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Sample records for peripheral arterial blood

  1. Enhanced external counterpulsation improves peripheral resistance artery blood flow in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Avery, Joseph C; Beck, Darren T; Casey, Darren P; Sardina, Paloma D; Braith, Randy W

    2014-03-01

    Enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) increases coronary artery perfusion and improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in peripheral muscular conduit arteries. It is unknown whether vasodilatory capacity is improved in the peripheral resistance vasculature. Here we provide novel evidence from the first randomized, sham-controlled study that EECP increases peak limb blood flow and improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in both calf and forearm resistance arteries in patients with coronary artery disease.

  2. Peripheral arterial line (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peripheral arterial line is a small, short plastic catheter placed through the skin into an artery of the arm or leg. The purpose of a peripheral arterial line is to allow continuous monitoring of blood pressure ...

  3. Peripheral artery bypass - leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007394.htm Peripheral artery bypass - leg To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Peripheral artery bypass is surgery to reroute the blood supply ...

  4. What Is Peripheral Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Peripheral Artery Disease? Peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) is ... that affects blood flow to the legs. Normal Artery and Artery With Plaque Buildup The illustration shows ...

  5. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  6. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  7. Peripheral arterial blood pressure monitoring adequately tracks central arterial blood pressure in critically ill patients: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Mignini, Mariano Alejandro; Piacentini, Enrique; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2006-01-01

    Invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring is a common practice in intensive care units (ICUs). Accuracy of invasive blood pressure monitoring is crucial in evaluating the cardiocirculatory system and adjusting drug therapy for hemodynamic support. However, the best site for catheter insertion is controversial. Lack of definitive information in critically ill patients makes it difficult to establish guidelines for daily practice in intensive care. We hypothesize that peripheral and central mean arterial blood pressures are interchangeable in critically ill patients. This is a prospective, observational study carried out in a surgical-medical ICU in a teaching hospital. Fifty-five critically ill patients with clinical indication of invasive arterial pressure monitoring were included in the study. No interventions were made. Simultaneous measurements were registered in central (femoral) and peripheral (radial) arteries. Bias and precision between both measurements were calculated with Bland-Altman analysis for the whole group. Bias and precision were compared between patients receiving high doses of vasoactive drugs (norepinephrine or epinephrine >0.1 microg/kg/minute or dopamine >10 microg/kg/minute) and those receiving low doses (norepinephrine or epinephrine <0.1 microg/kg/minute or dopamine <10 microg/kg/minute). Central mean arterial pressure was 3 +/- 4 mmHg higher than peripheral mean arterial pressure for the whole population and there were no differences between groups (3 +/- 4 mmHg for both groups). Measurement of mean arterial blood pressure in radial or femoral arteries is clinically interchangeable. It is not mandatory to cannulate the femoral artery, even in critically ill patients receiving high doses of vasoactive drugs.

  8. Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the setting of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a relatively common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that leads to progressive narrowing of the lumen of leg arteries. Circulating monocytes are in contact with the arterial wall and can serve as reporters of vascular pathology in the setting of PAD. We performed gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with PAD and controls without PAD to identify differentially regulated genes. Methods PAD was defined as an ankle brachial index (ABI) ≤0.9 (n = 19) while age and gender matched controls had an ABI > 1.0 (n = 18). Microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix HG-U133 plus 2.0 gene chips and analyzed using GeneSpring GX 11.0. Gene expression data was normalized using Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA) normalization method, differential expression was defined as a fold change ≥1.5, followed by unpaired Mann-Whitney test (P < 0.05) and correction for multiple testing by Benjamini and Hochberg False Discovery Rate. Meta-analysis of differentially expressed genes was performed using an integrated bioinformatics pipeline with tools for enrichment analysis using Gene Ontology (GO) terms, pathway analysis using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), molecular event enrichment using Reactome annotations and network analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis suite. Extensive biocuration was also performed to understand the functional context of genes. Results We identified 87 genes differentially expressed in the setting of PAD; 40 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated. We employed an integrated bioinformatics pipeline coupled with literature curation to characterize the functional coherence of differentially regulated genes. Conclusion Notably, upregulated genes mediate immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, stress response, phosphorylation, hemostasis, platelet activation and platelet aggregation. Downregulated genes included several genes from

  9. Peripheral arterial blood pressure versus central crterial blood pressure monitoring in critically ill patients after Cardio-pulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rana Altaf; Ahmad, Suhail; Naveed, Anjum; Baig, Mirza Ahmad Raza

    2017-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of peripheral (radial) arterial access as compared to central (femoral) arterial access for measurement of invasive blood pressure (IBP) in critically ill patients after cardiopulmonary bypass. Sixty patients (60) who required high inotropic/vasopressor support on weaning from cardio-pulmonary bypass and weaned off in 2(nd) attempt were included in this study. The duration of this study was from June 2015 to August 2016. Radial and femoral arterial access was achieved in all patients for simultaneous measurement of blood pressure. Arterial pressures were noted after 5, 15 and 30 minutes of weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass for both radial and femoral artery simultaneously. Mean age of study patients was 56.48±11.17 years. 85% patients were male. There was significant difference in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressures between the radial artery and femoral artery cannulation. Mean arterial pressures were significantly high in femoral artery as compared to the radial artery. The mean arterial pressures after five minutes of weaning using central access were 76.28±10.21 mmHg versus 64.15±6.76 mmHg in peripheral arterial access (p-value <0.001). Similarly we also found significant difference in mean arterial pressures after 15 minutes of weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass 78.70±10.12 mmHg in central access versus 72.03±6.76 mmHg using peripheral arterial access (p-value <0.001). The difference in arterial pressures were less marked as compared to the previous differences after 30 minutes of weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass as compared to the earlier readings (p-value 0.001). Peripheral arterial pressures are unreliable in critically ill patients after cardiopulmonary bypass receiving high dose of inotropic drugs. Central arterial access should be used in these patients to get accurate estimates of patients' blood pressure in early periods after cardiopulmonary bypass.

  10. Wall morphology, blood flow and wall shear stress: MR findings in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Galizia, Mauricio S; Barker, Alex; Liao, Yihua; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James; McDermott, Mary M; Markl, Michael

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-directional velocity encoding. During 1 year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age, 70 ± 12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contra-indications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with three-directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling and plaque progression. • Femoral plaques are associated with altered dynamics of peripheral blood flow. • Multi-contrast MRI can investigate the presence and type of atherosclerotic plaques. • Three-dimensional velocity-encoding phase-contrast MRI can investigate flow and wall shear stress. • Atherosclerotic peripheral arteries demonstrate increased systolic velocities and wall shear stress.

  11. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; Peroneal artery - ...

  12. Basis of monitoring central blood pressure and hemodynamic parameters by peripheral arterial pulse waveform analyses.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Hiroshi; Katsuda, Shin-ichiro

    2013-01-01

    In hypertension clinics, central blood pressure (CBP) should be estimated, instead of directly measured, by the "signal processing" of a noninvasive peripheral pressure waveform. This paper deals with the data obtained in our three separate studies focusing on a major estimation method, i.e., radial artery late systolic shoulder pressure (rSBP2)-based CBP estimation. Study 1: Using a wave separation analysis of precise animal data of pressure wave transmission along the upper-limb arteries, we first demonstrate that pulse pressure amplification is largely attributable to local wave reflection alone. Study 2: A frequency component analysis of simultaneously recorded human central and radial artery pressure waveforms showed a predominance of lower (1st+2nd) harmonic components in determining the central augmentation peak amplitude. The features of a central pressure waveform, including its phase property, may contribute to the less-altered transmission of augmentation peak pressure to rSBP2. Study 3: Comparisons of noninvasive rSBP2 with direct or estimated central systolic blood pressure (cSBP) revealed broad agreement but also augmentation-dependent biases. Based on the features of the biases as well as the counterbalanced relationship between pulse pressure amplification and the transmission-induced alterations of augmentation peak amplitude observed in Study 2, we propose an improved cSBP estimate, SBPm, the simple arithmetic mean of rSBP2 and peripheral systolic blood pressure.

  13. Signature of subclinical femoral artery atherosclerosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Llorente-Cortés, Vicenta; de Gonzalo-Calvo, David; Orbe, Josune; Páramo, Jose Antonio; Badimon, Lina

    2014-06-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a relevant public health problem associated with increased risk of morbimortality. Most of the patients with this condition are asymptomatic. Therefore, the development of accessible biochemical markers seems to be necessary to anticipate diagnosis. Our hypothesis is that asymptomatic subjects with objectively confirmed femoral artery atherosclerosis could be distinguished from control subjects by gene expression analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A total of 37 asymptomatic males over 50 years old were recruited at the University Clinic of Navarra (Spain). Nineteen participants were free from atherosclerotic vascular disease and 18 participants presented subclinical femoral artery atherosclerosis defined by means of Doppler ultrasound. PBMC were isolated from blood and the RNA extracted. A panel of atherosclerotic-related genes were evaluated by Taqman low-density array. In univariate logistic regression models, we found a direct relationship between IL4, ITGAM and TLR2 expression levels in PBMC and femoral atherosclerosis, even when the models were adjusted for age and hypertension prevalence. Multivariate logistic regression models showed that elevated IL4 expression levels were intimately associated with subclinical femoral atherosclerosis after adjusting for the same potential confounders. Current data suggest that gene expression in PBMC, in particular IL4 expression, could be a useful tool in the diagnosis of femoral artery atherosclerosis in asymptomatic patients. Furthermore, in patients with no differences in cardiovascular risk factors except for hypertension, the results point to the immune and inflammatory deregulation as a feature of subclinical peripheral atherosclerosis. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  14. The relationship between complete blood count parameters and Fontaine's Stages in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Demirtas, Sinan; Karahan, Oguz; Yazici, Suleyman; Guclu, Orkut; Caliskan, Ahmet; Yavuz, Celal; Kucuker, Aslihan; Mavitas, Binali

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate whether blood count parameters differ according to the stages of Fontaine's classification and to investigate the relationship between hemogram parameters and the severity of the disease. Eighty-two peripheral arterial disease patients were examined prospectively. Patients were classified according to the Fontaine classification system. Fifty newly diagnosed patients were included in the study. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, mean platelet volume, and red blood cell distribution width values were recorded. Mean neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio values were found to be 3.31 ± 1.1% in Stage I, 3.11 ± 1.3% in Stage II, and 3.48 ± 1.1% in Stage III (p > 0.05). Mean platelet volume values were found to be 7.8 ± 0.6 fl (Stage I), 8.2 ± 1.0 fl (Stage II), and 9.0 ± 0.9 fl (Stage III) (p < 0.05). Red blood cell distribution width values were found to be 13.6 ± 1.0% in Stage I, 14.8 ± 1.7% in Stage II, and 15.4 ± 2.3% in Stage III, being significantly different among all three stages (p < 0.05). Both red blood cell distribution width and mean platelet volume are found to be associated with the severity of atherosclerotic disease in patients with peripheral arterial disease. This finding hypothesizes that complete blood counting parameters may serve as a beneficial and cost-effective method for monitoring atherosclerotic peripheral disease. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Fourier analysis of peripheral blood pressure and flow in intraoperative assessment of infrainguinal arterial reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Cheshmedzhiev, Mihail V; Mircheva, Iskra S; Jordanov, Emil D; Kovacheva, Nina R

    2014-01-01

    To assess infrainguinal arterial reconstructions by intraoperative flowmetry under the distal anastomosis using a fast Fourier transformation; calculate and compare the amplitude ratios of peripheral arterial blood pressure and volume flow before and after drug-induced vasodilation of occluded bypass grafts and bypass grafts that have been patent at least for 1 year. To find what magnitude of the change of these ratios indicate a long-term patency of the bypass grafting. We compared the results of the intraoperative flowmetry tests of 97 patients with infrainguinal arterial reconstructions. The patients were divided into two groups based on the graft status: the grafts in 49 patients were patent for at least a year, and 48 patients had failed bypass. We used a fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the pressure and blood flow waves and compared the ratios of their amplitudes before and after administration of a vasodilator drug into the graft. Comparing the ratios obtained before and those after administration of the drug we quantified their change in each group and analysed them. After a drug-induced vasodilation, the blood pressure and flow amplitude ratios for the group with compromised reconstructions were less than 1.9 times smaller than those before drug infusion, while for the group with bypass grafts that had been functional for at least 12 months the ratios declined by more than 1.9 approximately 2 times. The magnitude of the change of amplitude ratios of the peripheral pressure and volume flow after drug-induced vasodilation can be used to make an assessment of the bypass graft and the distal arterial segment.

  16. Intra- and Inter-rater Reliability of Peripheral Arterial Blood Flow Velocity by Means of Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Guirro, Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira; Leite, Gabriella de Paula Marcondes Ferreira; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Borges, Nathalia Cristina de Souza; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2017-05-01

    Although it is possible to find studies that analyze the velocity of blood flow in different arteries, the reliability of Doppler ultrasound on peripheral arteries has not yet been completely established. Our objective was to evaluate intra- and inter-rater reliability of the measurement of blood flow velocity by Doppler ultrasound of brachial, radial, popliteal, and posterior tibial arteries. Fifty healthy individuals of both genders, aged between 18 and 45 years, were included in the study. For the evaluation of arterial blood flow velocity, a portable Doppler ultrasound device was used to measure the mean and maximum blood flow velocity of posterior tibial, popliteal, brachial, and radial arteries. Two examiners performed assessments of the same volunteers independently and twice, with an interval of 1 week between them. We found good to very good reliability for measuring the mean and maximum blood flow velocity of the arteries evaluated. The intraclass correlation coefficients ranged between 0.501 and 0.866, standard error of measurement ranged between 0.81 and 9.45 cm/s, and minimum detectable change ranged between 2.25 and 26.13 cm/s. The assessment of mean and maximum blood flow velocity of the brachial, radial, popliteal, and posterior tibial arteries by means of Doppler ultrasound presents acceptable reliability values, which supports the use of this evaluation method in research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Peripheral venous blood gas analysis: An alternative to arterial blood gas analysis for initial assessment and resuscitation in emergency and intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Shilpi; Rani, Raka; Malviya, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis is the gold standard method for assessment of oxygenation and acid base analysis, yielding valuable information about a variety of disease process. This study is aimed to determine the extent of correlation between arterial and peripheral venous samples for blood gases and acid base status in critically ill and emergency department patients and to evaluate if venous sample may be a better alternative for initial assessment and resuscitation. The prospective study was conducted on 45 patients of either sex in the age group of 15-80 years of intensive care unit and emergency ward. Relevant history, presenting complaints, vital signs, and indication for testing were recorded. Arterial and peripheral venous samples were drawn simultaneously in a pre-heparinized syringe and analyzed immediately for blood gases and acid base status. Mean difference and Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient was used to compare the result. After statistical evaluation, the present study shows minimal mean difference and good correlation (r > 0.9) between arterial and peripheral venous sample for blood gases and acid base status. Correlation in PO2 measurement was poor (r < 0.3). Thus, venous blood may be a useful alternative to arterial blood during blood gas analysis obviating the need for arterial puncture in difficult clinical situation especially trauma patients, for initial emergency department assessment and early stages of resuscitation. PMID:25885983

  18. Peripheral venous blood gas analysis: An alternative to arterial blood gas analysis for initial assessment and resuscitation in emergency and intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Shilpi; Rani, Raka; Malviya, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis is the gold standard method for assessment of oxygenation and acid base analysis, yielding valuable information about a variety of disease process. This study is aimed to determine the extent of correlation between arterial and peripheral venous samples for blood gases and acid base status in critically ill and emergency department patients and to evaluate if venous sample may be a better alternative for initial assessment and resuscitation. The prospective study was conducted on 45 patients of either sex in the age group of 15-80 years of intensive care unit and emergency ward. Relevant history, presenting complaints, vital signs, and indication for testing were recorded. Arterial and peripheral venous samples were drawn simultaneously in a pre-heparinized syringe and analyzed immediately for blood gases and acid base status. Mean difference and Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient was used to compare the result. After statistical evaluation, the present study shows minimal mean difference and good correlation (r > 0.9) between arterial and peripheral venous sample for blood gases and acid base status. Correlation in PO2 measurement was poor (r < 0.3). Thus, venous blood may be a useful alternative to arterial blood during blood gas analysis obviating the need for arterial puncture in difficult clinical situation especially trauma patients, for initial emergency department assessment and early stages of resuscitation.

  19. Blood pressure and calf muscle oxygen extraction during plantar flexion exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Luck, J Carter; Miller, Amanda J; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F; Proctor, David N; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Muller, Matthew D

    2017-04-06

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects 200 million worldwide. While PAD primarily affects large arteries, it is also associated with microvascular dysfunction, an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise, and high cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that fatiguing plantar flexion exercise that evokes claudication elicits a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation (SmO2) and a higher rise in BP in PAD compared to age-matched healthy subjects, but low-intensity steady state plantar flexion elicits similar responses between groups. In the first experiment, eight PAD patients and eight healthy controls performed fatiguing plantar flexion exercise (from 0.5 to 7 kg for up to 14 min). In the second experiment, seven PAD patients and seven healthy controls performed low-intensity plantar flexion exercise (2.0 kg for 14 min). BP, heart rate (HR), and SmO2 from near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) were measured continuously. SmO2 is the ratio of oxygenated hemoglobin to total hemoglobin, expressed as a percent. At fatigue, PAD patients had a greater increase in mean arterial BP (18 ± 2 versus vs. 10 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.029) and HR (14 ± 2 versus 6 ± 2 beats/min, P = 0.033) and a greater reduction in SmO2 (-54 ± 10 versus -12 ± 4 %, P = 0.001). However, both groups had similar physiological responses to low-intensity, non-painful plantar flexion exercise. These data suggest that PAD patients have altered oxygen uptake and/or utilization during fatiguing exercise coincident with an augmented BP response.

  20. Could Peripheral Arterial Disease Be Your Problem?

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise and yoga classes and has returned to teaching. Fast Facts Peripheral arterial disease (P.A.D.) occurs when a fatty material called plaque (pronounced plak) builds up on the inside walls of the arteries that carry blood from ...

  1. Peripheral Arterial Disease Can Be a Killer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Peripheral Arterial Disease Can Be a Killer Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table ... the arteries to narrow or become blocked, which can reduce or block blood flow. P.A.D. ...

  2. Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.)

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Peripheral Artery Disease (P.A.D.) What is P.A.D.? Arteries Clogged With Plaque Peripheral arterial disease (P. ... button on your keyboard.) Why Is P.A.D. Dangerous? Click for more information Blocked blood flow ...

  3. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with ... developing atherosclerosis, the most common cause of peripheral artery disease (PAD) . And individuals with PAD have a ...

  4. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase attenuates the blood pressure response to plantar flexion exercise in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Rachel C.; Ross, Amanda J.; Blaha, Cheryl A.; Cauffman, Aimee E.; Kaufman, Marc P.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2015-01-01

    Prostanoids are produced during skeletal muscle contraction and subsequently stimulate muscle afferent nerves, thereby contributing to the exercise pressor reflex. Humans with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex, but the metabolite(s) responsible for this augmented response is not known. We tested the hypothesis that intravenous injection of ketorolac, which blocks the activity of cyclooxygenase, would attenuate the rise in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) evoked by plantar flexion exercise. Seven PAD patients underwent 4 min of single-leg dynamic plantar flexion (30 contractions/min) in the supine posture (workload: 0.5–2.0 kg). MAP and HR were measured on a beat-by-beat basis; changes from baseline in response to exercise were determined. Ketorolac did not affect MAP or HR at rest. During the first 20 s of exercise with the most symptomatic leg, ΔMAP was significantly attenuated by ketorolac (2 ± 2 mmHg) compared with control (8 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.005), but ΔHR was similar (6 ± 2 vs. 5 ± 1 beats/min). Importantly, patients rated the exercise bout as “very light” to “fairly light,” and average pain ratings were 1 of 10. Ketorolac had no effect on perceived exertion or pain ratings. Ketorolac also had no effect on MAP or HR in seven age- and sex-matched healthy subjects who performed a similar but longer plantar flexion protocol (workload: 0.5–7.0 kg). These data suggest that prostanoids contribute to the augmented exercise pressor reflex in patients with PAD. PMID:26055794

  5. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase attenuates the blood pressure response to plantar flexion exercise in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Muller, Matthew D; Drew, Rachel C; Ross, Amanda J; Blaha, Cheryl A; Cauffman, Aimee E; Kaufman, Marc P; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-08-01

    Prostanoids are produced during skeletal muscle contraction and subsequently stimulate muscle afferent nerves, thereby contributing to the exercise pressor reflex. Humans with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex, but the metabolite(s) responsible for this augmented response is not known. We tested the hypothesis that intravenous injection of ketorolac, which blocks the activity of cyclooxygenase, would attenuate the rise in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) evoked by plantar flexion exercise. Seven PAD patients underwent 4 min of single-leg dynamic plantar flexion (30 contractions/min) in the supine posture (workload: 0.5-2.0 kg). MAP and HR were measured on a beat-by-beat basis; changes from baseline in response to exercise were determined. Ketorolac did not affect MAP or HR at rest. During the first 20 s of exercise with the most symptomatic leg, ΔMAP was significantly attenuated by ketorolac (2 ± 2 mmHg) compared with control (8 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.005), but ΔHR was similar (6 ± 2 vs. 5 ± 1 beats/min). Importantly, patients rated the exercise bout as "very light" to "fairly light," and average pain ratings were 1 of 10. Ketorolac had no effect on perceived exertion or pain ratings. Ketorolac also had no effect on MAP or HR in seven age- and sex-matched healthy subjects who performed a similar but longer plantar flexion protocol (workload: 0.5-7.0 kg). These data suggest that prostanoids contribute to the augmented exercise pressor reflex in patients with PAD.

  6. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed to restore blood flow: Angioplasty : In an angioplasty procedure, an interventional radiologist threads a catheter through a blood vessel to the affected artery and inflates a small balloon to reopen it. In some cases, the insertion ...

  7. Altered gene expression pattern in peripheral blood leukocytes from patients with arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, A V; Goryunova, L E; Khaspekov, G L; Kovalevskii, D A; Scamrov, A V; Bulkina, O S; Karpov, Yu A; Talitskii, K A; Buza, V V; Britareva, V V; Beabealashvilli, R Sh

    2006-12-01

    The role of various inflammatory mechanisms and oxidative stress in the development of atherosclerosis and arterial hypertension (AH) has been increasingly acknowledged during recent years. Hypertension per se or factors that cause hypertension along with other complications lead to infiltration of activated leukocytes in the vascular wall, where these cells contribute to the development of vascular injury by releasing cytokines, oxygen radicals, and other toxic mediators. However, molecular mechanisms underlying leukocyte activation at transcriptional level in AH are still far from being clear. To solve this problem we employed cDNA microarray technology to reveal the differences in gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes from patients with AH compared with healthy individuals. The microarray data were verified by a semi-quantitative RT-PCR method. We found 25 genes with differential expression in leukocytes from AH patients among which 21 genes were upregulated and 4 genes were downregulated. These genes are implicated in apoptosis (CASP2, CASP4, and CASP8, p53, UBID4, NAT1, and Fte-1), inflammatory response (CAGC, CXCR4, and CX3CR1), control of MAP kinase function (PYST1, PAC1, RAF1, and RAFB1), vesicular trafficking of molecules among cellular organelles (GDI-1 and GDI-2), cell redox homeostasis (GLRX), cellular stress (HSPA8 and HSP40), and other processes. Gene expression pattern of the majority of genes was similar in AH patients independent of the disease stage and used hypotensive therapy, but was clearly different from that of normotensive subjects.

  8. Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Depletion After Hepatic Arterial {sup 90}Yttrium Microsphere Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Brian I.; Metes, Diana M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The short- and long-term effects of {sup 90}Yttrium microspheres therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on peripheral blood lymphocytes are unknown and were therefore examined. Methods and Materials: Ninety-two HCC patients were enrolled in a {sup 90}Yttrium therapy study and routine blood counts were examined as part of standard clinical monitoring. Results: We found an early, profound, and prolonged lymphopenia. In a subsequent cohort of 25 additional HCC patients, prospective flow cytometric immune-monitoring analysis was performed to identify specific changes on distinct lymphocyte subsets (i.e., CD3, CD4, CD8 T, and CD19 B lymphocytes) and NK cells absolute numbers, in addition to the granulocytes and platelets subsets. We found that the pretreatment lymphocyte subset absolute numbers (with the exception of NK cells) had a tendency to be lower compared with healthy control values, but no significant differences were detected between groups. Posttherapy follow-up revealed that overall, all lymphocyte subsets, except for NK cells, were significantly (>50% from pretherapy values), promptly (as early as 24 h) and persistently (up to 30 months) depleted post-{sup 90}Yttrium microspheres therapy. In contrast, granulocytes increased rapidly (24 h) to compensate for lymphocyte depletion, and remained increased at 1-year after therapy. We further stratified patients into two groups, according to survival at 1 year. We found that lack of recovery of CD19, CD3, CD8, and especially CD4 T cells was linked to poor patient survival. No fungal or bacterial infections were noted during the 30-month follow-up period. Conclusions: The results show that lymphocytes (and not granulocytes, platelets, or NK cells) are sensitive to hepatic arterial {sup 90}Yttrium without associated clinical toxicity, and lack of lymphocyte recovery (possibly leading to dysregulation of adaptive cellular immunity) posttherapy indicates poor survival.

  9. Peripheral and central venous blood glucose concentrations in dogs and cats with acute arterial thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Klainbart, S; Kelmer, E; Vidmayer, B; Bdolah-Abram, T; Segev, G; Aroch, I

    2014-01-01

    Acute limb paralysis because of arterial thromboembolism (ATE) occurs in cats and less commonly in dogs. ATE is diagnosed based on physical examination findings and, occasionally, advanced imaging. Peripheral, affected limb venous glucose concentration is decreased in ATE, whereas its systemic concentration is within or above reference interval. Client-owned cats and dogs were divided into 3 respective groups: acute limb paralysis because of ATE (22 cats and 9 dogs); acute limb paralysis secondary to orthopedic or neurologic conditions (nonambulatory controls; 10 cats and 11 dogs); ambulatory animals presented because of various diseases (ambulatory controls; 10 cats and 9 dogs). Prospective observational, clinical study. Systemic and local (affected limb) blood glucose concentrations were measured. Their absolute and relative differences (ΔGlu and %ΔGlu, respectively) were compared among groups. ΔGlu and %ΔGlu were significantly higher in the ATE cats and dogs groups, compared to both of their respective controls (P < .0001 and P < .001, respectively). No significant differences were observed between the control groups. Receiver operator characteristics analysis of ΔGlu and %ΔGlu as predictors of ATE had area under the curve of 0.96 and 0.99 in cats, respectively, and 1.00 and 1.00, in dogs, respectively. ΔGlu cutoffs of 30 mg/dL and 16 mg/dL, in cats and dogs, respectively, corresponded to sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 90% in cats, respectively, and 100% in dogs. ΔGlu and %ΔGlu are accurate, readily available, diagnostic markers of acute ATE in paralyzed cats and dogs. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Suspension model for blood flow through a catheterized arterial stenosis with peripheral layer of plasma free from cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponalagusamy, R.

    2016-06-01

    The present article describes the blood flow in a catheterized artery with radially symmetric and axially asymmetric stenosis. To understand the effects of red cell concentration, plasma layer thickness and catheter size simultaneously, blood is considered by a two-layered model comprising a core region of suspension of all the erythrocytes (particles) supposed to be a particle-fluid mixture and a peripheral zone of cell-free plasma. The analytical expressions for flow features, such as fluid phase and particle phase velocities, flow rate, wall shear stress and resistive force are obtained. It is witnessed that the presence of the catheter causes a substantial increase in the frictional forces on the walls of arterial stenosis and catheter, shear stress and flow resistance, in addition to that, have occurred due to the presence of red cells concentration (volume fraction density of the particles) and the absence of peripheral plasma layer near the wall of the stenosed artery. The introduction of an axially asymmetric nature of stenosis and plasma layer thickness causes significant reduction in flow resistance. One can notice that the two-phase fluid (suspension model) is more profound to the thickness of peripheral plasma layer and catheter than the single-phase fluid.

  11. Acute Effects of T'ai Chi Chuan Exercise on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in Peripheral Artery Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Filipe Fernandes Oliveira; da Silva Santana, Fábio; da Silva, Thiago Souza Rosas; Cucato, Gabriel Grizzo; Farah, Breno Quintella; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the acute effect of a t'ai chi chuan session on blood pressure and heart rate in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Randomized crossover intervention study. Outpatient therapy center. Seven patients with PAD, aged 50-79 years, not using β-blockers, calcium-channel blockers, or nondihidropiridinic vasodilators. T'ai chi chuan and control session (both sessions lasted 40 minutes). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate, which were evaluated before and after the intervention (10, 30, and 50 minutes). T'ai chi chuan exercise acutely decreased systolic blood pressure at 30 minutes after exercise (p = 0.042) and increased diastolic blood pressure at 50 minutes after exercise (p = 0.041). Heart rate did not change after t'ai chi chuan exercise. T'ai chi chuan acutely decreases systolic blood pressure in patients with PAD.

  12. Intermittent pneumatic leg compressions enhance muscle performance and blood flow in a model of peripheral arterial insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roseguini, Bruno T.; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A.; Newcomer, Sean C.; Yang, Hsiao T.; Terjung, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Despite the escalating prevalence in the aging population, few therapeutic options exist to treat patients with peripheral arterial disease. Application of intermittent pneumatic leg compressions (IPC) is regarded as a promising noninvasive approach to treat this condition, but the clinical efficacy, as well the mechanistic basis of action of this therapy, remain poorly defined. We tested the hypothesis that 2 wk of daily application of IPC enhances exercise tolerance by improving blood flow and promoting angiogenesis in skeletal muscle in a model of peripheral arterial insufficiency. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to bilateral ligation of the femoral artery and randomly allocated to treatment or sham groups. Animals were anesthetized daily and exposed to 1-h sessions of bilateral IPC or sham treatment for 14–16 consecutive days. A third group of nonligated rats was also studied. Marked increases in treadmill exercise tolerance (∼33%, P < 0.05) and improved muscle performance in situ (∼10%, P < 0.05) were observed in IPC-treated animals. Compared with sham-treated controls, blood flow measured with isotope-labeled microspheres during in situ contractions tended to be higher in IPC-treated animals in muscles composed of predominantly fast-twitch white fibers, such as the plantaris (∼93%, P = 0.02). Capillary contacts per fiber and citrate synthase activity were not significantly altered by IPC treatment. Collectively, these data indicate that IPC improves exercise tolerance in a model of peripheral arterial insufficiency in part by enhancing blood flow to collateral-dependent tissues. PMID:22362398

  13. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010. Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review. We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 70 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents, bypass surgery, cilostazol, exercise, pentoxifylline, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), prostaglandins, smoking cessation, and statins. PMID:21477401

  14. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009. (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 59 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents; bypass surgery; cilostazol; exercise; pentoxifylline; percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA); prostaglandins; smoking cessation; and statins. PMID:19454099

  15. Peripheral artery disease of the legs - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000577.htm Peripheral artery disease of the legs - self-care To use ... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a narrowing of the blood ...

  16. Peripheral venous and arterial blood gas analysis in adults: are they comparable? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Anthony L; Bennett, Michael; Chatterji, Robindro; Symons, Rebecca; Pace, Nathan L; Thomas, Paul S

    2014-02-01

    Peripheral venous blood gas (PVBG) analysis is increasingly being used as a substitute for arterial blood sampling; however, comparability has not been clearly established. To determine if the pH, PCO2 and PO2 obtained from PVBG analysis is comparable with arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis. A search was conducted of electronic databases as well as hand-searching of journals and reference lists through December 2012 to identify studies comparing PVBG with ABG analysis in adult subjects. A systematic review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. A meta-analysis using a random effects model was used to calculate the average difference (bias) and the limits of agreement for the venous and arterial pH, PCO2 and PO2 . A total of 18 studies comprising 1768 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. There was considerable heterogeneity between studies with I(2) approaching 100%. There was little difference between the pH obtained from the PVBG and the ABG, with the arterial pH typically 0.03 higher than the venous pH (95% confidence interval 0.029-0.038). The venous and arterial PCO2 were not comparable because the 95% prediction interval of the bias for venous PCO2 was unacceptably wide, extending from -10.7 mm Hg to +2.4 mm Hg. The PO2 values compared poorly, the arterial PO2 typically 36.9 mm Hg greater than the venous with significant variability (95% confidence interval from 27.2 to 46.6 mm Hg). PVBG analysis compares well with ABG analysis for pH estimations in adults but not to the PCO2 or PO2 . These differences are sufficiently large to be of clinical significance. © 2014 The Authors. Respirology © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  17. Intermittent hypoxia and arterial blood pressure control in humans: role of the peripheral vasculature and carotid baroreflex.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Joshua C; Boulet, Lindsey M; Tymko, Michael M; Foster, Glen E

    2016-09-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) occurs in association with obstructive sleep apnea and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to examine the putative early adaptations at the level of the peripheral vasculature and carotid baroreflex (CBR) that may promote the development of hypertension. Ten healthy male participants (26 ± 1 yr, BMI = 24 ± 1 kg/m(2)) were exposed to 6 h of IH (1-min cycles of normoxia and hypoxia) and SHAM in a single-blinded, counterbalanced crossover study design. Ambulatory blood pressure was measured during each condition and the following night. Vascular strain of the carotid and femoral artery, a measure of localized arterial stiffness, and hemodynamic shear patterns in the brachial and femoral arteries were measured during each condition. Brachial artery reactive hyperemia flow-mediated vasodilation was assessed before and after each condition as a measure of endothelial function. CBR function and its control over leg vascular conductance (LVC) were measured after each condition with a variable-pressure neck chamber. Intermittent hypoxia 1) increased nighttime pulse pressure by 3.2 ± 1.3 mmHg, 2) altered femoral but not brachial artery hemodynamics, 3) did not affect brachial artery endothelial function, 4) reduced vascular strain in the carotid and possibly femoral artery, and 5) shifted CBR mean arterial pressure (MAP) to higher MAP while blunting LVC responses to CBR loading. These results suggest limb-specific vascular impairments, reduced vascular strain, and CBR resetting combined with blunted LVC responses are factors in the early pathogenesis of IH-induced development of hypertension. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Concentrations of C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, and haptoglobin in uterine arterial and peripheral blood in bitches with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Roman; Kostro, Krzysztof; Szczubiał, Marek

    2013-09-15

    Pyometra is a life-threatening reproductive disorder that affects the uterus of female dogs. This study was designed to identify the possible indicators of uterine inflammation by comparing C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), and haptoglobin (Hp) concentrations in uterine arterial and peripheral venous blood in bitches with open- and closed-cervix pyometra. CRP, SAA, and Hp concentrations were higher in bitches with closed-cervix pyometra irrespective of the site of blood collection. Higher acute-phase protein concentrations were observed in peripheral compared with uterine arterial blood in bitches with closed-cervix pyometra, whereas the levels were comparable in dogs with open-cervix pyometra. Our results indicate that mean acute-phase protein concentrations differ according to pyometra type/severity and blood source and suggest the possible use of peripheral blood levels of CRP, SAA, and Hp to monitor inflammation during the course of pyometra.

  19. Modeling of the blood flow in the lower extremities for dynamic diffuse optical tomography of peripheral artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marone, A.; Hoi, J. W.; Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Shrikhande, G.; Dayal, R.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is caused by a reduction of the internal diameters of the arteries in the upper or lower extremities mainly due to atherosclerosis. If not treated, its worsening may led to a complete occlusion, causing the death of the cells lacking proper blood supply, followed by gangrene that may require chirurgical amputation. We have recently performed a clinical study in which good sensitivities and specificities were achieved with dynamic diffuse optical tomography. To gain a better understanding of the physiological foundations of many of the observed effects, we started to develop a mathematical model for PAD. The model presented in this work is based on a multi-compartment Windkessel model, where the vasculature in the leg and foot is represented by resistors and capacitors, the blood pressure with a voltage drop, and the blood flow with a current. Unlike existing models, the dynamics induced by a thigh-pressure-cuff inflation and deflation during the measurements are taken into consideration. This is achieved by dynamically varying the resistances of the large veins and arteries. By including the effects of the thigh-pressure cuff, we were able to explain many of the effects observed during our dynamic DOT measurements, including the hemodynamics of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration changes. The model was implemented in MATLAB and the simulations were normalized and compared with the blood perfusion obtained from healthy, PAD and diabetic patients. Our preliminary results show that in unhealthy patients the total system resistance is sensibly higher than in healthy patients.

  20. The relative importance of systolic versus diastolic blood pressure control and incident symptomatic peripheral artery disease in women.

    PubMed

    Powell, Tiffany M; Glynn, Robert J; Buring, Julie E; Creager, Mark A; Ridker, Paul M; Pradhan, Aruna D

    2011-08-01

    Prospective data regarding risk factors for peripheral artery disease (PAD) are sparse, especially among women; the relative contribution of systolic versus diastolic blood pressure control for incident PAD has not been well studied. We evaluated the association of self-reported blood pressure control with incident symptomatic PAD in middle-aged and older women. We examined the relationship between reported hypertension and incident confirmed symptomatic PAD (n = 178) in 39,260 female health professionals aged ≥ 45 years without known vascular disease at baseline. Median follow-up was 13.3 years. Women were grouped according to presence of reported isolated diastolic (IDH), isolated systolic (ISH), or combined systolic-diastolic hypertension (SDH) using cut-points of 90 and 140 mmHg for diastolic and systolic blood pressure, respectively. SBP and DBP were modeled as continuous and categorical exposures. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs), including adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, were derived from Cox proportional hazards models. Adjusted HRs compared to women without reported hypertension were 1.0 (0.4-2.8) for IDH, 2.0 (1.3-3.1) for ISH, and 2.8 (1.8-4.5) for SDH. There was a 43% increased adjusted risk per 10 mmHg of reported SBP (95% CI 27-62%) and a gradient in risk according to SBP category (< 120, 120-139, 140-159, and ≥ 160 mmHg); HRs were 1.0, 2.3, 4.3, and 6.6 (p-trend < 0.001), respectively. Reported DBP, while individually predictive in models excluding SBP, was not predictive after adjustment for SBP. In conclusion, these prospective data suggest a strong prognostic role for uncontrolled blood pressure and, particularly, uncontrolled systolic blood pressure in the development of peripheral atherosclerosis in women.

  1. Peripheral blood circular RNA hsa_circ_0124644 can be used as a diagnostic biomarker of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenzhou; Li, Xuejie; Gao, Chuanyu; Jian, Dongdong; Hao, Peiyuan; Rao, Lixin; Li, Muwei

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of circular RNAs (circRNAs) in the peripheral blood of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and the potential use of circRNAs as diagnostic biomarkers of CAD. We first analysed peripheral blood circRNAs of 12 CAD patients and 12 control individuals by RNA microarray and found that 22 circRNAs were differentially expressed between these two groups: 12 were upregulated, and 10 were downregulated. Then, we selected 5 circRNAs as candidate biomarkers under stricter screening criteria and verified them in another group of subjects consisting of 30 control individuals and 30 CAD patients with different SYNTAX scores. These 5 circRNAs were all remarkably increased in the CAD group. Hsa_circ_0124644 had the largest area under the curve (AUC). We tested hsa_circ_0124644 in an independent cohort consisting of 115 control individuals and 137 CAD patients. After we included the risk factors for CAD, the AUC slightly increased from 0.769 (95% confidence interval = [0.710–0.827], P < 0.001) to 0.804 ([0.751–0.857], P < 0.001), and when combined with hsa_circ_0098964, the diagnostic value slightly increased. Taken together, our results suggest that hsa_circ_0124644 can be used as a diagnostic biomarker of CAD. PMID:28045102

  2. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation.

  3. [Identification of endogenous control genes for gene expression studies in peripheral blood of patients with coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Fong, S W; Suhairi, I; Mohamed, M S; Few, L L; Too, W C S; Khoo, B Y; Yussof, Z; Rahman, A R A; Yvonne-Tee, G B

    2013-01-01

    The selection of stable endogenous control genes is critical for normalization of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) data. In this study, we aimed to identify a suitable set of control genes to be used as endogenous references for gene expression evaluation in human peripheral blood samples among coronary artery disease patients. The expression levels of 12 endogenous control genes procured from TATAA Biocenter (Goteborg, Sweden) were measured in five acute coronary syndrome patients and five chronic stable angina patients. Gene expression stability was analyzed using two different software applications i.e geNorm and NormFinder. Results suggested that beta-glucuronidase is the most stable endogenous control, followed by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The NormFinder analysis further confirmed that beta-glucuronidase and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase were on the first rank order with the most stable expression among endogenous control genes analyzed and 60S acidic ribosomal protein P0. Besides this, the expression levels of 18S rRNA were revealed to be highly variable between coronary heart disease patients. We thus recommend the use of beta-glucuronidase and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase as reference genes for accurate normalization of relative quantities of gene expression levels in coronary artery disease patients using qPCR. Also the use of 18S rRNA as a control gene should be avoided.

  4. Expressions of adenosine A2A receptors in coronary arteries and peripheral blood mononuclear cells are correlated in coronary artery disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gariboldi, Vlad; Vairo, Donato; Guieu, Régis; Marlingue, Marion; Ravis, Eléonore; Lagier, David; Mari, Alissa; Thery, Elsa; Collart, Frédéric; Gaudry, Marine; Bonello, Laurent; Paganelli, Franck; Condo, Jocelyne; Kipson, Nathalie; Fenouillet, Emmanuel; Ruf, Jean; Mottola, Giovanna

    2017-03-01

    Altered coronary blood flow occurs in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Adenosine strongly impacts blood flow mostly via adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) expressed in coronary tissues. As part of a systemic regulation of the adenosinergic system, we compared A2AR expression in situ, and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in CAD patients. Aortic and coronary tissues, and PBMC were sampled in 20 CAD patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery and consecutively included. Controls were PBMC obtained from 15 healthy subjects. Expression and activity of A2AR were studied by Western blotting and cAMP measurement, respectively. A2AR expression on PBMC was lower in patients than in controls (0.83±0.31 vs 1.2±0.35 arbitrary units; p<0.01), and correlated with A2AR expression in coronary and aortic tissues (Pearson's r: 0.77 and 0.59, p<0.01, respectively). Basal and maximal cAMP productions following agonist stimulation of PBMC were significantly lower in patients than in controls (120±42 vs 191±65 and 360±113 vs 560±215pg/10(6) cells, p<0.05, respectively). In CAD patients, the increase from basal to maximal cAMP production in PBMC and aortic tissues was similar (+300% and +246%, respectively). Expression of A2AR on PBMC correlated with those measured in coronary artery and aortic tissues in CAD patients, A2AR activity of PBMC matched that observed in aorta, and A2AR expression and activity in PBMC were found reduced as compared to controls. Measuring the expression level of A2AR on PBMC represents a good tool to address in situ expression in coronary tissues of CAD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The ARIC carotid MRI study of blood cellular markers: an inverse association of monocyte myeloperoxidase content with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Matijevic, Nena; Wu, Kenneth K; Nidkarni, Nivedita; Heiss, Gerardo; Folsom, Aaron R

    2011-04-01

    We evaluated the association of blood monocyte and platelet activation markers with the risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in a multicenter study of atherosclerosis among African American and Caucasian patients. Flow cytometric analysis of blood cells was performed in 1791 participants (209 cases with PAD and 1582 noncases) from the cross-sectional Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Carotid Magnetic Resonance Imaging ([MRI] ARIC Carotid MRI) Study to assess platelet glycoproteins IIb and IIIa, P-selectin, CD40 ligand, platelet-leukocyte aggregates, monocyte lipopolysaccharide receptor, toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1, cyclooxygenase 2, and myeloperoxidase. Multivariate regression analyses evaluated the association of cellular markers with the risk of PAD. After adjusting for age, race, and gender, platelet CD40L, and monocyte myeloperoxidase (mMPO) levels were significantly lower (P < .001), and monocyte TLR-4 levels were higher (P = .03) in patients with PAD. With additional adjustments for conventional risk factors, mMPO remained inversely and independently associated with the risk of PAD (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P = .01).

  6. The ARIC Carotid MRI Study of Blood Cellular Markers: An Inverse Association of Monocyte Myeloperoxidase Content With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matijevic (Aleksic), Nena; Wu, Kenneth K.; Nidkarni, Nivedita; Heiss, Gerardo; Folsom, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the association of blood monocyte and platelet activation markers with the risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in a multicenter study of atherosclerosis among African American and Caucasian patients. Flow cytometric analysis of blood cells was performed in 1791 participants (209 cases with PAD and 1582 noncases) from the cross-sectional Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Carotid Magnetic Resonance Imaging ([MRI] ARIC Carotid MRI) Study to assess platelet glycoproteins IIb and IIIa, P-selectin, CD40 ligand, platelet–leukocyte aggregates, monocyte lipopolysaccharide receptor, toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1, cyclooxygenase 2, and myeloperoxidase. Multivariate regression analyses evaluated the association of cellular markers with the risk of PAD. After adjusting for age, race, and gender, platelet CD40L, and monocyte myeloperoxidase (mMPO) levels were significantly lower (P < .001), and monocyte TLR-4 levels were higher (P = .03) in patients with PAD. With additional adjustments for conventional risk factors, mMPO remained inversely and independently associated with the risk of PAD (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P = .01). PMID:21406422

  7. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... pale. When PAD becomes severe, you may have: Impotence Pain and cramps at night Pain or tingling ... emboli that block small arteries Coronary artery disease Impotence Open sores (ischemic ulcers on the lower legs) ...

  8. Hsa-circRNA11783-2 in peripheral blood is correlated with coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejie; Zhao, Zhenzhou; Jian, Dongdong; Li, Wentao; Tang, Haiyu; Li, Muwei

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the expression characteristics of circular RNAs in the peripheral blood of coronary artery disease patients and type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Circular RNA in the peripheral blood from 6 control individuals, 6 coronary artery disease patients, 6 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 6 coronary artery disease combined with type 2 diabetes mellitus patients was collected for microarray analysis, and a further independent cohort consisting of 20 normal individuals, 20 type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects and 20 coronary artery disease subjects was used to verify the expression of five circular RNAs chosen for further analysis. The findings were then tested in a third cohort using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. In total, 40 circular RNAs differentially expressed between the three experimental groups and the control group were identified by microarray analysis: 13 were upregulated in the experimental groups, while 27 were downregulated. Of the five circular RNAs chosen for further analysis, three were significantly downregulated in the experimental groups. The crude odds ratios and adjusted odds ratios of hsa-circRNA11783-2 showed significant differences in both the coronary artery disease group and type 2 diabetes mellitus group. We then verified hsa-circRNA11783-2 in the third cohort, and it remained closely related to both coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Hsa-circRNA11783-2 is closely related to both coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Improving the validity of peripheral venous blood gas analysis as an estimate of arterial blood gas by correcting the venous values with SvO₂.

    PubMed

    Lemoël, Fabien; Govciyan, Sandra; El Omri, Mouna; Marquette, Charles-Hugo; Levraut, Jacques

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral venous blood gas (pVBG) analysis in replacement of arterial blood gas (ABG) is limited by the unpredictable differences between arterial and venous values, especially for PCO2 and pH (ΔPCO2 and ΔpH). We hypothesized that, using the theoretical relationship linking SvO2 and blood flow, we could diminish the effect of local circulatory conditions on ΔPCO2 and ΔpH and thereby increase pVBG validity. This was a prospective cross-sectional study performed in emergency patients requiring a blood gas analysis in which ABG and pVBG were performed simultaneously. The data of 50 randomly selected patients (model group) were used for developing two equations to correct PvCO2 and pHv according to the peripheral SvO2 (SpvO2) level. The formulas derived were PvCO2cor = PvCO2 - 0.30 × (75 - SpvO2), and pHvcor = pHv + 0.001 × (75 - SpvO2). The validity of the corrected values was then tested on the remaining population (validation group). There were 281 patients included in the study, mainly for dyspnea. ΔPCO2 and ΔpH were strongly correlated with SpvO2 (r(2) = 0.62 and r(2) = 0.53, respectively, p < 0.001). Using the data of the model group, we developed equations that we applied on the validation group. We found that the corrected values were more valid than the raw values for detecting a PaCO2 > 45 mm Hg (AUC ROC = 0.96 ± 0.01 vs. 0.89 ± 0.02, p < 0.001), a PaCO2 < 35 mm Hg (AUC = 0.95 ± 0.02 vs. 0.84 ± 0.03, p < 0.001), a pHa < 7.35 (AUC = 0.97 ± 0.01 vs. 0.95 ± 0.02, p < 0.05), or a pHa > 7.45 (AUC = 0.91 ± 0.02 vs. 0.81 ± 0.04, p < 0.001). The variability of ΔPCO2 and ΔpH is significantly lowered when the venous values are corrected according to the SpvO2 value, and pVBG is therefore more accurate and valid for detecting an arterial abnormality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cryoplasty for peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    McCaslin, James E; Andras, Alina; Stansby, Gerard

    2013-08-11

    Percutaneous balloon angioplasty is an endovascular technique for restoring blood flow through an artery that has become narrowed or blocked by atherosclerosis. Narrowing of the artery following angioplasty (restenosis) is the major cause of long-term failure. Cryoplasty offers a different approach to improving long-term angioplasty results. It combines the dilation force of balloon angioplasty with cooling of the vessel wall. This systematic review evaluated cryoplasty in peripheral arterial disease and provides focus for further research in the field. This is an update of a review first published in 2007. To assess the efficacy of, and complications associated with, cryoplasty for maintaining patency in the iliac, femoropopliteal and crural arteries in the short and medium term. For this update the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (last searched October 2012) and CENTRAL (2012, Issue 10). Trial databases were searched for ongoing or unpublished studies. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles. All randomised controlled trials in which participants with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower limbs, or lower limb bypass graft stenoses, were randomised to cryoplasty with or without another procedure versus a procedure without cryoplasty were considered. This included trials where all participants received angioplasty and the randomisation was for cryoplasty versus no cryoplasty and trials where cryoplasty was used as an adjunct to conventional treatment (for example stenting) against a control. Two review authors independently reviewed, assessed and selected trials, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Seven trials (six primary cryoplasty and one adjunctive cryoplasty trial) with a combined total of 478 patients were included in this review. The trials reported patency and restenosis either by participant, lesion or vessel location. Follow-up ranged from 30 days to

  11. Multiparametric assessment of vascular function in peripheral artery disease: dynamic measurement of skeletal muscle perfusion, blood-oxygen-level dependent signal, and venous oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Englund, Erin K; Langham, Michael C; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Fanning, Molly J; Wehrli, Felix W; Mohler, Emile R; Floyd, Thomas F

    2015-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction present in patients with peripheral artery disease may be better understood by measuring the temporal dynamics of blood flow and oxygen saturation during reactive hyperemia than by conventional static measurements. Perfusion, Intravascular Venous Oxygen saturation, and T2* (PIVOT), a recently developed MRI technique, was used to measure the response to an ischemia-reperfusion paradigm in 96 patients with peripheral artery disease of varying severity and 10 healthy controls. Perfusion, venous oxygen saturation SvO2, and T2* were each quantified in the calf at 2-s temporal resolution, yielding a dynamic time course for each variable. Compared with healthy controls, patients had a blunted and delayed hyperemic response. Moreover, patients with lower ankle-brachial index had (1) a more delayed reactive hyperemia response time, manifesting as an increase in time to peak perfusion in the gastrocnemius, soleus, and peroneus muscles, and in the anterior compartment, (2) an increase in the time to peak T2* measured in the soleus muscle, and (3) a prolongation of the posterior tibial vein SvO2 washout time. Intrasession and intersession repeatability were also assessed. Results indicated that time to peak perfusion and time to peak T2* were the most reliable extracted time course metrics. Perfusion, dynamic SvO2, and T2* response times after induced ischemia are highly correlated with peripheral artery disease severity. Combined imaging of peripheral microvascular blood flow and dynamics of oxygen saturation with Perfusion, intravascular SvO2, and T2* may be a useful tool to investigate the pathophysiology of peripheral artery disease. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Individual blood pressure responses to walking and resistance exercise in peripheral artery disease patients: Are the mean values describing what is happening?

    PubMed

    Lima, Aluísio H R A; Miranda, Alessandra S; Correia, Marilia A; Soares, Antônio H G; Cucato, Gabriel G; Sobral Filho, Dario C; Gomes, Silvana L; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the average and individual blood pressure responses to walking and resistance exercise in patients with peripheral artery disease. Thirteen patients underwent three experimental sessions: walking exercise, resistance exercise, and control. Ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and rate pressure product were obtained before and until 24 hours after sessions. The mean cardiovascular values during 24 hours, awake, and sleep periods were similar (P > 0.05) after the three experimental sessions. The analysis of individual data revealed that during 24 hours, eight of 13 patients reduced systolic or diastolic blood pressure in ≥4.0 mm Hg in at least one of the exercise session; furthermore, most of these patients presented greater responses after resistance exercise. The clinical characteristics of patients seem to influence the blood pressure responses after exercises. Individual data showed that part of patients presented clinically significant decreases in blood pressure, showing that these patients have acute cardiovascular benefits after performing an acute bout of exercise. Although, in average, a bout of walking or resistance exercise did not decrease ambulatory blood pressure in peripheral artery disease patients, the individual data revealed that most patients presented clinically relevant blood pressure reductions, especially after resistance exercise. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Peripheral arterial line - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... PAL is in, it is connected to an IV fluid bag and blood pressure monitor. WHAT ARE THE RISKS OF A PAL? Risks include: The greatest risk is if the PAL stops blood ... than standard IVs. There is a small risk for infection, but ...

  14. Cell Therapy of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Zankhana; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    The age-adjusted prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in the US population was estimated to approach 12% in 1985, and as the population ages, the overall population having peripheral arterial disease is predicted to rise. The clinical consequences of occlusive peripheral arterial disease include intermittent claudication, that is, pain with walking, and critical limb ischemia (CLI), which includes pain at rest and loss of tissue integrity in the distal limbs, which may ultimately lead to amputation of a portion of the lower extremity. The risk factors for CLI are similar to those linked to coronary artery disease and include advanced age, smoking, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. The worldwide incidence of CLI was estimated to be 500 to 1000 cases per million people per year in 1991. The prognosis is poor for CLI subjects with advanced limb disease. One study of >400 such subjects in the United Kingdom found that 25% required amputation and 20% (including some subjects who had required amputation) died within 1 year. In the United States, ≈280 lower-limb amputations for ischemic disease are performed per million people each year. The first objective in treating CLI is to increase blood circulation to the affected limb. Theoretically, increased blood flow could be achieved by increasing the number of vessels that supply the ischemic tissue with blood. The use of pharmacological agents to induce new blood vessel growth for the treatment or prevention of pathological clinical conditions has been called therapeutic angiogenesis. Since the identification of the endothelial progenitor cell in 1997 by Asahara and Isner, the field of cell-based therapies for peripheral arterial disease has been in a state of continuous evolution. Here, we review the current state of that field. PMID:23620237

  15. 2D-DIGE-based proteomic analysis of intracoronary versus peripheral arterial blood platelets from acute myocardial infarction patients: Upregulation of platelet activation biomarkers at the culprit site.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Paula; Ocaranza-Sánchez, Raymundo; López-Otero, Diego; Grigorian-Shamagian, Lilian; Rosa, Isaac; Bravo, Susana Belén; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; García, Ángel

    2016-08-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in the atherothrombotic events that lead to an acute myocardial infarction. In the present study we compared the proteome of intracoronary and peripheral arterial platelets from ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients in the search for potential platelet biomarkers/drug targets related to what is happening at the culprit site. Ten STEMI patients were recruited and blood collected from the occluded coronary artery, at the culprit site, in the moment of reperfusion. Systemic blood obtained from the radial artery of the same patients was used as control. Proteome analysis was based on high-resolution 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry. Validations were by western blotting in a group of 11 patients. Sixteen differentially regulated protein features were identified, corresponding to 15 ORFs, mostly related to cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. We demonstrate the up-regulation of integrin αIIb (ITA2B), the adapter Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein-2 (SKAP2), and thrombospondin-1 isoforms in intracoronary platelets. This study constitutes the first analyzing in detail the proteome of arterial intracoronary platelets from STEMI patients. We show variations in the platelet proteome when comparing intracoronary and peripheral platelets. Observed differences might be related to platelet activation events at the culprit site. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Role of central and peripheral opiate receptors in the effects of fentanyl on analgesia, ventilation and arterial blood-gas chemistry in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Fraser; May, Walter J.; Gruber, Ryan B.; Discala, Joseph F.; Puscovic, Veljko; Young, Alex P.; Baby, Santhosh M.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the effects of the peripherally restricted µ-opiate receptor (µ-OR) antagonist, naloxone methiodide (NLXmi) on fentanyl (25 µg/kg, i.v.)-induced changes in (1) analgesia, (2) arterial blood gas chemistry (ABG) and alveolar-arterial gradient (A-a gradient), and (3) ventilatory parameters, in conscious rats. The fentanyl-induced increase in analgesia was minimally affected by a 1.5 mg/kg of NLXmi but was attenuated by a 5.0 mg/kg dose. Fentanyl decreased arterial blood pH, pO2 and sO2 and increased pCO2 and A-a gradient. These responses were markedly diminished in NLXmi (1.5 mg/kg)-pretreated rats. Fentanyl caused ventilatory depression (e.g., decreases in tidal volume and peak inspiratory flow). Pretreatment with NLXmi (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) antagonized the fentanyl decrease in tidal volume but minimally affected the other responses. These findings suggest that (1) the analgesia and ventilatory depression caused by fentanyl involve peripheral µ-ORs and (2) NLXmi prevents the fentanyl effects on ABG by blocking the negative actions of the opioid on tidal volume and A-a gradient. PMID:24284037

  17. Acute coronary syndromes are associated with a reduction of VLA-1+ peripheral blood T cells and their enrichment in coronary artery plaque aspirates.

    PubMed

    Asman, Arik; Chouraqui, Pierre; Marcu-Malina, Victoria; Matetzky, Shlomo; Segev, Amit; Fefer, Paul; Agranat, Oren; Koltakov, Alexander; Hod, Hanoch; Livneh, Avi; Bank, Ilan

    2014-04-01

    Memory T cells producing interferon (IFN)γ and expressing very late antigen-1 (VLA-1) integrin collagen receptors are found in carotid atherosclerotic plaques, suggesting their involvement in coronary artery disease (CAD) as well. To determine the role of VLA-1+ T cells in CAD percent of CD3+ T cells binding monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to VLA-1 in peripheral blood (PB), and in coronary plaque material aspirated during coronary arterography and arterial blood, were analyzed in a cohort of 117 patients with CAD and 34 controls without CAD. % VLA-1+ T cells in PB was 0.63 ± 0.09% in controls compared to 0.96 ± 0.95% in patients with CAD (p<0.009). The increase was due to a marked elevation of % VLA-1+ T cells in stable CAD (1.6 ± 0.27%) whereas % VLA-1+ T cells during acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and in patients with ischemia by thalium SPECT scan had significantly lower levels. % VLA-1+ T cells in coronary artery plaque material aspirated during therapeutic angiography in patients with ACS was significantly higher than in arterial blood (1.39 ± 0.96% vs 0.75 ± 0.84%, p<0.035, n=3). Thus, % VLA-1+ T cells increases in the PB during stable CAD but decreases in ACS. The finding of their enrichment in coronary blood containing atherosclerotic plaque aspirates suggests that a shift of VLA-1+ T cells from blood to atherosclerotic plaques may play a role in plaque instability in patients with ACS.

  18. Peripheral arterial disease in women.

    PubMed

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2009-12-20

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is chronic arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremities caused by atherosclerosis whose prevalence increases with age. Only one-half of women with PAD are symptomatic. Symptomatic and asymptomatic women with PAD are at increased risk for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and mortality from coronary artery disease. Modifiable risk factors that predispose women to PAD include active cigarette smoking, passive smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, increased plasma homocysteine levels and hypothyroidism. With regard to management, women who smoke should be encouraged to quit and referred to a smoking cessation program. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and hypothyroidism require treatment. Statins reduce the incidence of intermittent claudication and improve exercise duration until the onset of intermittent claudication in women with PAD and hypercholesterolemia. Anti-platelet drugs such as aspirin or especially clopidogrel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and statins should be given to all women with PAD. Beta blockers are recommended if coronary artery disease is present. Exercise rehabilitation programs and cilostazol increase exercise time until intermittent claudication develops. Chelation therapy should be avoided as it is ineffective. Indications for lower extremity percutaneous transluminal angioplasty or bypass surgery in women are (1) incapacitating claudication interfering with work or lifestyle; and (2) limb salvage in women with limb-threatening ischemia as manifested by rest pain, non-healing ulcers, and/or infection or gangrene. Future research includes investigation of mechanisms underlying why women have a higher risk of graft failure and major amputation.

  19. Type 1 interferon receptor in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may predict response to intra-arterial 5-fluorouracil + interferon therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyama, Yasuyuki; Yoshioka, Naoko; Yanai, Yoshiaki; Kawase, Tomoya; Nishina, Sohji; Hara, Yuichi; Yoshida, Koji; Korenaga, Keiko; Korenaga, Masaaki; Hino, Keisuke

    2011-01-01

    Background Type 1 interferon alpha receptor 2 (IFNAR2) in the liver has been reported to be a predictive factor for the response to intra-arterial 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) + systemic interferon (IFN)-alpha combination therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. We tested whether IFNAR2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells could predict the response to 5-FU + IFN. Methods Predictive factors for survival and response to therapy were determined in 30 patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent treatment with 5-FU + IFN. IFNAR2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured in 11 of the 30 patients. Results With a mean number of 4.2 courses of combination therapy, one patient (3%) showed a complete response, eight (27%) showed partial responses, 13 (43%) had stable disease, and eight (27%) showed progressive disease. The median survival time of responders (complete response/partial response) was 12.7 months and that of nonresponders (stable disease/progressive disease) was 7.5 months. The one-year and two-year cumulative survival rates of responders and nonresponders were 87/69% and 40/11%, respectively (P = 0.019). Multivariate analysis identified response to therapy (P = 0.037) as the sole independent determinant of survival. The expression level of IFNAR2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was significantly (P = 0.012) higher in responders (6.5 ± 2.4) than in nonresponders (2.4 ± 0.6), even though no clinical factors were identified as being associated with the response to the combination therapy. Conclusion IFNAR2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may predict the response to 5-FU + IFN therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, although these data are preliminary. PMID:24367220

  20. Mechanisms Underlying Drug Delivery to Peripheral Arteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Tzafriri, Rami; Patel, Sandeep M; Parikh, Sahil A

    2017-04-01

    Delivery of drugs onto arterial targets via endovascular devices commands several principles: dissolution, diffusion, convection, drug binding, barriers to absorption, and interaction between the drug, delivery vehicle, and accepting arterial wall. The understanding of drug delivery in the coronary vasculature is vast; there is ongoing work needed in the peripheral arteries. There are differences that account for some failures of application of coronary technology into the peripheral vascular space. Breakthroughs in peripheral vascular interventional techniques building on current technologies require investigators willing to acknowledge the similarities and differences between these different vascular territories, while developing technologies adapted for peripheral arteries.

  1. The prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in the aortic wall and in peripheral blood of patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Kuczaj, A; Stryjewski, P J; Fudal, M; Domal-Kwiatkowska, D; Ryfiński, B; Sliupkas-Dyrda, E; Smolik, S; Węglarz, L; Mazurek, U; Nowalany-Kozielska, E

    2016-01-01

    Some reports confirm a potential role of Chlamydia pneumoniae (ChP) in atherogenesis. In order to explore possible association between ChP and atherosclerosis, investigations were carried out in which the frequency of ChP in the arterial wall and peripheral blood was assessed in a group of patients with chronic coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifty-seven patients were enrolled in the study, 13 women and 44 men aged 61.8±6.5 (47-74), with previously diagnosed CAD, scheduled for planned coronary artery bypass grafting due to clinical indications. Vessel specimens retrieved from the ascending aorta (as a part of routine proximal venous graft development procedure) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from venous blood were evaluated for the presence of ChP DNA. Genomic DNA was extracted from PBMCs and vessel specimens. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to detect ChP DNA. A statistically more frequent occurrence of ChP was observed in aortic tissues compared to blood samples (70.2% vs 56.1%, respectively). Similarly, the number of ChP DNA genomic copies [n/1μg genomic DNA] was significantly higher in tissue specimens compared to blood samples (89±91 vs 41±77, respectively; p=0.0046). In patients without ChP in blood specimens, we observed significantly higher amounts of ChP in tissue specimens compared to patients with ChP in blood specimens (156±71 vs 107±88, respectively; p=0.0453). No correlation was found between the number of ChP DNA copies [n/1μg genomic DNA] in blood and in aortic specimens. The infection of ChP in the aortic wall was connected with hypercholesterolemia (p=0.029) and diabetes (p=0.03). We conclude that Chlamydia pneumoniae is a pathogen frequently occurring in the aortic wall of patients with CAD. The occurrence of ChP DNA in the aortic tissue is related to classic CAD risk factors such as diabetes and dyslipidemia.

  2. Endovascular management of traumatic peripheral arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Scott, Aaron R; Gilani, Ramyar; Tapia, Nicole M; Mattox, Kenneth L; Wall, Matthew J; Suliburk, James W

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic injuries to peripheral arterial vessels are increasingly managed with endovascular techniques. Early small series have suggested that endovascular therapy is feasible and decreases operative blood loss, but these data are limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and outcomes of endovascular management of nonaortic arterial trauma. We reviewed records of traumatic nonaortic arterial injuries presenting at an urban level 1 trauma center from December 2009-July 2013. Patients undergoing treatment in interventional radiology and patients whose injuries occurred >72 h before presentation were excluded. Demographics, indicators of injury severity, operative blood loss, transfusion requirements, and clinical outcome were compared between patients undergoing endovascular and open management using appropriate inferential statistics. During the study period, 17 patients underwent endovascular interventions and 20 had open surgery. There were 19 upper extremity and/or thoracic outlet arterial injuries, 15 lower extremity injuries and 11 pelvic injuries. Endovascular cases were completed using a vascular imaging C-arm in a standard operating room. Estimated blood loss during the primary procedure was significantly lower with endovascular management (150 versus 825 cc, P < 0.001). No differences were observed between cohorts in age, injury severity score, intensive care unit length of stay, arterial pH, transfusion requirements, inpatient complication rate, or mortality. Our experience with endovascular management demonstrates its feasibility with commonly available tools. Operative blood loss may be significantly decreased using endovascular techniques. Further study is needed to refine patient selection criteria and to define long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reduced peripheral arterial blood flow with preserved cardiac output during submaximal bicycle exercise in elderly heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Older heart failure (HF) patients exhibit exercise intolerance during activities of daily living. We hypothesized that reduced lower extremity blood flow (LBF) due to reduced forward cardiac output would contribute to submaximal exercise intolerance in older HF patients. Methods and Results Twelve HF patients both with preserved and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (aged 68 ± 10 years) without large (aorta) or medium sized (iliac or femoral artery) vessel atherosclerosis, and 13 age and gender matched healthy volunteers underwent a sophisticated battery of assessments including a) peak exercise oxygen consumption (peak VO2), b) physical function, c) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) submaximal exercise measures of aortic and femoral arterial blood flow, and d) determination of thigh muscle area. Peak VO2 was reduced in HF subjects (14 ± 3 ml/kg/min) compared to healthy elderly subjects (20 ± 6 ml/kg/min) (p = 0.01). Four-meter walk speed was 1.35 ± 0.24 m/sec in healthy elderly verses 0.98 ± 0.15 m/sec in HF subjects (p < 0.001). After submaximal exercise, the change in superficial femoral LBF was reduced in HF participants (79 ± 92 ml/min) compared to healthy elderly (222 ± 108 ml/min; p = 0.002). This occurred even though submaximal stress-induced measures of the flow in the descending aorta (5.0 ± 1.2 vs. 5.1 ± 1.3 L/min; p = 0.87), and the stress-resting baseline difference in aortic flow (1.6 ± 0.8 vs. 1.7 ± 0.8 L/min; p = 0.75) were similar between the 2 groups. Importantly, the difference in submaximal exercise induced superficial femoral LBF between the 2 groups persisted after accounting for age, gender, body surface area, LVEF, and thigh muscle area (p ≤ 0.03). Conclusion During CMR submaximal bike exercise in the elderly with heart failure, mechanisms other than low cardiac output are responsible for reduced lower extremity blood flow. PMID:19922666

  4. Blood Flow in Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, David N.

    Blood flow in arteries is dominated by unsteady flow phenomena. The cardiovascular system is an internal flow loop with multiple branches in which a complex liquid circulates. A nondimensional frequency parameter, the Womersley number, governs the relationship between the unsteady and viscous forces. Normal arterial flow is laminar with secondary flows generated at curves and branches. The arteries are living organs that can adapt to and change with the varying hemodynamic conditions. In certain circumstances, unusual hemodynamic conditions create an abnormal biological response. Velocity profile skewing can create pockets in which the direction of the wall shear stress oscillates. Atherosclerotic disease tends to be localized in these sites and results in a narrowing of the artery lumena stenosis. The stenosis can cause turbulence and reduce flow by means of viscous head losses and flow choking. Very high shear stresses near the throat of the stenosis can activate platelets and thereby induce thrombosis, which can totally block blood flow to the heart or brain. Detection and quantification of stenosis serve as the basis for surgical intervention. In the future, the study of arterial blood flow will lead to the prediction of individual hemodynamic flows in any patient, the development of diagnostic tools to quantify disease, and the design of devices that mimic or alter blood flow. This field is rich with challenging problems in fluid mechanics involving three-dimensional, pulsatile flows at the edge of turbulence.

  5. Assessing the end-organ in peripheral arterial occlusive disease—from contrast—enhanced ultrasound to blood-oxygen-level-dependent MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Partovi, Sasan; Jacobi, Bjoern; Fergus, Nathan; Schulte, Anja-Carina; Robbin, Mark R.; Bilecen, Deniz; Staub, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) is a result of atherosclerotic disease which is currently the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Patients with PAOD may present with intermittent claudication or symptoms related to critical limb ischemia. PAOD is associated with increased mortality rates. Stenoses and occlusions are usually detected by macrovascular imaging, including ultrasound and cross-sectional methods. From a pathophysiological view these stenoses and occlusions are affecting the microperfusion in the functional end-organs, such as the skin and skeletal muscle. In the clinical arena new imaging technologies enable the evaluation of the microvasculature. Two technologies currently under investigation for this purpose on the end-organ level in PAOD patients are contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MR imaging (MRI). The following article is providing an overview about these evolving techniques with a specific focus on skeletal muscle microvasculature imaging in PAOD patients. PMID:24834413

  6. Effectiveness of a New Exercise Program after Lower Limb Arterial Blood Flow Surgery in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jakubsevičienė, Edita; Vasiliauskas, Donatas; Velička, Linas; Kubilius, Raimondas; Milinavičienė, Eglė; Venclovienė, Jonė

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a supervised exercise program (SEP) plus at home nonsupervised exercise therapy (non-SET) on functional status, quality of life (QoL) and hemodynamic response in post-lower-limb bypass surgery patients. Results: One hundred and seventeen patients were randomized to an intervention (n = 57) or a control group (n = 60). A new individual SEP was designed for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and applied to the studied subjects of the intervention group who also continued non-SET at home, whereas those assigned to the control group received just usual SEP according to a common cardiovascular program. The participants of the study were assessed by a 6-min walking test (6 MWT), an ankle-brachial index (ABI), and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36) of QoL at baseline, at 1 and 6 months after surgery. A significant improvement was observed in the walked distance in the intervention group after 6 months compared with the control group (p < 0.001). The intervention group had significantly higher QoL score in the physical and mental component of SF-36 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: A 6-month application of the new SEP and non-SET at home has yielded significantly better results in walking distance and QoL in the intervention group than in the controls. PMID:25105547

  7. Pedal angiography in peripheral arterial occlusive disease: first-pass i.v. contrast-enhanced MR angiography with blood pool contrast medium versus intraarterial digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Kos, Sebastian; Reisinger, Clemens; Aschwanden, Markus; Bongartz, Georg M; Jacob, Augustinus L; Bilecen, Deniz

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate first-pass i.v. gadofosveset-enhanced MR angiography in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease for visualization of the pedal arteries and stenosis or occlusion of those arteries with intraarterial digital subtraction angiography as the reference standard. Twenty patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (nine women, 11 men; age-range 58-83 years) were prospectively enrolled. Gadofosveset first-pass contrast-enhanced MR angiography was performed with a 1.5-T system, a dedicated foot coil, and cuff compression to the calf. Arterial segments were assessed for degree of arterial stenosis, arterial visibility, diagnostic utility, and venous contamination. Detection of vessel stenosis or occlusion was evaluated in comparison with findings at digital subtraction angiography. The unpaired Student's t test was used to test arterial visibility with the two techniques. First-pass MR angiography with gadofosveset had good diagnostic utility in 83.9% of all segments and no venous contamination in 96.8% of all segments. There was no difference between the performance of intraarterial digital subtraction angiography and that of i.v. contrast-enhanced MR angiography in arterial visibility overall (p = 0.245) or in subgroup analysis of surgical arterial bypass targets (p = 0.202). The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of i.v. gadofosveset-enhanced MR angiography for characterization of clinically significant stenosis and occlusion were 91.4%, 96.1%, and 93.9%. In the subgroup analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 85.5%, 96.5%, and 92.1%. Gadofosveset-enhanced MR angiography of the pedal arteries in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease has arterial visibility equal to that of digital subtraction angiography and facilitates depiction of clinically significant stenosis and occlusion.

  8. [Efficacy of a massage and exercise programme on the ankle-brachial index and blood pressure in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and peripheral arterial disease: a randomized clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, Belén; Sánchez Labraca, Nuria; Sánchez Joya, María del Mar

    2010-02-06

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent disease that can favour the development of peripheral arterial disease. The objective of this study was to analyse the efficacy of a massage and exercise programme on the ankle-brachial index and arterial pressure of patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and peripheral arterial disease. An experimental study with placebo control group was performed. Sixty-six type 2 diabetes patients with Leriche-Fontaine stage II peripheral arterial disease were randomly assigned to an intervention (exercise and massage) or placebo control (simulated magnetotherapy) group. Study variables were arterial pressure and ankle-brachial index. After 10 weeks of treatment, significant (P<0.05) differences between the intervention and placebo groups were found in right and left ankle-brachial index values and in systolic and diastolic pressures in right and left lower extremities. A combined programme of exercise and massage improves arterial blood pressure and ankle brachial index values in type 2 diabetics with peripheral arterial disease. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Ischaemic stroke and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Attiya Sabeen; Akhtar, Syed Wasim; Jamal, Qaiser; Sultana, Nuzhat; Siddiqui, Muhammad Asadullah; Hassan, Ziaul

    2017-08-01

    To determine the frequency of atherosclerosis by ankle brachial index in patients with an ischaemic stroke and to assess the association of carotid artery stenosis and ankle brachial index in ischaemic stroke. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Abbasi Shaheed Hospital, Karachi, from July 2011 to May 2014, and comprised patients with ischaemic stroke. The patients were classified according to the Asian stroke criteria for classification of brain infarction. Primary outcome measures included carotid artery stenosis and ankle brachial index. The other independent variables were age, gender, body mass index and waist circumference. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis. A total of 327 patients were enrolled. The overall mean age was 57.6±12.8 years. Besides, 168(51.3%) participants were males. Peripheral artery disease was found in 60(18.3%) patients. Mild carotid artery stenosis was found in 182(55.6%) patients, moderate in 140(42.8%), severe in 3(0.9%) and complete occlusion in 2(0.6%) patients. In patients having mild carotid artery stenosis, 32(17.5%) had peripheral artery disease, whereas in patients with moderate carotid artery stenosis, 25(17.8%) had peripheral artery disease. Abnormally low ankle brachial index suggesting subclinical peripheral artery disease was 18%.

  10. Relation of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Peripheral Blood to Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation After Isolated Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Xu, Shu; Xu, Yinli; Liu, Yu; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Yuji; Jin, Yan; Xue, Xiaodong; Wang, Huishan

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative stress has been considered to be an important factor contributing to postoperative atrial fibrillation (PoAF). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood has been found to be associated with a patient's oxidative stress. Therefore, we sought to determine whether there was association between mtDNA copy number and the onset of atrial fibrillation. mtDNA copy numbers were measured using the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in peripheral blood from 485 consecutive patients with sinus rhythm undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The blood was collected before surgery. In the cohort, the incidence of PoAF was 20.8% (101/485). The mean mtDNA copy number was significantly higher in patents with PoAF than in those with sinus rhythm (36.43 vs 16.63, p <0.001). The receiver operating characteristic analysis proved that the mtDNA copy number could predict PoAF with good sensitivity and specificity (area under the curve = 0.814, cutoff = 20.91, sensitivity = 70.3%, specificity = 80.2%, p <0.001). On multivariate logistic and Cox regression analysis, mtDNA copy number was shown to be a significant independent risk factor for PoAF (odds ratio = 10.01, p <0.001 and hazard ratio = 7.011, p = 0.004). There was a strong positive correlation between mtDNA copy number and malondialdehyde in patients with PoAF (r = 0.449, p = 0.01). In conclusion, we showed that elevated mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood is associated with PoAF. Further investigation is needed to validate mtDNA copy number as a predictive biomarker for PoAF and to explore its potential role in arrhythmogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Peripheral artery disease and acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. When presented in the context of an acute coronary syndrome a differential diagnosis with aorta dissection should be made, because peripheral arterial disease may be asymptomatic despite the absence or asymmetry of femoral pulses. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Claudication

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatty deposits inside them. This is called atherosclerosis. If you have PAD, your arms, and more ... also more likely in people who already have atherosclerosis in other arteries, such as the arteries in ...

  13. Unusual forms of peripheral arterial embolization.

    PubMed

    Lazar, D; Slobodan, L; Maja, E; Marija, H; Stana, R; Vesna, C; Miljko, R

    1994-06-01

    Two cases of unusual forms of peripheral arterial embolization are presented. One had a septic embolization with necrosis of the popliteal artery due to subacute bacterial endocarditis and the other had a malignant embolization of the abdominal aorta bifurcation due to lung tumor. Both underwent successful surgical treatment.

  14. Low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy improves microcirculation blood flow of ischemic limbs in patients with peripheral arterial disease: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tara, Shuhei; Miyamoto, Masaaki; Takagi, Gen; Kirinoki-Ichikawa, Sonoko; Tezuka, Akito; Hada, Tomohito; Takagi, Ikuyo

    2014-01-01

    Because direct application of low-energy shock waves induces angiogenesis, we investigated the safety and efficacy of this new therapy to develop a noninvasive method of repeatable therapeutic angiogenesis for treating peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The subjects were 10 patients who had symptomatic PAD and limited ischemia in a below-the-knee artery. Low-energy shock waves were directly applied to the calf muscles 6 times every other day. Intracorporeal changes were evaluated with ultrasonography to determine adverse effects of therapy. To assess blood flow of the microcirculation, transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2), skin perfusion pressure (SPP), and (99m)technetium-tetrofosmin ((99m)Tc-TF) scintigraphy were performed before and after therapy. The TcPO2 was measured while subjects inhaled pure oxygen (maximum TcPO2). The (99m)Tc-TF perfusion index was determined as a ratio of uptake in muscle to that in the brain (control) for quantitative analysis. No adverse effects were noted in any patient. Maximum TcPO2 values increased significantly on the calf (57.3±28.4 to 71.0±14.5 mm Hg, p=0.044) and the dorsum of the foot (52.2±21.8 to 76.1±17.9 mm Hg, p=0.012). The SPP tended to increase after therapy on the dorsum and plantar surfaces of the foot, but the differences were not significant. The (99m)Tc-TF perfusion index in the foot significantly increased (0.48±0.09 to 0.61±0.12, p=0.0013), but that in the leg did not change. We have demonstrated that low-energy shock wave therapy is safe and can restore blood flow in the microcirculation in patients with symptomatic PAD.

  15. Flow Cytometric Quantification of Peripheral Blood Cell β-Adrenergic Receptor Density and Urinary Endothelial Cell-Derived Microparticles in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jonathan A.; Wanner, Nicholas; Cheong, Hoi I.; Queisser, Kimberly; Barrett, Patrick; Park, Margaret; Hite, Corrine; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V.; Erzurum, Serpil; Asosingh, Kewal

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by severe angiogenic remodeling of the pulmonary artery wall and right ventricular hypertrophy. Thus, there is an increasing need for novel biomarkers to dissect disease heterogeneity, and predict treatment response. Although β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) dysfunction is well documented in left heart disease while endothelial cell-derived microparticles (Ec-MPs) are established biomarkers of angiogenic remodeling, methods for easy large clinical cohort analysis of these biomarkers are currently absent. Here we describe flow cytometric methods for quantification of βAR density on circulating white blood cells (WBC) and Ec-MPs in urine samples that can be used as potential biomarkers of right heart failure in PAH. Biotinylated β-blocker alprenolol was synthesized and validated as a βAR specific probe that was combined with immunophenotyping to quantify βAR density in circulating WBC subsets. Ec-MPs obtained from urine samples were stained for annexin-V and CD144, and analyzed by a micro flow cytometer. Flow cytometric detection of alprenolol showed that βAR density was decreased in most WBC subsets in PAH samples compared to healthy controls. Ec-MPs in urine was increased in PAH compared to controls. Furthermore, there was a direct correlation between Ec-MPs and Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) in PAH patients. Therefore, flow cytometric quantification of peripheral blood cell βAR density and urinary Ec-MPs may be useful as potential biomarkers of right ventricular function in PAH. PMID:27270458

  16. Peripheral arterial disease and revascularization of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, R O; Brownrigg, J; Hinchliffe, R J

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes is a complex disease with many serious potential sequelae, including large vessel arterial disease and microvascular dysfunction. Peripheral arterial disease is a common large vessel complication of diabetes, implicated in the development of tissue loss in up to half of patients with diabetic foot ulceration. In addition to peripheral arterial disease, functional changes in the microcirculation also contribute to the development of a diabetic foot ulcer, along with other factors such as infection, oedema and abnormal biomechanical loading. Peripheral arterial disease typically affects the distal vessels, resulting in multi-level occlusions and diffuse disease, which often necessitates challenging distal revascularisation surgery or angioplasty in order to improve blood flow. However, technically successful revascularisation does not always result in wound healing. The confounding effects of microvascular dysfunction must be recognised--treatment of a patient with a diabetic foot ulcer and peripheral arterial disease should address this complex interplay of pathophysiological changes. In the case of non-revascularisable peripheral arterial disease or poor response to conventional treatment, alternative approaches such as cell-based treatment, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and the use of vasodilators may appear attractive, however more robust evidence is required to justify these novel approaches.

  17. Association between n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content of red blood cells and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Grenon, S. Marlene; Conte, Michael S.; Nosova, Emily; Alley, Hugh; Chong, Karen; Harris, William S.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Owens, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are dietary components derived from fish oil with beneficial cardiovascular effects that may relate in part to anti-inflammatory properties. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized by a marked pro-inflammatory state. We hypothesized that the n-3 PUFA content of red blood cells (omega-3 index) would be correlated with biomarkers of inflammation and vascular function in a PAD cohort. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of subjects who presented to an outpatient vascular surgery clinic for evaluation of PAD. We used linear regression to evaluate the independent association between the omega-3 index, inflammatory biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor-necrosis-factor-α (TNF-α)] and endothelial function (brachial artery flow mediated dilation [FMD]). Results 64 subjects (61 claudicants and 3 with critical limb ischemia) were recruited for the study. The mean CRP level was 5.0 ± 5.0 mg/L and the mean omega-3 index was 5.0% ± 1.8%. In an unadjusted model, the omega-3 index was negatively associated with CRP (38% increase in CRP for one standard deviation decrease in the omega-3 index; P=.007) which remained significant after adjustment for age, body-mass index, smoking, the ABI and HDL (33%; P=.04). There was also evidence for independent associations between the omega-3 index and IL-6 (P=.001). There were no significant associations between the omega-3 index and vascular function tests. Conclusions In a cohort of patients with PAD, the omega-3 index was inversely associated with biomarkers of inflammation even after adjustment for covariates including the ABI. Because patients with PAD have a high inflammatory burden, further studies should be conducted to determine if manipulation of omega-3 index via dietary changes or fish oil supplementation could improve inflammation and symptoms in these patients. PMID:23830313

  18. About Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAD). Both PAD and CAD are caused by atherosclerosis that narrows and blocks arteries in various critical ... can be managed with lifestyle changes and medication . Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which ...

  19. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials assessing the impact of beta-blockers on arterial stiffness, peripheral blood pressure and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenquan; Qi, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The recognition of beta-blockers as a preferred initial therapy for hypertension has been a hot topic of debate recently. This meta-analysis was aimed to assess the impact of different beta-blockers on arterial stiffness as indexed by pulse wave velocity (PWV), peripheral blood pressure (BP) and heart rate, relative to the placebo, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Two authors independently searched articles, appraised eligibility and abstracted information, and the data were analyzed using STATA. Twenty-four articles involving 27 independent trials were eligible. Relative to the placebo, treatment with beta-blockers led to remarkable improvement in PWV (WMD, 95% CI, P: -1.115m/s, -1.561 to -0.669, <0.001), systolic BP (-12.355mmHg, -14.330 to -10.380, <0.001), diastolic BP (-8.619mmHg, -10.357 to -6.880, <0.001), mean BP (-9.683mmHg, -11.172 to -8.194, <0.001), pulse pressure (-4.448mmHg, -7.386 to -1.510, 0.003) and heart rate (-12.335, -22.739 to -1.932, 0.020). Beta-blockers were remarkably superior to ACEIs in DBP (-2.540mmHg, -4.463 to -0.617, 0.010) and heart rate (-9.859bpm, -11.752 to -7.969, <0.001). In contrast to ARBs, beta-blocker treatment increased systolic BP (2.042mmHg, 0.639 to 3.444, 0.004) but reduced heart rate (-8.814bpm, -9.756 to -7.873, <0.001) significantly. No publication bias was observed. Beta-blockers exerted more favorable impact than the placebo on arterial stiffness, peripheral BP and heart rate, but less favorable impact than ACEIs or ARBs on all, except heart rate, characters, especially in trials with longer duration of treatment and higher baseline PWV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bioabsorbable stenting in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Galyfos, George; Geropapas, Georgios; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Kerasidis, Stavros; Stamatatos, Ioannis; Kastrisios, Georgios; Giannakakis, Sotirios; Papacharalampous, Gerasimos; Maltezos, Chrisostomos

    2015-12-01

    Arterial stenting has been broadly utilized for the management of peripheral arterial occlusive disease. The evolution of stent materials has led to the introduction of newer bioabsorbable scaffolds that have been extensively evaluated in the treatment of coronary artery disease. However, the utilization of bioabsorbable stents in the lower extremities remains challenging and has not been evaluated in the same degree. There are not many trials focusing on major outcomes of treatment with bioabsorbable stents or comparing them with other therapeutic choices such as surgery or angioplasty only. The aim of this review is to report current status on bioabsorbable stenting in peripheral artery disease treatment as well as to present the results of all major relevant trials. Moreover, future expectations and challenges with this type of stents are discussed as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the diagnosis of PAD is ultimately made with measurement of the leg blood pressure taken at the ... feels the same as an arm blood pressure measurement. The severity of ankle brachial index reduction roughly ...

  2. Metals in urine and peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Navas-Acien, Ana; Silbergeld, Ellen K; Sharrett, Richey; Calderon-Aranda, Emma; Selvin, Elizabeth; Guallar, Eliseo

    2005-02-01

    Exposure to metals may promote atherosclerosis. Blood cadmium and lead were associated with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In the present study we evaluated the association between urinary levels of cadmium, lead, barium, cobalt, cesium, molybdenum, antimony, thallium, and tungsten with PAD in a cross-sectional analysis of 790 participants > or =40 years of age in NHANES 1999-2000. PAD was defined as a blood pressure ankle brachial index < 0.9 in at least one leg. Metals were measured in casual (spot) urine specimens by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. After multivariable adjustment, subjects with PAD had 36% higher levels of cadmium in urine and 49% higher levels of tungsten compared with noncases. The adjusted odds ratio for PAD comparing the 75th to the 25th percentile of the cadmium distribution was 3.05 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.97 to 9.58]; that for tungsten was 2.25 (95% CI, 0.97 to 5.24). PAD risk increased sharply at low levels of antimony and remained elevated beyond 0.1 microg/L. PAD was not associated with other metals. In conclusion, urinary cadmium, tungsten, and possibly antimony were associated with PAD in a representative sample of the U.S. population. For cadmium, these results strengthen previous findings using blood cadmium as a biomarker, and they support its role in atherosclerosis. For tungsten and antimony, these results need to be interpreted cautiously in the context of an exploratory analysis but deserve further study. Other metals in urine were not associated with PAD at the levels found in the general population.

  3. Metals in Urine and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Navas-Acien, Ana; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Sharrett, A. Richey; Calderon-Aranda, Emma; Selvin, Elizabeth; Guallar, Eliseo

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to metals may promote atherosclerosis. Blood cadmium and lead were associated with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the 1999–2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In the present study we evaluated the association between urinary levels of cadmium, lead, barium, cobalt, cesium, molybdenum, antimony, thallium, and tungsten with PAD in a cross-sectional analysis of 790 participants ≥40 years of age in NHANES 1999–2000. PAD was defined as a blood pressure ankle brachial index < 0.9 in at least one leg. Metals were measured in casual (spot) urine specimens by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry. After multivariable adjustment, subjects with PAD had 36% higher levels of cadmium in urine and 49% higher levels of tungsten compared with noncases. The adjusted odds ratio for PAD comparing the 75th to the 25th percentile of the cadmium distribution was 3.05 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.97 to 9.58]; that for tungsten was 2.25 (95% CI, 0.97 to 5.24). PAD risk increased sharply at low levels of antimony and remained elevated beyond 0.1 μg/L. PAD was not associated with other metals. In conclusion, urinary cadmium, tungsten, and possibly antimony were associated with PAD in a representative sample of the U.S. population. For cadmium, these results strengthen previous findings using blood cadmium as a biomarker, and they support its role in atherosclerosis. For tungsten and antimony, these results need to be interpreted cautiously in the context of an exploratory analysis but deserve further study. Other metals in urine were not associated with PAD at the levels found in the general population. PMID:15687053

  4. PERIPHERAL BLOOD FILM - A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Adewoyin, AS; Nwogoh, B.

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral blood film (PBF) is a laboratory work-up that involves cytology of peripheral blood cells smeared on a slide. As basic as it is, PBF is invaluable in the characterization of various clinical diseases. This article highlights the basic science and art behind the PBF. It expounds its laboratory applications, clinical indications and interpretations in the light of various clinical diseases. Despite advances in haematology automation and application of molecular techniques, the PBF has remained a very important diagnostic test to the haematologist. A good quality smear, thorough examination and proper interpretation in line with patient's clinical state should be ensured by the haemato-pathologist. Clinicians should be abreast with its clinical utility and proper application of the reports in the management of patients. PMID:25960697

  5. Cadmium Exposure and Incident Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Plaza, Maria; Guallar, Eliseo; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Devereux, Richard B.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background Cadmium has been associated with peripheral arterial disease in cross-sectional studies but prospective evidence is lacking. Our goal was to evaluate the association of urine cadmium concentrations with incident peripheral arterial disease in a large population-based cohort. Methods and Results A prospective cohort study was performed with 2,864 adult American Indians 45-74 years old from Arizona, Oklahoma and North and South Dakota who participated in the Strong Heart Study in 1989-91 and were followed through two follow-up examination visits in 1993-1995 and 1997-1999. Participants were free of peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9 or >1.4, at baseline and had complete baseline information on urine cadmium, potential confounders and ankle brachial index determinations in the follow-up examinations. Urine cadmium was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and corrected for urinary dilution by normalization to urine creatinine.. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were computed using Cox-proportional hazards models for interval-censored data. A total of 470 cases of incident peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9 or >1.4, were identified. After adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors including smoking status and pack-years, the hazard ratio comparing the 80th to the 20th percentile of urine cadmium concentrations was 1.41 (1.05, 1.81). The hazard ratio comparing the highest to the lowest tertile was 1.96 (1.32, 2.81). The associations persisted after excluding participants with ankle brachial index > 1.4 only as well as in subgroups defined by sex and smoking status. Conclusions Urine cadmium, a biomarker of long-term cadmium exposure, was independently associated with incident peripheral arterial disease, providing further support for cadmium as a cardiovascular disease risk factor. PMID:24255048

  6. Dynamic diffuse optical tomography imaging of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Michael A; Kim, Hyun K; Kim, In-Kyong; Flexman, Molly; Dayal, Rajeev; Shrikhande, Gautam; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2012-09-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is the narrowing of arteries due to plaque accumulation in the vascular walls. This leads to insufficient blood supply to the extremities and can ultimately cause cell death. Currently available methods are ineffective in diagnosing PAD in patients with calcified arteries, such as those with diabetes. In this paper we investigate the potential of dynamic diffuse optical tomography (DDOT) as an alternative way to assess PAD in the lower extremities. DDOT is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality that uses near-infrared light to create spatio-temporal maps of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin in tissue. We present three case studies in which we used DDOT to visualize vascular perfusion of a healthy volunteer, a PAD patient and a diabetic PAD patient with calcified arteries. These preliminary results show significant differences in DDOT time-traces and images between all three cases, underscoring the potential of DDOT as a new diagnostic tool.

  7. Radial artery access for peripheral endovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Avnee J; Jones, Lauren E; Kollmeyer, Kenneth R; Feldtman, Robert W; Ferrara, Craig A; Moe, Michelle N; Chen, Julia F; Richmond, Jasmine L; Ahn, Sam S

    2017-09-01

    The radial artery is often used for coronary angiography, with a demonstrated decrease in local complications and an increase in postoperative mobility of the patient. Data on radial artery access for peripheral endovascular procedures, however, are limited. We describe our experience with radial artery access for diagnostic and endovascular interventions. Between February 2012 and March 2015, there were 95 endovascular procedures performed using radial artery access in 80 unique patients. Demographic and clinical data were recorded. Perioperative, postoperative, and 30-day follow-up data were evaluated retrospectively for major and minor complications. Major adverse events included any immediate hospitalization admission, stroke, hand amputation, bleeding requiring transfusion, hematoma requiring surgery, and death. Minor complications included superficial bleeding and hematoma. The patients (52.6% male, 47.4% female) had a mean age of 72.1 ± 9.4 years. Radial artery access was used for diagnostic purposes in 15.8% of all procedures and for therapeutic intervention, including angioplasty and stenting, in 84.2%. The radial artery was the only access point in 80% of patients and was accessed in conjunction with other sites in 20%. Percutaneous access was achieved in 100% of patients with a 100% technical success rate. Hemostasis after catheterization was achieved by manual compression (22.1%) and TR band (Terumo Medical, Tokyo, Japan; 77.9%). Major adverse events occurred in three cases (3.2%) and were unrelated to radial artery access. Radial artery access site-related complications occurred in three cases (3.2%), all of which were minor hematomas that required no treatment. The risk of radial artery complication was not associated with procedure type, vessels treated, or use of heparin. The incidence of stroke, hand ischemia, and upper extremity limb or finger loss was 0%. Radial artery access for peripheral endovascular procedures appears to be safe and

  8. Percutaneous Therapies for Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Shishehbor, Mehdi H; Jaff, Michael R

    2016-12-13

    Percutaneous therapies for peripheral artery disease continue to evolve with new techniques and devices. Although guidelines-recommended therapies have impacted cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, endovascular interventions have been shown to reduce limb pain, improve quality of life, and prolong walking distance for those with claudication and to reduce amputation rates among those with critical limb ischemia. Novel devices such as drug-eluting stents and drug-coated balloons have improved patency for moderate-length lesions, whereas others allow treatment of heavily calcified and tortuous segments. New adjunctive devices to cross lesions and reduce or modify associated plaque have also been developed, although level 1 data regarding their efficacy are sparse. There has also been a better mechanistic understanding of lower extremity endovascular treatment using tools such as intravascular ultrasound. This information has highlighted the need for better stent size selection for the femoropopliteal arterial segments and larger balloon diameters for the tibial arteries. Moreover, a wound perfusion approach with direct in-line flow, the so-called angiosome approach, and reconstruction of the pedal loop have been advocated for improved wound healing. Technical advances such as the tibiopedal access and reentry methods have allowed crossing of lesions that were considered no option for the endovascular approach in the past. Collectively, there has been increased awareness, interest, and commitment by various specialty societies and organizations to advance the treatment of peripheral artery disease and critical limb ischemia. This is also evident by the recent coalition of 7 professional societies and organizations that represented >150 000 allied health professionals and millions of patients with peripheral artery disease at the 2015 Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services Medicare Evidence Development and Coverage Analysis Committee meeting. The percutaneous

  9. Exercise training and peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Haas, Tara L; Lloyd, Pamela G; Yang, Hsiao-Tung; Terjung, Ronald L

    2012-10-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common vascular disease that reduces blood flow capacity to the legs of patients. PAD leads to exercise intolerance that can progress in severity to greatly limit mobility, and in advanced cases leads to frank ischemia with pain at rest. It is estimated that 12 to 15 million people in the United States are diagnosed with PAD, with a much larger population that is undiagnosed. The presence of PAD predicts a 50% to 1500% increase in morbidity and mortality, depending on severity. Treatment of patients with PAD is limited to modification of cardiovascular disease risk factors, pharmacological intervention, surgery, and exercise therapy. Extended exercise programs that involve walking approximately five times per week, at a significant intensity that requires frequent rest periods, are most significant. Preclinical studies and virtually all clinical trials demonstrate the benefits of exercise therapy, including improved walking tolerance, modified inflammatory/hemostatic markers, enhanced vasoresponsiveness, adaptations within the limb (angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, and mitochondrial synthesis) that enhance oxygen delivery and metabolic responses, potentially delayed progression of the disease, enhanced quality of life indices, and extended longevity. A synthesis is provided as to how these adaptations can develop in the context of our current state of knowledge and events known to be orchestrated by exercise. The benefits are so compelling that exercise prescription should be an essential option presented to patients with PAD in the absence of contraindications. Obviously, selecting for a lifestyle pattern that includes enhanced physical activity prior to the advance of PAD limitations is the most desirable and beneficial.

  10. Exercise Training and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Tara L.; Lloyd, Pamela G.; Yang, Hsiao-Tung; Terjung, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common vascular disease that reduces blood flow capacity to the legs of patients. PAD leads to exercise intolerance that can progress in severity to greatly limit mobility, and in advanced cases leads to frank ischemia with pain at rest. It is estimated that 12–15 million people in the United States are diagnosed with PAD, with a much larger population that is undiagnosed. The presence of PAD predicts a 50–1500% increase in morbidity and mortality, depending on severity. Treatment of patients with PAD is limited to modification of cardiovascular disease risk factors, pharmacological intervention, surgery, and exercise therapy. Extended exercise programs that involve walking ~5 times/wk, at a significant intensity that requires frequent rest periods, are most significant. Pre-clinical studies and virtually all clinical trials demonstrate the benefits of exercise therapy, including: improved walking tolerance, modified inflammatory/hemostatic markers, enhanced vasoresponsiveness, adaptations within the limb (angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, mitochondrial synthesis) that enhance oxygen delivery and metabolic responses, potentially delayed progression of the disease, enhanced quality of life indices, and extended longevity. A synthesis is provided as to how these adaptations can develop in the context of our current state of knowledge and events known to be orchestrated by exercise. The benefits are so compelling that exercise prescription should be an essential option presented to patients with PAD in the absence of contraindications. Obviously, selecting for a life style pattern, that includes enhanced physical activity prior to the advance of PAD limitations, is the most desirable and beneficial. PMID:23720270

  11. Antithrombotic Therapy in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Bellmunt, Sergi; McGorrian, Catherine; Anand, Sonia S.; Guzman, Randolph; Criqui, Michael H.; Akl, Elie A.; Olav Vandvik, Per; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This guideline focuses on antithrombotic drug therapies for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease as well as for the relief of lower-extremity symptoms and critical ischemia in persons with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: The most important of our 20 recommendations are as follows. In patients aged ≥ 50 years with asymptomatic PAD or asymptomatic carotid stenosis, we suggest aspirin (75-100 mg/d) over no therapy (Grade 2B) for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events. For secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with symptomatic PAD (including patients before and after peripheral arterial bypass surgery or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty), we recommend long-term aspirin (75-100 mg/d) or clopidogrel (75 mg/d) (Grade 1A). We recommend against the use of warfarin plus aspirin in patients with symptomatic PAD (Grade 1B). For patients undergoing peripheral artery percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stenting, we suggest single rather than dual antiplatelet therapy (Grade 2C). For patients with refractory claudication despite exercise therapy and smoking cessation, we suggest addition of cilostazol (100 mg bid) to aspirin (75-100 mg/d) or clopidogrel (75 mg/d) (Grade 2C). In patients with critical limb ischemia and rest pain unable to undergo revascularization, we suggest the use of prostanoids (Grade 2C). In patients with acute limb ischemia due to acute thrombosis or embolism, we recommend surgery over peripheral arterial thrombolysis (Grade 1B). Conclusions: Recommendations continue to favor single antiplatelet therapy for primary and secondary prevention of

  12. Effects of handgrip exercise or inorganic nitrate supplementation on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure and peripheral arterial function in overweight and obese middle age and older adults: A pilot RCT.

    PubMed

    Lara, Jose; Ogbonmwan, Ikponmwonsa; Oggioni, Clio; Zheng, Dingchang; Qadir, Othman; Ashor, Ammar; Brandt, Kirsten; Mathers, John C; Siervo, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is a major contributor to the global burden of cardiovascular diseases and its prevalence increases progressively with ageing. Therefore the identification of effective, age-friendly exercise and nutritional interventions which lower blood pressure (BP) is a research priority. To undertake a pilot RCT examining the efficacy of isometric handgrip exercise (IHGE) and beetroot juice (a rich source of inorganic nitrate) consumption in modifying clinic and 24-h ambulatory BP (24-h ABP), peripheral arterial function and plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in older overweight and obese adults. Thirty middle age and older adults (62±5 years) were randomised to: (a) bilateral IHGE at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (8 min/day), (b) 140 ml/day of concentrated beetroot juice, or (c) no-intervention (control group), for 7 days. All groups followed a standardised diet to control nitrate intake. Clinic and 24-h ABP, peripheral arterial function quantified by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and arterial volume distensibility were assessed before and after intervention. Clinical ageing research unit, Newcastle University. At baseline, there were no between-group differences in age, handgrip strength, clinic or 24-h ABP, BMI, waist circumference, fat mass, physical activity level, energy intake or urinary and plasma nitrate concentrations. After intervention, there were no significant effects on clinic systolic and diastolic BP or 24-h ABP, PWV (p=0.54), arterial volume distensibility (p=0.89), or ADMA (p=0.45). IHGE or beetroot juice consumption for 7 days did not affect BP or peripheral arterial function in overweight and obese middle age and older adults. Ageing may reduce the effects of these interventions on vascular function and studies are needed to test this hypothesis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Simple Radiowave-Based Method For Measuring Peripheral Blood Flow Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Project objective is to design small radio frequency based flow probes for the measurement of blood flow velocity in peripheral arteries such as the femoral artery and middle cerebral artery. The result will be the technological capability to measure peripheral blood flow rates and flow changes during various environmental stressors such as microgravity without contact to the individual being monitored. This technology may also lead to an easier method of detecting venous gas emboli during extravehicular activities.

  14. Duplex ultrasound in the assessment of peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Sayed A. A. F.

    Arteriography plays a central role in the assessment of peripheral arterial disease. Arteriography is associated with the risk of damage to the artery, peripheral embolisation, hazards of intra-arterial injection and exposure to ionising radiation. Arteriography provides an anatomical assessment of arterial stenosis but does not measure the functional results of the stenosis. Modern high resolution ultrasound imaging technology enables non-invasive assessment of vascular diseases and allows functional assessment of blood flow. This investigation is of proven value in studying carotid disease. The aim of the study was to determine the accuracy of duplex ultrasonography (DUS) in assessment of lower limb arterial disease in comparison with arteriography (IA DSA). A technical comparison has been made between the description of arterial lesion as indicated by DUS and IA DSA. In addition, the sensitivity of DUS in assessing multisegmental arterial disease has been determined. The clinical decision has been investigated in a further study in which five surgeons were asked to determine patient management based on IA DSA and DUS data in the same patient group. Concordance between management strategies was assessed. DUS was used as the primary method of investigation in further series of patients. Criteria were established to determine which patients would require angiography. The computer-assisted image analysis was used to study the ultrasound images of arterial stenosis and a method of analysing such images objectively was established. Two studies have been included in this section. These assess the technical accuracy of ultrasound image analysis compared with histological examination of plaque. The reproducibility of the image analysis has also been tested. I have developed a classification for peripheral arterial disease to be used to facilitate the communication between vascular laboratory staff who perform the duplex ultrasonography and surgeons who use this

  15. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in three cats

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Takuma; SUNAHARA, Hiroshi; SUGIMOTO, Keisuke; ITO, Tetsuro; KANAI, Eiichi; FUJII, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Case 1 involved a 4-month-old intact male Somali cat in which peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPS) was recognized after a cardiac murmur remained following patent ductus arteriosus ligation. Case 2, which involved a 1-year-old neutered male Norwegian Forest cat, and Case 3, which involved a 6-month-old intact female American Curl cat, were referred, because of cardiac murmurs. Grades III to IV/VI systolic heart murmurs were auscultated at the left heart base in all 3 cats. All cases showed bilateral pulmonary artery stenosis, although there were no associated clinical signs. In Cases 1 and 2, the pressure gradient through the stenosis decreased after treatment with atenolol. PMID:25650057

  16. Surgical treatment of peripheral artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Bahcivan, Muzaffer; Keceligil, H Tahsin; Kolbakir, Fersat; Gol, M Kamil

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral arterial aneurysms (PAA) may rupture, cause emboli and ischemia, and local symptoms due to compression. A total of 109 patients who underwent surgery for PAA were analyzed retrospectively, including clinical presentation, surgical procedures used, and postoperative follow-up data obtained 10 days after discharge. True aneurysm was present in 59 (54.1%) patients and pseudoaneurysm in 50 (45.9%). The femoral artery was the most common location. The surgical procedures used were as follows: graft interposition in 31 patients, bypass with synthetic or autologous grafts in 33 patients, aneurysm ligation in 5 patients, primary repair in 41 patients, and patch angioplasty reconstruction in 7 patients. One patient died as a result of massive hemorrhage. In four patients, amputation had to be performed. It is possible to prevent amputation and other complications, including mortality, during the surgical treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic PAA.

  17. Stent evolution for peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Lejay, A; Thaveau, F; Girsowicz, E; Georg, Y; Heim, F; Durand, B; Chakfé, N

    2012-02-01

    Endovascular treatment and stent implantation for peripheral arterial disease have been proposed for over 20 years. However, the first experiments with stainless stents were relatively disappointing. The first improvement consisted in the introduction of nitinol self-expanding stents. This technology allowed an initial improvement of clinical performances, but the first generation of nitinol stents demonstrated a relatively high rate of fractures. Better knowledge of arterial biomechanics and advances in technology allowed to propose a second generation of nitinol stents with improved flexibility, which decreased the rates of fracture. In-stent restenosis related to neointimal hyperplasia has also led to the development of new concepts to improve patency rates after stenting: drug-eluting stents (coated-stents), biodegradable stents, and covered stents. These technologies will help to treat more complex lesions in the future, but we are still waiting for results of ongoing studies.

  18. A meta-analytical comparison of atenolol with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on arterial stiffness, peripheral blood pressure and heart rate in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Luo, Gaoqing; Zheng, Yong; Peng, Feng; Xie, Liangdi

    2017-01-01

    This meta-analysis of randomized parallel controlled trials was designed to compare the efficacy of atenolol with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) in changing pulse wave velocity (PWV), peripheral blood pressure and heart rate (HR) among patients with essential hypertension. This study was conducted according to the PRISMA guideline. Data collection was independently completed by two investigators. Statistical analyses were completed by Stata software (v12.0). Eight clinical trials were meta-analyzed in this study. Overall changes in PWV (weighted mean difference or WMD = 0.068, 95% confidence interval or CI: -0.487 to -0.623, P = 0.811) and peripheral systolic blood pressure (PSBP) (WMD = -1.281 mmHg, 95% CI: -6.936 to 4.375, P = 0.657) did not differ significantly between atenolol and ACEIs treatment. Relative to ACEIs, atenolol had a more favorable impact on peripheral diastolic blood pressure (PDBP) (WMD = -1.912 mmHg, 95% CI: -3.732 to -0.091, P = 0.040) and HR (WMD = -9.23 bpm, 95% CI: -12.53 to -5.93, P < 0.001). In stratified analyses, particularly by follow-up period, atenolol was observed to be superior over ACEIs within early 3-month treatment in PSBP (WMD = -4.097 mmHg, 95% CI: -6.589 to -1.605, P = 0.001), PDBP (WMD = -6.802 mmHg, 95% CI: -8.517 to -5.087, P < 0.001) and HR (WMD = -14.242 bpm, 95% CI: -16.427 to -12.058, P = 0.028), without heterogeneity (I(2) = 0.0%). There were low probabilities of publication bias for all comparisons. Our findings demonstrate that atenolol and ACEIs were equally effective in reducing PWV and PSBP, while atenolol was superior over ACEIs in improving PDBP and HR, especially within short-term treatment.

  19. Peripheral Artery Disease and Aortic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Criqui, Michael H.; Aboyans, Victor; Allison, Matthew A.; Denenberg, Julie O.; Forbang, Nketi; McDermott, Mary M.; Wassel, Christina L.; Wong, Nathan D.

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed published MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) study articles concerning peripheral arterial disease, subclavian stenosis (SS), aortic artery calcium (AAC), and thoracic artery calcium (TAC). Important findings include, compared to non-Hispanic whites, lower ankle-brachial index (ABI) and more SS in African Americans, and higher ABI and less SS in Hispanic and Chinese Americans. Abnormal ABI and brachial pressure differences were associated with other subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) measures. Both very high and low ABI independently predicted increased CVD events. Looking at aortic measures, TAC and AAC were significantly associated with other subclinical CVD measures. Comparisons of AAC with coronary artery calcium (CAC) showed that both were less common in ethnic minority groups. However, although CAC was much more common in men than in women in multivariable analysis, this was not true of AAC. Also, when AAC and CAC were adjusted for each other in multivariable analysis, there was a stronger association for AAC than for CAC with CVD and total mortality. PMID:27741978

  20. Plasma viscosity increase with progression of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Poredos, P; Zizek, B

    1996-03-01

    Increased blood and plasma viscosity has been described in patients with coronary and peripheral arterial disease. However, the relation of viscosity to the extent of arterial wall deterioration--the most important determinant of clinical manifestation and prognosis of the disease--is not well known. Therefore, the authors studied plasma viscosity as one of the major determinants of blood viscosity in patients with different stages of arterial disease of lower limbs (according to Fontaine) and its relation to the presence of some risk factors of atherosclerosis. The study encompassed four groups of subjects: 19 healthy volunteers (group A), 18 patients with intermittent claudication up to 200 m (stage II; group B), 15 patients with critical ischemia of lower limbs (stage III and IV; group C), and 16 patients with recanalization procedures on peripheral arteries. Venous blood samples were collected from an antecubital vein without stasis for the determination of plasma viscosity (with a rotational capillary microviscometer, PAAR), fibrinogen, total cholesterol, alpha-2-macroglobulin, and glucose concentrations. In patients with recanalization procedure local plasma viscosity was also determined from blood samples taken from a vein on the dorsum of the foot. Plasma viscosity was most significantly elevated in the patients with critical ischemia (1.78 mPa.sec) and was significantly higher than in the claudicants (1.68 mPa.sec), and the claudicants also had significantly higher viscosity than the controls (1.58 mPa.sec). In patients in whom a recanalization procedure was performed, no differences in systemic and local plasma viscosity were detected, neither before nor after recanalization of the diseased artery. In all groups plasma viscosity was correlated with fibrinogen concentration (r=0.70, P < 0.01) and total cholesterol concentration (r=0.24, P < 0.05), but in group C (critical ischemia) plasma viscosity was most closely linked to the concentration of alpha-2

  1. Treatment of peripheral arterial disease via percutaneous brachial artery access.

    PubMed

    Franz, Randall W; Tanga, Christopher F; Herrmann, Joseph W

    2017-08-01

    This review was conducted to evaluate the types of endovascular procedures that can be performed via brachial artery access, evaluate the access success rate, and determine the incidence of technical complications. A retrospective 10-year record review at a tertiary facility from January 1, 2005, through June 30, 2015, was completed. Patients who underwent attempted brachial artery access were eligible for review. Outcomes intended to be evaluated included ability to access the vessel, reach an identified lesion, and perform an indicated procedure, while describing the incidence and type of complications that occurred to clarify the utility and safety of brachial artery access. The review included 265 access cases in 179 patients. The access success rate was 98.9%. Intervention was performed in 223 cases (84.2%). Angioplasty was the most common intervention (59%, [154 cases]), with stents, atherectomy, coiling, and percutaneous thrombectomy having also been performed. Complications included hematoma (2.3%) and pseudoaneurysm (1.5%). Complications requiring intervention occurred in 1.9% of procedures. Interventions were performed on all major vessels as distal as the dorsalis pedis. Sheath sizes ranged from 4F to 7F. Intervention was performed on bilateral lower extremities in 38 cases (14.5%). A femoral bypass graft was present in 141 patients (53%) as the main indication for brachial artery access. Brachial access is a reliable and effective option for treatment of peripheral vascular disease and should be considered when femoral access is difficult or contraindicated and when a bypass graft is present in the femoral region. In addition, bilateral lesions may be approached easily through one brachial artery access site, making this approach advantageous when bilateral lesions are expected. The complication rate is similar to femoral access and can be minimized with ultrasound-guided access distally over the humerus, micropuncture access, and a dedicated

  2. High-resolution ultrasound imaging and noninvasive optoacoustic monitoring of blood variables in peripheral blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is being widely used in clinics to obtain diagnostic information non-invasively and in real time. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging platform, Vevo (VisualSonics, Inc.) provides in vivo, real-time images with exceptional resolution (up to 30 microns) using high-frequency transducers (up to 80 MHz). Recently, we built optoacoustic systems for probing radial artery and peripheral veins that can be used for noninvasive monitoring of total hemoglobin concentration, oxyhemoglobin saturation, and concentration of important endogenous and exogenous chromophores (such as ICG). In this work we used the high-resolution ultrasound imaging system Vevo 770 for visualization of the radial artery and peripheral veins and acquired corresponding optoacoustic signals from them using the optoacoustic systems. Analysis of the optoacoustic data with a specially developed algorithm allowed for measurement of blood oxygenation in the blood vessels as well as for continuous, real-time monitoring of arterial and venous blood oxygenation. Our results indicate that: 1) the optoacoustic technique (unlike pure optical approaches and other noninvasive techniques) is capable of accurate peripheral venous oxygenation measurement; and 2) peripheral venous oxygenation is dependent on skin temperature and local hemodynamics. Moreover, we performed for the first time (to the best of our knowledge) a comparative study of optoacoustic arterial oximetry and a standard pulse oximeter in humans and demonstrated superior performance of the optoacoustic arterial oximeter, in particular at low blood flow.

  3. Peripheral Arteries May Be Reliable Indicators of Coronary Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoehmann, Christopher L; Futterman, Bennett; Beatty, Brian Lee

    2017-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a stronger predictor for ischemic cardiovascular events than traditional risk factors such as race, age, sex, history, and metabolic profile. Previous research had primarily used ultrasound; however, we performed a study using histopathology to more accurately grade atherosclerosis development using the American Heart Association's grading scale. We cross-sectioned 13 different arteries from 48 cadavers and placed them into three separate groups based on anatomic location: central arteries, peripheral arteries, and carotid arteries. The central artery group included arteries that are non-palpable and commonly lead to ischemic diseases when occluded. The peripheral artery group included arteries that are accessible to palpation. The carotid artery group included branches of the carotid artery. We investigated whether a centrally located atherosclerotic vessel was associated with atherosclerosis of a specific peripheral artery. We hypothesized a correlation between carotid, peripheral and central arteries that may point to specific arteries that are more effective to analyze clinically when assessing cardiovascular risk. We observed a correlation between pathology in the left coronary artery and bifurcation of the carotid artery (r = 0.37 P ≤ 0.016), two arteries known to be implicated in ischemic stroke and ischemic heart disease. Importantly, our study demonstrates that the radial artery, a peripheral vessel, exhibited a positive correlation between both the pathologic left coronary (r = 0.33 P ≤ 0.041) and bifurcation of the carotid arteries (r = 0.34 P ≤ 0.025). Therefore, we propose investigating the radial artery as a clinically accessible location to monitor with ultrasound when assessing a patient's risk for ischemic cardiovascular disease. Anat Rec, 300:1230-1239, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparison of 2% mepivacaine, clipping, and radiofrequency thermocoagulation for duration and magnitude of action in peripheral arterial blood flow induced by sympathetic block in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Otani, Taro; Shinozaki, Mio; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Tomohito; Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Nagao, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Shigeki; Kitajima, Toshimitsu

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic sympathetic block has recently been performed by placement of the clips on the sympathetic chain to interrupt nerve conduction. The aim of this study was to compare clipping with 2% mepivacaine and radiofrequency thermocoagulation for the potency of sympathetic block from the results of the duration and magnitude of the vasodilation effect induced by thoracic sympathetic block in dogs. We measured mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and right and left brachial artery blood flow (BABF) before and after thoracic sympathetic block in 24 dogs. The experimental protocol was designed as follows: (1) left thoracic sympathetic block by 1.0 mL of 2% mepivacaine (n = 8), (2) left thoracic sympathetic block by clipping (n = 8), and (3) left thoracic sympathetic block by radiofrequency thermocoagulation (n = 8). Mean arterial pressure and heart rate did not change significantly throughout the study in either group. Left thoracic sympathetic block by 2% mepivacaine increased left BABF significantly from 5 to 70 mins after the block (baseline, 100%; peak at 10 mins after the block, 179% ± 33%; P < 0.01). Left thoracic sympathetic block by clipping increased left BABF significantly from 5 to 120 mins after the block (baseline, 100%; peak at 30 mins after the block, 156% ± 31%; P < 0.01). Left thoracic sympathetic block by radiofrequency thermocoagulation increased left BABF significantly from 5 to 120 mins after the block (baseline, 100%; peak at 10 mins after the block, 206% ± 31%; P < 0.01). Clipping may have a same potency compared with 2% mepivacaine and a less potency compared with radiofrequency thermocoagulation in thoracic sympathetic block in dogs.

  5. Peripheral Arterial Disease Assessment Wall, Perfusion, and Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterized by lower limb arterial obstruction due to atherosclerosis and is increasingly common. Presently used methods for diagnosis and follow-up as well as for assessment of novel therapies are limited. Materials and Methods Three distinct magnetic resonance examinations were developed. The first was high-resolution black-blood atherosclerotic plaque imaging of the superficial femoral artery using a surface coil and flow saturation. Second, first-pass contrast-enhanced dual-contrast perfusion imaging of the calf muscle was performed at peak exercise using a magnetic resonance (MR)–compatible pedal ergometer. Lastly, 31P MR spectroscopy was also performed at peak exercise to measure phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics. Results Seventeen patients (age, 63 ± 10 yrs) with mild to moderate PAD were studied with black-blood atherosclerotic plaque imaging. Mean atherosclerotic plaque volume measured was 7.27 ± 3.73 cm3. Eleven patients (age, 61 ± 11 yrs) with mild to moderate symptomatic PAD and 22 normal control subjects were studied with first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging. Perfusion index was stepwise increased from patients to normal subjects with matched workload to normal subjects at maximal exercise. For PCr recovery kinetics, 20 patients with mild to moderate PAD and 14 controls were studied. The median recovery time constant of PCr was 34.7 seconds in the controls and 91.0 seconds in the PAD patients (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Three distinct MR examinations of different aspects of peripheral arterial disease have been developed and tested and shown to differentiate patients with mild to moderate PAD from normal controls. Taken together, these tests are potential quantitative end points for clinical trials of novel therapies in PAD. PMID:18025990

  6. Blood Cultures at Central Line Insertion in the Intensive Care Unit: Comparison with Peripheral Venipuncture▿

    PubMed Central

    Stohl, Sheldon; Benenson, Shmuel; Sviri, Sigal; Avidan, Alexander; Block, Colin; Sprung, Charles L.; Levin, Phillip D.

    2011-01-01

    Blood cultures are a key diagnostic test for intensive care unit (ICU) patients; however, contaminants complicate interpretations and lead to unnecessary antibiotic administration and costs. Indications for blood cultures and central venous catheter (CVC) insertions often overlap for ICU patients. Obtaining blood cultures under the strict sterile precautions utilized for CVC insertion might be expected to decrease culture contamination. This retrospective study compared the results of blood cultures taken at CVC insertion, at arterial line insertion, and from peripheral venipuncture in order to validate the advantage of CVC insertion cultures. Cultures from indwelling lines were excluded. Results of 14,589 blood cultures, including 2,736 (19%) CVC, 1,513 (10%) arterial line, and 10,340 (71%) peripheral cultures taken over 5.5 years in two ICUs (general and medical) were analyzed. CVC cultures were contaminated more frequently than arterial line or peripheral cultures (225/2,736 [8%] CVC, 48/1,513 [3%] arterial line, and 378/10,340 (4%) peripheral cultures [P < 0.001 for CVC versus peripheral and CVC versus arterial line cultures]). True pathogens were found more frequently in CVC insertion cultures (334/2,736 [12%] CVC, 155/1,513 [10%] arterial line, and 795/10,340 [8%] peripheral cultures [P < 0.001 for CVC versus peripheral cultures; P = 0.055 for CVC versus arterial line cultures; P < 0.001 for peripheral versus arterial line cultures]). Contamination and true-positive rates were similar for culture sets from the two ICUs for each given culture source. Despite superior sterile precautions, cultures taken at the time of central line insertion had a higher contamination rate than did either peripheral or arterial line blood cultures. This may be related to the increased manipulations required for CVC insertion. PMID:21525219

  7. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for ischemic femoral head necrosis.

    PubMed

    Song, H-J; Lan, B-Sh; Cheng, B; Zhang, K-F; Yan, H-W; Wang, W-Zh; Gao, Z-Q

    2010-06-01

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) is a highly mutilating disease. There is no effective way to treat femoral head ischemia. This study was designed to show the curative effects of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation to induce vascular regeneration and improve ischemic femoral head necrosis in rabbits. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits underwent ischemic femoral head necrosis in both hindlimbs using liquid-nitrogen refrigeration. One cohort of rats was intraperitoneally injected with granulocyte-specific colony-stimulating factor (250 microg/kg/d), and control animals received equivalent saline solution. The right side was used as the transplantation group and the left as the control. After separation of peripheral blood, a stem cell suspension was poured into the right femoral artery and saline solution into the left femoral artery. At 4 weeks after peripheral stem cell transplantation, standing ability and activity of the the transplanted right hindlimb were remarkably improved, but there were no obvious changes in the control limbs. The experimental rabbits underwent arteriography of bilateral femoral heads, which indicated increased and thickened blood supply to the transplanted right hindlimb compared with the left control. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation improved ischemic femoral head necrosis.

  8. Assessment of vascular autonomic function using peripheral arterial tonometry.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Satomi; Oono, Ai; Ishihara, Yuri; Hasegawa, Yuki; Akaza, Miho; Sumi, Yuki; Inoue, Yoshinori; Izumiyama, Hajime; Hirao, Kenzo; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Sasano, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral autonomic function is impaired in diabetic polyneuropathy. However, it is difficult to evaluate it due to the lack of non-invasive quantitative assessment. We aimed to establish a novel index to evaluate vascular autonomic function using reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT), a widely performed endothelial function test. Sixty-five subjects were enrolled, including healthy subjects, cases with sympathetic nerve blockers, and diabetic patients. RH-PAT was performed with 5-min blood flow occlusion in unilateral arm. We calculated the reduction ratio of the post-occlusion pulse amplitude to the baseline in the non-occluded arm (RPN), with 1-min sliding window. In healthy subjects, RPN gradually increased with time-dependent manner. However, this phenomenon was eliminated in cases with sympathetic nerve blockers. Plasma concentration of norepinephrine was measured before and after the blood flow occlusion, which showed a significant increase. We then compared RPNs with the change in heart rate variability (HRV) parameters. RPN calculated at 5 min after the reperfusion had the highest correlation with the change in sympathetic HRV parameter, and thus, we named sympathetic hypoemia index (SHI). Finally, we studied the relationship between SHI and diabetes. SHI was significantly lower in diabetic patients than matched controls. SHI, a novel index derived from RH-PAT, represented the peripheral sympathetic activity. SHI may be useful for assessing the vascular autonomic activity in diabetic patients.

  9. Association between arterial stiffness and peripheral artery disease as measured by radial artery tonometry.

    PubMed

    Zahner, Greg J; Gruendl, Magdalena A; Spaulding, Kimberly A; Schaller, Melinda S; Hills, Nancy K; Gasper, Warren J; Grenon, S Marlene

    2017-07-26

    Arterial stiffness and peripheral artery disease (PAD) are both associated with an elevated risk of major adverse cardiac events; however, the association between arterial stiffness and PAD is less well characterized. The goal of this study was to examine the association between parameters of radial artery tonometry, a noninvasive measure of arterial stiffness, and PAD. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 134 vascular surgery outpatients (controls, 33; PAD, 101) using arterial applanation tonometry. Central augmentation index (AIX) normalized to 75 beats/min and peripheral AIX were measured using radial artery pulse wave analysis. Pulse wave velocity was recorded at the carotid and femoral arteries. PAD was defined as symptomatic claudication with an ankle-brachial index of <0.9 or a history of peripheral revascularization. Controls had no history of atherosclerotic vascular disease and an ankle-brachial index ≥0.9. Among the 126 participants with high-quality tonometry data, compared with controls (n = 33), patients with PAD (n = 93) were older, with higher rates of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and smoking (P < .05). Patients with PAD also had greater arterial stiffness as measured by central AIX, peripheral AIX, and pulse wave velocity (P < .05). In a multivariable model, a significantly increased odds of PAD was associated with each 10-unit increase in central AIX (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.9; P = .03) and peripheral AIX (odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.2; P = .01). In addition, central and peripheral AIX were highly correlated (r120 = 0.76; P < .001). In a cross-sectional analysis, arterial stiffness as measured by the AIX is independently associated with PAD, even when adjusting for several atherosclerotic risk factors. Further prospective data are needed to establish whether radial artery tonometry could be a tool for risk stratification in the PAD population. Copyright © 2017 Society for

  10. Peripheral Chemoreception and Arterial Pressure Responses to Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh K.; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2015-01-01

    Carotid bodies are the principal peripheral chemoreceptors for detecting changes in arterial blood oxygen levels, and the resulting chemoreflex is a potent regulator of blood pressure. Recurrent apnea with intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major clinical problem in adult humans and infants born preterm. Adult patients with recurrent apnea exhibit heightened sympathetic nerve activity and hypertension. Adults born preterm are predisposed to early onset of hypertension. Available evidence suggests that carotid body chemoreflex contributes to hypertension caused by IH in both adults and neonates. Experimental models of IH provided important insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying carotid body chemoreflex-mediated hypertension. This article provides a comprehensive appraisal of how IH affects carotid body function, underlying cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms, and the contribution of chemoreflex to the hypertension. PMID:25880505

  11. Aortic augmentation index in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Mariella; Scandale, Giovanni; Carzaniga, Gianni; Cinquini, Michela; Minola, Marzio; Antoniazzi, Valeria; Dimitrov, Gabriel; Carotta, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Aortic augmentation index (AIx) is used to investigate arterial stiffness. The authors tested the hypothesis that patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) demonstrate a higher AIx and also evaluated several related factors. In 97 patients with PAD, identified by ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI ≤ 0.9), and 97 controls (ABPI ≥ 0.91< 1.4), AIx (%) was determined using tonometry of the radial artery. There was no significant difference between patients and controls in characteristics of age, sex, height, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, and heart rate. AIx was higher in patients with PAD (32 ± 9 vs 28 ± 9; P = .001). In multivariate regression analysis, AIx was independently associated with heart rate (β = -0.40, P = .0005). This study showed that AIx increased in patients with PAD and that heart rate is a determinant of AIx. Further studies are necessary to assess the pathophysiological and clinical importance of AIx in patients with PAD. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effect of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization Combined with Argon-Helium Cryosurgery System on the Changes of NK Cells and T Cell Subsets in Peripheral Blood of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Manping; Wang, Xiaoyi; Bin, Huang

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most aggressive tumors in humans. T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells are the body's first line of defense to prevent tumor cell growth. Previous studies have demonstrated that transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) combined with argon-helium cryosurgery system (AHCS) can effectively treat liver cancer. However, the mechanism of the treatment is unclear yet. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TACE combined with AHCS on the changes of T cell subsets and NK cells in peripheral blood of HCC. Our data show that alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels in peripheral blood were significantly up-regulated in HCC patients before treatment when compared with healthy people and reduced after TACE combined with AHCS treatment (P < 0.01). In addition, we found that CD4+ cells and NK cells decreased (P < 0.05) and CD8+ cells increased (P < 0.05) in HCC patients when compared with healthy people. After treatment, the CD4+ cells, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and NK cells were dramatically increased in HCC patients (P < 0.05). In contrast, CD8+ cells were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). TACE combined with AHCS treatment significantly prolonged 1-year survival rate of HCC patients and did not show significant side effects. Taken together, our data indicate that TACE combined with AHCS treatment improves patients' immune system. It is a feasible and effective therapeutic method for HCC patients.

  13. Comparison of Peripheral Arterial Response to Mental Stress in Men versus Women with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mustafa; Li, Qin; Brumback, Babette; Lucey, Dorian G.; Bestland, Melinda; Eubanks, Gina; Fillingim, Roger B.; Sheps, David S.

    2008-01-01

    There are profound gender-related differences in the incidence, presentations and outcomes of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). These differences are not entirely explained by traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Non-traditional risk factors such as psychological traits have increasingly been recognized as important contributors to the genesis and outcomes of CAD. Mental stress induces significant peripheral arterial vasoconstriction with consequent increases in heart rate, and blood pressure. These changes are thought to underlie the development of myocardial ischemia and other mental stress-induced adverse cardiac events in patients with CAD. In this study we examined for gender-related differences in the peripheral arterial response to mental stress in a cohort of CAD patients using a novel peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) technique. Participants were 211 patients [77 (37%) females] with documented history of CAD and a mean age of 64±9 years. Patients were enrolled between August 18th 2004 and February 21st 2007. Mental stress was induced using a public speaking task. Hemodynamic and PAT measurements were recorded during rest and mental stress. The PAT response was calculated as a ratio of stress to resting pulse wave amplitude. PAT responses were compared between males and females. We found that the PAT ratio (stress to rest) was significantly higher in females compared to males. The mean PAT ratio was 0.80±0.72 in females compared to 0.59±0.48 in males (p=0.032). This finding remained significant after controlling for possible confounding factors (p=0.037). In conclusion, peripheral vasoconstrictive response to mental stress was more pronounced in males compared to females. This finding may suggest that males have higher susceptibility to mental stress-related adverse effects. Further studies are needed to determine the significance of this finding. PMID:18929695

  14. Patterns of disease distribution of lower extremity peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shi, Yang; Wang, Yutang; Li, Xiaoying

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis that is associated with an increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular (CV) events. Peripheral arterial disease involves the arteries distal to the aortic bifurcation in a nonuniform manner. Studies have shown that symptoms and prognosis of patients with PAD vary according to the location and size of the affected artery. Several modalities have been used to identify the location of PAD, including noninvasive evaluations and invasive procedures. Peripheral arterial disease has a risk factor profile similar to that associated with coronary artery disease (ie, age, gender, diabetes, smoking, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia). Many studies have shown that the distribution, extent, and progression of PAD are influenced by CV risk factors but the findings are not consistent. Management strategies for PAD are different for proximal and distal PAD. The objective of this review is to discuss the patterns of diseases distribution in patients with PAD. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Gene Therapy Techniques for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Maekinen, Kimmo

    2002-03-15

    Somatic gene therapy is the introduction of new genetic material into selective somatic cells with resulting therapeutic benefits. Vascular wall and, subsequently, cardiovascular diseases have become an interesting target for gene therapy studies.Arteries are an attractive target for gene therapy since vascular interventions, both open surgical and endovascular, are well suited for minimally invasive, easily monitored gene delivery. Promising therapeutic effects have been obtained in animal models in preventing post-angioplasty restenosis and vein graft thickening, as well as increasing blood flow and collateral development in ischemic limbs.First clinical trials suggest a beneficial effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in achieving therapeutic angiogenesis in chronic limb ischemia and the efficacy of decoy oligonucleotides to prevent infrainguinal vein graft stenosis. However, further studies are mandatory to clarify the safety issues, to develop better gene delivery vectors and delivery catheters, to improve transgene expression, as well as to find the most effective and safe treatment genes.

  16. Surgical Techniques for Repair of Peripheral Pulmonary Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mainwaring, Richard D; Hanley, Frank L

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is a rare form of congenital heart disease frequently associated with Williams and Alagille syndromes. Patients with this disease typically have systemic level right ventricular pressures secondary to obstruction at the lobar, segmental, and subsegmental branches. The current management of patients with peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis remains somewhat controversial. We have pioneered an entirely surgical approach to the reconstruction of peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis. This approach initially entailed surgical patch augmentation of all major lobar branches and effectively reduced right ventricular pressures by more than half. This was the first report demonstrating an effective approach to the disease. Over the past 5 years, we have gradually evolved the technique to extend the reconstruction's reach to include segmental and subsegmental branch stenoses. An important technical aspect of this approach entails division of the main pulmonary and separation of the branch pulmonary arteries to access the lower lobe branches. Pulmonary artery homograft patches are used to augment hypoplastic pulmonary artery branches. In addition, we perform a Heineke-Mikulicz type ostioplasty for isolated ostial stenoses. The technical details of the surgical approach to peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis are outlined in this article, and can also be used for other complex peripheral pulmonary artery reconstructions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Topical Menthol, Ice, Peripheral Blood Flow, and Perceived Discomfort

    PubMed Central

    Topp, Robert; Ledford, Elizabeth R.; Jacks, Dean E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Injury management commonly includes decreasing arterial blood flow to the affected site in an attempt to reduce microvascular blood flow and edema and limit the induction of inflammation. Applied separately, ice and menthol gel decrease arterial blood flow, but the combined effects of ice and menthol gel on arterial blood flow are unknown. Objectives: To compare radial artery blood flow, arterial diameter, and perceived discomfort before and after the application of 1 of 4 treatment conditions. Design: Experimental crossover design. Setting: Clinical laboratory. Participants or Other Participants: Ten healthy men, 9 healthy women (mean age = 25.68 years, mean height = 1.73 m, mean weight = 76.73 kg). Intervention(s): Four treatment conditions were randomly applied for 20 minutes to the right forearm of participants on 4 different days separated by at least 24 hours: (1) 3.5 mL menthol gel, (2) 0.5 kg of crushed ice, (3) 3.5 mL of menthol gel and 0.5 kg of crushed ice, or (4) no treatment (control). Main Outcome Measure(s): Using high-resolution ultrasound, we measured right radial artery diameter (cm) and blood flow (mL/min) every 5 minutes for 20 minutes after the treatment was applied. Discomfort with the treatment was documented using a 1-to-10 intensity scale. Results: Radial artery blood flow decreased (P < .05) from baseline in the ice (−20% to −24%), menthol (−17% to −24%), and ice and menthol (−36% to −39%) treatments but not in the control (3% to 9%) at 5, 10, and 15 minutes. At 20 minutes after baseline, only the ice (−27%) and combined ice and menthol (−38%) treatments exhibited reductions in blood flow (P < .05). Discomfort was less with menthol than with the ice treatment at 5, 10, and 20 minutes after application (P < .05). Arterial diameter and heart rate did not change. Conclusions: The application of 3.5 mL of menthol was similar to the application of 0.5 kg of crushed ice in reducing peripheral blood flood. Combining

  18. Topical menthol, ice, peripheral blood flow, and perceived discomfort.

    PubMed

    Topp, Robert; Ledford, Elizabeth R; Jacks, Dean E

    2013-01-01

    Injury management commonly includes decreasing arterial blood flow to the affected site in an attempt to reduce microvascular blood flow and edema and limit the induction of inflammation. Applied separately, ice and menthol gel decrease arterial blood flow, but the combined effects of ice and menthol gel on arterial blood flow are unknown. To compare radial artery blood flow, arterial diameter, and perceived discomfort before and after the application of 1 of 4 treatment conditions. Experimental crossover design. Clinical laboratory. PARTICIPANTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Ten healthy men, 9 healthy women (mean age = 25.68 years, mean height = 1.73 m, mean weight = 76.73 kg). Four treatment conditions were randomly applied for 20 minutes to the right forearm of participants on 4 different days separated by at least 24 hours: (1) 3.5 mL menthol gel, (2) 0.5 kg of crushed ice, (3) 3.5 mL of menthol gel and 0.5 kg of crushed ice, or (4) no treatment (control). Using high-resolution ultrasound, we measured right radial artery diameter (cm) and blood flow (mL/min) every 5 minutes for 20 minutes after the treatment was applied. Discomfort with the treatment was documented using a 1-to-10 intensity scale. Radial artery blood flow decreased (P < .05) from baseline in the ice (-20% to -24%), menthol (-17% to -24%), and ice and menthol (-36% to -39%) treatments but not in the control (3% to 9%) at 5, 10, and 15 minutes. At 20 minutes after baseline, only the ice (-27%) and combined ice and menthol (-38%) treatments exhibited reductions in blood flow (P < .05). Discomfort was less with menthol than with the ice treatment at 5, 10, and 20 minutes after application (P < .05). Arterial diameter and heart rate did not change. The application of 3.5 mL of menthol was similar to the application of 0.5 kg of crushed ice in reducing peripheral blood flood. Combining crushed ice with menthol appeared to have an additive effect on reducing blood flow.

  19. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid P (SAP), and pentraxin 3 (PTX3), has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI), and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p = 0.019). Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD. PMID:27559483

  20. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Peripheral Arterial Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Peripheral Artery Disease? Many people ... flow, so the symptoms will go away. Other Signs and Symptoms Other signs and symptoms of P. ...

  1. Peripheral artery disease: a cause of refractory hypertension after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Raquel; Gonçalves, Pedro de Araújo; Almeida, Manuel; Weigert, André; Bruges, Margarida; Gaspar, Augusta; Negrão, Acácio Pita; Machado, Domingos; Clemente, Belarmino; Teles, Rui; Machado, Francisco Pereira; Silva, Aniceto

    2008-03-01

    The authors report the case of a 44-year-old man, with a history of hypertension, smoking, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. After renal transplantation, the patient developed persistent high blood pressure, despite optimal medical therapy. When angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor therapy was begun, he developed acute anuric renal failure, which was reversed after interruption of the ACE inhibitor. After the initial clinical evaluation, the patient was referred for renal angiography, which revealed critical stenosis of the proximal left common iliac artery, just above the renal graft artery anastomosis. The patient underwent successful angioplasty and stenting of the lesion, with complete normalization of blood pressure.

  2. Plasma nitrite flux predicts exercise performance in peripheral arterial disease after 3months of exercise training.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jason D; Stabler, Thomas; Kenjale, Aarti; Ham, Katherine L; Robbins, Jennifer L; Duscha, Brian D; Dobrosielski, Devon A; Annex, Brian H

    2010-09-15

    Plasma nitrite is a major oxidation product of nitric oxide. It has also recently been suggested to perform an endocrine-like function as a nitric oxide donor in hypoxic tissues, allowing vasodilation. Exercise performance is limited in peripheral arterial disease because of an inadequate blood supply to working tissues. We hypothesized that exercise training in peripheral arterial disease subjects will improve "plasma nitrite flux" and endothelial function, to accompany increased exercise performance. Peripheral arterial disease subjects were tested at baseline and after 3 months supervised or home exercise training. Venous blood (arm) was drawn at rest and 10 min after a maximal graded treadmill test. Samples were added to heparin and centrifuged and plasma was snap-frozen for analysis by reductive chemiluminescence. Brachial artery endothelial function was measured in response to a hyperemic stimulus (flow-mediated dilation). At 3 months the peripheral arterial disease-supervised exercise group showed increases in claudication onset pain time (+138 s, p< or =0.05), peak walking time (+260 s, p< or =0.01), VO(2peak) (1.3 ml/kg/min, p< or =0.05), brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (+2%, p< or =0.05), and plasma nitrite flux (+33% p< or =0.05). There were no changes in the peripheral arterial disease-home exercise group. The change in plasma nitrite flux predicted the change in claudication onset pain (r(2)=0.59, p< or =0.01). These findings suggest that changes in plasma nitrite are related to endothelial function and predict exercise performance in peripheral arterial disease. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Leptospirosis and Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lee, Feng-You; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Data on the association between peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and leptospirosis are limited. We conducted a retrospective cohort study for determining whether leptospirosis is one of the possible risk factors for PAOD. Patients diagnosed with leptospirosis by using 2000 to 2010 data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with leptospirosis without a history of PAOD were selected. For each leptospirosis patient, 4 controls without a history of leptospirosis and PAOD were randomly selected and frequency-matched for sex, age, the year of the index date, and comorbidity diseases. The follow-up period was from the time of the initial diagnosis of leptospirosis to the diagnosis date of PAOD, or December 31, 2011. The Cox proportional hazard regression models were used for analyzing the risk of PAOD. During the follow-up period, the cumulative incidence of PAOD was higher among the patients from the leptospirosis cohort than among the nonleptospirosis cohort (log-rank test, P < 0.001). In total, 29 patients with PAOD from the leptospirosis cohort and 81 from the nonleptospirosis cohort were observed with the incidence rates of 2.1 and 1.3 per 1000 person-years, respectively, yielding a crude hazards ratio (HR) of 1.62 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.44–1.81) and adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.75 (95% CI = 1.58–1.95). The risk of PAOD was 1.75-fold higher in the patients with leptospirosis than in the general population. PMID:26986166

  4. Endovascular Intervention for Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thukkani, Arun K.; Kinlay, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Advances in endovascular therapies during the past decade have broadened the options for treating peripheral vascular disease percutaneously. Endovascular treatment offers a lower risk alternative to open surgery in many patients with multiple comorbidities. Noninvasive physiological tests and arterial imaging precede an endovascular intervention and help localize the disease and plan the procedure. The timing and need for revascularization are broadly related to the 3 main clinical presentations of claudication, critical limb ischemia, and acute limb ischemia. Many patients with claudication can be treated by exercise and medical therapy. Endovascular procedures are considered when these fail to improve quality of life and function. In contrast, critical limb ischemia and acute limb ischemia threaten the limb and require more urgent revascularization. In general, endovascular treatments have greater long-term durability for aortoiliac disease than femoral popliteal disease. Infrapopliteal revascularization is generally reserved for critical and acute limb ischemia. Balloon angioplasty and stenting are the mainstays of endovascular therapy. New well-tested innovations include drug-eluting stents and drug-coated balloons. Adjunctive devices for crossing chronic total occlusions or debulking plaque with atherectomy are less rigorously studied and have niche roles. Patients receiving endovascular procedures need a structured surveillance plan for follow-up care. This includes intensive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors to prevent myocardial infarction and stroke, which are the main causes of death. Limb surveillance aims to identify restenosis and new disease beyond the intervened segments, both of which may jeopardize patency and lead to recurrent symptoms, functional impairment, or a threatened limb. PMID:25908731

  5. Dietary nitrate supplementation enhances exercise performance in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Kenjale, Aarti A.; Ham, Katherine L.; Stabler, Thomas; Robbins, Jennifer L.; Johnson, Johanna L.; VanBruggen, Mitch; Privette, Grayson; Yim, Eunji; Kraus, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) results in a failure to adequately supply blood and oxygen (O2) to working tissues and presents as claudication pain during walking. Nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability is essential for vascular health and function. Plasma nitrite (NO2−) is a marker of vascular NO production but may also be a protected circulating “source” that can be converted to NO during hypoxic conditions, possibly aiding perfusion. We hypothesized that dietary supplementation of inorganic nitrate in the form of beetroot (BR) juice would increase plasma NO2− concentration, increase exercise tolerance, and decrease gastrocnemius fractional O2 extraction, compared with placebo (PL). This was a randomized, open-label, crossover study. At each visit, subjects (n = 8) underwent resting blood draws, followed by consumption of 500 ml BR or PL and subsequent blood draws prior to, during, and following a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) test. Gastrocnemius oxygenation during the CPX was measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. There were no changes from rest for [NO2−] (152 ± 72 nM) following PL. BR increased plasma [NO2−] after 3 h (943 ± 826 nM; P ≤ 0.01). Subjects walked 18% longer before the onset of claudication pain (183 ± 84 s vs. 215 ± 99 s; P ≤ 0.01) and had a 17% longer peak walking time (467 ± 223 s vs. 533 ± 233 s; P ≤ 0.05) following BR vs. PL. Gastrocnemius tissue fractional O2 extraction was lower during exercise following BR (7.3 ± 6.2 vs. 10.4 ± 6.1 arbitrary units; P ≤ 0.01). Diastolic blood pressure was lower in the BR group at rest and during CPX testing (P ≤ 0.05). These findings support the hypothesis that NO2−-related NO signaling increases peripheral tissue oxygenation in areas of hypoxia and increases exercise tolerance in PAD. PMID:21454745

  6. [Management of peripheral vascular disease based on current guidelines. Peripheral artery occlusive disease of the iliac and femoral arteries and carotid artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Grebe, M T; Sternitzky, R

    2013-12-01

    The article summarizes the recommendations of current European and American guidelines concerning the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease and carotid artery stenosis. In comparison to older recommendations, current guidelines concerning endovascular treatment and concomitant medical therapy have been changed in recent years. With the exception of very complex and long lesions, endovascular methods are seen as the therapy of choice for revascularization of the iliac and femoral arteries. For cardiovascular risk reduction, patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease and stenosis of the carotid arteries should receive antiplatelet as well as statin therapy and should not be treated different from patients with coronary artery disease.

  7. Relationship of the angiographic extent of peripheral arterial disease with coronary artery involvement.

    PubMed

    Satiroglu, Omer; Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Karadag, Zakir; Temiz, Ahmet; Cetin, Mustafa; Canga, Aytun; Erdogan, Turan; Bostan, Mehmet; Cicek, Yuksel; Durakoglugil, Emre; Vural, Mutlu; Bozkurt, Engin

    2012-07-01

    To determine the co-incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients investigated for peripheral arterial disease (PAD), and to establish the relationship between the risk factors in the two groups of patients. The prospective study, done from January 2005 and April 2009, at the Cardiology Clinic of Rize Education and Research Hospital, Rize and John F. Kennedy Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey, had a cohort of 307 patients who had been diagnosed with peripheral artery disease either clinically or by ultrasonography for the arteries of the lower extremities and had undergone coronary angiography and peripheral angiography in the same or different sessions. The patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender and atherosclerotic risk factors. Relationship of the extent of peripheral arterial disease with coronary artery involvement was investigated. Of the 307 patients, 251 (81.8%) were male, and the mean age was 62.1 +/- 9.5 years. In the study population, 178 (58.0%) patients were diagnosed as hypertensive, 84 (27.4%) patients were diabetic, 18 (5.9%) patients had a family history of coronary artery disease, 111 (36.2%) were smokers, 149 (48.5%) were hypercholesterolemic, and 20 (6.5%) had cerebrovascular/carotid disease. In 92.3% of patients with peripheral arterial disease, various levels of coronary stenosis (P = 0.007) was noticed. Hypertension was a risk factor for both coronary and peripheral artery diseases (p = 0.012 and 0.027, respectively). Univariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the presence of peripheral artery disease was related to the coronary variety (Odds ratio [OR]: 6, 95% CI: 1.4-25.5, P = 0.016) and severe cases (diffused atherosclerotic stenosis and complete occlusion in all segments) significantly indicated the presence of some coronary pathology (OR: 8, 95% CI: 1.7-37.4, P = 0.008). This relationship maintained its significance after adjustment for age, gender, hypercholesterolaemia, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, family

  8. Current status of thrombolysis for peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Ouriel, Kenneth

    2002-11-01

    Acute peripheral arterial occlusion occurs as a result of thrombosis or embolism. A reduction in the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease accounts for a shift in the frequency of embolic to thrombotic occlusions. Also, a dramatic increase in the number of lower extremity arterial bypass graft procedures explains the predominance of graft occlusions in most recent series of patients with acute limb ischemia. While open surgical procedures remain the gold standard in the treatment of peripheral arterial occlusion, thrombolytic agents have been employed as an alternative to primary surgical revascularization in patients with acute limb ischemia. Systemic administration of thrombolytic agents, while effective for small coronary artery clots, fails to achieve dissolution of the large peripheral arterial thrombi. Catheter-directed administration of the agents directly into the occlusive thrombus is the only means of effecting early recanalization. Prior to 1999, urokinase was the sole agent used in North America for peripheral arterial indications, but the loss of the agent from the marketplace forced clinicians to turn to alternate agents, specifically alteplase and reteplase. Interest in the use of platelet glycoprotein inhibitors and mechanical thrombectomy devices also rose, coincident with the loss of urokinase from the marketplace. Most clinicians welcome the predicted return of urokinase to the marketplace. New investigative trials should be organized and executed to answer some of the remaining questions related to thrombolytic treatment of peripheral arterial disease. Foremost in this regard remains the question of which patients are best treated with percutaneous thrombolytic techniques and which are best treated with primary operative intervention. Ultimately, however, the thrombolytic agents are but one tool in the armamentarium of the vascular practitioner. This review is directed at providing the practicing clinician with the basic fund of knowledge

  9. Use of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry and circulating biological markers to predict outcomes in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Vandack; Ataíde, Thiago Bragança; Brant, Luisa Caldeira; Oliveira, Clara Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Lucas Vieira; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho; Lopes, Fernanda Barbosa; Saraiva, Ivan Euclides; Andrade, Marcus Vinícius

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usefulness and prognostic value of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry in patients with sepsis. Moreover, we investigated the association of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry results with serum levels of certain inflammatory molecules. Methods Prospective study, conducted in an 18-bed mixed intensive care unit for adults. The exclusion criteria included severe immunosuppression or antibiotic therapy initiated more than 48 hours before assessment. We measured the reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry on inclusion (day 1) and on day 3. Interleukin-6, interleukin-10, high-mobility group box 1 protein and soluble ST2 levels were measured in the blood obtained upon inclusion. Results Seventeen of the 79 patients (21.6%) enrolled were determined to have reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry signals considered technically unreliable and were excluded from the study. Thus, 62 patients were included in the final analysis, and they underwent a total of 95 reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry exams within the first 48 hours after inclusion. The mean age was 51.5 (SD: 18.9), and 49 (62%) of the patients were male. Reactive hyperemia indexes from days 1 and 3 were not associated with vasopressor need, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, or 28-day mortality. Among the patients who died, compared with survivors, there was a significant increase in the day 3 reactive hyperemia index compared with day 1 (p = 0.045). There was a weak negative correlation between the day 1 reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry index and the levels of high-mobility group box 1 protein (r = -0.287). Conclusion Technical difficulties and the lack of clear associations between the exam results and clinical severity or outcomes strongly limits the utility of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry in septic patients

  10. Use of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry and circulating biological markers to predict outcomes in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Vandack; Ataíde, Thiago Bragança; Brant, Luisa Caldeira; Oliveira, Clara Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Lucas Vieira; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho; Lopes, Fernanda Barbosa; Saraiva, Ivan Euclides; Andrade, Marcus Vinícius

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness and prognostic value of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry in patients with sepsis. Moreover, we investigated the association of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry results with serum levels of certain inflammatory molecules. Prospective study, conducted in an 18-bed mixed intensive care unit for adults. The exclusion criteria included severe immunosuppression or antibiotic therapy initiated more than 48 hours before assessment. We measured the reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry on inclusion (day 1) and on day 3. Interleukin-6, interleukin-10, high-mobility group box 1 protein and soluble ST2 levels were measured in the blood obtained upon inclusion. Seventeen of the 79 patients (21.6%) enrolled were determined to have reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry signals considered technically unreliable and were excluded from the study. Thus, 62 patients were included in the final analysis, and they underwent a total of 95 reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry exams within the first 48 hours after inclusion. The mean age was 51.5 (SD: 18.9), and 49 (62%) of the patients were male. Reactive hyperemia indexes from days 1 and 3 were not associated with vasopressor need, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, or 28-day mortality. Among the patients who died, compared with survivors, there was a significant increase in the day 3 reactive hyperemia index compared with day 1 (p = 0.045). There was a weak negative correlation between the day 1 reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry index and the levels of high-mobility group box 1 protein (r = -0.287). Technical difficulties and the lack of clear associations between the exam results and clinical severity or outcomes strongly limits the utility of reactive hyperemia - peripheral arterial tonometry in septic patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

  11. Cardiac and Arterial Contribution to Blood Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    heart to the blood pressure . We conclude that when the heart hypertrophies, as a result of the hypertension , the changed cardiac behavior, in turn...Plenary Talks Cardiac and Arterial Contribution to Blood Pressure N.Westerhof, Lab. for Physiology, Institute for Cardiovascular Research...Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam Blood pressure and blood flow result from the interaction of the heart, the pump, and the arterial system, the load

  12. [The role of ultrasonography of the peripheral arteries in diagnosing coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Pasierski, Tomasz; Sosnowski, Cezary; Szulczyk, Anna; Leszczyński, Lech; Rewicki, Marek

    2004-01-01

    Atherosclerosis develops simultaneously in multiple arterial beds, that creates opportunity to diagnose of coronary artery disease. Aim of the study was the evaluation of association between atherosclerotic involvement of peripheral arteries assessed by ultrasound and significant coronary artery disease revealed by angiography. Study included 410 patients, (73% males), mean age 56.0 +/- 9.5 year scheduled for coronary angiography. During ultrasound examination of common carotid and common femoral arteries arterial wall intima-media (IMT) thickness and atherosclerotic plaques presence were assessed. Significant coronary artery disease (CAD) was diagnosed with coronary angiography as diameter stenosis > 50%. Intimo-media thickness (IMT) of common carotid arteries did not differ between groups with and without significant coronary artery disease (right 6.6 vs 6.4 mm, p = ns, left 6.9 vs 6.6 mm, p = ns) but in common femoral arterial was greater in patients with coronary artery disease (right 8.2 vs 7.1 mm, p < 0.005, left 7.9 vs 7.1 mm, p = 0.03). Atherosclerotic plaques in carotid and femoral arteries was detected more often in CAD patients (90.1% vs 34.6%, p < 0.0001). Positive predictive value for CAD diagnosis with detection of plaque in carotid or femoral artery was 93% and negative prognostic value for exclusion CAD after plaque exclusion in all arteries was 61%. Search for atherosclerotic plaques in ultrasound examination of peripheral arteries may facilitate CAD diagnosis in selected patients groups.

  13. Stenting for Peripheral Artery Disease of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary Background Objective In January 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat received an application from University Health Network to provide an evidentiary platform on stenting as a treatment management for peripheral artery disease. The purpose of this health technology assessment is to examine the effectiveness of primary stenting as a treatment management for peripheral artery disease of the lower extremities. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a progressive disease occurring as a result of plaque accumulation (atherosclerosis) in the arterial system that carries blood to the extremities (arms and legs) as well as vital organs. The vessels that are most affected by PAD are the arteries of the lower extremities, the aorta, the visceral arterial branches, the carotid arteries and the arteries of the upper limbs. In the lower extremities, PAD affects three major arterial segments i) aortic-iliac, ii) femoro-popliteal (FP) and iii) infra-popliteal (primarily tibial) arteries. The disease is commonly classified clinically as asymptomatic claudication, rest pain and critical ischemia. Although the prevalence of PAD in Canada is not known, it is estimated that 800,000 Canadians have PAD. The 2007 Trans Atlantic Intersociety Consensus (TASC) II Working Group for the Management of Peripheral Disease estimated that the prevalence of PAD in Europe and North America to be 27 million, of whom 88,000 are hospitalizations involving lower extremities. A higher prevalence of PAD among elderly individuals has been reported to range from 12% to 29%. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) estimated that the prevalence of PAD is 14.5% among individuals 70 years of age and over. Modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors associated with PAD include advanced age, male gender, family history, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia. PAD is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction (MI

  14. Combination treatment of biomechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for the osteonecrosis of the femoral head: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qiang; Wang, Weidong; Xu, Taotao; Zhang, Shanxing; Xiao, Luwei; Chen, Di; Jin, Hongting; Tong, Peijian

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the benefits of combination treatment with mechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) via the medial circumflex femoral artery on the progression of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Fifty-five patients (89 hips) with early and intermediate stage ONFH were recruited and randomly assigned to combination treatment or mechanical support treatment (control group). All hips received mechanical support treatment (porous tantalum rod implantation). Then, hips in the combination treatment group were performed targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs. At each follow-up, Harris hip score (HHS) and Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) classification were used to evaluate the symptoms and progression of osteonecrosis. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) was assessed as an endpoint at each follow-up. At 36 months, 9 of the 41 hips (21.95%) in the control group progressed to clinical failure and underwent THA whereas only 3 of the 48 hips (6.25%) in the combination treatment group required THA (p = 0.031). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a significant difference in the survival time between the two groups (log-rank test; p = 0.025). Compared to the control group, combination treatment significantly improved the HHS at 36 months (p = 0.003). At the final follow-up examination, radiological progression was noted in 13 of 41 hips (31.71%) for the control group, but in only 4 of 48 hips (8.33%) for the combination treatment group (p = 0.005). The overall collapse rates were 15.15% (5/33 hips) and 8.11% (3/37 hips) in the control and combination treatment groups, respectively. Targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs is capable of enhancing the efficacy of biomechanical support in the treatment of ONFH. This clinical trial confirmed that the combination treatment might be a safe and feasible

  15. Medical management of patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Poredoš, P; Jezovnik, M; Kalodiki, E; Andreozzi, G; Antignani, P-L; Clement, D; Comerota, A; Fareed, J; Fletcher, J; Fras, Z; Griffin, M; Markel, A; Martini, R; Mignano, A; Nicolaides, A; Novo, G; Novo, S; Roztočil, K; Visona, A

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is one of the most frequent manifestations of atherosclerosis and is associated with atherosclerosis in the coronary and carotid arteries, leading to a highly increased incidence of cardiovascular events. Major risk factors of PAD are similar to those that lead to atherosclerosis in other vascular beds. However, there are differences in the power of individual risk factors in the different vascular territories. Cigarette smoking and diabetes mellitus represent the greatest risks of PAD. For prevention of the progression of PAD and accompanying cardiovascular events similar preventative measures are used as in coronary artery disease (CAD). However, recent data indicate that there are some differences in the efficacy of drugs used in the prevention of atherothrombotic events in PAD. Antiplatelet treatment is indicated in virtually all patients with PAD. In spite of the absence of hard evidence- based data on the long term efficacy of aspirin, it is still considered as a first line treatment and clopidogrel as an effective alternative. The new antiplatelet drugs ticagrelol and prasugrel also represent promising options for treatment of PAD. Statin therapy is indicated to achieve the target low density lipoprotein cholesterol level of ≤2.5 mmol/L (100 mg/dL) and there is emerging evidence that lower levels are more effective. Statins may also improve walking capacity. Antihypertensive treatment is indicated to achieve the goal blood pressure (<140/90 mmHg). All classes of antihypertensive drugs including beta-blockers are acceptable for treatment of hypertension in patients with PAD. Diabetic patients with PAD should reduce their glycosylated haemoglobin to ≤7%. As PAD patients represent the group with the highest risk of atherothrombotic events, these patients need the most intensive treatment and elimination of risk factors of atherosclerosis. These measures should be as comprehensive as those in patients with established

  16. Drug-Coated Balloons for Infrainguinal Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjum S; Lee, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Revascularization of infrainguinal peripheral artery disease has traditionally been accomplished via percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. However, long-term results have been hampered by high rates of restenosis. Along with the advent of stents, paclitaxel-coated balloons are an emerging therapeutic option for the invasive management of infrainguinal peripheral artery disease. Paclitaxel has been successful in inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia, the main mechanism for in-stent restenosis. Technological advances have facilitated the development of paclitaxel-coated balloons, which show promise in early trials for femoropopliteal stenosis relative to uncoated balloons. For infrapopliteal stenoses, the data remain scant and conflicted. Therefore, large-scale randomized clinical trials with long-term follow-up evaluating safety and effectiveness between various strategies need to be performed to determine the optimal invasive management strategy for infrainguinal peripheral artery disease.

  17. Peripheral arterial disease in general and diabetic population.

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, E M

    2007-06-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is stenosis or occlusion of peripheral arterial vessels by atherosclerotic plaque. It may present as intermittent claudication, rest pain and impotence. PAD of the lower limbs is the third most important site of atherosclerotic disease after coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Increasing age, family history, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia and more decisively diabetes are significant risk factors. PAD is a clinical condition that has often been neglected, underdiagnosed, undertreated and has a serious outcome. It may lead to nonhealing wounds, gangrene and amputation of the lower limbs. Hence, early identification of patients at risk of PAD and timely referral to the vascular surgeon in severe cases is crucial.

  18. Prevalence of significant carotid artery stenosis in Iranian patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Bavil, Abolhassan Shakeri; Ghabili, Kamyar; Daneshmand, Seyed Ebrahim; Nemati, Masoud; Bavil, Moslem Shakeri; Namdar, Hossein; Shaafi, Sheyda

    2011-01-01

    Generalized screening for carotid artery stenosis with carotid duplex ultrasonography in patients with peripheral arterial disease is controversial. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of significant internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis in a group of Iranian patients with peripheral arterial disease. We prospectively screened 120 patients with a known diagnosis of peripheral vascular disease for carotid artery stenosis. Based on the angiographic assessment of abdominal aorta and arteries of the lower extremities, patients with stenosis greater than 70% in the lower extremity arteries were included. A group of healthy individuals aged ≥ 50 years was recruited as a control. Risk factors for atherosclerosis including smoking, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, ischemic heart disease, and cerebrovascular disease were recorded. Common carotid arteries (CCAs) and the origins of the internal and external arteries were scanned with B-mode ultrasonography. Significant ICA stenosis, > 70% ICA stenosis but less than near occlusion of the ICA, was diagnosed when the ICA/CCA peak systolic velocity ratio was ≥ 3.5. Ninety-five patients, with a mean age of 58.52 ± 11.04 years, were studied. Twenty-five patients had a history of smoking, six patients had a history of coronary artery disease, six patients had hypertension, and ten patients had diabetes mellitus. Significant ICA stenosis was present in four patients (4.2%) with peripheral arterial disease in one healthy individual (1%) of the control group (P > 0.05). In terms of the risk factors for atherosclerosis, no statistically significant relationship was found between individual atherosclerotic risk factors and significant ICA stenosis (P > 0.05). The prevalence of significant ICA stenosis in Iranian patients with peripheral arterial disease is low. In addition, there is no relationship between individual atherosclerotic risk factors and significant ICA stenosis.

  19. Arterial cannulation can hasten the onset of symmetrical peripheral gangrene

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Nataraj M.; Chaudhuri, Souvik

    2011-01-01

    Symmetrical peripheral gangrene (SPG) is a devastating complication seen in critical care settings due to several contributory factors like low perfusion, high dose of vasopressors, disseminated intravascular coagulation, etc. Arterial cannulation is commonly done in critical patients for monitoring. We report a case of patient who developed early features of SPG which recovered in one hand, although it progressed in the hand which had the arterial cannula. PMID:25885311

  20. Quantification of wave reflection using peripheral blood pressure waveforms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Sei; Fazeli, Nima; McMurtry, M Sean; Finegan, Barry A; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel minimally invasive method for quantifying blood pressure (BP) wave reflection in the arterial tree. In this method, two peripheral BP waveforms are analyzed to obtain an estimate of central aortic BP waveform, which is used together with a peripheral BP waveform to compute forward and backward pressure waves. These forward and backward waves are then used to quantify the strength of wave reflection in the arterial tree. Two unique strengths of the proposed method are that 1) it replaces highly invasive central aortic BP and flow waveforms required in many existing methods by less invasive peripheral BP waveforms, and 2) it does not require estimation of characteristic impedance. The feasibility of the proposed method was examined in an experimental swine subject under a wide range of physiologic states and in 13 cardiac surgery patients. In the swine subject, the method was comparable to the reference method based on central aortic BP and flow. In cardiac surgery patients, the method was able to estimate forward and backward pressure waves in the absence of any central aortic waveforms: on the average, the root-mean-squared error between actual versus computed forward and backward pressure waves was less than 5 mmHg, and the error between actual versus computed reflection index was less than 0.03.

  1. Role of senescence marker p16 INK4a measured in peripheral blood T-lymphocytes in predicting length of hospital stay after coronary artery bypass surgery in older adults.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Barodka, Viachaslau; Sharpless, Norman E; Torrice, Chad; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E; Shah, Ashish S; Bandeen Roche, Karen J; Walston, Jeremy D

    2016-02-01

    Adults older than 65 years undergo more than 120,000 coronary artery bypass (CAB) procedures each year in the United States. Chronological age alone, though commonly used in prediction models of outcomes after CAB, does not alone reflect variability in aging process; thus, the risk of complications in older adults. We performed a prospective study to evaluate a relationship between senescence marker p16(INK4a) expression in peripheral blood T-lymphocytes (p16 levels in PBTLs) with aging and with perioperative outcomes in older CAB patients. We included 55 patients age 55 and older, who underwent CAB in Johns Hopkins Hospital between September 1st, 2010 and March 25th, 2013. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data following outline of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons data collection form was collected, and p16 mRNA levels in PBTLs were measured using TaqMan® qRT-PCR. Associations between p16 mRNA levels in PBTLs with length of hospital stay, frailty status, p16 protein levels in the aortic and left internal mammary artery tissue, cerebral oxygen saturation, and augmentation index as a measure of vascular stiffness were measured using regression analyses. Length of hospital stay was the primary outcome of interest, and major organ morbidity, mortality, and discharge to a skilled nursing facility were secondary outcomes. In secondary analysis, we evaluated associations between p16 mRNA levels in PBTLs and interleukin-6 levels using regression analyses. Median age of enrolled patients was 63.5 years (range 56-81 years), they were predominantly male (74.55%), of Caucasian descent (85.45%). Median log2(p16 levels in PBTLs) were 4.71 (range 1.10-6.82). P16 levels in PBTLs were significantly associated with chronological age (mean difference 0.06 for each year increase in age, 95% CI 0.01-0.11) and interleukin 6 levels (mean difference 0.09 for each pg/ml increase in IL-6 levels, 95% CI 0.01-0.18). There were no significant associations with frailty status, augmentation

  2. Arterial Blood, Rather Than Venous Blood, is a Better Source for Circulating Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terai, Mizue; Mu, Zhaomei; Eschelman, David J.; Gonsalves, Carin F.; Kageyama, Ken; Chervoneva, Inna; Orloff, Marlana; Weight, Ryan; Mastrangelo, Michael J.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Sato, Takami

    2015-01-01

    Background CTCs provide prognostic information and their application is under investigation in multiple tumor types. Of the multiple variables inherent in any such process, none is more important to outcome than the appropriateness of the sample source. To address this question, we investigated CTCs in paired peripheral venous and arterial blood specimens obtained from stage IV uveal melanoma patients. Methods Blood specimens were obtained from both common femoral arteries and antecubital veins in 17 uveal melanoma patients with multiple hepatic metastases for CTC measurements. Finding CTCs were detectable with greater frequency (100%) and in larger numbers (median 5, range 1 to 168) in all arterial blood specimens than in venous samples (52.9%; median 1, range 0 to 8). Patients with hepatic as well as extra-hepatic metastasis showed higher number of arterial CTCs, compared to patients with liver-only metastasis (p = 0.003). There was no significant association between the number of arterial CTCs and the tumor burden within the liver in patients who had liver-only metastases. Interpretation Our data indicate that arterial blood specimens might be a better source of circulating uveal melanoma cells. Although less conveniently processed, perhaps arterial blood should be evaluated as sample source for measurement of CTCs. PMID:26870807

  3. Continuous blood gas monitoring in femoral arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlain, Les A.; Spar, Steven M.; Dellinger, Bart

    1995-05-01

    Continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring is a potentially valuable tool in the surgical and intensive care arenas. Patient oxygenation and acid base status can change rapidly and without warning. The ability to monitor pHa, PaCO2 and PaO2 in arterial blood will be a major medical advance for the anesthesiologist and intensivist. Intra-arterial blood gas sensors are typically placed in radial arteries. In certain patient populations accurate monitoring is not possible in radial arteries due to arterial environmental factors such as hypotension, vasoconstriction and atherosclerotic disease. These same factors can make radial cannulation difficult resulting in traumatic catheter insertion, thereby further compromising flow conditions. In situations where radial artery flow is expected to be compromised, selecting a large vessel for sensor placement is desirable. We report an initial feasibility study of our blood gas monitoring system using the femoral artery as the sensing site. Clinical results are presented as well as potential advantages and disadvantages associated with monitoring in the femoral artery.

  4. Overview of Functional Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Throat Disorders Eye Disorders Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and Urinary Tract Disorders Liver ...

  5. Subintimal Angioplasty for Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Met, Rosemarie Lienden, Krijn P. Van; Koelemay, Mark J. W.; Bipat, Shandra; Legemate, Dink A.; Reekers, Jim A.

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this study was to summarize outcomes of subintimal angioplasty (SA) for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. The Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase databases were searched to perform a systematic review of the literature from 1966 through May 2007 on outcomes of SA for peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the infrainguinal vessels. The keywords 'percutaneous intentional extraluminal revascularization,' 'subintimal angioplasty,' 'peripheral arterial disease,' 'femoral artery,' 'popliteal artery,' and 'tibial artery' were used. Assessment of study quality was done using a form based on a checklist of the Dutch Cochrane Centre. The recorded outcomes were technical and clinical success, primary (assisted) patency, limb salvage, complications, and survival, in relation to the clinical grade of disease (intermittent claudication or critical limb ischemia [CLI] or mixed) and location of lesion (femoropopliteal, crural, or mixed). Twenty-three cohort studies including a total of 1549 patients (range, 27 to 148) were included in this review. Methodological and reporting quality were moderate, e.g., there was selection bias and reporting was not done according to the reporting standards. These and significant clinical heterogeneity obstructed a meta-analysis. Reports about length of the lesion and TASC classification were too various to summarize or were not mentioned at all. The technical success rates varied between 80% and 90%, with lower rates for crural lesions compared with femoral lesions. Complication rates ranged between 8% and 17% and most complications were minor. After 1 year, clinical success was between 50% and 70%, primary patency was around 50% and limb salvage varied from 80% to 90%. In conclusion, taking into account the methodological shortcomings of the included studies, SA can play an important role in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, especially in the case of critical limb ischemia. Despite the moderate patency

  6. The Recognition and Management of Peripheral Arterial Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, B. S.; Firor, W. B.; Key, J. A.

    1965-01-01

    Early recognition of limb ischemia may allow prompt, effective therapy for peripheral arterial injuries. A review of cases of peripheral arterial trauma at the Toronto General Hospital since 1953 revealed that 50% of the injuries were not immediately recognized. An expanding hematoma, pulsatile hemorrhage or the onset of a bruit and thrill signifies arterial damage in penetrating wounds. Ischemia may be difficult to recognize in patients with soft tissue or skeletal trauma, but the presence of distal pallor, coolness, paresis, cyanosis, anesthesia, poor capillary refill and disproportionate pain indicates significant arterial damage and necessitates surgical exploration. The diagnosis of arterial “spasm” in such instances is untenable and can only be made after direct inspection, or on the return of pulses after reduction of a fracture or release of a tight cast. Restoration of arterial continuity by end-to-end anastomosis is the recommended technique for all arterial injuries, since after ligation of even minor vessels, ischemia may ensue, and amputation may occasionally be necessary. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14285303

  7. Automated microscopy system for peripheral blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boev, Sergei F.; Sazonov, Vladimir V.; Kozinets, Gennady I.; Pogorelov, Valery M.; Gusev, Alexander A.; Korobova, Farida V.; Vinogradov, Alexander G.; Verdenskaya, Natalya V.; Ivanova, Irina A.

    2000-11-01

    The report describes the instrument ASPBS (Automated Screening of Peripheral Blood Cells) designed for an automated analysis of dry blood smears. The instrument is based on computer microscopy and uses dry blood smears prepared according to the standard Romanovskii-Giemza procedure. In comparison with the well-known flow cytometry systems, our instrument provides more detailed information and offers an opporunity of visualizing final results. The basic performances of the instrument are given. Software of this instrument is based on digital image processing and image recognition procedures. It is pointed out that the instrument can be used as a fairly universal tool in scientific research, public demonstrations, in medical treatment, and in medical education. The principle used as the basis of the instrument appeared adequate for creating an instrument version serviceable even during space flights where standard manual procedures and flow cytometry systems fail. The benefit of the use of the instrument in clinical laboratories is described.

  8. Arterial and venous blood gas analyses.

    PubMed

    Rieser, Teresa M

    2013-08-01

    Arterial and venous blood gases provide useful information regarding pulmonary function as well as acid-base balance. The goal of this article is to discuss the collection of blood gases, common errors in analysis, and what information can be gleaned from a blood gas analysis. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Feasibility and Safety of Routine Transpedal Arterial Access for Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Tak W; Shah, Sooraj; Amoroso, Nicholas; Diwan, Ravi; Makker, Parth; Ratcliffe, Justin A; Lala, Moinakhtar; Huang, Yili; Nanjundappa, Aravinda; Daggubati, Ramesh; Pancholy, Samir; Patel, Tejas

    2015-07-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility and safety of transpedal arterial access for lower-extremity angiography and intervention. Traditionally, the femoral artery is chosen for the initial access site in symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD), but this approach carries a substantial portion of the entire procedural complication risk. 80 patients were prospectively evaluated for the treatment of PAD between May and July 2014. All patients underwent peripheral angiography, and intervention if necessary. A pedal artery was the initial access site for all patients. Under ultrasound guidance, one of the pedal arteries was visualized and accessed, and a 4 Fr Glidesheath was inserted. Retrograde orbital atherectomy and balloon angioplasty were performed with a 4 Fr sheath or upsizing to a 6 Fr Glidesheath Slender (Terumo) for stenting as needed. Clinical and ultrasound assessment of the pedal arteries were performed before the procedure and at 1-month follow-up. Diagnostic transpedal peripheral angiography was performed in all 80 patients. 43 out of 51 patients (84%) who required intervention were successful using a pedal artery as the sole access site. No immediate or delayed access-site complications were detected. Clinical follow-up was achieved in 77 patients (96%) and access artery patency was demonstrated by ultrasound at 1 month in 100% of patients. The routine use of a transpedal approach for the treatment of PAD may be feasible and safe. Pedal artery access may also avoid many of the complications associated with the traditional femoral approach, but further study is needed.

  10. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain or shortness of breath that does not go away with rest. You have dizziness, fainting, or you are very tired. You are coughing up blood or yellow or green mucus. You have chills or a fever over ...

  11. Treating patients with peripheral arterial disease and claudication.

    PubMed

    Treat-Jacobson, Diane; Walsh, M Eileen

    2003-03-01

    The vascular nurse plays an important role in the treatment of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a prevalent atherosclerotic occlusive disease that affects approximately 8 to 12 million people in the United States. Approximately 4 to 5 million individuals with PAD experience claudication, the exercise-induced ischemic pain in the lower extremities that is relieved upon rest. Both PAD and claudication are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, limitations in functional capacity, and a decreased quality of life. Despite its prevalence, PAD is often undiagnosed and, therefore, increases the risk for cardiovascular ischemic events, disease progression, functional disability, amputation, and death. Risk factors for PAD and claudication are similar to those for other atherosclerotic diseases, including age, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperhomocysteinemia. Effective treatment to normalize these risk factors can reduce disease progression and the incidence of cardiovascular ischemic events. Claudication symptoms can be improved most effectively through exercise training, which may be used in conjunction with medications specifically indicated to improve these symptoms. Vascular nurses, practicing in a multitude of inpatient and outpatient settings, can assist patients with risk-factor modifications and behavioral changes to help them stop smoking, maintain glycemic control, normalize high blood pressure and lipid levels, and ensure initiation of lifelong antiplatelet therapy and participation in exercise rehabilitation programs, thus, promoting positive outcomes for patients with claudication.

  12. Hemodynamic Conditions in a Failing Peripheral Artery Bypass Graft

    PubMed Central

    McGah, Patrick M.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Beach, Kirk W.; Zierler, R. Eugene; Riley, James J.; Aliseda, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms of restenosis in autogenous vein bypass grafts placed for peripheral artery disease are not completely understood. We seek to investigate the role of hemodynamic stress in a case study of a revised bypass graft that failed due to restenosis. Methods The morphology of the lumen is reconstructed from a custom 3D ultrasound system. Scans were taken at one, six, and sixteen months after a patch angioplasty procedure. Computational hemodynamic simulations of the patient-specific model provide the blood flow features and the hemodynamic stresses on the vessel wall at the three time points studied. Results The vessel was initially free of any detectable lesions, but a 60% diameter reducing stenosis developed over the 16 month interval of study. As determined from the simulations, chaotic and recirculating flow occurred downstream of the stenosis due to the sudden widening of the lumen at the patch location. Curvature and a sudden increase in the lumen cross-sectional area induce these flow features that are hypothesized to be conducive to intimal hyperplasia. Favorable agreement was found between simulation results and in vivo Doppler ultrasound velocity measurements. Conclusions Transitional and chaotic flow occurs at the site of the revision, inducing a complex pattern of wall shear are computed with the hemodynamic simulations. This supports the hypothesis that the hemodynamic stresses in the revised segment, produced by the coupling of vessel geometry and chaotic flow, led to the intimal hyperplasia and restenosis of the graft. PMID:22551907

  13. [Our experience with peripheral arterial embolectomy].

    PubMed

    Caminiti, R; Arrigo, G; Broccio, G

    1975-04-30

    34 cases of acute peripheral ischaemia examined in recent years at the University of Messina General Surgery Clinic are presented. 16 were subjected to embolectomy according to Fogarty. The remaining 18 received protracted medical therapy. Some successes were obtained. In other cases, gangrene necessitated amputation of the affected limb. Satisfactory results were observed in 70% of the operated series. Success was more marked when only a short interval was left between the embolic episode, with progressively poorer results as the penalty for delay. The long-term results of embolectomy are related to the nature of the underlying disease and the treatment given after surgery.

  14. Blood Tracer Kinetics in the Arterial Tree

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Elias; Gall, Peter; Günther, Matthias; Reisert, Marco; Mader, Irina; Fleysher, Roman; Kiselev, Valerij G.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of blood supply of different organs relies on labeling blood with a suitable tracer. The tracer kinetics is linear: Tracer concentration at an observation site is a linear response to an input somewhere upstream the arterial flow. The corresponding impulse response functions are currently treated empirically without incorporating the relation to the vascular morphology of an organ. In this work we address this relation for the first time. We demonstrate that the form of the response function in the entire arterial tree is reduced to that of individual vessel segments under approximation of good blood mixing at vessel bifurcations. The resulting expression simplifies significantly when the geometric scaling of the vascular tree is taken into account. This suggests a new way to access the vascular morphology in vivo using experimentally determined response functions. However, it is an ill-posed inverse problem as demonstrated by an example using measured arterial spin labeling in large brain arteries. We further analyze transport in individual vessel segments and demonstrate that experimentally accessible tracer concentration in vessel segments depends on the measurement principle. Explicit expressions for the response functions are obtained for the major middle part of the arterial tree in which the blood flow in individual vessel segments can be treated as laminar. When applied to the analysis of regional cerebral blood flow measurements for which the necessary arterial input is evaluated in the carotid arteries, present theory predicts about 20% underestimation, which is in agreement with recent experimental data. PMID:25299048

  15. Hemodynamic analysis of edge stenosis in peripheral artery stent grafts.

    PubMed

    Al-Hakim, R; Lee, E W; Kee, S T; Seals, K; Varghese, B; Chien, A; Quirk, M; McWilliams, J

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the hemodynamics of peripheral artery stent grafts to guide intelligent stent redesign. Two surgically explanted porcine arteries were mounted in an ex vivo system with subsequent deployment of an Xpert self-expanding nitinol stent or Viabahn stent graft. The arteries were casted with radiopaque resin, and the cast then scanned using micro-computed tomography at 8μm isotropic voxel resolution. The arterial lumen was segmented and a computational mesh grid surface generated. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was subsequently performed using COMSOL Multiphysics 5.1. CFD analysis demonstrated low endothelial shear stress (ESS) involving 9.4 and 63.6% surface area of the central stent graft and bare metal stent, respectively. Recirculation zones were identified adjacent to the bare metal stent struts, while none were identified in the central stent graft. However, the stent graft demonstrated malapposition of the proximal stent graft edge with low velocity flow between the PTFE lining and arterial wall, which was associated with longitudinally and radially oriented recirculation zones and low ESS. Computational hemodynamic analysis demonstrates that peripheral artery stent grafts have a superior central hemodynamic profile compared to bare metal stents. Stents grafts, however, suffer from malapposition at the proximal stent edge which is likely a major contributor to edge stenosis. Copyright © 2017 Editions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Onder; Moog, Rainer

    2007-10-01

    The use of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) as a source of hematopoietic stem cells is steadily increasing and has nearly supplanted bone marrow transplantation. The present article reviews mobilization of PBSC as well as the side effects. Under steady state conditions less than 0.05% of the white blood cells (WBC) are CD34+ cells. Chemotherapy results in a 5-15-fold increase of PBSC. Combining chemotherapy and growth factors increases CD34+ cells up to 6% of WBC. In the allogeneic setting, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used alone for PBSC mobilization. Several factors affect the mobilization of PBSC: age, gender, type of growth factor, dose of the growth factor and in the autologous setting, the patient's diagnosis, chemotherapy regimen and number of previous chemotherapy cycles or radiation. Muscle and bone pain are frequent adverse events in allogeneic stem cell mobilization but are usually tolerated with the use of analgesics. Spleen enlargement followed by rupture is a serious complication in allogeneic donors. Large volume apheresis (LVL) with a processed volume of more than 4-fold of the patient's blood volume can be used to increase the CD34+ yield in patients with low CD34+ pre-counts, resulting in higher yields of CD34+ cells for transplantation. Processing of more blood in LVL is achieved by an increase of the blood flow rate and an altered anticoagulation regimen with the occurrence of more citrate reactions.

  17. Peripheral arterial volume distensibility changes with applied external pressure: significant difference between arteries with different compliance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mengyan; Chen, Aiqing; Si, Xiaoshui; Ji, Mingxia; Zheng, Dingchang

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the different effect of external cuff pressure on arterial volume distensibility between peripheral arteries with different compliance. 30 healthy subjects were studied with the arm at two positions (0° and 45° from the horizontal level) to introduce different compliance of arteries. The electrocardiogram and finger and ear photoplethysmograms were recorded simultaneously under five external cuff pressures (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mmHg) on the whole arm to obtain arterial volume distensibility. With the applied external cuff pressures of 10, 20, 30 and 40 mmHg, the overall changes in arterial volume distensibility referred to those without external pressure were 0.010, 0.029, 0.054 and 0.108% per mmHg for the arm at the horizontal level, and 0.026, 0.071, 0.170 and 0.389% per mmHg for the arm at 45° from the horizontal level, confirming the non-linearity between arterial volume distensibility and external pressure. More interestingly, the significant differences in arterial volume distensibility changes were observed between the two arm positions, which were 0.016, 0.043, 0.116 and 0.281% per mmHg (all P < 0.01). Our findings demonstrated that arterial volume distensibility of peripheral arm arteries increased with external pressure, with a greater effect for more compliant arteries. PMID:28094277

  18. Purification of basophils from peripheral human blood.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Franco H; Gibbs, Bernhard F

    2014-01-01

    The purification of basophils from peripheral blood has represented a formidable challenge for researchers since they were discovered by Paul Ehrlich in 1879. From the first published attempts in the late 1960s, it took half a century to develop robust protocols able to provide sufficient numbers of pure, functionally unimpaired basophils. The existing protocols for basophil purification exploit those properties of basophils which distinguish them from other cell types such as their localization in blood, density, and the presence or absence of surface markers. Purification techniques have been used in various combinations and variations to achieve a common goal in mind: to obtain a pure population of human basophils in sufficient numbers for downstream studies. The arduous way leading up to the modern protocols is summarized in this historical retrospective. A fast protocol for purification of basophils to near homogeneity is also described.

  19. [Peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell collection].

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Ines; Mazić, Sanja; Cepulić, Branka Golubić

    2009-01-01

    Summary. Peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (PBSC) have numerous advatages in comparison with traditionally used bone marrow. PBSC collection by leukapheresis procedure is simpler and better tolerated than bone marrow harvest. PBCS are mobilized by myelosupressive chemotherapy or/and hematopoietic growth factors. Leukapheresis product contains PBSC along with lineage commited progenitors and precursors which contribute to faster hematopoietic recovery. In "poor mobilizers" options are large-volume leukapheresis (LVL) procedure or second generation of mobilising agents (pegfilgrastim, CXCR4 receptor antagonists). Total blood volume is processed 2-3 times in standard procedure compared to more than 3 times in LVL. LVL yields significantly higher numbers of CD34+ cells. Adverse effects of leukapheresis are electrolyte disbalance (hypocalcemia) caused by citrat administration and risk of bleeding due to trobocytopenia and heparin administration. PBSC collection and product quality control are regulated by national and international standards and recommendations.

  20. Non-invasive quantification of peripheral arterial volume distensibility and its non-linear relationship with arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dingchang; Murray, Alan

    2009-05-29

    Arterial wall function is associated with different physiological and clinical factors. Changes in arterial pressure cause major changes in the arterial wall. This study presents a simple non-invasive method to quantify arterial volume distensibility changes with different arterial pressures. The electrocardiogram, finger and ear photoplethysmogram were recorded from 15 subjects with the right arm at five different positions (90 degrees , 45 degrees , 0 degrees , -45 degrees and -90 degrees referred to the horizontal level). Arm pulse propagation time was determined by subtracting ear pulse transit time from finger pulse transit time, and was used to obtain arterial volume distensibility. The mean arterial blood pressure with the arm at the horizontal level was acquired, and changes with position were calculated using the hydrostatic principle that blood pressure in the arm is linearly related to its vertical distance from the horizontal level. The mean arm pulse propagation times for the five different positions were 88, 72, 57, 54 and 52ms, with the corresponding mean arterial volume distensibility of 0.234%, 0.158%, 0.099%, 0.088% and 0.083% per mmHg. For all consecutive changes in arm position, arm pulse propagation time and arterial volume distensibility, were significantly different (all probability P<0.05). The slopes of arm pulse propagation time and arterial volume distensibility against arterial pressure decreased significantly between each consecutive arm position from 90 degrees to -45 degrees (all P<0.01), indicating significant non-linearity. The experimental results fitted the physiological exponential model and Langewouters' arctangent model well, and were also comparable to published data with arterial volume distensibility approximately tripling for transmural pressure changes from 101 to 58mmHg. In conclusion, the inverse and non-linear relationship between arterial volume distensibility and arterial pressure has been quantified using a simple

  1. Arterial erectile dysfunction and peripheral arterial disease: reliability of a new phenotype of endothelial progenitor cells and endothelial microparticles.

    PubMed

    Condorelli, Rosita A; Calogero, Aldo E; Vicari, Enzo; di Pino, Luigi; Giacone, Filippo; Mongioì, Laura; la Vignera, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the blood concentrations of a new immunophenotype of circulating late endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and endothelial microparticles (EMP) varies in patients with arterial erectile dysfunction (aED) and abnormalities in other arterial districts. To accomplish this, cavernous artery peak systolic velocity (PSV), acceleration time (AT), and intima-media thickness (IMT) were determined after intracavernous administration of alprostadil by echo-color Doppler in 80 consecutive patients (age range, 50-75 years). Fifteen patients had aED alone (group A) and served as controls; 22 had aED plus atheroma plaques and/or increased IMT of the common carotid artery (group B); 20 had aED plus lower limb artery abnormalities (group C); and 23 had aED plus carotid and lower limb artery abnormalities (group D). EPC and EMP blood concentrations were evaluated by flow cytometry. Blood mononuclear cells with the immunophenotype CD45(neg)/CD34(pos)/CD144(pos) were defined as EPCs, whereas CD45(neg)/CD144(pos)/annexin V(pos) cells were defined as EMPs. Group B and C patients had a similar PSV, AT, and IMT at the level of the cavernous arteries. Their PSV values were significantly lower and mean values of AT and IMT significantly higher compared with group A patients. Patients of group D had a significantly lower PSV and significantly higher AT and IMT compared with all other groups. As far as serum concentrations of EPCs and EMPs, group D patients had significantly higher EPC and EMP mean values compared with all other groups. Group B and C patients had similar EPC and EMP values. This study showed that a more generalized peripheral atherosclerotic process is associated with a more severe penile artery insufficiency and endothelial dysfunction. Moreover, this study confirms the diagnostic reliability of the immunophenotype of EPCs and EMPs chosen in the clinical practice.

  2. [Digital subtract arteriographic characteristics of carotid artery, vertebral artery, subclavian artery and renal artery in type 2 diabetic patients with lower extremities peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Chen, Da-Wei; Lu, Wu-Sheng; Wang, Chun; Jiao, He; Tian, Hao-Ming; Ran, Xing-Wu

    2012-09-01

    To investigate angiographical characteristics of carotid, vertebral, subclavian, and renal arteries in the type 2 diabetic patients with lower extremities peripheral arterial disease (LEPAD). There were 104 type 2 diabetic patients with LEPAD recruited in this study, who received digital subtract arteriography (DSA). Ankle-brachial index (ABI) assessment was also performed in 50 participants. Dependent upon the stenosis degree of vertebral artery, subclavian artery and renal artery measured by DSA, the patients were divided into normal group (stenosis < or = 50%) or pathological group(stenosis > 50% or blocked lesions). The angiographic features of carotid, vertebral, subclavian, and renal arteries were analyzed and the relationship between arterial stenosis and ABI was explored. DSA results of 104 patients showed that the most common lesion in the arteries was plaque. The stenosis degrees of 51%-74% and 75%-99% were most commonly observed in renal artery, with incidence of 22.1% and 5.8%, respectively. Arterial occlusion was most commonly observed in vertebral artery, with incidence of 27.9%. The patients with stenosis or occlusion of arteries had lower ABI (P = 0.000), and the patients with stenosis or occlusion of vertebral and renal arteries also had lower ABI (P = 0.003 and 0.02, respectively), compared with those without stenosis. ABI < 0.9 indicated higher risk of stenosis or occlusion of vertebral and renal arteries (P = 0.008 and 0.047 respectively). Between the patients with subclavian arterial stenosis and those without this artery stenosis, there was no statistical significant difference observed in ABI level. Type 2 diabetic patients with LEPAD can affect multiple arteries, showing plaque formation, multi-segmental stenosis and occlusion of arteries. The patients with ABI < 0.9 have higher risk of multiple arterial stenosis or occlusion lesions.

  3. 21 CFR 868.1100 - Arterial blood sampling kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arterial blood sampling kit. 868.1100 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1100 Arterial blood sampling kit. (a) Identification. An arterial blood sampling kit is a device, in kit form, used to obtain arterial blood...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1100 - Arterial blood sampling kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arterial blood sampling kit. 868.1100 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1100 Arterial blood sampling kit. (a) Identification. An arterial blood sampling kit is a device, in kit form, used to obtain arterial blood...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1100 - Arterial blood sampling kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arterial blood sampling kit. 868.1100 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1100 Arterial blood sampling kit. (a) Identification. An arterial blood sampling kit is a device, in kit form, used to obtain arterial blood...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1100 - Arterial blood sampling kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arterial blood sampling kit. 868.1100 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1100 Arterial blood sampling kit. (a) Identification. An arterial blood sampling kit is a device, in kit form, used to obtain arterial blood...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1100 - Arterial blood sampling kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arterial blood sampling kit. 868.1100 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1100 Arterial blood sampling kit. (a) Identification. An arterial blood sampling kit is a device, in kit form, used to obtain arterial blood...

  8. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriacou, P. A.; Shafqat, K.; Pal, S. K.

    2007-10-01

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO2 sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures. Both pulse

  9. Complexity of lower extremity peripheral artery disease reflects the complexity of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Aykan, Ahmet Çağrı; Hatem, Engin; Karabay, Can Yücel; Gül, İlker; Gökdeniz, Tayyar; Kalaycıoğlu, Ezgi; Turan, Turhan; Kara, Faruk; Arslan, Ahmet Oğuz; Dursun, İhsan; Çetin, Mustafa; Güler, Ahmet

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the relationship between peripheral artery disease complexity and coronary artery disease complexity in patients with peripheral artery disease. A total of 449 patients were enrolled. SYNTAX score, a marker of coronary artery disease complexity, was assessed by dedicated computer software and complexity of peripheral artery disease was determined by Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus II classification. The SYNTAX score of patients with minimal peripheral artery disease, Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus A, Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus B, Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus C and Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus D were 5 (11), 12.5 (13.25), 20 (14), 20.5 (19) and 27.5 (19), respectively (values in brackets represent the interquartile range). SYNTAX score and Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus class was moderately correlated (r = 0.495, p < 0.001). In multivariate regression analysis male sex (B = 0.169, p < 0.001, CI95% = 0.270-0.735), Log10 SYNTAX score (B = 0.282, p < 0.001, CI95% = 0.431-0.782), Log10 creatinine (B = 0.081, p = 0.036, CI95% = 0.043-1.239), low-density lipoprotein (B = 0.114, p = 0.003, CI95% = 0.001-0.006) and high-density lipoprotein (B = -0.360, p < 0.001, CI95% = -0.063 to -0.041) were the independent predictors of Trans Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus II class. We have shown that patients with complex peripheral artery disease had complex coronary artery disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Peripheral Arterial Pseudoaneurysms-a 10-Year Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Luther, Anil; Kumar, Amit; Negi, Kamal Nabh Rai

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral arterial pseudoaneurysms are quite common in Northern India (Punjab Province) and thus a common presenting complaint of varied etiology. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients presenting with peripheral arterial pseudoaneurysms of varied etiology. Retrospective analysis of medical records of patients with diagnosis of peripheral arterial pseudoaneurysm from 1 May 2001 to 30 October 2009 was done. In the prospective period from 1 November 2009 to 30 April 2011, the patients were personally examined by the authors and followed up till discharge from the hospital and subsequently at 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months postdischarge from the hospital. We studied 50 patients (13 in the prospective group and 37 in the retrospective study group). Intravenous drug abuse (26 cases) followed by trauma (nine cases) was the commonest etiology. Femoral artery was the commonest artery involved (37 cases). A pulsatile mass with localized tenderness was the commonest presentation. All patients underwent surgical treatment with 36 (72 %) patients undergoing ligation and excision of the pseudoaneurysm. Six (12 %) patients underwent revascularization with reverse saphenous vein graft. Five (10 %) patients underwent primary repair, and three (6 %) patients were managed by putting a synthetic ePTFE graft. Postoperative wound infection was seen in 18 (36 %) patients, and 33 (66 %) patients had an uneventful recovery. In pseudoaneurysms, surgical repair at the early instance carries a favorable prognosis. If feasible, reverse saphenous vein grafting is the best conduit for repair. Synthetic vascular graft (ePTFE) can be used in case autologous saphenous vein is not available. Excision and ligation is safe, and we recommend it as the treatment of choice for infected arterial pseudoaneurysms.

  11. Peripheral Endothelial Function After Arterial Switch Operation for D-looped Transposition of the Great Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Heather Y; Stauffer, Katie Jo; Nourse, Susan E; Vu, Chau; Selamet Tierney, Elif Seda

    2017-03-27

    Coronary artery re-implantation during arterial switch operation in patients with D-looped transposition of the great arteries (D-TGA) can alter coronary arterial flow and increase shear stress, leading to local endothelial dysfunction, although prior studies have conflicting results. Endothelial pulse amplitude testing can predict coronary endothelial dysfunction by peripheral arterial testing. This study tested if, compared to healthy controls, patients with D-TGA after arterial switch operation had peripheral endothelial dysfunction. Patient inclusion criteria were (1) D-TGA after neonatal arterial switch operation; (2) age 9-29 years; (3) absence of known cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, vascular disease, recurrent vasovagal syncope, and coronary artery disease; and (4) ability to comply with overnight fasting. Exclusion criteria included (1) body mass index ≥85th percentile, (2) use of medications affecting vascular tone, or (3) acute illness. We assessed endothelial function by endothelial pulse amplitude testing and compared the results to our previously published data in healthy controls (n = 57). We tested 20 D-TGA patients (16.4 ± 4.8 years old) who have undergone arterial switch operation at a median age of 5 days (0-61 days). Endothelial pulse amplitude testing indices were similar between patients with D-TGA and controls (1.78 ± 0.61 vs. 1.73 ± 0.54, p = 0.73).In our study population of children and young adults, there was no evidence of peripheral endothelial dysfunction in patients with D-TGA who have undergone arterial switch operation. Our results support the theory that coronary arterial wall thickening and abnormal vasodilation reported in these patients is a localized phenomenon and not reflective of overall atherosclerotic burden.

  12. Peripheral venous catheter fracture with embolism into the pulmonary artery

    PubMed Central

    Ammari, Chady; Campisi, Alessio; D’Andrea, Rocco

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral vein catheterization is generally considered a harmless procedure. Venous catheter rupture associated with pulmonary embolism is an unlikely but potentially serious complication. We report a case of a peripheral venous catheter (PVC) fracture with pulmonary artery embolization in the left lower lobe treated successfully by a surgical approach. The positioning of a PVC is not always a harmless procedure. Every time there are difficulties in positioning or in removal of a catheter device, it should be carefully inspected to verify integrity. The advisability of removal of these small foreign bodies is debated; percutaneous retrieval is preferred, while surgery should be discussed case by case. PMID:28149586

  13. Peripheral blood monocyte responses in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Fokkema, S J

    2012-08-01

    Periodontitis results from the interaction of bacteria on the tooth surfaces and the host immune response. Although periodontal pathogens are essential for the initiation and progression of the disease, the tissue damage in periodontitis is primarily mediated by the host immune response. Differences in the susceptibility to the disease and in the clinal outcome of the therapy seem to be less dependent on genetics but more on lifestyle factors, like smoking, overweight, stress and nutrition. It has been shown that these lifestyle factors may modulate the immune response and therefore influence the initiation and progression of the disease. To study the host immune response, whole blood cell cultures (WBCC) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been widely used and they specifically reflect the behaviour of monocytes. It has been shown that peripheral blood monocytes in LPS-stimulated WBCC from non-smoking periodontitis patients display a T-helper 2 (Th2)-promoting phenotype in comparison with controls. After periodontal therapy, this phenotype reversed and was comparable with controls. However, in smoking but treated patients, the Th2-promoting phenotype of monocytes still remained. Therefore, the aberrant phenotype of monocytes in the peripheral blood from periodontitis patients is likely to be a systemic response to exogenous and endogenous danger molecules released or induced by the periodontal infection or by smoking. It can be concluded that periodontal therapy in non-smoking periodontitis patients has beneficial health effects and that smoking cessation should be an integral part of the therapy as well for general health reasons as for the clinical outcome.

  14. The safety of brachial artery puncture for arterial blood sampling.

    PubMed

    Okeson, G C; Wulbrecht, P H

    1998-09-01

    This study was designed to determine the incidence of complications in a sample of 6,185 brachial artery punctures for arterial blood gas analysis. The study sample was comprised of adult patients who had arterial blood gas analysis ordered in the course of their clinical evaluations in a multispecialty clinic and hospital affiliated with a university school of medicine. Subjects were entered prospectively at the time the procedure was done. The overall incidence of all complications was 2.0%. Immediate limb pain or parenthesias occurred in 1.1%, while the onset of symptoms was delayed up to 24 h in 0.9%. Hematoma formation occurred in only 0.06%. None of the complications was considered to be of major impact, in that none was associated with limb ischemia or other objective abnormalities. Only one subject required analgesic medication to control pain that ultimately subsided spontaneously without deficit. We believe that brachial artery puncture, when properly performed, is a safe and reliable alternative route for obtaining arterial blood for gas analysis.

  15. Effect of Peripheral Edema on Oscillometric Blood Pressure Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Shamsi; Malaki, Majid; Rezaeifar, Afshin; Abdollahi Fakhim, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Blood pressure (BP) measurement is essential for epidemiological studies and clinical decisions. It seems that tissue characteristics can affect BP results and we try to find edema effect on BP results taken by different methods. Methods: BP of 55 children before open heart surgery were measured and compared according to three methods: Arterial as standard and reference, oscillometric and auscultatory methods. Peripheral edema as a tissue characteristic was defined in higher than +2 as marked edema and in equal or lower than +2 as no edema. Statistical analyses: data was expressed as Mean and 95% of confidence interval (CI 95%). Comparison of two groups was performed by T independent test and of more than two groups by ANOVA test. Mann–Whitney U and paired T-test were used for serially comparisons of changes. P less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Fifty five children aged 29.4±3.9 months were divided into two groups: 10 children with peripheral edema beyond +2 and 45 cases without edema. Oscillometric method overestimated systolic BP and the Mean (CI 95%) difference of oscillometric to arterial was 4.8 (8/-1, P=0.02) in edematous and 4.2 (7/1, p=0.004) in non edematous. Oscillometric method underestimated diastolic BP as -9 (-1.8/-16.5, P=0.03) in edematous group and 2.6 (-0.7/+5, P= 0.2) in non edematous compared to arterial method. Conclusion: Oscillometric device standards cannot cover all specific clinical conditions. It underestimates diastolic BP significantly in edematous children, which was 9.2 mmHg in average beyond the acceptable standards. PMID:25610552

  16. Metabolic syndrome and peripheral artery disease: Two related conditions.

    PubMed

    Oriol Torón, Pilar Ángeles; Badía Farré, Teresa; Romaguera Lliso, Amparo; Roda Diestro, Jovita

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) at the Martorell primary care (PC) center. To analyze the differences in comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors between patients with PAD with and without MS. A cross-sectional, descriptive study on patients diagnosed with PAD according to computerized clinical records of the Martorell PC center. Variables collected included age, sex, high blood pressure (HBP), dyslipidemia (DLP), diabetes (DM), smoking, obesity, cardiovascular disease (CVD), erectile dysfunction (ED), renal failure (RF), and oligoalbuminuria. An analysis comparing patients with and without MS was performed. There were 131 patients diagnosed with PAD, 104 (79%) of whom were male. Sixty-three (48.1%) also had MS. Patients with both PAD and MS had, as compared to those with PAD only, a higher prevalence of HBP (87.3 vs. 60.3%, P: 0.001), DLP (77.8 vs. 60.3%, P: 0.03), DM (69.8 vs. 30.9%, P<.001), obesity (25.4 vs. 10.3%, P: 0.03), CVD (42.9 vs. 19.1%); P: 0.004), ED (81.3 vs. 54.3%, P: 0.02), and RF (40.3 vs. 17.9%, P: 0.006). Patients with both PAD and MS had a higher prevalence of HBP, DLP, DM, and obesity. They also had more cardiovascular events and were significantly associated with pathological conditions highly relevant for cardiovascular prognosis such as erectile dysfunction and chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic syndrome in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Estirado, E; Lahoz, C; Laguna, F; García-Iglesias, F; González-Alegre, M T; Mostaza, J M

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and coronary or cerebrovascular disease is increasing, but it is not known whether this association also exists in patients with isolated PAD. The aim of the current study was to assess the prevalence of MS in patients with PAD who had no coronary or cerebrovascular disease, the prescription rate of evidence-based cardiovascular therapies and the attainment of therapeutic goals in patients with PAD and with and without MS. Multicenter, cross-sectional study of 3.934 patients aged ≥ 45 years with isolated PAD who were treated in primary care and specialized outpatient clinics during 2009. A diagnosis of PAD was reached for ankle brachial indices <0.9, a previous history of amputation or revascularization. In the overall population, the mean age was 67.6 years, 73.8% were males and 63% had MS (95% CI 61.5-64.3%). Patients with MS had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities, more severe PAD and higher prescription rate of evidence-based cardiovascular therapies. After adjusting for risk factors and comorbidity, there was a more frequent use of renin-angiotensin system blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics and statins among the patients with MS. A lower percentage of patients with MS achieved the therapeutic goals for blood pressure (22% vs. 41.5%, p<0.001). Similarly, a lower percentage of patients with diabetes achieved the glycated hemoglobin goals (44% vs. 53.1%, p<0.001), with no differences in LDL-cholesterol levels (29.8% vs. 39.1%, p=0.265). Patients with PAD have a high prevalence of MS. Patients with MS do not attain therapeutic goals as frequently as those without, despite taking more cardiovascular drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Arterial stiffness and carotid intima-media thickness in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ahmet; Demir, Kenan; Kaya, Zeynettin; Marakoglu, Kamile; Ceylan, Esra; Ekmekci, Ahmet Hakan; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Demir, Aysegul; Altunkeser, Bulent Behlul

    2014-10-29

    We investigated the relationship between peripheral neuropathy and parameters of arterial stiffness and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The study included 161 patients (80 females and 81 males), 69 of whom had peripheral neuropathy. All patients underwent 24-h blood pressure monitoring, and arterial stiffness parameters were measured. The CIMT was measured using B-mode ultrasonography and patients also underwent transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Patients with peripheral neuropathy, compared with those without it, were older (54.68±8.35 years vs. 51.04±7.89 years; p=0.005) and had T2DM for longer periods (60 vs. 36 months; p=0.004). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values (8.55±1.85 mg/dL vs. 7.30±1.51 mg/dL; p<0.001), pulse wave velocity (PWV) (7.74±1.14 m/s vs. 7.15±1.10 m/s; p=0.001), CIMT (anterior 0.74±0.15 mm vs. 0.67±0.13 mm; p=0.01), and left ventricular mass (LVM) index (98.68±26.28 g/m2 vs. 89.71±19.70 g/m2; p=0.02) were all significantly increased in the group with peripheral neuropathy compared to the group without peripheral neuropathy. We determined that duration of diabetes, HbA1c, and LVM index were predictors of peripheral neuropathy. A significant relationship was found between diabetic neuropathy and increased PWV, a parameter of arterial stiffness, as well as CIMT, a marker of systemic atherosclerosis. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy may be a determinant of subclinical atherosclerosis in T2DM.

  19. Arterial Stiffness and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Ahmet; Demir, Kenan; Kaya, Zeynettin; Marakoglu, Kamile; Ceylan, Esra; Ekmekci, Ahmet Hakan; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Demir, Aysegul; Altunkeser, Bulent Behlul

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated the relationship between peripheral neuropathy and parameters of arterial stiffness and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Material/Methods The study included 161 patients (80 females and 81 males), 69 of whom had peripheral neuropathy. All patients underwent 24-h blood pressure monitoring, and arterial stiffness parameters were measured. The CIMT was measured using B-mode ultrasonography and patients also underwent transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Results Patients with peripheral neuropathy, compared with those without it, were older (54.68±8.35 years vs. 51.04±7.89 years; p=0.005) and had T2DM for longer periods (60 vs. 36 months; p=0.004). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values (8.55±1.85 mg/dL vs. 7.30±1.51 mg/dL; p<0.001), pulse wave velocity (PWV) (7.74±1.14 m/s vs. 7.15±1.10 m/s; p=0.001), CIMT (anterior 0.74±0.15 mm vs. 0.67±0.13 mm; p=0.01), and left ventricular mass (LVM) index (98.68±26.28 g/m2 vs. 89.71±19.70 g/m2; p=0.02) were all significantly increased in the group with peripheral neuropathy compared to the group without peripheral neuropathy. We determined that duration of diabetes, HbA1c, and LVM index were predictors of peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions A significant relationship was found between diabetic neuropathy and increased PWV, a parameter of arterial stiffness, as well as CIMT, a marker of systemic atherosclerosis. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy may be a determinant of subclinical atherosclerosis in T2DM. PMID:25351260

  20. A Primary Care Approach to the Diagnosis and Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: (1) Be able to recognize characteristic symptoms of intermittent claudication (2) Diagnose PAD on the basis of history, physical exam, and simple limb blood pressure measurements (3) Recognize the significance of peripheral artery disease as a marker for coronary or cerebrovascular atherosclerosis (4) Provide appropriate medical management of atherosclerosis risk factors-- including use of antiplatelet therapy to reduce risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and death (5) Manage symptoms of intermittent claudication with program of smoking cessation, exercise, and medication The diagnosis of intermittent claudication secondary to peripheral artery disease (PAD) can often be made on the basis of history and physical examination. Additional evaluation of PAD is multi-modal and the techniques used will vary depending on the nature and severity of the patient's presenting problem. Most patients can be appropriately managed without referral for specialized diagnostic services or interventions.

  1. Pseudoaneurysm after transpedal arterial access for evaluation and treatment of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Apurva; Parikh, Roosha; Huang, Yili; Liou, Michael; Ratcliffe, Justin; Bertrand, Olivier F; Puma, Joseph; Kwan, Tak W

    2017-03-01

    There has been an increasing use of transpedal arterial access (TPA) for evaluation and treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) over a transfemoral approach (TFA). TPA, it is expected to be associated with better patient comfort, less recovery time and possibly less access site complications compared to standard TFA. Access site complications and pseudoaneurysm (PSA) associated with the TPA have not been previously reported. Here we report a series of pedal artery PSA related to access site complicating TPA catheterization. We studied 1460 patients with symptomatic PAD who underwent 2236 peripheral diagnostic and/or interventional procedures between 06/2014 and 01/2016 via TPA. Hemostasis was achieved using patent hemostasis technique by a radial artery compression device for 2h. PSA related to the access site were suspected clinically and confirmed with arterial duplex ultrasound. The incidence of PSA related to any access site was 0.002%. In this series all PSA occurred only in the posterior tibial artery, after an interventional procedure. All patients were treated successfully with thrombin injection with no residual complications. PSA associated with TPA is extremely rare and seems to occur exclusively after posterior tibial artery access. It is easily treatable by thrombin injection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimation of arterial and cardiopulmonary total peripheral resistance baroreflex gain values: validation by chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation.

    PubMed

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Kim, Jong-Kyung; Li, Ying; Sala-Mercado, Javier; Hammond, Robert L; Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-05-01

    Feedback control of total peripheral resistance (TPR) by the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex systems is an important mechanism for short-term blood pressure regulation. Existing methods for measuring this TPR baroreflex mechanism typically aim to quantify only the gain value of one baroreflex system as it operates in open-loop conditions. As a result, the normal, integrated functioning of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of TPR remains to be fully elucidated. To this end, the laboratory of Mukkamala et al. (Mukkamala R, Toska K, and Cohen RJ. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 284: H947-H959, 2003) previously proposed a potentially noninvasive technique for estimating the closed-loop (dimensionless) gain values of the arterial TPR baroreflex (GA) and the cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflex (GC) by mathematical analysis of the subtle, beat-to-beat fluctuations in arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, and stroke volume. Here, we review the technique with additional details and describe its experimental evaluation with respect to spontaneous hemodynamic variability measured from seven conscious dogs, before and after chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation. The technique was able to correctly predict the group-average changes in GA and GC that have previously been shown to occur following chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation. That is, reflex control by the arterial TPR baroreflex was virtually abolished (GA = -2.1 +/- 0.6 to 0.3 +/- 0.2; P < 0.05), while reflex control by the cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflex more than doubled (GC = -0.7 +/- 0.4 to -1.8 +/- 0.2; P < 0.05). With further successful experimental testing, the technique may ultimately be employed to advance the basic understanding of TPR baroreflex functioning in both humans and animals in health and disease.

  3. Connective Tissue Reflex Massage for Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A.; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, Belen; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva; Quesada-Rubio, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of connective tissue massage to improve blood circulation and intermittent claudication symptoms in type 2 diabetic patients. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken. Ninety-eight type 2 diabetes patients with stage I or II-a peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (Leriche-Fontaine classification) were randomly assigned to a massage group or to a placebo group treated using disconnected magnetotherapy equipment. Peripheral arterial circulation was determined by measuring differential segmental arterial pressure, heart rate, skin temperature, oxygen saturation and skin blood flow. Measurements were taken before and at 30 min, 6 months and 1 year after the 15-week treatment. After the 15-week program, the groups differed (P < .05) in differential segmental arterial pressure in right lower limb (lower one-third of thigh, upper and lower one-third of leg) and left lower limb (lower one-third of thigh and upper and lower one-third of leg). A significant difference (P < .05) was also observed in skin blood flow in digits 1 and 4 of right foot and digits 2, 4 and 5 of left foot. ANOVA results were significant (P < .05) for right and left foot oxygen saturation but not for heart rate and temperature. At 6 months and 1 year, the groups differed in differential segmental arterial pressure in upper third of left and right legs. Connective tissue massage improves blood circulation in the lower limbs of type 2 diabetic patients at stage I or II-a and may be useful to slow the progression of PAD. PMID:19933770

  4. Correlation between arterial FDG uptake and biomarkers in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kelly S; Rudd, James H F; Hailman, Eric P; Bolognese, James A; Burke, Joanne; Pinto, Cathy Anne; Klimas, Michael; Hargreaves, Richard; Dansky, Hayes M; Fayad, Zahi A

    2012-01-01

    A prospective, multicenter (18)fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging study was performed to estimate the correlations among arterial FDG uptake and atherosclerotic plaque biomarkers in patients with peripheral artery disease. Inflammation within atherosclerotic plaques is associated with instability of the plaque and future cardiovascular events. Previous studies have shown that (18)F-FDG-PET/CT is able to quantify inflammation within carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques, but no studies to date have investigated this correlation in peripheral arteries with immunohistochemical confirmation. Thirty patients across 5 study sites underwent (18)F-FDG-PET/CT imaging before SilverHawk atherectomy (FoxHollow Technologies, Redwood City, California) for symptomatic common or superficial femoral arterial disease. Vascular FDG uptake (expressed as target-to-background ratio) was measured in the carotid arteries and aorta and femoral arteries, including the region of atherectomy. Immunohistochemistry was performed on the excised atherosclerotic plaque extracts, and cluster of differentiation 68 (CD68) level as a measure of macrophage content was determined. Correlations between target-to-background ratio of excised lesions, as well as entire arterial regions, and CD68 levels were determined. Imaging was performed during the 2 weeks before surgery in all cases. Twenty-one patients had adequate-quality (18)F-FDG-PET/CT peripheral artery images, and 34 plaque specimens were obtained. No significant correlation between lesion target-to-background ratio and CD68 level was observed. There were no significant correlations between CD68 level (as a measure of macrophage content) and FDG uptake in the peripheral arteries in this multicenter study. Differences in lesion extraction technique, lesion size, the degree of inflammation, and imaging coregistration techniques may have been responsible for the failure to

  5. Utility of Indocyanine Green Angiography in Arterial Selection during Free Flap Harvest in Patients with Severe Peripheral Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Anne K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Indocyanine green angiography (SPY) was used to guide arterial selection for an anterolateral thigh free flap in the setting of severe peripheral vascular disease. SPY technology serves as a novel and sensitive intraoperative tool to predict decreased tissue perfusion from vessel sacrifice for flap harvest. Change in SPY time parameters measuring superficial blood flow distal to the donor site while temporarily intraoperatively clamping different possible arterial pedicles can optimize free flap design to avoid iatrogenic critical limb ischemia. PMID:27826489

  6. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes is higher in peripheral artery disease than in coronary artery disease patients.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Guenther; Rein, Philipp; Saely, Christoph H; Engelberger, Rolf P; Willenberg, Torsten; Do, Dai-Do; Kucher, Nils; Baumgartner, Iris; Drexel, Heinz

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes are risk factors for atherosclerosis and are highly prevalent in patients with coronary artery disease. However, the prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism in patients with peripheral artery disease is not as well elucidated. We aimed at comparing prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes, which were diagnosed according to the current American Diabetes Association criteria, among 364 patients with peripheral artery disease, 529 patients with coronary artery disease and 383 controls. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in peripheral artery disease patients was 49.7%. It was significantly higher in these patients than in coronary artery disease patients (34.4%; p < 0.001) and controls (21.4%; p < 0.001). Adjusted for sex, age and body mass index, odds ratios for type 2 diabetes mellitus were 2.0 (95% confidence interval 1.5-2.6) comparing the peripheral artery disease group with the coronary artery disease group (p < 0.001) and 4.0 (2.8-5.8) comparing the peripheral artery disease group with controls (p < 0.001). The prevalence of pre-diabetes among non-diabetic subjects was high in all three study groups (64.5% in peripheral artery disease patients, 63.4% in coronary artery disease patients and 61.8% in controls), without significant between-group differences. In conclusion, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is even higher in peripheral artery disease patients than in coronary artery disease patients. This observation underlines the need to consider impaired glucose regulation in the management of peripheral artery disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Human peripheral blood eosinophils induce angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Puxeddu, Ilaria; Alian, Akram; Piliponsky, Adrian Martin; Ribatti, Domenico; Panet, Amos; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2005-03-01

    Eosinophils play a crucial role in allergic reactions and asthma. They are also involved in responses against parasites, in autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, and in fibroses. There is increasing evidence that angiogenesis plays an important role in these processes. Since eosinophils are known to produce angiogenic mediators, we have hypothesized a direct contribution of these cells to angiogenesis. The effect of human peripheral blood eosinophil sonicates on rat aortic endothelial cell proliferation (in vitro), rat aorta sprouting (ex vivo) and angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (in vivo) have been investigated. To determine whether eosinophil-derived vascular endothelial growth factor influences the eosinophil pro-angiogenic activity, eosinophil sonicates were incubated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibodies and then added to the chorioallantoic membrane. Vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor density on the endothelial cells were also evaluated. Eosinophils were found to enhance endothelial cell proliferation and to induce a strong angiogenic response both in the aorta rings and in the chorioallantoic membrane assays. Pre-incubation of eosinophil sonicates with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibodies partially reduced the angiogenic response of these cells in the chorioallantoic membrane. Eosinophils also increased vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA production on endothelial cells. Eosinophils are able to induce angiogenesis and this effect is partially mediated by their pre-formed vascular endothelial growth factor. This strongly suggests an important role of eosinophils in angiogenesis-associated diseases such as asthma.

  8. [Enterobacterial antigen in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Faure-Fontenla, M A; García-Tamayo, F

    1989-11-01

    The following study has as prior history the research reports which have shown the existence of an antigenic tissue deposit in gram-negative enterobacteria. The antigens of the enterobacteria have also been found in the lymphocytic membranes and cytoplasm. Since intestinal lymphoid tissue cells can recirculate by means of the thoracic duct to the peripheral venous system, it was proposed that the circulating lymphocytes in healthy people could also contain small amounts of a common enterobacterial antigen. The study was carried out in 15 human venous blood samples, of which the lymphocytic population was separated to later be used in the preparation of 15 alcohol soluble extracts. This material was used for inhibiting the immuno-hemolysis assay in three occasions in order to show the presence of antigens shared by different enterobacterias, using as reference a fraction separated from the LPS of Escherichia coli 08. The results showed that the human lymphocytes also had antigenic determinants common to gram-negative bacteria.

  9. Skin autofluorescence is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Marjon J; Lefrandt, Joop D; Loeffen, Erik A H; Saleem, Ben R; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Lutgers, Helen L; Smit, Andries J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2012-02-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have a pivotal role in atherosclerosis. We evaluated skin autofluorescence (SAF), a non-invasive measurement of tissue AGE accumulation, in patients with carotid artery stenosis with and without coexisting peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD). SAF was measured using the AGE Reader™ in 56 patients with carotid artery stenosis and in 56 age- and sex-matched healthy controls without diabetes, renal dysfunction or known atherosclerotic disease. SAF was higher in patients with carotid artery stenosis compared to the control group: mean 2.81 versus 2.46 (P = 0.002), but especially in the younger age group of 50-60 years old: mean 2.82 versus 1.94 (P = 0.000). Patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD proved to have an even higher SAF than patients with carotid artery stenosis only: mean 3.28 versus 2.66 (P = 0.003). Backward linear regression analysis showed that age, smoking, diabetes mellitus, renal function and the presence of PAOD were the determinants of SAF, but carotid artery stenosis was not. SAF is increased in patients with carotid artery stenosis and PAOD. The univariate and multivariate associations of SAF with age, smoking, diabetes, renal insufficiency and PAOD suggest that increased SAF can be seen as an indicator of widespread atherosclerosis.

  10. Overview of Classification Systems in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Rulon L.; Jazaeri, Omid; Yi, J.; Smith, M.; Gupta, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD), secondary to atherosclerotic disease, is currently the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. While PAD is common, it is estimated that the majority of patients with PAD are undiagnosed and undertreated. The challenge to the treatment of PAD is to accurately diagnose the symptoms and determine treatment for each patient. The varied presentations of peripheral vascular disease have led to numerous classification schemes throughout the literature. Consistent grading of patients leads to both objective criteria for treating patients and a baseline for clinical follow-up. Reproducible classification systems are also important in clinical trials and when comparing medical, surgical, and endovascular treatment paradigms. This article reviews the various classification systems for PAD and advantages to each system. PMID:25435665

  11. Ticagrelor versus Clopidogrel in Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, William R; Fowkes, F Gerry R; Heizer, Gretchen; Berger, Jeffrey S; Baumgartner, Iris; Held, Peter; Katona, Brian G; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Norgren, Lars; Jones, W Schuyler; Blomster, Juuso; Millegård, Marcus; Reist, Craig; Patel, Manesh R

    2017-01-05

    Peripheral artery disease is considered to be a manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis with associated adverse cardiovascular and limb events. Data from previous trials have suggested that patients receiving clopidogrel monotherapy had a lower risk of cardiovascular events than those receiving aspirin. We wanted to compare clopidogrel with ticagrelor, a potent antiplatelet agent, in patients with peripheral artery disease. In this double-blind, event-driven trial, we randomly assigned 13,885 patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease to receive monotherapy with ticagrelor (90 mg twice daily) or clopidogrel (75 mg once daily). Patients were eligible if they had an ankle-brachial index (ABI) of 0.80 or less or had undergone previous revascularization of the lower limbs. The primary efficacy end point was a composite of adjudicated cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or ischemic stroke. The primary safety end point was major bleeding. The median follow-up was 30 months. The median age of the patients was 66 years, and 72% were men; 43% were enrolled on the basis of the ABI and 57% on the basis of previous revascularization. The mean baseline ABI in all patients was 0.71, 76.6% of the patients had claudication, and 4.6% had critical limb ischemia. The primary efficacy end point occurred in 751 of 6930 patients (10.8%) receiving ticagrelor and in 740 of 6955 (10.6%) receiving clopidogrel (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92 to 1.13; P=0.65). In each group, acute limb ischemia occurred in 1.7% of the patients (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.33; P=0.85) and major bleeding in 1.6% (hazard ratio, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.43; P=0.49). In patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease, ticagrelor was not shown to be superior to clopidogrel for the reduction of cardiovascular events. Major bleeding occurred at similar rates among the patients in the two trial groups. (Funded by AstraZeneca; EUCLID ClinicalTrials.gov number

  12. Ankle Brachial Index: simple non-invasive estimation of peripheral artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieniak, Marcin; Cieślicki, Krzysztof; Żyliński, Marek; Górski, Piotr; Murgrabia, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Gerard

    2014-11-01

    According to international guidelines, patients with Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) are burdened with high cardiovascular risk. One of the simplest, non-invasive methods for PAD detection is the ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement. The ABI is calculated as the ratio of systolic blood pressure at the ankle (pressure in the posterior tibial artery or the dorsal artery) to the systolic pressure in the arm (in the brachial artery) when the body is in a horizontal position. The physiological value of the ABI is assumed to be between 1 and 1.3; however, these limits vary from study to study. A value less than 0.9 indicates PAD. Some authors propose also measuring the ABI on both sides of the body to highlight possible differences in blood pressure between the opposite arterial segments. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the ABI diagnostic criteria used in different publications. Additionally, ABI measurements were performed on 19 healthy patients in age ranged from 20 to 63 years. The results showed a slight dependence between age and the differences between the values obtained from left and right sides of the body.

  13. [Long time regulation of arterial blood pressure: facts and hypothesis].

    PubMed

    Tsyrlin, V A

    2013-01-01

    The date about long time increase of blood pressure in conditions of excessive salt intake, constriction of renal artery in animals with initial low baroreceptor reflex is presented. Arterial hypertension in this case is accompanied by increase activity of sympathetic nervous system. The supposition that arterial baroreceptor reflex place a role in long time regulation of arterial blood pressure is expressed.

  14. Peripheral arterial disease symptom subtype and walking impairment.

    PubMed

    Collins, Tracie C; Petersen, Nancy J; Suarez-Almazor, Maria

    2005-08-01

    Walking impairment is common in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The purpose of this study was to compare specific leg symptoms and walking impairment in a racially diverse cohort of patients with PAD. Patients who were receiving care at the Michael E DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center or in the Harris County Hospital District were screened for PAD, which was diagnosed in the office setting by blood pressure measurements that were used to calculate the ankle-brachial index (a level <0.90 was defined as disease). To define leg symptoms, we asked patients to complete the San Diego Claudication Questionnaire. Based on the questionnaire results, leg symptoms were categorized as: asymptomatic, atypical, and intermittent claudication. The patients also completed the Walking Impairment Questionnaire. Among 403 patients screened (136 Caucasians, 136 African Americans and 131 Latinos), 67 were found to have PAD (18 Caucasians, 31 African Americans and 18 Latinos). The mean age of the cohort was 63.8 years (standard deviation (SD) 7.3). Walking distance, speed and stair climbing scores were lower (p < 0.0001) for patients with PAD and leg pain on exertion or at rest when compared with patients with PAD without leg symptoms or with symptoms of intermittent claudication. For patients with PAD and leg pain on exertion and at rest, the walking distance score was 27.1 +/- SD 37.7 compared with 41.0 +/- 38.4 for those with asymptomatic disease who were inactive, and with 38.5 +/- 42.7 for those with intermittent claudication (p = 0.02). In an ethnically diverse primary care clinic population, patients with PAD and leg pain on exertion and at rest had greater compromise in their walking ability when compared with patients with intermittent claudication. The reasons for the significant impairment in walking among patients with PAD and these atypical leg symptoms may stem from coexisting illnesses or other as yet undefined factors. Future research should focus on

  15. Cutting Balloon: Review on Principles and Background of Use in Peripheral Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cejna, Manfred

    2005-05-15

    This review describes peripheral use of cutting balloon (CB) angioplasty (CBA), its characteristics, and its distinction from conventional BA and describes the experimental and clinical background of its current use in peripheral arteries.

  16. Imaging of Small Animal Peripheral Artery Disease Models: Recent Advancements and Translational Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jenny B.; Phillips, Evan H.; Riggins, Ti’Air E.; Sangha, Gurneet S.; Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Lee, Janice Y.; Lycke, Roy J.; Hernandez, Clarissa L.; Soepriatna, Arvin H.; Thorne, Bradford R. H.; Yrineo, Alexa A.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a broad disorder encompassing multiple forms of arterial disease outside of the heart. As such, PAD development is a multifactorial process with a variety of manifestations. For example, aneurysms are pathological expansions of an artery that can lead to rupture, while ischemic atherosclerosis reduces blood flow, increasing the risk of claudication, poor wound healing, limb amputation, and stroke. Current PAD treatment is often ineffective or associated with serious risks, largely because these disorders are commonly undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Active areas of research are focused on detecting and characterizing deleterious arterial changes at early stages using non-invasive imaging strategies, such as ultrasound, as well as emerging technologies like photoacoustic imaging. Earlier disease detection and characterization could improve interventional strategies, leading to better prognosis in PAD patients. While rodents are being used to investigate PAD pathophysiology, imaging of these animal models has been underutilized. This review focuses on structural and molecular information and disease progression revealed by recent imaging efforts of aortic, cerebral, and peripheral vascular disease models in mice, rats, and rabbits. Effective translation to humans involves better understanding of underlying PAD pathophysiology to develop novel therapeutics and apply non-invasive imaging techniques in the clinic. PMID:25993289

  17. Endovascular Treatment of the Internal Iliac Artery in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Huetink, K. Steijling, J.J.F.; Mali, W.P.T.M.

    2008-03-15

    In patients with peripheral arterial disease not much is known about the relationship between the localization of the pain and the localization of arterial occlusions in the iliac arteries. Occlusions high in the iliac arteries are assumed to be able to induce pain in the buttocks and upper leg as well as pain in the calves. Several case reports show that the symptoms of arteriosclerotic lesions in the internal iliac artery are often atypical and not easy to diagnose. In this report, 3 patients with internal iliac artery occlusions who were treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) are described. One patient had isolated pain in the buttock region. In the other 2 patients the initial pain was focused on the buttock region with extension to the calves during exercise. After PTA, 2 patients were free of symptoms, while in the other patient the symptoms improved but did not disappear. Future research should clarify the relation between certain arterial occlusions and the location of the pain.

  18. Effects of 8 hemodynamic conditions on direct blood pressure values obtained simultaneously from the carotid, femoral and dorsal pedal arteries in dogs.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Eduardo R; Campagnol, Daniela; Bajotto, Gustavo C; Simões, Clarissa R; Rassele, Alice C

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of 8 hemodynamic conditions on blood pressure measurements taken from the carotid, femoral and dorsal pedal arteries of dogs. Six healthy dogs. During isoflurane anesthesia, catheters were introduced into the carotid, femoral and dorsal pedal arteries of dogs to allow simultaneous monitoring of direct blood pressure in each artery. The dogs were submitted to 8 hemodynamic conditions induced by combining changes in heart rate (bradycardia, normocardia, tachycardia) with changes in blood pressure (hypotension, normotension, hypertension). Values obtained from each arterial catheter were compared and agreement between central (carotid) and peripheral (femoral and dorsal pedal) values were analyzed by the Bland-Altman method. During hypotensive conditions, systolic arterial pressure (SAP) was lower in the femoral and dorsal pedal arteries compared to the carotid artery whereas during normotensive and hypertensive conditions, SAP was higher in peripheral arteries. During hypotensive states, increases in heart rate resulted in greater bias between central and peripheral SAP whereas during normotensive states, the bias decreased as heart rate increased. Mean and diastolic arterial pressures were lower in the femoral and dorsal pedal arteries than in the carotid artery during most hemodynamic conditions. In healthy anesthetized dogs, invasive blood pressure measurements in peripheral arteries may differ significantly from measurements in a central artery. The greatest differences were observed in SAP and the magnitude of differences between central and peripheral blood pressure measurements varied according to the dog's hemodynamic condition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Peripheral airways obstruction in idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension (primary).

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Bonetti, P; Lupi-Herrera, E; Martinez-Guerra, M L; Barrios, R; Seoane, M; Sandoval, J

    1983-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the lung were studied in ten nonsmokers with idiopathic pulmonary artery hypertension (IPAH) (mean pulmonary artery pressure 65.7 +/- 30 mm Hg). In the routine lung test, residual volume was found to be abnormal (greater than 120 percent of the predicted) in seven patients, and measured airway resistance was normal in eight out of the ten patients. A decreased FEF 75-85 percent, abnormal values for the helium-air flow ratios and increased closing capacities were documented in eight of ten patients in whom lung elastic recoil was normal (six of ten) or increased (four of ten). These features suggest peripheral airways obstruction (PAO) which was also supported by histopathologic findings in three cases (one biopsy and two necropsies). The observed changes in lung compliance could be related to the behavior of the coupling of the air-space and vascular compartments. The etiology of PAO in IPAH patients is not known, but our results indicate that both the peripheral airways and the pulmonary circulation are affected. The knowledge of PAO in IPAH patients could help to better understand the observed V/Q inequality in this entity.

  20. Hydration Status Is Associated with Aortic Stiffness, but Not with Peripheral Arterial Stiffness, in Chronically Hemodialysed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bia, Daniel; Galli, Cintia; Zócalo, Yanina; Armentano, Ricardo L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adequate fluid management could be essential to minimize high arterial stiffness observed in chronically hemodialyzed patients (CHP). Aim. To determine the association between body fluid status and central and peripheral arterial stiffness levels. Methods. Arterial stiffness was assessed in 65 CHP by measuring the pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a central arterial pathway (carotid-femoral) and in a peripheral pathway (carotid-brachial). A blood pressure-independent regional arterial stiffness index was calculated using PWV. Volume status was assessed by whole-body multiple-frequency bioimpedance. Patients were first observed as an entire group and then divided into three different fluid status-related groups: normal, overhydration, and dehydration groups. Results. Only carotid-femoral stiffness was positively associated (P < 0.05) with the hydration status evaluated through extracellular/intracellular fluid, extracellular/Total Body Fluid, and absolute and relative overhydration. Conclusion. Volume status and overload are associated with central, but not peripheral, arterial stiffness levels with independence of the blood pressure level, in CHP. PMID:26167301

  1. Statin use in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Harris, Sheena K; Roos, Matt G; Landry, Gregory J

    2016-12-01

    Statins are recommended for use in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) to reduce cardiovascular events and mortality. However, much of the data regarding benefits of statins stem from the cardiovascular literature. Here, we review the literature regarding statin use specifically in patients with PAD regarding its effects on cardiovascular events and mortality, limb-related outcomes, statin use after endovascular interventions, statin dosing, and concerns about statins. We performed a literature review using PubMed for literature after the year 2000. Search terms included "statins," "peripheral arterial disease," "peripheral vascular disease," "lipid-lowering medication," and "cardiovascular disease." There is good evidence of statins lowering cardiovascular events and cardiovascular-related mortality in patients with PAD. Though revascularization rates were reduced with statins, amputation rates and amputation-free survival did not improve. Small randomized controlled trials show that patients taking statins can slightly improve pain-free walking distance or pain-free walking time, although the extent of the effect on quality of life is unclear. Statin use for patients undergoing endovascular interventions is recommended because of the reduction of postoperative cardiovascular events. Not enough data exist to support local effects of systemic statin therapy, such as prevention of restenosis. For statin dosing, there is little increased benefit to intense therapy compared with the adverse effects, whereas moderate-dose therapy has significant benefits with very few adverse effects. Adverse effects of moderate-dose statin therapy are rare and mild and are greatly outweighed by the cardiovascular benefits. There is strong evidence to support use of statins in patients with PAD to reduce cardiovascular events and mortality. Use in patients undergoing open and endovascular interventions is also recommended. Statin use may reduce the need for

  2. Association of Peripheral Arterial and Cardiovascular Diseases in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carolina; Miname, Marcio; Makdisse, Marcia; Kalil, Roberto; Santos, Raul D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c). Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Objective This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. Methods The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI) values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men) with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations), mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. Results The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049). Conclusion Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients. PMID:25029472

  3. Arterial Blood Flow Measurement Using Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, David K.; Myerowitz, P. David; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Peppler, Walter W.; Fields, Barry L.; Watson, Kim M.; O'Connor, Julia

    1984-08-01

    Standard angiography demonstrates the anatomy of arterial occlusive disease but not its physiological signficance. Using intravenous digital subtraction angiography (DSA), we investigated transit-time videodensitometric techniques in measuring femoral arterial flows in dogs. These methods have been successfully applied to intraarterial DSA but not to intravenous DSA. Eight 20 kg dogs were instrumented with an electromagnetic flow probe and a balloon occluder above an imaged segment of femoral artery. 20 cc of Renografin 76 was power injected at 15 cc/sec into the right atrium. Flow in the femoral artery was varied by partial balloon occlusion or peripheral dilatation following induced ischemia resulting in 51 flow measurements varying from 15 to 270 cc/min. Three different transit-time techniques were studied: crosscorrelation, mean square error, and two leading edge methods. Correlation between videodensitometry and flowmeter measurements using these different techniques ranged from 0.78 to 0.88 with a mean square error of 29 to 37 cc/min. Blood flow information using several different transit-time techniques can be obtained with intravenous DSA.

  4. Immunohistochemical analysis of paraoxonases and chemokines in arteries of patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Sepúlveda, Julio; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Guirro, Maria; García-Heredia, Anabel; Cabré, Noemí; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Fort-Gallifa, Isabel; Martín-Paredero, Vicente; Joven, Jorge; Camps, Jordi

    2015-05-18

    Oxidative damage to lipids and lipoproteins is implicated in the development of atherosclerotic vascular diseases, including peripheral artery disease (PAD). The paraoxonases (PON) are a group of antioxidant enzymes, termed PON1, PON2, and PON3 that protect lipoproteins and cells from peroxidation and, as such, may be involved in protection against the atherosclerosis process. PON1 inhibits the production of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in endothelial cells incubated with oxidized lipoproteins. PON1 and CCL2 are ubiquitously distributed in tissues, and this suggests a joint localization and combined systemic effect. The aim of the present study has been to analyze the quantitative immunohistochemical localization of PON1, PON3, CCL2 and CCL2 receptors in a series of patients with severe PAD. Portions of femoral and/or popliteal arteries from 66 patients with PAD were obtained during surgical procedures for infra-inguinal limb revascularization. We used eight normal arteries from donors as controls. PON1 and PON3, CCL2 and the chemokine-binding protein 2, and Duffy antigen/chemokine receptor, were increased in PAD patients. There were no significant changes in C-C chemokine receptor type 2. Our findings suggest that paraoxonases and chemokines play an important role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis in peripheral artery disease.

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Arterial Access: Outcomes Among Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease and Critical Limb Ischemia Undergoing Peripheral Interventions.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, J A; Diaz-Sandoval, Larry J; Jaff, Michael R; Adams, George; Beasley, Robert; Finton, Sara; McGoff, Theresa; Miller, Larry E; Ansari, Mohammad; Saab, Fadi

    2016-06-01

    Arterial cannulation is a vital component of endovascular interventions and often unconventional access approaches are required due to disease complexity. Historically, varying maneuvers have been utilized to obtain arterial access. Lack of consensus exists regarding the safest and most effective method. This study examined the feasibility and immediate outcomes of ultrasound-guided access in traditional and advanced access approaches. Data were analyzed from a cohort of 407 patients enrolled in the Peripheral RegIstry of Endovascular Clinical OutcoMEs (PRIME). The 407 patients underwent 649 procedures with 896 access sites utilized. Access success, immediate outcomes, complications, and length of hospital stay were analyzed. Mean age was 70 years, and 67% were male. The majority of patients had critical limb ischemia (58%), 39% were Rutherford classification III. Most commonly utilized access sites were common femoral retrograde, common femoral antegrade, posterior tibial, and anterior tibial arteries (34.6%, 33.0%, 12.1%, and 12.1%, respectively). Mean number of attempts was 1.2, 1.2, 1.5, and 1.4, respectively; median time to access was 39, 45, 41, and 59 seconds, respectively; and access success rate was 99.4%, 97.3%, 90.7%, and 92.6%; respectively. Access-site combinations utilized were femoral antegrade (n = 188), femoral retrograde (n = 185), dual femoral/ tibio-pedal (n = 130), dual femoral retrograde (n = 44), retrograde tibio-pedal (n = 73), and other (n = 29). Access-related complications were low overall: hematoma (1.2%), bleeding requiring transfusion/intervention (1.7%), pseudoaneurysm (1.7%), arteriovenous fistula (0.3%), aneurysm (0%), compartment syndrome (0%), and death (0%). Utilization of ultrasound-guided arterial access in this complex cohort was shown to be safe and effective regardless of arterial bed and approach.

  6. Dietary sodium intake and arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Dumler, Francis

    2009-01-01

    We sought to summarize major recent studies in the field of dietary sodium intake and arterial blood pressure, and discuss the following trials. INTERSALT: Sodium intake correlates with the rise in blood pressure with age, but not with the prevalence of hypertension. The population study identified a minimal impact of sodium intake on blood pressure (0.9 mm Hg/10 mmol difference in salt intake). DASH: This diet induced significant reductions in blood pressure compared with the control diet. Further decreases were observed with DASH and a 50 mmol/day sodium intake. VANGUARD: Blood pressure was inversely related to urinary potassium, calcium and magnesium but not to sodium excretion. TONE: Cardiovascular events were highest in the usual care group (83%) and lowest in the sodium reduction-plus-weight loss group (56%). META-ANALYSIS: A systematic review of 11 long-term controlled randomized trials reported a small decrease (1.1 mm Hg) in median systolic but not diastolic blood pressure with a reduced dietary sodium intake. In conclusion, (1) sodium restriction in hypertensive patients reduces blood pressure, and (2) the long-term impact of reduced salt intake on blood pressure, mortality, and morbidity remains to be defined.

  7. Are arterial blood gases necessary in the evaluation of acutely dyspneic patients?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Arterial blood gases (ABG) are obtained commonly in dyspneic persons presenting to emergency departments. The study by Burri and colleagues found that the information contained in ABG fails to distinguish between pulmonary and other causes of dyspnea. On the other hand, arterial pH was highly predictive of ICU admission and outcome. Until large clinical studies show equivalence between peripheral venous and ABG, we will continue to advocate the use of ABG in the evaluation of acute dyspnea. PMID:21892979

  8. Hemodynamics in arterial reconstructions of the lower limb. II. Blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Dedichen, H

    1976-01-01

    In order to demonstrate common pressure gradients and peripheral arterial pressure in ileo-femoro-popliteal arteries before and after reconstruction for atherosclerosis, intra-operative pressure measurements were performed on 204 patients. Before reconstruction, the pressure differential was 44.3 mmHg in femoro-popliteal arteries and 29.0 mmHg in the iliac arteries. This was reduced to 8.4 and 4.1 mmHg by the reconstructions. In patients with femoro-popliteal disease, the pressure gradient was higher when gangrena or rest pain were present than when claudication was the principal symptom. When the iliac arteries were mainly involved, no such difference was seen. Postoperative gradients were slightly higher in arteries subjected to primary failure than in vessels remaining patent. The blood flow increase from intra-arterial papaverine injections accentuated existing pressure gradients and frequently disclosed gradients not manifest at basal flow rates.

  9. Early Detection of NSCLC Using Stromal Markers in Peripheral Blood

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0263 TITLE: Early Detection of NSCLC Using Stromal Markers in Peripheral Blood PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dingcheng...Sep 2014 - 31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Early Detection of NSCLC Using Stromal Markers in Peripheral Blood 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT There is an immediate clinical need to develop a diagnostic biomarker for lung cancer in early stage. In this proposal

  10. Radial artery pseudoaneurysm: A rare complication after a single arterial puncture for blood-gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kajal Nitin; Gandhi, Shruti P; Sutariya, Harsh C

    2016-10-01

    With a reported incidence of 0.048%, radial artery pseudoaneurysm (PA) is a rare but serious complication of arterial cannulation. We report a case of PA developing after a single puncture of the right radial artery for arterial blood-gas analysis diagnosed by Doppler ultrasound in young male patient. The development of PA after puncture of radial artery for continuous blood pressure monitoring and serial blood-gas analysis has been reported in the past; however, to the best of our knowledge, there is only one case report of development of PA after a single arterial puncture for blood-gas analysis is reported in the past.

  11. Pathophysiology of peripheral arterial disease in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao-Ling; Zhu, Lv-Yun; Han, Rui; Sun, Lei-Lei; Li, Jun-Xia; Dou, Jing-Tao

    2017-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) increases the risk of lower extremity amputation. It is also an independent predictor of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemic events, affecting both the quality and expectancy of life. Many studies have demonstrated that the prevalence of PAD in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is higher than in non-diabetic patients. In diabetic patients, PAD occurs early with rapid progression, and is frequently asymptomatic. Multiple metabolic aberrations in DM, such as advanced glycation end-products, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and abnormal oxidative stress, have been shown to worsen PAD. However, the role of DM in PAD is not completely understood. The purpose of the present article is to review and discuss the pathophysiology of PAD in DM. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. DIETARY INTAKE OF SUBJECTS WITH PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE AND CLAUDICATION

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Bright, Brianna C.; Ort, Kelly A.; Montgomery, Polly S.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the dietary intakes of subjects with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and claudication with diet recommendations of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and dietary reference intake values recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences. Forty-six subjects consumed a mean macronutrient composition of 17% protein, 51% carbohydrate, and 30% fat. Compared to the NCEP and IOM recommendations, few subjects met the recommended daily intakes for sodium (0%), vitamin E (0%), folate (13%), saturated fat (20%), fiber (26%), and cholesterol (39%). Subjects with PAD and claudication have poor nutrition, with diets particularly high in saturated fat, sodium, and cholesterol, and low in fiber, vitamin E and folate intakes. Subjects should be encouraged to reduce consumption of dietary fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium, and to increase fiber and vitamin intakes to meet recommendations of the NCEP and IOM. PMID:21406424

  13. The exercise pressor reflex and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-03-01

    The exercise pressor reflex contributes to increases in cardiovascular and ventilatory function during exercise. These reflexive increases are caused by both mechanical stimulation and metabolic stimulation of group III and IV afferents with endings in contracting skeletal muscle. Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex. Recently, an animal model of PAD was established which allows further investigation of possible mechanisms involved in this augmented reflex. Earlier studies have identified ASIC3 channels, bradykinin receptors, P2X receptors, endoperoxide receptors, and thromboxane receptors as playing a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in healthy rats. This review focuses on recent studies using a rat model of PAD in order to determine possible mechanisms contributing to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex seen in patients with this disease.

  14. Conditions Presenting with Symptoms of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aditya M.; Norton, Patrick T.; Zhu, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is estimated to affect more than 20% of people older than 65 years. The vast majority of patients with symptoms suggestive of PAD have atherosclerosis often associated with conventional vascular risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and inflammation. A minority of people presenting with symptoms suggesting PAD have an alternative etiology. These groups of disorders are often underdiagnosed, and if diagnosed correctly the diagnosis may be delayed. Understanding these pathologies well is important, as they can be very debilitating and optimal treatment may vary significantly. Inappropriate treatment of these disorders can lead to worsening morbidity and mortality. This article discusses the underlying causes of nonatherosclerotic PAD, including the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. PMID:25435652

  15. [Vascular rehabilitation in patients with peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    de Holanda, Ana; Aubourg, Marion; Dubus-Bausière, Valérie; Eveno, Dominique; Abraham, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Lower limb peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent debilitating disease associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. The benefit of rehabilitation in PAD patients has been largely demonstrated, both for patients that undergo amputation, and for patients with claudication. In these latter patients, rehabilitation programs rely on a variety of additional techniques or tools, among which: stretching, specific muscle proprioception, walking and a variety of other physical activities, exercise or situations adapted to community life, lower limb and respiratory physiotherapy, patient's education, support for smoking cessation and healthy nutrition, social support, etc. Whether rehabilitation is performed in specialised integrated structures or performed on a home-based basis, various clinicians are involved. Despite evidence-based proof of efficacy, rehabilitation of PAD patients with claudication is still under-used. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Life-style modification in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Cleanthis, M; Smout, J; Flather, M; Stansby, G

    2005-01-01

    To review the published evidence supporting the use of life-style modification in peripheral arterial disease (PAD). A systematic search of the medical literature was performed for relevant studies. The publications obtained were then searched for randomised clinical trials which reported end-points of mortality or major cardiovascular event rates with various life-style modifications. Only one randomised controlled trial was found reporting relevant end-points. Other trials were of other end-points such as walking distance or biochemical markers. There is a lack of randomised controlled data proving the benefit of life-style modification in improving mortality and reducing cardiovascular events in patients with PAD. Despite this there is sufficient evidence to recommend some life-style modification as part of the overall approach to risk reduction in these patients. There is compelling evidence to support smoking cessation, increased exercise and improved diet.

  17. Altered Immune Phenotype in Peripheral Blood Cells of Patients with Scleroderma-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Risbano, Michael G; Meadows, Christina A; Coldren, Christopher D; Jenkins, Tiffany J.; Edwards, Michael G; Collier, David; Huber, Wendy; Mack, Douglas G; Fontenot, Andrew P; Geraci, Mark W; Bull, Todd M

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common and fatal complication of scleroderma that may involve inflammatory and autoimmune mechanisms. Alterations in the gene expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been previously described in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Our goal is to identify differentially expressed genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in scleroderma patients with and without pulmonary hypertension as biomarkers of disease. Gene expression analysis was performed on a Microarray Cohort of scleroderma patients with (n=10) and without (n=10) pulmonary hypertension. Differentially expressed genes were confirmed in the Microarray Cohort and validated in a Validation Cohort of scleroderma patients with (n=15) and without (n=19) pulmonary hypertension by RT-qPCR. We identified inflammatory and immune-related genes including interleukin-7 receptor (IL-7R) and chemokine receptor 7 as differentially expressed in patients with scleroderma-associated pulmonary hypertension. Flow cytometry confirmed decreased expression of IL-7R on circulating CD4+ T-cells from scleroderma patients with pulmonary hypertension. Differences exist in the expression of inflammatory and immune-related genes in peripheral blood cells from patients with scleroderma-related pulmonary hypertension compared to those with normal pulmonary artery pressures. These findings may have implications as biomarkers to screen at-risk populations for early diagnosis and provide insight into mechanisms of scleroderma-related pulmonary hypertension. PMID:20973920

  18. Blood Pressure Regulation VIII: Resistance Vessel Tone and Implications for a Pro-Atherogenic Conduit Artery Endothelial Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Fadel, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunction of the endothelium is proposed as the primary initiator of atherosclerotic peripheral artery disease, which occurs mainly in medium to large-sized conduit arteries of the lower extremities (e.g., iliac, femoral, popliteal arteries). In this review article, we propose the novel concept that conduit artery endothelial cell phenotype is determined, in part, by microvascular tone in skeletal muscle resistance arteries through both changes in arterial blood pressure as well as upstream conduit artery shear stress patterns. First, we summarize the literature supporting the involvement of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and nitric oxide (NO) in the modulation of microvascular tone and arterial blood pressure. We then focus on the role of elevated blood pressure and shear stress profiles in modulating conduit artery endothelial cell phenotype. Last, we discuss findings from classic and emerging studies indicating that increased vascular resistance, as it occurs in the context of increased SNA and/or reduced NO bioavailability, is associated with greater oscillatory shear stress (e.g., increased retrograde shear) in upstream conduit arteries. The ideas put forth in this review set the stage for a new paradigm concerning the mechanistic link between increased microvascular tone and development of conduit artery endothelial dysfunction and thus increased risk for peripheral artery disease. Indeed, a vast amount of evidence supports the notion that excessive blood pressure and oscillatory shear stress are potent pro-atherogenic signals to the endothelium. PMID:23860841

  19. Fusion Guidance in Endovascular Peripheral Artery Interventions: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, Anna M. Haan, Michiel W. de Graaf, Rick de Zwam, Willem H. van; Schurink, Geert Willem H.; Nelemans, Patricia J.; Wildberger, Joachim E. Das, Marco

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of endovascular guidance by means of live fluoroscopy fusion with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA).MethodsFusion guidance was evaluated in 20 endovascular peripheral artery interventions in 17 patients. Fifteen patients had received preinterventional diagnostic MRA and two patients had undergone CTA. Time for fluoroscopy with MRA/CTA coregistration was recorded. Feasibility of fusion guidance was evaluated according to the following criteria: for every procedure the executing interventional radiologists recorded whether 3D road-mapping provided added value (yes vs. no) and whether PTA and/or stenting could be performed relying on the fusion road-map without need for diagnostic contrast-enhanced angiogram series (CEAS) (yes vs. no). Precision of the fusion road-map was evaluated by recording maximum differences between the position of the vasculature on the virtual CTA/MRA images and conventional angiography.ResultsAverage time needed for image coregistration was 5 ± 2 min. Three-dimensional road-map added value was experienced in 15 procedures in 12 patients. In half of the patients (8/17), intervention was performed relying on the fusion road-map only, without diagnostic CEAS. In two patients, MRA roadmap showed a false-positive lesion. Excluding three patients with inordinate movements, mean difference in position of vasculature on angiography and MRA/CTA road-map was 1.86 ± 0.95 mm, implying that approximately 95 % of differences were between 0 and 3.72 mm (2 ± 1.96 standard deviation).ConclusionsFluoroscopy with MRA/CTA fusion guidance for peripheral artery interventions is feasible. By reducing the number of CEAS, this technology may contribute to enhance procedural safety.

  20. Dual-Energy CT Angiography in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, Carolin Jochum, Susanne; Sadick, Maliha; Huck, Kurt; Ziegler, Peter; Fink, Christian; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Diehl, Steffen J.

    2009-07-15

    We sought to study the accuracy of dual-energy computed tomographic angiography (DE-CTA) for the assessment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity by using the dual-energy bone removal technique compared with a commercially available conventional bone removal tool. Twenty patients underwent selective digital subtraction angiography and DE-CTA of the pelvis and lower extremities. CTA data were postprocessed with two different applications: conventional bone removal and dual-energy bone removal. All data were reconstructed and evaluated as 3D maximum-intensity projections. Time requirements for reconstruction were documented. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and concordance of DE-CTA regarding degree of stenosis and vessel wall calcification were calculated. A total of 359 vascular segments were analyzed. Compared with digital subtraction angiography, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, respectively, of CTA was 97.2%, 94.1%, and 94.7% by the dual-energy bone removal technique. The conventional bone removal tool delivered a sensitivity of 77.1%, a specificity of 70.7%, and an accuracy of 72.0%. Best results for both postprocessing methods were achieved in the vascular segments of the upper leg. In severely calcified segments, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy stayed above 90% by the dual-energy bone removal technique, whereas the conventional bone removal technique showed a substantial decrease of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. DE-CTA is a feasible and accurate diagnostic method in the assessment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Results obtained by DE-CTA are superior to the conventional bone removal technique and less dependent on vessel wall calcifications.

  1. A program of 3 physical therapy modalities improves peripheral arterial disease in diabetes type 2 patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, Belen; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano; Sánchez-Labraca, Nuria; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is one of the main causes of peripheral vascular disease. The beneficial effects of exercise on glucose homeostasis include a marked stimulation of blood glucose utilization during and after its performance. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a program of 3 physical therapy modalities on blood circulation in patients with type 2 diabetes with peripheral arterial disease. A randomized controlled trial was undertaken. Sixty-eight patients with type 2 diabetes with Leriche-Fontaine stage I or IIa peripheral arterial disease were randomly assigned to an exercise or placebo group. For 20 weeks, the exercise group underwent treatment comprising 3 exercises at proximal, medium, and distal segments of the lower limbs, and the placebo group received sham treatment with disconnected ultrasound equipment. Peripheral arterial disease was determined by evaluating the ankle/brachial index (ABI), Doppler flow velocity, blood parameters, cardiovascular risk score, and heart rate during exercise test. After 20 weeks of treatment, significant differences between groups were found in the following: right (P < .039) and left (P < .023) ABI; Doppler flow velocity (cm/s) in the right (P < .010) and left (P < .026) posterior tibial artery and in the right (P < .012) and left (P < .022) dorsalis pedis artery; and fibrinogen (P < .045), hemoglobin (P < .021), cholesterol (P < .012), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < .031), and HbA1c (P < .034) values. There was no significant difference in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values (P < .110) between the groups. A program of these physical therapy modalities improves ABI, Doppler flow velocity, and blood parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  2. Clinical assessment of patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Marc A; Griffin, Kathryn J; Scott, D Julian A

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) describes the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis affecting the circulation in the legs. The severity of PAD is classified according to symptom severity, time course, and anatomical distribution. The signs and symptoms of PAD reflect the degree of circulatory compromise and whether there has been a gradual reduction in the circulation or an abrupt, uncompensated decrease. Accurate clinical assessment underpins decisions on management strategy and should objectively assess the severity of the ischemia and need for revascularization. Clinical history should discriminate symptoms of PAD from other conditions presenting with leg pain, elucidate cardiovascular risk factors and the effect of symptoms on the patient's quality of life. Clinical examination includes signs of general cardiovascular disease and associated conditions before assessing the circulation and viability of the limb. Palpation of peripheral pulses must be augmented by determination of the ankle brachial pressure index using hand held Doppler. A whole patient approach to management is required and must include modification of cardiovascular risk status as well as dealing with the local circulatory manifestation of PAD.

  3. Clinical Assessment of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Marc A.; Griffin, Kathryn J.; Scott, D. Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) describes the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis affecting the circulation in the legs. The severity of PAD is classified according to symptom severity, time course, and anatomical distribution. The signs and symptoms of PAD reflect the degree of circulatory compromise and whether there has been a gradual reduction in the circulation or an abrupt, uncompensated decrease. Accurate clinical assessment underpins decisions on management strategy and should objectively assess the severity of the ischemia and need for revascularization. Clinical history should discriminate symptoms of PAD from other conditions presenting with leg pain, elucidate cardiovascular risk factors and the effect of symptoms on the patient's quality of life. Clinical examination includes signs of general cardiovascular disease and associated conditions before assessing the circulation and viability of the limb. Palpation of peripheral pulses must be augmented by determination of the ankle brachial pressure index using hand held Doppler. A whole patient approach to management is required and must include modification of cardiovascular risk status as well as dealing with the local circulatory manifestation of PAD. PMID:25435653

  4. Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in the Metabolic Myopathy Accompanying Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rontoyanni, Victoria G.; Nunez Lopez, Omar; Fankhauser, Grant T.; Cheema, Zulfiqar F.; Rasmussen, Blake B.; Porter, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a serious but relatively underdiagnosed and undertreated clinical condition associated with a marked reduction in functional capacity and a heightened risk of morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of lower extremity PAD is complex, and extends beyond the atherosclerotic arterial occlusion and subsequent mismatch between oxygen demand and delivery to skeletal muscle mitochondria. In this review, we evaluate and summarize the available evidence implicating mitochondria in the metabolic myopathy that accompanies PAD. Following a short discussion of the available in vivo and in vitro methodologies to quantitate indices of muscle mitochondrial function, we review the current evidence implicating skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of PAD myopathy, while attempting to highlight questions that remain unanswered. Given the rising prevalence of PAD, the detriment in quality of life for patients, and the associated significant healthcare resource utilization, new alternate therapies that ameliorate lower limb symptoms and the functional impairment associated with PAD are needed. A clear understanding of the role of mitochondria in the pathophysiology of PAD may contribute to the development of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:28348531

  5. Does pulmonary rehabilitation reduce peripheral blood pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Canavan, Jane L; Kaliaraju, Djeya; Nolan, Claire M; Clark, Amy L; Jones, Sarah E; Kon, Samantha S C; Polkey, Michael I; Man, William D-C

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) can improve aerobic exercise capacity, health-related quality of life and dyspnoea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recent studies have suggested that exercise training may improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness, albeit in small highly selected cohorts. The aim of the study was to establish whether supervised outpatient or unsupervised home PR can reduce peripheral blood pressure. Resting blood pressure was measured in 418 patients with COPD before and after outpatient PR, supervised by a hospital-based team (HOSP). Seventy-four patients with COPD undergoing an unsupervised home-based programme acted as a comparator group (HOME). Despite significant improvements in mean (95% confidence interval) exercise capacity in the HOSP group (56 (50-60) m, p < 0.001) and HOME group (30 (17-42) m, p < 0.001) systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) did not change in either the HOSP (SBP: p = 0.47; DBP: p = 0.06; MAP: p = 0.38) or HOME group (SBP: p = 0.67; DBP: p = 0.38; MAP: p = 0.76). Planned subgroup analysis of HOSP patients with known hypertension and/or cardiovascular disease showed no impact of PR upon blood pressure. PR is unlikely to reduce blood pressure, and by implication, makes a mechanism of action in which arterial stiffness is reduced, less likely.

  6. A new noninvasive device for continuous arterial blood pressure monitoring in the superficial temporal artery.

    PubMed

    Chin, K Y; Panerai, R B

    2013-04-01

    Continuous recording of arterial blood pressure (ABP) has many applications in cardiovascular physiology, but existing alternatives rely on measurements performed in the fingers or radial artery. Peripheral recordings have significant differences from central ABP regarding the pattern of the waveform and corresponding systolic and diastolic values. To address the need for noninvasive measurements closer to the ascending aorta, a new device was constructed to measure ABP in the superficial temporal artery (STA) using photoplethysmography and the arterial volume clamping technique. The optoelectronic circuitry to generate the photoplethysmogram is contained in a specially designed probe placed over the STA and kept in place with a head frame. The prototype (STAbp) also includes original designs for the pneumatic, electronic, signal processing, control and display sub-systems. A self-calibration feature regularly updates the photoplethysmogram operating point to improve accuracy. The performance of the STAbp was compared against the Finapres in 19 healthy subjects. At rest, the bias (SDd) was -23.1 (15.05), -10.8 (13.83) and -12.4 (12.93) mmHg for systolic, mean and diastolic pressures respectively, without significant differences in drift between the two devices. The 99% bandwidth (SD) for the spectral distribution of ABP waveforms was 5.3 (1.46) Hz for STAbp and 6.8 (0.73) Hz for the Finapres (p < 0.01). Handgrip manoeuvre showed a very similar response to the Finapres, including the rapid return to baseline on release. The new STAbp device has considerable potential as a new tool for clinical and research applications where continuous recording of more central ABP is advantageous compared to peripheral alternatives.

  7. Modelling the relationship between peripheral blood pressure and blood volume pulses using linear and neural network system identification techniques.

    PubMed

    Allen, J; Murray, A

    1999-08-01

    The relationships between peripheral blood pressure and blood volume pulse waveforms can provide valuable physiological data about the peripheral vascular system, and are the subject of this study. Blood pressure and volume pulse waveforms were collected from 12 normal male subjects using non-invasive optical techniques, finger arterial blood pressure (BP, Finapres: Datex-Ohmeda) and photoelectric plethysmography (PPG) respectively, and captured to computer for three equal (1 min) measurement phases: baseline, hand raising and hand elevated. This simple physiological challenge was designed to induce a significant drop in peripheral blood pressure. A simple first order lag transfer function was chosen to study the relationship between blood pressure (system input) and blood volume pulse waveforms (system output), with parameters describing the dynamics (time constant, tau) and input-output gain (K). Tau and K were estimated for each subject using two different system identification techniques: a recursive parameter estimation algorithm which calculated tau and K from a linear auto-regressive with exogenous variable (ARX) model, and an artificial neural network which was trained to learn the non-linear process input-output relationships and then derive a linearized ARX model of the system. The identification techniques allowed the relationship between the blood pressure and blood volume pulses to be described simply, with the neural network technique providing a better model fit overall (p < 0.05, Wilcoxon). The median falls in tau following the hand raise challenge were 26% and 31% for the linear and neural network based techniques respectively (both p < 0.05, Wilcoxon). This preliminary study has shown that the time constant and gain parameters obtained using these techniques can provide physiological data for the clinical assessment of the peripheral circulation.

  8. Coronary exercise hyperemia is impaired in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Amanda J.; Gao, Zhaohui; Luck, J. Carter; Blaha, Cheryl A.; Cauffman, Aimee E.; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F.; Proctor, David N.; Leuenberger, Urs A.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.; Muller, Matthew D.

    2017-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects over 200 million worldwide. The hallmark of PAD is ischemic leg pain and this condition is also associated with an augmented blood pressure response to exercise, impaired vascular function, and high risk of myocardial infarction and cardiovascular mortality. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that coronary exercise hyperemia is impaired in PAD. Methods Twelve patients with PAD and no overt coronary disease (65 ± 2 yr, 7 men) and 15 healthy control subjects (64 ± 2 yr, 9 men) performed supine plantar flexion exercise (30 contractions/min, increasing workload). A subset of subjects (N = 7 PAD, N = 8 healthy) also performed isometric handgrip exercise (40% maximum voluntary contraction to fatigue). Coronary blood velocity in the left anterior descending artery was measured by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography; blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously. Results Coronary blood velocity responses to 4 minutes of plantar flexion exercise (PAD: Δ 2.4 ± 1.2, healthy: Δ 6.0 ± 1.6 cm/s, P = 0.039) and to isometric handgrip exercise (PAD: Δ 8.3 ± 4.2, healthy: Δ 16.9 ± 3.6, P = 0.033) were attenuated in PAD patients. Conclusions These data indicate that coronary exercise hyperemia is impaired in PAD, which may predispose these patients to myocardial ischemia. PMID:27575303

  9. Arterial gene transfer for therapeutic angiogenesis in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Isner, J M; Walsh, K; Symes, J; Pieczek, A; Takeshita, S; Lowry, J; Rosenfield, K; Weir, L; Brogi, E; Jurayj, D

    1996-05-20

    The age-adjusted prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the U.S. population has been estimated to approach 12%. The clinical consequences of occlusive peripheral arterial disease (PAD) include pain on walking (claudication), pain at rest, and loss of tissue integrity in the distal limbs; the latter may ultimately lead to amputation of a portion of the lower extremity. Surgical bypass techniques and percutaneous catheter-based interventions may be used to successfully revascularize the limbs of certain patients with PAD. In many patients, however, the anatomic extent and distribution of arterial occlusion is too severe to permit relief of pain and/or healing of ischemic ulcers. No effective medical therapy is available for the treatment of such patients. The purpose of this clinical protocol is to document the safety of therapeutic angiogenesis achieved in this case by percutaneous catheter-based delivery of the gene encoding vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in patients with PAD; and, as secondary objectives, investigate the bioactivity of this strategy to relieve rest pain and heal ischemic ulcers of the lower extremities. The rationale for this human protocol is based upon preclinical studies performed in a rabbit model of hindlimb ischemia. These studies are described in detail below and in the manuscripts enclosed in the Appendix to this proposal. In brief, a single intra-arterial bolus of VEGF recombinant human protein, delivered percutaneously to the ischemic limb via an intravascular catheter, resulted in angiographic, hemodynamic, physiologic, and histologic evidence of augmented collateral artery development. Subsequently, similar results were achieved using an angioplasty catheter with a hydrogel-coated balloon to deliver 400 micrograms of a plasmid containing the cDNA for VEGF to the internal iliac artery in the same animal model. Accordingly, we propose to administer arterial gene (VEGF) therapy to patients with rest pain and

  10. Peripheral blood pressure by Dinamap and central blood pressure by applanation tonometry in outpatient general practice.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Luiz Miguel; Simões, Ana Rita; Ricardo Miranda, Paula; Matias, Catarina; Rosendo, Inês; Constantino, Liliana; Santos, Tiago; Neto, Maria da Glória; Francisco, Maria dos Prazeres

    2013-06-01

    Central blood pressure (CBP) is the pressure exerted by the blood column at any given moment on the aortic and carotid artery walls, which is a close proxy for the blood pressure inside the brain and the heart, and is thus a better marker of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than peripheral blood pressure (PBP). To assess how the augmentation index (AI), peripheral pulse pressure (pPP), central pulse pressure (cPP) and subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR) vary in hypertensive patients according to level of control of CBP and PBP. We performed an observational, cross-sectional study in a convenience sample from a general practice in Central Portugal over a period of four days in May 2010. Measurements were taken after a four-minute resting period. The following values were considered to reflect controlled pressures: PBP <140/90 mmHg, CBP <130/80 mmHg, pPP <55 mmHg and cPP <45 mmHg. The sample included 92 patients, 38 male (41.3%), mean age 62.3±11.1 years, with no significant difference in gender distribution. PBP was controlled in 55 (59.8%), and CBP in 53 (57.6%). Both PBP and CBP were controlled in 50 patients (54.3%) and neither was controlled in 34 (37.9%). pPP and cPP were significantly lower in those with controlled PBP (p<0.001) and CBP (p<0.001). AI was non-significantly lower in those with controlled PBP (78±9 vs. 80.7) and those with controlled CBP (78±9 vs.81±7) (p=0.02). SEVR was within the desirable range in 92 patients (92.2%). 78.4% of individuals were taking drugs acting on the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS). In a convenience sample of 92 patients, PBP and CBP were controlled in 59.8% and 57.6%, respectively. Those with controlled PBP had significantly better peripheral systolic and diastolic blood pressure, CBP, pPP and cPP; the same was true of those with controlled CBP, who also had a significantly better AI. The percentage of the cardiac cycle in diastole had a desirable value for 92,2% of the subjects. Copyright © 2011

  11. Peripheral artery disease and CKD: a focus on peripheral artery disease as a critical component of CKD care.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Pranav S; Hart, Peter D; O'Hare, Ann; DeLoach, Stephanie; Herzog, Charles A; Hirsch, Alan T

    2012-10-01

    The incidence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) is higher in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) than in the general population. PAD is a strong independent risk factor for increased cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity, including limb amputation, in persons with CKD. Diagnosis of PAD in patients with CKD may be challenging in the absence of classic intermittent claudication or the presence of atypical leg symptoms. In addition, pedal artery incompressibility may decrease the accuracy of ankle-brachial index measurement, the most common PAD diagnostic tool. Alternative methods such as toe-brachial index should be used if clinical suspicion persists despite a normal ankle-brachial index value. Aggressive risk-factor modification, including treatment of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension and smoking cessation, should be mandatory in all patients. Treatment of all individuals with PAD should include antiplatelet medications and prescribed supervised exercise programs and/or cilostazol for individuals with claudication symptoms. Preventive foot care measures and a multidisciplinary approach involving podiatrists and vascular and wound care specialists should be used to reduce amputations. Revascularization for critical limb ischemia is associated with poor outcomes in patients with CKD with PAD. Future investigation is recommended to evaluate the benefit of earlier treatment strategies in this high cardiovascular disease risk population with CKD. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Simultaneous bilateral magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral arteries in peripheral arterial disease patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan; Karmonik, Christof; Brunner, Gerd; Lumsden, Alan; Ballantyne, Christie; Johnson, Shawna; Wang, Yi; Morrisett, Joel

    2011-07-01

    To image the femoral arteries in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) patients using a bilateral receive coil. An eight-channel surface coil array for bilateral MRI of the femoral arteries at 3T was constructed and evaluated. The bilateral array enabled imaging of a 25-cm segment of the superficial femoral arteries (SFA) from the profunda to the popliteal. The array provided improved the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the periphery and similar SNR in the middle of a phantom compared to three other commercially available coils (4-channel torso, quadrature head, whole body). Multicontrast bilateral images of the in vivo SFA with 1 mm in-plane resolution made it possible to directly compare lesions in the index SFA to the corresponding anatomical site in the contralateral vessel without repositioning the patient or coil. A set of bilateral time-of-flight, T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density-weighted images was acquired in a clinically acceptable exam time of ≈45 minutes. The developed bilateral coil is well suited for monitoring dimensional changes in atherosclerotic lesions of the SFA. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. LEISHMANIA DONOVANI IN THE PERIPHERAL BLOOD

    PubMed Central

    Young, Charles W.; Van Sant, Helen M.

    1923-01-01

    1. The effect of human red cells and serum on the growth of Leishmania donovani has been studied and a blood culture method devised, based on these findings. 2. The distribution of blood platelets and of the different varieties of leucocytes in the strata of centrifugalized diluted blood has been investigated, and also the distribution of Leishman-Donovan bodies, extracellular and intracellular, in these strata. 3. The effect of treatment with antimony on the cultivability of Leishmania donavani has been studied. PMID:19868786

  14. [Recent Knowledge of Smoking and Peripheral Arterial Disease in Lower Extremities].

    PubMed

    Sotoda, Yoko; Hirooka, Shigeki; Orita, Hiroyuki; Wakabayashi, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic obstructive disease of the arteries in lower extremities. Patients with PAD show high rates of mortality from coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke. Smoking as well as diabetes is an important risk factor for PAD. A lesion of PAD in the lower extremities tends to be more proximal in smokers than in nonsmokers and to be more distal in patients with diabetes than in nondiabetics. By a systematic review, the odds ratio for PAD of smokers vs nonsmokers has been reported to be in the range of 1.7-7.4. Previous epidemiological studies suggest a stronger association of smoking with PAD than that with CAD. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule suppressing the progression of atherosclerosis, but this function is compromised by smoking. Smoking decreases the bioactivity of NO and the expression level of NO synthase. In addition, smoking results in deteriorations of risk factors for atherosclerosis such as decreases in blood HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol and tissue plasminogen activator levels and increases in the levels of blood triglycerides, LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, fibrinogen and the von Willebrand factor. Thus, smoking increases blood coagulability and deteriorates the blood lipid profile, resulting in thrombogenetic proneness and dyslipidemia. Smoking also increases the generation of atherogenic oxidized LDL in blood and decreases antiatherogenic prostacyclin production in the vascular endothelium. Smoking cessation is important for the prevention and therapy of PAD, and to this end, counseling by physicians and nicotine replacement therapy are useful and strongly recommended for patients with PAD.

  15. Fast segmentation of the femoral arteries from 3D MR images: A tool for rapid assessment of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weifu; Xu, Jianrong; Chiu, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    The peripheral arterial disease is a powerful indicator of coexistent generalized atherosclerosis. As plaques in femoral arteries are diffused and can span a length of 30 cm, a large coverage of the arteries is required to assess the full extent of atherosclerosis. Recent development of 3D black-blood magnetic resonance imaging sequences has allowed fast acquisition of images with an extended longitudinal coverage. Vessel wall volume quantification requires the segmentation of the lumen and outer wall boundaries, and conventional manual planimetry would be too time-consuming to be feasible for analyzing images with such a large coverage. To address this challenge in image analysis, this work introduces an efficient 3D algorithm to segment the lumen and outer wall boundaries for plaque and vessel wall quantification in the femoral artery. To generate the initial lumen surface, a user identified the location of the lumen centers manually on a set of transverse images with a user-specified interslice distance (ISD). A number of geometric operators were introduced to automatically adjust the initial lumen surface based on pixel intensity and gradient along the boundary and at the center of each transverse slice. The adjusted surface was optimized by a 3D deformable model driven by the local stiffness force and external force based on image gradient. The optimized lumen surface was expanded to obtain the initial outer wall surface, which was subsequently optimized by the 3D deformable model. The algorithm was executed with and without adjustment of the initial lumen surface and for three different selections of ISD: 10, 20, and 30 mm. The segmentation accuracy was improved in a statistically significant way with the introduction of initial lumen surface adjustment, but was insensitive to the ISD setting. When compared with the manual segmentation, the settings with adjustment have, on average, mean absolute differences (MADs) of 0.28 and 0.36 mm, respectively, for lumen

  16. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reduces total peripheral resistance during chronic infusion: direct arterial mesenteric relaxation is not involved

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) delivered over 1 week results in a sustained fall in blood pressure in the sham and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rat. We hypothesized 5-HT lowers blood pressure through direct receptor-mediated vascular relaxation. In vivo, 5-HT reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP), increased heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac index, and reduced total peripheral resistance during a 1 week infusion of 5-HT (25 µg/kg/min) in the normotensive Sprague Dawley rat. The mesenteric vasculature was chosen as an ideal candidate for the site of 5-HT receptor mediated vascular relaxation given the high percentage of cardiac output the site receives. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA transcripts for the 5-HT2B, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT7 receptors are present in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric arteries. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot validated the presence of the 5-HT2B, 5- HT1B and 5-HT7 receptor protein in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric artery. Isometric contractile force was measured in endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery and mesenteric resistance arteries in which the contractile 5- HT2A receptor was antagonized. Maximum concentrations of BW-723C86 (5- HT2B agonist), CP 93129 (5-HT1B agonist) or LP-44 (5-HT7 agonist) did not relax the superior mesenteric artery from DOCA-salt rats vs. vehicle. Additionally, 5-HT (10–9 M to 10–5 M) did not cause relaxation in either contracted mesenteric resistance arteries or superior mesenteric arteries from normotensive Sprague- Dawley rats. Thus, although 5-HT receptors known to mediate vascular relaxation are present in the superior mesenteric artery, they are not functional, and are therefore not likely involved in a 5-HT-induced fall in total peripheral resistance and MAP. PMID:22559843

  17. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reduces total peripheral resistance during chronic infusion: direct arterial mesenteric relaxation is not involved.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert Patrick; Pattison, Jill; Thompson, Janice M; Tiniakov, Ruslan; Scrogin, Karie E; Watts, Stephanie W

    2012-05-06

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) delivered over 1 week results in a sustained fall in blood pressure in the sham and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rat. We hypothesized 5-HT lowers blood pressure through direct receptor-mediated vascular relaxation. In vivo, 5-HT reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP), increased heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac index, and reduced total peripheral resistance during a 1 week infusion of 5-HT (25 µg/kg/min) in the normotensive Sprague Dawley rat. The mesenteric vasculature was chosen as an ideal candidate for the site of 5-HT receptor mediated vascular relaxation given the high percentage of cardiac output the site receives. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA transcripts for the 5-HT2B, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT7 receptors are present in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric arteries. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot validated the presence of the 5-HT2B, 5- HT1B and 5-HT7 receptor protein in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric artery. Isometric contractile force was measured in endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery and mesenteric resistance arteries in which the contractile 5- HT2A receptor was antagonized. Maximum concentrations of BW-723C86 (5- HT2B agonist), CP 93129 (5-HT1B agonist) or LP-44 (5-HT7 agonist) did not relax the superior mesenteric artery from DOCA-salt rats vs. vehicle. Additionally, 5-HT (10-9 M to 10-5 M) did not cause relaxation in either contracted mesenteric resistance arteries or superior mesenteric arteries from normotensive Sprague- Dawley rats. Thus, although 5-HT receptors known to mediate vascular relaxation are present in the superior mesenteric artery, they are not functional, and are therefore not likely involved in a 5-HT-induced fall in total peripheral resistance and MAP.

  18. Evaluation and Treatment of Patients With Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manesh R.; Conte, Michael S.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Dib, Nabil; Geraghty, Patrick; Gray, William; Hiatt, William R.; Ho, Mami; Ikeda, Koji; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Jaff, Michael R.; Jones, W. Schuyler; Kawahara, Masayuki; Lookstein, Robert A.; Mehran, Roxana; Misra, Sanjay; Norgren, Lars; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Povsic, Thomas J.; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Rundback, John; Shamoun, Fadi; Tcheng, James; Tsai, Thomas T.; Suzuki, Yuka; Vranckx, Pascal; Wiechmann, Bret N.; White, Christopher J.; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Krucoff, Mitchell W.

    2016-01-01

    The lack of consistent definitions and nomenclature across clinical trials of novel devices, drugs, or biologics poses a significant barrier to accrual of knowledge in and across peripheral artery disease therapies and technologies. Recognizing this problem, the Peripheral Academic Research Consortium, together with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, has developed a series of pragmatic consensus definitions for patients being treated for peripheral artery disease affecting the lower extremities. These consensus definitions include the clinical presentation, anatomic depiction, interventional outcomes, surrogate imaging and physiological follow-up, and clinical outcomes of patients with lower-extremity peripheral artery disease. Consistent application of these definitions in clinical trials evaluating novel revascularization technologies should result in more efficient regulatory evaluation and best practice guidelines to inform clinical decisions in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease. PMID:25744011

  19. Prevalence and Risk Factors for the Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ae; Kim, Eun Su; Hwang, Ho Kyeong; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Sol; Jung, Ji Woong; Kwon, Yu Jin; Cho, Dong Hui; Park, Sang Su; Yoon, Jin; Jang, Yong-Seog

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is known as a major contributor of the worsening of ischemic symptoms and the foot ulceration in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). However, there are few studies reporting the prevalence and risk factors for PN in PAOD. This study aimed to evaluate these issues for PN and to establish the importance of screening as additional treatment target for PN in PAOD. Materials and Methods: A total of 52 limbs with PAOD were enrolled from January 2011 to December 2012. PN was divided into radiculopathy, ischemic PN (IPN), and diabetic PN (DPN), based on electromyographic findings. We investigated the prevalence of overall PN and subtypes of PN and then analyzed the risk factors. Results: The prevalence of overall PN in PAOD was 43 of 52 limbs (82.7%). In terms of subtypes of PN, the prevalence rate of radiculopathy and IPN was 30.8% and 23.1%, respectively. DPN showed in 22 limbs (73.3%) among 30 diabetic limbs. There was no significant correlation between each type of PN and ischemic symptoms. Our analysis showed that coronary artery disease (CAD) was a significant risk factor (P=0.01) for IPN, however, did not identify any significant risk factors for DPN. Conclusion: This present study indicated that most patients with PAOD had PN and CAD was a risk factor for IPN. In particular, PAOD with diabetes represented a higher prevalence for DPN. Our study suggests that PN should be evaluated and considered as another treatment target in patients with PAOD. PMID:26217631

  20. Ultrasound Guidance and Other Determinants of Successful Peripheral Artery Catheterization in Critically Ill Children.

    PubMed

    Kantor, David B; Su, Erik; Milliren, Carly E; Conlon, Thomas W

    2016-12-01

    Peripheral arterial catheterization is a common invasive procedure performed in critically ill children. However, the benefits of using ultrasound guidance for this procedure in critically ill children, especially when used by inexperienced trainees, are unclear. Our aims were to evaluate whether the use of ultrasound guidance for the placement of radial arterial catheters reduced time and improved success when compared with the palpation method and also to determine patient and trainee variables that influence procedure outcomes. Finally, we evaluated whether adoption of ultrasound guidance among trainees comes at the expense of learning landmark-based methods. Prospective observational cohort. University affiliated PICU. A total of 208 procedures performed by 45 trainees in 192 unique patients (1 mo to 20 yr old) were observed. Implementation of ultrasound curriculum. The main outcome measures were time and number of attempts required for the procedure. Compared with palpation method, ultrasound guidance was associated with reduced procedure time (8.1 ± 5.2 min compared with 16.5 ± 8.8 min; p < 0.001), reduced number of attempts (3.1 ± 2.6 attempts compared with 6.9 ± 4.2 attempts; p < 0.001), and improved first attempt success rate (28% compared with 11%; p = 0.001) even after adjusting for key confounders in multivariate random effects models. The factors most likely to interfere with peripheral arterial catheterization are patient age, patient systolic blood pressure, patient body mass index, degree of fluid overload, and trainee months in fellowship. The use of ultrasound guidance mitigates the influence of each of these factors. We found no evidence that the adoption of ultrasound guidance by trainees is associated with reduced proficiency in landmark-based methods. The use of ultrasound guidance by trainees for radial artery catheterization in critically ill children is associated with improved outcomes compared with the palpation

  1. Shockwave therapy in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Notarnicola, Angela; Scicchitano, Pietro; Sassara, Marco; Carbonara, Santa; Maiorano, Mariagrazia; Moretti, Biagio

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies support the fact that extracorporeal shockwave (SW) induces angiogenesis and improves symptoms in patients affected by limb ischemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of SW therapy in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Twenty-two patients were enrolled in this study and were randomly assigned into two groups: SW treatment (12 patients, 67 ± 9 years) and control (10 patients, 68 ± 12 years). The inclusion criteria were the following: age over 40 years, PAD diagnosis, optimal medical therapy, and ankle-brachial index less than 0.9. SW therapy was administered using the Minilith® SL1 litotriptor with an ultrasound guide able to detect the target area using a B-mode technique and a 7.5 MHz convex probe emitting 2,000 impulses with an energy flux density of 0.03 mJ/mm(2). The variation in the degree of stenosis before and after treatment was statistically significant between the groups (-9% ± -10% vs. 0% ± 0%; P = 0.001). In addition, a significantly higher number of treated patients than controls showed a reduction in the Fontaine stage (12 [63%] vs. 0 [0%]; P < 0.001). This result was confirmed by analyzing the difference in patients' pain-free walking distance before and after SW therapy (76 ± 46 m vs. 0 ± 0 m for treated patients vs. controls; P < 0.001) and the difference in pain severity (measured on a pain scale; -1.4 ± 0.5 in the treated patients vs. -0.2 ± 0.4 in the controls; P < 0.001). On the basis of these results the authors hypothesized a direct effect of SW on the ultrastructural composition of the vessel walls, inducing a reduction in artery stenosis. These data support the application of SW therapy as a new medical tool to improve the natural clinical course of PAD.

  2. The effects of cilostazol on peripheral neuropathy in diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Mark E; Badger, Stephen A; Sharif, Muhammed Anees; Makar, Ragai R; Young, Ian S; Lee, Bernard; Soong, Chee V

    Evidence from diabetic animal models suggests that cilostazol, a cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of claudication, is efficacious in the treatment of peripheral neuropathy, although this is unproven in humans. The main aim of this study was to assess the effects of cilostazol on neuropathic symptomatology in diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Diabetic patients with PAD were prospectively recruited to a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled trial. Baseline clinical data were recorded prior to trial commencement following medical optimization. Neurological assessment included the Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Scoring system (TCNS) and vibration perception thresholds (VPT) with a neurothesiometer at baseline, 6 weeks, and 24 weeks. Twenty-six patients were recruited from December 2004 to January 2006, which included 20 males. Baseline patient allocation to treatment arms was matched for age, sex, and medical comorbidities. There was no significant difference in neurological assessment between the treatment groups using the TCNS and VPT at 6 and 24 weeks. Despite extensive animal-based evidence that cilostazol attenuates neuropathic symptomatology, our results do not support this effect in human diabetic PAD patients.

  3. Regional redistribution of blood flow in the external and internal carotid arteries during acute hypotension.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Lericollais, Romain; Hirasawa, Ai; Sakai, Sadayoshi; Normand, Hervé; Bailey, Damian M

    2014-05-15

    The present study examined to what extent an acute bout of hypotension influences blood flow in the external carotid artery (ECA) and the corresponding implications for blood flow regulation in the internal carotid artery (ICA). Nine healthy male participants were subjected to an abrupt decrease in arterial pressure via the thigh-cuff inflation-deflation technique. Duplex ultrasound was employed to measure beat-to-beat ECA and ICA blood flow. Compared with the baseline normotensive control, acute hypotension resulted in a heterogeneous blood flow response. ICA blood flow initially decreased following cuff release and then returned quickly to baseline levels. In contrast, the reduction in ECA blood flow persisted for 30 s following cuff release. Thus, the contribution of common carotid artery blood flow to the ECA circulation decreased during acute hypotension (-10 ± 4%, P < 0.001). This finding suggests that a preserved reduction in ECA blood flow, as well as dynamic cerebral autoregulation likely prevent a further decrease in intracranial blood flow during acute hypotension. The peripheral vasculature of the ECA may, thus, be considered an important vascular bed for intracranial cerebral blood flow regulation.

  4. Relation of Iliac Artery Calcium With Adiposity Measures and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jane J; Pedley, Alison; Weinberg, Ido; Britton, Kathryn A; Massaro, Joseph M; Hoffmann, Udo; Manders, Emily; Fox, Caroline S; Murabito, Joanne M

    2017-04-15

    Arterial calcification is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. To improve the understanding of the pathogenesis involved with iliac artery calcium (IAC), we sought to examine the associations between the burden of IAC with adiposity measures and peripheral artery disease (PAD). Participants (n = 1,236, 52% women, mean age 60 years) were drawn from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring cohort who underwent multidetector computed tomography. The extent of IAC was quantified based on calcified atherosclerotic plaques detected in the iliac arteries. High IAC was defined based on gender-specific 90th percentile cut-off points from a healthy referent subsample. PAD is defined as an ankle-brachial index < 0.9, intermittent claudication, and/or history of lower extremity revascularization. The association between PAD and IAC was assessed using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models. The burden of high IAC was 20.5% in women and 25.5% in men. High IAC was not associated with generalized (body mass index) or area-specific (waist circumference, and volumes of thoracic periaortic, abdominal subcutaneous, and visceral adipose tissue) adiposity measures (all p ≥0.22). High IAC was associated with increased odds of PAD (odds ratio 10.36, 95% confidence interval 4.28 to 25.09). This association persisted even after additionally adjusting for coronary artery calcium (odds ratio 11.25, 95% confidence interval 4.29 to 29.53). Burden of IAC was associated with an increased risk of PAD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cardiac and peripheral blood similarities in the comparison of nordiazepam and bromazepam blood concentrations.

    PubMed

    Pos Pok, P-Rop; Haddouche, Djamel; Mauras, Michel; Kuhlmann, Erika; Burle, Joëlle; Salmon, Thierry; Berland, Emilie; Coiffait, P-Emmanuel; Viala, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Concomitant heart and peripheral blood determinations were performed on 40 fatal cases involving nordiazepam (20 cases) and bromazepam (20 cases). The heart blood concentration for the two drugs (588 ng/mL for nordiazepam and 802 ng/mL for bromazepam) does not differ from the corresponding peripheral blood concentration (587 ng/mL for nordiazepam and 883 ng/mL for bromazepam). The mean ratios for the heart and peripheral blood concentrations were 0.95 for nordiazepam and 0.86 for bromazepam. No postmortem redistribution was observed for these two benzodiazepines. The authors thus suggest that corresponding heart blood can be proposed in the quantitative analysis of these drugs when peripheral blood is unavailable. The present study also shows the stability of the two drugs after a year of storage.

  6. Review of aspirin and clopidogrel resistance in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Guirgis, Mina; Thompson, Peter; Jansen, Shirley

    2017-09-08

    Aspirin resistance (AR) and clopidogrel resistance (CR) are terms used to describe a reduction in the medication's efficacy in inhibiting platelet aggregation despite regular dosing. This review gives context to the clinical role and implications of antiplatelet resistance in peripheral arterial disease (PAD). A review of English-language literature on AR and CR in PAD involving human subjects using PubMed and MEDLINE databases was performed in April 2017. A total of 2075 patients in 22 relevant studies were identified. To give this issue context, a review of the larger, more established literature on antiplatelet resistance in coronary disease was undertaken, identifying significant research associating resistance to major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs). Studies in the coronary arterial disease literature have strongly associated antiplatelet resistance with increased MACE. Prevalence of AR or CR in coronary disease appears to be >55% for each in some studies. Meta-analyses of >50 studies revealed that AR and CR are significantly associated with MACE (relative risk of 2.09 and 2.8, respectively). This adds further weight to the literature reporting antiplatelet resistance as an independent predictor of and a threefold risk factor for major adverse cardiovascular events. The prevalence of resistance in PAD in this review was comparable to that in the coronary disease literature, with AR and CR prevalence up to 60% and 65%, respectively. There is evidence that the adverse effects of antiplatelet resistance are significant in PAD. In fact, research directly studying stent thrombosis populations with either coronary arterial disease or PAD revealed more significantly impaired platelet responsiveness to clopidogrel and aspirin in PAD compared with similar individuals with coronary disease. AR in PAD was found in studies to be a significant risk factor for iliofemoral stent reocclusion (P = .0093) and stroke in patients with symptomatic carotid disease (P

  7. Peripheral blood findings associated with asymptomatic lead exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Day, C.M.; Tennant, F.S. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    This study was done to determine whether erythroid alterations can be found on a peripheral blood smear from an asymptomatic person exposure to excess atmospheric lead. Thirty healthy, asymptomatic adults who lived within five miles of a major Los Angeles, California freeway for five consecutive years were studied. Erythroid cytologic alterations-including-anisocytosis, poikilocytosis, polychromasia and basophilic stippling were statistically associated with increased free erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels. These findings indicate that erythroid alterations may be found on a peripheral blood smear prior to the development of clinical symptoms of lead intoxication.

  8. Blood borne hormones in a cross-talk between peripheral and brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure, the role of circumventricular organs.

    PubMed

    Ufnal, Marcin; Skrzypecki, Janusz

    2014-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that blood borne hormones modulate brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure. This appears to be mediated by the circumventricular organs which are located in the walls of the brain ventricular system and lack the blood-brain barrier. Recent evidence shows that neurons of the circumventricular organs express receptors for the majority of cardiovascular hormones. Intracerebroventricular infusions of hormones and their antagonists is one approach to evaluate the influence of blood borne hormones on the neural mechanisms regulating arterial blood pressure. Interestingly, there is no clear correlation between peripheral and central effects of cardiovascular hormones. For example, angiotensin II increases blood pressure acting peripherally and centrally, whereas peripherally acting pressor catecholamines decrease blood pressure when infused intracerebroventricularly. The physiological role of such dual hemodynamic responses has not yet been clarified. In the paper we review studies on hemodynamic effects of catecholamines, neuropeptide Y, angiotensin II, aldosterone, natriuretic peptides, endothelins, histamine and bradykinin in the context of their role in a cross-talk between peripheral and brain mechanisms involved in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The "Intermediate" CD14(++)CD16(+) monocyte subset increases in severe peripheral artery disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Aschenbrenner, Teresa; Wendorff, Heiko; Czubba, Maria; Glinzer, Almut; Haller, Bernhard; Schiemann, Matthias; Zimmermann, Alexander; Berger, Hermann; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Meier, Reinhard; Wohlgemuth, Walter A; Libby, Peter; Zernecke, Alma

    2016-12-19

    Monocytes are key players in atherosclerotic. Human monocytes display a considerable heterogeneity and at least three subsets can be distinguished. While the role of monocyte subset heterogeneity has already been well investigated in coronary artery disease (CAD), the knowledge about monocytes and their heterogeneity in peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) still is limited. Therefore, we aimed to investigate monocyte subset heterogeneity in patients with PAOD. Peripheral blood was obtained from 143 patients suffering from PAOD (Rutherford stage I to VI) and three monocyte subsets were identified by flow cytometry: CD14(++)CD16(-) classical monocytes, CD14(+)CD16(++) non-classical monocytes and CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes. Additionally the expression of distinct surface markers (CD106, CD162 and myeloperoxidase MPO) was analyzed. Proportions of CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocyte levels were significantly increased in advanced stages of PAOD, while classical and non-classical monocytes displayed no such trend. Moreover, CD162 and MPO expression increased significantly in intermediate monocyte subsets in advanced disease stages. Likewise, increased CD162 and MPO expression was noted in CD14(++)CD16(-) classical monocytes. These data suggest substantial dynamics in monocyte subset distributions and phenotypes in different stages of PAOD, which can either serve as biomarkers or as potential therapeutic targets to decrease the inflammatory burden in advanced stages of atherosclerosis.

  10. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease Does Not Affect Circulating Monocyte Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Krzanowski, Marek; Malinowski, Krzysztof P.; Nizankowski, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes are mononuclear cells characterized by distinct morphology and expression of CD14 and CD16 surface receptors. Classical, quiescent monocytes are positive for CD14 (lipopolysaccharide receptor) but do not express Fc gamma receptor III (CD16). Intermediate monocytes coexpress CD16 and CD14. Nonclassical monocytes with low expression of CD14 represent mature macrophage-like monocytes. Monocyte behavior in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and during vessel wall directed treatment is not well defined. This observation study aimed at monitoring of acute changes in monocyte subpopulations during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in PAD patients. Patients with Rutherford 3 and 4 PAD with no signs of inflammatory process underwent PTA of iliac, femoral, or popliteal segments. Flow cytometry for CD14, CD16, HLA-DR, CD11b, CD11c, and CD45RA antigens allowed characterization of monocyte subpopulations in blood sampled before and after PTA (direct angioplasty catheter sampling). Patients were clinically followed up for 12 months. All 61 enrolled patients completed 12-month follow-up. Target vessel failure occurred in 12 patients. While absolute counts of monocyte were significantly lower after PTA, only subtle monocyte activation after PTA (CD45RA and β-integrins) occurred. None of the monocyte parameters correlated with long-term adverse clinical outcome. Changes in absolute monocyte counts and subtle changes towards an activation phenotype after PTA may reflect local cell adhesion phenomenon in patients with Rutherford 3 or 4 peripheral arterial disease. PMID:27818999

  11. Peripheral arterial disease - diagnosis and management in general practice.

    PubMed

    Au, Thuy Bich; Golledge, Jonathan; Walker, Philip J; Haigh, Kate; Nelson, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis. It affects 10-15% of the general population, and is often asymptomatic; leading to under-diagnosis and under-treatment. Atherosclerotic risk factors are often not intensively managed in PAD patients. To summarise the information around the diagnosis and management of PAD in the general practice setting. Careful history, clinical examination, and measurement of ankle-brachial index remain the initial means of diagnosing PAD. More detailed anatomic information from duplex imaging, computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography, is usually unnecessary unless endovascular or surgical intervention is being considered, or if abdominal aortic aneurysm or popliteal aneurysm need to be excluded. Management is focused on lifestyle modification, including smoking cessation and exercise; medical management of atherosclerotic risk factors, including antiplatelet agents, statins, antihypertensive therapy; and agents to improve walking distance, such as cilostazol and ramipril. Endovascular or surgical interventions are usually considered for lifestyle limiting intermittent claudication not responding to conservative therapies, and for critical limb ischaemia.

  12. Challenges associated with peripheral arterial disease in women

    PubMed Central

    Barochiner, Jessica; Aparicio, Lucas S; Waisman, Gabriel D

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an increasingly recognized disorder that is associated with functional impairment, quality-of-life deterioration, increased risk of cardiovascular ischemic events, and increased risk of total and cardiovascular mortality. Although earlier studies suggested that PAD was more common in men, recent reports based on more sensitive tests have shown that the prevalence of PAD in women is at least the same as in men, if not higher. PAD tends to present itself asymptomatically or with atypical symptoms more frequently in women than in men, and is associated with comorbidities or situations particularly or exclusively found in the female sex, such as osteoporosis, hypothyroidism, the use of oral contraceptives, and a history of complications during pregnancy. Fat-distribution patterns and differential vascular characteristics in women may influence the interpretation of diagnostic methods, whereas sex-related vulnerability to drugs typically used in subjects with PAD, differences in risk-factor distribution among sexes, and distinct responses to revascularization procedures in men and women must be taken into account for proper disease management. All these issues pose important challenges associated with PAD in women. Of note, this group has classically been underrepresented in research studies. As a consequence, several sex-related challenges regarding diagnosis and management issues should be acknowledged, and research gaps should be addressed in order to successfully deal with this major health issue. PMID:24648743

  13. The patient's experience of amputation due to peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Torbjörnsson, Eva; Ottosson, Carin; Blomgren, Lena; Boström, Lennart; Fagerdahl, Ann-Mari

    2017-06-01

    It is not uncommon that patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) need to undergo a lower limb amputation, with or without previous revascularization attempts. Despite that, the patient's experience of the amputation has been scarcely studied. The aim of this qualitative study was to describe the patient's experience of amputation due to PAD. Thirteen interviews were conducted with vascular patients who had undergone a lower limb amputation at tibia, knee, or femoral level. Data were analyzed with content analysis. Our findings of the patient's experiences during the amputation process resulted in three themes with additional time sequences: the decision phase "From irreversible problem to amputation decision", the surgical phase "A feeling of being in a vacuum," and the rehabilitation phase "Adaptation to the new life". One main finding was that the patients felt abandoned during the surgical period. Despite that, most of the participants were satisfied with the decision, some of them even regretted that they had not undergone an amputation earlier in the process. It is important for the patient's well-being to develop a partnership with the surgeon to increase a feeling of being participating in the care. Vascular patients need better information on lower limb amputation, and its consequences so as to be better prepared for the whole process. To increase the patient's quality of life and reduce unnecessary suffering, amputation may be presented earlier in the process as a valuable treatment option. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. ADAM12: a genetic modifier of preclinical peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lingdan; Okutsu, Mitsuharu; Farber, Charles R.; Hazarika, Surovi; Jones, W. Schuyler; Craig, Damian; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Lye, R. John; Shah, Svati H.; Annex, Brian H.

    2015-01-01

    In prior studies from multiple groups, outcomes following experimental peripheral arterial disease (PAD) differed considerably across inbred mouse strains. Similarly, in humans with PAD, disease outcomes differ, even when there are similarities in risk factors, disease anatomy, arteriosclerotic burden, and hemodynamic measures. Previously, we identified a locus on mouse chromosome 7, limb salvage-associated quantitative trait locus 1 (LSq-1), which was sufficient to modify outcomes following experimental PAD. We compared expression of genes within LSq-1 in Balb/c mice, which normally show poor outcomes following experimental PAD, with that in C57Bl/6 mice, which normally show favorable outcomes, and found that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase gene 12 (ADAM12) had the most differential expression. Augmentation of ADAM12 expression in vivo improved outcomes following experimental PAD in Balb/c mice, whereas knockdown of ADAM12 made outcomes worse in C57Bl/6 mice. In vitro, ADAM12 expression modulates endothelial cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis in ischemia, and this appeared to be dependent on tyrosine kinase with Ig-like and EGF-like domain 2 (Tie2) activation. ADAM12 is sufficient to modify PAD severity in mice, and this likely occurs through regulation of Tie2. PMID:26163448

  15. ADAM12: a genetic modifier of preclinical peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Dokun, Ayotunde O; Chen, Lingdan; Okutsu, Mitsuharu; Farber, Charles R; Hazarika, Surovi; Jones, W Schuyler; Craig, Damian; Marchuk, Douglas A; Lye, R John; Shah, Svati H; Annex, Brian H

    2015-09-01

    In prior studies from multiple groups, outcomes following experimental peripheral arterial disease (PAD) differed considerably across inbred mouse strains. Similarly, in humans with PAD, disease outcomes differ, even when there are similarities in risk factors, disease anatomy, arteriosclerotic burden, and hemodynamic measures. Previously, we identified a locus on mouse chromosome 7, limb salvage-associated quantitative trait locus 1 (LSq-1), which was sufficient to modify outcomes following experimental PAD. We compared expression of genes within LSq-1 in Balb/c mice, which normally show poor outcomes following experimental PAD, with that in C57Bl/6 mice, which normally show favorable outcomes, and found that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase gene 12 (ADAM12) had the most differential expression. Augmentation of ADAM12 expression in vivo improved outcomes following experimental PAD in Balb/c mice, whereas knockdown of ADAM12 made outcomes worse in C57Bl/6 mice. In vitro, ADAM12 expression modulates endothelial cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis in ischemia, and this appeared to be dependent on tyrosine kinase with Ig-like and EGF-like domain 2 (Tie2) activation. ADAM12 is sufficient to modify PAD severity in mice, and this likely occurs through regulation of Tie2.

  16. Transcatheter Arterial Infusion of Autologous CD133+ Cells for Diabetic Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Lian, Weishuai; Lou, Wensheng; Han, Shilong; Lu, Chenhui; Zuo, Keqiang; Su, Haobo; Xu, Jichong; Cao, Chuanwu; Tang, Tao; Jia, Zhongzhi; Jin, Tao; Uzan, Georges; Gu, Jianping; Li, Maoquan

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular lesion in diabetic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) still cannot be resolved by current surgical and interventional technique. Endothelial cells have the therapeutic potential to cure microvascular lesion. To evaluate the efficacy and immune-regulatory impact of intra-arterial infusion of autologous CD133+ cells, we recruited 53 patients with diabetic PAD (27 of CD133+ group and 26 of control group). CD133+ cells enriched from patients' PB-MNCs were reinfused intra-arterially. The ulcer healing followed up till 18 months was 100% (3/3) in CD133+ group and 60% (3/5) in control group. The amputation rate was 0 (0/27) in CD133+ group and 11.54% (3/26) in control group. Compared with the control group, TcPO2 and ABI showed obvious improvement at 18 months and significant increasing VEGF and decreasing IL-6 level in the CD133+ group within 4 weeks. A reducing trend of proangiogenesis and anti-inflammatory regulation function at 4 weeks after the cells infusion was also found. These results indicated that autologous CD133+ cell treatment can effectively improve the perfusion of morbid limb and exert proangiogenesis and anti-inflammatory immune-regulatory impacts by paracrine on tissue microenvironment. The CD133+ progenitor cell therapy may be repeated at a fixed interval according to cell life span and immune-regulatory function. PMID:26981134

  17. Imaging of vascular dynamics within the foot using dynamic diffuse optical tomography to diagnose peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Hoi, J. W.; Kim, I.; Dayal, R.; Shrikande, G.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is the narrowing of the functional area of the artery generally due to atherosclerosis. It affects between 8-12 million people in the United States and if untreated this can lead to ulceration, gangrene and ultimately amputation. The current diagnostic method for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ABI is a ratio of the patient's systolic blood pressure in the foot to that of the brachial artery in the arm, a ratio below 0.9 is indicative of affected vasculature. However, this method is ineffective in patients with calcified arteries (diabetic and end-stage renal failure patients), which falsely elevates the ABI recording resulting in a false negative reading. In this paper we present our results in a pilot study to deduce optical tomography's ability to detect poor blood perfusion in the foot. We performed an IRB approved 30 patient study, where we imaged the feet of the enrolled patients during a five stage dynamic imaging sequence. The patients were split up into three groups: 10 healthy subjects, 10 PAD patients and 10 PAD patients with diabetes and they were imaged while applying a pressure cuff to their thigh. Differences in the magnitude of blood pooling in the foot and rate at which the blood pools in the foot are all indicative of arterial disease.

  18. Peripheral blood stem cell mobilization failure.

    PubMed

    Kurnaz, Fatih; Kaynar, Leylagül

    2015-08-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an important and often life saving treatment for many hematological malignancies and selected solid tumors. To rescue hematopoiesis after high-dose chemotherapy in autologous HSCT depends on maintaining sufficient stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells expressing CD34 in the BM are mobilized into the circulation with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor ± chemotherapy prior to autologous HSCT. One of the most important factors for success of autologous HSCT is hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) count. Minimum threshold for the engraftment of hematopoietic cells is accepted as 2 × 10(6) CD34 + cells/kg especially for platelet engraftment. Below this level it is defined as stem cell mobilization failure. There are several factors affecting stem cell mobilization: prior chemotherapy (such as fludarabine, melphalan, lenalidomide) and radiotherapy, age, type of disease, bone marrow cellularity. We tried to summarize the reasons of peripheral stem cell mobilization failure.

  19. Does kidney transplantation to iliac artery deteriorate ischemia in the ipsilateral lower extremity with peripheral arterial disease?

    PubMed

    Northcutt, Ashley; Zibari, Gazi; Tan, Tze-Woei; Coulter, Amy H; Zhang, Wayne W

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the progression of lower extremity ischemia following kidney transplantation to iliac artery in patients with peripheral arterial disease. A retrospective chart review of all renal transplant patients completed at a university teaching medical center from January 2006 to December of 2011 was performed. A total of 219 patients underwent successful kidney transplantation to the common, external, or internal iliac artery. Pre- and post-transplantation ischemic changes in the ipsilateral lower extremity were reviewed and analyzed. Thirty-eight of the 219 patients had ipsilateral peripheral arterial disease and seven of them were symptomatic. Six of the seven symptomatic patients remained stable and one patient's rest pain improved, postoperatively. Eight patients developed new symptoms of ischemia 12 months later, including four with claudication, two with ischemic ulcers, and two with gangrene toes. The ulcers were healed following superficial femoral artery stenting and wound care. Toe amputation was performed in two patients with gangrene. No major amputation was required up to 48 months of follow-up. Transplanted kidney to iliac artery does not significantly deteriorate ischemia in adults with ipsilateral lower extremity peripheral arterial disease. Late developed ischemic complications may be due to the progression of underlying arterial disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Advances in Percutaneous Therapies for Peripheral Artery Disease: Drug-Coated Balloons.

    PubMed

    Al-Bawardy, Rasha F; Waldo, Stephen W; Rosenfield, Kenneth

    2017-08-24

    This review paper provides a summary on the use of drug-coated balloons in peripheral artery disease. It covers the main drug-coated balloon (DCB) trials. It is divided into categories of lesions: superficial femoral artery and popliteal lesions, infra-popliteal lesions and in-stent restenosis. It also includes an overview of the future of DCBs, highlighting the main ongoing trials. The latest research on DCB focuses on newer types of DCBs, mainly paclitaxel-coated but with lower doses. Another area of latest DCB research is its use in superficial femoral artery and popliteal artery in-stent restenosis, with superior outcomes. Drug-coated balloons produce better outcomes than percutaneous transluminal angioplasty alone in de novo and in-stent restenosis lesions of superficial femoral artery and popliteal arteries. More data are needed to demonstrate efficacy and safety of DCBs in infrapopliteal disease. Newer DCBs and adjunctive therapy may provide improved outcomes for peripheral artery disease interventions.

  1. Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in patients with diabetes mellitus in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, E M

    2007-06-01

    The aims of the study were to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in diabetic patients and in different ethnic groups at a primary care setting, and to evaluate risk factors associated with PAD in these diabetic patients. A cross sectional study of 200 diabetic patients over 18 years old who attended a primary care clinic at a teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia was carried out. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using structured questionnaires for demographic characteristics and risk factors evaluation. Blood pressure measurements, assessment of peripheral neuropathy and ankle brachial pressures were performed. PAD was diagnosed by an ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) of <0.9 on either leg. The overall prevalence of PAD was 16% in this diabetic population. The prevalence of PAD was 5.8% in Malays, 19.4% in Chinese and 19.8% in Indians. The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy was 41%, foot ulcer 9.5%, and gangrene 3.0%. The presence of foot ulcer was weakly associated with PAD (P=0.052). No significant relationships were found between age, gender, smoking status, duration of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, and PAD. PAD is common in the diabetic population of this study.

  2. Gene Expression Signature in Peripheral Blood Detects Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Dov; Balasubramanian, Sriram; Iakoubova, Olga; Tranquilli, Maryann; Albornoz, Gonzalo; Blake, Julie; Mehmet, Necip N.; Ngadimo, Dewi; Poulter, Karen; Chan, Frances; Samaha, Raymond R.; Elefteriades, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is usually asymptomatic and associated with high mortality. Adverse clinical outcome of TAA is preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. We hypothesized that gene expression patterns in peripheral blood cells may correlate with TAA disease status. Our goal was to identify a distinct gene expression signature in peripheral blood that may identify individuals at risk for TAA. Methods and Findings Whole genome gene expression profiles from 94 peripheral blood samples (collected from 58 individuals with TAA and 36 controls) were analyzed. Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM) identified potential signature genes characterizing TAA vs. normal, ascending vs. descending TAA, and sporadic vs. familial TAA. Using a training set containing 36 TAA patients and 25 controls, a 41-gene classification model was constructed for detecting TAA status and an overall accuracy of 78±6% was achieved. Testing this classifier on an independent validation set containing 22 TAA samples and 11 controls yielded an overall classification accuracy of 78%. These 41 classifier genes were further validated by TaqMan® real-time PCR assays. Classification based on the TaqMan® data replicated the microarray results and achieved 80% classification accuracy on the testing set. Conclusions This study identified informative gene expression signatures in peripheral blood cells that can characterize TAA status and subtypes of TAA. Moreover, a 41-gene classifier based on expression signature can identify TAA patients with high accuracy. The transcriptional programs in peripheral blood leading to the identification of these markers also provide insights into the mechanism of development of aortic aneurysms and highlight potential targets for therapeutic intervention. The classifier genes identified in this study, and validated by TaqMan® real-time PCR, define a set of promising potential diagnostic markers

  3. Flow-mediated dilation benefits of mesoglycan in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Gossetti, B; Antignani, P L; Jabbour, J; Martinelli, O

    2015-08-01

    Mesoglycan, composed of natural glycosaminoglycans, is used for treatment in arterial and venous disease for its benefits on endothelial glicocalix. Little is known about mesoglycan impact on endothelial blood flow regulation. We sought to evaluate the effects of mesoglycan intermittently added to back-ground treatments on impairment of endothelial function in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) patients. We studied the effects of a 2+2 months oral treatment with 50 mg b.i.d. of mesoglycan, intervalled by 2 months without mesoglycan, in 540 PAD patients on four occasions (visit 1: baseline, visit 2: 2 months, visit 3: 4 months and visit 4: 6 months). At these time visits we assessed brachial artery endothelial-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD), together with femoral intima-medial thickness (IMT), and walking distance (WD). There were significant changes in FMD (1.88%, CI 95%: 1.13, 2.63; P<0.001), IMT (-0.05 mm, CI 95%: -0.07,-0.02; P<0.001) and WD (38,9%, CI 95% 33.2, 44.8; P<0.001). The positive effects and benefit were maintained during the two-months interval without mesoglycan treatment. Significant changes in FMD were observed in a number of patient groups, stratified for risk factors (aging, sex, smoke, diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension). Two months cycles with mesoglycan improved endothelial function in PAD patients, with a parallel reduction of atherosclerotic damage and amelioration of clinical condition.

  4. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a ...

  5. Assessment of Normal Variability in Peripheral Blood Gene Expression

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, Catherine; Vernon, Suzanne D.; Karem, Kevin L.; ...

    2002-01-01

    Peripheral blood is representative of many systemic processes and is an ideal sample for expression profiling of diseases that have no known or accessible lesion. Peripheral blood is a complex mixture of cell types and some differences in peripheral blood gene expression may reflect the timing of sample collection rather than an underlying disease process. For this reason, it is important to assess study design factors that may cause variability in gene expression not related to what is being analyzed. Variation in the gene expression of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from three healthy volunteers sampled three times onemore » day each week for one month was examined for 1,176 genes printed on filter arrays. Less than 1% of the genes showed any variation in expression that was related to the time of collection, and none of the changes were noted in more than one individual. These results suggest that observed variation was due to experimental variability.« less

  6. A high-quality annotated transcriptome of swine peripheral blood

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: High throughput gene expression profiling assays of peripheral blood are widely used in biomedicine, as well as in animal genetics and physiology research. Accurate, comprehensive, and precise interpretation of such high throughput assays relies on well-characterized reference genomes an...

  7. Whole-body MR angiography in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Yousef Jesper Wirenfeldt

    2010-12-01

    Ph.D. project performed at Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev in the period 2007-2010. To investigate whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) as diagnostic method in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Due to the systemic nature of atherosclerosis patients with PAD often have concomitant arterial stenoses outside the peripheral arteries. In this respect, it seems desirable to perform whole-body angiography. Currently, WB-MRA is the only imaging modality allowing assessment of the total arterial system (excluding the coronary arteries) in one examination without limiting factors like invasiveness or ionizing radiation. Four studies were performed (I-IV). Study I investigated the feasibility of performing WB-MRA in a 3T MRI system using body coil acquisition and a blood-pool contrast agent. Study II investigated the impact of a hybrid scan technique on the performance of 3T WB-MRA using body coil acquisition and an extracellular contrast agent. The aim of study III was to investigate if addition of infra-genicular steady-state MRA (SS-MRA) to first-pass imaging alone improves diagnostic performance in 3T WB-MRA. The last study (IV) was a questionnaire-based investigation of patient acceptance of WB-MRA compared to digital subtraction angiography (DSA). In all studies the inclusion criterium was referral to DSA due to PAD. Exclusion criteria were overweight exceeding the MRI system's limitations, inability to lie still due to rest pain, allergy to gadolinium-based contrast media, chronic renal insufficiency with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 30 ml/min/1.73 m², dialysis, inability to obtain informed consent, and contraindications for MRI (pacemaker, claustrophobia etc.). In total, 57 patients were investigated in the technical oriented studies (I: n = 11, II: n = 26, and III: n = 20). Seventy-nine patients were included in study IV. DSA served as method of reference for calculation of WB-MRA sensitivity and specificity for

  8. Peripheral arterial chemoreceptors and sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gauda, Estelle B; Cristofalo, Elizabeth; Nunez, Jeanne

    2007-07-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the major cause of death in infants between 1 month and 1 year of age. Two particular concerns are that (1) premature or low birth weight (<2500-g) infants have a 2- to 40-fold greater risk of dying of SIDS (depending on the sleep position) than infants born at term and of normal birth weight, and that (2) the proportion of premature infants dying of SIDS has increased from 12 to 34% between 1988 and 2003. Hypo- and hypersensitivity of peripheral arterial chemoreceptors (PACs) may be one biological mechanism that could help to explain the epidemiological association between the increased incidence of SIDS in formerly premature infants. Because premature infants are often exposed to the extremes of oxygen stress during early postnatal development, they are more likely to have a maladaptive response of PACs later in their lives. As the first line of defense that mediates an increase in ventilation to a hypoxic challenge during wakefulness and sleep, PACs also mediate arousal responses during sleep in response to an asphyxial event that is often associated with upper airway obstruction. In most mammalian species, PACs are not fully developed at birth and thus are vulnerable to plasticity-induced changes mediated by environmental exposures such as the extremes of oxygen tension. Hypoxic or hyperoxic exposure during early postnatal development can lead to hyposensitive or hypersensitive PAC responses later in life. Although baseline chemoreceptor activity may not be the cause of an initial hypoxic or asphyxial event, the level of peripheral chemoreceptor drive does modulate the (1) time to arousal, (2) resumption of airflow during airway obstruction, (3) escape behaviors during rebreathing, and (4) cardiorespiratory responses that result from activation of the laryngeal chemoreflex. The laryngeal chemoreflex can be stimulated by reflux of gastric contents above the upper esophageal sphincter, or an increase in nasopharyngeal

  9. Blood pressure, heart rate and arterial blood gas reactions to acute hypoxia in carotid body denervated spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Huckstorf, C; Behm, R; Habeck, J O; Rückborn, K; Franz, U

    1987-01-01

    The role of the peripheral arterial chemoreceptors in the reflex control of respiration and the cardiovascular systems was studied in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In carotid body denervated and in sham-operated control rats mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate and arterial blood gases were measured under normoxic conditions and in acute normobaric hypoxia. Under normoxia the carotid body denervated SHR differ from the sham-operated ones only in significantly lowered arterial pO2 and pH and in significantly increased pCO2 values. The carotid body denervated SHR react to acute hypoxia with a significantly smaller increase in respiratory rate, a more pronounced fall in the arterial pO2 and a greater decrease in mean arterial blood pressure than the sham-operated control rats. Our results suggest that carotid body chemoreceptors in SHR are of great importance in regulating respiration but of secondary consequence regarding the reflex control of the cardiovascular system.

  10. Monitoring of peripheral vascular condition using a log-linearized arterial viscoelastic index during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Hiroki; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Hirano, Harutoyo; Kurita, Yuichi; Ukawa, Teiji; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Yoshizumi, Masao; Kawamoto, Masashi; Tsuji, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel technique to support the monitoring of peripheral vascular conditions using biological signals such as electrocardiograms, arterial pressure values and pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveforms. In this approach, a second-order log-linearized model (referred to here as a log-linearized peripheral arterial viscoelastic model) is used to describe the non-linear viscoelastic relationship between blood pressure waveforms and photo-plethysmographic waveforms. The proposed index enables estimation of peripheral arterial wall stiffness changes induced by sympathetic nerve activity. The validity of the method is discussed here based on the results of peripheral vascular condition monitoring conducted during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). The results of ETS monitoring showed significant changes in stiffness variations between the periods before and during the procedures observed (p < 0.01) as well as during and after them (p < 0.01), so that it was confirmed that sympathetic nerve activity is drastically decreased in the area around the monitoring site after the thoracic sympathetic nerve trunk on the monitoring side is successfully blocked. In addition, no change was observed in the values of the proposed index during the ETS procedure on the side opposite that of the monitoring site. The experimental results obtained clearly show the proposed method can be used to assess changes in sympathetic nerve activity during ETS.

  11. Histology and ultrastructure of arteries, veins, and peripheral nerves during limb lengthening.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, E; Peretti, G; Bellocci, M; Farsetti, P; Tudisco, C; Caterini, R; De Martino, C

    1994-11-01

    The effects of lengthening of the metacarpal bone on peripheral nerves and blood vessels were studied in 8 calves. Specimens for light and electron microscopy were obtained from the palmar neurovascular bundle at 1 cm (8% of the initial length), 2.5 cm (20% of the initial length), and 4 cm (33% of the initial length) of metacarpal lengthening. In 2 calves, specimens were studied 2 months after the end of the lengthening procedure. At 8% of lengthening, myelinated fibers of the palmar nerve showed moderate degenerative changes in the myelin sheath. This became severe at 20% and 33% of lengthening, and affected the axoplasm as well. At 20% of lengthening, the palmar vein started to show fibrous metaplasia of the smooth muscle tissue of the tunica media. This became much thinner than normal. The palmar artery showed moderate alterations of the inner part of the tunica media and the intima. The palmar nerve and blood vessels recovered their normal structure almost completely 2 months after the end of the lengthening procedure. The morphologic alterations of peripheral nerves and vessels may constitute the pathophysiologic basis of the nervous and circulatory disturbance observed in clinical practice.

  12. The Role of Coagulation and Inflammation After Angioplasty in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlgren, C.M. Sten-Linder, M.; Egberg, N.; Kalin, B.; Blohme, L.; Swedenborg, J.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. Restenosis remains a frequent complication after angioplasty in peripheral arterial disease. Inflammation plays a critical role in the vascular response to injury. Effective medical treatment to improve patency after angioplasty is still elusive. The aims of this prospective clinical study were to investigate changes in blood coagulation and inflammatory markers after angioplasty and their significance for restenosis. Methods. Thirty-four patients with peripheral arterial disease underwent angioplasty of the iliac and superficial femoral arteries. Ten patients undergoing diagnostic angiography were included in the study as controls. Plasma levels of tissue factor, prothrombin fragment 1 + 2, D-dimer, P-selectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen were analyzed before and after angioplasty. Patients were followed up with angiography after 6 months to assess restenosis. Results. CRP was elevated the day after angioplasty (6.6 mg/l, p = 0.0001) and tended to peak after 1 week (11 mg/l, p = 0.09). There was a significant increase of D-dimer and P-selectin 1-4 hr after angioplasty (0.4 mg/l, p = 0.001 and 68 ng/ml, p = 0.05, respectively). None of the biochemical markers was a statistically significant predictor of restenosis. Conclusion. We have observed a much more prolonged inflammatory response than previously noted, but only minor changes in coagulation activity after angioplasty. The biochemical markers, before and after angioplasty, were not related to restenosis. Further studies are needed to delineate the molecular mechanisms behind these observations and their involvement in thrombosis and restenosis. If these pathways are further defined, improved treatment strategies, including antithrombotic treatments and statins, could be tailored to modulate postprocedural inflammation.

  13. Exercise Training Reduces Peripheral Arterial Stiffness and Myocardial Oxygen Demand in Young Prehypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Large artery stiffness is a major risk factor for the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Persistent prehypertension accelerates the progression of arterial stiffness. METHODS Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure (SBP) = 120–139mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) = 80–89mm Hg) men and women and 15 normotensive time-matched control subjects (NMTCs; n = 15) aged 18–35 years of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). Treatment groups performed exercise training 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and central and peripheral blood pressures were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. RESULTS PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP by 9.6±3.6mm Hg and 11.9±3.4mm Hg, respectively, and DBP by 8.0±5.1mm Hg and 7.2±3.4mm Hg, respectively (P < 0.05). PHRT and PHET decreased augmentation index (AIx) by 7.5% ± 2.8% and 8.1% ± 3.2% (P < 0.05), AIx@75 by 8.0% ± 3.2% and 9.2% ± 3.8% (P < 0.05), and left ventricular wasted pressure energy, an index of extra left ventricular myocardial oxygen requirement due to early systolic wave reflection, by 573±161 dynes s/cm2 and 612±167 dynes s/cm2 (P < 0.05), respectively. PHRT and PHET reduced carotid–radial PWV by 1.02±0.32 m/sec and 0.92±0.36 m/sec (P < 0.05) and femoral–distal PWV by 1.04±0.31 m/sec and 1.34±0.33 m/sec (P < 0.05), respectively. No significant changes were observed in the time-control groups. CONCLUSIONS This study suggests that both resistance and endurance exercise alone effectively reduce peripheral arterial stiffness, central blood pressures, augmentation index, and myocardial oxygen demand in young prehypertensive subjects. PMID:23736111

  14. Imaging Angiogenesis Using 99mTc-Macroaggregated Albumin Scintigraphy in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Gen; Miyamoto, Masaaki; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Yasutake, Masahiro; Tara, Shuhei; Takagi, Ikuyo; Seki, Naoki; Kumita, Shinichiro; Shimizu, Wataru

    2016-02-01

    One problem of vascular angiogenesis therapy is the lack of reliable methods for evaluating blood flow in the microcirculation. We aimed to assess whether (99m)Tc-macroaggregated albumin perfusion scintigraphy ((99m)Tc-MAA) predicts quantitated blood flow after therapeutic angiogenesis in patients with peripheral artery disease. Forty-six patients with peripheral artery disease were treated with bone marrow mononuclear cell implantation (BMCI). Before and 4 wk after BMCI, blood flow was evaluated via transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2), ankle-brachial index, intravenous (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin perfusion scintigraphy ((99m)Tc-TF), and intraaortic (99m)Tc-MAA. Four weeks after BMCI, TcPO2 improved significantly (20.4 ± 14.4 to 36.0 ± 20.0 mm Hg, P < 0.01), but ankle-brachial index did not (0.65 ± 0.30 to 0.76 ± 0.24, P = 0.07). Improvement in (99m)Tc-TF count (0.60 ± 0.23 to 0.77 ± 0.29 count ratio/pixel, P < 0.01) and (99m)Tc-MAA count (5.21 ± 3.56 to 10.33 ± 7.18 count ratio/pixel, P = 0.02) was observed in the foot region but not the lower limb region, using both methods. When these data were normalized by subtracting the pixel count of the untreated side, the improvements in (99m)Tc-TF count (-0.04 ± 0.26 to 0.08 ± 0.32 count ratio/pixel, P = 0.04) and (99m)Tc-MAA count (1.49 ± 3.64 to 5.59 ± 4.84 count ratio/pixel, P = 0.03) in the foot remained significant. (99m)Tc-MAA indicated that the newly developed arteries were approximately 25 μm in diameter. BMCI induced angiogenesis in the foot, which was detected using (99m)Tc-TF and (99m)Tc-MAA. (99m)Tc-MAA is a useful method to quantitate blood flow, estimate vascular size, and evaluate flow distribution after therapeutic angiogenesis. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  15. Exercise training reduces peripheral arterial stiffness and myocardial oxygen demand in young prehypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Beck, Darren T; Martin, Jeffrey S; Casey, Darren P; Braith, Randy W

    2013-09-01

    Large artery stiffness is a major risk factor for the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Persistent prehypertension accelerates the progression of arterial stiffness. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure (SBP) = 120-139 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) = 80-89 mm Hg) men and women and 15 normotensive time-matched control subjects (NMTCs; n = 15) aged 18-35 years of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). Treatment groups performed exercise training 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity (PWV), and central and peripheral blood pressures were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP by 9.6±3.6mm Hg and 11.9±3.4mm Hg, respectively, and DBP by 8.0±5.1mm Hg and 7.2±3.4mm Hg, respectively (P < 0.05). PHRT and PHET decreased augmentation index (AIx) by 7.5% ± 2.8% and 8.1% ± 3.2% (P < 0.05), AIx@75 by 8.0% ± 3.2% and 9.2% ± 3.8% (P < 0.05), and left ventricular wasted pressure energy, an index of extra left ventricular myocardial oxygen requirement due to early systolic wave reflection, by 573±161 dynes s/cm(2) and 612±167 dynes s/cm(2) (P < 0.05), respectively. PHRT and PHET reduced carotid-radial PWV by 1.02±0.32 m/sec and 0.92±0.36 m/sec (P < 0.05) and femoral-distal PWV by 1.04±0.31 m/sec and 1.34±0.33 m/sec (P < 0.05), respectively. No significant changes were observed in the time-control groups. This study suggests that both resistance and endurance exercise alone effectively reduce peripheral arterial stiffness, central blood pressures, augmentation index, and myocardial oxygen demand in young prehypertensive subjects.

  16. Study on mental stress using near-infrared spectroscopy, electroencephalography, and peripheral arterial tonometry.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yoshikazu; Ogata, Hajime; Takano, Hidenori; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Mukai, Toshiharu; Yagi, Tohru

    2008-01-01

    In this research, we used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as an alternative technique for mental state analysis, and compared its performance with other conventional techniques such as electroencephalography (EEG) and peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) during stress and healing tasks. We measured biological signals simultaneously in our experiments using these techniques for comparison. NIRS results showed that the level of total hemoglobin in the frontal cortex increased during a stress task and decreased during a healing task for all subjects whose blood volume change was properly recorded. EEG, however, showed inconsistent results due to task variation. Only PAT gave consistent results in many of the subjects. Taken together, the results suggest that NIRS might be suitable for mental state evaluation, with PAT as an alternative.

  17. Community walking programs for treatment of peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ryan J.; Rogers, R. Kevin; Hiatt, William R.; Regensteiner, Judith G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Supervised walking programs offered at medical facilities for patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and intermittent claudication (IC), while effective, are often not utilized due to barriers including lack of reimbursement and the need to travel to specialized locations for the training intervention. Walking programs for PAD patients that occur in community settings, such as those outside of supervised settings, may be a viable treatment option, as they are convenient and potentially bypass the need for supervised walking. This review evaluated the various methodologies and outcomes of community walking programs for PAD. Methods A literature review using appropriate search terms was conducted within PubMed/Medline and the Cochrane databases to identify studies in the English language employing community walking programs to treat PAD patients with IC. Search results were reviewed, and relevant articles were identified that form the basis of this review. The primary outcome was peak walking performance on the treadmill. Results Randomized controlled trials (n=10) examining peak walking outcomes in 558 PAD patients demonstrated that supervised exercise programs were more effective than community walking studies that consisted of general recommendations for patients with IC to walk at home. Recent community trials that incorporated more advice and feedback for PAD patients in general resulted in similar outcomes with no differences in peak walking time compared to supervised walking exercise groups. Conclusions Unstructured recommendations for patients with symptomatic PAD to exercise in the community are not efficacious. Community walking programs with more feedback and monitoring offer improvements in walking performance for patients with claudication and may bypass some obstacles associated with facility-based exercise programs. PMID:24103409

  18. Socioeconomic inequality and peripheral artery disease prevalence in US adults.

    PubMed

    Pande, Reena L; Creager, Mark A

    2014-07-01

    Lower socioeconomic status is associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine whether there is a higher prevalence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in individuals with lower socioeconomic status. We analyzed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999 to 2004. PAD was defined based on an ankle.brachial index .0.90. Measures of socioeconomic status included poverty.income ratio,a ratio of self-reported income relative to the poverty line, and attained education level. Of 6791 eligible participants,overall weighted prevalence of PAD was 5.8% (SE, 0.3). PAD prevalence was significantly higher in individuals with low income and lower education. Individuals in the lowest of the 6 poverty.income ratio categories had more than a2-fold increased odds of PAD compared with those in the highest poverty-income ratio category (odds ratio, 2.69; 95%confidence interval, 1.80.4.03; P<0.0001). This association remained significant even after multivariable adjustment(odds ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.04.2.6; P=0.034). Lower attained education level also associated with higher PAD prevalence (odds ratio, 2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.96.4.0; P<0.0001) but was no longer significant after multivariable adjustment. Low income and lower attained education level are associated with PAD in US adults. These data suggest that individuals of lower socioeconomic status remain at high risk and highlight the need for education and advocacy efforts focused on these at-risk populations.

  19. Assessment of gene expression profiles in peripheral occlusive arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Bubenek, Serban; Nastase, Anca; Niculescu, Ana Maria; Baila, Sorin; Herlea, Vlad; Lazar, Vadimir; Paslaru, Liliana; Botezatu, Anca; Tomescu, Dana; Popescu, Irinel; Dima, Simona

    2012-01-01

    Molecular events responsible for the onset and progression of peripheral occlusive arterial disease (POAD) are incompletely understood. Gene expression profiling may point out relevant features of the disease. Tissue samples were collected as operatory waste from a total of 36 patients with (n = 18) and without (n = 18) POAD. The tissues were histologically evaluated, and the patients with POAD were classified according to Leriche-Fontaine (LF) classification: 11% with stage IIB, 22% with stage III, and 67% with stage IV. Total RNA was isolated from all samples and hybridized onto Agilent 4×44K Oligo microarray slides. The bioinformatic analysis identified genes differentially expressed between control and pathologic tissues. Ten genes with a fold change ≥ 2 (1 with a fold change ≥ 1.8) were selected for quantitative polymerase chain reaction validation (GPC3, CFD, GDF10, ITLN1, TSPAN8, MMP28, NNMT, SERPINA5, LUM, and FDXR). C-reactive protein (CRP) was assessed with a specific assay, while nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) was evaluated in the patient serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A multiple regression analysis showed that the level of CRP in the serum is correlated with the POAD LF stages (r(2) = 0.22, P = 0.046) and that serum NNMT is higher in IV LF POAD patients (P = 0.005). The mRNA gene expression of LUM is correlated with the LF stage (r(2) = 0.45, P = 0.009), and the mRNA level of ITLN1 is correlated with the ankle-brachial index (r(2) = 0.42, P = 0.008). Our analysis shows that NNMT, ITLN1, LUM, CFD, and TSPAN8 in combination with other known markers, such as CRP, could be evaluated as a panel of biomarkers of POAD. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Leptospirosis and Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease: A Nationwide Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lee, Feng-You; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-03-01

    Data on the association between peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and leptospirosis are limited. We conducted a retrospective cohort study for determining whether leptospirosis is one of the possible risk factors for PAOD. Patients diagnosed with leptospirosis by using 2000 to 2010 data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with leptospirosis without a history of PAOD were selected. For each leptospirosis patient, 4 controls without a history of leptospirosis and PAOD were randomly selected and frequency-matched for sex, age, the year of the index date, and comorbidity diseases. The follow-up period was from the time of the initial diagnosis of leptospirosis to the diagnosis date of PAOD, or December 31, 2011. The Cox proportional hazard regression models were used for analyzing the risk of PAOD. During the follow-up period, the cumulative incidence of PAOD was higher among the patients from the leptospirosis cohort than among the nonleptospirosis cohort (log-rank test, P < 0.001). In total, 29 patients with PAOD from the leptospirosis cohort and 81 from the nonleptospirosis cohort were observed with the incidence rates of 2.1 and 1.3 per 1000 person-years, respectively, yielding a crude hazards ratio (HR) of 1.62 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.44-1.81) and adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.75 (95% CI = 1.58-1.95).The risk of PAOD was 1.75-fold higher in the patients with leptospirosis than in the general population.

  1. Peripheral arterial disease diagnosed with high-count-rate radionuclide arteriography

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, M.; Ijima, H.; Kohda, Y.; Kuramoto, K.; Kikuchi, Y.; Wada, M.; Akisada, M.

    1984-07-01

    Thirty-seven patients with peripheral vascular disease involving the legs were studied with first-pass peripheral radio-nuclide arteriography (RNA) and contrast arteriography to determine whether RNA could be used to evaluate perfusion of the toes. Peripheral time-activity curves were examined and the time required for activity to decline to 75% of peak activity (T75) was recorded. These data suggest that peripheral RNA of the toes is a reliable, noninvasive procedure for evaluation of peripheral arterial disease; it can be valuable as a screening test prior to contrast arteriography as well as for follow-up.

  2. Total knee arthroplasty after ipsilateral peripheral arterial bypass graft: acute arterial occlusion is a risk with or without tourniquet use.

    PubMed

    Turner, N S; Pagnano, M W; Sim, F H

    2001-04-01

    A retrospective review was done of the total joint registry at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, which contains the computerized records of 19,808 consecutive total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) including primary and revision that were performed from 1970 to 1997. From that database, 9 patients were found to have had a TKA after an ipsilateral peripheral arterial reconstruction. One patient had had bilateral peripheral arterial reconstruction followed by bilateral TKA, and 10 TKAs were reviewed. The medical records were reviewed retrospectively with particular attention given to the type of peripheral bypass surgery performed, the bypass graft source, the timing of the bypass surgery relative to TKA, the use of a tourniquet at the time of TKA, and the occurrence of complications after TKA. Of the 10 TKAs, 2 patients had acute arterial occlusion. One patient had a tourniquet, and the other patient did not. There was not a statistical correlation between graft type, tourniquet use, timing of surgery, postoperative anticoagulation, and occurrence of arterial occlusion. There is a marked risk of acute thrombosis of an ipsilateral arterial bypass graft after TKA that cannot be eliminated by performing the TKA without a tourniquet. Careful monitoring of the vascular status of the limb is required in the early postoperative period to detect arterial compromise. Should limb ischemia be suspected, an emergent vascular surgery consultation is required, and arterial flow to the lower extremity must be re-established.

  3. [Microangiopathy in preeclampsia: the usefulness of the peripheral blood smear].

    PubMed

    Duarte-Mote, Jesús; Espinosa-López, Rogelio F; Romero-Figueroa, Socorro; Lee Eng-Castro, Víctor E; Verduzco-Pineda, Julio; Calvo-Colindres, Jesús; Sánchez-Rojas, Graciela

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a fundamental characteristic in the physiopathology of preeclampsia. Currently, a series of markers which explain endothelial dysfunction have been identified. The recognition of endothelial dysfunction has been used to realize an early diagnosis of preeclampsia, as soon as the classification of a possible prognosis. Nevertheless the detection of these markers is not accessible to the majority of hospitable centers that treat patients with preeclampsia. One indirect marker of endothelial dysfunction with a greater accessibility is the assessment of peripheral blood smear. Several studies had proved the presence of endothelial dysfunction by identification of red blood cells crenated in peripheral blood smear led us also to measure the impact in the evolution of the disease.

  4. Use of peripheral blood transcriptome biomarkers for epilepsy prediction

    PubMed Central

    Karsten, Stanislav L.; Kudo, Lili; Bragin, Anatol J.

    2011-01-01

    There are currently no predictive methods to identify patients who suffered an initial brain injury and are at high risk of developing chronic epilepsy. Consequently, treatments aimed at epilepsy prevention that would target the underlying epileptogenic process are neither available nor being developed. After a brain injury or any other initial precipitating event (IPE) to the development of epilepsy, pathological changes may occur in forms of inflammation, damage in the blood brain barrier, neuron loss, gliosis, axon sprouting, etc., in multiple brain areas. Recent studies provide connections between various kinds of brain pathology and alterations in the peripheral blood transcriptome. In this review we discuss the possibility of using peripheral blood transcriptome biomarkers for the detection of epileptogenesis and consequently, subjects at high risk of developing epilepsy. PMID:21419828

  5. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis: an unusual case and discussion of genetic associations.

    PubMed

    Ngo, My-Linh D; Aggarwal, Avichal; Knudson, Jarrod D

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is a common congenital heart lesion associated with several genetic syndromes. We have reviewed the genetics of the lesion and present an unusual case of peripheral pulmonary stenosis involving a newly reported genetic deletion on chromosome 16. Further studies will be needed to confirm association of this genotype and phenotype.

  6. A pilot exercise intervention to improve lower extremity functioning in peripheral arterial disease unaccompanied by intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mary M; Tiukinhoy, Susan; Greenland, Philip; Liu, Kiang; Pearce, William H; Guralnik, Jack M; Unterreiner, Shay; Gluckman, Ty J; Criqui, Michael H; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2004-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to test the feasibility of supervised treadmill exercise training to improve functioning in study participants with peripheral arterial disease who did not have classical symptoms of intermittent claudication. For this study, 32 men and women with peripheral arterial disease but no symptoms of claudication were randomized to exercise training or usual care. The intervention was a 12-week supervised treadmill walking program. Outcomes included 6-minute walk distance, maximum treadmill walking distance, and 4-meter walking velocity. Participant-reported community walking ability was measured with the Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ). Inflammatory blood factor levels also were measured. Altogether, 25 participants who completed follow-up testing were included in intention-to-treat analyses. Of 24 participants (58%) randomized to exercise, 14 completed the entire exercise training program. The participants randomized to the intervention showed greater improvement in their WIQ walking speed score than the control subjects (P =.05). The participants randomized to the intervention showed improvements in their 6-minute walk distance (1134 +/- 347 vs 1266 +/- 295 feet; P =.03), maximal treadmill walking distance (389 +/- 248 vs 585 +/- 293 feet; P <.001), WIQ distance score (52.3 +/- 29.1 vs 63.1 +/- 25.1; P =.002), and WIQ speed score (48.7 +/- 26.8 vs 59.7 +/- 22.7; P =.008). The participants randomized to the control condition showed improvements in maximal treadmill walking distance (362 +/- 180 vs 513 +/- 237 feet; P =.014). There were no significant changes in the inflammatory blood factors after exercise. This pilot study demonstrated that a supervised treadmill walking program may be feasible and may improve functioning for individuals with peripheral arterial disease who do not have classical symptoms of intermittent claudication. Further study is needed with a larger sample to identify optimal exercise methods that improve lower

  7. [2011 ESC guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral artery diseases].

    PubMed

    Brogneaux, C; Sprynger, M; Magnée, M; Lancellotti, P

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we present the 2011 guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral artery diseases. The document covers the diagnostic modalities and therapeutic strategies for the atherosclerotic disease of the extra-cranial carotid, mesenteric, renal, upper and lower extremity arteries indicating the class and level of evidence of the recommendations.

  8. Effects of adrenergic and nitrergic blockade on theophylline-induced increase in peripheral blood flow in rat ear.

    PubMed

    Sanae, F; Hayashi, H

    1998-11-01

    A bolus injection of theophylline produced a significant increase in peripheral blood flow in anesthetized rat ear, monitored by laser-Doppler flowmetry, with increases in arterial blood pressure and heart rate. These effects were attenuated by previous treatment with reserpine, but reserpine had no effect on the blood flow increase produced by acetylcholine. A dose of propranolol, which caused attenuation of the theophylline-induced increase in heart rate, did not change the peripheral blood flow. The higher dose of propranolol, which nearly canceled the increases in blood pressure and heart rate, caused attenuation of the blood flow increase but did not cancel it. However, the theophylline-induced flow increase was completely reversed by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, which alone had no effect, without any change in arterial blood pressure and heart rate. Treatment of the rats with the dose of inhibitor slightly and significantly reduced the response of peripheral blood flow to acetylcholine. The other isomer, NG-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester, and the other inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, did not have such an effect. These results suggest that the flow increase is due to an independent effect on the heart with modification by autonomic reflexes and involves the adrenergic and nitrergic pathways.

  9. Induction and identification of rabbit peripheral blood derived dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Yang, FuYuan; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study a method of the induction of dendritic cells (DCs) from rabbit peripheral blood. Methods: Peripheral blood cells were removed from rabbit, filtered through nylon mesh. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood cells by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation (density of 1.077g/cm3).To obtain DCs, PBMC were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, 50U/mL penicillin and streptomycin, referred to subsequently as complete medium, at 37°C in 5% CO2 atmosphere for 4 hours. Nonadherent cells were aspirated, adherent cells were continued incubated in complete medium, supplemented with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 50ng/ml),and interleukin 4 (IL-4, 50ng/ml) for 9 days. Fluorescein labeled antibodies(anti-CD14, anti-HLA-DR, anti-CD86) were used to sign cells cultured for 3,6,9 days respectively, Then flow cytometry was performed. Results: Ratio of anti-HLA-DR and anti-CD86 labeled cells increased with induction time extension, in contrast with anti-CD14. Conclusion: Dendritic cells can be effectively induced by the method of this experiment, cell maturation status increased with induction time extension.

  10. Mouse cloning using a drop of peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Satoshi; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Hirose, Michiko; Oikawa, Mami; Yo, Masahiro; Ohara, Osamu; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Ogura, Atsuo

    2013-08-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a unique technology that produces cloned animals from single cells. It is desirable from a practical viewpoint that donor cells can be collected noninvasively and used readily for nuclear transfer. The present study was undertaken to determine whether peripheral blood cells freshly collected from living mice could be used for SCNT. We collected a drop of peripheral blood (15-45 μl) from the tail of a donor. A nucleated cell (leukocyte) suspension was prepared by lysing the red blood cells. Following SCNT using randomly selected leukocyte nuclei, cloned offspring were born at a 2.8% birth rate. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting revealed that granulocytes/monocytes and lymphocytes could be roughly distinguished by their sizes, the former being significantly larger. We then cloned putative granulocytes/monocytes and lymphocytes separately and obtained 2.1% and 1.7% birth rates, respectively (P > 0.05). Because the use of lymphocyte nuclei inevitably results in the birth of offspring with DNA rearrangements, we applied granulocyte/monocyte cloning to two genetically modified strains and two recombinant inbred strains. Normal-looking offspring were obtained from all four strains tested. The present study clearly indicated that genetic copies of mice could be produced using a drop of peripheral blood from living donors. This strategy will be applied to the rescue of infertile founder animals or a "last-of-line" animal possessing invaluable genetic resources.

  11. Drug-eluting stents in the management of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, Marc; Cagiannos, Catherine; Deloose, Koen; Verbist, Jürgen; Peeters, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Since major meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in interventional cardiology showed the potential of drug-eluting stents in decreasing restenosis and reintervention rates after coronary artery stenting, one of the next steps in the treatment of arterial occlusive disease is the transfer of the active coating technology towards peripheral arterial interventions. In this manuscript, we aim to provide a literature overview on available peripheral (lower limb, renal, and supra-aortic) drug-eluting stent applications, debate the cost implications, and give recommendations for future treatment strategies.

  12. Drug-eluting stents in the management of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Bosiers, Marc; Cagiannos, Catherine; Deloose, Koen; Verbist, Jürgen; Peeters, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Since major meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in interventional cardiology showed the potential of drug-eluting stents in decreasing restenosis and reintervention rates after coronary artery stenting, one of the next steps in the treatment of arterial occlusive disease is the transfer of the active coating technology towards peripheral arterial interventions. In this manuscript, we aim to provide a literature overview on available peripheral (lower limb, renal, and supra-aortic) drug-eluting stent applications, debate the cost implications, and give recommendations for future treatment strategies. PMID:18827906

  13. A study of peripheral blood in hedgehogs in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozparlak, Haluk; Celik, Ilhami; Sur, Emrah; Ozaydin, Tuğba; Arslan, Atilla

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine diameters of blood cells, differential counts of peripheral blood leukocytes, alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE), acid phosphatase (ACP-ase) activity of some leukocyte types, and enzymatic positivity percentages of peripheral blood lymphocytes in two hedgehogs species, Hemiechinus auritus, the long-eared hedgehog, and Erinaceus concolor, the southern white-breasted hedgehog. Air-dried peripheral blood smears were stained with May-Grünwald-Giemsa stain. ANAE and ACP-ase were stained in glutaraldehyde-acetone-fixed smears. ANAE-positive lymphocytes displayed a dot-like positivity pattern characterized with 1-5 reddish brown cytoplasmic granules, whereas ACP-ase positive lymphocytes displayed a dot-like positivity pattern characterized with 1-3 pinkish cytoplasmic granules. Monocytes gave a diffuse and strong reaction while neutrophils displayed a weak positive reaction for ANAE and ACP-ase. No difference was observed in mean diameters of peripheral blood cells of these species. It was found that lymphocytes made up the majority (64.3% and 65.5%) of leukocytes, followed by neutrophils (23.9% and 23.3%), eosinophils (9.0% and 7.6%), monocytes (1.8% and 2.3%), and basophils (1.0% and 1.3%) in H. auritus and E. concolor, respectively. Mean ANAE positivity oflymphocytes was 36.6% and 51.3% and ACP-ase positivity was 32.1% and 37.5% for H. auritus and E. concolor, respectively. The ANAE positivity of lymphocytes in E. concolor was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that of H. auritus.

  14. Development of implantable autologous small-calibre vascular grafts from peripheral blood samples.

    PubMed

    Aper, T; Teebken, O E; Krüger, A; Heisterkamp, A; Hilfiker, A; Haverich, A

    2013-04-01

    At present the generation of a small-calibre (≤5 mm) vascular replacement for artificial bypasses remains a challenge for tissue engineering. The biocompatibility of bioartificial vessel replacements is of decisive significance for function and depends on the materials used. A completely autologous vessel substitute must exhibit high biocompatibility and functionality. For this purpose we developed and optimised a technique for the engineering of an autologous bypass material from a fibrin scaffold and vascular cells isolated from the same sample of peripheral blood in a porcine model. Fibrinogen, late outgrowth endothelial and smooth muscle cells were isolated from peripheral blood samples (n=14, 100 mL each). Fibroblasts were isolated from porcine aortic adventitial tissue (n=4). Tubular seeded fibrin segments were obtained using an injection moulding technique with the simultaneous incorporation of the in vitro expanded cells into the fibrin matrix. The segments were cultivated under dynamic conditions with pulsatile perfusion in a bioreactor. Morphological and functional characterization was done. Artificial vascular segments with a length of 150 mm were reproducibly obtained with a hierarchical arrangement of incorporated cells similar to the structure of the vascular wall. By additional seeding of fibroblasts, suturable segments with biomechanical properties suitable for implantation into the arterial system were obtained. Implantable bioartificial vascular grafts can be generated from blood. After cultivation under dynamic conditions the vascular segments possess a structure similar to that of the vascular wall and exhibit biomechanical properties sufficient for implantation as arterial substitutes. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Management strategies for poor peripheral blood stem cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Moog, Rainer

    2008-06-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) have nearly replaced bone marrow (BM) as the preferred source of hematopoietic rescue for patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy. However, some patients fail to mobilize sufficient numbers of PBSC into the peripheral blood thereby putting high-dose chemotherapy at risk. The present article reviews mobilization of PBSC with a special focus on poor mobilizers. Under steady-state conditions less than 0.05% of the white blood cells (WBC) are CD34+ cells. Chemotherapy results in a 5-15-fold increase of PBSC. Combining chemotherapy and growth factors increases CD34+ cells up to 6% of WBC. Several factors affect the mobilization of PBSC: age, gender, type of growth factor, dose of the growth factor and in the autologous setting patient's diagnosis, chemotherapy regimen and number of previous chemotherapy cycles or radiation. Poor mobilizers are defined as patients with less than 10 CD34+ cells/mul in the peripheral blood during mobilization. Promising approaches for those patients rely on remobilization, use of high doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), or the combination of G-CSF and granulocyte macrophage (GM)-CSF, which successfully mobilized the majority of poor mobilizing patients. New agents such as long lasting variants of G-CSF and CXCR4 antagonists are at the horizon and studied in clinical trials as mobilizing agents. Muscle and bone pain are frequent adverse events in stem cell mobilization but are usually tolerated under the use of analgesics. Large volume apheresis (LVL) with a processed volume of more than 4-fold patient's blood volume is an approach to increase the CD34+ yield in patients with low CD34+ pre-counts resulting in higher yields of CD34+ cells for transplantation. Processing of more blood in LVL is achieved by an increase of the blood flow rate and an altered anticoagulation regimen with the occurrence of more citrate reactions.

  16. A thermal peripheral blood flowmeter with contact force compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Jai Kyoung; Youn, Sechan; Cho, Young-Ho

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a thermal peripheral blood flowmeter where a force sensor is integrated to compensate the blood flow measurement. Since blood flow is highly sensitive to the contact force between the sensor and skin, previous blood flowmeters needed to be fixed on the skin with a constant contact force. We integrate a force sensor with a thermal blood flowmeter to measure both blood flow and contact force simultaneously for force-compensated blood flow measurement. The blood flowmeter presented here is composed of a resistance temperature detector and a piezoresistive force sensor and was fabricated by surface and bulk micromachining techniques. In the experimental measurement, the blood flow linearly decreased with the contact force at the rate of 31.7% N-1. By using the measured compensation coefficient, the device showed a constant blood flow with the maximum difference of 6.4% over the contact force variation of 1-3 N, and otherwise showed the maximum difference of 75.0%. The present device is suitable for applications with portable biomedical instrumentation or air-conditioning systems for the estimation of human thermoregulation status.

  17. System identification of dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aljuri, A. N.; Bursac, N.; Marini, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity in space flight missions (days) impairs the mechanisms responsible for defense of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cardiac output (CO) against orthostatic stress in the post-flight period. The mechanisms responsible for the observed orthostatic intolerance are not yet completely understood. Additionally, effective counter measures to attenuate this pathophysiological response are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of our proposed system identification method to predict closed-loop dynamic changes in TPR induced by changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right atrial pressure (RAP). For this purpose we designed and employed a novel experimental animal model for the examination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in the dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance (TPR), and applied system identification to the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in the measured signals. Grant numbers: NAG5-4989. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. System identification of dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolai Aljuri, A.; Bursac, Nenad; Marini, Robert; Cohen, Richard J.

    2001-08-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity in space flight missions (days) impairs the mechanisms responsible for defense of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cardiac output (CO) against orthostatic stress in the post-flight period. The mechanisms responsible for the observed orthostatic intolerance are not yet completely understood. Additionally, effective counter measures to attenuate this pathophysiological response are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of our proposed system identification method to predict closed-loop dynamic changes in TPR induced by changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right atrial pressure (RAP). For this purpose we designed and employed a novel experimental animal model for the examination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in the dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance (TPR), and applied system identification to the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in the measured signals.

  19. System identification of dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aljuri, A. N.; Bursac, N.; Marini, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity in space flight missions (days) impairs the mechanisms responsible for defense of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cardiac output (CO) against orthostatic stress in the post-flight period. The mechanisms responsible for the observed orthostatic intolerance are not yet completely understood. Additionally, effective counter measures to attenuate this pathophysiological response are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of our proposed system identification method to predict closed-loop dynamic changes in TPR induced by changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right atrial pressure (RAP). For this purpose we designed and employed a novel experimental animal model for the examination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in the dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance (TPR), and applied system identification to the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in the measured signals. Grant numbers: NAG5-4989. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Peripheral arterial obliterative disease. Cost of illness in France.

    PubMed

    Montron, A; Guignard, E; Pelc, A; Comte, S

    1998-01-01

    The main purpose of this study, carried out in 1995, was to determine, using available sources, the cost of peripheral arterial obliterative disease (PAOD) in France over a 1-year period. This cost-of-illness study was based on a retrospective analysis of the available literature and databases. It involved a description of epidemiological data and a cost estimate of the different medical resources consumed over 1 year. For this latter purpose, a payer perspective was chosen. Data were extracted from national representative surveys and databases with respect to morbidity and mortality [from the National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale; INSERM) and the National Sickness Insurance Fund for Salaried People (Caisse Nationale d'Assurance Maladie des Travailleurs Salariés; CNAMTS)], consultations, examination tests and drug prescriptions [from the French Medical Audit conducted by Intercontinental Medical Statistics (IMS)], hospitalisations [from the Statistical Unit of the Department of Health-Service des Statistiques, des Etudes et des Systemes d'Information (SESI) and the National Public Research Centre in Health Economics (Centre de Recherche d'Etude et de Documentation en Economie de la Santé; CREDES)] and related health expenditure from CNAMTS. In France, the prevalence of stage II PAOD (Leriche and Fontaine classification) in 1992 was estimated to be 675,000; 53% of these patients had undergone vascular or bypass surgery. The total annual cost of healthcare (including consultations, drugs, laboratory tests, hospitalisation and hydrotherapy) for the management of patients with PAOD ranged from 3.9 billion French francs (F) to F4.6 billion (1995 values), depending on the type of hospital considered. 50% of this cost was related to hospitalisations and 75% was covered by the CNAMTS. Although this study was only a partial evaluation and did not take into account indirect costs or nonmedical direct

  1. Volumetric liquid flow measurement through thermography to simulate blood flow in an artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaseñor-Mora, Carlos; Rabell-Montiel, Adela; González-Vega, Arturo; Gutierrez-Juarez, Gerardo

    2015-09-01

    Encouraged to improve the procedure to measure the blood flow in cases with peripheral artery disease using thermography, that allows to evaluate several arteries simultaneously, it was developed an alternative to measure the volumetric flow through a conduit, it was studied the variation of the thermal energy computed from thermal images due to changes in flow at different temperatures, and it was observed that the measurement is not strongly influenced by the emissivity of the conduit, the ambient temperature and humidity, but that is necessary to establish an adequate calibration of the camera to can use it as measurement instrument.

  2. Numerical simulations of the blood flow through vertebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Jozwik, Krzysztof; Obidowski, Damian

    2010-01-19

    Vertebral arteries are two arteries whose structure and location in human body result in development of special flow conditions. For some of the arteries, one can observe a significant difference between flow rates in the left and the right arteries during ultrasonography diagnosis. Usually the reason of such a difference was connected with pathology of the artery in which a smaller flow rate was detected. Simulations of the flow through the selected type of the vertebral artery geometry for twenty five cases of artery diameters have been carried out. The main aim of the presented experiment was to visualize the flow in the region of vertebral arteries junction in the origin of the basilar artery. It is extremely difficult to examine this part of human circulation system, thus numerical experiments may be helpful in understanding the phenomena occurring when two relatively large arteries join together to form one vessel. The obtained results have shown that an individual configuration and diameters of particular arteries can exert an influence on the flow in them and affect a significant difference between flow rates for vertebral arteries. It has been assumed in the investigations that modelled arteries were absolutely normal, without any pathology. In the numerical experiment, the non-Newtonian model of blood was employed.

  3. [239Pu and chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Okladnikova, N D; Osovets, S V; Kudriavtseva, T I

    2009-01-01

    The genome status in somatic cells was assessed using the chromosomal aberration (CA) test in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 194 plutonium workers exposed to occupational radiation mainly from low-transportable compounds of airborne 230Pu. Pu body burden at the time of cytogenetic study varied from values close to the method sensitivity to values multiply exceeding the permissible level. Standard (routine) methods of peripheral blood lymphocytes cultivation were applied. Chromatid- and chromosomal-type structural changes were estimated. Aberrations were estimated per 100 examined metaphase cells. The quantitative relationship between the CA frequency and Pu body burden and the absorbed dose to the lung was found. Mathematical processing of results was carried out based on the phenomenological model. The results were shown as theoretical and experimental curves. The threshold of the CA yield was 0.43 +/- 0.03 kBq (Pu body burden) and 6.12 +/- 1.20 cGy (absorbed dose to the lung).

  4. In vitro hemorheological effects of parenteral agents used in peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biro, Katalin; Sandor, Barbara; Toth, Andras; Koltai, Katalin; Papp, Judit; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Kalman; Kesmarky, Gabor

    2014-05-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis. In PAD hemorheological parameters were defined as risk factors in a number of studies and several therapeutic agents were tried in these conditions. Our study aims to investigate and compare the in vitro hemorheological effects of various drugs generally used in the parenteral treatment of intermittent claudication and critical limb ischemia. Blood samples of healthy male volunteers were incubated with iloprost, alprostadil, pentoxifylline, sulodexide or pentosan polysulfate at calculated therapeutic serum concentration. Hematocrit (Hct) was determined by microhematocrit centrifuge. Plasma and apparent whole blood viscosities (WBV) were evaluated by capillary viscometer. Red blood cell aggregation was measured by LORCA (laserassisted optical rotational cell analyzer) aggregometer, and LORCA ektacytometer was used for measuring erythrocyte deformability at 37°C. Iloprost, alprostadil, and pentoxifylline incubation did not have any significant effect on plasma and apparent WBV. Elongation index increased in samples incubated with alprostadil at low shear stresses 0.95 and 0.53 Pa (p < 0.05). Sulodexide significantly improved WBV and Hct/WBV ratio (p < 0.05). Incubation with pentosan polysulfate resulted in higher WBV, lower Hct/WBV ratio and deterioration in the aggregation parameters (p < 0.05). Sulodexide may have beneficial effect on a macrorheological parameter; alprostadil may improve a microrheological parameter. Hemorheological alterations could be important in PAD patients with hampered vasodilator capacity.

  5. Optical coherence tomography and hyperspectral imaging of vascular recovery in a model of peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Kristin M.; Sit, Wesley W.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Duvall, Craig L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) leads to an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life. The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is the most commonly used system for studying the mechanisms of collateral vessel formation and for testing new PAD therapies, but there is a lack of techniques for acquiring physiologically-relevant, quantitative data intravitally in this model. In this work, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were applied to the mouse HLI model over a time course. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaged changes in blood flow (Doppler OCT) and microvessel morphology (speckle variance OCT) through the skin of haired mice with high resolution. Hyperspectral imaging was also used to quantify blood oxygenation. In ischemic limbs, blood oxygenation in the footpad was substantially reduced after induction of ischemia followed by complete recovery by three weeks, consistent with standard measures. Three dimensional images of the vasculature distal to vessel occlusion acquired with speckle variance OCT revealed changes in OCT flow signal and vessel morphology. Taken together, OCT and hyperspectral imaging enable intravital acquisition of both functional and morphological data which fill critical gaps in understanding structure-function relationships that contribute to recovery in the mouse HLI model. Therefore, these optical imaging methods hold promise as tools for studying the mechanisms of vascular recovery and evaluating novel therapeutic treatments in preclinical studies.

  6. Measuring blood oxygenation of pulsatile arteries using photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Yu, Tianhao; Li, Lin; Chai, Xinyu; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2016-10-01

    Heart pumps blood through the blood vessels to provide body with oxygen and nutrients. As the result, the blood flow, volume and oxygenation in arteries has a pulsatile nature. Measuring these pulsatile parameters enables more precise monitoring of oxygen metabolic rate and is thus valuable for researches and clinical applications. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a proven label-free method for in vivo measuring blood oxygenation at single blood vessel level. However, studies using PAM to observe the pulsatile nature of blood oxygenation in arteries were not reported. In this paper, we use optical-resolution PAM (OR-PAM) technology to study the blood oxygenation dynamics of pulsatile arteries. First, the ability of our OR-PAM system to accurately reflect the change of optical absorption in imaged objects is demonstrated in a phantom study. Then the system is used to image exposed cortical blood vessels of cat. The pulsatile nature of blood volume and oxygenation in arteries is clearly reflected in photoacoustic (PA) signals, whereas it's not observable in veins. By using a multi-wavelength laser, the dynamics of the blood oxygenation of pulsatile arteries in cardiac cycles can be measured, based on the spectroscopic method.

  7. Peripheral Arterial Disease Study (PERART): Prevalence and predictive values of asymptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Alzamora, María Teresa; Baena-Díez, José Miguel; Sorribes, Marta; Forés, Rosa; Toran, Pere; Vicheto, Marisa; Pera, Guillem; Reina, María Dolores; Albaladejo, Carlos; Llussà, Judith; Bundó, Magda; Sancho, Amparo; Heras, Antonio; Rubiés, Joan; Arenillas, Juan Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Background The early diagnosis of atherosclerotic disease is essential for developing preventive strategies in populations at high risk and acting when the disease is still asymptomatic. A low ankle-arm index (AAI) is a good marker of vascular events and may be diminished without presenting symptomatology (silent peripheral arterial disease). The aim of the PERART study (PERipheral ARTerial disease) is to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (both silent and symptomatic) in a general population of both sexes and determine its predictive value related to morbimortality (cohort study). Methods/Design This cross-over, cohort study consists of 2 phases: firstly a descriptive, transversal cross-over study to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, and secondly, a cohort study to evaluate the predictive value of AAI in relation to cardiovascular morbimortality. From September 2006 to June 2007, a total of 3,010 patients over the age of 50 years will be randomly selected from a population adscribed to 24 healthcare centres in the province of Barcelona (Spain). The diagnostic criteria of peripheral arterial disease will be considered as an AAI < 0.90, determined by portable Doppler (8 Mhz probe) measured twice by trained personnel. Cardiovascular risk will be calculated with the Framingham-Wilson tables, with Framingham calibrated by the REGICOR and SCORE groups. The subjects included will be evaluted every 6 months by telephone interview and the clnical history and death registries will be reviewed. The appearance of the following cardiovascular events will be considered as variables of response: transitory ischaemic accident, ictus, angina, myocardial infartction, symptomatic abdominal aneurysm and vascular mortality. Discussion In this study we hope to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, especially the silent forms, in the general population and establish its relationship with cardiovascular morbimortality. A low

  8. Peripheral Arterial Disease study (PERART): prevalence and predictive values of asymptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Alzamora, María Teresa; Baena-Díez, José Miguel; Sorribes, Marta; Forés, Rosa; Toran, Pere; Vicheto, Marisa; Pera, Guillem; Reina, María Dolores; Albaladejo, Carlos; Llussà, Judith; Bundó, Magda; Sancho, Amparo; Heras, Antonio; Rubiés, Joan; Arenillas, Juan Francisco

    2007-12-11

    The early diagnosis of atherosclerotic disease is essential for developing preventive strategies in populations at high risk and acting when the disease is still asymptomatic. A low ankle-arm index (AAI) is a good marker of vascular events and may be diminished without presenting symptomatology (silent peripheral arterial disease). The aim of the PERART study (PERipheral ARTerial disease) is to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (both silent and symptomatic) in a general population of both sexes and determine its predictive value related to morbimortality (cohort study). This cross-over, cohort study consists of 2 phases: firstly a descriptive, transversal cross-over study to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, and secondly, a cohort study to evaluate the predictive value of AAI in relation to cardiovascular morbimortality. From September 2006 to June 2007, a total of 3,010 patients over the age of 50 years will be randomly selected from a population adscribed to 24 healthcare centres in the province of Barcelona (Spain). The diagnostic criteria of peripheral arterial disease will be considered as an AAI < 0.90, determined by portable Doppler (8 Mhz probe) measured twice by trained personnel. Cardiovascular risk will be calculated with the Framingham-Wilson tables, with Framingham calibrated by the REGICOR and SCORE groups. The subjects included will be evaluted every 6 months by telephone interview and the clnical history and death registries will be reviewed. The appearance of the following cardiovascular events will be considered as variables of response: transitory ischaemic accident, ictus, angina, myocardial infartction, symptomatic abdominal aneurysm and vascular mortality. In this study we hope to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, especially the silent forms, in the general population and establish its relationship with cardiovascular morbimortality. A low AAI may be a better marker of

  9. Reelin (RELN) DNA methylation in the peripheral blood of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nabil Fikri, Rahim Mohd; Norlelawati, A Talib; Nour El-Huda, Abdul Rahim; Hanisah, Mohd Noor; Kartini, Abdullah; Norsidah, Kuzaifah; Nor Zamzila, Abdullah

    2017-05-01

    The epigenetic changes of RELN that are involved in the development of dopaminergic neurons may fit the developmental theory of schizophrenia. However, evidence regarding the association of RELN DNA methylation with schizophrenia is far from sufficient, as studies have only been conducted on a few limited brain samples. As DNA methylation in the peripheral blood may mirror the changes taking place in the brain, the use of peripheral blood for a DNA methylation study in schizophrenia is feasible due to the scarcity of brain samples. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the relationship of DNA methylation levels of RELN promoters with schizophrenia using genomic DNA derived from the peripheral blood of patients with the disorder. The case control studies consisted of 110 schizophrenia participants and 122 healthy controls who had been recruited from the same district. After bisufhite conversion, the methylation levels of the DNA samples were calculated based on their differences of the Cq values assayed using the highly sensitive real-time MethyLight TaqMan(®) procedure. A significantly higher level of methylation of the RELN promoter was found in patients with schizophrenia compared to controls (p = 0.005) and also in males compared with females (p = 0.004). Subsequently, the RELN expression of the methylated group was 25 fold less than that of the non-methylated group. Based upon the assumption of parallel methylation changes in the brain and peripheral blood, we concluded that RELN DNA methylation might contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. However, the definite effects of methylation on RELN function during development and also in adult life still require further elaboration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitative optical imaging of vascular response in vivo in a model of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Kristin M.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Sit, Wesley W.; Walsh, Alex J.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2013-01-01

    The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is well established for studying collateral vessel formation and testing therapies for peripheral arterial disease, but there is a lack of quantitative techniques for intravitally analyzing blood vessel structure and function. To address this need, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were developed to assess the time-course of recovery in the mouse HLI model. Hyperspectral imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to non-invasively image hemoglobin oxygen saturation and microvessel morphology plus blood flow, respectively, in the anesthetized mouse after induction of HLI. Hyperspectral imaging detected significant increases in hemoglobin saturation in the ischemic paw as early as 3 days after femoral artery ligation (P < 0.01), and significant increases in distal blood flow were first detected with OCT 14 days postsurgery (P < 0.01). Intravital OCT images of the adductor muscle vasculature revealed corkscrew collateral vessels characteristic of the arteriogenic response to HLI. The hyperspectral imaging and OCT data significantly correlated with each other and with laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and tissue oxygenation sensor data (P < 0.01). However, OCT measurements acquired depth-resolved information and revealed more sustained flow deficits following surgery that may be masked by more superficial measurements (LDPI, hyperspectral imaging). Therefore, intravital OCT may provide a robust biomarker for the late stages of ischemic limb recovery. This work validates non-invasive acquisition of both functional and morphological data with hyperspectral imaging and OCT. Together, these techniques provide cardiovascular researchers an unprecedented and comprehensive view of the temporal dynamics of HLI recovery in living mice. PMID:23955718

  11. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... blood-gas study as evidence that the miner was totally disabled at death. (e) In the case of a deceased... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section...-gas studies. (a) Blood-gas studies are performed to detect an impairment in the process of...

  12. [Immunophenotypic characteristics of peripheral blood cells in normal elderly men].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Zhe; Chang, Yan; Lu, Dan; Shi, Hong-Xia; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Yan-Rong

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to distinguish abnormal cells and to diagnose hematologic diseases through recognizing antigen expression pattern and percentage of peripheral blood cells in normal elderly men. Antigen expression of blast cells, granulocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes, nucleated red blood cells and plasma cells was detected by seven-color flow cytometry in a total of 88 peripheral blood samples from normal elderly men, aged median 82 years old, from 70 to 98 years. Groups were divided according to age, region and underlying diseases, and the percentages of different subgroup cells were examined to confirm whether the differences were significant or not. The results showed that the median proportion of CD34(+) blast cells in peripheral blood from normal elderly men were 0.017% (0.015%-0.020%), with high expression of HLA-DR, CD33, CD13 and CD117, low expression of myeloid antigens, such as CD15, CD11b and CD16, while lymphoid antigens were seldom positive, including CD7, CD19 and CD56. Dim-expression of CD38 was found in peripheral blood blast cells, CD38(dim)+/- cell percentage in blast cells was 61.36% ± 18.26%. In the differentiation and development of granulocytes, CD16(-), CD13(+) CD16(+) (intermediate) and CD16(+) (strong) CD13(+) cells appeared in sequence from immature to mature granulocytes, whose median proportions in nuclear cells were 0.04%, 0.30% and 61.30%, respectively. The percentages of immature monocytes, such as CD64(+) CD14(-) and HLA-DR(+) CD11b(-) cells, were from 0.00% to 0.10% and from 0.07% to 0.68%, separately. No significant differences were found between different subgroups (P > 0.05). It is concluded that the immunophenotypic characteristics and referential percentages of CD34(+) blast cells, granulocytes and monocytes with different development stages in peripheral blood from normal elderly men are recognized, which can help to discriminate abnormal cells.

  13. Detection of disseminated tumor cells in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Zieglschmid, V; Hollmann, C; Böcher, O

    2005-01-01

    Metastases are the major cause of cancer-related deaths in patients with solid epithelial malignancies, such as breast, colorectal and prostate carcinomas. Hematogenous spreading of tumor cells from a primary tumor can be considered as a crucial step in the metastasis cascade leading eventually to the formation of clinically manifest metastases. Consequently, as shown in recent studies, the detection of disseminated tumor cells in peripheral blood might be of clinical relevance with respect to individual patient prognosis and staging or monitoring of therapy. However, the rarity of disseminated tumor cells in peripheral blood renders the application of sensitive techniques mandatory for their detection. The emergence of highly sophisticated reverse transciptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, combining a preanalytical enrichment step with the assessment of multiple molecular tumor markers expressed in disseminated tumor cells, provides a powerful tool in detecting disseminated tumor cells with high sensitivity and specificity. This review will discuss currently used tumor markers as well as experimental means to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of RT-PCR assays to detect disseminated tumor cells in the peripheral blood of patients with breast, colorectal, and prostate cancers, and their clinical relevance assessed in recent studies.

  14. Paclitaxel Drug-Eluting Stents in Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease is a condition in which atherosclerotic plaques partially or completely block blood flow to the legs. Although percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and metallic stenting have high immediate success rates in treating peripheral arterial disease, long-term patency and restenosis rates in long and complex lesions remain unsatisfactory. Objective The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, safety, cost-effectiveness and budget impact of Zilver paclitaxel self-expanding drug-eluting stents for the treatment of de novo or restenotic lesions in above-the-knee peripheral arterial disease. Data Sources Literature searches were performed using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and EBM Reviews. For the economic review, a search filter was applied to limit search results to economics-related literature. Data sources for the budget impact analysis included expert opinion, published literature, and Ontario administrative data. Review Methods Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, and observational studies were included in the clinical effectiveness review, and full economic evaluations were included in the economic literature review. Studies were included if they examined the effect of Zilver paclitaxel drug-eluting stents in de novo or restenotic lesions in above-the-knee arteries. For the budget impact analysis, 3 scenarios were constructed based on different assumptions. Results One randomized controlled trial reported a significantly higher patency rate with Zilver paclitaxel drug-eluting stents for lesions ≤ 14 cm than with angioplasty or bare metal stents. One observational study showed no difference in patency rates between Zilver paclitaxel drug-eluting stents and paclitaxel drug-coated balloons. Zilver paclitaxel drug-eluting stents were associated with

  15. Joint segmentation of lumen and outer wall from femoral artery MR images: Towards 3D imaging measurements of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Yuan, Jing; Qiu, Wu; Rajchl, Martin; Chiu, Bernard; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) measurements of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) plaque burden extracted from fast black-blood magnetic resonance (MR) images have shown to be more predictive of clinical outcomes than PAD stenosis measurements. To this end, accurate segmentation of the femoral artery lumen and outer wall is required for generating volumetric measurements of PAD plaque burden. Here, we propose a semi-automated algorithm to jointly segment the femoral artery lumen and outer wall surfaces from 3D black-blood MR images, which are reoriented and reconstructed along the medial axis of the femoral artery to obtain improved spatial coherence between slices of the long, thin femoral artery and to reduce computation time. The developed segmentation algorithm enforces two priors in a global optimization manner: the spatial consistency between the adjacent 2D slices and the anatomical region order between the femoral artery lumen and outer wall surfaces. The formulated combinatorial optimization problem for segmentation is solved globally and exactly by means of convex relaxation using a coupled continuous max-flow (CCMF) model, which is a dual formulation to the convex relaxed optimization problem. In addition, the CCMF model directly derives an efficient duality-based algorithm based on the modern multiplier augmented optimization scheme, which has been implemented on a GPU for fast computation. The computed segmentations from the developed algorithm were compared to manual delineations from experts using 20 black-blood MR images. The developed algorithm yielded both high accuracy (Dice similarity coefficients ≥ 87% for both the lumen and outer wall surfaces) and high reproducibility (intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.95 for generating vessel wall area), while outperforming the state-of-the-art method in terms of computational time by a factor of ≈ 20. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Peripheral Artery Disease: Current Insight Into the Disease and Its Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Olin, Jeffrey W.; Sealove, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD), which comprises atherosclerosis of the abdominal aorta, iliac, and lower-extremity arteries, is underdiagnosed, undertreated, and poorly understood by the medical community. Patients with PAD may experience a multitude of problems, such as claudication, ischemic rest pain, ischemic ulcerations, repeated hospitalizations, revascularizations, and limb loss. This may lead to a poor quality of life and a high rate of depression. From the standpoint of the limb, the prognosis of patients with PAD is favorable in that the claudication remains stable in 70% to 80% of patients over a 10-year period. However, the rate of myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular death in patients with both symptomatic and asymptomatic PAD is markedly increased. The ankle brachial index is an excellent screening test for the presence of PAD. Imaging studies (duplex ultrasonography, computed tomographic angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, catheter-based angiography) may provide additional anatomic information if revascularization is planned. The goals of therapy are to improve symptoms and thus quality of life and to decrease the cardiovascular event rate (myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular death). The former is accomplished by establishing a supervised exercise program and administering cilostazol or performing a revascularization procedure if medical therapy is ineffective. A comprehensive program of cardiovascular risk modification (discontinuation of tobacco use and control of lipids, blood pressure, and diabetes) will help to prevent the latter. PMID:20592174

  17. Peripheral Augmentation Index is Associated With the Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index in Patients With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S.; Patvardhan, Eshan A.; Karas, Richard H.; Kuvin, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Vascular dysfunction is highly prevalent if not ubiquitous in patients with hypertension. We compared two different measures of vascular function obtained from digital volume waveforms with measures of ventricular-vascular load derived from 24-hour blood pressure (BP) recordings in patients with hypertension. Methods Digital pulsatile volume waveforms were captured via plethysmography (peripheral arterial tone, PAT) and used to derive augmentation index (a measure of ventricular-vascular coupling) and the pulse wave amplitude-reactive hyperemia index (a measure of microvascular reactivity). Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) and the BP variability ratio (BPVR) were derived from 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings. Results There was a positive association between PAT-AIx and AASI (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). There was also a positive association between PAT-AIx and BPVR (r = 0.37, P < 0.05). PAT-AIx was not associated with PWA-RHI (r = -0.14, P > 0.05). PWA-RHI was not associated with AASI or BPVR (P > 0.05). Conclusions PAT-AIx is associated with ambulatory measures of vascular function and may offer clinical insight into vascular burden and cardiovascular disease risk in patients with hypertension independent of information obtained from PWA-RHI.

  18. A Review of the Pathophysiology and Potential Biomarkers for Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Smriti Murali; Moxon, Joseph V.; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is due to the blockage of the arteries supplying blood to the lower limbs usually secondary to atherosclerosis. The most severe clinical manifestation of PAD is critical limb ischemia (CLI), which is associated with a risk of limb loss and mortality due to cardiovascular events. Currently CLI is mainly treated by surgical or endovascular revascularization, with few other treatments in routine clinical practice. There are a number of problems with current PAD management strategies, such as the difficulty in selecting the appropriate treatments for individual patients. Many patients undergo repeated attempts at revascularization surgery, but ultimately require an amputation. There is great interest in developing new methods to identify patients who are unlikely to benefit from revascularization and to improve management of patients unsuitable for surgery. Circulating biomarkers that predict the progression of PAD and the response to therapies could assist in the management of patients. This review provides an overview of the pathophysiology of PAD and examines the association between circulating biomarkers and PAD presence, severity and prognosis. While some currently identified circulating markers show promise, further larger studies focused on the clinical value of the biomarkers over existing risk predictors are needed. PMID:25993296

  19. Increased aortic stiffness and related factors in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Mariella; Scandale, Giovanni; Carzaniga, Gianni; Cinquini, Michela; Minola, Marzio; Dimitrov, Gabriel; Carotta, Maria

    2013-10-01

    A number of conditions have been associated with functional changes of large arteries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with aortic stiffness in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The authors studied 86 patients with PAD (ankle-brachial pressure index [ABPI] ≤0.9) and 86 controls. Aortic stiffness was determined by pulse wave velocity (aPWV) using applanation tonometry. In PAD patients, aPWV was higher compared with controls (11 ± 3 vs 9.8 ± 1.8; P=.002). In multiple regression analysis, aPWV was independently associated with pulse pressure (β=0.05, P=.01) in the PAD patients and with age in the control group (β=0.08, P=.0005). The results of this study confirm an aPWV increase in patients with PAD and emphasize the association between blood pressure and aPWV. Further studies are necessary to assess whether higher aortic stiffening adds prognostic value to ABPI, which is the most powerful prognostic indicator in PAD. ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mapping of Autogenous Saphenous Veins as an Imaging Adjunct to Peripheral MR Angiography in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease and Peripheral Bypass Grafting: Prospective Comparison with Ultrasound and Intraoperative Findings

    PubMed Central

    Jah-Kabba, Ann-Marie Bintu Munda; Kukuk, Guido Matthias; Hadizadeh, Dariusch Reza; Träber, Frank; Koscielny, Arne; Kabba, Mustapha Sundifu; Verrel, Frauke; Schild, Hans Heinz; Willinek, Winfried Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background Mapping of the great saphenous vein is very important for planning of peripheral and coronary bypass surgery. This study investigated mapping of the great saphenous vein as an adjunct to peripheral MR angiography using a blood pool contrast agent in patients who were referred for evaluation of peripheral arterial occlusive disease and bypass surgery. Methods 38 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (21 men; mean age: 71 years, range, 44–88 years) underwent peripheral MR angiography using the blood pool contrast agent Gadofosveset trisodium. Apart from primary arterial assessment images were evaluated in order to determine great saphenous vein diameters at three levels: below the saphenofemoral junction, mid thigh and 10 cm above the knee joint (usability: diameter range: >3 and <10 mm at one level and >3.5 and <10 mm at a neighboring level). Duplex ultrasound was performed by an independent examiner providing diameter measurements at the same levels. Additionally, vessel usability was determined intraoperatively by the vascular surgeon during subsequent bypass surgery. Results Mean venous diameters for MR angiography/duplex ultrasound were 5.4±2.6/5.5±2.8 mm (level 1), 4.7±2.7/4.6±2.9 mm (level 2) and 4.4±2.2/4.5±2.3 mm (level 3), respectively, without significant differences between the modalities (P = 0.207/0.806/0.518). Subsequent surgery was performed in 27/38 patients. A suitable saphenous vein was diagnosed in 25 and non-usability was diagnosed in 2 of the 27 patients based on MR angiography/duplex ultrasound, respectively. Usability was confirmed by intraoperative assessment in all of the 24 patients that received a venous bypass graft in subsequent bypass surgery. In 1 case, in which the great saphenous vein was assessed as useable by both MR angiography and duplex ultrasound, it was not used during subsequent bypass surgery due to the patients clinical condition and comorbidities. Conclusion Simultaneous mapping of the

  1. Vascular Function and Intima-media Thickness of a Leg Artery in Peripheral Artery Disease: A Comparison of Buerger Disease and Atherosclerotic Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Akimichi; Kajikawa, Masato; Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Oda, Nozomu; Kishimoto, Shinji; Matsui, Shogo; Kihara, Yasuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Goto, Chikara; Noma, Kensuke; Aibara, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Ayumu; Higashi, Yukihito

    2016-11-01

    Both vascular function and structure are independent predictors of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate vascular function and structure of a leg artery in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). We measured flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) and nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation (NID) as indices of vascular function and intima-media thickness (IMT) as an index of vascular structure of the popliteal artery in 100 subjects, including 20 patients with Buerger disease and 30 patients with atherosclerotic PAD, 20 age- and sex-matched subjects without Buerger disease (control group) and 30 age- and sex-matched patients without atherosclerotic PAD (control group). IMT was significantly larger in the Buerger group than in the control group (Buerger, 0.63± 0.20 mm; control, 0.50±0.07 mm; P=0.01), whereas there were no significant differences in FMD and NID between the two groups. IMT was significantly larger in the atherosclerotic PAD group than in the control group (atherosclerotic PAD, 0.80±0.22 mm; control, 0.65±0.14 mm; P<0.01), and FMD and NID were significantly smaller in the atherosclerotic PAD group than in the control group (FMD: atherosclerotic PAD, 3.9%±1.1%; control, 5.0%±1.8%; P<0.01; and NID: atherosclerotic PAD, 6.1%±2.0%; control, 8.4%±2.1%; P<0.01). These findings suggest that vascular function is preserved in patients with Buerger disease and that both vascular function and vascular structure are impaired in patients with atherosclerotic PAD.

  2. Lower extremity peripheral arterial disease in hospitalized patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Dieter, Robert S; Tomasson, Jon; Gudjonsson, Thorbjorn; Brown, Roger L; Vitcenda, Mark; Einerson, Jean; McBride, Patrick E

    2003-11-01

    The prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has been well defined. However, the prevalence of PAD in hospitalized patients with CAD has not been defined. The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a useful non-invasive tool to screen for PAD. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of PAD in hospitalized patients with CAD by measuring the ABI. The study was conducted at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics inpatient Cardiovascular Medicine Service. Medically stable patients with CAD were invited to participate prior to hospital discharge. Data regarding cardiovascular risk factors, history of previous PAD, physical examination, and ABI were collected. An ABI less than or equal to 0.9 or a history of previous lower extremity vascular invention was considered to be indicative of significant PAD. A total of 100 patients (66 men and 34 women) were recruited. Forty patients were found to have PAD (mean ABI in non-revascularized patients with PAD = 0.67). By measuring the ABI, 37 (25 men) were positive for PAD and three had an ABI corrected with previous revascularization. Of these patients, 21 (52.5%) had previously documented PAD. Patients with PAD were older (p = 0.003), had a greater smoking history (p = 0.002), were more likely to have diabetes (p = 0.012), hypertension (p = 0.013) and a trend towards more dyslipidemia (p = 0.055). In conclusion, hospitalized patients with CAD are likely to have concomitant PAD. Risk factors for PAD in this patient population include advanced age, history of smoking, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and abnormal pulse examination. Identification of patients with PAD by measuring the ankle-brachial index is easily done.

  3. Femoral artery plaque characteristics, lower extremity collaterals, and mobility loss in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mary M; Carroll, Timothy; Carr, James; Yuan, Chun; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Kibbe, Melina; Criqui, Michael H; Tian, Lu; Polonsky, Tamar; Zhao, Lihui; Gao, Ying; Hippe, Daniel S; Xu, Dongxiang; McCarthy, Walter; Kramer, Christopher M

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about the prognostic significance of specific characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measured plaque in the superficial femoral artery (SFA). Associations of MRI-measured plaque quantity, lumen area, and plaque composition in the SFA with subsequent mobility loss were studied in people with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD). Participants with an ankle-brachial index (ABI) < 1.00 were identified from Chicago medical centers and underwent direct visualization of atherosclerotic plaque in the SFA using MRI. Participants were followed annually for up to 4 years. Mobility loss was defined as becoming unable to walk up and down a flight of stairs or walk one-quarter of a mile without assistance among participants without mobility impairment at baseline. Analyses adjusted for age, sex, race, comorbidities, ABI, physical activity, and other confounders. Of 308 PAD participants without baseline mobility impairment, 100 (32.5%) developed mobility loss during follow-up. Compared to the lowest mean plaque area tertile at baseline, participants in the highest (worst) plaque area tertile had a higher rate of mobility loss (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-3.79, p = 0.018). Compared to the highest mean lumen area tertile, the smallest (worst) mean lumen area tertile was associated with greater mobility loss (HR = 2.18, 95% CI = 1.20-3.96, p = 0.011). Neither lipid rich necrotic core nor calcium in the SFA were associated with mobility loss. In conclusion, greater plaque quantity and smaller lumen area in the proximal SFA, but not lipid rich necrotic core or calcium, were associated with higher mobility loss in people with PAD.

  4. Peripheral markers of Alzheimer's disease: surveillance of white blood cells.

    PubMed

    Shad, Kaneez Fatima; Aghazadeh, Yashar; Ahmad, Sagheer; Kress, Bodo

    2013-08-01

    Inflammation is part of the complex biological response of vascular tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. This is a mechanism of innate immunity, which may cause an increase in the number of monocytes and neutrophils circulating in the blood. Literature indicated that chronic inflammation might be a factor in developing neurological problems, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other similar illnesses. Our main objective is to identify peripheral markers of Alzheimer's disease and for that purpose; we are looking at the profile of white blood cells focusing on monocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes and basophils. Twenty-seven patients of Alzheimer's disease (AD), diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological tests were observed for their blood profile. Key observations during this study were that the levels of monocytes in the blood of the diagnosed AD patients were high irrespective of their age and sex. For those patients whose monocytes were in normal range their neutrophil levels were significantly high. Whereas blood levels of lymphocytes and basophils were found to be constantly low. Escalated levels of monocytes and neutrophils are hallmarks of chronic inflammation and may be precursor to Alzheimer's disease. A low lymphocyte count specifies that the body's resistance to fight infection is substantially reduced, whereas low basophil levels indicates their over utilization due to chronic allergic inflammatory condition. Future studies involved closer look at the cytokines produced by these white blood cells especially TNF IL-1, and IL-12, which are products of monocytes. Likewise, blood glucose and creatinine levels were high whereas calcium ions were low. Our studies indicated that white blood cells along with other inflammatory byproducts may act as peripheral markers for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Accuracy of peripheral arterial tonometry in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Pinto, José Antonio; Godoy, Luciana Balester Mello de; Ribeiro, Renata Coutinho; Mizoguchi, Elcio Izumi; Hirsch, Lina Ana Medeiros; Gomes, Leonardo Marques

    2015-01-01

    The use of handheld devices that assess peripheral arterial tonometry has emerged as an auxiliary method for assessment and diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. To evaluate the accuracy of peripheral arterial tonometry in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea. Contemporary cohort cross-sectional study. Thirty patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea underwent peripheral arterial tonometry and assisted nocturnal polysomnography concomitantly. The mean apnea/hypopnea index by peripheral arterial tonometry was significantly higher than that by polysomnography (p<0.001), but the values of both sleep studies were significantly correlated (r=0.762). There was a high correlation between variables: minimum oxygen saturation (r=0.842, p<0.001), oxygen saturation<90% (r=0.799, p<0.001), and mean heart rate (r=0.951, p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity were 60% and 96.2% (AUC: 0.727; p=0.113), respectively, when at a threshold value of 5 events/h. In severe cases (≥30 events/h), the result was a sensitivity of 77.8% and a specificity of 86.4% (AUC: 0.846, p=0.003). Peripheral arterial tonometry is a useful portable device for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea; its accuracy is higher in moderate and severe cases. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Measuring Arterial Blood Pressure. A Self-Contained Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Chris Ellen

    This self-contained instructional module is designed to help adult caregivers learn how to measure arterial blood pressure in the home. The module includes the following parts: objectives; pretest (with answers); four sections of instructional material covering (1) equipment, (2) cuff placement and locating the brachial artery, (3) measuring blood…

  7. Apolipoprotein (a) concentrations and susceptibility to coronary artery disease in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Groves, P; Rees, A; Bishop, A; Morgan, R; Ruttley, M; Lewis, N; Lane, I; Hall, R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the relation between apolipoprotein(a) concentrations and angiographically defined coronary artery disease in patients with atheromatous peripheral vascular disease. DESIGN--40 consecutive patients were recruited at the time of admission for peripheral vascular surgery. All underwent clinical assessment and coronary arteriography. Apolipoprotein(a) concentrations were measured by an immunoradiometric assay. SETTING--Tertiary referral centre. SUBJECTS--Patients requiring surgical intervention for large vessel peripheral vascular disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Presence or absence and severity and distribution of angiographically defined coronary artery disease. Measurement of circulating contractions of apolipoprotein(a) and other lipid indices. RESULTS--Coronary artery disease was absent in 11 patients (group 1), mild to moderate in 12 (group 2), and severe in 17 (group 3). The distribution of peripheral vascular disease and of standard lipid indices was similar in these three groups of patients. There was a significant difference in apolipoprotein(a) concentrations between the three groups, with concentrations progressively increasing with the severity of coronary artery disease (mean (95% confidence interval): group 1, 112 U/1 (52 to 242); group 2, 214 U/1 (129 to 355); group 3, 537 U/1 (271 to 1064) (analysis of variance p < 0.005). The prevalence of coronary artery disease was increased 7.4 fold in patients with apolipoprotein(a) concentrations that were greater than the cohort median (206 U/1) (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS--The results show an association between apolipoprotein(a) concentrations and angiographically defined coronary artery disease in patients with large vessel peripheral vascular disease. The findings imply differences in the pathogenesis of coronary and peripheral atheroma and suggest that the measurement of apolipoprotein(a) may prove a useful additional tool in the risk factor assessment of patients undergoing peripheral

  8. Pathogenesis of the limb manifestations and exercise limitations in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, William R; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Larson, Christopher J; Brass, Eric P

    2015-04-24

    Patients with peripheral artery disease have a marked reduction in exercise performance and daily ambulatory activity irrespective of their limb symptoms of classic or atypical claudication. This review will evaluate the multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the exercise impairment in peripheral artery disease based on an evaluation of the current literature and research performed by the authors. Peripheral artery disease results in atherosclerotic obstructions in the major conduit arteries supplying the lower extremities. This arterial disease process impairs the supply of oxygen and metabolic substrates needed to match the metabolic demand generated by active skeletal muscle during walking exercise. However, the hemodynamic impairment associated with the occlusive disease process does not fully account for the reduced exercise impairment, indicating that additional pathophysiologic mechanisms contribute to the limb manifestations. These mechanisms include a cascade of pathophysiological responses during exercise-induced ischemia and reperfusion at rest that are associated with endothelial dysfunction, oxidant stress, inflammation, and muscle metabolic abnormalities that provide opportunities for targeted therapeutic interventions to address the complex pathophysiology of the exercise impairment in peripheral artery disease. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Changes in CD34+ cell count in peripheral blood after whole blood donation.

    PubMed

    Pala, Cigdem; Mumcuoglu, Haluk; Kurnaz, Fatih; Sivgin, Serdar; Kaynar, Leylagul; Keklik, Muzaffer; Akyol, Gulsah; Koker, Yavuz; Eser, Bulent

    2013-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the change in the number of stem cells and white cells in the early period following blood donation. 22 male (71%) and 9 female (29%), 31 volunteers in total were included in the study. 450 ml of whole blood were collected from each of the volunteers for the donation. Complete blood counts were performed on the volunteers before and at 6 and 24h after the donation and CD34+ cell counts per ml of peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry technique. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood at 6h following blood donation (p<0.001). At 24h, however, there was a statistically significant decrease in the number of CD34+ cells, compared to 6h (p<0.001). There was a statistically significant increase in the number of leukocytes in the peripheral blood at 6h following blood donation (p<0.001). At 24h, there was a decrease in the number of leukocytes, which was statistically significant compared to 6h (p<0.001). When the difference in CD34+ cell and leukocytes counts before blood donation and at 24h after blood donation were compared, the results were not statistically significant. As the result of this study, a transient increase in the number of CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood after blood donation was demonstrated, with a decline in CD34+ cell counts back to levels prior to donation at 24h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluating peripheral arterial volume distensibility by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Xu, Guan; Wei, Xinbin; Cheng, Qian; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Stiffness of arteries, especially small arteries, is an important marker for many diseases and a good parameter to evaluate the risks of cardiovascular problems. In this research, we proposed a new method for measurement of local arterial distensibility by using photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) technology. Taking advantages from its excellent sensitivity and high spatial resolution, PAM can evaluate the morphology and volume change of a small artery accurately without involving any contrast agent. When working in the linear elastic range of a vessel, measuring the initial and the distended diameters of the vessel before and after pressure change facilitates quantitative assessment of vessel distensibility. The preliminary experiment on well-controlled gel phantoms demonstrates the feasibility of this technology.

  11. PADPIN: protein-protein interaction networks of angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, and inflammation in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Chaitanya G.; Annex, Brian H.; Bader, Joel S.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) results from an obstruction of blood flow in the arteries other than the heart, most commonly the arteries that supply the legs. The complexity of the known signaling pathways involved in PAD, including various growth factor pathways and their cross talks, suggests that analyses of high-throughput experimental data could lead to a new level of understanding of the disease as well as novel and heretofore unanticipated potential targets. Such bioinformatic analyses have not been systematically performed for PAD. We constructed global protein-protein interaction networks of angiogenesis (Angiome), immune response (Immunome), and arteriogenesis (Arteriome) using our previously developed algorithm GeneHits. The term “PADPIN” refers to the angiome, immunome, and arteriome in PAD. Here we analyze four microarray gene expression datasets from ischemic and nonischemic gastrocnemius muscles at day 3 posthindlimb ischemia (HLI) in two genetically different C57BL/6 and BALB/c mouse strains that display differential susceptibility to HLI to identify potential targets and signaling pathways in angiogenesis, immune, and arteriogenesis networks. We hypothesize that identification of the differentially expressed genes in ischemic and nonischemic muscles between the strains that recovers better (C57BL/6) vs. the strain that recovers more poorly (BALB/c) will help for the prediction of target genes in PAD. Our bioinformatics analysis identified several genes that are differentially expressed between the two mouse strains with known functions in PAD including TLR4, THBS1, and PRKAA2 and several genes with unknown functions in PAD including EphA4, TSPAN7, SLC22A4, and EIF2a. PMID:26058837

  12. Atherosclerotic burden in coronary and peripheral arteries in patients with first clinical manifestation of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kranjec, Igor

    2011-04-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the atherosclerotic burden in patients with the first symptoms of coronary artery disease (CAD). The study population consisted of 100 consecutive patients (new-onset severe angina or myocardial infarction) and 70 age and sex matched asymptomatic volunteers. Functional and morphologic atherosclerotic markers were sought in carotid, brachial and femoral arteries of all individuals by means of high-resolution ultrasonography, whereas coronary arteriography was performed in the CAD patients only. A total of 347 coronary lesions [230 (66%) obstructive] were discovered in the CAD patients as well as 105 peripheral plaques [26 (25%) obstructive]. The mean percentage diameter stenosis of the culprit coronary lesion was 83.8 ± 15.8%, the mean vessel score 1.7 (range 0-3), the mean stenosis score 19.8 (range 1.5-89.0), and the mean extent score 49.1% (range 10-65%). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation, as assessed by the brachial flow-mediated response (FMR), was reduced by 50% in the CAD patients (P < 0.001 vs. controls). Furthermore, endothelium-independent vasodilation was significantly impaired in all investigated peripheral arteries of the CAD patients (P < 0.05-0.001 vs. controls). Intima-media thickness (IMT) was increased in the carotid arteries of the CAD patients by 43%, in brachial arteries by 20% and in femoral arteries by 57% (P < 0.01-0.001 vs. controls). Decreased FMR or increased carotid IMT was found to be independent risk factors for the CAD, and they correlated with the coronary vessel and extent scores. In conclusion, the atherosclerotic process was quite advanced in coronary as well as peripheral arteries of our patients with the first clinical presentation of CAD.

  13. The acute effects of lower limb intermittent negative pressure on foot macro- and microcirculation in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Sundby, Øyvind Heiberg; Høiseth, Lars Øivind; Mathiesen, Iacob; Weedon-Fekjær, Harald; Sundhagen, Jon O; Hisdal, Jonny

    2017-01-01

    Intermittent negative pressure (INP) applied to the lower leg and foot increases foot perfusion in healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to describe the effects of INP to the lower leg and foot on foot macro- and microcirculation in patients with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD). In this experimental study, we analyzed foot circulation during INP in 20 patients [median (range): 75 (63-84yrs)] with PAD. One leg was placed inside an air-tight vacuum chamber connected to an INP-generator. During application of INP (alternating 10s of -40mmHg/7s of atmospheric pressure), we continuously recorded blood flow velocity in a distal foot artery (ultrasound Doppler), skin blood flow on the pulp of the first toes (laser Doppler), heart rate (ECG), and systemic blood pressure (Finometer). After a 5-min baseline sequence (no pressure), a 10-min INP sequence was applied, followed by 5-min post-INP (no pressure). To compare and quantify blood flow fluctuations between sequences, we calculated cumulative up-and-down fluctuations in arterial blood flow velocity per minute. Onset of INP induced an increase in arterial flow velocity and skin blood flow. Peak blood flow velocity was reached 3s after the onset of negative pressure, and increased 46% [(95% CI 36-57), P<0.001] above baseline. Peak skin blood flow was reached 2s after the onset of negative pressure, and increased 89% (95% CI 48-130), P<0.001) above baseline. Cumulative fluctuations per minute were significantly higher during INP-sequences compared to baseline [21 (95% CI 12-30)cm/s/min to 41 (95% CI 32-51)cm/s/min, P<0.001]. Mean INP blood flow velocity increased significantly ~12% above mean baseline blood flow velocity [(6.7 (95% CI 5.2-8.3)cm/s to 7.5 (95% CI 5.9-9.1)cm/s, P = 0.03)]. INP increases foot macro- and microcirculatory flow pulsatility in patients with PAD. Additionally, application of INP resulted in increased mean arterial blood flow velocity.

  14. Hypereosinophilic syndrome accompanying gangrene of the toes with peripheral arterial occlusion--a case report.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Satoru; Masaki, Ichiro; Furuyama, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    The authors herein report the case of a teenage boy who presented with peripheral arterial occlusion of both upper and lower extremities associated with hypereosinophilia. During a 10-year follow-up, corticosteroid therapy was continued for the treatment of hypereosinophilia. The patient underwent bilateral lumbar sympathectomies because of severe ischemia of the bilateral lower extremities with gangrene of the toes. Based on the progress of his disease over the past 10 years, he was suspected to have idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) accompanied by peripheral arterial obstruction. Idiopathic HES is a disease characterized by unexpected hypereosinophilia, which may lead to organ damage. This is a very rare case of peripheral arterial occlusion associated with idiopathic HIS.

  15. The relationship between obesity and peripheral arterial disease in adult Nigerian diabetics.

    PubMed

    Oyelade, Bolaji Oyelade; Olaolorun, Akintayo D; Odeigah, Louis O; Amole, Isaac O; Aderibigbe, Sunday A

    2014-03-01

    The aim was to identify any relationship between obesity and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in diabetic subjects. Male and female diabetic subjects aged 50-89 years. Body mass index (BMI) was used to estimate total body weight and the waist-to- hip ratio (WHR) as well as waist circumference (WC) were used for abdominal fat distribution estimation. Peripheral arterial disease was defined by an ankle brachial index <0.9. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) was observed in 52.5% of the subjects. BMI, WHR and WC did not correlate with PAD. None of the parameters (i.e BMI, WHR and WC) used to assess the relationship between obesity and PAD was found to correlate with PAD.

  16. Peripheral blood counts in workers exposed to synthetic fibres.

    PubMed

    Caciari, Tiziana; Casale, Teodorico; Loreti, Beatrice; Schifano, Maria P; Capozzella, Assunta; Scala, Barbara; De Sio, Simone; Tomei, Gianfranco; Rosati, Maria V; Tomei, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Acrylonitrile is an intermediary with possible adverse health effects in the synthesis of organic products, such as acrylic fibres. This investigation was undertaken to determine the possible changes in the peripheral blood counts in workers of a polyacrylic fibres plant. The study involved 218 workers exposed to acrylonitrile at low doses and a control group of 200 unexposed workers. The chosen subjects underwent blood tests in order to check their haematological parameters. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of the red blood cells, haemoglobin and total number of leukocytes. An increase in the neutrophils associated with a reduction of lymphocytes, both statistically significant, was observed. The authors hypothesized that the neutrophils are influenced by the exposure to acrylonitrile at low doses.

  17. A Novel Index Using Ankle Hemodynamic Parameters to Assess the Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Jun; Gatate, Yodo; Kasai, Takatoshi; Nakano, Shintaro; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Sato, Osamu; Ichioka, Shigeru; Kuro-O, Makoto; Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    In peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower extremities, the presence of flow-limiting stenoses can be objectively detected by the ankle-brachial index (ABI). However, the severity of ischemic symptoms is not necessarily associated with the ABI value. Atherosclerotic plaque in lower extremity PAD induces ankle arterial stiffness and reduces ankle vascular resistance, which may decrease ankle blood flow and cause ischemic symptoms. We hypothesized that the ankle hemodynamic index (AHI), defined as the ratio of ankle arterial stiffness to ankle vascular resistance, could be used to assess the blood supply deficiency in a diseased lower limb in patients with PAD. The 85 consecutive patients with PAD who were retrospectively analyzed in this study had Rutherford grade 1 to grade 6 ischemia diagnosed as PAD and significant stenotic lesions (>50% diameter stenosis) of the lower extremity on contrast angiography. The AHI was calculated as the product of the ankle pulse pressure and the ratio of heart rate to ankle mean arterial pressure (ankle pulse pressure × heart rate/ankle mean arterial pressure). The Rutherford grade was significantly correlated with the AHI (r = 0.50, P < 0.001), but not with the ABI (r = 0.07, P = 0.52). Multiple ordinal regression analysis showed that anemia (odds ratio 0.66, P = 0.002) and AHI (odds ratio 1.04, P = 0.02) were independently associated with Rutherford grade. Our study shows that AHI, a novel parameter based on the ABI measurement, is well correlated with ischemic symptoms, and may be a useful means to assess the arterial blood supply of the lower extremities of patients with PAD.

  18. Endothelial interleukin-21 receptor up-regulation in peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Cunningham, Alexis; Houston, Kevin; Sharma, Aditya M; Chen, Lingdan; Dokun, Ayotunde O; Lye, R John; Spolski, Rosanne; Leonard, Warren J; Annex, Brian H

    2016-01-01

    In most patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD), severe stenosis in or occlusion of the major blood vessels that supply the legs make the amount of distal blood flow dependent on the capacity to induce angiogenesis and collateral vessel formation. Currently, there are no medications that improve perfusion to the ischemic limb, and thus directly treat the primary problem of PAD. A recent report from our group in a pre-clinical mouse PAD model showed that interleukin-21 receptor (IL-21R) is up-regulated in the endothelial cells from ischemic hindlimb muscle. We further showed that loss of IL-21R resulted in impaired perfusion recovery in this model. In our study, we sought to determine whether IL-21R is present in the endothelium from ischemic muscle of patients with PAD. Using human gastrocnemius muscle biopsies, we found increased levels of IL-21R in the skeletal muscle endothelial cells of patients with PAD compared to control individuals. Interestingly, PAD patients had approximately 1.7-fold higher levels of circulating IL-21. These data provide direct evidence that the IL-21R pathway is indeed up-regulated in patients with PAD. This pathway may serve as a therapeutic target for modulation. PMID:26705256

  19. Cuban Americans have the highest rates of peripheral arterial disease in diverse Hispanic/Latino communities.

    PubMed

    Allison, Matthew A; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Raij, Leopoldo; Kaplan, Robert; Ostfeld, Robert J; Pattany, Maria S; Heiss, Gerardo; Criqui, Michael H

    2015-09-01

    Because Hispanic ethnicity in the United States is heterogeneous, the purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiology of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) within U.S. Hispanic/Latino groups defined by national background. This analysis included 9648 men and women older than 45 years enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). The ankle-brachial index (ABI) was computed as the higher of the posterior tibial and dorsalis pedis systolic blood pressures for each leg divided by the higher brachial artery systolic blood pressure. The index ABI was the higher of the two. An ABI ≤0.90 was the criterion for the presence of PAD. The mean age was 56 years, and 55% were female. Overall, the prevalence of an ABI ≤0.90 (PAD), 0.90 to 0.99 (borderline), 1.0 to 1.39 (normal), and ≥1.40 (high) was 5.7%, 19.3%, 72.5%, and 2.6%, respectively. After multivariable adjustment for PAD risk factors and compared with Mexicans, Cubans had a nearly threefold higher odds for PAD (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-4.4). The odds of PAD for the other Hispanic/Latino groups ranged from 1.2 to 1.8. Although men had a more than threefold higher odds of an ABI ≥1.40 (3.6; 2.0-6.5), the odds did not differ significantly by Hispanic/Latino background. Compared with Mexican Americans, all other Hispanic/Latino background groups have a significantly higher odds of having PAD, with the odds being nearly threefold higher among Cubans. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors, Peripheral Arterial Disease, and Lower Extremity Amputation Risk in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Chin; Chen, Yung-Tai; Hsu, Chien-Yi; Su, Yu-Wen; Chiu, Chun-Chih; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have elucidated the vascular protective effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. However, to date, no large-scale studies have been carried out to determine the impact of DPP-4 inhibitors on the occurrence of peripheral arterial disease, and lower extremity amputation risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We conducted a retrospective registry analysis using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database to investigate the correlation between the use of DPP-4 inhibitors and risk of peripheral arterial disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 82,169 propensity score-matched pairs of DPP-4 inhibitor users and nonusers with type 2 diabetes mellitus were examined for the period 2009 to 2011. The mean age of the study subjects was 58.9 ± 12.0 years, and 54% of subjects were male. During the mean follow-up of 3.0 years (maximum, 4.8 years), a total of 3369 DPP-4 inhibitor users and 3880 DPP-4 inhibitor nonusers were diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease. Compared with nonusers, DPP-4 inhibitor users were associated with a lower risk of peripheral arterial disease (hazard ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.88). Additionally, DPP-4 inhibitor users had a decreased risk of lower-extremity amputation than nonusers (hazard ratio 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.79). The association between use of DPP-4 inhibitors and risk of peripheral arterial disease was also consistent in subgroup analysis. This large-scale nationwide population-based cohort study is the first to demonstrate that treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors is associated with lower risk of peripheral arterial disease occurrence and limb amputation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Peripheral pulmonary arteries: identification at multi-slice spiral CT with 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Pawlak, Sebastien; Dechambre, Stéphane; Maldague, Baudouin

    2003-04-01

    Our objective was to analyze the peripheral pulmonary arteries using thin-collimation multi-slice spiral CT. Twenty consecutive patients underwent enhanced-spiral multi-slice CT using 1-mm collimation. Two observers analyzed the pulmonary arteries by consensus on a workstation. Each artery was identified on axial and 3D shaded-surface display reconstruction images. Each subsegmental artery was measured at a mediastinal window setting and compared with anatomical classifications. The location and branching of every subsegmental artery was recorded. The number of well-visualized sub-subsegmental arteries at a mediastinal window setting was compared with those visualized at a lung window setting. Of 800 subsegmental arteries, 769 (96%) were correctly visualized and 123 accessory subsegmental arteries were identified using the mediastinal window setting. One thousand ninety-two of 2019 sub-subsegmental arteries (54%) identified using the lung window setting were correctly visualized using the mediastinal window setting. Enhanced multi-slice spiral CT with thin collimation can be used to analyze precisely the subsegmental pulmonary arteries and may identify even more distal pulmonary arteries.

  2. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index as Predictors of Mortality in Residents of Metlika County, Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Mlačak, Blaž; Blinc, Aleš; Pohar, Maja; Stare, Janez

    2006-01-01

    Aim To test how the presence of peripheral arterial disease predicted mortality of middle-aged and elderly residents of Metlika county, a rural area in southeastern Slovenia. Methods In 1987, we interviewed and examined a representative cohort of 646 subjects aged 45-80 years at inclusion without overt coronary or cerebrovascular disease, for cardiovascular risk factors and measured the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI). Peripheral arterial disease was defined as ABPI<0.90. The subjects were followed up 15 years or until death. All-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality were assessed and compared between subjects with and without peripheral arterial disease in a multivariate model. Results There were 580 subjects with normal ABPI and 66 subjects with peripheral arterial disease, among which 49 were asymptomatic and 17 had intermittent claudication. Because subjects with peripheral arterial disease were on average 10 years older than those without peripheral arterial disease, the mere presence of peripheral arterial disease was not an independent predictor of mortality. However, there was a significant interaction of peripheral arterial disease with age, with a more pronounced adverse prognostic effect of peripheral arterial disease in younger than in older age groups. For a 55-year-old subject with peripheral arterial disease, the hazard ratio of dying from any cause in the follow-up period was 2.44 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-4.96) in comparison to an age-matched subject without peripheral arterial disease, but at 75 years of age, the hazard ratio decreased to only 0.71 (95% CI, 0.46-1.09). For cardiovascular mortality, the hazard ratio in the presence of peripheral arterial disease was 6.05 (95% CI, 1.87-16.27) at 55 years and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.54-1.52) at 75 years. Among patients with peripheral arterial disease, each decrement of ABPI at inclusion by 0.10 significantly increased the cardiovascular mortality after 15 years by 30% (P = 0

  3. Novel Risk Factors for Premature Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Non-Diabetic Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bedel, Aurélie; Le Trequesser, Rémi; Freyburger, Geneviève; Nurden, Alan; Colomer, Sylvie; Guérin, Viviane; Vergnes, Marie-Christine; Becker, François; Camelot, Gabriel; Bressolette, Luc; Lacroix, Philippe; Cambou, Jean-Pierre; Bura-Rivière, Alessandra; Emmerich, Joseph; Darmon, Michel; Deletraz, Anne-Marie; Mesli, Samir; Colombies, Brigitte; Vanbrugghe, Virginie; Conri, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the prevalence of genetic and environmental vascular risk factors in non diabetic patients with premature peripheral arterial disease, either peripheral arterial occlusive disease or thromboangiitis obliterans, the two main entities of peripheral arterial disease, and to established whether some of them are specifically associated with one or another of the premature peripheral arterial disease subgroups. Methods and Results This study included 113 non diabetic patients with premature peripheral arterial disease (diagnosis <45-year old) presenting either a peripheral arterial occlusive disease (N = 64) or a thromboangiitis obliterans (N = 49), and 241 controls matched for age and gender. Both patient groups demonstrated common traits including cigarette smoking, low physical activity, decreased levels of HDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein A–I, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (active form of B6 vitamin) and zinc. Premature peripheral arterial occlusive disease was characterized by the presence of a family history of peripheral arterial and carotid artery diseases (OR 2.3 and 5.8 respectively, 95% CI), high lipoprotein (a) levels above 300 mg/L (OR 2.3, 95% CI), the presence of the factor V Leiden (OR 5.1, 95% CI) and the glycoprotein Ia807T,837T,873A allele (OR 2.3, 95% CI). In thromboangiitis obliterans group, more patients were regular consumers of cannabis (OR 3.5, 95% CI) and higher levels in plasma copper has been shown (OR 6.5, 95% CI). Conclusions According to our results from a non exhaustive list of study parameters, we might hypothesize for 1) a genetic basis for premature peripheral arterial occlusive disease development and 2) the prevalence of environmental factors in the development of thromboangiitis obliterans (tobacco and cannabis). Moreover, for the first time, we demonstrated that the 807T/837T/873A allele of platelet glycoprotein Ia may confer an additional risk for development of peripheral

  4. Novel risk factors for premature peripheral arterial occlusive disease in non-diabetic patients: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bérard, Annie M; Bedel, Aurélie; Le Trequesser, Rémi; Freyburger, Geneviève; Nurden, Alan; Colomer, Sylvie; Guérin, Viviane; Vergnes, Marie-Christine; Becker, François; Camelot, Gabriel; Bressolette, Luc; Lacroix, Philippe; Cambou, Jean-Pierre; Bura-Rivière, Alessandra; Emmerich, Joseph; Darmon, Michel; Deletraz, Anne-Marie; Mesli, Samir; Colombies, Brigitte; Vanbrugghe, Virginie; Conri, Claude; Constans, Joël

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of genetic and environmental vascular risk factors in non diabetic patients with premature peripheral arterial disease, either peripheral arterial occlusive disease or thromboangiitis obliterans, the two main entities of peripheral arterial disease, and to established whether some of them are specifically associated with one or another of the premature peripheral arterial disease subgroups. This study included 113 non diabetic patients with premature peripheral arterial disease (diagnosis <45-year old) presenting either a peripheral arterial occlusive disease (N = 64) or a thromboangiitis obliterans (N = 49), and 241 controls matched for age and gender. Both patient groups demonstrated common traits including cigarette smoking, low physical activity, decreased levels of HDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein A-I, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (active form of B6 vitamin) and zinc. Premature peripheral arterial occlusive disease was characterized by the presence of a family history of peripheral arterial and carotid artery diseases (OR 2.3 and 5.8 respectively, 95% CI), high lipoprotein (a) levels above 300 mg/L (OR 2.3, 95% CI), the presence of the factor V Leiden (OR 5.1, 95% CI) and the glycoprotein Ia(807T,837T,873A) allele (OR 2.3, 95% CI). In thromboangiitis obliterans group, more patients were regular consumers of cannabis (OR 3.5, 95% CI) and higher levels in plasma copper has been shown (OR 6.5, 95% CI). According to our results from a non exhaustive list of study parameters, we might hypothesize for 1) a genetic basis for premature peripheral arterial occlusive disease development and 2) the prevalence of environmental factors in the development of thromboangiitis obliterans (tobacco and cannabis). Moreover, for the first time, we demonstrated that the 807T/837T/873A allele of platelet glycoprotein Ia may confer an additional risk for development of peripheral atherosclerosis in premature peripheral arterial occlusive

  5. Periodontal therapy alters gene expression of peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Papapanou, Panos N; Sedaghatfar, Michael H; Demmer, Ryan T; Wolf, Dana L; Yang, Jun; Roth, Georg A; Celenti, Romanita; Belusko, Paul B; Lalla, Evanthia; Pavlidis, Paul

    2007-09-01

    We investigated the effects of periodontal therapy on gene expression of peripheral blood monocytes. Fifteen patients with periodontitis gave blood samples at four time points: 1 week before periodontal treatment (#1), at treatment initiation (baseline, #2), 6-week (#3) and 10-week post-baseline (#4). At baseline and 10 weeks, periodontal status was recorded and subgingival plaque samples were obtained. Periodontal therapy (periodontal surgery and extractions without adjunctive antibiotics) was completed within 6 weeks. At each time point, serum concentrations of 19 biomarkers were determined. Peripheral blood monocytes were purified, RNA was extracted, reverse-transcribed, labelled and hybridized with AffymetrixU133Plus2.0 chips. Expression profiles were analysed using linear random-effects models. Further analysis of gene ontology terms summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. Differential expression of selected genes was confirmed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in a subset of patients. Treatment resulted in a substantial improvement in clinical periodontal status and reduction in the levels of several periodontal pathogens. Expression profiling over time revealed more than 11,000 probe sets differentially expressed at a false discovery rate of <0.05. Approximately 1/3 of the patients showed substantial changes in expression in genes relevant to innate immunity, apoptosis and cell signalling. The data suggest that periodontal therapy may alter monocytic gene expression in a manner consistent with a systemic anti-inflammatory effect.

  6. Periodontal therapy alters gene expression of peripheral blood monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Papapanou, Panos N.; Sedaghatfar, Michael H.; Demmer, Ryan T.; Wolf, Dana L.; Yang, Jun; Roth, Georg A.; Celenti, Romanita; Belusko, Paul B.; Lalla, Evanthia; Pavlidis, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Aims We investigated the effects of periodontal therapy on gene expression of peripheral blood monocytes. Methods Fifteen patients with periodontitis gave blood samples at four time points: 1 week before periodontal treatment (#1), at treatment initiation (baseline, #2), 6-week (#3) and 10-week post-baseline (#4). At baseline and 10 weeks, periodontal status was recorded and subgingival plaque samples were obtained. Periodontal therapy (periodontal surgery and extractions without adjunctive antibiotics) was completed within 6 weeks. At each time point, serum concentrations of 19 biomarkers were determined. Peripheral blood monocytes were purified, RNA was extracted, reverse-transcribed, labelled and hybridized with AffymetrixU133Plus2.0 chips. Expression profiles were analysed using linear random-effects models. Further analysis of gene ontology terms summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. Differential expression of selected genes was confirmed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in a subset of patients. Results Treatment resulted in a substantial improvement in clinical periodontal status and reduction in the levels of several periodontal pathogens. Expression profiling over time revealed more than 11,000 probe sets differentially expressed at a false discovery rate of <0.05. Approximately 1/3 of the patients showed substantial changes in expression in genes relevant to innate immunity, apoptosis and cell signalling. Conclusions The data suggest that periodontal therapy may alter monocytic gene expression in a manner consistent with a systemic anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:17716309

  7. Civil and war peripheral arterial trauma: review of risk factors associated with limb loss.

    PubMed

    Davidovic, Lazar B; Cinara, Ilijas S; Ille, Tanja; Kostic, Dusan M; Dragas, Marko V; Markovic, Dragan M

    2005-01-01

    We sought to analyze the early results of civil and war peripheral arterial injury treatment and to identify risk factors associated with limb loss. Between 1992 and 2001, data collected retrospectively and prospectively on 413 patients with 448 peripheral arterial injuries were analyzed. Of these, there were 140 patients with war injuries and 273 patients with civil injuries. The mechanism of injury was gunshot in 40%, blunt injury in 24%, explosive trauma in 20.3%, and stabbing in 15.7% of the cases. The most frequently injured vessels were the femoral arteries (37.3%), followed by the popliteal (27.8%), axillary and brachial (23.5%), and crural arteries (6.5%). Associated injuries, which included bone, nerve, and remote injuries affecting the head, chest, or abdomen, were present in 60.8% of the cases. Surgery was carried out on all patients, with a limb salvage rate of 89.1% and a survival rate of 97.3%. In spite of a rising trend in peripheral arterial injuries, our total and delayed amputation rates remained stable. On statistical analysis, significant risk factors for amputation were found to be failed revascularization, associated injuries, secondary operation, explosive injury, war injury (p < .01) and arterial contusion with consecutive thrombosis, popliteal artery injury, and late surgery (p < .05). Peripheral arterial injuries, if inadequately treated, carry a high amputation rate. Explosive injuries are the most likely to lead to amputations, whereas stab injuries are the least likely to do so. The most significant independent risk factor for limb loss was failed revascularization.

  8. Peripheral blood eosinophilia has a favorable prognostic impact on transplant outcomes after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Popradi, Gizelle; Xu, Wei; Gupta, Vikas; Kuruvilla, John; Wright, Janice; Messner, Hans A; Lipton, Jeffrey H

    2009-04-01

    Peripheral eosinophilia after allogeneic stem cell transplant (ASCT) may reflect the activation of the Th2 cytokine pathway. A retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of early- (before day 100: EEo) or late-onset (beyond day 100: LEo) eosinophilia (> or =0.5 x 10(9)/L in peripheral blood) on transplant outcomes after peripheral blood SCT (PBSCT) in 237 patients. The incidence of EEo and LEo was 43% at day 100 and 62% at 2 years, respectively. Compared with patients without LEo, improved transplant outcomes were observed in patients with LEo: better overall survival (OS; 86% versus 41%, P = 5 x 10(-11)), lower nonrelapse mortality (NRM; 10% versus 37%, P = 3 x 10(-6)), lower relapse incidence (11% versus 31%, P = 3 x 10(-5)), and higher GVHD-specific survival (GSS; 90% versus 64%, P = 1 x 10(-6)) were observed. In addition, similar finding was observed when transplant outcomes were analyzed according to the occurrence of eosinophilia at the onset of cGVHD. The multivariate analyses confirmed a favorable implication of LEo on OS, NRM, and GSS. LEo was associated with: (1) less severe chronic GVHD (cGVHD), (2) higher prevalence of autoantibodies, and (3) rapid lymphocyte count recovery after ASCT. In summary, the development of eosinophila after allogeneic PBSCT seemed to be a prognostic marker for improving transplant outcome.

  9. Peripheral blood smear image analysis: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Emad A; Mohamed, Mostafa M A; Far, Behrouz H; Naugler, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral blood smear image examination is a part of the routine work of every laboratory. The manual examination of these images is tedious, time-consuming and suffers from interobserver variation. This has motivated researchers to develop different algorithms and methods to automate peripheral blood smear image analysis. Image analysis itself consists of a sequence of steps consisting of image segmentation, features extraction and selection and pattern classification. The image segmentation step addresses the problem of extraction of the object or region of interest from the complicated peripheral blood smear image. Support vector machine (SVM) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) are two common approaches to image segmentation. Features extraction and selection aims to derive descriptive characteristics of the extracted object, which are similar within the same object class and different between different objects. This will facilitate the last step of the image analysis process: pattern classification. The goal of pattern classification is to assign a class to the selected features from a group of known classes. There are two types of classifier learning algorithms: supervised and unsupervised. Supervised learning algorithms predict the class of the object under test using training data of known classes. The training data have a predefined label for every class and the learning algorithm can utilize this data to predict the class of a test object. Unsupervised learning algorithms use unlabeled training data and divide them into groups using similarity measurements. Unsupervised learning algorithms predict the group to which a new test object belong to, based on the training data without giving an explicit class to that object. ANN, SVM, decision tree and K-nearest neighbor are possible approaches to classification algorithms. Increased discrimination may be obtained by combining several classifiers together.

  10. A single serving of blueberry (V. corymbosum) modulates peripheral arterial dysfunction induced by acute cigarette smoking in young volunteers: a randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Del Bo', Cristian; Porrini, Marisa; Fracassetti, Daniela; Campolo, Jonica; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Riso, Patrizia

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoking causes oxidative stress, hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. Polyphenol-rich foods may prevent these conditions. We investigated the effect of a single serving of fresh-frozen blueberry intake on peripheral arterial function and arterial stiffness in young smokers. Sixteen male smokers were recruited for a 3-armed randomized-controlled study with the following experimental conditions: smoking treatment (one cigarette); blueberry treatment (300 g of blueberry) + smoking; control treatment (300 mL of water with sugar) + smoking. Each treatment was separated by one week of wash-out period. The blood pressure, heart rate, peripheral arterial function (reactive hyperemia and Framingham reactive hyperemia), and arterial stiffness (digital augmentation index, digital augmentation index normalized for a heart rate of 75 bpm) were measured before and 20 min after smoking with Endo-PAT2000. Smoking impaired the blood pressure, heart rate and peripheral arterial function, but did not affect the arterial stiffness. Blueberry consumption counteracted the impairment of the reactive hyperemia index induced by smoking (-4.4 ± 0.8% blueberry treatment vs. -22.0 ± 1.1% smoking treatment, p < 0.01) and Framingham reactive hyperemia (+28.3 ± 19.2% blueberry treatment vs. -42.8 ± 20.0% smoking treatment, p < 0.0001), and the increase of systolic blood pressure (+8.4 ± 0.02% blueberry treatment vs. +13.1 ± 0.02% smoking treatment, mmHg, p < 0.05) after cigarette smoking. No effect was observed for arterial stiffness and other vital signs. In conclusion, data obtained suggest a protective role of blueberry on reactive hyperemia, Framingham reactive hyperemia, and systolic blood pressure in subjects exposed to smoke of one cigarette. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms involved.

  11. Retrograde blood flow in the brachial and axillary arteries during routine radial arterial catheter flushing.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Glenn S; Szokol, Joseph W; Marymont, Jesse H; Avram, Michael J; Vender, Jeffery S; Kubasiak, John

    2006-09-01

    Flushing of radial arterial catheters may be associated with retrograde embolization of air or thrombus into the cerebral circulation. For embolization into the central circulation to occur, sufficient pressure must be generated during the flushing process to reverse antegrade blood flow in the arterial blood vessels of the upper extremity. This ultrasound study was designed to examine whether routine radial catheter flushing practices produce retrograde blood flow patterns in the brachial and proximal axillary arteries. Duplex ultrasound examinations of the brachial and axillary arteries were conducted in 100 surgical patients to quantify direction and velocity of blood flow during catheter flushing. After obtaining Doppler spectral images of brachial and axillary arterial flow patterns, manual flushing was performed by injecting 10 ml flush solution using a syringe at a rate reflecting standard clinical practices. The flow-regulating device on the pressurized (300 mmHg) arterial flushing-sampling system was then opened for 10 s to deliver a rapid bolus of fluid (flush valve opening). The rate of manual flush solution injection through the radial arterial catheter was related to the probability of retrograde flow in the axillary artery (P < 0.001). Reversed arterial flow was noted in the majority of subjects (33 of 51) at a manual flush rate of less than 9 s and in no subjects (0 of 48) at a rate 9 s or greater. Retrograde flow was observed less frequently during flush valve opening (2 of 99 patients; P < 0.001 vs. manual flushing). Rapid manual flushing of radial arterial catheters at rates faster than 1 ml/s produces retrograde flow in the proximal axillary artery.

  12. Mechanical Recanalization of Subacute Vessel Occlusion in Peripheral Arterial Disease with a Directional Atherectomy Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Massmann, Alexander Katoh, Marcus; Shayesteh-Kheslat, Roushanak; Buecker, Arno

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively examine the technical feasibility and safety of directional atherectomy for treatment of subacute infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions. Methods: Five patients (one woman, four men, age range 51-81 years) with peripheral arterial disease who experienced sudden worsening of their peripheral arterial disease-related symptoms during the last 2-6 weeks underwent digital subtraction angiography, which revealed vessel occlusion in native popliteal artery (n = 4) and in-stent occlusion of the superficial femoral artery (n = 1). Subsequently, all patients were treated by atherectomy with the SilverHawk (ev3 Endovascular, USA) device. Results: The mean diameter of treated vessels was 5.1 {+-} 1.0 mm. The length of the occlusion ranged 2-14 cm. The primary technical success rate was 100%. One patient experienced a reocclusion during hospitalization due to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. There were no further periprocedural complications, in particular no peripheral embolizations, until hospital discharge or during the follow-up period of 1 year. Conclusion: The recanalization of infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions by atherectomy with the SilverHawk device is technically feasible and safe. In our limited retrospective study, it was associated with a high technical success rate and a low procedure-related complication rate.

  13. Modeled microgravity inhibits apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity interferes with numerous lymphocyte functions (expression of cell surface molecules, locomotion, polyclonal and antigen-specific activation, and the protein kinase C activity in signal transduction). The latter suggests that gravity may also affect programmed cell death (PCD) in lymphocyte populations. To test this hypothesis, we investigated spontaneous, activation- and radiation-induced PCD in peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to modeled microgravity (MMG) using a rotating cell culture system. The results showed significant inhibition of radiation- and activation-induced apoptosis in MMG and provide insights into the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon.

  14. Modeled Microgravity Inhibits Apoptosis in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risin, Diana; Pellis, Neal R.

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity interferes with numerous lymphocyte functions (expression of cell surface molecules, locomotion, polyclonal and antigen-specific activation, and the protein kinase C activity in signal transduction). The latter suggests that gravity may also affect programmed cell death (PCD) in lymphocyte populations. To test this hypothesis, we investigated spontaneous, activation- and radiation-induced PCD in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to modeled microgravity using a rotating cell culture system. The results showed significant inhibition of radiation- and activation-induced apoptosis in modeled microgravity and provide insights into the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon.

  15. [Autologous transplantation of peripheral blood stem cells in malignant lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Luceros, A; Koziner, B

    1995-01-01

    The administration of high dose chemotherapy and or radiotherapy with autologous hematopoietic rescue has become a treatment modality with increasing number of indications in a variety of malignant conditions. Improvements in the conditioning regimens and supportive measures used, as well as a more refined patient selection based on prognostic factors, have resulted in progressively better results. The availability of precursor cells from peripheral blood has allowed a faster restoration of hematopoiesis, decreasing the period and intensity of myelosuppression. The following revision gives an updated image of the accumulated experience with this mode of support in malignant lymphomas.

  16. Oropouche virus is detected in peripheral blood leukocytes from patients.

    PubMed

    de Souza Luna, Luciano Kleber; Rodrigues, Alcir Humberto; Santos, Rodrigo Ivo Marques; Sesti-Costa, Renata; Criado, Miriã Ferreira; Martins, Ronaldo B; Silva, Maria Lúcia; Delcaro, Luana Sella; Proença-Modena, Jose Luiz; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes; Acrani, Gustavo Olszanski; Arruda, Eurico

    2017-06-01

    Oropouche virus (OROV) is a frequent cause of arboviral febrile disease in the Amazon. The present report describes studies done in two patients, one of them; the first OROV human case acquired outside of the Amazon, which have revealed for the first time the presence of OROV in peripheral blood leukocytes. This novel finding raises important issues regarding pathogenesis of human infections and may offer a new tool, for the rapid diagnosis of this neglected infection. J. Med. Virol. 89:1108-1111, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Modeled microgravity inhibits apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity interferes with numerous lymphocyte functions (expression of cell surface molecules, locomotion, polyclonal and antigen-specific activation, and the protein kinase C activity in signal transduction). The latter suggests that gravity may also affect programmed cell death (PCD) in lymphocyte populations. To test this hypothesis, we investigated spontaneous, activation- and radiation-induced PCD in peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to modeled microgravity (MMG) using a rotating cell culture system. The results showed significant inhibition of radiation- and activation-induced apoptosis in MMG and provide insights into the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon.

  18. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... exercise); (7) Duration and type of exercise; (8) Pulse rate at the time the blood sample was drawn; (9... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.105...

  19. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... exercise); (7) Duration and type of exercise; (8) Pulse rate at the time the blood sample was drawn; (9... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.105...

  20. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... exercise); (7) Duration and type of exercise; (8) Pulse rate at the time the blood sample was drawn; (9... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.105...

  1. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... exercise); (7) Duration and type of exercise; (8) Pulse rate at the time the blood sample was drawn; (9... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.105...

  2. Heart and Artery Damage and High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to a Heart Attack Updated:Dec ... sheet This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  3. Intra-Arterial Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia with Eosinophilia: A Rare Case Report of Peripheral Medium Sized Muscular Artery Involvement.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ashima; Umashankar, T; Dsouza, Chryselle Olive

    2015-08-01

    Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) is an uncommon benign vasoproliferative disease with distinct clinical and histopathological features. The most common clinical presentation is dermal and subcutaneous painless nodules in the head and neck region. The involvement of medium sized peripheral muscular artery is uncommon. It predominantly affects Caucasian adults during the third and fourth decades, but is also known to occur in Asians and it very rarely occurs in children. We here by present a case of intravascular ALHE in a 46-year-old female presenting with subcutaneous forearm nodule clinically diagnosed as ulnar artery thrombosis.

  4. Effect of Peripheral Artery Sympathetic Denervation on Muscle Microperfusion and Macroperfusion in an Animal Peripheral Artery Disease Model Using Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Doppler Flow Measurement.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Verena A; Mommertz, Gottfried; Thiesler, Thore; Kristiansen, Glen; Schild, Hans; Naehle, Claas P

    2015-09-01

    To determine the effects of catheter-based peripheral sympathetic denervation (CPSD) on peripheral artery sympathetic tone and peripheral microperfusion (PMP). The effects of bilateral CPSD in common iliac arteries on PMP of the biceps femoris were determined in pigs using contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and mean transit time (mTT) and wash-in rate (WiR) were calculated during steady-state infusion of INN-sulfur-hexafluoride. Measurements were performed bilaterally at rest and during infusion of adenosine 70 μg/kg/min after unilateral moderate left external iliac artery stenosis. Before CPSD, PMP decreased significantly (P < .05) under adenosine stress compared with resting conditions, with right mTT of 7.5 seconds ± 3.6 versus 16.9 seconds ± 11.9 and WiR of 63.1 arbitrary units (AU) ± 49.0 versus 25.0 AU ± 17.5 and left mTT of 29.2 seconds ± 18.0 versus 56.3 seconds ± 38.7 and WiR of 13.6 AU ± 8.4 versus 6.0 AU ± 4.1. After CPSD, PMP did not differ significantly (P > .05) between conditions of adenosine stress and rest, with right mTT of 19.9 seconds ± 24.7 versus 23.2 seconds ± 21.0 and WiR of 16.2 AU ± 25.0 versus 20.5 AU ± 19.7 and left mTT of 23.3 seconds ± 23.1 versus 25.8 seconds ± 21.7 and WiR of 12.5 AU ± 6.2 versus 20.0 AU ± 12.1. CPSD reduced peripheral artery sympathetic tone and may be an alternative to surgical or computed tomography-guided sympathectomy for the treatment of end-stage peripheral artery disease and Raynaud phenomenon. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Vorapaxar in patients with peripheral artery disease: results from TRA2{degrees}P-TIMI 50.

    PubMed

    Bonaca, Marc P; Scirica, Benjamin M; Creager, Mark A; Olin, Jeffrey; Bounameaux, Henri; Dellborg, Mikael; Lamp, Jessica M; Murphy, Sabina A; Braunwald, Eugene; Morrow, David A

    2013-04-09

    Vorapaxar is a novel antagonist of protease-activated receptor-1, the primary receptor for thrombin on human platelets that is also present on vascular endothelium and smooth muscle. Patients with peripheral artery disease are at risk of systemic atherothrombotic events, as well as acute and chronic limb ischemia and the need for peripheral revascularization. The Trial to Assess the Effects of SCH 530348 in Preventing Heart Attack and Stroke in Patients With Atherosclerosis (TRA2°P-TIMI 50) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vorapaxar in 26 449 patients with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease (myocardial infarction, stroke, or peripheral artery disease). Patients with qualifying peripheral artery disease (n=3787) had a history of claudication and an ankle-brachial index of <0.85 or prior revascularization for limb ischemia. The primary efficacy end point was cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke, and the principal safety end point was Global Utilization of Streptokinase and t-PA for Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO) bleeding. In the peripheral artery disease cohort, the primary end point did not differ significantly with vorapaxar (11.3% versus 11.9%; hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.14; P=0.53). However, rates of hospitalization for acute limb ischemia (2.3% versus 3.9%; hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.86; P=0.006) and peripheral artery revascularization (18.4% versus 22.2%; hazard ratio, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.73-0.97; P=0.017) were significantly lower in patients randomized to vorapaxar. Bleeding occurred more frequently with vorapaxar compared with placebo (7.4% versus 4.5%; hazard ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-2.18; P=0.001). Vorapaxar did not reduce the risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke in patients with peripheral artery disease; however, vorapaxar significantly reduced acute limb ischemia and peripheral revascularization

  6. Enlargement of the diameter of the peripheral arteries in patients with idiopathic venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Poredos, P; Jezovnik, M K

    2012-12-01

    Recent findings indicate that enlargement of the diameter of the peripheral arteries represents a risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events. As the data indicate a relationship between atherosclerosis and venous thrombosis (VT), we investigated whether the diameter of the peripheral arteries is larger in patients with idiopathic VT than in healthy subjects. The study included 49 patients with idiopathic VT and 48 age-matched healthy controls. Diameters of the brachial, common carotid and common femoral arteries as well as the intima media thickness (IMT) of the carotid and femoral arteries were measured with the high frequency ultrasound method. Patients had significantly higher values for the diameter of the common carotid artery than the controls: 7.9 mm (7.4 - 8.4 mm) vs. 7.4 mm (7.0 - 7.9 mm), p < 0.001, and for the common femoral artery: 10.3 mm (9.2 - 11.1 mm) vs. 9.5 mm (8.9 - 10.4 mm), p = 0.025. Both the carotid and femoral diameters showed significant correlations with gender, age, body mass index and IMT. Linear regression analysis confirmed that the presence of VT significantly and independently influenced the diameter of the carotid and femoral artery but not the brachial artery. The results of our study showed that carotid and femoral artery diameters are enlarged in patients with idiopathic VT in comparison to healthy subjects. Since enlargement of the investigated arterial diameters is an indicator of atherosclerosis, our findings are consistent with the presumption that there is some interrelationship between VT and arterial atherosclerotic disease. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Development of Arterial Blood Supply in Experimental Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Dezső, Katalin; Bugyik, Edina; Papp, Veronika; László, Viktória; Döme, Balázs; Tóvári, József; Tímár, József; Nagy, Péter; Paku, Sándor

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present a mechanism for the development of arterial blood supply in experimental liver metastases. To analyze the arterialization process of experimental liver metastases, we elucidated a few key questions regarding the blood supply of hepatic lobules in mice. The microvasculature of the mouse liver is characterized by numerous arterioportal anastomoses and arterial terminations at the base of the lobules. These terminations supply one hepatic microcirculatory subunit per lobule, which we call an arterial hepatic microcirculatory subunit (aHMS). The process of arterialization can be divided into the following steps: 1) distortion of the aHMS by metastasis; 2) initial fusion of the sinusoids of the aHMS at the tumor parenchyma interface; 3) fusion of the sinusoids located at the base of the aHMSs, which leads to the disruption of the vascular sphincter (burst pipe); 4) incorporation of the dilated artery and the fused sinusoids into the tumor; and 5) further development of the tumor vasculature (arterial tree) by proliferation, remodeling, and continuous incorporation of fused sinusoids at the tumor–parenchyma interface. This process leads to the inevitable arterialization of liver metastases above the 2000- to 2500-μm size, regardless of the origin and growth pattern of the tumor. PMID:19574433

  8. High-Intensity Statin Therapy Is Associated With Improved Survival in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Foley, T Raymond; Singh, Gagan D; Kokkinidis, Damianos G; Choy, Ho-Hin K; Pham, Thai; Amsterdam, Ezra A; Rutledge, John C; Waldo, Stephen W; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Laird, John R

    2017-07-15

    The relative benefit of higher statin dosing in patients with peripheral artery disease has not been reported previously. We compared the effectiveness of low- or moderate-intensity (LMI) versus high-intensity (HI) statin dose on clinical outcomes in patients with peripheral artery disease. We reviewed patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease who underwent peripheral angiography and/or endovascular intervention from 2006 to 2013 who were not taking other lipid-lowering medications. HI statin use was defined as atorvastatin 40-80 mg or rosuvastatin 20-40 mg. Baseline demographics, procedural data, and outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. Among 909 patients, 629 (69%) were prescribed statins, and 124 (13.6%) were treated with HI statin therapy. Mean low-density lipoprotein level was similar in patients on LMI versus HI (80±30 versus 87±44 mg/dL, P=0.14). Demographics including age (68±12 versus 67±10 years, P=0.25), smoking history (76% versus 80%, P=0.42), diabetes mellitus (54% versus 48%, P=0.17), and hypertension (88% versus 89%, P=0.78) were similar between groups (LMI versus HI). There was a higher prevalence of coronary artery disease (56% versus 75%, P=0.0001) among patients on HI statin (versus LMI). After propensity weighting, HI statin therapy was associated with improved survival (hazard ratio for mortality: 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.81; P=0.004) and decreased major adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio: 0.58; 95% confidence interval 0.37-0.92, P=0.02). In patients with peripheral artery disease who were referred for peripheral angiography or endovascular intervention, HI statin therapy was associated with improved survival and fewer major adverse cardiovascular events compared with LMI statin therapy. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  9. Mass transfer to blood flowing through arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarifuddin; Chakravarty, Santabrata; Mandal, Prashanta Kumar; Andersson, Helge I.

    2009-03-01

    The present investigation deals with a mathematical model representing the mass transfer to blood streaming through the arteries under stenotic condition. The mass transport refers to the movement of atherogenic molecules, that is, blood-borne components, such as oxygen and low-density lipoproteins from flowing blood into the arterial walls or vice versa. The blood flowing through the artery is treated to be Newtonian and the arterial wall is considered to be rigid having differently shaped stenoses in its lumen arising from various types of abnormal growth or plaque formation. The nonlinear unsteady pulsatile flow phenomenon unaffected by concentration-field of the macromolecules is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations together with the equation of continuity while that of mass transfer is controlled by the convection-diffusion equation. The governing equations of motion accompanied by appropriate choice of the boundary conditions are solved numerically by MAC(Marker and Cell) method and checked numerical stability with desired degree of accuracy. The quantitative analysis carried out finally includes the respective profiles of the flow-field and concentration along with their distributions over the entire arterial segment as well. The key factors like the wall shear stress and Sherwood number are also examined for further qualitative insight into the flow and mass transport phenomena through arterial stenosis. The present results show quite consistency with several existing results in the literature which substantiate sufficiently to validate the applicability of the model under consideration.

  10. Effects of age and cardiovascular risk factors on (18)F-FDG PET/CT quantification of atherosclerosis in the aorta and peripheral arteries.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Ahmed K; Moghbel, Mateen; Saboury, Babak; Gharavi, Mohammed H; Blomberg, Björn A; Torigian, Drew A; Kwee, Thomas C; Basu, Sandip; Mohler Iii, Emile R; Alavi, Abass

    2015-01-01

    To quantify fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake in the aorta and peripheral arteries and assess the variation of (18)F-FDG uptake with age and cardiovascular risk factors. The subject population of this retrospective study comprises melanoma patients who underwent whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans. The patients' medical records were examined for cardiovascular risk factors and for a history of coronary artery disease or peripheral artery disease. Fluorine-18-FDG uptake in the peripheral arteries (iliac and femoral) and aorta was semi-quantified as a weighted-average mean standardized uptake value (wA-SUVmean), while background noise was accounted for by measuring mean venous blood pool SUV (V-SUVmean) in the superior vena cava. Atherosclerosis was semi-quantified by the tissue-to-background ratio (TBR) (wA-SUVmean divided by V-SUVmean). A regression model and t-test were used to evaluate the effect of age and location on the degree of atherosclerosis. To assess the effect of cardiovascular risk factors on atherosclerotic burden, the wA-SUVmean of patients with at least one of these risk factors was compared to that of patients without any risk factors. A total of 76 patients (46 men, 30 women; 22-91 years old) were included in this study. The average TBR of the aorta and peripheral arteries were 2.68 and 1.43, respectively, and increased with age in both locations. In regression analysis, the beta coefficients of age for TBR in the aorta and peripheral arteries were 0.55 (P<0.001) and 0.03 (P<0.001), respectively. In all age groups, the TBR of the aorta was significantly greater than that of the peripheral arteries. The Pearson correlation coefficients between the four age groups and the TBR of the aorta and peripheral arteries were 0.83 (P<0.001) and 0.75 (P<0.001), respectively. The wA-SUVmean of patients with cardiovascular risk factors was only significant (P<0.05) in the aorta. An increase in (18)F-FDG uptake was observed in the peripheral

  11. Relationship between arterial blood pressure and blood viscosity in spontaneously hypertensive rats treated with pentoxifylline.

    PubMed

    Plotnikov, Mark B; Aliev, Oleg I; Nosarev, Alexey V; Shamanaev, Alexander Y; Sidekhmenova, Anastasia V; Anfinogenova, Yana; Anishchenko, Anna M; Pushkina, Ekaterina V

    2016-07-26

    Systemic arterial pressure (AP) depends on two physiological variables: cardiac output (CO) and total peripheral resistance (TPR). The latter depends on vascular hindrance and blood viscosity (BV). However, the relative contributions of the vascular and rheological factors to TPR remain unclear. The aim of our work was to study the haemodynamic and haemorheologic effects of a treatment course with pentoxifylline (PTX) in SHRs in an effort to assess the impact of the rheological factor on TPR and AP. The effects of the treatment course with PTX (100 mg/kg/day p.o. for six weeks) on BV, plasma viscosity, haematocrit, erythrocyte aggregation and deformability, mean AP (MAP), stroke volume (SV), CO, and TPR were studied in SHRs and in control Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. PTX-treated SHRs had a lower BV, lower erythrocyte aggregation, and higher erythrocyte deformability index compared with the controls. The TPR level was higher by 43% compared with that in WKY rats and did not differ from the values obtained from control SHRs. In SHRs, moderate and strong positive correlations were found between BV and MAP and between BV and TPR. PTX-treated SHRs did not have any significant correlations between the above mentioned parameters. Treatment with PTX attenuated whole blood viscosity, but did not affect the AP and hemodynamic parameters in the experimental SHRs compared with the control SHRs. The magnitude of the rheologic effects of PTX was insufficient to cause appreciable decreases in TPR and AP.

  12. Kurloff cells in peripheral blood and organs of wild capybaras.

    PubMed

    Jara, Luis Fernando; Sánchez, Jairo Mauricio; Alvarado, Hernán; Nassar-Montoya, Fernando

    2005-04-01

    Peripheral blood and tissue from twenty-two free-ranging, hunter-killed capybaras (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris) collected between December 1996 and April 1997 in Casanare, Colombia (5 degrees 58'N and 71 degrees 33'W), were examined by light microscopy for Kurloff cells (KCs). Kurloff cells were observed in the blood of one pregnant adult female, and in organs from all the animals, including spleen (21 of 22 animals), liver (18 of 21), lungs (13 of 21), ovary (8 of 11), uterus (7 of 10), bone marrow (13 of 20), kidney (8 of 22), adrenal gland (6 of 20), and lymph node (4 of 14). The anatomic distribution of the KC in the wild capybaras was similar to that of the guinea pig.

  13. Twenty-five years of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Körbling, Martin; Freireich, Emil J

    2011-06-16

    Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) is the most common transplantation procedure performed in medicine. Its clinical introduction in 1986 replaced BM as a stem-cell source to approximately 100% in the autologous and to approximately 75% in the allogeneic transplantation setting. This historical overview provides a brief insight into the discovery of circulating hematopoietic stem cells in the early 1960s, the development of apheresis technology, the discovery of hematopoietic growth factors and small molecule CXCR4 antagonist for stem- cell mobilization, and in vivo experimental transplantation studies that eventually led to clinical PBSCT. Also mentioned are the controversies surrounding the engraftment potential of circulating stem cells before acceptance as a clinical modality. Clinical trials comparing the outcome of PBSCT with BM transplantation, registry data analyses, and the role of the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) in promoting unrelated blood stem-cell donation are addressed.

  14. Characteristics of peripheral blood monocytes in hereditary xerocytosis and spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Snyder, L M; Leb, L; Jacobs, J B; Fortier, N L; Reeves, D; Neri, L L; St John, M

    1982-01-01

    Peripheral blood monocytes isolated from patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, hereditary xerocytosis and spherocytosis, demonstrated in vivo engulfment of red cell and platelet fragments. In addition, morphometric studies performed on these monocytes showed an increase in cytoplasmic/nuclear ratio as well as lysosome and phagosome volumes. The production of carbon dioxide from glucose-1-14C in abnormal monocytes was increased (15-80%) but the intracellular values of beta-glucuronidase and esterase activity were similar to control monocytes. Monocyte locomotion assessed in the presence of chemotactic stimuli was found significantly increased (73 +/- 12 monocytes/oil immersion fields vs. 46 +/- 5 for control monocytes). We concluded that the monocytes in hemolytic anemias associated with increased in vitro red cell fragmentation have some features resembling the 'stimulated' monocytes and that this alteration may be due to red blood cell fragment ingestion.

  15. Severity of arterial hypoxaemia affects the relative contributions of peripheral muscle fatigue to exercise performance in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Amann, Markus; Romer, Lee M; Subudhi, Andrew W; Pegelow, David F; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2007-05-15

    We examined the effects of hypoxia severity on peripheral versus central determinants of exercise performance. Eight cyclists performed constant-load exercise to exhaustion at various fractions of inspired O2 fraction (FIO2 0.21/0.15/0.10). At task failure (pedal frequency < 70% target) arterial hypoxaemia was surreptitiously reversed via acute O2 supplementation (FIO2 = 0.30) and subjects were encouraged to continue exercising. Peripheral fatigue was assessed via changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force (DeltaQ(tw,pot)) as measured pre- versus post-exercise in response to supramaximal femoral nerve stimulation. At task failure in normoxia (haemoglobin saturation (SpO2) approximately 94%, 656 +/- 82 s) and moderate hypoxia (SpO2) approximately 82%, 278 +/- 16 s), hyperoxygenation had no significant effect on prolonging endurance time. However, following task failure in severe hypoxia (SpO2) approximately 67%; 125 +/- 6 s), hyperoxygenation elicited a significant prolongation of time to exhaustion (171 +/- 61%). The magnitude of DeltaQ(tw,pot) at exhaustion was not different among the three trials (-35% to -36%, P = 0.8). Furthermore, quadriceps integrated EMG, blood lactate, heart rate, and effort perceptions all rose significantly throughout exercise, and to a similar extent at exhaustion following hyperoxygenation at all levels of arterial oxygenation. Since hyperoxygenation prolonged exercise time only in severe hypoxia, we repeated this trial and assessed peripheral fatigue following task failure prior to hyperoxygenation (125 +/- 6 s). Although Q(tw,pot) was reduced from pre-exercise baseline (-23%; P < 0.01), peripheral fatigue was substantially less (P < 0.01) than that observed at task failure in normoxia and moderate hypoxia. We conclude that across the range of normoxia to severe hypoxia, the major determinants of central motor output and exercise performance switches from a predominantly peripheral origin of fatigue to a hypoxia-sensitive central

  16. Ultrastructure and composition of thrombi in coronary and peripheral artery disease: correlations with clinical and laboratory findings.

    PubMed

    Kovács, András; Sótonyi, Péter; Nagy, Anikó Ilona; Tenekedjiev, Kiril; Wohner, Nikolett; Komorowicz, Erzsébet; Kovács, Eszter; Nikolova, Natalia; Szabó, László; Kovalszky, Ilona; Machovich, Raymund; Szelid, Zsolt; Becker, David; Merkely, Béla; Kolev, Krasimir

    2015-04-01

    Fibrin structure and cellular composition of thrombi profoundly affect the clinical outcomes in ischemic coronary and peripheral artery disease. Our study addressed the interrelations of structural features of thrombi and routinely measured laboratory parameters. Thrombi removed by thromboaspiration following acute myocardial infarction (n=101) or thrombendarterectomy of peripheral arteries (n=50) were processed by scanning electron microscopy and immunostaining for fibrin and platelet antigen GPIIb/IIIa to determine fibrin fibre diameter and relative occupancy by fibrin and cells. Correlations between the structural characteristics and selected clinical parameters (age, sex, vascular localization, blood cell counts, ECG findings, antiplatelet medication, accompanying diseases, smoking) were assessed. We observed significant differences in mean fibre diameter (122 vs. 135 nm), fibrin content (70.5% vs. 83.9%), fluorescent fibrin/platelet coverage ratio (0.18 vs. 1.06) between coronary and peripheral thrombi. Coronary thrombi from smokers contained more fibrin than non-smokers (78.1% vs. 62.2% mean occupancy). In the initial 24 h, fibrin content of coronary thrombi decreased with time, whereas in peripheral thrombi platelet content increased in the first 7 days. In coronaries, higher platelet content and smaller vessel diameter were associated with thinner fibrin fibres, whereas hematocrit higher than 0.35 correlated with larger intrathrombotic platelet occupancy. Smoking and dyslipidaemia strengthened the dependence of clot platelet content on systemic platelet count (the adjusted determination coefficient increased from 0.33 to 0.43 and 0.65, respectively). Easily accessible clinical parameters could be identified as significant determinants of ultrastructure and composition of coronary and peripheral thrombi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Peripheral Arterial Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... krvnih žila - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Blood Vessel Disease 血管疾病 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Blood Vessel Disease 血管疾病 - 繁體中文 ( ...

  18. Factors affecting the validity of the oscillometric ankle brachial index to detect peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Herráiz-Adillo, Ángel; Cavero-Redondo, Iván; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Pozuelo-Carrascosa, Diana P; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca

    2017-09-08

    The use of oscillometric ankle brachial index (ABI) to diagnose peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has raised concern, especially due to a lack of agreement and sensitivity. This study aimed to evaluate those factors affecting the validity of oscillometric ABI in comparison to Doppler ABI to detect PAD. Through univariate and multivariate linear regression, we studied those factors affecting the differences between oscillometric and Doppler ABI; through univariate and multivariate logistic regression we analyzed the false negative rate of oscillometric ABI to detect PAD. We analyzed 197 consecutive subjects (394 legs) from two settings: Primary Care and Vascular Service. The means of oscillometric ABI and Doppler ABI were 1.094 (95%CI: 0.843-1.345) and 1.073 (95%CI: 0.769-1.374) (p<0.001), respectively. In men, covariates explaining the differences between oscillometric and Doppler ABI were Doppler ankle blood pressure (β=‒0.610, p<0.001), ankle circumference (β=0.176, p=0.004) and oscillometric brachial blood pressure (β=0.136, p=0.037); in women, those were weight (β=0.351, p<0.001) and Doppler ankle blood pressure (β=‒0.318, p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of oscillometric ABI to detect PAD were 80.6% and 97.4%, respectively, and covariates explaining the rate of false negatives in PAD population were setting (Exp(β)=17.21, p=0.009) and tobacco (packs/year) (Exp(β)=1.049, p=0.002). Although some factors influencing the lack of agreement between oscillometric and Doppler ABI were identified, the correction of oscillometric ABI seems impractical, since Doppler is needed, the bias is not always uniformly distributed and its clinical relevance is small. According to sensitivity, borderline oscillometric ABI in Primary Care settings and smokers suggest PAD.

  19. Isolation of foamy viruses from peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tobaly-Tapiero, Joëlle; Bittoun, Patricia; Saïb, Ali

    2005-01-01

    The isolation of a retrovirus from peripheral blood lymphocytes/monocytes can be a difficult task, requiring the fulfillment of three essential parameters. First, this viral agent must infect such cells in vivo. Second, these circulating cells should harbor wild-type proviruses. Finally, the viral agent has to express, at least when these cells are cultured in vitro, the structural proteins necessary for the production of viral particles. Foamy viruses (FVs), also known as spumaviruses, are complex retroviruses whose genomic organization has been known since the cloning of the prototypic primate foamy virus type 1. These retroviruses infect most cell lines in culture, but circulating lymphocytes seem to represent their major reservoir in vivo. FV infection leads to the formation of multinucleated giant cells, resulting from the fusion of adjacent infected cells, which present multiple vacuoles giving the monolayer culture a foam aspect. These two features, combined with electron microscopy studies, have helped investigators in their attempt to isolate new FVs. These viruses were described and isolated from different animal species, mostly in nonhuman primates. Here we present the successive steps leading to the isolation of the equine foamy virus from peripheral blood lymphocytes of infected horses.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood and melanoma risk.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Gopalakrishnan, Vancheswaran; Lee, Jeffrey E; Fang, Shenying; Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood has been suggested as risk modifier in various types of cancer. However, its influence on melanoma risk is unclear. We evaluated the association between mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood and melanoma risk in 500 melanoma cases and 500 healthy controls from an ongoing melanoma study. The mtDNA copy number was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Overall, mean mtDNA copy number was significantly higher in cases than in controls (1.15 vs 0.99, P<0.001). Increased mtDNA copy number was associated with a 1.45-fold increased risk of melanoma (95% confidence interval: 1.12-1.97). Significant joint effects between mtDNA copy number and variables related to pigmentation and history of sunlight exposure were observed. This study supports an association between increased mtDNA copy number and melanoma risk that is independent on the known melanoma risk factors (pigmentation and history of sunlight exposure).

  1. Peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes during acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed Central

    Lueker, R D; Abdin, Z H; Williams, R C

    1975-01-01

    Proportions and total numbers of thymus-derived (T) and bone marrow-derived (B) peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied in 53 patients with acute rheumatic fever, diagnosed on the basis of modifified Jones criteria. An elevation in both proportions and absolute numbers of cells bearing surface Ig was found in most patients, particularly during the first 7 days after onset. Conversely, T-cell proportions and numbers were often found to be depressed early in the acue phases of rheumatic fever. Proportions of cells bearing surface Ig did not correlate with another B-cell marker, the aggregated gamma globulin receptor, suggesting that such cells bearing surface Ig were not all B lymphocytes. Incuvation for 20 h at 37 per cent C of cells showing high proportions of surface Ig-bearing surface Ig in both normal and rheumatic fever subjects, although there was no appreciable increment in proportions of lymphocytes expressing T-cell markers. Patients with initial attacks showed higher percentages and total numbers of Ig-bearing lymphocytes (P smaller than 0.01) than did those with rneumatic fever recurrences. Elevations in numbers and proportions of peripheral blood lymphocytes bearing Ig appeared to correlate with the relative acute nature of the rheumatic fever attack. PMID:1091658

  2. Genetic analysis in retinoblastoma and peripheral blood correlation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz del Río, N; Abelairas Gómez, J M; Alonso García de la Rosa, F J; Peralta Calvo, J M; de las Heras Martín, A

    2015-12-01

    To determine the importance of intratumoral genetic analysis in the diagnosis of germ-line mutations in patients with retinoblastoma. To underline the importance of performing these genetic tests in every case of retinoblastoma. Intratumoral genetic analysis of RB1 mutation was performed on 17 enucleated eyes that were non-responsive to conservative treatment. Patients had no family history of retinoblastoma, and lesions were always single. The identified mutations were then also studied in peripheral blood analysis. There were 12 (70.6%) cases with positive results in intratumoral analysis. In 8 cases (47.1%) mutation of both RB1 alelli were detected, and in 4 (23.5%) cases only one allele was found mutated. In 5 patients (29.4%) no mutation was identified. In the first hit, mutations comprised 7 frameshift or nonsense and 2 splice, whereas in the second hit, one splice mutation, 2 nonsense and 8 loss of heterozygosity were identified. Among 6 patients where intratumoral analysis detected a single mutation associated with a loss of heterozygosity, the peripheral blood analysis was able to detect the same mutation in 3 cases (50%). Intratumoral genetic analysis of sporadic retinoblastoma can detect germ-line mutations. These patients are at higher risk of bilateralization and development of second tumors or trilateral retinoblastoma. Genetic screening is recommended in every patient diagnosed with retinoblastoma. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count reliably predicts autograft yield.

    PubMed

    Chapple, P; Prince, H M; Quinn, M; Bertoncello, I; Juneja, S; Wolf, M; Januszewicz, H; Brettell, M; Gardyn, J; Seymour, C; Venter, D

    1998-07-01

    A reliable measure to predict peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) autograft CD34+ cell content is required to optimize the timing of PBPC collection. We prospectively examined the peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cell count in 59 consecutive patients with various malignancies and analyzed the correlation between the PB CD34+ cell count and various parameters in the PBPC autograft. Two hundred and thirty-five collections were performed with a median of 4.0 collections per patient (range, 2-10). The median PB CD34+ cell count at the time of collection was 39 x 10(6)/1 (range, 0.0-285.6). The PBPC autograft parameters measured were the CD34+ cell, colony-forming unit granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and mononuclear cell (MNC) content. There was a strong linear correlation between PB CD34+ cells/l and autograft CD34+ cells/kg (r = 0.8477). The correlation with CFU-GM/kg (r = 0.5512) was weaker. There was no correlation between autograft CD34+ cells/kg and PB WBC (r= 0.0684), PB MNC (r = 0.1518) or PB platelet count (r = 0.2010). At our institution we aim to obtain a minimum of 0.5 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg with each day of collection. We demonstrate that such a collection can be reliably obtained if the PB CD34+ cell count exceeds 5.0 x 10(6)/l.

  4. [Sulodexide in conservative treatment of peripheral arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Kosykh, I V; Yu, Tolstikhin V; Kuznetsova, V F; Magnitsky, I A

    2015-01-01

    Presented in the article is a review of the literature, analysing principles of conservative therapy of patients with obliterating diseases of lower limb arteries and most commonly used drugs to treat them, followed by discussing the mechanisms of action and efficacy of such pharmacological agents as pentoxyphyllin, cilostazol, naphthidrofuryl, aktovegin, sulodexide. Described in details are subtle mechanisms of action of sulodexide as an endothelioprotector, its clinical efficacy in intermittent claudication.

  5. [Umbilical artery blood gases of term neonates at altitude].

    PubMed

    Villamonte, Wilfredo; Escalante, Darío; Yabar, Janet; Jerí, María; Peralta, Paola; Ochoa, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the normal values of arterial blood gases in the umbilical artery of term infants at 3400 m altitude, a cross-sectional study was conducted. It was performed in the umbilical artery blood of 300 term infants, with an adequate gestational age and whose birth took place between January 2010 and December 2011 at the Essalud National Hospital Adolfo Guevara Velazco (Cusco, Peru). It was found that the average pH of healthy term infants was 7.33 ± 0.07; the values for percentiles 5 and 95 were 7.18 and 7.40 respectively. Tables with the 5th and 95th percentiles for pH, pO2, pCO2, SO2, p50, base excess and HCO3 of the umbilical artery of term infants at 3400 m altitude are provided.

  6. Effects of Beraprost Sodium on Subjective Symptoms in Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hang Seob; Choi, Woo Jin; Sung, Il Hoon; Lee, Ho Seong; Chung, Hyung Jin

    2013-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the effects of Beraprost sodium (Berasil) on subjective leg symptoms in patients with peripheral arterial disease caused by diabetes mellitus. Methods Ninety-four diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease were treated with Beraprost in a fixed-dose, prospective, multicenter, cohort study. Beraprost (40 µg) was administered orally 3 times daily (120 µg/day) for 12 weeks. We developed a new disease-specific symptom questionnaire, which evaluated the effect of peripheral arterial disease on leg discomfort in daily life and assessed therapeutic responses to treatment. Patients were asked for their subjective assessment of symptoms on a written questionnaire before treatment and after 12 weeks of therapy. Results There was significant improvement in all estimated subjective symptoms (burning, coldness, edema, exertional pain, stabbing, and paresthesias) in the lower extremities at 12 weeks (p < 0.001). There were 18 patients with neuropathy in whom significant improvement was noted for 6 subjective symptoms at 12 weeks (p < 0.05). Adverse events considered to be drug-related were observed in 4 patients (4.3%), all of which were mild and resolved with discontinuation of the medication. Conclusions Beraprost is effective as a treatment for improving various subjective symptoms in the lower extremities, such as burning, coldness, edema, exertional pain, stabbing, and paresthesias, in diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease. PMID:23730480

  7. Peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes and postprandial lipidaemia: Is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    Valdivielso, Pedro; Ramírez-Bollero, José; Pérez-López, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease, manifested as intermittent claudication or critical ischaemia, or identified by an ankle/brachial index < 0.9, is present in at least one in every four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several reasons exist for peripheral arterial disease in diabetes. In addition to hyperglycaemia, smoking and hypertension, the dyslipidaemia that accompanies type 2 diabetes and is characterised by increased triglyceride levels and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations also seems to contribute to this association. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in postprandial lipidaemia, as a result of various prospective studies showing that non-fasting triglycerides predict the onset of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease better than fasting measurements do. Additionally, the use of certain specific postprandial particle markers, such as apolipoprotein B-48, makes it easier and more simple to approach the postprandial phenomenon. Despite this, only a few studies have evaluated the role of postprandial triglycerides in the development of peripheral arterial disease and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in type 2 diabetes, focusing on the role of postprandial triglycerides and particles. PMID:25317236

  8. Measurement of arterial and capillary blood oxygen tension

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, J. H.

    1966-01-01

    An oxygen electrode system, supplied as an attachment to the Radiometer Astrup micro equipment for blood pH determination (AME I), has been investigated. Determination of blood oxygen tension using this electrode system has been compared with tension measurements using an established Bishop type oxygen electrode and satisfactory agreement was found. The storage of blood for routine estimation of oxygen tension has been investigated. Capillary blood oxygen tension has been measured and compared with that of simultaneously taken arterial blood samples. PMID:5929338

  9. The distribution of calcified nodule and plaque rupture in patients with peripheral artery disease: an intravascular ultrasound analysis.

    PubMed

    Horimatsu, Tetsuo; Fujii, Kenichi; Fukunaga, Masashi; Miki, Kojiro; Nishimura, Machiko; Naito, Yoshiro; Shibuya, Masahiko; Imanaka, Takahiro; Kawai, Kenji; Tamaru, Hiroto; Sumiyoshi, Akinori; Saita, Ten; Masuyama, Tohru; Ishihara, Masaharu

    2017-05-02

    In addition to plaque rupture (PR), calcified nodule (CN) may also have the potential to develop into arterial thrombus in the peripheral arteries. This study evaluated the distribution of plaque ruptures and calcified nodules in the peripheral arteries and their impact on the outcome of endovascular therapy (EVT). Consecutive 159 patients who underwent EVT with intravascular ultrasound guidance were enrolled. The position of CNs and PRs were assigned to any of common iliac artery, external iliac artery, common femoral artery, and superficial femoral artery. Forty-six (29%) patients had calcified nodule and twenty-eight (18%) patients had plaque rupture somewhere in the lower limb arteries. Although calcified nodules were evenly distributed throughout the length of the arteries plaque ruptures were predominantly located in the proximal segment of the iliofemoral arteries. Stent expansion ratio was significantly smaller in the target arteries with calcified nodules than in those with plaque rupture. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified hemodialysis as an independent clinical predictor of calcified nodule (odds ratio 8.15, 95% confidence interval 1.73-38.3; P = 0.008). CN definitely affects incomplete stent deployment in the peripheral artery contributing to adverse events, on the other hand, PR has more acceptable outcomes after stent implantation. In the clinical setting, it is important that we realize the features of peripheral artery disease and its patient characteristics which having CNs and PRs to make a strategy for revascularization.

  10. CUBAN AMERICANS HAVE THE HIGHEST RATES OF PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE IN DIVERSE HISPANIC/LATINO COMMUNITIES

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Matthew A.; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Raij, Leopoldo; Kaplan, Robert; Ostfeld, Robert J.; Pattany, Maria S.; Heiss, Gerardo; Criqui, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since Hispanic ethnicity in the United States is heterogeneous, the purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiology of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) within US Hispanic/Latino groups defined by national background. Methods 9,648 men and women over the age of 45 years enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study – Study of Latinos (HCHS-SOL) included in this analysis. The ankle brachial index (ABI) was computed as the higher of the posterior tibial and dorsalis pedis systolic blood pressures (SBP) for each leg divided by the higher brachial artery SBP. The index ABI was the higher of the two. An ABI ≤ 0.90 was criterion for the presence of PAD. Results The mean age was 56 years and 55% were female. Overall, the prevalence of an ABI ≤ 0.90 (PAD), 0.90 to 0.99 (borderline), 1.0 to 1.39 (normal) and ≥ 1.40 (high) was 5.7, 19.3, 72.5 and 2.6%, respectively. After multivariable adjustment for PAD risk factors, and compared to Mexicans, Cubans had nearly a 3-fold higher odds for PAD (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.9 – 4.4). The odds of PAD for the other Hispanic/Latino groups ranged from 1.2 to 1.8. Although males had over a 3-fold higher odds of an ABI ≥ 1.40 (3.6, 2.0 – 6.5), the odds did not differ significantly by Hispanic/Latino background. Conclusions Compared to Mexican Americans, all other Hispanic/Latino background groups have a significantly higher odds of having PAD, with the odds being nearly 3-fold higher among Cubans. PMID:26141696

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Allopurinol in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Alan J.; Struthers, Allan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are limited by intermittent claudication in the distance they can walk. Allopurinol has been shown in coronary arterial disease to prolong exercise before angina occurs, likely by prevention of oxygen wastage in tissues and reduction of harmful oxidative stress. Methods In this study we evaluated whether allopurinol could prolong the time to development of leg pain in participants with PAD. In a double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial participants were randomized to receive either allopurinol 300 mg twice daily or placebo for 6 months. The primary outcome was change in exercise capacity on treadmill testing at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were 6-minute walking distance, Walking Impairment Questionnaire, SF-36 questionnaire, flow-mediated dilatation, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Outcome measures were repeated midstudy and at the end of study. The mean age of the 50 participants was 68.4 ± 1.2 years with 39 of 50 (78%) male. Results Five participants withdrew during the study (2 active, 3 placebo). There was a significant reduction in uric acid levels in those who received active treatment of 52.1% (P < 0.001), but no significant change in either the pain-free or the maximum walking distance. Other measures of exercise capacity, blood vessel function, and the participants' own assessment of their health and walking ability also did not change during the course of the study. Conclusions Although allopurinol has been shown to be of benefit in a number of other diseases, in this study there was no evidence of any improvement after treatment in patients with PAD. PMID:26277090

  12. Evidence that reduced nitric oxide signal contributes to cutaneous microvascular dysfunction in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Gary J; Nawaz, Shah; Tew, Garry A

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction and an increased risk of arterial ulceration in the affected lower-limb(s). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in cutaneous microvascular dysfunction in patients with PAD. Using laser-Doppler flowmetry, we measured skin blood flow (SkBF) in 5 patients with unilateral symptomatic PAD and 10 age-matched healthy controls at baseline and during 40 min of local skin heating to 42°C at 1) untreated lower-leg sites, and 2) lower-leg sites treated with 20 mM N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to inhibit NO synthase activity. SkBF was expressed as laser-Doppler flux (LDF) and normalized to maximal LDF (%LDF(max)) achieved through localized heating to 44°C and concomitant infusion of 56 mM sodium nitroprusside. Pharmacological agents and control treatments (lactated Ringer's) were administered using intradermal microdialysis. The plateau LDF response to local skin warming at the untreated skin sites was significantly (P<0.05) lower in the diseased limb of the PAD patients (70.3±13.6 %max) compared to the non-diseased contralateral limb (85.0±10.2 %max) and the response observed for the control participants (89.0±5.2 %max). The NO contribution to the plateau SkBF response tended to be lower in the diseased limb of the PAD patients (45.1±16.4% versus 56.1±10.7% [P=0.12] and 55.4±11.5% [P=0.13], respectively). The results suggest that PAD impairs downstream cutaneous microvascular vasodilatory function and that the microvascular dysfunction is probably explained, at least in part, by a reduced NO signal.

  13. Identifying unrecognized peripheral arterial disease among asymptomatic patients in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Doubeni, Chyke A; Yood, Robert A; Emani, Srinivas; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2006-01-01

    National initiatives to enhance recognition of the detrimental impact of peripheral arterial disease on the health of adult Americans have been advocated. The objective of this study was to evaluate a strategy for identifying patients with unrecognized peripheral arterial disease from among persons without known atherosclerotic disease in the primary care setting. A cross-sectional design was used. Participants were patients receiving care from a multispecialty group practice in Massachusetts between July 2002 and July 2003, with a scheduled appointment with a primary care physician. Persons 70 years of age or older who were not already known to have atherosclerotic disease were enrolled. In addition, persons aged 50-69 with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and/or smoking based on information derived from administrative databases, and not known to have atherosclerotic disease, were enrolled. Before the scheduled appointment, potential study participants completed a telephone interview to ascertain their medical history. The ankle-brachial index (ABI) of eligible patients was measured at the time of the scheduled primary care office visit. Peripheral arterial disease was diagnosed if 1 or both legs had an ABI of or=70 years, 45 (12.5%) were diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease. Nine (2.5%) of 358 subjects aged 50-69 years were diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease. The average total time (n = 52) for ABI testing was 13.7 (SD: +/-3.3) minutes. Patients aged >or=70 years required more time for ABI testing compared to those aged 50-69 (mean: 15.0 vs 13.0 minutes, p=0.04). Unrecognized asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease can be commonly detected among patients in the primary care setting who are not already known to have

  14. Apheresis techniques for collection of peripheral blood progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Moog, Rainer

    2004-12-01

    The combination of effective mobilisation protocols and efficient use of apheresis machines has caused peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) transplantation to grow rapidly. The development of apheresis technology has improved over the years. Today PBSC procedures have changed towards systems to minimise operator interaction and to reduce the collection of undesired cells such as polymorphonuclear cells and platelets using functionally closed, sterile environments for PBSC collection in keeping with Good Manufacturing Practice guidelines. Blood cell separators with continuous flow technique allow the processing of more blood than intermittent flow devices resulting in higher PBSC yields. Large volume leukapheresis with the processing of 3-4-fold donor's/patient's blood volume can increase the number of collected progenitor cells. Therefore, intermittent flow cell separators are indicated if only single vein access is available. Anticoagulant induced hypocalcaemia is an often observed side effect in long lasting PBPC harvesting and monitoring of electrolytes should be performed especially at the end of the apheresis procedure to supplement low levels of potassium, calcium or magnesium. Refinement and improvement of collection techniques continue to add to the armamentarium of current approaches for cancer and non-malignant conditions and will enable future strategies.

  15. Validation of the pulse decomposition analysis algorithm using central arterial blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a significant need for continuous noninvasive blood pressure (cNIBP) monitoring, especially for anesthetized surgery and ICU recovery. cNIBP systems could lower costs and expand the use of continuous blood pressure monitoring, lowering risk and improving outcomes. The test system examined here is the CareTaker® and a pulse contour analysis algorithm, Pulse Decomposition Analysis (PDA). PDA’s premise is that the peripheral arterial pressure pulse is a superposition of five individual component pressure pulses that are due to the left ventricular ejection and reflections and re-reflections from only two reflection sites within the central arteries. The hypothesis examined here is that the model’s principal parameters P2P1 and T13 can be correlated with, respectively, systolic and pulse pressures. Methods Central arterial blood pressures of patients (38 m/25 f, mean age: 62.7 y, SD: 11.5 y, mean height: 172.3 cm, SD: 9.7 cm, mean weight: 86.8 kg, SD: 20.1 kg) undergoing cardiac catheterization were monitored using central line catheters while the PDA parameters were extracted from the arterial pulse signal obtained non-invasively using CareTaker system. Results Qualitative validation of the model was achieved with the direct observation of the five component pressure pulses in the central arteries using central line catheters. Statistically significant correlations between P2P1 and systole and T13 and pulse pressure were established (systole: R square: 0.92 (p < 0.0001), diastole: R square: 0.78 (p < 0.0001). Bland-Altman comparisons between blood pressures obtained through the conversion of PDA parameters to blood pressures of non-invasively obtained pulse signatures with catheter-obtained blood pressures fell within the trend guidelines of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation SP-10 standard (standard deviation: 8 mmHg(systole: 5.87 mmHg, diastole: 5.69 mmHg)). Conclusions The results indicate that arterial

  16. Validation of the pulse decomposition analysis algorithm using central arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Martin C; Kalantari, Kambiz; Gerdt, David W; Adkins, Charles M

    2014-07-08

    There is a significant need for continuous noninvasive blood pressure (cNIBP) monitoring, especially for anesthetized surgery and ICU recovery. cNIBP systems could lower costs and expand the use of continuous blood pressure monitoring, lowering risk and improving outcomes.The test system examined here is the CareTaker® and a pulse contour analysis algorithm, Pulse Decomposition Analysis (PDA). PDA's premise is that the peripheral arterial pressure pulse is a superposition of five individual component pressure pulses that are due to the left ventricular ejection and reflections and re-reflections from only two reflection sites within the central arteries.The hypothesis examined here is that the model's principal parameters P2P1 and T13 can be correlated with, respectively, systolic and pulse pressures. Central arterial blood pressures of patients (38 m/25 f, mean age: 62.7 y, SD: 11.5 y, mean height: 172.3 cm, SD: 9.7 cm, mean weight: 86.8 kg, SD: 20.1 kg) undergoing cardiac catheterization were monitored using central line catheters while the PDA parameters were extracted from the arterial pulse signal obtained non-invasively using CareTaker system. Qualitative validation of the model was achieved with the direct observation of the five component pressure pulses in the central arteries using central line catheters. Statistically significant correlations between P2P1 and systole and T13 and pulse pressure were established (systole: R square: 0.92 (p < 0.0001), diastole: R square: 0.78 (p < 0.0001). Bland-Altman comparisons between blood pressures obtained through the conversion of PDA parameters to blood pressures of non-invasively obtained pulse signatures with catheter-obtained blood pressures fell within the trend guidelines of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation SP-10 standard (standard deviation: 8 mmHg(systole: 5.87 mmHg, diastole: 5.69 mmHg)). The results indicate that arterial blood pressure can be accurately measured and tracked

  17. Arterial vs venous blood gas differences during hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kristopher Burton; Christmas, Ashley Britton; Heniford, Brant Todd; Sing, Ronald Fong; Messick, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To characterize differences of arterial (ABG) and venous (VBG) blood gas analysis in a rabbit model of hemorrhagic shock. METHODS: Following baseline arterial and venous blood gas analysis, fifty anesthetized, ventilated New Zealand white rabbits were hemorrhaged to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 40 mmHg until a state of shock was obtained, as defined by arterial pH ≤ 7.2 and base deficit ≤ -15 mmol/L. Simultaneous ABG and VBG were obtained at 3 minute intervals. Comparisons of pH, base deficit, pCO2, and arteriovenous (a-v) differences were then made between ABG and VBG at baseline and shock states. Statistical analysis was applied where appropriate with a significance of P < 0.05. RESULTS: All 50 animals were hemorrhaged to shock status and euthanized; no unexpected loss occurred. Significant differences were noted between baseline and shock states in blood gases for the following parameters: pH was significantly decreased in both arterial (7.39 ± 0.12 to 7.14 ± 0.18) and venous blood gases (7.35 ± 0.15 to 6.98 ± 0.26, P < 0.05), base deficit was significantly increased for arterial (-0.9 ± 3.9 mEq/L vs -17.8 ± 2.2 mEq/L) and venous blood gasses (-0.8 ± 3.8 mEq/L vs -15.3 ± 4.1 mEq/L, P < 0.05). pCO2 trends (baseline to shock) demonstrated a decrease in arterial blood (40.0 ± 9.1 mmHg vs 28.9 ± 7.1 mmHg) but an increase in venous blood (46.0 ± 10.1 mmHg vs 62.8 ± 15.3 mmHg), although these trends were non-significant. For calculated arteriovenous differences between baseline and shock states, only the pCO2 difference was shown to be significant during shock. CONCLUSION: In this rabbit model, significant differences exist in blood gas measurements for arterial and venous blood after hemorrhagic shock. A widened pCO2 a-v difference during hemorrhage, reflective of poor tissue oxygenation, may be a better indicator of impending shock. PMID:24892020

  18. Mobilization and harvesting of peripheral blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Moog, Rainer

    2006-05-01

    The use of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) as a source of hematopoietic stem cells is steadily increasing and has nearly supplanted bone marrow. The present article reviews mobilization and collection of PBSC as well as its side effects. Specialized harvesting strategies such as large volume leukapheresis (LVL) and pediatric PBSC collection are included in this overview. Under steady state conditions, less than 0.05% of the white blood cells (WBC) are CD34+ cells. Chemotherapy results in a 5-15-fold increase of PBSC. Combining chemotherapy and growth factors increases CD34+ cells up to 6% of WBC. In the allogeneic setting, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor is used alone for PBSC mobilization. Several factors affect the mobilization of PBSC: age, gender, type of growth factor, dose of the growth factor and in the autologous setting, patient's diagnosis, chemotherapy regimen and number of previous chemotherapy cycles or radiation. Harvesting of PBSC can be performed with various blood cell separators using continuous or discontinuous flow technique. Continuous flow separators allow the processing of more blood compared with intermittent flow devices resulting in higher yields of CD34+ cells for transplantation. LVL can be used to increase the CD34+ yield in patients with low CD34+ pre-counts. Processing of more blood in LVL is achieved by an increase of the blood flow rate and an altered anticoagulation regimen. Specialized strategies were developed for pediatric PBSC collection considering the main limiting factors, extracorporeal volume and vascular access. Adverse events in PBSC collection can be subdivided in apheresis associated and mobilization associated side effects. Citrate reactions due to hypocalcemia are frequent during apheresis, especially in pediatric PBSC collection and LVL. Thrombocytopenia is often observed in patients after termination of apheresis due to platelet loss during PBSC harvesting. Muscle and bone pain are frequent adverse events

  19. Angiogenesis in skeletal muscle precede improvements in peak oxygen uptake in peripheral artery disease patients.

    PubMed

    Duscha, Brian D; Robbins, Jennifer L; Jones, William S; Kraus, William E; Lye, R John; Sanders, John M; Allen, Jason D; Regensteiner, Judith G; Hiatt, William R; Annex, Brian H

    2011-11-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized by impaired blood flow to the lower extremities, causing claudication and exercise intolerance. The mechanism(s) by which exercise training improves functional capacity is not understood. This study tested the hypothesis that in PAD patients who undergo supervised exercise training, increases in capillary density (CD) in calf muscle take place before improvements in peak oxygen uptake (VO(2)). Thirty-five PAD patients were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of directly supervised or home-based exercise training. Peak VO(2) testing and gastrocnemius muscle biopsies were performed at baseline and after training. CD (endothelial cells/mm(2)) was measured using immunofluorescence staining. After 3 weeks of directly supervised training, patients had an increase in CD (216±66 versus 284±77, P<0.01) but no increase in peak VO(2). However, after 12 weeks, peak VO(2) increased (15.3±2.8 versus 16.8±3.8, P<0.01), whereas in muscle, CD remained increased over baseline, but there were no changes in markers of oxidative capacity. Within subjects, CD was related to peak VO(2) before and after directly supervised training. Changes in CD in ischemic muscle with training may modulate the response to training, and those changes precede the increase in VO(2).

  20. Angiogenesis in Skeletal Muscle Precede Improvements in Peak VO2 in Peripheral Artery Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Duscha, Brian D.; Robbins, Jennifer L.; Jones, William S.; Kraus, William E.; Lye, R. John; Sanders, John M.; Allen, Jason D.; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Hiatt, William R.; Annex, Brian H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective PAD is characterized by impaired blood flow to the lower extremities, causing claudication and exercise intolerance. The mechanism(s) by which exercise training improves functional capacity is not understood. This study tested the hypothesis that in peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients who undergo supervised exercise training, increases in capillary density (CD) in calf muscle take place before improvements in peak oxygen uptake (VO2). Methods and Results 35 PAD patients were randomized to 12 weeks of directly-supervised or home–based exercise training. Peak VO2 testing and gastrocnemius muscle biopsies were performed at baseline and after training. Capillary density (endothelial cells/mm2) was measured using immunofluorescence staining. After 3 weeks of directly-supervised training, patients had an increase in CD (216±66 vs 284±77, p<0.01) but no increase in peak VO2. However after 12 weeks, peak VO2 increased (15.3±2.8 vs 16.8±3.8, p<0.01), while in muscle CD remained increased over baseline but there were no changes in markers of oxidative capacity. Within subjects, CD was related to peak VO2 before and after directly-supervised training. Conclusions Changes in capillary density in ischemic muscle with training may modulate the response to training and those changes precede the increase in VO2. PMID:21868709

  1. β-Blockers and Vascular Hemodynamics in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Schlager, Oliver; Gajdosova Kovacicova, Ludmila; Senn, Oliver; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice; Wilkinson, Ian B; Jacomella, Vincenzo; Husmann, Marc

    2016-12-01

    Aortic augmentation index (AIx) is a marker of central aortic pressure burden and is modulated by antihypertensive drugs. In patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) undergoing antihypertensive treatment, aortic pressures parameters, heart rate-adjusted augmentation index (AIx75), and unadjusted AIx were determined. The (aortic) systolic and diastolic blood pressure did not differ between PAD patients who were taking β-blockers (n=61) and those who were not taking β-blockers (n=80). In patients taking β-blockers, augmentation pressure and pulse pressure were higher than in patients who did not take β-blockers (augmentation pressure, P=.02; pulse pressure, P=.005). AIx75 was lower in PAD patients taking β-blockers than in patients not taking β-blockers (P=.04), while the AIx did not differ between PAD patients taking and not taking β-blockers. The present study demonstrates that β-blockers potentially affect markers of vascular hemodynamics in patients with PAD. Because these markers are surrogates of cardiovascular risk, further studies are warranted to clarify the impact of selective β-blocker treatment on clinical outcome in patients with PAD.

  2. Peripheral artery disease in peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis patients: single-center retrospective study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition characterized by restricted blood flow to the extremities, and is especially common in the elderly. PAD increases the risk for mortality and morbidity in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), especially those on hemodialysis (HD). Methods The records of 484 patients with end-stage renal disease who were on HD or peritoneal dialysis (PD) were reviewed. PAD was diagnosed based on the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI). Demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. Results PAD had an overall prevalence of 18.2% and was significantly more common in HD patients (21.8%) than in PD patients (4.8%). Advanced age, diabetes mellitus, smoking, low parathyroid hormone level, elevated serum ferritin, elevated serum glucose, and low serum creatinine levels increased the risk for PAD. PAD was independently associated with advanced age, diabetes mellitus, duration of dialysis, low serum creatinine, and hyperlipidemia. PD patients had a significantly lower prevalence of PAD than HD patients, maybe due to their younger age and lower prevalence of diabetes mellitus in this present study. Conclusions The prevalence of PAD was greater in the HD group than the PD group. Most of the risk factors for PAD were specific to HD, and no analyzed factor was significantly associated with PAD in PD patients. PMID:22943313

  3. Emergency coronary and peripheral arteries combined with percutaneous intervention in the elderly: success or therapeutic excess?

    PubMed

    Pepe, Martino; Furgieri, Alessandro; Miranda, Marianna; Cafaro, Alessandro; Paradies, Valeria; Iacovelli, Fortunato; Castriota, Fausto; Liso, Armando

    2015-09-01

    Acute lower extremities peripheral artery disease represents a clinical emergency. Peripheral artery disease incidence ranges from 2.5 to 22% and has progressively increased due to the world population aging phenomenon and associates with coronary artery disease with a rate of 40-60%. The authors present the case of an 89-year-old man coming to their attention with acute lower extremities ischemia and unstable angina. Despite the short-to-midterm favorable outcome, doubts remain about the opportunity of treating 'very old' patients. The lack of dedicated randomized trials and of defined guidelines is a problem the scientific community needs to face considering that patients over 85 years represent a raising quote of the whole population of our catheterization laboratories.

  4. Magnetic sensor for arterial distension and blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ruhhammer, Johannes; Herbstritt, Tamara; Ruh, Dominic; Foerster, Katharina; Heilmann, Claudia; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Goldschmidtboeing, Frank; Seifert, Andreas; Woias, Peter

    2014-12-01

    A novel sensor for measuring arterial distension, pulse and pressure waveform is developed and evaluated. The system consists of a magnetic sensor which is applied and fixed to arterial vessels without any blood vessel constriction, hence avoiding stenosis. The measurement principle could be validated by in vitro experiments on silicone tubes, and by in vivo experiments in an animal model, thereby indicating the non-linear viscoelastic characteristics of real blood vessels. The sensor is capable to provide absolute measurements of the dynamically varying arterial diameter. By calibrating the sensor, a long-term monitoring system for continuously measuring blood pressure and other cardiovascular parameters could be developed based on the method described. This will improve diagnostics for high risk patients and enable a better, specific treatment.

  5. Use of paravascular admittance waveforms to monitor relative change in arterial blood pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Todd M.; Hettrick, Doug; Cho, Yong

    2010-04-01

    Non-invasive methods to monitor ambulatory blood pressure often have limitations that can affect measurement accuracy and patient adherence [1]. Minimally invasive measurement of a relative blood pressure surrogate with an implantable device may provide a useful chronic diagnostic and monitoring tool. We assessed a technique that uses electrocardiogram and paravascular admittance waveform morphology analysis to one, measure a time duration (vascular tone index, VTI in milliseconds) change from the electrocardiogram R-wave to admittance waveform peak and two, measure the admittance waveform minimum, maximum and magnitude as indicators of change in arterial compliance/distensibility or pulse pressure secondary to change in afterload. Methods: Five anesthetized domestic pigs (32 ± 4.2 kg) were used to study the effects of phenylephrine (1-5 ug/kg/min) on femoral artery pressure and admittance waveform morphology measured with a quadrapolar electrode array catheter placed next to the femoral artery to assess the relative change in arterial compliance due to change in peripheral vascular tone. Results: Statistical difference was observed (p < 0.05) comparing baseline VTI to phenylephrine VTI (246 ± .05 ms to 320 ± .07 ms) and baseline admittance waveform maximum to phenylephrine admittance waveform maximum (0.0148 ± .002 siemens to 0.0151 ± .002 siemens). Conclusion: Chronic minimally invasive admittance measurement techniques that monitor relative change in blood pressure may be suitable for implantable devices to detect progression of cardiovascular disease such as hypertension.

  6. Quantification of peripheral and central blood pressure variability using a time-frequency method.

    PubMed

    Kouchaki, Z; Butlin, M; Qasem, A; Avolio, A P; Kouchaki, Z; Butlin, M; Qasem, A; Avolio, A P; Kouchaki, Z; Avolio, A P; Butlin, M; Qasem, A

    2016-08-01

    Systolic blood pressure variability (BPV) is associated with cardiovascular events. As the beat-to-beat variation of blood pressure is due to interaction of several cardiovascular control systems operating with different response times, assessment of BPV by spectral analysis using the continuous measurement of arterial pressure in the finger is used to differentiate the contribution of these systems in regulating blood pressure. However, as baroreceptors are centrally located, this study considered applying a continuous aortic pressure signal estimated noninvasively from finger pressure for assessment of systolic BPV by a time-frequency method using Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT). The average ratio of low frequency and high frequency power band (LFPB/HFPB) was computed by time-frequency decomposition of peripheral systolic pressure (pSBP) and derived central aortic systolic blood pressure (cSBP) in 30 healthy subjects (25-62 years) as a marker of balance between cardiovascular control systems contributing in low and high frequency blood pressure variability. The results showed that the BPV assessed from finger pressure (pBPV) overestimated the BPV values compared to that assessed from central aortic pressure (cBPV) for identical cardiac cycles (P<;0.001), with the overestimation being greater at higher power.

  7. Evaluation of the Effects of Mesoglycan on Some Markers of Endothelial Damage and Walking Distance in Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Angela; Romano, Davide; Maffioli, Pamela

    2017-03-06

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the variation of some parameters involved in peripheral artery disease progression in diabetic patients with peripheral artery disease after six months of mesoglycan [...].

  8. [Chlamydia trachomaatis DNA in leukocytes of peripheral blood from neonates].

    PubMed

    López-Hurtado, Marcela; Cuevas-Recillas, Karla N; Flores-Salazar, Verónica R; Guerra-Infante, Fernando M

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in newborns is difficult; however, this diagnosis is performed by cell culture or by detection of IgM antibodies against C. trachomatis. Detection of C. trachomatis DNA in peripheral blood leukocytes using polymer chain reaction (PCR) may be a better tool for the diagnosis of infection by this pathogen. A total of 44 premature newborns, all weighing less than 2500g, were included in the study. A blood sample and nasopharyngeal lavages were obtained from each newborn. Leukocyte DNA was obtained by phenol-chloroform extraction technique. Detection of C. trachomatis was performed by amplifying the ompA gene using the PCR endpoint. Cell culture tests and the detection of IgM antibodies against C. trachomatis by microimmunofluorescence assay were also performed. Twenty newborns were PCR-positive (45.5%), with this test being significantly associated with the presence of pneumonia (RR=2.28; 95%CI: 1.01 to 5.17; P=.035). The cell culture of nasopharyngeal lavage was positive in only 7 samples and no significant association was observed with any clinical or laboratory data. The titer of IgM antibodies against C. trachomatis associated with PCR-positive was 1:32 (RR=2.74; 95%CI: 1.21 to 6.23; P=.008), however this titer was not associated with the presence of pneumonia. DNA detection in peripheral blood leukocytes could be useful for diagnosis of C. trachomatis infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Fetal blood flow in branching models of the chorionic arterial vasculature.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Zoya; Eytan, Osnat; Jaffa, Ariel J; Elad, David

    2007-04-01

    Fetal development depends on adequate exchange of materials between the fetus and maternal circulatory systems, which requires optimal distribution of blood vessels over the chorionic plate to ensure perfusion of the whole placental volume. Based on a previous investigation of the architecture of the chorionic vessels in the human placenta, we developed in this study typical models for the dichotomous and monopodial segments of the chorionic arteries of a mature placenta. Each model also included some intraplacental (IP) vessels that branch off into the cotyledons perpendicular to the chorionic arteries. Computational analysis of steady blood flow through these models was performed to explore the distribution of fetal blood over the chorionic plate. The results demonstrated that energy losses are small in the monopodial model, which explains their efficient delivery of fetal blood over the chorionic plate in cases of a marginal cord insertion. On the other hand, the dichotomous model is efficient in distributing a relatively large volume of blood over large areas near the bifurcation. Accordingly, the combination of dichotomous and monopodial bifurcation in a normal chorionic plate ensures a uniform blood perfusion of the placenta. Simulations with narrow daughter and IP vessels did not result in significant changes in the main mother tubes, supporting clinical observations in which umbilical blood flow remains normal although some peripheral vessels may be occluded.

  10. Association of lower extremity arterial calcification with amputation and mortality in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Lun; Wu, I-Hui; Wu, Yen-Wen; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Wang, Shoei-Shen; Chen, Wen-Jone; Lee, Wen-Jeng; Yang, Wei-Shiung

    2014-01-01

    The clinical implication of the coronary artery calcium score (CS) is well demonstrated. However, little is known about the association between lower extremity arterial calcification and clinical outcomes. Eighty-two patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (age 61.0±12.4 years) were followed for 21±11 months. CSs, ranging from the common iliac artery bifurcation to the ankle area, were analyzed through noncontrast multidetector computed tomography images retrospectively. The primary endpoints of this study were amputation and mortality. Old age, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and end-stage renal disease were associated with higher CSs. Patients with more advanced Fontaine stages also tended to have significantly higher CSs (p = 0.03). During the follow-up period (21±11 months), 29 (35%) patients underwent amputation, and 24 (29%) patients died. Among the patients who underwent amputation, there were no significant differences in CSs between the amputated legs and the non-amputated legs. In the Cox proportional hazard model with CS divided into quartiles, patients with CS in the highest quartile had a 2.88-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-12.72, p = 0.03) and a 5.16-fold (95% CI 1.13-21.61, p = 0.04) higher risk for amputation and all-cause mortality, respectively, than those with CS in the lowest quartile. These predictive effects remained after conventional risk factor adjustment. Lower extremity arterial CSs are associated with disease severity and outcomes, including amputation and all-cause mortality, in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease. However, the independent predictive value needs further investigation in large scale, prospective studies.

  11. Superficial femoral artery plaque and functional performance in peripheral arterial disease: walking and leg circulation study (WALCS III).

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mary M; Liu, Kiang; Carroll, Timothy J; Tian, Lu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Li, Debiao; Carr, James; Guralnik, Jack M; Kibbe, Melina; Pearce, William H; Yuan, Chun; McCarthy, Walter; Kramer, Christopher M; Tao, Huimin; Liao, Yihua; Clark, Elizabeth Talley; Xu, Dongxiang; Berry, Jarett; Orozco, Jennifer; Sharma, Leena; Criqui, Michael H

    2011-07-01

    We studied associations of magnetic resonance imaging measurements of plaque area and relative percent lumen reduction in the proximal superficial femoral artery with functional performance among participants with peripheral arterial disease. The clinical significance of directly imaged plaque characteristics in lower extremity arteries is not well established. A total of 454 participants with an ankle brachial index <1.00 underwent magnetic resonance cross-sectional imaging of the proximal superficial femoral artery and completed a 6-min walk test, measurement of 4-m walking velocity at usual and fastest pace, and measurement of physical activity with a vertical accelerometer. Adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking, statin use, comorbidities, and other covariates, higher mean plaque area (1st quintile [least plaque]: 394 m, 2nd quintile: 360 m, 3rd quintile: 359 m, 4th quintile: 329 m, 5th quintile [greatest plaque]: 311 m; p trend <0.001) and smaller mean percent lumen area (1st quintile [greatest plaque]: 319 m, 2nd quintile: 330 m, 3rd quintile: 364 m, 4th quintile: 350 m, 5th quintile: 390 m; p trend <0.001) were associated with shorter distance achieved in the 6-min walk test. Greater mean plaque area was also associated with slower usual-paced walking velocity (p trend = 0.006) and slower fastest-paced 4-m walking velocity (p trend = 0.003). Associations of mean plaque area and mean lumen area with 6-min walk distance remained statistically significant even after additional adjustment for the ankle brachial index and leg symptoms. Among participants with peripheral arterial disease, greater plaque burden and smaller lumen area in the proximal superficial femoral artery are associated independently with poorer functional performance, even after adjusting for the ankle brachial index and leg symptoms. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Association of statins with aortic, peripheral, and visceral artery aneurysm development.

    PubMed

    Mansi, Ishak A; Frei, Christopher R; Halm, Ethan A; Mortensen, Eric M

    2017-08-01

    Objectives Prior studies examining the effects of statins on arterial aneurysm development and progression yielded conflicting results due to their smaller size and presence of residual confounders. The objective of this study is to examine the association of statins with risk of being diagnosed with aortic, peripheral, and visceral artery aneurysm. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of Tricare enrollees (from 1 October 2003 to 31 March 2012). Main outcomes were diagnosis of aortic, peripheral, or visceral artery aneurysm and undergoing aortic aneurysm repair procedure during follow-up period. Using 115 baseline characteristics, we generated a propensity score to match statin users and nonusers and examine the odds of outcomes (primary analysis). Secondary analysis examined outcomes at various subcohorts. Results Out of 10,910 statin users and 49,545 nonusers, we propensity score-matched 6728 pairs of statin users and nonusers. Statin users and nonusers had similar odds of being diagnosed with aortic, peripheral, and visceral artery aneurysms (odds ratio [OR]: 1.06, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.85-1.33) and of undergoing aortic aneurysm repair procedures (OR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.22-1.35). Secondary analysis showed a tendency toward fewer aortic aneurysm procedures among statin users that did not reach statistical significance. However, high-intensity statin users in comparison to non-intensive statin users had higher adjusted odds of aortic, peripheral, and visceral artery aneurysms (OR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.37-2.25, p < .0001). Conclusions This study does not support a clinically significant benefit or harm from statins regarding development of arterial aneurysm. However, secondary analyses may support the hypothesis proposed by previous research proposing a bidirectional role for statins.

  13. Myocardial ischemia in a patient with peripheral vascular disease, an arteriovenous fistula, and patent coronary artery bypass grafts.

    PubMed

    Moza, Ankush; Moukarbel, George V; Cooper, Christopher J; Bhat, Pradeep K

    2015-07-01

    Patients with coronary artery disease often have concurrent peripheral vascular disease. The presence of concurrent vascular pathologies can pose unique challenges among patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass grafting utilizing the left internal mammary artery. We describe a patient with peripheral vascular disease and prior history of coronary artery bypass grafting, who presented with recurrent anginal symptoms and an abnormal stress test despite the absence of significant residual unrevascularized coronary artery disease. Additional evaluation led to the identification of an ipsilateral severe subclavian stenosis with a concomitant ipsilateral upper extremity arteriovenous fistula. Patient's symptoms resolved with the treatment of the underlying vascular lesions.

  14. Reducing the number of parameters in 1D arterial blood flow modeling: less is more for patient-specific simulations

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Sally; Willemet, Marie; Chowienczyk, Phil J.

    2015-01-01

    Patient-specific one-dimensional (1D) blood flow modeling requires estimating model parameters from available clinical data, ideally acquired noninvasively. The larger the number of arterial segments in a distributed 1D model, the greater the number of input parameters that need to be estimated. We investigated the effect of a reduction in the number of arterial segments in a given distributed 1D model on the shape of the simulated pressure and flow waveforms. This is achieved by systematically lumping peripheral 1D model branches into windkessel models that preserve the net resistance and total compliance of the original model. We applied our methodology to a model of the 55 larger systemic arteries in the human and to an extended 67-artery model that contains the digital arteries that perfuse the fingers. Results show good agreement in the shape of the aortic and digital waveforms between the original 55-artery (67-artery) and reduced 21-artery (37-artery) models. Reducing the number of segments also enables us to investigate the effect of arterial network topology (and hence reflection sites) on the shape of waveforms. Results show that wave reflections in the thoracic aorta and renal arteries play an important role in shaping the aortic pressure and flow waves and in generating the second peak of the digital pressure and flow waves. Our novel methodology is important to simplify the computational domain while maintaining the precision of the numerical predictions and to assess the effect of wave reflections. PMID:25888513

  15. Reducing the number of parameters in 1D arterial blood flow modeling: less is more for patient-specific simulations.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Sally; Willemet, Marie; Chowienczyk, Phil J; Alastruey, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    Patient-specific one-dimensional (1D) blood flow modeling requires estimating model parameters from available clinical data, ideally acquired noninvasively. The larger the number of arterial segments in a distributed 1D model, the greater the number of input parameters that need to be estimated. We investigated the effect of a reduction in the number of arterial segments in a given distributed 1D model on the shape of the simulated pressure and flow waveforms. This is achieved by systematically lumping peripheral 1D model branches into windkessel models that preserve the net resistance and total compliance of the original model. We applied our methodology to a model of the 55 larger systemic arteries in the human and to an extended 67-artery model that contains the digital arteries that perfuse the fingers. Results show good agreement in the shape of the aortic and digital waveforms between the original 55-artery (67-artery) and reduced 21-artery (37-artery) models. Reducing the number of segments also enables us to investigate the effect of arterial network topology (and hence reflection sites) on the shape of waveforms. Results show that wave reflections in the thoracic aorta and renal arteries play an important role in shaping the aortic pressure and flow waves and in generating the second peak of the digital pressure and flow waves. Our novel methodology is important to simplify the computational domain while maintaining the precision of the numerical predictions and to assess the effect of wave reflections.

  16. [Assessment of remote survival in patients with peripheral atherosclerosis after endured interventions on coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Bazylev, V V; Chernogrivov, A E; Voevodin, A B

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with a retrospective analysis of the risk for the development of unfavourable outcomes in vascular patients after interventions on coronary arteries versus those without them. The authors assessed remote survival in patients with atherosclerotic lesions of the coronary and vascular beds as compared with isolated coronary artery bypass grafting. All patients were at the Federal Centre for Cardiovascular Surgery from October 2008 to December 2009 and later on underwent planned examination at a polyclinic. The patients were subdivided into the following groups: Group 1 comprised a total of 131 vascular patients undergoing single-stage or stepwise operations on coronary arteries (CA) (CABG + peripheral vascular disease). They were also subjected to interventions on the abdominal aorta, carotid arteries and lower-limb arteries. Group 2 (PVD) comprised a total of 153 vascular patients without myocardial revascularization with documented indications for coronary artery bypass grafting according to the findings of coronography and noninvasive methods of examination. Group 3 (CABG) consisted of 258 patients without symptoms of peripheral atherosclerosis who underwent CABG and were examined at a polyclinic over the same period of time as the study groups. The findings of examination confirmed the world-literature discussed proposition suggesting that preventive CABG considerably improves the long-term prognosis for vascular patients. This is of special importance taking into consideration that a preventive intervention on CA brings no additional risk of operative treatment.

  17. Marvels, Mysteries, and Misconceptions of Vascular Compensation to Peripheral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    ZIEGLER, MATTHEW A.; DISTASI, MATTHEW R.; BILLS, RANDALL G.; MILLER, STEVEN J.; ALLOOSH, MOUHAMAD; MURPHY, MICHAEL P.; AKINGBA, A. GEORGE; STUREK, MICHAEL; DALSING, MICHAEL C.; UNTHANK, JOSEPH L.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a major health problem and there is a significant need to develop therapies to prevent its progression to claudication and critical limb ischemia. Promising results in rodent models of arterial occlusion have generally failed to predict clinical success and led to questions of their relevance. While sub-optimal models may have contributed to the lack of progress, we suggest that advancement has also been hindered by misconceptions of the human capacity for compensation and the specific vessels which are of primary importance. We present and summarize new and existing data from humans, Ossabaw miniature pigs, and rodents which provide compelling evidence that natural compensation to occlusion of a major artery (i) may completely restore perfusion, (ii) occurs in specific pre-existing small arteries, rather than the distal vasculature, via mechanisms involving flow-mediated dilation and remodeling (iii) is impaired by cardiovascular risk factors which suppress the flow-mediated mechanisms and (iv) can be restored by reversal of endothelial dysfunction. We propose that restoration of the capacity for flow-mediated dilation and remodeling in small arteries represents a largely unexplored potential therapeutic opportunity to enhance compensation for major arterial occlusion and prevent the progression to critical limb ischemia in the peripheral circulation. PMID:20141596

  18. An Inquiry-Based Teaching Tool for Understanding Arterial Blood Pressure Regulation and Cardiovascular Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Heidi L.; Rodenbaugh, David W.; Murphy, Todd P.; Kulics, Jennifer M.; Bailey, Cynthia M.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to the hemodynamic variables (heart rate, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, and compliance) that alter arterial pressure. (Author/CCM)

  19. An Inquiry-Based Teaching Tool for Understanding Arterial Blood Pressure Regulation and Cardiovascular Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Heidi L.; Rodenbaugh, David W.; Murphy, Todd P.; Kulics, Jennifer M.; Bailey, Cynthia M.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to the hemodynamic variables (heart rate, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, and compliance) that alter arterial pressure. (Author/CCM)

  20. Late Stent Expansion and Neointimal Proliferation of Oversized Nitinol Stents in Peripheral Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hugh Q. Nikanorov, Alexander; Virmani, Renu; Jones, Russell; Pacheco, Erica; Schwartz, Lewis B.

    2009-07-15

    For peripheral endovascular intervention, self-expanding (SE) stents are commonly oversized in relation to target arteries to assure optimal wall apposition and prevent migration. However, the consequences of oversizing have not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of SE stent oversizing (OS) with respect to the kinetics of late stent expansion and the long-term histological effects of OS. Pairs of overlapped 8 x 28-mm Nitinol SE stents were implanted into the iliofemoral arteries of 14 Yucatan swine. Due to variations in target artery size, the stent-to-artery ratio ranged from 1.2:1 to 1.9:1. Lumen and stent diameters were assessed by quantitative angiography at the time of implantation. Following angiographic assessment at 6 months, stented arteries were perfusion-fixed, sectioned, and stained for histological analysis. Immediately following implantation, the stents were found to be expanded to a range of 4.7-7.1 mm, largely conforming to the diameter of the recipient target artery. The stents continued to expand over time, however, and all stents had enlarged to nearly their 8-mm nominal diameter by 6 months. The histological effects of OS were profound, with marked increases in injury and luminal area stenosis, including a statistically significant linear correlation between stent-to-artery ratio and area stenosis. In this experimental model of peripheral endovascular intervention, oversized Nitinol SE stents are constrained by their target artery diameter upon implantation but expand to their nominal diameter within 6 months. Severe OS (stent-to-artery ratio >1.4:1) results in a profound long-term histological response including exuberant neointimal proliferation and luminal stenosis.

  1. Effects of a traditional herbal medicine on peripheral blood flow in women experiencing peripheral coldness: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Shinji; Eguchi, Eri; Ohira, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kato, Yukiko Hakariya; Hagihara, Keisuke; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2015-04-02

    In Japan, a traditional herbal medicine, Tokishigyakukagoshuyushokyoto (TJ-38), is often used for the treatment of peripheral coldness, which is a common complaint among Japanese women. However, the effects of this herbal medicine have yet to be examined in a randomized controlled trial. In the current study, the effect of TJ-38 on the peripheral blood flow in women experiencing peripheral coldness was investigated using a parallel-group randomized controlled trial. Fifty-eight women aged 23 to 79 years with peripheral coldness were randomly divided into the intervention or control group. They were examined using cold bathing tests, physical examinations, and questionnaires in January 2010 for the baseline and in March 2010 for the follow-up, and January 2011 and March 2011, respectively. At the baseline, there were no differences in clinical characteristics between the two groups. In the intervention group, peripheral coldness improved after the intervention term; however, it persisted in the control group. Mean values of percentage recovery of the peripheral blood flow after cold bathing tests were 17.2% and -28.2% for the intervention and control groups, respectively (p = 0.007), and the proportions for percentage recovery of >50% were 32% and 0%, respectively (p = 0.0007). Mean values of percent recovery of skin temperature did not differ between the two groups. The present clinical trial supports that a traditional herbal medicine relieves peripheral coldness in women probably through the improvement of peripheral blood flow.

  2. Increased wall tension in response to vasoconstrictors in isolated mesenteric arterial rings from patients with high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Tahvanainen, Anna; Taurio, Jyrki; Mäki-Jouppi, Jenni; Kööbi, Peeter; Mustonen, Jukka; Kähönen, Mika; Sand, Juhani; Nordback, Isto; Pörsti, Ilkka

    2006-12-01

    Essential hypertension is associated with several alterations in arterial function. A wealth of information from animal models is available concerning hypertensive changes in the mesenteric circulation, while only few studies have examined human mesenteric arterial function. The tone of isolated mesenteric arterial segments (outer diameter 0.7-0.9 mm) was examined from individuals with high (n=17) or normal (n=22) blood pressure, grouped using the current definition of elevated blood pressure (140/90 mmHg). Since the majority of them were operated because of malignancies, we evaluated whether functional vascular properties provided information about patient prognosis. Wall tension development (mN/mm) in response to vasoconstrictors (noradrenaline, 5-hydroxy tryptamine, potassium chloride) was higher in mesenteric arterial rings from patients with high than normal blood pressure. There was no difference in vasoconstrictor sensitivity, or endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasorelaxation. Arterial segment weight was higher in hypertensive subjects, suggesting vascular wall hypertrophy. The 10-year follow-up showed no differences in the control of arterial tone between the surviving (n=14) or deceased (n=25) patients. In conclusion, isolated mesenteric arterial segments from hypertensive patients showed increased wall tension in response to vasoconstrictors. Since the mesenteric circulation is an important regulator of peripheral arterial resistance, possible functional alterations in this vascular bed should be further investigated in hypertensive patients.

  3. Factors Influencing the Prescription of Cardiovascular Preventive Therapies in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gauvin, Valerie; Turcotte, Stephane; Milot, Alain; Douville, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend that patients with peripheral arterial disease should be medically treated to reduce the occurrence of serious cardiovascular events. Despite these recommendations, studies conducted in the early 2000s reported that medical therapies for secondary cardiovascular prevention are not given systematically to patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We identified factors associated with the prescription of preventive therapies in patients with symptomatic PAD. Methods and Findings Consecutive patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (n = 362) treated between 2008 and 2010 in one tertiary care center (CHU de Quebec, Canada) were considered. Data were collected from the medical charts. The main outcome was the combined prescription of three therapies: 1) statins, 2) antiplatelets, 3) angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The mean age was 70 years and 43% had a pre-existing coronary artery disease. Antiplatelet therapy was the most prescribed drug (83%). A total of 52% of the patients received the three combined therapies. Less than 10% of patients had a known contraindication to one class of medication. Having at least three cardiovascular risk factors (Odds Ratio (OR) = 4.51; 95% CI: 2.76–7.37) was the factor most strongly associated with the prescription of the combined therapies. Pre-existing coronary artery disease (OR = 2.28; 95% CI: 1.43–3.65) and history of peripheral vascular surgery (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.37–3.86) were two factors independently associated with the prescription of the combined therapies. However, peripheral arterial disease patients with chronic critical limb ischemia were less likely to receive the combined therapies (OR = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.32–0.87) than those with claudication. The retrospective nature of this study, not allowing for an exhaustive report of the contraindication to medication prescription, is the main limitation. Conclusion About half

  4. Computational drug repositioning for peripheral arterial disease: prediction of anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Liang-Hui; Annex, Brian H.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) results from atherosclerosis that leads to blocked arteries and reduced blood flow, most commonly in the arteries of the legs. PAD clinical trials to induce angiogenesis to improve blood flow conducted in the last decade have not succeeded. We have recently constructed PADPIN, protein-protein interaction network (PIN) of PAD, and here we combine it with the drug-target relations to identify potential drug targets for PAD. Specifically, the proteins in the PADPIN were classified as belonging to the angiome, immunome, and arteriome, characterizing the processes of angiogenesis, immune response/inflammation, and arteriogenesis, respectively. Using the network-based approach we predict the candidate drugs for repositioning that have potential applications to PAD. By compiling the drug information in two drug databases DrugBank and PharmGKB, we predict FDA-approved drugs whose targets are the proteins annotated as anti-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory, respectively. Examples of pro-angiogenic drugs are carvedilol and urokinase. Examples of anti-inflammatory drugs are ACE inhibitors and maraviroc. This is the first computational drug repositioning study for PAD. PMID:26379552

  5. Computational drug repositioning for peripheral arterial disease: prediction of anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chu, Liang-Hui; Annex, Brian H; Popel, Aleksander S

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) results from atherosclerosis that leads to blocked arteries and reduced blood flow, most commonly in the arteries of the legs. PAD clinical trials to induce angiogenesis to improve blood flow conducted in the last decade have not succeeded. We have recently constructed PADPIN, protein-protein interaction network (PIN) of PAD, and here we combine it with the drug-target relations to identify potential drug targets for PAD. Specifically, the proteins in the PADPIN were classified as belonging to the angiome, immunome, and arteriome, characterizing the processes of angiogenesis, immune response/inflammation, and arteriogenesis, respectively. Using the network-based approach we predict the candidate drugs for repositioning that have potential applications to PAD. By compiling the drug information in two drug databases DrugBank and PharmGKB, we predict FDA-approved drugs whose targets are the proteins annotated as anti-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory, respectively. Examples of pro-angiogenic drugs are carvedilol and urokinase. Examples of anti-inflammatory drugs are ACE inhibitors and maraviroc. This is the first computational drug repositioning study for PAD.

  6. Does the DASH diet lower blood pressure by altering peripheral vascular function?

    PubMed

    Hodson, L; Harnden, K E; Roberts, R; Dennis, A L; Frayn, K N

    2010-05-01

    We tested whether lowering of blood pressure (BP) on the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) diet was associated with changes in peripheral vascular function: endothelial function, assessed by flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery, and subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF). We also assessed effects on heart rate variability (HRV) as a measure of autonomic control of the heart. We allocated 27 men and women to DASH diet and control groups. We measured FMD, ATBF and HRV on fasting and after ingestion of 75 g glucose, before and after 30 days on dietary intervention, aiming for weight maintenance. The control group did not change their diet. The DASH-diet group complied with the diet as shown by significant reductions in systolic (P<0.001) and diastolic (P=0.005) BP, and in plasma C-reactive protein (P<0.01), LDL-cholesterol (P<0.01) and apolipoprotein B (P=0.001), a novel finding. Body weight changed by <1 kg. There were no changes in the control group. We found no changes in FMD, or in ATBF, in the DASH-diet group, although heart rate fell (P<0.05). Glucose and insulin concentrations did not change. In this small-scale study, the DASH diet lowered BP independently of peripheral mechanisms.

  7. The Effects of Impact Vibration on Peripheral Blood Vessels and Nerves

    PubMed Central

    KRAJNAK, Kristine M.; WAUGH, Stacey; JOHNSON, Claud; MILLER, G. Roger; XU, Xueyan; WARREN, Christopher; DONG, Ren G.

    2013-01-01

    Research regarding the risk of developing hand-arm vibration syndrome after exposure to impact vibration has produced conflicting results. This study used an established animal model of vibration-induced dysfunction to determine how exposure to impact vibration affects peripheral blood vessels and nerves. The tails of male rats were exposed to a single bout of impact vibration (15 min exposure, at a dominant frequency of 30 Hz and an unweighted acceleration of approximately 345 m/s2) generated by a riveting hammer. Responsiveness of the ventral tail artery to adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction and acetylcholine-mediated re-dilation was measured ex vivo. Ventral tail nerves and nerve endings in the skin were assessed using morphological and immunohistochemical techniques. Impact vibration did not alter vascular responsiveness to any factors or affect trunk nerves. However, 4 days following exposure there was an increase in protein-gene product (PGP) 9.5 staining around hair follicles. A single exposure to impact vibration, with the exposure characteristics described above, affects peripheral nerves but not blood vessels. PMID:24077447

  8. Autologous Cell Therapy for Peripheral Arterial Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Nonrandomized, and Noncontrolled Studies.

    PubMed

    Rigato, Mauro; Monami, Matteo; Fadini, Gian Paolo

    2017-04-14

    Critical limb ischemia is a life-threatening complication of peripheral arterial disease. In patients who are ineligible for revascularization procedures, there are few therapeutic alternatives, leading to amputations and death. To provide a systematic review of the literature and a meta-analysis of studies evaluating safety and efficacy of autologous cell therapy for intractable peripheral arterial disease/critical limb ischemia. We retrieved 19 randomized controlled trials (837 patients), 7 nonrandomized trials (338 patients), and 41 noncontrolled studies (1177 patients). The primary outcome was major amputation. Heterogeneity was high, and publication bias could not be excluded. Despite these limitations, the primary analysis (all randomized controlled trials) showed that cell therapy reduced the risk of amputation by 37%, improved amputation-free survival by 18%, and improved wound healing by 59%, without affecting mortality. Cell therapy significantly increased ankle brachial index, increased transcutaneous oxygen tension, and reduced rest pain. The secondary analysis (all controlled trials; n=1175 patients) shows that there may be potential to avoid ≈1 amputation/year for every 2 patients successfully treated. The tertiary analysis (all studies; n=2332 patients) precisely estimated the changes in ankle brachial index, transcutaneous oxygen tension, rest pain, and walking capacity after cell therapy. Intramuscular implantation appeared more effective than intra-arterial infusion, and mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells may outperform bone marrow-mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stem cells. Amputation rate was improved more in trials wherein the prevalence of diabetes mellitus was high. Cell therapy was not associated with severe adverse events. Remarkably, efficacy of cell therapy on all end points was no longer significant in placebo-controlled randomized controlled trials and disappeared in randomized controlled trials with a low risk of bias

  9. Distribution of cyanide in heart blood, peripheral blood and gastric contents in 21 cyanide related fatalities.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jongsook; Jung, Jinmi; Yeom, Hyesun; Lee, Hansun; Lee, Sangki; Park, Yoosin; Chung, Heesun

    2011-07-15

    This paper presents 21 cases related to cyanide intoxication by oral ingestion. Cyanide concentrations in biological specimens are especially different from the type of postmortem specimens, and very important in interpreting the cause of death in postmortem forensic toxicology. Besides the detection of cyanide in autopsy specimens, the autopsy findings were unremarkable. Biological samples (0.2mL or equal to less than 10μg of cyanide) were analyzed colorimetrically for cyanide. In a series of 21 cyanide fatalities, the concentration ranges (mean±SD) of cyanide in heart blood, peripheral blood and gastric contents were 0.1-248.6mg/L (38.1±56.6mg/L), 0.3-212.4mg/L (17.1±45.1mg/L) and 2.0-6398.0mg/kg (859.0±1486.2mg/kg), respectively. The ranges of the heart/peripheral blood concentration ratio and gastric contents/peripheral blood concentration ratio were 0.3-10.6 (mean 3.4) and 3.4-402.4 (mean 86.0), respectively. From the difference of cyanide concentration and the concentration ratio of cyanide in different types of postmortem specimens, the possibility of the postmortem redistribution of cyanide and death by oral ingestion of cyanide could be confirmed. We reported cyanide fatal cases along with a review of literature.

  10. Ideal cardiovascular health and peripheral artery disease in African Americans: Results from the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Collins, Tracie C; Slovut, David P; Newton, Robert; Johnson, William D; Larrivee, Sandra; Patterson, Jeremy; Johnston, Judy A; Correa, Adolfo

    2017-09-01

    We sought to determine the association of Life's Simple Seven (LSS) with peripheral artery disease (PAD) in African Americans. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data (2000-2004) from subjects participating in the Jackson Heart Study. African American men and women (N = 4403) age 35-84 years participated in the study. PAD was defined by an ankle-brachial index (ABI) of < 0.9. We assessed frequency of LSS (body mass index [BMI], blood pressure, total cholesterol, glucose, dietary habits, physical activity, and smoking) among participants with and without PAD. LSS variables were categorized as ideal, intermediate, or poor to indicate a participant's health status. Data were analyzed using logistic regression to assess the association of PAD with LSS. PAD was diagnosed in 113 participants (2.6%). The percentage of the cohort meeting criteria for ideal health for each of the seven LSS factors was: 14.2% for BMI, 17.1% for blood pressure, 38.0% for total cholesterol, 72.9% for glucose, 1.0% for dietary habits, 19.2% for physical activity, and 84.6% for smoking. Having ≥ 3 LSS variables within the category of poor health was associated with elevated odds for PAD (odds ratio (OR) 1.34, 95% CI 1.11-1.63) after adjusting for age. Among African American adults, LSS variables are associated with PAD. Further studies are needed to determine the association of LSS with PAD among other racial/ethnic groups.

  11. Impact of Diabetes and Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease on the Functional Microcirculation at the Plantar Foot

    PubMed Central

    Kabbani, Mohammad; Rotter, Robert; Busche, Marc; Wuerfel, Waldemar; Jokuszies, Andreas; Knobloch, Karsten; Vogt, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Plastic and reconstructive surgeons are commonly faced with chronic ulcerations and consecutive wound infections of the feet as complications in patients with diabetes and/or peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Microcirculatory changes seem to play an important role. However, the evaluation of functional changes in the soft tissue microcirculation at the plantar foot using combined Laser-Doppler and Photospectrometry System has not yet been performed in patients with DM or PAOD. Methods: A prospective, controlled cohort study was designed consisting of a total of 107 subjects allocated to 1 of 3 groups—group A: healthy subjects (57% males, 63.3 y); group B: patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) (53% males, 59.4 y); and group C: patients with PAOD (81% males, 66.1 y). Microcirculatory data were assessed using a combined Laser-Doppler and Photospectrometry System. Results: Global cutaneous oxygen saturation microcirculation at the plantar foot of healthy individuals was 8.4% higher than in patients with DM and 8.1% higher than in patients with PAOD (both P = 0.033). Patients with diabetes did not show significant differences in global cutaneous blood flow when compared with either healthy subjects or patients suffering from PAOD. Conclusions: Functional microcirculation at the plantar foot differs between healthy subjects and patients suffering from diabetes or PAOD of the same age. Patients with either diabetes or PAOD demonstrate deteriorated cutaneous oxygen saturation with equivalent blood perfusion at the plantar foot. More clinical studies have to be conducted to evaluate therapeutical methods that might ameliorate cutaneous oxygen saturation within diabetic foot disease and PAOD. PMID:25289243

  12. Total Adiponectin and Risk of Symptomatic Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease in Men

    PubMed Central

    Joosten, Michel M.; Joshipura, Kaumudi J.; Pai, Jennifer K.; Bertoia, Monica L.; Rimm, Eric B.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Lower concentrations of adiponectin have been linked to subsequent risk of coronary heart disease in healthy individuals. Whether similar relationships exist for the development of systemic atherosclerosis, such as peripheral artery disease (PAD), is uncertain. We investigated the association between total adiponectin and risk of lower extremity PAD. Methods and Results We performed a prospective, nested case-control study among 18,225 male participants of the Health Professionals Follow-up Study who were free of diagnosed cardiovascular disease at the time of blood draw (1993-1995). During 14 years of follow-up, 143 men developed PAD. Using risk set sampling, controls were selected in a 3:1 ratio and matched on age, smoking status, fasting status, and date of blood draw (n=429). Median (interquartile range) adiponectin concentrations at baseline were lower among cases compared to controls (4.1 [3.2-5.5] vs. 5.4 [3.8-7.5] μg/mL; P<0.001). A log-linear inverse association was evident over the full spectrum of adiponectin concentrations with PAD risk after controlling for baseline cardiovascular risk factors using restricted spline conditional logistic regression. Adiponectin was associated with a 42% lower risk of PAD per SD increase in natural log-transformed adiponectin (Relative risk [RR], 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45-0.74) after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. The RR was attenuated (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.51-0.92) after further accounting for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and cystatin C. Additional adjustment for hemoglobin A1c, triglycerides, and gamma-glutamyltransferase had little impact on this association (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.50-0.92). Conclusion Total adiponectin is inversely associated with risk of symptomatic lower extremity PAD in men. PMID:23448969

  13. [Systematic screening of masked hypertension in patients with peripheral arterial disease: a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Claisse, G; Maldonado, P; Kpogbemabou, N; Boudghène-Stambouli, F; Delsart, P; Devos, P; Mounier-Vehier, C

    2015-02-01

    Masked hypertension (MH) is defined by a normal office blood pressure (BP) and a high ambulatory BP. MH is characterized by high prevalence and poor cardiovascular prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of routine MH screening, using 24-h blood pressure monitoring (BPM), among patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Between 2011 and 2013, 54 patients with PAD were included in the Hypertension and Vascular Medicine Unit of the Lille Hospital. They had normal office BP (< 140/90mmHg). A 24 h-BPM device was set on each patient. MH diagnosis was established if the BP average over 24 hours was ≥ 130/80 mmHg and/or the daytime average ≥ 135/85 mmHg and/or the nighttime average ≥ 120/70 mmHg. MH prevalence was about 42.6% (23 patients). It was significantly more frequent in diabetic patients (odds ratio: 3.8 [1.1-12.8]), in patients with known hypertension (odds ratio: 5 [1.5-16.9]) or with high normal office BP (<140/90 mmHg but ≥ 130/85 mmHg) (odds ratio: 5.6 [1.7-18.2]). By multivariate analysis, only known hypertension and high normal office BP were associated with masked hypertension. The high prevalence of MH in patients with PAD shows us the importance of a careful screening of MH in this population, especially in diabetic patients, in patients with known hypertension or with a high normal office BP. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Endovascular surgery for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. A critical review.

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, S S; Eton, D; Moore, W S

    1992-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is a new multidisciplinary field that applies the recently innovated techniques of angioscopy, intraluminal ultrasound, balloon angioplasty, laser, mechanical atherectomy, and stents. This field can be defined as a diagnostic and therapeutic discipline that uses catheter-based systems to treat vascular disease. As such, it integrates the subspecialties of vascular surgery, interventional radiology, interventional cardiology, and biomedical engineering for the common purpose of improving arterial hemodynamics. Endovascular surgery offers many potential benefits: long incisions are replaced with a puncture wound, the need for postoperative intensive care is significantly reduced, major cardiac and pulmonary complications from general anesthesia are side stepped, and the dollar savings could be dramatic as the need for intensive care unit and in-hospital stay diminishes. Despite these technological advancements, endovascular surgery is still in its infancy and currently has limited applications. This review provides an updated summary of endovascular surgery today and addresses some of the obstacles still preventing its widespread use. PMID:1385944

  15. Right hepatic artery crossing the common hepatic artery: an unusual blood supply to the liver.

    PubMed

    Felli, Emanuele; Vennarecci, Giovanni; Santoro, Roberto; Guglielmo, Nicola; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria

    2016-04-01

    To perform hepatic surgery a precise preoperative and intraoperative study of liver vascular supply is mandatory. Detecting vascular variations may have great importance on surgical strategy and outcome, and details of anatomy do not concern only academical knowledge but become deeply involved in practice. We present a case of unusual blood supply to the liver, the common hepatic artery was directed to the right liver and a right hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery was directed to the left liver. The right hepatic artery crossed the common hepatic artery in the proximal part of the hepatic pedicle, anterior to the portal vein. To our knowledge this type of anatomical variation has not been described before and it represents a rare finding that has to be kept in mind, especially in case of major hepatectomies and more demanding splitting liver procedures such as A.L.P.P.S., in situ split, ex situ split and living donor liver transplantation.

  16. A high-quality annotated transcriptome of swine peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haibo; Smith, Timothy P L; Nonneman, Dan J; Dekkers, Jack C M; Tuggle, Christopher K

    2017-06-24

    High throughput gene expression profiling assays of peripheral blood are widely used in biomedicine, as well as in animal genetics and physiology research. Accurate, comprehensive, and precise interpretation of such high throughput assays relies on well-characterized reference genomes and/or transcriptomes. However, neither the reference genome nor the peripheral blood transcriptome of the pig have been sufficiently assembled and annotated to support such profiling assays in this emerging biomedical model organism. We aimed to assemble published and novel RNA-seq data to provide a comprehensive, well-annotated blood transcriptome for pigs by integrating a de novo assembly with a genome-guided assembly. A de novo and a genome-guided transcriptome of porcine whole peripheral blood was assembled with ~162 million pairs of paired-end and ~183 million single-end, trimmed and normalized Illumina RNA-seq reads (~6 billion initial reads from 146 RNA-seq libraries) from five independent studies by using the Trinity and Cufflinks software, respectively. We then removed putative transcripts (PTs) of low confidence from both assemblies and merged the remaining PTs into an integrated transcriptome consisting of 132,928 PTs, with 126,225 (~95%) PTs from the de novo assembly and more than 91% of PTs spliced. In the integrated transcriptome, ~90% and 63% of PTs had significant sequence similarity to sequences in the NCBI NT and NR databases, respectively; 68,754 (~52%) PTs were annotated with 15,965 unique gene ontology (GO) terms; and 7618 PTs annotated with Enzyme Commission codes were assigned to 134 pathways curated by the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Full exon-intron junctions of 17,528 PTs were validated by PacBio IsoSeq full-length cDNA reads from 3 other porcine tissues, NCBI pig RefSeq mRNAs and transcripts from Ensembl Sscrofa10.2 annotation. Completeness of the 5' termini of 37,569 PTs was validated by public cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE

  17. Advanced Noncontrast Magnetic Resonance Angiography of the Thoracic and Peripheral Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindley, Marc Daniel

    The gold standard for evaluation of arterial disease using MR continues to be contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA) with gadolinium-based contrast agents (Gd-MRA). There has been a recent resurgence in interest in methods that do not rely on gadolinium for enhancement of blood vessels due to associations Gd-MRA has with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in patients with impaired renal function. The risk due to NSF has been shown to be minimized when selecting the appropriate contrast type and dose. Even though the risk of NSF has been shown to be minimized, demand for noncontrast MRA has continued to rise to reduce examination cost, and improve patient comfort and ability to repeat scans. Several methods have been proposed and used to perform angiography of the aorta and peripheral arteries without the use of gadolinium. These techniques have had limitations in transmit radiofrequency field (B1+) inhomogeneities, acquisition time, and specific hardware requirements, which have stunted the utility of noncontrast enhanced MRA. In this work feasibility of noncontrast (NC) MRA at 3T of the femoral arteries using dielectric padding, and using 3D radial stack of stars and compressed sensing to accelerate acquisitions in the abdomen and thorax were tested. Imaging was performed on 13 subjects in the pelvis and thighs using high permittivity padding, and 11 in the abdomen and 19 in the thorax using 3D radial stack of stars with tiny golden angle using gold standards or previously published techniques. Qualitative scores for each study were determined by radiologists who were blinded to acquisition type. Vessel conspicuity in the thigh and pelvis showed significant increase when high permittivity padding was used in the acquisition. No significant difference in image quality was observed in the abdomen and thorax when using undersampling, except for the descending aorta in thoracic imaging. All image quality scores were determined to be of diagnostic quality. In this

  18. [Production of mature red blood cell by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells].

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan-Jun; Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Ke-Ying; Shang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Wei; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Na; Wang, Lin; Cui, Shuang; Ni, Lei; Zhao, Bo-Tao; Wang, Dong-Mei; Gao, Song-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Most protocols for in vitro producing red blood cells (RBC) use the CD34(+) cells or embryonic stem cells from cord blood, bone marrow or peripheral blood as the start materials. This study was purposed to produce the mature RBC in vitro by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells as start material. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were isolated from buffy coat after blood leukapheresis, the mature red blood cells (RBC) were prepared by a 4-step culture protocol. The results showed that after culture by inducing with the different sets of cytokines and supporting by mouse MS-5 cell line, the expansion of PBMNC reached about 1000 folds at the end of the culture. About 90% of cultured RBC were enucleated mature cells which had the comparable morphological characteristics with normal RBC. Colony-forming assays showed that this culture system could stimulate the proliferation of progenitors in PBMNC and differentiate into erythroid cells. The structure and function analysis indicated that the mean cell volume of in vitro cultured RBC was 118 ± 4 fl, which was slight larger than that of normal RBC (80-100 fl); the mean cell hemoglobin was 36 ± 1.2 pg, which was slight higher than that of normal RBC (27-31 pg); the maximal deformation index was 0.46, which approachs level of normal RBC; the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyrurvate kinase levels was consistant with young RBC. It is concluded that PBMNC are feasble, convenient and low-cost source for producing cultured RBC and this culture system is suitable to generate the RBC from PBMNC.

  19. Angiogenic conditioning of peripheral blood mononuclear cells promotes fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Mifuji, K.; Kamei, N.; Tanaka, R.; Arita, K.; Mizuno, H.; Asahara, T.; Adachi, N.; Ochi, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) treated with quality and quantity control culture (QQ-culture) to expand and fortify angiogenic cells on the acceleration of fracture healing. Methods Human PBMNCs were cultured for seven days with the QQ-culture method using a serum-free medium containing five specific cytokines and growth factors. The QQ-cultured PBMNCs (QQMNCs) obtained were counted and characterised by flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Angiogenic and osteo-inductive potentials were evaluated using tube formation assays and co-culture with mesenchymal stem cells with osteo-inductive medium in vitro. In order to evaluate the therapeutic potential of QQMNCs, cells were transplanted into an immunodeficient rat femur nonunion model. The rats were randomised into three groups: control; PBMNCs; and QQMNCs. The fracture healing was evaluated radiographically and histologically. Results The total number of PBMNCs was decreased after QQ-culture, however, the number of CD34+ and CD206+ cells were found to have increased as assessed by flow cytometry analysis. In addition, gene expression of angiogenic factors was upregulated in QQMNCs. In the animal model, the rate of bone union was higher in the QQMNC group than in the other groups. Radiographic scores and bone volume were significantly associated with the enhancement of angiogenesis in the QQMNC group. Conclusion We have demonstrated that QQMNCs have superior potential to accelerate fracture healing compared with PBMNCs. The QQMNCs could be a promising option for fracture nonunion. Cite this article: K. Mifuji, M. Ishikawa, N. Kamei, R. Tanaka, K. Arita, H. Mizuno, T. Asahara, N. Adachi, M. Ochi. Angiogenic conditioning of peripheral blood mononuclear cells promotes fracture healing. Bone Joint Res 2017;6: 489–498. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.68.BJR-2016-0338.R1. PMID:28835445

  20. The treadmill test in the assessment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Ucchino, S; Nardi, M; Santarelli, M; Legnini, M; Costantini, A; Ucchino, G; Napolitano, A M

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study using the treadmill test on 32 patients with peripheral Fontaine's stage II arterial disease are described. The aim of the study was to evaluate the utility of the test in assessing useful information concerning the site of the lesion. Patients were divided in three classes depending on the arterial segment involved (iliac-femoral, femoro-popliteal, associated lesions) as resulted from the velocimetric and angiographic evaluation. Ankle pressure and WI, at rest and after stress test, PFWD and RT were evaluated. The authors conclude that data achieved with the dynamic test are related to the arterial involvement, allowing to differentiate obstructive and stenotic lesions, but do not give information concerning the site of the lesion. Nevertheless it is a valuable means of highlighting arterial lesions well compensated at rest and with normal pressure values.