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Sample records for period surface wave

  1. Numerical Simulation of Long-period Surface Wave in Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiqiong; Yu, Yanxiang

    2016-04-01

    Studies have shown that the western Taiwan coastal plain is influenced by long-period ground motion from the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake, and engineering structures with natural vibration long-period are damaged by strong surface wave in the western coastal plain. The thick sediments in the western coastal plain are the main cause of the propagation of strong long-period ground motion. The thick sediments similar to in the western coastal plain also exist in northern China. It is necessary to research the effects of thick sediments to long-period ground motion in northern China. The numerical simulation of ground motion based on theoretical seismology is one of important means to study the ground motion. We will carry out the numerical simulation of long-period ground motion in northern China by using the existing tomographic imaging results of northern China to build underground medium model, and adopting finite fault source model for wave input. In the process of simulation, our previous developed structure-preserving algorithm, symplectic discrete singular convolution differentiator (SDSCD), is used to deal with seismic wave field propagation. Our purpose is to reveal the formation and propagation of long-period surface wave in thick sediments and grasp the amplification effect of long-period ground motion due to the thick sediments. It will lay the foundation on providing the reference for the value of the long-period spectrum during determining the ground motion parameters in seismic design. This work has been supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.41204046, 42574051).

  2. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  3. Geometric effects of global lateral heterogeneity on long-period surface wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, T.; Kanamori, H.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to document examples of anomalous long-period surface wave amplitude behavior and to provide a preliminary appraisal of the effects of global lateral heterogeneity on surface wave propagation from a ray theory perspective. Attention is given to remarkable long-period surface wave anomalies described in literature, an equidistance azimuthal plot centered on the Iranian source region, Rayleigh wave and Love wave spectra for the 256-s period arrivals for the Tabas earthquake, constrained moment tensor and fault model inversion solutions ofr Iranian earthquakes, aspects of surface wave ray tracing, and a table of Rayleigh wave amplitude anomalies for Iranian earthquakes. Surface wave ray-tracing calculations for models of global phase velocity variations proposed by Nakanishi and Anderson (1984) are found to show that large-amplitude anomalies will be observed for Love and Rayleigh waves with periods of 100-250 s.

  4. Geometric effects of global lateral heterogeneity on long-period surface wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, T.; Kanamori, H.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to document examples of anomalous long-period surface wave amplitude behavior and to provide a preliminary appraisal of the effects of global lateral heterogeneity on surface wave propagation from a ray theory perspective. Attention is given to remarkable long-period surface wave anomalies described in literature, an equidistance azimuthal plot centered on the Iranian source region, Rayleigh wave and Love wave spectra for the 256-s period arrivals for the Tabas earthquake, constrained moment tensor and fault model inversion solutions ofr Iranian earthquakes, aspects of surface wave ray tracing, and a table of Rayleigh wave amplitude anomalies for Iranian earthquakes. Surface wave ray-tracing calculations for models of global phase velocity variations proposed by Nakanishi and Anderson (1984) are found to show that large-amplitude anomalies will be observed for Love and Rayleigh waves with periods of 100-250 s.

  5. Measuring complex spectra of long-period surface waves for earthquake source analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiajun; Lay, T. )

    1989-03-01

    Long-periodic surface waves from large earthquakes can provide reliable estimates of the source depth, rupture duration, seismic moment, and fault orientation. This requires accurate surface wave phase and amplitude spectra and precise propagation corrections. Standard procedures for estimating spectra of traveling waves in source analyses are inaccurate for periods exceeding 300 s, so the longer periods are usually analyzed by free oscillation analysis if at all. The authors apply a multiple filter analysis to extract complex spectra for periods up to 500 s suitable for traveling wave spectral inversions. This will allow improved constraints on the rupture process of large earthquakes to be obtained by inversion methods using a single formalism.

  6. Powerful surface-wave oscillators with two-dimensional periodic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Malkin, A. M.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2012-04-02

    We propose planar relativistic surface-wave oscillators with two-dimensional periodic gratings. Additional transverse propagating waves emerging on these gratings synchronize the emission from the wide sheet rectilinear electron beam which allows realizing a Cherenkov millimeter wave oscillator with gigawatt output power.

  7. Almost Exponential Decay of Periodic Viscous Surface Waves without Surface Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yan; Tice, Ian

    2013-02-01

    We consider a viscous fluid of finite depth below the air, occupying a three-dimensional domain bounded below by a fixed solid boundary and above by a free moving boundary. The fluid dynamics are governed by the gravity-driven incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and the effect of surface tension is neglected on the free surface. The long time behavior of solutions near equilibrium has been an intriguing question since the work of Beale (Commun Pure Appl Math 34(3):359-392, 1981). This paper is the third in a series of three (Guo in Local well-posedness of the viscous surface wave problem without surface tension, Anal PDE 2012, to appear; in Decay of viscous surface waves without surface tension in horizontally infinite domains, Preprint, 2011) that answers this question. Here we consider the case in which the free interface is horizontally periodic; we prove that the problem is globally well-posed and that solutions decay to equilibrium at an almost exponential rate. In particular, the free interface decays to a flat surface. Our framework contains several novel techniques, which include: (1) a priori estimates that utilize a "geometric" reformulation of the equations; (2) a two-tier energy method that couples the boundedness of high-order energy to the decay of low-order energy, the latter of which is necessary to balance out the growth of the highest derivatives of the free interface; (3) a localization procedure that is compatible with the energy method and allows for curved lower surface geometry. Our decay estimates lead to the construction of global-in-time solutions to the surface wave problem.

  8. Elastic waves at periodically-structured surfaces and interfaces of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Every, A. G.; Maznev, A. A.

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents a simple treatment of elastic wave scattering at periodically structured surfaces and interfaces of solids, and the existence and nature of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and interfacial (IW) waves at such structures. Our treatment is embodied in phenomenological models in which the periodicity resides in the boundary conditions. These yield zone folding and band gaps at the boundary of, and within the Brillouin zone. Above the transverse bulk wave threshold, there occur leaky or pseudo-SAW and pseudo-IW, which are attenuated via radiation into the bulk wave continuum. These have a pronounced effect on the transmission and reflection of bulk waves. We provide examples of pseudo-SAW and pseudo-IW for which the coupling to the bulk wave continuum vanishes at isloated points in the dispersion relation. These supersonic guided waves correspond to embedded discrete eigenvalues within a radiation continuum. We stress the generality of the phenomena that are exhibited at widely different scales of length and frequency, and their relevance to situations as diverse as the guiding of seismic waves in mine stopes, the metrology of periodic metal interconnect structures in the semiconductor industry, and elastic wave scattering by an array of coplanar cracks in a solid.

  9. Wood's anomalies and surface waves in the problem of scattering by a periodic boundary. II

    SciTech Connect

    Kamotskii, I V; Nazarov, S A

    1999-02-28

    The solution of the problem of diffraction of an acoustic plane wave by a periodic boundary for frequencies close to threshold values is studied. It is shown that if the periodic structure has some special geometry, then the transformations of the diffraction pattern (Wood's anomalies) are accompanied by the occurrence of surface waves. Substantiation of asymptotic formulae is carried out on the basis of the techniques of equivalent weighted norms in Sobolev spaces.

  10. Dynamics of laser ablative shock waves from one dimensional periodic structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelikani, Leela; Pinnoju, Venkateshwarlu; Paturi, Prem Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Laser ablative shock waves (LASWs) from one dimensional periodic structured surfaces (1D-PSS) on Aluminum metal is studied using time resolved shadowgraphy technique. 1D-PSS of triangular and sinusoidal periodic density profiles consisting of 288 lines per laser focal spot diameter (lp2ω0) with periodicity of 0.83 μm are used as targets. The SW properties such as propagation distance, velocity and pressure behind the shock front were compared with flat Aluminum surface of the target under the same experimental conditions. The possibility of tailoring the nature of LASWs with varying density profile on the surface is presented.

  11. Computational Modeling of Bloch Surface Waves in One-Dimensional Periodic and Aperiodic Multilayer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koju, Vijay

    Photonic crystals and their use in exciting Bloch surface waves have received immense attention over the past few decades. This interest is mainly due to their applications in bio-sensing, wave-guiding, and other optical phenomena such as surface field enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Improvement in numerical modeling techniques, state of the art computing resources, and advances in fabrication techniques have also assisted in growing interest in this field. The ability to model photonic crystals computationally has benefited both the theoretical as well as experimental communities. It helps the theoretical physicists in solving complex problems which cannot be solved analytically and helps to acquire useful insights that cannot be obtained otherwise. Experimentalists, on the other hand, can test different variants of their devices by changing device parameters to optimize performance before fabrication. In this dissertation, we develop two commonly used numerical techniques, namely transfer matrix method, and rigorous coupled wave analysis, in C++ and MATLAB, and use two additional software packages, one open-source and another commercial, to model one-dimensional photonic crystals. Different variants of one-dimensional multilayered structures such as perfectly periodic dielectric multilayers, quasicrystals, aperiodic multilayer are modeled, along with one-dimensional photonic crystals with gratings on the top layer. Applications of Bloch surface waves, along with new and novel aperiodic dielectric multilayer structures that support Bloch surface waves are explored in this dissertation. We demonstrate a slow light configuration that makes use of Bloch Surface Waves as an intermediate excitation in a double-prism tunneling configuration. This method is simple compared to the more usual techniques for slowing light using the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency in atomic gases or doped ionic crystals operated at temperatures below 4K. Using a semi

  12. FE-Based Surface Elastic Wave Analysis of a Two-Dimensional Periodic Half-Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kazuhisa; Araki, Toshihide; Koro, Kazuhiro

    This paper presents a numerical method for surface elastic waves in a half-space possessing a two-dimensional periodicity. The solution is expressed by plane waves in the vertical direction, while it is approximated by finite elements in the horizontal plane. By virtue of the Bloch's theorem, the problem is reduced to equations of motion in a unit cell. The vertical wavenumbers satisfying the equations in the unit cell are determined by solving an eigenvalue problem with respect to the wavenumbers. As numerical examples, periodic arrays of piles embedded in a ground are analyzed. In the analyses piles made of concrete and a soft material are considered with arrangements given by the square and the triangular honeycomb lattices. Under these conditions, the influences of the stiffness and the lattice pattern of piles on the band structure are investigated.

  13. Dynamics of laser ablative shock waves from one dimensional periodic structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturi, Prem Kiran; Chelikani, Leela; Pinnoju, Venkateshwarlu; Acrhem Team

    2015-06-01

    Spatio-temporal evolution of Laser ablative shock waves (LASWs) from one dimensional periodic structured surfaces (1D-PSS) of Aluminum is studied using time resolved defocused shadowgraphy technique. LASWs are generated by focusing 7 ns pulses from second harmonic of Nd:YAG (532 nm, 10 Hz) laser on to 1D-PSS with sinusoidal and triangular modulations of varying periodicity. An expanded He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) is used as probe beam for shadowgraphy. Evolution of ablative shock front (SF) with 1.5 ns temporal resolution is used to measure position of the SF, its nature, density and pressure behind the SF. The effect of surface modulation on the LASW and contact front dynamics was compared to those from a flat surface (FS) of Aluminum. SWs from FS and PSS obeyed Taylor's solution for spherical and planar nature, respectively. The velocity of SF from 1D PSS had a twofold increase compared to the FS. This was further enhanced for structures whose periodicity is of the order of excitation wavelength. Variation of SF properties with varying periodicity over a range of 3.3 μm to 0.55 μm has the potential to tailor shockwaves of required parameters. The work is supported by Defence Research and Developement Organization, India through Grants-in-Aid Program. The periodic surfaces were procured with financial support from BRFST project No. NFP-MAT-A12-04.

  14. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Water Surface Wave in a Trough with Periodical Topographical Bottom under Vertical Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yi; Miao, Guo-Qing; Wei, Rong-Jue

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the water surface waves in a vertically vibrated long rectangular trough with several identical Plexiglas rectangles lined periodically on the bottom. The band structure is computed theoretically by the method of transfer matrix. Some interesting phenomena, such as the localized wave, especially the solitary-like wave inside the band gap, are observed in the experiments.

  15. Increased efficiency of surface wave stimulation on the inaccessible side of a thick isotropic plate with superimposed periodicity.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Nico F; Sarens, Bart

    2007-07-01

    Because of the growing number of applications of phononic crystals and other periodic structures, there is a renewed and growing interest in understanding the interaction of ultrasound with periodically corrugated surfaces. This paper presents a theoretical investigation of the transformation of ultrasound incident from the solid side onto a solid-liquid periodically corrugated interface. It is shown that it is possible to tailor the shape of a corrugated surface with given periodicity such that there is a significant amount of energy transformed into Scholte-Stoneley waves than if pure saw-tooth or sine-shaped surfaces were used. This permits the fabrication of periodic structures that can be patched on or engraved in body parts of a construction and enables efficient generation of Scholte-Stoneley waves. The study is performed for incident homogeneous plane waves as well as for bounded beams. Incident longitudinal waves are studied as well as incident shear waves.

  16. Surface Acoustic Wave Ammonia Sensors Based on ST-cut Quartz under Periodic Al Structure.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Liang; Shen, Chi-Yen; Tsai, Rume-Tze; Su, Ming-Yau

    2009-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are key components for sensing applications. SAW propagation under a periodic grating was investigated in this work. The theoretical method used here is the space harmonic method. We also applied the results of SAW propagation studied in this work to design a two-port resonator with an Al grating on ST-cut quartz. The measured frequency responses of the resonator were similar to the simulation ones. Then, the chemical interface of polyaniline/WO(3) composites was coated on the SAW sensor for ammonia detection. The SAW sensor responded to ammonia gas and could be regenerated using dry nitrogen.

  17. Variable-period surface-wave magnitudes: A rapid and robust estimator of seismic moments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonner, J.; Herrmann, R.; Benz, H.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface-wave magnitudes (Ms), measured at local, regional, and teleseismic distances, can be used as a rapid and robust estimator of seismic moment magnitude (Mw). We used the Russell (2006) variable-period surface-wave magnitude formula, henceforth called Ms(VMAX), to estimate the Ms for 165 North American events with 3.2 period surface-wave observed at a local or near-regional distance seismic station after a preliminary epicentral location has been formed. Therefore, it may be used to make rapid measurements of Mw, which are needed by government agencies for early warning systems.

  18. Experimental investigation of the dispersion of Scholte-Stoneley waves on a periodically corrugated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfei; Declercq, Nico F.

    2016-12-01

    The dispersion of the phase velocities of the Scholte-Stoneley waves on a periodically corrugated interface is experimentally investigated and presented. The Scholte-Stoneley waves are generated through diffraction of the incident bulk longitudinal waves in water on a solid-fluid (brass-water) interface with one-dimensional grooves. The diffractions resulting from both the incident longitudinal waves and the generated Scholte-Stoneley waves are experimentally detected in a polar scan. The extracted velocity-frequency curves first confirm that the incident bulk wave is not dispersive and further show that the Scholte-Stoneley wave generated on the periodic interface is also not dispersive, although the velocity-frequency curves have oscillatory features.

  19. Short-period surface-wave phase velocities across the conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, G.

    2017-09-01

    Surface-wave phase-velocity maps for the full footprint of the USArray Transportable Array (TA) across the conterminous United States are developed and tested. Three-component, long-period continuous seismograms recorded on more than 1800 seismometers, most of which were deployed for 18 months or longer, are processed using a noise cross-correlation technique to derive inter-station Love and Rayleigh dispersion curves at periods between 5 and 40 s. The phase-velocity measurements are quality controlled using an automated algorithm and then used in inversions for Love and Rayleigh phase-velocity models at discrete periods on a 0.25°-by-0.25° pixel grid. The robustness of the results is examined using comparisons of maps derived from subsets of the data. A winter-summer division of the cross-correlation data results in small model differences, indicating relatively minor sensitivity of the results to seasonal variations in the distribution of noise sources. Division of the dispersion data based on inter-station azimuth does not result in geographically coherent model differences, suggesting that azimuthal anisotropy at the regional scale is weak compared with variations in isotropic velocities and does not substantially influence the results for isotropic velocities. The phase-velocity maps and dispersion measurements are documented and made available as data products of the 10-year-long USArray TA deployment.

  20. Verification of Long Period Surface Waves from Ambient Noise and Its Application in Constructing 3D Shear Wave Structure of Lithosphere in United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J.; Yang, Y.; Ni, S.; Zhao, K.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decade, ambient noise tomography (ANT) has become an estimated method to construct the earth's interior structures thanks to its advantage in extracting surface waves from cross-correlations of ambient noise without using earthquake data. However, most of previous ambient noise tomography studies concentrate on short and intermediate periods (<50sec) due to the dominant energy of the microseism at these periods. Studies of long period surface waves from cross-correlation of ambient noise are limited. In this study, we verify the accuracy of the long period (50-250sec) surface wave (Rayleigh wave) from ambient noise by comparing both dispersion curves and seismic waveforms from ambient noise with those from earthquake records quantitatively. After that, we calculate vertical-vertical cross-correlation functions among more than1800 USArray Transportable Array stations and extract high quality interstation phase velocity dispersion curves from them at 10-200 sec periods. Then, we adopt a finite frequency ambient noise tomography method based on Born approximation to obtain high resolution phase velocity maps using the obtained dispersion measurements at 10-150 sec periods. Afterward, we extract local dispersion curves from these dispersion maps and invert them for 1D shear wave velocity profiles at individual grids using a Bayesian Monte Carlo method. Finally, a 3D shear velocity model is constructed by assembling all the 1D Vs profiles. Our 3D model is overall similar to other models constructed using earthquake surface waves and body waves. In summary, we demonstrate that the long period surface waves can be extracted from ambient noise, and the long period dispersion measurements from ambient noise are as accurate as those from earthquake data and can be used to construct 3D lithospheric structure from surface down to lithosphere/asthenosphere depths.

  1. Observations and modelling of winds and waves during the surface wave dynamics experiment. Report 2. Intensive observation period IOP-3, 25 February-9 March 1991. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, M.J.; Graber, H.C.; Jensen, R.E.; Donelan, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes the compilation of observed and modelled wind, wave and current parameters during the third intensive observation period (IOP-3) from February 25 to March 9, 1991, of the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment. The measurements include wind speed and direction, wave heights and periods, air and sea temperatures, and atmospheric pressures from four directional wave buoys, two meteorological buoys, and several routinely operated buoys from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC). Examples of directional wave spectra obtained from two airborne radars and from a Swath ship are presented along with surface currents from airborne expendable current profilers (AXCP) and acoustic doppler current profilers (ADCP). In addition, a summary of directional wave spectra is presented for this period. The model data include examples of wind fields from six numerical weather prediction models and the corresponding wave height maps as derived from the 3G-WAM ocean wave model. Estimated surface current velocities and directions from the Fleet Numerical Oceanographic Center (FNOC) model and selected satellite images of sea surface temperature fields are also presented for this time period.

  2. Line-focus probe excitation of Scholte acoustic waves at the liquid-loaded surfaces of periodic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Every, A.G.; Vines, R.E.; Wolfe, J.P.

    1999-10-01

    A model is introduced to explain our observation of Scholte-like ultrasonic waves traveling at the water-loaded surfaces of solids with periodically varying properties. The observations pertain to two two-dimensional superlattices: a laminated solid of alternating 0.5-mm-thick layers of aluminum and a polymer, and a hexagonal array of polymer rods of lattice spacing 1 mm in an aluminum matrix. The surface waves are generated and detected by line focus acoustic lenses aligned parallel to each other, and separated by varying distances. The acoustic fields of these lenses may be considered a superposition of plain bulk waves with wave normals contained within the angular apertures of the lenses. For homogeneous solids, phase matching constraints do not allow the Scholte wave to be coupled into with an experimental configuration of this type. This is not true for a spatially periodic solid, where coupling between bulk waves and the Scholte surface wave takes place through Umklapp processes involving a change in the wave-vector component parallel to the surface by a reciprocal lattice vector. In the experiments, the source pulse is broadband, extending up to about 6 MHz, whereas the spectrum of the observed Scholte wave is peaked at around 4 and 4.5 MHz for the layered solid and hexagonal lattice, respectively. We attribute this to a resonance in the surface response of the solid, possibly associated with a critical point in the dispersion relation of the superlattice. On rotating the solid about its surface normal, the Scholte wave displays dramatic variation in phase arrival time and, to a lesser extent, also group arrival time. This variation is well accounted for by our model. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Investigating Global 3-D Shear-Wave Anisotropy in the Earth's Mantle from Free Oscillations, Body Waves, Surface Waves and Long-period Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekstrom, G.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a framework that can be used to investigate anisotropic velocity, density and anelastic heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle using a wide spectrum (0.3-50 mHz) of seismological observables. We start with the extensive dataset of surface-wave phase anomalies, long-period waveforms, and body-wave travel times collected by Kustowski et al. (2008) for the development of the global model S362ANI. The additional data included in our analysis are splitting functions of spheroidal and toroidal modes, which are analogous to phase velocity maps at low frequencies. We include in this set of observations a new dataset containing the splitting functions of 56 spheroidal fundamental modes and overtones, measured by Deuss et al. (2011, 2012) using data from large recent earthquakes. Apart from providing unique constraints on the long-wavelength elastic and density structure in the mantle, the overtone splitting data are especially sensitive to the velocity (and anisotropic) structure in the transition zone and in the deeper mantle. The detection of anisotropy, a marker of flow, in the transition zone has implications for our understanding of mantle convection. Our forward modeling of the splitting functions, like the other types of data, includes the effects of radial anisotropy (Mochizuki, 1986). We show that the upper-mantle shear-wave anisotropy of S362ANI generates a clear contribution to the splitting functions of the modes that are sensitive to the upper-mantle structure. We explore the tradeoffs between fitting the mode splitting functions and the travel-times of body waves that turn in the transition zone or in the lower mantle (e.g. SS), while observing that the waveforms and the surface wave phase-anomalies provide complementary information about the mantle. Our experiments suggest that the splitting data are sufficiently sensitive to the anisotropy in the mantle such that their inclusion may provide a better depth resolution of the anisotropic shear

  4. High-speed landslide mechanism extracted from long-period surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Yu, H.; Mangeney, A.; Stutzmann, E.

    2013-12-01

    Long-period seismic signals gathered at stations far from the landslide source can be used to recover the characteristics of the event. Source mechanism inversion based on the surface waves had already been done on two large volcanic debris avalanches (Montserrat, Lesser Antilles 1997 and Mount St. Helens, USA 1980), the initial flow direction, the total volume and the mean slope of the topography had been successfully extracted. We here try to apply the method to two other landslide events, our objective is to refine the source model used in the inversion, and to improve the method for a wider application. The first event is a huge landslide occurred in Yigong Bomi district (30.22N, 94.99E) in Tibet province of China on 9 April 2000. This landslide began as a sliding mass started to fall at the elevation of 5500m, when colliding with the ground, it broke up into debris, and ran for long distance. The whole process lasted about 10 minutes, about 300 million cube meters deposit formed a 60m-high dam in the Yigong river at the elevation of 2190m. The other event is the sudden failure happened at Qianjiangping village (30.97N, 110.61E) on 13 July 2003, on the bank of the Qinggan river. It is the biggest landslide in the last 20 years in the Three Gorges Reservoir area. The landslide flow brought about 20 million cube meters rock and soil masses right into the Qinggan river in a short time with a maximum sliding velocity of about 16m/s. It is a typical rocky-bedding slide, which has been compared to the 1963 Vaiont landslide in Italy. Seismic waves generated by these two events have been recorded respectively by more than 3 seismic stations from China Earthquake Networks (CEN), in the distance range between 360km and 1700km from the landslide source. We use a source model with impulse forces, derived from the schematic view of the mass traveling down the slope.We also perform waveform inversion and compare the result with the force model. The two landslides are

  5. Short-Period Surface-Wave Dispersion from Ambient Noise Tomography in Western China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    basins , including the Tarim Basin , Qaidam Basin , Sichuan Basin , and Ordos Basin . At the intermediate periods of this study (25–60 sec), Rayleigh waves...major sedimentary basins are labeled: Tarim (TM), Daidam (QM), Sichuan (SC), and Ordos (OD). 2008 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies 230 ...E. Pasyanos2 University of Colorado at Boulder1, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory2, and China Earthquake Administration 3

  6. Wood's anomalies and surface waves in the problem of scattering by a periodic boundary. I

    SciTech Connect

    Kamotskii, I V; Nazarov, S A

    1999-02-28

    The solution of the problem of diffraction of an acoustic plane wave by a periodic boundary for frequencies close to threshold values is studied. Wood's well-known experiments show that deviations from the threshold frequency values by a small quantity bring about drastic changes in the diffraction pattern. The asymptotic formula with respect to the small parameter {epsilon} is obtained for the corresponding scattering matrix.

  7. A secondary diffraction effect and the generation of Scholte-Stoneley acoustic wave on periodically corrugated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfei; Declercq, Nico F.

    2016-05-01

    When a wideband sound beam is incident onto a periodically corrugated surface, a series of diffraction related phenomena can occur. In this work, we report the observation of a secondary diffraction, which is different from those previously investigated. The search of the physical origin of this newly observed diffraction leads to the discovery of the possibility of generating Scholte-Stoneley waves, inspired by Guo, Margetan, and Thompson's work in sound backscattering from rough surfaces, through a nonconventional energy conversion mechanism: direct coupling of the incident energy with the periodic interface. This mechanism allows for the Scholte-Stoneley wave generation at any angle of incidence, which distinguishes it from the well-known energy conversion mechanism of the diffraction-related phenomena such as acoustic Wood anomaly and backward displacement in which wave generation is highly angle dependent. The findings of this work not only enrich the understanding of the interaction of sound with periodically corrugated structures but also provide a new surface wave generation method for the potential applications in nondestructive evaluation of materials.

  8. A secondary diffraction effect and the generation of Scholte–Stoneley acoustic wave on periodically corrugated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jingfei; Declercq, Nico F.

    2016-05-07

    When a wideband sound beam is incident onto a periodically corrugated surface, a series of diffraction related phenomena can occur. In this work, we report the observation of a secondary diffraction, which is different from those previously investigated. The search of the physical origin of this newly observed diffraction leads to the discovery of the possibility of generating Scholte–Stoneley waves, inspired by Guo, Margetan, and Thompson's work in sound backscattering from rough surfaces, through a nonconventional energy conversion mechanism: direct coupling of the incident energy with the periodic interface. This mechanism allows for the Scholte–Stoneley wave generation at any angle of incidence, which distinguishes it from the well-known energy conversion mechanism of the diffraction-related phenomena such as acoustic Wood anomaly and backward displacement in which wave generation is highly angle dependent. The findings of this work not only enrich the understanding of the interaction of sound with periodically corrugated structures but also provide a new surface wave generation method for the potential applications in nondestructive evaluation of materials.

  9. A novel approach for detecting trapped surface waves in a canal with periodic underwater topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Sergey A.

    2009-08-01

    A new approach is proposed to detect trapped modes in periodic canals. The obtained sufficient condition is new even for a straight canal with a body piercing the water surface as well. To cite this article: S.A. Nazarov, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  10. Moment Tensor Inversion of the 1998 Aiquile Earthquake Using Long-period surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.

    2016-12-01

    On 22nd May 1998 at 04:49(GMT), an earthquake of magnitude Mw = 6.6 struck the Aiquile region of Bolivia, causing 105 deaths and significant damage to the nearby towns of Hoyadas and Pampa Grande. This was the largest shallow earthquake (15 km depth) in Bolivia in over 50 years, and was felt as far Sucre, approximately 100 km away. In this report, a centroid moment tensor (CMT) inversion is carried using body waves and surface waves from 1998 Aiquile earthquake with 1-D and 3-D earth models to obtain the source model parameters and moment tensor, which are the values will be subsequently compared against the Global Centroid Moment Tensor Catalog(GCMT). Also, the excitation kernels could be gained and synthetic data can be created with different earth models. The two method for calculating synthetic seismograms are SPECFEM3D Globe which is based on shear wave mantle model S40RTS and crustal model CRUST 2.0, and AxiSEM which is based on PREM 1-D earth Model. Within the report, the theory behind the CMT inversion was explained and the source parameters gained from the inversion can be used to reveal the tectonics of the source of this earthquake, these information could be helpful in assessing seismic hazard and overall tectonic regime of this region. Furthermore, results of synthetic seismograms and the solution of inversion are going to be used to assess two models.

  11. Imaging the Anisotropic Shear-wave Velocity in the Earth's Mantle using Free Oscillations, Body Waves, Surface Waves and Long-period Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekstrom, G.

    2013-12-01

    We incorporate normal-mode splitting functions into a framework containing surface-wave phase anomalies, long-period waveforms, and body-wave travel times to investigate the three-dimensional structure of anisotropic shear-wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. In contrast with earlier studies, our modeling approach spans a wider spectrum (0.3-50 mHz) of seismological observables, jointly inverts for velocity and anisotropy apart from the discontinuity topographies, and incorporates new crustal corrections for the splitting functions that are consistent with the nonlinear corrections we employ for the waveforms. Our preferred anisotropic model, S362ANI+, an update to S362ANI, gives better fits to the recently measured splitting functions of spheroidal and toroidal modes that are modeled in this study. The splitting functions require additional isotropic variations in the transition zone and the mid mantle that are geographically distributed in the southern hemisphere. The level of agreement in the isotropic shear-velocity structure is higher between S362ANI+ and other recent studies than in the earlier generation of models. The anisotropic part of S362ANI+ is similar to S362ANI and is restricted to the upper 300 km in the mantle since only small improvements in fits are observed on adding anisotropy at depth. We also show that modeling the splitting functions reduces the tradeoffs between lateral variations in velocity and anisotropy in the lowermost mantle. Therefore, more data should be included to constrain any radial anisotropy in the transition zone and in the lower mantle.

  12. Transversally periodic solitary gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Paul A; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-08

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity-capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity-capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles.

  13. Transversally periodic solitary gravity–capillary waves

    PubMed Central

    Milewski, Paul A.; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity–capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity–capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles. PMID:24399922

  14. Experimental observation of optical bandgaps for surface electromagnetic waves in a periodically corrugated one-dimensional silicon nitride photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Descrovi, Emiliano; Giorgis, Fabrizio; Dominici, Lorenzo; Michelotti, Francesco

    2008-02-01

    Dispersion curves of surface electromagnetic waves (SEWs) in 1D silicon nitride photonic crystals having periodic surface corrugations are considered. We experimentally demonstrate that a bandgap for SEWs can be obtained by fabricating a polymeric grating on the multilayered structure. Close to the boundary of the first Brillouin zone connected to the grating, we observe the splitting of the SEW dispersion curve into two separate branches and identify two regions of very low group velocity. The proper design of the structure allows the two folded branches to lie beyond the light line in a wide spectral range, thus doubling the density of modes available for SEWs and avoiding light scattering.

  15. High-speed landslide mechanism extracted from long-period surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Long-period seismic signals gathered at stations far from landslide area can be used to recover the landslide source force applied on ground during the rapid sliding process. This force history is helpful to improve our ability to deduce the characteristics of the event as well as the dynamic properties of bulk motion. We use source mechanism inversion to analyse two different large landslides. Seismic waves generated by these two events have been recorded respectively by more than 5 stations, with the distance range from 69km to 1325km. The first event is the sudden failure happened at Qianjiangping village (30.97°N, 110.61°E) on 13 July 2003, on the bank of the Qinggan river. The landslide flow brought about 20 million cubic meters rock and soil masses right into the river in a short time. It moved about 250 meters in the main sliding direction of S45°E before stopped by the opposite bank. It is a typical reservoir landslide, which has been compared to the 1963 Vaiont landslide in Italy. The other event is the Xiaolin (120.64°E; 23.16°N) deep-seated landslide, located in southwestern Taiwan and had volume of about 27 million cubic meters. The landslide moved in the westward direction, divided into two streams at about the middle of the run-out, because there had been a small ridge and two valleys extended from the west side of the ridge. The deposit spreading length of this landslide is about 2300 meters. We discuss the different characteristics of the two events in both geological structure and movement mode based on the field survey. Then we show that those differences are also revealed by the source force-time functions from inversion.

  16. On neutron surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatovich, V. K.

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that neutron surface waves do not exist. The difference between the neutron wave mechanics and the wave physics of electromagnetic and acoustic processes, which allows the existence of surface waves, is analyzed.

  17. Imaging upper mantle structures in regional, continental and global scales using long-period surface waves (50-300 sec) from ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Xie, J.

    2014-12-01

    Most of ambient noise tomography studies performed to date exploit surface waves at periods shorter than 40/50 sec. Two natural questions one may ask are (1) whether longer-period surface wave (>50 s) can also be extracted from ambient noise and (2) whether long-period dispersion curves from ambient noise are accurate enough for tomography to constrain upper-mantle structures. In this study, we investigate the capability of using teleseismic long-period surface waves from ambient noise in regional-, continental- and global-scale surface wave tomography and also evaluate the accuracy of long-period dispersion measurements at periods up to 300 sec. For regional and continental scale studies, we process ambient noise data from USArray to extract inter-station long-period surface wave dispersion curves and then perform surface wave tomography using the dispersion curves. For the global scale studies, we process ambient noise data from more than 1000 stations distributed around the globe, including both permanent FDSN stations and a number of PASSCAL transportable arrays. We observe clear, strong, and coherent long-period surface waves at 50-300 sec periods at both regional and teleseismic inter-station distances. Using long-period dispersion curves from ambient noise, we generate phase velocity maps at 50-300 sec periods and then compare them with those generated from earthquake data. The results show that long-period dispersion measurements from ambient noise are compatible with those from earthquake data and phase velocity maps from ambient noise data and earthquake data are similar to each other, verifying the feasibility and validity of using long-period surface waves from ambient noise in regional, continental and global surface wave tomography. Long-period surface waves from ambient noise are complementary to those from earthquakes. The inclusion of them in regional and global surface wave tomography could significantly increase both lateral and azimuthal path

  18. Periodicity effects on compound guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiadini, Francesco; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Scaglione, Antonio; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2016-09-01

    Surface waves of different types can be compounded when a homogeneous layer is sandwiched between two half spaces filled with dissimilar periodically non-homogeneous dielectric materials and the intermediate layer is sufficiently thin. We solved the boundary-value problem for compound waves guided by a layer of a homogeneous and isotropic (metal or dielectric) material sandwiched between a structurally chiral material (SCM) and a periodically multi-layered isotropic dielectric material. We found that the periodicity of the SCM is crucial to excite a multiplicity of compound guided waves with strong coupling between the two interfaces.

  19. Quasi-optical theory of relativistic surface-wave oscillators with one-dimensional and two-dimensional periodic planar structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Malkin, A. M.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2013-11-15

    Within the framework of a quasi-optical approach, we develop 2D and 3D self-consistent theory of relativistic surface-wave oscillators. Presenting the radiation field as a sum of two counter-propagating wavebeams coupled on a shallow corrugated surface, we describe formation of an evanescent slow wave. Dispersion characteristics of the evanescent wave following from this method are in good compliance with those found from the direct cst simulations. Considering excitation of the slow wave by a sheet electron beam, we simulate linear and nonlinear stages of interaction, which allows us to determine oscillation threshold conditions, electron efficiency, and output coupling. The transition from the model of surface-wave oscillator operating in the π-mode regime to the canonical model of relativistic backward wave oscillator is considered. We also described a modified scheme of planar relativistic surface-wave oscillators exploiting two-dimensional periodic gratings. Additional transverse propagating waves emerging on these gratings synchronize the emission from a wide sheet rectilinear electron beam allowing realization of a Cherenkov millimeter-wave oscillators with subgigawatt output power level.

  20. Intermediate period surface waves from mining explosions for crustal structure and source studies: Application in the western United States and northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rongmao

    The study of intermediate period surface waves from mining explosions in Western USA (Wyoming) and Northeast China (QianAn) provides constraints on the crustal structure in these regions and the source mechanism of the explosions. Large-scale mining explosions as a result of their long time duration and large spatial extent can generate short- to intermediate-period (1--20 s) surface waves. Regional surface waves observed in the Western US were generated by four large-scale cast blasts in a Wyoming coal mine. Intermediate-period surface waves in Northeast China were generated by a mining explosion in an iron mine. Fundamental mode Rayleigh wave group velocities were estimated using multiple filter analysis and refined by phase matched filtering. Station specific velocity models were determined by linear inversion of the dispersion curves and found to complement known shallow crustal structure in each area. Synthetics based on mining source models and the inverted velocity structure suggest that some combination of mine free face orientation, blasting direction and material casting contribute to the observations. The Wyoming and China studies are presented at Paper I and Paper II, respectively. Assessment of surface wave dispersion provides the opportunity to make intermediate period Ms estimates with path correction. These surface wave magnitude estimates are combined with regional body wave magnitude estimates, mb, and compared to M s:mb data from explosions and earthquakes for purposes of identifying the source type. These results suggest that mining explosions are different from simultaneously detonated explosions and may appear earthquake like. This work is discussed in Paper III. The surface wave inversions used in the first part of the study utilized common linearized inversion procedures. In order to assess the effect of the linearization, a niching genetic algorithm (NGA) was introduced, developed and tested for crustal shear-wave velocity inversion in

  1. Development of discrimination, detection, and location capabilities in central and southern Asia using middle-period surface waves recorded by a regional array. Scientific report No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Levshin, A.L.; Ritzwoller, M.H.

    1996-01-10

    This research is dedicated to the investigation of the relevance and use of intermediate period (5 - 25 s) surface wave data in problems of detection, discrimination, and the accurate location of small events using regional array data. It is focused on analysis of data from earthquakes throughout Central and Southern Asia and the Middle East and nuclear explosions at Lop Nor within 15 - 25 degrees of the Kyrghiz Telemetered Seismic Network. The main efforts during the 6.5-month time period covered by this report were directed to data collection and preprocessing, software development, measurements of surface wave characteristics, and constructing `master curves` for clusters of events in specific regions. In the next year, we will greatly increase the volume of processed data and construct group velocity maps for Central and Southern Asia. The expected weak surface wave signals recorded by a network and improvement of the regional model of the lithosphere. This will provide means to enhance detection and location capabilities.

  2. First two-station results for long-period surface waves velocity from the Geoscope Stations in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadiouche, O.; Jobert, N.; Romanowicz, B.

    1986-06-01

    Rayleigh and Love phase and group velocity dispersion measurements are performed along a purely african path between the Geoscope stations TAM and AGR, for the Leewards Isl. earthquake of March 16, 1985. This regional study is important as it brings deep-seated structure information in a seismologically blank region of Africa. It enables to improve the spatial resolution of larger scale models. For periods longer than 160 s. and up to 250 s., the fundamental Rayleigh wave dispersion is in agreement with prediction by global models. For shorter periods, the results fall below this prediction, which is an indication of lithospheric S-wave velocities lower than those of the models. The results are also compared with previous regionalizations. The Rayleigh second higher mode is extracted at AGR, and the phase velocity dispersion obtained in the period range 50-140 s is in agreement with the theoretical dispersion for PREM.

  3. Tamm-Langmuir surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golenitskii, K. Â. Yu.; Koshelev, K. Â. L.; Bogdanov, A. Â. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we develop a theory of surface electromagnetic waves localized at the interface of periodic metal-dielectric structures. We have shown that the anisotropy of plasma frequency in metal layers lifts the degeneracy of plasma oscillations and opens a series of photonic band gaps. This results in appearance of surface waves with singular density of states—we refer to them as Tamm-Langmuir waves. Such naming is natural since we have found that their properties are very similar to the properties of both bulk Langmuir and surface Tamm waves. Depending on the anisotropy parameters, Tamm-Langmuir waves can be either forward or backward waves. Singular density of states and high sensitivity of the dispersion to the anisotropy of the structure makes Tamm-Langmuir waves very promising for potential applications in nanophotonics and biosensing.

  4. Periodic minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Alan L.

    1985-04-01

    A minimal surface is one for which, like a soap film with the same pressure on each side, the mean curvature is zero and, thus, is one where the two principal curvatures are equal and opposite at every point. For every closed circuit in the surface, the area is a minimum. Schwarz1 and Neovius2 showed that elements of such surfaces could be put together to give surfaces periodic in three dimensions. These periodic minimal surfaces are geometrical invariants, as are the regular polyhedra, but the former are curved. Minimal surfaces are appropriate for the description of various structures where internal surfaces are prominent and seek to adopt a minimum area or a zero mean curvature subject to their topology; thus they merit more complete numerical characterization. There seem to be at least 18 such surfaces3, with various symmetries and topologies, related to the crystallographic space groups. Recently, glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) was shown by Longley and McIntosh4 to take the shape of the F-surface. The structure postulated is shown here to be in good agreement with an analysis of the fundamental geometry of periodic minimal surfaces.

  5. Asymmetric coupling and dispersion of surface-plasmon-polariton waves on a periodically patterned anisotropic metal film

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Jhuma; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-01-07

    The morphology of a columnar thin film (CTF) of silver renders it an effectively biaxially anisotropic continuum. CTFs of silver deposited on one-dimensional gratings of photoresist showed strong blazing action and asymmetrically coupled optical radiation to surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves propagating only along one direction supported by either the CTF/photoresist or the CTF/air interfaces. Homogenization of the CTFs using the Bruggeman formalism revealed them to display hyperbolic dispersion, and the dispersion of SPP waves was adequately described thereby.

  6. Spectra of Surface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-22

    with a wave follower during Marsen. J. Gophysical Res. 88, 9844-9849. 11. Hughes, B.A., 1978. The effects on internal waves on surface waves : 2...Spectra of Surface Waves K. Watson March 1989 JSR-88-130 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. DTIC SELECTE JUN0 11989 0 JASONE The...Arlington, VA 22209 8503Z 11. TITLE (hlde Secvfty Cof.kaftn) SPECTRA OF SURFACE WAVES (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOfRS) K. Watson 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME

  7. An anisotropic shear velocity model of the Earth's mantle using normal modes, body waves, surface waves and long-period waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekström, G.

    2014-12-01

    We use normal-mode splitting functions in addition to surface wave phase anomalies, body wave traveltimes and long-period waveforms to construct a 3-D model of anisotropic shear wave velocity in the Earth's mantle. Our modelling approach inverts for mantle velocity and anisotropy as well as transition-zone discontinuity topographies, and incorporates new crustal corrections for the splitting functions that are consistent with the non-linear corrections we employ for the waveforms. Our preferred anisotropic model, S362ANI+M, is an update to the earlier model S362ANI, which did not include normal-mode splitting functions in its derivation. The new model has stronger isotropic velocity anomalies in the transition zone and slightly smaller anomalies in the lowermost mantle, as compared with S362ANI. The differences in the mid- to lowermost mantle are primarily restricted to features in the Southern Hemisphere. We compare the isotropic part of S362ANI+M with other recent global tomographic models and show that the level of agreement is higher now than in the earlier generation of models, especially in the transition zone and the lower mantle. The anisotropic part of S362ANI+M is restricted to the upper 300 km in the mantle and is similar to S362ANI. When radial anisotropy is allowed throughout the mantle, large-scale anisotropic patterns are observed in the lowermost mantle with vSV > vSH beneath Africa and South Pacific and vSH > vSV beneath several circum-Pacific regions. The transition zone exhibits localized anisotropic anomalies of ˜3 per cent vSH > vSV beneath North America and the Northwest Pacific and ˜2 per cent vSV > vSH beneath South America. However, small improvements in fits to the data on adding anisotropy at depth leave the question open on whether large-scale radial anisotropy is required in the transition zone and in the lower mantle. We demonstrate the potential of mode-splitting data in reducing the trade-offs between isotropic velocity and

  8. Generalization of Natural Bond Orbital Analysis to Periodic Systems: Applications to Solids and Surfaces via Plane-Wave Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Dunnington, Benjamin D; Schmidt, J R

    2012-06-12

    Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis is a powerful analysis technique capable of generating intuitive chemical representations of otherwise complex quantum mechanical electronic structure results, yielding a localized "Lewis-like" description of bonding and reactivity. We generalize this algorithm to periodic systems, thus expanding the scope of NBO analysis to bulk materials and/or periodic surface models. We employ a projection scheme to further expand the algorithm's applicability to ubiquitous plane-wave density functional theory (PW DFT) calculations. We also present a variety of example applications: examining bulk bonding and surface reconstruction and elucidating fundamental aspects of heterogeneous catalysis-all derived from rigorous underlying PW DFT calculations.

  9. Nonlinear thermal surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1984-09-01

    It is shown that density profile modifications near a plasma surface can survive at moving localized spots because of the radiation pressure of leaking wave field fluctuations. The properties of these luminous surface cavitons are studied.

  10. Composite surface-plasmon-polariton waves guided by a thin metal layer sandwiched between a homogeneous isotropic dielectric material and a periodically multilayered isotropic dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiadini, Francesco; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Scaglione, Antonio; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-01-01

    Multiple p- and s-polarized compound surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves at a fixed frequency can be guided by a structure consisting of a metal layer sandwiched between a homogeneous isotropic dielectric (HID) material and a periodic multilayered isotropic dielectric (PMLID) material. For any thickness of the metal layer, at least one compound SPP wave must exist. It possesses the p-polarization state, and is strongly bound to the metal/HID interface when the metal thickness is large but to both metal/dielectric interfaces when the metal thickness is small. When the metal layer vanishes, this compound SPP wave transmutes into a Tamm wave. Additional compound SPP waves exist, depending on the thickness of the metal layer, the relative permittivity of the HID material, and the period and composition of the PMLID material. Some of these are p-polarized, the others are s-polarized. All of them differ in phase speed, attenuation rate, and field profile, even though all are excitable at the same frequency. The multiplicity and dependence of the number of compound SPP waves on the relative permittivity of the HID material when the metal layer is thin could be useful for optical sensing applications and intrachip plasmonic optical communication.

  11. Stratified and steady periodic water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Samuel

    This thesis considers two-dimensional stratified water waves propagating under the force of gravity over an impermeable at bed and with a free surface. In the absence of surface tension, it is proved that there exists of a global continuum of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. These waves, moreover, can exhibit large density variation, speed, and amplitude. When the motion is assumed to be driven by capillarity on the surface and a gravitational force acting on the body of the fluid, it is shown that there exists global continua of such solutions. In both regimes, this is accomplished by first constructing a 1-parameter family of laminar flow solutions, then applying bifurcation theory methods to obtain local curves of small amplitude solutions branching from the laminar curve at an eigenvalue of the linearized problem. Each solution curve is then continued globally by means of a degree theoretic argument in the spirit of Rabinowitz. We also provide an alternate global bifurcation theorem via the analytic continuation method of Dancer. Finally, we consider the question of symmetry for two-dimensional stably stratified steady periodic gravity water waves with surface profiles monotonic between crests and troughs. We provide sufficient conditions under which such waves are necessarily symmetric. We do this by first exploiting some elliptic structure in the governing equations to show that, in certain size regimes, a maximum principle holds. This then forms the basis for a method of moving planes argument.

  12. A high-order perturbation of surfaces method for scattering of linear waves by periodic multiply layered gratings in two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Youngjoon; Nicholls, David P.

    2017-09-01

    The capability to rapidly and robustly simulate the scattering of linear waves by periodic, multiply layered media in two and three dimensions is crucial in many engineering applications. In this regard, we present a High-Order Perturbation of Surfaces method for linear wave scattering in a multiply layered periodic medium to find an accurate numerical solution of the governing Helmholtz equations. For this we truncate the bi-infinite computational domain to a finite one with artificial boundaries, above and below the structure, and enforce transparent boundary conditions there via Dirichlet-Neumann Operators. This is followed by a Transformed Field Expansion resulting in a Fourier collocation, Legendre-Galerkin, Taylor series method for solving the problem in a transformed set of coordinates. Assorted numerical simulations display the spectral convergence of the proposed algorithm.

  13. Joint inversion of long period waveform and surface wave dispersion data for crust and upper mantle structure using the Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekic, V.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    Surface waves and overtones provide excellent constraints on crustal, upper mantle, and transition zone structure. They offer far better radial resolution of shallow structure than is possible with teleseismic body waves, while simultaneously having excellent global coverage and signal-to-noise ratios. Indeed, since its development a quarter century ago (Woodhouse and Dziewonski, 1984), the modeling of long period waveforms of surface waves and overtones using approximate techniques has made possible the development of high resolution models of upper mantle shear wave velocity and radial anisotropy. However, the ray- and perturbation theory that underlie these efforts can result in modeling errors that exceed the noise level of the observed waveforms (Panning et al., 2009). In the case of realistic crustal structure, the modeling inaccuracies can significantly contaminate the retrieved images of mantle velocity and radial anisotropy (Lekic et al., 2009). Fortunately, the development of computational techniques capable of fully modeling wave propagation through the complex, heterogeneous Earth (Spectral Element Method, SEM: e.g. Capdeville et al., 2003) enables us to move away from approximate techniques. Previously, we have applied SEM to the modeling of long period waveforms to construct a preliminary model of isotropic shear wavespeed and radial anisotropy in the upper mantle (Lekic and Romanowicz, 2008). Yet, the superior accuracy of the spectral element method SEM comes at a far greater computational cost than that associated with approximate techniques, especially because of the presence of thin layers in the crust. At the same time, inaccuracies in existing global crustal models like CRUST2 (Bassin et al., 2000) can contaminate the retrieved mantle images. Thus, there is a need for approaches that avoid the meshing of thin layers while increasing the accuracy of crustal corrections. Long period waveforms lack the resolution necessary for crustal inversion, so

  14. Surface plasma wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, E.

    1989-01-01

    Surface plasma waves (SPWs) are electromagnetic oscillations that occur at the interface between a metal and a dielectric medium. The wave amplitude reaches a maximum at the interface and decays exponentially along the normal direction within each medium, with a decaying length on the order of a wavelength. Because SPW excitation is a resonant phenomenon which is strongly dependent on the boundary conditions, SPWs are sensitive probes of optical and structural properties of the interface, allowing, by means of visible light, the detection of changes of sub-angstrom dimensions in thin films covering a metal surface. The resonant nature of the excitation also leads to a wave intensity two to three orders of magnitude higher than the intensity produced by a conventional electromagnetic wave striking a metal surface. Therefore, light scattering from surface irregularities can be enhanced by the same factor under SPW excitation, and structural information can be obtained. Measurement of SPW basic parameters such as amplitude, velocity and damping is achieved using simple optical procedures. These procedures are described and applied in this thesis for the characterization of multilayer rough surfaces and for the simultaneous determination of coating thickness and substrate optical constants of dielectric-coated, metal mirrors. These applications are relevant in the diagnosis of optical and structural properties of thin films. We also use the high sensitivity of SPWs to the presence of very thin coatings to design a surface plasmon immunoassay (SPI) for monitoring immunochemical reactions occurring nearby a metal surface. In particular, the SPI can be used as a simple and rapid procedure to determine antibody levels in blood serum, which is of interest in the field of immunology.

  15. Waves in active and passive periodic structures - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1976-01-01

    The theory and recent applications of waves in periodic structures are reviewed. Both the Floquet and coupled waves approach are analyzed in some detail. The theoretical part of the paper includes wave propagation in unbounded and bounded active or passive periodic media, wave scattering from periodic boundaries, source radiation (dipole, Cerenkov, transition, and Smith-Purcell) in periodic media, and pulse transmission through a periodic slab. The applications part covers the recent development in a variety of fields: distributed feedback oscillators, filters, mode converters, couplers, second-harmonic generators, deflectors, modulators, and transducers in the fields of integrated optics and integrated surface acoustics. Work on insect compound eyes, mechanical structures, ocean waves, pulse compressions, temperature waves, and cholesteric liquid crystals, and particles interaction with crystals is briefly reviewed, especially in the case of zeolite crystals and superlattices. Recent advances in fabrication techniques for very fine gratings are also covered.

  16. Periodic waves in fiber Bragg gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, K. W.; Merhasin, Ilya M.; Malomed, Boris A.; Nakkeeran, K.; Senthilnathan, K.; Wai, P. K. A.

    2008-02-15

    We construct two families of exact periodic solutions to the standard model of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with Kerr nonlinearity. The solutions are named ''sn'' and ''cn'' waves, according to the elliptic functions used in their analytical representation. The sn wave exists only inside the FBG's spectral bandgap, while waves of the cn type may only exist at negative frequencies ({omega}<0), both inside and outside the bandgap. In the long-wave limit, the sn and cn families recover, respectively, the ordinary gap solitons, and (unstable) antidark and dark solitons. Stability of the periodic solutions is checked by direct numerical simulations and, in the case of the sn family, also through the calculation of instability growth rates for small perturbations. Although, rigorously speaking, all periodic solutions are unstable, a subfamily of practically stable sn waves, with a sufficiently large spatial period and {omega}>0, is identified. However, the sn waves with {omega}<0, as well as all cn solutions, are strongly unstable.

  17. Shear surface waves in phononic crystals.

    PubMed

    Kutsenko, A A; Shuvalov, A L

    2013-02-01

    The existence of shear horizontal (SH) surface waves in two-dimensional periodic phononic crystals with an asymmetric depth-dependent profile is theoretically reported. Examples of dispersion spectra with bandgaps for subsonic and supersonic SH surface waves are demonstrated. The link between the effective (quasistatic) speeds of the SH bulk and surface waves is established. Calculation and analysis is based on the integral form of a projector on the subspace of evanescent modes which means no need for their explicit finding. This method can be extended to the vector waves and the three-dimensional case.

  18. Flow generated by surfaces waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzmann, Horst; Francois, Nicolas; Xia, Hua; Shats, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Trajectories of fluid parcels on the surface have been described analytically for progressing irrotational waves, where particles move in the direction of wave propagation. Waves in the laboratory and in nature are more complex due to the development of instabilities that render ideal planar 2D propagating waves into complex 3D waves. The motion of particles in such waves is not well understood. In this talk I will present experiments in the short wavelength gravity-capillary range that demonstrate the generation of surface flows by propagating waves driven by a vertically oscillating plunger. At low amplitude, in a quasi-linear wave regime, buoyant particle tracers move in the direction of the wave propagation. At high wave amplitude, modulation instability (or Benjamin-Feir instability) renders the planer wave front into wave packets. This affects the macroscopic flow such that floaters drift against the direction of the wave, towards the plunger wave source [1]. The role of surface vorticity generation by waves will be discussed. Reference: Punzmann H., Francois N., Xia H., Falkovich G. and Shats M.; Generation and reversal of surface flows by propagating waves, Nature Physics 10, 658-663 (2014).

  19. Wave propagation in axially moving periodic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Vladislav S.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2017-04-01

    The paper deals with analytically studying transverse waves propagation in an axially moving string with periodically modulated cross section. The structure effectively models various relevant technological systems, e.g. belts, thread lines, band saws, etc., and, in particular, roller chain drives for diesel engines by capturing both their spatial periodicity and axial motion. The Method of Varying Amplitudes is employed in the analysis. It is shown that the compound wave traveling in the axially moving periodic string comprises many components with different frequencies and wavenumbers. This is in contrast to non-moving periodic structures, for which all components of the corresponding compound wave feature the same frequency. Due to this "multi-frequency" character of the wave motion, the conventional notion of frequency band-gaps appears to be not applicable for the moving periodic strings. Thus, for such structures, by frequency band-gaps it is proposed to understand frequency ranges in which the primary component of the compound wave attenuates. Such frequency band-gaps can be present for a moving periodic string, but only if its axial velocity is lower than the transverse wave speed, and, the higher the axial velocity, the narrower the frequency band-gaps. The revealed effects could be of potential importance for applications, e.g. they indicate that due to spatial inhomogeneity, oscillations of axially moving periodic chains always involve a multitude of frequencies.

  20. Magnetoacoustic nonlinear periodic (cnoidal) waves in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur-Rehman, Hafeez; Mahmood, S.; Hussain, S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic nonlinear periodic (cnoidal) waves and solitons are studied in magnetized electron-ion plasmas with inertial cold ions and warm electrons. Using the two fluid model, the dispersion relation of the magnetoacoustic waves is obtained in the linear limit and the wave dispersive effects appear through the electron inertial length. The well known reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries equation for magnetoacoustic waves in plasmas. The Sagdeev potential approach is used, and the cnoidal wave solution of magnetoacoustic waves is obtained under periodic boundary conditions. The analytical solution for magnetoacoustic solitons is also presented. The phase plane portraits are also plotted for magnetoacoustic solitons shown as a separatrix, and the cnoidal wave structure always lies within the separatrix. It is found that plasma beta, which depends on the plasma density, electron temperature, and magnetic field intensity, has a significant effect on the amplitude and phase of the cnoidal waves, while it also affects the width and amplitude of the magnetoacoustic soliton in plasmas. The numerical results are plotted within the plasma parameters for laboratory and space plasmas for illustration. It is found that only compressive magnetoacoustic nonlinear periodic wave and soliton structures are formed in magnetized plasmas.

  1. Propagation and excitation of multiple surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faryad, Muhammad

    Surface waves are the solutions of the frequency-domain Maxwell equations at the planar interface of two dissimilar materials. The time-averaged Poynting vector of a surface wave (i) has a significant component parallel to the interface and (ii) decays at sufficiently large distances normal to the interface. If one of the partnering materials is a metal and the other a dielectric, the surface waves are called surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves. If both partnering materials are dielectric, with at least one being periodically nonhomogeneous normal to the interface, the surface waves are called Tamm waves; and if that dielectric material is also anisotropic, the surface waves are called Dyakonov--Tamm waves. SPP waves also decays along the direction of propagation, whereas Tamm and Dyakonov--Tamm waves propagate with negligible losses. The propagation and excitation of multiple SPP waves guided by the interface of a metal with a periodically nonhomogeneous sculptured nematic thin film (SNTF), and the interface of a metal with a rugate filter were theoretically investigated. The SNTF is an anisotropic material with a permittivity dyadic that is periodically nonhomogeneous in the thickness direction. A rugate filter is also a periodically nonhomogeneous dielectric material; however, it is an isotropic material. Multiple SPP waves of the same frequency but with different polarization states, phase speeds, attenuation rates, and spatial field profiles were found to be guided by a metal/SNTF interface, a metal/rugate-filter interface, and a metal slab in the SNTF. Multiple Dyakonov--Tamm waves of the same frequency but different polarization states, phase speeds, and spatial field profiles were found to be guided by a structural defect in an SNTF, and by a dielectric slab in an SNTF. The characteristics of multiple SPP and Dyakonov--Tamm waves were established by the investigations on canonical boundary-value problems. The Turbadar-Kretschmann-Raether (TKR) and the

  2. Surface wave tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Vertically polarized shear wave velocity (VSV), determined primarily from fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, and the difference between the velocity of horizontally polarized shear waves (VSH) and VSV, therefore a measure of anisotropy, are shown.

  3. Surface waves affect frontogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Hamlington, Peter E.; Van Roekel, Luke P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of momentum, angular momentum, vorticity, and energy budgets of a submesoscale front undergoing frontogenesis driven by an upper-ocean, submesoscale eddy field in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The LES solves the wave-averaged, or Craik-Leibovich, equations in order to account for the Stokes forces that result from interactions between nonbreaking surface waves and currents, and resolves both submesoscale eddies and boundary layer turbulence down to 4.9 m × 4.9 m × 1.25 m grid scales. It is found that submesoscale frontogenesis differs from traditional frontogenesis theory due to four effects: Stokes forces, momentum and kinetic energy transfer from submesoscale eddies to frontal secondary circulations, resolved turbulent stresses, and unbalanced torque. In the energy, momentum, angular momentum, and vorticity budgets for the frontal overturning circulation, the Stokes shear force is a leading-order contributor, typically either the second or third largest source of frontal overturning. These effects violate hydrostatic and thermal wind balances during submesoscale frontogenesis. The effect of the Stokes shear force becomes stronger with increasing alignment of the front and Stokes shear and with a nondimensional scaling. The Stokes shear force and momentum transfer from submesoscale eddies significantly energize the frontal secondary circulation along with the buoyancy.

  4. Saturn's Quasi-Periodic Magnetohydrodynamic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, J. N.; Dougherty, M. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Sulaiman, A.; Masters, A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Provan, G.; Chen, C. H. K.; Kivelson, M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Achilleos, N. A.; Sorba, A. M.; Coates, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Quasi-periodic 1 hour fluctuations have been recently observed in numerous instruments on-board the Cassini spacecraft. The source of these fluctuations has remained elusive to date. Here we present a case study of such fluctuations observed using the magnetometer instrument during six days in December 2006. We find that magnetic field observations at high-latitudes have small scale ( 0.4 nT) Alfvénic fluctuations present and these fluctuations are concentrated in wave-packets similar to those observed in Kleindienst et al., 2009. The observed wave-packets recur periodically at the northern magnetic oscillation period. Furthermore, we explore the nature of these fluctuations with regards to the consistency of the 1 h period using a magnetospheric box model. Our model results suggest that the observed magnetic fluctuations are standing second harmonic Alfvén waves within Saturn's outer magnetosphere.

  5. Modelling seismic noise surface and body waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, L.; Stutzmann, E.; Capdeville, Y.; Farra, V.; Schimmel, M.; Ardhuin, F.; Mangeney, A.; Morelli, A.

    2013-12-01

    A proper knowledge of seismic noise sources is important to correctly extract properties of the Earth from seismic noise records. We present the theory for modeling both surface and body waves in the secondary microseism period band 3-10 s. We consider noise sources as vertical single forces at the ocean surface and we derive their amplitude from a realistic ocean wave model. We compute the site effect due to the bathymetry for both Rayleigh and body waves by using normal modes and ray theory. We show that it varies strongly with frequency and seismic wave type. We compute the amplitude of noise spectra by using normal mode summation and we show that the fundamental mode of Rayleigh wave is the dominant signal on noise spectra amplitude. For computing Rayleigh wave seismic spectra, we derive an attenuation model that enables to fit well the amplitudes of the noise vertical component whatever the station location in the secondary microseismic period band. Moreover, we estimate the energy amount of Love waves by modelling horizontal components with vertical force sources. The discrepancy between real and synthetic spectra on the horizontal components enables to estimate the amount of Love waves for which a different source mechanism is needed. The same theory is applied to study long period noise (T=20-500 s), considering noise sources as single forces generated by the interaction of ocean infragravity waves. We compute the Rayleigh wave site effect by using normal modes and we show that it is not frequency dependent.

  6. Surface gravity-wave lensing.

    PubMed

    Elandt, Ryan B; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-02-01

    Here we show that a nonlinear resonance between oceanic surface waves caused by small seabed features (the so-called Bragg resonance) can be utilized to create the equivalent of lenses and curved mirrors for surface gravity waves. Such gravity wave lenses, which are merely small changes to the seafloor topography and therefore are surface noninvasive, can focus or defocus the energy of incident waves toward or away from any desired focal point. We further show that for a broadband incident wave spectrum (i.e., a wave group composed of a multitude of different-frequency waves), a polychromatic topography (occupying no more than the area required for a monochromatic lens) can achieve a broadband lensing effect. Gravity wave lenses can be utilized to create localized high-energy wave zones (e.g., for wave energy harvesting or creating artificial surf zones) as well as to disperse waves in order to create protected areas (e.g., harbors or areas near important offshore facilities). In reverse, lensing of oceanic waves may be caused by natural seabed features and may explain the frequent appearance of very high amplitude waves in certain bodies of water.

  7. Surface wave tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Vertically polarized shear wave velocity (VSV), determined primarily from fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, and the difference between the velocity of horizontally polarized shear waves (VSH) and VSV, therefore a measure of anisotropy, are shown. Previously announced in STAR as N84-17728

  8. Influence of prestress and periodic corrugated boundary surfaces on Rayleigh waves in an orthotropic medium over a transversely isotropic dissipative semi-infinite substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shishir; Ahmed, Mostaid

    2017-01-01

    The paper environs the study of Rayleigh-type surface waves in an orthotropic crustal layer over a transversely isotropic dissipative semi-infinite medium under the effect of prestress and corrugated boundary surfaces. Separate displacement components for both media have been derived in order to characterize the dynamics of individual materials. Suitable boundary conditions have been employed upon the surface wave solutions of the elasto-dynamical equations that are taken into consideration in the light of corrugated boundary surfaces. From the real part of the sixth-order complex determinantal expression, we obtain the frequency equation for Rayleigh waves concerning the proposed earth model. Possible special cases have been envisaged and they fairly comply with the corresponding results for classical cases. Numerical computations have been performed in order to graphically demonstrate the role of the thickness of layer, prestress, corrugation parameters and dissipation on Rayleigh wave velocity. The study may be regarded as important due to its possible applications in delay line services and investigating deformation characteristics of solids as well as typical rock formations.

  9. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  10. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  11. Gravity Forcing Of Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, K. E.

    2005-12-01

    Surface waves in deep water are forced entirely by gravity at the air-sea interface when no other forces act tangent to the surface. Then according to Newton's second law, the fluid acceleration parallel to the surface must equal the component of gravity parallel to the surface. Between crest and trough the fluid accelerates; between trough and crest the fluid decelerates. By replacing Bernoulli's law, gravity forcing becomes the dynamic boundary condition needed to solve the mathematical problem of these waves. Irrotational waves with a sinusoidal profile satisfy the gravity forcing condition, with the usual dispersion relation, provided the slope is small compared to one, as is true also of the Stokes development. However, the exact wave shape can be calculated using the gravity forcing method in a way that is less complex and less time consuming than that of the Stokes perturbation expansion. To the second order the surface elevation is the same as the Stokes result; the third order calculation has not been made yet. Extensions of the gravity forcing method can easily be carried out for multiple wave trains, solitary waves and bores, waves in finite constant mean depths, and internal waves in a two-layer system. For shoaling surface waves gravity forcing provides a physical understanding of the progressive steepening often observed near shore.

  12. On Irrotational Flows Beneath Periodic Traveling Equatorial Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirchmayr, Ronald

    2017-06-01

    We discuss some aspects of the velocity field and particle trajectories beneath periodic traveling equatorial surface waves over a flat bed in a flow with uniform underlying currents. The system under study consists of the governing equations for equatorial ocean waves within a non-inertial frame of reference, where Euler's equation of motion has to be suitably adjusted, in order to account for the influence of the earth's rotation.

  13. On Irrotational Flows Beneath Periodic Traveling Equatorial Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirchmayr, Ronald

    2016-08-01

    We discuss some aspects of the velocity field and particle trajectories beneath periodic traveling equatorial surface waves over a flat bed in a flow with uniform underlying currents. The system under study consists of the governing equations for equatorial ocean waves within a non-inertial frame of reference, where Euler's equation of motion has to be suitably adjusted, in order to account for the influence of the earth's rotation.

  14. Identification for a Nonlinear Periodic Wave Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Morosanu, C.; Trenchea, C.

    2001-07-01

    This work is concerned with an approximation process for the identification of nonlinearities in the nonlinear periodic wave equation. It is based on the least-squares approach and on a splitting method. A numerical algorithm of gradient type and the numerical implementation are given.

  15. Multichannel analysis of surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.

    1999-01-01

    The frequency-dependent properties of Rayleigh-type surface waves can be utilized for imaging and characterizing the shallow subsurface. Most surface-wave analysis relies on the accurate calculation of phase velocities for the horizontally traveling fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave acquired by stepping out a pair of receivers at intervals based on calculated ground roll wavelengths. Interference by coherent source-generated noise inhibits the reliability of shear-wave velocities determined through inversion of the whole wave field. Among these nonplanar, nonfundamental-mode Rayleigh waves (noise) are body waves, scattered and nonsource-generated surface waves, and higher-mode surface waves. The degree to which each of these types of noise contaminates the dispersion curve and, ultimately, the inverted shear-wave velocity profile is dependent on frequency as well as distance from the source. Multichannel recording permits effective identification and isolation of noise according to distinctive trace-to-trace coherency in arrival time and amplitude. An added advantage is the speed and redundancy of the measurement process. Decomposition of a multichannel record into a time variable-frequency format, similar to an uncorrelated Vibroseis record, permits analysis and display of each frequency component in a unique and continuous format. Coherent noise contamination can then be examined and its effects appraised in both frequency and offset space. Separation of frequency components permits real-time maximization of the S/N ratio during acquisition and subsequent processing steps. Linear separation of each ground roll frequency component allows calculation of phase velocities by simply measuring the linear slope of each frequency component. Breaks in coherent surface-wave arrivals, observable on the decomposed record, can be compensated for during acquisition and processing. Multichannel recording permits single-measurement surveying of a broad depth range, high levels of

  16. Heat waves and warm periods in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faško, Pavel; Bochníček, Oliver; Markovič, Ladislav; Švec, Marek

    2016-04-01

    The scenarios of climate change caused by human activity show that frequency of occurrence and extent of heat waves in the interior of Europe is increasing. Among the most exposed regions in this regard should the area of southeastern and eastern Austria and south-western Slovakia. The relatively faster increase in the number of heat waves in this area is related also to potential desertification in this region just east of the Alps, since during summer, weather fronts advancing from the west are consequently losing their original features and moderating influence. Summer weather patterns for this area should in the future more closely remind climate typical for some inland areas of southwestern, southern and southeastern Europe. A certain shift of climate zones from south to north should thus modify future climate and Slovakia. Despite the complex natural conditions the existing trends derived from results of meteorological measurements and observations are clear and they confirm warming of climate in this region. Observations and measurements in the recent years of the 21st century confirm, that heat waves are no longer rare phenomenon during summer, but are systematically appearing even in colder regions of northern Slovakia. What is very remarkable and will be necessary to pay more attention to, is the fact that these heat waves are expanding into previously unaffected areas, associated with the lack of rainfall and drought, on larger regional scale. In this study heat wave periods and individual heat events and days are statistically identified in the time series characteristics of air temperature at selected meteorological stations for the period from the mid-20th century until 2015, in case of available historical data even for longer period.

  17. Wave functions of log-periodic oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bessa, V.; Guedes, I.

    2011-06-15

    We use the Lewis and Riesenfeld invariant method [J. Math. Phys. 10, 1458 (1969)] and a unitary transformation to obtain the exact Schroedinger wave functions for time-dependent harmonic oscillators exhibiting log-periodic-type behavior. For each oscillator we calculate the quantum fluctuations in the coordinate and momentum as well as the quantum correlations between the coordinate and momentum. We observe that the oscillator with m=m{sub 0}t/t{sub 0} and {omega}={omega}{sub 0}t{sub 0}/t, which exhibits an exact log-periodic oscillation, behaves as the harmonic oscillator with m and {omega} constant.

  18. Solitary surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1982-06-01

    Surface solitons excited at the edge of a plasma sheet can propagate across the sheet along its surface and, depending on the parameters chosen, collide with surface solitons at the edge. The strong electric field created in such a collision may produce a spot of light. Attention is given to surface solitons on a semi-infinite plasma, using cold electron plasma equations. Because all characteristic times of the processes in question are much smaller than the inverse ion plasma frequency, the ions may be regarded as immobile. This situation is relevant to a plasma bounded by a dielectric which prevents distortion of the surface.

  19. Waves in almost periodic particle chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazor, Y.; Steinberg, Ben Z.

    2014-07-01

    Almost periodic particle chains exhibit peculiar propagation properties that are not observed in perfectly periodic ones. Furthermore, since they inherently support nonnegligible long-range interactions and radiation through the surrounding free space, nearest-neighbor approximations cannot be invoked. Hence the governing operator is fundamentally different from that used in traditional analysis of almost periodic structures, e.g., Harper's model and almost Mathieu difference equations. We present a mathematical framework for the analysis of almost periodic particle chains, and study their electrodynamic properties. We show that they support guided modes that exhibit a complex interaction mechanism with the light cone. These modes possess a two-dimensional fractal-like structure in the frequency-wave number space, such that a modal phase velocity cannot be uniquely defined. However, a well-defined group velocity is revealed due to the fractal's inner structure.

  20. Regularity for steady periodic capillary water waves with vorticity.

    PubMed

    Henry, David

    2012-04-13

    In the following, we prove new regularity results for two-dimensional steady periodic capillary water waves with vorticity, in the absence of stagnation points. Firstly, we prove that if the vorticity function has a Hölder-continuous first derivative, then the free surface is a smooth curve and the streamlines beneath the surface will be real analytic. Furthermore, once we assume that the vorticity function is real analytic, it will follow that the wave surface profile is itself also analytic. A particular case of this result includes irrotational fluid flow where the vorticity is zero. The property of the streamlines being analytic allows us to gain physical insight into small-amplitude waves by justifying a power-series approach.

  1. Resonance wave pumping with surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmigniani, Remi; Gharib, Morteza; Violeau, Damien; Caltech-ENPC Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The valveless impedance pump enables the production or amplification of a flow without the use of integrated mobile parts, thus delaying possible failures. It is usually composed of fluid-filled flexible tubing, closed by solid tubes. The flexible tube is pinched at an off-centered position relative to the tube ends. This generates a complex wave dynamic that results in a pumping phenomenon. It has been previously reported that pinching at intrinsic resonance frequencies of the system results in a strong pulsating flow. A case of a free surface wave pump is investigated. The resonance wave pump is composed of a rectangular tank with a submerged plate separating the water into a free surface and a recirculation rectangular section connected through two openings at each end of the tank. A paddle placed at an off-center position above the submerged plate is controlled in a heaving motion with different frequencies and amplitudes. Similar to the case of valveless impedance pump, we observed that near resonance frequencies strong pulsating flow is generated with almost no oscillations. A linear theory is developed to pseudo-analytically evaluate these frequencies. In addition, larger scale applications were simulated using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic codes.

  2. Generation Of 3d Periodic Internal Wave Beams:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yuli D.; Vasiliev, Alexey Yu.

    We study generation of 2D and 3D periodic internal wave beams in continuously strat- ified viscous liquid basing on a complete set of governing equations and exact bound- ary conditions that is no-slip for velocity and attenuation of all disturbances at infinite distance from the source. The linearized governing equations are solved by an integral transform method. A total set of dispersion equation roots contains terms correspond- ing to internal waves and additional roots describing two kinds of periodic boundary layers. The first one is a viscous boundary layer and has an analogue that is a periodic or Stokes' layer in a homogeneous fluid. Its thickness is defined by a kinematic viscos- ity coefficient and a buoyancy frequency. The second one, that is an internal boundary layer, is a specific feature of stratified flows. Its thickness besides the Stokes' scale contains additional factor depending on relative wave frequency and geometry of the problem that is on the local slope of emitting surface and a direction of the waves propagation. We have constructed exact solutions of linear problems describing gen- eration of 2D waves by a strip and 3D by a rectangular with an arbitrary ratio of sides moving along or normally to a sloping plane. We also calculated the wave pattern gen- erated by a part of a vertical cylinder surface with different ratios of intrinsic scales that is of cylinder radius, thickness of the boundary layer and internal viscous scale. All solutions are regularly matched between themselves in limiting cases. The spatial decay of the waves depends on dimension and geometry of the problem. Non-linear generation of internal waves by the Stokes' boundary layer on a periodically rotating horizontal disk or by interacting boundary layers on an arbitrary moving strip is in- vestigated. We found conditions of generation of the main frequency and its second harmonic. In experiments periodic waves beams from different sources are visualised by the

  3. Particle trajectories in linear periodic capillary and capillary-gravity water waves.

    PubMed

    Henry, David

    2007-09-15

    Surface tension plays a significant role as a restoration force in the setting of small-amplitude waves, leading to pure capillary and gravity-capillary waves. We show that within the framework of linear theory, the particle paths in a periodic gravity-capillary or pure capillary wave propagating at the surface of water over a flat bed are not closed.

  4. Chemical waves on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselko, Jerzy; Showalter, Kenneth

    1989-06-01

    THE concentric-circular and spiral patterns exhibited by the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction in thin films of solution are representative of spatiotemporal behaviour in a two-dimensional, planar excitable medium1-6. Here we report BZ chemical waves propagating on the two-dimensional surface of a sphere. A wave on the surface of a single cation-exchange bead, loaded with ferroin and bathed in BZ reaction mixture containing no catalyst, develops to form a rotating spiral. Unlike spiral waves in thin films of solution, which typically wind out to connect with a twin rotating in the opposite direction, these waves rotate from pole to pole in a single direction. The spiral winds outward from a meandering source at one pole, crosses the equator, and undergoes self-annihilation as it winds into itself at the other pole. This behaviour, which is not possible in a two-dimensional planar configuration, arises from qualitative (negative to positive) and quantitative changes in wavefront curvature as the wave traverses the spherical surface. These observations of a single spiral wave contrast with theoretical predictions7,8 of counter-rotating spirals in this geometry.

  5. Periodic envelopes of waves over non-uniform depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Girish K.; Bayram, Saziye; Henderson, Diane M.

    2016-04-01

    The envelope of narrow-banded, periodic, surface-gravity waves propagating in one dimension over water of finite, non-uniform depth may be modeled by the Djordjević and Redekopp ["On the development of packets of surface gravity waves moving over an uneven bottom," Z. Angew. Math. Phys. 29, 950-962 (1978)] equation (DRE). Here we find five approximate solutions of the DRE that are in the form of Jacobi-elliptic functions and discuss them within the framework of ocean swell. We find that in all cases, the maximum envelope-amplitude decreases/increases when the wave group propagates on water of decreasing/increasing depth. In the limit of the elliptic modulus approaching one, three of the solutions reduce to the envelope soliton solution. In the limit of the elliptic modulus approaching zero, two of the solutions reduce to an envelope-amplitude that is uniform in an appropriate reference frame.

  6. Engineering surface waves in flat phononic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Héctor; Candelas, Pilar; Belmar, Francisco; Uris, Antonio; García de Abajo, F. Javier; Meseguer, Francisco

    2012-05-01

    Surface acoustic-wave phenomena span a wide range of length scales going from the devastation of earthquakes down to image reconstruction of buried nanostructures. In solid-fluid systems, the so-called Scholte-Stoneley waves (SSWs) dominate the scene at the interface with their evanescent fields decaying away into both media. Understanding and manipulating these waves in patterned surfaces would enable new applications of sound to be devised for imaging and acoustic signal processing, although this task has so far remained elusive. Here, we report SSW modes displaying directional gaps and band folding in fluid-loaded solid phononic plates. The plates are inhomogeneously patterned with in-plane periodic modulations of the elastic constants, but present flat surfaces free of corrugations. We experimentally demonstrate control of SSWs, which opens a promising route toward acoustic fluid sensing, microscopy, and signal processing.

  7. Topological charge pump by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zheng; Shi-Ping, Feng; Shi-Jie, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Quantized electron pumping by the surface acoustic wave across barriers created by a sequence of split metal gates is interpreted from the viewpoint of topology. The surface acoustic wave serves as a one-dimensional periodical potential whose energy spectrum possesses the Bloch band structure. The time-dependent phase plays the role of an adiabatic parameter of the Hamiltonian which induces a geometrical phase. The pumping currents are related to the Chern numbers of the filled bands below the Fermi energy. Based on this understanding, we predict a novel effect of quantized but non-monotonous current plateaus simultaneously pumped by two homodromous surface acoustic waves. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374036) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821403).

  8. Analysis of waves in the plasma guided by a periodical vane-type slow wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.J.; Kou, C.S.

    2005-10-01

    In this study, the dispersion relation has been derived to characterize the propagation of the waves in the plasma guided by a periodical vane-type slow wave structure. The plasma is confined by a quartz plate. Results indicate that there are two different waves in this structure. One is the plasma mode that originates from the plasma surface wave propagating along the interface between the plasma and the quartz plate, and the other is the guide mode that originally travels along the vane-type slow wave structure. In contrast to its original slow wave characteristics, the guide mode becomes a fast wave in the low-frequency portion of the passband, and there exists a cut-off frequency for the guide mode. The vane-type guiding structure has been shown to limit the upper frequency of the passband of the plasma mode, compared with that of the plasma surface wave. In addition, the passband of the plasma mode increases with the plasma density while it becomes narrower for the guide mode. The influences of the parameters of the guiding structure and plasma density on the propagation of waves are also presented.

  9. Born scattering of long-period body waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalkolmo, Jörg; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2000-09-01

    The Born approximation is applied to the modelling of the propagation of deeply turning long-period body waves through heterogeneities in the lowermost mantle. We use an exact Green's function for a spherically symmetric earth model that also satisfies the appropriate boundary conditions at internal boundaries and the surface of the earth. The scattered displacement field is obtained by a numerical quadrature of the product of the Green's function, the exciting wavefield and structural perturbations. We study three examples: scattering of long-period P waves from a plume rising from the core-mantle boundary (CMB), generation of long-period precursors to PKIKP by strong, localized scatterers at the CMB, and propagation of core-diffracted P waves through large-scale heterogeneities in D''. The main results are as follows: (1) the signals scattered from a realistic plume are small with relative amplitudes of less than 2 per cent at a period of 20s, rendering plume detection a fairly difficult task; (2) strong heterogeneities at the CMB of appropriate size may produce observable long-period precursors to PKIKP in spite of the presence of a diffraction from the PKP-B caustic; (3) core-diffracted P waves (Pdiff) are sensitive to structure in D'' far off the geometrical ray path and also far beyond the entry and exit points of the ray into and out of D'' sensitivity kernels exhibit ring-shaped patterns of alternating sign reminiscent of Fresnel zones; (4) Pdiff also shows a non-negligible sensitivity to shear wave velocity in D'' (5) down to periods of 40s, the Born approximation is sufficiently accurate to allow waveform modelling of Pdiff through large-scale heterogeneities in D'' of up to 5 per cent.

  10. Equatorial Rossby Waves and Periodicities of Flare Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Y.-Q.

    2000-05-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) aboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) first revealed a 154-day periodicity in solar flare rates. Subsequently, periodicities in various solar flare activities and sunspot areas or groups during a few years around solar maxima have been extensively monitored using different diagnostics and at many electromagnetic wavelengths. Notable periods are ~ 154, 128, 102, 78 and 51 days during maxima of different solar cycles from various data sets. The origin of such long-time periodicities particularly prominent during solar maxima remains a mystery for nearly two decades. For slow and large-scale photospheric dynamics, the shallow magnetofluid approximation can be invoked when the Rossby number R0≡ U/(2Ω sun L) is small, where U (< ~ 103 cm s-1) and L (≳ Rsun) are typical horizontal velocity and spatial scales. Physical properties of equatorially trapped Kelvin waves, Poincaré waves, Rossby waves and mixed Rossby-Poincaré waves are examined. For typical solar parameters, period estimates of Rossby and mixed Rossby-Poincaré waves are ~ 151-155, 126-127, 101-102, 76-78 and 51-54 days in good agreement with inferred periodicities. The effect of large-scale subsurface magnetic fields is estimated. Two methods (i.e., surface velocity correlations and precise diameter measurements) of directly detecting equatorially trapped solar Rossby-type waves are emphasized. Plausible connections among the large-scale photospheric wave dynamics, Rossby radius of deformation, sunspot zones, subsurface magnetic fields, magnetic flux emergence, active regions and solar flare activities are discussed. The scenario of a dynamic feedback cycle is advanced for excitations of these low-frequency Rossby-type waves during solar maxima. It would be of considerable interest to examine whether large-scale coronal mass ejections also carry the similar periodicities in the current solar maximum using SOHO observations. This work was supported in part by grants of

  11. Frequency selective surfaces with multiple periodic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jeffrey Alan

    A thorough computer design study using the method of Chen1,2,3 was undertaken for band-pass filters constructed from frequency selective surfaces (FSSs). The FSSs, modeled as thin, perfectly conducting surfaces with periodically arranged apertures, were designed to produce a transmission profile with a bandpass characteristic centered at 10.6 μm and to have various specified bandwidths. The effects of aperture shape and dimensions, configuration and periodicity of the aperture array, and presence of a dielectric substrate were examined in- depth. For comparison purposes, a complimentary array of metallic patches was also examined. The successful design (a thin, planar sheet of aluminum perforated with narrow rectangular apertures in a triangular array configuration on a thick zinc selenide substrate) provided a preliminary set of basic design rules for creating bandpass filters from FSSs. Dual resonance transmission profiles were generated by considering a FSS with a group of apertures as the periodic element. Chen's method1,2,3 was modified to work with periodic groups of up to four rectangular or circular shaped apertures (or metallic patches). Combinations of different length narrow slot apertures, combinations of square and narrow slot apertures, and variation of periodicity along alternating rows of narrow slot apertures, all produced a dual resonance transmission profile in the computer model. For the combination of different length narrow apertures, the dual resonance resulted from the natural resonance associated with the two different length narrow apertures, while for the combination of squares and narrow slots, an enhancement of the Wood's anomaly at the diffraction edge created the second resonance peak. Variation of the periodicity along alternating rows produced a dual resonance because each of the 'superimposed arrays' had a different periodicity. The presence of Wood's anomalies in the transmission profile was also examined. Finally, 'proof of

  12. Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2007-07-17

    A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

  13. Surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collman, James P.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Zhang, Xumu; Herrmann, Paul C.

    1994-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) device that responds to oxygen pressure was developed by coating a 158 MHz quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) device with an oxygen binding agent. Two types of coatings were used. One type was prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer containing the axial ligand. A second type was prepared with an oxygen binding porphyrin solution containing excess axial ligand without a polymer matrix. In the polymer based coatings, the copolymer served to provide the axial ligand to the oxygen binding agent and as a coating matrix on the surface of the SAW device. The oxygen sensing SAW device has been shown to bind oxygen following a Langmuir isotherm and may be used to measure the equilibrium constant of the oxygen binding compound in the coating matrix.

  14. Microseisms and hum from ocean surface gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traer, James; Gerstoft, Peter; Bromirski, Peter D.; Shearer, Peter M.

    2012-11-01

    Ocean waves incident on coasts generate seismic surface waves in three frequency bands via three pathways: direct pressure on the seafloor (primary microseisms, PM), standing waves from interaction of incident and reflected waves (double-frequency microseisms, DF), and swell-transformed infragravity wave interactions (the Earth's seismic hum). Beamforming of USArray seismic data shows that the source azimuths of the generation regions of hum, PM and DF microseisms vary seasonally, consistent with hemispheric storm patterns. The correlation of beam power with wave height over all azimuths is highest in near-coastal waters. Seismic signals generated by waves from Hurricane Irene and from a storm in the Southern Ocean have good spatial and temporal correlation with nearshore wave height and peak period for all three wave-induced seismic signals, suggesting that ocean waves in shallow water commonly excite hum (via infragravity waves), PM, and DF microseisms concurrently.

  15. On the generation of internal wave modes by surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlander, Uwe; Kirschner, Ian; Maas, Christian; Zaussinger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves play an important role in the ocean since they transport energy and momentum and the can lead to mixing when they break. Surface waves and internal gravity waves can interact. On the one hand, long internal waves imply a slow varying shear current that modifies the propagation of surface waves. Surface waves generated by the atmosphere can, on the other hand, excite internal waves by nonlinear interaction. Thereby a surface wave packet consisting of two close frequencies can resonate with a low frequency internal wave (Phillips, 1966). From a theoretical point of view, the latter has been studied intensively by using a 2-layer model, i.e. a surface layer with a strong density contrast and an internal layer with a comparable weak density contrast (Ball, 1964; Craig et al., 2010). In the present work we analyse the wave coupling for a continuously stratified fluid using a fully non-linear 2D numerical model (OpenFoam) and compare this with laboratory experiments (see Lewis et al. 1974). Surface wave modes are used as initial condition and the time development of the dominant surface and internal waves are studied by spectral and harmonic analysis. For the simple geometry of a box, the results are compared with analytical spectra of surface and gravity waves. Ball, F.K. 1964: Energy transfer between external and internal gravity waves. J. Fluid Mech. 19, 465. Craig, W., Guyenne, P., Sulem, C. 2010: Coupling between internal and surface waves. Natural Hazards 57, 617-642. Lewis, J.E., Lake, B.M., Ko, D.R.S 1974: On the interaction of internal waves and surfacr gravity waves, J. Fluid Mech. 63, 773-800. Phillips, O.M. 1966: The dynamics of the upper ocean, Cambridge University Press, 336pp.

  16. Solitary surface waves on a plasma cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1983-03-01

    By considering electrostatic surface waves propagating along a plasma cylinder, it is demonstrated that solitary variations in the cylinder radius may appear. The properties of these slow perturbations are determined by the surface wave intensities.

  17. ULTRASONIC MEASUREMENT MODELS FOR SURFACE WAVE AND PLATE WAVE INSPECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerr, Lester W. Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2010-02-22

    A complete ultrasonic measurement model for surface and plate wave inspections is obtained, where all the electrical, electromechanical, and acoustic/elastic elements are explicitly described. Reciprocity principles are used to describe the acoustic/elastic elements specifically in terms of an integral of the incident and scattered wave fields over the surface of the flaw. As with the case of bulk waves, if one assumes the incident surface waves or plate waves are locally planar at the flaw surface, the overall measurement model reduces to a very modular form where the far-field scattering amplitude of the flaw appears explicitly.

  18. Deterministic forward scatter from surface gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Deane, Grant B; Preisig, James C; Tindle, Chris T; Lavery, Andone; Stokes, M Dale

    2012-12-01

    Deterministic structures in sound reflected by gravity waves, such as focused arrivals and Doppler shifts, have implications for underwater acoustics and sonar, and the performance of underwater acoustic communications systems. A stationary phase analysis of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff scattering integral yields the trajectory of focused arrivals and their relationship to the curvature of the surface wave field. Deterministic effects along paths up to 70 water depths long are observed in shallow water measurements of surface-scattered sound at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory. The arrival time and amplitude of surface-scattered pulses are reconciled with model calculations using measurements of surface waves made with an upward-looking sonar mounted mid-way along the propagation path. The root mean square difference between the modeled and observed pulse arrival amplitude and delay, respectively, normalized by the maximum range of amplitudes and delays, is found to be 0.2 or less for the observation periods analyzed. Cross-correlation coefficients for modeled and observed pulse arrival delays varied from 0.83 to 0.16 depending on surface conditions. Cross-correlation coefficients for normalized pulse energy for the same conditions were small and varied from 0.16 to 0.06. In contrast, the modeled and observed pulse arrival delay and amplitude statistics were in good agreement.

  19. Wave-wave interactions in the stratosphere - Observations during quiet and active wintertime periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. K.; Gille, J. C.; Lyjak, L. V.

    1984-01-01

    Smith (1983) has demonstrated that wave-wave interactions among planetary waves 1, 2, and 3 were important during the month of January 1979, a period characterized by extremely large wave 1 amplitudes in the stratosphere. In the present investigation, the same analysis is applied to the period November 1978 through March 1979 with the aim to determine the conditions under which wave-wave interactions were important. Attention is given to enstrophy budget calculations, the wave 1/wave 2 vacillation, a quantitative measure of wave-wave interactions, and examples of wave-wave interactions during several periods. It is found that the vacillation between waves 1 and 2 has no clear relationship to the tropopause forcing as represented by the 300 mb amplitude.

  20. Surface acoustic wave frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsko, A. B.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate opto-mechanical oscillation (OMO) and subsequent generation of acoustic wave frequency combs in monolithic crystalline whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators. The OMO is observed in resonators made of electro-optic (lithium tantalate), non-electro-optic birefringent (magnesium fluoride), and non-birefringent (calcium fluoride) materials. The phenomenon manifests itself as generation of optical harmonics separated by the eigenfrequency of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) mechanical mode of the same WGM resonator. We show that the light escaping the resonator and demodulated on a fast photodiode produces a spectrally pure radio frequency (RF) signal. For instance, we demonstrate generation of 200 MHz signals with instantaneous linewidth of 0.2 Hz.

  1. Traveling surface waves of moderate amplitude in shallow water

    PubMed Central

    Gasull, Armengol; Geyer, Anna

    2014-01-01

    We study traveling wave solutions of an equation for surface waves of moderate amplitude arising as a shallow water approximation of the Euler equations for inviscid, incompressible and homogeneous fluids. We obtain solitary waves of elevation and depression, including a family of solitary waves with compact support, where the amplitude may increase or decrease with respect to the wave speed. Our approach is based on techniques from dynamical systems and relies on a reformulation of the evolution equation as an autonomous Hamiltonian system which facilitates an explicit expression for bounded orbits in the phase plane to establish existence of the corresponding periodic and solitary traveling wave solutions. PMID:24895474

  2. Watching surface waves in phononic crystals.

    PubMed

    Wright, Oliver B; Matsuda, Osamu

    2015-08-28

    In this paper, we review results obtained by ultrafast imaging of gigahertz surface acoustic waves in surface phononic crystals with one- and two-dimensional periodicities. By use of quasi-point-source optical excitation, we show how, from a series of images that form a movie of the travelling waves, the dispersion relation of the acoustic modes, their corresponding mode patterns and the position and widths of phonon stop bands can be obtained by temporal and spatio-temporal Fourier analysis. We further demonstrate how one can follow the temporal evolution of phononic eigenstates in k-space using data from phononic-crystal waveguides as an example. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of ocean surface wave shape from forward scattered sound.

    PubMed

    Walstead, Sean P; Deane, Grant B

    2016-08-01

    Forward scattered sound from the ocean surface is inverted for wave shape during three periods: low wind, mix of wind and swell, and stormy. Derived wave profiles are spatially limited to a Fresnel region at or near the nominal surface specular reflection point. In some cases, the surface wave profiles exhibit unrealistic temporal and spatial properties. To remedy this, the spatial gradient of inverted waves is constrained to a maximum slope of 0.88. Under this global constraint, only surface waves during low wind conditions result in a modeled surface multipath that accurately matches data. The power spectral density of the inverted surface wave field saturates around a frequency of 8 Hz while upward looking SONAR saturates at 1 Hz. Each shows a high frequency spectral slope of -4 that is in agreement with various empirical ocean wave spectra. The improved high frequency resolution provided by the scattering inversion indicates that it is possible to remotely gain information about high frequency components of ocean waves. The inability of the inversion algorithm to determine physically realistic surface waves in periods of high wind indicates that bubbles and out of plane scattering become important in those operating scenarios.

  4. Global surface wave tomography using seismic hum.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi

    2009-10-02

    The development of global surface wave tomography using earthquakes has been crucial to exploration of the dynamic status of Earth's deep. It is naturally believed that only large earthquakes can generate long-period seismic waves that penetrate deep enough into Earth for such exploration. The discovery of seismic hum, Earth's background free oscillations, which are randomly generated by oceanic and/or atmospheric disturbances, now provides an alternative approach. We present results of global upper-mantle seismic tomography using seismic hum and without referring to earthquakes. At periods of 100 to 400 seconds, the phase-velocity anomalies of Rayleigh waves are measured by modeling the observed cross-correlation functions between every pair of stations from among 54 globally distributed seismic stations. The anomalies are then inverted to obtain the three-dimensional S-wave velocity structure in the upper mantle. Our technique provides a new means for exploring the three-dimensional structure of the interior of terrestrial planets with an atmosphere and/or oceans, particularly Mars.

  5. Surface acoustic wave biosensors: a review.

    PubMed

    Länge, Kerstin; Rapp, Bastian E; Rapp, Michael

    2008-07-01

    This review presents an overview of 20 years of worldwide development in the field of biosensors based on special types of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices that permit the highly sensitive detection of biorelevant molecules in liquid media (such as water or aqueous buffer solutions). 1987 saw the first approaches, which used either horizontally polarized shear waves (HPSW) in a delay line configuration on lithium tantalate (LiTaO(3)) substrates or SAW resonator structures on quartz or LiTaO(3) with periodic mass gratings. The latter are termed "surface transverse waves" (STW), and they have comparatively low attenuation values when operated in liquids. Later Love wave devices were developed, which used a film resonance effect to significantly reduce attenuation. All of these sensor approaches were accompanied by the development of appropriate sensing films. First attempts used simple layers of adsorbed antibodies. Later approaches used various types of covalently bound layers, for example those utilizing intermediate hydrogel layers. Recent approaches involve SAW biosensor devices inserted into compact systems with integrated fluidics for sample handling. To achieve this, the SAW biosensors can be embedded into micromachined polymer housings. Combining these two features will extend the system to create versatile biosensor arrays for generic lab use or for diagnostic purposes.

  6. GENERAL: Periodic folded waves for a (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Hua

    2009-08-01

    A general solution, including three arbitrary functions, is obtained for a (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water-wave (MDWW) equation by means of the WTC truncation method. Introducing proper multiple valued functions and Jacobi elliptic functions in the seed solution, special types of periodic folded waves are derived. In the long wave limit these periodic folded wave patterns may degenerate into single localized folded solitary wave excitations. The interactions of the periodic folded waves and the degenerated single folded solitary waves are investigated graphically and found to be completely elastic.

  7. Maximum Periodic Wave Runup on Smooth Slopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    parameters in Equation 1, Iribarren (1949) first noted the importance of the combination of wave steepness (H/L0) and structure slope (A) in one parameter...the Iribarren number (tan (A)/(H/Lo)1/2). Various researchers (Galvin (1972), Battjes (1974), Hunt (1959)) have noted the impor- tance of this...proportional to the Iribarren number under breaking wave conditions. Battjes (1974) provides a physical explanation for the relationship between runup and

  8. Distributed feedback acoustic surface wave oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An acoustic surface wave oscillator is constructed from a semiconductor piezoelectric acoustic surface wave amplifier by providing appropriate perturbations at the piezoelectric boundary. The perturbations cause Bragg order reflections that maintain acoustic wave oscillation under certain conditions of gain and feedback.

  9. Surface Josephson Plasma Waves in Layered Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savel'Ev, Sergey; Yampol'Skii, Valery; Nori, Franco

    2005-10-01

    We predict the existence of surface waves in layered superconductors in the THz frequency range, below the Josephson plasma frequency ωJ. This wave propagates along the vacuum-superconductor interface and dampens in both transverse directions out of the surface (i.e., towards the superconductor and towards the vacuum). This is the first prediction of propagating surface waves in any superconductor. These predicted surface Josephson plasma waves are important for different phenomena, including the complete suppression of the specular reflection from a sample (Wood’s anomalies) and a huge enhancement of the wave absorption (which can be used as a THz detector).

  10. Coordinate transformation formulation of electromagnetic scattering from imperfectly periodic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Koki; Pištora, Jaromír; Nakatake, Yoshimasa

    2012-04-23

    This paper considers the electromagnetic scattering problem of periodically corrugated surface with local imperfection of structural periodicity, and presents a formulation based on the coordinate transformation method (C-method). The C-method is originally developed to analyze the plane-wave scattering from perfectly periodic structures, and uses the pseudo-periodic property of the fields. The fields in imperfectly periodic structures are not pseudo-periodic and the C-method cannot be directly applied. This paper introduces the pseudo-periodic Fourier transform to convert the fields in imperfectly periodic structures to pseudo-periodic ones, and the C-method becomes then applicable. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  11. Peaked Periodic Wave Solutions to the Broer–Kaup Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo; Bi, Qin-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    By qualitative analysis method, a sufficient condition for the existence of peaked periodic wave solutions to the Broer–Kaup equation is given. Some exact explicit expressions of peaked periodic wave solutions are also presented. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11102076 and Natural Science Fund for Colleges and Universities in Jiangsu Province under Grant No. 15KJB110005

  12. Generation of 1D interference patterns of Bloch surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadomina, E. A.; Bezus, E. A.; Doskolovich, L. L.

    2016-09-01

    Interference patterns of Bloch surface waves with a period that is significantly less than the wavelength of incident radiation are formed using dielectric diffraction gratings located on the surface of photonic crystal. The simulation based on electromagnetic diffraction theory is used to demonstrate the possibility of high-quality interference patterns due to resonant enhancement of higher evanescent diffraction orders related to the excitation of the Bloch surface waves. The contrast of the interference patterns is close to unity, and the period is less than the period of the diffraction structure by an order of magnitude.

  13. Decaying surface waves in inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begmatov, A.

    2016-11-01

    Two problems on plane decaying surface waves in an inhomogeneous medium are under consideration: the problem where the waves similar to Rayleigh waves propagate in an isotropic elastic half-space that borders with a layer of an ideal incompressible fluid and the problem where the waves similar to Love waves propagate in a semi-infinite saturated porous medium that borders with a layer of an isotropic elastic medium.

  14. Surface Wave Imaging to Detect Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. D.; Ballard, R. F.; Park, C. B.; Xia, J.

    2002-05-01

    Unauthorized infiltration into the U.S. is possible through the air, from the sea, across the land, and under the ground. Several near-surface geophysical techniques have been evaluated and in certain situations show promise in detecting underground activity related to tunneling. Recently developed acquisition and analysis techniques for multi-channel surface wave imaging has opened the door to a vast number of near-surface applications including anomaly detection and delineation, specifically tunnels. Routine scanning of the subsurface for anomalies unique to tunneling activities using surface waves can be done at relatively high production rates with confident interpretations made by minimally trained technical staff. Acquisition tests have proven that appropriate coupling for accurate recording of surface waves can be established with only pressure contact to the earth's surface, unlike body wave surveying in which coupling is optimized by invasive "planting." Marine streamer technology adapted to land provides near-continuous acquisition of 2-D profiles using pressure-coupled sources and receivers. Once parameters in a particular area have been selected, processing routines can be automated with pattern recognition and differencing routines used to identify potential targets. These nearly fully automated interpretive techniques could be almost real-time with preliminary results available within minutes of data acquisition. This tool is well suited for either initial reconnaissance surveys or differencing of periodic "patrol" surveys. A system using surface wave imaging technology could routinely monitor the shallow subsurface along the U.S. borders to recognize changes in physical earth properties likely related to tunneling. To evaluate the potential of this imaging technology a feasibility study was conducted in an area along the California/Mexico border with two sites in reasonably close proximity: one with a known tunnel and the other with a suspected

  15. Undulations from amplified low frequency surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, Antonin; Parentani, Renaud

    2014-04-15

    We study the linear scattering of gravity waves in longitudinal inhomogeneous stationary flows. When the flow becomes supercritical, it is known that counterflow propagating shallow waves are blocked and converted into deep waves. Here we show that in the zero-frequency limit, the reflected waves are amplified in such a way that the free surface develops an undulation, i.e., a zero-frequency wave of large amplitude with nodes located at specific places. This amplification involves negative energy waves and implies that flat surfaces are unstable against incoming perturbations of arbitrary small amplitude. The relation between this instability and black hole radiation (the Hawking effect) is established.

  16. SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Arregui, I.; Terradas, J.

    2012-07-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

  17. Swimming Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel. PMID:23431358

  18. Swimming using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel.

  19. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.; Lee, D. L.; Leja, I.

    1979-01-01

    Four areas of surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were investigated and a number of 401.2 MHz oscillators were constructed that showed improved performance. Aging studies on SAW devices packaged in HC36/U cold weld enclosures produced frequency drifts as low as 0.4 ppm in 35 weeks and drift rates well under 0.5 ppm/year. Temperature compensation circuits have substantially improved oscillator temperature stability, with a deviation of + or - 4 ppm observed over the range -45 C to + 40 C. High efficiency amplifiers were constructed for SAW oscillators and a dc to RF efficiency of 44 percent was obtained for an RF output of 25 mW. Shock and vibration tests were made on four oscillators and all survived 500 G shock pulses unchanged. Only when white noise vibration (20 Hz to 2000 Hz) levels of 20 G's rms were applied did some of the devices fail.

  20. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    A number of 401.2 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were built and tested. The performance of these oscillators was evaluated for possible use as stable oscillators in communication systems. A short term frequency stability of better than 1 x 10 to the minus 9th power for one second was measured for the SAW oscillators. Long term frequency drift was measured and was found to be dependent on SAW design and packaging. Drift rates ranging from 15 ppm in twenty weeks to 2.5 ppm in twenty weeks were observed. Some further improvement was required. The temperature dependence of the saw oscillators was evaluated and it was concluded that some form of temperature compensation will be necessary to meet the requirements of some communication systems.

  1. Monitoring short-period internal waves in the White Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimin, A. V.; Kozlov, I. E.; Atadzhanova, O. A.; Chapron, B.

    2016-12-01

    Widespread short-period internal wave (SPIW) activity in the White Sea has been revealed for the first time based on long-term (2009-2013) monitoring performed using satellite and in situ observations, and the statistical characteristics of these waves have been obtained. Two main regions where short-period waves constantly exist have been identified: the shelf area near the frontal zone at the boundary between the Basin and the Gorlo Strait and the shallow shelf area where the depths are about 30-50 m near Solovetskie Islands. Intense internal waves (IIWs), which are substantially nonlinear and are related to specific phases of a barotropic tide, are regularly observed near frontal zones. The wave height can reach half the sea depth and the wave periods vary from 7 to 18 min.

  2. Reflection of underwater sound from surface waves.

    PubMed

    Tindle, Chris T; Deane, Grant B; Preisig, James C

    2009-01-01

    A tank experiment has been conducted to measure reflection of underwater sound from surface waves. Reflection from a wave crest leads to focusing and caustics and results in rapid variation in the received waveform as the surface wave moves. Theoretical results from wavefront modeling show that interference of three surface reflected eigenrays for each wave crest produces complicated interference waveforms. There is good agreement between theory and experiment even on the shadow side of caustics where there are two surface reflected arrivals but only one eigenray.

  3. Characterization of Surface Cracks Using Rayleigh Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Masserey, B.; Mazza, E.

    2005-04-09

    The characterization of surface cracks in steel plates using surface acoustic waves is investigated. In the experiments Rayleigh wave is generated by a standard wedge technique and the surface displacement is measured pointwise by means of a heterodyne laser interferometer. The presence of a crack in the acoustic field leads to an amplitude increase due to the scattering of the surface wave at the defect. The time-of-flight method is extended to crack depth smaller than the wavelength by correlating the time delay of the transmitted wave with the defect depth. The method is shown to provide good results for defect depths down to 0.2 mm.

  4. Nonlinear Generation of Vorticity by Surface Waves.

    PubMed

    Filatov, S V; Parfenyev, V M; Vergeles, S S; Brazhnikov, M Yu; Levchenko, A A; Lebedev, V V

    2016-02-05

    We demonstrate that waves excited on a fluid surface produce local surface rotation owing to hydrodynamic nonlinearity. We examine theoretically the effect and obtain an explicit formula for the vertical vorticity in terms of the surface elevation. Our theoretical predictions are confirmed by measurements of surface motion in a cell with water where surface waves are excited by vertical and harmonic shaking the cell. The experimental data are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. We discuss physical consequences of the effect.

  5. Effect of capillary waves on surface tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the effect which a cutting off of the capillary waves has on surface tension, taking into account a calculation based on capillary-wave theory. For simplicity, three-dimensional systems are considered, and capillary-wave theory is used to calculate sigma-k, the surface tension of an interface where only those modes with at least one wave-vector component greater than k are allowed. Attention is given to a review of capillary-wave theory, the calculation of surface tensions, a determination of the range of validity of capillary-wave theory, and some numerical examples. The quantitative behavior of sigma-k and its relation to the surface tension of a finite-size system are considered. The most surprising result is that sigma-k can be significantly larger than the unconstrained surface tension.

  6. Negative effective gravity in water waves by periodic resonator arrays.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinhua; Chan, C T; Ho, Kai-Ming; Zi, Jian

    2011-04-29

    Based on analytic derivations and numerical simulations, we show that near a low resonant frequency water waves cannot propagate through a periodic array of resonators (bottom-mounted split tubes) as if water has a negative effective gravitational acceleration g(e) and positive effective depth h(e). This gives rise to a low-frequency resonant band gap in which water waves can be strongly reflected by the resonator array. For a damping resonator array, the resonant gap can also dramatically modify the absorption efficiency of water waves. The results provide a mechanism to block water waves and should find applications in ocean wave energy extraction.

  7. Shock waves in a long-period optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamova, M. S.; Zolotovskiĭ, I. O.; Sementsov, D. I.

    2008-12-01

    The possibility of forming a shock wave of the pulse envelope has been investigated in a long-period or Bragg optical fiber with a system of two unidirectional linearly coupled waves. It has been demonstrated that, in principle, the possibility exists of forming a shock wave in a nonlinear optical fiber not only at the trailing edge but also at the leading edge of the wave packet. The origin of the formation of a shock wave depends substantially on the initial conditions providing excitation of the optical fiber.

  8. Wave-Wave Interactions in the Stratosphere: Observations during Quiet and Active Wintertime Periods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anne K.; Gille, John C.; Lyjak, Lawrence V.

    1984-02-01

    Using satellite data from the Nimbus 7 LIMS instrument, a previous study by Smith showed that interactions among planetary waves 1, 2 and 3 in the stratosphere were significant during January 1979. That month was characterized by an exceptionally large wave 1 amplitude in the stratosphere. The present study extends the analysis to the period November 1978-March 1979 to determine the conditions under which wave-wave interactions have a significant effect on variations in wave activity and on wave-mean flow interactions. A quantitative measure of how wave-wave interactions affect the wave activity of zonal waves 1 and 2 is obtained from the potential enstrophy budget.The results demonstrate that the relative importance of wave-wave versus wave-mean flow interactions depends on the magnitude of the eddy mean wind and potential vorticity relative to the zonal means. When the zonal mean wind is weak, a relatively small amplitude wave tends to behave nonlinearly, whereas when the mean wind is strong, only large amplitude waves are significantly nonlinear. In the 1978-79 winter, the zonal mean wind was weaker and wave-wave interactions were more important in middle and late winter than during November-December.Further evidence is presented that the vacillation between waves 1 and 2, which has been observed in the winter stratosphere of both hemispheres, is as strongly influenced by wave-wave interactions in the stratosphere as by variations in the forcing from the troposphere.

  9. Propagation of Lamb waves in an immersed periodically grooved plate: experimental detection of the scattered converted backward waves.

    PubMed

    Harhad, Nadia; El-Kettani, Mounsif Ech-Cherif; Djelouah, Hakim; Izbicki, Jean-Louis; Predoi, Mihai Valentin

    2014-03-01

    Guided waves propagation in immersed plates with irregular surfaces has potential application to detection and assessment of the extent, depth and pattern of the irregularity. The complexity of the problem, due to the large number of involved parameters, has limited the number of existing studies. The simplest case of irregularities of practical interest is the two-dimensional corrosion profile. Even this case is in general so complex, that one can extract several amplitude dominant periodic surfaces only by using a Fourier spectrum of the surface. Guided waves in plates, with one or both free surfaces having periodic perturbations of different shapes, have been presented in specialized literature. In this paper is studied the propagation of Lamb waves in an aluminum plate with a periodic grooved surface on only one side and immersed in water. The interaction between an incident Lamb wave and the grating gives rise to retro-converted waves. Preliminary numerical simulation by the finite element method is performed in order to obtain key parameters for the experiments. It is shown that retro-converted waves radiating into the water are detectable although their amplitudes are small. The phonon relation is verified for the leaky Lamb modes. The damping coefficients of the leaky Lamb modes in the grooved immersed plate are evaluated.

  10. Waves in periodic dissipative laminate metamaterial generated by plate impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Pedro Franco; Benson, David J.; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated numerically the nature of high amplitude stress waves generated by plate impact on Al/W viscoplastic laminates with different cell sizes. Weakly attenuating localized travelling waves, closely resembling solitary waves, quickly form near the impacted surface at relatively short duration of incoming pulse. They have properties similar to solitary solutions of the Korteweg-de Vries equation with the dispersive and nonlinear parameters connected to laminate properties. The peak temperature in the localized stress wave is dramatically different than the temperature corresponding to the shock wave at the same pressure, reflecting different paths of loading. Increase of the duration of the incoming pulse results in a train of solitary pulses or in oscillatory stationary shock like stress waves. The leading front of the shock like stress wave is closely described by the rising part of solitary stress wave.

  11. Chaotic particle motion under linear surface waves.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Tomas; Hansen, Jonas Lundbek

    1996-12-01

    We investigate the motion of infinitesimal particles in the flow field inside the fluid under a traveling surface wave. It is shown that, even for two-dimensional waves, a superposition of two or more traveling harmonic waves is enough to generate chaotic particle motion, i.e., Lagrangian chaos. (c) 1996 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Diffracted and head waves associated with waves on nonseparable surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.

    1992-01-01

    A theory is presented for computing waves radiated from waves on a smooth surface. With the assumption that attention of the surface wave is due only to radiation and not to dissipation in the surface material, the radiation coefficient is derived in terms of the attenuation factor. The excitation coefficient is determined by the reciprocity condition. Formulas for the shape and the spreading of the radiated wave are derived, and some sample calculations are presented. An investigation of resonant phase matching for nonseparable surfaces is presented with a sample calculation. A discussion of how such calculations might be related to resonant frequencies of nonseparable thin shell structures is included. A description is given of nonseparable surfaces that can be modeled in the vector that facilitates use of the appropriate formulas of differential geometry.

  13. Surface and guided waves on structured surfaces and inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanco, Javier

    Surface and guided waves on structured surfaces and inhomogeneous media studies the propagation of waves in systems with spatially varying parameters. In the rainbow case (chapter 1), the dielectric constant changes with coordinates. In the cylinder case: boundary and the metal (chapter 2), it is a curved surface. Finally, in the last case (chapter 3), the dielectric constant changes in z-direction.

  14. Surface Wave Velocity of Crosslinked Polyacrylate Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Tatsuro; Kinouchi, Wataru; ShinobuKoda, ShinobuKoda; Nomura, Hiroyasu

    1999-05-01

    Surface wave velocities of crosslinked polyacrylate hydrogelswere measured as a function of water content with differentcompositions of sodium polyacrylate (NaPA) and polyacrylic acid (PAA).The water content and composition dependencies of the surface wavevelocity were discussed.

  15. Light Scattering by Surface Tension Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbuch, G.; Garbay, F.

    1979-01-01

    This simple and inexpensive experiment is an illustration of the physical concepts of interaction between light and surface tension waves, and provides a new method of measuring surface tension. (Author/GA)

  16. Potential surface waves in anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, Yu. M. Vagin, K. Yu. Uryupin, S. A.; Frolov, A. A.

    2016-06-15

    The dependences of the frequency and damping rate of a potential surface wave on the wavenumber and the degree of anisotropy of a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution characterized by different temperatures along and across the plasma surface are established. It is demonstrated that the influence of electron thermal motion along the plasma surface on the surface wave properties is similar to the influence of thermal motion on the properties of a bulk Langmuir wave. On the contrary, thermal motion across the surface qualitatively affects the dispersion relation and substantially increases the damping rate.

  17. Thin metamaterial Luneburg lens for surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dockrey, J. A.; Lockyear, M. J.; Berry, S. J.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Sambles, J. R.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2013-03-01

    By suitably patterning a metasurface, the phase velocity of surface waves may be manipulated. Here, a low-loss, thin (1/14th of the free-space wavelength), omnidirectional Luneburg lens, based upon a Sievenpiper “mushroom” array [Sievenpiper , IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech.IETMAB0018-948010.1109/22.798001 47, 2059 (1999)], is fabricated and characterized at microwave frequencies. Surface waves excited using a near-field point source on the perimeter of the lens, exit the opposite side of the lens as planar wave fronts. The electric field of the surface wave is mapped out experimentally and compared to numerical simulations.

  18. Luneburg modified lens for surface water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichard, Helene; Maurel, Agnes; Petitjeans, Phillipe; Martin, Paul; Pagneux, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that when the waves pass across an elevated bathymetry, refraction often results in amplification of waves behind it. In this sense, focusing of liquid surface waves can be used to enhance the harvest efficiency of ocean power. An ocean wave focusing lens concentrates waves on a certain focal point by transforming straight crest lens of incident waves into circular ones just like an optical lens. These devices have attracted ocean engineers and are promising because they enable the effective utilization of wave energy, the remaining challenge being to increase the harvest efficiency of the lens. In this work, in order to improve well known focusing of surface liquid waves by lens, the propagation of liquid surface waves through a Luneburg modified lens is investigated. The traditional Luneburg lens is a rotationally symmetric lens with a spatially varying refractive-index profile that focuses an incident plane wave on the rim of the lens. The modified Luneburg lens allows to choose the position of the focal point, which can lie inside or outside the lens. This new degree of freedom leads to enhanced focusing and tunable focusing. The focusing of linear surface waves through this lens is investigated and is shown to be more efficient than classical profile lenses.

  19. Retinal Wave Behavior through Activity-Dependent Refractory Periods

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Keith B; Swindale, Nicholas V

    2007-01-01

    In the developing mammalian visual system, spontaneous retinal ganglion cell (RGC) activity contributes to and drives several aspects of visual system organization. This spontaneous activity takes the form of spreading patches of synchronized bursting that slowly advance across portions of the retina. These patches are non-repeating and tile the retina in minutes. Several transmitter systems are known to be involved, but the basic mechanism underlying wave production is still not well-understood. We present a model for retinal waves that focuses on acetylcholine mediated waves but whose principles are adaptable to other developmental stages. Its assumptions are that a) spontaneous depolarizations of amacrine cells drive wave activity; b) amacrine cells are locally connected, and c) cells receiving more input during their depolarization are subsequently less responsive and have longer periods between spontaneous depolarizations. The resulting model produces waves with non-repeating borders and randomly distributed initiation points. The wave generation mechanism appears to be chaotic and does not require neural noise to produce this wave behavior. Variations in parameter settings allow the model to produce waves that are similar in size, frequency, and velocity to those observed in several species. Our results suggest that retinal wave behavior results from activity-dependent refractory periods and that the average velocity of retinal waves depends on the duration a cell is excitatory: longer periods of excitation result in slower waves. In contrast to previous studies, we find that a single layer of cells is sufficient for wave generation. The principles described here are very general and may be adaptable to the description of spontaneous wave activity in other areas of the nervous system. PMID:18052546

  20. Coupled Waves on a Periodically Supported Timoshenko Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HECKL, MARIA A.

    2002-05-01

    A mathematical model is presented for the propagation of structural waves on an infinitely long, periodically supported Timoshenko beam. The wave types that can exist on the beam are bending waves with displacements in the horizontal and vertical directions, compressional waves and torsional waves. These waves are affected by the periodic supports in two ways: their dispersion relation spectra show passing and stopping bands, and coupling of the different wave types tends to occur. The model in this paper could represent a railway track where the beam represents the rail and an appropriately chosen support type represents the pad/sleeper/ballast system of a railway track. Hamilton's principle is used to calculate the Green function matrix of the free Timoshenko beam without supports. The supports are incorporated into the model by combining the Green function matrix with the superposition principle. Bloch's theorem is applied to describe the periodicity of the supports. This leads to polynomials with several solutions for the Bloch wave number. These solutions are obtained numerically for different combinations of wave types. Two support types are examined in detail: mass supports and spring supports. More complex support types, such as mass/spring systems, can be incorporated easily into the model.

  1. Symmetry of steady periodic water waves with vorticity.

    PubMed

    Mikyoung Hur, Vera

    2007-09-15

    The symmetry and monotonicity properties of steady periodic gravity water waves are established for arbitrary vorticities if the wave profile is monotone near the trough and every streamline attains a minimum below the trough. The proof uses the method of moving planes.

  2. Misidentification caused by leaky surface wave in high-frequency surface wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lingli; Xia, Jianghai; Pan, Yudi

    2014-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method analyses high-frequency surface waves to determine shear (S)-wave velocities of near-surface materials, which are usually unconsolidated and possess higher Poisson's ratios. One of key steps using the MASW method to obtain the near-surface S-wave velocities is to pick correct phase velocities in dispersive images. A high-frequency seismic survey conducted over near-surface materials with a higher Poisson's ratio will often result in data that contains non-geometric wave, which will raise an additional energy in the dispersion image. Failure to identify it may result in misidentification. In this paper, we have presented a description about leaky surface wave and the influence caused by the existence of leaky waves in a high-frequency seismic record. We first introduce leaky wave and non-geometric wave. Next, we use two synthetic tests to demonstrate that non-geometric wave is leaky wave and show the properties about leaky surface wave by eigenfunctions using Chen's algorithm. We show that misidentification may occur in picking the dispersion curves of normal Rayleigh wave modes because the leaky-wave energy normally connects energy of fundamental and/or higher modes. Meanwhile, we use a real-world example to demonstrate the influence of leaky wave. We also propose that muting and filtering should been applied to raw seismic records prior to generating dispersive images to prevent misidentifying leaky surface waves as modal surface waves by a real-world example. Finally, we use a three-layer model with a low-velocity half-space to illustrate that leaky surface waves appear on condition that the phase velocities are higher than maximum S-wave velocity of the earth model when solving the Rayleigh equation.

  3. Earthquake ground motion amplification for surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Daniel C.; Tsai, Victor C.

    2017-01-01

    Surface waves from earthquakes are known to cause strong damage, especially for larger structures such as skyscrapers and bridges. However, common practice in characterizing seismic hazard at a specific site considers the effect of near-surface geology on only vertically propagating body waves. Here we show that surface waves have a unique and different frequency-dependent response to known geologic structure and that this amplification can be analytically calculated in a manner similar to current hazard practices. Applying this framework to amplification in the Los Angeles Basin, we find that peak ground accelerations for certain large regional earthquakes are underpredicted if surface waves are not properly accounted for and that the frequency of strongest ground motion amplification can be significantly different. Including surface-wave amplification in hazards calculations is therefore essential for accurate predictions of strong ground motion for future San Andreas Fault ruptures.

  4. Restoration of Surface Waves Elevation Using the 5-th Order Stokes Waves Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximov, Vasily; Nudner, Igor; Semenov, Konstantin; Titova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    It is very useful from the engineering point of view to get the way to recalculate the pressure values measured inside the liquid to the elevation of the free surface. Up to now this problem, despite its obvious importance, has not received any satisfactory solution. This is mostly due to the fact that the waves on the surface may have a different nature and complex degree of description. In our study, we examined both theoretically and experimentally the ability to restore the elevation of the free surface, using the data for the pressure within the fluid in the case of nonlinear periodic waves. We have seen how the wave surface elevation restores using the first, third, and fifth approximations for Stokes waves. The algorithm of wave height restoration is presented for each order from the list above. We examined how the measurements errors propagate through our algorithms of wave height restoration with Monte-Carlo techniques. The experiments were fulfilled in the hydro flume having 40 m length, 1.0 m width, and 1.2 m height. The depth of fluid was 0.6 m. The shield-type wavemaker produced the periodic waves having large amplitude. The wave height was varied in the range of 4 to 22 cm. The wave periods were from 1.0 to 2.6 sec. The wave steepness was from 0.006 to 0.064. Depth of the liquid was 66 cm. In the experiments, we have measured the pressure wave at about half the depth (more precisely, at a depth of 26.5 cm) and at the bottom. The free surface elevation was measured directly by wavemeter. The comparison of experimental and numerical data shows clearly that theoretical results describe satisfactory the physics of the problem. The rules for the selection of varying order of approximation depending on the measurement accuracy of the initial parameters are proposed.

  5. High-frequency homogenization for travelling waves in periodic media.

    PubMed

    Harutyunyan, Davit; Milton, Graeme W; Craster, Richard V

    2016-07-01

    We consider high-frequency homogenization in periodic media for travelling waves of several different equations: the wave equation for scalar-valued waves such as acoustics; the wave equation for vector-valued waves such as electromagnetism and elasticity; and a system that encompasses the Schrödinger equation. This homogenization applies when the wavelength is of the order of the size of the medium periodicity cell. The travelling wave is assumed to be the sum of two waves: a modulated Bloch carrier wave having crystal wavevector [Formula: see text] and frequency ω1 plus a modulated Bloch carrier wave having crystal wavevector [Formula: see text] and frequency ω2. We derive effective equations for the modulating functions, and then prove that there is no coupling in the effective equations between the two different waves both in the scalar and the system cases. To be precise, we prove that there is no coupling unless ω1=ω2 and [Formula: see text] where Λ=(λ1λ2…λ d ) is the periodicity cell of the medium and for any two vectors [Formula: see text] the product a⊙b is defined to be the vector (a1b1,a2b2,…,adbd ). This last condition forces the carrier waves to be equivalent Bloch waves meaning that the coupling constants in the system of effective equations vanish. We use two-scale analysis and some new weak-convergence type lemmas. The analysis is not at the same level of rigour as that of Allaire and co-workers who use two-scale convergence theory to treat the problem, but has the advantage of simplicity which will allow it to be easily extended to the case where there is degeneracy of the Bloch eigenvalue.

  6. High-frequency homogenization for travelling waves in periodic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Davit; Milton, Graeme W.; Craster, Richard V.

    2016-07-01

    We consider high-frequency homogenization in periodic media for travelling waves of several different equations: the wave equation for scalar-valued waves such as acoustics; the wave equation for vector-valued waves such as electromagnetism and elasticity; and a system that encompasses the Schrödinger equation. This homogenization applies when the wavelength is of the order of the size of the medium periodicity cell. The travelling wave is assumed to be the sum of two waves: a modulated Bloch carrier wave having crystal wavevector k and frequency ω1 plus a modulated Bloch carrier wave having crystal wavevector m and frequency ω2. We derive effective equations for the modulating functions, and then prove that there is no coupling in the effective equations between the two different waves both in the scalar and the system cases. To be precise, we prove that there is no coupling unless ω1=ω2 and (k -m )⊙Λ ∈2 π Zd, where Λ=(λ1λ2…λd) is the periodicity cell of the medium and for any two vectors a =(a1,a2,…,ad),b =(b1,b2,…,bd)∈Rd, the product a⊙b is defined to be the vector (a1b1,a2b2,…,adbd). This last condition forces the carrier waves to be equivalent Bloch waves meaning that the coupling constants in the system of effective equations vanish. We use two-scale analysis and some new weak-convergence type lemmas. The analysis is not at the same level of rigour as that of Allaire and co-workers who use two-scale convergence theory to treat the problem, but has the advantage of simplicity which will allow it to be easily extended to the case where there is degeneracy of the Bloch eigenvalue.

  7. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiberg, P.L.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the 'effective' forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  8. Shallow water sound propagation with surface waves.

    PubMed

    Tindle, Chris T; Deane, Grant B

    2005-05-01

    The theory of wavefront modeling in underwater acoustics is extended to allow rapid range dependence of the boundaries such as occurs in shallow water with surface waves. The theory allows for multiple reflections at surface and bottom as well as focusing and defocusing due to reflection from surface waves. The phase and amplitude of the field are calculated directly and used to model pulse propagation in the time domain. Pulse waveforms are obtained directly for all wavefront arrivals including both insonified and shadow regions near caustics. Calculated waveforms agree well with a reference solution and data obtained in a near-shore shallow water experiment with surface waves over a sloping bottom.

  9. Strong motion from surface waves in deep sedimentary basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    It is widely recognized that long-period surface waves generated by conversion of body waves at the boundaries of deep sedimentary basins make an important contribution to strong ground motion. The factors controlling the amplitude of such motion, however, are not widely understood. A study of pseudovelocity response spectra of strong-motion records from the Los Angeles Basin shows that late-arriving surface waves with group velocities of about 1 km/sec dominate the ground motion for periods of 3 sec and longer. The rate of amplitude decay for these waves is less than for the body waves and depends significantly on period, with smaller decay for longer periods. The amplitude can be modeled by the equation log y = f(M, RE) + c + bRB where y is the pseudovelocity response, f(M, RE) is an attenuation relation based on a general strong-motion data set, M is moment magnitude, RE is the distance from the source to the edge of the basin, RB is the distance from the edge of the basin to the recording site, and b and c are parameters fit to the data. The equation gives values larger by as much as a factor of 3 than given by the attenuation relationships based on general strong-motion data sets for the same source-site distance. It is clear that surface waves need to be taken into account in the design of long-period structures in deep sedimentary basins. The ground-motion levels specified by the earthquake provisions of current building codes, in California at least, accommodate the long-period ground motions from basin-edge-generated surface waves for periods of 5 sec and less and earthquakes with moment magnitudes of 7.5 or less located more than 20 km outside the basin. There may be problems at longer periods and for earthquakes located closer to the basin edge. The results of this study suggest that anelastic attenuation may need to be included in attempts to model long-period motion in deep sedimentary basins. To obtain better data on surface waves in the future

  10. Tapping of Love waves in an isotropic surface waveguide by surface-to-bulk wave transduction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, H.-S.; Chang, C.-P.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical study of tapping a Love wave in an isotropic microacoustic surface waveguide is given. The surface Love wave is tapped by partial transduction into a bulk wave at a discontinuity. It is shown that, by careful design of the discontinuity, the converted bulk wave power and the radiation pattern may be controlled. General formulas are derived for the calculation of these important characteristics from a relatively general surface contour deformation.

  11. Existence of solitary waves and periodic waves for a perturbed generalized BBM equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aiyong; Guo, Lina; Deng, Xijun

    2016-11-01

    The existence of solitary waves and periodic waves for a perturbed generalized BBM equation is established by using geometric singular perturbation theory. Attention goes to perturbations of the Hamiltonian vector field with an elliptic Hamiltonian of degree four, exhibiting a cuspidal loop. It is proven that the wave speed c0 (h) is decreasing on h ∈ [ 0 , 1 / 12 ] by analyzing the ratio of Abelian integrals. The upper and lower bounds of the limit wave speed are given. Moreover, the relation between the wave speed and the wavelength of traveling waves is obtained.

  12. Novel meta-surfaces for wave manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shulin; He, Qiong; Xiao, Shiyi; Xu, Qin; Zhou, Lei

    2011-03-01

    Meta-materials are man-made electromagnetic (EM) materials composed by subwavelength local resonance structures of electric and/or magnetic type, and thus possess arbitrary values of permittivity and permeability dictated by such resonance structures. Many novel EM properties, such as the negative refraction, the superlensing effect, and even the invisibility cloaking were predicted or discovered based on meta-materials. By carefully designing metamaterials with appropriate EM wave properties, one can employ metamaterials to efficiently manipulate various properties of EM waves, including the wave propagation, polarization, and so on. Here, we present our latest theoretical and experimental efforts in designing novel meta-surfaces (ultra-thin metamaterials) with anomalous EM wave properties to allow efficiently manipulating wave propagation directions. Furthermore, our system can also convert propagating wave to surface plasmon polariton. Microwave experiments are performed on realistic structures to successfully realize the theoretical predictions, and the obtained results are in agreements with FDTD simulations.

  13. Wave packet dynamics in periodically kicked nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan; Gao, Yi; Tong, Peiqing

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a wave packet in a periodically kicked nonlinear Aubry-André (AA) model when the initial state is localized at a single lattice site. We found that, beside the nonlinearity strength β and the strength (phase) of the quasiperiodic potential λ (θ), the kicking period T can also influence the dynamical evolution of the wave packet. Especially when T,β \\ll 1, the periodically kicked nonlinear AA model can be reduced to a static nonlinear AA model with a rescaled nonlinearity strength β /T.

  14. Nonlinear standing waves on a periodic array of circular cylinders.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijun; Lu, Ya Yan

    2015-08-10

    A periodic array of parallel and infinitely long dielectric circular cylinders surrounded by air can be regarded as a simple two-dimensional periodic waveguide. For linear cylinders, guided modes exist continuously below the lightline in various frequency intervals, but standing waves, which are special guided modes with a zero Bloch wavenumber, could exist above the lightline at a discrete set of frequencies. In this paper, we consider a periodic array of nonlinear circular cylinders with a Kerr nonlinearity, and show numerically that nonlinear standing waves exist continuously with the frequency and their amplitudes depend on the frequency. The amplitude-frequency relations are further investigated in a perturbation analysis.

  15. Analyzing periodic and random textured silicon thin film solar cells by Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Rahul; Jovanov, Vladislav; Hamraz, Saeed; Knipp, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    A simple and fast method was developed to determine the quantum efficiency and short circuit current of thin-film silicon solar cells prepared on periodically or randomly textured surfaces. The optics was studied for microcrystalline thin-film silicon solar cells with integrated periodic and random surface textures. Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) was used to investigate the behaviour of the solar cells. The analysis of the periodic and random textured substrates allows for deriving optimal surface textures. Furthermore, light trapping in periodic and randomly textured substrates will be compared. PMID:25112301

  16. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. II. LAMB, SURFACE, AND CENTRIFUGAL WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A.; Imamura, T.; Read, P. L.; Luz, D.; Piccialli, A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the second in a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases where the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this second part, we study the waves' solutions when several atmospheric approximations are applied: Lamb, surface, and centrifugal waves. Lamb and surface waves are found to be quite similar to those in a geostrophic regime. By contrast, centrifugal waves turn out to be a special case of Rossby waves that arise in atmospheres in cyclostrophic balance. Finally, we use our results to identify the nature of the waves behind atmospheric periodicities found in polar and lower latitudes of Venus's atmosphere.

  17. Light scattering by surface acoustic waves on corrugated metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, W.M.; Grimsditch, M. ); Moretti, A.L.; Kaufman, R.G.; Hulse, G.R. ); Fullerton, E.; Schuller, I.K. )

    1990-03-15

    We report the results of a Brillouin-scattering study of corrugated Ag surfaces. The corrugation plays a dramatic role in the wave-vector--selection rules governing coupling to surface phonons, and this effect is substantially different when the effective wave vector of the surface corrugation is collinear or perpendicular to the scattering plane. In processes that involve the grating wave vector, we show that the coupling mechanism between light and phonons is governed by surface plasmons which introduce a new scattering interaction with unusual polarization features in the Brillouin-scattering process.

  18. Nonlinear surface waves in photonic hypercrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Munazza Zulfiqar

    2017-08-01

    Photonic crystals and hyperbolic metamaterials are merged to give the concept of photonic hypercrystals. It combines the properties of its two constituents to give rise to novel phenomena. Here the propagation of Transverse Magnetic waves at the interface between a nonlinear dielectric material and a photonic hypercrystal is studied and the corresponding dispersion relation is derived using the uniaxial parallel approximation. Both dielectric and metallic photonic hypercrystals are studied and it is found that nonlinearity limits the infinite divergence of wave vectors of the surface waves. These states exist in the frequency region where the linear surface waves do not exist. It is also shown that the nonlinearity can be used to engineer the group velocity of the resulting surface wave.

  19. The generalized Doppler effect for surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, G.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate energy exchanges through scales occurring when a surface wave reflects on a harmonically oscillating wall. We first experimentally evidence the creation of Doppler-shifted waves and measure their height as a function of the oscillation amplitude. Then, we theoretically compute the amplitudes of these new waves in the gravity regime. Both results show that even without bulk non-linearities, oscillating paddles in a fluid container lead to a complex wave energy spectrum competing with the one predicted by wave turbulence. To exemplify this point, we characterize a simple one-dimensional model consisting of a linear wave equation in an oscillating cavity with distinct injection and dissipation mechanisms. It displays features usually associated with non-linearities, as self-similarity in a spectral domain (the so-called inertial range), appearance of energy at larger and/or lower scales than the forcing one and creation of shock waves.

  20. Free-surface wave-induced separation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.J.; Stern, F.

    1996-09-01

    Free-surface wave-induced separation is studied for a surface-piercing NACA 0024 foil over a range of Froude numbers (0, .2, .37, .55) through computational fluid dynamics of the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and the continuity equations with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, exact nonlinear kinematic and approximate dynamic free-surface boundary conditions, and a body/free-surface conforming grid. The flow conditions and uncertainty analysis are discussed. A topological rule for a surface-piercing body is derived and verified. Steady-flow results are presented and analyzed with regard to the wave and viscous flow and the nature of the separation.

  1. Surface Waves and Landau Resonant Heating in Unmagnetized Bounded Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Kevin

    2001-10-01

    Owing to the large areas and high plasma densities found in some recently developed devices [1], electrostatic theories of plasma resonances and surface wave [2-3] propagation in such devices are suspect as the size of the device is much larger than the free space wavelength associated with the peak plasma frequency. Accordingly, an electromagnetic model of surface wave propagation has been developed appropriate for large area plasmas. The predicted wave dispersion of the two models differs for extremely long wavelengths but is degenerate in devices small compared with wavelength. First principles particle-in-cell simulations using new techniques developed for the demanding simulation regime have been conducted which support these results. Given the slow wave character and boundary localized fields of surface waves, a periodic electrode may be used to resonantly excite a strong wave-particle interaction between surface waves and electrons. At saturation, the electron velocity distribution is enhanced above the phase velocity of the applied wave and suppressed below. The use of this technique (``Landau resonant heating'') to selectively heat the electron high energy tail to enhance electron-impact ionization is demonstrated using particle-in-cell simulation. [1] Matsumoto (Sumitomo Metal Industries). Private Communication. July 1999. [2] Nickel, Parker, Gould. Phys. Fluids. 7:1489. 1964. [3] Cooperberg. Phys. Plasmas. Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1998.

  2. Acoustic wave filter based on periodically poled lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Courjon, Emilie; Bassignot, Florent; Ulliac, Gwenn; Benchabane, Sarah; Ballandras, Sylvain

    2012-09-01

    Solutions for the development of compact RF passive transducers as an alternative to standard surface or bulk acoustic wave devices are receiving increasing interest. This article presents results on the development of an acoustic band-pass filter based on periodically poled ferroelectric domains in lithium niobate. The fabrication of periodically poled transducers (PPTs) operating in the range of 20 to 650 MHz has been achieved on 3-in (76.2-mm) 500-μm-thick wafers. This kind of transducer is able to excite elliptical as well as longitudinal modes, yielding phase velocities of about 3800 and 6500 ms(-1), respectively. A new type of acoustic band-pass filter is proposed, based on the use of PPTs instead of the SAWs excited by classical interdigital transducers. The design and the fabrication of such a filter are presented, as well as experimental measurements of its electrical response and transfer function. The feasibility of such a PPT-based filter is thereby demonstrated and the limitations of this method are discussed.

  3. On the turbulence generated by the potential surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilov, A. Y.

    2012-11-01

    The turbulence (the random vortex motions) of the upper ocean is nourished by the energy and momentum of the surface waves (the potential motion). The statistical characteristics of the turbulence (turbulent kinetic energy, dissipation rate, and Reynolds stresses) depend on the state of the ocean surface waves. This paper discusses the possibilities of generating this turbulence using the vortex instability of the potential surface waves. The vortex component of fluctuations of velocity field and possibly the interaction between both the vortex and potential motions cause the vertical transport of the momentum. The Reynolds tensor is a linear function of the correlation tensor of vortex field. The initial small vortex perturbations always exist in the upper ocean because of the molecular viscosity influences, especially near the free surface, and the fluctuations of the seawater density. The horizontal inhomogeneities of the seawater density produce the vortex field even if the initial vorticity was zero and the initial flow was the potential flow. The evolution of the small initial vortex disturbances in the velocity field of potential linear surface waves is reduced to a coupled set of linear ordinary differential equations of the first order with periodic coefficients. The solution of this problem shows that the small initial vortex perturbations of potential linear surface waves always grow. The initial small vortex perturbations interacting with the potential surface wave produce the small-scale turbulence (Novikov's turbulence) that finally causes the viscous dissipation of the potential surface wave. The wave-induced turbulence can be considered as developed turbulence with a well distinguishable range of the turbulent wave numberskwhere turbulence obeys the Kolmogorov's self-similarity law.

  4. Ultrasonic geometrical characterization of periodically corrugated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingfei; Declercq, Nico F

    2013-04-01

    Accurate characterization of the characteristic dimensions of a periodically corrugated surface using ultrasonic imaging technique is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The possibility of accurately characterizing the characteristic dimensions is discussed. The condition for accurate characterization and the quantitative relationship between the accuracy and its determining parameters are given. The strategies to avoid diffraction effects instigated by the periodical nature of a corrugated surface are also discussed. Major causes of erroneous measurements are theoretically discussed and experimentally illustrated. A comparison is made between the presented results and the optical measurements, revealing acceptable agreement. This work realistically exposes the capability of the proposed ultrasonic technique to accurately characterize the lateral and vertical characteristic dimensions of corrugated surfaces. Both the general principles developed theoretically as well as the proposed practical techniques may serve as useful guidelines to peers.

  5. Interactions among periodic waves and solitary waves of the (N+1)-dimensional sine-Gordon field

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, S.Y.; Hu Hengchun; Tang Xiaoyan

    2005-03-01

    Exact solutions of the (n+1)-dimensional sine-Gordon field equation are studied with help of those of the cubic nonlinear Klein-Gordon fields. The mapping relations among the sine-Gordon field equation and the cubic nonlinear Klein-Gordon fields are pure algebraic. By solving the cubic nonlinear Klein-Gordon equations, many new types of exact explicit solutions such as the periodic-periodic interaction waves, periodic-kink interaction waves, periodic perturbed 'snake' shape solitary waves, etc., are displayed both analytically and graphically.

  6. Silver Nanowires for Reconfigurable Bloch Surface Waves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Douguo; Wang, Ruxue; Xiang, Yifeng; Kuai, Yan; Kuang, Cuifang; Badugu, Ramachandram; Xu, Yingke; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Liu, Xu; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2017-09-20

    The use of a single silver nanowire as a flexible coupler to transform a free space beam into a Bloch surface wave propagating on a dielectric multilayer is proposed. Based on Huygens' Principle, when a Gaussian beam is focused onto a straight silver nanowire, a Bloch surface wave is generated and propagates perpendicular to the nanowire. By curving the silver nanowire, the surface wave can be focused. Furthermore, the spatial phase of the incident laser beam can be actively controlled with the aid of a spatial light modulator, resulting in the reconfigurable or dynamically controlled Bloch surface waves. The low cost of the chemically synthesized silver nanowires and the high flexibility with regard to tuning the spatial phase of the incident light make this approach very promising for various applications including optical micromanipulation, fluorescence imaging, and sensing.

  7. Modulational instabilities of periodic traveling waves in deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, Benjamin F.

    2015-04-01

    The spectrum of periodic traveling waves in deep water is discussed. A multi-scale method is used, expanding the spectral data and the Bloch parameter in wave amplitude, to compute the size and location of modulated instabilities. The role of these instabilities in limiting the spectrum's analyticity is explained. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional instabilities are calculated. The asymptotic predictions are compared to numerical simulations.

  8. Generation of vortices by gravity waves on a water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, S. V.; Aliev, S. A.; Levchenko, A. A.; Khramov, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    The generation of a vortex motion on a water surface by gravity waves at frequencies of 3 and 4 Hz and wavelengths of 17 and 9.7 cm, respectively, has been studied experimentally. It has been shown that the results can be described by a model of the formation of a vorticity by nonlinear waves. It has been shown for the first time that the vorticity amplitude on a water surface depends on the phase difference between the waves propagating at an angle of 90° with respect to each other and with a period of 360°. A quadratic dependence of the surface vorticity amplitude on the angular amplitude of the waves has been observed. Transfer of the energy of the vortex motion from the pumping region to a larger scale has been discovered.

  9. Matter-wave exact periodic solutions in optical lattices with periodic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changfu; Zhu, Aijun

    2013-10-01

    Some special matter-wave periodic solutions for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with periodic potential in the multidimensional optical lattices, are obtained through restricting parameters and some balance conditions between the optical potentials and interaction energies. The results show that the same type of periodic solutions in the same dimension possesses the same norm but different phases and they are all bounded. Especially, the numerics shows that two class (2+1)-dimensional periodic solutions are stable.

  10. Compressional and torsional wave amplitudes in rods with periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A.; Flores, J.; Gutierrez, L.; Mendez-Sanchez, R. A.

    2002-11-01

    To measure and detect elastic waves in metallic rods a low-frequency electromagnetic-acoustic transducer has been developed. Frequencies range from a few hertz up to hundreds of kilohertz. With appropriate configuration of the transducer, compressional or torsional waves can be selectively excited or detected. Although the transducer can be used in many different situations, it has been tested and applied to a locally periodic rod, which consists of a finite number of unit cells. The measured wave amplitudes are compared with theoretical ones, obtained with the one-dimensional transfer matrix method, and excellent agreement is obtained. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  11. Spin waves in a periodically layered magnetic nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglyak, V. V.; Hicken, R. J.; Kuchko, A. N.; Gorobets, V. Yu.

    2005-07-01

    We report a simple theoretical derivation of the spectrum and damping of spin waves in a cylindrical periodically structured magnetic nanowire (cylindrical magnonic crystal) in the "effective-medium" approximation. The dependence of the "effective" magnetic parameters upon the individual layer parameters is shown to be different from the arithmetic average over the volume of the superlattice. The formulas that are obtained can be applied firstly in the description of spin-wave dispersion in the first allowed band of the structure and secondly in the design of a magnonic crystal with band gaps in an arbitrary part of the spin-wave spectrum.

  12. Reflections concerning triply-periodic minimal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Alan H

    2012-10-06

    In recent decades, there has been an explosion in the number and variety of embedded triply-periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS) identified by mathematicians and materials scientists. Only the rare examples of low genus, however, are commonly invoked as shape templates in scientific applications. Exact analytic solutions are now known for many of the low genus examples. The more complex surfaces are readily defined with numerical tools such as Surface Evolver software or the Landau-Ginzburg model. Even though table-top versions of several TPMS have been placed within easy reach by rapid prototyping methods, the inherent complexity of many of these surfaces makes it challenging to grasp their structure. The problem of distinguishing TPMS, which is now acute because of the proliferation of examples, has been addressed by Lord & Mackay (Lord & Mackay 2003 Curr. Sci. 85, 346-362).

  13. Reflections concerning triply-periodic minimal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been an explosion in the number and variety of embedded triply-periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS) identified by mathematicians and materials scientists. Only the rare examples of low genus, however, are commonly invoked as shape templates in scientific applications. Exact analytic solutions are now known for many of the low genus examples. The more complex surfaces are readily defined with numerical tools such as Surface Evolver software or the Landau–Ginzburg model. Even though table-top versions of several TPMS have been placed within easy reach by rapid prototyping methods, the inherent complexity of many of these surfaces makes it challenging to grasp their structure. The problem of distinguishing TPMS, which is now acute because of the proliferation of examples, has been addressed by Lord & Mackay (Lord & Mackay 2003 Curr. Sci. 85, 346–362). PMID:24098851

  14. River dykes investigation using seismic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitri, Adnand; Jousset, Philippe; Samyn, Kévin; Naylor, Adam

    2010-05-01

    Natural underground caves such as karsts are quite common in the region "Centre", France. These subsurface perturbations can be found underneath the protection dykes around "the Loire" River and the damage caused can create routes for floods. Geophysical methods such as Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) can be used for locating voids or karsts systems, but its efficiency on surface with strong topography such as dykes is not certain. Three dimensional Rayleigh wave modelling was used to understand the role of topography in the propagation of surface waves and with the aim of determining the best way for MASW investigations of surfaces with strong topography such as river dykes. Numerical modelling shows that surface waves propagation is not strongly affected by topography for an array parallel to the dyke. For homogeneous models with topography, a diminution of surface waves amplitude is observed while higher propagation modes are amplified in the dispersion curves in the case of heterogeneous models with topography. For an array perpendicular to the dyke, numerical modeling shows that Rayleigh waves' velocity is lower. MASW investigations can then be applied if lateral variations of the topography are not too strong along the seismic line. Diffraction hyperbolas created by a full of water cavity were identified in numerical modelling with topography. According to these elements, a MASW survey has been performed on the dykes of "the Loire" river close to a collapsed cavity and potential karstic systems were discovered.

  15. Photonics surface waves on metamaterials interfaces.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Osamu; Bogdanov, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2017-09-12

    A surface wave (SW) in optics is a light wave, which is supported at an interface of two dissimilar media and propagates along the interface with its field amplitude exponentially decaying away from the boundary. The research on surface waves has been flourishing in last few decades thanks to their unique properties of surface sensitivity and field localization. These features have resulted in applications in nano-guiding, sensing, light-trapping and imaging based on the near-field techniques, contributing to the establishment of the nanophotonics as a field of research. Up to present, a wide variety of surface waves has been investigated in numerous material and structure settings. This paper reviews the recent progress and development in the physics of SWs localized at metamaterial interfaces, as well as bulk media in order to provide broader perspectives on optical surface waves in general. For each type of the surface waves, we discuss material and structural platforms. We mainly focus on experimental realizations in the visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges. We also address existing and potential application of SWs in chemical and biological sensing, and experimental excitation and characterization methods. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  17. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-03-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs.

  18. Gravitational waves from periodic three-body systems.

    PubMed

    Dmitrašinović, V; Suvakov, Milovan; Hudomal, Ana

    2014-09-05

    Three bodies moving in a periodic orbit under the influence of Newtonian gravity ought to emit gravitational waves. We have calculated the gravitational radiation quadrupolar waveforms and the corresponding luminosities for the 13+11 recently discovered three-body periodic orbits in Newtonian gravity. These waves clearly allow one to distinguish between their sources: all 13+11 orbits have different waveforms and their luminosities (evaluated at the same orbit energy and body mass) vary by up to 13 orders of magnitude in the mean, and up to 20 orders of magnitude for the peak values.

  19. Laser-induced periodic surface structures, modeling, experiments, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, G. R. B. E.; Skolski, J. Z. P.; Oboňa, J. Vincenc; Ocelík, V.; de Hosson, J. T. M.; Huis in't Veld, A. J.

    2014-03-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) consist of regular wavy surface structures, or ripples, with amplitudes and periodicity in the sub-micrometer range. A summary of experimentally observed LIPSSs is presented, as well as our model explaining their possible origin. Linearly polarized continuous wave (cw) or pulsed laser light, at normal incidence, can produce LIPSSs with a periodicity close to the laser wavelength, and direction orthogonal to the polarization on the surface of the material. Ripples with a periodicity (much) smaller than the laser wavelength develop when applying laser pulses with ultra-short durations in the femtosecond and picosecond regime. The direction of these ripples is either parallel or orthogonal to the polarization direction. Finally, when applying numerous pulses, structures with periodicity larger than the laser wavelength can form, which are referred to as "grooves". The physical origin of LIPSSs is still under debate. The strong correlation of the ripple periodicity to the laser wavelength, suggests that their formation can be explained by an electromagnetic approach. Recent results from a numerical electromagnetic model, predicting the spatially modulated absorbed laser energy, are discussed. This model can explain the origin of several characteristics of LIPSSs. Finally, applications of LIPSSs will be discussed.

  20. Understanding airglow signatures of short-period gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, Jonathan; Taylor, Michael J.; Pendleton, William R., Jr.; Pautet, Pierre-Dominique

    Airglow imaging is a primary tool in the study of gravity waves at mesospheric and lower-thermospheric (MLT) altitudes, clearly revealing signatures of small-scale (<100 km) and short-period (<30 min) waves. Short-period waves are in particular able to carry significant momentum into the MLT [e.g., Fritts and Alexander, 2003, Rev. Geophys., 41(1)]. However, quantification of short-period wave fluxes and propagation characteristics is complicated by their susceptibility to refraction by ambient wind and thermal structure at airglow altitudes. These effects lead to vertical wavelengths that vary dramatically with altitude throughout the airglow layers, and reflection and ducting, which can prevent the accurate assessment of ampli-tude and vertical direction of propagation [e.g., Fritts, 2000, JGR, 105(D17), 22,355-22,360]. To investigate airglow signatures of short-period gravity waves, we utilize a two-dimensional nonlinear dynamics model coupled with OH Meinel band and OI 557.7 nm airglow photochem-istry models. Case studies where the ambient atmospheric structure significantly influences wave propagation are presented, for both ducted and reflected waves, and also for waves ap-proaching critical levels. Arising from Doppler shifts to higher and lower intrinsic frequencies, respectively, these effects contribute to significant variation of vertical wavelength throughout the airglow region, and may limit the altitude of propagation. Cancellation effects of vertically-integrated airglow volume emission rate perturbations are discussed, along with observable nonlinear features due to large amplitude [e.g., Huang et al., 2003, JGR, 108(A5), 1173], and effects of partial perturbations to airglow layers by vertically-confined waves [e.g., Snively et al., JGR, In Review, 2010]. In particular, it is demonstrated that high temporal and spatial resolution measurements of airglow intensity and brightness-weighted temperature, combined with detailed descriptions of ambient

  1. Polarimetric thermal emission from periodic water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.; Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Wilson, W. J.; Li, F. K.; Johnson, J. T.; Kong, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results and theoretical calculations are presented to study the polarimetric emission from water surfaces with directional features. For our ground-based Ku-band radiometer measurements, a water pool was constructed on the roof of a building in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and a fiberglass surface with periodic corrugations in one direction was impressed on the top of the water surface to create a stationary water surface underneath it. It is observed that the measured Stokes parameters of corrugated fiberglass-covered water surfaces are functions of azimuth angles and agree very well with the theoretical calculations. The theory, after being verified by the experimental data, was then used to calculate the Stokes parameters of periodic surfaces without fiberglass surface layer and with rms height of the order of wind-generated water ripples. The magnitudes of the azimuthal variation of the calculated emissivities at horizontal and vertical polarizations corresponding to the first two Stokes parameters are found to be comparable to the values measured by airborne radiometers and SSM/I. In addition, the third Stokes parameter not shown in the literature is seen to have approximately twice the magnitude of the azimuth variation of either T(sub h) or T(sub v), which may make it more sensitive to the row direction, while less susceptive to noises because the atmospheric and system noises tend to be unpolarized and are expected to be cancelled out when the third Stokes parameter is derived as the difference of two or three power measurements, as indicated by another experiment carried out at a swimming pool with complicated surroundings. The results indicate that passive polarimetry is a potential technology in the remote sensing of ocean wind vector which is a crucial component in the understanding of global climate change. Issues related to the application of microwave passive polarimetry to ocean wind are also discussed.

  2. Polarimetric thermal emission from periodic water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.; Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Wilson, W. J.; Li, F. K.; Johnson, J. T.; Kong, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results and theoretical calculations are presented to study the polarimetric emission from water surfaces with directional features. For our ground-based Ku-band radiometer measurements, a water pool was constructed on the roof of a building in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and a fiberglass surface with periodic corrugations in one direction was impressed on the top of the water surface to create a stationary water surface underneath it. It is observed that the measured Stokes parameters of corrugated fiberglass-covered water surfaces are functions of azimuth angles and agree very well with the theoretical calculations. The theory, after being verified by the experimental data, was then used to calculate the Stokes parameters of periodic surfaces without fiberglass surface layer and with rms height of the order of wind-generated water ripples. The magnitudes of the azimuthal variation of the calculated emissivities at horizontal and vertical polarizations corresponding to the first two Stokes parameters are found to be comparable to the values measured by airborne radiometers and SSM/I. In addition, the third Stokes parameter not shown in the literature is seen to have approximately twice the magnitude of the azimuth variation of either T(sub h) or T(sub v), which may make it more sensitive to the row direction, while less susceptive to noises because the atmospheric and system noises tend to be unpolarized and are expected to be cancelled out when the third Stokes parameter is derived as the difference of two or three power measurements, as indicated by another experiment carried out at a swimming pool with complicated surroundings. The results indicate that passive polarimetry is a potential technology in the remote sensing of ocean wind vector which is a crucial component in the understanding of global climate change. Issues related to the application of microwave passive polarimetry to ocean wind are also discussed.

  3. Structure of the airflow above surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Marc; Veron, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Weather, climate and upper ocean patterns are controlled by the exchanges of momentum, heat, mass, and energy across the ocean surface. These fluxes are, in turn, influenced by the small-scale physics at the wavy air-sea interface. We present laboratory measurements of the fine-scale airflow structure above waves, achieved in over 15 different wind-wave conditions, with wave ages Cp/u* ranging from 1.4 to 66.7 (where Cp is the peak phase speed of the waves, and u* the air friction velocity). The experiments were performed in the large (42-m long) wind-wave-current tank at University of Delaware's Air-Sea Interaction laboratory (USA). A combined Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Induced Fluorescence system was specifically developed for this study, and provided two-dimensional airflow velocity measurement as low as 100 um above the air-water interface. Starting at very low wind speeds (U10~2m/s), we directly observe coherent turbulent structures within the buffer and logarithmic layers of the airflow above the air-water interface, whereby low horizontal velocity air is ejected away from the surface, and higher velocity fluid is swept downward. Wave phase coherent quadrant analysis shows that such turbulent momentum flux events are wave-phase dependent. Airflow separation events are directly observed over young wind waves (Cp/u*<3.7) and counted using measured vorticity and surface viscous stress criteria. Detached high spanwise vorticity layers cause intense wave-coherent turbulence downwind of wave crests, as shown by wave-phase averaging of turbulent momentum fluxes. Mean wave-coherent airflow motions and fluxes also show strong phase-locked patterns, including a sheltering effect, upwind of wave crests over old mechanically generated swells (Cp/u*=31.7), and downwind of crests over young wind waves (Cp/u*=3.7). Over slightly older wind waves (Cp/u* = 6.5), the measured wave-induced airflow perturbations are qualitatively consistent with linear critical layer

  4. Propagation of SH waves in an infinite/semi-infinite piezoelectric/piezomagnetic periodically layered structure.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Liu, Yu-Shan; Liu, Jin-Xi; Feng, Wen-Jie

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, SH bulk/surface waves propagating in the corresponding infinite/semi-infinite piezoelectric (PE)/piezomagnetic (PM) and PM/PE periodically layered composites are investigated by two methods, the stiffness matrix method and the transfer matrix method. For a semi-infinite PE/PM or PM/PE medium, the free surface is parallel to the layer interface. Both PE and PM materials are assumed to be transversely isotropic solids. Dispersion equations are derived by the stiffness/transfer matrix methods, respectively. The effects of electric-magnetic (ME) boundary conditions at the free surface and the layer thickness ratios on dispersion curves are considered in detail. Numerical examples show that the results calculated by the two methods are the same. The dispersion curves of SH surface waves are below the bulk bands or inside the frequency gaps. The ratio of the layer thickness has an important effect not only on the bulk bands but also on the dispersion curves of SH surface waves. Electric and magnetic boundary conditions, respectively, determine the dispersion curves of SH surface waves for the PE/PM and PM/PE semi-infinite structures. The band structures of SH bulk waves are consistent for the PE/PM and PM/PE structures, however, the dispersive behaviors of SH surface waves are indeed different for the two composites. The realization of the above-mentioned characteristics of SH waves will make it possible to design PE/PM acoustic wave devices with periodical structures and achieve the better performance.

  5. On the wave length of smooth periodic traveling waves of the Camassa-Holm equation.

    PubMed

    Geyer, A; Villadelprat, J

    2015-09-15

    This paper is concerned with the wave length λ of smooth periodic traveling wave solutions of the Camassa-Holm equation. The set of these solutions can be parametrized using the wave height a (or "peak-to-peak amplitude"). Our main result establishes monotonicity properties of the map [Formula: see text], i.e., the wave length as a function of the wave height. We obtain the explicit bifurcation values, in terms of the parameters associated with the equation, which distinguish between the two possible qualitative behaviors of [Formula: see text], namely monotonicity and unimodality. The key point is to relate [Formula: see text] to the period function of a planar differential system with a quadratic-like first integral, and to apply a criterion which bounds the number of critical periods for this type of systems.

  6. On the wave length of smooth periodic traveling waves of the Camassa-Holm equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, A.; Villadelprat, J.

    2015-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the wave length λ of smooth periodic traveling wave solutions of the Camassa-Holm equation. The set of these solutions can be parametrized using the wave height a (or "peak-to-peak amplitude"). Our main result establishes monotonicity properties of the map a ⟼ λ (a), i.e., the wave length as a function of the wave height. We obtain the explicit bifurcation values, in terms of the parameters associated with the equation, which distinguish between the two possible qualitative behaviors of λ (a), namely monotonicity and unimodality. The key point is to relate λ (a) to the period function of a planar differential system with a quadratic-like first integral, and to apply a criterion which bounds the number of critical periods for this type of systems.

  7. Highly Nonlinear Wave Propagation in Elastic Woodpile Periodic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Li, F.; Chong, C.; Theocharis, G.; Yang, J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2015-03-01

    In the present work, we experimentally implement, numerically compute with, and theoretically analyze a configuration in the form of a single column woodpile periodic structure. Our main finding is that a Hertzian, locally resonant, woodpile lattice offers a test bed for the formation of genuinely traveling waves composed of a strongly localized solitary wave on top of a small amplitude oscillatory tail. This type of wave, called a nanopteron, is not only motivated theoretically and numerically, but is also visualized experimentally by means of a laser Doppler vibrometer. This system can also be useful for manipulating stress waves at will, for example, to achieve strong attenuation and modulation of high-amplitude impacts without relying on damping in the system.

  8. Highly nonlinear wave propagation in elastic woodpile periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Li, F; Chong, C; Theocharis, G; Yang, J; Kevrekidis, P G

    2015-03-20

    In the present work, we experimentally implement, numerically compute with, and theoretically analyze a configuration in the form of a single column woodpile periodic structure. Our main finding is that a Hertzian, locally resonant, woodpile lattice offers a test bed for the formation of genuinely traveling waves composed of a strongly localized solitary wave on top of a small amplitude oscillatory tail. This type of wave, called a nanopteron, is not only motivated theoretically and numerically, but is also visualized experimentally by means of a laser Doppler vibrometer. This system can also be useful for manipulating stress waves at will, for example, to achieve strong attenuation and modulation of high-amplitude impacts without relying on damping in the system.

  9. Solitary wave dynamics in shallow water over periodic topography.

    PubMed

    Nakoulima, Ousseynou; Zahibo, Narcisse; Pelinovsky, Efim; Talipova, Tatiana; Kurkin, Andrey

    2005-09-01

    The problem of long-wave scattering by piecewise-constant periodic topography is studied both for a linear solitary-like wave pulse, and for a weakly nonlinear solitary wave [Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) soliton]. If the characteristic length of the topographic irregularities is larger than the pulse length, the solution of the scattering problem is obtained analytically for a leading wave in the framework of linear shallow-water theory. The wave decrement in the case of the small height of the topographic irregularities is proportional to delta2, where delta is the relative height of the topographic obstacles. An analytical approximate solution is also obtained for the weakly nonlinear problem when the length of the irregularities is larger than the characteristic nonlinear length scale. In this case, the Korteweg-de Vries equation is solved for each piece of constant depth by using the inverse scattering technique; the solutions are matched at each step by using linear shallow-water theory. The weakly nonlinear solitary wave decays more significantly than the linear solitary pulse. Solitary wave dynamics above a random seabed is also discussed, and the results obtained for random topography (including experimental data) are in reasonable agreement with the calculations for piecewise topography.

  10. Frequency shift of the Bragg and Non-Bragg backscattering from periodic water wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Biyang; Li, Ke

    2016-08-01

    Doppler effect is used to measure the relative speed of a moving target with respect to the radar, and is also used to interpret the frequency shift of the backscattering from the ocean wave according to the water-wave phase velocity. The widely known relationship between the Doppler shift and the water-wave phase velocity was deduced from the scattering measurements data collected from actual sea surface, and has not been verified under man-made conditions. Here we show that this ob- served frequency shift of the scattering data from the Bragg and Non-Bragg water wave is not the Doppler shift corresponding to the water-wave phase velocity as commonly believed, but is the water-wave frequency and its integral multiple frequency. The power spectrum of the backscatter from the periodic water wave consists of serials discrete peaks, which is equally spaced by water wave frequency. Only when the water-wave length is the integer multiples of the Bragg wave, and the radar range resolution is infinite, does the frequency shift of the backscattering mathematically equal the Doppler shift according to the water-wave phase velocity.

  11. Frequency shift of the Bragg and Non-Bragg backscattering from periodic water wave.

    PubMed

    Wen, Biyang; Li, Ke

    2016-08-17

    Doppler effect is used to measure the relative speed of a moving target with respect to the radar, and is also used to interpret the frequency shift of the backscattering from the ocean wave according to the water-wave phase velocity. The widely known relationship between the Doppler shift and the water-wave phase velocity was deduced from the scattering measurements data collected from actual sea surface, and has not been verified under man-made conditions. Here we show that this ob- served frequency shift of the scattering data from the Bragg and Non-Bragg water wave is not the Doppler shift corresponding to the water-wave phase velocity as commonly believed, but is the water-wave frequency and its integral multiple frequency. The power spectrum of the backscatter from the periodic water wave consists of serials discrete peaks, which is equally spaced by water wave frequency. Only when the water-wave length is the integer multiples of the Bragg wave, and the radar range resolution is infinite, does the frequency shift of the backscattering mathematically equal the Doppler shift according to the water-wave phase velocity.

  12. Periodic features in the Alfven wave wake of Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. N.; Smith, P. R.

    1990-04-01

    The evolution of Io's Alfven waves is modeled in a realistic magnetic field and torus density distribution. This is performed by calculating the normal modes of the field lines disturbed by Io and synthesizing the waves near Io from a complex sum over the eigenmodes. The wave pattern produced downstream from the satellite exhibits periodic structure over a range of scales. In terms of the Jovian longitude of a stationary observer, large-scale structure (greater than 60 deg), small-scale structure (smaller than 6 deg), and intermediate periods are expected. These are close to observed intervals in decametric (DAM) emissions, such as the length of a DAM storm, bunching of arcs within a storm, and individual arc separation.

  13. Demultiplexing surface waves with silicon nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, I.; Bogdanov, A.; Komissarenko, F.; Petrov, M.; Frizyuk, K.; Makarov, S.; Mukhin, I.; Samusev, A.; Lavrinenko, A.; Iorsh, I.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate directional launching of surface plasmon polaritons on thin gold film with a single silicon nanosphere. The directivity pattern of the excited surface waves exhibits rapid switching from forward to backward excitation within extremely narrow spectral band (¡ 50 nm), which is driven by the mutual interference of magnetic and electric dipole moments supported by the dielectric nanoantenna.

  14. Surface periodic structures under the optical damage of transparent dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libenson, Mikhail N.; Makin, Vladimir S.; Shiryaev, V. A.; Soileau, M. J.

    1995-07-01

    Experimental studies of the laser element's radiation strength show that optical damage of transparent dielectrics may be accompanied by the formation of surface periodic structures (SPS). SPS with ripples oriented normally to the strength vector of the incident electric field were found on the output surface of a dielectric plate (alkali- halide crystal) under focusing near or middle IR laser radiations of a microsecond duration. This relief was assumed to arise from heating caused by interference between the incident light and the wave scattered from the surface defects on the assumption that scattered wave represents a rapidly decreasing field of the Coulomb type. More correct SPS model developed by V. S. Makin proposes participation of surface electromagnetic waves (SEW). As known, optical damage is accompanied by the development of plasma flash. When emission of electronics from solid surface is strong, the plasma dielectric constant runs out to be negative with its modulus exceeding the dielectric constant of the transparent medium. This causes the generation conditions for SEW to be fulfield on the dielectric-plasma boundary, which results in interference between the incident light and SEW, thus leading to formation of SPS. The model explains reasonably well, why these SPS can be observed only on the output surface when developing plasma produces no screening effect on the surface. For CO2 laser irradiation, the necessary electronic concentration is high but reasonable value and amounts about 1019 cm-. However, SPS formed by the short-wavelengths radiation cannot find correct explanation in the framework of this model, since electronic concentration at the wavelengths (lambda) equals micrometers should be no less than 1021 cm-3 in this case.

  15. The Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, S. R.; Oberholtzer, J. D.; Wright, C. W.; Shirk, H. G.

    1988-01-01

    SWADE was developed to study the dynamics of the wave field development in the open ocean with the following specific objectives: (1) to understand the development of the wave directional spectrum under various conditions; (2) to determine the effect of waves on the air/sea transfers of momentum, heat, and mass; (3) to determine breaking distributions as a function of sea state, wind, and boundary stability; and (4) to provide data and analyses for ERS-1 validation. The experiment is designed for the winter of 1990 to 1991. Four buoys will be deployed for 6 months starting October 1990 and ending March 1991. During that time period, three intensive periods of 2 weeks duration each will be selected for frequent aircraft flights for wave data collection to satisfy scientific studies, as well as ERS-1 validation needs.

  16. Ultrasonic Surface Wave Propagation and Interaction with Surface Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Dixon, S.; Edwards, R. S.; Jian, X.

    2007-03-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) are non-contact ultrasonic transducers capable of generating wideband surface acoustic waves on metallic samples. We describe some lab based ultrasonic measurements using EMATs to generate wideband, low frequency (approximately 50-500kHz) ultrasonic surface waves on a number of samples including aluminum billets and sections of rail track that contain simulated defects. A stabilized Michelson interferometer has been used to measure accurately the absolute out-of-plane displacement of the ultrasonic waves generated on the sample, which propagate along the sample to interact with a simulated surface breaking defect. Transient finite element analysis has been used to model the ultrasonic wave propagation on the sample and the interaction of these waves with surface breaking defects. These simulations compare very favorably with the experimental results obtained using the Michelson interferometer to measure the out-of-plane displacement of the surface waves. We describe different approaches that can be used to determine the depth and presence of the crack. The non-contact nature of EMATs and the pitch-catch test geometry that we propose to use for testing make them especially suitable for online detection and depth gauging of surface breaking cracks at high inspection speeds.

  17. Drift laws for spiral waves on curved anisotropic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierckx, Hans; Brisard, Evelien; Verschelde, Henri; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2013-07-01

    Rotating spiral waves organize spatial patterns in chemical, physical, and biological excitable systems. Factors affecting their dynamics, such as spatiotemporal drift, are of great interest for particular applications. Here, we propose a quantitative description for spiral wave dynamics on curved surfaces which shows that for a wide class of systems, including the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and anisotropic cardiac tissue, the Ricci curvature scalar of the surface is the main determinant of spiral wave drift. The theory provides explicit equations for spiral wave drift direction, drift velocity, and the period of rotation. Depending on the parameters, the drift can be directed to the regions of either maximal or minimal Ricci scalar curvature, which was verified by direct numerical simulations.

  18. A mixed finite element/boundary element approach to simulate complex guided elastic wave periodic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballandras, S.; Lardat, R.; Wilm, M.; Pastureaud, Th.; Reinhardt, A.; Champavert, N.; Steichen, W.; Daniau, W.; Laude, V.; Armati, R.; Martin, G.

    2009-01-01

    The development of new surface acoustic wave devices exhibiting complicated electrode patterns or layered excitation transducers has been favored by an intense innovative activity in this area. For instance, devices exhibiting interdigital transducers covered by piezoelectric or dielectric layers have been fabricated and tested, but the design of such structures requires simulation tools capable to accurately take into account the actual shape of the wave guide elements. A modeling approach able to address complicated surface acoustic wave periodic structures (defined in the saggital plane) exhibiting any geometry then has been developed and implemented. It is based on the combination of a finite element analysis and a boundary element method. A first validation of the computation is reported by comparison with standard surface wave devices. Surface transverse wave resonators covered by amorphous silica have been built and consequently used for theory/experiment assessment. Also the case of recessed electrodes has been considered. The proposed model offers large opportunities for modeling any two-dimensional periodic elastic wave guide.

  19. Wave breaking and shock waves for a periodic shallow water equation.

    PubMed

    Escher, Joachim

    2007-09-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of a recently derived periodic shallow water equation. We discuss in detail the blow-up scenario of strong solutions and present several conditions on the initial profile, which ensure the occurrence of wave breaking. We also present a family of global weak solutions, which may be viewed as global periodic shock waves to the equation under discussion.

  20. Photonic crystal surface waves for optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Konopsky, Valery N; Alieva, Elena V

    2007-06-15

    We present a new optical biosensor technique based on registration of dual optical s-polarized modes on a photonic crystal surface. The simultaneous registration of two optical surface waves with different evanescent depths from the same surface spot permits the segregation of the volume and the surface contributions from an analyte, while the absence of metal damping permits an increase in the propagation length of the optical surface waves and the sensitivity of the biosensor. Our technique was tested with the binding of biotin molecules to a streptavidin monolayer that has been detected with signal/noise ratio of approximately 15 at 1-s signal accumulation time. The detection limit is approximately 20 fg of the analyte on the probed spot of the surface.

  1. A simplified method for electromagnetic scattering from periodic surface of lossy media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ping; Cai, Xing; Han, Jianxin; Dong, Tianlin

    2007-11-01

    A simplified method is presented for the problem of electromagnetic scattering of a time-harmonic plane wave from a non-planar sinusoidal periodic surface of lossy media. Assume that the heights of the rough surface are much smaller than the wavelength of the incidence and the space periodic of rough surface. The diffraction of the incidence can be described by using the elementary Huygens principle. The reflected and the transmitted field approximated by a linear combination of plane waves having different wave vectors. Based the method, we can deduce the simple formulation of the reflected field at far suitable for engineering application.

  2. Wave Period and Coastal Bathymetry Estimations from Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilo, Celine; Melgani, Farid

    2016-08-01

    We present an approach for wave period and coastal water depth estimation. The approach based on wave observations, is entirely independent of ancillary data and can theoretically be applied to SAR or optical images. In order to demonstrate its feasibility we apply our method to more than 50 Sentinel-1A images of the Hawaiian Islands, well-known for its long waves. Six wave buoys are available to compare our results with in-situ measurements. The results on Sentinel-1A images show that half of the images were unsuitable for applying the method (no swell or wavelength too small to be captured by the SAR). On the other half, 78% of the estimated wave periods are in accordance with buoy measurements. In addition, we present preliminary results of the estimation of the coastal water depth on a Landsat-8 image (with characteristics close to Sentinel-2A). With a squared correlation coefficient of 0.7 for ground truth measurement, this approach reveals promising results for monitoring coastal bathymetry.

  3. Cross-correlation search for periodic gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Mukhopadhyay, Himan; Krishnan, Badri; Whelan, John T.

    2008-04-15

    In this paper we study the use of cross correlations between multiple gravitational wave (GW) data streams for detecting long-lived periodic signals. Cross-correlation searches between data from multiple detectors have traditionally been used to search for stochastic GW signals, but recently they have also been used in directed searches for periodic GWs. Here we further adapt the cross-correlation statistic for periodic GW searches by taking into account both the nonstationarity and the long-term-phase coherence of the signal. We study the statistical properties and sensitivity of this search and its relation to existing periodic wave searches, and describe the precise way in which the cross-correlation statistic interpolates between semicoherent and fully coherent methods. Depending on the maximum duration over which we wish to preserve phase coherence, the cross-correlation statistic can be tuned to go from a standard cross-correlation statistic using data from distinct detectors, to the semicoherent time-frequency methods with increasing coherent time baselines, and all the way to a full coherent search. This leads to a unified framework for studying periodic wave searches and can be used to make informed trade-offs between computational cost, sensitivity, and robustness against signal uncertainties.

  4. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmeier, Peter; Dóra, Balázs; Ziegler, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation is a powerful method to investigate two-dimensional (2D) electron systems. We show how SAW observables are influenced by coupling to the 2D massless Dirac electrons of graphene and argue that Landau oscillations in SAW propagation can be observed as function of gate voltage for constant field. Contrary to other transport measurements, the zero-field SAW propagation gives the wave-vector dependence of graphene conductivity for small wave numbers. We predict a crossover from Schrödinger to Dirac-like behavior as a function of gate voltage, with no attenuation in the latter for clean samples.

  5. Complex periodic non-diffracting beams generated by superposition of two identical periodic wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuanmei; Wen, Zengrun; Zheng, Liren; Zhao, Lina

    2017-04-01

    A method has been proposed to generate complex periodic discrete non-diffracting beams (PDNBs) via superposition of two identical simple PDNBs at a particular angle. As for special cases, we studied the superposition of the two identical squares (;4+4;) and two hexagonal (;6+6;) periodic wave fields at specific angles, respectively, and obtained a series of interesting complex PDNBs. New PDNBs were also obtained by modulating the initial phase difference between adjacent interfering beams. In the experiment, a 4 f Fourier filter system and a phase-only spatial light modulator imprinting synthesis phase patterns of these PDNBs were used to produce desired wave fields.

  6. Terahertz surface plasmon polaritons on a semiconductor surface structured with periodic V-grooves.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Jadidi, Mohammad M; Murphy, Thomas E; Kumar, Gagan

    2013-03-25

    We demonstrate propagation of terahertz waves confined to a semiconductor surface that is periodically corrugated with V-shaped grooves. A one-dimensional array of V-grooves is fabricated on a highly-doped silicon surface, using anisotropic wet-etching of crystalline silicon, thereby forming a plasmonic waveguide. Terahertz time domain spectroscopy is used to characterize the propagation of waves near the corrugated surface. We observe that the grating structure creates resonant modes that are confined near the surface. The degree of confinement and frequency of the resonant mode is found to be related to the pitch and depth of the V-grooves. The surface modes are confirmed through both numerical simulations and experimental measurements. Not only does the V-groove geometry represent a new and largely unexplored structure for supporting surface waves, but it also enables the practical fabrication of terahertz waveguides directly on semiconductor surfaces, without relying on reactive-ion etching or electroplating of sub-millimeter metallic surfaces.

  7. Envelope solitons of acoustic plate modes and surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andreas P; Kovalev, Alexander S

    2003-06-01

    The problem of the existence of evelope solitons in elastic plates and at solid surfaces covered by an elastic film is revisited with special attention paid to nonlinear long-wave short-wave interactions. Using asymptotic expansions and multiple scales, conditions for the existence of envelope solitons are established and it is shown how their parameters can be expressed in terms of the elastic moduli and mass densities of the materials involved. In addition to homogeneous plates, weak periodic modulation of the plate's material parameters are also considered. In the case of wave propagation in an elastic plate, modulations of weakly nonlinear carrier waves are governed by a coupled system of partial differential equations consisting of evolution equations for the complex amplitude of the carrier wave (the nonlinear Schrödinger equation for envelope solitons and the Mills-Trullinger equations for gap solitons), and the wave equation for long-wavelength acoustic plate modes. In contrast to this situation, envelope solitons of surface acoustic waves in a layered structure are normally described by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation alone. However, at higher orders of the carrier wave amplitude, the envelope soliton is found to be accompanied by a quasistatic long-wavelength strain field, which may be localized at the surface with penetration depth into the substrate of the order of the inverse amplitude or which may radiate energy into the bulk. A new set of modulation equations is derived for the resonant case of the carrier wave's group velocity being equal to the phase velocity of long-wavelength Rayleigh waves of the uncoated substrate.

  8. Metamaterial Absorber for Electromagnetic Waves in Periodic Water Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Young Joon; Ju, Sanghyun; Park, Sang Yoon; Ju Kim, Young; Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Lee, Youngpak

    2015-09-01

    Perfect metamaterial absorber (PMA) can intercept electromagnetic wave harmful for body in Wi-Fi, cell phones and home appliances that we are daily using and provide stealth function that military fighter, tank and warship can avoid radar detection. We reported new concept of water droplet-based PMA absorbing perfectly electromagnetic wave with water, an eco-friendly material which is very plentiful on the earth. If arranging water droplets with particular height and diameter on material surface through the wettability of material surface, meta-properties absorbing electromagnetic wave perfectly in GHz wide-band were shown. It was possible to control absorption ratio and absorption wavelength band of electromagnetic wave according to the shape of water droplet-height and diameter- and apply to various flexible and/or transparent substrates such as plastic, glass and paper. In addition, this research examined how electromagnetic wave can be well absorbed in water droplets with low electrical conductivity unlike metal-based metamaterials inquiring highly electrical conductivity. Those results are judged to lead broad applications to variously civilian and military products in the future by providing perfect absorber of broadband in all products including transparent and bendable materials.

  9. Metamaterial Absorber for Electromagnetic Waves in Periodic Water Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Young Joon; Ju, Sanghyun; Park, Sang Yoon; Ju Kim, Young; Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-01-01

    Perfect metamaterial absorber (PMA) can intercept electromagnetic wave harmful for body in Wi-Fi, cell phones and home appliances that we are daily using and provide stealth function that military fighter, tank and warship can avoid radar detection. We reported new concept of water droplet-based PMA absorbing perfectly electromagnetic wave with water, an eco-friendly material which is very plentiful on the earth. If arranging water droplets with particular height and diameter on material surface through the wettability of material surface, meta-properties absorbing electromagnetic wave perfectly in GHz wide-band were shown. It was possible to control absorption ratio and absorption wavelength band of electromagnetic wave according to the shape of water droplet–height and diameter– and apply to various flexible and/or transparent substrates such as plastic, glass and paper. In addition, this research examined how electromagnetic wave can be well absorbed in water droplets with low electrical conductivity unlike metal-based metamaterials inquiring highly electrical conductivity. Those results are judged to lead broad applications to variously civilian and military products in the future by providing perfect absorber of broadband in all products including transparent and bendable materials. PMID:26354891

  10. Metamaterial Absorber for Electromagnetic Waves in Periodic Water Droplets.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Young Joon; Ju, Sanghyun; Park, Sang Yoon; Ju Kim, Young; Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-09-10

    Perfect metamaterial absorber (PMA) can intercept electromagnetic wave harmful for body in Wi-Fi, cell phones and home appliances that we are daily using and provide stealth function that military fighter, tank and warship can avoid radar detection. We reported new concept of water droplet-based PMA absorbing perfectly electromagnetic wave with water, an eco-friendly material which is very plentiful on the earth. If arranging water droplets with particular height and diameter on material surface through the wettability of material surface, meta-properties absorbing electromagnetic wave perfectly in GHz wide-band were shown. It was possible to control absorption ratio and absorption wavelength band of electromagnetic wave according to the shape of water droplet-height and diameter- and apply to various flexible and/or transparent substrates such as plastic, glass and paper. In addition, this research examined how electromagnetic wave can be well absorbed in water droplets with low electrical conductivity unlike metal-based metamaterials inquiring highly electrical conductivity. Those results are judged to lead broad applications to variously civilian and military products in the future by providing perfect absorber of broadband in all products including transparent and bendable materials.

  11. Surface and shear horizontal waves in piezoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsivais, G.; Otero, J. A.; Calás, H.

    2005-02-01

    Surface and shear horizontal waves in piezoelectric composite media consisting of piezoelectric layers of hexagonal 6mm symmetry are studied. We consider finite and infinite systems. For the finite case we study “periodic” and two types of nonperiodic structures: Fibonacci sequences and systems with a linear perturbation in the piezoelectric parameters which give rise to resonances of Stark-Ladder type. For the infinite case we only consider periodic systems. The transmission, dispersion relation, angular dispersion relation, and eigenmodes of vibration of the composites are analyzed. We discuss in detail the effect of surface waves on these properties. We use the transfer matrix formalisms of 4×4 and 2×2 dimensions to study the system in the exact approach and in the approximation where the surface waves are neglected, respectively. Numerical results are also presented.

  12. Waves in Periodic Dissipative Laminate Metamaterial Generated by Plate Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco Navarro, Pedro; Benson, David; Nesterenko, Vitali

    2015-06-01

    Waves generated by plate impact loading of Al/W laminates with different size of cell were investigated numerically depending on the impactor/cell mass ratio. The materials model took into account viscoplastic behavior of materials. It was observed that this mass ratio has a direct impact on the structure of stress pulses traveling through the composite. At the small impactor/cell mass ratio travelling waves closely resembling solitary waves were quickly formed near the impacted surface. They propagate as quasistationary weakly attenuating localized pulses. The properties of these pulses were satisfactory described based on a theoretical model using dispersive and nonlinear parameters of the materials similar to solitary solutions for the Korteweg-de Vries equation (KdV). The temperature at given pressure at the maximum is dramatically different then the temperature corresponding to the shock wave at the same pressure reflecting a different paths of loading. Increase of impactor/cell mass ratio results in the train of solitary like pulses which number increased with the increase of the impactor/cell mass ratio. At large impactor/cell mass ratio oscillatory stationary shock waves were formed. The leading front of these stationary shock waves was closely described by a solitary like pulse observed at small impactor/cell mass ratio. One of the authors (PFN) was supported by UCMexus Fellowship

  13. Polarimetric passive remote sensing of periodic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veysoglu, Murat E.; Yueh, H. A.; Shin, R. T.; Kong, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of polarimetry in active remote sensing is extended to passive remote sensing. The potential use of the third and fourth Stokes parameters U and V, which play an important role in polarimetric active remote sensing, is demonstrated for passive remote sensing. It is shown that, by the use of the reciprocity principle, the polarimetric parameters of passive remote sensing can be obtained through the solution of the associated direct scattering problem. These ideas are applied to study polarimetric passive remote sensing of periodic surfaces. The solution of the direct scattering problem is obtained by an integral equation formulation which involves evaluation of periodic Green's functions and normal derivative of those on the surface. Rapid evaluation of the slowly convergent series associated with these functions is observed to be critical for the feasibility of the method. New formulas, which are rapidly convergent, are derived for the calculation of these series. The study has shown that the brightness temperature of the Stokes parameter U can be significant in passive remote sensing. Values as high as 50 K are observed for certain configurations.

  14. Brunt-Doppler ducting of small-period gravity waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.Y.; Tuan, T.F. )

    1988-09-01

    The variation of the Brunt period with height lends itself to a natural ducting and filtering mechanism for low-altitude short-period gravity waves. The authors investigate this mechanism in combination with Doppler ducting produced by the variation in horizontal winds. Both the frequency dispersion at fixed propagation direction and the direction dispersion at fixed frequency have been examined in a COSPAR background atmosphere with zonal and meridional winds. The results show that not only are the low-altitude short-period gravity waves ducted, but unlike the usual ducting mechanisms due to uneven structure and dissipation which produce only partially guided modes, this mechanism produces primarily guided modes in the absence of winds and a mixture of fully and partially guided modes with winds. The wind effects are very large on the higher modes and less significant on the few lowest modes, including the Lamb mode. Investigation of viscous dissipation, nonlinearity, and instability have shown that viscosity is unimportant for most altitudes of interest and that nonlinearity and instability can play a role for all but the lowest guided modes. They propose that simultaneous continuous observation of airglow at mesospheric and ionospheric altitudes be made to verify not only the low-altitude Brunt-Doppler ducting for short-period gravity waves, but also the vertical energy distribution of the medium- and large-scale TIDs.

  15. Continuous leaky-wave scanning using periodically modulated spoof plasmonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Gu Sheng; Ma, Hui Feng; Cai, Ben Geng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    The plasmonic waveguide made of uniform corrugated metallic strip can support and guide spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) with high confinements. Here, we propose periodically-modulated plasmonic waveguide composed of non-uniform corrugated metallic strip to convert SSPPs to radiating waves, in which the main beam of radiations can steer continuously as the frequency changes. To increase the radiation efficiency of the periodically-modulated plasmonic waveguide at the broadside, an asymmetrical plasmonic waveguide is further presented to reduce the reflections and realize continuous leaky-wave scanning. Both numerical simulations and experimental results show that the radiation efficiency can be improved greatly and the main beam of leaky-wave radiations can steer from the backward quadrant to the forward quadrant, passing through the broadside direction, which generally is difficult to be realized by the common leaky-wave antennas. PMID:27404740

  16. Polarization controlled directional excitation of Bloch surface waves (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevich, Tatiana; Boyer, Philippe; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Kim, Myun-Sik; Herzig, Hans Peter; Grosjean, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Bloch surface waves (BSWs) are electromagnetic surface waves which can be excited at the interface between periodic dielectric multilayer and a surrounding medium. In comparison with surface plasmon polaritons these surface states perform high quality factor due to low loss characteristics of dielectric materials and can be exited both by TE and TM polarized light. A platform consisting of periodic stacks of alternative SiO2 and Si3N4 layers is designed and fabricated to work at the wavelength of 1.55 µm. The platform has an application in sensing and in integrated optics domain. A standard way of BSW excitation is coupling via Kretschmann configuration, but in this work we investigate a grating coupling of BSWs. Grating parameters are analytically and numerically optimized by RCWA and FDTD methods in order to obtain the best coupling conditions. The light is launched orthogonally to the surface of the photonic crystal and the grating. Due to a special grating configuration we demonstrate directionality of the BSW propagation depending on polarization of the incident light. The structure was experimentally realized on the surface of the photonic crystal by FIB milling. Experimental results are in a good agreement with a theory. The investigated configuration can be successfully used as a BSW launcher in on-chip all-optical integrated systems and work as a surface wave switch or modulator.

  17. Eikonal tomography for earthquake data: surface wave azimuthal anisotropy in the western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Ritzwoller, M.; Lin, F.

    2008-12-01

    In principle, seismic anisotropy provides powerful constraints on the deformation of crust and upper mantle. In recent years, numerous models of azimuthal anisotropy from surface wave studies have been interpreted to explain lithospheric and asthenospheric dynamics. The frequency dependence of the azimuthal anisotropy of surface waves yields information on both the lateral and vertical distributions of anisotropy. However, there is a trade-off between azimuthal anisotropy and isotropic wave speeds in traditional surface wave tomography based on large matrix inversions, which typically involve regulation, damping and smoothing. The trade-off potentially biases the direction and amplitude of azimuthal anisotropy. To overcome this problem, we use a new method of surface wave tomography based on the Eikonal equation to obtain surface wave azimuthal anisotropy. The Eikonal equation states that the gradient of a phase travel time surface constrains both the local phase speed and the direction of wave propagation when the amplitudes of seismic waves vary smoothly. In the western US, we have collected surface waves from more than 200 regional and teleseismic earthquakes with magnitudes larger than 5.0, which are recorded on the Earthscope/USArray Transportable Array (TA). We construct phase travel time surfaces for Rayleigh waves following each earthquake. We find that the variations of surface wave amplitudes are smooth compared to those of surface wave phases, which justifies applying the Eikonal equation in surface wave tomography. For each geographic location, we measure azimuthally dependent phase speed based on the phase travel time surface from each earthquake. Assembling results from all earthquakes, we statistically estimate isotropic phase speeds, azimuthal anisotropy, and their uncertainties at periods from 25 to 100 sec across the entire western US. Surface waves at these periods are mainly sensitive to a depth range from the crust to ~150 km. The resulting

  18. Co-periodic stability of periodic waves in some Hamiltonian PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzoni-Gavage, S.; Mietka, C.; Rodrigues, L. M.

    2016-10-01

    The stability of periodic traveling wave solutions to dispersive PDEs with respect to ‘arbitrary’ perturbations is still widely open. The focus is put here on stability with respect to perturbations of the same period as the wave, for KdV-like systems of one-dimensional Hamiltonian PDEs. Stability criteria are derived and investigated first in a general abstract framework, and then applied to three basic examples that are very closely related, and ubiquitous in mathematical physics, namely, a quasilinear version of the generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation (qKdV), and the Euler-Korteweg system in both Eulerian coordinates (EKE) and in mass Lagrangian coordinates (EKL). Those criteria consist of a necessary condition for spectral stability, and of a sufficient condition for orbital stability. Both are expressed in terms of a single function, the abbreviated action integral along the orbits of waves in the phase plane, which is the counterpart of the solitary waves moment of instability introduced by Boussinesq. Regarding solitary waves, the celebrated Grillakis-Shatah-Strauss stability criteria amount to looking for the sign of the second derivative of the moment of instability with respect to the wave speed. For periodic waves, the most striking results obtained here can be summarized as: an odd value for the difference between N—the size of the PDE system—and the negative signature of the Hessian of the action implies spectral instability, whereas a negative signature of the same Hessian being equal to N implies orbital stability. Since these stability criteria are merely encoded by the negative signature of matrices, they can at least be checked numerically. Various numerical experiments are presented, which clearly discriminate between stable cases and unstable cases for (qKdV), (EKE) and (EKL).

  19. Dynamics of mechanical waves in periodic grapheme nanoribbon assemblies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We simulate the natural frequencies and the acoustic wave propagation characteristics of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) of the type (8,0) and (0,8) using an equivalent atomistic-continuum FE model previously developed by some of the authors, where the C-C bonds thickness and average equilibrium lengths during the dynamic loading are identified through the minimisation of the system Hamiltonian. A molecular mechanics model based on the UFF potential is used to benchmark the hybrid FE models developed. The acoustic wave dispersion characteristics of the GNRs are simulated using a Floquet-based wave technique used to predict the pass-stop bands of periodic mechanical structures. We show that the thickness and equilibrium lengths do depend on the specific vibration and dispersion mode considered, and that they are in general different from the classical constant values used in open literature (0.34 nm for thickness and 0.142 nm for equilibrium length). We also show the dependence of the wave dispersion characteristics versus the aspect ratio and edge configurations of the nanoribbons, with widening band-gaps that depend on the chirality of the configurations. The thickness, average equilibrium length and edge type have to be taken into account when nanoribbons are used to design nano-oscillators and novel types of mass sensors based on periodic arrangements of nanostructures. PACS 62.23.Kn · 62.25.Fg · 62.25.Jk PMID:21711495

  20. Viscoelastic love-type surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2008-01-01

    The general theoretical solution for Love-Type surface waves in viscoelastic media provides theoreticalexpressions for the physical characteristics of the waves in elastic as well as anelastic media with arbitraryamounts of intrinsic damping. The general solution yields dispersion and absorption-coefficient curves for the waves as a function of frequency and theamount of intrinsic damping for any chosen viscoelastic model.Numerical results valid for a variety of viscoelastic models provide quantitative estimates of the physicalcharacteristics of the waves pertinent to models of Earth materials ranging from small amounts of damping in the Earth’s crust to moderate and large amounts of damping in soft soils and water-saturated sediments. Numerical results, presented herein, are valid for a wide range of solids and applications.

  1. Wave propagation in a quasi-periodic waveguide network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Sheelan; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2005-06-01

    We investigate the transport properties of a classical wave propagating through a quasi-periodic Fibonacci array of waveguide segments in the form of loops. The formulation is general, and applicable for electromagnetic or acoustic waves through such structures. We examine the conditions for resonant transmission in a Fibonacci waveguide structure. The local positional correlation between the loops is found to be responsible for the resonance. We also show that, depending on the number of segments attached to a particular loop, the intensity at the nodes displays a perfectly periodic or a self-similar pattern. The former pattern corresponds to a perfectly extended mode of propagation, which is to be contrasted to the electron or phonon characteristics of a pure one-dimensional Fibonacci quasi-crystal.

  2. Modelling Ocean Surface Waves in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosekova, Lucia; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Coward, Andrew; Bertino, Laurent; Williams, Timothy; Nurser, George A. J.

    2015-04-01

    In the Polar Oceans, the surface ocean waves break up sea ice cover and create the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ), an area between the sea-ice free ocean and pack ice characterized by highly fragmented ice. This band of sea ice cover is undergoing dramatic changes due to sea ice retreat, with up to a 39% widening in the Arctic Ocean reported over the last three decades and projections predicting a continuing increase. The surface waves, sea ice and ocean interact in the MIZ through multiple complex feedbacks and processes which are not accounted for in any of the present-day climate models. To address this issue, we present a model development which implements surface ocean wave effects in the global Ocean General Circulation Model NEMO, coupled to the CICE sea ice model. Our implementation takes into account a number of physical processes specific to the MIZ dynamics. Incoming surface waves are attenuated due to reflection and energy dissipation induced by the presence of ice cover, which is in turn fragmented in response to external stresses. This process generates a distribution of floe sizes and impacts the dynamics of sea ice by the means of combined rheology that takes into account floe collisions and allows for a more realistic representation of the MIZ. We present results from the NEMO OGCM at 1 degree resolution with a wave-ice interaction module described above. The module introduces two new diagnostics previously unavailable in GCM's: surface wave spectra in sea ice covered areas, and floe size distribution due to wave-induced fragmentation. We discuss the impact of these processes on the ocean and sea ice state, including ocean circulation, mixing, stratification and the role of the MIZ in the ocean variability. The model predictions for the floe sizes in the summer Arctic Ocean range from 60 m in the inner MIZ to a few tens of meters near the open ocean, which agrees with estimates from the satellites. The extent of the MIZ throughout the year is also in

  3. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    SciTech Connect

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-09-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  4. Chiral surface waves for enhanced circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Giovanni; Finazzi, Marco; Celebrano, Michele; Duò, Lamberto; Biagioni, Paolo

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel chiral sensing platform that combines a one-dimensional photonic crystal design with a birefringent surface defect. The platform sustains simultaneous transverse electric and transverse magnetic surface modes, which are exploited to generate chiral surface waves. The present design provides homogeneous and superchiral fields of both handednesses over arbitrarily large areas in a wide spectral range, resulting in the enhancement of the circular dichroism signal by more than two orders of magnitude, thus paving the road toward the successful combination of surface-enhanced spectroscopies and electromagnetic superchirality.

  5. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Irzhak, Dmitry; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-09-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  6. Local field enhancement on metallic periodic surface structures produced by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kudryashov, Sergei I; Ligachev, A E; Makarov, Sergei V; Mel'nik, N N; Rudenko, A A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Khmelnitskii, R A

    2013-04-30

    Periodic surface structures on aluminium are produced by femtosecond laser pulses for efficient excitation of surface electromagnetic waves using a strong objective (NA = 0.5). The local electromagnetic field enhancement on the structures is measured using the technique of surface-enhanced Raman scattering from pyridine molecules. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  7. Gas sensing with surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. J.; Schweizer, K. S.; Ricco, A. J.; Zipperian, T. E.

    1985-03-01

    The use of a ZnO-on-Si surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator as a gas sensor is discussed. In particular, the sensitivity of the device to organic vapors is examined. The planar nature of the SAW device, in which the acoustic energy is confined to within roughly one acoustic wavelength of the surface, makes the device extremely sensitive to surface perturbations. This characteristic has been exploited in the construction of SAW gas sensors in which the surface wave propagation characteristics are altered by species adsorbed from the ambient gas. The porous nature of the sputtered ZnO film, in conjunction with the microbalance capability of the SAW device, gives the sensor the ability to distinguish molecules on the basis of both size and mass.

  8. Acoustic Bloch Wave Propagation in a Periodic Waveguide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-24

    electrical conductivity. In the quantum theory, the electron is represented by De Broglie/ Schr ~ dinger matter waves which propagate in an electrical conductor...waveguide loaded with a periodic array of rigid spheres. They based their approach on the Webster horn equation and compared the results of a strained...governing equations , we simply use the dissi- pative equations in the limit as the heat conductivity and viscosity approach zero. In such a limit the

  9. Madden Julian Oscillation impacts on global ocean surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Andrew G.; Hendon, Harry H.; Durrant, Tom H.; Hemer, Mark A.

    2015-12-01

    We assess the impact of the tropical Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) on global ocean wind waves using 30 years of wave data from a wave model hindcast that is forced with high resolution surface winds from the NCEP-CFSR reanalysis. We concentrate on the boreal winter season when the MJO has its greatest amplitude and is potentially a source of predictable wave impacts at intra-seasonal lead times. Statistically significant anomalies in significant wave height (Hs), peak wave period (Tp) and zonal wave energy flux (CgE) are found to covary with the intra-seasonal variation of surface zonal wind induced by the MJO as it traverses eastward from the western tropical Indian Ocean to the eastern tropical Pacific. Tp varies generally out of phase with Hs over the life cycle of the MJO, indicating that these MJO-wave anomalies are locally wind-generated rather than remotely generated by ocean swell. Pronounced Hs anomalies develop on the northwest shelf of Australia, where the MJO is known to influence sea level and surface temperatures, and in the western Caribbean Sea and Guatemalan-Panama Seas with enhanced wave anomalies apparent in the vicinity of the Tehuantepec and Papagayo gaps. Significant wave anomalies are also detected in the North Pacific and North Atlantic oceans in connection with the MJO teleconnection to the extratropics via atmospheric wave propagation. The impact in the north Atlantic stems from induction of the high phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) about 1 week after MJO convection traverses the Indian Ocean, and the low phase of the NAO about one week after suppressed convection traverses the Indian Ocean. Strong positive Hs anomalies maximize on the Northern European coast in the positive NAO phase and vice versa for the negative NAO phase. The MJO also influences the occurrence of daily low (below the 5th percentile) and high (above the 95th percentile) wave conditions across the tropics and in the North Pacific and North Atlantic

  10. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    DOEpatents

    Branch,; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold, G [Ithaca, NY

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  11. Improved spherical wave least squares method for analyzing periodic arrays of spheres.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huan; Lu, Ya Yan

    2010-06-01

    For analyzing plane wave scattering from a multilayer periodic structure where each layer consists of a two-dimensional periodic array of spheres, a spherical wave least squares method is developed which extends and improves the earlier work by Matsushima et al. [PIER 69, 305 (2007)]. A number of techniques are used to speed up the method and to reduce the memory requirement. Spherical wave expansions are used in one unit cell containing a sphere in each layer, and quasi-periodic conditions are imposed on lateral surfaces of the unit cell in the least squares sense. Unlike the layer-Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method [Physica A 141, 575 (1987)], the method does not need lattice sums and it is relatively simple to implement.

  12. Interior impedance wedge diffraction with surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy

    1988-01-01

    The exact impedance wedge solution is evaluated asymptotically using the method of steepest descents for plane wave illumination at normal incidence. Uniform but different impedances on each face are considered for both soft and hard polarizations. The asymptotic solution isolates the incident, singly reflected, multiply reflected, diffracted, and surface wave fields. Multiply reflected fields of any order are permitted. The multiply reflected fields from the exact solution are written as ratios of auxiliary Maliuzhinets functions, whereas a geometrical analysis gives the reflected fields as products of reflection coefficients. These two representations are shown to be identical in magnitude, phase and the angular range over which they exist. The diffracted field includes four Fresnel transition functions as in the perfect conductor case, and the expressions for the appropriate discontinuities at the shadow boundaries are presented. The surface wave exists over a finite angular range and only for certain surface impedances. A surface wave transition field is included to retain continuity. Computations are presented for interior wedge diffractions although the formulation is valid for both exterior and interior wedges.

  13. Existence, Uniqueness and Asymptotic Stability of Time Periodic Traveling Waves for a Periodic Lotka-Volterra Competition System with Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyu; Ruan, Shigui

    2011-06-01

    We study the existence, uniqueness, and asymptotic stability of time periodic traveling wave solutions to a periodic diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition system. Under certain conditions, we prove that there exists a maximal wave speed c(*) such that for each wave speed c ≤ c(*), there is a time periodic traveling wave connecting two semi-trivial periodic solutions of the corresponding kinetic system. It is shown that such a traveling wave is unique modulo translation and is monotone with respect to its co-moving frame coordinate. We also show that the traveling wave solutions with wave speed c < c(*) are asymptotically stable in certain sense. In addition, we establish the nonexistence of time periodic traveling waves for nonzero speed c > c(*).

  14. Existence, Uniqueness and Asymptotic Stability of Time Periodic Traveling Waves for a Periodic Lotka-Volterra Competition System with Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangyu; Ruan, Shigui

    2011-01-01

    We study the existence, uniqueness, and asymptotic stability of time periodic traveling wave solutions to a periodic diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition system. Under certain conditions, we prove that there exists a maximal wave speed c* such that for each wave speed c ≤ c*, there is a time periodic traveling wave connecting two semi-trivial periodic solutions of the corresponding kinetic system. It is shown that such a traveling wave is unique modulo translation and is monotone with respect to its co-moving frame coordinate. We also show that the traveling wave solutions with wave speed c < c* are asymptotically stable in certain sense. In addition, we establish the nonexistence of time periodic traveling waves for nonzero speed c > c*. PMID:21572575

  15. Multiple-frequency surface acoustic wave devices as sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Martin, Stephen J.

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a multiple-frequency acoustic wave (MUFAW) device on ST-cut quartz with nominal surface acoustic wave (SAW) center frequencies of 16, 40, 100, and 250 MHz. The four frequencies are obtained by patterning four sets of input and output interdigital transducers of differing periodicities on a single substrate. Such a device allows the frequency dependence of AW sensor perturbations to be examined, aiding in the elucidation of the operative interaction mechanism(s). Initial measurements of the SAW response to the vacuum deposition of a thin nickel film show the expected frequency dependence of mass sensitivity in addition to the expected frequency independence of the magnitude of the acoustoelectric effect. By measuring changes in both wave velocity and attenuation at multiple frequencies, extrinsic perturbations such as temperature and pressure changes are readily differentiated from one another and from changes in surface mass.

  16. Radial wave crystals: radially periodic structures from anisotropic metamaterials for engineering acoustic or electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2009-08-07

    We demonstrate that metamaterials with anisotropic properties can be used to develop a new class of periodic structures that has been named radial wave crystals. They can be sonic or photonic, and wave propagation along the radial directions is obtained through Bloch states like in usual sonic or photonic crystals. The band structure of the proposed structures can be tailored in a large amount to get exciting novel wave phenomena. For example, it is shown that acoustical cavities based on radial sonic crystals can be employed as passive devices for beam forming or dynamically orientated antennas for sound localization.

  17. Mechanical Surface Waves Accompany Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin; El Hady, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    The action potential (AP) is the basic mechanism by which information is transmitted along neuronal axons. Although the excitable nature of axons is understood to be primarily electrical, many experimental studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane co-propagates with the electrical signal. While the experimental evidence for co-propagating mechanical waves is diverse and compelling, there is no consensus for their physical underpinnings. We present a model in which these mechanical displacements arise from the driving of mechanical surface waves, in which potential energy is stored in elastic deformations of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is stored in the movement of the axoplasmic fluid. In our model these surface waves are driven by the traveling wave of electrical depolarization that characterizes the AP, altering the electrostatic forces across the membrane as it passes. Our model allows us to predict the shape of the displacement that should accompany any traveling wave of voltage, including the well-characterized AP. We expect our model to serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs in neurobiology. See Arxiv/1407.7600

  18. Surface waves in three-dimensional electromagnetic composites and their effect on homogenization.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoyan Y Z; Jiang, Li Jun; Markel, Vadim A; Tsukerman, Igor

    2013-05-06

    Reflection and transmission of electromagnetic waves at the boundaries of periodic composites (electromagnetic/optical metamaterials) depends in general on both bulk and surface waves. We investigate the interplay of these two contributions using three-dimensional full-wave numerical simulations and a recently developed non-asymptotic homogenization theory.

  19. Anatomy of a Periodically Driven p-Wave Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Erhai

    2016-10-01

    The topological properties of periodically driven many-body systems often have no static analogs and defy a simple description based on the effective Hamiltonian. To explore the emergent edge modes in driven p-wave superconductors in two dimensions, we analysed a toy model of Kitaev chains (one-dimensional spinless p-wave superconductors with Majorana edge states) coupled by time-periodic hopping. We showed that with proper driving, the coupled Kitaev chains can turn into a fully gapped superconductor, which is analogous to the px+ipy state but has two, rather than one, chiral edge modes. A different driving protocol turns it into a gapless superconductor with isolated point nodes and completely flat edge states at quasienergy ω=0 or π/T, with T as the driving period. The time evolution operator U(kx, ky, t) of the toy model is computed exactly to yield the phase bands. And the "topological singularities" of the phase bands are exhausted and compared to those of a periodically driven Hofstadter model, which features counter-propagating chiral edge modes. These examples demonstrate the unique edge states in driven superconducting systems and suggest driving as a potentially fruitful route to engineer new topological superconductors.

  20. Surface plasmon THz waves on gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Maxim; Garet, Frédéric; Armand, Damien; Shkurinov, Alexander; Coutaz, Jean-Louis

    2008-03-01

    Because of their long propagation length at a metal surface in the far infrared, surface plasmons make potentially feasible the design and realization of 2D integrated terahertz systems over a metallic substrate. The coupling of a terahertz beam to the surface plasmon wave is very efficiently achieved by diffraction gratings engraved at the metal surface. In this article, we present a review of some recent works we performed in view of characterizing this coupling phenomenon. The analysis of the experimental data supplied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy allows us to point out the main parameters that govern this diffraction process and the propagation of a surface plasmon over a flat or corrugated metal surface. To cite this article: M. Nazarov et al., C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  1. Writing magnetic patterns with surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weiyang; Buford, Benjamin; Jander, Albrecht; Dhagat, Pallavi

    2014-05-07

    A novel patterning technique that creates magnetization patterns in a continuous magnetostrictive film with surface acoustic waves is demonstrated. Patterns of 10 μm wide stripes of alternating magnetization and a 3 μm dot of reversed magnetization are written using standing and focusing acoustic waves, respectively. The magnetization pattern is size-tunable, erasable, and rewritable by changing the magnetic field and acoustic power. This versatility, along with its solid-state implementation (no moving parts) and electronic control, renders it as a promising technique for application in magnetic recording, magnonic signal processing, magnetic particle manipulation, and spatial magneto-optical modulation.

  2. Lost surface waves in nonpiezoelectric solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, Eugene A.; Morozovska, Anna N.; Glinchuk, Maya D.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2017-07-01

    The existence of shear surface acoustic waves (SAWs) has been regarded as impossible in nonpiezoelectrics with homogeneous flat surfaces. We show that transverse shear SAWs can propagate near the flat surfaces of all crystalline dielectrics due to the omnipresent flexoelectric coupling. It appears that the penetration depth of the previously unexplored SAW is defined by the flexocoupling strength. Since the SAW occurs due to the flexoelectric coupling, we name it the flexoelectric SAW (flexo-SAW). We predict that the phonon spectra corresponding to the flexo-SAWs and bulk phonon modes can be separated in thin nonpiezoelectric films, such as strontium titanate.

  3. Finite-element simulation of wave propagation in periodic piezoelectric SAW structures.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Manfred; Finger, Norman; Kovacs, Günter; Schöberl, Joachim; Zaglmayr, Sabine; Langer, Ulrich; Lerch, Reinhard

    2006-06-01

    Many surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consist of quasiperiodic structures that are designed by successive repetition of a base cell. The precise numerical simulation of such devices, including all physical effects, is currently beyond the capacity of high-end computation. Therefore, we have to restrict the numerical analysis to the periodic substructure. By using the finite-element method (FEM), this can be done by introducing periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) at special artificial boundaries. To be able to describe the complete dispersion behavior of waves, including damping effects, the PBC has to be able to model each mode that can be excited within the periodic structure. Therefore, the condition used for the PBCs must hold for each phase and amplitude difference existing at periodic boundaries. Based on the Floquet theorem, our two newly developed PBC algorithms allow the calculation of both, the phase and the amplitude coefficients of the wave. In the first part of this paper we describe the basic theory of the PBCs. Based on the FEM, we develop two different methods that deliver the same results but have totally different numerical properties and, therefore, allow the use of problem-adapted solvers. Further on, we show how to compute the charge distribution of periodic SAW structures with the aid of the new PBCs. In the second part, we compare the measured and simulated dispersion behavior of waves propagating on periodic SAW structures for two different piezoelectric substrates. Then we compare measured and simulated input admittances of structures similar to SAW resonators.

  4. S-wave velocity structure in southwest China from surface wave tomography and receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Wu, J.; Fang, L.; Lai, G.; Yang, T.

    2013-12-01

    Using the surface wave records of 504 teleseismic events at 50 temporal and 92 permanent seismic stations in southwest China, we extracted the phase velocity dispersion curves with interstation correlation method, and obtained the phase velocity maps at 10, 15, 25, 40, 60 and 75 s with a grid space of 0.5×0.5 from surface wave tomography. Meanwhile, we obtained the S-wave velocity structures beneath three profiles from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface waves. From the maps at short periods (10 and 15 s) and long periods (40, 60 and 75 s), different distribution features of high velocity zones (HVZs for short) and low velocity zones (LVZs for short) are shown in the study area: HVZs at short periods are shown in the Panzhihua - Emeishan region, Sichuan basin and Weixi-Lijiang region, surrounding the LVZs from Songpan-Ganzi block to the east of Lijiang where there are significant higher elevations; whereas HVZs at long periods are shown in the Weixi-Lijiang region, Panzhihua-Chuxiong basin and Kunming-Tonghai region and forming a line in the center part of the study area, and the fast polarization directions of the shear wave from SKS analysis on the two sides of the line change significantly. These phenomena indicate plateau material flow can be blocked in two different depth intervals and leads to different horizontal extensions. From the maps at long periods and the structures along the profiles, LVZs are shown in the upper mantle beneath rapid slip fault zones, such as Anninghe - Zemuhe - Xiaojiang fault zone, Red River fault zone and Xiaojinhe fault zone, implying these faults are deep penetrating faults. Figure (a-f) Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps at 10, 15, 25,40,60 and 75 s with a resolution of 100 km. The black lines represent faults. The red points represent M≥6 earthquakes. The colour scale changes in different panels. Figure (g) Distribution of the seismic stations and regional tectonic features in the study area. Figure (h

  5. High resolution surface wave dispersion studies in China

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.E.; Patton, H.J.

    1997-11-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory regional calibration project is actively assembling a database of surface-wave dispersion information for China and surrounding areas. As part of the effort to characterize surface wave dispersion in China, we integrate prior long period results from the University of Colorado with our shorter period dispersion measurements in a high resolution survey of key monitoring areas. Focusing on western China initially, we employ broadband data recorded on CDSN stations, and regional events (m{sub b} 4 and above). Our approach is twofold, employing path specific calibration of key stations and well-recorded reference events, and tomographic inference to provide group velocity curves for regions with sparse station distribution and little seismic activity. Initial dispersion studies at Chinese stations WMQ and LZH show substantial azimuthal variation in dispersion, reinforcing the need for careful determination of source regions for path-specific calibration.

  6. Blackfolds, plane waves and minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas, Jay; Blau, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    Minimal surfaces in Euclidean space provide examples of possible non-compact horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat space-time. On the other hand, the existence of limiting surfaces in the space-time provides a simple mechanism for making these configurations compact. Limiting surfaces appear naturally in a given space-time by making minimal surfaces rotate but they are also inherent to plane wave or de Sitter space-times in which case minimal surfaces can be static and compact. We use the blackfold approach in order to scan for possible black hole horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat, plane wave and de Sitter space-times. In the process we uncover several new configurations, such as black helicoids and catenoids, some of which have an asymptotically flat counterpart. In particular, we find that the ultraspinning regime of singly-spinning Myers-Perry black holes, described in terms of the simplest minimal surface (the plane), can be obtained as a limit of a black helicoid, suggesting that these two families of black holes are connected. We also show that minimal surfaces embedded in spheres rather than Euclidean space can be used to construct static compact horizons in asymptotically de Sitter space-times.

  7. An idealised experimental model of ocean surface wave transmission by an ice floe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennetts, L. G.; Alberello, A.; Meylan, M. H.; Cavaliere, C.; Babanin, A. V.; Toffoli, A.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental model of transmission of ocean waves by an ice floe is presented. Thin plastic plates with different material properties and thicknesses are used to model the floe. Regular incident waves with different periods and steepnesses are used, ranging from gently-sloping to storm-like conditions. A wave gauge is used to measure the water surface elevation in the lee of the floe. The depth of wave overwash on the floe is measured by a gauge in the centre of the floe's upper surface. Results show transmitted waves are regular for gently-sloping incident waves but irregular for storm-like incident waves. The proportion of the incident wave transmitted is shown to decrease as incident wave steepness increases, and to be at its minimum for an incident wavelength equal to the floe length. Further, a trend is noted for transmission to decrease as the mean wave height in the overwash region increases.

  8. Modelling of quasi-periodic oscillations with wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpar, M. A.; Yilmaz, A.

    1997-08-01

    Model dispersion relations are introduced to explore power spectra of the normal-branch (NB) and horizontal-branch (HB) quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs; for reviews see Van der Klis (1989)[ARA&A, 27, 517], (1992) [Proc. of NATO ASI X-Ray Binaries and Recycled Pulsars, eds. E.P.J. Van den Heuvel & S.A. Rappaport, Kluwer, Dordrecht], (1995)[Proc. of NATO ASI The Lives of the Neutron Stars, eds. M.A. Alpar, Ümit Kiziloğlu, & J. van Paradijs, Kluwer, Dordrecht]) of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in terms of wave packets and to illustrate the presence of frequency bands around the Kepler and beat frequencies. For the NB QPOs wave packets of sound waves in a thick middle disk state, with frequencies determined by the rotation frequency, have wavelengths comparable to the size of the middle disk. For Z-sources on the HB, the wave packets result from disturbances in the inner disk induced by the neutron star magnetic field which rotates at the beat frequency with respect to the inner disk. For both the NB and the HB QPOs, we construct simple model dispersion relations, and show that the QPO peaks in the observed power spectra correspond to reasonable wavelengths and system parameters. The kilohertz QPOs, which were discovered after the original version of this paper was submitted, are also discussed as a possible realization of the Kepler and beat frequency bands. Problems of integrating the kHz and HB QPOs in a disk model are briefly noted. It is tentatively suggested that supersonic and wave propagation regions of the inner disk have complementary functions for the origin of kHz and HB QPOs respectively.

  9. Atomic spectroscopy with surface wave plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hubert, J; Bordeleau, S; Tran, K C; Michaud, S; Milette, B; Sing, R; Jalbert, J; Boudreau, D; Moisan, M; Margot, J

    1996-06-01

    The use of microwave induced plasmas, particularly of surface wave plasmas, as detectors in atomic emission spectrometry for elemental analysis is reviewed. Surface wave plasmas have been produced at low HF power and used as gas chromatographic detectors. The analytical performances for the detection of non-metals with a Fourier transform spectrometer and a two-channel filter unit are reported. The excitation behavior of non-metals in helium-based mixed gas-plasmas has also be studied. In particular, the effect of power and of nitrogen concentration on the bromine emission has been systematically investigated. A nine-fold improvement of the detection limits for bromine can be obtained in a high power (900 W) helium-nitrogen (0.1-0.2%) plasma.

  10. Surface wave tomography with compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Z.; Li, Q.; Huang, J.

    2016-12-01

    The development of dense seismic arrays has led to the emergence of new surface wave tomography methods, such as Eikonal/Helmholtz tomography, wavefield gradiometry, and seismic noise gradiometry. All these methods need to calculate spatial derivatives of some attributes of the wavefields, for example travel time, amplitude, or the displacement itself. Usually, the waveforms contain noise and are observed on an irregular grid. Interpolation and smoothing are necessary to mitigate the problems, but also limit the resolution of tomography. Here, we propose a new data pre-processing method based on compressive sensing (CS). The new method uses sparsity promoting inverse techniques and curvelet transform to achieve simultaneous seismic data interpolation and denoising in frequency domain. The resulted wavefields can then be used in any wavefield-based surface wave tomography method. Preliminary tests with finite-difference synthetics show improved tomographic images, compared with images from the same methods applied to the original synthetics.

  11. Breaking Waves on the Ocean Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwendeman, Michael S.

    equilibrium range waves and normalizing by the wave directional spread. Meanwhile, correlation of W with turbulent dissipation measurements is significantly worse, which may be due to uncertainty in the measurements or bias related to micro-breaking waves. Finally, phase-resolved, three-dimensional, measurements of the whitecaps were made from a new ship-based stereo video system. Comparison with concurrent buoy measurements indicate that the stereo data accurately reproduces the wave statistics, including the frequency spectra. The whitecaps are characterized by transient and spatially localized regions of extreme surface gradients, rather than large crest-to-trough steepnesses. It was found that whitecaps were around 10 times more likely to have extreme slopes, and 50% of the observed extreme surface slopes were in the vicinity of the breaking waves. The maximum whitecap slopes show good agreement with the Stokes 120 degree limiting crest geometry, and the whitecap crest loses much of its maximum steepness shortly after the onset of breaking. The whitecap phase speeds are consistently less than the linear or weakly nonlinear predicted phase speed, which indicate the effect of narrow-band wave groups, despite the broad-band wave spectra.

  12. Wireless Multiplexed Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Sensor is a new technology for obtaining multiple, real-time measurements under extreme environmental conditions. This project plans to develop a wireless multiplexed sensor system that uses SAW sensors, with no batteries or semiconductors, that are passive and rugged, can operate down to cryogenic temperatures and up to hundreds of degrees C, and can be used to sense a wide variety of parameters over reasonable distances (meters).

  13. Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves in Two Dimensionally Periodic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tian-Lin

    1985-12-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves in two dimensionally periodic structure is systematically investigated, to provide the basic theory for two dimensionally modulated dielectric waveguide. A canonical two dimensionally periodic medium of infinite extent, whose dielectic constant varies sinusoidally in two orthogonal directions, is first examined. The charact solutions are represented exactly by a double Fourier series which is known as the Floquet solution. The harmonic amplitudes of the Floquet solution are determined by a five-term recurrence relation in the vector form, properly taking into account the hybrid-mode nature of the propagation problem. The five-term recurrence relation is then treated by different approaches so that clear physical pictures and practical numerical methods can be obtained. The characteristic solutions for two dimensionally periodic medium are then applied to the boundary-value problem of multi-layer dielectric waveguides containing a finite layer of periodic medium. As an example, the guidance problems are analysed and the numerical analysis of the dispersion characteristics are then carried out. Besides the canonical medium as a model, more general two dimensionally periodic medium are also discussed.

  14. Ultrafast microfluidics using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface acoustic waves (SAWs), nanometer amplitude Rayleigh waves driven at megahertz order frequencies propagating on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate, offer a powerful method for driving a host of extremely fast microfluidic actuation and micro∕bioparticle manipulation schemes. We show that sessile drops can be translated rapidly on planar substrates or fluid can be pumped through microchannels at 1–10 cm∕s velocities, which are typically one to two orders quicker than that afforded by current microfluidic technologies. Through symmetry-breaking, azimuthal recirculation can be induced within the drop to drive strong inertial microcentrifugation for micromixing and particle concentration or separation. Similar micromixing strategies can be induced in the same microchannel in which fluid is pumped with the SAW by merely changing the SAW frequency to rapidly switch the uniform through-flow into a chaotic oscillatory flow by exploiting superpositioning of the irradiated sound waves from the sidewalls of the microchannel. If the flow is sufficiently quiescent, the nodes of the transverse standing wave that arises across the microchannel also allow for particle aggregation, and hence, sorting on nodal lines. In addition, the SAW also facilitates other microfluidic capabilities. For example, capillary waves excited at the free surface of a sessile drop by the SAW underneath it can be exploited for micro∕nanoparticle collection and sorting at nodal points or lines at low powers. At higher powers, the large accelerations off the substrate surface as the SAW propagates across drives rapid destabilization of the drop free surface giving rise to inertial liquid jets that persist over 1–2 cm in length or atomization of the entire drop to produce 1–10 μm monodispersed aerosol droplets, which can be exploited for ink-jet printing, mass spectrometry interfacing, or pulmonary drug delivery. The atomization of polymer∕protein solutions

  15. Broadband surface-wave transformation cloak.

    PubMed

    Xu, Su; Xu, Hongyi; Gao, Hanhong; Jiang, Yuyu; Yu, Faxin; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng; Sun, Handong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-06-23

    Guiding surface electromagnetic waves around disorder without disturbing the wave amplitude or phase is in great demand for modern photonic and plasmonic devices, but is fundamentally difficult to realize because light momentum must be conserved in a scattering event. A partial realization has been achieved by exploiting topological electromagnetic surface states, but this approach is limited to narrow-band light transmission and subject to phase disturbances in the presence of disorder. Recent advances in transformation optics apply principles of general relativity to curve the space for light, allowing one to match the momentum and phase of light around any disorder as if that disorder were not there. This feature has been exploited in the development of invisibility cloaks. An ideal invisibility cloak, however, would require the phase velocity of light being guided around the cloaked object to exceed the vacuum speed of light--a feat potentially achievable only over an extremely narrow band. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally show that the bottlenecks encountered in previous studies can be overcome. We introduce a class of cloaks capable of remarkable broadband surface electromagnetic waves guidance around ultrasharp corners and bumps with no perceptible changes in amplitude and phase. These cloaks consist of specifically designed nonmagnetic metamaterials and achieve nearly ideal transmission efficiency over a broadband frequency range from 0(+) to 6 GHz. This work provides strong support for the application of transformation optics to plasmonic circuits and could pave the way toward high-performance, large-scale integrated photonic circuits.

  16. Broadband surface-wave transformation cloak

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Su; Xu, Hongyi; Gao, Hanhong; Jiang, Yuyu; Yu, Faxin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng; Sun, Handong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    Guiding surface electromagnetic waves around disorder without disturbing the wave amplitude or phase is in great demand for modern photonic and plasmonic devices, but is fundamentally difficult to realize because light momentum must be conserved in a scattering event. A partial realization has been achieved by exploiting topological electromagnetic surface states, but this approach is limited to narrow-band light transmission and subject to phase disturbances in the presence of disorder. Recent advances in transformation optics apply principles of general relativity to curve the space for light, allowing one to match the momentum and phase of light around any disorder as if that disorder were not there. This feature has been exploited in the development of invisibility cloaks. An ideal invisibility cloak, however, would require the phase velocity of light being guided around the cloaked object to exceed the vacuum speed of light—a feat potentially achievable only over an extremely narrow band. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally show that the bottlenecks encountered in previous studies can be overcome. We introduce a class of cloaks capable of remarkable broadband surface electromagnetic waves guidance around ultrasharp corners and bumps with no perceptible changes in amplitude and phase. These cloaks consist of specifically designed nonmagnetic metamaterials and achieve nearly ideal transmission efficiency over a broadband frequency range from 0+ to 6 GHz. This work provides strong support for the application of transformation optics to plasmonic circuits and could pave the way toward high-performance, large-scale integrated photonic circuits. PMID:26056299

  17. Long-Period ULF Wave Activity in the Cusp Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V.; Belakhovsky, V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kozlovsky, A.

    2013-12-01

    We compare simultaneous observations of long-period ULF wave activity from the Svalbard/IMAGE and Greenland fluxgate magnetometer profiles covering the expected cusp geomagnetic latitudes. Irregular Pulsations at Cusp Latitudes (IPCL) and narrow-band Pc5 waves are found to be a ubiquitous element of ULF activity in the dayside high-latitude region. To identify the ionospheric projections of the cusp, we use the width of the return signal of the SuperDARN radar covering the Svalbard archipelago, predictions of empirical cusp models, and augmented whenever possible by DMSP identification of magnetospheric boundary domains. The meridional spatial structure of IPCL/Pc5 pulsation spectral power has been found to have a localized latitudinal peak, but not under the cusp proper as was previously thought, but several degrees southward from the equatorward cusp boundary. Possible mechanisms and their relevance to observational data are discussed. The occurrence of IPCL and Pc5 waves in the dayside boundary layers is a challenge to modelers, because so far their mechanism has not been firmly identified.

  18. Ring waveguide resonator on surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, S. V.; Martin, G.; Weihnacht, M.

    2007-04-01

    A simple regular electrode structure for surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices is proposed. The structure consists of an interdigital transducer in the form of a ring placed on the Z cut of a hexagonal piezoelectric crystal. Finite thickness electrodes produce the known slowing effect for a SAW in comparison with this SAW on a free surface. The closed "slow" electrode region with the "fast" surrounding region forms an open waveguide resonator structure with the acoustic field concentrated in the electrode region. If the radius of the structure is large enough for a given wavelength, an acceptable level of radiation losses can be reached. The electrical admittance of such resonator does not have sidelobes.

  19. Periodic orbits in nonlinear wave equations on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, J. G.; Khames, I.; Knippel, A.; Panayotaros, P.

    2017-09-01

    We consider a cubic nonlinear wave equation on a network and show that inspecting the normal modes of the graph, we can immediately identify which ones extend into nonlinear periodic orbits. Two main classes of nonlinear periodic orbits exist: modes without soft nodes and others. For the former which are the Goldstone and the bivalent modes, the linearized equations decouple. A Floquet analysis was conducted systematically for chains; it indicates that the Goldstone mode is usually stable and the bivalent mode is always unstable. The linearized equations for the second type of modes are coupled, they indicate which modes will be excited when the orbit destabilizes. Numerical results for the second class show that modes with a single eigenvalue are unstable below a threshold amplitude. Conversely, modes with multiple eigenvalues always seem unstable. This study could be applied to coupled mechanical systems.

  20. Illusions and Cloaks for Surface Waves

    PubMed Central

    McManus, T. M.; Valiente-Kroon, J. A.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Hao, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Ever since the inception of Transformation Optics (TO), new and exciting ideas have been proposed in the field of electromagnetics and the theory has been modified to work in such fields as acoustics and thermodynamics. The most well-known application of this theory is to cloaking, but another equally intriguing application of TO is the idea of an illusion device. Here, we propose a general method to transform electromagnetic waves between two arbitrary surfaces. This allows a flat surface to reproduce the scattering behaviour of a curved surface and vice versa, thereby giving rise to perfect optical illusion and cloaking devices, respectively. The performance of the proposed devices is simulated using thin effective media with engineered material properties. The scattering of the curved surface is shown to be reproduced by its flat analogue (for illusions) and vice versa for cloaks. PMID:25145953

  1. Illusions and Cloaks for Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, T. M.; Valiente-Kroon, J. A.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Hao, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Ever since the inception of Transformation Optics (TO), new and exciting ideas have been proposed in the field of electromagnetics and the theory has been modified to work in such fields as acoustics and thermodynamics. The most well-known application of this theory is to cloaking, but another equally intriguing application of TO is the idea of an illusion device. Here, we propose a general method to transform electromagnetic waves between two arbitrary surfaces. This allows a flat surface to reproduce the scattering behaviour of a curved surface and vice versa, thereby giving rise to perfect optical illusion and cloaking devices, respectively. The performance of the proposed devices is simulated using thin effective media with engineered material properties. The scattering of the curved surface is shown to be reproduced by its flat analogue (for illusions) and vice versa for cloaks.

  2. Surface acoustic wave microsensors and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galipeau, David W.; Story, Patrick R.; Vetelino, Kevin A.; Mileham, R. D.

    1997-06-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been studied for the last twenty years as highly sensitive yet relatively inexpensive microsensors for applications ranging from gas and biological sensing to thin film and surface characterization. This wide range of applications is due to SAW microsensors high sensitivity to several physical parameters including mass, conductivity, permittivity, stress, temperature and electric fields. Their low cost results from the use of standard batch microelectronic fabrication techniques for their manufacture. In this work several SAW sensing applications are described. These include: gas detection; thin film polymer characterization; dew-point measurements; surface energy measurements; and as a method to measure surface cleanliness. Experimental results are presented along with comparisons to other measurement techniques.

  3. Coherence in ultrafast laser-induced periodic surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Li, Chen; Faure, Nicolas; Cheng, Guanghua; Stoian, Razvan

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast laser irradiation can trigger anisotropically structured nanoscaled gratinglike arrangements of matter, the laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs). We demonstrate here that the formation of LIPSS is intrinsically related to the coherence of the laser field. Employing several test materials that allow large optical excursions, we observe the effect of randomizing spatial phase in generating finite domains of ripples. Using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain methods, we evaluate energy deposition patterns below a material's rough surface and show that modulated pattern, i.e., a spatially ordered electromagnetic solution, results from the coherent superposition of waves. By separating the field scattered from a surface rough topography from the total field, the inhomogeneous energy absorption problem is reduced to a simple interference equation. We further distinguish the contribution of the scattered near field and scattered far field on various types of inhomogeneous energy absorption features. It is found that the inhomogeneous energy absorption which could trigger the low-spatial-frequency LIPSSs (LSFLs) and high-spatial-frequency LIPSSs (HSFLs) of periodicity Λ >λ /Re(n ˜) are due to coherent superposition between the scattered far field (propagation) and the refracted field, while HSFLs of Λ <λ /Re(n ˜) are triggered by coherent superposition between the scattered near field (evanescent) and the refracted field. This is a general scenario that involves a topography-induced scattering phenomenon and stationary evanescent fields, being applied to two model case materials that exhibit large optical excursions upon excitation (W, Si) and nonplasmonic to plasmonic transitions. We indicate the occurrence of a general light interference phenomenon that does not necessarily involve wavelike surface plasmonic excitation. Finally, we discuss the role of interference field and scattered field on the enhancement of LIPSSs by

  4. Megaquakes, prograde surface waves and urban evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, C.; Castaños, H.

    2013-05-01

    Cities grow according to evolutionary principles. They move away from soft-ground conditions and avoid vulnerable types of structures. A megaquake generates prograde surface waves that produce unexpected damage in modern buildings. The examples (Figs. 1 and 2) were taken from the 1985 Mexico City and the 2010 Concepción, Chile megaquakes. About 400 structures built under supervision according to modern building codes were destroyed in the Mexican earthquake. All were sited on soft ground. A Rayleigh wave will cause surface particles to move as ellipses in a vertical plane. Building codes assume that this motion will be retrograde as on a homogeneous elastic halfspace, but soft soils are intermediate materials between a solid and a liquid. When Poisson's ratio tends to ν→0.5 the particle motion turns prograde as it would on a homogeneous fluid halfspace. Building codes assume that the tilt of the ground is not in phase with the acceleration but we show that structures on soft ground tilt into the direction of the horizontal ground acceleration. The combined effect of gravity and acceleration may destabilize a structure when it is in resonance with its eigenfrequency. Castaños, H. and C. Lomnitz, 2013. Charles Darwin and the 1835 Chile earthquake. Seismol. Res. Lett., 84, 19-23. Lomnitz, C., 1990. Mexico 1985: the case for gravity waves. Geophys. J. Int., 102, 569-572. Malischewsky, P.G. et al., 2008. The domain of existence of prograde Rayleigh-wave particle motion. Wave Motion 45, 556-564.; Figure 1 1985 Mexico megaquake--overturned 15-story apartment building in Mexico City ; Figure 2 2010 Chile megaquake Overturned 15-story R-C apartment building in Concepción

  5. Gradient-index meta-surfaces as a bridge linking propagating waves and surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shulin; He, Qiong; Xiao, Shiyi; Xu, Qin; Li, Xin; Zhou, Lei

    2012-05-01

    The arbitrary control of electromagnetic waves is a key aim of photonic research. Although, for example, the control of freely propagating waves (PWs; refs , , , , , ) and surface waves (SWs; refs , , , ) has separately become possible using transformation optics and metamaterials, a bridge linking both propagation types has not yet been found. Such a device has particular relevance given the many schemes of controlling electromagnetic waves at surfaces and interfaces, leading to trapped rainbows, lensing, beam bending, deflection, and even anomalous reflection/refraction. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that a specific gradient-index meta-surface can convert a PW to a SW with nearly 100% efficiency. Distinct from conventional devices such as prism or grating couplers, the momentum mismatch between PW and SW is compensated by the reflection-phase gradient of the meta-surface, and a nearly perfect PW-SW conversion can happen for any incidence angle larger than a critical value. Experiments in the microwave region, including both far-field and near-field characterizations, are in excellent agreement with full-wave simulations. Our findings may pave the way for many applications, including high-efficiency surface plasmon couplers, anti-reflection surfaces, light absorbers, and so on.

  6. Gradient-index meta-surfaces as a bridge linking propagating waves and surface waves.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shulin; He, Qiong; Xiao, Shiyi; Xu, Qin; Li, Xin; Zhou, Lei

    2012-04-01

    The arbitrary control of electromagnetic waves is a key aim of photonic research. Although, for example, the control of freely propagating waves (PWs) and surface waves (SWs) has separately become possible using transformation optics and metamaterials, a bridge linking both propagation types has not yet been found. Such a device has particular relevance given the many schemes of controlling electromagnetic waves at surfaces and interfaces, leading to trapped rainbows, lensing, beam bending, deflection, and even anomalous reflection/refraction. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that a specific gradient-index meta-surface can convert a PW to a SW with nearly 100% efficiency. Distinct from conventional devices such as prism or grating couplers, the momentum mismatch between PW and SW is compensated by the reflection-phase gradient of the meta-surface, and a nearly perfect PW-SW conversion can happen for any incidence angle larger than a critical value. Experiments in the microwave region, including both far-field and near-field characterizations, are in excellent agreement with full-wave simulations. Our findings may pave the way for many applications, including high-efficiency surface plasmon couplers, anti-reflection surfaces, light absorbers, and so on.

  7. Spin waves in periodic antidot waveguide of complex base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Santanu; Kłos, Jarosław W.; Mieszczak, Szymon; Barman, Anjan; Krawczyk, Maciej

    2017-07-01

    We consider the planar magnonic waveguide with a periodic sequence of antidots forming a zig-zag pattern, where two neighboring antidots are shifted towards the opposite edges of the waveguide. This system has a complex base with two antidots in one unit cell. The Brillouin zone is here two-times narrower than the Brillouin zone for the waveguide without displacement of antidots. We have shown that for dispersion relation folded into a narrower Brillouin zone, a new frequency gap can be opened and their width can be controlled by the shift of the antidots. We found that the different strength of spin wave pinning at the edges of the periodic waveguide (and their antidots) determines the dependence of the width of gap on the shift of antidots. For the systems with completely free or ideally pinned magnetization, these dependencies are qualitatively different. We have found an optimum shift of antidot for maximizing the width of the gap for the system with pinned magnetization. More interestingly, we notice that for this kind of geometry of the structure, the majority of the modes are doubly degenerate at the edge of Brillouin zone and have a finite group velocity at the very close vicinity of the edge of Brillouin zone, for larger values of antidot shift. This empowers us to design a magnonic waveguide to steer the spin waves.

  8. Scattering of electromagnetic waves from a randomly perturbed quasiperiodic surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, R. T.; Kong, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Electromagnetic-wave scattering by a quasi-periodic surface with random perturbations (as in the remote sensing of plowed fields) is investigated analytically, applying the Kirchhoff approximation and modeling the plowed fields by means of Gaussian random variation, sinusoidal variation, and Gaussian random variation about the spatial frequency. Coherent and incoherent bistatic scattering coefficients are derived in closed form by evaluating the physical-optics integral and shown to be proportional, in the geometric-optics limit, to the occurrence probability of slopes which reflect the incident wave specularly in the direction of the scattered wave. Backscattering cross sections are plotted as functions of incidence angle for a number of cases, demonstrating the strong effect of row direction.

  9. Anomalous shear wave delays and surface wave velocities at Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, R.G.; Boore, D.M.

    1982-04-10

    To investigate the effects of a geothermal area on the propagation of intermediate-period (1--30 s) teleseismic body waves and surface waves, a specially designed portable seismograph system was operated in Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming. Travel time residuals, relative to a station outside the caldera, of up to 2 s for compressional phases are in agreement with short-period residuals for P phases measured by other investigators. Travel time delays for shear arrivals in the intermediate-period band range from 2 to 9 s and decrease with increasing dT/d..delta... Measured Rayleigh wave phase velocities are extremely low, ranging from 3.2 km/s at 27-s period to 2.0 km/s at 7-s period; the estimated uncertainty associated with these values is 15%. We propose a model for compressional and shear velocities and Poisson's ratio beneath the Yellowstone caldera which fits the teleseismic body and surface wave data: it consists of a highly anomalous crust with an average shear velocity of 3.0 km/s overlying an upper mantle with average velocity of 4.1 km/s. The high average value of Poisson's ratio in the crust (0.34) suggests the presence of fluids there; Poisson's ratio in the mantle between 40 and approximately 200 km is more nearly normal (0.29) than in the crust. A discrepancy between normal values of Poisson's ratio in the crust calculated from short-period data and high values calculated from teleseismic data can be resolved by postulating a viscoelastic crustal model with frequency-dependent shear velocity and attenuation.

  10. Surface-wave-induced sub- and super-harmonic internal waves over lutocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahvildari, N.

    2016-12-01

    Previous experimental and theoretical works have shown that a monochromatic surface wave can generate a pair of subharmonic oblique internal waves in a two-layer fluid through nonlinear interactions. Recent experiments on wave-mud interaction have observed additional higher internal wave harmonics over water-mud interface, or lutocline. In this study, we develop an analytical and analytical-numerical models to examine two mechanisms through which a surface wave can generate superharmonic internal waves. The water-fluid mud system is assumed to behave as a two-layer fluid with homogenous, incompressible, and immiscible fluid layers. Surface and internal waves are assumed to be in intermediate depth, and both layers are assumed to be lightly viscous. The first mechanism involves a primary surface wave harmonic that generates two oblique internal waves. Through self-interaction, the primary surface wave generates a second harmonic which in turn can generate two internal waves. These subharmonic internal waves have the same frequency as the primary surface wave and appear to be superhamonic to the internal waves it generates. The second generation mechanism is the self-interaction of the internal waves generated by the primary surface wave. We compare the growth rate of the internal wave superharmonics that are generated through these two mechanisms.

  11. Surface wave phase velocities from 2-D surface wave tomography studies in the Anatolian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif Kutlu, Yusuf; Erduran, Murat; Çakır, Özcan; Vinnik, Lev; Kosarev, Grigoriy; Oreshin, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    We study the Rayleigh and Love surface wave fundamental mode propagation beneath the Anatolian plate. To examine the inter-station phase velocities a two-station method is used along with the Multiple Filter Technique (MFT) in the Computer Programs in Seismology (Herrmann and Ammon, 2004). The near-station waveform is deconvolved from the far-station waveform removing the propagation effects between the source and the station. This method requires that the near and far stations are aligned with the epicentre on a great circle path. The azimuthal difference of the earthquake to the two-stations and the azimuthal difference between the earthquake and the station are restricted to be smaller than 5o. We selected 3378 teleseismic events (Mw >= 5.7) recorded by 394 broadband local stations with high signal-to-noise ratio within the years 1999-2013. Corrected for the instrument response suitable seismogram pairs are analyzed with the two-station method yielding a collection of phase velocity curves in various period ranges (mainly in the range 25-185 sec). Diffraction from lateral heterogeneities, multipathing, interference of Rayleigh and Love waves can alter the dispersion measurements. In order to obtain quality measurements, we select only smooth portions of the phase velocity curves, remove outliers and average over many measurements. We discard these average phase velocity curves suspected of suffering from phase wrapping errors by comparing them with a reference Earth model (IASP91 by Kennett and Engdahl, 1991). The outlined analysis procedure yields 3035 Rayleigh and 1637 Love individual phase velocity curves. To obtain Rayleigh and Love wave travel times for a given region we performed 2-D tomographic inversion for which the Fast Marching Surface Tomography (FMST) code developed by N. Rawlinson at the Australian National University was utilized. This software package is based on the multistage fast marching method by Rawlinson and Sambridge (2004a, 2004b). The

  12. Extraordinary transmission of gigahertz surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chonan, Kazuki; Otsuka, Paul H.; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Lee, Sam H.; Wright, Oliver B.

    2016-01-01

    Extraordinary transmission of waves, i.e. a transmission superior to the amount predicted by geometrical considerations of the aperture alone, has to date only been studied in the bulk. Here we present a new class of extraordinary transmission for waves confined in two dimensions to a flat surface. By means of acoustic numerical simulations in the gigahertz range, corresponding to acoustic wavelengths λ ~ 3–50 μm, we track the transmission of plane surface acoustic wave fronts between two silicon blocks joined by a deeply subwavelength bridge of variable length with or without an attached cavity. Several resonant modes of the structure, both one- and two-dimensional in nature, lead to extraordinary acoustic transmission, in this case with transmission efficiencies, i.e. intensity enhancements, up to ~23 and ~8 in the two respective cases. We show how the cavity shape and bridge size influence the extraordinary transmission efficiency. Applications include new metamaterials and subwavelength imaging. PMID:27640998

  13. Semiclassical methods for high frequency wave propagation in periodic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgadillo, Ricardo A.

    We will study high-frequency wave propagation in periodic media. A typical example is given by the Schrodinger equation in the semiclassical regime with a highly oscillatory periodic potential and external smooth potential. This problem presents a numerical challenge when in the semiclassical regime. For example, conventional methods such as finite differences and spectral methods leads to high numerical cost, especially in higher dimensions. For this reason, asymptotic methods like the frozen Gaussian approximation (FGA) was developed to provide an efficient computational tool. Prior to the development of the FGA, the geometric optics and Gaussian beam methods provided an alternative asymptotic approach to solving the Schrodinger equation efficiently. Unlike the geometric optics and Gaussian beam methods, the FGA does not lose accuracy due to caustics or beam spreading. In this thesis, we will briefly review the geometric optics, Gaussian beam, and FGA methods. The mathematical techniques used by these methods will aid us in formulating the Bloch-decomposition based FGA. The Bloch-decomposition FGA generalizes the FGA to wave propagation in periodic media. We will establish the convergence of the Bloch-decomposition based FGA to the true solution for Schrodinger equation and develop a gauge-invariant algorithm for the Bloch-decomposition based FGA. This algorithm will avoid the numerical difficulty of computing the gauge-dependent Berry phase. We will show the numerical performance of our algorithm by several one-dimensional examples. Lastly, we will propose a time-splitting FGA-based artificial boundary conditions for solving the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS) on an unbounded domain. The NLS will be split into two parts, the linear and nonlinear parts. For the linear part we will use the following absorbing boundary strategy: eliminate Gaussian functions whose centers are too distant to a fixed domain.

  14. Highly Nonlinear Wave Propagation in Elastic Woodpile Periodic Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-03

    attenuated over time (again, we briefly discuss the relevant features in Supple- mental Material [41]). We now explore this nanopteronic waveform more...formation of genuinely traveling waves composed of a strongly-localized solitary wave on top of a small amplitude oscillatory tail. This type of wave...manipulat- ing highly nonlinear stress waves at will, including high wave attenuation and spontaneous formation of novel traveling waves after an impact

  15. Calculations of the heights, periods, profile parameters, and energy spectra of wind waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korneva, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    Sea wave behavior calculations require the precalculation of wave elements as well as consideration of the spectral functions of ocean wave formation. The spectrum of the random wave process is largely determined by the distribution of energy in the actual wind waves observed on the surface of the sea as expressed in statistical and spectral characteristics of the sea swell.

  16. Calculations of the heights, periods, profile parameters, and energy spectra of wind waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korneva, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    Sea wave behavior calculations require the precalculation of wave elements as well as consideration of the spectral functions of ocean wave formation. The spectrum of the random wave process is largely determined by the distribution of energy in the actual wind waves observed on the surface of the sea as expressed in statistical and spectral characteristics of the sea swell.

  17. Surface acoustic wave microsensors and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galipeau, David W.; Story, Patrick R.; Vetelino, Kevin A.; Mileham, Russell D.

    1997-12-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been studied for the last twenty years as highly sensitive yet relatively inexpensive microsensors for applications ranging from temperature and stress to gas and biological sensing. This wide range of applications is due to the SAW microsensors' high sensitivity to several physical parameters including mass, temperature, stress, and conductivity. Their low cost results from the use of standard batch microelectronic fabrication techniques for their manufacture. In this paper several chemical sensing applications for SAW devices are described. These include: gas detection; thin-film polymer characterization; dew-point measurements; surface energy measurements; and as a method to measure surface cleanliness. Experimental results are presented along with comparisons to other measurement techniques.

  18. Demonstration of sawtooth period control with EC waves in KSTAR plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Joung, M.; Kim, D.; Goodman, T. P.; Sauter, O.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M. H.; Park, H.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.

    2015-03-12

    The sawtooth period control in tokamak is important issue in recent years because the sawtooth crash can trigger TM/NTM instabilities and drive plasmas unstable. The control of sawtooth period by the modification of local current profile near the q=1 surface using ECCD has been demonstrated in a number of tokamaks [1, 2] including KSTAR. As a result, developing techniques to control the sawtooth period as a way of controlling the onset of NTM has been an important area of research in recent years [3]. In 2012 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth period control is carried out by the different deposition position of EC waves across the q=1 surface. The sawtooth period is shortened by on-axis co-ECCD (destabilization), and the stabilization of the sawtooth is also observed by off-axis co-ECCD at outside q=1 surface. In 2013 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth locking experiment with periodic forcing of 170 GHz EC wave is carried out to control the sawtooth period. The optimal target position which lengthens the sawtooth period is investigated by performing a scan of EC beam deposition position nearby q=1 surface at the toroidal magnetic field of 2.9 T and plasma current of 0.7 MA. The sawtooth locking by the modulated EC beam is successfully demonstrated as in [3-5] with the scan of modulation-frequency and duty-ratio at the low beta (βN~0.5) plasma. In this paper, the sawteeth behavior by the location of EC beam and the preliminary result of the sawtooth locking experiments in KSTAR will be presented.

  19. Demonstration of sawtooth period control with EC waves in KSTAR plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Joung, M.; ...

    2015-03-12

    The sawtooth period control in tokamak is important issue in recent years because the sawtooth crash can trigger TM/NTM instabilities and drive plasmas unstable. The control of sawtooth period by the modification of local current profile near the q=1 surface using ECCD has been demonstrated in a number of tokamaks [1, 2] including KSTAR. As a result, developing techniques to control the sawtooth period as a way of controlling the onset of NTM has been an important area of research in recent years [3]. In 2012 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth period control is carried out by the different depositionmore » position of EC waves across the q=1 surface. The sawtooth period is shortened by on-axis co-ECCD (destabilization), and the stabilization of the sawtooth is also observed by off-axis co-ECCD at outside q=1 surface. In 2013 KSTAR plasma campaign, the sawtooth locking experiment with periodic forcing of 170 GHz EC wave is carried out to control the sawtooth period. The optimal target position which lengthens the sawtooth period is investigated by performing a scan of EC beam deposition position nearby q=1 surface at the toroidal magnetic field of 2.9 T and plasma current of 0.7 MA. The sawtooth locking by the modulated EC beam is successfully demonstrated as in [3-5] with the scan of modulation-frequency and duty-ratio at the low beta (βN~0.5) plasma. In this paper, the sawteeth behavior by the location of EC beam and the preliminary result of the sawtooth locking experiments in KSTAR will be presented.« less

  20. Third Stokes parameter emission from a periodic water surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. T.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.; Staelin, D. H.; Oneill, K.; Lohanick, A.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment in which the third Stokes parameter thermal emission from a periodic water surface was measured is documented. This parameter is shown to be related to the direction of periodicity of the periodic surface and to approach brightnesses of up to 30 K at X band for the surface used in the experiment. The surface actually analyzed was a 'two-layer' periodic surface; the theory of thermal emission from such a surface is derived and the theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements. These results further the idea of using the third Stokes parameter emission as an indicator of wind direction over the ocean.

  1. Surface Wave Velocity Structure of the Western Himalayan Syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, A. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Meltzer, A. S.

    2008-12-01

    The Nanga Parbat Haramosh massif (NPHM) is located within the western Himalayan syntaxis, and is characterized by extreme topography and very high erosion rates. The NPHM has undergone rapid uplift and exhumation at a rate of 5-10 mm/yr over the last 3 Ma. This uplift rate may be a simple lithostatic response to the high rate of erosion, or may include uplift due to tectonic compression. In this project, we seek to constrain the mantle velocity structure of the NPHM by using Rayleigh wave phases. We apply a surface wave inversion to a data set of ~90 teleseismic events collected from an array of 10 broadband stations of the Nanga Parbat experiment in 1996. This inversion consists of a two-plane wave approximation which represents perturbations to the wave field by the interference of two plane waves, allowing us to solve for phase velocities at various periods. We find that phase velocities increase steadily from 3.2 km/s to 4.0 km/s over the period range 20-70 seconds, without demonstrating a significant Moho discontinuity. Phase velocities are somewhat low for typical continental crust, possibly indicating higher temperatures. Rays passing through the Indian plate show higher velocities than the surrounding terrane. Azimuthal anisotropy is ~1.5% for periods below 40 seconds, and is mostly limited to the crust. This level of anisotropy predicts an SKS splitting time of ~0.4 seconds, which agrees with previous SKS studies in the area. The anisotropic orientation is N 60 W at periods below 40 seconds, consistent with the least principal stress direction associated with NE-SW convergence of India and Eurasia. Vertical constraints of crust and mantle velocities in the NPHM compared to its surrounding lithospheric blocks will help differentiate between lithostatic and compressional tectonic models for uplift.

  2. Lithospheric structure of South China Sea from surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Xue, M.; Le, K.; Yang, T.

    2011-12-01

    The South China Sea is one of the marginal seas of the West Pacific where the Eurasian Plate, Philippine Sea Plate, Pacific Plate and Indo-Australian Plate interact. In this study we give a 3D shear wave velocity structure of South China Sea using surface wave tomographic methods. We use earthquakes distributed on the periphery of the South China Sea and collect the earthquake data from 48 stations (IRIS stations, CDSN stations and four stations deployed in Vietnam by Tongji University) with rays up to ~ 3000. We first calculate the group velocity dispersion curves of fundamental mode for Rayleigh waves with periods from 14 sec to 130 sec using the multiple filter technique. After getting the dispersion curve between each station-to-source pair, we conduct an inversion to get group velocity at each grid point in the rectangular region of 14° s - 34° N and 86° E - 134° E with different grid spacing of 2° × 2° and 1° × 1°. This process is done by the fast marching method as the forward step and then subspace inversion step followed. When we get the group velocity of each grid point for corresponding periods, we can extract a dispersion curve for that point. Through the surface wave inversion which uses Knopoff's calculation method for layered medium as the forward step and the damped least square method as the inversion step followed, we can get an iterative model which carries the information of shear wave velocity and layer depth for each grid point. Finally we put all the shear wave velocity structures of all points together to obtain the three-dimensional shear wave structures. With checkboard tests indicating good resolution, we find that higher group velocities persistently show up in South China Sea Basin, West Philippine Sea Basin, and Celebes Sea Basin from periods of 20 sec to 60 sec, which reflect structures down to 20 - 60 km deep. Similar high shear velocity features also show up in depth slices from 30 km to 60 km. These high shear velocity

  3. Solar energy converter using surface plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Sunlight is dispersed over a diffraction grating formed on the surface of a conducting film on a substrate. The angular dispersion controls the effective grating period so that a matching spectrum of surface plasmons is excited for parallel processing on the conducting film. The resulting surface plasmons carry energy to an array of inelastic tunnel diodes. This solar energy converter does not require different materials for each frequency band, and sunlight is directly converted to electricity in an efficient manner by extracting more energy from the more energetic photons.

  4. Broadband surface-wave transformation cloak

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Su; Xu, Hongyi; Gao, Hanhong; ...

    2015-06-08

    Guiding surface electromagnetic waves around disorder without disturbing the wave amplitude or phase is in great demand for modern photonic and plasmonic devices, but is fundamentally difficult to realize because light momentum must be conserved in a scattering event. A partial realization has been achieved by exploiting topological electromagnetic surface states, but this approach is limited to narrow-band light transmission and subject to phase disturbances in the presence of disorder. Recent advances in transformation optics apply principles of general relativity to curve the space for light, allowing one to match the momentum and phase of light around any disorder asmore » if that disorder were not there. This feature has been exploited in the development of invisibility cloaks. An ideal invisibility cloak, however, would require the phase velocity of light being guided around the cloaked object to exceed the vacuum speed of light—a feat potentially achievable only over an extremely narrow band. In this paper, we theoretically and experimentally show that the bottlenecks encountered in previous studies can be overcome. We introduce a class of cloaks capable of remarkable broadband surface electromagnetic waves guidance around ultrasharp corners and bumps with no perceptible changes in amplitude and phase. These cloaks consist of specifically designed nonmagnetic metamaterials and achieve nearly ideal transmission efficiency over a broadband frequency range from 0+ to 6 GHz. Finally, this work provides strong support for the application of transformation optics to plasmonic circuits and could pave the way toward high-performance, large-scale integrated photonic circuits.« less

  5. Broadband surface-wave transformation cloak

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Su; Xu, Hongyi; Gao, Hanhong; Jiang, Yuyu; Yu, Faxin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng; Sun, Handong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-06-08

    Guiding surface electromagnetic waves around disorder without disturbing the wave amplitude or phase is in great demand for modern photonic and plasmonic devices, but is fundamentally difficult to realize because light momentum must be conserved in a scattering event. A partial realization has been achieved by exploiting topological electromagnetic surface states, but this approach is limited to narrow-band light transmission and subject to phase disturbances in the presence of disorder. Recent advances in transformation optics apply principles of general relativity to curve the space for light, allowing one to match the momentum and phase of light around any disorder as if that disorder were not there. This feature has been exploited in the development of invisibility cloaks. An ideal invisibility cloak, however, would require the phase velocity of light being guided around the cloaked object to exceed the vacuum speed of light—a feat potentially achievable only over an extremely narrow band. In this paper, we theoretically and experimentally show that the bottlenecks encountered in previous studies can be overcome. We introduce a class of cloaks capable of remarkable broadband surface electromagnetic waves guidance around ultrasharp corners and bumps with no perceptible changes in amplitude and phase. These cloaks consist of specifically designed nonmagnetic metamaterials and achieve nearly ideal transmission efficiency over a broadband frequency range from 0+ to 6 GHz. Finally, this work provides strong support for the application of transformation optics to plasmonic circuits and could pave the way toward high-performance, large-scale integrated photonic circuits.

  6. Wave-Breaking Turbulence in the Ocean Surface Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    Wave-Breaking Turbulence in the Ocean Surface Layer JIM THOMSON, MICHAEL S. SCHWENDEMAN, AND SETH F. ZIPPEL Applied Physics Laboratory, University of...2016) ABSTRACT Observations of winds, waves, and turbulence at the ocean surface are compared with several analytic formulations and a numerical model...Introduction Wave breaking at the ocean surface limits wave growth (Melville 1994), enhances gas exchange (Zappa et al. 2007), and generates turbulence that

  7. Lamb waves in phononic crystal slabs: truncated plane parallels to the axis of periodicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiujiu; Xia, Yunjia; Han, Xu; Zhang, Hongbo

    2012-09-01

    A theoretical study is presented on the propagation properties of Lamb wave modes in phononic crystal slabs consisting of a row or more of parallel square cylinders placed periodically in the host material. The surfaces of the slabs are parallel to the axis of periodicity. The dispersion curves of Lamb wave modes are calculated based on the supercell method. The finite element method is employed to calculate the band structures and the transmission power spectra, which are in good agreement with the results by the supercell method. We also have found that the dispersion curves of Lamb waves are strongly dependent on the crystal termination, which is the position of the cut plane through the square cylinders. There exist complete or incomplete (truncated) layers of square cylinders with the change of the crystal termination. The influence of the crystal termination on the band gaps of Lamb wave modes is analyzed by numerical simulations. The variation of the crystal termination leads to obvious changes in the dispersion curves of the Lamb waves and the widths of the band gaps. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. MAGNETIC ROSSBY WAVES IN THE SOLAR TACHOCLINE AND RIEGER-TYPE PERIODICITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Carbonell, Marc; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.e E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.e

    2010-02-01

    Apart from the eleven-year solar cycle, another periodicity around 155-160 days was discovered during solar cycle 21 in high-energy solar flares, and its presence in sunspot areas and strong magnetic flux has been also reported. This periodicity has an elusive and enigmatic character, since it usually appears only near the maxima of solar cycles, and seems to be related with a periodic emergence of strong magnetic flux at the solar surface. Therefore, it is probably connected with the tachocline, a thin layer located near the base of the solar convection zone, where a strong dynamo magnetic field is stored. We study the dynamics of Rossby waves in the tachocline in the presence of a toroidal magnetic field and latitudinal differential rotation. Our analysis shows that the magnetic Rossby waves are generally unstable and that the growth rates are sensitive to the magnetic field strength and to the latitudinal differential rotation parameters. Variation of the differential rotation and the magnetic field strength throughout the solar cycle enhance the growth rate of a particular harmonic in the upper part of the tachocline around the maximum of the solar cycle. This harmonic is symmetric with respect to the equator and has a period of 155-160 days. A rapid increase of the wave amplitude could give rise to a magnetic flux emergence leading to observed periodicities in solar activity indicators related to magnetic flux.

  9. Scattered surface wave energy in the seismic coda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeng, Y.

    2006-01-01

    One of the many important contributions that Aki has made to seismology pertains to the origin of coda waves (Aki, 1969; Aki and Chouet, 1975). In this paper, I revisit Aki's original idea of the role of scattered surface waves in the seismic coda. Based on the radiative transfer theory, I developed a new set of scattered wave energy equations by including scattered surface waves and body wave to surface wave scattering conversions. The work is an extended study of Zeng et al. (1991), Zeng (1993) and Sato (1994a) on multiple isotropic-scattering, and may shed new insight into the seismic coda wave interpretation. The scattering equations are solved numerically by first discretizing the model at regular grids and then solving the linear integral equations iteratively. The results show that scattered wave energy can be well approximated by body-wave to body wave scattering at earlier arrival times and short distances. At long distances from the source, scattered surface waves dominate scattered body waves at surface stations. Since surface waves are 2-D propagating waves, their scattered energies should in theory follow a common decay curve. The observed common decay trends on seismic coda of local earthquake recordings particular at long lapse times suggest that perhaps later seismic codas are dominated by scattered surface waves. When efficient body wave to surface wave conversion mechanisms are present in the shallow crustal layers, such as soft sediment layers, the scattered surface waves dominate the seismic coda at even early arrival times for shallow sources and at later arrival times for deeper events.

  10. The Breaking of Ocean Surface Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-06

    only in a qualitative sense and the mathematics are quite complex . : Cokelet (1977) has summarized most of the attempts to develop numerical... complex velocity potential. Then 9.. the complex Bernoulli equation and the kinematic equations at the free surface are integrated in time. A time...proifi l 41’i1o’ 4 k 611 .0 t30t t , Frigure- 12tti A’~ # coprio of a sefsiia anlyi aproiato of an Overturning gravity wave with the observed profile in

  11. Surface Acoustic Wave Atomizer and Electrostatic Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, Yutaka

    A new methodology for fabricating thin film or micro patters of organic/bio material using surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer and electrostatic deposition is proposed and characteristics of atomization techniques are discussed in terms of drop size and atomization speed. Various types of SAW atomizer are compared with electrospray and conventional ultrasonic atomizers. It has been proved that SAW atomizers generate drops as small as electrospray and have very fast atomization speed. This technique is applied to fabrication of micro patterns of proteins. According to the result of immunoassay, the specific activity of immunoglobulin was preserved after deposition process.

  12. Surface acoustic wave atomizer and electrostatic deposition.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    A new methodology for fabricating thin film or micro patters of organic/bio material using surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer and electrostatic deposition is proposed and characteristics of atomization techniques are discussed in terms of drop size and atomization speed. Various types of SAW atomizer are compared with electrospray and conventional ultrasonic atomizers. It has been proved that SAW atomizers generate drops as small as electrospray and have very fast atomization speed. This technique is applied to fabrication of micro patterns of proteins. According to the result of immunoassay, the specific activity of immunoglobulin was preserved after deposition process.

  13. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. H.; Xu, W.

    2011-06-01

    We present a theoretical study on interactions of electrons in graphene with surface acoustic waves (SAWs). We find that owing to momentum and energy conservation laws, the electronic transition accompanied by the SAW absorption cannot be achieved via inter-band transition channels in graphene. For graphene, strong absorption of SAWs can be observed in a wide frequency range up to terahertz at room temperature. The intensity of SAW absorption by graphene depends strongly on temperature and can be adjusted by changing the carrier density. This study is relevant to the exploration of the acoustic properties of graphene and to the application of graphene as frequency-tunable SAW devices.

  14. Surface acoustic wave oxygen pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A transducer for the measurement of absolute gas-state oxygen pressure from pressures of less than 100 Pa to atmospheric pressure (1.01 x 10(exp 5) Pa) is based on a standard surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. The piezoelectric material of the SAW device is coated with a compound which will selectively and reversibly bind oxygen. When oxygen is bound by the coating, the mass of the coating increases by an amount equal to the mass of the bound oxygen. Such an increase in the mass of the coating causes a corresponding decrease in the resonant frequency of the SAW device.

  15. Surface-Acoustic-Wave Piezoelectric Microbalance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuan, Raymond L.; Bowers, William D.

    1992-01-01

    Improved piezoelectric microbalances developed for use in measuring masses of volcanic, aerosol, and other small particles suspended in air. Sensitive microbalance used to analyze airborne particles in real time in environments as diverse as clean rooms or upper atmosphere. Surface-acoustic-wave resonator includes input and output sets of interdigitated electrodes and two passive conductive patterns acting as reflectors. Mechanical energy travels both ways out from middle and reflected back toward middle. Microbalance and associated circuitry fit in small package. Circuit draws only 80 mA at 5 V. Sensitivity more than 400 times that of bulk piezoelectric microbalance.

  16. Surface-Acoustic-Wave Piezoelectric Microbalance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuan, Raymond L.; Bowers, William D.

    1992-01-01

    Improved piezoelectric microbalances developed for use in measuring masses of volcanic, aerosol, and other small particles suspended in air. Sensitive microbalance used to analyze airborne particles in real time in environments as diverse as clean rooms or upper atmosphere. Surface-acoustic-wave resonator includes input and output sets of interdigitated electrodes and two passive conductive patterns acting as reflectors. Mechanical energy travels both ways out from middle and reflected back toward middle. Microbalance and associated circuitry fit in small package. Circuit draws only 80 mA at 5 V. Sensitivity more than 400 times that of bulk piezoelectric microbalance.

  17. Solitary Water Waves of Large Amplitude Generated by Surface Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Miles H.

    2015-11-01

    We consider exact nonlinear solitary water waves on a shear flow with an arbitrary distribution of vorticity. Ignoring surface tension, we impose a non-constant pressure on the free surface. Starting from a uniform shear flow with a flat free surface and a supercritical wave speed, we vary the surface pressure and use a continuation argument to construct a global connected set of symmetric solitary waves. This set includes waves of depression whose profiles increase monotonically from a central trough where the surface pressure is at its lowest, as well as waves of elevation whose profiles decrease monotonically from a central crest where the surface pressure is at its highest. There may also be two waves in this connected set with identical surface pressure, only one of which is a wave of depression.

  18. Synoptic Kelvin type perturbation waves over Congo basin over the period 1979-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclaire, Zebaze; Lenouo, André; Tchawoua, Clément; Janicot, Serge

    2015-08-01

    The synoptic structure and inter-annual variability of Kelvin waves over the Congo basin from 1979 to 2010 are explored using outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and National Centers for Environmental Prediction-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP-NCAR) reanalysis data. Composite method shows that high values of synoptic Kelvin wave (SKW) index are located over Congo basin during March-June where the convective active phase favours the formation of convective synoptic systems. Mean composite SKWs structure shows that these waves propagate faster over land surface and dissipate with suppressed phase. Because convective instability is smaller, these waves cannot grow in Congo basin. High correlation between SKWs and precipitation time series occurs when the Kelvin waves lead the precipitation time series by about 4 days. The analysis of 32 years datasets (1979-2010) also shows that in some particular year, strong SKWs propagation exists with periods centred around 5 days. Otherwise, results show marked inter-annual variability of Kelvin wave activity over Congo basin associated with divergence and low level westerly trade winds.

  19. Resonant surface acoustic wave chemical detector

    DOEpatents

    Brocato, Robert W.; Brocato, Terisse; Stotts, Larry G.

    2017-08-08

    Apparatus for chemical detection includes a pair of interdigitated transducers (IDTs) formed on a piezoelectric substrate. The apparatus includes a layer of adsorptive material deposited on a surface of the piezoelectric substrate between the IDTs, where each IDT is conformed, and is dimensioned in relation to an operating frequency and an acoustic velocity of the piezoelectric substrate, so as to function as a single-phase uni-directional transducer (SPUDT) at the operating frequency. Additionally, the apparatus includes the pair of IDTs is spaced apart along a propagation axis and mutually aligned relative to said propagation axis so as to define an acoustic cavity that is resonant to surface acoustic waves (SAWs) at the operating frequency, where a distance between each IDT of the pair of IDTs ranges from 100 wavelength of the operating frequency to 400 wavelength of the operating frequency.

  20. Pointwise asymptotic behavior of modulated periodic reaction-diffusion waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soyeun

    By working with the periodic resolvent kernel and the Bloch-decomposition, we establish pointwise bounds for the Green function of the linearized equation associated with spatially periodic traveling waves of a system of reaction-diffusion equations. With our linearized estimates together with a nonlinear iteration scheme developed by Johnson-Zumbrun, we obtain Lp-behavior (p⩾1) of a nonlinear solution to a perturbation equation of a reaction-diffusion equation with respect to initial data in L1∩H2 recovering and slightly sharpening results obtained by Schneider using weighted energy and renormalization techniques. We obtain also pointwise nonlinear estimates with respect to two different initial perturbations |u0|⩽E0e/M, |⩽E0 and |u0|⩽E0(1, r>2, |⩽E0 respectively, E0>0 sufficiently small and M>1 sufficiently large, showing that behavior is that of a heat kernel. These pointwise bounds have not been obtained elsewhere, and do not appear to be accessible by previous techniques.

  1. Acceleration of solitary ion-acoustic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenflo, L.; Gradov, O. M.

    1991-10-01

    We consider the interaction between long-wavelength ion-acoustic and electron-plasma surface waves on a semi-infinite plasma. It then turns out that an ion-acoustic solitary wave can be accelerated when the amplitude of the electron-plasma surface wave varies in time.

  2. Observation of quasi-periodic solar radio bursts associated with propagating fast-mode waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, C. R.; Nisticò, G.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Zimovets, I. V.; White, S. M.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: Radio emission observations from the Learmonth and Bruny Island radio spectrographs are analysed to determine the nature of a train of discrete, periodic radio "sparks" (finite-bandwidth, short-duration isolated radio features) which precede a type II burst. We analyse extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging from SDO/AIA at multiple wavelengths and identify a series of quasi-periodic rapidly-propagating enhancements, which we interpret as a fast wave train, and link these to the detected radio features. Methods: The speeds and positions of the periodic rapidly propagating fast waves and the coronal mass ejection (CME) were recorded using running-difference images and time-distance analysis. From the frequency of the radio sparks the local electron density at the emission location was estimated for each. Using an empirical model for the scaling of density in the corona, the calculated electron density was used to obtain the height above the surface at which the emission occurs, and the propagation velocity of the emission location. Results: The period of the radio sparks, δtr = 1.78 ± 0.04 min, matches the period of the fast wave train observed at 171 Å, δtEUV = 1.7 ± 0.2 min. The inferred speed of the emission location of the radio sparks, 630 km s-1, is comparable to the measured speed of the CME leading edge, 500 km s-1, and the speeds derived from the drifting of the type II lanes. The calculated height of the radio emission (obtained from the density) matches the observed location of the CME leading edge. From the above evidence we propose that the radio sparks are caused by the quasi-periodic fast waves, and the emission is generated as they catch up and interact with the leading edge of the CME. The movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Relative Earthquake Locations Using Surface Waves in Continental Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintner, J. A.; Ammon, C. J.; Cleveland, M.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate and precise hypocenter locations are an essential observation needed for seismic event characterization and analysis. Traditional location estimation methods that utilize seismic arrival times provide relatively imprecise results in remote regions, where there is a lack of numerous seismic stations near the events. Recent work has made great progress in improving the relative hypocentral precision using arrival times measured using cross correlations of body and surface waveforms. In addition, InSAR data can provide accurate centroid locations of select shallow seismic events in relatively limited numbers. In this work we use intermediate-period (30-80s) regional and teleseismic Rayleigh and Love waves to estimate relative locations of several hundred moderately-sized seismic events in regions around Iran's Zagros Mountains that occurred between 1990 and 2016. The approach has been used to effectively relocate seismic events along remote oceanic transform faults. Extending this method to continental regions provides the opportunity to compare the surface-wave based relative locations with a suite of InSAR centroid location estimates. In comparison with oceanic applications, use of surface-wave time shifts in the Zagros region presents new challenges, including more variation in faulting orientation, depth, and differences in intermediate-period dispersion caused by the structure of the continental crust. Simple assumptions about similarities in source geometry and inter-earthquake wave slowness (inverse of speed) are less applicable. We explore these challenges using earthquakes in regions around the Zagros Mountains of Iran, with an emphasis on the Fin and Qeshm Island earthquake sequences. Our ultimate goal is to adapt this approach to work with continental regions, and if possible to account for variations in source depth and faulting geometry to refine the relative locations and better characterize this region of high seismic activity and hazard.

  4. Excitation of high-frequency surface waves with long duration in the Valley of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Masahiro

    1999-04-01

    During the 1985 Michoacan earthquake (Ms = 8.1), large-amplitude seismograms with extremely long duration were recorded in the lake bed zone of Mexico City. We interpret high-frequency seismic wave fields in the three geotechnical zones (the hill, the transition, and the lake bed zones) in the Valley of Mexico on the basis of a systematic analysis for borehole strong motion recordings. We make identification of wave types for real seismograms. First, amplitude ratios between surface and underground seismograms indicate that predominant periods of the surface seismograms are largely controlled by the wave field incident into surficial layers in the Valley of Mexico. We interpret recorded surface waves as fundamental-mode Love waves excited in the Mexican Volcanic Belt by calculating theoretical amplification for different-scale structures. Second, according to a cross-correlation analysis, the hill and transition seismograms are mostly surface waves. In the lake bed zone, while early portions are noisy body waves, late portions are mostly surface waves. Third, using two kinds of surface arrays with different station intervals, we investigate high-frequency surface-wave propagation in the lake bed zone. The wave propagation is very complicated, depending upon the time section and the frequency band. Finally, on the basis of a statistical time series model with an information criterion, we separate S- and surface-wave portions from lake bed seismograms. Surface waves are dominant and are recognized even in the early time section. Thus high-frequency surface waves with long duration in the Valley of Mexico are excited by the Mexican Volcanic Belt.

  5. Wave propagation in photonic crystals and metamaterials: Surface waves, nonlinearity and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingnan

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystals and metamaterials, both composed of artificial structures, are two interesting areas in electromagnetism and optics. New phenomena in photonic crystals and metamaterials are being discovered, including some not found in natural materials. This thesis presents my research work in the two areas. Photonic crystals are periodically arranged artificial structures, mostly made from dielectric materials, with period on the same order of the wavelength of the working electromagnetic wave. The wave propagation in photonic crystals is determined by the Bragg scattering of the periodic structure. Photonic band-gaps can be present for a properly designed photonic crystal. Electromagnetic waves with frequency within the range of the band-gap are suppressed from propagating in the photonic crystal. With surface defects, a photonic crystal could support surface modes that are localized on the surface of the crystal, with mode frequencies within the band-gap. With line defects, a photonic crystal could allow the propagation of electromagnetic waves along the channels. The study of surface modes and waveguiding properties of a 2D photonic crystal will be presented in Chapter 1. Metamaterials are generally composed of artificial structures with sizes one order smaller than the wavelength and can be approximated as effective media. Effective macroscopic parameters such as electric permittivity ϵ, magnetic permeability μ are used to characterize the wave propagation in metamaterials. The fundamental structures of the metamaterials affect strongly their macroscopic properties. By designing the fundamental structures of the metamaterials, the effective parameters can be tuned and different electromagnetic properties can be achieved. One important aspect of metamaterial research is to get artificial magnetism. Metallic split-ring resonators (SRRs) and variants are widely used to build magnetic metamaterials with effective μ < 1 or even μ < 0. Varactor based

  6. Surface plasmon wave adapter designed with transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiao, Sanshui; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2011-06-28

    On the basis of transformation optics, we propose the design of a surface plasmon wave adapter which confines surface plasmon waves on non-uniform metal surfaces and enables adiabatic mode transformation of surface plasmon polaritons with very short tapers. This adapter can be simply achieved with homogeneous anisotropic naturally occurring materials or subwavelength grating-structured dielectric materials. Full wave simulations based on a finite-element method have been performed to validate our proposal.

  7. A study of long-period mantle wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschede, M.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    This study examines long-period mantle wave scattering on the global scale. To this end, we extend a set of existing long wavelength global tomographic shear-velocity models with a random von-Karman model to add heterogeneities at much smaller scales. The spectrum of the random model is chosen to match the power of regional models at small scales and to transfer smoothly to the global model at long scales. Because such a model includes heterogeneities with realistic strengths at scales equal and smaller than wavelengths of long-period mantle signals (> 100s) we can examine the strong scattering regime. We use a spherical-harmonics multitaper approach to estimate the power spectrum of different regional models. We compare them to the power spectrum of global models estimated from the same region, and show that both spectra transfer reasonably smoothly into each other. The heterogeneity spectrum can be approximated by a von-Karman spectrum which is a decreasing power-law at short scales. We extend the global models in the upper mantle, based on these estimates of the short scale power spectra, and in the lower mantle, by extrapolation. Naturally, knowledge of the power spectrum alone, limits our models to realistic two-point correlations on short scales, neglecting higher orders. The consequences of such semi-statistical high-resolution models on the spectro-temporal behavior of long-period waveforms are analyzed using long time (> 30h) global spectral element simulations. We focus on measuring the scattering attenuation and the behavior of the envelopes to compare with real data and better constrain the spectral character of earth models at short wavelengths.

  8. Quasi-periodic Fast-mode Wave Trains Within a Global EUV Wave and Sequential Transverse Oscillations Detected by SDO-AIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Nitta, Nariaki; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances greater than approximately solar radius/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 kilometers per second decelerating to approximately 650 kilometers per second. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by approximately 50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

  9. Quasi-periodic Fast-mode Wave Trains within a Global EUV Wave and Sequential Transverse Oscillations Detected by SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2012-07-01

    We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances >~ R ⊙/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s-1 decelerating to ~650 km s-1. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by ~50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

  10. QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-MODE WAVE TRAINS WITHIN A GLOBAL EUV WAVE AND SEQUENTIAL TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS DETECTED BY SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Ofman, Leon

    2012-07-01

    We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances {approx}> R{sub Sun }/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s{sup -1} decelerating to {approx}650 km s{sup -1}. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by {approx}50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

  11. Different types of nonlinear localized and periodic waves in an erbium-doped fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yang; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Liu, Chong; Yang, Wen-Li

    2015-12-01

    We study nonlinear waves on a plane-wave background in an erbium-doped fiber system, which is governed by the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger and the Maxwell-Bloch equations. We find that prolific different types of nonlinear localized and periodic waves do exist in the system, including multi-peak soliton, periodic wave, antidark soliton, and W-shaped soliton (as well as the known bright soliton, breather, and rogue wave). In particular, the dynamics of these waves can be extracted from a unified exact solution, and the corresponding existence conditions are presented explicitly. Our results demonstrate the structural diversity of the nonlinear waves in this system.

  12. Periodic Folded Wave Patterns for (2+1)-Dimensional Higher-Order Broer Kaup Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Hua

    2008-10-01

    A general solution including three arbitrary functions is obtained for the (2+1)-dimensional higher-order Broer Kaup equation by means of WTC truncation method. Introducing proper multiple valued functions and Jacobi elliptic functions in the seed solution, special types of periodic folded waves are derived. In long wave limit these periodic folded wave patterns may degenerate into single localized folded solitary wave excitations. The interactions of the periodic folded waves and their degenerated single folded solitary waves are investigated graphically and are found to be completely elastic.

  13. Nozzleless Spray Cooling Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar Man; Yeo, Leslie; Friend, James; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming Kwang

    2015-11-01

    Due to its reliability and portability, surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomization is an attractive approach for the generation of monodispersed microdroplets in microfluidics devices. Here, we present a nozzleless spray cooling technique via SAW atomization with key advantage of downward scalability by simply increasing the excitation frequency. With generation of micron size droplets through surface destabilization using SAW, the clogging issues commonly encountered by spraying nozzle can be neutralized. Using deionised water, cooling is improved when the atomization rate is increased and the position of the device is optimized such that the atomized droplets can be easily seeded into the upstream of the flow circulation. Cooling is further improved with the use of nanofluids; a suspension of nanoparticles in water. By increasing nanoparticle mass concentration from 1% to 3%, cooling is enhanced due to the deposition and formation of nanoparticle clusters on heated surface and eventually increase the surface area. However, further increase the concentration to 10% reduces the cooling efficiency due to drastic increase in viscosity μ that leads to lower atomization rate which scales as ṁ ~μ - 1 / 2 .

  14. Electromagnetic Wave Absorbing Technique Using Periodic Patterns for Low RCS Patch Array Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hong-Kyu; Lee, Yeon-Gwan; Shin, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Chun-Gon

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents an electromagnetic wave absorbing technique to reduce a radar cross-section (RCS) of a patch array antenna without compromising their antenna performance. The technique is based on periodic patterns, which is made of resistive materials. The 2×2 patch array antenna with a resonance frequency of 3.0 GHz was designed and fabricated. To reduce the RCS of the patch array antenna, the periodic patterns using a square patch element were proposed and applied to the surface between the four antenna patches. The printed lossy periodic patterns have radar absorbing performance at 12.0 GHz frequency. The measured results show that the lossy periodic patterns have no significant effect on the antenna radiation performance. On the other hand, the RCS is reduced by more than 98% compared to the conventional antenna at the target frequency.

  15. Surface wave holography on designing subwavelength metallic structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Fu, Jin-Xin; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2011-11-21

    We report a method in the framework of surface wave holography to manipulate the electromagnetic wave on the metallic surface for realizing complicated electromagnetic wave transport functionalities in three-dimensional (3D) space. The method allows for direct determination of the metallic surface structure morphology for a given transport functionality, by means of writing desirable object information on the metallic surface via interference with a reference surface wave. We have employed the analytical approach to design and build metallic surface structures that realize arbitrary single-point focusing, arbitrary single-direction beam collimation, and simultaneous two-point focusing of electromagnetic wave in 3D space. Good agreement between numerical simulations and microwave experimental measurements has been found and confirms the power of the method in conceptually understanding and exploiting the surface electromagnetic wave on subwavelength metal structures.

  16. Wave extraction with portable high-frequency surface wave radar OSMAR-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao; Roarty, Hugh; Wen, Biyang

    2014-12-01

    High frequency surface wave radar (HFSWR) has now gained more and more attention in real-time monitoring of sea surface states such as current, waves and wind. Normally a small-aperture antenna array is preferred to a large-aperture one due to the easiness and low cost to set up. However, the large beam-width and the corresponding incorrect division of the first- and second-order Doppler spectral regions often lead to big errors in wave height and period estimations. Therefore, for the HFSWR with a compact cross-loop/monopole antenna (CMA), a new algorithm involving improved beam-forming (BF) and spectral division techniques is proposed. On one hand, the cross-spectrum of the output sequence by the conventional beam-forming (CBF) with all the three elements and the output with only the two loops is used in place of the CMA output self-spectrum to achieve a decreased beam-width; on the other hand, the better null seeking process is included to improve the division accuracy of the first- and second-order regions. The algorithm is used to reprocess the data collected by the portable HFSWR OSMAR-S during the Sailing Competition of the 16th Asian Games held in Shanwei in November 2010, and the improvements of both the correlation coefficients and root-mean-square (RMS) errors between the wave height and period estimations and in situ buoy measurements are obvious. The algorithm has greatly enhanced the capabilities of OSMAR-S in wave measurements.

  17. Computation of homoclinic solutions to periodic orbits in a reduced water-wave problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champneys, A. R.; Lord, G. J.

    1997-02-01

    This paper concerns homoclinic solutions to periodic orbits in a fourth-order Hamiltonian system arising from a reduction of the classical water-wave problem in the presence of surface tension. These solutions correspond to travelling solitary waves which converge to non-decaying ripples at infinity. An analytical result of Amick and Toland (1992), showing the existence of such homoclinic orbits to small-amplitude periodic orbits in a singular limit, is extended numerically. Also, a related result by Amick and McLeod (1991), showing the non-existence of homoclinic solutions to zero, is motivated geometrically. A general boundary-value method is constructed for continuation of homoclinic orbits to periodic orbits in Hamiltonian and reversible systems. Numerical results are presented using the path-following software AUTO, showing that the Amick-Toland solutions persist well away from the singular limit and for large-amplitude periodic orbits. Special account is taken of the phase shift between the two periodic solutions in the asymptotic limits. Furthermore, new multi-modal homoclinic solutions to periodic orbits are shown to exist under a transversality hypothesis, which is verified a posteriori by explicit computation. Continuation of these new solutions reveals limit points with respect to the singular parameter.

  18. Communication: A combined periodic density functional and incremental wave-function-based approach for the dispersion-accounting time-resolved dynamics of {sup 4}He nanodroplets on surfaces: {sup 4}He/graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Castells, María Pilar de; Stoll, Hermann; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Causà, Mauro; Voloshina, Elena; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Pi, Martí

    2014-10-21

    In this work we propose a general strategy to calculate accurate He–surface interaction potentials. It extends the dispersionless density functional approach recently developed by Pernal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] to adsorbate-surface interactions by including periodic boundary conditions. We also introduce a scheme to parametrize the dispersion interaction by calculating two- and three-body dispersion terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) level via the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)]. The performance of the composite approach is tested on {sup 4}He/graphene by determining the energies of the low-lying selective adsorption states, finding an excellent agreement with the best available theoretical data. Second, the capability of the approach to describe dispersionless correlation effects realistically is used to extract dispersion effects in time-dependent density functional simulations on the collision of {sup 4}He droplets with a single graphene sheet. It is found that dispersion effects play a key role in the fast spreading of the {sup 4}He nanodroplet, the evaporation-like process of helium atoms, and the formation of solid-like helium structures. These characteristics are expected to be quite general and highly relevant to explain experimental measurements with the newly developed helium droplet mediated deposition technique.

  19. Communication: A combined periodic density functional and incremental wave-function-based approach for the dispersion-accounting time-resolved dynamics of 4He nanodroplets on surfaces: 4He/graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Stoll, Hermann; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Causà, Mauro; Voloshina, Elena; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Pi, Martí

    2014-10-01

    In this work we propose a general strategy to calculate accurate He-surface interaction potentials. It extends the dispersionless density functional approach recently developed by Pernal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] to adsorbate-surface interactions by including periodic boundary conditions. We also introduce a scheme to parametrize the dispersion interaction by calculating two- and three-body dispersion terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) level via the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)]. The performance of the composite approach is tested on 4He/graphene by determining the energies of the low-lying selective adsorption states, finding an excellent agreement with the best available theoretical data. Second, the capability of the approach to describe dispersionless correlation effects realistically is used to extract dispersion effects in time-dependent density functional simulations on the collision of 4He droplets with a single graphene sheet. It is found that dispersion effects play a key role in the fast spreading of the 4He nanodroplet, the evaporation-like process of helium atoms, and the formation of solid-like helium structures. These characteristics are expected to be quite general and highly relevant to explain experimental measurements with the newly developed helium droplet mediated deposition technique.

  20. Communication: A combined periodic density functional and incremental wave-function-based approach for the dispersion-accounting time-resolved dynamics of ⁴He nanodroplets on surfaces: ⁴He/graphene.

    PubMed

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Stoll, Hermann; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Causà, Mauro; Voloshina, Elena; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O; Pi, Martí

    2014-10-21

    In this work we propose a general strategy to calculate accurate He-surface interaction potentials. It extends the dispersionless density functional approach recently developed by Pernal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] to adsorbate-surface interactions by including periodic boundary conditions. We also introduce a scheme to parametrize the dispersion interaction by calculating two- and three-body dispersion terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) level via the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)]. The performance of the composite approach is tested on (4)He/graphene by determining the energies of the low-lying selective adsorption states, finding an excellent agreement with the best available theoretical data. Second, the capability of the approach to describe dispersionless correlation effects realistically is used to extract dispersion effects in time-dependent density functional simulations on the collision of (4)He droplets with a single graphene sheet. It is found that dispersion effects play a key role in the fast spreading of the (4)He nanodroplet, the evaporation-like process of helium atoms, and the formation of solid-like helium structures. These characteristics are expected to be quite general and highly relevant to explain experimental measurements with the newly developed helium droplet mediated deposition technique.

  1. Surface waves on floating liquids induced by ultrasound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a kind of wave pattern on the surface of floating liquids in a modulated ultrasound field. The waves are related to the liquid/solid phase transformation process. The nucleation sites of the eutectics locate at the center of these waves, and the eutectic growth direction is parallel to the propagation direction of the waves. It is revealed that such wave phenomenon can be ascribed to the interaction between ultrasound and eutectic growth at the liquid/solid interface. This result may provide a potential method for fabricating wave patterned surfaces on eutectic alloys.

  2. Identification of surface wave higher modes using a methodology based on seismic noise and coda waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, Diane; Campillo, Michel; Sanchez-Sesma, Francisco; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.; Singh, Shri Krishna

    2015-11-01

    Dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves is performed to assess the velocity of complex structures such as sedimentary basins. At short periods several modes of the Rayleigh waves are often exited. To perform a reliable inversion of the velocity structure an identification of these modes is thus required. We propose a novel method to identify the modes of surface waves. We use the spectral ratio of the ground velocity for the horizontal components over the vertical component (H/V) measured on seismic coda. We then compare the observed values with the theoretical H/V ratio for velocity models deduced from surface wave dispersion when assuming a particular mode. We first invert the Rayleigh wave measurements retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation with the assumptions that (1) the fundamental mode and (2) the first overtone are excited. Then we use these different velocity models to predict theoretical spectral ratios of the ground velocity for the horizontal components over the vertical component (H/V). These H/V ratios are computed under the hypothesis of equipartition of a diffuse field in a layered medium. Finally we discriminate between fundamental and higher modes by comparing the theoretical H/V ratio with the H/V ratio measured on seismic coda. In an application, we reconstruct Rayleigh waves from cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise recorded at seven broad-band stations in the Valley of Mexico. For paths within the soft quaternary sediments basin, the maximum energy is observed at velocities higher than expected for the fundamental mode. We identify that the dominant mode is the first higher mode, which suggests the importance of higher modes as the main vectors of energy in such complex structures.

  3. Apodized waveguide arrays induced by photorefractive nonlinear surface waves.

    PubMed

    Qi, P F; Hu, Z J; Han, R; Zhang, T H; Tian, J G; Xu, J J

    2015-11-30

    A new type of nonlinear waveguides, photorefractive surface optical waveguides is suggested, which can be induced by photorefractive surface waves on the boundary of photorefractive crystal. The disturbed refractive index distribution of such waveguides behaves as a periodic lattice with apodized envelope, thus we call them photorefractive surface apodized waveguide arrays. Moreover, the dispersion relation and corresponding modes are analyzed. It is very interesting that the dispersion curves of index-guided modes and Bragg-guided modes couple and intertwine with each other, and anti-crossings instead of crossings between them hence generate some mini-gaps. Moreover there exists a type of extraordinary modes constituted by the splice of index-guided modes and Bragg-guided modes.

  4. Developing a Short-Period, Fundamental-Mode Rayleigh-Wave Attenuation Model for Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Levshin, A. L.; Barmin, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    We are developing a 2D, short-period (12 - 22 s), fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave attenuation model for Asia. This model can be used to invert for a 3D attenuation model of the Earth's crust and upper mantle as well as to implement more accurate path corrections in regional surface-wave magnitude calculations. The prerequisite for developing a reliable Rayleigh-wave attenuation model is the availability of accurate fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave amplitude measurements. Fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave amplitudes could be contaminated by a variety of sources such as multipathing, focusing and defocusing, body wave, higher-mode surface wave, and other noise sources. These contaminations must be reduced to the largest extent possible. To achieve this, we designed a procedure by taking advantage of certain Rayleigh-wave characteristics, such as dispersion and elliptical particle motion, for accurate amplitude measurements. We first analyze the dispersion of the surface-wave data using a spectrogram. Based on the characteristics of the data dispersion, we design a phase-matched filter by using either a manually picked dispersion curve, or a group-velocity-model predicted dispersion curve, or the dispersion of the data, and apply the filter to the seismogram. Intelligent filtering of the seismogram and windowing of the resulting cross-correlation based on the spectrogram analysis and the comparison between the phase-match filtered data spectrum, the raw-data spectrum and the theoretical source spectrum effectively reduces amplitude contaminations and results in reliable amplitude measurements in many cases. We implemented these measuring techniques in a graphic-user-interface tool called Surface Wave Amplitude Measurement Tool (SWAMTOOL). Using the tool, we collected and processed waveform data for 200 earthquakes occurring throughout 2003-2006 inside and around Eurasia. The records from 135 broadband stations were used. After obtaining the Rayleigh-wave amplitude

  5. Dispersion of Lamb waves under a periodic metal grating in aluminum nitride plates.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Natalya F

    2014-09-01

    Dispersion of Lamb waves propagating in AlN plates with a periodic Al grating on the top surface and an Al electrode on the bottom surface is investigated using the numerical technique SDA-FEM-SDA, which combines finite element modeling (FEM) analysis of the electrode region with spectral-domain analysis (SDA) of the adjacent multi-layered half-spaces. Characteristics of zero-order and higher-order Lamb waves are presented as functions of plate thickness and spectral frequency, which varies in the first Brillouin zone. The structures of typical Lamb waves are examined via visualization of the instantaneous displacement fields in the AlN plate confined between the grating and the bottom electrode. The mechanism of building hybrid modes, which arise from intermode coupling between the counter-propagating Lamb waves of different symmetry and order, is illustrated by two examples of modes propagating with wavelengths λ = 3p and λ = 4p, where p is the pitch of the grating.

  6. Equatorial long waves in geostationary satellite observations and in a multichannel sea surface temperature analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legeckis, R.; Pichel, W.; Nesterczuk, G.

    1983-01-01

    Geostationary satellite observations of a zonally oriented sea surface temperature front in the eastern equatorial Pacific were made between 1975 and 1981. Long waves appeared along the front mainly during the summer and fall, except during 1976, the year of an El Nino. The waves have averaged periods of 25 days and wavelengths of 1000 km. At the end of 1981, the long waves also were detected in a new sea surface temperature analysis based on multichannel infrared measurements from a polar-orbiting satellite. This quantitative analysis may improve the ability to resolve low-frequency equatorial wave motions from satellite observations.

  7. Skin characteristics by laser generated surface waves.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhihong; L'Etang, Adèle

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses a study into the suitability of using laser generated surface acoustic waves for the characterisation of skin properties without causing any damage to the skin thermally or by mechanical disruption. Using commercial Finite Element Code ANSYS, the effects of laser wavelength, laser beam radius and laser rise time on generation of laser generated ultrasonic waves in a 3-layered elastic isotropic model of human skin were studied. The FE model is an example of a sequential coupled field analysis where the thermal and mechanical analyses are treated separately. The heating of the skin model due to the short laser pulse is simulated by a dynamic thermal analysis with the laser pulse modeled as volumetric heat generation and the results from this analysis subsequently applied as a load in the mechanical analysis where the out-of-plane displacement histories are analyzed. The technique described in this paper also involves measuring the propagation velocity of SAWs, which are directly related to the material properties, and thickness of layers, this is done over a wide frequency range in order to obtain maximum information regarding the material under test.

  8. Surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Shrinivas G.

    1991-03-01

    The use of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device to measure the rate of gas flow is described. A SAW oscillator heated to a suitable temperature above ambient is placed in the path of a flowing gas. Convective cooling caused by the gas flow results in a change in the oscillator frequency. A 73-MHz oscillator fabricated on 128 deg rotated Y-cut lithium niobate substrate and heated to 55 C above ambient shows a frequency variation greater than 142 kHz for flow-rate variation from 0 to 1000 cu cm/min. The output of the sensor can be calibrated to provide a measurement of volume flow rate, pressure differential across channel ports, or mass flow rate. High sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and direct digital output are among the attractive features of this sensor. Theoretical expressions for the sensitivity and response time of the sensor are derived. It is shown that by using ultrasonic Lamb waves propagating in thin membranes, a flow sensor with faster response than a SAW sensor can be realized.

  9. Standing Surface Acoustic Wave Based Cell Coculture

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Precise reconstruction of heterotypic cell–cell interactions in vitro requires the coculture of different cell types in a highly controlled manner. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell coculture platform. In our approach, different types of cells are patterned sequentially in the SSAW field to form an organized cell coculture. To validate our platform, we demonstrate a coculture of epithelial cancer cells and endothelial cells. Real-time monitoring of cell migration dynamics reveals increased cancer cell mobility when cancer cells are cocultured with endothelial cells. Our SSAW-based cell coculture platform has the advantages of contactless cell manipulation, high biocompatibility, high controllability, simplicity, and minimal interference of the cellular microenvironment. The SSAW technique demonstrated here can be a valuable analytical tool for various biological studies involving heterotypic cell–cell interactions. PMID:25232648

  10. Raising Photoemission Efficiency with Surface Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    A. Afanasev, F. Hassani, C.E. Korman, V.G. Dudnikov, R.P. Johnson, M. Poelker, K.E.L. Surles-Law

    2012-07-01

    We are developing a novel technique that may help increase the efficiency and reduce costs of photoelectron sources used at electron accelerators. The technique is based on the use of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) in piezoelectric materials, such as GaAs, that are commonly used as photocathodes. Piezoelectric fields produced by the traveling SAW spatially separate electrons and holes, reducing their probability of recombination, thereby enhancing the photoemission quantum efficiency of the photocathode. Additional advantages could be increased polarization provided by the enhanced mobility of charge carriers that can be controlled by the SAW and the ionization of optically-generated excitons resulting in the creation of additional electron-hole pairs. It is expected that these novel features will reduce the cost of accelerator operation. A theoretical model for photoemission in the presence of SAW has been developed, and experimental tests of the technique are underway.

  11. Standing surface acoustic wave based cell coculture.

    PubMed

    Li, Sixing; Guo, Feng; Chen, Yuchao; Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Wang, Lin; Cameron, Craig E; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-10-07

    Precise reconstruction of heterotypic cell-cell interactions in vitro requires the coculture of different cell types in a highly controlled manner. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell coculture platform. In our approach, different types of cells are patterned sequentially in the SSAW field to form an organized cell coculture. To validate our platform, we demonstrate a coculture of epithelial cancer cells and endothelial cells. Real-time monitoring of cell migration dynamics reveals increased cancer cell mobility when cancer cells are cocultured with endothelial cells. Our SSAW-based cell coculture platform has the advantages of contactless cell manipulation, high biocompatibility, high controllability, simplicity, and minimal interference of the cellular microenvironment. The SSAW technique demonstrated here can be a valuable analytical tool for various biological studies involving heterotypic cell-cell interactions.

  12. The radiation of surface wave energy: Implications for volcanic tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Denolle, M.; Lyons, J. J.; Nakahara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The seismic energy radiated by active volcanism is one common measurement of eruption size. For example, the magnitudes of individual earthquakes in volcano-tectonic (VT) swarms can be summed and expressed in terms of cumulative magnitude, energy, or moment release. However, discrepancies exist in current practice when treating the radiated energy of volcano seismicity dominated by surface waves. This has implications for volcanic tremor, since eruption tremor typically originates at shallow depth and is made up of surface waves. In the absence of a method to compute surface wave energy, estimates of eruption energy partitioning between acoustic and seismic waves typically assume seismic energy is composed of body waves. Furthermore, without the proper treatment of surface wave energy, it is unclear how much volcanic tremor contributes to the overall seismic energy budget during volcanic unrest. To address this issue, we derive, from first principles, the expression of surface wave radiated energy. In contrast with body waves, the surface wave energy equation is naturally expressed in the frequency domain instead of the time domain. We validate our result by reproducing an analytical solution for the radiated power of a vertical force source acting on a free surface. We further show that the surface wave energy equation leads to an explicit relationship between energy and the imaginary part of the surface wave Green's tensor at the source location, a fundamental property recognized within the field of seismic interferometry. With the new surface wave energy equation, we make clear connections to reduced displacement and propose an improved formula for the calculation of surface wave reduced displacement involving integration over the frequency band of tremor. As an alternative to reduced displacement, we show that reduced particle velocity squared is also a valid physical measure of tremor size, one based on seismic energy rate instead of seismic moment rate. These

  13. New Hybridized Surface Wave Approach for Geotechnical Modeling of Shear Wave Velocity at Strong Motion Recording Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R.; Carkin, B.; Minasian, D.

    2006-12-01

    Strong motion recording (SMR) networks often have little or no shear wave velocity measurements at stations where characterization of site amplification and site period effects is needed. Using the active Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method, and passive H/V microtremor method we have investigated nearly two hundred SMR sites in California, Alaska, Japan, Australia, China and Taiwan. We are conducting these studies, in part, to develop a new hybridized method of site characterization that utilizes a parallel array of harmonic-wave sources for active-source SASW, and a single long period seismometer for passive-source microtremor measurement. Surface wave methods excel in their ability to non-invasively and rapidly characterize the variation of ground stiffness properties with depth below the surface. These methods are lightweight, inexpensive to deploy, and time-efficient. They have been shown to produce accurate and deep soil stiffness profiles. By placing and wiring shakers in a large parallel circuit, either side-by-side on the ground or in a trailer-mounted array, a strong in-phase harmonic wave can be produced. The effect of arraying many sources in parallel is to increase the amplitude of waves received at far-away spaced seismometers at low frequencies so as to extend the longest wavelengths of the captured dispersion curve. The USGS system for profiling uses this concept by arraying between two and eight electro-mechanical harmonic-wave shakers. With large parallel arrays of vibrators, a dynamic force in excess of 1000 lb can be produced to vibrate the ground and produce surface waves. We adjust the harmonic wave through a swept-sine procedure to profile surface wave dispersion down to a frequency of 1 Hz and out to surface wave-wavelengths of 200-1000 meters, depending on the site stiffness. The parallel-array SASW procedure is augmented using H/V microtremor data collected with the active source turned off. Passive array microtremor data

  14. Frequency and wavelength prediction of ultrasonic induced liquid surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mahravan, Ehsan; Naderan, Hamid; Damangir, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of parametric excitation of liquid free surface by a high frequency sound wave is preformed, using potential flow theory. Pressure and velocity distributions, resembling the sound wave, are applied to the free surface of the liquid. It is found that for impinging wave two distinct capillary frequencies will be excited: One of them is the same as the frequency of the sound wave, and the other is equal to the natural frequency corresponding to a wavenumber equal to the horizontal wavenumber of the sound wave. When the wave propagates in vertical direction, mathematical formulation leads to an equation, which has resonance frequency equal to half of the excitation frequency. This can explain an important contradiction between the frequency and the wavelength of capillary waves in the two cases of normal and inclined interaction of the sound wave and the free surface of the liquid.

  15. Surface spin-electron acoustic waves in magnetically ordered metals

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Pavel A. Kuz'menkov, L. S.

    2016-05-09

    Degenerate plasmas with motionless ions show existence of three surface waves: the Langmuir wave, the electromagnetic wave, and the zeroth sound. Applying the separated spin evolution quantum hydrodynamics to half-space plasma, we demonstrate the existence of the surface spin-electron acoustic wave (SSEAW). We study dispersion of the SSEAW. We show that there is hybridization between the surface Langmuir wave and the SSEAW at rather small spin polarization. In the hybridization area, the dispersion branches are located close to each other. In this area, there is a strong interaction between these waves leading to the energy exchange. Consequently, generating the Langmuir waves with the frequencies close to hybridization area we can generate the SSEAWs. Thus, we report a method of creation of the spin-electron acoustic waves.

  16. Nonlinear surface acoustic waves in cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, Ronald Edward

    Model equations developed by Hamilton, Il'inskii, and Zabolotskaya [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 639-651 (1999)] are used to perform theoretical and numerical studies of nonlinear surface acoustic waves in a variety of nonpiezoelectric cubic crystals. The basic theory underlying the model equations is outlined, quasilinear solutions of the equations are derived, and expressions are developed for the shock formation distance and nonlinearity coefficient. A time-domain equation corresponding to the frequency-domain model equations is derived and shown to reduce to a time-domain equation introduced previously for Rayleigh waves [E. A. Zabolotskaya, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 2569-2575 (1992)]. Numerical calculations are performed to predict the evolution of initially monofrequency surface waves in the (001), (110), and (111) planes of the crystals RbCl, KCl, NaCl, CaF2, SrF2, BaF2, C (diamond), Si, Ge, Al, Ni, Cu in the moverline 3m point group, and the crystals Cs-alum, NH4- alum, and K-alum in the moverline 3 point group. The calculations are based on measured second- and third- order elastic constants taken from the literature. Nonlinearity matrix elements which describe the coupling strength of harmonic interactions are shown to provide a powerful tool for characterizing waveform distortion. Simulations in the (001) and (110) planes show that in certain directions the velocity waveform distortion may change in sign, generation of one or more harmonies may be suppressed and shock formation postponed, or energy may be transferred rapidly to the highest harmonics and shock formation enhanced. Simulations in the (111) plane show that the nonlinearity matrix elements are generally complex-valued, which may lead to asymmetric distortion and the appearance of low frequency oscillations near the peaks and shocks in the velocity waveforms. A simple transformation based on the phase of the nonlinearity matrix is shown to provide a reasonable approximation of asymmetric waveform

  17. Transverse instability of periodic and generalized solitary waves for a fifth-order KP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haragus, Mariana; Wahlén, Erik

    2017-02-01

    We consider a fifth-order Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation which arises as a two-dimensional model in the classical water-wave problem. This equation possesses a family of generalized line solitary waves which decay exponentially to periodic waves at infinity. We prove that these solitary waves are transversely spectrally unstable and that this instability is induced by the transverse instability of the periodic tails. We rely upon a detailed spectral analysis of some suitably chosen linear operators.

  18. Wavelength dependence of picosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragkaki, Stella; Derrien, Thibault J.-Y.; Levy, Yoann; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Ostendorf, Andreas; Gurevich, Evgeny L.

    2017-09-01

    The physical mechanisms of the laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) formation are studied in this paper for single-pulse irradiation regimes. The change in the LIPSS period with wavelength of incident laser radiation is investigated experimentally, using a picosecond laser system, which provides 7-ps pulses in near-IR, visible, and UV spectral ranges. The experimental results are compared with predictions made under the assumption that the surface-scattered waves are involved in the LIPSS formation. Considerable disagreement suggests that hydrodynamic mechanisms can be responsible for the observed pattern periodicity.

  19. Impacts of climate changes on ocean surface gravity waves over the eastern Canadian shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lanli; Sheng, Jinyu

    2017-05-01

    A numerical study is conducted to investigate the impact of climate changes on ocean surface gravity waves over the eastern Canadian shelf (ECS). The "business-as-usual" climate scenario known as Representative Concentration Pathway RCP8.5 is considered in this study. Changes in the ocean surface gravity waves over the study region for the period 1979-2100 are examined based on 3 hourly ocean waves simulated by the third-generation ocean wave model known as WAVEWATCHIII. The wave model is driven by surface winds and ice conditions produced by the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CanRCM4). The whole study period is divided into the present (1979-2008), near future (2021-2050) and far future (2071-2100) periods to quantify possible future changes of ocean waves over the ECS. In comparison with the present ocean wave conditions, the time-mean significant wave heights ( H s ) are expected to increase over most of the ECS in the near future and decrease over this region in the far future period. The time-means of the annual 5% largest H s are projected to increase over the ECS in both near and far future periods due mainly to the changes in surface winds. The future changes in the time-means of the annual 5% largest H s and 10-m wind speeds are projected to be twice as strong as the changes in annual means. An analysis of inverse wave ages suggests that the occurrence of wind seas is projected to increase over the southern Labrador and central Newfoundland Shelves in the near future period, and occurrence of swells is projected to increase over other areas of the ECS in both the near and far future periods.

  20. Impacts of climate changes on ocean surface gravity waves over the eastern Canadian shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lanli; Sheng, Jinyu

    2017-03-01

    A numerical study is conducted to investigate the impact of climate changes on ocean surface gravity waves over the eastern Canadian shelf (ECS). The "business-as-usual" climate scenario known as Representative Concentration Pathway RCP8.5 is considered in this study. Changes in the ocean surface gravity waves over the study region for the period 1979-2100 are examined based on 3 hourly ocean waves simulated by the third-generation ocean wave model known as WAVEWATCHIII. The wave model is driven by surface winds and ice conditions produced by the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CanRCM4). The whole study period is divided into the present (1979-2008), near future (2021-2050) and far future (2071-2100) periods to quantify possible future changes of ocean waves over the ECS. In comparison with the present ocean wave conditions, the time-mean significant wave heights (H s ) are expected to increase over most of the ECS in the near future and decrease over this region in the far future period. The time-means of the annual 5% largest H s are projected to increase over the ECS in both near and far future periods due mainly to the changes in surface winds. The future changes in the time-means of the annual 5% largest H s and 10-m wind speeds are projected to be twice as strong as the changes in annual means. An analysis of inverse wave ages suggests that the occurrence of wind seas is projected to increase over the southern Labrador and central Newfoundland Shelves in the near future period, and occurrence of swells is projected to increase over other areas of the ECS in both the near and far future periods.

  1. Characteristics of offshore extreme wind-waves detected by surface drifters with a low-cost GPS wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Kosei

    Wind-generated waves have been recognized as one of the most important factors of the sea surface roughness which plays crucial roles in various air-sea interactions such as energy, mo-mentum, heat and gas exchanges. At the same time, wind waves with extreme wave heights representatively called as freak or rogue waves have been a matter of great concern for many people involved in shipping, fishing, constracting, surfing and other marine activities, because such extreme waves frequently affect on the marine activities and sometimes cause serious dis-asters. Nevertheless, investigations of actual conditions for the evolution of wind waves in the offshore region are less and sparse in contrast to dense monitoring networks in the coastal re-gions because of difficulty of offshore observation with high accuracy. Recently accurate in situ observation of offshore wind waves is getting possible at low cost owing to a wave height and di-rection sensor developed by Harigae et al. (2004) by installing a point-positioning GPS receiver on a surface drifting buoy. The point-positioning GPS sensor can extract three dimensional movements of the buoy excited by ocean waves with minimizing effects of GPS point-positioning errors through the use of a high-pass filter. Two drifting buoys equipped with the GPS-based wave sensor charged by solar cells were drifted in the western North Pacific and one of them continued to observe wind waves during 16 months from Sep. 2007. The RMSE of the GPS-based wave sensor was less than 10cm in significant wave height and about 1s in significant wave period in comparison with other sensors, i.e. accelerometers installed on drifting buoys of Japan Meteorological Agency, ultrasonic sensors placed at the Hiratsuka observation station of the University of Tokyo and altimeter of the JASON-1. The GPS-based wave buoys enabled us to detect freak waves defined as waves whose height is more than twice the significant wave height. The observation conducted by

  2. The formation of double working surfaces in periodically variable jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raga, A.; Cantó, J. http://www. astroscu. unam. mx/rmaa/RMxAA.. 53-2/PDF/RMxAA.. 53-2 asaad. pdf

    2017-10-01

    It is a well known result that a periodic ejection variability in a hypersonic jet results in the production of a train of internal working surfaces (one working surface produced by each period of the ejection variability) travelling down the jet beam. This mechanism has been successfully applied to model the knot structures of Herbig-Haro (HH) jets. In this paper we explore the possibility of producing more than one working surface with each ejection variability period. We derive the mathematical criteria that have to be satisfied by the functional form of an ejection velocity variability that produces double working surfaces, and study a family of functions with appropriate properties.

  3. Understanding Peakons, Periodic Peakons and Compactons via a Shallow Water Wave Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jibin; Zhu, Wenjing; Chen, Guanrong

    In this paper, a shallow water wave model is used to introduce the concepts of peakon, periodic peakon and compacton. Traveling wave solutions of the shallow water equation are presented. The corresponding traveling wave system is a singular planar dynamical system with one singular straight line. By using the method of dynamical systems, bifurcation diagrams and explicit exact parametric representations of the solutions are given, including solitary wave solution, periodic wave solution, peakon solution, periodic peakon solution and compacton solution under different parameter conditions.

  4. Strong enhancement of surface diffusion by nonlinear surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugaev, Maxim V.; Manzo, Anthony J.; Wu, Chengping; Zaitsev, Vladimir Yu.; Helvajian, Henry; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2015-06-01

    The phenomenon of acoustic activation of surface diffusion is investigated in a combined computational and experimental study. The ability of pulsed laser-generated surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to enhance the mobility of small atomic clusters is demonstrated by directly tracking, with fluorescence microscopy, individual A u8 clusters moving on a (111) silicon substrate. A 19-fold increase in the effective diffusion coefficient is measured in room temperature experiments in the presence of SAWs generated by nanosecond pulse laser irradiation at a 100 Hz repetition rate. A strong enhancement of cluster mobility by SAWs is also observed in large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of surface diffusion of small atomic clusters. The analysis of the computational results demonstrates that the nonlinear sharpening of SAWs and the corresponding enrichment of the SAW spectra by high frequency harmonics which are capable of dynamic coupling to the cluster vibrations are responsible for the efficient acoustic activation of surface mobility in the simulations. The increase in the effective diffusion coefficient is proportional to the number of the SAW pulses passing through the diffusion region per unit time and a dramatic 4500-fold diffusion enhancement (corresponds to an equivalent temperature increase by ˜103K ) is predicted in the simulations for 15 GHz SAWs. The ability of SAWs to affect atomic-level surface processes has far-reaching implications for the design of new techniques where the acoustic energy serves as an effective substitution for thermal activation in applications where heating must be avoided or rapid switching of surface conditions is required.

  5. Orbital stability of periodic waves in the class of reduced Ostrovsky equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Edward R.; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2016-09-01

    Periodic travelling waves are considered in the class of reduced Ostrovsky equations that describe low-frequency internal waves in the presence of rotation. The reduced Ostrovsky equations with either quadratic or cubic nonlinearities can be transformed to integrable equations of the Klein-Gordon type by means of a change of coordinates. By using the conserved momentum and energy as well as an additional conserved quantity due to integrability, we prove that small-amplitude periodic waves are orbitally stable with respect to subharmonic perturbations, with period equal to an integer multiple of the period of the wave. The proof is based on construction of a Lyapunov functional, which is convex at the periodic wave and is conserved in the time evolution. We also show numerically that convexity of the Lyapunov functional holds for periodic waves of arbitrary amplitudes.

  6. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  7. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Vibration Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit. PMID:22247694

  8. Rail Defect Detection Using Ultrasonic Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R. S.; Jian, X.; Fan, Y.; Dixon, S.

    2006-03-01

    Current testing of the rail network is limited in terms of both speed of testing and accuracy of detecting surface defects such as gauge corner cracking. By using ultrasonic surface waves generated and detected in a pitch-catch manner we can detect such defects with a much higher accuracy. We use electro-magnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) to generate and detect the ultrasound. These have the advantage of being non-contact and require no couplant. It is not sufficient to merely detect the presence of a defect; hence accurate calibration of the system is required. We present measurements on calibration samples giving the response of the system to defects of different depths. Further experiments have been performed on rail samples containing real and manufactured defects, both longitudinal and transverse. Using the change in signal amplitude and frequency content we are able to give a depth and position for these defects, and these are compared with more established measurement methods. An enhancement of the signal when the receive EMAT is close to the defect is also discussed.

  9. Controlling Spin-Density Wave Periodicity in Thin Cr1-x Vx Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupin, Oleg; Rotenberg, Eli; Kevan, S. D.

    2007-03-01

    Chromium is an itinerant antiferromagnet with a spin-density wave (SDW) ground state driven by a nesting of Fermi surface sheets around the Gamma and H points of the Brillouin zone. Periodicity of the SDW plays an important role in mediating magnetic interactions in magnetic multilayer structures providing a giant magnetoresistance effect and potentially interesting for application in spintronic devices. Therefore control of SDW in thin chromium films is of the high importance. It requires a detailed understanding of phenomena related to stabilization of SDW. We used angle-resolved photoemission to characterize spin-density wave and Fermi surface topology in thin Cr1-x Vx films as a function of the film thickness, temperature, composition and hydrogen surface coverage. A key feature of our results is the ability to control the magnetic structure of thin films of Cr with an external perturbation: balancing the surface energetic interactions favored commensurate state of SDW vs. the energy associated with Fermi surface topology stabilizing SDW incommensurate phase in the bulk.

  10. Reconstruction of arbitrary surface wave fields by refraction global method in a wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Heynert; Ludu, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    We use a new photographic procedure and design to construct reliable system for measurement and analysis of various surface water waves in a wave tank, including rogue and tsunami-like waves. The image of a grid placed at the bottom of the tank (3 feet maximum depth) is deformed by the surface waves and recorded on one or two cameras placed above the water. The measurement of the height and slope of the surface waves is determined by inverse refraction calculations plus the calibration information at four grouped points from capacitive level gauges. This research was supported by ERAU INTERNAL STUDENT RESEARCH AWARD.

  11. Surface Wave Simulation and Processing with MatSeis

    SciTech Connect

    THOMPSON,BEVERLY D.; CHAEL,ERIC P.; YOUNG,CHRISTOPHER J.; WALTER,WILLIAM R.; PASYANOS,MICHAEL E.

    2000-08-07

    In order to exploit the information on surface wave propagation that is stored in large seismic event datasets, Sandia and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories have developed a MatSeis interface for performing phase-matched filtering of Rayleigh arrivals. MatSeis is a Matlab-based seismic processing toolkit which provides graphical tools for analyzing seismic data from a network of stations. Tools are available for spectral and polarization measurements, as well as beam forming and f-k analysis with array data, to name just a few. Additionally, one has full access to the Matlab environment and any functions available there. Previously the authors reported the development of new MatSeis tools for calculating regional discrimination measurements. The first of these performs Lg coda analysis as developed by Mayeda and coworkers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A second tool measures regional phase amplitude ratios for an event and compares the results to ratios from known earthquakes and explosions. Release 1.5 of MatSeis includes the new interface for the analysis of surface wave arrivals. This effort involves the use of regionalized dispersion models from a repository of surface wave data and the construction of phase-matched filters to improve surface wave identification, detection, and magnitude calculation. The tool works as follows. First, a ray is traced from source to receiver through a user-defined grid containing different group velocity versus period values to determine the composite group velocity curve for the path. This curve is shown along with the upper and lower group velocity bounds for reference. Next, the curve is used to create a phase-matched filter, apply the filter, and show the resultant waveform. The application of the filter allows obscured Rayleigh arrivals to be more easily identified. Finally, after screening information outside the range of the phase-matched filter, an inverse version of the filter is applied to obtain a

  12. Constructing Quasi-Periodic Wave Solutions of Differential-Difference Equation by Hirota Bilinear Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper, based on the Riemann theta function, the Hirota bilinear method is extended to directly construct a kind of quasi-periodic wave solution of a new integrable differential-difference equation. The asymptotic property of the quasi-periodic wave solution is analyzed in detail. It will be shown that quasi-periodic wave solution converge to the soliton solutions under certain conditions and small amplitude limit.

  13. A Surface Wave Study of the South-China Subplate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    block in the southeast. The Yangtze fault block is a section of old continental crust formed during the Jinning 9 Orogeny (1300-950 m.y.), and was...density and shear wave partial deriva - tives, it was determined that compressional wave velocity cannot be neglected when inverting surface wave data. The

  14. Nonlinear Dispersion of Magnetostatic Surface Waves on Ferromagnetic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, D. Boardman; Bao, Jiashan; Wang, Qi; Cai, Yingshi; S, A. Nikitov

    1991-11-01

    The wave equation of nonlinear magnetostatic surface waves (MSSW) on ferromagnetic films is derived and its solution is found. The nonlinear dispersion relation of MSSW is discussed. Our result shows that the wave power has a little effect to the frequency shift of MSSW with lower frequency, but has a considerably larger effect to that with higher frequency within the band.

  15. Self-focusing of ion-acoustic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenflo, L.; Gradov, O. M.

    1996-06-01

    An electrostatic ion-acoustic surface wave propagating along the boundary of a semi-infinite plasma is considered. It is shown that a nonlinear Schrödinger equation can describe the development of the wave amplitude. The self-focusing length of a wave beam is estimated.

  16. Viscoelastic representation of surface waves in patchy saturated poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Xu, Yixian; Xia, Jianghai; Ping, Ping; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2014-08-01

    Wave-induced flow is observed as the dominated factor for P wave propagation at seismic frequencies. This mechanism has a mesoscopic scale nature. The inhomogeneous unsaturated patches are regarded larger than the pore size, but smaller than the wavelength. Surface wave, e.g., Rayleigh wave, which propagates along the free surface, generated by the interfering of body waves is also affected by the mesoscopic loss mechanisms. Recent studies have reported that the effect of the wave-induced flow in wave propagation shows a relaxation behavior. Viscoelastic equivalent relaxation function associated with the wave mode can describe the kinetic nature of the attenuation. In this paper, the equivalent viscoelastic relaxation functions are extended to take into account the free surface for the Rayleigh surface wave propagation in patchy saturated poroelastic media. Numerical results for the frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation and the time-dependent dynamical responses for the equivalent Rayleigh surface wave propagation along an interface between vacuum and patchy saturated porous media are reported in the low-frequency range (0.1-1,000 Hz). The results show that the dispersion and attenuation and kinetic characteristics of the mesoscopic loss effect for the surface wave can be effectively represented in the equivalent viscoelastic media. The simulation of surface wave propagation within mesoscopic patches requires solving Biot's differential equations in very small grid spaces, involving the conversion of the fast P wave energy diffusion into the Biot slow wave. This procedure requires a very large amount of computer consumption. An efficient equivalent approach for this patchy saturated poroelastic media shows a more convenient way to solve the single phase viscoelastic differential equations.

  17. Temperature-mediated transition from Dyakonov-Tamm surface waves to surface-plasmon-polariton waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiadini, Francesco; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Mackay, Tom G.; Scaglione, Antonio; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2017-08-01

    The effect of changing the temperature on the propagation of electromagnetic surface waves (ESWs), guided by the planar interface of a homogeneous isotropic temperature-sensitive material (namely, InSb) and a temperature-insensitive structurally chiral material (SCM) was numerically investigated in the terahertz frequency regime. As the temperature rises, InSb transforms from a dissipative dielectric material to a dissipative plasmonic material. Correspondingly, the ESWs transmute from Dyakonov-Tamm surface waves into surface-plasmon-polariton waves. The effects of the temperature change are clearly observed in the phase speeds, propagation distances, angular existence domains, multiplicity, and spatial profiles of energy flow of the ESWs. Remarkably large propagation distances can be achieved; in such instances the energy of an ESW is confined almost entirely within the SCM. For certain propagation directions, simultaneous excitation of two ESWs with (i) the same phase speeds but different propagation distances or (ii) the same propagation distances but different phase speeds are also indicated by our results.

  18. Two-Period Gratings For Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Grating surfaces having two spatial periods tailored to obtain desired proportions of output coupling and inward reflection. Solid-state lasers of type emitting light perpendicularly to their broad surfaces made more efficient. Same principle also applicable to "Annular-Bragg-Grating Surface-Emitting Laser", (NPO-17912).

  19. A new algorithm for three-dimensional joint inversion of body wave and surface wave data and its application to the Southern California plate boundary region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongjian; Zhang, Haijiang; Yao, Huajian; Allam, Amir; Zigone, Dimitri; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Thurber, Clifford; van der Hilst, Robert D.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for joint inversion of body wave and surface wave data to get better 3-D P wave (Vp) and S wave (Vs) velocity models by taking advantage of the complementary strengths of each data set. Our joint inversion algorithm uses a one-step inversion of surface wave traveltime measurements at different periods for 3-D Vs and Vp models without constructing the intermediate phase or group velocity maps. This allows a more straightforward modeling of surface wave traveltime data with the body wave arrival times. We take into consideration the sensitivity of surface wave data with respect to Vp in addition to its large sensitivity to Vs, which means both models are constrained by two different data types. The method is applied to determine 3-D crustal Vp and Vs models using body wave and Rayleigh wave data in the Southern California plate boundary region, which has previously been studied with both double-difference tomography method using body wave arrival times and ambient noise tomography method with Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion measurements. Our approach creates self-consistent and unique models with no prominent gaps, with Rayleigh wave data resolving shallow and large-scale features and body wave data constraining relatively deeper structures where their ray coverage is good. The velocity model from the joint inversion is consistent with local geological structures and produces better fits to observed seismic waveforms than the current Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) model.

  20. Investigation of Surface Waves in Deep and Shallow Water using Coherent Radars at Grazing Incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, M.; Horstmann, J.; Carrasco, R.; Seemann, J.; Stresser, M.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent microwave radars operating at X-band near grazing incidence are utilized to measure the backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity from the small-scale surface roughness of the ocean. The radar backscatter is dependent on the wind and strongly modulated by the surface waves and therefore enables to retrieve the surface wind as well as surface waves. The radar measured Doppler velocities are also modulated by contributions from the wind, current and waves and allow getting additional information on these parameters. In addition coherent marine radars allow to observe breaking waves, which lead to a increase in radar backscatter as well as a strong change of the Doppler speed.Within this presentation we will introduce and validate new methods to measure spectral wave properties such as wave directions, periods and significant wave height from coherent marine radars. The methods have been applied in deep and shallow water and validated to measurements of directional wave riders as well as an Acoustic Wave and Current Profiler. These comparisons show an overall excellent performance of coherent radars for the retrieval of spectral wave properties (e.g. Hs rms of 0.2 m). Furthermore, new methodologies will be presented that enable to observe and quantify wave breaking in deep water as well as in the littoral zone. The above mentioned methods have been applied to investigate the influence of Offshore Wind Farms (OWF) on the wave field with respect to the spectral properties as well as the amount of wave breaking. We will present the results obtained during a cruise in May 2015 within and around the OWF Dantysk in the German Bight of the North Sea, which consist of eighty 3.5 MW wind turbines. In addition we will present our initial results on the investigation of wave dissipation in the littoral zone at the coast of the island Sylt using marine radars, pressure gauges as well as directional wave riders.

  1. Surface electromagnetic wave equations in a warm magnetized quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chunhua; Yang, Weihong; Wu, Zhengwei; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-07-15

    Based on the single-fluid plasma model, a theoretical investigation of surface electromagnetic waves in a warm quantum magnetized inhomogeneous plasma is presented. The surface electromagnetic waves are assumed to propagate on the plane between a vacuum and a warm quantum magnetized plasma. The quantum magnetohydrodynamic model includes quantum diffraction effect (Bohm potential), and quantum statistical pressure is used to derive the new dispersion relation of surface electromagnetic waves. And the general dispersion relation is analyzed in some special cases of interest. It is shown that surface plasma oscillations can be propagated due to quantum effects, and the propagation velocity is enhanced. Furthermore, the external magnetic field has a significant effect on surface wave's dispersion equation. Our work should be of a useful tool for investigating the physical characteristic of surface waves and physical properties of the bounded quantum plasmas.

  2. Crocodylus niloticus (Crocodilia) is highly sensitive to water surface waves.

    PubMed

    Grap, Nadja J; Monzel, Anna S; Kohl, Tobias; Bleckmann, Horst

    2015-10-01

    Crocodiles show oriented responses to water surface wave stimuli but up to now behavioral thresholds are missing. This study determines the behavioral thresholds of crocodilians to water surface waves. Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) were conditioned to respond to single-frequency water surface wave stimuli (duration 1150 ms, frequency 15, 30, 40, 60 and 80 Hz), produced by blowing air onto the water surface. Our study shows that C. niloticus is highly sensitive to capillary water surface waves. Threshold values decreased with increasing frequency and ranged between 10.3 μm (15 Hz) and 0.5 μm (80 Hz) peak-to-peak wave amplitude. For the frequencies 15 Hz and 30 Hz the sensitivity of one spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus) to water surface waves was also tested. Threshold values were 12.8 μm (15 Hz) down to 1.76 μm (30 Hz), i.e. close to the threshold values of C. niloticus. The surface wave sensitivity of crocodiles is similar to the surface wave sensitivity of semi-aquatic insects and fishing spiders but does not match the sensitivity of surface-feeding fishes which is higher by one to two orders of magnitude. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of surface electromagnetic waves in metamaterial absorbers

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Wen -Chen; Cardin, Andrew; Koirala, Machhindra; ...

    2016-03-18

    Metamaterial absorbers have been demonstrated across much of the electromagnetic spectrum and exhibit both broad and narrow-band absorption for normally incident radiation. Absorption diminishes for increasing angles of incidence and transverse electric polarization falls off much more rapidly than transverse magnetic. We unambiguously demonstrate that broad-angle TM behavior cannot be associated with periodicity, but rather is due to coupling with a surface electromagnetic mode that is both supported by, and well described via the effective optical constants of the metamaterial where we achieve a resonant wavelength that is 19.1 times larger than the unit cell. Furthermore, experimental results are supportedmore » by simulations and we highlight the potential to modify the angular response of absorbers by tailoring the surface wave.« less

  4. Role of surface electromagnetic waves in metamaterial absorbers

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Wen -Chen; Cardin, Andrew; Koirala, Machhindra; ...

    2016-03-18

    Metamaterial absorbers have been demonstrated across much of the electromagnetic spectrum and exhibit both broad and narrow-band absorption for normally incident radiation. Absorption diminishes for increasing angles of incidence and transverse electric polarization falls off much more rapidly than transverse magnetic. We unambiguously demonstrate that broad-angle TM behavior cannot be associated with periodicity, but rather is due to coupling with a surface electromagnetic mode that is both supported by, and well described via the effective optical constants of the metamaterial where we achieve a resonant wavelength that is 19.1 times larger than the unit cell. Furthermore, experimental results are supportedmore » by simulations and we highlight the potential to modify the angular response of absorbers by tailoring the surface wave.« less

  5. Role of surface electromagnetic waves in metamaterial absorbers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Chen; Cardin, Andrew; Koirala, Machhindra; Liu, Xianliang; Tyler, Talmage; West, Kevin G; Bingham, Christopher M; Starr, Tatiana; Starr, Anthony F; Jokerst, Nan M; Padilla, Willie J

    2016-03-21

    Metamaterial absorbers have been demonstrated across much of the electromagnetic spectrum and exhibit both broad and narrow-band absorption for normally incident radiation. Absorption diminishes for increasing angles of incidence and transverse electric polarization falls off much more rapidly than transverse magnetic. We unambiguously demonstrate that broad-angle TM behavior cannot be associated with periodicity, but rather is due to coupling with a surface electromagnetic mode that is both supported by, and well described via the effective optical constants of the metamaterial where we achieve a resonant wavelength that is 19.1 times larger than the unit cell. Experimental results are supported by simulations and we highlight the potential to modify the angular response of absorbers by tailoring the surface wave.

  6. Role of surface electromagnetic waves in metamaterial absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wen -Chen; Cardin, Andrew; Koirala, Machhindra; Liu, Xianliang; Tyler, Talmage; West, Kevin G.; Bingham, Christopher M.; Starr, Tatiana; Starr, Anthony F.; Jokerst, Nan M.; Padilla, Willie J.

    2016-03-18

    Metamaterial absorbers have been demonstrated across much of the electromagnetic spectrum and exhibit both broad and narrow-band absorption for normally incident radiation. Absorption diminishes for increasing angles of incidence and transverse electric polarization falls off much more rapidly than transverse magnetic. We unambiguously demonstrate that broad-angle TM behavior cannot be associated with periodicity, but rather is due to coupling with a surface electromagnetic mode that is both supported by, and well described via the effective optical constants of the metamaterial where we achieve a resonant wavelength that is 19.1 times larger than the unit cell. Furthermore, experimental results are supported by simulations and we highlight the potential to modify the angular response of absorbers by tailoring the surface wave.

  7. California Surface Wave Tomography from Ambient Seismic Noise: Tracking the Progress of the USArray Transportable Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschetti, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Shapiro, N. M.

    2005-12-01

    We have extended the application of high resolution ambient noise surface wave tomography across all of California by incorporating emerging data from the USArray Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope. Ambient seismic noise contains a significant component of Rayleigh wave energy from which the Green function between pairs of stations can be extracted by cross-correlating long noise sequences. Surface wave group velocities are then measured on the estimated Green functions. Early efforts were applied to records from USArray TA stations in Southern California and resulted in the construction of high-resolution short-period (7-18 s) surface wave dispersion maps and the imaging of the principal crustal geological units in Southern California (Shapiro et al., Science, 307, 1615, 2005). As the spatial coverage of the USArray TA in Northern California has improved over the past year, the number of potential receiver pairs and their resulting sampled paths have increased proportionately. We have extended surface wave tomography across California by computing cross-correlations to obtain short period (7-25 s) surface wave group velocity measurements for paths across the state. The majority of the paths in Northern California result from the recent emplacement of USArray TA instruments. Cross-correlations of three month time windows, starting in October 2004 and continuing through September 2005, result in evolving maps of the surface wave group velocities in Northern California. Newly imaged tomographic features are seen to emerge as the resolution improves.

  8. Investigation on Periodically Surface-Corrugated Long-Period Gratings Inscribed on Photonic Crystal Fibers.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Geun

    2017-12-01

    Transmission characteristics of periodically surface-corrugated long-period gratings (LPGs) inscribed on photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) using a wet-etching technique were experimentally investigated. A conventional wet method was implemented to periodically engrave the silica cladding region of the PCFs resulting in the periodic surface corrugation in the PCF. After applying the external strain to the PCF with the periodic surface micro-ridges, periodic modulation of refractive index based on the photoelastic effect is induced resulting in the formation of the PCF-based LPG. Increasing the applied strain successfully improves the extinction ratio of the resonant peak of the PCF-based LPG without the resonant wavelength shift. We also measured the transmission characteristics of the PCF-based LPG with variations in temperature and ambient index.

  9. Analytical Solution of Thermal Wave Models on Skin Tissue Under Arbitrary Periodic Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlali, R.; Ahmadikia, H.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling and understanding the heat transfer in biological tissues is important in medical thermal therapeutic applications. The biothermomechanics of skin involves interdisciplinary features, such as bioheat transfer, biomechanics, and burn damage. The hyperbolic thermal wave model of bioheat transfer and the parabolic Pennes bioheat transfer equations with blood perfusion and metabolic heat generation are applied for the skin tissue as a finite and semi-infinite domain when the skin surface temperature is suddenly exposed to a source of an arbitrary periodic temperature. These equations are solved analytically by Laplace transform methods. The thermal wave model results indicate that a non-Fourier model has predicted the thermal behavior correctly, compared to that of previous experiments. The results of the thermal wave model show that when the first thermal wave moves from the first boundary, the temperature profiles for finite and semi-infinite domains of skin become separated for these phenomena; the discrepancy between these profiles is negligible. The accuracy of the obtained results is validated through comparisons with existing numerical results. The results demonstrate that the non-Fourier model is significant in describing the thermal behavior of skin tissue.

  10. Broadband attenuation of Lamb waves through a periodic array of thin rectangular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Pennec, Yan; Marchal, Rémi; Bonello, Bernard; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2014-10-01

    We study theoretically subwavelength physical phenomena, such as resonant transmission and broadband sound shielding for Lamb waves propagating in an acoustic metamaterial made of a thin plate drilled with one or two row(s) of rectangular holes. The resonances and antiresonances of periodically arranged rectangular junctions separated by holes are investigated as a function of the geometrical parameters of the junctions. With one and two row(s) of holes, high frequency specific features in the transmission coefficient are explained in terms of a coupling of incident waves with both Fabry-Perot oscillations inside the junctions and induced surface acoustic waves between the homogeneous part of the plate and the row of holes. With two rows of holes, low frequency peaks and dips appear in the transmission spectrum. The choice of the distance between the two rows of holes allows the realization of a broadband low frequency acoustic shielding with attenuation over 99% for symmetric waves in a wide low frequency range and over 90% for antisymmetric ones. The origin of the transmission gap is discussed in terms of localized modes of the "H" element made by the junctions, connecting the two homogeneous parts of the plate.

  11. From plane waves to local Gaussians for the simulation of correlated periodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, George H.; Tsatsoulis, Theodoros; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Grüneis, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    We present a simple, robust, and black-box approach to the implementation and use of local, periodic, atom-centered Gaussian basis functions within a plane wave code, in a computationally efficient manner. The procedure outlined is based on the representation of the Gaussians within a finite bandwidth by their underlying plane wave coefficients. The core region is handled within the projected augment wave framework, by pseudizing the Gaussian functions within a cutoff radius around each nucleus, smoothing the functions so that they are faithfully represented by a plane wave basis with only moderate kinetic energy cutoff. To mitigate the effects of the basis set superposition error and incompleteness at the mean-field level introduced by the Gaussian basis, we also propose a hybrid approach, whereby the complete occupied space is first converged within a large plane wave basis, and the Gaussian basis used to construct a complementary virtual space for the application of correlated methods. We demonstrate that these pseudized Gaussians yield compact and systematically improvable spaces with an accuracy comparable to their non-pseudized Gaussian counterparts. A key advantage of the described method is its ability to efficiently capture and describe electronic correlation effects of weakly bound and low-dimensional systems, where plane waves are not sufficiently compact or able to be truncated without unphysical artifacts. We investigate the accuracy of the pseudized Gaussians for the water dimer interaction, neon solid, and water adsorption on a LiH surface, at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

  12. Simulation of elastic wave diffraction by multiple strip-like cracks in a layered periodic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    The problem of numerical simulation of the steady-state harmonic vibrations of a layered phononic crystal (elastic periodic composite) with a set of strip-like cracks parallel to the layer boundaries is solved, and the accompanying wave phenomena are considered. The transfer matrix method (propagator matrix method) is used to describe the incident wave field. It allows one not only to construct the wave fields but also to calculate the pass bands and band gaps and to find the localization factor. The wave field scattered by multiple defects is represented by means of an integral approach as a superposition of the fields scattered by all cracks. An integral representation in the form of a convolution of the Fourier symbols of Green's matrices for the corresponding layered structures and a Fourier transform of the crack opening displacement vector is constructed for each of the scattered fields. The crack opening displacements are determined by the boundary integral equation method using the Bubnov-Galerkin scheme, where Chebyshev polynomials of the second kind, which take into account the behavior of the solution near the crack edges, are chosen as the projection and basis systems. The system of linear algebraic equations with a diagonal predominance of components arising when the system of integral equations is discretized has a block structure. The characteristics describing qualitatively and quantitatively the wave processes that take place under the diffraction of plane elastic waves by multiple cracks in a phononic crystal are analyzed. The resonant properties of a system of defects and the influence of the relative positions and sizes of defects in a layered phononic crystal on the resonant properties are studied. To obtain clearer results and to explain them, the energy flux vector is calculated and the energy surfaces and streamlines corresponding to them are constructed.

  13. Freely decaying weak turbulence for sea surface gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Onorato, M; Osborne, A R; Serio, M; Resio, D; Pushkarev, A; Zakharov, V E; Brandini, C

    2002-09-30

    We study the long-time evolution of deep-water ocean surface waves in order to better understand the behavior of the nonlinear interaction processes that need to be accurately predicted in numerical models of wind-generated ocean surface waves. Of particular interest are those nonlinear interactions which are predicted by weak turbulence theory to result in a wave energy spectrum of the form of [k](-2.5). We numerically implement the primitive Euler equations for surface waves and demonstrate agreement between weak turbulence theory and the numerical results.

  14. Surface topography measurements for pilot-wave hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiano, Adam; Harris, Daniel; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Bush, John

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of our attempt to refine the surface Schlieren technique originally developed by Moisy et al. (2009, 2012) to resolve the surface topography associated with capillary wave fields. Our technique is applied to infer the wave field that accompanies millimetric droplets self-propeling on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath. Apart from a shadow region on the order of the drop's cross-sectional area, the waves are resolved to a micron scale, allowing for quantitative comparison with existing theoretical models of the wave field. The technique is used to yield insight into the interaction between walking droplets and submerged barriers. Thanks to the NSF.

  15. Investigation of surface wave amplitudes in 3-D velocity and 3-D Q models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2010-12-01

    It has been long recognized that seismic amplitudes depend on both wave speed structures and anelasticity (Q) structures. However, the effects of lateral heterogeneities in wave speed and Q structures on seismic amplitudes has not been well understood. We investigate the effects of 3-D wave speed and 3-D anelasticity (Q) structures on surface-wave amplitudes based upon wave propagation simulations of twelve globally-distributed earthquakes and 801 stations in Earth models with and without lateral heterogeneities in wave speed and anelasticity using a Spectral Element Method (SEM). Our tomographic-like 3-D Q models are converted from a velocity model S20RTS using a set of reasonable mineralogical parameters, assuming lateral perturbations in both velocity and Q are due to temperature perturbations. Surface-wave amplitude variations of SEM seismograms are measured in the period range of 50--200 s using boxcar taper, cosine taper and Slepian multi-tapers. We calculate ray-theoretical predictions of surface-wave amplitude perturbations due to elastic focusing, attenuation, and anelastic focusing which respectively depend upon the second spatial derivative (''roughness'') of perturbations in phase velocity, 1/Q, and the roughness of perturbations in 1/Q. Both numerical experiments and theoretical calculations show that (1) for short-period (~ 50 s) surface waves, the effects of amplitude attenuation due to 3-D Q structures are comparable with elastic focusing effects due to 3-D wave speed structures; and (2) for long-period (> 100 s) surface waves, the effects of attenuation become much weaker than elastic focusing; and (3) elastic focusing effects are correlated with anelastic focusing at all periods due to the correlation between velocity and Q models; and (4) amplitude perturbations are depend on measurement techniques and therefore cannot be directly compared with ray-theoretical predictions because ray theory does not account for the effects of measurement

  16. Analysis of wave propagation in periodic 3D waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Christoph; Bischoff, Stefan; Gaul, Lothar

    2013-11-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is a growing research field in the realm of civil engineering. SHM concepts are implemented using integrated sensors and actuators to evaluate the state of a structure. Within this work, wave-based techniques are addressed. Dispersion effects for propagating waves in waveguides of different materials are analyzed for various different cross-sections. Since analytical theory is limited, a general approach based on the Waveguide Finite Element Method is applied. Numerical results are verified experimentally.

  17. Surface Wave Processes on the Shelf and Beach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    shelf. RESULTS The nonlinear dispersion of random surface gravity waves in shallow water was investigated with Boussinesq theory and extensive field data...Wavenumbers of surface gravity waves observed in shallow water near Duck, NC, are compared with the linear dispersion relation and nonlinear Boussinesq...Thornton, Gravity and shear wave contributions to nearshore infragravity motions, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 29(2), 231-239, 1999. Herbers, T. H. C., S. Elgar

  18. Acoustic Measurement of Surface Wave Damping by a Meniscus.

    PubMed

    Michel, Guillaume; Pétrélis, François; Fauve, Stéphan

    2016-04-29

    We investigate the reflection of gravity-capillary surface waves by a plane vertical barrier. The size of the meniscus is found to strongly affect reflection: the energy of the reflected wave with a pinned contact line is around twice the one corresponding to a fully developed meniscus. To perform these measurements, a new experimental setup similar to an acousto-optic modulator is developed and offers a simple way to measure the amplitude, frequency and direction of propagation of surface waves.

  19. Surface wave patterns on acoustically levitated viscous liquid alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Yan, N.; Geng, D. L.; Wei, B.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate two different kinds of surface wave patterns on viscous liquid alloys, which are melted and solidified under acoustic levitation condition. These patterns are consistent with the morphologies of standing capillary waves and ensembles of oscillons, respectively. The rapid solidification of two-dimensional liquid alloy surfaces may hold them down.

  20. Magnetically programmable surface acoustic wave radio frequency identification tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Matthew; Buford, Benjamin; Dhagat, Pallavi

    2011-04-01

    A reconfigurable surface acoustic wave reflector using an integrated magnetoresistive bit was fabricated and evaluated for use in programmable radio frequency identification tags. It is shown that two distinct reflectivities can be achieved depending on the magnetic state of the bit. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations of optimal reflectivities achievable from resistively loaded surface acoustic wave transducers.

  1. Visualization of Bloch surface waves and directional propagation effects on one-dimensional photonic crystal substrate.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Ju; Lin, I-Sheng

    2016-07-11

    This paper reports a novel approach to the direct observation of Bloch surface waves, wherein a layer of fluorescent material is deposited directly on the surface of a semi-infinite periodic layered cell. A set of surface nano-gratings is used to couple pumping light to Bloch surface waves, while the sample is rotated until the pumping light meets the quasi-phase matching conditions. This study investigated the directional propagation of waves on stripe and circular one-dimensional grating structures by analyzing the dispersion relationship of the first two eigen modes. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed scheme in visualizing Bloch surface waves, which could be extended to a variety of other devices.

  2. Surface Seiches and Internal Kelvin Waves Observed Off Zadar (East Adriatic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilibić, I.; Orlić, M.

    1999-01-01

    Two campaigns, comprising the measurements of temperature, salinity, currents and sea level, were performed in the Zadar and Pašman Channels during summer 1994. Basic dynamics, including tidal, wind-driven and residual circulation, are briefly considered here, but the paper concentrates on the surface seiche and internal Kelvin wave analyses and modelling. Surface seiches are found to be excited by strong meteorological disturbances in the late summer of 1994, with a period of approximately 2·2 h and a sea-level and current amplitude of approximately 10 cm and 9 cm s -1, respectively. Internal Kelvin waves, having a period of approximately 4 days and maximum surface currents of approximately 8 cm s -1, appeared during July 1994. The energy loss at the head of the basin, occurring due to the basin bathymetry, is analytically modelled by imposing the radiation condition there, both for the surface seiches and internal Kelvin waves, while the nodal line is enforced at the basin mouth. The modelled periods of surface seiches and internal Kelvin waves are 2·1 h and 94 h, respectively. The currents and sea levels agree fairly well with the observed values. Furthermore, the Defant numerical procedure, which allows for a variable basin bathymetry, gives slightly lower periods (1·9 h for the surface seiches and 91 h for the internal Kelvin waves) and moves the maximum current amplitudes towards the head of the basin in agreement with the observations.

  3. Surface Acoustic Waves to Drive Plant Transpiration

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Eliot F.; Berggren, Magnus; Simon, Daniel T.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging fields of research in electronic plants (e-plants) and agro-nanotechnology seek to create more advanced control of plants and their products. Electronic/nanotechnology plant systems strive to seamlessly monitor, harvest, or deliver chemical signals to sense or regulate plant physiology in a controlled manner. Since the plant vascular system (xylem/phloem) is the primary pathway used to transport water, nutrients, and chemical signals—as well as the primary vehicle for current e-plant and phtyo-nanotechnology work—we seek to directly control fluid transport in plants using external energy. Surface acoustic waves generated from piezoelectric substrates were directly coupled into rose leaves, thereby causing water to rapidly evaporate in a highly localized manner only at the site in contact with the actuator. From fluorescent imaging, we find that the technique reliably delivers up to 6x more water/solute to the site actuated by acoustic energy as compared to normal plant transpiration rates and 2x more than heat-assisted evaporation. The technique of increasing natural plant transpiration through acoustic energy could be used to deliver biomolecules, agrochemicals, or future electronic materials at high spatiotemporal resolution to targeted areas in the plant; providing better interaction with plant physiology or to realize more sophisticated cyborg systems. PMID:28361922

  4. Surface Acoustic Waves to Drive Plant Transpiration.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Eliot F; Berggren, Magnus; Simon, Daniel T

    2017-03-31

    Emerging fields of research in electronic plants (e-plants) and agro-nanotechnology seek to create more advanced control of plants and their products. Electronic/nanotechnology plant systems strive to seamlessly monitor, harvest, or deliver chemical signals to sense or regulate plant physiology in a controlled manner. Since the plant vascular system (xylem/phloem) is the primary pathway used to transport water, nutrients, and chemical signals-as well as the primary vehicle for current e-plant and phtyo-nanotechnology work-we seek to directly control fluid transport in plants using external energy. Surface acoustic waves generated from piezoelectric substrates were directly coupled into rose leaves, thereby causing water to rapidly evaporate in a highly localized manner only at the site in contact with the actuator. From fluorescent imaging, we find that the technique reliably delivers up to 6x more water/solute to the site actuated by acoustic energy as compared to normal plant transpiration rates and 2x more than heat-assisted evaporation. The technique of increasing natural plant transpiration through acoustic energy could be used to deliver biomolecules, agrochemicals, or future electronic materials at high spatiotemporal resolution to targeted areas in the plant; providing better interaction with plant physiology or to realize more sophisticated cyborg systems.

  5. Surface Acoustic Wave Induced Magnetic Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, S.; Baruth, A.; Adenwalla, S.

    2010-03-01

    We report on the use of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) to switch the magnetization direction of lithographically patterned 40um by 10um cobalt rectangles between two titanium inter-digital transducers (IDTs) on Y-cut LiNbO3. Easy and hard axis magnetization loops measured using the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) show the expected in-plane shape anisotropy. After magnetic saturation along the long easy axis, the magnetic field is turned off and the IDT's are excited at the fundamental resonance frequency, 91.5 MHz, producing a SAW that travels across the patterned Co magnetic structure producing a fast time dependent mechanical strain parallel to the short hard axis of the Co. Magneto-elastic coupling results in a rotation of the magnetization into the hard axis direction, measured by in-plane MOKE measurements along the hard axis direction. Both dc MOKE and high frequency MOKE show, as expected, a definite turn on voltage followed by an asymptotic approach to saturation. Support from NSF MRSEC (DMR-0820521), UCARE, and NFC-Minnesota.

  6. Surface Acoustic Waves to Drive Plant Transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Eliot F.; Berggren, Magnus; Simon, Daniel T.

    2017-03-01

    Emerging fields of research in electronic plants (e-plants) and agro-nanotechnology seek to create more advanced control of plants and their products. Electronic/nanotechnology plant systems strive to seamlessly monitor, harvest, or deliver chemical signals to sense or regulate plant physiology in a controlled manner. Since the plant vascular system (xylem/phloem) is the primary pathway used to transport water, nutrients, and chemical signals—as well as the primary vehicle for current e-plant and phtyo-nanotechnology work—we seek to directly control fluid transport in plants using external energy. Surface acoustic waves generated from piezoelectric substrates were directly coupled into rose leaves, thereby causing water to rapidly evaporate in a highly localized manner only at the site in contact with the actuator. From fluorescent imaging, we find that the technique reliably delivers up to 6x more water/solute to the site actuated by acoustic energy as compared to normal plant transpiration rates and 2x more than heat-assisted evaporation. The technique of increasing natural plant transpiration through acoustic energy could be used to deliver biomolecules, agrochemicals, or future electronic materials at high spatiotemporal resolution to targeted areas in the plant; providing better interaction with plant physiology or to realize more sophisticated cyborg systems.

  7. Surface acoustic wave devices for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Liu; Xiao, Chen; Hualin, Cai; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xiangguang, Tian; Luqi, Tao; Yi, Yang; Tianling, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been widely used in different fields and will continue to be of great importance in the foreseeable future. These devices are compact, cost efficient, easy to fabricate, and have a high performance, among other advantages. SAW devices can work as filters, signal processing units, sensors and actuators. They can even work without batteries and operate under harsh environments. In this review, the operating principles of SAW sensors, including temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors and biosensors, will be discussed. Several examples and related issues will be presented. Technological trends and future developments will also be discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60936002, 61025021, 61434001, 61574083), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002) and the Special Fund for Agroscientific Research in the Public Interest of China (No. 201303107). M.A.M is additionally supported by the Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) program of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (CPSF).

  8. Elastic metamaterial-based seismic shield for both Lamb and surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qiujiao; Zeng, Yi; Huang, Guoliang; Yang, Hongwu

    2017-07-01

    Controlling the propagation of seismic waves to protect critical infrastructure via metamaterial is of new topical interest. This approach can be implemented by remote shielding of incoming waves rather than with vibration isolating structures. In this paper, a two-dimensional elastic metamaterial with periodically square concrete-filled steel piles embedded in soil is proposed to achieve a seismic shield for guided Lamb waves and surface waves. Its properties are numerically investigated using the finite element method. For Lamb waves, we first identify complete bandgaps appearing in a periodic composite with cylindrical piles. By comparison, it is found that if the shape of the pile is replaced with the square shape, the bandgaps become wider and shift to the lower frequencies, which is more suitable for practical applications. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a complete low frequency bandgap also exists for surface waves. The vibration modes for both types of waves at the bandgap edges are computed and analyzed to clarify the mechanism of the bandgap generation. The study focuses on realistic structures that can be effective in the frequency ranges for seismic waves. Although we have focused on the geophysical setting, elastic waves are also very important in applications involving acoustic wave devices.

  9. Guiding, bending, and splitting of coupled defect surface modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-25

    We experimentally demonstrate a type of waveguiding mechanism for coupled surface-wave defect modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal. Unlike conventional spoof surface plasmon waveguides, waveguiding of coupled surface-wave defect modes is achieved through weak coupling between tightly localized defect cavities in an otherwise gapped surface-wave photonic crystal, as a classical wave analogue of tight-binding electronic wavefunctions in solid state lattices. Wave patterns associated with the high transmission of coupled defect surface modes are directly mapped with a near-field microwave scanning probe for various structures including a straight waveguide, a sharp corner, and a T-shaped splitter. These results may find use in the design of integrated surface-wave devices with suppressed crosstalk.

  10. Electromagnetic scattering and depolarization across rough surfaces: Full wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Ezekiel; Huang, Guorong; Lee, Bom Son

    1995-05-01

    Full wave solutions are derived for vertically and horizontally polarized waves diffusely scattered across an interface that is two-dimensionally rough separating two different propagating media. Since the normal to the rough surface is not restricted to the reference plane of incidence, the waves are depolarized upon scattering; and the single scattered radiation fields are expressed as integrals of a surface element transmission scattering matrix that also accounts for coupling between the vertically and horizontally polarized waves. The integrations are over the rough surface area as well as the complete two-dimensional wave spectra of the radiation fields. The full wave solutions satisfy the duality and reciprocity relationships in electromagnetic theory, and the surface element scattering matrix is invariant to coordinate transformations. It is shown that in the high-frequency limit the full wave solutions reduce to the physical optics solutions, while in the low-frequency limit (for small mean square heights and slopes) the full wave solutions reduce to Rice's (1951) small perturbation solutions. Thus, the full wave solution accounts for specular point scattering as well as diffuse, Bragg-type scattering in a unified, self-consistent manner. It is therefore not necessary to use hybrid, perturbation and physical optics approaches (based on two-scale models of composite surfaces with large and small roughness scales) to determine the like- and cross-polarized fields scattered across the rough surface.

  11. Electromagnetic wave propagation in quasi-periodic photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    El Boudouti, E H; Hassouani, Y El; Aynaou, H; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Akjouj, A; Velasco, V R

    2007-06-20

    We study theoretically and experimentally the properties of quasiperiodic one-dimensional serial loop structures made of segments and loops arranged according to a Fibonacci sequence (FS). Two systems are considered. (i) By inserting the FS horizontally between two waveguides, we give experimental evidence of the scaling behaviour of the amplitude and the phase of the transmission coefficient. (ii) By grafting the FS vertically along a guide, we obtain from the maxima of the transmission coefficient the eigenmodes of the finite structure (assuming the vanishing of the magnetic field at the boundaries of the FS). We show that these two systems (i) and (ii) exhibit the property of self-similarity of order three at certain frequencies where the quasiperiodicity is most effective. In addition, because of the different boundary conditions imposed on the ends of the FS, we show that horizontal and vertical structures give different information on the localization of the different modes inside the FS. Finally, we show that the eigenmodes of the finite FS coincide exactly with the surface modes of two semi-infinite superlattices obtained by the cleavage of an infinite superlattice formed by a periodic repetition of a given FS.

  12. Anti-plane transverse waves propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, A-Li; Yan, Dong-Jia; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, anti-plane transverse wave propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures is studied. The localization factor is introduced to characterize the wave propagation behavior. The transfer matrix method based on the nonlocal piezoelectricity continuum theory is used to calculate the localization factor. Additionally, the stiffness matrix method is applied to compute the wave transmission spectra. A cut-off frequency is found, beyond which the elastic waves cannot propagate through the periodic structure. The size effect or the influence of the ratio of the internal to external characteristic lengths on the cut-off frequency and the wave propagation behavior are investigated and discussed.

  13. Ambient noise surface wave tomography of the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottaghi, Ali Asghar; Rezapour, Mehdi; Korn, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Ambient noise tomography is used to retrieve Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity variations in the period range of 8-40 s based on the vertical component of cross-correlation functions from permanent broad-band and mid-band seismometers across the Iranian Plateau. The iterative, non-linear inversion method of fast marching surface tomography (FMST) is employed to produce 2-D group and phase velocity maps. Shear wave velocities are also estimated using a linear least-square method. Unlike most previous largescale tomographic results, our group, phase and shear wave velocity estimations, emphasize low velocity crustal structure (up to 50 km depth) beneath Zagros Fold and Thrust Belt (ZFTB) and Sanandaj-Sirjan metaphormic Zone (SSZ). The suture zone resulting from the subduction of the Arabian plate under the Central Iran is inferred along the boundary of SSZ and Urmieh-Dokhtar Magmatic Arc (UDMA). The velocity patterns show the main sedimentary basins, and reveal lateral velocity changes indicating the crustal thickening beneath ZFTB, SSZ and Lut Desert (LD), and the crustal thinning beneath Kavir Desert (KD) and UDMA are well inferred. A prominent low velocity is persistent in the whole crust beneath the central part of Alborz mountain range with high topography, and we suggest that it is likely due to elevated crustal temperatures within thin lithosphere.

  14. Modeling and Analysis of Lateral Propagation of Surface Acoustic Waves Including Coupling Between Different Waves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Benfeng; Han, Tao; Tang, Gongbin; Zhang, Qiaozhen; Omori, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Ken-Ya

    2017-09-01

    This paper discusses lateral propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in periodic grating structures when two types of SAWs exist simultaneously and are coupled. The thin plate model proposed by the authors is extended to include the coupling between two different SAW modes. First, lateral SAW propagation in an infinitely long periodic grating is modeled and discussed. Then, the model is applied to the Al-grating/42° YX-LiTaO3 (42-LT) substrate structure, and it is shown that the slowness curve shape changes from concave to convex with the Al grating thickness. The transverse responses are also analyzed on an infinitely long interdigital transducer on the structure, and good agreement is achieved between the present and the finite-element method analyses. Finally, SAW resonators are fabricated on the Cu grating/42-LT substrate structure, and it is experimentally verified that the slowness curve shape of the shear horizontal SAW changes with the Cu thickness.

  15. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design. PMID:27035269

  16. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design.

  17. Do tidal or swing waves roughen planetary surfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, Gennady G.

    2010-05-01

    Surfaces of the terrestrial planets and their moons are far from being smooth. They are warped by several wavelengths and show a remarkable regularity: their roughness increases with the solar distance. Thus, if for Mercury the surface relief range does not exceed several km, for Mars it is already about 30 km. Earth's range is 20 km, Venus' one 14 km. Recently it was shown that this row of ranges reflects ratios of the tectonic granules radii of terrestrial planets [1, 2]. These radii related to unity of reduced planetary globes (in a geometrical model all planets are represented by even circles [2]) are as follows: Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2. It means that in the great planetary circles (equators) there are 32, 12, 8, and 4 tectonic granules (now they all are mapped by remote methods) and their numbers are inversely proportional to the orbital frequencies of the planets: higher frequency - smaller granule, and, vice versa, lower frequency - larger granule. In this planetary law is a firm confirmation of the main conceptual point of the wave planetology: "Orbits make structures" [3]. But how this happens? A basic reason lies in the keplerian elliptical orbits implying periodical changes of planetary bodies accelerations. Periodical slowing down and speeding up produce inertia-gravity waves warping any celestial body. In rotating bodies this wave warping is divided in four directions: two orthogonal and two diagonal. An interference of these directions produces tectonic blocks of three kinds: uplifting, subsiding, and neutral. Sizes and amplitudes of the blocks (granules) depend on the warping wavelengths and increase with the solar distance. Thus, a relief-forming potential and the actual relief range observed on the planets increase in this direction [1, 2, 4]. But the tidal forces diminish in this direction. That is why they cannot be a reason for the relief-forming potential. Having in mind a swinging action of planetary orbits on

  18. Nanoscale Periodic Modulations on Sodium Chloride Induced by Surface Charges

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Kendal W; Qin, Shengyong; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Li, An-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The sodium chloride surface is one of the most common platforms for the study of catalysts, thin film growth, and atmospheric aerosols. Here we report a nanoscale periodic modulation pattern on the surface of a cleaved NaCl single crystal, revealed by non-contact atomic force microscopy with a tuning fork sensor. The surface pattern shows two orthogonal domains, extending over the entire cleavage surface. The spatial modulations exhibit a characteristic period of 5.4 nm, along 110 crystallographic directions of the NaCl. The modulations are robust in vacuum, not affected by the tip-induced electric field or gentle annealing (<300 C); however, they are eliminated after exposure to water and an atomically flat surface can be recovered by subsequent thermal annealing after water exposure. A strong electrostatic charging is revealed on the cleavage surface which may facilitate the formation of the observed metastable surface reconstruction.

  19. Wavefield Analysis of Rayleigh Waves for Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chong

    2011-12-01

    Shear (S)-wave velocity is a key property of near-surface materials and is the fundamental parameter for many environmental and engineering geophysical studies. Directly acquiring accurate S-wave velocities from a seismic shot gather is usually difficult due to the poor signal-to-noise ratio. The relationship between Rayleigh-wave phase velocity and frequency has been widely utilized to estimate the S-wave velocities in shallow layers using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) technique. Hence, Rayleigh wave is a main focus of most near-surface seismic studies. Conventional dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves assumes that the earth is laterally homogeneous and the free surface is horizontally flat, which limits the application of surface-wave methods to only 1D earth models or very smooth 2D models. In this study I extend the analysis of Rayleigh waves to a 2D domain by employing the 2D full elastic wave equation so as to address the lateral heterogeneity problem. I first discuss the accurate simulation of Rayleigh waves through finite-difference method and the boundary absorbing problems in the numerical modeling with a high Poisson's ratio (> 0.4), which is a unique near-surface problem. Then I develop an improved vacuum formulation to generate accurate synthetic seismograms focusing on Rayleigh waves in presence of surface topography and internal discontinuities. With these solutions to forward modeling of Rayleigh waves, I evaluate the influence of surface topography to conventional dispersion analysis in 2D and 3D domains by numerical investigations. At last I examine the feasibility of inverting waveforms of Rayleigh waves for shallow S-wave velocities using a genetic algorithm. Results of the study show that Rayleigh waves can be accurately simulated in near surface using the improved vacuum formulation. Spurious reflections during the numerical modeling can be efficiently suppressed by the simplified multiaxial perfectly matched layers. The

  20. LLNL Identification Program: Regional Body-Wave Correction Surfaces and Surface-Wave Tomography Models to Improve Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W.; Rodgers, A.J.; Pasyanos, M.E.; Mayeda, K.M.; Sicherman, A.; Harris, D.B.

    2001-07-27

    LLNL identification research is focused on the problem of correctly discriminating small-magnitude explosions from a background of earthquakes, mining tremors, and other events. The goal is to reduce the variance within the population of each type of event, while increasing the separation between the explosions and the other event types. We address this problem for both broad categories of seismic waves: body waves and surface waves. First, we map out the effects of propagation and source size in advance so that they can be accounted for and removed from observed events. This can dramatically reduce the population variance. Second, we try to optimize the measurement process to improve the separation between population types. For body waves we focus on the identification power of the short-period regional phases Pn, Pg, Sn and Lg, which can often be detected down to very small magnitudes. Many studies have shown that particular ratios of these phases, such as 6-to 8-Hz Pn/Lg, can effectively discriminate between closely located explosions and earthquakes. To extend this discrimination power over broad areas, we use our revised Magnitude and Distance Amplitude Correction (MDAC2) procedure. This joint source and path model fits the observed spectra and removes magnitude and distance trends from the data. The MDAC residuals are kriged to provide full 2-D path corrections by phase and frequency band. The MDAC residuals allow the exploration of all possible ratios and multivariate combinations of ratios for their discrimination power. We also make use of the MDAC spectra and the noise spectra to determine the expected detectability of each phase and use that to optimize the multivariate discriminants as a function of location. We quantify the discrimination power using the misidentified event trade-off curves and an equi-probable measure. We evaluate the correction surfaces using a cross-validation technique. The result is an end-to-end validation and discrimination

  1. A Multiscale Nested Modeling Framework to Simulate the Interaction of Surface Gravity Waves with Nonlinear Internal Gravity Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Interaction of Surface Gravity Waves with Nonlinear Internal Gravity Waves Lian Shen St. Anthony Falls Laboratory and Department of Mechanical...on studying surface gravity wave evolution and spectrum in the presence of surface currents caused by strongly nonlinear internal solitary waves...interaction of surface and internal gravity waves in the South China Sea. We will seek answers to the following questions: 1) How does the wind-wave

  2. Orbital stability of periodic traveling-wave solutions for the log-KdV equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, Fábio; Pastor, Ademir; Cristófani, Fabrício

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we establish the orbital stability of periodic waves related to the logarithmic Korteweg-de Vries equation. Our motivation is inspired in the recent work [3], in which the authors established the well-posedness and the linear stability of Gaussian solitary waves. By using the approach put forward recently in [20] to construct a smooth branch of periodic waves as well as to get the spectral properties of the associated linearized operator, we apply the abstract theories in [13] and [25] to deduce the orbital stability of the periodic traveling waves in the energy space.

  3. Multichannel analysis of surface waves to map bedrock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Richard D.; Xia, Jianghai; Park, Choon B.; Ivanov, Julian M.

    1999-01-01

    High velocity gradients within the shear wave velocity field consistent with drill confirmed bedrock are considered diagnostic of the bedrock surface and were used to map the top of bedrock on all four lines connected at this site. Calculating the shear wave velocity field from surface wave arrivals was accomplished with a high degree of accuracy regardless of cultural noise. Improved resolution on the surface of the bedrock provides insight into the texture of bedrock and permits identification and appraisal of short wavelength variations in the bedrock surface.

  4. Surface wave tomography with USArray: Rayleigh wave phase velocity, ellipticity, and local amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, F.; Schmandt, B.; Tsai, V. C.

    2012-12-01

    The deployment of the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array allows detailed empirical study of the surface-wave wavefield on a large scale. In this presentation, we show that three local properties of Rayleigh waves, i.e. phase velocity, ellipticity (or H/V ratio), and local amplification, can be determined across the array in the western US between 24 and 100 sec period based on teleseismic measurements. More than 900 earthquakes are analyzed where phase velocity and local amplification are determined based on empirical phase travel time and amplitude mapping. The three Rayleigh wave properties, which are all sensitive to the 1D structure beneath each location, have very distinct depth sensitivity to Vs, Vp/Vs ratio, and density. Joint inversion of these quantities therefore reduces the trade-off between the three different parameters at different depths. Including the H/V ratio, in particular, allows the uppermost (0-3 km) crustal velocity and density structure to be constrained, and our new results are in excellent agreement with known surface features. Pronounced low Vs, low density, and high Vp/Vs anomalies are imaged in the locations of several major sedimentary basins including the Williston, Powder River, Green River, Denver, and San Juan basins. Preliminary results on the inverted 3D Vs, Vp/Vs ratio, and density structure in the crust and upper mantle will also be discussed. (a)-(c) 30-sec Rayleigh-wave phase velocity, local amplification, and H/V ratio observed across USArray in the western US. The red lines denote the tectonic boundaries and the triangles in (b)-(c) shown the stations used. The thick black lines indicate 3-km sediment contours for several major sedimentary basins (WB: Williston Basin; PR: Powder River Basin; GR: Green River Basin; DB: Denver Basin). (d)-(f) The Vs, density, and Vp/Vs ratio in the uppermost crust (0-3 km) inverted by phase velocity and H/V ratio measurements.

  5. Laser-induced periodic surface structures: Fingerprints of light localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolski, J. Z. P.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Obona, J. V.; Ocelik, V.; Huis in't Veld, A. J.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2012-02-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to study the inhomogeneous absorption of linearly polarized laser radiation below a rough surface. The results are first analyzed in the frequency domain and compared to the efficacy factor theory of Sipe and coworkers. Both approaches show that the absorbed energy shows a periodic nature, not only in the direction orthogonal to the laser polarization, but also in the direction parallel to it. It is shown that the periodicity is not always close to the laser wavelength for the perpendicular direction. In the parallel direction, the periodicity is about λ/Re(ñ), with ñ being the complex refractive index of the medium. The space-domain FDTD results show a periodicity in the inhomogeneous energy absorption similar to the periodicity of the low- and high-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures depending on the material's excitation.

  6. Solitary Surface Waves at a Plasma Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.

    A new equation describing the behaviour of strongly nonlinear waves localized near the boundary of a semi-infinite plasma is deduced. This equation has solitary wave solutions that can be found numerically. Various limiting cases are treated analytically in the present paper.

  7. Surface wave velocity structure of the western Himalayan syntaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, A. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2013-09-01

    The Nanga Parbat Haramosh massif (NPHM) is located in the western syntaxis of the India-Eurasia collision zone and is subject to erosion rates that are so extreme as to impact the isostatic equilibrium of the massif. In order to investigate the interaction between large scale tectonic forces and local isostatic processes, we employ a Rayleigh wave tomography method to measure phase velocities within the massif and surrounding region at crust and mantle depths. Our inversion solves for phase velocity anomalies by representing perturbations in the wavefield as the interference of two plane waves. Our data set was obtained from a temporary seismic array deployed in 1996 and includes 53 teleseismic events with Mw ≥ 5.0, at periods from 20 to 79 s. Phase velocities at short periods are low, ranging from 3.2 km s-1 at 20 s, and increasing gradually to 3.5 km s-1 at 40 s. These velocities are 11 per cent lower than velocities observed in the Indian continental Plate at periods below 45 s. Above 50 s, phase velocities in the Nanga Parbat region are significantly higher, ranging from 3.7 km s-1 at 45 s to 4.0 km s-1 at 79 s. These high phase velocities above 60 s are consistent with average velocities measured within the Indian Plate. Comparison of these results with surface wave studies in other regions of the Tibetan plateau including the eastern syntaxis and central Tibet show a similar low velocity anomaly below 45 s. Phase velocities above 55 s, however, are significantly higher in the Nanga Parbat region compared to velocities reported for all other regions of the plateau. Shear wave inversions produce significantly low velocities in the upper crust of the NPHM but exceed average lithospheric velocities below the Moho. We suggest the combination of anomalously low velocities in the upper crust and high velocities at lithospheric depths is due to rapid exhumation of deep crustal material causing elevated geothermal gradients. Azimuthal anisotropy shows a NNW-SSE fast

  8. Detection, location, and analysis of earthquakes using seismic surface waves (Beno Gutenberg Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Göran

    2015-04-01

    For shallow sources, Love and Rayleigh waves are the largest seismic phases recorded at teleseismic distances. The utility of these waves for earthquake characterization was traditionally limited to magnitude estimation, since geographically variable dispersion makes it difficult to determine useful travel-time information from the waveforms. Path delays due to heterogeneity of several tens of seconds are typical for waves at 50 sec period, and these delays must be accounted for with precision and accuracy in order to extract propagation-phase and source-phase information. Advances in tomographic mapping of global surface-wave phase velocities, and continuous growth and improvements of seismographic networks around the world, now make possible new applications of surface waves for earthquake monitoring and analysis. Through continuous back propagation of the long-period seismic wave field recorded by globally distributed stations, nearly all shallow earthquakes greater than M=5 can be detected and located with a precision of 25 km. Some of the detected events do not appear in standard earthquake catalogs and correspond to non-tectonic earthquakes, including landslides, glacier calving, and volcanic events. With the improved ability to predict complex propagation effects of surface waves across a heterogeneous Earth, moment-tensor and force representations of seismic sources can be routinely determined for all earthquakes greater than M=5 by waveform fitting of surface waves. A current area of progress in the use of surface waves for earthquake studies is the determination of precise relative locations of remote seismicity by systematic cross correlation and analysis of surface waves generated by neighboring sources. Preliminary results indicate that a location precision of 5 km may be achievable in many areas of the world.

  9. Depths of large earthquakes determined from long-period Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Hiroo

    1988-05-01

    The depths and source mechanisms of nine large shallow earthquakes were determined from long-period (150 to 300 s) Rayleigh waves recorded by the Global Digital Seismograph Network (GDSN) and International Deployment of Accelerometers (IDA) networks. We inverted the data set of complex source spectra for a moment tensor (linear) or a double couple (nonlinear). By solving a least squares problem, we obtained the centroid depth or the extent of the distributed source for each earthquake. The depths and source mechanisms of large shallow earthquakes determined from long-period Rayleigh waves depend on the models of source finiteness, wave propagation, and excitation. We tested various models of source finiteness, Q, group velocity, and excitation in the determination of earthquake depths. In order to determine the depth of large earthquakes from long-period surface waves, source-finiteness effects must be corrected using adequate models. The depth estimates obtained using the Q model of Dziewonski and Stein (1982) and the excitation functions computed for the average ocean model of Regan and Anderson (1984) are considered most reasonable. Diziewonski and Steim's Q model represents a good global average of Q determined over a period range of the Rayleigh waves used in this study. Since most of the earthquakes studied here occurred in subduction zones, Regan and Anderson's average ocean model is considered most appropriate. Our depth estimates are in general consistent with the Harvard centroid-moment tensor (CMT) solutions. The centroid depths and their 90% confidence intervals (numbers in parentheses) determined by the Student's t test are Columbia-Ecuador earthquake (December 12, 1979), d=11 km (9, 24 km); Santa Cruz Island earthquake (July 17, 1980), d=36 km (18, 46 km); Samoa earthquake (September 1, 1981), d=15 km (9, 26 km); Playa Azul, Mexico, earthquake (October 25, 1981), d=41 km (28, 49 km); El Salvador earthquake (June 19, 1982), d=49 km (41, 55 km); New

  10. Tunable Nanowire Patterning Using Standing Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuchao; Ding, Xiaoyun; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Yang, Shikuan; Huang, Po-Hsun; Nama, Nitesh; Zhao, Yanhui; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Guo, Feng; Wang, Wei; Gu, Yeyi; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Patterning of nanowires in a controllable, tunable manner is important for the fabrication of functional nanodevices. Here we present a simple approach for tunable nanowire patterning using standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW). This technique allows for the construction of large-scale nanowire arrays with well-controlled patterning geometry and spacing within 5 seconds. In this approach, SSAWs were generated by interdigital transducers (IDTs), which induced a periodic alternating current (AC) electric field on the piezoelectric substrate and consequently patterned metallic nanowires in suspension. The patterns could be deposited onto the substrate after the liquid evaporated. By controlling the distribution of the SSAW field, metallic nanowires were assembled into different patterns including parallel and perpendicular arrays. The spacing of the nanowire arrays could be tuned by controlling the frequency of the surface acoustic waves. Additionally, we observed 3D spark-shape nanowire patterns in the SSAW field. The SSAW-based nanowire-patterning technique presented here possesses several advantages over alternative patterning approaches, including high versatility, tunability, and efficiency, making it promising for device applications. PMID:23540330

  11. Tunable nanowire patterning using standing surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuchao; Ding, Xiaoyun; Steven Lin, Sz-Chin; Yang, Shikuan; Huang, Po-Hsun; Nama, Nitesh; Zhao, Yanhui; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Guo, Feng; Wang, Wei; Gu, Yeyi; Mallouk, Thomas E; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-23

    Patterning of nanowires in a controllable, tunable manner is important for the fabrication of functional nanodevices. Here we present a simple approach for tunable nanowire patterning using standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW). This technique allows for the construction of large-scale nanowire arrays with well-controlled patterning geometry and spacing within 5 s. In this approach, SSAWs were generated by interdigital transducers, which induced a periodic alternating current (ac) electric field on the piezoelectric substrate and consequently patterned metallic nanowires in suspension. The patterns could be deposited onto the substrate after the liquid evaporated. By controlling the distribution of the SSAW field, metallic nanowires were assembled into different patterns including parallel and perpendicular arrays. The spacing of the nanowire arrays could be tuned by controlling the frequency of the surface acoustic waves. Additionally, we observed 3D spark-shaped nanowire patterns in the SSAW field. The SSAW-based nanowire-patterning technique presented here possesses several advantages over alternative patterning approaches, including high versatility, tunability, and efficiency, making it promising for device applications.

  12. Fast and Efficient Approach in Surface Wave Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanli, A. I.

    2010-12-01

    Fast and Efficient Approach in Surface Wave Analysis Ali Ismet KANLI Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Geophysical Engineering, 34320, Avcilar Campus, Istanbul-Turkey, E-mail: kanli@istanbul.edu.tr Abstract: A two-step surface wave analysis method is proposed including both the MASW (Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves) and Micro-tremor based techniques. This is an integrated approach and the MASW survey data are gathered to obtain the shear wave velocity-depth information up to at least 30 meters by using a special type active seismic source called as SR-II or Kangaroo. In the second step, the microtremor data which are based on surface waves from seismic noise at each site are used to determine the shear-wave velocity-depth profiles. In the second step of the process, the multichannel analysis of surface waves data are given as constraints in the microtremor inversion process. This proposed algorithm allows us to calculate shear wave velocity-depth information with all geotechnical parameters from near surface to bedrock depths very fast and efficiently.

  13. Reconfigurable surface plasmon polariton wave adapter designed by transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Arigong, Bayaner; Shao, Jin; Ren, Han; Zheng, Geng; Lutkenhaus, Jeffrey; Kim, HyoungSoo; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Hualiang

    2012-06-18

    In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable surface plasmon polariton (SPP) wave adapter designed by transformation optics, which can control the propagation of SPP waves on un-even surfaces. The proposed plasmonic device is constructed using homogeneously tunable materials (e.g. liquid crystals) so that the corresponding SPP wave transmission can be reconfigured by applying different voltages. Additionally, modified designs optimized for practical fabrication parameters are investigated. Their performance is verified by full-wave simulations. The proposed devices will pave the way towards developing tunable plasmonic devices.

  14. Regional Body-Wave Corrections and Surface-Wave Tomography Models to Improve Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W R; Pasyanos, M E; Rodgers, A J; Meyeda, K M; Sicherman, A

    2003-07-18

    Our identification research for the past several years has focused on the problem of correctly discriminating small-magnitude explosions from a background of earthquakes, mining tremors, and other events. Small magnitudes lead to an emphasis on regional waveforms. The goal is to reduce the variance within the population of each type of event, while increasing the separation between the explosions and the other event types. We address this problem for both broad categories of seismic waves, body waves, and surface waves. First, we map out the effects of propagation and source size in advance so that they can be accounted for and removed from observed events. This can dramatically reduce the population variance. Second, we try to optimize the measurement process to improve the separation between population types. For body waves we focus on the identification power of the short-period regional phases Pn, Pg, Sn and Lg, and coda that can often be detected down to very small magnitudes. It is now well established that particular ratios of these phases, such as 6- to 8-Hz Pn/Lg, can effectively discriminate between closely located explosions and earthquakes. To extend this discrimination power over broad areas, we developed a revised Magnitude and Distance Amplitude Correction (MDAC2) procedure (Walter and Taylor, 2002). This joint source and path model fits the observed spectra and removes magnitude and distance trends from the data. It allows for the possibility of variable apparent stress scaling in earthquakes, an unresolved issue that is the subject of investigation under separate funding. The MDACZ procedure makes use of the extremely stable coda estimates of Mw for source magnitude and can also use independent Q tomography to help reduce trade-offs in fitting spectra. We can then apply the kriging operation to the MDAC2 residuals to provide full 2-D path corrections by phase and frequency band. These corrections allow the exploration of all possible ratios and

  15. Radar Measurements of Ocean Surface Waves using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-30

    please find the Final Technical Report with SF 298 for Dr. Erin E. Hackett’s ONR grant entitled Radar Measurements of Ocean Surface Waves Using Proper...request. Stephanie Cassavaugh, Director Enclosures P.O. Box 261954 Conway, South Carolina 29528-6054 Radar Measurements of Ocean Surface Waves Using...COVERED (From - To) 30-03-2017 Final Technical 22-01-2015-31-12-2016 4. TITLE AND S UBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Radar Measurements of Ocean Surface

  16. Tunable hybrid surface waves supported by a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorsh, I. V.; Shadrivov, I. V.; Belov, P. A.; Kivshar, Yu. S.

    2013-05-01

    We study electromagnetic waves localized near the surface of a semi-infinite dielectric medium covered by a graphene layer in the presence of a strong external magnetic field. We demonstrate that a novel type of hybrid TE-TM polarized surface plasmons can propagate along the graphene layer. We analyze the effect of the Hall conductivity on the polarization properties of these hybrid surface waves and suggest a possibility to tune the graphene plasmons by the external magnetic field.

  17. Shallow seismic surface waves analysis across a tectonic fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazdova, R.; Vilhelm, J.; Kolinsky, P.

    2011-12-01

    When performing a seismic survey of a shallow medium, we record wave motion which can be excited by a sledge hammer blow on the ground surface. The recorded wave motion is a complex combination of different types of waves, propagating directly from the source to the receiver, reflecting from velocity boundaries, passing through multiple layers or forming dispersive surface waves. We can use all of these wave types to identify the structure of the medium. In the presented contribution we deal with interpretation of surface waves. In contrast with body waves, the surface wave velocity is frequency-dependent. This property is called dispersion, and the dependence of the velocity on the frequency is known as the dispersion curve. The measured dispersion of the surface waves can be used to assess the structural velocity distribution in the layered medium, through which the waves propagate. We analyze surface waves recorded within the geophysical survey of the paleoseismological trench site over the Hluboka tectonic fault, Czech Republic, Central Europe. The surface waves in frequency range 15 - 70 Hz were recorded by the three component geophones with the active (sledge hammer) source. Group velocities are analyzed by the program SVAL which is based on the multiple filtering technique. It is a standard method of the Fourier transform-based frequency-time analysis. The spectrum of each record is multiplied by weighting functions centered at many discrete frequencies. Five local envelope maxima of all quasiharmonic components obtained by the inverse Fourier transform are found and their propagation times determined. These maxima are assigned to different modes of direct surface waves as well as to possible reflected, converted and multipathed modes. Filtered fundamental modes at pairs of geophones are correlated and phase velocities of surface waves are computed from the delays of propagation times of all quasiharmonic components. From the dispersion curves the shear wave

  18. Backscatter from a periodic rough surface at near grazing incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, A. K.; Shamansky, H. T.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of periodic surface roughness on the radar cross section (RCS) was studied. The surface roughness was formed by a small sinusoidal variation in a planar surface. RCS measurements were obtained for two different sinusoidal variations near grazing incidence for both principle polarizations. Significant grating lobes were observed in the measurements which directly correspond to the roughness characteristics. A physical optics solution was generated and compared to the measurements with reasonable agreement.

  19. The effect of sedimentary basins on surface waves that pass through them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lili; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2017-10-01

    Surface waves propagating through sedimentary basins undergo elastic wavefield complications that include multiple scattering, amplification, the formation of secondary wave fronts and subsequent wave front healing. Unless these effects are accounted for accurately, they may introduce systematic bias to estimates of source characteristics, the inference of the anelastic structure of the Earth, and ground motion predictions for hazard assessment. Most studies of the effects of basins on surface waves have centred on waves inside the basins. In contrast, the purpose of this paper is to investigate wavefield effects downstream from sedimentary basins, with particular emphasis on continental basins and propagation paths, elastic structural heterogeneity and Rayleigh waves at 10 s period. Based on wavefield simulations through a recent 3-D crustal and upper-mantle model of East Asia, we demonstrate significant Rayleigh wave amplification downstream from sedimentary basins in eastern China such that Ms measurements made on the simulated wavefield vary by more than a magnitude unit. We show that surface wave amplification caused by basins results predominantly from elastic focusing and that amplification effects produced through 3-D basin models are reproduced using 2-D membrane wave simulations through an appropriately defined phase velocity map. The principal characteristics of elastic focusing in both 2-D and 3-D simulations include (1) retardation of the wave front inside the basins; (2) deflection of the wave propagation direction; (3) formation of a high-amplitude lineation directly downstream from the basin bracketed by two low-amplitude zones and (4) formation of a secondary wave front. We illustrate with several examples how the size and geometry of the basin affects focusing. Finally, by comparing the impact of elastic focusing with anelastic attenuation, we argue that on-continent sedimentary basins are expected to affect surface wave amplitudes more strongly

  20. Study of Magnetohydrodynamic Surface Waves on Liquid Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Hantao Ji; William Fox; David Pace; H.L. Rappaport

    2004-05-13

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) surface waves on liquid gallium are studied theoretically and experimentally in the small magnetic Reynolds number limit. A linear dispersion relation is derived when a horizontal magnetic field and a horizontal electric current is imposed. No wave damping is found in the shallow liquid limit while waves always damp in the deep liquid limit with a magnetic field parallel to the propagation direction. When the magnetic field is weak, waves are weakly damped and the real part of the dispersion is unaffected, while in the opposite limit waves are strongly damped with shortened wavelengths. In a table-top experiment, planar MHD surface waves on liquid gallium are studied in detail in the regime of weak magnetic field and deep liquid. A non-invasive diagnostic accurately measures surface waves at multiple locations by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface onto a screen, which is recorded by an Intensified-CCD camera. The measured dispersion relation is consistent with the linear theory with a reduced surface tension likely due to surface oxidation. In excellent agreement with linear theory, it is observed that surface waves are damped only when a horizontal magnetic field is imposed parallel to the propagation direction. No damping is observed under a perpendicular magnetic field. The existence of strong wave damping even without magnetic field suggests the importance of the surface oxide layer. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors, especially on the wave damping and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability when the Lorentz force is used to support liquid metal layer against gravity, are discussed.

  1. Boundary Waves on the Ice Surface Created by Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, K.; Izumi, N.; Yokokawa, M.; Yamada, T.; de Lima, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of periodic boundary waves, e.g. antidunes and cyclic steps (Parker & Izumi 2000) has been known to be caused by instabilities between flow and bed (e.g. Engelund 1970), and are observed not only on river beds or ocean floors but also on ice surfaces, such as the surface of glaciers and underside of river ice (Carey 1966). In addition, owing to recent advancements of remote sensing technology, it has been found that the surfaces of the polar ice caps on Mars as well as on the Earth have step-like formations (Smith & Holt 2010) which are assumed to be boundary waves, because they are generated perpendicularly to the direction of the currents. These currents acting on the polar ice caps are density airflow, i.e. katabatic wind (Howard et al 2000). The comprehension of the formation process of the Martian polar ice caps may reveal climate changes which have occurred on Mars. Although the formation of boundary waves on river beds or ocean floors has been studied by a number of researchers, there are few works on their formation on ice surfaces. Yokokawa et al (2013) suggested that the temperature distribution of the ambient air, fluid and ice is a factor which determines the direction of migration of boundary waves formed on ice surfaces through their experiments. In this study, we propose a mathematical model in order to describe the formation process of the boundary waves and the direction of their migration. We consider that a liquid is flowing through a flume filled with a flat ice layer on the bottom. The flow is assumed to be turbulent and its temperature is assumed to merge with the ambient temperature at the flow surface and with the melting point of ice at the bottom (ice surface). The ice surface evolution is dependent on the unbalance between the interfacial heat flux of the liquid and ice, and we employ the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation, the continuity equation, heat transfer equations for the liquid and ice, and a heat balance

  2. An accurate control of the surface wave using transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Hao, Yang

    2012-04-23

    In this paper, we study two surface wave control scenarios at microwave frequencies. The first is a surface wave traveling along an uneven interface with a triangular obstruction present on a grounded dielectric slab. The other is a surface wave that circumvents a metallic rhombus-shaped obstacle, which is partially buried in a flat grounded dielectric slab. With a consideration of the eigenmode properties of the surface wave, our proposed technique - based on transformation optics - offers an efficient and accurate way to perform the filed manipulation. On the one hand, we see that the surface wave is guided along the uneven interface with no scattering into the air, as the grounded dielectric slab is flat. On the other hand, we observe that the surface wave is capable of traversing the rhombus obstacle with no shadow left behind, as the obstacle is cloaked. This technique for surface wave control is also valid at higher frequency ranges, and can easily be extended to encompass other propagating modes. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  3. An asymptotic theory for waves guided by diffraction gratings or along microstructured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Antonakakis, T.; Craster, R. V.; Guenneau, S.; Skelton, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    An effective surface equation, that encapsulates the detail of a microstructure, is developed to model microstructured surfaces. The equations deduced accurately reproduce a key feature of surface wave phenomena, created by periodic geometry, that are commonly called Rayleigh–Bloch waves, but which also go under other names, for example, spoof surface plasmon polaritons in photonics. Several illustrative examples are considered and it is shown that the theory extends to similar waves that propagate along gratings. Line source excitation is considered, and an implicit long-scale wavelength is identified and compared with full numerical simulations. We also investigate non-periodic situations where a long-scale geometrical variation in the structure is introduced and show that localized defect states emerge which the asymptotic theory explains. PMID:24399920

  4. Upper Mantle Structure beneath Afar: inferences from surface waves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicilia, D.; Montagner, J.; Debayle, E.; Lepine, J.; Leveque, J.; Cara, M.; Ataley, A.; Sholan, J.

    2001-12-01

    The Afar hotspot is related to one of the most important plume from a geodynamic point of view. It has been advocated to be the surface expression of the South-West African Superswell. Below the lithosphere, the Afar plume might feed other hotspots in central Africa (Hadiouche et al., 1989; Ebinger & Sleep, 1998). The processes of interaction between crust, lithosphere and plume are not well understood. In order to gain insight into the scientific issue, we have performed a surface-wave tomography covering the Horn of Africa. A data set of 1404 paths for Rayleigh waves and 473 paths for Love waves was selected in the period range 45-200s. They were collected from the permanent IRIS and GEOSCOPE networks and from the PASSCAL experiment, in Tanzania and Saudi Arabia. Other data come from the broadband stations deployed in Ethiopia and Yemen in the framework of the French INSU program ``Horn of Africa''. The results presented here come from a path average phase velocities obtained with a method based on a least-squares minimization (Beucler et al., 2000). The local phase velocity distribution and the azimuthal anisotropy were simultaneously retrieved by using the tomographic technique of Montagner (1986). A correction of the data is applied according to the crustal structure of the 3SMAC model (Nataf & Ricard, 1996). We find low velocities down to 200 km depth beneath the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden, Afars, the Ethiopian Plateau and southern Arabia. High velocities are present in the eastern Arabia and the Tanzania Craton. The anisotropy beneath Afar seems to be complex, but enables to map the flow pattern at the interface lithosphere-asthenosphere. The results presented here are complementary to those obtained by Debayle et al. (2001) at upper-mantle transition zone depths using waveform inversion of higher Rayle igh modes.

  5. Wave turbulence in a two-layer fluid: Coupling between free surface and interface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issenmann, Bruno; Laroche, Claude; Falcon, Eric

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally study gravity-capillary wave turbulence on the interface between two immiscible fluids of close density with free upper surface. We locally measure the wave height at the interface between both fluids by means of a highly sensitive laser Doppler vibrometer. We show that the inertial range of the capillary wave turbulence regime is significantly extended when the upper fluid depth is increased: The crossover frequency between the gravity and capillary wave turbulence regimes is found to decrease whereas the dissipative cut-off frequency of the spectrum is found to increase. We explain these observations by the progressive decoupling between waves propagating at the interface and the ones at the free surface, using the full dispersion relation of gravity-capillary waves in a two-layer fluid of finite depths. The cut-off evolution is due to the disappearance of parasitic capillaries responsible for the main wave dissipation for a single fluid.

  6. An experimental study of wave coupling in gravity surface wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Sommeria, Joel; Viboud, Samuel; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Weak turbulence is a theoretical framework aimed at describing wave turbulence (in the weakly nonlinear limit) i.e. a statistical state involving a large number of nonlinearly coupled waves. For gravity waves at the surface of water, it provides a phenomenology that may describe the formation of the spectrum of the ocean surface. Analytical predictions of the spectra are made based on the fact that energy transfer occurs through 4-wave coupling. By using an advanced stereoscopic imaging technique, we measure in time the deformation of the water surface. We obtain a state of wave turbulence by using two small wedge wavemakers in a 13-m diameter wavetank. We then use high order correlator (bi- and tri-coherence) in order to get evidence of the active wave coupling present in our system as used successfully for gravity-capillary wave turbulence. At odds with the weak turbulence theory we observe 3-wave interaction involving 2 quasi linear wave and a bound wave whose frequency lies on the first harmonics of the linear dispersion relation. We do not observe 4-wave coupling within the accuracy of our measurement. This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant agreement No 647018-WATU).

  7. Bounded inhomogeneous wave profiles for increased surface wave excitation efficiency at fluid-solid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Woods, Daniel C; Bolton, J Stuart; Rhoads, Jeffrey F

    2017-04-01

    Though the ultrasonic excitation of surface waves in solids is generally realized through the use of a contact transducer, remote excitation would enable standoff testing in applications such as the nondestructive evaluation of structures. With respect to the optimal incident wave profile, bounded inhomogeneous waves, which include an exponentially decaying term, have been shown to improve the surface wave excitation efficiency as compared to Gaussian and square waves. The purpose of this work is to investigate the effect of varying the incident wave spatial decay rate, as applied to both lossless fluid-solid interfaces and to solids with viscoelastic losses included. The Fourier method is used to decompose the incident profile and subsequently compute the reflected wave profile. It is shown that inhomogeneous plane wave theory predicts, to a close approximation, the location of the minimum in the local reflection coefficient with respect to the decay rate for bounded incident waves. Moreover, plane wave theory gives a reasonable indication of the decay rate that maximizes the surface wave excitation efficiency.

  8. Extremely Fast Numerical Integration of Ocean Surface Wave Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    1) is a natural two-space-dimension extension of the KdV equation . The periodic KP solutions include directional spreading in the wave field: y η...of the nonlinear preprocessor in the new approach for obtaining numerical solutions to nonlinear wave equations . I will now do so, but without many...analytical study and extremely fast numerical integration of the extended nonlinear Schroedinger equation for fully three dimensional wave motion

  9. Surface Wave Amplitude Anomalies in the Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy, C.; Ekstrom, G.

    2011-12-01

    We determine maps of local surface wave amplitude factors across the Western United States for Rayleigh and Love waves at discrete periods between 25 and 125s. Measurements of raw amplitude anomalies are made from data recorded at 1161 USArray stations for minor arc arrivals of earthquakes with Mw>5.5 occurring between 2006 and 2010. We take the difference between high-quality amplitude anomaly measurements for events recorded on station pairs less than 2 degrees apart. The mean of these differences for each station pair is taken as the datum. Surface wave amplitudes are controlled by four separate mechanisms: focusing due to elastic structure, attenuation due to anelastic structure, source effects, and receiver effects. By taking the mean of the differences of amplitude anomalies for neighboring stations, we reduce the effects of focusing, attenuation, and the seismic source, thus isolating amplitude anomalies due to near-receiver amplitude effects. We determine local amplitude factors for each USArray station by standard linear inversion of the differential data set. The individual station amplitude factors explain the majority of the variance of the data. For example, derived station amplitude factors for 50s Rayleigh waves explain 92% of the variance of the data. We explore correlations between derived station amplitude factors and local amplitude factors predicted by crust and upper mantle models. Maps of local amplitude factors show spatial correlation with topography and geologic structures in the Western United States, particularly for maps derived from Rayleigh wave amplitude anomalies. A NW-SE trending high in amplitude factors in Eastern California is evident in the 50s map, corresponding to the location of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. High amplitude factors are observed in Colorado and New Mexico in the 50s-125s maps in the location of the highest peaks of the Rocky Mountains. High amplitude factors are also seen in Southern Idaho and Eastern Wyoming in

  10. Surface Wave Cloak from Graded Refractive Index Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    La Spada, L.; McManus, T. M.; Dyke, A.; Haq, S.; Zhang, L.; Cheng, Q.; Hao, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been re-emerged on the possibility to manipulate surface waves, in particular, towards the THz and optical regime. Both concepts of Transformation Optics (TO) and metamaterials have been regarded as one of key enablers for such applications in applied electromagnetics. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time a dielectric surface wave cloak from engineered gradient index materials to illustrate the possibility of using nanocomposites to control surface wave propagation through advanced additive manufacturing. The device is designed analytically and validated through numerical simulations and measurements, showing good agreement and performance as an effective surface wave cloak. The underlying design approach has much wider applications, which span from microwave to optics for the control of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and radiation of nanoantennas. PMID:27416815

  11. Surface Wave Cloak from Graded Refractive Index Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spada, L.; McManus, T. M.; Dyke, A.; Haq, S.; Zhang, L.; Cheng, Q.; Hao, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been re-emerged on the possibility to manipulate surface waves, in particular, towards the THz and optical regime. Both concepts of Transformation Optics (TO) and metamaterials have been regarded as one of key enablers for such applications in applied electromagnetics. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time a dielectric surface wave cloak from engineered gradient index materials to illustrate the possibility of using nanocomposites to control surface wave propagation through advanced additive manufacturing. The device is designed analytically and validated through numerical simulations and measurements, showing good agreement and performance as an effective surface wave cloak. The underlying design approach has much wider applications, which span from microwave to optics for the control of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and radiation of nanoantennas.

  12. A general FEM technique to model wave propagation in cellular periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzzene, Massimo; Scarpa, Fabrizio L.

    2003-08-01

    The paper describes a finite element based technique to model the propagation of elastic waves in cellular periodic structures. The technique can be applied to predict the dynamic response of repetitive structural assemblies, such as honeycombs, network grids part of deployable antennas and space trusses. In the proposed method, the unit cell of the structure is modeled using conventional elements available in commercial finite element codes. The cell finite element model is then duplicated to obtain a representation of real and imaginary fields of the propagating wave. Instead of imposing the Bloch wave conditions using complex number relations between cell edge nodes, a set of equivalent real equations is established as constraint relations to couple real and imaginary domains. This approach is effective and flexible as it can be easily implemented into the meta-parametric languages of commercial finite element codes. Existing Lanczos routines can be used to calculate the phase constant surfaces, the modes of the repeating cells as well as the structure's harmonic response.

  13. Spatial characteristics of ocean surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmrich, Johannes; Thomson, Jim; Rogers, W. Erick; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Lehner, Susanne

    2016-08-01

    The spatial variability of open ocean wave fields on scales of O (10km) is assessed from four different data sources: TerraSAR-X SAR imagery, four drifting SWIFT buoys, a moored waverider buoy, and WAVEWATCH III Ⓡ model runs. Two examples from the open north-east Pacific, comprising of a pure wind sea and a mixed sea with swell, are given. Wave parameters attained from observations have a natural variability, which decreases with increasing record length or acquisition area. The retrieval of dominant wave scales from point observations and model output are inherently different to dominant scales retrieved from spatial observations. This can lead to significant differences in the dominant steepness associated with a given wave field. These uncertainties have to be taken into account when models are assessed against observations or when new wave retrieval algorithms from spatial or temporal data are tested. However, there is evidence of abrupt changes in wave field characteristics that are larger than the expected methodological uncertainties.

  14. Engineered surface Bloch waves in graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuanjiang; Guo, Jun; Dai, Xiaoyu; Wen, Shuangchun; Tang, Dingyuan

    2014-02-10

    A kind of tunable hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) based on the graphene-dielectric layered structure at near-infrared frequencies is presented, and the engineered surface Bloch waves between graphene-based HMM and isotropic medium are investigated. Our calculations demonstrate that the frequency and frequency range of surface Bloch waves existence can be tuned by varying the Fermi energy of graphene sheets via electrostatic biasing. Moreover, we show that the frequency range of surface Bloch waves existence can be broadened by decreasing the thickness of the dielectric in the graphene-dielectric layered structure or by increasing the layer number of graphene sheets.

  15. Hyperbolic crystallography of two-periodic surfaces and associated structures.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Hyde, Stephen T

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the families of the simplest, two-periodic constant mean curvature surfaces, the genus-two HCB and SQL surfaces, and their isometries. All the discrete groups that contain the translations of the genus-two surfaces embedded in Euclidean three-space modulo the translation lattice are derived and enumerated. Using this information, the subgroup lattice graphs are constructed, which contain all of the group-subgroup relations of the aforementioned quotient groups. The resulting groups represent the two-dimensional representations of subperiodic layer groups with square and hexagonal supergroups, allowing exhaustive enumeration of tilings and associated patterns on these surfaces. Two examples are given: a two-periodic [3,7]-tiling with hyperbolic orbifold symbol {\\sf {2223}} and a {\\sf {22222}} surface decoration.

  16. Spectral stability of periodic waves in the generalized reduced Ostrovsky equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Anna; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2017-02-01

    We consider stability of periodic travelling waves in the generalized reduced Ostrovsky equation with respect to co-periodic perturbations. Compared to the recent literature, we give a simple argument that proves spectral stability of all smooth periodic travelling waves independent of the nonlinearity power. The argument is based on the energy convexity and does not use coordinate transformations of the reduced Ostrovsky equations to the semi-linear equations of the Klein-Gordon type.

  17. Spectral stability of periodic waves in the generalized reduced Ostrovsky equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Anna; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2017-07-01

    We consider stability of periodic travelling waves in the generalized reduced Ostrovsky equation with respect to co-periodic perturbations. Compared to the recent literature, we give a simple argument that proves spectral stability of all smooth periodic travelling waves independent of the nonlinearity power. The argument is based on the energy convexity and does not use coordinate transformations of the reduced Ostrovsky equations to the semi-linear equations of the Klein-Gordon type.

  18. How ocean waves rock the Earth: Two mechanisms explain microseisms with periods 3 to 300 s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Gualtieri, Lucia; Stutzmann, Eléonore

    2015-02-01

    Microseismic activity, recorded everywhere on Earth, is largely due to ocean waves. Recent progress has clearly identified sources of microseisms in the most energetic band, with periods from 3 to 10 s. In contrast, the generation of longer-period microseisms has been strongly debated. Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain seismic wave generation: a primary mechanism, by which ocean waves propagating over bottom slopes generate seismic waves, and a secondary mechanism which relies on the nonlinear interaction of ocean waves. Here we show that the primary mechanism explains the average power, frequency distribution, and most of the variability in signals recorded by vertical seismometers, for seismic periods ranging from 13 to 300 s. The secondary mechanism only explains seismic motions with periods shorter than 13 s. Our results build on a quantitative numerical model that gives access to time-varying maps of seismic noise sources.

  19. Ocean Surface Wave Optical Roughness: Innovative Polarization Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    whitecap breaking waves. * Prof. Michael L . Banner, School of Mathematics, The University of NSW, Sydney, Australia Dr. Bertrand Chapron...of microsacle breaking waves from infrared imagery using a PIV algorithm. Meas. Sci. Technol. 16, 1961-1969. Phillips, O. M., Posner, F. L ., and... Hansen , J. P. 2001 High resolution radar measurements of the speed distribution of breaking events in wind-generated ocean waves: surface impulse

  20. Ocean Surface Wave Optical Roughness - Innovative Measurement and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    and whitecap breaking waves. * Prof. Michael L . Banner, School of Mathematics, The University of NSW, Sydney, Australia Dr. Bertrand Chapron...microsacle breaking waves from infrared imagery using a PIV algorithm. Meas. Sci. Technol. 16, 1961-1969. Phillips, O. M., Posner, F. L ., and... Hansen , J. P. 2001 High resolution radar measurements of the speed distribution of breaking events in wind-generated ocean waves: surface impulse and

  1. Coronal quasi-periodic fast-propagating magnetosonic waves observed by SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuandeng

    Coronal quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves are scare in previous studies due to the relative low temporal and spatial resolution of past telescopes. Recently, they are detected by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Here, two cases of QFP waves are presented. The analysis results indicate that QFP waves are tightly associated with the associated flares. It is indicate that QFP waves and the associated flares are possibly driven by the same physic process such as quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection process in producing flares.

  2. Isolated true surface wave in a radiative band on a surface of a stressed auxetic.

    PubMed

    Trzupek, D; Zieliński, P

    2009-08-14

    We demonstrate that a surface resonance (pseudosurface wave) may transform into a true surface wave, i.e., acquire an infinite lifetime, at a single isolated point within a bulk band (radiative region) in a model of a stressed auxetic material. In contrast with the secluded supersonic elastic surface waves, the one found here does not belong to a dispersion line of true surface waves. Therefore we propose to call it an isolated true surface wave (ITSW). The ITSW manifests itself by a deltalike peak in the local density of states and by anomalies in reflection coefficients. The phenomenon may be useful in redirecting energy and/or information from the bulk to the surface in devices supporting guided acoustic waves.

  3. Broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission by a plate with quasi-periodic surface ridges

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chunhui; Ke, Manzhu Ye, Yangtao; Xu, Shengjun; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, an acoustic system with broadband asymmetric transmission is designed and fabricated, which consists of a water-immersed aluminum plate engraved with quasi-periodically-patterned ridges on single surface. It demonstrates that when the acoustic waves are launched into the system from the structured side, they can couple into the Lamb modes in the plate efficiently and attain a high transmission; on the contrary, when the waves are incident from the opposite flat side, the coupling is weak, and the transmission is low. Superior to systems with periodic patterning, this quasi-periodically-patterned system has a broad working frequency range due to the collective contributions from the multiple diffractions specific to the structure.

  4. Broadband surface wave dispersion measurements across North America from ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensen, G. D.; Shapiro, N. M.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Campillo, M.; Stehly, L.

    2005-05-01

    Ambient seismic noise contains a significant component of Rayleigh wave energy that appears to be excited by oceanic microseisms and atmospheric forcing. These signals constitute a wavefield in which the phase is randomized by a multiplicity of sources and by scattering. Cross- correlations of the ambient wavefield between pairs of receivers can be used to extract the Rayleigh wave part of Green's function and, therefore, provide a new source of surface wave information that is particularly useful in the context of arrays of broadband seismometers such as PASSCAL experiments, the emerging USArray, or other national deployments. The method produces numerous inter-station measurements that are not sampled by traditional observational methods based on earthquake waves. The method to extract surface wave dispersion measurements from ambient noise was first applied systematically to records from USArray Transportable Array stations in California. These observations were used to construct high-resolution short-period (7-18 s) surface wave dispersion maps and to image the principal crustal geological units. In addition, it has been previously shown that reliable dispersion meausurements can be obtained at intermediate to long periods (20 - 100 sec). In particular, cross-correlations of several months of ambient seismic noise observed at several station-pairs across North America result in coherent broadband waveforms with dispersion characteristics similar to Rayleigh-wave tomography maps constructed using earthquakes waves. We extend this work by computing cross-correlations and obtaining intermediate and long period surface wave group velocity measurements for paths connecting about one hundred permanent broadband stations in North America many of which constitute the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS). We discuss the promise and limitations of the method to improve information about the crust and upper mantle across North America.

  5. Application of surface acoustic wave devices to radio telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strasilla, U.

    1983-01-01

    Three experimental Surface Acoustic Wave Resonators (SAWR) are developed and evaluated. A desired center frequency is obtained by correct spacing of the Inter-Digital Transducers (IDT). Transmitting and receiving IDT's must be close for adequate coupling and a sufficient number of reflectors are required to create a high quality standing wave. A review of oscillator theory is given and current technology evaluated.

  6. Numerical simulation of floating bodies in extreme free surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. Z.; Causon, D. M.; Mingham, C. G.; Qian, L.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we use the in-house Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow code AMAZON-SC as a numerical wave tank (NWT) to study wave loading on a wave energy converter (WEC) device in heave motion. This is a surface-capturing method for two fluid flows that treats the free surface as contact surface in the density field that is captured automatically without special provision. A time-accurate artificial compressibility method and high resolution Godunov-type scheme are employed in both fluid regions (air/water). The Cartesian cut cell method can provide a boundary-fitted mesh for a complex geometry with no requirement to re-mesh globally or even locally for moving geometry, requiring only changes to cut cell data at the body contour. Extreme wave boundary conditions are prescribed in an empty NWT and compared with physical experiments prior to calculations of extreme waves acting on a floating Bobber-type device. The validation work also includes the wave force on a fixed cylinder compared with theoretical and experimental data under regular waves. Results include free surface elevations, vertical displacement of the float, induced vertical velocity and heave force for a typical Bobber geometry with a hemispherical base under extreme wave conditions.

  7. Solitary surface waves on a magnetized plasma cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.; Sünder, D.

    1985-02-01

    We analyse high-frequency electrostatic solitary surface waves that propagate along a plasma cylinder in the presence of a constant axial magnetic field. The width of such a solitary wave, which is found to be inversely proportional to its amplitude, is expressed as a function of the magnitude of the external magnetic field.

  8. Unveiling Quasiperiodicity through Nonlinear Wave Mixing in Periodic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Bahabad, Alon; Arie, Ady; Voloch, Noa; Bruner, Ariel; Eger, David

    2007-05-18

    Quasiperiodicity is the concept of order without translation symmetry. The discovery of quasiperiodic order in natural materials transformed the way scientists examine and define ordered structure. We show and verify experimentally that quasiperiodicity can be observed by scattering processes from a periodic structure, provided the interaction area is of finite width. This is made through a momentum conservation condition, physically realizing a geometrical method used to model quasiperiodic structures by projecting a periodic structure of a higher dimension.

  9. Radar investigations of surface wave variability in shelf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhanov, Victor; Bogatov, Nikolai; Ermoshkin, Aleksei; Zuikova, Emma; Kazakov, Vasilii; Kemarskaya, Olga; Repina, Irina; Titov, Victor

    2010-05-01

    -frequency radiation scattering by the sea surface at the angles of 20 - 70 degrees, while at the grazing angles less than 10 degrees one should take into account an additional scale, i.e., steep breaking waves. Transformation of sea surface roughness spectrum on nonuniform flow for assigned wind field can be described within the framework of the energy balance equation for spectral density of wave action. The technique of determining the kinematic characteristics of sea surface roughness such as length, period, velocity of energy-carrying wave and its propagation direction by radar data obtained from the ship is described. This work was supported by the grant RFBR 08-05-00195, 07-05-00565, 07-05-12011, 07-05-10106, and 08-05-10047.

  10. A Multiscale Nested Modeling Framework to Simulate the Interaction of Surface Gravity Waves with Nonlinear Internal Gravity Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    being centimeter scale, surface mixed layer processes arising from the combined actions of tides, winds and mesoscale currents. Issues related to...the internal wave field and how it impacts the surface waves. APPROACH We are focusing on the problem of modification of the wind -wave field...does the wind -wave field evolve in the presence of surface currents driven by ISWs? 3) How does the surface gravity wave field above ISWs modify the

  11. Ocean wave properties, and implications for seismic noise from 1 to 300 s period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Herbers, Thomas; Stutzmann, Eleonore; Obrebski, Mathias; Gualtieri, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    The Longuet-Higgins and Hasselman theory of seismic and acoustic noise generation has been expanded recently from Rayleigh waves only to body waves, including a strong seismic source reduction for ocean waves in finite water depth, which is very important for periods larger than 30 s (Ardhuin and Herbers 2013). In spite of uncertainties of seismic propagation effects, the theory is very well verified for periods 2 to 10 s. This verification required the improvement of directional wave properties represented in numerical wave models, in particular due to coastal reflection. Efforts are still required to improve the variability of shoreline reflection coefficients. We are now expanding the direct modeling of wave-generated noise towards lower and higher frequencies. At high frequencies, the variability of modeled directional properties are poorly represented, as revealed by new measurements of wave spectra. This results in a poor performance of the direct model compared to ocean bottom acoustic data, and will require an upgrade of wave generation and dissipation parameterizations. For longer periods, the theory for wave propagating over varying water depths (Hasselmann 1963) provides good order of magnitude for the vertical motion recorded from 10 to 300 s. However, some uncertainties remain due to imperfect knowldge of bottom topography and ocean wave coherence properties.

  12. Wideband Scattering Diffusion by using Diffraction of Periodic Surfaces and Optimized Unit Cell Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Filippo; Monorchio, Agostino; Manara, Giuliano

    2016-05-01

    A methodology to obtain wideband scattering diffusion based on periodic artificial surfaces is presented. The proposed surfaces provide scattering towards multiple propagation directions across an extremely wide frequency band. They comprise unit cells with an optimized geometry and arranged in a periodic lattice characterized by a repetition period larger than one wavelength which induces the excitation of multiple Floquet harmonics. The geometry of the elementary unit cell is optimized in order to minimize the reflection coefficient of the fundamental Floquet harmonic over a wide frequency band. The optimization of FSS geometry is performed through a genetic algorithm in conjunction with periodic Method of Moments. The design method is verified through full-wave simulations and measurements. The proposed solution guarantees very good performance in terms of bandwidth-thickness ratio and removes the need of a high-resolution printing process.

  13. Wideband Scattering Diffusion by using Diffraction of Periodic Surfaces and Optimized Unit Cell Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Filippo; Monorchio, Agostino; Manara, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    A methodology to obtain wideband scattering diffusion based on periodic artificial surfaces is presented. The proposed surfaces provide scattering towards multiple propagation directions across an extremely wide frequency band. They comprise unit cells with an optimized geometry and arranged in a periodic lattice characterized by a repetition period larger than one wavelength which induces the excitation of multiple Floquet harmonics. The geometry of the elementary unit cell is optimized in order to minimize the reflection coefficient of the fundamental Floquet harmonic over a wide frequency band. The optimization of FSS geometry is performed through a genetic algorithm in conjunction with periodic Method of Moments. The design method is verified through full-wave simulations and measurements. The proposed solution guarantees very good performance in terms of bandwidth-thickness ratio and removes the need of a high-resolution printing process. PMID:27181841

  14. Surface wave acoustics of granular packing under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, Eric; Andreotti, Bruno; Bonneau, Lenaic

    2009-06-18

    Due to the non-linearity of Hertzian contacts, the speed of sound in granular matter increases with pressure. For a packing under gravity and in the presence of a free surface, bulk acoustic waves cannot propagate due to the inherent refraction toward the surface (the mirage effect). Thus, only modes corresponding to surface waves (Raleigh-Hertz modes) are able to propagate the acoustic signal. First, based on a non-linear elasticity model, we describe the main features associated to these surface waves. We show that under gravity, a granular packing is from the acoustic propagation point of view an index gradient waveguide that selects modes of two distinct families i.e. the sagittal and transverse waves localized in the vicinity of the free surface. A striking feature of these surface waves is the multi-modal propagation: for both transverse and sagittal waves, we show the existence of a infinite but discrete series of propagating modes. In each case, we determine the mode shape and and the corresponding dispersion relation. In the case of a finite size system, a geometric waveguide is superimposed to the index gradient wave guide. In this later case, the dispersion relations are modified by the appearance of a cut-off frequency that scales with depth. The second part is devoted to an experimental study of surface waves propagating in a granular packing confined in a long channel. This set-up allows to tune a monomodal emission by taking advantage of the geometric waveguide features combined with properly designed emitters. For both sagittal and transverses waves, we were able to isolate a single mode (the fundamental one) and to plot the dispersion relation. This measurements agree well with the Hertzian scaling law as predicted by meanfield models. Furthermore, it allows us to determine quantitatively relations on the elastic moduli. However, we observe that our data yield a shear modulus abnormally weak when compared to several meanfield predictions.

  15. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  16. Nonlinear Cylindrical Waves on a Plane Plasma Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.

    2004-01-01

    By means of the cold electron plasma equations, it is shown that surface soliton solutions can exist in the azimuthally symmetric case at the boundary of semi-infinite plasmas for both standing and running waves.

  17. Surface wave propagation in thin silver films under residual stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njeh, Anuar; Wieder, Thomas; Schneider, D.; Fuess, Hartmut; Ben Ghozlen, M. H.

    Investigations using surface acoustic waves provide information on the elastic properties of thin films. Residual stresses change the phase velocity of the surface waves. We have calculated phase velocity and dispersion of surface waves in thin silver films with a strong [111]-fibre texture. A non-linear description of surface waves propagating along the [110]-direction of the substrate has been developed on the basis of an acoustoelastic theory, taking into account residual stresses. The relative change delta_v/v of the velocity v was found to be lin-ear for large excitation frequencies. The dispersion curves were measured using a photoa-coustic method. For sputtered polycrystalline thin silver films we found good agreement be-tween the experimental and calculated dispersion curves for frequencies up to 225 MHz.

  18. Excitation of surface electromagnetic waves in a graphene-based Bragg grating

    PubMed Central

    Sreekanth, Kandammathe Valiyaveedu; Zeng, Shuwen; Shang, Jingzhi; Yong, Ken-Tye; Yu, Ting

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report the fabrication of a graphene-based Bragg grating (one-dimensional photonic crystal) and experimentally demonstrate the excitation of surface electromagnetic waves in the periodic structure using prism coupling technique. Surface electromagnetic waves are non-radiative electromagnetic modes that appear on the surface of semi-infinite 1D photonic crystal. In order to fabricate the graphene-based Bragg grating, alternating layers of high (graphene) and low (PMMA) refractive index materials have been used. The reflectivity plot shows a deepest, narrow dip after total internal reflection angle corresponds to the surface electromagnetic mode propagating at the Bragg grating/air boundary. The proposed graphene based Bragg grating can find a variety of potential surface electromagnetic wave applications such as sensors, fluorescence emission enhancement, modulators, etc. PMID:23071901

  19. Excitation of surface electromagnetic waves in a graphene-based Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Sreekanth, Kandammathe Valiyaveedu; Zeng, Shuwen; Shang, Jingzhi; Yong, Ken-Tye; Yu, Ting

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report the fabrication of a graphene-based Bragg grating (one-dimensional photonic crystal) and experimentally demonstrate the excitation of surface electromagnetic waves in the periodic structure using prism coupling technique. Surface electromagnetic waves are non-radiative electromagnetic modes that appear on the surface of semi-infinite 1D photonic crystal. In order to fabricate the graphene-based Bragg grating, alternating layers of high (graphene) and low (PMMA) refractive index materials have been used. The reflectivity plot shows a deepest, narrow dip after total internal reflection angle corresponds to the surface electromagnetic mode propagating at the Bragg grating/air boundary. The proposed graphene based Bragg grating can find a variety of potential surface electromagnetic wave applications such as sensors, fluorescence emission enhancement, modulators, etc.

  20. Orbital stability of periodic traveling wave solutions for the Kawahara equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, Thiago Pinguello; Cristófani, Fabrício; Natali, Fábio

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the orbital stability of periodic traveling waves for the Kawahara equation. We prove that the periodic traveling wave, under certain conditions, minimizes a convenient functional by using an adaptation of the method developed by Grillakis et al. [J. Funct. Anal. 74, 160-197 (1987)]. The required spectral properties to ensure the orbital stability are obtained by knowing the positiveness of the Fourier transform of the associated periodic wave established by Angulo and Natali [SIAM J. Math. Anal. 40, 1123-1151 (2008)].

  1. On periodic wave solutions and asymptotic behaviors to a generalized Konopelchenko-Dubrovsky-Kaup-Kupershmidt equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lian-Li; Tian, Shou-Fu; Yan, Hui; Wang, Li; Zhang, Tian-Tian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a lucid and systematic approach is proposed to systematically study the periodic-wave solutions and asymptotic behaviors of a (2 + 1) -dimensional generalized Konopelchenko-Dubrovsky-Kaup-Kupershmidt (gKDKK) equation, which can be used to describe certain situations from the fluid mechanics, ocean dynamics and plasma physics. Based on Bell's polynomials, the bilinear formalism and N -soliton solution of the gKDKK equation are derived, respectively. Furthermore, based on multidimensional Riemann theta functions, the periodic-wave solutions of the equation are also constructed. Finally, an asymptotic relation between the periodic-wave solutions and soliton solutions are strictly established under a limited procedure.

  2. Predominant Periods and Shear Wave Velocity an indicator for Sediment Thickness, Caracas, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocabado, V.; Schmitz, M.

    2013-05-01

    Within the Caracas seismic microzoning project, carried out by Venezuelan Foundation for Seismological Research (FUNVISIS), more than 1500 single measurements of ambient noise have been done since mid-90's in order to determinate fundamental periods of soil. In this work we show the result of these single stations applying H/V analysis, with period values between 0.2s and 2.4s, we propose a new relationship to estimate sediment thickness from period values, including the effect of the surface sediment layers, considering the values of shear-wave velocities for the first 30 m (Vs30) and the Vs value of the sedimentary layer, just above bedrock. The results indicate that this relationship generates more accurate estimates of sediment thickness comparing with depth values from other geophysical methods; this relationship was calibrated with information from 4 depth boreholes in Caracas, obtaining accurate depth values. The main objective of this new relationship is consider local information of soils in other cities, for local relationships between periods and sediment thickness, to generate accurate sediment thickness estimates from environmental noise measurements within seismic microzoning projects in Venezuela's most important cities.

  3. Ozone pollution during heat wave periods over last 15 years in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzewska, J.; Kaminski, J. W.; Jefimow, M.

    2012-04-01

    Periods characterized with the high ozone concentrations are usually associated with very high air temperature and antycyclonic conditions or meridional circulation. A 15-year (1997 - 2011) maximum daily temperature records from GSOD NOAA archive was analyzed for 20 stations in Central Europe. For each year the number of days with the maximum temperature exceeding 25oC and 30oC was calculated. For years with a positive anomaly of the number of the hot days the data were analyzed to identify exact dates and the duration of such events. This allows classification of the high temperature period as "heat waves" (periods with maximum temperature exceeding 30oC lasting at least 3 consecutive days) and hot weather periods (periods with maximum temperature exceeding 25oC and high daily average temperature). These two types of high temperature are usually associated with different air masses inflow - subtropical from the south or transformed polar from westerly directions. This indicates also the differences in contribution of transboundary transport of ozone and its precursors. For selected high temperature episodes the ozone pollution was assessed based on AirBase (1997-2009) and national database (2010-2011). The analysis covered the 8-hour running average and daily maximum concentration of ozone near the surface. Also, the contribution to the SOMO35 index during selected episodes will be calculated as a diagnostic for adverse health effects. Since the two analyzed types of hot weather periods have different origin in terms of synoptic scale situation, an attempt will be made to answer whether there are differences in the intensity of ozone episodes during selected hot weather periods. The outcome from the study will be useful for the interpretation of modelling results for air quality in future climate.

  4. Excitation and propagation of shear-horizontal-type surface and bulk acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, K Y; Yamaguchi, M

    2001-09-01

    This paper reviews the basic properties of shear-horizontal (SH)-type surface acoustic waves (SAWs) and bulk acoustic waves (BAWs). As one of the simplest cases, the structure supporting Bleustein-Gulyaev-Shimizu waves is considered, and their excitation and propagation are discussed from various view points. First, the formalism based on the complex integral theory is presented, where the surface is assumed to be covered with an infinitesimally thin metallic film, and it is shown how the excitation and propagation of SH-type waves are affected by the surface perturbation. Then, the analysis is extended to a periodic grating structure, and the behavior of SH-type SAWs under the grating structure is discussed. Finally, the origin of the leaky nature is explained.

  5. Low-loss unidirectional transducer for high frequency surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, S. V.; Martin, G.; Schmidt, H.; Wall, B.

    2011-10-01

    A multi-track unidirectional transducer for surface acoustic wave devices is presented. This transducer consists of periodic cells containing in each of the multiple tracks, only two electrodes and two gaps with quarter period width. So the structure has maximal possible dimensions of its elements for a cell period equal to one wavelength. In spite of current technological limitations this permits to implement unidirectional transducers in GHz range. In contrast to known structures with active tracks only, the structure contains alternating both active transducer tracks and passive reflector tracks with different apertures comparable to surface acoustic wave (SAW) wavelength. The tracks strongly interact due to diffraction of waves excited by such electrode structure on a piezoelectric substrate. A structure analysis by means of finite element method shows that complete unidirectionality can be reached. First experimental results are given.

  6. Full-wave model and numerical study of electromagnetic plane wave scattering by multilayered, fiber-based periodic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y.; Lesselier, D.; Zhong, Y.

    2015-07-01

    The present work aims at building up a full-wave computational model of electromagnetic nondestructive testing of composite materials produced by stacking up dielectric slabs one over the other. In each such dielectric slab, a periodic array of infinite cylindrical fibers is embedded. Electromagnetic scattering of such a multilayered, fiber-based periodic composite is investigated here for an obliquely incident plane wave, the plane of incidence of which differs from the plane orthogonal to the fibers' axes. Full-wave field representations are given first by multipole and plane wave expansions. Mode matching at boundaries between layers then yields the propagating matrices, which are applied to connect reflection and transmission coefficients of the longitudinal field components. Power reflection and transmission coefficients are obtained from time-averaged Poynting vectors. Numerical experiments with comparisons with known results illustrate the accuracy of the model proposed.

  7. Estimation of Sea Surface Wave Spectra Using Acoustic Tomography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    develops a new technique for estimating quasi- homogeneous and quasi-stationary sea surface wave frequency-direction spectra using acoustic tomog...problems for the homogeneous and quasi- homogeneous frequency-direction spectrum are introduced. The theory is ap- plied tosynthetic data which simulate...thesis introduces a technique that estimates the quasi-stationary and quasi- homogeneous sea surface wave frequency-direction spectrum from the spectra of

  8. The Development of Nonlinear Surface and Internal Wave Groups.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    propagating in groups in near-shore regions. In these regions strong coastal currents, enhanced density gradients from river outflow and from greater influence ...D-A122 103 THE DEVELOPMENT OF NONLINERR SURFACE AND INTERNAL WAVE 1/4 GROUPS (U) WOODS H4OLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION MA T K~ CHERESKIN NOV 82 WHOI...TECHNOLOGY * PROGRAM IN op GOCEANOGRAPHY II!AND OCEAN ENGINEERING -0 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION THE DEVELOPMENT OF NONLINEAR SURFACE AND INTERNAL WAVE GROUPS BY

  9. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  10. Oscillon dynamics and rogue wave generation in Faraday surface ripples.

    PubMed

    Xia, H; Maimbourg, T; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2012-09-14

    We report new experimental results which suggest that the generation of extreme wave events in the Faraday surface ripples is related to the increase in the horizontal mobility of oscillating solitons (oscillons). The analysis of the oscillon trajectories in a horizontal plane shows that at higher vertical acceleration, oscillons move chaotically, merge and form enclosed areas on the water surface. The probability of the formation of such craters, which precede large wave events, increases with the increase in horizontal mobility.

  11. Anomalous Surface Wave Launching by Handedness Phase Control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Yuehong; Yue, Weisheng; Tian, Zhen; Gu, Jianqiang; Li, Yanfeng; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Shuang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2015-11-25

    Anomalous launch of a surface wave with different handedness phase control is achieved in a terahertz metasurface based on phase discontinuities. The polarity of the phase profile of the surface waves is found to be strongly correlated to the polarization handedness, promising polarization-controllable wavefront shaping, polarization sensing, and environmental refractive-index sensing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Measurement of waves in flows across a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing wave flow across a surface wherein at least two pressure levels are sensed and combined to provide a representation of waves within the flow. In the preferred embodiment holes bored through the aircraft surface at an interval of one-half the wavelength of the flow being measured introduce pressure perturbations into a cavity so they may acoustically interfere. The interfering waveform is sensed by at least one microphone disposed in the cavity.

  13. Computation of plate wave dispersion diagrams and surface wave velocities without explicit boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Laude, Vincent; Assouar, Badreddine; Hou, Zhilin

    2010-07-01

    We discuss the computation of the band structure of plate waves using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method. This method is generally used to formulate eigenvalue problems to compute dispersion diagrams for solid-solid phononic crystals. We show how the free surface boundary condition can be included implicitly in the form of the PWE solution, thus leading to an efficient eigenvalue problem. This generic method for wave dispersion is non-iterative and does not require an initial guess for the solution. Furthermore, surface acoustic wave velocities can be estimated from the slowest wave for large wave vectors. Examples for a single plate and a multilayer plate are given, and extension to piezoelectric materials is discussed.

  14. Brain wave synchronization and entrainment to periodic acoustic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Will, Udo; Berg, Eric

    2007-08-31

    As known, different brainwave frequencies show synchronies related to different perceptual, motor or cognitive states. Brainwaves have also been shown to synchronize with external stimuli with repetition rates of ca. 10-40 Hz. However, not much is known about responses to periodic auditory stimuli with periodicities found in human rhythmic behavior (i.e. 0.5-5 Hz). In an EEG study we compared responses to periodic stimulations (drum sounds and clicks with repetition rates of 1-8 Hz), silence, and random noise. Here we report inter-trial coherence measures taken at the Cz-electrode that show a significant increase in brainwave synchronization following periodic stimulation. Specifically, we found (1) a tonic synchronization response in the delta range with a maximum response at 2 Hz, (2) a phasic response covering the theta range, and (3) an augmented phase synchronization throughout the beta/gamma range (13-44 Hz) produced through increased activity in the lower gamma range and modulated by the stimulus periodicity. Periodic auditory stimulation produces a mixture of evoked and induced, rate-specific and rate-independent increases in stimulus related brainwave synchronization that are likely to affect various cognitive functions. The synchronization responses in the delta range may form part of the neurophysiological processes underlying time coupling between rhythmic sensory input and motor output; the tonic 2 Hz maximum corresponds to the optimal tempo identified in listening, tapping synchronization, and event-interval discrimination experiments. In addition, synchronization effects in the beta and gamma range may contribute to the reported influences of rhythmic entrainment on cognitive functions involved in learning and memory tasks.

  15. Localized Electromagnetic Waves: Interactions with Surfaces and Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Nicholas R.

    The interaction of electromagnetic waves with nanostructures is an important area of research for signal processing devices, magnetic data storage, biosensors and a variety of other applications. In this work, we present analytic and numerical calculations for oscillating electric and magnetic fields coupling with excitations in magnetic materials as well as metallic and dielectric materials, near their resonance frequencies. One of the problems with the miniaturization of signal processing components is that there is a cutoff frequency associated with the transverse electric (TE) mode in waveguides. However, it is usually the TE mode which is used to achieve nonreciprocity for devices such as isolators. As a first step to circumvent this problem we looked at the absorption of electromagnetic waves in an antiferromagnet and a ferrite when the incident wave is at an arbitrary angle with respect to the magnetization direction. We calculated reflectivity and attenuated total reflectivity and found absorption and nonreciprocity, asymmetric behavior for waves traveling in opposite directions, for a broad range of propagation angles. Subsequently we also performed calculations for a transverse magnetic mode in a waveguide. The wave was allowed to propagate at an arbitrary angle with respect to the magnetization direction of the ferrite in the waveguide. We again found nonreciprocity for a wide range of angles. Our results show that this system could be used as an on-chip isolator with isolation values over 75 dB/cm in the 50 GHz range. We explored another signal processing device operating in the GHz range: a nonlinear phase shifter. Using Fe as the magnetic material allows the phase shifter to operate over a wide frequency and power range. We found a differential phase shift of greater than 50° over 3 cm for this device. The theoretical results compared well with experimental measurements. Finally, we study surface plasmon polaritons propagating along a metallic

  16. Experimental investigation of three-wave interactions of capillary surface-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhanu, Michael; Cazaubiel, Annette; Deike, Luc; Jamin, Timothee; Falcon, Eric

    2014-11-01

    We report experiments studying the non-linear interaction between two crossing wave-trains of gravity-capillary surface waves generated in a closed laboratory tank. Using a capacitive wave gauge and Diffusive Light Photography method, we detect a third wave of smaller amplitude whose frequency and wavenumber are in agreement with the weakly non-linear triadic resonance interaction mechanism. By performing experiments in stationary and transient regimes and taking into account the viscous dissipation, we estimate directly the growth rate of the resonant mode in comparison with theory. These results confirm at least qualitatively and extend earlier experimental results obtained only for unidirectional wave train. Finally we discuss relevance of three-wave interaction mechanisms in recent experiment studying capillary wave turbulence.

  17. A new method to estimate wave height of specified return period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liping; Xu, Xin; Liu, Guilin; Chen, Baiyu; Chen, Zhengshou

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to estimate the wave height of a specific return period based on the Hurst rule and a self-affine fractal formula. A detailed description of our proposed model is presented in this paper. We use the proposed model to analyze wave height data recorded along the coast of Chaolian Island from 1963 to 1989. The results show that the performance of our proposed model in estimating design wave heights is superior to traditional models.

  18. Finite element analysis of true and pseudo surface acoustic waves in one-dimensional phononic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Graczykowski, B. Alzina, F.; Gomis-Bresco, J.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2016-01-14

    In this paper, we report a theoretical investigation of surface acoustic waves propagating in one-dimensional phononic crystal. Using finite element method eigenfrequency and frequency response studies, we develop two model geometries suitable to distinguish true and pseudo (or leaky) surface acoustic waves and determine their propagation through finite size phononic crystals, respectively. The novelty of the first model comes from the application of a surface-like criterion and, additionally, functional damping domain. Exemplary calculated band diagrams show sorted branches of true and pseudo surface acoustic waves and their quantified surface confinement. The second model gives a complementary study of transmission, reflection, and surface-to-bulk losses of Rayleigh surface waves in the case of a phononic crystal with a finite number of periods. Here, we demonstrate that a non-zero transmission within non-radiative band gaps can be carried via leaky modes originating from the coupling of local resonances with propagating waves in the substrate. Finally, we show that the transmission, reflection, and surface-to-bulk losses can be effectively optimised by tuning the geometrical properties of a stripe.

  19. Laser-induced periodic annular surface structures on fused silica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Brelet, Yohann; Forestier, Benjamin; Houard, Aurelien; Yu, Linwei; Deng, Yongkai; Jiang, Hongbing

    2013-06-24

    We report on the formation of laser-induced periodic annular surface structures on fused silica irradiated with multiple femtosecond laser pulses. This surface morphology emerges after the disappearance of the conventional laser induced periodic surface structures, under successive laser pulse irradiation. It is independent of the laser polarization and universally observed for different focusing geometries. We interpret its formation in terms of the interference between the reflected laser field on the surface of the damage crater and the incident laser pulse.

  20. Polarization controlled directional propagation of Bloch surface wave.

    PubMed

    Kovalevich, Tatiana; Boyer, Philippe; Suarez, Miguel; Salut, Roland; Kim, Myun-Sik; Herzig, Hans Peter; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Grosjean, Thierry

    2017-03-06

    Bloch surface waves (BSWs) are recently developing alternative to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Due to dramatically enhanced propagation distance and strong field confinement these surface states can be successfully used in on-chip all-optical integrated devices of increased complexity. In this work we propose a highly miniaturized grating based BSW coupler which is gathering launching and directional switching functionalities in a single element. This device allows to control with polarization the propagation direction of Bloch surface waves at subwavelength scale, thus impacting a large panel of domains such as optical circuitry, function design, quantum optics, etc.

  1. Acoustomicrofluidic application of quasi-shear surface waves.

    PubMed

    Darinskii, A N; Weihnacht, M; Schmidt, H

    2017-02-20

    The paper analyzes the possibility of using predominantly boundary polarized surface acoustic waves for actuating fluidic effects in microchannels fabricated inside containers made of PDMS. The aim is to remove a shortcoming peculiar to conventionally utilized predominantly vertically polarized waves. Such waves strongly attenuate while they propagate under container side walls because of the leakage into them. Due to a specific feature of PDMS - extremely small shear elastic modulus - losses of boundary polarized modes should be far smaller. The amplitude of vertical mechanical displacements can be increased right inside the channel owing to the scattering of acoustic fields. As an example, the predominantly vertically polarized surface wave on 128YX LiNbO3 is compared with the quasi-shear leaky wave on 64YX LiNbO3. Our computations predict that, given the electric power supplied to the launching transducer, the quasi-shear wave will drive the fluid more efficiently than the surface wave on 128YX LiNbO3 when the container wall thickness is larger than 25-30 wavelengths, if there are no additional scatterers inside the channel. In the presence of a scatterer, such as a thin gold strip, the quasi-shear wave can be more efficient when the wall thickness exceeds 10-15 wavelengths.

  2. Steep waves in free-surface flow past narrow topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Stephen L.; Binder, Benjamin J.; Mattner, Trent W.; Denier, James P.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we compute steep forced solitary wave solutions for the problem of free-surface flow over a localised topographic disturbance in an otherwise flat horizontal channel bottom. A single forced solitary wave and a double-crested forced solitary wave solution are shown to exist, both of which approach the Stokes limiting configuration of an included angle of 12 0° and a stagnation point at the wave crests. The solution space for the topographically forced problem is compared to that found in Wade et al. ["On the free-surface flow of very steep forced solitary waves," J. Fluid Mech. 739, 1-21 (2014)], who considered forcing due to a localised distribution of pressure applied to the free surface. The main feature that differentiates the two types of forcing is an additional solution that exists in the pressure-forced problem, a steep wave with a cusp at a single wave crest. Our numerical results suggest that this cusped-wave solution does not exist in the topographically forced problem.

  3. Shear elasticity estimation from surface wave: the time reversal approach.

    PubMed

    Brum, J; Catheline, S; Benech, N; Negreira, C

    2008-12-01

    In this work the shear elasticity of soft solids is measured from the surface wave speed estimation. An external source creates mechanical waves which are detected using acoustic sensors. The surface wave speed estimation is extracted from the complex reverberated elastic field through a time-reversal analysis. Measurements in a hard and a soft gelatin-based phantom are validated by independent transient elastography estimations. In contrast with other elasticity assessment methods, one advantage of the present approach is its low sound technology cost. Experiments performed in cheese and soft phantoms allows one to envision applications in the food industry and medicine.

  4. Drag reduction characteristics of small amplitude rigid surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cary, A. M., Jr.; Weinstein, L. M.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of reducing drag by using rigid, wavy surfaces is investigated both analytically and experimentally. Although pressure drag for rigid sine-wave surfaces can be predicted empirically, viscous drag for even shallow waves was poorly predicted by state-of-the-art turbulent boundary layer calculation procedures. Calculations for the effects of geometric and fluid variables on total wave drag are presented under the philosophy that trends will be nearly correct even though levels are probably incorrect. Experiments by the present authors indicate that a total drag reduction with wavy walls is possible.

  5. Coupling of Surface and Internal Gravity Waves: A Hamiltonian Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-04-01

    which w^ shall use is the somewhat unrealistic, but convenient, thin thermocline model: N(z) = 0, except near z = -D, -D+6 f N2(z)dz = g 5p/po...L) = C, -L ~*1 ~ (51) we satisfy the resonance condition between the internal wave and adjacent pairs of surface waves. In this case , a...modes as listed in Column II of Table II to represent the ocean environment. In this case , in addition to the surface waves having the equilibrium

  6. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  7. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  8. Effects of surface wave breaking on the oceanic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hailun; Chen, Dake

    2011-04-01

    Existing laboratory studies suggest that surface wave breaking may exert a significant impact on the formation and evolution of oceanic surface boundary layer, which plays an important role in the ocean-atmosphere coupled system. However, present climate models either neglect the effects of wave breaking or treat them implicitly through some crude parameterization. Here we use a one-dimensional ocean model (General Ocean Turbulence Model, GOTM) to investigate the effects of wave breaking on the oceanic boundary layer on diurnal to seasonal time scales. First a set of idealized experiments are carried out to demonstrate the basic physics and the necessity to include wave breaking. Then the model is applied to simulating observations at the northern North Sea and the Ocean Weather Station Papa, which shows that properly accounting for wave breaking effects can improve model performance and help it to successfully capture the observed upper ocean variability.

  9. Diffraction correction for precision surface acoustic wave velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz M., Alberto; Nagy, Peter B.

    2002-09-01

    Surface wave dispersion measurements can be used to nondestructively characterize shot-peened, laser shock-peened, burnished, and otherwise surface-treated specimens. In recent years, there have been numerous efforts to separate the contribution of surface roughness from those of near-surface material variations, such as residual stress, texture, and increased dislocation density. As the accuracy of the dispersion measurements was gradually increased using state-of-the-art laser-ultrasonic scanning and sophisticated digital signal processing methods, it was recognized that a perceivable dispersive effect, similar to the one found on rough shot-peened specimens, is exhibited by untreated smooth surfaces as well. This dispersion effect is on the order of 0.1%, that is significantly higher than the experimental error associated with the measurements and comparable to the expected velocity change produced by near-surface compressive residual stresses in metals below their yield point. This paper demonstrates that the cause of this apparent dispersion is the diffraction of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) as it travels over the surface of the specimen. The results suggest that a diffraction correction may be introduced to increase the accuracy of surface wave dispersion measurements. A simple diffraction correction model was developed for surface waves and this correction was subsequently validated by laser-interferometric velocity measurements on aluminum specimens. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  10. Tensorial Minkowski functionals of triply periodic minimal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mickel, Walter; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E.; Mecke, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of the formation and properties of a complex spatial structure relies on robust quantitative tools to characterize morphology. A systematic approach to the characterization of average properties of anisotropic complex interfacial geometries is provided by integral geometry which furnishes a family of morphological descriptors known as tensorial Minkowski functionals. These functionals are curvature-weighted integrals of tensor products of position vectors and surface normal vectors over the interfacial surface. We here demonstrate their use by application to non-cubic triply periodic minimal surface model geometries, whose Weierstrass parametrizations allow for accurate numerical computation of the Minkowski tensors. PMID:24098847

  11. Ion-acoustic nonlinear periodic waves in electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, J. K.; Mishra, M. K.

    2010-10-15

    Ion-acoustic nonlinear periodic waves, namely, ion-acoustic cnoidal waves have been studied in electron-positron-ion plasma. Using reductive perturbation method and appropriate boundary condition for nonlinear periodic waves, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived for the system. The cnoidal wave solution of the KdV equation is discussed in detail. It is found that the frequency of the cnoidal wave is a function of its amplitude. It is also found that the positron concentration modifies the properties of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves. The existence regions for ion-acoustic cnoidal wave in the parameters space (p,{sigma}), where p and {sigma} are the positron concentration and temperature ratio of electron to positron, are discussed in detail. In the limiting case these ion-acoustic cnoidal waves reduce to the ion-acoustic soliton solutions. The effect of other parameters on the characteristics of the nonlinear periodic waves is also discussed.

  12. Estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity by inversion of Rayleigh waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The shear-wave (S-wave) velocity of near-surface materials (soil, rocks, pavement) and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many groundwater, engineering, and environmental studies. Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered-earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix provides a measure of dispersion-curve sensitivity to earth properties. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence on a dispersion curve in a high-frequency range (>5 Hz) followed by layer thickness. An iterative solution technique to the weighted equation proved very effective in the high-frequency range when using the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques. Convergence of the weighted solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Synthetic examples demonstrated calculation efficiency and stability of inverse procedures. We verify our method using borehole S-wave velocity measurements.Iterative solutions to the weighted equation by the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques are derived to estimate near-surface shear-wave velocity. Synthetic and real examples demonstrate the calculation efficiency and stability of the inverse procedure. The inverse results of the real example are verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements.

  13. Experimental study of spatiotemporally localized surface gravity water waves.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Akhmediev, N; Hoffmann, N P

    2012-07-01

    We present experimental results on the study of spatiotemporally localized surface wave events on deep water that can be modeled using the Peregrine breather solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. These are often considered as prototypes of oceanic rogue waves that can focus wave energy into a single wave packet. For small steepness values of the carrier gravity waves the Peregrine breathers are relatively wide, thus providing an excellent agreement between the theory and experimental results. For larger steepnesses the focusing leads to temporally and spatially shorter events. Nevertheless, agreement between measurements and the Peregrine breather theory remains reasonably good, with discrepancies of modulation gradients and spatiotemporal symmetries being tolerable. Lifetimes and travel distances of the spatiotemporally localized wave events determined from the experiment are in good agreement with the theory.

  14. Acoustic tweezing of particles using decaying opposing travelling surface acoustic waves (DOTSAW).

    PubMed

    Ng, Jia Wei; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Neild, Adrian

    2017-10-11

    Surface acoustic waves offer a versatile and biocompatible method of manipulating the location of suspended particles or cells within microfluidic systems. The most common approach uses the interference of identical frequency, counter propagating travelling waves to generate a standing surface acoustic wave, in which particles migrate a distance less than half the acoustic wavelength to their nearest pressure node. The result is the formation of a periodic pattern of particles. Subsequent displacement of this pattern, the prerequisite for tweezing, can be achieved by translation of the standing wave, and with it the pressure nodes; this requires changing either the frequency of the pair of waves, or their relative phase. Here, in contrast, we examine the use of two counterpropagating traveling waves of different frequency. The non-linearity of the acoustic forces used to manipulate particles, means that a small frequency difference between the two waves creates a substantially different force field, which offers significant advantages. Firstly, this approach creates a much longer range force field, in which migration takes place across multiple wavelengths, and causes particles to be gathered together in a single trapping site. Secondly, the location of this single trapping site can be controlled by the relative amplitude of the two waves, requiring simply an attenuation of one of the electrical drive signals. Using this approach, we show that by controlling the powers of the opposing incoherent waves, 5 μm particles can be migrated laterally across a fluid flow to defined locations with an accuracy of ±10 μm.

  15. A Variable-resolution Surface Wave Dispersion Study of Eurasia, North Africa, and Surrounding Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E

    2005-03-21

    This paper presents the results of a large-scale study of surface wave dispersion performed across Eurasia and North Africa. Improvements were made to previous surface wave work by enlarging the study region, increasing path density, improving spatial resolution, and expanding the period range. This study expands the coverage area northwards and eastwards relative to a previous dispersion analysis, which covered only North Africa and the Middle East. We have significantly increased the number of seismograms examined and group velocity measurements made. We have now made good quality dispersion measurements for about 30,000 Rayleigh wave and 20,000 Love wave paths, and have incorporated measurements from several other researchers into the study. A conjugate gradient method was employed for the group velocity tomography, which improved the inversion from the previous study by adopting a variable smoothness. This technique allows us to go to higher resolution where the data allow without producing artifacts. The current results include both Love and Rayleigh wave inversions across the region for periods from 7 to 100 seconds at 1{sup o} resolution. Short period group velocities are sensitive to slow velocities associated with large sedimentary features such as the Caspian Sea, West Siberian Platform, Mediterranean Sea, Bay of Bengal, Tarim Basin, and Persian Gulf. Intermediate periods are sensitive to differences in crustal thickness, such as those between oceanic and continental crust or along orogenic zones and continental plateaus. At longer periods, fast velocities are consistently found beneath cratons while slow upper mantle velocities occur along rift systems, subduction zones, and collision zones such as the Tethys Belt. We have compared the group velocities at various periods with features such as sediment thickness, topographic height, crustal thickness, proximity to plate boundaries, lithospheric age and lithospheric thickness, and find significant

  16. Evaluation of Wave-Dependent Surface Roughness Parameterization Using a Coupled Atmosphere-Wave Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.

    2016-02-01

    The coupling of waves to the atmosphere is an obvious and necessary step toward a unified approach in order to improve the description of the atmospheric boundary layer and the forecast of ocean waves. There have been a number of studies on the effect of surface waves on air-sea transfer process, especially at high winds over the sea such as typhoons and hurricanes. Although an air-sea coupling in tropical cyclones is useful for improving model intensity forecasts, the wave-dependent surface parameterization at the air-sea interface has a strong influence on tropical cyclone structure and intensity. In this study, several wave-dependent surface roughness parameterizations are evaluated, and sensitivity of tropical cyclone simulations to the parameterizations is examined using a coupled atmosphere-wave model. The sea surface roughness estimated by several parameterizations may lead to the significant difference on both wave fields and typhoon intensity. A change of drag coefficients due to the roughness parameterizations makes the change of typhoon intensity because of frictional convergence changes, which results in alteration of wind fields, and then wave fields. Further details will be presented in the conference.

  17. New Travelling Solitary Wave and Periodic Solutions of the Generalized Kawahara Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Huaitang; Yin Huicheng

    2007-09-06

    A simple elliptic equation method is used for constructing exact trevelling wave solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations(PDEs) in a unified way. With the aid of Maple, more new travelling solitary wave and periodic solutions are obtained for the generalized Kawahara equation.

  18. Stratification and Dissipation Effects in Running 2D Surface and Internal Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistovich, A. V.; Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    Problem of 2D gravity wave propagation inside and along a free surface of a deep viscous stratified fluid is analyzed analytically basing on set of fundamental governing equations that are continuity and Navier-Stokes neglecting by compressibility effects. Conventional boundary conditions taking into account solid films on the free surface where used. In a limit of clean fluid surface the set is transformed into partial differential equation of the fourth order for a stream function. The sense of applied approximations is discussed. In infinitesimal limit the equation is split on independent sub-equations with characteristic dispersion relations describing propagating independent surface and internal waves. Waves are supplemented by fine flow components. Relations between amplitude of regular waves and singular perturbed components corresponding of a fine structure are derived and discussed. Expressions for vorticity and rate of baroclinic generation of vorticity are presented. Waves of finite amplitudes are investigated in the limit of non-viscous fluid. Two kinds of the running surface wave forms for different values of the wave steepness were calculated and discussed. New approximate non-linear equations was solved and a set of solutions for stratified and homogeneous fluids describing running waves of small finite and large steepness of the waves are constructed. Received expressions for drift velocity are transferred into well-known Stokes solutions in limit of small steepness. Calculations of running periodic internal waves are compared with data of laboratory experiments performed on USU "HPC IPMech RAS" under support of Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation (Goscontract No. 16.518.11.7059. Extrapolation results of calculations on the environmental conditions are speculated.

  19. Ambient Noise Cross-correlation Surface Wave Tomography of the Continental United States and Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensen, G. D.; McCoy, C.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Levshin, A. L.; Barmin, M. P.; Shapiro, N. M.

    2006-12-01

    The recent development of surface wave tomography based on ambient noise cross-correlations has provided good results on regional scales and relatively short periods less than 40 seconds. This technique however is viable at longer periods and on the continental scale. We present dispersion maps from ambient noise cross- correlation surface-wave tomography for the continental United States and Alaska between 10 and 60 seconds period. Using up to 2 years of data from over 250 permanent and temporary stations obtained from the IRIS DMC and the Canadian National Seismic Network we compute cross-correlations for all station pairs. An automated dispersion analysis technique is applied to obtain Rayleigh wave group and phase speed curves and unacceptable measurements are removed. Dispersion curves from over 12,500 paths are retained in the continental US and about 1,000 cross-correlation and earthquake paths result in Alaska. We obtain isotropic Rayleigh wave group and phase speed maps on a one half degree grid using a damped ray theoretical inversion. Compared to previous teleseismic earthquake techniques, the short period maps provide better resolution of smaller scale features, especially those in the crust. The improved path coverage also enhances resolution at longer periods compared to previous maps with better delineation of tectonic provinces. In Alaska, limited station coverage and earthquake distribution confine the results to the south-central part of the state. Preliminary azimuthally anisotropic Rayleigh wave tomography maps are also presented together with an assessment of their robustness.

  20. Triply periodic minimal and constant mean curvature surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Grosse-Brauckmann, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We want to summarize some established results on periodic surfaces which are minimal or have constant mean curvature, along with some recent results. We will do this from a mathematical point of view with a general readership in mind. PMID:24098842