pigtail catheters are useful in the drainage of pleural fluids. The pigtail catheters can be placed successful at bedside by the pulmonologists under ultrasound guidance with minimal complications and marked clinical improvement. The cost effectives of this procedure over the conventional chest tube placement, makes this procedure more desirable in most of the hospital settings. PMID:22754668

  6. A randomised controlled trial of perineural vs intravenous dexamethasone for foot surgery.

    PubMed

    Dawson, R L; McLeod, D H; Koerber, J P; Plummer, J L; Dracopoulos, G C

    2016-03-01

    We used 20 ml ropivacaine 0.75% for ankle blocks before foot surgery in 90 participants who we allocated in equal numbers to: perineural dexamethasone 8 mg and intravenous saline 0.9%; perineural saline 0.9% and intravenous dexamethasone 8 mg; or perineural and intravenous saline 0.9%. Dexamethasone increased the median (IQR [range]) time for the return of some sensation or movement, from 14.6 (10.8-18.8 [5.5-38.0]) h with saline to 24.1 (19.3-29.3 [5.0-44.0]) h when given perineurally, p = 0.00098, and to 20.9 (18.3-27.8 [8.8-31.3]) h when given intravenously, p = 0.0067. Dexamethasone increased the median (IQR [range]) time for the return of normal neurology, from 17.6 (14.0-21.0 [9.5-40.5]) h with saline to 27.5 (22.0-36.3 [7.0-53.0]) h when given perineurally, p = 0.00016, and to 24.0 (20.5-32.3 [13.0-42.5]) h when given intravenously, p = 0.0022. Dexamethasone did not affect the rates of block success, postoperative pain scores, analgesic use, or nausea and vomiting. The route of dexamethasone administration did not alter its effects.

  7. A case of symptomatic cervical perineural (Tarlov) cyst: clinical manifestation and management.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keewon; Chun, Se Woong; Chung, Sun G

    2012-01-01

    Perineural (Tarlov) cysts are most often found in the sacral region and are rare in the cervical spine. Although they are usually asymptomatic, a small number of those at the lumbosacral level have been known to produce localized or radicular pain. Few reports are available on symptomatic perineural cysts in the cervical spine and it has not been discussed how they should be managed. We present here a case of cervical perineural cysts with persistent radicular pain where the pain was adequately managed with repetitive transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI). The patient had experienced intractable pain in the posterior neck and left upper extremity for more than 7 years. The nature of the pain was cramping and a tingling sensation, which was aggravated in the supine position. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a perineural cyst in the neural foramen of left C7 root. The patient underwent three repetitive TFESIs targeted at the root. Each injection provided incremental relief, which lasted more than 6 months. Follow-up image revealed shrinkage of the cyst. This case illustrates in detail the clinical manifestation of a rare symptomatic perineural cyst in the cervical region and to our knowledge is the first to report the beneficial effect of repetitive TFESI.

  8. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  9. Sequestrated caudal catheter in a child: An anesthetic nightmare and surgical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Eu, Chong Soon; Kumar, Shyamala V.; Ali, Saedah; Hassan, Shamsul Kamalrujan

    2017-01-01

    The usage of epidural infusion for intraoperative and postoperative pain relief is widely used in certain pediatric anesthetic practice because of the effectiveness and advantages. However, there is drawback for these techniques due to its potential complications such as inadvertent intrathecal placement, local anesthetic toxicity, catheter migration, infection, and breakage of epidural catheter. Though occur infrequently, epidural catheters have been known to snap during insertion or removal. The retained catheter tip may lead to multiple complications, including nerve injury, infection, and even catheter migration. Although there are literatures recommend options for management of removal of retained catheter, there are limited reports of these occurrences, especially among children. We report a case of sequestrated sheared epidural catheter segment in a child, aiming to share this experience for the future management of patients under similar condition. PMID:28217061

  10. Factors associated with external ventricular drain placement accuracy: data from an electronic health record repository

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vaibhav; Lacson, Ronilda; Vosburgh, Kirby G.; Wong, Judith M.; Prevedello, Luciano; Andriole, Katherine; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Popp, A. John; Khorasani, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Background We evaluated external ventricular drain placement for factors associated with placement accuracy. Data was acquired using an electronic health record data requisition tool. Method Medical records of all patients who underwent ventriculostomy from 2003–2010 were identified and evaluated. Patient demographics, diagnosis, type of guidance and number of catheter passes were searched for and recorded. Post-procedural hemorrhage and/or infection were identified. A grading scale was used to classify accuracy of catheter placements. A multiple logistic regression model was developed to assess features associated with accurate catheter placement. Results One hundred nine patients who underwent 111 ventriculostomies from 2003–2010 were identified. Patient diagnoses were classified into vascular (63%), tumor (21%), trauma (14%), and cyst (2%). Procedures were performed freehand in 90 (81%), with the Ghajar guide in 17 (15%), and with image guidance in 4 (4%) patients. Eighty-eight (79%) catheters were placed in the correct location. Trauma patients were more likely to have catheters misplaced (p=0.007) whereas patients in other diagnostic categories were not significantly associated with misplaced catheters. Post-procedural hemorrhage was noted in 2 (1.8%) patients on post-procedural imaging studies. Five (4.5%) definite and 6 (5.4%) suspected infections were identified. Conclusions External ventricular drain placement can be performed accurately in most patients. Patients with trauma are more likely to have catheters misplaced. Further development is required to identify and evaluate procedure outcomes using an electronic health record repository. PMID:23700258

  11. Incidence of catheter-associated bloodstream infection after introduction of minocycline and rifampin antimicrobial-coated catheters in a pediatric burn population.

    PubMed

    Weber, Joan M; Sheridan, Robert L; Fagan, Shawn; Ryan, Colleen M; Pasternack, Mark S; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections suggest that antimicrobial-coated catheters can decrease the risk of developing catheter-related bloodstream infection in a variety of adult patient populations. There are limited data on their efficacy in the pediatric population, particularly among children with burn injuries. A study was conducted at Shriners Hospitals for Children®, Boston, to determine whether minocycline/rifampin (MR)-coated catheters could decrease the incidence of catheter-associated bloodstream infection (CABSI) in a pediatric burn population. A historical control group included all patients with double- or triple-lumen catheters inserted in the 18-month period from January 2006 to June 2007. The study group included all patients with MR antimicrobial double- or triple-lumen catheters inserted in the subsequent 18-month period, July 2007 to December 2008. Data collected included name, age, date of burn/injury, date of admission, percent TBSA area burn injury or other diagnosis, catheter site (subclavian, internal jugular, or femoral), method of insertion (new percutaneous stick or guidewire), type of catheter (double or triple lumen), date inserted, duration of catheter placement (days), and positive blood cultures recovered while the central venous catheter was in place. CABSI was defined using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection. There were a total of 66 patients with 252 catheters (1780 catheter days) in the control group and 75 patients with 263 catheters (1633 catheter days) in the study group. Age, percent burn injury, catheter site, and method of insertion were not statistically different between the two groups. The percentage of infected catheters and the rate of infection were significantly different for the two groups, with the MR antimicrobial catheters only half as likely to become infected. In

  12. Guided Application of Ventricular Catheters (GAVCA) - multicentre study to compare the ventricular catheter position after use of a catheter guide versus freehand application: study protocol for a randomised trail

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The standard technique for the placement of ventricular catheters (VC) comprises a high proportion of malpositioning of the catheter (12.5 to 40%). Technical advances such as neuronavigation or ultrasound have been shown to increase the accuracy of the procedure. Since these means result in significant technical and time consuming efforts, they are used for selected cases only. In order to simplify the controlled placement of ventricular catheters a newly developed smartphone assisted guiding tool has been introduced. In this study the efficacy and safety of this guiding tool is determined. Methods/design This study is a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial. A total of 144 patients planned for an elective shunting procedure will be enrolled throughout 10 study centres within two years. The primary objective of the trial is to show the superiority of the guided placement in comparison to the standard freehand technique of ventricular catheter application. Patients will be followed up for 30 days after the operation in regard to image-based evaluation of the catheter position as well as possible shunt dysfunction and complications. Discussion The Guided Application of Ventricular Catheters (GAVCA) trial compares the guided catheter positioning with the standard freehand technique of catheter placement in hydrocephalic patients. If superiority is shown, the standard technique may be changed with the advantage of a more reliable and safer positioning of the ventricular catheter with just a slight effort in time and pre-operative planning. Trial registration The GAVCA trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under the number NCT01811589. PMID:24330776

  13. Prognosis and Progression of ESCC Patients with Perineural Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guanghui; Feng, Fan; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Shushang; Zheng, Gaozan; Xiao, Shuao; Cai, Lei; Yang, Xuewen; Li, Guocai; Lian, Xiao; Guo, Man; Sun, Li; Yang, Jianjun; Fan, Daiming; Lu, Qun; Zhang, Hongwei

    2017-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) has been recognized as a poor prognostic factor in several malignancies, but the definition and pathogenesis of PNI in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains to be defined. PNI was evaluated by H&E staining and S100 immunohistochemistry. The predictive value of PNI in the prognosis of ESCC patients was analyzed. PNI was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. A total of 54 specimens (17.88%) were defined as PNI-a and 99 specimens (32.78%) as PNI-b. S100 staining was superior to H&E staining for PNI detection (50.66% vs 27.15%, P < 0.001, κ = 0.506). Tumor depth (P = 0.001), tumor stage (P = 0.010), and vascular invasion (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with PNI. PIN-a and PNI-b had significant lower disease free survival (DFS) and disease specific survival (DSS) than PNI-0 patients, and the prognosis of PNI-b patients was significantly worse than PNI-a patients for DFS (P = 0.009). PNI was an independent predictor for DFS and DSS in ESCC as evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. ESCC cells could metastasize along the nerve in vitro and in vivo, and PNI was a dynamic process. S100 staining significantly improved the accuracy of PNI detection. PNI was associated with local recurrence and poor prognosis of ESCC patients. PMID:28256609

  14. Post-discectomy perineural fibrosis: comparison of conventional versus microsurgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Touliatos, A S; Soucacos, P N; Beris, A E

    1992-01-01

    The lumbar spines of twenty-one dogs were used as an experimental model. The animals were divided into three groups. In the first group, selective damage to the perimeningeal blood vessels was induced and the resultant hematoma was left untouched in the spinal canal. In the second group, the posterior longitudinal ligament was incised, and in the third group, the posterior longitudinal ligament was incised and damage induced to the perimeningeal blood vessels. The pathology examination revealed: (1) the hematoma itself did not lead to the formation of perineural fibrosis, (2) the incision of the posterior longitudinal ligament led to the formation of a limited amount of fibrosis, and (3) the coexistence of hematoma and incision of the posterior longitudinal ligament led to the formation of extensive perineural fibrosis. When discs are removed using microsurgical techniques, it is possible to avoid the formation of the postoperative hematoma and consequently to eliminate the perineural fibrosis.

  15. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections. Centers For Disease Control and Prevention. April 2011. ... MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. ...

  16. Sensory nerve conduction and nociception in the equine lower forelimb during perineural bupivacaine infusion along the palmar nerves

    PubMed Central

    Zarucco, Laura; Driessen, Bernd; Scandella, Massimiliano; Cozzi, Francesca; Cantile, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study lateral palmar nerve (LPN) and medial palmar nerve (MPN) morphology and determine nociception and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) following placement of continuous peripheral nerve block (CPNB) catheters along LPN and MPN with subsequent bupivacaine (BUP) infusion. Myelinated nerve fiber distribution in LPN and MPN was examined after harvesting nerve specimens in 3 anesthetized horses and processing them for morphometric analysis. In 5 sedated horses, CPNB catheters were placed along each PN in both forelimbs. Horses then received in one forelimb 3 mL 0.125% BUP containing epinephrine 1:200 000 and 0.04% NaHCO3 per catheter site followed by 2 mL/h infusion over a 6-day period, while in the other forelimb equal amounts of saline (SAL) solution were administered. The hoof withdrawal response (HWR) threshold during pressure loading of the area above the dorsal coronary band was determined daily in both forelimbs. On day 6 SNCV was measured under general anesthesia of horses in each limb’s LPN and MPN to detect nerve injury, followed by CPNB catheter removal. The SNCV was also recorded in 2 anesthetized non-instrumented horses (sham controls). In both LPN and MPN myelinated fiber distributions were bimodal. The fraction of large fibers (>7 μm) was greater in the MPN than LPN (P < 0.05). Presence of CPNB catheters and SAL administration did neither affect measured HWR thresholds nor SNCVs, whereas BUP infusion suppressed HWRs. In conclusion, CPNB with 0.125% BUP provides pronounced analgesia by inhibiting sensory nerve conduction in the distal equine forelimb. PMID:21197231

  17. Pulmonary artery catheter insertion in a patient of dextrocardia with anomalous venous connections.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Mukesh; Kumar, Naresh; Singh, Prabhat K

    2004-08-01

    In a young adult patient having situs solitus with dextrocardia the attempted pulmonary artery catheter placement for emergency mitral valve replacement required an unduly long length (50cm) of catheter insertion to get into right ventricle and then into pulmonary artery. Although catheter coiling was suspected initially, chest x-ray taken after successfully placement revealed an uncommon congenital anomalous venous connection i.e. right internal jugular opening into left sided superior vena cava then into inferior vena cava after running all along the left border of the heart. With the result, it required to pass 50cm of PA catheter to get into right ventricle in our patient. This emphasizes the need to look for abnormal venous connections during echocardiography and x-ray screening in congenital heart disease. Fluoroscopy is recommended when an unusual length of pulmonary artery catheter insertion is required to enter the pulmonary artery.

  18. Conversion of tunneled hemodialysis catheter into HeRO device can provide immediate access for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Julio C; DeLaRosa, Jacob; Rahim, Fahim; Rahim, Naeem

    2010-11-01

    Patients with central venous occlusion who are ''tunneled catheter dependent'' are a challenge for hemodialysis access. A relatively new option for them is the hemodialysis reliable outflow (HeRO) device that can be totally implanted subcutaneously. However, patients still require a tunneled hemodialysis catheter that is used until the HeRO device is mature, 4 to 6 weeks later. Here, we describe a conversion of an existing tunneled hemodialysis catheter into a HeRO device, which was combined with a ''self-sealing'' Flixene graft. This allowed almost immediate use of the HeRO device without the need for placement of a catheter.

  19. Baclofen pump catheter leakage after migration of the abdominal catheter in a pediatric patient with spasticity.

    PubMed

    Dastgir, Amer; Ranalli, Nathan J; MacGregor, Theresa L; Aldana, Philipp R

    2015-09-01

    The authors report an unusual case of intrathecal baclofen withdrawal due to the perforation and subsequent leakage of a baclofen pump catheter in a patient with spastic cerebral palsy. A 15-year-old boy underwent an uncomplicated placement of an intrathecal baclofen pump for the treatment of spasticity due to cerebral palsy. After excellent control of symptoms for 3 years, the patient presented to the emergency department with increasing tremors following a refill of his baclofen pump. Initial evaluation consisted of radiographs of the pump and catheter, which appeared normal, and a successful aspiration of CSF from the pump's side port. A CT dye study revealed a portion of the catheter directly overlying the refill port and extravasation of radiopaque dye into the subfascial pocket anterior to the pump. During subsequent revision surgery, a small puncture hole in the catheter was seen to be leaking the drug. The likely cause of the puncture was an inadvertent perforation of the catheter by a needle during the refilling of the pump. This case report highlights a unique complication in a patient with an intrathecal baclofen pump. Physicians caring for these patients should be aware of this rare yet potential complication in patients presenting with baclofen withdrawal symptoms.

  20. Perineural versus intravenous dexamethasone as adjuncts to local anaesthetic brachial plexus block for shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, D M; Ivancic, M G; Hattrup, S J; Renfree, K J; Watkins, A R; Hentz, J G; Gorlin, A W; Spiro, J A; Trentman, T L

    2016-04-01

    This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the effect of perineural with intravenous dexamethasone, both administered concomitantly with interscalene brachial plexus block for shoulder surgery. Patients received 8 mg dexamethasone mixed with ropivacaine in the block injection (n = 42), 8 mg dexamethasone intravenously at the time of the block (n = 37), or intravenous saline (n = 41) at the time of the block. Perineural and intravenous dexamethasone resulted in prolonged mean (SD) duration of block to 16.9 (5.2) h and 18.2 (6.4) h, respectively, compared with 13.8 (3.8) h for saline (p = 0.001). Mean (SD) opioid consumption (morphine equivalents) during the first 24 h after postanaesthesia recovery arrival was 12.2 (9.3) mg in the perineural dexamethasone, 17.1 (15.9) mg in the intravenous dexamethasone and 24.1 (14.3) mg in the saline groups (p = 0.001). Dexamethasone via either route reduced anti-emetic use (p = 0.046). There was no effect on patient satisfaction. These results suggest that both perineural and intravenous dexamethasone are useful adjuncts to ropivacaine interscalene block, with the intravenous route preferred as this avoids the possibility of neural toxicity of dexamethasone.

  1. [Medial venous catheter or midline (MVC)].

    PubMed

    Carrero Caballero, Ma Carmen; Montealegre Sanz, María; Cubero Pérez, Ma Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Current clinical practice is characterised for importance of the patient's quality of life and the need to reduce the costs of their treatment. We search intravenous therapy alternatives that meet the needs of the patient, reducing the complications associated with the use of venous catheters. Scientific evidence shows that there are midline venous catheters that offer patients and professionals the possibility of extending the duration of infusion therapy, using more venous compatibility materials, and with less risk of infection. The Midlines are becoming in a safe an efficient device for intravenous therapy, continuous and intermittent infusion, provided the necessary care by expert nurses. Midline catheters are peripheral venous access devices between 3 to 10 inches in length (8 to 25 cm). Midlines are usually placed in an upper arm vein, such as the brachial or cephalic, and the distal extreme ends below the level of the axillary line. Midlines catheters implanted in the cephalic or deep basilica veins get more blood flow. This large blood volume justifies the lower risk of mechanical or chemical phlebitis. Midlines are routinely used for two to six weeks. Due that the extrem of these catheters does not extend beyond the axillary line, there are limitations for its use: type of infused drugs, velocity of infusion, etc. In general, solutions that have pH 5 to 9, or an osmolarity less than 500 mOsm are appropriate for infusion through a Midline. Its use is recommended in case of treatments over 7 days with low irritant capacity fluids. According to the Infusion Nurses Society's standards of practice, Midline catheters are appropriate for all intravenous fluids that would normally be administered through a short peripheral IV Importantly, due that the catheter does not pass through the central veins, Midlines can be placed without a chest X-ray to confirm placement. For certain situations, Midlines are suitable for acute units and even for care home settings

  2. New tools in diagnosing catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Blot, F; Nitenberg, G; Brun-Buisson, C

    2000-07-01

    Clinical criteria alone are insufficient to allow a diagnosis of intravascular catheter-related sepsis (CRS). A definite diagnosis of CRS usually requires removal of the catheter for quantitative catheter tip culture. However, only about 15-25% of central venous catheters (CVC) removed because infection is suspected actually prove to be infected, and the diagnosis is always retrospective. Other diagnostic tests, such as differential quantitative blood cultures from samples taken simultaneously from the catheter and a peripheral vein, have been proposed to avoid unjustified removal of the catheter and the potential risks associated with the placement of a new catheter at a new site: a central-to-peripheral blood culture colony count ratio of 5:1 to 10:1 is considered indicative of CRS. Despite its high specificity, the latter diagnostic technique is not routinely used in clinical practice because of its complexity and cost. The measurement of the differential time to positivity between hub blood (taken from the catheter port) and peripheral blood cultures might be a reliable tool facilitating the diagnosis of CRS in situ. In an in vitro study, we found a strong relationship between the inoculum size of various microorganisms and the time to positivity of cultures. When the times to positivity of cultures of blood taken simultaneously from central and peripheral veins in patients with and without CRS were examined, we found that earlier positivity of central vs peripheral vein blood cultures was highly correlated with CRS. Using a cut-off value of +120 min, the "differential time to positivity" of the paired blood samples, defined as time to positivity of the peripheral blood minus that of the hub blood culture, had 91% specificity and 94% sensitivity for the diagnosis of CRS. This method may be coupled with other techniques that have high negative predictive value, such as skin cultures at the catheter exit site. This diagnostic test can be proposed for routine

  3. [Advantages and disadvantages in the use of central venous catheters in children with malignant diseases].

    PubMed

    Sporisević, L; Hasanbegović, E; Hadzihasanović, E; Bajraktarević, A; Khatib, H; Hamamdzić, M

    1999-01-01

    The authors report the problem of central venous catheter appliance to the children with malignant diseases, employed for the first time in Bosnia and Herzegovina with the aim of pediatric oncologic patients treatment. During 1997 central venous catheter type Hickman was used in nine children between two and half to eleven years old (average six years and one months). The average time of catheter placement was six months, in two cases catheter were eliminated after two and three months respectively since application (spontaneous elimination and repeated septic attacks, caused bu resistant bacterial strains). Gram-positive bacteria have been isolated with eight children (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis), and gram-negative enterobacteriaceae (Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella oxytocia and pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Salmonella group C and Enterococcus faecalis) in samples taken from the catheter and hemoculture. The central venous catheter is useful in treating oncological patients, but may cause serious consequences, like local infections or septicaemia.

  4. Total parenteral alimentation via indwelling umbilical catheters in the newborn period.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, R T; Rhodes, P G

    1976-01-01

    Total parenteral alimentation (TPA) was delivered to 80 infants via indwelling umbilical artery and to 9 via indwelling umbilical venous catheters. The primary indication for catheter placement and maintenance was monitoring of arterial blood gases (umbilical venous catheter tip in left atrium) in a group of sick neonates requiring increased inspired oxygen or assisted ventilation. Results were compared with those from 23 infants who had tunnelled jugular catheters for a variety of chronic medical and surgical problems preventing gastric or intestinal feeding. A mean weight gain was achieved in both groups. Mortality and morbidity rates were similar in both groups. The most common complications were infection and thrombotic phenomena. Metabolic complications were few. It is concluded that infusing TPA solutions via indwelling umbilical catheters presents no greater risk than infusion via tunnelled jugular catheters, and provides a method for supplying adequate caloric intake for growth during the acute stage of illness. PMID:827978

  5. Effects of Perineural Administration of Dexmedetomidine in Combination with Levobupivacaine in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Block☆

    PubMed Central

    Ali Erdogan, Mehmet; Polat, Alaaddin; Yucel, Aytac; Aydogan, Mustafa Said; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Tekin, Suat; Durmus, Mahmut; Ozcan Ersoy, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess if perineural administration of dexmedetomidine combined with levobupivacaine increases the duration of the sensory and motor blockade of a sciatic peripheral nerve block in rats. Methods Forty male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 experimental groups: Group 1, sham; Group 2, perineural levobupivacaine (0.2 mL of a 0.5% solution) and subcutaneous saline; Group 3, perineural levobupivacaine (0.2 mL of a 0.5% solution) plus dexmedetomidine (20 µg/kg dexmedetomidine) and subcutaneous saline; Group 4, perineural saline and subcutaneous dexmedetomidine; and Group 5, perineural saline and subcutaneous saline. Pain reflexes in response to a thermal stimulus were measured at 0 and 240 minutes after drug administration by using a hot-plate and tail-flick tests. Neurobehavioral status, including sensory and motor functions, was assessed by an investigator who was blinded to the experimental groups every 30 minutes until normal functioning resumed. Results The sensory and motor blockades of the rats did not increase in the treatment with dexmedetomidine plus levobupivacaine when compared with the treatment with levobupivacaine alone at all the time points (P > 0.05). Compared with rats in Group 2, those in Group 3 showed significantly higher latency times at 30 and 60 minutes in the hot plate test (P < 0.01). At 30 and 60 minutes, the latency times of the rats in Group 3 were longer than those in Group 2 in the tail-flick test (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the durations of the complete sensory and motor blockade were similar when treatment with levobupivacaine plus dexmedetomidine was compared with treatment with levobupivacaine alone. Conclusions A 20µg/kg dose of dexmedetomidine added to levobupivacaine did not increase the duration of the sensory and motor blockades in rats. However, treatment with dexmedetomidine plus levobupivacaine increased the quality of analgesia in rats. PMID:24385106

  6. Refractory optic perineuritis due to granulomatosis with polyangiitis successfully treated with methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yoshitaka; Asako, Kurumi; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Kono, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Optic perineuritis is an uncommon inflammatory disorder of the optic sheath that causes visual loss or eye pain. There are few case reports of optic perineuritis associated with granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Herein we report the case of a 37-year-old male with granulomatosis with polyangiitis and who presented with headache, blurred vision in the right eye, diplopia, and numbness in the right forehead. Brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) findings revealed hypertrophic pachymeningitis and refractory optic perineuritis. These were manageable only by means of weekly methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil combination therapy but not with methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, intravenous cyclophosphamide, rituximab, azathioprine, or cyclosporine individually. PMID:28293459

  7. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  8. Central venous catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  9. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin care part of your daily routine. Avoid physical activity for a week or two after your catheter is placed in your bladder. Cleaning Your Skin You will need these supplies for cleaning your ...

  10. Complications associated with insertion of intrauterine pressure catheters: an unusual case of uterine hypertonicity and uterine perforation resulting in fetal distress after insertion of an intrauterine pressure catheter.

    PubMed

    Rood, Kara M

    2012-01-01

    Insertion of intrauterine pressure catheters is a routine procedure performed in labor and delivery departments, with few associated complications. There are several reports of maternal and neonatal morbidity associated with the use of intrauterine pressure catheters and their rare adverse outcomes. We report an unusual case of uterine hypertonicity resulting in fetal distress, immediately after the placement of an intrauterine pressure catheter. An emergent Cesarean section was performed for fetal distress and revealed a 5 cm vertical rent in the posterior lower uterine segment. The uterine perforation was repaired intraoperatively. Mother and infant did well and were discharged home on postoperative day four.

  11. Laparoscopic versus open peritoneal dialysis catheter insertion, the LOCI-trial: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an effective treatment for end-stage renal disease. It allows patients more freedom to perform daily activities compared to haemodialysis. Key to successful PD is the presence of a well-functioning dialysis catheter. Several complications, such as in- and outflow obstruction, peritonitis, exit-site infections, leakage and migration, can lead to catheter removal and loss of peritoneal access. Currently, different surgical techniques are in practice for PD-catheter placement. The type of insertion technique used may greatly influence the occurrence of complications. In the literature, up to 35% catheter failure has been described when using the open technique and only 13% for the laparoscopic technique. However, a well-designed randomized controlled trial is lacking. Methods/Design The LOCI-trial is a multi-center randomized controlled, single-blind trial (pilot). The study compares the laparoscopic with the open technique for PD catheter insertion. The primary objective is to determine the optimum placement technique in order to minimize the incidence of catheter malfunction at 6 weeks postoperatively. Secondary objectives are to determine the best approach to optimize catheter function and to study the quality of life at 6 months postoperatively comparing the two operative techniques. Discussion This study will generate evidence on any benefits of laparoscopic versus open PD catheter insertion. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR2878 PMID:22185091

  12. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient.

  13. Update on Insertion and Complications of Central Venous Catheters for Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bream, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are a popular choice for the initiation of hemodialysis or for bridging between different types of access. Despite this, they have many drawbacks including a high morbidity from thrombosis and infection. Advances in technology have allowed placement of these lines relatively safely, and national guidelines have been established to help prevent complications. There is an established algorithm for location and technique for placement that minimizes harm to the patient; however, there are significant short- and long-term complications that proceduralists who place catheters should be able to recognize and manage. This review covers insertion and complications of central venous catheters for hemodialysis, and the social and economic impact of the use of catheters for initiating dialysis is reviewed. PMID:27011425

  14. Peritoneal catheters and related infections.

    PubMed

    Thodis, Elias; Passadakis, Ploumis; Lyrantzopooulos, Nikolaos; Panagoutsos, Stelios; Vargemezis, Vassilis; Oreopoulos, Dimitrios

    2005-01-01

    Catheter related infectious complications (exit-site infections, tunnel infections, and peritonitis) remain the major reasons for technique failure during the three decades since, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) treatment has been first established. Despite improvements in catheter's survival rates, catheter related complications result in an increase in the cumulative patients' morbidity and often leading to the catheter removal. The ideal catheter provides reliable and rapid dialysate flow rates without leaks or infections. Among several types, the double-cuff straight Tenckhoff catheter, developed in 1968, is still the most widely used, although its use is decreasing in favour of swanneck catheters. Although there are only few well-designed trials comparing catheters and catheters related infectious complications, controlling for all other important variables, no difference in these complications among the main types of catheters was seen. The single cuff catheters have been associated with a shorter survival rate and time to the first peritonitis episode than the double-cuff catheters. Also exit-site infections were found to be more frequent and significantly more resistant to treatment with single-cuff compared to double-cuff ones. Finally, better results have been reported with the latest developed presternal peritoneal dialysis catheter both regarding survival rates and exit-site infection and peritonitis rates. Recently a renewed interest in continuous flow peritoneal dialysis stimulated inventions of imaginative, double-lumen catheters since a suitable peritoneal access is a sine qua non condition for the development of this new technique of peritoneal dialysis.

  15. Catheter-Related Mortality among ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wasse, Haimanot

    2010-01-01

    Hemodialysis access-related complications remain one of the most important sources of morbidity and cost among persons with end-stage renal disease, with total annual costs exceeding $1 billion annually. In this context, the creation and maintenance of an effective hemodialysis vascular access is essential for safe and adequate hemodialysis therapy. Multiple reports have documented the type of vascular access used for dialysis and associated risk of infection and mortality. Undoubtedly, the central venous catheter (CVC) is associated with the greatest risk of infection-related and all-cause mortality compared with the autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or synthetic graft (AVG). The AVF has the lowest risk of infection, longer patency rates, greater quality of life, and lower all-cause mortality compared with the AVG or CVC. It is for these reasons that the National Kidney Foundation’s Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Access recommend the early placement and use of the AVF among at least 50% of incident hemodialysis patients. This report presents catheter-related mortality and calls for heightened awareness of catheter-related complications. PMID:19000119

  16. The Survival Benefit of "Fistula First, Catheter Last" in Hemodialysis Is Primarily Due to Patient Factors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert S; Patibandla, Bhanu K; Goldfarb-Rumyantzev, Alexander S

    2017-02-01

    Patients needing hemodialysis are advised to have arteriovenous fistulas rather than catheters because of significantly lower mortality rates. However, disparities in fistula placement raise the possibility that patient factors have a role in this apparent mortality benefit. We derived a cohort of 115,425 patients on incident hemodialysis ≥67 years old from the US Renal Data System with linked Medicare claims to identify the first predialysis vascular access placed. We compared mortality outcomes in patients initiating hemodialysis with a fistula placed first, a catheter after a fistula placed first failed, or a catheter placed first (n=90,517; reference group). Of 21,436 patients with a fistula placed first, 9794 initiated hemodialysis with that fistula, and 8230 initiated dialysis with a catheter after failed fistula placement. The fistula group had the lowest mortality over 58 months (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.48 to 0.52; P<0.001), with mortality rates at 6, 12, and 24 months after initiation of 9%, 17%, and 31%, respectively, compared with 32%, 46%, and 62%, respectively, in the catheter group. However, the group initiating hemodialysis with a catheter after failed fistula placement also had significantly lower mortality rates than the catheter group had over 58 months (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.64 to 0.68; P<0.001), with mortality rates of 15%, 25%, and 42% at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. Thus, patient factors affecting fistula placement, even when patients are hemodialyzed with a catheter instead, may explain at least two thirds of the mortality benefit observed in patients with a fistula.

  17. Experience of Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter in Patients with Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yoshinori; Fukuta, Takanori; Maruyama, Junko; Omura, Hiromi; Tanaka, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    Objective Although use of the peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) has become increasingly common, there are few reports of PICCs used for patients with hematologic diseases. In this study, we analyzed the safety of PICC placement in patients with hematologic diseases where PICCs had been placed to perform blood collection, blood transfusion, drug administration, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods This study included 142 PICCs placed in 95 patients managed at our department from November 2013 to December 2015. The PICCs used were the GroshongⓇ Catheter (NXT single-lumen; BARD Inc.). Results A total of 95 patients underwent the placement of 142 PICCs. The mean patient age was 65.5 years. The total duration of catheterization was 8,089 days, with a mean duration of 57.0 days. Chemotherapy was administered through 107 catheters. Stem cells were injected through 12 catheters. Although a fever was observed in association with 103 catheters, it was generally controlled by antimicrobial therapy. There were 18 catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) cases, an incidence equivalent to 2.1 cases per 1,000 catheter-days. Conclusion The present study demonstrated a low CRBSI incidence rate and found no evidence of serious complications with PICC placement. PICCs can be used for blood collection, blood transfusion, drug administration, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without problems. Thus, PICC placement appears to be a safe procedure for patients with hematologic diseases. Safe catheters are therefore urgently needed for these patients. We expect that PICCs will be widely adopted in Japan in the near future. PMID:28202859

  18. Atypical Presentation of Idiopathic Bilateral Optic Perineuritis in a Young Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tevaraj, Jessica Mani Penny; Mohd-Noor, Raja-Azmi; Thavaratnam, Lakana Kumar; Salmah, Win Mar

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 27-year-old Malay male presented with acute onset of painless, severe blurring of vision in his right eye. It was associated with headache and vomiting for the past week. Relative afferent pupillary defect was present in the right eye, with reduced optic nerve function. Patient also had bilateral generalised optic disc swelling, splinter haemorrhages, and tortuous vessels. Initial examination was suggestive of either optic neuritis or raised intracranial pressure. Typical features of bilateral optic perineuritis (OPN) such as tram track and doughnut sign were observed on magnetic resonance imaging. Connective tissue and infective screening were negative. He was diagnosed with bilateral optic perineuritis and treated with high dose intravenous corticosteroids followed by a three-month course of oral steroids. His vision and optic nerve function recovered to baseline levels. PMID:28078151

  19. Perineural tumour spread from colon cancer, an unusual cause of trigeminal neuropathy - a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Kavitha; George, Thomas; El Beltagi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Malignant trigeminal neuralgia due to perineural spread along the branches of the trigeminal nerve, is known to commonly occur secondary to squamous cell carcinomas, lymphomas and adenoid cystic carcinomas in the head and neck region. Rarely metastases to the trigeminal nerve have been reported in breast cancer, prostate cancer and colon cancer. To the best of our knowledge trigeminal neuropathy due to skull base metastases and perineural spread along the maxillary (V2) and mandibular (V3) branches of the trigeminal nerve, secondary to colon cancer, has not been previously reported. The diagnosis in our index case was made on magnetic resonance imaging, and patient was treated accordingly by fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, with subsequent relief of her pain. PMID:26629299

  20. Perineural fibrous thickening within the dental pulp in type 1 neurofibromatosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Curtin, J P; McCarthy, S W

    1997-10-01

    A case of type 1 neurofibromatosis is presented that illustrates oral manifestations and their role in the diagnosis of this condition. The oral lesions may be overlooked in the diagnosis of intraoral swellings. This case documents the finding of perineural fibrous thickening within the dental pulp. Such changes may indicate pulpal involvement in neurofibromatosis and the effect of a genetically transmitted disorder upon the pulp.

  1. Risk factors for central venous catheter-related thrombosis in children: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Agarwal, Arnav; Tassone, Maria Cristina; Shahjahan, Nadia; Walton, Mark; Chan, Anthony; Mondal, Tapas

    2016-06-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) placement is associated with increased risk of thrombosis in the paediatric population, particularly in relation to the type of catheter and the manner of its insertion. Here, we investigate risk factors associated with CVC-related thrombosis in children, with particular emphasis on positioning of the catheter tip. Patients aged 0-18 who underwent at least one CVC placement from 2008 to 2013 at a single centre with a subsequent follow-up echocardiogram were included for a total of 104 patients and 147 lines. Data on clinical and catheter-related risk factors were collected from patient charts. Statistical analysis using Pearson's χ tests, independent samples t-test, and odds ratios were used to assess potential risk factors for thrombosis. Neither insertion site (subclavian vein or otherwise), left- vs. right-sided insertion, nor catheter type were significant risk factors for thrombosis. There were no thrombotic events reported at the superior vena cava (SVC)-right atrium junction and no significant differences in thrombotic risk with initial tip placement in the SVC-right atrium junction vs. the SVC, right atrium, or inferior vena cava. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was a major clinical risk factor for thrombosis. Tip movement was common and may have been an important factor in the development of CVC-related thrombi. Prospective studies can yield insight into the role of follow-up imaging in the prevention of catheter-related thrombosis in children.

  2. Role of perineural invasion as a prognostic factor in laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    MESOLELLA, MASSIMO; IORIO, BRIGIDA; MISSO, GABRIELLA; LUCE, AMALIA; CIMMINO, MARIANO; IENGO, MAURIZIO; LANDI, MARIO; SPERLONGANO, PASQUALE; CARAGLIA, MICHELE; RICCIARDIELLO, FILIPPO

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of laryngeal cancer cells in the perineural space is a parameter associated with a negative prognosis, high loco-regional recurrence and low disease-free survival rates. The spread of tumor cells on the perineural sheath highlights the histopathological and clinically aggressive behavior of this type of tumor, which may extend proximally or distally in the nerve for >10 cm. Therefore, the surgical resection margin is generally insufficient to treat patients with laryngeal cancer presenting with perineural invasion (PNI) with surgery alone. In PNI, the minor laryngeal nerves are frequently involved, rather than the superior and inferior laryngeal nerves. The aim of the present study was: i) To evaluate the prognostic importance of PNI; ii) to correlate the rate of infiltration with factors associated with the tumor, including histotype, site and tumor-node-metastasis stage, and with the type of surgery (total or partial laryngectomy); and iii) to evaluate the rate of disease-free survival according to the outcome of combined surgery and radiotherapy (RT) treatment, by means of retrospective analysis. The results of the present study highlighted the importance of performing a closer clinical and instrumental follow-up in patients with laryngeal cancer whose histopathological examination is positive for PNI. In such cases, it is important to complement the surgical therapeutic treatment with adjuvant RT. PMID:27073523

  3. Novel polysaccharide-derived hydrogel prevents perineural adhesions in a rat model of sciatic nerve adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Michiro; Endo, Nobuyuki; Ito, Masaya; Okui, Nobuyuki; Koh, Shukuki; Kaneko, Hiroaki; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the effects of a novel carboxymethylcellulose (CMC)-derived hydrogel, in which phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was introduced into the carboxyl groups of CMC, for preventing perineural adhesion after extensive internal neurolysis of rat sciatic nerve. Sciatic nerves were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: the Control group, operated but no treatment; the HA group, operated and treated with 1% hyaluronan; the CMC-PE(L) group, operated and treated with low-viscosity CMC-PE hydrogel; and the CMC-PE(H) group, operated and treated with high-viscosity CMC-PE hydrogel. Perineural adhesions were evaluated at 6 weeks. Nerves were also subjected to biomechanical testing to assess ultimate breaking strength. Electrophysiological and wet muscle weight measurements were performed. Breaking strengths were significantly lower for the CMC-PE(L) group than for the Control and HA groups. Latency was significantly longer for the Control group than for the CMC-PE(L) group at 20 days. The mean percentage of wet muscle weight to body weight was significantly lower for the Control group than for the CMC-PE(L) group at 6 weeks. Low-viscosity CMC-PE hydrogel appears to prevent perineural adhesions and allow early restoration of nerve function.

  4. Central Venous Catheter Intravascular Malpositioning: Causes, Prevention, Diagnosis, and Correction.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Carlos J; Paniagua, Linda

    2015-09-01

    Despite the level of skill of the operator and the use of ultrasound guidance, central venous catheter (CVC) placement can result in CVC malpositioning, an unintended placement of the catheter tip in an inadequate vessel. CVC malpositioning is not a complication of central line insertion; however, undiagnosed CVC malpositioning can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this review were to describe factors associated with intravascular malpositioning of CVCs inserted via the neck and chest and to offer ways of preventing, identifying, and correcting such malpositioning. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and MD Consult was performed in June 2014. By searching for "Central line malposition" and then for "Central venous catheters intravascular malposition," we found 178 articles written in English. Of those, we found that 39 were relevant to our objectives and included them in our review. According to those articles, intravascular CVC malpositioning is associated with the presence of congenital and acquired anatomical variants, catheter insertion in left thoracic venous system, inappropriate bevel orientation upon needle insertion, and patient's body habitus variants. Although plain chest radiography is the standard imaging modality for confirming catheter tip location, signs and symptoms of CVC malpositioning even in presence of normal or inconclusive conventional radiography findings should prompt the use of additional diagnostic methods to confirm or rule out CVC malpositioning. With very few exceptions, the recommendation in cases of intravascular CVC malpositioning is to remove and relocate the catheter. Knowing the mechanisms of CVC malpositioning and how to prevent, identify, and correct CVC malpositioning could decrease harm to patients with this condition.

  5. Catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Tracie A

    2009-06-01

    Tunneled, cuffed, double-lumen catheters are commonly used for long-term venous access in hemodialysis patients. Complications of these catheters, including catheter-related infection, are a major cause of morbidity and resource utilization in the hemodialysis population. Treatment of catheter-related bloodstream infections includes the use of antibiotics and evaluation of the need for catheter removal or exchange. Measures to prevent catheter-related infections include use of an aseptic technique and antiseptic cleaning solution, elimination of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage, topical exit site application of antibiotics, use of antibiotic lock solutions, and use of catheters and cuffs coated or impregnated with antimicrobial or antiseptic agents. This review article will provide an update on the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of catheter-related infections in the hemodialysis population.

  6. Balloon Catheter Prevents Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginson, Gregory A.; Bouffard, Marc R.; Hoehicke, Beth S.; King, Bradley D.; Peterson, Sandra L.

    1994-01-01

    Balloon catheter similar to that used in such medical procedures as angioplasty and heart surgery protects small orifices against contamination and blockage by chips generated in machining operations. Includes small, inflatable balloon at end of thin, flexible tube. Contains additional features adapting it to anticontamination service: balloon larger to fit wider channel it must block; made of polyurethane (rather than latex), which does not fragment if bursts; material made thicker to resist abrasion better; and kink-resistant axial wire helps catheter negotiate tight bends.

  7. Malignant ascites in patients with terminal cancer is effectively treated with permanent peritoneal catheter

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Frank V.; Madsen, Hans Henrik Torp

    2015-01-01

    Background Malignant ascites is a pathological condition caused by intra- or extra-abdominal disseminated cancer. The object of treatment is palliation. In search of an effective and minimally invasive palliative treatment of malignant ascites placement of a permanent intra peritoneal catheter has been suggested. Purpose To evaluate our experiences with treatment of malignant ascites by implantation of a permanent PleurX catheter. Material and Methods A retrospective study was conducted, comprising 20 consecutive patients with terminal cancer, who had a permanent PleurX catheter implanted because of malignant ascites in the period from February to November 2014. Using the patients’ medical records, we retrieved data on patients and procedures. Results The technical success rate was 100%. Catheter patency was 95.2%, one catheter was removed due to dislocation. Ten patients (50.0%) experienced minor adverse events. No procedural difficulties were reported and there was no need for additional treatment of malignant ascites after catheter implantation. Median residual survival after catheter implantation was 27 days. Conclusion Implantation of a permanent PleurX catheter is a minimally invasive and effective procedure with only minor adverse events and a high rate of catheter patency in patients with malignant ascites caused by terminal cancer disease. PMID:26346641

  8. Multiple Coaxial Catheter System for Reliable Access in Interventional Stroke Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcsar, Zsolt Yilmaz, Hasan; Bonvin, Christophe; Lovblad, Karl O.; Ruefenacht, Daniel A.

    2010-12-15

    In some patients with acute cerebral vessel occlusion, navigating mechanical thrombectomy systems is difficult due to tortuous anatomy of the aortic arch, carotid arteries, or vertebral arteries. Our purpose was to describe a multiple coaxial catheter system used for mechanical revascularization that helps navigation and manipulations in tortuous vessels. A triple or quadruple coaxial catheter system was built in 28 consecutive cases presenting with acute ischemic stroke. All cases were treated by mechanical thrombectomy with the Penumbra System. In cases of unsuccessful thrombo-aspiration, additional thrombolysis or angioplasty with stent placement was used for improving recanalization. The catheter system consisted of an outermost 8-Fr and an intermediate 6-Fr guiding catheter, containing the inner Penumbra reperfusion catheters. The largest, 4.1-Fr, reperfusion catheter was navigated over a Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. The catheter system provided access to reach the cerebral lesions and provided stability for the mechanically demanding manipulations of thromboaspiration and stent navigation in all cases. Apart from their mechanical role, the specific parts of the system could also provide access to different types of interventions, like carotid stenting through the 8-Fr guiding catheter and intracranial stenting and thrombolysis through the Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. In this series, there were no complications related to the catheter system. In conclusion, building up a triple or quadruple coaxial system proved to be safe and efficient in our experience for the mechanical thrombectomy treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  9. A Placement Advisory Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The primary method of placement at Portland CC (PCC) is the Compass Placement test. For the most part, students are placed correctly, but there are cases when students feel that they have been placed too low. In such cases we use our newly created Placement Advisory Test (PAT) to help us place them appropriately. (Contains 2 figures.)

  10. Catheter-associated UTI

    MedlinePlus

    ... UTI; Health care-associated UTI; Catheter-associated bacteriuria; Hospital acquired-UTI Images Bladder catheterization, female Bladder catheterization, male References Calfee DP. Prevention and control of health care-associated infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  11. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... area around your catheter every day with mild soap and water. Gently pat it dry. Showers are fine. Ask your providers about bathtubs, swimming pools, and hot tubs. DO NOT use creams, powders, or sprays near the site. Apply bandages around ...

  12. Transcortical Transventricular Endoscopic Approach and Ommaya Reservoir Placement for Cystic Craniopharyngioma.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Dhaval

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of craniopharyngioma is varied. It ranges from radical excision to direct radiotherapy. As the morbidity of excision is high, more conservative approaches are used. Placement of a catheter and reservoir is one such option for cystic craniopharyngiomas. The positioning of catheters has been performed by various means. A method of endoscopic reservoir catheter placement is described. Three children with ages ranging from 5 to 12 years presented with clinical features of raised intracranial pressure. They did not have vision impairment. Imaging showed a predominantly cystic craniopharyngioma extending into the third ventricle with hydrocephalus. All underwent precoronal burr hole, transcortical transventricular endoscopic biopsy of craniopharyngioma, and Ommaya reservoir placement. There were no complications. All children did well after surgery and did not require further cyst aspiration.

  13. The Swan-Ganz catheters: past, present, and future. A viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kanu

    2009-01-06

    The Swan-Ganz balloon flotation catheter was introduced in 1970. It can be placed at the bedside within a few minutes even in critically ill patients. Although placement of these catheters is not difficult, some training and experience are required to avoid complications and for proper interpretation of the hemodynamic data that can be obtained by pulmonary artery catheterization. Because of the many advantages of balloon flotation catheters compared with conventional catheters, they have been used without a proper indication and frequently overused in critical care units, resulting in many complications, including mortality. The prospective randomized trials have reported that in the majority of clinical circumstances, the routine use of balloon flotation catheters is not indicated. These results are not surprising because balloon flotation catheters are diagnostic and not therapeutic tools. That we have learned a great deal about hemodynamics in critically ill patients with the use of balloon flotation catheters should not be ignored or forgotten. Furthermore, our clinical knowledge of hemodynamics has been made possible because of extensive experience gained from directly determined hemodynamics with the use of balloon flotation catheters. It should also be realized that despite the introduction and refinement of newer noninvasive imaging modalities, a number of clinical circumstances exist in which determination of hemodynamics with the use of a balloon flotation catheter is necessary and should be considered, but only by experienced physicians. With the proper use of Swan-Ganz catheters, our knowledge of hemodynamics has been enhanced considerably. Its abuse, particularly by relatively inexperienced operators, has resulted in serious complications, including death. Prospective randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that the routine use of Swan-Ganz catheters does not provide any benefit. However, use of the Swan-Ganz catheter is still indicated in many

  14. Abduction of Arm Facilitates Correction of Kinked Peel-Away Sheath During Subclavian Central Line Placement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghoon

    2015-12-01

    A tunneled central line catheter placement using a subclavian vein approach can be complicated by an occurrence of peel-away sheath kink which prevents the advancement of the catheter through the sheath. The kink is created due to the angular junction of subclavian and brachiocephalic veins which meet at 90 degree angle. A technique is described which corrects the peel-away sheath kink by extending the subclavian/brachiocephalic vein angle to greater than 90 degrees by abducting the patient's arm.

  15. Perspective on the management of catheter-related infections in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hiemenz, J; Skelton, J; Pizzo, P A

    1986-01-01

    The risk of infectious complications ranges from 9 to 80% depending on patient population and definition of catheter-related infection. In the vast majority of these patients, those infections can be treated successfully without catheter removal. The major exceptions to this guideline are patients with significant exit site or tunnel infections or with fungal isolates. Because the majority of those infections are caused by Gram-positive organisms such as S. epidermidis or S. aureus that have variable sensitivities to the antistaphylococcal penicillins, intravenous vancomycin along with gentamicin should be administered empirically until culture results are available. It appears to be unnecessary to remove the Silastic catheter automatically just because the patient is febrile, particularly if there is no microbiological evidence that the catheter is the source of the fever. Quantitative blood cultures drawn through the catheter and from a peripheral vein may lead to a better understanding of the role the catheter plays in the septic episodes in these patients but has yet to be definitive in identifying patients who absolutely require catheter removal to cure their infection. Surveillance cultures have not proved helpful in defining an "at risk" group for catheter-related infection and, due to cost and possible added risk of inducing an infectious complication, should not be routinely performed outside of an investigational setting. Instruction of patients in proper catheter care both before and after placement is of critical importance. To date there is no proved standard of catheter care and maintenance. There is a need for careful investigation in this area. We recommend that routine handling of the catheter be done with aseptic technique, which usually requires use of Betadine swabs when manipulating the catheter tip and use of a sterile dressing (e.g. E. Med IV Strip) or Op-Site (a transparent occlusive dressing) at the exit site. Continued dressings with

  16. Ultrasound guidance for distal insertion of ventriculo-atrial shunt catheters: technical note.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Sameer A; McGirt, Matthew; Woodworth, Graeme; Wang, Paul; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2009-04-01

    Ventriculo-atrial (VA) shunts are often used for CSF diversion in situations involving abdominal pathology that preclude the use of ventriculo-peritoneal shunts. Distal (venous) catheters of VA shunts have historically been inserted using a cut-down on the internal jugular vein (IJV). Less invasive placement of atrial catheters may minimize operative times and attenuate post-operative incisional discomfort. We describe a method for atrial catheter placement using ultrasound guidance to visualize the IJV and facilitate percutaneous venous puncture in 17 adult patients (23 total insertions) undergoing treatment for hydrocephalus or pseudotumor cerebri. The IJV and carotid artery were visualized by ultrasound in 23 (100%) cases. Venous penetration and successful atrial catheter placement was achieved on the first attempt in 23 (100%) cases. Pneumothorax, carotid artery puncture or need for venous cut-down occurred in no cases. The utilization of ultrasound guidance for distal VA shunt catheter insertion may increase comfort with this procedure and ultimately decrease complication rate and operative time.

  17. Perineural Injection for Treatment of Root-Signature Signs Associated with Lateralized Disk Material in Five Dogs (2009–2013)

    PubMed Central

    Giambuzzi, Sarah; Pancotto, Theresa; Ruth, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disk disease (IVDD) is common in dogs; cervical IVDD accounts for 13–25% of all cases. Ventral slot decompression provides access to ventral and centrally extruded or protruded disk material. However, procedures to remove dorsally or laterally displaced material are more difficult. This case series describes the use of perineural injection as a potential treatment option for dogs experiencing root-signature signs associated with lateralized disk material in the cervical spine. Five dogs underwent fluoroscopically guided perineural injection of methylprednisolone ± bupivacaine. Most patients experienced improvement in root-signature signs and remained pain free without the assistance of oral pain medication. These findings suggest the perineural injection of methylprednisolone ± bupivacaine represents a viable option for dogs with cervical lateralized disk material causing root-signature signs. PMID:26858952

  18. Neurotoxicity of perineural vs intraneural-extrafascicular injection of liposomal bupivacaine in the porcine model of sciatic nerve block.

    PubMed

    Damjanovska, M; Cvetko, E; Hadzic, A; Seliskar, A; Plavec, T; Mis, K; Vuckovic Hasanbegovic, I; Stopar Pintaric, T

    2015-12-01

    Liposomal bupivacaine is a prolonged-release local anaesthetic, the neurotoxicity of which has not yet been determined. We used quantitative histomorphometric and immunohistochemical analyses to evaluate the neurotoxic effect of liposomal bupivacaine after perineural and intraneural (extrafascicular) injection of the sciatic nerve in pigs. In this double-blind prospective randomised trial, 4 ml liposomal bupivacaine 1.3% was injected either perineurally (n = 5) or intraneurally extrafascicularly (n = 5). Intraneural-extrafascicular injection of saline (n = 5) was used as a control. After emergence from anaesthesia, neurological examinations were conducted over two weeks. After harvesting the sciatic nerves, no changes in nerve fibre density or myelin width indicative of nerve injury were observed in any of the groups. Intraneural injections resulted in longer sensory blockade than perineural (p < 0.003) without persistent motor or sensory deficit. Sciatic nerve block with liposomal bupivacaine in pigs did not result in histological evidence of nerve injury.

  19. Knowledge Level on Administration of Chemotherapy through Peripheral and Central Venous Catheter among Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Kapucu, Sevgisun; Özkaraman, Ayşe Özaydın; Uysal, Neşe; Bagcivan, Gulcan; Şeref, Ferhan Çetin; Elöz, Aygül

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the knowledge levels of oncology nurses about peripheral and central venous catheter during their chemotherapy administration. Methods: Data collection of this descriptive study was started on April 15, 2015–July 15, 2015. The data presented in this summary belong to 165 nurses. Data were collected with data collection form including questions related to sociodemographic qualifications and knowledge levels of nurses. Data collection forms were E-mailed to the members of Turkish Oncology Nursing Society. Data presented with numbers, percentages, and mean ± standard deviation. Results: The mean age of nurses was 33.60 ± 7.34 years and mean duration for oncology nursing experience was 2.65 ± 0.91 years. Nurses had correct information about the importance of selecting peripheral venous catheter and choosing the placement area for chemotherapy administration (63.6%), control of catheter before the administration (93.9%), influence of chemotherapeutic agent on length of catheter (40.6%), and management of extravasation (75.7%). Nurses also had correct information about the first use of port catheter (67.3%) and checking the catheter whether it is working properly or not (75.8%). Conclusions: In General, nurses’ level of knowledge related to catheter is 50% and higher. It is recommended to increase the knowledge of nurses about evidence-based information for catheter care as a step to safe chemotherapy practice. PMID:28217732

  20. [Recurrent Hiccups Caused by Malposition of the Peritoneal Catheter of a Lumboperitoneal Shunt: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuya; Nakajima, Yoshio; Tokuda, Kazuhiko; Kidani, Ryuichi

    2016-02-01

    A number of rare and unpredictable shunt-related complications after shunt placement to treat hydrocephalus have been described. Here a 78-year-old man who underwent lumboperitoneal (LP) shunt placement presented postoperatively with recurrent hiccups. Abdominal radiography and computed tomography performed at 7 days postoperative revealed that a peritoneal catheter had migrated into the upper abdominal cavity and contacted the diaphragm. The patient underwent LP shunt revision, during which the catheter was pulled back and repositioned within the lower abdominal cavity. The hiccups ceased completely. To our knowledge, the only other report of a similar complication was published in the 1980s. Here we describe a case in which a peritoneal catheter from an LP shunt migrated into the upper abdominal cavity and irritated the diaphragm, causing recurrent hiccups.

  1. The Pigtail Catheter for Pleural Drainage: A Less Invasive Alternative to Tube Thoracostomy

    PubMed Central

    Gammie, James S.; Banks, Michael C.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Pham, Si M.; Griffith, Bartley p.; Keenan, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Background: Tube thoracostomy remains the standard of care for the treatment of pneumothoraces and simple effusions. This report describes a favorable experience with the 8.3 French pigtail catheter as a less invasive alternative to traditional chest tube insertion. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 109 consecutive pigtail catheter placements. Catheters were inserted under local anesthesia at the bedside without radiographie guidance. Pre- and post-insertion chest radiographs were reviewed to determine efficacy of drainage. Results: Fifty-one of 109 patients (47%) were mechanically ventilated and 26 patients (24%) had a coagulopathy. There were no complications related to pigtail catheter insertion. Seventy-seven pigtail catheters were placed for pleural effusion and 32 for pneumothorax. Mean effusion volume decreased from 43 to 9 percent, and drainage averaged 2899 ml over 97 hours. Mean pneumothorax size diminished from 38 to 1 percent during an average 71-hour placement. Clinical success rates in the effusion and pneumothorax groups were 86 and 81 percent, respectively. Conclusion: The pigtail catheter offers reliable treatment of pneumothoraces and simple effusions and is a safe and less invasive alternative to tube thoracostomy. PMID:10323171

  2. [Rotational stability of angiography catheters].

    PubMed

    Schröder, J; Weber, M

    1992-10-01

    Rotatory stability is a parameter that reflects the ability of a catheter to transmit a rotation applied at the outer end to the catheter tip for the purpose of selective probing. A method for measuring the rotatory stability is described, and the results of rotatory stability measurements of 70 different commercially available catheters are reported. There is an almost linear correlation between the rotatory stability and the difference between the respective fourth power of the external and internal diameter or, approximately, to the fourth power of the external diameter for catheters without wire reinforcement. With the same cross-sectional dimensions, the rotatory stability of teflon, polyethylene, and nylon catheters has an approximate ratio of 1:2:4. Wire reinforcement increases rotatory stability by an average factor of about 3. For catheters of calibers 5 F and 6 F, a correlation between the rotatory stability and the weight of the reinforcing wire mesh is apparent.

  3. Evaluation of the association between perineural invasion and clinical and histopathological features of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, You-Sheng; Yao, De-Sheng; Long, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) has been investigated as a new prognostic factor in a number of carcinomas. However, studies on PNI in cervical cancer are limited, and inconsistent conclusions have been reported by different groups. The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between perineural invasion (PNI) and clinical and histopathological features of cervical cancer, and to evaluate the clinical significance of PNI of cervical cancer. Retrospective review identified 206 patients with cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy between December 2012 and August 2014. The association between PNI and clinical and histopathological features of cervical cancer and post-operative radiotherapy was evaluated based on univariate and multivariate analyses. PNI of cervical cancer was identified in 33 of 206 (16%) cervical cancer patients. Univariate analysis demonstrated that PNI was associated with clinical stage, tumor grade, tumor size, depth of invasion, lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI), and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05), but not associated with age and histopathological types (P>0.05). Multivariate analysis suggests that LVSI and lymph node metastasis were associated with PNI of cervical cancer (P<0.05). In addition, post-operative radiotherapy was significantly more recommended for patients with PNI than those without PNI (P<0.001). In conclusion, PNI of cervical cancer is associated with LVSI and lymph node metastasis and can be used as an index for the determination of post-operative radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients.

  4. Intracranial hypotension in the setting of concurrent perineural cyst rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Walavan; Ravindra, Vijay M; Cutler, Aaron; Couldwell, William T

    2014-06-01

    Although most patients with intracranial hypotension typically present with headaches, the rest of the clinical spectrum is characteristically non-specific and often quite variable. In a patient with concurrent pathologies that can produce a similar clinical picture, a high index of suspicion must be maintained to achieve the correct diagnosis. The authors report a patient with intracranial hypotension in the setting of concurrent perineural cyst rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 63-year-old woman with a family history of ruptured intracranial aneurysms presented after a sudden thunderclap headache and was found to have diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage. Imaging revealed anterior communicating and superior hypophyseal artery aneurysms. Following the uneventful clipping of both aneurysms, the patient experienced a delayed return to her neurological baseline. After it was noted that the patient had an improved neurological examination when she was placed supine, further investigation confirmed intracranial hypotension from perineural cyst rupture. The patient improved and returned to her neurological baseline after undergoing a high-volume blood patch and remained neurologically intact at postoperative follow-up. Although intracranial hypotension is known to be commonly associated with cerebrospinal fluid leak, its causal and temporal relationship with subarachnoid hemorrhage has yet to be elucidated.

  5. Architectural Analyses and Developments of 1 mm Diameter Micro Forceps for Catheter Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokata, Makoto; Hashimoto, Yusuke; Obayashi, Takumi

    Blockage in a blood vessel due to cardiovascular disease such as arteriosclerosis or aneurysms requires minimally invasive placement of a mesh tube or platinum coil stent via a catheter to open the affected area. Stents are positioned using a guide wire via a catheter, but the stent may be dropped on the way to its destination and requires much time in surgery, increasing the burden on the patient. Medical apparatuses are thus desired having a mechanism to grasp artifacts securely in blood vessels. We designed prototype microforceps for use on the end of a catheter for grasping operation in blood vessels and to contribute to medical apparatuses in this field. The microforceps we designed using a minimum number of parts uses metal injection molding (MIM) to realize strong mass production. Microforceps installed in the tip of a catheter. Stress analysis verified its capability to grasp, bend and turn within the confines of a blood vessels model.

  6. Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Meddings, Jennifer; Rogers, Mary A M; Krein, Sarah L; Fakih, Mohamad G; Olmsted, Russell N; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are costly, common and often preventable by reducing unnecessary urinary catheter (UC) use. Methods To summarise interventions to reduce UC use and CAUTIs, we updated a prior systematic review (through October 2012), and a meta-analysis regarding interventions prompting UC removal by reminders or stop orders. A narrative review summarises other CAUTI prevention strategies including aseptic insertion, catheter maintenance, antimicrobial UCs, and bladder bundle implementation. Results 30 studies were identified and summarised with interventions to prompt removal of UCs, with potential for inclusion in the meta-analyses. By meta-analysis (11 studies), the rate of CAUTI (episodes per 1000 catheter-days) was reduced by 53% (rate ratio 0.47; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.64, p<0.001) using a reminder or stop order, with five studies also including interventions to decrease initial UC placement. The pooled (nine studies) standardised mean difference (SMD) in catheterisation duration (days) was −1.06 overall (p=0.065) including a statistically significant decrease in stop-order studies (SMD −0.37; p<0.001) but not in reminder studies (SMD, −1.54; p=0.071). No significant harm from catheter removal strategies is supported. Limited research is available regarding the impact of UC insertion and maintenance technique. A recent randomised controlled trial indicates antimicrobial catheters provide no significant benefit in preventing symptomatic CAUTIs. Conclusions UC reminders and stop orders appear to reduce CAUTI rates and should be used to improve patient safety. Several evidence-based guidelines have evaluated CAUTI preventive strategies as well as emerging evidence regarding intervention bundles. Implementation strategies are important because reducing UC use involves changing well-established habits. PMID:24077850

  7. Intensivist supervision of resident-placed central venous catheters decreases the incidence of catheter-related blood stream infections.

    PubMed

    Papadimos, Thomas J; Hensely, Sandra J; Duggan, Joan M; Hofmann, James P; Khuder, Sadik A; Borst, Marilyn J; Fath, John J

    2008-04-30

    Catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI) cause significant morbidity and mortality. A retrospective study of a performance improvement project in our teaching hospital's surgical intensive care unit (SICU) showed that intensivist supervision was important in reinforcing maximal sterile barriers (MSB) use during the placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) in the prevention of CRBSI. A historical control period, 1 January 2001-31 December 2003, was established for comparison. From 1 January 2003-31 December 2007, MSB use for central venous line placement was mandated for all operators. However, in 2003 there was no intensivist supervision of CVC placements in the SICU. The use of MSB alone did not cause a significant change in the CRBSI rate in the first year of the project, but close supervision by an intensivist in years 2004-2007, in conjunction with MSB use, demonstrated a significant drop in the CRBSI rate when compared to the years before intensivist supervision (2001-2003), p < .0001. A time series analysis comparing monthly rates of CRBSI (2001-2007) also revealed a significant downward trend, p = .028. Additionally, in the first year of the mandated MSB use (2003), 85 independently observed resident-placed CVCs demonstrated that breaks in sterile technique (34/85), as compared those placements that had no breaks in technique (51/85), had more CRBSI, 6/34 (17.6%) vs. 1/51 (1.9%), p < .01. Interventions to reduce CRBSI in our SICU needed emphasis on adequate supervision of trainees in CVC placement, in addition to use of MSB, to effect lower CRBSI rates.

  8. Percutaneous Fibrin Gel Injection under C-Arm Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Minimally Invasive Choice for Symptomatic Sacral Perineural Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Qiu, QuanHe; Hao, Jie; Zhang, XiaoJun; Shui, Wei; Hu, ZhenMing

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are a common cause of chronic pain. Surgery is one choice for symptom relief but has a high risk of cyst recurrence and complications. As a simple and safe method to manage symptomatic sacral perineural cysts, C-arm fluoroscopy-guided fibrin gel injection may represent a new minimally invasive alternative. To evaluate the efficacy of this new method, we conducted a retrospective study of 42 patients. Methods and Findings From June 2009 to August 2012, a total of 42 patients with symptomatic sacral perineural cysts underwent C-arm fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous fibrin gel injection therapy. Patient outcomes in terms of improvements in pain and neurologic function were evaluated during a follow-up period of 13–39 months. The preoperative and postoperative pain severity were assessed according to a 10-cm visual analog pain scale, and imaging changes were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. We also assessed postoperative complications. Most patients experienced benefit from the procedure: twenty-five patients (59.5%) reported excellent recovery, eleven (26.2%) reported good recovery, three (7.1%) reported fair recovery, and three (7.1%) reported poor recovery. The overall effectiveness rate (excellent and good recoveries) was 85.7%. No serious postoperative complications were observed. Conclusion Percutaneous fibrin gel injection under C-arm fluoroscopy guidance could be a simple, safe and effective treatment option for symptomatic sacral perineural cysts. PMID:25706639

  9. Combined approaches to the skull base for intracranial extension of tumors via perineural spread can improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Palejwala, Sheri K; Barry, Jonnae Y; Rodriguez, Crystal N; Parikh, Chandni A; Goldstein, Stephen A; Lemole, G Michael

    2016-11-01

    Many neoplasms of the head and neck extend centripetally, gaining access to the central nervous system via nerves through the skull base foramina. Often patients with perineural spread have been excluded from aggressive interventions given the overall poor prognosis and technical difficulty when addressing the perineural components. However, in carefully selected patients combined surgical approaches can provide the greatest potential for disease control as well as neural decompression for symptom relief. We performed a retrospective chart review of 20 consecutive patients who underwent skull base approaches for resection of tumors with intracranial extension via perineural spread from 2011 to 2014. Patients were evaluated for symptom change, surgical approaches, histopathology, adjuvant therapy, outcome, and prognosis. The most common presenting symptoms were pain or cranial nerve palsies. 55% of patients underwent endoscopic endonasal approaches, 50% transcranial approaches, and 15% underwent transfacial approaches. Overall 85% of patients reported symptom improvement in the post-operative period while 40% were completely asymptomatic following surgical resection. Ultimately, we observed a 45% mortality rate with an average survival of 8 months after diagnosis. In carefully selected patients, an aggressive multidisciplinary approach using a combination of surgical avenues to the skull base for the treatment of intracranial tumor via perineural extension can improve patient quality of life.

  10. The effects of free fat grafts on the stiffness of the rat sciatic nerve and perineural scar.

    PubMed

    Dumanian, G A; McClinton, M A; Brushart, T M

    1999-01-01

    We developed a new quantitative rat sciatic nerve model to test whether free fat grafts can reduce postoperative perineural scar formation. Epineurectomies of sciatic nerves were performed to create scar. The force required to distract the nerve a unit distance was measured after surgery to determine the time of maximal scar formation. Nerve stiffness normalized for rat weight was statistically greater at 2 months after the initial dissection (0.097+/-0.009 g/mm/g rat weight; n = 10 limbs) than rat limbs that had not undergone a previous dissection (0.075+/-0.012 g/mm/g rat weight). Perineural scar thickness was thicker at 2 months than the perineural tissue in preoperative controls. Free fat grafts decreased nerve stiffness at 2 months (0.078+/-0.012 g/mm/g rat weight) in comparison to the contralateral surgical control limb without a fat graft (0.094+/-0.014 g/mm/g rat weight). Free fat grafts reduced the strength of postoperative perineural scar in this surgical model; however, they were associated with an unexpected finding of substantial postoperative neuropathy.

  11. Three-dimensional volume-rendered multidetector CT imaging of the posterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery: its anatomy and role in diagnosing extrapancreatic perineural invasion

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Craig; Brooke Jeffrey, R.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Olcott, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Extrapancreatic perineural spread in pancreatic adenocarcinoma contributes to poor outcomes, as it is known to be a major contributor to positive surgical margins and disease recurrence. However, current staging classifications have not yet taken extrapancreatic perineural spread into account. Four pathways of extrapancreatic perineural spread have been described that conveniently follow small defined arterial pathways. Small field of view three-dimensional (3D) volume-rendered multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images allow visualization of small peripancreatic vessels and thus perineural invasion that may be associated with them. One such vessel, the posterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (PIPDA), serves as a surrogate for extrapancreatic perineural spread by pancreatic adenocarcinoma arising in the uncinate process. This pictorial review presents the normal and variant anatomy of the PIPDA with 3D volume-rendered MDCT imaging, and emphasizes its role as a vascular landmark for the diagnosis of extrapancreatic perineural invasion from uncinate adenocarcinomas. Familiarity with the anatomy of PIPDA will allow accurate detection of extrapancreatic perineural spread by pancreatic adenocarcinoma involving the uncinate process, and may potentially have important staging implications as neoadjuvant therapy improves. PMID:24434918

  12. Ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of pelvic collections.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Anuj; Sundareyan, Ramaniwas; Kumar, Sheo; Arora, Divya

    2015-01-01

    The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain intra-abdominal collections not reached by the transabdominal approach. We discuss 6 patients with such pelvic collections treated with transrectal drainage using catheter placement via Seldinger technique. Transrectal drainage helped achieve clinical and radiological resolution of pelvic collections in 6 and 5 of 6 cases, respectively. It simultaneously helped avoid injury to intervening bowel loops and neurovascular structures using real-time visualization of armamentarium used for drainage. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopic/CT guidance was avoided. Morbidity and costs incurred in surgical exploration were reduced using this much less invasive ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of deep-seated pelvic collections.

  13. We still go for the jugular: implications of the 3SITES central venous catheter study for nephrology.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M; Vassalotti, Joseph A

    2016-03-01

    The 3SITES study randomly assigned a nontunneled central venous catheter site in over 3000 adults treated in intensive care units. The subclavian site was associated with a lower rate of short-term complications, including catheter-related bloodstream infection and deep venous thrombosis, compared to the femoral or internal jugular site. Nephrologists should be aware of this study and should continue to advocate for alternatives to subclavian vein catheter placement in patients with chronic kidney disease who are expected to require arteriovenous access for dialysis in the future.

  14. Balloon-assisted guide catheter positioning to overcome extreme cervical carotid tortuosity: technique and case experience

    PubMed Central

    Peeling, Lissa; Fiorella, David

    2014-01-01

    Background and significance We describe a method by which to efficiently and atraumatically achieve distal positioning of a flexible guiding catheter beyond extreme cervical tortuosity using a hypercompliant temporary occlusion balloon. Methods A retrospective review of a prospective neuroendovascular database was used to identify cases in which a hypercompliant balloon catheter (Hyperform or Hyperglide, ev3/Covidien, Irvine, California, USA; Scepter or Scepter XC, Alisa Viejo, California, USA) was used to achieve distal positioning of a flexible guiding catheter (Navion, ev3/Covidien, Irvine, California, USA; Neuron, Penumbra Inc, Alameda, California, USA). After achieving a stable guiding sheath position within the proximal cervical carotid artery, a hypercompliant balloon catheter was manipulated beyond the tortuous cervical internal carotid segment into the distal carotid artery. The balloon was then inflated to anchor it distally within an intracranial (cavernous or petrous) segment of the internal carotid artery. The guiding catheter was then advanced beyond the tortuous cervical segment, over the balloon catheter, as gentle counter traction was applied to the balloon. Results Balloon-assisted guiding catheter placement was used to perform endovascular treatments of 12 anterior circulation aneurysms. One patient underwent coiling alone. Five patients underwent balloon-assisted coiling. One patient underwent balloon and stent assisted coil embolization. Four patients with five carotid aneurysms (one with bilateral carotid aneurysms) underwent vascular reconstruction with the pipeline embolization device. All patients had severe tortuosity of the extracranial carotid system. Three patients had findings consistent with cervical carotid fibromuscular dysplasia. The technique was successful each time it was attempted. No parent artery dissections or catheter induced vasospam were noted in any case. Discussion Hypercompliant balloon catheters can be reliably used

  15. Transhepatic central venous catheter for long-term access in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Mortell, Alan; Said, Hanan; Doodnath, Reshma; Walsh, Kevin; Corbally, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Vascular access in paediatric patients with chronic and/or life-threatening illness is crucial to survival. Access is frequently lost in this group because of thrombosis, infection, or displacement, and vascular options can quickly be exhausted. The last resort access procedure is generally a direct atrial catheter inserted via a thoracotomy. A viable alternative is the percutaneous transhepatic Broviac catheter (Bard Access Systems, Salt Lake City, UT). We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 5 patients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic Broviac insertion for long-term access over a 4-year period in a single institution. Four of the patients (80%) had a significant cardiac abnormality, with 1 patient requiring long-term parenteral nutrition after complicated necrotizing enterocolitis. All patients had significant caval thrombosis, which precluded them having placement of a standard percutaneous or openly placed central catheter. Of the 5 patients, 2 (40%) died of cardiac-related illnesses. Of the 3 surviving patients, 2 had functioning catheters electively removed because they were no longer required. One catheter was removed at thoracotomy for right atrial perforation because of catheter erosion. Vascular access in paediatric patients with chronic and/or life-threatening illness is crucial to survival. Transhepatic central venous catheters are a feasible, reliable, and relatively easily placed form of central access in patients with multiple venous thromboses requiring long-term access. This route should be considered in paediatric patients requiring central access in preference to a thoracotomy.

  16. Pain and dysphagia in patients with squamous carcinomas of the head and neck: the role of perineural spread.

    PubMed

    Carter, R L; Pittam, M R; Tanner, N S

    1982-08-01

    Clinical and pathological features of perineural spread have been investigated in patients with squamous carcinomas at several sites in the head and neck. In 100 surgical cases, the clinical and pathological findings were congruent in 76%. Combined clinical and histological evidence of perineural invasion was recorded in 33% and the overall incidence of nerve involvement detected morphologically was 44%. Perineural infiltration was demonstrated histologically in 51% of major excisions from the buccal cavity and in 34% of resections from the oropharynx, hypopharynx and cervical oesophagus. The neurological findings were dominated by hypoaesthesia, dysaesthesia and referred pain - mainly in the territories of cranial nerves V and IX. Multiple and/or sequential nerve involvement was occasionally seen. No correlation was established between nerve invasion and metastasis to regional lymph nodes. Long-distance infiltration of nerve trunks, and multiple involvement, are grave prognostic features.In 17 terminal patients submitted to autopsy, 65% had combined clinical and pathological evidence of perineural spread and the overall incidence of nerve involvement detected morphologically was 88%. Sensory changes again predominated. Multiple nerve involvement was observed in 35%. An apparently new `dysphagia syndrome' is described in 4 patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas in whom gross mechanical obstruction was simulated by a combination of perineural spread of tumour into the ipsilateral vagal trunk, sometimes accompanied by segmental infarction, variable invasion of the sympathetic chain, and `splinting' of the pharynx by local fibrosis and tumour in the soft tissues of the neck. Short-term palliation was achieved in these patients with high-dose steroids.

  17. Common patterns of perineural spread in head-neck squamous cell carcinoma identified on fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Piyush; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Perineural spread in HNSCC is associated with dismal prognosis and decreased overall survival. Clinical diagnosis of this relatively asymptomatic entity is usually delayed and made incidentally on imaging. MRI is gold standard imaging for early diagnosing of this condition owing to its excellent anatomic resolution. With the ever increasing use of PET/CT in commonly encountered cancer such as HNSCC for staging and re-staging, observing perineural spread on PET/CT is not infrequent. Through this pictorial essay we demonstrate the common patterns of perineural spread in HNSCC on PET/CT with the aim of improving reporting accuracy across readers. PMID:27833312

  18. Review of the Management of Peroral Extrusion of Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Catheter

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    of frequency were: (a) removal of entire VPS catheter n=5; (b) removal of entire VPS catheter, and delayed re-VPS n=5; (c) removal of peritoneal catheter with or without External Ventricular Drainage (EVD), and revision of peritoneal catheter n=3; (d) removal of peritoneal catheter, with or without EVD, and VA shunt n=3; (e) removal of peritoneal catheter, EVD and delayed re-VPS n=2; (f) removal of entire VPS catheter, EVD and delayed re-VPS n=2; (g) removal of peritoneal catheter, EVD and others n=2. Two deaths are also reported during the management of peroral extrusion of VPS catheter. Conclusion Peroral extrusion of peritoneal part of VPS catheter is an extremely rare complication following VPS insertion, and most frequently observed in children, although also reported in adults. In more than two-third of the cases it occurred within one-year of the VPS placement or last shunts revision, so a close follow-up is a must during this period following VPS placement. Management of such a case depends upon many factors such as presence or absence of shunt tract infection, peritonitis, meningitis, and cerebro spinal fluid infection. PMID:28050444

  19. Incidence of Central Vein Stenosis and Occlusion Following Upper Extremity PICC and Port Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Carin F. Eschelman, David J.; Sullivan, Kevin L.; DuBois, Nancy; Bonn, Joseph

    2003-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of central vein stenosis and occlusion following upper extremity placement of peripherally inserted central venous catheters(PICCs) and venous ports. One hundred fifty-four patients who underwent venography of the ipsilateral central veins prior to initial and subsequent venous access device insertion were retrospectively identified. All follow-up venograms were interpreted at the time of catheter placement by one interventional radiologist over a 5-year period and compared to the findings on initial venography. For patients with central vein abnormalities, hospital and home infusion service records and radiology reports were reviewed to determine catheter dwelltime and potential alternative etiologies of central vein stenosis or occlusion. The effect of catheter caliber and dwell time on development of central vein abnormalities was evaluated. Venography performed prior to initial catheter placement showed that 150 patients had normal central veins. Three patients had central vein stenosis, and one had central vein occlusion. Subsequent venograms (n = 154)at the time of additional venous access device placement demonstrated 8 patients with occlusions and 10 with stenoses. Three of the 18 patients with abnormal follow-up venograms were found to have potential alternative causes of central vein abnormalities. Excluding these 3 patients and the 4 patients with abnormal initial venograms, a 7% incidence of central vein stenosis or occlusion was found in patients with prior indwelling catheters and normal initial venograms. Catheter caliber showed no effect on the subsequent development of central vein abnormalities. Patients who developed new or worsened central vein stenosis or occlusion had significantly (p =0.03) longer catheter dwell times than patients without central vein abnormalities. New central vein stenosis or occlusion occurred in 7% of patients following upper arm placement of venous access devices

  20. Image-guided intrathecal baclofen pump catheter implantation: a technical note and case series.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Shenandoah; Robertson, Faith C; Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; O'Brien, Cormac P; Berde, Charles; Padua, Horacio

    2017-02-03

    OBJECTIVE Medically refractory spasticity and dystonia are often alleviated with intrathecal baclofen (ITB) administration through an indwelling catheter inserted in the lumbar spine. In patients with cerebral palsy, however, there is a high incidence of concomitant neuromuscular scoliosis. ITB placement may be technically challenging in those who have severe spinal deformity or who have undergone prior instrumented thoracolumbar fusion. Although prior reports have described drilling through the lumbar fusion mass with a high-speed bur, as well as IT catheter implantation at the foramen magnum or cervical spine, these approaches have notable limitations. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of ITB placement using cone beam CT (CBCT) image guidance to facilitate percutaneous IT catheterization. METHODS Data were prospectively collected on patients treated between November 2012 and June 2014. In the interventional radiology suite, general anesthesia was induced and the patient was positioned prone. Imaging was performed to identify the optimal trajectory. Percutaneous puncture was performed at an entry site with image-guided placement of a sheathed needle. CBCT provided real-time 2D projections and 3D reconstructions for detailed volumetric imaging. A biopsy drill was passed through the sheath, and subsequently a Tuohy needle was advanced intrathecally. The catheter was threaded cephalad under fluoroscopic visualization. After tip localization and CSF flow were confirmed, the stylet was replaced, the external catheter tubing was wrapped sterilely in a dressing, and the patient was transported to the operating room. After lateral decubitus positioning of the patient, the IT catheter was exposed and connected to the distal abdominal tubing with typical pump placement. RESULTS Of 15 patients with Gross Motor Function Classification System Levels IV and V cerebral palsy and instrumented thoracolumbar fusion, 8 had predominantly spasticity, and 7 had mixed

  1. ESL Placement and Schools

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Rebecca; Wilkinson, Lindsey; Muller, Chandra; Frisco, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors explore English as a Second Language (ESL) placement as a measure of how schools label and process immigrant students. Using propensity score matching and data from the Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement Study and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the authors estimate the effect of ESL placement on immigrant achievement. In schools with more immigrant students, the authors find that ESL placement results in higher levels of academic performance; in schools with few immigrant students, the effect reverses. This is not to suggest a one-size-fits-all policy; many immigrant students, regardless of school composition, generational status, or ESL placement, struggle to achieve at levels sufficient for acceptance to a 4-year university. This study offers several factors to be taken into consideration as schools develop policies and practices to provide immigrant students opportunities to learn. PMID:20617111

  2. Fiducial Marker Placement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Computed Tomography (CT) - Body General Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Introduction to Cancer Therapy (Radiation Oncology) Proton Therapy Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Images related to Fiducial Marker Placement Sponsored by ...

  3. Gastrostomy tube placement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100125.htm Gastrostomy tube placement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  4. Evaluation of routine postoperative chest roentgenogram for determination of the correct position of permanent central venous catheters tip

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Fereshteh; Hekmatnia, Ali; Shahabi, Javad; Keshavarzian, Amir; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Jazi, Amir Hosein Davarpanah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proper placement of central venous catheter (CVC) tip could reduce early and late catheter-related complications. Although the live fluoroscopy is standard of care for placement of the catheter, it is not available in many centers. Therefore, the present study evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of bedside chest X-ray (CXR) for proper positioning of the catheter tip. Materials and Methods: A total of 82 adult patients undergoing elective placement of tunneled CVC were enrolled in this study during 2010-2012. The catheter tip position was evaluated by postoperative bedside chest radiographs as well as trans-thoracic echocardiogram as definite diagnostic tool. The catheter position was considered correct if the tip was positioned in the right atrium both in CXR or echocardiography. Finally, CXRs interpreted by expert radiologist. Thus findings were compared by echocardiography. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive, and negative predictive values were calculated. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL), and P < 0.05 considered as significant. Results: The patients were 57.37 ± 18.91 years of age, weighed 65.79 ± 15.58 kg and were 166.36 ± 9.91 cm tall. Sensitivity and specificity of CXR for proper catheter tip position were 74.3% and 58.3%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 91.2% and 28%. In addition accuracy, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio were 71.9%, 1.78, and 2.27 respectively. Conclusion: Bedside CXR alone does not reliably predict malpositioning after CVC placement. PMID:25767527

  5. Galanin modulates the neural niche to favour perineural invasion in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Christina Springstead; Banerjee, Rajat; Inglehart, Ronald C; Liu, Min; Russo, Nickole; Hariharan, Amirtha; van Tubergen, Elizabeth A; Corson, Sara L; Asangani, Irfan A; Mistretta, Charlotte M; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; D’Silva, Nisha J

    2015-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is an indicator of poor survival in multiple cancers. Unfortunately, there is no targeted treatment for PNI since the molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. PNI is an active process, suggesting that cancer cells communicate with nerves. However, nerve-tumour crosstalk is understudied due to the lack of in vivo models to investigate the mechanisms. Here, we developed an in vivo model of PNI to characterise this interaction. We show that the neuropeptide galanin (GAL) initiates nerve-tumour crosstalk via activation of its G-protein-coupled receptor, GALR2. Our data reveal a novel mechanism by which GAL from nerves stimulates GALR2 on cancer cells to induce NFATC2-mediated transcription of cyclooxygenase-2 and GAL. Prostaglandin E2 promotes cancer invasion, and in a feedback mechanism, GAL released by cancer induces neuritogenesis, facilitating PNI. This study describes a novel in vivo model for PNI and reveals the dynamic interaction between nerve and cancer. PMID:25917569

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Perineural Invasion, Hypoxia and Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Ma, Qingyong; Xu, Qinhong; Lei, Jianjun; Li, Xuqi; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Erxi

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most fatal human malignancies. Though a relatively rare malignancy, it remains one of the deadliest tumors, with an extremely high mortality rate. The prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer remains poor; only patients with small tumors and complete resection have a chance of a complete cure. Pancreatic cancer responds poorly to conventional therapies, including chemotherapy and irradiation. Tumor-specific targeted therapy is a relatively recent addition to the arsenal of anti-cancer therapies. It is important to find novel targets to distinguish tumor cells from their normal counterparts in therapeutic approaches. In the past few decades, studies have revealed the molecular mechanisms of pancreatic tumorigenesis, growth, invasion and metastasis. The proteins that participate in the pathophysiological processes of pancreatic cancer might be potential targets for therapy. This review describes the main players in perineural invasion, hypoxia and desmoplasia and the molecular mechanisms of these pathophysiological processes. PMID:22372500

  7. Therapeutic potential of perineural invasion, hypoxia and desmoplasia in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Ma, Qingyong; Xu, Qinhong; Lei, Jianjun; Li, Xuqi; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Erxi

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most fatal human malignancies. Though a relatively rare malignancy, it remains one of the deadliest tumors, with an extremely high mortality rate. The prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer remains poor; only patients with small tumors and complete resection have a chance of a complete cure. Pancreatic cancer responds poorly to conventional therapies, including chemotherapy and irradiation. Tumor-specific targeted therapy is a relatively recent addition to the arsenal of anti-cancer therapies. It is important to find novel targets to distinguish tumor cells from their normal counterparts in therapeutic approaches. In the past few decades, studies have revealed the molecular mechanisms of pancreatic tumorigenesis, growth, invasion and metastasis. The proteins that participate in the pathophysiological processes of pancreatic cancer might be potential targets for therapy. This review describes the main players in perineural invasion, hypoxia and desmoplasia and the molecular mechanisms of these pathophysiological processes.

  8. The insertion of chronic indwelling central venous catheters (Hickman lines) in interventional radiology suites.

    PubMed

    Page, A C; Evans, R A; Kaczmarski, R; Mufti, G J; Gishen, P

    1990-08-01

    The insertion of Hickman central venous catheters for chronic venous access is a procedure usually conducted in the operating theatre under local or general anaesthesia. In a prospective study over a one year period we have assessed the feasibility of radiologists inserting central venous catheters for long term access. A subclavicular approach to the subclavian vein with prior digital subtraction angiography or video imaging of the vein was the technique of choice. Thirty-one Hickman catheters were inserted in 21 patients. All but two patients had a haematological malignancy. Ages ranged from 19 to 77 years. The mean time for insertion was 43 min (range 20-80 min). The catheters remained in situ for between 2 days and 242 days with a mean of 86 days. There was one documented line infection; nine patients had episodes of septicaemia with identified organisms, and a further six had pyrexias of unknown origin during the line indwelling period. There were four documented line and or ipsilateral subclavian vein thromboses, and one death occurred within 36 hours of the procedure. We conclude that radiological placement is an excellent alternative to 'blind' surgical placement. Screening during insertion provides immediate facilities for correction of malposition and monitoring of immediate complications. The time taken for catheter insertion did not impede the usual patient throughout in the interventional radiology suite.

  9. Cortactin is associated with perineural invasion in the deep invasive front area of laryngeal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Eliane Papa; Rosa, Fabíola Encinas; Domingues, Maria Aparecida Custódio; Villacis, Rolando André Rios; Coudry, Renata de Almeida; Tagliarini, José Vicente; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2011-09-01

    The cortactin gene, mapped at 11q13, has been associated with an aggressive clinical course in many cancers because of its function of invasiveness. This study evaluated CTTN protein and its prognostic value in the deep invasive front and superficial areas of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The transcript expression levels were evaluated in a subset of cases. Overexpression of CTTN cytoplasmatic protein (80% of cases in both the deep invasive front and superficial areas) and transcript (30% of samples) was detected in a significant number of cases. In more than 20% of cases, observation verified membrane immunostaining in the deep invasive front and superficial areas. Perineural invasion was significantly associated with N stage and recurrence (P = .0058 and P = .0037, respectively). Higher protein expression levels were correlated with perineural invasion (P = .004) in deep invasive front cells, suggesting that this area should be considered a prognostic tool in laryngeal carcinomas. Although most cases had moderate to strong CTTN expression on the tumor surface, 2 sets of cases revealed a differential expression pattern in the deep invasive front. A group of cases with absent to weak expression of CTTN in the deep invasive front showed good prognosis parameters, and a second group with moderate to strong expression of CTTN were associated with an unfavorable prognosis, suggesting an association with worse outcome. Taken together, these results suggest that the deep invasive front might be considered a grading system in laryngeal carcinomas and that cortactin is a putative marker of worse outcome in the deep invasive front of laryngeal carcinomas.

  10. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P.

    1987-01-01

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty.

  11. Five-Lumen Antibiotic-Impregnated Femoral Central Venous Catheters in Severely Burned Patients: An Investigation of Device Utility and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce C; Mian, Mohammad A H; Mullins, Robert F; Hassan, Zaheed; Shaver, Joseph R; Johnston, Krystal K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rate in a severely burned patient population, many of whom required prolonged use of central venous catheters (CVCs). Between January 2008 and June 2012, 151 patients underwent placement of 455 five-lumen minocycline/rifampin-impregnated CVCs. CRBSI was defined as at least one blood culture (>100,000 colonies) and one simultaneous roll-plate CVC tip culture (>15 colony forming units) positive for the same organism. Most patients had accidental burns (81.5%) with a mean TBSA of 50%. A mean of three catheters were inserted per patient (range, 1-25). CVCs were inserted in the femoral vein (91.2%), subclavian vein (5.3%), and internal jugular vein (3.3%). Mean overall catheter indwell time was 8 days (range, 0-39 days). The overall rate of CRBSI per 1000 catheter days was 11.2; patients with a TBSA >60% experienced significantly higher rates of CRBSI than patients with a TBSA ≤60% (16.2 vs 7.3, P = .01). CVCs placed through burned skin were four times more likely to be associated with CRBSI than CVCs placed through intact skin. The most common infectious organism was Acinetobacter baumannii. Deep venous thrombosis developed in eleven patients (7%). The overall rate of CRBSI was 11.2, consistent with published rates of CRBSI in burn patients. Thus, femoral placement of 5-lumen CVCs did not result in increased CRBSI rates. These data support the safety of femoral CVC placement in burn patients, contrary to the Centers for Disease Control recommendation to avoid femoral CVC insertion.

  12. [Catheter-related infections: microbiology].

    PubMed

    Timsit, J F

    2005-03-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are the most frequent microorganisms responsible for catheter-related infections. A relative frequency of microorganisms varies according to the countries, microenvironment and outbreaks of multiresistant bacterias. Infections due to fungi, S. aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are associated with the more severe complications. Recent data suggest that chlorhexidine, either used for cutaneous antisepsis or for catheter impregnation decreases infections due to gram positive cocci. Ecological data should be taken into account when deciding a probabilistic treatment in case of suspicion of catheter-related infection.

  13. Diagnosis, management, and prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Carol E; Gould, Carolyn V; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-03-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is common, costly, and causes significant patient morbidity. CAUTIs are associated with hospital pathogens with a high propensity toward antimicrobial resistance. Treatment of asymptomatic patients with CAUTI accounts for excess antimicrobial use in hospitals and should be avoided. Duration of urinary catheterization is the predominant risk for CAUTI; preventive measures directed at limiting placement and early removal of urinary catheters have an impact on decreasing CAUTI rates. The use of bladder bundles and collaboratives, coupled with the support and active engagement from both hospital leaders and followers, seem to help prevent this common problem.

  14. Right atrial thrombus associated with subclavian catheter developed due to total parenteral nutrition application

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Nursel; Basarici, Ibrahim; Erbasan, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheterization as a frequent routine clinical procedure may have significant complications. Mechanical complications may occur during catheter placement, whereas thromboembolic and infectious complications can be seen during follow-up. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) associated central venous catheterizations may result in early mechanical complications and thrombotic and infectious complications in the long term. This paper describes a patient diagnosed as mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy requiring long-term central venous catheterization for TPN implementation, who had an infected thrombus on the catheter tip resected by cardiac surgery. PMID:27212985

  15. Comparison of histopathological effects of perineural administration of bupivacaine and bupivacaine-dexmedetomidine in rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Memari, Elham; Hosseinian, Mohammad-Ali; Mirkheshti, Ali; Arhami-Dolatabadi, Ali; Mirabotalebi, Mojtaba; Khandaghy, Mohsen; Daneshbod, Yahya; Alizadeh, Leila; Shirian, Sadegh

    2016-11-01

    Injection of a variety of drugs such as local anesthetics (LAs) for peripheral nerve block has been shown to cause damage to peripheral nerves. Bupivacaine is a local anesthetic widely used in surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neurotoxicity of LAs including Bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine (DEX)-Bupivacaine on sciatic nerve tissue at histopathological level. In addition, we investigated whether perineural administration of DEX can attenuate Bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity. Twenty adult Sprague Dawley rats received unilateral sciatic nerve blocks with either 0.2ml of 0.5% bupivacaine (n=8) or 0.5% bupivacaine plus 0.005% DEX (n=8) or normal saline (0.9%, as control group) (n=4) in the left hind extremity. Sciatic nerves were harvested at 14days post-injection and analyzed for nerve damage using ultrastructure and histopathologic analysis. Histopathology of sciatic nerve at day 14 post-injection showed a variable degree of neuronal injury associated with perineural inflammation in each treatment group and was classified as none or mild, intermediate or severe. Administration of both LAs resulted in a significant decrease in the total number of myelinated fibers per nerve (95% CI for group difference: Bupivacaine, P=0.001, DEX-Bupivacaine, P=0.036) compared to the saline control group. Animals that received these perineural local anesthetics (LAs) injections showed increased severity of injury compared to the control group. Animals in the DEX-Bupivacaine group had higher perineural inflammation and nerve damage than those of the saline control group and less than those of the Bupivacaine group at day 14 post-injection. Quantitatively, average total nerve fiber per nerve and average myelinated nerve fiber density in the injured region of the Bupivacaine-treated group was less than that of the DEX-Bupivacaine-treated group. LAs injection into the nerve causes peripheral nerve damage and remains an important clinical danger. Bupivacaine is

  16. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  17. Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  18. Catheter Ablation for Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nof, Eyal; Stevenson, William G; John, Roy M

    2013-01-01

    Catheter ablation has emerged as an important and effective treatment option for many recurrent ventricular arrhythmias. The approach to ablation and the risks and outcomes are largely determined by the nature of the severity and type of underlying heart disease. In patients with structural heart disease, catheter ablation can effectively reduce ventricular tachycardia (VT) episodes and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. For VT and symptomatic premature ventricular beats that occur in the absence of structural heart disease, catheter ablation is often effective as the sole therapy. Advances in catheter technology, imaging and mapping techniques have improved success rates for ablation. This review discusses current approaches to mapping and ablation for ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:26835040

  19. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... nontunneled central venous catheters. In: Mauro MA, Murphy KPJ, Thomson KR, et al., eds. Image-Guided Interventions . ... by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is ...

  20. Comparison of cuffed tunneled hemodialysis catheter survival.

    PubMed

    Rocklin, M A; Dwight, C A; Callen, L J; Bispham, B Z; Spiegel, D M

    2001-03-01

    Despite efforts to have hemodialysis patients begin renal replacement therapy with a mature arteriovenous shunt, many patients begin dialysis with a cuffed tunneled catheter as their access. An increasing number of differently designed tunneled hemodialysis catheters have become available in the last decade. The primary aim of this study is to compare catheter survival for Hickman (Bard, Salt Lake City, UT) and Opti-flow (Bard) catheters. The 16-month experience with 182 catheters, totaling 13,861 catheter-days, is reported. The probability of Hickman catheter failure at 30, 60, and 90 days was 29%, 49%, and 67%. The probability of Opti-flow catheter failure was significantly less at 10%, 24%, and 38% for the same times, respectively (P: < 0.05 for all time points). The difference in catheter failure rates was caused by a greater malfunction rate of Hickman catheters; the two catheters had similar infection rates. We conclude that survival of Opti-flow catheters was significantly better than that of Hickman catheters from 30 to 90 days, which is a clinically relevant period when patients are waiting for maturation of a permanent access or replacement of a failed access. Since the conclusion of our study, we documented 10 episodes of Opti-flow catheter malfunction within 4 months secondary to hairline fracture of the arterial hub. The Opti-flow catheter was recalled and is now available with retooled hubs.

  1. Hickman to central venous catheter: A case of difficult venous access in a child suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Agrawal, Sanjit; Datta, Taniya; Mitra, Suparna; Khemka, Rakhi

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy in children suffering from cancer usually requires placement of an indwelling central venous catheter (CVC). A child may need to undergo repeated procedures because of infection and occlusion of previous access devices. We present a case of CVC insertion in a child suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia where an innovative technique was employed. PMID:27695218

  2. Rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Early onset of distal catheter migration into scrotum in an adult male: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bryan S.; Vadera, Sumeet; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The role of shunt placement is to divert cerebrospinal fluid from within the ventricles to an alternative location in the setting of hydrocephalus. One of the rare shunt complications is distal catheter migration, and various body sites have been reported, including the scrotum. Although cases of scrotal migration of distal catheter have been reported in pediatric patients, cases in adult patients are rare due to obliterated processus vaginalis. Furthermore, there has not been a case reported for scrotal migration in an adult at an early onset. Presentation of case 65-year-old male underwent shunt placement for normal-pressure hydrocephalus-like symptoms. On post-operative day seven patient developed right testicular edema, for which ultrasound was performed, revealing hydrocele along with the presence of distal catheter in the scrotum. On post-operative day nine patient underwent distal catheter trimming via laparoscopic approach with general surgery, with post-operative imaging showing satisfactory location of distal catheter in the peritoneal cavity. Discussion/Conclusion Early onset of distal catheter migration into scrotum in an adult male is a unique case, as most cases are reported in pediatric patients, and it is the first case reported in the English literature to have occurrence at an early onset during the peri-operative period. As our case demonstrates, early occurrence and detection of scrotal migration of the distal catheter prevent shunt malfunction. Prompt surgical management of catheter repositioning is therefore recommended to avoid the risk of further complications. PMID:25553524

  3. Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infection and the Medicare Rule Changes

    PubMed Central

    Saint, Sanjay; Meddings, Jennifer A.; Calfee, David; Kowalski, Christine P.; Krein, Sarah L.

    2009-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection, a common and potentially preventable complication of hospitalization, is one of the hospital-acquired complications chosen by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for which hospitals no longer receive additional payment. To help understand the potential consequences of the recent CMS rule changes we examine the preventability of catheter-associated infection, review the CMS rules changes regarding catheter-associated urinary tract infection, offer our assessment of the possible consequences of these changes, and provide guidance for hospital-based administrators and clinicians. Though controversial, we conclude that the CMS rule changes related to catheter-associated urinary tract infection may do more good than harm since hospitals are likely to re-double their efforts in preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection, which may minimize unnecessary placement and facilitate prompt removal of indwelling catheters. While we applaud CMS for forcing hospitals to increase efforts to prevent complications stemming from hospital-acquired infection, the opportunity costs and potential for unintended consequences cannot be overlooked. Consequently, how hospitals and physicians respond to the CMS rule changes must be monitored closely. PMID:19528567

  4. Intravascular catheter-related infections: a preventable challenge in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Chatzinikolaou, I; Raad, I I

    2000-12-01

    In modem medicine, central venous catheters (CVCs) have a pivotal role in the management of critically ill patients. The most serious complication of effective CVC placement is catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). Microbial colonization and CRBSI are the byproducts of the interaction of 4 factors: (1) microbial factors (hydrophobicity and exopolysaccharide production), (2) host factors (such protein adhesins as fibrin and fibronectin that attach to the catheter surface), (3) catheter material (hydrophobicity, surface charges, thrombogenicity), and (4) iatrogenic factors (total parenteral nutrition, interleukin-2). The organisms most frequently associated with CRBSI are Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida spp. CRBSIs were traditionally diagnosed through semiquantitative or quantitative cultures of the catheter tip. However, the diagnosis can be achieved without catheter removal through cultures of blood specimens collected simultaneously though the CVC and a peripheral vein. Currently, the most effective method of preventing a CRBSI is the use of a CVC coated with antimicrobial agents. Intravenous administration of vancomycin for 7 days is adequate for an uncomplicated CRBSI caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci, and at least 10 days of therapy with beta-lactams is required for an uncomplicated infection caused by methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. CRBSI caused by Candida albicans or Candida parapsilosis can be treated with at least 14 days of therapy with fluconazole or amphotericin B. In the case of Candida krusei, only amphotericin B is effective.

  5. Delayed Diagnosis of Cauda Eqina Syndrome with Perineural Cyst after Combined Spinal-Epidural Anesthesia in Hemodialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Akeda, Koji; Tsujii, Masaya; Sudo, Akihiro

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic Tarlov (perineural cysts) are uncommon. In the following hemodialysis case, cauda equina syndrome was not detected after combined spinal-epidural anesthesia untilthe patient reported a lack of sensation in the perianal area 14 days postoperatively. She had normal motor function of her extremities. A laminectomy and cyst irrigation was performed. After the operation, her sphincter disturbance subsided gradually and her symptoms had disappeared. PMID:24066221

  6. Reexcision Perineural Invasion and Epithelial Sheath Neuroma Possibly on a Spectrum of Postinjury Reactive Hyperplasia Mediated by IL-6.

    PubMed

    Wang, James Y; Nuovo, Gerard; Kline, Mitchell; Magro, Cynthia M

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial sheath neuroma is a rarely recognized but established entity in the medical literature. First described in 2000 by Requena et al, there have only been 7 published cases to date, mostly in female patients and presenting as symptomatic solitary lesions on the back without a known history of trauma. In 2006, Beer et al described and reviewed a dozen cases in which epithelial sheath neuroma-like features were seen in the advent of a surgical procedure, which was termed "re-excision perineural invasion" and attributed to possible eccrine duct implantation during surgery. Our case is a 66-year-old male patient who underwent an excision of a melanocytic neoplasm in which a reactive epithelial sheath neuroma was incidentally discovered in the excision specimen, adjacent to the biopsy site cicatrix. Histologically, there was benign cutaneous nerve hyperplasia with a proliferation of squamous epithelium in intimate apposition to the nerve bundles in the superficial dermis. We postulate that the process active in the formation of re-excision perineural invasion is the same as in epithelial sheath neuroma and that minor trauma not appreciable on histologic examination is responsible in the latter entity. We performed IL-6 staining and documented that IL-6 was upregulated at the interface of the nerve and reactive epithelium, but was absent in nerves distant from the site of surgery, suggesting that IL-6 may be essential to the lesion's development. The recognition of reactive epithelial sheath neuroma including the subcategory of re-excision perineural invasion is crucial for the dermatopathologist to prevent mislabeling this reactive entity as a perineural squamous cell carcinoma, which has clinical consequences for the patient such as wider re-excision and radiation treatment. Additionally, we have identified a potential pathophysiologic basis for this lesion.

  7. Prevention and management of hemodialysis catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Venkat; Darouiche, Rabih O

    2012-12-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) catheters are associated with blood stream infections, and catheter use continues to be high among incident and prevalent patients on maintenance HD. Migration of micro-organism along the external surface of the catheter is probably the most common route of infection, followed by the endoluminal route of contamination. Almost all HD catheters have biofilm formation on their surfaces and this serves as a good reservoir for micro-organisms. These active but protected microorganisms have been implicated in local and systemic infections associated with HD catheters. Good personal hygiene, exit-site care with topical antibiotics and antibiotic lock solution in the dialysis catheter reduce the incidence of catheter infection. In selected subgroup of patients, HD catheter is promptly removed after the diagnosis of blood stream infection. However, catheter guidewire exchange is an acceptable alternate strategy in some patients. The most important goal should be to increase the rate of incident arteriovenous fistula use in the HD population.

  8. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction caused by proximal catheter fat obstruction.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Cezar José; Spektor, Sergey; Margolin, Emil; Shoshan, Yigal; Ben-David, Eliel; Cohen, José E; Moscovici, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement is the mainstay of treatment for hydrocephalus, yet shunts remain vulnerable to a variety of complications. Although fat droplet migration into the subarachnoid space and cerebrospinal fluid pathways following craniotomy has been observed, a VP shunt obstruction with fat droplets has never been reported to our knowledge. We present the first reported case of VP shunt catheter obstruction by migratory fat droplets in a 55-year-old woman who underwent suboccipital craniotomy for removal of a metastatic tumor of the left medullocerebellar region, without fat harvesting. A VP shunt was inserted 1month later due to communicating hydrocephalus. The patient presented with gait disturbance, intermittent confusion, and pseudomeningocele 21days after shunt insertion. MRI revealed retrograde fat deposition in the ventricular system and VP shunt catheter, apparently following migration of fat droplets from the fatty soft tissue of the craniotomy site. Spinal tap revealed signs of aseptic meningitis. Steroid treatment for aseptic "lipoid" meningitis provided symptom relief. MRI 2months later revealed partial fat resorption and resolution of the pseudomeningocele. VP shunt malfunction caused by fat obstruction of the ventricular catheter should be acknowledged as a possible complication in VP shunts after craniotomy, even in the absence of fat harvesting.

  9. Effects of perineural capsaicin treatment of the abdominal vagus on endotoxin fever and on a non-febrile thermoregulatory event.

    PubMed

    Pétervári, Erika; Garami, András; Pákai, Eszter; Székely, Miklós

    2005-01-01

    Following perineural capsaicin pretreatment of the main trunks of the abdominal vagus of rats, the first and the second phases of the polyphasic febrile response to intravenous lipopolysaccharide were unaltered, while the third phase of fever course (peak at 5 h) was attenuated. In rats desensitized by intraperitoneal (i.p.) capsaicin (i.e. abdominal non-systemic desensitization), mainly the first but not the later fever phases were reduced. The postprandial hyperthermia to intragastric injection of BaSO4 suspension was attenuated by either i.p. or perineural capsaicin treatment. It is concluded that, in contrast to the accepted model of postprandial hyperthermia, which is mediated by capsaicin-sensitive fibers of the abdominal vagus, in the early phase of polyphasic fever the vagal afferent nerves appear to play no role. The influence of i.p. capsaicin-desensitization on this initiating fever phase is independent of the vagus, and a capsaicin-induced alteration of endotoxin action in the liver, prior to vagal nerve endings, is more likely. The late febrile phase is probably influenced by efferent vagal fibers, which might be damaged more easily by perineural than i.p. capsaicin treatment.

  10. Use of human amniotic membrane wrap in reducing perineural adhesions in a rabbit model of ulnar nerve neurorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Kim, S S; Sohn, S K; Lee, K Y; Lee, M J; Roh, M S; Kim, C H

    2010-03-01

    The object of this experimental study was to assess the effect of wrapping human amniotic membrane around a repaired ulnar nerve in a rabbit model of perineural adhesion. Ulnar nerves from 10 white New Zealand rabbits were exposed bilaterally, dissected and repaired. Human amniotic membrane was then wrapped around the repair site in one limb with no such wrap in the neurorrhaphy of the contralateral limb. Three months later, the same nerves were re-explored and removed using microsurgical external neurolysis. Perineural adhesion around the ulnar nerve was evaluated by blinded surgical dissection and scored using a visual 4-point qualitative scale. Extent and grade of fibrosis around repair sites were measured microscopically (x 200) after Masson trichrome staining using measure of the depth of fibrosis and the grading criteria of adhesion. Quantitative morphometric analysis was also performed under light microscopy (x 200) with the aid of a digital counter and virtual slide imaging software (ScanScope T2, Vista, CA, USA). Human amniotic membrane wrapped nerves showed significantly less perineural adhesion and fibrosis than controls (P < 0.05). No nerve healing problems were encountered. This study suggests that human amniotic membrane application can reduce fibrosis and adhesion around neurorrhaphy sites in this animal model.

  11. Compensation for Unconstrained Catheter Shaft Motion in Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Degirmenci, Alperen; Loschak, Paul M.; Tschabrunn, Cory M.; Anter, Elad; Howe, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization with ultrasound (US) imaging catheters provides real time US imaging from within the heart, but manually navigating a four degree of freedom (DOF) imaging catheter is difficult and requires extensive training. Existing work has demonstrated robotic catheter steering in constrained bench top environments. Closed-loop control in an unconstrained setting, such as patient vasculature, remains a significant challenge due to friction, backlash, and physiological disturbances. In this paper we present a new method for closed-loop control of the catheter tip that can accurately and robustly steer 4-DOF cardiac catheters and other flexible manipulators despite these effects. The performance of the system is demonstrated in a vasculature phantom and an in vivo porcine animal model. During bench top studies the robotic system converged to the desired US imager pose with sub-millimeter and sub-degree-level accuracy. During animal trials the system achieved 2.0 mm and 0.65° accuracy. Accurate and robust robotic navigation of flexible manipulators will enable enhanced visualization and treatment during procedures. PMID:27525170

  12. WE-G-17A-05: Real-Time Catheter Localization Using An Active MR Tracker for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R; Penzkofer, T; Schmidt, E; Pan, L; Gilson, W; Seethamraju, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel active MR-tracking system which can provide accurate and rapid localization of brachytherapy catheters, and assess its reliability and spatial accuracy in comparison to standard catheter digitization using MR images. Methods: An active MR tracker for brachytherapy was constructed by adding three printed-circuit micro-coils to the shaft of a commercial metallic stylet. A gel phantom with an embedded framework was built, into which fifteen 14-Gauge catheters were placed, following either with parallel or crossed paths. The tracker was inserted sequentially into each catheter, with MR-tracking running continuously. Tracking was also performed during the tracker's removal from each catheter. Catheter trajectories measured from the insertion and the removal procedures using the same micro-coil were compared, as well as trajectories obtained using different micro-coils. A 3D high-resolution MR image dataset of the phantom was acquired and imported into a treatment planning system (TPS) for catheter digitization. A comparison between MR-tracked positions and positions digitized from MR images by TPS was performed. Results: The MR tracking shows good consistency for varying catheter paths and for all micro-coils (mean difference ∼1.1 mm). The average distance between the MR-tracking trajectory and catheter digitization from the MR images was 1.1 mm. Ambiguity in catheter assignment from images due to crossed paths was resolved by active tracking. When tracking was interleaved with imaging, real-time images were continuously acquired at the instantaneous tip positions and displayed on an external workstation. Conclusion: The active MR tracker may be used to provide an independent measurement of catheter location in the MR environment, potentially eliminating the need for subsequent CT. It may also be used to control realtime imaging of catheter placement. This will enable MR-based brachytherapy planning of interstitial implants without ionizing

  13. College Placement in Today's Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, James L.

    1982-01-01

    Analyzed the effects of reduced financing on college placement items such as services, staffing, fees, conference attendance, travel, recruitment, and salaries. Placement personnel (N=224) responded to a questionnaire. Results indicated that budgets have generally remained the same. (RC)

  14. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Charles; Tripcony, Lee; Keller, Jacqui; Poulsen, Michael; Martin, Jarad; Jackson, James; Dickie, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  15. A Model for Perineural Invasion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huyett, Phillip; Gilbert, Mark; Liu, Lijun; Ferris, Robert L; Kim, Seungwon

    2017-01-05

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is found in approximately 40% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Despite multimodal treatment with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, locoregional recurrences and distant metastases occur at higher rates, and overall survival is decreased by 40% compared to HNSCC without PNI. In vitro studies of the pathways involved in HNSCC PNI have historically been challenging given the lack of a consistent, reproducible assay. Described here is the adaptation of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) assay for the examination of PNI in HNSCC. In this model, DRG are harvested from the spinal column of a sacrificed nude mouse and placed within a semisolid matrix. Over the subsequent days, neurites are generated and grow in a radial pattern from the cell bodies of the DRG. HNSCC cell lines are then placed peripherally around the matrix and invade preferentially along the neurites toward the DRG. This method allows for rapid evaluation of multiple treatment conditions, with very high assay success rates and reproducibility.

  16. Perineural (Tarlov) cysts mimicking adnexal masses: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    H'ng, M W C; Wanigasiri, U I D K; Ong, C L

    2009-08-01

    Perineural (Tarlov) cysts are usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed for low back pain. However, in a tertiary women's hospital, they may present as incidental findings on gynecological ultrasound imaging. Approximately 40,000 pelvic scans are performed annually in our department. Tarlov cysts were identified in three women between August 2007 and September 2008. In two patients (Cases 1 and 3), these cysts were initially misdiagnosed as hydrosalpinges on ultrasound examination, the latter having a differential diagnosis of an ovarian cyst. Two patients (Cases 1 and 2) were symptomatic, although Case 2 had symptoms that could not entirely be accounted for by the location of the cyst. Although asymptomatic, Case 3 underwent laparoscopy with a view to salpingectomy/cystectomy. In these patients, confirmation of Tarlov cysts was subsequently made on either computed tomography (CT) or MRI. All three patients were managed conservatively. Here we describe their clinical presentation, the appearance of the cysts on ultrasound imaging and on CT or MRI, and their eventual outcomes.

  17. Symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cysts: A report of three cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mayur; Velho, Vernon; Mally, Rahul; Khan, Shadma W.

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral perineural cysts (Tarlov's cysts) are nerve root cysts, which are usually asymptomatic and are detected incidentally on imaging. These cysts are rare with an incidence of 4.6%. We report three cases of Lumbosacral Tarlov's cysts, which presented with cauda equina syndrome and radicular pain syndrome. Two of our patients had symptoms of cauda equina syndrome, and one had acute sciatica. Complete excision of the cyst was achieved in two patients and marsupialization of the cyst was done in another patient due to its large size and dense adherence to the sacral nerve roots. All the patients were relieved of the radicular pain with no new neurological deficit following surgery. Symptomatic lumbosacral Tarlov's cyst is a rare lesion, and the presentation can be low back pain, cauda equina syndrome or sciatica. Therefore, this entity should be kept in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these symptoms. Complete Surgical excision of these symptomatic cysts is the treatment of choice to achieve a cure. PMID:26396612

  18. Tumours of the oropharynx and oral cavity: perineural spread and bone invasion.

    PubMed

    Maroldi, R; Battaglia, G; Farina, D; Maculotti, P; Chiesa, A

    1999-12-01

    Clinical examination of the oral cavity and oropharynx provides essential information in the assessment of neoplastic lesions. A precise evaluation of their deep spread along the most common growth pathways can be achieved by imaging, ranging from the basic, but nowadays incomplete, information of conventional X-ray, to the sophisticated details obtained by MR. Three oncological questions must be faced: the three dimensional evaluation of primary tumour spread; the assessment of nodal involvement; the post-treatment survey with the early detection of local recurrences, during the follow up. Either CT or MR accurately assesses the deep extension of neoplasms, nevertheless, the most cost-effective protocol is provided by a combination of CT and ultrasound (staging respectively T and N). MR is the technique of first choice when an infiltration of the base of the tongue or perineural spread is suspected, because of its superior ability to detect muscular invasion and segmental abnormalities of cranial nerves. Bone involvement can be adequately showed by MR not only because focal erosions of the cortical rim are well demonstrated, but also by means of the early demonstration of bone marrow abnormalities. Moreover, MR plays an essential role during the follow up, as it is the only morphological imaging technique permitting to differentiate recurrent tumour and necrosis from scar tissue.

  19. Large-volume paracentesis with indwelling peritoneal catheter and albumin infusion: a community hospital study

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Daniel K.; Walayat, Saqib; Jinma, Ren; Ahmed, Zohair; Ragunathan, Karthik; Dhillon, Sonu

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of ascites can be problematic. This is especially true in patients with diuretic refractory ascites who develop a tense abdomen. This often results in hypotension and decreased venous return with resulting renal failure. In this paper, we further examine the risks and benefits of utilizing an indwelling peritoneal catheter to remove large-volume ascites over a 72-h period while maintaining intravascular volume and preventing renal failure. Methods We retrospectively reviewed charts and identified 36 consecutive patients undergoing continuous large-volume paracentesis with an indwelling peritoneal catheter. At the time of drain placement, no patients had signs or laboratory parameters suggestive of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. The patients underwent ascitic fluid removal through an indwelling peritoneal catheter and were supported with scheduled albumin throughout the duration. The catheter was used to remove up to 3 L every 8 h for a maximum of 72 h. Regular laboratory and ascitic fluid testing was performed. All patients had a clinical follow-up within 3 months after the drain placement. Results An average of 16.5 L was removed over the 72-h time frame of indwelling peritoneal catheter maintenance. The albumin infusion utilized correlated to 12 mg/L removed. The average creatinine trend improved in a statistically significant manner from 1.37 on the day of admission to 1.21 on the day of drain removal. No patients developed renal failure during the hospital course. There were no documented episodes of neutrocytic ascites or bacterial peritonitis throughout the study review. Conclusion Large-volume peritoneal drainage with an indwelling peritoneal catheter is safe and effective for patients with tense ascites. Concomitant albumin infusion allows for maintenance of renal function, and no increase in infectious complications was noted. PMID:27802853

  20. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique’s benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument’s flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system. PMID:24887743

  1. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  2. Safeguards May Be Reducing Serious Catheter Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... They include using sterile gloves, covering catheters with antimicrobial dressings and checking catheters daily for signs of movement or infection. Many hospitals have also added extra training, equipment and supplies. For this study, Nuckols and her colleagues analyzed ...

  3. Implementation of the updated 2015 Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) recommendations “Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections” in the hospitals in Frankfurt/Main, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Heudorf, Ursel; Grünewald, Miriam; Otto, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) updated the recommendations for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in 2015. This article will describe the implementation of these recommendations in Frankfurt’s hospitals in autumn, 2015. Material and methods: In two non-ICU wards of each of Frankfurt’s 17 hospitals, inspections were performed using a checklist based on the new KRINKO recommendations. In one large hospital, a total of 5 wards were inspected. The inspections covered the structure and process quality (operating instructions, training, indication, the placement and maintenance of catheters) and the demonstration of the preparation for insertion of a catheter using an empty bed and an imaginary patient, or insertion in a model. Results: Operating instructions were available in all hospital wards; approximately half of the wards regularly performed training sessions. The indications were largely in line with the recommendations of the KRINKO. Alternatives to urinary tract catheters were available and were used more often than the urinary tract catheters themselves (15.9% vs. 13.5%). In accordance with the recommendations, catheters were placed without antibiotic prophylaxis or the instillation of antiseptic or antimicrobial substances or catheter flushing solutions. The demonstration of catheter placement was conscientiously performed. Need for improvement was seen in the daily documentation and the regular verification of continuing indication for a urinary catheter, as well as the omission of regular catheter change. Conclusion: Overall, the recommendations of the KRINKO on the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were adequately implemented. However, it cannot be ruled out that in situations with time pressure and staff shortage, the handling of urinary tract catheters may be of lower quality than that observed during the inspections, when catheter insertion was done by

  4. Postoperative life-threatening recurrent ventricular arrhythmia triggered by the swan-ganz catheter in a patient undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Min, Jooncheol; Choi, Jae-Sung; Oh, Se Jin; Seong, Yong Won; Moon, Hyun Jong; Lee, Jeong Sang

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent ventricular arrhythmia can be fatal and cause serious complications, particularly when it is caused immediately after an operation. Incorrect placement of a Swan-Ganz catheter can trigger life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia, but even intensive care specialists tend to miss this fact. Here, we report a case of recurrent ventricular arrhythmia causing a severe hemodynamic compromise; the arrhythmia was induced by a severely angulated Swan-Ganz catheter. The recurrent ventricular arrhythmia was not controlled by any measures including repositioning of the catheter, until the complete removal of the Swan-Ganz catheter. It is necessary to keep in mind that the position of the pulmonary artery catheter should be promptly checked if there is intractable recurrent ventricular arrhythmia.

  5. The Wiley Spinal Catheter-Over-Needle System for Continuous Spinal Anesthesia: A Case Series of 5 Cesarean Deliveries Complicated by Paresthesias and Headaches.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Christine P; Carvalho, Brendan; Riley, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal catheter devices using a catheter-over-needle design and softer flexible material have been introduced to clinical practice with the aim of reducing some of the complications such as postdural puncture headaches and paresthesias seen with previous versions of intrathecal catheters. We present a case series of 5 cesarean deliveries using the Wiley Spinal intrathecal system (Epimed, Johnstown, New York), which was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. The intrathecal catheter system consists of a flexible 23-gauge intrathecal cannula over a 27-gauge pencil-point spinal needle. The placement of the intrathecal catheter was successful in all 5 cases; however, paresthesias in 3 cases and postdural puncture headaches in 2 cases complicated the placement and use of the device. Although the unique catheter-over-needle design facilitates the use of smaller-gauge spinal needles for dural puncture and larger-gauge catheters for medication administration, this case series using the Wiley Spinal suggests that paresthesias and postdural puncture headaches may still limit its widespread utilization. Future studies are needed to determine the true incidence of complications and to determine the role of continuous spinal anesthesia in the obstetric population.

  6. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter-Related Infections

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M.; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; MacRae, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections, exit-site infections, and tunnel infections are common complications related to hemodialysis central venous catheter use. The various definitions of catheter-related infections are reviewed, and various preventive strategies are discussed. Treatment options, for both empiric and definitive infections, including antibiotic locks and systemic antibiotics, are reviewed. PMID:28270921

  7. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter. (a) Identification. A nasopharyngeal catheter is a device consisting of a bougie or filiform catheter that is intended for use in probing or dilating the eustachian tube. This generic type of device...

  8. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter. (a) Identification. A nasopharyngeal catheter is a device consisting of a bougie or filiform catheter that is intended for use in probing or dilating the eustachian tube. This generic type of device...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1280 - Steerable catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter. 870.1280 Section 870.1280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1280 Steerable catheter. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter is...

  10. Bilateral Brachial Plexus Home Going Catheters After Digital Amputation for Patient With Upper Extremity Digital Gangrene

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A; Seif, John; Guirguis, Maged; Zaky, Sherif; Mounir-Soliman, Loran

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheter placement is used to control surgical pain. Performing bilateral brachial plexus block with catheters is not frequently performed; and in our case sending patient home with bilateral brachial plexus catheters has not been reported up to our knowledge. Our patient is a 57 years old male patient presented with bilateral upper extremity digital gangrene on digits 2 through 4 on both sides with no thumb involvement. The plan was to do the surgery under sequential axillary blocks. On the day of surgery a right axillary brachial plexus block was performed under ultrasound guidance using 20 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine. Patient was taken to the OR and the right fingers amputation was carried out under mild sedation without problems. Left axillary brachial plexus block was then done as the surgeon was closing the right side, two hours after the first block was performed. The left axillary block was done also under ultrasound using 20 ml of 2% mepivacaine. The brachial plexus blocks were performed in a sequential manner. Surgery was unremarkable, and patient was transferred to post anesthetic care unit in stable condition. Over that first postoperative night, the patient complained of severe pain at the surgical sites with minimal pain relief with parentral opioids. We placed bilateral brachial plexus catheters (right axillary and left infra-clavicular brachial plexus catheters). Ropivacaine 0.2% infusion was started at 7 ml per hour basal rate only with no boluses on each side. The patient was discharged home with the catheters in place after receiving the appropriate education. On discharge both catheters were connected to a single ON-Q (I-flow Corporation, Lake Forest, CA) ball pump with a 750 ml reservoir using a Y connection and were set to deliver a fixed rate of 7 ml for each catheter. The brachial plexus catheters were removed by the patient on day 5 after surgery without any difficulty. Patient's postoperative course was otherwise unremarkable

  11. Impacted material placement plans

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, M.J.

    1997-01-29

    Impacted material placement plans (IMPP) are documents identifying the essential elements in placing remediation wastes into disposal facilities. Remediation wastes or impacted material(s) are those components used in the construction of the disposal facility exclusive of the liners and caps. The components might include soils, concrete, rubble, debris, and other regulatory approved materials. The IMPP provides the details necessary for interested parties to understand the management and construction practices at the disposal facility. The IMPP should identify the regulatory requirements from applicable DOE Orders, the ROD(s) (where a part of a CERCLA remedy), closure plans, or any other relevant agreements or regulations. Also, how the impacted material will be tracked should be described. Finally, detailed descriptions of what will be placed and how it will be placed should be included. The placement of impacted material into approved on-site disposal facilities (OSDF) is an integral part of gaining regulatory approval. To obtain this approval, a detailed plan (Impacted Material Placement Plan [IMPP]) was developed for the Fernald OSDF. The IMPP provides detailed information for the DOE, site generators, the stakeholders, regulatory community, and the construction subcontractor placing various types of impacted material within the disposal facility.

  12. Effectiveness of different central venous catheters for catheter-related infections: a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Huang, T; Jing, J; Jin, J; Wang, P; Yang, M; Cui, W; Zheng, Y; Shen, H

    2010-09-01

    We aimed to compare the effectiveness of various catheters for prevention of catheter-related infection and to evaluate whether specific catheters are superior to others for reducing catheter-related infections. We identified randomised, controlled trials that compared different types of central venous catheter (CVC), evaluating catheter-related infections in a systematic search of articles published from January 1996 to November 2009 via Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Network meta-analysis with a mixed treatment comparison method using Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation was used to combine direct within-trial, between-treatment comparisons with indirect trial evidence. Forty-eight clinical trials (12 828 CVCs) investigating 10 intervention catheters contributed to the analyses. For prevention of CVC colonisation, adjusted silver iontophoretic catheters (odds ratio: 0.58; 95% confidence interval: 0.33-0.95), chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine catheters (0.49; 0.36-0.64), chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine blue plus catheters (0.37; 0.17-0.69), minocycline-rifampicin catheters (0.28; 0.17-0.43) and miconazole-rifampicin catheters (0.11; 0.02-0.33) were associated with a significantly lower rate of catheter colonisation compared with standard catheters. For prevention of CRBSI, adjusted heparin-bonded catheters (0.20; 0.06-0.44) and minocycline-rifampicin catheters (0.18; 0.08-0.34) were associated with a significantly lower rate of CRBSI with standard catheters. Rifampicin-based impregnated catheters seem to be better for prevention of catheter-related infection compared with the other catheters.

  13. Is the Routine Check Nephrostogram Following Percutaneous Antegrade Ureteric Stent Placement Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Soh, Keng Chuan; Tay, Kiang Hiong Tan, Bien Soo; MM Htoo, Austin; HG Lo, Richard; Lin, Shueh En

    2008-05-15

    Our aim was to review our experience with percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent (PAUS) placement and to determine if the routinely conducted check nephrostogram on the day following ureteric stent placement was necessary. Retrospective review of patients who had undergone PAUS placement between January 2004 and December 2005 was performed. There were 83 subjects (36 males, 47 females), with a mean age of 59.9 years (range, 22-94 years). Average follow-up duration was 7.1 months (range, 1-24 months). The most common indications for PAUS placement were ureteric obstruction due to metastatic disease (n = 56) and urinary calculi (n = 34). Technical success was 93.2% (96/103 attempts), with no major immediate procedure-related complications or mortalities. The Bard 7Fr Urosoft DJ Stent was used in more than 95% of the cases. Eighty-one of 89 (91.0%) check nephrostograms demonstrated a patent ureteric stent with resultant safety catheter removal. Three check nephrostograms revealed distal stent migration requiring repositioning by a goose-snare, while five others showed stent occlusion necessitating permanent external drainage by nephrostomy drainage catheter reinsertion. Following PAUS placement, the serum creatinine level improved or stabilized in 82% of patients. The serum creatinine outcome difference between the groups with benign and malignant indications for PAUS placement was not statistically significant (p = 0.145) but resolution of hydronephrosis was significantly better (p = 0.008) in patients with benign indications. Percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent placement is a safe and effective means of relief for ureteric obstruction. The check nephrostogram following ureteric stent placement was unnecessary in the majority of patients.

  14. Multi-purpose silastic dual-lumen central venous catheters for both collection and transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, H M; Trehan, S; Miller, R; Fox, R M; Creger, R J; Raaf, J H

    2000-04-01

    Autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation frequently requires sequential placement and use of two separate central venous catheters: (1) a short-term, large-bore, stiff device inserted for leukapheresis, and after removal of that device, (2) a long-term, multi-lumen, flexible, Silastic catheter for administration of high-dose chemotherapy, re-infusion of hematopoietic cells, and intensive supportive care. We reviewed our recent experience with two dual-lumen, large-bore, Silastic multi-purpose ('hybrid') catheters, each of which can be used as a single device for both leukapheresis and long-term supportive care throughout the transplant process. Quinton-Raaf PermCath and Bard-Hickman hemodialysis/apheresis dual-lumen catheters were used as the sole venous access device in 112 consecutive patients who underwent autologous PBPC collection and transplantation. The catheter exit site was monitored three times a week, and lumen patency was assessed using clinical and radiologic techniques. Catheters were removed prematurely for persistent thrombus, positive blood cultures despite appropriate antibiotics, or mechanical dysfunction. There were no intra-operative or immediate post-operative complications relating to insertion. Thirty-two patients experienced catheter occlusion necessitating urokinase instillation. Persistent occlusive problems were noted in 16 patients, and in 10 patients the catheter had to be removed. Two exit site infections and 17 bacteremias occurred. Catheters had to be removed for persistent infection in two subjects and for mechanical problems in five others. Cost analysis comparing the hybrid catheters alone vs conventional devices revealed a charge of $4230 in patients with hybrid catheters vs. $7530 in those requiring a temporary non-Silastic dialysis catheter in addition to a flexible, long-term Silastic catheter. Hybrid, Silastic, dual-lumen, large-bore central venous catheters are safe, cost-effective and convenient

  15. Patency and complications of translumbar dialysis catheters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. Results There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/min) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter and total catheter were 65, 84 and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6 and 12 months were 43%, 25% and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion This study data suggests that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  16. Catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Gahlot, Rupam; Nigam, Chaitanya; Kumar, Vikas; Yadav, Ghanshyam; Anupurba, Shampa

    2014-01-01

    Central-venous-catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are an important cause of hospital-acquired infection associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. Consequences depend on associated organisms, underlying pre-morbid conditions, timeliness, and appropriateness of the treatment/interventions received. We have summarized risk factors, pathogenesis, etiology, diagnosis, and management of CRBSI in this review. PMID:25024944

  17. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... flushing Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing Sterile technique Surgical wound care - open Review Date 9/17/2016 Updated by: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, ...

  18. Cytometric Catheter for Neurosurgical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Allison, Stephen W; Fillmore, Helen; Broaddus, William C; Dyer, Rachel L; Gillies, George

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of neural progenitor cells into the central nervous system has attracted strong interest for treatment of a variety of pathologies. For example, the replacement of dopamine-producing (DA) neural cells in the brain appears promising for the treatment of patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Previous studies of cell-replacement strategies have shown that less than 90% of implanted cells survive longer than 24 - 48 hours following the implantation procedure. However, it is unknown if these cells were viable upon delivery, or if they were affected by other factors such as brain pathology or an immune response. An instrumented cell-delivery catheter has been developed to assist in answering these questions by facilitating quantification and monitoring of the viability of the cells delivered. The catheter uses a fiber optic probe to perform flourescence-based cytometric measurments on cells exiting the port at the catheter tip. The current implementation of this design is on a 3.2 mm diameter catheter with 245 micrometer diameter optical fibers. Results of fluorescence testing data are presented and show that the device can characterize the quantity of cell densities ranging from 60,000 cells/ml to 600,000 cells/ml with a coefficient of determination of 0.93.

  19. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of Medical Grade Polyurethane Composite Catheters for Near-Infrared Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, André T.; Reese, Laura M.; Hill, Tanner K.; McGuire, Jeffrey; Mohs, Aaron M.; Shekhar, Raj; Bickford, Lissett R.; Whittington, Abby R.

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are hollow polymeric tubes that transport nutrients, blood and medications to neonates. To determine proper PICC placement, frequent X-ray imaging of neonates is performed. Because X-rays pose severe health risks to neonates, safer alternatives are needed. We hypothesize that near infrared (NIR) polymer composites can be fabricated into catheters by incorporating a fluorescent dye (IRDye 800CW) and visualized using NIR imaging. To fabricate catheters, polymer and dye are dry mixed and pressed, sectioned, and extruded to produce hollow tubes. We analyzed surface roughness, stiffness, dye retention, NIR contrast intensity, and biocompatibility. The extrusion process did not significantly alter the mechanical properties of the polymer composites. Over a period of 23 days, only 6.35 ± 5.08% dye leached out of catheters. The addition of 0.025 wt% dye resulted in a 14-fold contrast enhancement producing clear PICC images at 1 cm under a tissue equivalent. The addition of IRDye 800CW did not alter the biocompatibility of the polymer and did not increase adhesion of cells to the surface. We successfully demonstrated that catheters can be imaged without the use of harmful radiation and still maintain the same properties as the unaltered medical grade equivalent. PMID:25907050

  1. Continuous Low-dose-rate Irradiation of Iodine-125 Seeds Inhibiting Perineural Invasion in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zheng; Dong, Teng-Hui; Si, Pei-Ren; Shen, Wei; Bi, Yi-Liang; Min, Min; Chen, Xin; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perineural invasion (PNI) is a histopathological characteristic of pancreatic cancer (PanCa). The aim of this study was to observe the treatment effect of continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR) irradiation to PNI and assess the PNI-related pain relief caused by iodine-125 (125I) seed implantation. Methods: The in vitro PNI model established by co-culture with dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and cancer cells was interfered under 2 and 4 Gy of 125I seeds CLDR irradiation. The orthotopic models of PNI were established, and 125I seeds were implanted in tumor. The PNI-related molecules were analyzed. In 30 patients with panCa, the pain relief was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Pain intensity was measured before and 1 week, 2 weeks, and 1, 3, and 6 months after 125I seed implantation. Results: The co-culture of DRG and PanCa cells could promote the growth of PanCa cells and DRG neurites. In co-culture groups, the increased number of DRG neurites and pancreatic cells in radiation group was significantly less. In orthotopic models, the PNI-positive rate in radiation and control group was 3/11 and 7/11; meanwhile, the degrees of PNI between radiation and control groups was significant difference (P < 0.05). At week 2, the mean VAS pain score in patients decreased by 50% and significantly improved than the score at baseline (P < 0.05). The pain scores were lower in all patients, and the pain-relieving effect was retained about 3 months. Conclusions: The CLDR irradiation could inhibit PNI of PanCa with the value of further study. The CLDR irradiation could do great favor in preventing local recurrence and alleviating pain. PMID:27748339

  2. Microsurgical treatment of sacral perineural (Tarlov) cysts: case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Burke, John F; Thawani, Jayesh P; Berger, Ian; Nayak, Nikhil R; Stephen, James H; Farkas, Tunde; Aschyan, Hovik John; Pierce, John; Kanchwala, Suhail; Long, Donlin M; Welch, William C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Tarlov cysts (TCs) occur most commonly on extradural components of the sacral and coccygeal nerve roots. These lesions are often found incidentally, with an estimated prevalence of 4%-9%. Given the low estimated rates of symptomatic TC and the fact that symptoms can overlap with other common causes of low-back pain, optimal management of this entity is a matter of ongoing debate. Here, the authors investigate the effects of surgical intervention on symptomatic TCs and aim to solidify the surgical criteria for this disease process. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of data from consecutive patients who were surgically treated for symptomatic TCs from September 2011 to March 2013. Clinical evaluations and results from surveying pain and overall health were used. Univariate statistical analyses were performed. RESULTS Twenty-three adults (4 males, 19 females) who had been symptomatic for a mean of 47.4 months were treated with laminectomy, microsurgical exposure and/or imbrication, and paraspinous muscle flap closure. Eighteen patients (78.3%) had undergone prior interventions without sustained improvement. Thirteen patients (56.5%) underwent lumbar drainage for an average of 8.7 days following surgery. The mean follow-up was 14.4 months. Univariate analyses demonstrated that an advanced age (p = 0.045), the number of noted perineural cysts on preoperative imaging (p = 0.02), and the duration of preoperative symptoms (p = 0.03) were associated with a poor postoperative outcome. Although 47.8% of the patients were able to return to normal activities, 93.8% of those surveyed reported that they would undergo the operation again if given the choice. CONCLUSIONS This is one of the largest published studies on patients with TCs treated microsurgically. The data suggest that patients with symptomatic TCs may benefit from open microsurgical treatment. Although outcomes seem related to patient age, duration of symptoms, and extent of disease

  3. Interobserver Variation Among Pathologists in Evaluating Perineural Invasion for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chi, Angela C; Katabi, Nora; Chen, Huey-Shys; Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this study are as follows: (1) to assess variations among pathologists in evaluating perineural invasion (PNI) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), (2) to survey PNI criteria used by pathologists and how they came to adopt those criteria. An electronic survey was sent to 363 oral and/or surgical pathologists. Eligibility criteria included pathology board certification. The survey participants were asked to rate whether PNI was present, absent, or uncertain for 15 provided photomicrographs, which depicted various types of tumor-nerve relationships without excessive desmoplasia or lymphocytic host response. The survey obtained information regarding demographics, whether PNI criteria were taught during residency, criteria used by participants to evaluate PNI, how the participants developed their criteria, and agreement with six proposed PNI definitions. 88 pathologists completed the survey. The participants included 47 males and 41 females, with average age = 49 years and average practice experience = 17 years. Practice settings included dental school (40 %), medical school (36 %), private pathology lab (13 %), and other (11 %). Agreement between participants in rating PNI status for the provided images was fair (κ = .38, 95 % CI .37-.39). 56 % of respondents indicated that they were taught PNI criteria during residency training. The basis for criteria currently used by participants included residency training (n = 42), published literature (n = 29), and own experience/views (n = 32). Agreement regarding six proposed PNI definitions was slight (κ = .10, 95 % CI .08-.11). In conclusion, interobserver agreement in assessing PNI status was fair. Our results suggest that more widely accepted, objective, and reproducible criteria are needed for evaluating PNI in OSCC.

  4. Compartment syndrome in a patient treated with perineural liposomal bupivacaine (Exparel).

    PubMed

    Soberón, José Raul; Sisco-Wise, Leslie E; Dunbar, Ross M

    2016-06-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a condition that may result in sensorimotor deficits and loss of function of the affected limb as a result of ischemic injury. It is considered a surgical emergency and prompt diagnosis and treatment results in more favorable outcomes. The use of regional anesthesia is controversial in patients at risk for compartment syndrome due to concern of its potential to mask symptoms of the condition. A 44-year-old African American male presented to surgery for open reduction and internal fixation of a comminuted distal radius fracture. As part of an off-label, investigator-initiated, and institutional review board-approved study, he received a perineural injection of liposomal bupivacaine (Exparel) around the median, ulnar, and radial nerves at the level of the proximal forearm. The following morning, his initial complaints of numbness and incisional pain progressively evolved into worsening numbness, diffuse discomfort, and pain with passive movement. A diagnosis of compartment syndrome was made and he underwent an emergency fasciotomy. The diagnosis of compartment syndrome requires a high index of suspicion and prompt treatment. This patient's changing pattern of symptoms-rather than his pain complaints alone-resulted in the diagnosis of compartment syndrome treated with emergent fasciotomy in spite of finger numbness that was initially attributed to the liposomal bupivacaine. While the use of liposomal bupivacaine did not preclude the diagnosis of compartment syndrome in our patient, it should be used with caution in patients at risk for compartment syndrome until additional data, particularly regarding block characteristics, are available.

  5. Presentation of Neurolytic Effect of 10% Lidocaine after Perineural Ultrasound Guided Injection of a Canine Sciatic Nerve: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Asma; Kataria, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background Phenol and alcohol have been used to ablate nerves to treat pain but are not specific for nerves and can damage surrounding soft tissue. Lidocaine at concentrations > 8% injected intrathecal in the animal model has been shown to be neurotoxic. Tests the hypothesis that 10% lidocaine is neurolytic after a peri-neural blockade in an ex vivo experiment on the canine sciatic nerve. Methods Under ultrasound, one canine sciatic nerve was injected peri-neurally with 10 cc saline and another with 10 cc of 10% lidocaine. After 20 minutes, the sciatic nerve was dissected with gross inspection. A 3 cm segment was excised and preserved in 10% buffered formalin fixative solution. Both samples underwent progressive dehydration and infusion of paraffin after which they were placed on paraffin blocks. The sections were cut at 4 µm and stained with hemoxylin and eosin. Microscopic review was performed by a pathologist from Henry Ford Hospital who was blinded to which experimental group each sample was in. Results The lidocaine injected nerve demonstrated loss of gross architecture on visual inspection while the saline injected nerve did not. No gross changes were seen in the surrounding soft tissue seen in either group. The lidocaine injected sample showed basophilic degeneration with marked cytoplasmic vacuolation in the nerve fibers with separation of individual fibers and endoneurial edema. The saline injected sample showed normal neural tissue. Conclusions Ten percent lidocaine causes rapid neurolytic changes with ultrasound guided peri-neural injection. The study was limited by only a single nerve being tested with acute exposure. PMID:27413480

  6. Perineural capsaicin induces the uptake and transganglionic transport of choleratoxin B subunit by nociceptive C-fiber primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Oszlács, O; Jancsó, G; Kis, G; Dux, M; Sántha, P

    2015-12-17

    The distribution of spinal primary afferent terminals labeled transganglionically with the choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) or its conjugates changes profoundly after perineural treatment with capsaicin. Injection of CTB conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into an intact nerve labels somatotopically related areas in the ipsilateral dorsal horn with the exceptions of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa, whereas injection of this tracer into a capsaicin-pretreated nerve also results in massive labeling of these most superficial layers of the dorsal horn. The present study was initiated to clarify the role of C-fiber primary afferent neurons in this phenomenon. In L5 dorsal root ganglia, analysis of the size frequency distribution of neurons labeled after injection of CTB-HRP into the ipsilateral sciatic nerve treated previously with capsaicin or resiniferatoxin revealed a significant increase in the proportion of small neurons. In the spinal dorsal horn, capsaicin or resiniferatoxin pretreatment resulted in intense CTB-HRP labeling of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa. Electron microscopic histochemistry disclosed a dramatic, ∼10-fold increase in the proportion of CTB-HRP-labeled unmyelinated dorsal root axons following perineural capsaicin or resiniferatoxin. The present results indicate that CTB-HRP labeling of C-fiber dorsal root ganglion neurons and their central terminals after perineural treatment with vanilloid compounds may be explained by their phenotypic switch rather than a sprouting response of thick myelinated spinal afferents which, in an intact nerve, can be labeled selectively with CTB-HRP. The findings also suggest a role for GM1 ganglioside in the modulation of nociceptor function and pain.

  7. Microbial Biofilms on Needleless Connectors for Central Venous Catheters: Comparison of Standard and Silver-Coated Devices Collected from Patients in an Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T.; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P.; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P = 0.11). There were no significant associations (P > 0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P = 0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P = 0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  8. Microbial biofilms on needleless connectors for central venous catheters: comparison of standard and silver-coated devices collected from patients in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M Ryan; Donlan, Rodney M

    2014-03-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P=0.11). There were no significant associations (P>0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P=0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P=0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination.

  9. Facial Paralysis Secondary to Extensive Perineural Spread of Adenocarcinoma of the Parotid Gland Identified by PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Achong, Dwight M; Zloty, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Brain MRI in an 82-year-old man with presumed Bell's palsy revealed a clinically unsuspected right parotid gland mass but no other acute findings. Biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Staging F-FDG PET/CT revealed an FDG-avid parotid mass, abnormal FDG uptake along the course of the facial nerve from mass to skull base, and multiple FDG-avid right level II neck lymph nodes and hepatic metastases. The PET/CT findings and prolonged clinical course suggest that diffuse perineural spread of tumor from a smoldering parotid neoplasm, and not idiopathic Bell's palsy, was responsible for the patient's facial paralysis.

  10. Does Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improve Outcomes In pT1-3N0 Oral Cavity Cancer With Tumor-Free Margins and Perineural Invasion?

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The criteria for administration of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain controversial, and it is unclear whether patients with pT1-3N0 disease benefit from adjuvant radiation in the presence of free margins and perineural invasion. The goal of this report was to determine whether this group would benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy in terms of 5-year local control rate and overall survival rate. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed our case records from January 1996 to May 2005. In all, 460 pT1-3N0 OSCC patients had tumor-free margins, of whom 68 had perineural invasion. Postoperative adjuvant RT was performed in patients with pT4 tumors, positive lymph nodes, or close margins ({<=}4 mm). In addition, selected OSCC patients with large pT3 tumors or perineural invasion received postoperative adjuvant RT. Local control and overall survival rates were plotted by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: There were no significant differences in 5-year local control (p 0.1936) and overall survival (p = 0.5580) rates between patients with perineural invasion compared with those without. Among patients with perineural invasion, the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy did not significantly alter the 5-year local control rate (p = 0.3170) or the overall survival rate (p = 0.0935). Conclusion: Altogether, these data seem to indicate that radical surgical resection alone should be considered a sufficient treatment for OSCC patients with pT1-3N0 disease, even in the presence of perineural invasion.

  11. Endovascular Treatment of Superior Vena Cava Syndrome via Balloon-in-Balloon Catheter Technique with a Palmaz Stent

    PubMed Central

    Almanfi, Abdelkader; Massumi, Mehran; Dougherty, Kathryn G.; Parekh, Dhaval R.; Strickman, Neil E.

    2016-01-01

    Superior vena cava syndrome is a well-known disease entity that carries substantial rates of morbidity and mortality. Although most cases of superior vena cava syndrome are secondary to a malignant process, additional causes (such as mediastinal fibrosis, pacemaker lead implantation, or central venous catheter placement) have been reported. Multiple treatment options include percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, stent implantation, thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, and venous grafting. We present a case of superior vena cava syndrome in a symptomatic 30-year-old woman who obtained complete relief of obstruction and marked symptomatic improvement through venoplasty and stenting, aided by our use of a balloon-in-balloon catheter system. PMID:28100973

  12. The power peripherally inserted central catheter is superior to a central venous catheter in management of patients with esophageal variceal bleeding undergoing devascularization.

    PubMed

    Jing, Wen; Rong, He; Li, Jiang; Xia, Zhang Hai; Yu, Zhang Hong; Ke, Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Peripherally-inserted central catheters (PICC) have a greater retention time and less complications compared to central venous catheters (CVC). The study was conducted from From January of 2014 to December 2015 at Beijing DiTan Hospital, Beijing, China, and comprised 70 patients undergoing devascularisation. Of the total, 36(51.4%) patients underwent placement of PICC (Group A), while 34(48.6%) underwent had CVC (Group B). Venous catheterisation was successful in all patients. The median duration of venous catheterization in Group A was greater than that in Group B (p=0.002). Catheter-associated complications did not differ between the groups (p=0.46). The level of blood platelet (PLT) count, Prothrombin activity (PTA) and white blood cell (WBC) count before venous catheterisation were independent risk factors for bleeding at the puncture site and catheter-related infections. A Power PICC may be a better choice than a CVC in patients undergoing devascularisation requiring catheterisation. For patients with a lower PLT count, a decreased PTA, or a decreased WBC, venous catheterisation should be performed with caution.

  13. Risk factors for central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection: a 1073-patient study.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Junichi; Ishimaru, Toshiyuki; Fujimoto, Michiko; Hirata, Noriko; Matsubara, Nobuo; Koyanagi, Nobuhiro

    2008-12-01

    We intended to evaluate the risk factors for catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI) with central venous (CV) catheters. For the hub of the CV line, we used three-way stopcocks in the first year of the study and closed needleless connectors (NCs) in the second year. Background factors included the age and sex of patients; the ward; the specialty service; the CV catheter and its days of placement; and the staff compounding the intravenous infusion, i.e., either nurses, who disinfect hands-free, or pharmacists using clean benches. Outcome factors included positive culture from the blood-related samples and the body temperature estimate. Of a total of 29 221 device-days in 1073 patients, positive cultures showed an overall incidence of 2.26 per 1000 device-days. Multivariate analysis showed a higher odds ratio of positive cultures for the ICU (odds ratio [OR], 4.415; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.054-9.490]) and for CV catheter placement for more than 30 days (OR, 7.529; 95% CI, 4.279-13.247), but no significance for male sex (OR, 1.752; 95% CI, 0.984-3.119) or for pharmacists' compounding (OR, 2.150; 95% CI, 0.974-4.749). Univariate analysis showed no significance for the following factors: age more than 70 years (OR, 0.968; 95% CI 0.561-1.641), the surgery service (OR, 1.029; 95% CI, 0.582-1.818), double-lumen CV catheters (OR, 0.841; 95% CI, 0.465-1.521), or the NC (1.107; 95% CI, 0.673-1.821). We conclude that the theoretical benefit of the NC, the abolished dead space in the hub, contributed little to the outcomes of blood-related culture. The hands-free disinfection may have resulted in comparable odds ratios for the nurses and the pharmacists compounding the infusions.

  14. Coronary artery embolism from infectious endocarditis treated with catheter thrombectomy using a GuideLiner catheter.

    PubMed

    Oestreich, Brett A; Sommer, Per; Armstrong, Ehrin J

    2016-04-01

    A 27-year-old male with history of IV drug use and recurrent endocarditis necessitating bioprosthetic mitral and tricuspid valve replacements presented with 2 weeks of fevers and chest pain. ECG revealed inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction and he was taken urgently to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Coronary angiography revealed thrombotic occlusion of the distal right coronary artery (RCA) with no angiographic evidence of atherosclerotic disease. Aspiration thrombectomy was performed followed by rheolytic thrombectomy. Despite multiple attempts at thrombectomy, significant residual organized thrombus persisted in the distal RCA. Therefore, further thrombectomy was performed by placing a GuideLiner catheter (Vascular Solutions, Minneapolis, MN) deep within the right coronary artery near the bifurcation into the posterior descending and posterior left ventricular arteries. After repeat aspiration, there was significant improvement with thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 3 flow. Intravascular ultrasound of the RCA revealed a normal-appearing vessel without evidence of atherosclerotic disease and mild residual thrombus. The decision was made to not pursue stent placement, given the concern for a likely embolic source. Following the procedure, the patient's chest pain resolved and his ST-segments normalized.

  15. Clinical application of transanal ileal tube placement using X-ray monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dechun; Du, Hongtao; Shao, Guoqing; Xu, Yuanshun; Li, Ruihong; Tian, Qingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, which includes colon and rectal cancer, is a common digestive tract tumor. Although surgery is the primary form of treatment, there are a number of drawbacks, including patients experiencing considerable pain and high cost. The present study was undertaken to examine the clinical value of transanal ileal tube placement under X-ray monitoring. Thirty-six cases of left colon obstruction presenting to our hospital between July 2011 and February 2014, underwent transanal ileal tube placement using a single-curve catheter guided by a guidewire under X-ray monitoring. An ileal tube was successfully inserted into 32 patients. Clinical symptoms were alleviated effectively within 48 h. Indwelling catheter decompression time was 4–9 days with an average of 5.61 days. In two cases, the colon guidewire perforated into the abdominal cavity. Repeated exploration resistance of the guidewire and catheter indicated stenosis at this position owing to obstruction. In conclusion, transanal placement of the ileal tube through X-ray monitoring is capable of effectively alleviating the symptoms of ileus. Thus, this constitutes a safe, effective, and economical method that is acceptable to patients. PMID:28123533

  16. 7. View showing placement of timber deck placement on chord ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View showing placement of timber deck placement on chord and built up construction of top chord and continuous construction through top panel points, eye bar construction on bottom chord - Bridge No. 2.4, Spanning Boiling Fork Creek at Railroad Milepost JC-2.4, Decherd, Franklin County, TN

  17. Peripheral nerve catheters and local anesthetic infiltration in perioperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Christopher K; Mariano, Edward R; Kaye, Alan David; Lissauer, Jonathan; Mancuso, Kenneth; Prabhakar, Amit; Urman, Richard D

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters (PNCs) and local infiltration analgesia (LIA) represent valuable options for controlling perioperative pain. PNCs have been increasingly utilized to provide both surgical anesthesia and prolonged postoperative analgesia for a wide variety of procedures. PNCs can be more technically challenging to place than typical single-injection nerve blocks (SINB), and familiarity with the indications, contraindications, relevant anatomy, and appropriate technical skills is a prerequisite for the placement of any PNC. PNCs include risks of peripheral nerve injury, damage to adjacent anatomic structures, local anesthetic toxicity, intravascular injection, risks associated with motor block, risks of unnoticed injury to the insensate limb, and risks of sedation associated with PNC placement. In addition to these common risks, there are specific risks unique to each PNC insertion site. LIA strategies have emerged that seek to provide the benefit of targeted local anesthesia while minimizing collateral motor block and increasing the applicability of durable local anesthesia beyond the extremities. LIA involves the injection and/or infusion of a local anesthetic near the site of surgical incision to provide targeted analgesia. A wide variety of techniques have been described, including single-injection intraoperative wound infiltration, indwelling wound infusion catheters, and the recent high-volume LIA technique associated with joint replacement surgery. The efficacy of these techniques varies depending on specific procedures and anatomic locations. The recent incorporation of ultra-long-acting liposomal bupivacaine preparations has the potential to dramatically increase the utility of single-injection LIA. LIA represents a promising yet under-investigated method of postoperative pain control.

  18. Untangling of knotted urethral catheters.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Andrew J; Todd, Alistair

    2007-04-01

    Intravesical catheter knotting during micturating cystourethrography is a rare but recognized complication of the procedure. We were able to untangle a knot utilizing a fluoroscopically guided vascular guidewire. Following this success, a small study was performed using a model. Various types of guidewires and techniques were tested for different diameters of knots in order to predict the likelihood of success in this type of situation.

  19. Stromal-derived factor-1α/CXCL12-CXCR4 chemotactic pathway promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinhong; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Xin; Duan, Wanxing; Lei, Jianjun; Zong, Liang; Li, Xuqi; Sheng, Liang; Ma, Jiguang; Han, Liang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lun; Guo, Kun; Ma, Zhenhua; Wu, Zheng; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong

    2015-03-10

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is considered as an alternative route for the metastatic spread of pancreatic cancer cells; however, the molecular changes leading to PNI are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis plays a pivotal role in the neurotropism of pancreatic cancer cells to local peripheral nerves. Immunohistochemical staining results revealed that CXCR4 elevation correlated with PNI in 78 pancreatic cancer samples. Both in vitro and in vivo PNI models were applied to investigate the function of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in PNI progression and pathogenesis. The results showed that the activation of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis significantly increased pancreatic cancer cells invasion and promoted the outgrowth of the dorsal root ganglia. CXCL12 derived from the peripheral nerves stimulated the invasion and chemotactic migration of CXCR4-positive cancer cells in a paracrine manner, eventually leading to PNI. In vivo analyses revealed that the abrogation of the activated signaling inhibited tumor growth and invasion of the sciatic nerve toward the spinal cord. These data indicate that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis may be a novel therapeutic target to prevent the perineural dissemination of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Central vascular catheters and infections.

    PubMed

    Dioni, Elisabetta; Franceschini, Renata; Marzollo, Roberto; Oprandi, Daniela; Chirico, Gaetano

    2014-03-01

    Newborn infants in critical conditions require a permanent intra-venous line to allow for the administration of fluids, parenteral nutrition and drugs. The use of central venous catheters, however, is associated with an increased risk of infections, leading to prolongation of length of stay and higher hospitalization costs, particularly in extremely preterm infants. Dwell time is a significant factor for complications, with a predicted risk of catheter related infections of about 4 per 1000 catheter-days. To reduce the incidence of complications, several requirements must be met, including adequate staff and resources to provide education, training, and quality improvement programs, within a culture of communication and teamwork. Rigorous reporting schedule on line care and the implementation of unique bundle elements, the use of health care failure mode and effect analysis, the judicious use of antibiotics through an antimicrobial stewardship strategy, the application of specific antifungal prophylaxis are among the most effective interventions, while the addition of heparin to parenteral solution, or the use of antibiotic plus heparin lock therapy are under evaluation. Nursing assistance plays a fundamental role in managing central venous lines and in reducing or preventing the incidence of infection, by the application of several complex professional strategies.

  1. Infections associated with the central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Drasković, Biljana; Fabri, Izabella; Benka, Anna Uram; Rakić, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheters are of an essential importance to critically ill patients who require long-term venous access for various purposes. Their use made the treatment much easier, but still they are not harmless and are prone to numerous complications. Catheter infections represent the most significant complication in their use. The frequency of infections varies in different patient care settings, but their appearance mostly depends on the patient's health condition, catheter insertion time, localization of the catheter and type of the used catheter. Since they are one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections and related to significant number of morbidity and mortality in intensive care units, it is very important that maximal aseptic precautions are taken during the insertion and the maintenance period. Prevention of infection of the central venous catheters demands several measures that should be applied routinely.

  2. Position Control of Motion Compensation Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Kesner, Samuel B.; Howe, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Robotic catheters have the potential to revolutionize cardiac surgery by enabling minimally invasive structural repairs within the beating heart. This paper presents an actuated catheter system that compensates for the fast motion of cardiac tissue using 3D ultrasound image guidance. We describe the design and operation of the mechanical drive system and catheter module and analyze the catheter performance limitations of friction and backlash in detail. To mitigate these limitations, we propose and evaluate mechanical and control system compensation methods, including inverse and model-based backlash compensation, to improve the system performance. Finally, in vivo results are presented that demonstrate that the catheter can track the cardiac tissue motion with less than 1 mm RMS error. The ultimate goal of this research is to create a fast and dexterous robotic catheter system that can perform surgery on the delicate structures inside of the beating heart. PMID:21874124

  3. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Warren, J W

    2001-04-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection acquired in both hospitals and nursing homes and is usually associated with catheterization. This infection would be even more common but for the use of the closed catheter system. Most modifications have not improved on the closed catheter itself. Even with meticulous care, this system will not prevent bacteriuria. After bacteriuria develops, the ability to limit its complications is minimal. Once a catheter is put in place, the clinician must keep two concepts in mind: keep the catheter system closed in order to postpone the onset of bacteriuria, and remove the catheter as soon as possible. If the catheter can be removed before bacteriuria develops, postponement becomes prevention.

  4. Accidental Entrapment of Electrical Mapping Catheter by Chiari's Network in Right Atrium during Catheter Ablation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Sakakibara, Tomoaki; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to frequent palpitation. His electrocardiogram (ECG) presented regular narrow QRS tachycardia with 170 bpm, and catheter ablation was planned. During electroanatomical mapping of the right atrium (RA) with a multiloop mapping catheter, the catheter head was entrapped nearby the ostium of inferior vena cava. Rotation and traction of the catheter failed to detach the catheter head from the RA wall. Exfoliation of connective tissue twined around catheter tip by forceps, which were designed for endomyocardial biopsy, succeeded to retract and remove the catheter. Postprocedural echocardiography and pathologic examination proved the existence of Chiari's network. The handling of complex catheters in the RA has a potential risk of entrapment with Chiari's network. PMID:27366332

  5. MAPP: A Mathematics Placement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doblin, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    MAPP (A Mathematics Placement Program) uses two COBOL programs to place entering freshmen in mathematics courses which are commensurate with their backgrounds and abilities. Having been used for three years, the program is considered to be a viable alternative to the traditional mathematics placement process. (Author/JKS)

  6. [Developmental Placement.] Collected Research References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorklund, Gail

    Drawing on information and references in the ERIC system, this literature review describes research related to a child's developmental placement. The issues examined include school entrance age; predictive validity, reliability, and features of Gesell School Readiness Assessment; retention; and the effectiveness of developmental placement. A…

  7. Improvement of Job Placement Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    The Improvement of Job Placement Services Project was undertaken to examine and strengthen job placement services and programs in the California community colleges. Specific objectives of the project were to: (1) select and convene a 12-member representative advisory committee to oversee project operations working with the California Placement…

  8. Placement and Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shippen, Samuel Joseph, Ed.; Wasil, Raymond A., Ed.

    This document contains a compilation of original manuscripts written by competent authorities in the field of job placement services for students. Viewing placement as both a product and an integral part of a developmental process, these papers are divided into the following six topical areas: (1) information, (2) exploration, (3) counseling, (4)…

  9. College Student Personnel Graduate Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Richard M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This study reports results of ACPA Commission XII's survey of 101 college student personnel training institutions regarding their graduate placement. Graduates were identified according to degree, race, and sex. Percentages of graduates placed, specialty areas, types of institutions, areas of the country, and time and method of placement were…

  10. Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access for therapeutic apheresis procedures reduces need for central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Eric; Garcia, Salvador; Miguel, Robin; Segura, Francisco J; Ipe, Tina S; Leveque, Christopher

    2016-08-10

    Therapeutic and donor apheresis requires adequate vascular access to achieve inlet flow rates of ∼50-100 mL/min. While central dialysis-type venous catheters can usually provide such access, their use includes several associated risks. Some of these risks can be avoided or diminished if adequate peripheral venous access can be established. Some patients have adequate peripheral veins for apheresis that cannot be readily identified visually or by palpation. We hypothesized that ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access would benefit such patients and would lead to placement of fewer central venous catheters. The technique of ultrasound-guided peripheral access for apheresis has been in use at Houston Methodist Hospital since 2012. We performed a prospective review of patients undergoing inpatient and outpatient apheresis at Houston Methodist Hospital from July 1, 2015 to September 30, 2015, to assess its benefit. During this time, we performed 831 procedures on 186 patients, including 787 therapeutic plasma exchanges, three red blood cell exchanges, 41 peripheral stem cell collections. Ultrasound-guided vascular access was used for 68 procedures (8% of all procedures), including 62 therapeutic plasma exchanges, 4 peripheral stem cell collections, and 2 red blood cell changes. Use of ultrasound-guided peripheral access prevented the placement of central venous catheters in 37 (20%) patients, demonstrating its utility in a busy transfusion service.

  11. Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Donato, Concetta; De Carolis, Elena; Vella, Antonietta; Vaccaro, Luisa; La Greca, Antonio; Fantoni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheter-related fungemia are increasing in the last years, also due to rare fungi. We report the case of a Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection in a patient with metastatic carcinoma of the bladder and a long term totally implanted venous catheter. The diagnosis was done by paired blood cultures and differential time to positivity. The Candida species was rapidly identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The patient was successfully treated with anidulafungine. PMID:25473600

  12. Thrombolytic therapy for central venous catheter occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Jacquelyn L.; Reiss, Ulrike; Wilimas, Judith A.; Metzger, Monika L.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-term central venous catheters have improved the quality of care for patients with chronic illnesses, but are complicated by obstructions which can result in delay of treatment or catheter removal. Design and Methods This paper reviews thrombolytic treatment for catheter obstruction. Literature from Medline searches using the terms “central venous catheter”, “central venous access device” OR “central venous line” associated with the terms “obstruction”, “occlusion” OR “thrombolytic” was reviewed. Efficacy of thrombolytic therapy, central venous catheter clearance rates and time to clearance were assessed. Results Alteplase, one of the current therapies, clears 52% of obstructed catheters within 30 min with 86% overall clearance (after 2 doses, when necessary). However, newer medications may have higher efficacy or shorter time to clearance. Reteplase cleared 67–74% within 30–40 min and 95% of catheters overall. Occlusions were resolved in 70 and 83% of patients with one and 2 doses of tenecteplase, respectively. Recombinant urokinase cleared 60% of catheters at 30 min and 73% overall. Alfimeprase demonstrated rapid catheter clearance with resolution in 40% of subjects within 5 min, 60% within 30 min, and 80% within 2 h. Additionally, urokinase prophylaxis decreased the incidence of catheter occlusions from 16–68% in the control group to 4–23% in the treatment group; in some studies, rates of catheter infections were also decreased in the urokinase group. Conclusions Thrombolytic agents successfully clear central venous catheter occlusions in most cases. Newer agents may act more rapidly and effectively than currently utilized therapies, but randomized studies with direct comparisons of these agents are needed to determine optimal management for catheter obstruction. PMID:22180420

  13. Use of a percutaneous transabdominal catheter for management of obstructive urolithiasis in goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs: 69 cases (2000-2014).

    PubMed

    Chigerwe, Munashe; Heller, Meera C; Balcomb, Christie C; Angelos, John A

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the use of a percutaneous transabdominal catheter (PTC) for urinary bladder drainage in goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs with obstructive urolithiasis. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 43 goats, 10 sheep, and 16 potbellied pigs (all males) with obstructive urolithiasis evaluated at the University of California-Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital. PROCEDURES Medical records of goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs examined because of obstructive urolithiasis from January 2000 through December 2014 were reviewed. Records of animals for which a standard PTC had been placed into the urinary bladder as part of disease management were selected. Data were collected regarding signalment, complications associated with PTC placement, and duration of PTC placement prior to removal. RESULTS 42 of 43 goats, 5 of 10 sheep, and all potbellied pigs were castrated. Median (range) duration of PTC placement was 2 (1 to 4) days for goats, 1 (1 to 4) day for sheep, and 1 (1 to 3) day for potbellied pigs. Complications associated with PTC placement included blockage of the catheter by urine sediment, perforation of the cecum, and migration of the catheter out of the urinary bladder. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Placement of a PTC into the urinary bladder allowed for effective stabilization of goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs with obstructive urolithiasis while acid-base and electrolyte imbalances were corrected. Use of a PTC should be considered for urinary bladder drainage during medical management or prior to surgical management of obstructive urolithiasis for these species.

  14. Erroneous laboratory values obtained from central catheters.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J B; Messina, M

    1991-01-01

    Serious analytic errors in potassium measurements have been identified in blood specimens obtained from newly inserted central catheters. Erroneous elevated readings have been related to interactions of chemistry analyzer electrodes and substances fixed to external and intraluminal walls of the central catheter. Anecdotal summaries of this phenomenon are presented to enable the nurse to recognize potential problems when sampling blood from central catheters. Studies were performed to determine the amount of flush necessary to clear the catheter of interfering residue. To eliminate this potentially hazardous occurrence, recommended flush volumes, nursing implications, and actions are described.

  15. Housestaff Knowledge Related to Urinary Catheter Utilization and Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTIs)

    PubMed Central

    Paras, Molly L.; Shenoy, Erica S.; Hsu, Heather E.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Hooper, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite published catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) prevention guidelines, inappropriate catheter use is common. We surveyed housestaff about their knowledge of CAUTIs at a teaching hospital and found the majority is aware of prevention guidelines; however, their application to clinical scenarios and catheter practices fall short of national goals. PMID:26278269

  16. Catheter indwell time and phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration

    PubMed Central

    Pasalioglu, Kadriye Burcu; Kaya, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Intravenous catheters have been indispensable tools of modern medicine. Although intravenous applications can be used for a multitude of purposes, these applications may cause complications, some of which have serious effects. Of these complications, the most commonly observed is phlebitis. This study was conducted to determine the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. Methods: This study determined the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. The study included a total of 103 individuals who were administered 439 catheters and satisfied the study enrollment criteria at one infectious diseases clinic in Istanbul/Turkey. Data were compiled from Patient Information Forms, Peripheral Intravenous Catheter and Therapy Information Forms, reported grades based on the Visual Infusion Phlebitis Assessment Scale, and Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Nurse Observation Forms. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Results : The mean patient age was 53.75±15.54 (standard deviation) years, and 59.2% of the study participants were men. Phlebitis was detected in 41.2% of peripheral intravenous catheters, and the rate decreased with increased catheter indwell time. Analyses showed that catheter indwell time, antibiotic usage, sex, and catheterization sites were significantly associated with development of phlebitis. Conclusion: The results of this study show that catheters can be used for longer periods of time when administered under optimal conditions and with appropriate surveillance. PMID:25097505

  17. Relationship of the location of the ventricular catheter tip and function of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shoko Merrit; Kitagawa, Ryo; Teramoto, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The long-term maintenance of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt function depends on the correct placement of the catheter tip in the lateral ventricle. The relationship between the location of the ventricular catheter tip and VP shunt function was analyzed in 52 patients. The location of the ventricular catheter tip was classified into one of the following five groups: (i) Group A--superior to the foramen of Monro; (ii) Group B--in the center of the lateral ventricle body; (iii) Group C--in the third ventricle; (iv) Group D--contacting the ventricle wall; and (v) Group E--in the septum pellucidum. VP shunt function was defined as well controlled hydrocephalus when the Evan's ratio of the ventricular size was < 0.3. The VP shunt functioned well in 14 of 52 patients (26.9%), the shunt valve pressure was incorrectly set in 21 (40.4%), and irreversible shunt malfunction was identified in 17 (32.7%). Among the 14 patients with a well-functioning shunt, 13 were in Groups A or B with an odds ratio (OR) of 17.875 (p<0.05). In the 17 irreversible shunt malfunctions, 13 were identified in Groups C, D, or E with an OR of 0.123 (p<0.05). Long term VP shunt function or failure due to irreversible malfunction is directly influenced by the position of the ventricular catheter tip. Ideal points for positioning the ventricular catheter tip are superior to the foramen of Monro and in the center of the lateral ventricle body. Early shunt revision may be required for patients in whom the catheter tip contacts the ventricle wall or is located in the septum pellucidum.

  18. Cross-sectional imaging of thoracic and abdominal complications of cerebrospinal fluid shunt catheters.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Ferdia; Fardanesh, Reza; Morgan, Tara; Katz, Douglas S; Daly, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to review the imaging findings of distal (thoracic and abdominal) complications related to ventriculo-peritoneal (VP), ventriculo-pleural (VPL), and ventriculo-atrial (VA) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt catheter placement. Institution review board-approved single-center study of patients with thoracic and abdominal CSF catheter-related complications on cross-sectional imaging examinations over a 14-year period was performed. Clinical presentation, patient demographics, prior medical history, and subsequent surgical treatment were recorded. The presence or absence of CSF catheter-related infection and/or acute hydrocephalus on cross-sectional imaging was also recorded. There were 81 distal CSF catheter-related complications identified on 47 thoracic or abdominal imaging examinations in 30 patients (age 5-80 years, mean 39.3 years), most often on CT (CT = 42, MRI = 1, US = 4). Complications included 38 intraperitoneal and 11 extraperitoneal fluid collections. Extraperitoneal collections included nine abdominal wall subcutaneous (SC) pseudocysts associated with shunt migration and obesity, an intrapleural pseudocyst, and a breast pseudocyst. There were also two large VPL-related pleural effusions, a fractured catheter in the SC tissues, and a large VA shunt thrombus within the right atrium. Ten patients (33.3 %) had culture-positive infection from CSF or shunt catheter samples. Ten patients (33.3 %) had features of temporally related acute or worsening hydrocephalus on neuroimaging. In four of these patients, the detection of thoracic and abdominal complications on CT preceded and predicted the findings of acute hydrocephalus on cranial imaging. Thoracic and abdominal complications of CSF shunts, as can be identified on CT, include shunt infection and/or obstruction, may be both multiple and recurrent, and may be predictive of concurrent acute intracranial problems.

  19. Percutaneous Implantation of a Catheter with Subcutaneous Reservoir for Intraarterial Regional Chemotherapy: Technique and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Grosso, Maurizio; Zanon, Claudio; Mancini, Andrea; Garruso, Matteo; Gazzera, Carlo; Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo; Veglia, Simona; Gandini, Giovanni

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: We present the technique and the preliminary results of percutaneous implantation of intraarterial catheters connected to a subcutaneous infusion reservoir for prolonged regional chemotherapy of hepatic and extrahepatic tumors.Methods: Two hundred patients with primary or secondary hepatic neoplasms, pelvic, pancreatic, renal, lingual, and breast cancer underwent the procedure. The access was the left axillary artery (188 patients) and the femoral artery (12 patients). The catheter tip was placed in the hepatic (170 patients), hypogastric (18), splenic (4), internal thoracic (2), gastroduodenal (3), renal (2) or the external carotid artery (1). The catheter was connected to a subcutaneous reservoir and filled with heparin; chemotherapeutic infusion was subsequently started.Results: One hundred percent immediate technical success was obtained. Forty-three of 200 (21.5%) patients had a complication: 29 patients had a catheter dislodgment, nine had arterial thrombosis, three had a pseudoaneurysm of the left axillary artery and two had a port pocket hematoma. Most complications (37/43, 86%) were treated percutaneously without interruption of chemotherapy. In only six cases (3% of the total population) was chemotherapy discontinued due to the complication itself. The mean duration of catheter patency was 7.2 months.Conclusion: Percutaneous placement of an intraarterial catheter is feasible and causes less discomfort to the patient than the surgical approach. The technique has an acceptable complication rate (21.5%), similar to that for surgical implantation (17.8%), with the advantage that in most cases the complications can be resolved percutaneously. This technique represents an alternative to surgical implantation in the treatment of liver metastases from colorectal cancer and opens new therapeutic possibilities for the local prolonged treatment of other kinds of tumor, though its clinical efficacy must be assessed in selected trials.

  20. Ultrasound for Localization of Central Venous Catheter: A Good Alternative to Chest X-Ray?

    PubMed Central

    Kamalipour, Hamid; Ahmadi, Sedigheh; Kamali, Karmella; Moaref, Alireza; Shafa, Masih; Kamalipour, Parsa

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest radiography after central venous catheter (CVC) insertion is the main method of verifying the catheter location. Despite the widespread use of radiography for detecting catheter position, x-ray may not always be readily available, especially in the operating room. Objectives We aimed to compare contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and chest radiography for detecting the correct location of CVCs. Methods One hundred sixteen consecutive patients with indications for CVC before cardiac surgery were enrolled in this observational study. After catheter insertion, CEUS was performed. Portable radiography was obtained postoperatively in the intensive care unit. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were determined by comparing the ultrasonography results with radiographic findings as a reference standard. Results Chest radiography revealed 16 CVC misplacements: two cases of intravascular and 14 cases of right atrium (RA) misplacement. CEUS detected 11 true catheter malpositionings in the RA, while it could not recognize seven catheter placements correctly. CEUS showed two false RA misplacements and five falsely correct CVC positions. A sensitivity of 98% and specificity of 69% were achieved for CEUS in detecting CVC misplacements. Positive and negative predictive values were 95% and 85%, respectively. The interrater agreement (kappa) between CEUS and radiography was 0.72 (P < 0.001). Conclusions Despite close concordance between ultrasonography and chest radiography, CEUS is not a suitable alternative for standard chest radiography in detecting CVC location; however, considering its high sensitivity and acceptable specificity in our study, its usefulness as a triage method for detecting CVC location on a real-time basis in the operating room cannot be ignored. PMID:27847699

  1. An Endovascular Approach to the Entrapped Central Venous Catheter After Cardiac Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Shamit S.; Konanur, Meghana; Foltz, Gretchen; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Resnick, Scott

    2016-03-15

    PurposeEntrapment of central venous catheters (CVC) at the superior vena cava (SVC) cardiopulmonary bypass cannulation site by closing purse-string sutures is a rare complication of cardiac surgery. Historically, resternotomy has been required for suture release. An endovascular catheter release approach was developed.Materials and MethodsFour cases of CVC tethering against the SVC wall and associated resistance to removal, suggestive of entrapment, were encountered. In each case, catheter removal was achieved using a reverse catheter fluoroscopically guided over the suture fixation point between catheter and SVC wall, followed by the placement of a guidewire through the catheter. The guidewire was snared and externalized to create a through-and-through access with the apex of the loop around the suture. A snare placed from the femoral venous access provided concurrent downward traction on the distal CVC during suture release maneuvers.ResultsIn the initial attempt, gentle traction freed the CVC, which fractured and was removed in two sections. In the subsequent three cases, traction alone did not release the CVC. Therefore, a cutting balloon was introduced over the guidewire and inflated. Gentle back-and-forth motion of the cutting balloon atherotomes successfully incised the suture in all three attempts. No significant postprocedural complications were encountered. During all cases, a cardiovascular surgeon was present in the interventional suite and prepared for emergent resternotomy, if necessary.ConclusionAn endovascular algorithm to the “entrapped CVC” is proposed, which likely reduces risks posed by resternotomy to cardiac surgery patients in the post-operative period.

  2. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    MedlinePlus

    ... correct position. Next, the surgeon will move a wire through the catheter to the blockage. Another catheter ... on the end will be pushed over this wire and into the blockage. Then the balloon is ...

  3. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to help prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections if I have a catheter? • Always clean your hands before and after doing catheter care. • Always keep your urine bag below the level ...

  4. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  9. Perineural Mast Cells Are Specifically Enriched in Pancreatic Neuritis and Neuropathic Pain in Pancreatic Cancer and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Kehl, Timo; Giese, Nathalia A.; Algül, Hana; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pancreatic neuritis is a histopathological hallmark of pancreatic neuropathy and correlates to abdominal neuropathic pain sensation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PCa) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, inflammatory cell subtypes that compose pancreatic neuritis and their correlation to the neuropathic pain syndrome in PCa and CP are yet unknown. Methods Inflammatory cells within pancreatic neuritis lesions of patients with PCa (n = 20) and CP (n = 20) were immunolabeled and colorimetrically quantified with the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, with CD68 (macrophages), CD8 (cytotoxic T-lymphocytes), CD4 (T-helper cells), CD20 (B-lymphocytes), NCL-PC (plasma cells), neutrophil elastase, PRG2 (eosinophils), anti-mast cell (MC) tryptase and correlated to pain sensation. Perineural mast cell subtypes were analyzed by double immunolabeling with MC chymase. Expression and neural immunoreactivity of protease-activated receptor type 1 (PAR-1) and type 2 (PAR-2) were analyzed in PCa and CP and correlated to pain status of the patients. Results In PCa and CP, nerves were predominantly infiltrated by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (PCa: 35% of all perineural inflammatory cells, CP: 33%), macrophages (PCa: 39%, CP: 33%) and MC (PCa: 21%, CP: 27%). In both entities, neuropathic pain sensation was associated with a specific increase of perineural MC (PCa without pain: 14% vs. PCa with pain: 31%; CP without pain: 19% vs. CP with pain: 34%), not affecting the frequency of other inflammatory cell subtypes. The vast majority of these MC contained MC chymase. PAR-1 and PAR-2 expression did not correlate to the pain sensation of PCa and CP patients. Conclusion Pancreatic neuritis in PC and CP is composed of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, macrophages and MC. The specific enrichment of MC around intrapancreatic nerves in neuropathic pain due to PCa and CP suggests the presence of MC-induced visceral hypersensitivity in the pancreas. Therefore, pancreatic and enteric neuropathies seem

  10. Sacral laminoplasty and cystic fenestration in the treatment of symptomatic sacral perineural (Tarlov) cysts: Technical case report

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary A.; Li, Zhenzhou; Raphael, Dan; Khoo, Larry T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Perineural cysts of the sacrum, or Tarlov cysts, are cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-filled sacs that commonly occur at the intersection of the dorsal root ganglion and posterior nerve root in the lumbosacral spine. Although often asymptomatic, these cysts have the potential to produce significant symptoms, including pain, weakness, and/or bowel or bladder incontinence. We present a case in which the sacral roof is removed and reconstructed via plated laminoplasty and describe how this technique could be of potential use in maximizing outcomes. Methods: We describe technical aspects of a sacral laminoplasty in conjunction with cyst fenestration for a symptomatic sacral perineural cyst in a 50-year-old female with severe sacral pain, lumbosacral radiculopathy, and progressive incontinence. This patient had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT)-myelographic evidence of a non-filling, 1.7 × 1.4 cm perineural cyst that was causing significant compression of the cauda equina and sacral nerve roots. This surgical technique was also employed in a total of 18 patients for symptomatic tarlov cysts with their radiographic and clinical results followed in a prospective fashion. Results: Intraoperative images, drawings, and video are presented to demonstrate both the technical aspects of this technique and the regional anatomy. Postoperative MRI scan demonstrated complete removal of the Tarlov cyst. The patient's symptoms improved dramatically and she regained normal bladder function. There was no evidence of radiographic recurrence at 12 months. At an average 16 month followup interval 10/18 patients had significant relief with mild or no residual complaints, 3/18 reported relief but had persistent coccydynia around the surgical area, 2/18 had primary relief but developed new low back pain and/or lumbar radiculopathy, 2/18 remained at their preoperative level of symptoms, and 1/18 had relief of their preoperative leg pain but developed new pain

  11. Successful retrieval of an irretrievable jugular tesio catheter using a fogarty arterial embolectomy catheter.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Gutiérrez-Diez, Francisco; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier; Expósito, Víctor; Nistal, Juan Francisco; Rodríquez-Entem, Felipe; Olalla, Juan José; López-Rodríguez, Javier; González-Santos, José María

    2014-05-01

    Long life expectancy and wide development of therapies have increased the number of patients under artificial treatment for lost kidney function or dialysis. Different options for vascular access are suitable for receiving this therapy. The use of tunneled catheters has consequently increased complications related to its use. A difficult retrieval of catheters caused by a hard fibrin sheath along its trajectory is a common drawback. Herein, we report a woman with suspicion of hemodialysis catheter infection and an irretrievable Tesio catheter. A novel technique using a Fogarty arterial catheter allowed a successful retrieval and avoided an aggressive management.

  12. Elimination of pneumothorax and hemothorax during placement of implantable venous access ports using ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, Grant T; Fowl, Richard J; Stone, William M; Money, Samuel R

    2013-12-01

    Implantable venous access ports are essential for patients requiring chronic venous access. Ultrasound guided catheter placement has been recognized as a valuable adjunct for reducing complications during placement of access ports in the radiology and critical care medicine literature. We reviewed the medical records of patients undergoing insertion of implantable venous access ports from June 2006 through June 2009. All procedures were performed using ultrasound guidance with the internal jugular vein as the access site. There were 500 implantable venous access ports placed and included for review. There were no post-procedure pneumothoraces or hemothoraces. Carotid puncture was documented in 4 (0.8%)cases. Routine use of ultrasound guidance during placement of implantable venous access ports has eliminated the complications of pneumothorax and hemothorax during placement of internal jugular venous access ports on our vascular surgery service. Elimination of these complications and decreased use of chest x-rays should also provide increased cost savings for this procedure.

  13. Low Cardiac Output Secondary to a Malpositioned Umbilical Venous Catheter: Value of Targeted Neonatal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Dany E.; Poon, Wei Bing; James, Andrew; McNamara, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic hypotension is common in very low birthweight preterm infants but the nature of the precipitating cause may be unclear. Targeted neonatal echocardiography (TnEcho) is being increasingly used to support hemodynamic decisions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), including identifying impairments in the transitional circulation of preterm infants, providing timely re-evaluation after institution of therapies and evaluating the placement of indwelling catheters. We present a case of a preterm infant with systemic hypotension and low cardiac output secondary to a large transatrial shunt induced by a malpositioned umbilical venous catheter. Repositioning of the line led to resolution of the hemodynamic disturbance and clinical instability, highlighting the utility of TnEcho in the NICU. PMID:25032055

  14. Transanal presentation of a distal ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheter: Management of bowel perforation without laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Bales, James; Morton, Ryan P.; Airhart, Nathan; Flum, David; Avellino, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bowel perforation is a serious but rare complication after a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) procedure. Prior studies have reported spontaneous bowel perforation after VPS placement in adults of up to 0.07%. Transanal catheter protrusion is a potential presentation of VPS bowel perforation and places a patient at risk for both peritonitis and ventriculitis/meningitis via retrograde migration of bacteria. This delayed complication can be fatal if unrecognized, with a 15% risk of mortality secondary to ventriculitis, peritonitis, or sepsis. Case Description: We describe a unique case of a patient with distal VPS catheter protrusion from the anus whose bowel perforation did not cause clinical sequelae of infection. We were able to manage the patient without laparotomy. Conclusions: A subset of patients can be managed without laparotomy and only with externalization of the ventricular shunt with antibiotics until the cerebrospinal fluid cultures finalize without growth. PMID:28194303

  15. Robust pigtail catheter tip detection in fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Wang, Peng; Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-02-01

    The pigtail catheter is a type of catheter inserted into the human body during interventional surgeries such as the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The catheter is characterized by a tightly curled end in order to remain attached to a valve pocket during the intervention, and it is used to inject contrast agent for the visualization of the vessel in fluoroscopy. Image-based detection of this catheter is used during TAVI, in order to overlay a model of the aorta and enhance visibility during the surgery. Due to the different possible projection angles in fluoroscopy, the pigtail tip can appear in a variety of different shapes spanning from pure circular to ellipsoid or even line. Furthermore, the appearance of the catheter tip is radically altered when the contrast agent is injected during the intervention or when it is occluded by other devices. All these factors make the robust real-time detection and tracking of the pigtail catheter a challenging task. To address these challenges, this paper proposes a new tree-structured, hierarchical detection scheme, based on a shape categorization of the pigtail catheter tip, and a combination of novel Haar features. The proposed framework demonstrates improved detection performance, through a validation on a data set consisting of 272 sequences with more than 20,000 images. The detection framework presented in this paper is not limited to pigtail catheter detection, but it can also be applied successfully to any other shape-varying object with similar characteristics.

  16. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Brattain, Laura J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  17. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  18. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  19. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  20. Haemodialysis catheters in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Huriaux, Laetitia; Costille, Paul; Quintard, Hervé; Journois, Didier; Kellum, John A; Rimmelé, Thomas

    2016-11-29

    Ten to 15% of critically ill patients need renal replacement therapy (RRT) for severe acute kidney injury. The dialysis catheter is critical for RRT quality and efficiency. Catheters have several properties that must be optimized to promote RRT success. The distal tip has to be located in a high blood flow location, which means central venous territory. Therefore, catheters are mostly inserted into the right internal jugular vein or in femoral veins. External diameter should vary from 12 to 16 Fr in order to ensure adequate blood flow inside the catheter. Lumen shapes are theoretically designed to limit thrombotic risk with low turbulences and frictional forces against the internal wall. With low aspiration pressure, distal tip shape has to deliver sufficient blood flow, while limiting recirculation rate. Catheter material should be biocompatible. Despite in vitro data, no strong evidence supports the use of coated catheters in the ICU in order to reduce infectious risk. Antibiotic "lock" solutions are not routinely recommended. Ultrasound guidance for catheterization significantly decreases mechanical complications. Clinicians should select the optimal catheter according to patient body habitus, catheter intrinsic properties and RRT modality to be used.

  1. Cost/benefit analysis of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated venous catheters for femoral access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo; Lecuona, María; Jiménez, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Lisset; Diosdado, Sara; Marca, Lucía; Mora, María L

    2014-10-01

    Sixty-four patients with chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters had a lower rate of catheter-related bloodstream infection and lower central venous catheter-related costs per catheter day than 190 patients with a standard catheter.

  2. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  3. Prevention of central venous catheter bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Walz, J Matthias; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Heard, Stephen O

    2010-01-01

    The majority of nosocomial bloodstream infections in critically ill patients originate from an infected central venous catheter (CVC). Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) cause significant morbidity and mortality and increase the cost of care. The most frequent causative organisms for CRBSI are coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNSs), Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, and Candida species. The path to infection frequently includes migration of skin organisms at the insertion site into the cutaneous catheter tract, resulting in microbial colonization of the catheter tip and formation of biofilm. Evidence-based strategies for the prevention of CRBSI include behavioral and educational interventions, effective skin antisepsis coupled with maximum barrier precautions, the use of antiseptic dressings, and the use of antiseptic or antibiotic impregnated catheters. Achieving and maintaining very low rates of CRBSI requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the entire health care team, the use of novel technologies in patients with the highest risk of CRBSI, and frequent reeducation of staff.

  4. Catheter-related urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2005-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are used frequently in older populations. For either short- or long-term catheters, the infection rate is about 5% per day. Escherichia coli remains the most common infecting organism, but a wide variety of other organisms may be isolated, including yeast species. Bacteria tend to show increased resistance because of the repeated antimicrobial courses. Urinary tract infection (UTI) usually follows formation of biofilm on both the internal and external catheter surface. The biofilm protects organisms from both antimicrobials and the host immune response. Morbidity from UTI with short-term catheter use is limited if appropriate catheter care is practised. In patients with long-term catheters, fever from a urinary source is common with a frequency varying from 1 per 100 to 1 per 1000 catheter days. Long-term care facility residents with chronic indwelling catheters have a much greater risk for bacteraemia and other urinary complications than residents without catheters. Asymptomatic catheter-acquired UTI should not be treated with antimicrobials. Antimicrobial treatment does not decrease symptomatic episodes but will lead to emergence of more resistant organisms. For treatment of symptomatic infection, many antimicrobials are effective. Wherever possible, antimicrobial selection should be delayed until culture results are available. Whether to administer initial treatment by an oral or parenteral route is determined by clinical presentation. If empirical therapy is required, antimicrobial selection is based on variables such as route of administration, anticipated infecting organism and susceptibility, and patient tolerance. Renal function, concomitant medications, local formulary and cost may also be considered in selection of the antimicrobial agent. The duration of therapy is usually 10-14 days, but patients who respond promptly and in whom the catheter must remain in situ may be treated with a shorter 7-day course to reduce

  5. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  6. Intraluminal fluorescence spectroscopy catheter with ultrasound guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Park, Jesung; Sun, Yang; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Marcu, Laura

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) technique for intraluminal investigation of arterial vessel composition under intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance. A prototype 1.8-mm (5.4 Fr) catheter combining a side-viewing optical fiber (SVOF) and an IVUS catheter was constructed and tested with in vitro vessel phantoms. The prototype catheter can locate a fluorophore in the phantom vessel wall, steer the SVOF in place, perform blood flushing under flow conditions, and acquire high-quality TRFS data using 337-nm wavelength excitation. The catheter steering capability used for the coregistration of the IVUS image plane and the SVOF beam produce a guiding precision to an arterial phantom wall site location of 0.53+/-0.16 mm. This new intravascular multimodal catheter enables the potential for in vivo arterial plaque composition identification using TRFS.

  7. Evaluation of an intravenous catheter for use in the horse.

    PubMed

    Gulick, B A; Meagher, D M

    1981-02-01

    A commercially available polyvinyl chloride intravenous catheter was studied in 9 horses for 3 to 10 days to evaluate the catheter's suitability for use in the horse, to develop a new insertion technique, and to establish a protocol for catheter care. Seven of the animals were clinically normal horses receiving parenteral nutrition; one was a horse with hypocalcemia receiving frequent intravenous injections of calcium gluconate, and one was a clinically normal horse receiving no infusions. The catheter dressings were changed every 48 hours, and an aspirate from the catheter and the catheter tip was cultured at the time of catheter removal. One catheter became infected following a break in the protocol. It was concluded that the polyvinyl catheter is suitable for use in the horse and that the proposed protocol for catheter insertion and maintenance may reduce the likelihood of complications such as catheter sepsis, thrombophlebitis, and embolism.

  8. Fluid mechanics and clinical success of central venous catheters for dialysis--answers to simple but persisting problems.

    PubMed

    Ash, Stephen R

    2007-01-01

    Over 60% of patients initiating chronic hemodialysis in the United States have a chronic central venous catheter (CVC) as their first blood access device. Although it would be better if these patients started dialysis with fistulas, the CVC is used because it is a reliable and relatively safe method for obtaining blood access over a period of months. Drawing blood from a vein at 300-400 ml/minute is a relatively delicate and somewhat unpredictable process, and there is always a tendency for the vein wall to draw over the arterial tip and obstruct flow. Several methods have been employed to minimize this problem and maximize blood flow, and differing catheter designs have resulted. With all of the different catheter designs now on the market, it is natural to ask what is the logic of different designs. Moreover, in the absence of many direct comparative studies it is natural to ask whether one design is really better than another. There is some misinformation regarding catheter design and function. The following is a list of 10 frequently asked questions In this review, the hydraulic features of CVC are discussed and explained, and logical answers are provided for the following questions: 1. Why do ''D'' catheters flow better than concentric or side by side catheters? 2. Why are all catheters about the same diameter? Does making them bigger really decrease the resistance to flow? 3. Why might a split tip catheter flow better than a solid body catheter? 4. What happens to injections of lock solution at catheter volume? 5. What's better-numerous side holes or none? 6. Why does blood rise into some internal jugular catheters over time, displacing the lock solution? 7. How can a little kink (or stenosis) decrease flow so much? 8. Where should the tips be placed-superior vena cava or right atrium? 9. Which is really better, splitsheath or over-the-wire placement? 10. Which dialysis access has a lower complication rate--CVC or arteriovenous (AV) graft? There remain

  9. 34 CFR 300.327 - Educational placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Educational placements. 300.327 Section 300.327... Educational Placements Development of Iep § 300.327 Educational placements. Consistent with § 300.501(c), each... makes decisions on the educational placement of their child. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1414(e))...

  10. 34 CFR 300.327 - Educational placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Educational placements. 300.327 Section 300.327... Educational Placements Development of Iep § 300.327 Educational placements. Consistent with § 300.501(c), each... makes decisions on the educational placement of their child. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1414(e))...

  11. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Materials and Methods. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5-F angiographic catheters (pigtail; Sos Omni), gooseneck snares, or combinations thereof. Results. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients port catheter malposition correction was not possible, because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. Conclusions. We conclude that in migrated catheter tips radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis port catheter correction is often more challenging.

  12. Placement of a Retrievable Guenther Tulip Filter in the Superior Vena Cava for Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nadkarni, Sanjay; Macdonald, Sumaira; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A.

    2002-12-15

    A retrievable Guenther Tulip caval filter(William Cook, Europe) was successfully placed and retrieved in the superior vena cava for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman. Bilateral subclavian and internal jugular venous thromboses thought secondary to placement of multiple central venous catheters were present. There have been reports of the use of permanent Greenfield filters and a single case report of a temporary filter in the superior vena cava. As far as we are aware this is the first reported placement and successful retrieval of a filter in these circumstances.

  13. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Aljohi, Alanood Ahmed; Hassan, Hanan Elkefafy; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the most common device-related healthcare-acquired infection. CAUTI can be severe and lead to bacteremia, significant morbidity, prolonged hospital stay, and high antibiotic consumption. Patients and Methods: In this study, we evaluated the CAUTI-reducing efficacy of noble metal alloy catheters in sixty patients (thirty per group) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at the King Fahad Hospital in Saudi Arabia. The study was a single-blinded, randomized, single-centered, prospective investigation that included patients using urinary catheters for 3 days. Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006). When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005). In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100%) for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24). No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use. PMID:28057985

  14. A Retrospective Comparative Study of Tunneled Haemodialysis Catheters Inserted Through Occluded or Collateral Veins Versus Conventional Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Steven; Chan, Tze Yuan; Bhat, Rammohan; Lam, Kimberly; Narlawar, Ranjeet S.; Cullen, Nicola; Littler, Peter

    2010-08-15

    Tunneled hemodialysis catheters become essential in dialysis access when there is no possibility of using a functioning arteriovenous fistula. Collateral or occluded veins visible on ultrasound are used for puncture and passage of catheters into the central venous system. Chronically occluded veins are crossed with guidewires to allow dilatation and subsequent passage of hemodialysis catheters. We performed a retrospective analysis of patient demographics, comorbidities, procedural complications, functional survival, performance, and history of previous vascular access. The study group was compared with two control groups in which dialysis catheters were inserted either by radiologists in the interventional suite or by clinicians on the wards. Nineteen patients from the study group were compared with same number of patients in both control groups. The mean age of the study group was higher compared with the control groups. There was no significant difference in mean functional survival, infection rates, dialysis pump speeds in the first 2 weeks, and procedural complications between the study group and the controls. The study group had a significantly higher number of previous vascular access interventions, longer dialysis careers, and more comorbidities. Tunneled dialysis catheter placement by way of collateral or occluded veins appears safe and effective. These techniques give the operator further options when faced with patients possessing challenging vascular access. Indeed, there may be a case for preferential use of these veins to keep patent central veins in reserve.

  15. Catheter-related complications of cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Greene, J N

    1996-06-01

    Although the management of CVC-related infection appears complex and at times the literature seems to be contradictory, simple guidelines can direct the clinician in a stepwise fashion. Knowledge of the pathogenesis of each organism and the immune status of the host is crucial to decide whether catheter removal or retention is indicated. For example, in general, GNB bacteremia does not immediately prompt catheter removal in a neutropenic patient but does in a nonneutropenic host because of the gastrointestinal source of the former and a primary catheter source in the latter. In summary, as more CVCs are inserted in patients undergoing chemotherapeutic, antimicrobial, transfusional, and nutritional supportive care, novel approaches to prevention and treatment of the associated infectious complications inherent with such devices are needed. A multifaceted approach from impregnated catheters to local catheter-site antisepsis was reviewed. We may find, however, that as simple handwashing between patients is crucial to infection control, so too is a trained catheter-care team using total barrier precautions and ensuring proper local catheter maintenance critical to preventing CVC-related infections.

  16. [Multifunctional testing of PTCA balloon catheters].

    PubMed

    Kraft, M; Schmitz, H; Schulte, R; Boenick, U

    2000-06-01

    New in vitro measuring methods for balloon catheters used for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and their verification in a complex test device are presented. This system can mimic all relevant application situations. The central element of the test device is a coronary vessel model matching the physiological situation in terms of geometrical structure and frictional properties. Reactive force sensors are used to measure the application-relevant forces exerted by the catheter on the model vessel walls and accessories, such as guide wire and guiding catheter. To generate a kink-free advancement of the catheter and permit measurement of the active forces, an alternating drive unit has been specially developed. The testing and application of the newly developed methods revealed statistically significant differences between various types of catheter. The test device closes a gap between complex but subjective clinical tests, and individual objective, but application-removed in vitro test setups for PTCA catheters. While the initial prototype had shortcomings with regard to the reproducibility of measurements, successor systems developed for industrial use are now in production. The properties of these measuring systems developed for the benefit of manufacturer and reprocessor of PTCA catheters are discussed.

  17. Catheters for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Ullah, H.; Hamza, M. Y.; Ikram, M.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review article is to overview technology, clinical evidence, and future applications to date optical coherence tomography (OCT) probes to yield the diagnostic purpose. We have reviewed the designing, construction and working of different categories of OCT probes developed for optical diagnostics having a potential for non invasive and improved detection of different types of cancer as well as other neoplasm. Rotational and balloon catheters, imaging needles and hand-held, linear scanning, multichannel, micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology based, dynamic focusing, forward view imaging, and common path interferometer based probes have been discussed in details. The fiber probes have shown excellent performance for two dimensional and three dimensional higher resolution, cross-sectional imaging of interior and exterior body tissues that can be compared with histopathology to provide the information about the angiogenesis and other lesions in the tissue. The MEMS-technology based probes are found to be more suitable for three dimensional morphological imaging.

  18. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt with a rare twist: small-bowel ischemia and necrosis secondary to knotting of peritoneal catheter.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee A; Kasliwal, Manish K; Moftakhar, Roham; Munoz, Lorenzo F

    2014-09-01

    Small-bowel ischemia and necrosis due to knotting of the peritoneal catheter is an extremely rare complication related to a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS). A 3-month-old girl, with a history of Chiari II malformation and myelomeningocele (MM) after undergoing right occipital VPS insertion and MM repair at birth, presented to the emergency department with a high-grade fever. Examination of a CSF sample obtained via shunt tap raised suspicion for the presence of infection. Antibiotic therapy was initiated, and subsequently the VPS was removed and an external ventricular drain was placed. Intraoperatively, as attempts at pulling the distal catheter from the scalp incision were met with resistance, the distal catheter was cut and left in the abdomen while the remainder of the shunt system was successfully removed. While the patient was awaiting definitive shunt revision surgery to replace the VPS, she developed abdominal distension due to small-bowel obstruction. An emergency exploratory laparotomy revealed a knot in the distal catheter looping around and strangulating the distal ileum, causing small-bowel ischemia and necrosis in addition to the obstruction. A small-bowel resection with ileostomy was performed, with subsequent placement of ventriculoatrial shunt for treatment of hydrocephalus. The authors report this exceedingly rare clinical scenario to highlight the fact that any retained distal catheter must be carefully managed with immediate abdominal exploration to remove the distal catheter to avoid bowel necrosis as pulling of a knotted peritoneal catheter may strangulate the bowel and cause ischemia, with significant clinical morbidity and possible mortality.

  19. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section...

  4. Conversion from temporary to tunneled catheters by nephrologists: report of a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bruno C; Rodrigues, Camila E; Abdulkader, Regina CRM; Elias, Rosilene M

    2016-01-01

    Background Nephrologists have increasingly participated in the conversion from temporary catheters (TC) to tunneled-cuffed catheters (TCCs) for hemodialysis. Objective To prospectively analyze the outcomes associated with TCC placement by nephrologists with expertise in such procedure, in different time periods at the same center. The impact of vancomycin or cefazolin as prophylactic antibiotics on the infection outcomes was also tested. Patients and methods Hemodialysis patients who presented to such procedure were divided into two cohorts: A (from 2004 to 2008) and B (from 2013 to 2015). Time from TC to TCC conversion, prophylactic antibiotics, and reasons for TCC removal were evaluated. Results One hundred and thirty patients were included in cohort A and 228 in cohort B. Sex, age, and follow-up time were similar between cohorts. Median time from TC to TCC conversion was longer in cohort A than in cohort B (14 [3; 30] vs 4 [1; 8] days, respectively; P⩽0.0001). Infection leading to catheter removal occurred in 26.4% vs 18.9% of procedures in cohorts A and B, respectively, and infection rate was 0.93 vs 0.73 infections per 1,000 catheter-days, respectively (P=0.092). Infection within 30 days from the procedure occurred in 1.4% of overall cohort. No differences were observed when comparing vancomycin and cefazolin as prophylactic antibiotics on 90-day infection-free TCC survival in a Kaplan–Meier model (log-rank = 0.188). TCC removal for low blood flow occurred in 8.9% of procedures. Conclusion Conversion of TC to TCC by nephrologists had overall infection, catheter patency, and complications similar to data reported in the literature. Vancomycin was not superior to cefazolin as a prophylactic antibiotic. PMID:27114715

  5. Juxtaoral Organ of Chievitz, an Obscure Anatomical Structure Masquerading as Perineural Invasion of Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Sancheti, Sankalp Mahendra; Sawaimoon, Satyakam; Zameer, Mohammed Abdul Lateef

    2015-09-01

    The juxtaoral organ was first described by Chievitz in 1885. This is typically located deep to the medial pterygoid muscle (unilaterally or bilaterally) in the pterygomandibular space. Juxtaoral organ of Chievitz (JOOC) is usually incidentally detected in biopsies or resection specimen of other tumors but exceptionally, it can present as mass lesions. Awareness of this normal anatomic structure is important, because the epithelial islands in this area could be misinterpreted as an invasive carcinoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma, an odontogenic tumor such as ameloblastoma or adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, or a perineural invasion by carcinoma. When a portion of the juxtaoral organ of Chievitz is accidentally exposed by frozen biopsy, there is an even higher risk of mistaking these cells for an invasive cancer or a perineural invasion of carcinoma. We report this to create awareness about this obscure structure and to draw attention to its differential diagnosis.

  6. Early removal of urinary catheters in patients with thoracic epidural catheters.

    PubMed

    Tripepi-Bova, Kathleen A; Sun, Zhiyuan; Mason, David; Albert, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether early removal of urinary catheters in patients with thoracic epidurals resulted in urinary retention (>500 mL by bladder scanner). Patients were given up to 8 hours to void before further intervention. Of 61 patients, only 4 (6.6%) required urinary catheter reinsertion due to urinary retention. Early removal of urinary catheters after thoracic surgery in patients with thoracic epidurals was safe, with minimal urinary retention.

  7. Evaluating safety of tunneled small bore central venous catheters in chronic kidney disease population: A quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Gauri; El Ters, Mireille; Kremers, Walter K; Klunder, Joe L; Taler, Sandra J; Williams, Amy W; Stockland, Andrew H; Hogan, Marie C

    2016-09-20

    Introduction Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) may adversely impact future successful arteriovenous fistulae (AVF). As part of a quality improvement project, the performance of tunneled small bore tunneled central venous catheters (TSB-CVCs), as alternatives to PICCs, was evaluated. Methods A retrospective observational study, involving individuals ≥18 years of age who underwent TSB-CVC placement by Interventional Radiology at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN between 1/1/2010 and 8/30/2013. Findings The study cohort included 92 patients with a median age of 55 (46-67) years, who underwent 108 TSB-CVC placements. Baseline renal disease was present in 71% (77/108). Most TSB-CVCs were placed in hospitalized patients (94%; 102/108); five French in diameter (61%; 66/108) and located in an internal jugular vein (84%; 91/108). Median catheter indwelling time was 20 (11-43) days (n = 84). TSB-CVC-related bloodstream infection, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and superficial venous thrombosis (SpVT) rates per line were 0.009 (1/108), 0.018 (2/108), and 0.009 (1/108), respectively. Venous outcomes in a subgroup of 54 patients, who had documented PICC placements (n = 161) in addition to TSB-CVC (n = 58) were compared. TSB-CVC-DVT rate was lower than the PICC-DVT rate (0.017 [1/58] vs. 0.106 per line [17/161]; P = 0.04). The TSB-CVC-SpVT rate was not different from the PICC-SpVT rate (0 [0/58] vs. 0.037 [6/161] per line; P = 0.14). Discussion TSB-CVCs demonstrated an excellent safety profile in our study. These catheters should be preferentially utilized for arm vein preservation in advanced kidney disease. Their impact on future AVF success needs further evaluation.

  8. Management and visualization of a kinked epidural catheter

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidis, T; Fileli, A; Pyrgos, P

    2010-01-01

    A lumbar epidural catheter inserted in a 29-year-old woman for labor analgesia. The catheter failed to provide adequate analgesia. Moreover, after labor, it proved difficult to be removed. After computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance impedance (MRI) examination the course of the catheter was visible, the entrapped catheter was dislodged intact, revealing a kinking near its distal tip. Kinking of an epidural catheter leading to entrapment is an unusual complication of epidural catheterization. PMID:21311644

  9. Novel CT-guided biopsy of isolated perineural spread of adenoid cystic carcinoma along the trigeminal nerve masquerading as chronic trigeminal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yong, Xian Zhang Eric; Dillon, Jonathan; Smith, Paul; Salinas-La Rosa, Cesar; Jhamb, Ashu

    2017-02-01

    The differential diagnoses for chronic peripheral neuropathy are broad and diagnosing a cause can be challenging. We present a case of isolated perineural spread of adenoid cystic carcinoma to the trigeminal nerve involving skull base foramina and Meckel's cave in the setting of chronic trigeminal neuropathy and no known prior malignancy. Computed tomography-guided core (CT) needle biopsy was needed to arrive at a diagnosis and a novel approach was required to obtain tissue from the trigeminal nerve lesion at foramen ovale.

  10. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-05-04

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it.

  11. Prevention of central venous catheter-related infections: what works other than impregnated or coated catheters?

    PubMed

    Mermel, Leonard A

    2007-06-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) are a significant cause of morbidity and excess hospital cost. Data from prospective, randomized trials demonstrate that the risk of these infections can be minimized by simple interventions. Changing the behaviour of healthcare workers who insert and care for intravascular catheters is imperative. Creating a culture of patient safety and assuring easy access to the products necessary to maintain strict asepsis during catheter insertion, dressing changes, and when manipulating catheter hubs, will enhance adherence to optimal practice and will reduce the risk posed to the millions of patients in need of such devices.

  12. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  13. Sensor placement optimization in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Simone; Tisato, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    In this work we address the problem of optimal sensor placement for a given region and task. An important issue in designing sensor arrays is the appropriate placement of the sensors such that they achieve a predefined goal. There are many problems that could be considered in the placement of multiple sensors. In this work we focus on the four problems identified by Hörster and Lienhart. To solve these problems, we propose an algorithm based on Direct Search, which is able to approach the global optimal solution within reasonable time and memory consumption. The algorithm is experimentally evaluated and the results are presented on two real floorplans. The experimental results show that our DS algorithm is able to improve the results given by the most performing heuristic introduced in. The algorithm is then extended to work also on continuous solution spaces, and 3D problems.

  14. Management of catheter-related infection.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Jean-Luc; Eggimann, Philippe

    2008-02-01

    Nosocomial infections related to the development of catheter-related infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among critically ill hospitalized patients. Despite important preventive efforts, these infections remain a daily concern for most clinicians. Significant improvements in the knowledge of their pathophysiology and diagnosis allow us to treat them more efficiently. Current practices, such as guidewire exchange of catheters suspected to be the source of clinical sepsis, are supported by indirect evidence only. Infected catheters should systematically be removed, but some of them may be salved by combining systemic and antibiotic-lock treatment. After reviewing some specific therapeutic aspects, we suggest a practical approach to manage catheter-related infections.

  15. Designing a catheter skills training programme.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    Karen Logan describes how a team of continence advisers designed and implemented a training programme that allows local nurses to meet the national occupational standards and competencies in catheterisation and catheter care.

  16. Peripherally inserted central catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - dressing change ... You have a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). This is a tube that goes into a vein in your arm. It carries nutrients and medicines into your body. It may also ...

  17. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... several weeks. A bloodstream infection can occur when bacteria or other germs travel down a “central line” and enter the blood. If you develop a catheter-associated blood- stream infection you may become ill with fevers and ...

  18. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  19. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  20. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  1. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  2. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  3. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  4. Catheter-directed interventions for pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Zarghouni, Mehrzad; Charles, Hearns W.; Maldonado, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE), a potentially life-threatening entity, can be treated medically, surgically, and percutaneously. In patients with right ventricular dysfunction (RVD), anticoagulation alone may be insufficient to restore cardiac function. Because of the morbidity and mortality associated with surgical embolectomy, clinical interest in catheter-directed interventions (CDI) has resurged. We describe specific catheter-directed techniques and the evidence supporting percutaneous treatments. PMID:28123985

  5. Evaluation of antiseptic-impregnated central venous catheters for prevention of catheter-related infection in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Sheng, W H; Ko, W J; Wang, J T; Chang, S C; Hsueh, P R; Luh, K T

    2000-09-01

    Central venous catheterization represents a significant medical advancement, particularly in the treatment of critical ill. However, there is a high risk of central venous catheters-related infection. A novel antiseptic central venous catheter, made of polyurethane and impregnated with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine, was developed to reduce the risk of catheters-related infection. In this study, we did a randomized clinical study to determine the efficacy by using antiseptic catheters for the prevention of central venous catheters-related infection in the intensive care units. A total of 204 patients with 235 central venous catheters were studied at the surgical intensive care units at National Taiwan University Hospital between November 1998 and June 1999. Participants received either a standard triple-lumen polyurethane catheter or an antiseptic catheter (Arrow International, Reading, Pennsylvania, USA). Both were indistinguishable from each other. Compared to standard polyurethane catheters, antiseptic catheters were less likely to be colonized by microorganisms when they were cultured at the removal (8.0 versus 20.0 colonized catheters per 100 catheters; relative risk 0.34 [95% CI, 0.15 to 0.74]; p<0.01). There was no significant differences between both groups in catheter-related infections (0.9 versus 4.9 infections per 100 catheters; relative risk 0.17 [95% CI, 0.03 to 1.15]; p = 0.07). Gram-positive cocci and fungi were more likely to colonize in the standard polyurethane catheters (p = 0.06 and 0.04, compared to antiseptic catheters respectively). Two of our cases in the control group died directly due to catheter-related candidemia. No adverse reactions such as hypersensitivity or leukopenia were found in the antiseptic catheter group. Our study showed that central venous catheters with antiseptic coating were safe and had less risk of colonization of bacteria and fungi than standard catheters in the critically ill patients.

  6. MR-trackable intramyocardial injection catheter.

    PubMed

    Karmarkar, P V; Kraitchman, D L; Izbudak, I; Hofmann, L V; Amado, L C; Fritzges, D; Young, R; Pittenger, M; Bulte, J W M; Atalar, E

    2004-06-01

    There is growing interest in delivering cellular agents to infarcted myocardium to prevent postinfarction left ventricular remodeling. MRI can be effectively used to differentiate infarcted from healthy myocardium. MR-guided delivery of cellular agents/therapeutics is appealing because the therapeutics can be precisely targeted to the desired location within the infarct. In this study, a steerable intramyocardial injection catheter that can be actively tracked under MRI was developed and tested. The components of the catheter were arranged to form a loopless RF antenna receiver coil that enabled active tracking. Feasibility studies were performed in canine and porcine myocardial infarction models. Myocardial delayed-enhancement (MDE) imaging identified the infarcted myocardium, and real-time MRI was used to guide left ventricular catheterization from a carotid artery approach. The distal 35 cm of the catheter was seen under MRI with a bright signal at the distal tip of the catheter. The catheter was steered into position, the distal tip was apposed against the infarct, the needle was advanced, and a bolus of MR contrast agent and tissue marker dye was injected intramyocardially, as confirmed by imaging and postmortem histology. A pilot study involving intramyocardial delivery of magnetically labeled stem cells demonstrated the utility of the active injection catheter system.

  7. Comparison of a Balloon Guide Catheter and a Non-Balloon Guide Catheter for Mechanical Thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Aglaé; Buerke, Boris; Stracke, Christian P; Berkemeyer, Shoma; Mosimann, Pascal J; Schwindt, Wolfram; Alcázar, Pedro; Cnyrim, Christian; Niederstadt, Thomas; Chapot, René; Heindel, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy with the use of a stent retriever in acute ischemic stroke, performed by using a balloon guide catheter or non-balloon guide catheter. Materials and Methods In accordance with the institutional review board approval obtained at the two participating institutions, retrospective analysis was performed in 183 consecutive patients treated between 2013 and 2014 for occlusions in the middle cerebral artery or carotid terminus by using a stent retriever with a balloon guide catheter (n = 102) at one center and a non-balloon guide catheter (n = 81) at the other center. Data on procedure duration, number of passes, angiographic findings, type of stent retriever used, and expertise of the operators were collected. Successful recanalization was defined as grade 3 or 2b modified Treatment in Cerebral Ischemia recanalization accomplished in up to three passes. Univariate and multivariate subgroup analyses were conducted to control for the confounding variables of prior thrombolysis, location of occlusion, and operator expertise. Results Successful recanalization with the balloon guide catheter was achieved in 89.2% of thrombectomies (91 of 102) versus 67.9% (55 of 81) achieved with the non-balloon guide catheter (P = .0004). The one-pass thrombectomy rate with the balloon guide catheter was significantly higher than for that with the non-balloon guide catheter (63.7% [65 of 102] vs 35.8% [29 of 81], respectively; P = .001). The procedure duration was significantly shorter by using the balloon guide catheter than the non-balloon guide catheter (median, 20.5 minutes vs 41.0 minutes, respectively; P < .0001). Conclusion The effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers in acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation in terms of angiographic results and procedure duration was improved when performed in combination with the balloon guide catheter. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  8. [A standardized technique for ultrasound controlled placement of a central venous catheter].

    PubMed

    Mergelsberg, M

    1991-12-01

    To reduce the rate of complications and failures in central venous catheterisation a technique for ultrasonically controlled puncture of the internal jugular vein was standardised. The puncture procedure, including the application of local anaesthesia, is continuously observed and guided by real-time ultrasound. Imaging, control and practising of the puncture are described and discussed.

  9. A standardized method for 4D ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade and catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Clendenen, N J; Robards, C B; Clendenen, S R

    2014-01-01

    We present a standardized method for using four-dimensional ultrasound (4D US) guidance for peripheral nerve blocks. 4D US allows for needle tracking in multiple planes simultaneously and accurate measurement of the local anesthetic volume surrounding the nerve following injection. Additionally, the morphology and proximity of local anesthetic spread around the target nerve is clearly seen with the described technique. This method provides additional spatial information in real time compared to standard two-dimensional ultrasound.

  10. The Placement Professional as Marketeer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walz, Garry R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses resistance of helping professions to marketing. Defines human services marketing. Describes forces that are placing human services in an increasingly competitive position. Makes recommendations to enhance the image of career planning and placement services and increase their usage. Concludes that by adopting a marketeer orientation,…

  11. Placement Services: A Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Vocational Education, Washington, DC.

    This self-contained instructional package defines a comprehensive job placement program as a coordinated series of activities involving school-community interaction, staff training and curriculum development resulting in youth being able to obtain and retain satisfying employment. The author and contributors focus their efforts on presenting case…

  12. A Consideration of Placement Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Gordon

    This report consists of three sections, the first of which is a discussion of placement testing. It is maintained that the strengths and weaknesses of a tested population cannot be determined by a single composite test--yet, many institutions place students in beginning courses on the basis of such limited information. To assess basic capabilities…

  13. The Ironies of Mandatory Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadden, Craig

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that mandatory placement of underprepared students in developmental courses may actually provide the key to opening the door to true academic, vocational, or community success, despite criticism by some that it excludes students and restricts their freedoms. Discusses ethical balances between access, student success and academic…

  14. College Student Personnel Graduate Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packwood, William

    1976-01-01

    ACPA's Commission XII surveyed 103 college student personnel training institutions regarding their graduate placement. Graduates were identified according to degree, sex, and race. Percentages of graduates placed, areas within the college student personnel field, types of institutions, and areas of the country were computed. The discussion…

  15. [Appropriate and inappropriate use of indwelling urinary catheters].

    PubMed

    Janzen, Jolien; Geerlings, Suzanne E

    2012-01-01

    Many hospitalized patients receive a urinary catheter during their stay. In 21-54% of patients, however, there is no appropriate indication for this. The most significant complication caused by the use of urinary catheters is the development of a urinary tract infection (UTI), one of the most common nosocomial infections. In 71-80% of hospital acquired UTIs a urinary catheter is present. The duration of the presence of a catheter is the major risk factor for catheter-associated UTI. Reducing the number of inappropriate catheterisations is an effective way of preventing catheter-related UTIs. Inappropriate use of indwelling urinary catheters can be reduced by maintaining strict guidelines on justifiable indications for inserting a urinary catheter, verifying daily whether the indication still applies, and by timely removal of the catheter when it is not or no longer needed.

  16. Practical approach to catheter-related bloodstream infections in paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBIs) are a common problem in paediatrics. Sterile insertion and proper care of the catheter is likely more important than the type of catheter in determining the rate of CRBIs. The accuracy of the diagnosis of CRBIs can be improved by comparing the time to positivity or the concentration of organisms in blood drawn through the catheter with blood drawn from other sites, or by changing the catheter over a guidewire and culturing the removed catheter. When a CRBI is suspected, the catheter should be removed if it is no longer required, the child is hemodynamically unstable, there are metastatic foci of infection, the infecting organism is Candida or a mycobacterium, or there is a tunnel infection. The necessity for catheter removal is controversial if the infecting organism is Staphylococcus aureus or a Gram-negative organism. In most other situations, the catheter only needs to be removed if bacteremia persists despite appropriate antibiotic use. PMID:19668658

  17. Uptake of drugs by catheters: the influence of the drug molecule on sorption by polyurethane catheters.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Davies, M C; Melia, C D; Denyer, S P; Derrick, M R

    1996-08-01

    The sorption of drugs by indwelling intravenous catheters may have clinical consequences both by alteration of the dose received by the patient and by physically affecting the catheter materials themselves which may lead to changes in mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Studies of drug sorption to new catheter materials are therefore important. Pellethane, a polyurethane increasingly used in vascular access catheters, is as yet little studied in terms of its capacity for drug sorption. In this work a range of drugs known to be sorbed by PVC infusion sets were studied with respect to their sorption by Pellethane catheters. Standard lengths of catheter were incubated with solutions of drugs and samples of the solution were taken at intervals, assayed spectrophotometrically and compared with control solutions incubated without catheter. Losses from solution of up to 93% were found after 24 h. A series of highly sorbing and clinically relevant drugs was identified and their uptake was studied until equilibrium had been reached. A correlation was evident between the octanol/water partition coefficient and the fraction of drug taken up from solution at equilibrium, with the more hydrophobic drugs being taken up to a greater extent by the catheter.

  18. Duration of temporary catheter use for hemodialysis: an observational, prospective evaluation of renal units in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background For chronic hemodialysis, the ideal permanent vascular access is the arteriovenous fistula (AVF). Temporary catheters should be reserved for acute dialysis needs. The AVF is associated with lower infection rates, better clinical results, and a higher quality of life and survival when compared to temporary catheters. In Brazil, the proportion of patients with temporary catheters for more than 3 months from the beginning of therapy is used as an evaluation of the quality of renal units. The aim of this study is to evaluate factors associated with the time between the beginning of hemodialysis with temporary catheters and the placement of the first arteriovenous fistula in Brazil. Methods This is an observational, prospective non-concurrent study using national administrative registries of all patients financed by the public health system who began renal replacement therapy (RRT) between 2000 and 2004 in Brazil. Incident patients were eligible who had hemodialysis for the first time. Patients were excluded who: had hemodialysis reportedly started after the date of death (inconsistent database); were younger than 18 years old; had HIV; had no record of the first dialysis unit; and were dialyzed in units with less than twenty patients. To evaluate individual and renal unit factors associated with the event of interest, the frailty model was used (N = 55,589). Results Among the 23,824 patients (42.9%) who underwent fistula placement in the period of the study, 18.2% maintained the temporary catheter for more than three months until the fistula creation. The analysis identified five statistically significant factors associated with longer time until first fistula: higher age (Hazard-risk - HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.99-1.00); having hypertension and cardiovascular diseases (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.9-0.98) as the cause of chronic renal disease; residing in capitals cities (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.9-0.95) and certain regions in Brazil - South (HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.8-0.87), Midwest (HR 0

  19. Perineural invasion is an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after local treatment: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yang; Liao, Yan-Biao; Xu, Peng; Wei, Wu-Ran; Wang, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Controversy still existed regarding the role of perineural invasion (PNI) in prostate cancer. The present meta-analysis aimed to investigate the association between PNI and biochemical recurrence (BCR) of prostate cancer after local treatment. A systematic search of Medline, Embase and CENTRAL was performed for eligible studies. Pooled estimates of hazard ratios (HRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were acquired by using the generic inverse variance method. Subgroup analyses were performed by the method treating prostate cancer including radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) as well as the specimens which were acquired from RP and biopsy. A total of 12 studies incorporating 5188 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, PNI was significantly associated with BCR (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.37-1.84). Similarly, a significant correlation between PNI and BCR was also found in RP series (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.25-1.83) and RT series (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.35-2.13). PNI predicted BCR of prostate cancer in both RP (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.23-1.85) and biopsy specimens (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.36-2.09). PNI was demonstrated to be associated with higher risk for BCR of prostate cancer after local treatment. Therefore, PNI should be considered when assessing the risk of BCR in prostate cancer, thereby to achieve the best treatment.

  20. Effects of perineural administration of dexmedetomidine in combination with bupivacaine in a femoral-sciatic nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Helal, Safaa M.; Eskandr, Ashraf M.; Gaballah, Khaled M.; Gaarour, Ihab S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: Perineural administration of dexmedetomidine, a α2-adrenoceptor agonist, prolongs the duration of analgesia. We hypothesized that adding dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine would prolong postoperative analgesia after below knee surgery. Materials and Methods: After ethical approval, 60 patients scheduled for below knee surgery under combined femoral-sciatic nerve block were randomly allocated into two groups to have their block performed using bupivacaine 0.5% alone (group B) or bupivacaine 0.5% combined with 100 μg bupivacaine-dexmedetomidine (group BD). Motor and sensory block onset times; durations of blockades and analgesia were recorded. Results: Sensory and motor block onset times were shorter by 20% in group BD than in group B (P < 0.01). Sensory and motor blockade durations were longer in group BD (+45% and +40%, respectively) than in group B (P < 0.01). Duration of analgesia was longer in group BD by 75% than in group B (P < 0.01). Systolic, diastolic arterial blood pressure levels, and heart rate were significantly less in group BD, six patients in group BD, and no patients in group B developed bradycardia (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The addition of dexmedetomidine 100 μg to bupivacaine 0.5% during ultrasound-guided combined femoral and sciatic block for below knee surgery was associated with a prolonged duration of analgesia. However, this may be associated with significant bradycardia requiring treatment. PMID:26955305

  1. Expression profiling of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with perineural invasion implicates the p53 pathway in the process

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Timothy A.; Broit, Natasa; Simmons, Jacinta L.; Pierce, Carly J.; Chawla, Sharad; Lambie, Duncan L. J.; Quagliotto, Gary; Brown, Ian S.; Parsons, Peter G.; Panizza, Benedict J.; Boyle, Glen M.

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common cancer worldwide and accounts for approximately 30% of all keratinocyte cancers. The vast majority of cutaneous SCCs of the head and neck (cSCCHN) are readily curable with surgery and/or radiotherapy unless high-risk features are present. Perineural invasion (PNI) is recognized as one of these high-risk features. The molecular changes during clinical PNI in cSCCHN have not been previously investigated. In this study, we assessed the global gene expression differences between cSCCHN with or without incidental or clinical PNI. The results of the analysis showed signatures of gene expression representative of activation of p53 in tumors with PNI compared to tumors without, amongst other alterations. Immunohistochemical staining of p53 showed cSCCHN with clinical PNI to be more likely to exhibit a diffuse over-expression pattern, with no tumors showing normal p53 staining. DNA sequencing of cSCCHN samples with clinical PNI showed no difference in mutation number or position with samples without PNI, however a significant difference was observed in regulators of p53 degradation, stability and activity. Our results therefore suggest that cSCCHN with clinical PNI may be more likely to contain alterations in the p53 pathway, compared to cSCCHN without PNI. PMID:27665737

  2. Bradycardia during Transradial Cardiac Catheterization due to Catheter Manipulation: Resolved by Catheter Removal

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vishesh; Stys, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To report the resolution of bradycardia encountered during transradial cardiac catheterization through the catheter pullback technique in two cases. Case Report. A 62-year-old male and an 81-year-old male underwent coronary angiogram to evaluate for coronary artery disease and as a result of positive stress test, respectively. Upon engagement of the FL 3.5 catheter into the ascending aorta through the transradial approach, the first case developed bradycardia with a heart rate of 39 beats per minute. The second case developed profound bradycardia with a heart rate of 25 beats per minute upon insertion of the 5 Fr FL 3.5 catheter near the right brachiocephalic trunk through the right radial access. Conclusion. Bradycardia can be subsided by removal of the catheter during catheter manipulation in patients undergoing transradial coronary angiogram if there is a suspicion of excessive stretching of aortic arch receptors and/or carotid sinus receptors. PMID:28348915

  3. Mathematics Placement at the University of Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlgren Reddy, Alison; Harper, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Data from the ALEKS-based placement program at the University of Illinois is presented visually in several ways. The placement exam (an ALEKS assessment) contains precise item-specific information and the data show many interesting properties of the student populations of the placement courses, which include Precalculus, Calculus, and Business…

  4. Can Placement Tests Inform Instructional Decisions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Anthony B.; Weir, Cyril J.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of placement tests are typically narrowly concerned with their validation as instruments for the efficient grouping of students. They rarely explore the assumption that placement test content can be related to classroom tasks and so inform instructional decisions. This study focuses on a trial version of the Global Placement Test (GPT), a…

  5. 28 CFR 551.24 - Child placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Child placement. 551.24 Section 551.24 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.24 Child placement. (a) The Warden may...

  6. 28 CFR 551.24 - Child placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Child placement. 551.24 Section 551.24 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.24 Child placement. (a) The Warden may...

  7. 28 CFR 551.24 - Child placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Child placement. 551.24 Section 551.24 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.24 Child placement. (a) The Warden may...

  8. 28 CFR 551.24 - Child placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Child placement. 551.24 Section 551.24 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.24 Child placement. (a) The Warden may...

  9. 28 CFR 551.24 - Child placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Child placement. 551.24 Section 551.24 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Birth Control, Pregnancy, Child Placement, and Abortion § 551.24 Child placement. (a) The Warden may...

  10. 5 CFR 359.702 - Placement rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Placement rights. 359.702 Section 359.702 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REMOVAL FROM THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE; GUARANTEED PLACEMENT IN OTHER PERSONNEL SYSTEMS Guaranteed Placement § 359.702...

  11. 5 CFR 359.702 - Placement rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Placement rights. 359.702 Section 359.702 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS REMOVAL FROM THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE; GUARANTEED PLACEMENT IN OTHER PERSONNEL SYSTEMS Guaranteed Placement § 359.702...

  12. Experience of robotic catheter ablation in humans using a novel remotely steerable catheter sheath

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Daniel T.; Goldenberg, Alex S.; Peters, Nicholas S.; Davies, D. Wyn

    2008-01-01

    Background A novel remotely controlled steerable guide catheter has been developed to enable precise manipulation and stable positioning of any eight French (Fr) or smaller electrophysiological catheter within the heart for the purposes of mapping and ablation. Objective To report our initial experience using this system for remotely performing catheter ablation in humans. Methods Consecutive patients attending for routine ablation were recruited. Various conventional diagnostic catheters were inserted through the left femoral vein in preparation for treating an accessory pathway (n = 1), atrial flutter (n = 2) and atrial fibrillation (n = 7). The steerable guide catheter was inserted into the right femoral vein through which various irrigated and non-irrigated tip ablation catheters were used. Conventional endpoints of loss of pathway conduction, bidirectional cavotricuspid isthmus block and four pulmonary vein isolation were used to determine acute procedural success. Results Ten patients underwent remote catheter ablation using conventional and/or 3D non-fluoroscopic mapping technologies. All procedural endpoints were achieved using the robotic control system without manual manipulation of the ablation catheter. There was no major complication. A radiation dosimeter positioned next to the operator 2.7 m away from the X-ray source showed negligible exposure despite a mean cumulative dose area product of 7,281.4 cGycm2 for all ten ablation procedures. Conclusions Safe and clinically effective remote navigation of ablation catheters can be achieved using a novel remotely controlled steerable guide catheter in a variety of arrhythmias. The system is compatible with current mapping and ablation technologies Remote navigation substantially reduces radiation exposure to the operator. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10840-007-9184-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  13. Midline catheters: the middle ground of intravenous therapy administration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, N Richard

    2004-01-01

    Evangelical Community Hospital at Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, is a small community hospital with 110 beds. This organization sought a device to bridge between the short peripheral catheter and the peripherally inserted central catheter. The midline catheter provided an answer to this dilemma. However, a literature search for midline catheters yielded only four published articles, and only one of these was related to outcomes. The drugs used and the type of patients treated at Evangelical Community Hospital provided a challenge for the infusion therapist. This article examines the management of the patients who fell into a midlength of stay, and for whom both the short peripheral catheter and the peripherally inserted central catheter were inappropriate.

  14. Malfunctioning central venous catheters in children: a diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    Barnacle, Alex; Arthurs, Owen J.; Roebuck, Derek

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access is increasingly becoming the domain of the radiologist, both in terms of the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) and in the subsequent management of these lines. This article seeks to provide an overview of the CVC types available for paediatric patients and a more detailed explanation of the spectrum of complications that may lead to catheter malfunction. A standard catheter contrast study or ‘linogram’ technique is described. The normal appearances of such a study and a detailed pictorial review of abnormal catheter studies are provided, together with a brief overview of how information from catheter investigations can guide the management of catheter complications. PMID:17932667

  15. Improving the patient experience with real-time PICC placement confirmation.

    PubMed

    Bidgood, Claire

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are now widely used in health care. The use of ultrasound and the micro introducer set have led to an increase in successful insertion rates. However, malposition can still be a problem. This can lead to delays in treatment, increase in procedure time and repeated chest X-rays as well as placement failure. Evolving technologies mean that these challenges can now be overcome. This article describes how a tracking and tip confirmation system (Sherlock 3CG Tip Confirmation System, CR Bard) was used to improve the patient experience during PICC placements by preventing malposition and delays in the start of treatment. Of 88 PICCs placed with the system, all were in an acceptable position when confirmed by chest X-ray and therefore none required any further adjustments post insertion.

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Radiological Placement of Central Venous Port via the Subclavian Vein: A Retrospective Analysis of 500 Cases at a Single Institute.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Notiaki; Arai, Yasuaki; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Takahashi, Mahahide; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Sugimuta, Kazuro

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with ultrasound (US)-guided radiological placement (RP) of a central venous port (CVP) via the subclavian vein (SCV). Between April 2006 and May 2007, a total of 500 US-guided RPs of a CVP via the SCV were scheduled in 486 cancer patients (mean age +/- SD, 54.1 +/- 18.1 years) at our institute. Referring to the interventional radiology report database and patients' records, technical success rate and AEs relevant to CVP placement were evaluated retrospectively. The technical success rate was 98.6% (493/500). AEs occurred in 26 cases (5.2%) during follow-up (range, 1-1080 days; mean +/- SD, 304.0 +/- 292.1 days). AEs within 24 h postprocedure occurred in five patients: pneumothorax (n = 2), arterial puncture (n = 1), hematoma formation at the pocket site (n = 2), and catheter tip migration into the internal mammary vein (n = 1). There were seven early AEs: hematoma formation at the pocket site (n = 2), fibrin sheath formation around the indwelling catheter (n = 2), and catheter-related infections (n = 3). There were 13 delayed AEs: catheter-related infections (n = 7), catheter detachments (n = 3), catheter occlusion (n = 1), symptomatic thrombus in the SCV (n = 1), and catheter migration (n = 1). No major AEs, such as procedure-related death, air embolism, or events requiring surgical intervention, were observed. In conclusion, US-guided RP of a CVP via the SCV is highly appropriate, based on its high technical success rate and the limited number of AEs.

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Radiological Placement of Central Venous Port via the Subclavian Vein: A Retrospective Analysis of 500 Cases at a Single Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Noriaki Arai, Yasuaki Takeuchi, Yoshito Takahashi, Masahide Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with ultrasound (US)-guided radiological placement (RP) of a central venous port (CVP) via the subclavian vein (SCV). Between April 2006 and May 2007, a total of 500 US-guided RPs of a CVP via the SCV were scheduled in 486 cancer patients (mean age {+-} SD, 54.1 {+-} 18.1 years) at our institute. Referring to the interventional radiology report database and patients' records, technical success rate and AEs relevant to CVP placement were evaluated retrospectively. The technical success rate was 98.6% (493/500). AEs occurred in 26 cases (5.2%) during follow-up (range, 1-1080 days; mean {+-} SD, 304.0 {+-} 292.1 days). AEs within 24 h postprocedure occurred in five patients: pneumothorax (n = 2), arterial puncture (n = 1), hematoma formation at the pocket site (n = 2), and catheter tip migration into the internal mammary vein (n = 1). There were seven early AEs: hematoma formation at the pocket site (n = 2), fibrin sheath formation around the indwelling catheter (n = 2), and catheter-related infections (n = 3). There were 13 delayed AEs: catheter-related infections (n = 7), catheter detachments (n = 3), catheter occlusion (n = 1), symptomatic thrombus in the SCV (n = 1), and catheter migration (n = 1). No major AEs, such as procedure-related death, air embolism, or events requiring surgical intervention, were observed. In conclusion, US-guided RP of a CVP via the SCV is highly appropriate, based on its high technical success rate and the limited number of AEs.

  18. Intravenous catheter for intracorporeal plasma filtration.

    PubMed

    Handley, Harold H; Gorsuch, Rey; Levin, Nathan W; Ronco, Claudio

    2002-01-01

    Future advances in dialysis of end-stage renal disease patients may include improvements in therapeutic continuity and patient mobility. Continuous renal replacement therapies could lead to self-contained, mobile and potentially wearable dialysis units. We investigated an experimental, intravenous slow-continuous plasma separation system (IPSS) as a precursor to direct intravenous hemofiltration. An intracorporeal catheter employs asymmetric hollow fibers to separate blood cells from plasma in vivo. The fibers possess a sieving coefficient of 0.7 microm and remove 99.99% of all platelets. In vivo, catheters sustain an average plasma separation flow rate of 3 ml/min over 22 h, sufficient to remove 2 net liters of water from pigs through an extracorporeal hemofilter. Used catheter fibers are relatively free of protein deposition or clots in situ. In vitro studies suggest that human catheters may perform at 3-4 times the rate of porcine catheters. IPSS is proposed for acute fluid removal in CHF patients refractory to diuretics.

  19. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  20. [Indications for catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Deneke, T; Israel, C W; Krug, J; Nentwich, K; Müller, P; Mügge, A; Schade, A

    2013-09-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) can cause sudden cardiac death. This can be prevented by an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) but approximately 25% of patients with an ICD develop electrical storm (≥ 3 VTs within 24 hours) during the course of 4-5 years. This is a life-threatening event even in the presence of an ICD, particularly if incessant VT is present, and may significantly deteriorate the patient's psychological state if multiple shocks are discharged. Catheter ablation of VT has developed into a standard procedure in many specialized electrophysiology centers. Patients with hemodynamically stable and unstable VT are amendable to substrate-based ablation strategies. Catheter ablation can be performed as emergency procedure in patients with electrical storm as well as electively in patients with monomorphic VT stored in ICD memory. In patients with ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, VT ablation is complementary to ICD implantation and can reduce the number of ventricular arrhythmia episodes and shocks and should be performed early. In patients with electrical storm, catheter ablation can acutely achieve rhythm stabilization and may improve prognosis in the long term. Further indications for catheter ablation exist in patients with idiopathic VT where catheter ablation represents a curative therapy, and in patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic frequent premature ventricular beats which may improve prognosis in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  1. Noninvasive biophotonic imaging for monitoring of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and therapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L; Modi, Kshitij; Yu, Jun; Francis, Kevin P; Purchio, Tony; Contag, Pamela R

    2005-07-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections acquired by humans, particularly in catheterized patients. A major problem with catheterization is the formation of bacterial biofilms on catheter material and the risk of developing persistent UTIs that are difficult to monitor and eradicate. To better understand the course of UTIs and allow more accurate studies of in vivo antibiotic efficacy, we developed a catheter-based biofilm infection model with mice, using bioluminescently engineered bacteria. Two important urinary tract pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis, were made bioluminescent by stable insertion of a complete lux operon. Segments of catheter material (precolonized or postimplant infected) with either pathogen were placed transurethrally in the lumen of the bladder by using a metal stylet without surgical manipulation. The bioluminescent strains were sufficiently bright to be readily monitored from the outside of infected animals, using a low-light optical imaging system, including the ability to trace the ascending pattern of light-emitting bacteria through ureters to the kidneys. Placement of the catheter in the bladder not only resulted in the development of strong cystitis that persisted significantly longer than in mice challenged with bacterial suspensions alone but also required prolonged antibiotic treatment to reduce the level of infection. Treatment of infected mice for 4 days with ciprofloxacin at 30 mg/kg of body weight twice a day cured cystitis and renal infection in noncatheterized mice. Similarly, ciprofloxacin reduced the bacterial burden to undetectable levels in catheterized mice but did not inhibit rebound of the infection upon cessation of antibiotic therapy. This methodology easily allows spatial information to be monitored sequentially throughout the entire disease process, including ascending UTI, treatment efficacy, and relapse, all without exogenous sampling, which is not

  2. Humanitarian engineering placements in our own communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderSteen, J. D. J.; Hall, K. R.; Baillie, C. A.

    2010-05-01

    There is an increasing interest in the humanitarian engineering curriculum, and a service-learning placement could be an important component of such a curriculum. International placements offer some important pedagogical advantages, but also have some practical and ethical limitations. Local community-based placements have the potential to be transformative for both the student and the community, although this potential is not always seen. In order to investigate the role of local placements, qualitative research interviews were conducted. Thirty-two semi-structured research interviews were conducted and analysed, resulting in a distinct outcome space. It is concluded that local humanitarian engineering placements greatly complement international placements and are strongly recommended if international placements are conducted. More importantly it is seen that we are better suited to address the marginalised in our own community, although it is often easier to see the needs of an outside populace.

  3. Anatomical basis of central venous catheter fracture.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark O

    2008-03-01

    Central venous catheter fracture is a rare complication of long-term indwelling subclavian venous access. Subclavian vein access has been the recommended approach for placing central venous catheters. The anatomical landmark method for subclavian access remains a highly successful and nonequipment-dependent method for rapid central access. More recently, the internal jugular vein approach has emerged as the preferred route for long-term central venous access. However, variations in internal jugular vein anatomy make the landmark method less reliable. Use of two-dimensional real-time ultrasound during internal jugular vein access is associated with better success, a lower complication rate, and faster access. A case of central venous catheter fracture initiated an internal review of long-term central venous access procedures. We have converted to a predominantly internal jugular vein approach. This case report and literature review may assist other physicians and institutions in re-evaluating long-term central venous access protocols.

  4. Lesion-specific laser catheters for angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy-Chutorian, Douglas

    1992-08-01

    Since no one laser catheter can treat all types of disease, a new family of `lesion-specific' devices was evaluated with a holmium laser source. Three-hundred-thirty-one patients (avg. 60 years) with symptomatic coronary disease were studied. Average lesion length was 1.2 cm. A 1.4, 1.5, 1.7, or 2.0 mm, tapered-tip or non-tapered, multifiber catheter (Eclipse, Palo Alto, Calif.) was advanced over the wire while emitting 250 - 600 mj/pulse at 5 Hz. Mean percent stenosis decreased from 89% to 57% after lasing with a mean of 140 pulses. Complications were infrequent. Overall procedural success was 95%. The conclusion is that specialized laser catheters delivering holmium laser energy are capable of reducing the severity of coronary stenoses including balloon angioplasty failures and bypass graft failures. Follow up studies are in progress to assess long term efficacy.

  5. Catheter tip force transducer for cardiovascular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A force transducer for measuring dynamic force activity within the heart of a subject essentially consists of a U-shaped beam of low elastic compliance material. Two lines extend from the beams's legs and a long coil spring is attached to the beam. A strain gauge is coupled to one of the beam's legs to sense deflections thereof. The beam with the tines and most of the spring are surrounded by a flexible tube, defining a catheter, which is insertable into a subject's heart through an appropriate artery. The tines are extractable from the catheter for implantation into the myocardium by pushing on the end of the spring which extends beyond the external end of the catheter.

  6. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1230 - Fiberoptic oximeter catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic oximeter catheter is a device used to estimate the oxygen saturation of the blood. It consists of two fiberoptic bundles that conduct light at a desired...

  11. Intravascular magnetic resonance imaging using a loopless catheter antenna.

    PubMed

    Ocali, O; Atalar, E

    1997-01-01

    Recently, intravascular catheter probes have been developed to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for MR imaging of blood vessels. Miniaturization of these catheter probes without degrading their performances is very critical in imaging small vessels such as coronary arteries. Catheter coils have a loop incorporated in their structure and have limitations in physical dimensions and electromagnetic properties. The use of a loopless intravascular catheter antenna is proposed to overcome these problems. The catheter antenna is essentially a dipole, which makes a very thin diameter possible, and its electronic circuitry can be placed outside the blood vessels without performance degradation. The theoretical foundation for the design and operation of the catheter antenna is presented. Several catheter antennae, as small as 1.5 French, were constructed and tested on phantoms and rabbits with great success. The catheter antenna has a simple structure and is easy to design, implement, and operate.

  12. Magnetic Resonance-guided Active Catheter Tracking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Several advantages of MR imaging compared with other imaging modalities have provided the rationale for increased attention to MR-guided interventions, including its excellent soft tissue contrast, its capability to show both anatomic and functional information, and no use of ionizing radiation. An important aspect of MR-guided intervention is to provide visualization and navigation of interventional devices relative to the surrounding tissues. This article focuses on the methods for MR-guided active tracking in catheter-based interventions. Practical issues about implementation of active catheter tracking in a clinical setting are discussed and several current application examples are highlighted.

  13. Prevention of indwelling catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Sue

    2011-03-01

    The use of indwelling urethral catheters has become a common aspect of patient care, but they can be a source of infection. Nurses can help to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections by using aseptic technique on insertion, following best practice in ongoing care and promptly removing catheters. The urinary catheter assessment and monitoring form (UCAM) is used at the Royal Hampshire County Hospital, Winchester, to remind staff of best practice and promote their early removal.

  14. Echinocandin and ethanol lock therapy treatment of fungal catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Pieroni, Kevin P; Nespor, Colleen; Poole, Robert L; Kerner, John A; Berquist, William E

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol lock therapy has been implemented to prevent infections of central venous catheters as well as to treat infections. Fungal catheter-associated blood stream infections are historically more difficult to treat and have required removal of central venous catheters. We report the largest case series to date, successfully treating 5 of 7 fungal catheter-associated blood stream infections with ethanol lock therapy and systemic echinocandin administration.

  15. Perineural Invasion Predicts Increased Recurrence, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer Following Treatment With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Felix Y.; Qian Yushen; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Vance, Sean; Sandler, Howard M.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of perineural invasion (PNI) for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 651 men treated for prostate cancer with EBRT to a minimum dose {>=}75 Gy. We assessed the impact of PNI as well as pretreatment and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival. Results: PNI was present in 34% of specimens at biopsy and was significantly associated with higher Gleason score (GS), T stage, and prostate-specific antigen level. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the presence of PNI was associated with worse FFBF (hazard ratio = 1.7, p <0.006), FFM (hazard ratio = 1.8, p <0.03), and CSS (HR = 1.4, p <0.05) compared with absence of PNI; there was no difference in overall survival. Seven-year rates of FFBF, FFM, and CCS were 64% vs. 80%, 84% vs. 92%, and 91% vs. 95% for those patients with and without PNI, respectively. On recursive partitioning analysis, PNI predicted for worse FFM and CSS in patients with GS 8-10, with FFM of 67% vs. 89% (p <0.02), and CSS of 69% vs. 91%, (p <0.04) at 7 years for those with and without PNI, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of PNI in the prostate biopsy predicts worse clinical outcome for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy. Particularly in patients with GS 8-10 disease, the presence of PNI suggests an increased risk of metastasis and prostate cancer death.

  16. Effective Dose of CT- and Fluoroscopy-Guided Perineural/Epidural Injections of the Lumbar Spine: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Gebhard Schmitz, Alexander; Borchardt, Dieter; Ewen, Klaus; Rothenburg, Thomas von; Koester, Odo; Jergas, Michael

    2006-02-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the effective radiation dose of perineural and epidural injections of the lumbar spine under computed tomography (CT) or fluoroscopic guidance with respect to dose-reduced protocols. We assessed the radiation dose with an Alderson Rando phantom at the lumbar segment L4/5 using 29 thermoluminescence dosimeters. Based on our clinical experience, 4-10 CT scans and 1-min fluoroscopy are appropriate. Effective doses were calculated for CT for a routine lumbar spine protocol and for maximum dose reduction; as well as for fluoroscopy in a continuous and a pulsed mode (3-15 pulses/s). Effective doses under CT guidance were 1.51 mSv for 4 scans and 3.53 mSv for 10 scans using a standard protocol and 0.22 mSv and 0.43 mSv for the low-dose protocol. In continuous mode, the effective doses ranged from 0.43 to 1.25 mSv for 1-3 min of fluoroscopy. Using 1 min of pulsed fluoroscopy, the effective dose was less than 0.1 mSv for 3 pulses/s. A consequent low-dose CT protocol reduces the effective dose compared to a standard lumbar spine protocol by more than 85%. The latter dose might be expected when applying about 1 min of continuous fluoroscopy for guidance. A pulsed mode further reduces the effective dose of fluoroscopy by 80-90%.

  17. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway contributes to the development of salivary gland neoplasms regardless of perineural infiltration.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Lourenço, Sílvia Vanessa; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo; Studart, Eduardo J B; Valverde, Ludmila de Faro; Araújo, Iguaracyra Barreto de Oliveira; Ramos, Eduardo Antônio Gonçalves; Xavier, Flávia Caló de Aquino; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2016-07-01

    The pleomorphic adenoma (PA), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) are common tumors arising from salivary glands whose histopathology is heterogeneous. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (Hh) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) play important roles in cell proliferation, favoring tumor growth. The aim of this investigation was to study components of the Hh pathway, as well as STAT3 in salivary gland neoplasms in an attempt to add information about the biological characteristics of these neoplasms. We used 9 cases of PA, 17 cases of ACC, and 20 cases of MEC. Using immunohistochemistry, SHH, GLI1, SUFU, HHIP, and STAT3 were investigated. For comparative purposes, MCM3 (cellular proliferation marker) was also included. In PA, there was high expression of cytoplasmic SHH and SUFU and low expression of STAT3 and MCM3. In the ACC, there was high expression of GLI1, HHIP, and STAT3 and low expression of SHH, SUFU, and MCM3. In the MEC, we observed high expression of SHH, GLI1, SUFU, and HHIP and low expression of STAT3 and MCM3. There was a statistically significant difference between SHH (p = 0.0064), STAT3 (p = 0.0003), and MCM3 (p = 0.0257) when all tumors were compared and a higher expression in parenchyma for all tumors when stroma and parenchyma were compared (p < 0.05). These findings suggests a possible role of Hh pathway in the development and maintenance of the cytoarchitectural pattern of PA, ACC, and MEC, as well as the participation of STAT3 in the development of ACC, irrespective perineural infiltration.

  18. Predicting the Risk of Non–organ-confined Prostate Cancer When Perineural Invasion Is Found on Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Michael A.; Chalfin, Heather J.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Feng, Zhaoyong; Partin, Alan W.; Trock, Bruce J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To more precisely define the risk of non–organ-confined (non-OC) prostate cancer among men with perineural invasion (PNI) identified on prostate biopsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS The Johns Hopkins radical prostatectomy database was queried for men with PNI reported on prostate biopsy. Patients with and without non-OC disease were compared for differences in preoperative clinical and pathologic characteristics, including three biopsy-based measures of tumor volume (number of cores with cancer, percentage of cores with cancer, and maximum percent core involvement with cancer). After evaluating the different preoperative variables in univariate analyses, a multivariable logistic regression model was generated, and bootstrap estimates of the risk of non-OC disease were calculated. RESULTS In total, 556 patients with PNI were analyzed, 279 (50.2%) of whom were found to have non-OC prostate cancer. In univariate analyses, preoperative prostate-specific antigen, clinical T stage, biopsy Gleason sum, and the three biopsy-based measures of tumor volume were significantly associated with non-OC disease. Of the three measures of tumor volume, the best fit to the data and highest degree of model discrimination were obtained using maximum percent core involvement with cancer. Incorporating this variable, preoperative prostate-specific antigen, clinical T stage, and biopsy Gleason sum into a multivariable model, the estimated risk of non-OC disease was found to range from 13.8% to 94.4% (bootstrap corrected c-index = 0.735). CONCLUSION Men with PNI on prostate biopsy are at a wide range of risk for non-OC disease. Preoperative estimation of this risk is improved by considering readily available biopsy estimates of tumor volume. PMID:24655556

  19. Incorporation of perineural invasion of gastric carcinoma into the 7th edition tumor-node-metastasis staging system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Deng, Jing-Yu; Liu, Yong; Ke, Bin; Liu, Hong-Gen; Liang, Han

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of perineural invasion (PNI) in patients with gastric cancer who underwent curative resection. We retrospectively analyzed 518 patients who had undergone curative gastrectomy. Paraffin sections of surgical specimens from all patients were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. PNI was defined when carcinoma cells infiltrated into the perineurium or neural fascicles. Patients with PNI had a significantly larger tumors (≥5.0 cm), lymphatic venous invasion (positive), deeper tumor invasion (T4), more number of lymph node metastases (N3), and higher tumor stage (III). Regarding survival, multivariate analysis showed that PNI emerged as an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.901, P < 0.001). We incorporated the PNI into the 7th edition tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging system. Comparing with the 7th edition staging system, the redefinition of TPNI stage had higher -2loglikelihood value (-2loglikelihood = 3,492.259) and lower HR and 95 % confidence interval (CI) (HR = 1.955, 95 % CI = 1.630-2.343); redefinition of NPNI and TNMIIIPNI stage both had lower -2loglikelihood value (-2loglikelihood = 3,306.608; -2loglikelihood = 2,535.151) and higher HR and 95 % CI (HR = 1.879, 95 % CI = 1.720-2.053; HR = 2.268, 95 % CI = 1.900-2.707), which represented the optimum prognostic stratification, together with better homogeneity, discriminatory ability. Our results showed that the frequency of PNI was high in patients with gastric cancer who underwent curative gastrectomy and the proportion of PNI positivity increased with progression and clinical stage of disease. PNI may be useful in detecting patients who had poor prognosis after curative resection in gastric cancer and it should be incorporated into TNM staging.

  20. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  4. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  5. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  6. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  7. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  8. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  9. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that is connected to the proximal end of a steerable guide wire that controls the motion of the steerable...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that is connected to the proximal end of a steerable guide wire that controls the motion of the steerable...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  17. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1350 Catheter balloon repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace...

  18. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1350 Catheter balloon repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1350 Catheter balloon repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  2. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  3. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  4. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  5. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  6. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1240 - Flow-directed catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flow-directed catheter. 870.1240 Section 870.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1240 Flow-directed catheter. (a) Identification. A flow-directed catheter is a device that incorporates a gas-filled balloon...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  11. Ultraminiature manometer-tipped cardiac catheter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Miniature diaphragm-type capacitance transducer capable of being mounted on the end of a cardiac catheter has been developed for measurement of intravascular pressures. The transducer can be inserted in small ducts /arteries and veins/ without disturbing the flow characteristics. It is very useful for making measurements in babies.

  12. Peripherally inserted central catheters. Intravenous Nurses Society.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Intravenous Nurses Society (INS) recognizes the need for uniform terminology for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) to encourage standardization for indications, care, and maintenance strategies for these devices. It also recognizes the need for recommendations regarding the choice, use, management, and discontinuation of PICCs to promote positive patient outcomes and enhance patient comfort, safety, and satisfaction.

  13. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  14. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  16. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  17. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  18. 21 CFR 870.5175 - Septostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Septostomy catheter. 870.5175 Section 870.5175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enlarge the atrial septal defect found in the heart of certain infants. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. [Femoral venous catheter: an unusual complication].

    PubMed

    Garcia, P; Mora, A; Trambert, P; Maler, E; Courant, P

    2000-08-01

    We report an erratic course of a venous femoral catheter which was in the abdominal cavity in a patient with an haemoperitoneum and an hepatic injury. This complication led to an inefficiency of the transfusion and a worsening of the haemoperitoneum.

  20. Left ventricular volumetric conductance catheter for rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Takaki, M; Yamaguchi, H; Tachibana, H; Suga, H

    1996-04-01

    Left ventricular (LV) volume (V) is an essential parameter for assessment of the cardiac pump function. Measurement of LVV in situ by a conductance catheter method has been widely used in dogs and humans but not yet in small experimental animals such as rats. We instituted a miniaturized six-electrode conductance catheter (3-F) for rat LVV measurement and its signal processing apparatus. We compared stroke volumes (SVs) simultaneously measured with this conductance catheter introduced into the LV through the apex and an electromagnetic flow probe placed on the ascending aorta during gradual decreases in LVV by an inferior vena caval occlusion. A high and linear correlation (r = 0.982) was obtained between these differently measured by SVs pooled from six rats. In another group of three rats, LV pressure was simultaneously measured with a 3-F catheter-tip micromanometer introduced into the LV through the apex. We obtained the slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume (P-V) relationship (Emax) by a gradual ascending aortic occlusion. After administration of propranolol, Emax obviously decreased with no change in volume intercept of the P-V relationship. The conductance volumetry proved to be useful in rats.

  1. Acadian flycatcher nest placement: Does placement influence reproductive success?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, R.R.; Cooper, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    We located 511 Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) nests in bottomland hardwood forest of eastern Arkansas. Microhabitat characteristics were measured and their relationship with nest success evaluated. Fifty-two percent of all nesting attempts resulted in predation. Attributes of nest placement were similar between successful and unsuccessful nests, although successful nests were placed higher. Similarly, nonparasitized nests were typically higher than parasitized nests. Nests initiated late in the breeding season were placed in larger trees with higher canopy bases resulting in increased vegetation around the nest. Fifteen different tree species were used for nesting. Acadian Flycatchers chose nest trees in a nonrandom fashion, selecting Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii) and possumhaw (Ilex decidua) in greater proportions than their availability. However, there was no relationship between tree species used for nesting and nest success. Nest height was positively correlated with concealment at the nest site, supporting the predator-avoidance theory. No other attribute of nest placement differentiated successful nest sites, suggesting that nest predation is likely a function of random events in space and time.

  2. Causes and nursing countermeasures in pediatric PICC catheter complications.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Mingli; Li, Na; Yi, Lan; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the complications and nursing countermeasures of PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) catheters using children PICC catheter technique 40 cases, complications were observed, and analyze the original causes, in order to propose a solution. There were 10 cases of catheter blockage, 5 cases of catheter infection, 6 cases of phlebitis, 5 cases of puncture difficulties, 2 cases of poor feeding tube, 2 cases of bleeding puncture site with the continuous exploration and research of nursing intervention, the production of clinical complications from PICC has been used in children were greatly reduced.

  3. Two-dimensional optimal sensor placement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.

    1995-05-01

    A method for determining the optimal two-dimensional spatial placement of multiple sensors participating in a robot perception task is introduced in this paper. This work is motivated by the fact that sensor data fusion is an effective means of reducing uncertainties in sensor observations, and that the combined uncertainty varies with the relative placement of the sensors with respect to each other. The problem of optimal sensor placement is formulated and a solution is presented in the two dimensional space. The algebraic structure of the combined sensor uncertainty with respect to the placement of sensor is studied. A necessary condition for optimal placement is derived and this necessary condition is used to obtain an efficient closed-form solution for the global optimal placement. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the solution. 11 refs.

  4. Peripheral Stent Placement in Hemodialysis Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Kariya, Shuji Tanigawa, Noboru; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shomura, Yuzo; Shiraishi, Tomokuni; Kawanaka, Toshiaki; Sawada, Satoshi

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of peripheral stent placement after failed balloon angioplasty in patients with grafts who are on hemodialysis. We examined 30 Wallstents that were placed in 26 patients because balloon angioplasty failed or early restenosis (<3 months) occurred within 3 months. We retrospectively reviewed 267 consecutive balloon angioplasties performed in 71 patients with graft access between August 2000 and March 2007. Stent placements accounted for 30 (11.2%) of the 267 balloon angioplasties. The clinical success rate of stent placement was 93.3% (28 of 30 stent placements). The 3-, 6-, and 12-month primary patency rates were 73.3%, 39.3%, and 17.7%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year secondary patency rates were 90.2%, 83.8%, and 83.8%, respectively. Primary patency was significantly prolonged by stent placement after early restenosis compared with previous balloon angioplasty alone (P = 0.0059). Primary patency after stent placement was significantly lower than after successful balloon angioplasty without indications for stent placement (P = 0.0279). Secondary patency rates did not significantly differ between stent placement and balloon angioplasty alone. The mean number of reinterventions required to maintain secondary patency after stent placement was significantly larger than that after balloon angioplasty alone (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.0419). We concluded that peripheral stent placement for graft access is effective for salvaging vascular access after failed balloon angioplasty and for prolonging patency in early restenosis after balloon angioplasty. However, reinterventions are required to maintain secondary patency after stent placement. Furthermore, peripheral stent placement for graft access cannot achieve the same primary patency as balloon angioplasty alone.

  5. Surgical aspects and biological considerations of arteriovenous fistula placement.

    PubMed

    Achneck, Hardean E; Sileshi, Bantayehu; Li, Madison; Partington, Erin J; Peterson, David A; Lawson, Jeffrey H

    2010-01-01

    Since the Fistula First Initiative was formulated in 2003, providers and payers have increasingly emphasized the need to create more arteriovenous fistulae. To maximize the chances of successful fistula maturation, a thorough understanding of the biology and surgical aspects of fistula placement are essential. A functional endothelium in the target vessels is the prerequisite for the adaptive remodeling of the vessel wall, which has to take place after fistula formation. Mechanoreceptors of the endothelium sense the increase in shear stress and, through a variety of activated signaling cascades, induce the necessary changes and vasodilation of the respective vessels. The successful fistula placement starts with a thorough preoperative evaluation, which focuses on protecting the target vessels and avoiding intravenous catheters and devices. Intraoperatively, the risk of endothelial dysfunction and hyperplasia is further minimized through an atraumatic dissection with minimal manipulation of the vein and artery. The surgical technique should also focus on decreasing the vessel compliance mismatch and avoiding an inflammatory response secondary to hematoma formation. Postoperatively, the fistula must be diligently monitored for the complications of thrombosis, postoperative steal syndrome, neuropathy, aneurysm formation, infection, and high-output cardiac failure. Early recognition of a problem is the key to saving an otherwise doomed fistula. An armamentarium of percutaneous techniques is available to the access surgeon to treat the most common causes of failed access formation. However, in some cases a surgical revision of the access site through patch angioplasty, a jump graft, and graft interposition is necessary to create a fistula which can be successfully used for hemodialysis.

  6. Influence of catheter and arterial diameter on flow distal to an intra-aortic balloon insertion site: a theoretic examination and in vitro assessment.

    PubMed

    Ohley, W J; Antonelli, L; Leschinsky, B

    1998-01-01

    Percutaneous placement of an intra-aortic balloon (IAB) through a femoral artery of a patient is associated with a risk of reduction of blood flow distal to the balloon insertion site. If this reduction is severe, it ultimately causes limb ischemia and necessitates IAB removal. Although clinicians intuitively know that larger catheters cause higher flow restrictions, very few studies have examined this situation quantitatively. The authors theoretically analyzed the insertion site geometry in relationship to the catheter diameter and other factors effecting distal flow. To verify the findings, in vitro flow tests were conducted with various IAB catheters currently available on the market, as well as their respective sheaths and hemostasis plugs. This was done using a blood analog solution in an array of polyvinyl chloride tubing sizes. Diameters of the vessel and catheter have a profound and nonlinear effect on the distal flow. For example, a 12.2 Fr catheter in a 0.187 in. vessel only allows 19.9% of normal flow, whereas a 6.1 Fr catheter in the same size vessel allows a 92.0% flow. As the catheter diameter increases, the physical resistance suddenly grows, which causes a significant drop in distal flow. These results are accurately predicted by a mathematical model that gives flow percentage results to within 15% of those measured experimentally. In general, vessels larger than 5 mm in diameter do not exhibit substantial flow reduction for most IABs with and without sheaths. In smaller vessels, however, this reduction may be significant. Sheathless insertion is extremely effective in improving distal blood flow in such a situation. Hemostasis plugs restrict the distal flow similar to respective sheaths, thus diminishing the benefits of sheathless insertion.

  7. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood vessel in your groin. A tiny flexible wire will be inserted through this needle. Your surgeon ... area. Next, your surgeon will pass a guide wire through the catheter to the blockage. The surgeon ...

  8. Product placement of computer games in cyberspace.

    PubMed

    Yang, Heng-Li; Wang, Cheng-Shu

    2008-08-01

    Computer games are considered an emerging media and are even regarded as an advertising channel. By a three-phase experiment, this study investigated the advertising effectiveness of computer games for different product placement forms, product types, and their combinations. As the statistical results revealed, computer games are appropriate for placement advertising. Additionally, different product types and placement forms produced different advertising effectiveness. Optimum combinations of product types and placement forms existed. An advertisement design model is proposed for use in game design environments. Some suggestions are given for advertisers and game companies respectively.

  9. Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Adaptable, Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT) Project will test and demonstrate a deployable aeroshell concept as a viable thermal protection system for entry, descent, and landing o...

  10. Automated fiber placement: Evolution and current demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Carroll G.; Benson, Vernon M.

    1993-01-01

    The automated fiber placement process has been in development at Hercules since 1980. Fiber placement is being developed specifically for aircraft and other high performance structural applications. Several major milestones have been achieved during process development. These milestones are discussed in this paper. The automated fiber placement process is currently being demonstrated on the NASA ACT program. All demonstration projects to date have focused on fiber placement of transport aircraft fuselage structures. Hercules has worked closely with Boeing and Douglas on these demonstration projects. This paper gives a description of demonstration projects and results achieved.

  11. Validation of the Accuracy and Reliability of Culturing Intravascular Catheter Segments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-24

    catheters located in central veins of adult surgical and medical intensive care patients were cultured. Any type of central venous catheter was accepted for...20 to 92 years). All catheters were central venous catheters, including 76 triple lumen catheters, 60 Swan-Ganz pulmonary artery catheters, 54 Cordis...RT, Kruse JA, Thill-Baharozian MC, Carlson RW. Triple-vs. Single-Lumen Central Venous Catheters: A prospective study in a critically ill population

  12. Dynamics of Placement...How to Develop a Successful Career Planning & Placement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingleton, John D.; Fitzpatrick, Edwin B.

    This document presents college practitioners with a practical guide for establishing, maintaining, expanding, or revitalizing a contemporary career planning and placement center. The introduction to this guide contains a brief history of career planning and placement. Chapter 1, Career Planning and Placement in the Academic Setting, addresses the…

  13. Cervical Epidural Abscess in Haemodialysis Patients by Catheter Related Infection: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gezici, Ali Riza

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in neuroimaging and neurosurgical treatment modalities, spinal epidural abscess remains a challenging problem. Early diagnosis is often difficult and treatment is always delayed. Spinal epidural abscess usually develops in patients with predisposing factors such as IV drug abuse, senillity, diabetes mellitus, spinal attempts, alcoholism, immunosuppression, liver diseases and catheterizations. It is rarely seen in cervical region. A successful treatment is only possible with early diagnosis and accurate surgical and medical treatment. Optimal management is unclear and morbidity and mortality are significant. We present two adult haemodialysis patients with end-stage renal insufficiency who developed cervical epidural abscess following central venous catheter placement. Early surgical intervention is mandatory in cases those have progressive neurological deficit and spinal deformity, and this is also increases the success rate of medical therapy. PMID:20052368

  14. Urethral protrusion of the abdominal catheter of ventriculoperitoneal shunt: Case report of extremely rare complication.

    PubMed

    Yazar, Ugur; Kanat, Ayhan; Akca, Nezih; Gazioglu, Gurkan; Arda, Irfan S; Kazdal, Hizir

    2012-05-01

    Hydrocephalus in its various forms constitutes one of the major problems in pediatric neurosurgical practice. The placement of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is the most common form of treatment for hydrocephalus, so that all neurosurgeons struggle with shunt malfunctions and their complications. Well-known complications are connected with the use of the valve systems (malfunction, infectious, overdrainage, secondary craniosynostosis, etc.). We report an unusual case of protruding abdominal catheter from the urethra. This girl had received a VP shunt for hydrocephalus following surgery of posterior fossa medulloblastoma 4 years ago. After admission, the entire system was removed, antibiotic treatment was administered for 2 weeks, and a new VP shunt was placed. The postoperative course was uneventful. This complication is extremely rare.

  15. Catheter-related infections: diagnosis and intravascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Burillo, A; Muñoz, P

    2001-11-01

    The diagnosis of catheter-related infections relies on the presence of clinical manifestations of infection and the evidence of colonization of the catheter tip by bacteria, mycobacteria or fungi. The reference method to confirm the latter requires the withdrawal of the catheter for culturing, which frequently turns out to be inconvenient, unnecessary and costly. New methods try to avoid these inconveniences and to assess the presence of tip colonization without withdrawal. One of these methods uses quantitative blood cultures with a jump (> or = 5) in colony counts between blood obtained from the catheter lumen and simultaneously from a peripheral vein. It has a high sensitivity (>80%) and specificity (94%-100%) but is cumbersome and requires both an easy backflow of blood in the catheter and the existence of bacteremia. Cytocentrifugation and acridine orange staining of blood withdrawn from an infected catheter lumen has a sensitivity and a specificity of over 90% for the diagnosis of tip colonization. "Superficial cultures" consist in the semiquantitative culture of the hub, of the skin surrounding the catheter entrance and of the first (1 cm) subcutaneous portion of the catheter after swabbing. Sensitivity of this method is >90% and specificity is >80%, and positive and negative predictive values for catheters (considering together those with and without clinical data of infection) are 66% and 97%, respectively. Endoluminal brushing has turned out to be an impractical and unreliable procedure, at least in our experience. New methods based on the speed of bacterial growth to detectable levels of microorganisms in conventional blood cultures are a new and interesting way of assessing catheter-related infections. Besides, as use of antimicrobial-coated catheters becomes more prevalent, the existing definitions of catheter colonization and catheter-related infection may need to be modified, because such coatings may lead to false-negative culture results. Many

  16. Validation of catheter semiquantitative culture technique for nonstaphylococcal organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, D P; Garcia, A; Kelly, J W; Longfield, R N; Harrison, L

    1996-01-01

    The catheter semiquantitative culture roll tip technique has been validated as a discriminator between non-catheter-related bacteremias and catheter-related bacteremias (CRBs) caused by Staphylococcus species. However, this technique has not been specifically validated when used for the evaluation of catheters infected with organisms other than staphylococci. We reviewed catheters that had been submitted for semiquantitative roll tip culture as well as hospital records to determine clinical correlates of infection. Local infection and CRB were defined by standard criteria. Catheter-related sepsis (CRS) was defined as fever, leukocytosis, or hypotension which resolved with catheter removal, without another source of infection. For 195 catheters from 93 patients, gram-negative rods and enterococci were present on 36, fungi were on 25, Corynebacterium species were on 5, Bacillus species were on 3, Staphylococcus species were on 79, and 41 demonstrated no growth. Of 21 episodes of CRB or CRS due to nonstaphylococcal organisms, only 1 (questionable) episode was due to a catheter with < 15 CFU (P < 0.05). Eleven of these 21 episodes of CRB or CRS were due to gram-negative rods and enterococci, of which only the questionable episode was due to a catheter with < 15 CFU. Nine of these 21 episodes of CRB or CRS were due to fungi, none of which were associated with a catheter with < 15 CFU. The data for Staphylococcus species recapitulated published data (none of 21 CRB or CRS episodes were associated with catheters with < 15 CFU) and validated this retrospective technique. The data presented in this study validate the use of the semiquantitative culture technique for the evaluation of catheter-related infections caused by organisms other than staphylococci. PMID:8789025

  17. Exploring Continuous Clinical Placement for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Lisa G.; Wray, Natalie; McCall, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Clinical placements are integral to health professional preparatory courses. These placements allow for the application of classroom-based learning into real patient care situations. In doing so, they provide opportunities for applying theoretical knowledge into practice contexts, skills development and socialisation into the chosen profession.…

  18. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with §...

  19. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with §...

  20. 32 CFR 1656.10 - Job placement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Job placement. 1656.10 Section 1656.10 National....10 Job placement. (a) Selective Service will maintain a job bank for the exclusive purpose of placing ASWs in alternative service jobs. (b) An ASW who has identified his own job in accordance with §...